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Sample records for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies

  1. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated glomerulonephritis and vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Jennette, J. C.; Wilkman, A. S.; Falk, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) react with constituents of neutrophil primary granules and monocyte lysosomes. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy using alcohol-fixed neutrophils demonstrates two ANCA types: one causing cytoplasmic staining (C-ANCA), and a second causing artifactual perinuclear staining (P-ANCA) that frequently has specificity for myeloperoxidase. Using indirect immunofluorescence microscopy (IIFM) and enzyme immunoassays (EIA), sera from over 300 patients with renal disease, with and without systemic vasculitis, were analyzed. Of 76 patients with pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with crescents or necrosis, 87% had ANCA by IIFM (38% of C-ANCA type, 49% of P-ANCA type), and 78% had ANCA by EIA. Of 55 patients with nonlupus immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis, only 11% had ANCA by IIFM and 5% had ANCA by EIA. Of 24 patients with anti-GBM antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis, none had ANCA. Renal and extrarenal lesions were studied in 81 patients with ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis. These patients formed a pathologic continuum ranging from renal-limited to widespread systemic vascular injury, including patients with primary crescentic glomerulonephritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, and polyarteritis nodosa. In ANCA-positive patients the frequency of C-ANCA and P-ANCA correlated with disease distribution. P-ANCA was most frequent with renal-limited disease and C-ANCA was most frequent when there was lung and sinus involvement. It is proposed that ANCA are not only useful diagnostic markers, but may also be directly involved in a novel pathogenetic mechanism that is a frequent cause of crescentic glomerulonephritis and systemic necrotizing vasculitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2683800

  2. Neutrophil extracellular traps in neuropathy with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated microscopic polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroki; Kawasaki, Teruaki; Shigematsu, Kazuo; Kawamura, Kazuyuki; Oka, Nobuyuki

    2017-04-01

    To clarify the roles of neutrophils in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitic neuropathy, we studied neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in peripheral nerve vasculitis. Stored nerve samples from 17 patients with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) were immunohistochemically analyzed using antibodies for citrullinated histone H3 (citH3) and various neutrophil enzymes. We defined merged citH3 and extracellularly released myeloperoxidase (MPO) as NET formation. We also compared NET formation between MPO-ANCA-positive/negative MPA and rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated vasculitic neuropathy. NETs were identified mostly in vasculitic small arterioles of 6 of 12 MPO-ANCA-positive MPA patients, and their frequency was higher (p < 0.05) than in ANCA-negative patients. NETs were not found in vasculitic neuropathy with RA or patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. NETs were also observed in the peripheral nervous system of MPA patients as well as in the lung and kidney. These results suggest that NETs may be involved in the pathogenesis of MPA neuropathy.

  3. Comparison of disease activity measures for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, PA; Cuthbertson, DD; Hellmich, B; Hoffman, GS; Jayne, DRW; Kallenberg, CGM; Krischer, JP; Luqmani, R; Mahr, AD; Matteson, EL; Specks, U; Stone, JH

    2011-01-01

    Aim Currently, several different instruments are used to measure disease activity and extent in clinical trials of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, leading to division among investigative groups and difficulty comparing study results. An exercise comparing six different vasculitis instruments was performed. Methods A total of 10 experienced vasculitis investigators from 5 countries scored 20 cases in the literature of Wegener granulomatosis or microscopic polyangiitis using 6 disease assessment tools: the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (BVAS), The BVAS for Wegener granulomatosis (BVAS/WG), BVAS 2003, a Physician Global Assessment (PGA), the Disease Extent Index (DEI) and the Five Factor Score (FFS). Five cases were rescored by all raters. Results Reliability of the measures was extremely high (intraclass correlations for the six measures all=0.98). Within each instrument, there were no significant differences or outliers among the scores from the 10 investigators. Test/retest reliability was high for each measure: range=0.77 to 0.95. The scores of the five acute activity measures correlated extremely well with one another. Conclusions Currently available tools for measuring disease extent and activity in ANCA-associated vasculitis are highly correlated and reliable. These results provide investigators with confidence to compare different clinical trial data and helps form common ground as international research groups develop new, improved and universally accepted vasculitis disease assessment instruments. PMID:18664546

  4. [Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated rapid progressive glomerulonephritis complicated with both limited and diffuse scleroderma].

    PubMed

    Miyata, Naoko; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Matsukawa, Yoshihiro; Sawada, Shigemasa; Nishinarita, Susumu; Horie, Takashi

    2002-12-01

    We report two patients with scleroderma, 73-year-old female and 67-year-old female, who developed anti neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA) associated rapid progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN). Both patients have had a long history of scleroderma (23 and 14 years, respectively) when ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis occurred. In the first patient, scleroderma was localized in both fingers. She has been followed-up as CREST syndrome rather than systemic sclerosis. The complaints on admission were leg edema and left chest pain in the first patient, and a pyrexia and dyspnea in the second patient. Both patients showed pulmonary manifestation (pleural effusion in the first patient, interstitial pneumonia and alveolar hemorrhage in the second patient, respectively) and rapid progressive glomerulonephritis. Both patients died in spite of corticosteroid therapy. Autopsy findings in the second patient demonstrated crescentic glomerulonephritis and alveolar hemorrhage. Our cases demonstrated that MPO-ANCA associated glomerulonephritis could be associated with limited scleroderma as well as systemic scleroderma. In these condition, the prognosis will be poor if scleroderma seemed to be stable.

  5. Neutrophil anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody proteins: bactericidal increasing protein, lactoferrin, cathepsin, and elastase as serological markers of inflammatory bowel and other diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakidi, Kallirroi S.; Tsianos, Vasileios E.; Karvounis, Evaggelos; Christodoulou, Dimitrios K.; Katsanos, Konstantinos H.; Tsianos, Epameinondas V.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract comprising Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Although the pathogenesis of the disease is not clearly defined yet, environmental, genetic and other factors contribute to the onset of the disease. Apart from the clinical and histopathological findings, several serological biomarkers are also employed to detect IBD. One of the most thoroughly studied biomarker is anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA). We herein provide an overview of the current knowledge on the use of ANCA and certain ANCA proteins, such as bactericidal increasing protein, lactoferrin, cathepsin G and elastase, as serological markers for IBD and other diseases. PMID:27366026

  6. A case of a 6-year-old girl with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-negative pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Maki; Sekiguchi, Takanori; Kishi, Natsuko; Goji, Aya; Takahashi, Tomoko; Kozan, Hiroko; Sakaguchi, Zenichi; Kinoshita, Yukiko; Matsuura, Sato; Suga, Kenichi; Urushihara, Maki; Kondo, Shuji; Kagami, Shoji; Ohara, Katsuaki

    2011-08-01

    A 6-year-old girl was admitted to our hospital with proteinuria, hematuria, skin rash and joint pain of the lower limbs. Due to rapid progression of renal insufficiency, hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis were performed. She was diagnosed with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Kidney biopsy showed severe crescent formation (50% of glomeruli) and no deposition of any immunoglobulins or complements. Serologically, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA) was negative not only by ELISA against proteinase-3 and myeloperoxidase-ANCA but also by indirect immunofluorescent assay against cytoplasmic and perinuclear ANCA. Anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody was also negative. In the acute phase, proinflammatory cytokines such as soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1), soluble interleukin (IL)-2 receptor (sIL2R), IL-6 and chemokine IL-8 were elevated. The patient was diagnosed with ANCA-negative pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis (CrGN). Intensive treatment with methylprednisolone pulse therapy, plasma exchange, and multiple drug therapy including prednisolone and cyclophosphamide resulted in histopathological improvement and complete remission of proteinuria. There was a possibility that sTNFR1, sIL2R, IL-6 and IL-8 might be involved in the initiation and progression of ANCA-negative pauci-immune CrGN, and to remove and suppress these cytokines might be an effective way to treat ANCA-negative pauci-immune CrGN.

  7. Reduced CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and interleukin-10(+) regulatory B cells in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis permit increased circulating autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Aybar, L T; McGregor, J G; Hogan, S L; Hu, Y; Mendoza, C E; Brant, E J; Poulton, C J; Henderson, C D; Falk, R J; Bunch, D O

    2015-05-01

    Pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is B cell-dependent, although how particular B cell subsets modulate immunopathogenesis remains unknown. Although their phenotype remains controversial, regulatory B cells (Bregs ), play a role in immunological tolerance via interleukin (IL)-10. Putative CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD27(+) Bregs were evaluated in addition to their CD5(+) subsets in 69 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). B cell IL-10 was verified by flow cytometry following culture with CD40 ligand and cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG) DNA. Patients with active disease had decreased levels of CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells and IL-10(+) B cells compared to patients in remission and healthy controls (HCs). As IL-10(+) and CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells normalized in remission within an individual, ANCA titres decreased. The CD5(+) subset of CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells decreases in active disease and rebounds during remission similarly to IL-10-producing B cells. Moreover, CD5(+) B cells are enriched in the ability to produce IL-10 compared to CD5(neg) B cells. Together these results suggest that CD5 may identify functional IL-10-producing Bregs . The malfunction of Bregs during active disease due to reduced IL-10 expression may thus permit ANCA production.

  8. The activation of the neutrophil respiratory burst by anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibody (ANCA) from patients with systemic vasculitis requires tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C activation

    PubMed Central

    Radford, D J; Lord, J M; Savage, C O S

    1999-01-01

    The ability of antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) from patients with systemic vasculitis to stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) and tyrosine kinases was examined in human neutrophils. Using the superoxide dismutase-inhibitable reduction of ferricytochrome C, the kinetics of ANCA-induced superoxide (O2−) production were characterized and subsequently manipulated by specific inhibitors of PKC and tyrosine kinases. With this approach, ANCA IgG, but not normal IgG or ANCA F(ab′)2 fragments caused a time and dose dependent release of O2− from TNF-α primed neutrophils. The kinetics of ANCA-induced O2− production showed an initial 10–15 min lag phase compared to the N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine response, suggesting differences in the signalling pathways recruited by these two stimuli. Inhibitor studies revealed that ANCA-activation involved members of both the Ca2+-dependent and -independent PKC isoforms and also tyrosine kinases. ANCA IgG resulted in the translocation of the βII isoform of PKC at a time corresponding to the end of the lag phase of O2− production, suggesting that PKC activity may be instrumental in processes regulating the activity of the NADPH oxidase in response to ANCA. Tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous proteins also peaked 10–15 min after stimulation with ANCA but not normal IgG. These data suggest that PKC and tyrosine kinases regulate O2− production from neutrophils stimulated with autoantibodies from patients with systemic vasculitis. PMID:10540175

  9. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated paraneoplastic vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, J. F.; Quereda, C.; Rivera, M.; Navarro, F. J.; Ortuño, J.

    1994-01-01

    A 68 year old man presented with a systemic necrotizing vasculitis and elevated levels of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) which responded to treatment with steroids and cyclophosphamide, with a decrease in the titre of ANCA until its disappearance. Four months later he presented with weakness, loss of weight, aphonia and dysphagia. A computerized tomography scan showed a solid mass in the anterior mediastinum, and histological studies revealed an undifferentiated adenocarcinoma. Vasculitis improved although the malignancy progressed and ANCA was persistently negative. Our case demonstrates an association between ANCA and paraneoplastic vasculitis. Images Figure 2 PMID:8016013

  10. Prevalence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection associated mixed cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, M; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Iacob, Simona Alexandra

    2006-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been linked to extrahepatic autoimmune phenomena. In addition, a variety of autoantibodies are found in patients with HCV. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) have been considered to be highly specific for systemic small vessel vasculitides with renal involvement. The prevalence, nature, a clinical significance of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in serum samples of patients with HCV were therefore investigated. A prospective study of 67 consecutive patients with chronic HCV with no evidence of previous hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection or any other autoimmune disorder. Twenty-seven patients with HBV and 35 healthy volunteers matched for age and sex served as control groups. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in the serum samples were measured by indirect immunofluorescence assay. The group of patients with HCV and ANCA in their serum showed significantly higher total IgG levels, a higher incidence of antinuclear antibodies, and viraemia (HCV RNA) than the ANCA negative patients. None of the patients with HCV and ANCA showed any clinical manifestations related to those autoantibodies. This study clearly shows a high prevalence of ANCA in the serum of patients with HCV. The role of these autoantibodies on the course of HCV infection and their clinical significance has not been determined yet. In conclusion, ANCA are not only markers of small vessel vasculitides, but can also be (false?) positive in patients with HCV infection. A hepatitis C associated vasculitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Determination of target antigens for ANCA is indispensable. Interpretation and therapeutic decisions concerning ANCA associated HCV should only be performed within the clinical context.

  11. Atypical, cytoplasmic and perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Frenzer, A; Fierz, W; Rundler, E; Hammer, B; Binek, J

    1998-09-01

    Atypical, cytoplasmic and perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (x-, c- and pANCA, respectively) are associated with a variety of inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies are more common in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) than in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Most publications only refer to p- and cANCA in relation to IBD. We have prospectively evaluated the reactivity of sera from 58 patients with IBD and 10 healthy controls against human neutrophils with emphasis on the distinction of the ANCA types. The sera were incubated with ethanol- and formaldehyde-fixed granulocytes to differentiate between c-, p- and xANCA. The results showed that 10 of 24 patients with UC were positive for ANCA, whereas only one of 34 patients with CD was ANCA positive. These results correspond to a sensitivity of 42%, a specificity of 97%, a negative predictive value of 91% and a positive predictive value of 75% in UC. Of the 11 ANCA-positive sera, two showed a cytoplasmic staining pattern, three showed a perinuclear and six an atypical staining pattern. The disease activity was not correlated to either the ANCA titre or to the presence of ANCA in the serum. In conclusion, ANCA are of limited value in differentiating between UC and CD. Because the majority of ANCA in patients with IBD are xANCA, these ANCA should be explored by not only incubating on ethanol-fixed granulocytes, but also on formaldehyde-fixed granulocytes.

  12. [Wegener's granulomatosis with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies against anti-cathepsin G antigen].

    PubMed

    Ocaña Pérez, E; Peña Casas, A M; del Campo Muñoz, T; Avila Casas, A; Luque Barona, R

    2013-12-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis belongs to the group of small vessel vasculitis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies characterized by granulomatous inflammation and necrotising vasculitis in various organs with particular involvement of the upper and lower respiratory tracts and kidneys. Wegener's granulomatosis is a rare disorder in childhood and early diagnosis of this disease is critical to the long-term prognosis of the disease. The presence of positive cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody staining or a high titre of proteinase 3 antibodies were added as new criteria of vasculitis in childhood. This article presents a case of Wegener's granulomatosis, with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies with cytoplasmic pattern with absence of anti-proteinase 3 antibodies and presence of high levels of anti-cathepsin G antibodies, rarely described in Wegener's granulomatosis.

  13. Antibodies to selected minor target antigens in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA).

    PubMed

    Talor, M V; Stone, J H; Stebbing, J; Barin, J; Rose, N R; Burek, C L

    2007-10-01

    In patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, indirect immunofluorescence (IF) distinguishes between cytoplasmic (C-ANCA) and perinuclear (P-ANCA) neutrophil staining patterns. In patients with primary systemic vasculitis such as Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis and Churg-Strauss syndrome, these IF staining patterns correspond broadly with antibodies to the two major antigens: the C-ANCA pattern is associated generally with antibodies to serine protease 3 (PR3) and the P-ANCA pattern with antibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO). However, some sera positive for ANCA by IF are negative for anti-PR3 and anti-MPO antibodies, suggesting the presence of antibodies to minor antigens of PMN granules. We tested sera from a previously well-defined clinical cohort of patients for antibodies to four possible minor antigens: bactericidal permeability increasing protein, elastase, cathepsin G and lactoferrin. IF-positive (+) sera had significantly higher antibody frequencies to the minor antigens than did the IF-negative (-) sera (P < 0.01). Patients with IF(+) PR3(-)MPO(-) sera showed the most varied reactivity to the minor antigens. Among the IF(+) groups, the IF(+) PR3(+)/MPO(-) sera showed the lowest reactivity to the minor antigens. Patients with well-defined ANCA specificities, e.g. the PR3-ANCA response associated with Wegener's granulomatosis, are less likely than are other patient subsets to have antibodies to minor antigen targets. Autoantibodies to these minor antigens contribute to the overall pattern of ANCA identified by IF and help to explain why the correlation between IF and enzyme immunoassays show discrepancies. While the pathophysiological significance of antibodies to minor target antigens needs further evaluation, they may be markers of inflammation associated with disease processes.

  14. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated systemic vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsson, S M; Pettersson, Å; Ohlsson, S; Selga, D; Bengtsson, A A; Segelmark, M; Hellmark, T

    2012-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a group of autoimmune diseases, including granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). It is not known why ANCA develop, but it has been shown that they participate in pathogenesis by activating polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). In this study we hypothesize that dysregulation of phagocytosis in AAV leads to the accumulation of apoptotic neutrophils seen in association with blood vessels in AAV. These cells progress into secondary necrosis, contributing to tissue damage and autoantibody formation. Peripheral blood cells were counted, and phagocytosis was investigated using monocyte-derived macrophages (MØ) and PMNs from healthy blood donors (HBD), AAV patients and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Furthermore, the effect of serum was assessed. Phagocytosis was measured using flow cytometry. The results showed no deviation in monocyte subpopulations for AAV patients compared to HBDs, although there was a decrease in lymphocyte and pDC (plasmacytoid dendritic cell) populations (4·2 × 106 cells/l versus 10·4 × 106 cells/l, P < 0·001). The number of neutrophils was increased (6·0 × 109 cells/l versus 3·8 × 109 cells/l, P < 0·001). There were no differences found in the ability of MØs to engulf apoptotic cells, nor when comparing apoptotic PMNs to become engulfed. However, serum from AAV donors tended to decrease the phagocytosis ability of MØs (36%) compared to serum from HBDs (43%). In conclusion, there is no intrinsic dysfunction in the MØs or in the PMNs that have an effect on phagocytic activity, but ANCA may play a role by decreasing phagocytic ability. PMID:22943200

  15. Systemic vasculitis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies against bactericidal/permeability increasing protein.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Atsuro; Tanino, Yoshinori; Sato, Suguru; Ishii, Taeko; Nikaido, Takefumi; Kanazawa, Kenya; Saito, Junpei; Ishida, Takashi; Kanno, Makoto; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Munakata, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase- and proteinase 3-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) are often negative in cases in which systemic vasculitis is highly suspected. We herein present a case of bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI)-ANCA-positive systemic vasculitis. This case highlights the possible role of BPI-ANCA in the pathogenesis of systemic vasculitis as well as the possible use of BPI as a diagnostic tool. The accumulation of further case-based reports is expected to shed some light on the pathogesis of systemic vasculitis.

  16. Pediatric case of crescentic post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis with myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Hiroaki; Sawanobori, Emi; Koizumi, Keiichi; Ohashi, Ryuji; Higashida, Kosuke

    2015-04-01

    Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) generally has a good renal prognosis, and immunosuppressive therapies are not needed. However, a few patients present with severe acute kidney injury and extensive crescent formations. The etiology of such patients is not well known, and involvement of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies is rarely reported. A 9-year-old girl with rapidly progressive nephritic syndrome was diagnosed with PSGN. A biopsy showed diffuse crescentic glomerulonephritis with immunoglobulin G and C3 deposits; moreover, humps were observed on electron microscopy. After she was administered methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide, followed by prednisolone and azathioprine therapy, her urinary abnormalities improved and renal function normalized. However, the myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) titers gradually increased. We speculated that PSGN may be augmented by increased MPO-ANCA levels. Therefore, the patient is currently being treated with losartan, enalapril, azathioprine, and prednisolone. Although the MPO-ANCA titer remains high, urinary findings show mild proteinuria and her renal function has been norma for 18 months since onset. A progressive clinical course and severe histological findings may indicate the involvement of ANCA in deterioration of condition in patients with PSGN. Furthermore, in such cases immunosuppressive therapies should be considered even in pediatric PSGN.

  17. Invasive amoebiasis is associated with the development of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Pudifin, D J; Duursma, J; Gathiram, V; Jackson, T F

    1994-01-01

    Features of tissue damage in invasive amoebiasis, in particular polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) degranulation and vasculitis, bear resemblance to that seen in Wegener's granulomatosis, the latter being associated with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). We therefore tested sera from patients with confirmed amoebic liver abscess (ALA) for the presence of ANCA by means of an indirect fluorescent antibody test using pure neutrophils as substrate. ANCA was detected in 97.4% of amoebic sera; the pattern of staining was cytoplasmic, homogeneous, without central accentuation (C-ANCA). A proteinase 3 (PR3) ELISA demonstrated PR3 specificity in 75% of C-ANCA-positive ALA sera. Possible explanations are (i) a cross-reacting antibody to a component of Entamoeba histolytica, or (ii) an antibody to PMN components released, and possibly modified, by the action of E. histolytica on PMN. It is possible that this antibody contributes to the pathogenesis of invasive amoebiasis. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8033420

  18. Invasive amoebiasis is associated with the development of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody.

    PubMed

    Pudifin, D J; Duursma, J; Gathiram, V; Jackson, T F

    1994-07-01

    Features of tissue damage in invasive amoebiasis, in particular polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) degranulation and vasculitis, bear resemblance to that seen in Wegener's granulomatosis, the latter being associated with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). We therefore tested sera from patients with confirmed amoebic liver abscess (ALA) for the presence of ANCA by means of an indirect fluorescent antibody test using pure neutrophils as substrate. ANCA was detected in 97.4% of amoebic sera; the pattern of staining was cytoplasmic, homogeneous, without central accentuation (C-ANCA). A proteinase 3 (PR3) ELISA demonstrated PR3 specificity in 75% of C-ANCA-positive ALA sera. Possible explanations are (i) a cross-reacting antibody to a component of Entamoeba histolytica, or (ii) an antibody to PMN components released, and possibly modified, by the action of E. histolytica on PMN. It is possible that this antibody contributes to the pathogenesis of invasive amoebiasis.

  19. Recent advances in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, B.; John, G. T.; O’Callaghan, C.; Ranganathan, D.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is an uncommon inflammatory disease of small to medium-sized vessels that frequently presents with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and renal failure though it can affect any organ system. If untreated, the vast majority of patients will die within a year. Current treatments improve prognosis but affected patients remain at a substantially higher risk of death and adverse outcomes. We review the classification of the disease, our understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology, and propose future directions for research. We also evaluate the evidence supporting established treatment regimens and the progress of clinical trials for newer treatments to inform the design of future studies. PMID:27051131

  20. Clinical features of usual interstitial pneumonia with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody in comparison with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Chiaki; Baba, Tomohisa; Hagiwara, Eri; Ito, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Norikazu; Kitamura, Hideya; Iwasawa, Tae; Okudela, Koji; Takemura, Tamiko; Ogura, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) is occasionally positive in patients with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). However, the differences from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF/UIP) have not been well documented. We aimed to clarify the clinical, radiological and pathological features of UIP associated with MPO-ANCA (ANCA/UIP). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 12 consecutive ANCA/UIP patients not manifesting microscopic polyangiitis and 108 IPF/UIP patients with no autoantibodies, both diagnosed by surgical lung biopsy. There was no significant difference in clinical background, laboratory results and pulmonary function tests between ANCA/UIP patients and IPF/UIP patients except for the percentage of bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophils. HRCT showed subpleural reticulation in both groups. Increased attenuation around honeycombing and cysts was significantly observed in ANCA/UIP. Pathologically, ANCA/UIP had more prominent inflammatory cell infiltration, lymphoid follicles with germinal centres and cellular bronchiolitis. During the disease course, three of 12 patients (25%) developed microscopic polyangiitis. Immunosuppressive treatment tended to be more effective in ANCA/UIP patients, and the survival time in ANCA/UIP patients tended to be longer than those with IPF/UIP. ANCA/UIP may be distinguishable from IPF/UIP with a combination of HRCT findings of increased attenuation around honeycombing and cysts and some of the characteristic pathological findings. In contrast to IPF/UIP, immunosuppressive treatment could be a therapeutic option for ANCA/UIP. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  1. Periodontitis and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Novo, E; Garcia-MacGregor, E; Viera, N; Chaparro, N; Crozzoli, Y

    1999-02-01

    This investigation was designed to determine and compare the distribution pattern of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the presence or absence of periodontal disease. Sera of 30 patients with SLE and 30 with RA were tested for ANCA utilizing an indirect enzyme immunosorbent assay (ELISA) directed to a neutrophil granular extract and 6 neutrophil granule proteins. A control group of 20 healthy individuals showing neither evidence of periodontal disease nor systemic compromise was also included in this study. For RA, the number of ANCA-positive sera was very low but was evenly distributed among patients with and without periodontitis. Conversely, a high number of ANCA-positive sera in SLE was found mostly in individuals presenting periodontal compromise. A statistically significant association between ANCA and periodontitis in SLE patients was found (P <0.005, chi square test). A marked difference in the number and distribution of ANCA with respect to periodontitis between RA and SLE was found. Hyperresponsiveness of B cells and polyclonal B activation to periodontopathic bacteria in SLE might be accountable for the high numbers of ANCA and the close association observed between those autoantibodies and periodontitis in SLE.

  2. Possible intrinsic association of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis coexisting with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huifang; Xiong, Jiachuan; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Ying; Nie, Ling; Wang, Yiqin; Zhao, Jinghong

    2016-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a life-threatening condition that causes renal failure. Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant proliferation of monoclonal plasma cells in the blood that can also cause renal failure. The two diseases have high morbidity and mortality rates in the elderly, with a poor prognosis. A 64-year-old female presented to Xinqiao Hospital (Chonqing, China) with fatigue and a poor appetite that had been apparent for 6 weeks. Laboratory tests revealed a serum creatinine level of 10.31 mg/dl, a cytoplasmic ANCA titer of 1:10, a positive result for myeloperoxidase and a serum globulin level of 3.96 g/dl. A renal biopsy revealed crescent glomerulonephritis, combined with the rapid progression of renal function. Based on these observations (ANCA titer, crescent glomerulonephritis and rapid progression of renal function) a diagnosis of AAV was established. MM was confirmed by serum immunofixation electrophoresis combined with bone marrow aspiration. The present study discusses what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of AAV coexisting with MM in order to highlight it as a clinical concern. PMID:27602144

  3. [Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Habegger de Sorrentino, A; Motta, P; Iliovich, E; Sorrentino, A P

    1997-01-01

    The cytopathic effect of HIV on CD4 T cells, as well as the active autoimmune mechanism occurring during infection, have been documented. Of the cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of AIDS, the main one produced by the monocyte-macrophage series is tumor necrosis factor alfa (TNF alpha). This cytokine induces antigens such as proteinase 3 (Pr 3) or mieloperoxidase (MPO). Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are directed against this type of PMN antigens. In the present paper, the role of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in HIV infected patients as responsible for autoimmune phenomena in relation to opportunistic infections, was studied. A total of 88 serum samples belonging to 49 asymptomatic and 39 symptomatic HIV infected patients were tested for ANCA by an indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) test over a neutrophil substrate. ANCA were detected in 53.8% of symptomatic patients as compared to 4.1% in asymptomatic cases (p < 0.0001). A 95.9% correlation was observed between ANCA-positive samples and pulmonary infection (n = 20). In those ANCA (+) samples 95.9% correlation was found with pulmonary infection (n = 20). Pulmonary infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a frequent finding in HIV infected patients from Northeastern Argentina. When the presence of ANCA in TB(+) HIV(+) and TB(+) HIV(-) patients was studied, it was seen that positive-ANCA significantly correlated with the first group (p < 0.001). The presence of ANCA was not related to viral infections, toxoplasmosis, neurological features of AIDS, vasculitis or malignant diseases. ANCA during pulmonary infection, mostly caused by TB, as well as PMN infiltration in pulmonary parenchyma, and the deregulated immune reaction elicited by HIV, may contribute to the onset of autoimmune phenomena. The presence of human T lymphocytes reactive to heat stress proteins (Hsp), an important target of immune response against certain intracellular auto-antigens such as MPO from PMN, added to

  4. Cytoplasmic-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies targeting myeloperoxidase in Wegener's granulomatosis: a rare phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Bhavana M; Joshi, Sangeeta; Adhikary, Ranjeeta

    2014-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) patients can rarely have antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) directed against myeloperoxidase (MPO), producing a cytoplasmic pattern on indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). This has important implications in the diagnosis and pathophysiology of the disease. We present to you a report of three cases of WG, demonstrating a cytoplasmic-ANCA pattern on indirect IIF, but directed against MPO. It is necessary to diagnose a patient taking into account both the autoimmune test results and the clinical features.

  5. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in cholesterol embolism: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Heng-Yuan; Chen, Shi-Zhi; Huang, Ji-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol embolism is a multisystemic disorder with clinical manifestations that resemble vasculitis. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are a defining feature of ANCA-associated vasculitis, and the presence of ANCA in cholesterol embolism complicates its differential diagnosis and treatment. At present, the role of ANCA in cholesterol embolism remains unclear and no effective treatment is currently available. The present study reports the case of an Asian male who presented with spontaneous cholesterol embolism with proteinase 3 (PR3)-specific ANCA, subacute interstitial nephritis and late-developing skin lesions. The 69-year-old patient was admitted to The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University (Xiamen, China) complaining of chest tightness, fatigue, progressive renal failure and refractory hypertension. In addition, transient eosinophilia was detected. Following immunosuppressive therapy with steroids and cyclophosphamide for 6 months, hemodialysis treatment was initiated. Skin lesions appeared at >1 month following hemodialysis initiation; however, they were gradually improved following treatment with atorvastatin and anti-platelet aggregation therapy for 5 months. The patient was maintained on hemodialysis for ~2 years and exhibited general good health at the most recent follow-up. In addition, 11 cases of cholesterol embolism associated with ANCA reported in the literature were discussed in the present study. PMID:27446313

  6. Rituximab in induction therapy for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Niles, J

    2011-05-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) have been associated with a spectrum of vasculitis that includes granulomatous polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener's granulomatosis), microscopic polyangiitis, the Churg-Strauss syndrome, primary pauciimmune necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis and related forms of vasculitis. In vitro, in vivo and clinical evidence support the conclusion that ANCA participate in the pathophysiology of this disease spectrum. Rituximab is a potent tool that can interrupt B cell-mediated immunity without major compromise of T cell-mediated immunity. Thus, it has great appeal as a tool to interrupt antibody-mediated autoimmune disease. The results of two prospective randomized trials confirm that rituximab can be effective as part of induction therapy for active ANCA-associated vasculitis. The safety profile for rituximab appears favourable relative to cyclophosphamide and steroids. However, there remain many patients who require individualized adjustments of ancillary therapy, as breakthrough disease, relapses and infectious complications do occur. Based on our current knowledge, rituximab should now be incorporated as part of induction therapy in many patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis. However, more work is needed to determine how rituximab may best be integrated into the overall immunosuppression of these patients.

  7. Current and novel biomarkers in anti-neutrophil cytoplasm-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Draibe, Juliana Bordignon; Fulladosa, Xavier; Cruzado, Josep Maria; Torras, Joan; Salama, Alan David

    2016-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is characterized by a variable disease course, with up to 50% of patients having one relapse within 5 years and many progressing to end-stage organ damage despite modern treatment strategies. Moreover, complications arising from treatment dominate the causes of mortality and morbidity both early and late during disease, especially in the elderly and those with severe renal involvement, and there is additional uncertainty as to how long treatment should be continued. There is, therefore, an urgent clinical need to identify robust biomarkers to better predict treatment responses, risk of disease relapse and eventual complete clinical and immunological quiescence. To date, no such biomarkers exist, but better understanding of disease pathogenesis and the underlying immune dysfunction has provided some potential candidates linked to the discovery of new antibodies, different leukocyte activation states, the role of the alternative complement pathway and markers of vascular activation. With all promising new biomarkers, there is the need to rapidly replicate and validate early findings using large biobanks of samples that could be brought together by leaders in the field. PMID:27478594

  8. Autophagy is induced by anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic Abs and promotes neutrophil extracellular traps formation.

    PubMed

    Sha, Li-Li; Wang, Huan; Wang, Chen; Peng, Hong-Ying; Chen, Min; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2016-11-01

    Dysregulated neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) formation contributes to the pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic Ab (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). Increasing evidence indicates that autophagy is involved in the process of NETs formation. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether ANCA could induce autophagy in the process of NETs formation. Autophagy was detected using live cell imaging, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B (LC3B) accumulation and Western blotting. The results showed that autophagy vacuolization was detected in neutrophils treated with ANCA-positive IgG by live cell imaging. This effect was enhanced by rapamycin, the autophagy inducer, and weakened by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), the autophagy inhibitor. In line with these results, the autophagy marker, LC3B, showed a punctate distribution pattern in the neutrophils stimulated with ANCA-positive IgG. In the presence of rapamycin, LC3B accumulation was further increased; however, this effect was attenuated by 3-MA. Moreover, incubated with ANCA-positive IgG, the NETosis rate significantly increased compared with the unstimulated group. And, the rate significantly increased or decreased in the neutrophils pretreated with rapamycin or 3-MA, respectively, as compared with the cells incubated with ANCA-positive IgG. Overall, this study demonstrates that autophagy is induced by ANCA and promotes ANCA-induced NETs formation.

  9. Myeloperoxidase-Specific Plasma Cell Depletion by Bortezomib Protects from Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibodies–Induced Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Bontscho, Julia; Manz, Rudolf A.; Schneider, Wolfgang; Luft, Friedrich C.; Kettritz, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) cause vasculitis and necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis (NCGN). Steroids and cytotoxic drugs reduce mortality but can cause significant adverse events. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BTZ) prevents glomerulonephritis in mouse models of lupus but its efficacy in ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis is unknown. We induced anti-MPO IgG-mediated NCGN by transplanting wild-type bone marrow (BM) into irradiated MPO-deficient mice immunized with MPO. Four weeks after BM transplantation, we treated mice with steroid/cyclophosphamide (S/CYC) or BTZ. Compared with untreated control mice, both S/CYC and BTZ significantly reduced urine abnormalities, NCGN, and infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages. Response to BTZ depended on timing of administration: BTZ abrogated NCGN if begun 3 weeks, but not 5 weeks, after BM transplantation. BTZ treatment significantly reduced total and MPO-specific plasma cells in both the spleen and bone marrow, resulting in significantly reduced anti-MPO titers. Furthermore, BTZ affected neither B cells nor total CD4 and CD8 T cells, including their naive and effector subsets. In contrast, S/CYC reduced the total number of cells in the spleen, including total and MPO-specific plasma cells and B cells. In contrast to BTZ, S/CYC did not affect total and MPO-specific plasma cells in the bone marrow. Three of 23 BTZ-treated mice died within 36 hours after BTZ administration. In summary, BTZ depletes MPO-specific plasma cells, reduces anti-MPO titers, and prevents NCGN in mice. PMID:21233415

  10. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies target sequential functional proteinase 3 epitopes in the sera of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, B F; Vista, E S; Wynn, D M; Harley, J B; James, J A

    2010-01-01

    Many patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) have anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Aside from being a diagnostic marker, these autoantibodies may play roles in disease pathogenesis. Proteinase 3 (PR3) is the primary target of c-ANCA in WG patient sera. Of 60 c-ANCA-positive patients, 10 patients were selected for detailed humoral epitope analysis, contingent upon serum availability, using samples with positive levels of anti-PR3 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Sequential epitope specificities of anti-PR3 antibodies detected by screening the maximally overlapping solid-phase octapeptides of PR3 showed seven major common antigenic targets bound by WG patient sera. These include novel and previously identified sequential PR3 epitopes bound by c-ANCA. B cell epitope prediction algorithms identified all or part of the seven defined epitopes. Several epitopes share sequence and structural proximity with functional sites, including the catalytic triad and proposed binding sites of other potential proteins [PR3 complementary peptide and soluble endothelial protein C receptor (sEPCR)]. Epitope 4 (VVLGAHNVRTQ) had the highest binding prevalence (90%) and epitope 2 (AQPHSRPYMAS) has the highest average reactivity of the antigenic regions. Epitope 4 includes the interaction site between sEPCR and PR3 which may serve as an important interaction to down-regulate inflammation. Epitopes 3, 5 and 7 are in direct proximity to amino acids that form the catalytic triad of the protein. c-ANCA targets both unique and previously known sequential PR3 peptides. This information may prove useful in understanding anti-PR3-mediated disease pathogenesis in systemic vasculitides. PMID:21077276

  11. Involvement of pentraxin-3 in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody production induced by aluminum salt adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Kei; Aratani, Yasuaki; Shibuya, Akira; Yamagata, Kunihiro

    2017-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a multifunctional soluble factor. PTX3 can be involved in the regulation of vasculitis and is expressed in the cytoplasm of neutrophils. As anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) is recognised as a cause of vasculitis, we aimed to discover the role of PTX3 in ANCA production in vivo. To this end, we used aluminum salt (alum), which induces neutrophil extracellular traps, as an adjuvant for producing anti-myeloperoxidase-ANCA (MPO-ANCA). Specifically, we intraperitoneally injected alum and recombinant MPO (rMPO) into MPO-deficient mice and then measured the concentration of anti-MPO IgG in their blood. To show the involvement of extracellular PTX3 in this model, we assessed PTX3 protein content and host double-stranded DNA levels in the mice's peritoneal fluid after alum injection. In addition, we simultaneously administered recombinant PTX3, rMPO and alum to MPO-deficient mice to assess the function of PTX3 in producing anti-MPO IgG in vivo. Anti-MPO IgG was produced by the alum + rMPO immunisation model in MPO-deficient but not wildtype mice. Injection of alum induced extracellular PTX3 as well as double-stranded DNA and dead cells in MPO-deficient mice. Simultaneous injection of recombinant PTX3 with rMPO and alum attenuated the production of anti-MPO IgG in MPO-deficient mice. Our current findings provide evidence that PTX3 attenuates the production of murine MPO-ANCA.

  12. Familial vasculitides: granulomatosis with polyangitis and microscopic polyangitis in two brothers with differing anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody specificity

    PubMed Central

    Prendecki, Maria; Cairns, Tom; Pusey, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a group of rare autoimmune diseases. Although the aetiology of AAV is uncertain, it is likely that genetic and environmental factors contribute. We report the unusual case of two brothers presenting with AAV with differing clinical pictures and differing ANCA specificity. There is a recently identified difference in genetic risk factors associated with ANCA specificity, making it surprising that first-degree relatives develop AAV with differing clinical and serological features. Our report illustrates the complex aetiology of AAV and suggests that further research on the interaction of genetic and environmental factors is needed. PMID:27274829

  13. Two Cases of Proteinase 3-Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody (PR3-ANCA)-related Nephritis in Infectious Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Kazuya; Miura, Naoto; Yoshino, Masabumi; Miyamoto, Kanyu; Nobata, Hironobu; Nagai, Takuhito; Suzuki, Keisuke; Banno, Shogo; Imai, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    We herein report two cases of proteinase 3-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (PR3-ANCA)-related nephritis in infectious endocarditis. In both cases, the patients were middle-aged men with proteinuria and hematuria, hypoalbuminemia, decreased kidney function, anemia, elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and PR3-ANCA positivity. Each had bacteremia, due to Enterococcus faecium in one and Streptococcus bovis in the other. One patient received aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic regurgitation with vegetation, and the other underwent tricuspid valve replacement therapy and closure of a ventricular septic defect to treat tricuspid regurgitation with vegetation. These patients' urinary abnormalities and PR3-ANCA titers improved at 6 months after surgery following antibiotic treatment without steroid therapy. PMID:27904114

  14. [Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic anti body (ANCA)-negative limited form of Wegener's granulomatosis; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Sato, Nobuyuki; Tsubochi, H; Kishimoto, K; Imai, T; Kaimori, M

    2007-07-01

    A 54-year-old man, who was suspected to suffer from multi-drug resistant lung abcess, was admitted to our hospital. Chest computed tomography (CT) scan showed large cavitary mass in right S6 and nodules in left S1+2 and S10. No abnormal findings were detected without raised immunoglobulin E (IgE) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) was repeatedly negative. We couldn't make a diagnosis by percutaneous biopsy. Finally we performed open lung biopsy of left lung, and Wegener's granulomatosis was diagnosed at last He improved immediately after treatment with prednisolone, cyclophosphamide and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim. ANCA-negative Wegener's granulomatosis should be considered when we diagnose multiple pulmonary nodules.

  15. Long-term Prognosis of Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Negative Renal Vasculitis: Cohort Study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Woo; Yu, Mi-Yeon; Baek, Seon Ha; Ahn, Shin-Young; Kim, Sejoong; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Chin, Ho Jun

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have reported on the long-term prognosis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-negative renal vasculitis. Between April 2003 and December 2013, 48 patients were diagnosed with renal vasculitis. Their ANCA status was tested using indirect immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. During a median (interquartile range) follow-up duration of 933.5 (257.5-2,079.0) days, 41.7% of patients progressed to end stage renal disease (ESRD) and 43.8% died from any cause. Of 48 patients, 6 and 42 were ANCA-negative and positive, respectively. The rate of ESRD within 3 months was higher in ANCA-negative patients than in ANCA-positive patients (P = 0.038). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, ANCA-negative patients showed shorter renal survival than did ANCA-positive patients (log-rank P = 0.033). In univariate Cox-proportional hazard regression analysis, ANCA-negative patients showed increased risk of ESRD, with a hazard ratio 3.190 (95% confidence interval, 1.028-9.895, P = 0.045). However, the effect of ANCA status on renal survival was not statistically significant in multivariate analysis. Finally, ANCA status did not significantly affect patient survival. In conclusion, long-term patient and renal survival of ANCA-negative renal vasculitis patients did not differ from those of ANCA-positive renal vasculitis patients. Therefore, different treatment strategy depending on ANCA status might be unnecessary.

  16. Elevated serum levels of two anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in a lung cancer patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Okauchi, Shinichiro; Tamura, Tomohiro; Kagohashi, Katsunori; Kawaguchi, Mio; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A 71-year-old woman with arthralgia and lung fibrosis was referred to Mito Kyodo General Hospital (Mito, Japan) for a mass, which was incidentally observed on a chest radiograph. The chest computed tomography scan demonstrated fibrotic lesions in the lower lobes of the lung and a nodule in the left upper lobe. The serum levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and proteinase 3 (PR3)-ANCA were 60.3 and 7.5 U/ml, respectively. A transbronchial biopsy obtained from the nodule in the left upper lobe of the lung revealed a lung adenocarcinoma and the patient underwent standard upper lobectomy of the left lung. Subsequent to the resection, the serum levels of PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA returned to 10.0 and <1.0 U/ml, respectively. Notably, titers of antinuclear antibodies were also decreased during the postoperative course. Although elevated serum ANCA levels are rarely seen in lung cancer, they may be associated with the occurrence of lung cancer in certain patients, as observed in the present case. PMID:27699023

  17. Role of plasmapheresis performed in hemodialysis units for the treatment of anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody-associated systemic vasculitides.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Zeki; Gursu, Meltem; Karadag, Serhat; Uzun, Sami; Tatli, Emel; Sumnu, Abdullah; Ozturk, Savas; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza

    2011-10-01

    Anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) positivity is seen in some systemic necrotizing vasculitides. Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis are among the ANCA-associated systemic vasculitides (AASV) and mortality is very high when renal failure occurs together with alveolar hemorrhage. The role of plasmapheresis in the treatment of these diseases has been studied retrospectively. Twelve patients with AASV who had plasmapheresis together with immunosuppressive medications have been involved. Primary diseases, immunosuppressive protocols, the number of plasmapheresis sessions, the amount of plasma that has been exchanged, urea and creatinine levels before and after treatment, pulmonary findings, the need for hemodialysis, and the outcome of patients were recorded. The mean age of patients was 52.9 ± 18.2 years. Wegener's granulomatosis was diagnosed in seven (58.3%) and microscopic polyangiitis in five (41.7%) patients. All patients had pulse cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone followed by maintenance doses and plasmapheresis. Seven patients had hemodialysis at the beginning, and hemodialysis needed to be continued in three patients. Partial and complete remission was seen in 6 (50%) and 3 (25%) patients, respectively, and pulmonary findings regressed in all patients. End-stage renal disease develops generally in AASV due to rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis causing severe irreversible glomerular damage. The mortality rate rises to 50% in cases of renal failure with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage; therefore, pulse immunosuppressive treatment with plasmapheresis may be life-saving, as shown in our study.

  18. First steps in the standardization of immunoglobulin IgG myeloperoxidase-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody measurements.

    PubMed

    Hutu, D P; Tuddenham, E; Monogioudi, E; Meroni, P; Schimmel, H; Sheldon, J; Zegers, I

    2016-02-01

    The standardization of immunoassays for immunoglobulin (Ig)G myeloperoxidase-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (MPO-ANCA) could contribute to a more accurate diagnosis and follow-up of small vessels-associated vasculitis, a systemic autoimmune disorder that leads to necrosis of blood vessel walls. Despite significant efforts by different groups, the level of comparability of results from commercially available immunoassays used for IgG MPO-ANCA detection is still poor. Therefore, the potential for improvement using reference materials was assessed. The evaluation of a set of 30 patient samples with 11 assays showed that differences between assays result in different interpretations for individual patients. Only 10 of 30 patient samples had the same clinical interpretation among 11 assays applying the cut-off values provided by each respective manufacturer. The correlation between results from 13 different assays was assessed in a pairwise manner. The correlation between results from patient samples was systematically very good for combinations of seven of those assays. The correlation of results ranged from reasonable to good for combinations with four other assays, therefore it should be possible to improve the comparability of results using a commutable reference material for calibration. Feasibility studies were conducted in order to find a reference material format most suitable for a calibrator. Two sets of candidate reference materials were produced from different raw materials, and assessed according to their suitability. A final format was selected, and a candidate reference material was produced.

  19. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies target sequential functional proteinase 3 epitopes in the sera of patients with Wegener’s granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Bruner, B F; Vista, E S; Wynn, D M; Harley, J B; James, J A

    2010-11-01

    Many patients with Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG) have anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA). Aside from being a diagnostic marker, these autoantibodies may play roles in disease pathogenesis. Proteinase 3 (PR3) is the primary target of c-ANCA in WG patient sera. Of 60 c-ANCA-positive patients, 10 patients were selected for detailed humoral epitope analysis, contingent upon serum availability, using samples with positive levels of anti-PR3 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Sequential epitope specificities of anti-PR3 antibodies detected by screening the maximally overlapping solid-phase octapeptides of PR3 showed seven major common antigenic targets bound by WG patient sera. These include novel and previously identified sequential PR3 epitopes bound by c-ANCA. B cell epitope prediction algorithms identified all or part of the seven defined epitopes. Several epitopes share sequence and structural proximity with functional sites, including the catalytic triad and proposed binding sites of other potential proteins [PR3 complementary peptide and soluble endothelial protein C receptor (sEPCR)]. Epitope 4 (VVLGAHNVRTQ) had the highest binding prevalence (90%) and epitope 2 (AQPHSRPYMAS) has the highest average reactivity of the antigenic regions. Epitope 4 includes the interaction site between sEPCR and PR3 which may serve as an important interaction to down-regulate inflammation. Epitopes 3, 5 and 7 are in direct proximity to amino acids that form the catalytic triad of the protein. c-ANCA targets both unique and previously known sequential PR3 peptides. This information may prove useful in understanding anti-PR3-mediated disease pathogenesis in systemic vasculitides.

  20. Myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody affinity is associated with the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps in the kidney and vasculitis activity in myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated microscopic polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masaharu; Yamada, Muneharu; Sudo, Yasuyo; Kojima, Tadasu; Tomiyasu, Tomohiro; Yoshikawa, Noriko; Oda, Takashi; Yamada, Michiyuki

    2016-07-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) is associated with small-vessel vasculitis particularly in the kidneys and can induce the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) from primed neutrophils. Recently we have reported that the induction of NETs correlates with ANCA affinity for myeloperoxidase (MPO) and disease activity in patients with MPO-ANCA-associated microscopic polyangiitis. To investigate whether MPO-ANCA affinity is associated with the formation of NETs in vivo, we examined the occurrence of NETs in the renal tissues of patients with MPO-ANCA-associated microscopic polyangiitis and ANCA affinity by double immunofluorescence staining for NET components of citrullinated histone, MPO and PAD4 and by ELISA competition with MPO, respectively. We divided 30 MPO-ANCA-associated microscopic polyangiitis patients into 2 groups based on their ANCA affinity levels (IC50 for the high: 0.11 ± 0.04 µg/mL (Group1) and IC50 for the low: 0.66 ± 0.24 µg/mL (Group2)). Group1 showed a higher Birmingham vasculitis activity score (15.6 ± 5.7) and 73% of the patients presented clinically with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and histologically with focal/crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN). Group 2 showed a lower Birmingham vasculitis activity score (9.2 ± 4.9) and 73% of the patients presented clinically with chronic renal failure and histologically with mixed/sclerotic GN. Group 1 showed a much higher occurrence of NETs than Group 2. Our findings indicate that ANCA affinity was associated with the in vivo formation of NETs, which might be involved in the pathophysiology of patients with MPO-ANCA-associated microscopic polyangiitis. © 2016 The Authors Nephrology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  1. Incidence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis before and after the February 2011 Christchurch Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, H J; McGettigan, B; Chapman, P T; O'Donnell, J L; Frampton, C; Stamp, L K

    2017-01-01

    It has been suggested that environmental pollution from an earthquake might be associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). To determine the incidence of AAV during the 3-year period before (period 1), and the 3 years following (period 2), the earthquake that occurred on 22 February 2011 in Christchurch, New Zealand. All ANCA tests performed in the Canterbury region for 3 years before the earthquake (period 1, 2007-2010), and for 3 years after the earthquake (period 2, 2011-2014) were examined. AAV was defined according to The European Medicines Agency classification algorithm. Medical records were reviewed and cases were included if they were newly diagnosed within the study period. Incidence was calculated using population data from the 2013 New Zealand census. A total of 52 new cases of AAV was identified. The incidence in period 1 was 1.87/100 000/annum (95% C.I. 1.23-2.72), and for period 2 was 1.73/100 000/annum (95% C.I. 1.12-2.55). There was no statistically significant difference in incidence between the two study periods. There was no difference when analysing by myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase-3 status, or restricting the analyses to those residing in an urban environment. The mean age at diagnosis for MPO AAV was significantly younger in period 2 than period 1 (61 years vs 71 years, P = 0.05). There were no other clinically important differences between the two groups. This study does not support the hypothesis that an environmental agent, caused by dust pollution related to earthquake damage, has a causative role in the pathogenesis of AAV. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  2. Health related quality of life in patients with newly diagnosed anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michael; Mukhtyar, Chetan; Mahr, Alfred; Herlyn, Karen; Luqmani, Raashid; Merkel, Peter A.; Jayne, David R. W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV) can present with a broad spectrum of signs and symptoms. The relative effects of different manifestations on health related quality of life (HRQOL) is unknown. Methods We conducted an individual patient data meta-analysis of baseline Short Form 36 (SF-36) scores from four randomized controlled trials of patients with newly diagnosed AAV. We determined the associations between organ manifestations at trial entry and the SF-36 Physical Composite Score (PCS) and Mental Composite Score (MCS) using mixed effects models adjusted for demographic factors. Associations with each of the 8 domains of the SF-36 were further explored using multivariate multiple regression. Results SF-36 data was available from 346 patients. Older age (−0.11 points/year; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] −0.21 to −0.012; p=0.029) and neurologic involvement (−5.84, p<0.001) at baseline were associated with lower Physical Composite Scores. Physical Function scores were the most affected and older age (−0.25 points per year, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] −0.38 to −0.11; p<0.001) scores and neurologic involvement (−8.48 points, 95% CI −12.90 to −4.06; p<0.001) had the largest effects. The MCS was negatively affected only by chest involvement (p=0.027) but this effect was not exerted in any particular domain. Conclusions HRQOL in patients with newly diagnosed AAV are complex and incompletely explained by their organ system manifestations. PMID:21452254

  3. Neutrophil surface presentation of the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-antigen proteinase 3 depends on N-terminal processing

    PubMed Central

    von Vietinghoff, S; Eulenberg, C; Wellner, M; Luft, F C; Kettritz, R

    2008-01-01

    The neutrophil serine protease proteinase 3 (PR3) is a main autoantigen in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. PR3 surface presentation on neutrophilic granulocytes, the main effector cells, is pathogenically important. PR3 is presented by the NB1 (CD177) glycoprotein, but how the presentation develops during neutrophil differentiation is not known. An N-terminally unprocessed PR3 (proPR3) is produced early during neutrophil development and promotes myeloid cell differentiation. We therefore investigated if PR3 presentation depended on NB1 during neutrophil differentiation and if PR3 and proPR3 could both be presented by NB1. In contrast to mature neutrophils, differentiating neutrophils showed an early NB1-independent PR3 surface display that was recognized by only two of four monoclonal anti-PR3 antibodies and occurred in parallel with proPR3, but not PR3 secretion, suggesting that the NB1-independent surface PR3 was proPR3. PR3 gene expression preceeded NB1. When the NB1 receptor was detected on the surface, a mode of PR3 surface display similar to mature neutrophils developed together with the degranulation system. Ectopic expression studies showed that NB1 was a sufficient receptor for PR3 but not proPR3. ProPR3 display on the plasma membrane may influence the bone marrow microenvironment. NB1-mediated PR3 presentation depended on PR3 N-terminal processing implicating the PR3–N-terminus as NB1-binding site. PMID:18462208

  4. A historical study of American patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody negative pauci-immune glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shivani; Havill, John; Rahman, M Hafizur; Geetha, Duvuru

    2016-04-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) play an important role in the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis. The lack of ANCA antibodies may indicate a variation in clinical presentation and outcomes of this disease. We identified 74 adult patients between 1995 and 2009 with the diagnosis of pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. Demographics, histological features, and treatment outcomes were compared between ANCA-positive and ANCA-negative patients. These factors were correlated with renal function at presentation and follow-up. Of the 74 patients, 57 were ANCA-positive, and 17 were ANCA-negative. Demographics and mean Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score were similar between ANCA-negative and ANCA-positive patients at presentation. Renal function was significantly worse at presentation in the ANCA-negative patients (eGFR 16.59 vs. 31.89 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.03). Patients in the ANCA-negative group had a significantly higher interstitial fibrosis score compared to the ANCA-positive group (2.1 vs.1.6, p = 0.04). The median time to remission was shorter in the ANCA-negative patients (51 vs. 78 days, p = 0.01). Long-term renal function and 1-year patient and renal survival were similar between ANCA-negative and ANCA-positive patients. Baseline eGFR, percentage of normal glomeruli, glomerular sclerosis, and tubulointerstitial scarring predicted eGFR at 1 year in both groups similarly. This is the first historical review of American patients with pauci-immune glomerulonephritis, comparing patients with ANCA-negative and ANCA-positive serology. Although ANCA-negative patients present with lower eGFR and more interstitial fibrosis, 1-year and long-term outcomes in both groups are similar.

  5. Water intoxication induced by low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in a patient with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Akihiko; Sugiura, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Misaki, Taro; Tsuji, Takayuki; Sakao, Yukitoshi; Sakakima, Masaaki; Yasuda, Hideo; Fujigaki, Yoshihide; Hishida, Akira

    2008-10-01

    We reported the case of a 70-year-old woman with moderate renal failure due to anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related glomerulonephritis who developed symptomatic water intoxication (serum Na: 108 mEq/L) following treatment with oral low-dose cyclophosphamide (CY) (50mg/day). Estimated glomerular filtration rate was 29.5 mL/min/1.73 m(2). She had drunk >2 L of fluid in 12 h prior to the development of cerebral oedema. This rare case suggests that oral low-dose CY could be an occult cause of water intoxication in patients with chronic kidney disease taking large fluid volumes.

  6. Development of a Certified Reference Material for myeloperoxidase-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (MPO-ANCA).

    PubMed

    Monogioudi, Evanthia; Hutu, Dana Petronela; Martos, Gustavo; Sheldon, Joanna; Schimmel, Heinz; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Zegers, Ingrid

    2016-06-01

    A serum Certified Reference Material (CRM) for supporting reliable autoimmune diagnostics was recently released by the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. It was produced in collaboration with a Working Group on the Harmonisation of Autoimmune Tests of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC WG-HAT). This material is aimed at facilitating the standardisation of measurements of anti-myeloperoxidase immunoglobulin G antibodies. The CRM could be used as a common calibrant by clinicians and manufacturers thereby significantly improving the comparability of results from commercial immunoassays used for IgG anti-MPO measurements. This paper provides information on the new CRM and its intended use.

  7. Water intoxication induced by low-dose oral cyclophosphamide in a patient with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Akihiko; Sugiura, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Misaki, Taro; Tsuji, Takayuki; Sakao, Yukitoshi; Sakakima, Masaaki; Yasuda, Hideo; Fujigaki, Yoshihide; Hishida, Akira

    2008-01-01

    We reported the case of a 70-year-old woman with moderate renal failure due to anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related glomerulonephritis who developed symptomatic water intoxication (serum Na: 108 mEq/L) following treatment with oral low-dose cyclophosphamide (CY) (50mg/day). Estimated glomerular filtration rate was 29.5 mL/min/1.73 m2. She had drunk >2 L of fluid in 12 h prior to the development of cerebral oedema. This rare case suggests that oral low-dose CY could be an occult cause of water intoxication in patients with chronic kidney disease taking large fluid volumes. PMID:18795141

  8. [A patient with both cocaine-induced nasal septum destruction and antibodies against anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA); potential confusion with Wegener's disease].

    PubMed

    Scheenstra, R J; van Buren, M; Koopman, J P

    2007-10-27

    A 37-year-old male cocaine user presented with continual, sanguinolent nasal obstruction and persistant pain following a nasal operation one year ago. Examination showed crustae, granulations and exposed septal cartilage in the right nasal passage in addition to a considerable septal deviation to the left. No other physical abnormalities were found. A biopsy of the nasal mucosa showed acute necrotic inflammation. The serological examination revealed markedly elevated anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) titres with positive reactions against proteinase-3, indicating Wegener's disease. Additional testing also showed a positive ANCA reaction for human neutrophil elastase, which made cocaine use a more plausible cause for the nasal abnormalities than Wegener's disease. Treatment consisted of nasal flushing with saline and, for a short period, a nasal tampon with hydrocortisone-oxytetracycline-polymyxin B ointment. However, the patient did, ultimately, develop a septal perforation. Cocaine-induced nasal abnormalities can imitate symptoms that may fit Wegener's disease, including relevant serological ANCA findings.

  9. Development and validation of case-finding algorithms for the identification of patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis in large healthcare administrative databases.

    PubMed

    Sreih, Antoine G; Annapureddy, Narender; Springer, Jason; Casey, George; Byram, Kevin; Cruz, Andy; Estephan, Maya; Frangiosa, Vince; George, Michael D; Liu, Mei; Parker, Adam; Sangani, Sapna; Sharim, Rebecca; Merkel, Peter A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate case-finding algorithms for granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's, GPA), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), and eosinophilic GPA (Churg-Strauss, EGPA). Two hundred fifty patients per disease were randomly selected from two large healthcare systems using the International Classification of Diseases version 9 (ICD9) codes for GPA/EGPA (446.4) and MPA (446.0). Sixteen case-finding algorithms were constructed using a combination of ICD9 code, encounter type (inpatient or outpatient), physician specialty, use of immunosuppressive medications, and the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody type. Algorithms with the highest average positive predictive value (PPV) were validated in a third healthcare system. An algorithm excluding patients with eosinophilia or asthma and including the encounter type and physician specialty had the highest PPV for GPA (92.4%). An algorithm including patients with eosinophilia and asthma and the physician specialty had the highest PPV for EGPA (100%). An algorithm including patients with one of the diagnoses (alveolar hemorrhage, interstitial lung disease, glomerulonephritis, and acute or chronic kidney disease), encounter type, physician specialty, and immunosuppressive medications had the highest PPV for MPA (76.2%). When validated in a third healthcare system, these algorithms had high PPV (85.9% for GPA, 85.7% for EGPA, and 61.5% for MPA). Adding the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody type increased the PPV to 94.4%, 100%, and 81.2% for GPA, EGPA, and MPA, respectively. Case-finding algorithms accurately identify patients with GPA, EGPA, and MPA in administrative databases. These algorithms can be used to assemble population-based cohorts and facilitate future research in epidemiology, drug safety, and comparative effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Symptomatic Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Positive Disease Complicating Subacute Bacterial Endocarditis: To Treat or Not to Treat?

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, Konstantin N.; Harris, Alexis A.; Hartshorne, Michael F.; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H.

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old man was diagnosed with Streptococcus mutans endocarditis of the mitral valve. Serological tests disclosed the presence of multiple autoantibodies including c-ANCA, anti-PR3 and anti-MPO. While the fever subsided with antibiotics, mental status and renal function deteriorated rapidly. Kidney biopsy revealed pauci-immune glomerulonephritis and acute eosinophilic interstitial nephritis. The abnormal clinical features improved rapidly after addition of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide to the antibiotics. Immunosuppressive agents may be required in a fraction of the patients with infective endocarditis who develop ANCA and ANCA-mediated renal disease. Histological identification of the type of renal disease is imperative for the choice of the treatment. PMID:23197952

  11. A case of myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA)-associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis presenting with multiple cranial nerve palsies and diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Ken; Sainouchi, Makoto; Goto, Masahiro; Murase, Nagako; Ohtani, Ryo; Nakamura, Michikazu

    2016-05-31

    A 61-year-old woman developed hearing difficulties and became thirsty after experiencing cold symptoms. A neurological examination revealed a loss of odor sensation, facial palsy, dysphasia, and dysarthria. Vocal cord palsy was observed during pharyngoscopy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a thickened pituitary stalk and swelling of the pituitary gland, but no high signal intensity regions were seen in the posterior portion of the pituitary gland. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI demonstrated a thickened dura mater over the anterior cranial fossa. A biopsy specimen of the thickened dura mater showed fibrosis, granulomatous inflammation, and necrotic foci. Blood tests detected myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA). The patient's urine osmolarity was low even though she exhibited hypernatremia. We diagnosed her with hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with MPO-ANCA and diabetes insipidus. The patient received two courses of 5-day high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone (1.0 g/day), and was subsequently administered oral prednisolone, which gradually relieved her symptoms. However, the patient's symptoms recurred despite the high-dose prednisolone treatment. It was difficult to control the patient's symptoms in this case with oral prednisolone monotherapy, but combined treatment with cyclosporine resulted in sustained remission. It is considered that patients with MPO-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis require combination therapy with prednisolone and immunosuppressive agents at an early stage.

  12. Evaluation of automated multi-parametric indirect immunofluorescence assays to detect anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA).

    PubMed

    Csernok, Elena; Damoiseaux, Jan; Rasmussen, Niels; Hellmich, Bernhard; van Paassen, Pieter; Vermeersch, Pieter; Blockmans, Daniel; Cohen Tervaert, Jan-Willem; Bossuyt, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this multicenter EUVAS study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of multi-parametric indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assays to detect anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). The study included 912 samples from diseased controls and 249 diagnostic samples from GPA (n=183) and MPA (n=66) patients. The performance of two automated multi-parametric assays [Aklides (Medipan/Generic Assays) and EuroPattern (Euroimmun)] combining IIF on cellular and purified antigen substrates was compared with two manual IIF analyses and with commercially available ELISAs for MPO- and PR3-ANCA (Euroimmun). The area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve to discriminate AAV from controls was 0.925, 0.848, 0.855 and 0.904 for, respectively, the two manual analyses, Aklides and EuroPattern, and 0.959, 0.921 and 0.886 for, respectively, antigen-specific ELISA, antigen-coated beads, and microdot, respectively. Variation in pattern assignment between IIF methods was observed. The performance of IIF depends on the substrate used and the definition of IIF patterns. The performance of automated IIF is improved by multi-parameter testing (combined IIF and antigen-specific testing). Given the variability between IIF methods, the diagnostic importance of this technique is questioned. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Coexistence of Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibodies and Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies in a Child With Human Leukocyte Antigen Susceptibility and Detailed Antibody Description: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-jun; Cui, Zhao; Jia, Xiao-yu; Chen, Zhi; Liu, Xiao-rong; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2015-07-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis both could cause rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. The coexistence of ANCAs and anti-GBM antibodies was known as "double positive," which was extremely rare in children. We report a pediatric case with coexistence of ANCAs and anti-GBM antibodies. A 6-year-old girl presented with acute renal failure, hematuria, proteinuria, and oliguria. She was double positive of ANCAs specific to myeloperoxidase, and anti-GBM antibodies. Kidney biopsy confirmed linear immunoglobulin (Ig)G deposit along GBM and 100% of crescent formation in glomeruli; among them 83.3% were cellular crescents. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene typing showed DRB1*1501, an allele strongly associated with anti-GBM disease, and DRB1*0405, an independent risk factor for renal failure in patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis. The titer of anti-GBM antibodies was 1:800, and the predominant IgG subclass was IgG1, which was closely related with severe kidney injury and worse outcome. The target antigen of anti-GBM antibodies was restricted on the noncollagen domain 1 of the α3 chain of type IV collagen (α3[IV]NC1), with recognitions to both epitopes, EA (α317-31) and EB (α3127-141). This is the first reported pediatric case with coexistence of ANCAs and anti-GBM antibodies, in which the HLA typing and immunologic characters of autoantibodies were identified. The findings on this early-onset patient are meaningful for understanding the mechanisms of both anti-GBM disease and ANCA-associated vasculitis.

  14. The effects of duration of glucocorticoid therapy on relapse rate in anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitis: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michael; Merkel, Peter A.; Mahr, Alfred; Jayne, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective Disease relapses are common for patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitis (AAV). The role of low-dose glucocorticoids (GC) in relapse prevention is controversial. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine if GC target doses influence relapses of AAV. Methods Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for observational studies and randomized controlled trials of treatment of AAV that included a predefined GC treatment plan. The association of GC target dose with the proportion of relapses in studies was assessed using meta-regression and multi-level generalized linear modeling. Results Thirteen studies (983 patients) were identified for inclusion. There were no studies directly comparing GC regimens. We classified 288 patients as having a non-zero GC target dose by study end and 695 patients as having a zero GC target dose by study end. The pooled proportion of patients with a relapse was 36% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25 to 47%). GC regimen was the most significant variable explaining the variability between the proportions of patients with relapses. The proportion of patients with a relapse was 14% (95% CI 10 to 19%) in non-zero GC target dose and 43% (95% CI 33 to 52%) in zero GC target dose studies. Differences other than GC regimens exist between studies that complicate the comparability of trials and isolation of the variability in relapses due to GC target alone. Conclusions Studies with longer courses of GC in AAV are associated with fewer relapses. These results have implications for study design and outcome assessment in clinical trials of AAV. PMID:20235186

  15. Effects of cyclophosphamide on the prognosis of Japanese patients with renal vasculitis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive microscopic polyangiitis.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Nakaya, Izaya; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Shibagaki, Yugo; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Oe, Yuji; Sakuma, Tsutomu; Sato, Toshinobu; Taguma, Yoshio; Soma, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of cyclophosphamide (CY) on anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) with renal involvement in Japanese patients. Eighty-two patients with newly diagnosed ANCA-positive MPA were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether they received combination therapy with a corticosteroid (CS) plus CY (CY group) or CS alone or with other therapies (non-CY group). The primary outcome was defined as the combination of death and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The CY and non-CY groups included 29 and 53 patients, respectively. In the non-CY group, 31 patients were treated with CS alone, and 22 with a combination of CS and other therapeutics. The percentage of males and mean Birmingham vasculitis activity scores were higher in the CY group than those in the non-CY group, but other factors such as age, serum creatinine, serum albumin, or CRP at baseline were equivalent in the two groups. No differences were observed in remission rates using induction therapy for the two groups. However, the survival rate 5 years after induction therapy was lower in the CY group than in the non-CY group (0.50 vs. 0.73; P = 0.041), although the hazard ratio of CY for the primary outcome adjusted for all confounding factors was 1.321 [95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.662-2.637; P = 0.171]. CY may not have an additive effect on induction therapy with CS for Japanese patients with renal vasculitis associated with ANCA-positive MPA.

  16. [The significances of peripheral neutrophils CD(55) and myeloperoxidase expression in patients with myeloperoxidase-specific anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Zhou, X L; Zheng, M J; Shuai, Z W; Zhang, L; Zhang, M M; Chen, S Y

    2017-06-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of CD(55) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) on neutrophils in patients with MPO-specific anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis(MPO-AAV), and analyze the relationship between the expression and clinical manifestation. Methods: Forty untreated patients with active MPO-AAV (patient group) and 30 healthy volunteers (control group) were enrolled in this study. The CD(55) on neutrophils and both membrane and cytoplasmic MPO were detected by flow cytometry. Serum fragment-from the activated complement factor B(Ba) and MPO were measured by ELISA. The clinical activity of vasculitis was valued by Birmingham vasculitis activity score-version 3(BVAS-V3). The significance of laboratory data was evaluated by Spearman correlation test and multivariate linear regression analysis. Results: (1)The mean fluorescence intensity(MFI) of CD(55) expressed on neutrophils was significantly higher than that in control group[4 068.6±2 306.0 vs 2 999.5±1 504.9, P=0.033]. Similar results of serum MPO and Ba in patient group were found compared to controls [500.0(381.0, 612.7) IU/L vs 286.9(225.5, 329.1) IU/L, P<0.001; 35.2(25.2, 79.5) ng/L vs 18.0(15.0, 28.0) ng/L, P<0.001], respectively. However, MIF of cytoplasmic MPO in patients was significantly lower than that of control group(1 577.1±1 175.9 vs 3 105.3±2 323.0, P=0.003) . (2) In patient group, cytoplasmic intensity of MPO was negatively associated with the serum levels of MPO(r=-0.710, P<0.001) and Ba (r=-0.589, P=0.001). Moreover, serum MPO was positively associated with serum Ba(r=0.691, P<0.001). Membrane intensity of CD(55) on neutrophils was positively correlated with patient age (r=0.514, P=0.001), C reactive protein (r=0.376, P=0.018), peripheral neutrophils count (r=0.485, P=0.001) and BVAS-V3 (r=0.484, P=0.002), whereas negative correlation between membrane CD(55) and disease duration was seen (r=-0.403, P=0.01). (3) The result of multiple linear regression analysis

  17. High prevalence of IgA class anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) is associated with increased risk of bacterial infection in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Papp, Maria; Sipeki, Nora; Vitalis, Zsuzsanna; Tornai, Tamas; Altorjay, Istvan; Tornai, Istvan; Udvardy, Miklos; Fechner, Kai; Jacobsen, Silvia; Teegen, Bianca; Sumegi, Andrea; Veres, Gabor; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Kappelmayer, Janos; Antal-Szalmas, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are a non-uniform family of antibodies recognizing diverse components of neutrophil granulocytes. ANCA formation might be induced by protracted bacterial infections or probably reflect an abnormal immune response to commensal microorganisms. Bacterial infections are common complications in cirrhosis with high incidence of episodes caused by enteric organisms, therefore, we sought to study the presence and clinical importance of ANCA in cirrhosis. Sera of 385 patients with cirrhosis of different etiologies were assayed for ANCA of IgG, IgA, IgA1, IgA2, and secretory IgA subtypes by indirect immunofluorescence and ELISAs. The control group comprised 202 patients with chronic liver diseases without cirrhosis and 100 healthy subjects. In cirrhosis, a 2-year follow-up, observational study was conducted to assess a possible association between the presence of ANCA and clinically significant bacterial infections. Prevalence of ANCA IgA was significantly higher in cirrhosis (52.2%) compared to chronic liver diseases (18.6%) or healthy controls (0%, p<0.001 for both). ANCA IgA subtyping assays revealed marked increase in the proportion of IgA2 subtype (46% of total ANCA IgA) and presence of the secretory component concurrently. Presence of ANCA IgA was associated with disease-specific clinical characteristics (Child-Pugh stage and presence of ascites, p<0.001). During a 2-year follow-up period, risk of infections was higher among patients with ANCA IgA compared to those without (41.8% vs. 23.4%, p<0.001). ANCA IgA positivity was associated with a shorter time to the first infectious complication (pLogRank <0.001) in Kaplan-Meier analysis and was identified as an independent predictor in multivariate Cox-regression analysis (HR:1.74, 95% CI: 1.18-2.56, p=0.006). Presence of IgA type ANCA is common in cirrhosis. Involvement of gut mucosal immune system is in center of their formation and probably reflects sustained exposure to

  18. Clinicopathologic Characteristics and Outcomes of Renal Thrombotic Microangiopathy in Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibody-Associated Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su-Fang; Wang, Huan; Huang, Yi-Min; Li, Zhi-Ying; Wang, Su-Xia; Yu, Feng; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) has been mainly reported in isolated case reports. The aim of this study was to analyze clinical and pathologic characteristics and prognosis of patients with renal TMA in ANCA-associated GN in a large cohort of Chinese patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Clinical and renal histopathologic data of 220 patients with biopsy-proven ANCA-associated GN from 1996 to 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were followed up for a median period of 32 (interquartile range [IQR], 12–65) months, and outcomes of patients were analyzed. Results Among the 220 patients with ANCA-associated GN, 30 were identified having concomitant renal TMA by pathologic evaluation. Compared with the non-TMA group, patients with renal TMA presented with more severe renal injury, as evidenced clinically by a higher level of serum creatinine at diagnosis (5.0 [IQR, 3.5–9.0] versus 3.2 [IQR, 1.7–6.8] mg/dl; P=0.02) and pathologically by a higher percentage of cellular crescents (15.0% [IQR, 6.9%–34.9%] versus 6.9% [IQR, 0%–21.1%]; P=0.04) and more severe interstitial infiltration (2 [IQR, 2–2] versus 2 [IQR, 1–2]; P=0.03) in renal biopsies. Furthermore, multivariate analysis showed that renal TMA was independently associated with mortality of patients with AAV after adjusting for age, sex, initial serum creatinine, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.08 to 3.41; P=0.03) or for age, sex, the histopathologic classification scheme proposed by Berden et al. (J Am Soc Nephrol 21: 1628–1636, 2010), tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis (hazard ratio, 1.95; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 3.55; P=0.03). Conclusions Renal TMA in ANCA-associated GN is not rare and presents with more severe renal injury. Renal TMA is independently associated with all-cause mortality in patients with AAV. PMID:25749534

  19. Presence of Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibodies and Myeloperoxidase Anti-Neutrophilic Cytoplasmic Antibodies in a Case of Rapidly Progressive Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Mavani, Gaurang P; Pommier, Max; Win, Sandar; Michelis, Michael F; Rosenstock, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old male had initially presented with low-grade proteinuria, microhematuria, and a positive myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophilic antibody (ANCA). He subsequently developed deterioration of kidney function and developed uremic symptoms. Creatinine was 486.2 μmol/L (5.5 mg/dL). Anti-MPO was positive (titer >8 U, normal <0.4). He was clinically diagnosed with rapidly proliferative glomerulonephritis most likely due to ANCA vasculitis. He received three doses of pulse methylprednisolone therapy. Kidney biopsy showed pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. Immunofluorescence was positive for faint linear IgG staining of glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Anti-GBM antibody was positive 2.1 U (normal <1). He was started on high-dose oral steroids; monthly intravenous cyclophosphamide and plasmapheresis were also initiated. His symptoms improved and creatinine is 247.5 μmol/L (2.8 mg/dL). His repeat anti-GBM antibody was negative. This is a rare case of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis due to dual MPO-ANCA antibodies and anti-GBM antibodies (DAV).

  20. Presence of Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibodies and Myeloperoxidase Anti-Neutrophilic Cytoplasmic Antibodies in a Case of Rapidly Progressive Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Mavani, Gaurang P.; Pommier, Max; Win, Sandar; Michelis, Michael F.; Rosenstock, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old male had initially presented with low-grade proteinuria, microhematuria, and a positive myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophilic antibody (ANCA). He subsequently developed deterioration of kidney function and developed uremic symptoms. Creatinine was 486.2 μmol/L (5.5 mg/dL). Anti-MPO was positive (titer >8 U, normal <0.4). He was clinically diagnosed with rapidly proliferative glomerulonephritis most likely due to ANCA vasculitis. He received three doses of pulse methylprednisolone therapy. Kidney biopsy showed pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. Immunofluorescence was positive for faint linear IgG staining of glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Anti-GBM antibody was positive 2.1 U (normal <1). He was started on high-dose oral steroids; monthly intravenous cyclophosphamide and plasmapheresis were also initiated. His symptoms improved and creatinine is 247.5 μmol/L (2.8 mg/dL). His repeat anti-GBM antibody was negative. This is a rare case of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis due to dual MPO-ANCA antibodies and anti-GBM antibodies (DAV). PMID:26301224

  1. Cytoplasmic 5'-nucleotidase autoantibodies in inclusion body myositis: Isotypes and diagnostic utility.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Steven A

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have identified circulating immunoglobulin (Ig) G autoantibodies against cytoplasmic 5'-nucleotidase 1A (cN1A; NT5C1A) in patients with inclusion body myositis (IBM), whose detection provides for an IBM blood diagnostic test. Whether or not anti-cN1A autoantibody isotypes other than IgG are present in IBM has not previously been reported. Plasma and serum samples from 205 patients (50 with and155 without IBM) were studied for the presence of IgM and IgA, in addition to IgG, anti-cN1A autoantibodies using immunoblots and enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISAs). IgM, IgA, and IgG anti-cN1A autoantibodies were detected by ELISA with similar sensitivities (49-53%) and specificities (94-96%), but with differing patterns of autoantibody isotype presence. Combination assays of all 3 autoantibody levels improved diagnostic sensitivity to 76%. In addition to previously recognized IgG anti-cN1A autoantibodies, IBM patients have circulating IgM and IgA anti-cN1A autoantibodies. Differing patterns of these isotypes may be present and useful for diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [Use of autoantibodies in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Petitpierre, Stéphanie; Aubert, Vincent; Leimgruber, Annette; Spertini, François; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre

    2009-04-15

    Autoantibodies are frequently determined in unclear clinical situations and in the context of an inflammatory syndrome. The aim of this article is not to review all autoantibodies in details, but to discuss those used in clinical practice by describing their methods of detection and interpretation. Thus we will focus on antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which are typically associated with connective tissue diseases, as well as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), which are useful in the diagnosis of ANCA-associated vasculitides. Due to its high sensitivity indirect immunofluorescence is used as a screening test; when positive, ELISA is performed to search for antibodies more specifically associated with certain auto-immune diseases.

  3. T lymphocyte responses to anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA) antigens are present in patients with ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis and persist during disease remission

    PubMed Central

    King, W J; Brooks, C J; Holder, R; Hughes, P; Adu, D; Savage, C O S

    1998-01-01

    ANCA with specificity for myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3) are present in patients with systemic vasculitis. The aim of this work was to determine whether such patients have T cell responses to these antigens and whether these responses are related to disease activity. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 45 patients and 19 controls were cultured with ANCA antigens and proliferation measured. The antigens used were heat-inactivated (HI) MPO, HI PR3, native (non-HI) PR3, HI whole α-granules, and 25 overlapping peptides covering the entire PR3 sequence. Significant responses to both whole PR3 preparations were seen from patient and control groups, and to the α-granules from the patient group. Patients responded at all stages of disease: active, remitting, treated or untreated. Only two patients responded significantly to MPO. Responses were significantly higher with the patient group than the control group to all four whole ANCA antigens. Responses to those PR3 peptides containing epitopes known to be recognized by ANCA were detected from one patient. Thus, these studies demonstrate that T cells from vasculitis patients can proliferate to PR3 and occasionally to associated ANCA antigens. Further, responses may persist even after disease remission has been achieved. PMID:9649227

  4. A novel class of autoantigens of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis: the lysosomal membrane glycoprotein h-lamp-2 in neutrophil granulocytes and a related membrane protein in glomerular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis (NCGN) is frequently associated with circulating antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA). It is established that ANCA are specific for soluble enzymes of granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMN), such as myeloperoxidase (MPO) or protease 3 (PR3). The purpose of this study was to identify membrane proteins of PMNs, and/or glomerular cells, as additional autoantigenic ANCA targets. When membrane protein fractions were prepared from PMNs and isolated human glomeruli, and immunoblotted with ANCA sera of NCGN patients, two bands with apparent molecular masses of 170 and 80-110 kD (gp170/80-110) were labeled in PMNs, and a 130-kD glycoprotein (gp130) in glomeruli. Gp130 was purified, and monoclonal and rabbit antibodies (Abs) were produced which showed the same double specificity as the patient's ANCA. Using these probes, evidence was provided that gp170/80-110 is identical with human lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (h-lamp-2), because both proteins were immunologically cross-reactive and screening of a cDNA expression library from human promyelocytic leukemia cells with anti- gp130 Ab yielded a clone derived from h-lamp-2. Gp170/80-110 was localized primarily in granule membranes of resting PMNs, and was translocated to the cell surfaces by activation with FMLP. By contrast, gp130 was localized in the surface membranes of endothelial cells of human glomerular and renal interstitial capillaries, rather than in lysosomes, as found for h-lamp-2. Potential clinical relevance of autoantibodies to gp170/80-110 and gp130 was assessed in a preliminary trial, in which ANCA sera of patients (n = 16) with NCGN were probed with purified or recombinant antigens. Specific reactivity was detected in approximately 90% of cases with active phases of NCGN, and frequently also in combination with autoantibodies specific for PR3 or MPO. Collectively, these data provide evidence that h-lamp-2 in PMNs and a

  5. Role of autoantibody testing.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Amita

    2014-12-01

    Autoantibodies are the serological hallmark of autoimmune disease. Though their pathogenic role is debatable, they play an important role in the management of a patient with rheumatic disease. However, due to their presence in the general population as well as in multiple autoimmune diseases, the presence of an autoantibody alone does not make a diagnosis; the result has to be interpreted along with clinical findings. Similarly, the absence of autoantibody does not exclude a disease. The common autoantibodies used in clinical practice include rheumatoid factor, anti-CCP antibodies, antinuclear antibodies (ANAs), anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and anti-phospholipid antibodies. Once an autoantibody to a broad antigen is detected in a patient, sub-specificity analysis can improve the utility of the antibody. Autoantibodies are detected in the serum using different assays and results of which can vary; thus, it is important for a clinician to know the method used, its sensitivity and specificity to help in the proper interpretation of the laboratory results. This review will address these issues.

  6. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies: how should the biologist manage them?

    PubMed

    Beauvillain, C; Delneste, Y; Renier, G; Jeannin, P; Subra, J F; Chevailler, A

    2008-10-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are directed against enzymes found in the granules of the polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocytes. They are detected by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy assays on human ethanol fixed neutrophils. Three different fluorescence patterns can be distinguished: a cytoplasmic pattern (cANCA), a perinuclear pattern (pANCA), and an atypical pattern (aANCA). The use of other fixatives, e.g., formalin and methanol, allows differentiation between the pANCA and the antinuclear antibodies. ANCA specificity is determined by solid phase assays (ELISA, immunodot, and multiplex assay). ANCA with high titres and defined specificities (antiproteinase 3 [PR 3] or antimyeloperoxidase [MPO]) are proven to be good serological markers of active primary systemic vasculitis: c/PR 3-ANCA for Wegener's granulomatosis and p/MPO-ANCA for microscopic polyangiitis. The former have higher sensitivity and specificity for Wegener's granulomatosis than the latter for microscopic polyangiitis. ANCA with low titres and unknown specificity have been detected in a wide range of inflammatory and infectious diseases leading to a critical reappraisal of the diagnostic significance of ANCA testing. Physicians must keep in mind the possible occurrence of infectious diseases like subacute endocarditis that could be dramatically worsened by irrelevant immunosuppressive therapy. ANCA findings in certain manifestations, such as the pulmonary-renal syndrome in which massive pulmonary hemorrhage can quickly be life-threatening, warrant ANCA testing as an emergency test for patient care.

  7. Autoantibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities PLEASE NOTE: Your web browser does not have JavaScript enabled. Unless you enable Javascript , your ability to navigate and access the features of this website will be limited. Home ... Examples | Related Pages What are autoantibodies? Autoantibodies ...

  8. Interference of Wegener's granulomatosis autoantibodies with neutrophil Proteinase 3 activity.

    PubMed Central

    van de Wiel, B A; Dolman, K M; van der Meer-Gerritsen, C H; Hack, C E; von dem Borne, A E; Goldschmeding, R

    1992-01-01

    Classic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (C-ANCA) are disease-specific markers of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). The possible pathogenetic role of these autoantibodies, which are directed against Proteinase 3 (PR3), is not yet clear. We studied the effect of C-ANCA on PR3 proteolytic activity and on the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT). C-ANCA IgG from eight patients with active WG significantly inhibited PR3 proteolytic activity, particularly towards elastin (median 84.2% inhibition). C-ANCA IgG significantly inhibited the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1AT (median 58.8% inhibition). Moreover, addition of purified PR3 to C-ANCA-positive sera from WG patients yielded less complexes with alpha 1AT (median 44.8%) compared with sera containing perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (P-ANCA) or ANCA-negative sera. These findings indicate the existence of a hitherto unknown property of C-ANCA, which may be of importance in the pathogenesis of WG. PMID:1458677

  9. Anti–LAMP-2 Antibodies Are Not Prevalent in Patients With Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibody Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael C.; Smith, Rex Neal; Badhwar, Anshul K.; Parente, Oscar; Chung, Hyun chul; O’Dell, Donna; Bunch; McGregor, JulieAnne G.; Hogan, Susan L.; Hu, Yichun; Yang, Jia-Jin; Berg, Elisabeth A.; Niles, John; Jennette, J. Charles; Preston, Gloria A.; Falk, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    Lysosomal membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2) is a target of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) in addition to the more commonly known targets proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase. The prevalence of anti–LAMP-2 antibodies and their relationship to disease in ANCA glomerulonephritis are not well described. We measured anti–LAMP-2 reactivity in 680 sera samples (two academic centers) from patients with ANCA glomerulonephritis (n=329); those with ANCA-negative glomerulonephritis (n=104); those with fimbriated, gram-negative Escherichia coli urinary tract infection (n=104); disease controls (n=19); and healthy volunteers (n=124). With levels in healthy controls used to define a reference range, anti–LAMP-2 reactivity was present in 21% of ANCA sera from two of the centers; reactivity was present in 16% of the control group with urinary tract infection. Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy did not verify positivity. Titers of anti-myeloperoxidase and anti–proteinase 3 antibodies were 1500-fold and 10,000-fold higher than anti–LAMP-2 titers, respectively. There was no correlation between anti–LAMP-2 antibodies and disease activity. Furthermore, Wistar Kyoto rats injected with anti–LAMP-2 antibodies did not develop glomerulonephritis. In conclusion, antibodies that react with LAMP-2 may exist at very low titers in a minority of patients with ANCA disease. These data do not support a mechanistic relationship between anti–LAMP-2 antibodies and ANCA glomerulonephritis. PMID:22021709

  10. Pitfalls with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA).

    PubMed

    De Clerck, L S; Van Offel, J F; Smolders, W A; Empsten, F A; Bridts, C H; Bourgeois, N; Van Marck, E; Timmermans, U; Stevens, W J

    1989-12-01

    A 39-year-old Ugandan student is described presenting with general malaise, fever and a pulmonary infiltrate. Open lung biopsy showing infarction and positive ANCA lead to a diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis and a treatment with immunosuppressive drugs was instituted. Five weeks after admission, however, sputum cultures turned out to be positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The importance of ANCA-interpretation and the possibility of false positive results is discussed.

  11. Clinical significance of autoantibodies directed against nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens in autoimmune liver disease.

    PubMed

    McLean, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Previous research carried out in the area of autoimmune liver disease and autoantibody specificity has not been conclusive, and correlation between the two in most situations remains unclear. This study aims to facilitate a consensus on these autoantibodies in an unselected patient population and their relationship to autoimmune liver disease (AILD). The study detected two autoantibodies that show reasonable specificity for primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), anti-sp100 and anti-gp210, and it may be clinically useful to report any antimitochondrial antibody (AMA) detected, as this may be a sign of very early PBC. The inter-methodological differences in assays available for detection of the autoantibodies were also noted. Care must be taken when selecting methods to detect these autoantibodies.

  12. Clinical significance of autoantibodies in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2013-10-01

    The accurate diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) rely upon the detection of characteristic autoantibodies. Positivity for anti-nuclear (ANA) and/or anti-smooth muscle (SMA) autoantibodies defines AIH type 1 (AIH-1), whereas anti-liver kidney microsomal type 1 (anti-LKM1) and/or anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1) define AIH type 2 (AIH-2). ANA and SMA, and less commonly anti-LKM1, have also been detected in de-novo autoimmune hepatitis developing after liver transplantation, a condition that may affect patients transplanted for non-autoimmune liver disease. The diagnostic autoantibodies associated with AIH-1 are also detected in the paediatric AIH/sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome, referred to as autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC). ASC, like adult primary sclerosing cholangitis, is often associated with atypical perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (p-ANCA), although p-ANCA are also detected in other autoimmune liver diseases. These associations highlight the necessity for simple and prompt diagnostic autoantibody testing, and the requirement for the accurate interpretation of the results of the tests in the clinical context. Fine-mapping of antigenic autoantibody targets has facilitated the development of rapid molecular assays that have the potential to revolutionise the field if properly standardised and when used in combination with classical immunofluorescence. Despite their diagnostic significance, the pathogenic role of the various autoantibodies and the mechanisms by which they can potentially inflict damage onto the liver cell remain a topic for further research.

  13. Autoantibodies in malaria, tuberculosis and hepatitis B in a west African population.

    PubMed Central

    Adebajo, A O; Charles, P; Maini, R N; Hazleman, B L

    1993-01-01

    Following reports of associations between autoantibodies and living in the tropics, we have studied the seroprevalence and nature of anti-nuclear antibodies, anti-cardiolipin antibodies, antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens and anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies in 351 West Africans with malaria, tuberculosis or hepatitis B, or in good health. Amongst healthy West Africans we found a seroprevalence of 7% for anti-nuclear antibodies with several staining patterns, and of 30.3% for anti-cardiolipin antibodies. Among patients with tuberculosis and malaria there was twice that frequency of anti-nuclear antibodies (predominantly speckled in pattern), and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (predominantly IgM) were demonstrated in a few cases. A possible association between IgG anti-cardiolipin antibodies and tuberculosis was observed (P < 0.05), but antibodies to double-stranded DNA were not elevated and no antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens were found in any of the patients or healthy individuals studied. Our findings suggest the need for caution in the interpretation of autoantibody tests in subjects from or living in the tropics, as well as in patients with tropical infections. PMID:8467567

  14. The Presence of Autoantibodies to Cytoplasmic Rod and Ring Particles in the Serum of Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Afsharzadeh, Fatemeh; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Esghaei, Maryam; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Merat, Shahin; Poustchi, Hossein; Haj-Sheykholeslami, Arghavan; Keyvani, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with extra hepatic autoimmune disorders, while peg-IFNa-2a/RBV combination therapy may exacerbate these conditions. Autoantibodies to cytoplasmic structures, called rod and ring particles (RR), have strong associations with these patients and are identified by HEp-2 cells. Objectives Our purpose was to study the correlation of autoantibodies to cytoplasmic rod and ring particles in the serum of patients with chronic HCV infection with their response to standard therapy. Methods Serum samples were gathered from 120 patients with HCV infection (40 naive treatments, 40 with sustained virological response (SVR), and 40 with relapse response) during peg-IFNa-2a/RBV combination therapy and analyzed for the presence of RR antibodies by IIF on commercially available HEp-2 cell substrate slides from Euroimmun (Lu beck, Germany). Results Anti-rod and ring (anti-RR) autoantibodies were detected in only the serum of 1 out of 120 patients (0.8%), which belonged to a patient (out of 40) with relapse response (2.5%). No correlation was found between the types of response to peg-IFNa-2a/RBV combination therapy and the presence of anti-RR autoantibodies. Conclusions The only HCV patient with RR autoantibodies previously had received IFN/ribavirin antiviral therapy. The presence of these autoantibodies is extremely rare in Iranian HCV patients. Further studies are warranted to determine the role of genetic background and geographical pattern in the prevalence of these novel autoantibodies worldwide. PMID:28123444

  15. Human autoantibodies to diacyl-phosphatidylethanolamine recognize a specific set of discrete cytoplasmic domains

    PubMed Central

    Laurino, C C F C; Fritzler, M J; Mortara, R A; Silva, N P; Almeida, I C; Andrade, L E C

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize a novel human autoantibody–autoantigen system represented as cytoplasmic discrete speckles (CDS) in indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). A distinct CDS IIF pattern represented by 3–20 discrete speckles dispersed throughout the cytoplasm was identified among other cytoplasmic speckled IIF patterns. The cytoplasmic domains labelled by human anti-CDS-1 antibodies did not co-localize with endosome/lysosome markers EEA1 and LAMP-2, but showed partial co-localization with glycine–tryptophan bodies (GWB). CDS-1 sera did not react with several cellular extracts in immunoblotting and did not immunoprecipitate recombinant GW182 or EEA1 proteins. The typical CDS-1 IIF labelling pattern was abolished after delipidation of HEp-2 cells. Moreover, CDS-1 sera reacted strongly with a lipid component co-migrating with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC)-immunostaining of HEp-2 cell total lipid extracts. The CDS-1 major molecular targets were established by electrospray ionization–mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), HPTLC-immunostaining and chemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as diacyl-PE species, containing preferentially a cis-C18 : 1 fatty acid chain at C-2 of the glycerol moiety, namely 1,2-cis-C18 : 1-PE and 1-C16 : 0-2-cis-C18 : 1-PE. The clinical association of CDS-1 sera included a variety of systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases but they were also observed in patients with no evidence of autoimmune disease. PMID:16487257

  16. Autoantibody profiles and their association with blood eosinophils in asthma and COPD.

    PubMed

    Tamai, Koji; Yoshimatsu, Harukazu; Saito, Toshiharu; Matsuoka, Hirofumi; Okada, Nobuhiko; Koma, Yasuko; Otsuka, Akiko; Oda, Nao; Inoue, Sayaka; Kume, Sachie; Suzuki, Yujiro

    2017-04-01

    Autoimmune involvement in the pathogenesis of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been proposed, and autoantibodies are a hallmark of autoimmunity. This study aimed to compare the autoantibody profiles of asthma and COPD, and the relationship between autoantibodies and features of these diseases. We recruited 110 asthma patients and 92 COPD patients for a prospective study. Six autoantibody types were evaluated: antinuclear antibody, anti-cytoplasmic antibodies, rheumatoid factor, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody, myeloperoxidase-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (MPO-ANCA) and proteinase 3-ANCA. Other clinical data were also recorded concurrently. An antinuclear antibody titre of ≥1:160 presented only in asthma but not in COPD (10% vs. 0%, p = 0.0002). Eosinophil counts in blood were negative predictors of antinuclear antibody in asthma. Conversely, eosinophil counts in blood and immunoglobulin-E levels of ≥100 IU/mL were positively associated with rheumatoid factor in asthma but not in COPD. There was no relationship between antinuclear antibody or rheumatoid factor and disease severity. It is possible that asthma tends to involve autoimmunity associated with antinuclear antibody more frequently than COPD because asthma is the more robust factor for antinuclear antibody positivity. Antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor are associated with eosinophilic responses, but they do not work as biomarkers for disease severity. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Autoimmune hepatitis in the Alaska Native population: autoantibody profile and HLA associations.

    PubMed

    Ferucci, Elizabeth D; Choromanski, Tammy L; Hurlburt, Kathy J; Livingston, Stephen; Plotnik, Julia; Manns, Michael P; McMahon, Brian J; James, Judith A

    2014-09-01

    The Alaska Native population is one of few populations in the world with a high prevalence of autoimmune hepatitis. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and HLA and clinical associations of autoantibodies in Alaska Native people with autoimmune hepatitis. Alaska Native individuals with autoimmune hepatitis were recruited in clinics conducted statewide. Sera were tested for the presence of autoantibodies described in either autoimmune hepatitis or rheumatic disease. Associations between autoantibodies and HLA alleles and clinical features were assessed. Seventy-one patients were included. At the study visit, 34 patients (47.9%) had antibodies to double-stranded DNA by immunofluorescence; 27 (38.0%) had anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies; and 11 (15.5%) had anti-Ro antibodies. Only one person had antibodies against soluble liver antigen, and in that person, anti-Ro was absent. Associations were found between autoantibodies and HLA alleles, including positive associations between HLA DR3 and anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies and between HLA DR14 and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. There was no association between autoantibodies and clinical outcomes. As in other populations, the prevalence of anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies is high in Alaska Native people with autoimmune hepatitis. In contrast to data from other populations, there is a lower prevalence of anti-soluble liver antigen and a lack of association between anti-Ro and anti-soluble liver antigen. In addition, the HLA profile and associations with autoantibodies are unique. No clear prognostic implications of autoantibodies have emerged in this population. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies against bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, R S; Zhao, M H; Hamilton, M I; Brownlee, A; Chapman, P; Pounder, R E; Wakefield, A J; Lockwood, C M

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), a constituent of primary neutrophil granules, is a potent natural antibiotic and an antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA) antigen in cases of vasculitis in which the target antigen is neither myeloperoxidase (MPO) nor proteinase-3 (PR3). AIM: To investigate BPI as a possible target antigen for ANCAs in inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: ANCAs were detected by routine immunofluorescence (IIF) and solid phase enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) performed for antibodies to the purified neutrophil granule proteins; MPO, PR3, cathepsin-G, lactoferrin, and BPI in serum samples from 88 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (36 with Crohn's disease, 52 with ulcerative colitis). Thirty patients with bacterial enteritis acted as controls. RESULTS: Significantly more patients with ulcerative colitis were ANCA positive by IIF (60%) than patients with Crohn's disease (28%) or infectious enteritis (23%) (p < 0.001). IgG anti-BPI antibodies were present in 29% of patients with ulcerative colitis, 14% of patients with Crohn's disease, and 23% of patients with infectious enteritis, occurring in 44% of those patients with inflammatory bowel disease who were ANCA positive by IIF. Antibodies to other ANCA antigens were rare. The presence of ANCAs was not related to either disease activity or extent; presence of anti-BPI antibodies was significantly related to both a lower serum albumin concentration (p = 0.001) and a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p = 0.02) in patients with ulcerative colitis, and to colonic involvement in patients with Crohn's disease (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: BPI is a significant minority target antigen for ANCAs in inflammatory bowel disease that seems related to colonic Crohn's disease and disease activity in ulcerative colitis. Anti-BPI antibodies occur in infectious enteritis. PMID:9155585

  19. Autoantibodies from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis recognize a restricted region within the cytoplasmic tail of nuclear pore membrane glycoprotein Gp210.

    PubMed

    Nickowitz, R E; Worman, H J

    1993-12-01

    Patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) frequently have autoantibodies against a 210-kD integral glycoprotein of the nuclear envelope pore membrane. This protein, termed gp210, has a 1,783-amino acid amino-terminal domain located in the perinuclear space, a 20-amino acid transmembrane segment, and a 58-amino acid cytoplasmic carboxy-terminal tail. We now demonstrate that autoantibodies from 25 patients with PBC that recognize gp210 react with the cytoplasmic carboxy-terminal tail while none react with unmodified linear epitopes in the amino-terminal domain. The epitope(s) recognized by autoantibodies from all 25 patients is contained within a stretch of 15 amino acids. The recognized amino acid sequence is homologous to the protein products of the Escherichia coli mutY gene and Salmonella typhimurium mutB gene with an exact identity of six consecutive amino acids, suggesting that anti-gp210 antibodies may arise by molecular mimicry of bacterial antigenic determinants.

  20. [Investigation of the presence of autoantibodies in patients with toxocariasis].

    PubMed

    Kaya, Selçuk; Demirci, Mustafa; Sesli Cetin, Emel; Cicioğlu Aridoğan, Buket; Sahin, Mehmet; Taş, Tekin; Korkmaz, Metin

    2009-10-01

    Immunopathologic reactions may occur during toxocariasis due to tissue invasion and destruction by the secretions of larvae containing various enzymes with broad spectrum. The aim of this study was to search for autoantibodies such as anti-nuclear (ANA), anti-mitochondrial (AMA), anti-smooth muscle (ASMA), anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic (ANCA), anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) and liver-kidney microsomal type 1 (LKM-1) antibodies in patients with toxocariasis, in order to investigate the role of toxocariasis as a trigger factor for autoimmune reactions. Forty patients (22 were male; mean age: 35.6 +/- 10.7 years) diagnosed as toxocariasis by clinical findings (abdominal pain, allergic symptoms and/or eosinophilia, without detection of any other causative agents, and without liver dysfunction, diabetes mellitus, cardiac or renal failure, and autoimmune disease) and in-house ELISA positivity and 32 healthy controls (16 were male; mean age: 40.7 +/- 11.2 years) were included to the study. ANA (screen), dsDNA, SS-A, SS-B, Scl-70, LKM-1, MPO and M2 autoantibodies have been investigated by ELISA (Euroimmun, Germany), while ANCA, AMA and ASMA antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence (IMMCO, NY) methods. Autoantibody positivity was detected in 18 (45%) patients of whom 11 yielded a single type, and 7 yielded > or = 2 types of autoantibodies. This rate was 12.5% for control group (two subjects were positive for ANA-Screen, one for anti-M2 and one for anti-LKM-1). The difference between the total positivity rates in patient and control groups was found statistically significant (chi2 = 5.72, p = 0.004). The most frequent autoantibody type among patients were ASMA (n = 6), followed by anti-dsDNA (n = 5), anti-M2 (n = 5), anti-SS-B (n = 4), anti-LKM-1 (n = 3), anti-SS-A (n = 2), ANCA (n = 2) and anti-MPO (n = 1). Positivity rate for ASMA was found statistically significant in patients' group compared to controls (chi2 = 12.24, p = 0.03), while there was no significant difference

  1. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody in the absence of Wegener's granulomatosis or microscopic polyangiitis: implications for the surgical pathologist.

    PubMed

    Gal, Anthony A; Velasquez, Alvaro

    2002-03-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are useful serologic markers for the diagnosis and management of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). However, problems in diagnosis and classification may occur when patients with other disorders develop ANCA. A 7-year review (1993-1999) disclosed 247 patients whose sera tested positively for ANCA by an indirect immunofluorescence method: 166 patients for cytoplasmic-ANCA (C-ANCA) and 81 patients for perinuclear-ANCA (P-ANCA) Twenty-seven patients had active pulmonary disease and underwent open-lung biopsy or transbronchial biopsy. Eight patients (30%) had a disease other than WG or MPA, and their clinical, pathological, and serological findings were reviewed. The patients, all women, ranged in age from 28 to 77 years (median, 37 y). Dyspnea (n = 6), cough (n = 6), chest pain (n = 2), and/or hemoptysis (n = 2) were present. The duration of symptoms lasted from 3 weeks to 6 years (median, 6 mo). ANCA titers were C-ANCA (n = 4; range, 1:40-1280) or P-ANCA (n = 4; range, 1:40-640). The lung biopsies disclosed nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (n = 4), bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (n = 1), diffuse alveolar damage (n = 1), organizing diffuse alveolar hemorrhage without capillaritis (n = 1), and necrotic granuloma (n = 1). No cases showed characteristic histology for WG or MPA. The final diagnoses were various connective tissue disorders (n = 5), chronic hypersensitivity pneumonia (n = 1), postinfectious bronchitis/bronchiectasis (n = 1), and ulcerative colitis-related lung disease (n = 1). Surgical pathologists should be aware that significantly elevated ANCA titers may be associated with diverse forms of pulmonary disease. ANCA positivity alone, in the absence of appropriate clinical or pathologic findings, should not be used to substantiate a diagnosis of WG or MPA.

  2. Double Filtration Plasmapheresis in the Treatment of Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibody Associated Vasculitis With Severe Renal Failure: A Preliminary Study of 15 Patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinghua; Yang, Liu; Li, Kang; Liu, Zhengzhao; Gong, Dehua; Zhang, Haitao; Liu, Zhihong; Hu, Weixin

    2016-04-01

    Our aim was to investigate the clinical efficacy of double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) in the treatment of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-(ANCA) associated vasculitis (AAV) with severe renal involvement. Fifteen AAV patients who had severe renal failure (median SCr 5.6(IQR 5.2-9.0) mg/dL) and needed initial renal replacement therapy (RRT) were treated with DFPP and immunosuppressive therapy. Two plasma volumes were processed during each DFPP session. The changes of serum ANCA and renal function were investigated. After the DFPP treatment for three to five sessions, serum MPO-ANCA level decreased from 250.0 ± 86.9 RU/mL to 70.5 ± 64.7RU/mL (P = 0.00), with a median reduction rate of 67.6%. Eleven patients (73.3%) no longer needed from RRT 3 months after DFPP treatment, while another four patients remained on dialysis. During the follow up for median 10 (IQR 6-24) months, SCr level decreased to normal in one patient, one patient progressed into ESRD. The 1 year renal survival rate was 62.9%. Five (33.3%) patients were complicated with pulmonary infection. DFPP combined with immunosuppressive therapy could increase the renal recovery rate through rapidly decreasing serum ANCA levels for AAV patients with severe renal failure, but its clinical efficacy and impact on long-term renal survival require further studies.

  3. Effect of Continuous B Cell Depletion With Rituximab on Pathogenic Autoantibodies and Total IgG Levels in Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Cortazar, Frank B; Pendergraft, William F; Wenger, Julia; Owens, Charles T; Laliberte, Karen; Niles, John L

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of rituximab on pathogenic autoantibodies and total Ig levels, and to identify serious adverse events in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) treated with continuous B cell depletion. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 239 patients with AAV treated with rituximab-induced continuous B cell depletion. Two treatment cohorts were analyzed: an induction group (n = 52) and a maintenance group (n = 237). Changes in ANCA titers and total Ig levels over time were evaluated using mixed-effects models. Risk factors for serious infections during maintenance treatment were evaluated using Poisson regression. During induction, IgG levels fell at a mean rate of 6% per month (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 4, 8%), while ANCA levels declined at a mean rate of 47% per month (95% CI 42, 52%) and 48% per month (95% CI 42, 54%) for patients with antimyeloperoxidase (anti-MPO) antibodies and those with anti-proteinase 3 (anti-PR3) antibodies, respectively. During maintenance treatment, with a median duration of 2.4 years (interquartile range 1.5, 4.0 years), IgG levels declined a mean of 0.6% per year (95% CI -0.2, 1.4%). New significant hypogammaglobulinemia (IgG level of <400 mg/dl) during maintenance treatment occurred in 4.6% of the patients, all of whom were in the lowest baseline IgG quartile. Serious infections during maintenance therapy occurred at a rate of 0.85 per 10 patient-years (95% CI 0.66, 1.1) and were independently associated with an IgG level of <400 mg/dl. B cell-targeted therapy causes a preferential decline in ANCA titers relative to total IgG levels. Despite prolonged maintenance therapy with rituximab, IgG levels remain essentially constant. Serious infections were rare. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Anti-neutrophil cell antibodies in newly diagnosed patients with type-1-diabetes.

    PubMed

    Parlapiano, C; Marangi, M; Campana, E; Giovanniello, T; Pantone, P; Suraci, C; Sanguigni, S

    1999-01-01

    Both anti neutrophil cell antibodies and anti endothelial cell antibodies were found in 7 out of 30 newly-diagnosed type-1 diabetic patients. This confirms the abnormal activation of the immunological system in the early stage of type-1 diabetes mellitus.

  5. Auto-Antibodies and Their Association with Clinical Findings in Women Diagnosed with Microscopic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsson, Bodil

    2013-01-01

    Background Microscopic colitis (MC) is a disease manifested by diarrhoea and is divided into collagenous and lymphocytic colitis. The aetiology is unknown, but auto-immunity is suggested. Auto-antibodies have been only rarely examined in this entity. The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence of auto-antibodies, and to examine associations between the presence of antibodies and clinical findings. Methods and Findings Women with MC verified by biopsy and younger than 73 years, at any Department of Gastroenterology, in the district of Skåne, between 2002 and 2010 were invited to participate in this study. The patients were asked to complete both a questionnaire describing their medical history and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). Blood samples were collected. Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), and antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD), islet antigens-like insulin 2 (anti-IA2), thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), and thyrotropin receptor (TRAK) were analysed. Of 240 women identified, 133 were finally included in the study, median age 63 (59–67) years. Apart from the MC diagnosis, 52% also suffered from irritable bowel syndrome, 31% from hypertension and 31% from allergy. The prevalence of ANA (14%), ASCA IgG (13%), and anti-TPO antibodies (14%) for these patients was slightly higher than for the general population, and were found together with other concomitant diseases. Patients had more of all gastrointestinal symptoms compared with norm values, irrespective of antibody expression. Conclusions Women with MC have a slightly increased prevalence of some auto-antibodies. These antibodies are not associated with symptoms, but are expressed in patients with concomitant diseases, obscuring the pathophysiology and clinical picture of MC. PMID:23776613

  6. Clinical characteristics of inflammatory ocular disease in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ungprasert, Patompong; Crowson, Cynthia S; Cartin-Ceba, Rodrigo; Garrity, James A; Smith, Wendy M; Specks, Ulrich; Matteson, Eric L; Makol, Ashima

    2017-10-01

    To characterize the clinical correlates and outcome of inflammatory ocular disease (IOD) among patients with ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV). Medical records of potential cases of AAV seen at Mayo Clinic from 2003 to 2013, inclusive, were reviewed to identify confirmed cases meeting the diagnosis of AAV using the Chapel Hill Consensus Conference 2012 descriptors. Records of confirmed cases of AAV were then further reviewed for IOD, and clinical characteristics, treatment and outcomes abstracted. A total of 1171 confirmed cases of AAV were identified of which 183 patients (mean age 49.0 years; 51% female; 95% Caucasian) had IOD. The most common manifestation of IOD was injection of the eye (57%) followed by eye pain (46%) and visual acuity loss (18%). Scleritis was the most common type of IOD (22%) followed by episcleritis (21%), orbital inflammation (18%), lacrimal duct stenosis (10%) and uveitis (9%). Oral glucocorticoids were used to treat IOD in the majority of patients (96%). CYC and rituximab were the most frequently used immunosuppressive agents (54 and 36%, respectively). Of those with orbital inflammation, 52% underwent therapeutic surgical intervention. Clinical remission of IOD was achieved in 91% of patients but relapses were seen in 23%. Significant visual acuity loss was observed in only six patients. IOD is a common manifestation of AAV and seen in about 16% of patients with AAV. Scleritis, episcleritis and orbital inflammation are the most common subtypes. Most patients respond well to glucocorticoids and immunosuppression, but relapse of IOD is common.

  7. Treatment of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated systemic vasculitis with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, C; Schnabel, A; Csernok, E; De Groot, K; Reinhold-Keller, E; Gross, W L

    1995-01-01

    In this uncontrolled study 15 patients with ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis, who were poor responders to conventional therapy, were treated with single or multiple courses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), 30 g/day over 5 days. Clinical and serological evaluation was performed before and 4 weeks after IVIG. Six of the 15 patients experienced clinically significant benefit from IVIG. Improvement was confined to single organ manifestations (skin, ENT findings), no improvement was seen with conjunctivitis and scleritis, pericarditis or nephritis. No patient experienced complete remission after IVIG. Repeated courses of IVIG at 4-week intervals were no more effective than single courses. In six anti-proteinase 3 (PR3)-positive patients pretreatment sera were incubated with F(ab')2 fragments of the IVIG preparation in vitro to measure the inhibitory effect of IVIG on anti-PR3 activity. An inhibition of anti-PR3 activity by 25-70% was observed; this did not correlate with clinical effects. Approximately 40% of patients benefited from IVIG treatment, though complete remission of disease activity did not occur. Neither clinical characteristics nor the inhibitory effect of the IVIG preparation on serum anti-PR3 activity in vitro predicted clinical response to this treatment modality. PMID:7621588

  8. Treatment of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated systemic vasculitis with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Richter, C; Schnabel, A; Csernok, E; De Groot, K; Reinhold-Keller, E; Gross, W L

    1995-07-01

    In this uncontrolled study 15 patients with ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis, who were poor responders to conventional therapy, were treated with single or multiple courses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), 30 g/day over 5 days. Clinical and serological evaluation was performed before and 4 weeks after IVIG. Six of the 15 patients experienced clinically significant benefit from IVIG. Improvement was confined to single organ manifestations (skin, ENT findings), no improvement was seen with conjunctivitis and scleritis, pericarditis or nephritis. No patient experienced complete remission after IVIG. Repeated courses of IVIG at 4-week intervals were no more effective than single courses. In six anti-proteinase 3 (PR3)-positive patients pretreatment sera were incubated with F(ab')2 fragments of the IVIG preparation in vitro to measure the inhibitory effect of IVIG on anti-PR3 activity. An inhibition of anti-PR3 activity by 25-70% was observed; this did not correlate with clinical effects. Approximately 40% of patients benefited from IVIG treatment, though complete remission of disease activity did not occur. Neither clinical characteristics nor the inhibitory effect of the IVIG preparation on serum anti-PR3 activity in vitro predicted clinical response to this treatment modality.

  9. Serum Th1 and Th17 related cytokines and autoantibodies in patients with Posner-Schlossman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Chen, Wenchieh; Huang, Xiaosheng; Peng, Shiming; Zhu, Tianhui; Deng, Zhihui; Liang, Ping; Chang, Hui; Fan, Bao Jian

    2017-01-01

    Posner-Schlossman syndrome (PSS) shares some clinical features with uveitis and open angle glaucoma. Cytokines and autoantibodies have been associated with uveitis and open angle glaucoma. However, the role of serum cytokines and autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of PSS remains unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the associations of type 1 T helper (Th1) and Th17 related cytokines and autoantibodies with PSS. Peripheral blood serum samples were collected from 81 patients with PSS and 97 gender- and age-matched healthy blood donors. Th1 and Th17 related cytokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon- γ (IFN-γ), IL-6 and IL-17, and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) were determined by double antibody sandwich ELISA. Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), anti-keratin antibody (AKA) and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) were detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Anti-cardiolipin antibody (ACA)-IgG, ACA-IgM, ACA-IgA, anti-double stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP) were detected by indirect ELISA. Serum levels of IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-6 in PSS patients were significantly lower than those in controls (P < 0.003), and these associations survived the Bonferroni correction (Pc < 0.018). There was no significant difference in serum levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17 between the PSS and control groups (Pc > 0.12). Positive rate of serum anti-dsDNA in PSS patients was significantly higher than that in the control group (P = 0.002, Pc = 0.018), while positive rates of serum ANA, AKA, ANCA, ACA-IgG, ACA-IgM, ACA-IgA, GPI and anti-CCP in the PSS group were not significantly different from those in the control group (Pc > 0.09). These results suggest that anti-dsDNA may contribute to the pathogenesis of PSS, while Th1 and Th17 related cytokines and other autoantibodies may not be major contributors to PSS.

  10. Simultaneous comprehensive multiplex autoantibody analysis for rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Sowa, Mandy; Trezzi, Barbara; Hiemann, Rico; Schierack, Peter; Grossmann, Kai; Scholz, Juliane; Somma, Valentina; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Radice, Antonella

    2016-11-01

    Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) is mainly caused by anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis, immune-complex or anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides and leads to rapid loss of renal function. Detection of ANCA and autoantibodies (autoAbs) to GBM and dsDNA enables early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of RPGN aiding in preventing end-stage renal disease.Determination of ANCA on neutrophils (ANCA) as well as autoAbs to myeloperoxidase (MPO-ANCA), proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA), GBM, and dsDNA was performed by the novel multiplex CytoBead technology combining cell- and microbead-based autoAb analyses by automated indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). Forty patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 48 with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), 2 with eosinophilic GPA, 42 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 43 with Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), 57 with infectious diseases (INF), and 55 healthy subjects (HS) were analyzed and findings compared with classical single testing.The CytoBead assay revealed for GPA, MPA, GPS, and SLE the following diagnostic sensitivities and for HS and INF the corresponding specificities: PR3-ANCA, 85.0% and 100.0%; MPO-ANCA, 77.1% and 99.1%; anti-GBM autoAb, 88.4% and 96.4%; anti-dsDNA autoAb, 83.3% and 97.3%; ANCA, 91.1% and 99.1%, respectively. Agreement with classical enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and IIF was very good for anti-GBM autoAb, MPO-ANCA, PR3-ANCA, and ANCA, respectively. Anti-dsDNA autoAb comparative analysis demonstrated fair agreement only and a significant difference (P = 0.0001).The CytoBead technology provides a unique multiplex reaction environment for simultaneous RPGN-specific autoAb testing. CytoBead RPGN assay is a promising alternative to time-consuming single parameter analysis and, thus, is well suited for emergency situations.

  11. Simultaneous comprehensive multiplex autoantibody analysis for rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Mandy; Trezzi, Barbara; Hiemann, Rico; Schierack, Peter; Grossmann, Kai; Scholz, Juliane; Somma, Valentina; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Radice, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) is mainly caused by anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis, immune-complex or anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides and leads to rapid loss of renal function. Detection of ANCA and autoantibodies (autoAbs) to GBM and dsDNA enables early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of RPGN aiding in preventing end-stage renal disease. Determination of ANCA on neutrophils (ANCA) as well as autoAbs to myeloperoxidase (MPO-ANCA), proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA), GBM, and dsDNA was performed by the novel multiplex CytoBead technology combining cell- and microbead-based autoAb analyses by automated indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). Forty patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 48 with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), 2 with eosinophilic GPA, 42 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 43 with Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), 57 with infectious diseases (INF), and 55 healthy subjects (HS) were analyzed and findings compared with classical single testing. The CytoBead assay revealed for GPA, MPA, GPS, and SLE the following diagnostic sensitivities and for HS and INF the corresponding specificities: PR3-ANCA, 85.0% and 100.0%; MPO-ANCA, 77.1% and 99.1%; anti-GBM autoAb, 88.4% and 96.4%; anti-dsDNA autoAb, 83.3% and 97.3%; ANCA, 91.1% and 99.1%, respectively. Agreement with classical enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and IIF was very good for anti-GBM autoAb, MPO-ANCA, PR3-ANCA, and ANCA, respectively. Anti-dsDNA autoAb comparative analysis demonstrated fair agreement only and a significant difference (P = 0.0001). The CytoBead technology provides a unique multiplex reaction environment for simultaneous RPGN-specific autoAb testing. CytoBead RPGN assay is a promising alternative to time-consuming single parameter analysis and, thus, is well suited for emergency situations. PMID:27858870

  12. [Auto-antibodies in liver disease].

    PubMed

    Montaño Loza, Aldo J; Angulo, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Autoantibodies are a nonpathogenic manifestation of immune reactivity that may occur in acute and chronic liver diseases. Autoantibodies are the consequence rather than the cause of liver injury, and they can be used as diagnostic tools rather than etiologic markers. Conventional autoantibodies used in the categorization of liver disease are antinuclear antibodies, smooth muscle antibodies, antibodies to liver/kidney microsome type 1, antimitochondrial antibodies, and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. However, the final diagnosis and the treatment strategies do not depend solely on the serological markers. Autoantibodies titles vary overtime and their behavior does not correlate with disease activity. Over-interpretation is the major pitfall in the clinical application of the serological results. Recognition and characterization of new autoantibodies is expected to improve the diagnostic precision, provide diagnostic parameters, and elucidate target autoantigens for the management of liver diseases.

  13. [Assessment of antibodies anti-saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA) and autoantibodies in patients with inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Beltrão, Marília; Bodas, Abilia; Azevedo, Fernando; Nunes, Amadeu; Santos, Carlos; Delgado, Luís

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been increasing worldwide, and despite the advances regarding their pathogenesis and therapeutics, the differential diagnosis between Crohn's Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC) is mainly based on clinically invasive tests. Recent studies have identified new serological markers with a potential value for the diagnosis of these pathologies, in particular the anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Also of note are the anti-goblet cells antibodies (anti-CCI) and the anti-pancreatic exocrine autoantibodies that react with the pancreatic acinus (anti-AP). We assessed these new serological markers and compared the efficiency between immune enzymatic (ELISA) and indirect immunofluorescence tests in the identification of ASCA of IgG or IgA class. We studied a set of 81 serum samples (with an initial diagnosis of IBD) and 33 control samples from healthy blood donors. The laboratory tests were correlated with the diagnosis of each patient, established in the Gastroenterology outpatient unit based on conventional methods. The agreement between the two laboratory methods employed in the identification of the ASCA was excellent (k = 0.63) for the IgG antibodies and good (k = 0.56) for the IgA antibodies. We found a weak agreement (k = 0.137) between ELISA (MPO and PR3 purified antigens) and the IFA test for ANCA. Regarding the serologic markers ANCA, anti-AP and anti-CCI, only the later showed no differences in the distribution of positive results between the studied groups. Positive ASCA IgG and IgA were significantly associated with diagnosis of DC, with both laboratorial methods tested. The identification of ANCA with the available solidphase tests does not seem appropriate for the screening of the autoantibodies with the atypical p-ANCA pattern of IBD. The combination between anti-AP and ASCA antibodies seems a good option for the laboratorial diagnosis of

  14. Clinical association of mixed connective tissue disease and granulomatosis with polyangiitis: a case report and systematic screening of anti-U1RNP and anti-PR3 auto-antibody double positivity in ten European hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tubery, Amandine; Fortenfant, Françoise; Combe, Bernard; Abreu, Isabelle; Bossuyt, Xavier; Chretien, Pascale; Desplat-Jégo, Sophie; Fabien, Nicole; Hue, Sophie; Johanet, Catherine; Lakomy, Daniela; Vincent, Thierry; Daïen, Claire I

    2016-12-01

    We report here the case of a 50-years-old man treated for mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) positive for anti-U1 ribonucleoprotein (U1RNP) antibodies who secondarily developed a granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) associated with anti-proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (PR3-ANCA). We then evaluated the frequency of the association between anti-U1RNP and anti-PR3-ANCA antibodies by a systematic retrospective study in ten European hospitals. Overall, out of 11,921 samples analyzed for both auto-antibodies, 18 cases of anti-U1RNP and anti-PR3-ANCA double positivity were found and only one patient presented with both MCTD and GPA symptoms. Our retrospective analysis indicates that anti-U1RNP and anti-PR3-ANCA antibodies double positivity is infrequent and very rarely associated with both MTCD and GPA. Our observation describes for the first time the coexistence of MTCD and severe GPA in a Caucasian patient. Association of anti-U1RNP and ANCA antibodies was rarely reported in the literature. Eleven cases of MCTD and ANCA vasculitis have been reported to date, with only two cases with anti-PR3-ANCA association, and only one vasculitis. The seven other cases reported in the literature presented with an association of MCTD and microscopic polyangiitis which appears to be a more frequent presentation than MTCD associated with GPA.

  15. Nuclear envelope protein autoantibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Courvalin, J C; Worman, H J

    1997-02-01

    A subset of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) have autoantibodies directed against nuclear envelope proteins. The major autoantigen is gp210, a 210 kilodalton (kD) transmembrane protein of the nuclear pore complex, that is recognized by antibodies in approximately 25% of patients. The predominant epitope in gp210 that is recognized by most of the autoantibodies is a 15 amino acid stretch in the cytoplasmic, carboxyl-terminal domain of the protein. Gp210 autoantibodies are specific for PBC, as are the less frequent autoantibodies directed against LBR, a transmembrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane. Although autoantibodies against nuclear lamins, abundant intermediate filament proteins associated with the inner nuclear membrane, may be found in PBC, they are not specific for this disease. Nuclear envelope protein autoantibodies are also present in some patients without detectable antimitochondrial antibodies and may be of particular utility in diagnosing individuals with atypical presentations of PBC.

  16. [Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies].

    PubMed

    Sebastiani, G D

    2009-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are predominantly IgG autoantibodies directed against constituents of primary granules of neutrophils and monocytes lysosomes. Although several antigenic targets have been identified, those ANCA directed to proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, whereas the importance of other ANCA remains unknown. Both are strongly associated with small vessel vasculitides, the ANCA-associated vasculitides, which include Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome, and the localised forms of these diseases (eg, pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis). ANCA is a useful serological test to assist in diagnosis of small-vessel vasculitides. 85-95% of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis have serum ANCA. ANCA directed to either proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, yet the relevance of other ANCA remains unknown. Besides their diagnostic potential, ANCA might be valuable in disease monitoring. In addition, data seem to confirm the long-disputed pathogenic role of these antibodies. There is increasing evidence that myeloperoxidase-ANCA are directly involved in the pathogenesis of necrotizing vasculitis. This is less clear for proteinase 3-ANCA, markers for Wegener's granulomatosis. With respect to proteinase 3-ANCA, complementary proteinase 3, a peptide translated from the antisense DNA strand of proteinase 3 and homologous to several microbial peptides, may be involved in induction of proteinase 3-antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies.

  17. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies to proteinase 3 (PR3) as candidate tools for epitope mapping of human anti-PR3 autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Van Der Geld, Y M; Limburg, P C; Kallenberg, C G

    1999-12-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies directed against PR3 (PR3-ANCA) in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis are supposedly involved in the pathophysiology of this disease as different functional characteristics of the autoantibodies correlate with disease activity. However, little is known about the epitopes of PR3 that are recognized by PR3-ANCA and how epitope specificity may relate to functional characteristics of PR3-ANCA. As candidate tools for epitope mapping we studied 13 anti-PR3 MoAbs, including nine widely used and four newly raised MoAbs, for their mutual binding characteristics to PR3 using biosensor technology. Antigen specificity was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence, immunoblotting, FACS analysis and antigen-specific ELISA. Competition between anti-PR3 MoAbs in binding to PR3 was investigated in a capture system set up in a BIAcore. In this system grouping of 12 of the 13 anti-PR3 MoAbs based on their mutual recognition patterns was achieved. Four MoAbs, from different research groups, namely 12.8, PR3G-2, 6A6 and Hz1F12, recognized comparable epitopes (group 1). Group 2 MoAbs including PR3G-4 and PR3G-6 bound to overlapping regions on PR3. The MoAbs PR3G-3, 4A5 and WGM2 recognized similar epitopes as they inhibited binding of each other (group 3). The fourth group of related MoAbs consisted of MC-PR3-2, 4A3 and WGM3. Because of its binding characteristics MoAb WGM1 could not be grouped. These results demonstrate that eight well-established anti-PR3 MoAbs produced by different research groups and four newly produced anti-PR3 MoAbs recognize four separate epitope areas on PR3, including one area detected with newly raised MoAbs only.

  18. Circulating anti-brain autoantibodies in schizophrenia and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Margari, Francesco; Petruzzelli, Maria Giuseppina; Mianulli, Rossana; Campa, Maria Gloria; Pastore, Adriana; Tampoia, Marilina

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, an inflammatory autoimmune process, autoantibodies mediated, has been porposed as having a role in the development of different psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to assay organ-specific and non organ-specific circulating autoantibodies in schizophrenia, mood disorders and healthy controls; among organ-specific autoantibodies we focused on different fluorescence patterns of anti-brain autoantibodies against rat and monkey's sections of hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebellum. Serum samples from 50 acutelly ill patients (30 schizophrenia and 20 mood disorders) and from 20 healthy controls were collected. Autoantibodies were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and chemiluminescence immunoassay. We found a significant difference for circulating autoantibodies to hypothalamus, hippocampus and cerebellum and for anti-nuclear autoantibodies in both schizophrenia and mood disorders when compared to the control group. Referring to the two groups of patients only, circulating antibodies anti-hypothalamus were found significant higher in mood disorders rather than in schizophrenia, with specific regard to nuclear and cytoplasmic staining of the neurons. These data suggest an aspecific diffuse brain involvement of anti-brain autoantibodies in acute phases of schizophrenia and mood disorders. The greater involvement of the hypothalamus in mood disorders highlights the close relationship between autoimmunity, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and affective disorders.

  19. Autoantibody testing for autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Self, Sally E

    2010-09-01

    The proper use and interpretation of serologic testing for diagnosing autoimmune diseases presents a challenge to clinicians for several reasons. Most laboratory tests for autoimmune disease are significantly less than 100% sensitive or specific. In addition, different techniques for the same antibody test may give different results, such as indirect immunofluorescence and multiplex bead assay for antinuclear antibody. Autoantibody testing should only be performed in the context of the clinical workup of patients who have a reasonable likelihood of having the disease for which the testing is relevant. Otherwise, the predictive value of a positive test is too low. Particularly with antinuclear antibody and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody testing, clinicians must know the methodology through which the tests are being performed, and should develop a relationship with the laboratory pathologist so that inconsistent or surprising results can be investigated.

  20. A comparison of the characteristics of circulating anti-myeloperoxidase autoantibodies in vasculitis with those in non-vasculitic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Locke, I C; Leaker, B; Cambridge, G

    1999-01-01

    Although circulating anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO) are strongly associated with the presence of vasculitis, they have been described in sera from patients with other conditions. High levels of anti-MPO antibodies can also persist in sera from patients with vasculitis despite the achievement of clinical remission. One possible interpretation is that a potentially pathogenic subset of anti-MPO antibodies exists, which is only present in patients with active vasculitis. We therefore compared the characteristics of anti-MPO antibodies in sera from patients with active vasculitis (n = 18) with those present in remission (n = 9) and in a disease control group (n = 10) without clinical evidence of vasculitis. The class, subclass and ability of anti-MPO antibodies from the three groups of patients to recognize three different conformational epitopes were analysed using ELISA-based techniques. The expression of an idiotope, designated 9G4, was also examined. Epitope recognition by anti-MPO antibodies from all patients tested was found to be similar. Sera from patients with active vasculitis showed an over-representation of IgG4 subclass anti-MPO antibodies and a more frequent presence of IgM class anti-MPO antibodies. In disease controls, IgG1 anti-MPO antibodies were predominant. In vitro, neutrophil activation by ANCA has been shown to be dependent on engagement of neutrophil FcγRIIa receptors following binding of these autoantibodies to surface-expressed ANCA antigens. We found that active vasculitis may be associated with the presence of circulating anti-MPO antibodies which do not significantly bind this receptor, suggesting that mechanisms other than those dependent on FcγRIIa binding should be explored. In addition, the expression of the 9G4 idiotope on anti-MPO antibodies in 60% (12/18) of patients with active vasculitis and 20% (2/10) of disease control patients may indicate a common origin for anti

  1. CYTOPLASMIC MICROTUBULES

    PubMed Central

    Slautterback, David B.

    1963-01-01

    Small cytoplasmic tubules are present in the interstitial cells and cnidoblasts of hydra. They are referred to here as "microtubules." These tubular elements have an outside diameter of 180 A and an inside diameter of 80 A. By difference, the membranous wall is estimated to be 50 A thick. The maximum length of the microtubules cannot be determined from thin sections but is known to exceed 1.5 µ. In the interstitial cells the microtubules are found in the intercellular bridges, free in the cytoplasm and in association with the centrioles. In the cnidoblast they form a framework around the developing nematocyst and in late stages are related to the cnidocil forming a tight skein in the basal part of the cell. Especially in this cell, confluence of microtubules with small spherical vesicles of the Golgi complex has been observed. It is proposed that these tubules function in the transport of water, ions, or small molecules. PMID:14079495

  2. Autoantibodies and their antigens in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2009-08-01

    Autoantibody detection assists in the diagnosis and allows differentiation of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) type 1 (AIH-1), characterized by antinuclear antibody (ANA) and/or smooth muscle antibody (SMA), and type 2 (AIH-2), distinguished by the presence of antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 (anti-LKM1) and/or antibodies to liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1). Detection of atypical perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) and anti-soluble liver antigen (SLA) antibodies can act as an additional pointer toward the diagnosis of AIH, particularly in the absence of the conventional autoantibodies. Routine autoantibody testing by indirect immunofluorescence has been recently complemented by molecular assays based on purified or recombinant antigens. Although the AIH-1-specific ANA and SMA targets need better definition, those of anti-LKM1 and anti-LC1 in AIH-2 have been clearly identified; the fine specificity of antibody reactivity and its clinical relevance to disease pathogenesis are the focus of ongoing investigation. This article critically discusses the current knowledge of the diagnostic and clinical significance of AIH-related autoantibody reactivities, focusing on key issues that the physician needs to be aware of to be able to request the appropriate testing and to interpret correctly the laboratory results within the clinical context of the patient.

  3. Autoantibodies, mortality and ageing.

    PubMed

    Richaud-Patin, Y; Villa, A R

    1995-01-01

    Immunological failure may be the cause of predisposition to certain infections, neoplasms, and vascular diseases in adulthood. Mortality risks through life may reflect an undetermined number of causes. This study describes the prevalence of positivity of autoantibodies through life, along with general and specific mortality causes in three countries with different socioeconomic development (Guatemala, Mexico and the United States). Prevalence of autoantibodies by age was obtained from previous reports. In spite of having involved different ethnic groups, the observed trends in prevalence of autoantibodies, as well as mortality through life, showed a similar behavior. Thus, both the increase in autoantibody production and death risk as age rises, may share physiopathological phenomena related to the ageing process.

  4. Cytoplasmic dynein.

    PubMed

    Allan, Victoria J

    2011-10-01

    The organization and function of eukaryotic cells rely on the action of many different molecular motor proteins. Cytoplasmic dynein drives the movement of a wide range of cargoes towards the minus ends of microtubules, and these events are needed, not just at the single-cell level, but are vital for correct development. In the present paper, I review recent progress on understanding dynein's mechanochemistry, how it is regulated and how it binds to such a plethora of cargoes. The importance of a number of accessory factors in these processes is discussed.

  5. [Anti-TPO autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Kotani, T

    1998-04-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is a member of the thyroid autoantigens. Anti-thyroid autoantibodies, anti-TPO,-thyroglobulin and -TSH receptor autoantibodies, are important in diagnosing autoimmune thyroid diseases and for judging treatment efficacy. To diagnose chronic thyroiditis, anti-TPO autoantibody detection is the most sensitive among the three anti-thyroid autoantibodies. Eighty-five to ninety percent of patients with chronic thyroiditis have anti-TPO autoantibodies. Using recombinant human TPO protein, a kit measuring anti-TPO antibodies specifically have been developed. The developmental process and specificity of the kit are discussed. Compared with the microsome test, the most greatest advantage of the anti-TPO EIA kit can specifically measure anti-TPO antibodies. Structure of anti-TPO antibody immunoglobulin, which has been demonstrated over the last several years using the phage display method, is also discussed. The most prominent feature is that VL is believed to be important in determining anti-TPO antibody specificity in contrast to that of other autoantibodies, although VL itself does not have TPO-binding activity.

  6. The current status of neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, F J; Daha, M R; van Es, L A

    1989-01-01

    Several studies in the past 10 years have demonstrated the occurrence of autoantibodies against cytoplasmic constituents in patients with vasculitis and glomerulonephritis. In this review the nomenclature of these antibodies is discussed and assays and clinical associations are summarized. Although the antigens involved are not completely identified, antibodies and T cells reactive with myeloid lysozomal enzymes may both play a significant role in pathogenesis. PMID:12412739

  7. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Xavier; Guilabert, Antonio; Font, Josep

    2006-07-29

    Much like other autoantibodies (eg, anti-double stranded DNA in systemic lupus erythematosus or antiglomerular basement membrane antibodies in Goodpasture's syndrome), antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) have provided doctors with a useful serological test to assist in diagnosis of small-vessel vasculitides, including Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, and their localised forms (eg, pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis). 85-95% of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis have serum ANCA. ANCA directed to either proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, yet the relevance of other ANCA remains unknown. Besides their diagnostic potential, ANCA might be valuable in disease monitoring. In addition, data seem to confirm the long-disputed pathogenic role of these antibodies. Present treatments for ANCA-associated vasculitis are not free from side-effects and as many as 50% of patients relapse within 5 years. Accurate understanding of the key pathogenic points of ANCA-associated vasculitis can undoubtedly provide a more rational therapeutic approach.

  8. Nuclear Pore Protein p62 Autoantibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Doris M; Tony, Hans-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease which is classically characterised by a variety of autoantibodies to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), other nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens. Recently several novel autoantibodies against a variety of specific nuclear pore proteins have been described, including the nucleoporin p62. In this paper we evaluate anti-nucleoporin p62 antibodies by western blot analysis in 25 systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Six patients showed antibodies directed against nucleoporin p62. Our data indicate that p62 antibodies could be a useful additional marker in SLE. PMID:20648220

  9. Autoantibody Production in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Asherson, G. L.; Dumonde, D. C.

    1963-01-01

    The sera of rabbits injected with rat liver, kidney, heart, muscle, spleen and brain in Freund's complete adjuvant fixed complement with rabbit tissue. This complement-fixing activity was attributed to autoantibodies which were able to fix complement in vitro with the tissue of the rabbit in which they occurred. Absorption, gel diffusion and antibody and antigen titrations indicated that some of the anti-liver, anti-kidney, anti-heart, anti-muscle and anti-brain sera contained organ-specific autoantibody. The sera also contained autoantibody reacting with widely distributed antigen(s), which was relatively labile at 65°. The anti-kidney and anti-brain sera reacted with distinct antigens which were extracted from rabbit kidney and brain with a mixture of chloroform and methanol. The natural autoantibody of Kidd and Friedewald was usually labile at 65° and behaved like a macroglobulin on sucrose gradient centrifugation. Sera taken 1 week after immunization with rat tissue contained heat-labile macroglobulin antibody. However, sera taken 1 month after immunization also contained small molecular weight antibody which was stable at 65°. PMID:13965166

  10. Autoantibody production in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Asherson, G. L.; Holborow, E. J.

    1966-01-01

    Rabbits received two injections of dead bacteria in Freund's complete adjuvant. One month later the sera of the rabbits were examined for autoantibodies against gut by indirect immunofluorescence using the rabbit's own stomach, ileum and colon taken at post mortem. Autoantibodies against colon were found in three out of seven rabbits injected with one particular strain of Escherichia coli O64 and in a few animals injected with other E. coli, Salmonella arizona, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus faecalis. The antigen, with which the autoantibodies reacted, behaved like mucus and was detected in the colon and sometimes in the ileum and the stomach. Three patterns of staining were observed: (a) staining of the superficial mucosa of the colon with sparing of the deep glands; (b) staining of scattered groups of glands in the deepest part of the colon with sparing of the superficial glands (this pattern of staining was associated with staining of the superficial mucosa of the body of the stomach); and (c) staining of both the superficial and deep glands of the colon. None of the sera tested reacted with the bronchial or salivary glands. Polysaccharide preparations of the colon, but not the stomach, inhibited the reaction of the autoantibodies with colon in the sera tested. The amount of antigen needed to inhibit the basal staining was much greater than that needed to inhibit the superficial staining. It was concluded that rabbits may produce autoantibodies to colon and in some cases to ileum and stomach following the injection of certain dead bacteria in Freund's complete adjuvant. ImagesFIGS. 1-2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6 PMID:4956607

  11. Autoantibody Production in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Asherson, G. L.; Rose, M. Elaine

    1963-01-01

    The finding that the serum of apparently healthy rabbits fixed complement with rabbit liver and kidney has been confirmed. Experimental infection of rabbits with Eimeria stiedae, the cause of hepatic coccidiosis, led to a rise in the titre of serum complement-fixing factors. The rise was statistically significant 14, 21 and 28 days after infection. The factors were regarded as antibodies because they behaved as macroglobulins on diethylaminoethyl—cellulose chromatography and sucrose gradient centrifugation, and as autoantibodies because they fixed complement with the kidney of the rabbits in which they occurred. The antibody reacted with widely distributed antigen(s) with high activity in brain and low activity in skeletal muscle. The possibility that coccidial infection may be responsible for the natural autoantibody of rabbits is discussed. PMID:13965167

  12. Autoantibodies and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hon-Chi; Huang, Kristin T. L.; Wang, Xiao-Li; Shen, Win-Kuang

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, afflicting about 5% of the population of the United States. They encompass a wide range of disorders that affect all organs of the human body and have a predilection for women. In the past, autoimmune pathogenesis was not thought to be a major mechanism for cardiovascular disorders, and potential relationships remain understudied. However, accumulating evidence suggests that a number of vascular and cardiac conditions are autoimmune-mediated. Recent studies indicate that autoantibodies play an important role in the development of cardiac arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation, modulation of autonomic influences on heart rate and rhythm, conduction system abnormalities, and ventricular arrhythmias. This manuscript will review the current evidence for the role of autoantibodies in the development of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:21740882

  13. [Autoantibodies, tolerance and autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Oppezzo, Pablo; Dighiero, Guillaume

    2003-07-01

    In 1900, the group from Metchnikoff suggested the concept of autoimmunization by demonstrating the presence of autoantibodies in normal conditions; which was opposed to the concept of horror autotoxicus raised by Ehrlich. Landsteiner's description of the transfusion compatibility rules and 50 year-later work from Burnett's and Medawar's groups lead to the clonal deletion theory as a general explanation of tolerance and autoimmunity. However, more recent work succeeded demonstrating that autoreactive B cells constitute a substantial part of the B-cell repertoire and that this autoreactive repertoire secretes the so-called natural autoantibodies (NAA) characterized by their broad reactivity mainly directed against very well conserved public epitopes. They fulfill the definition of an autoantibody since they are self-reactive, but they are not self-specific. As yet, NAA directed against determinants of polymorphism have not been reported. The presence of this repertoire in normal conditions challenges the clonal deletion theory as a unique explanation for self-tolerance. However, if we take into account that this autoreactive B-cell repertoire is not self-specific, this contradiction may not be a real one opposition. Indeed, the Lansteiner's rule that a subject belonging to group A will never produce anti-A antibodies and will always produce natural antibodies against the B-cell group, could never be challenged. Clonal deletion is probably accounting for this phenomenum. However, the serum of healthy adult individuals frequently exhibits low titers of anti-I antibodies, which is a precursor molecule of AB0 antigen system. The mechanism accounting for deletion of B cells directed against critical determinants like antigens A and B in the red blood cell system and allowing the production of autoantibodies against I remain elusive.

  14. Autoantibodies to Argonaute 2 (Su antigen).

    PubMed

    Satoh, Minoru; Chan, Jason Y F; Ceribelli, Angela; Vazquez del-Mercado, Monica; Chan, Edward K L

    2013-01-01

    Like many other classical autoantibodies in systemic rheumatic diseases, anti-Su antibodies were originally defined by the double immunodiffusion assay in the early 80s. However, despite its high prevalence, only a few reports on anti-Su were published in the following years and the progress in characterizing the target antigens and clinical significance was slow, probably due to its inconsistent or poor reactivity in other standard immunoassays. In 2006 the target antigen was identified as the microRNA (miRNA)-binding protein Argonaute 2 (Ago2). Ago2 is a key component of the RNA-induced silencing complex enriched in cytoplasmic foci called GW bodies. Due to preferential reactivity of human autoantibodies with native antigens, immunoprecipitation is the only method to reliably detect anti-Su/Ago2 antibodies. Anti-Su/Ago2 does not appear to have disease specificity since it is found in 10-20% of patients with various rheumatic diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, and Sjögren's syndrome, as well as apparently healthy individuals at lower prevalence. The clinical significance and the mechanism of production of anti-Su/Ago2 remains to be clarified.

  15. Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Honglin; Luo, Hui; Yan, Mei; Zuo, Xiaoxia; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins), cytoplasmic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epitopes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection. Proteomic microarray as a multiplexed high-throughput screening platform is playing an increasingly-important role in autoantibody diagnostics. In this article, we highlight the use of autoantigen microarrays for autoantibody exploration in SLE.

  16. Nature and functions of autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Elkon, Keith; Casali, Paolo

    2008-09-01

    Antibodies that react with self-molecules occur in healthy individuals and are referred to as natural antibodies or autoantibodies. Natural autoantibodies are mainly IgM, are encoded by unmutated V(D)J genes and display a moderate affinity for self-antigens. They provide a first line of defense against infections, probably serve housekeeping functions and contribute to the homeostasis of the immune system. By contrast, high-affinity, somatically mutated IgG autoantibodies reflect a pathologic process whereby homeostatic pathways related to cell clearance, antigen-receptor signaling or cell effector functions are disturbed. In some autoimmune disorders, autoantibodies might be present before disease onset, show remarkable specificity and serve as biomarkers providing an opportunity for diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. In organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as myasthenia gravis or pemphigus, autoantibodies directly bind to and injure target organs. In systemic autoimmune diseases, autoantibodies react with free molecules, such as phospholipids, as well as cell surface and nucleoprotein antigens, forming pathogenic antigen-antibody (immune) complexes. These autoantibodies injure tissues and organs through engagement of Fc gammaR activation of complement as well as internalization and activation of Toll-like receptors. Activation of intracellular Toll-like receptors in plasmacytoid dendritic cells leads to the production of type I interferon, whereas engagement of intracellular Toll-like receptors on antigen-presenting cells stimulates cell activation and the production of other inflammatory cytokines. Thus, immune complexes might perpetuate a positive feedback loop amplifying inflammatory responses.

  17. Autoantibodies in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Suveer; du Bois, Ron

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis (CFA) involves injury, an immune/inflammatory response and fibrosis. The cause of the injury is unknown, but the identification of serum autoantibodies makes an autoimmune aetiology attractive. The core study on which this commentary is based used novel cloning and serum screening technologies in order to identify new public and private autoantibodies in sera from 12 patients with CFA. Largely negative conclusions were drawn from that study. However, we suggest that the prevalence of autoantibodies may have been underestimated, that the study was timely and that this approach is worth pursuing further. PMID:11686865

  18. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy and autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Encephalopathy occasionally occurs in association with thyroid disorders, but most of these are treatable. These encephalopathies include a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with hypothyroidism, called myxedema encephalopathy. Moreover, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) has been recognized as a new clinical disease based on an autoimmune mechanism associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Steroid treatment was successfully administered to these patients. Recently, we discovered that the serum autoantibodies against the NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) are highly specific diagnostic biomarkers for HE. Further, we analyzed serum anti-NAE autoantibodies and the clinical features in many cases of HE from institutions throughout Japan and other countries. Approximately half of assessed HE patients carry anti-NAE antibodies. The age was widely distributed with 2 peaks (20-30 years and 50-70 years). Most HE patients were in euthyroid states, and all patients had anti-thyroid (TG) antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies. Anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies were observed in some cases. The common neuropsychiatry features are consciousness disturbance and psychosis, followed by cognitive dysfunction, involuntary movements, seizures, and ataxia. Abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow on brain SPECT were common findings, whereas abnormal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rare. HE patients have various clinical phenotypes such as the acute encephalopathy form, the chronic psychiatric form, and other particular clinical forms, including limbic encephalitis, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)-like form. The cerebellar ataxic form of HE clinically mimics spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and is characterized by the absence of nystagmus, absent or mild cerebellar atrophy, and lazy background activities on EEG. Taken together, these data suggest that the possibility of

  19. The three ZNT8 autoantibody variants together improve the diagnostic sensitivity of childhood and adolescent type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Andersson, C; Larsson, K; Vaziri-Sani, F; Lynch, K; Carlsson, A; Cedervall, E; Jönsson, B; Neiderud, J; Månsson, M; Nilsson, A; Lernmark, A; Elding Larsson, H; Ivarsson, S-A

    2011-08-01

    We tested whether autoantibodies to all three ZnT8RWQ variants, GAD65, insulinoma-associated protein 2 (IA-2), insulin and autoantibodies to islet cell cytoplasm (ICA) in combination with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) would improve the diagnostic sensitivity of childhood type 1 diabetes by detecting the children who otherwise would have been autoantibody-negative. A total of 686 patients diagnosed in 1996-2005 in Skåne were analyzed for all the seven autoantibodies [arginin 325 zinc transporter 8 autoantibody (ZnT8RA), tryptophan 325 zinc transporter 8 autoantibody (ZnT8WA), glutamine 325 Zinc transporter 8 autoantibody (ZnT8QA), autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA), Autoantibodies to islet-antigen-2 (IA-2A), insulin autoantibodies (IAA) and ICA] in addition to HLA-DQ genotypes. Zinc transporter 8 autoantibody to either one or all three amino acid variants at position 325 (ZnT8RWQA) was found in 65% (449/686) of the patients. The frequency was independent of age at diagnosis. The ZnT8RWQA reduced the frequency of autoantibody-negative patients from 7.5 to 5.4%-a reduction by 28%. Only 2 of 108 (2%) patients who are below 5 years of age had no autoantibody at diagnosis. Diagnosis without any islet autoantibody increased with increasing age at onset. DQA1-B1(*)X-0604 was associated with both ZnT8RA (p = 0.002) and ZnT8WA (p = 0.01) but not with ZnT8QA (p = 0.07). Kappa agreement analysis showed moderate (>0.40) to fair (>0.20) agreement between pairs of autoantibodies for all combinations of GADA, IA-2A, ZnT8RWQA and ICA but only slight ( < 0.19) agreement for any combination with IAA. This study revealed that (1) the ZnT8RWQA was common, independent of age; (2) multiple autoantibodies were common among the young; (3) DQA1-B1(*)X-0604 increased the risk for ZnT8RA and ZnT8WA; (4) agreement between autoantibody pairs was common for all combinations except IAA. These results suggest that ZnT8RWQA is a necessary complement to the classification and

  20. [Autoantibodies of Inflammatory Myopathies: Update].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeaki

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group of immune-mediated diseases that involve the skeletal muscle as well as many other organs. In addition to a histological diagnosis at muscle biopsy, the clinical phenotypes of inflammatory myopathies can be defined by the presence of various autoantibodies that are originally detected by RNA or protein immunoprecipitation. However, the correlation between histological features and autoantibodies has not been fully elucidated. Immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM), which is characterized by significant necrotic and regeneration muscle fibers with minimal or no inflammatory cell infiltration, is associated with the presence of autoantibodies. IMNM is now classified as a distinct category of inflammatory myopathies, separate from polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and sporadic inclusion body myositis. Here, we divided the autoantibodies of inflammatory myopathies into the following categories: those associated with IMNM, those with activity against aminoacyl transfer RNA synthetase, those associated with dermatomyositis, and those related to other disorders, including overlap syndrome, inclusion body myositis, and primary biliary cirrhosis. The detection of autoantibodies against signal recognition particle or 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase is useful for the diagnosis of IMNM. The screening of autoantibodies has clinical relevance for managing patients with inflammatory myopathies.

  1. Cytoplasmic dynein nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, K. Kevin; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Gibbons, Ian R.; Hays, Thomas S.; Holzbaur, Erika L.F.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Porter, Mary E.; Schroer, Trina A.; Vaughan, Kevin T.; Witman, George B.; King, Stephen M.; Vallee, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of names has been used in the literature for the subunits of cytoplasmic dynein complexes. Thus, there is a strong need for a more definitive consensus statement on nomenclature. This is especially important for mammalian cytoplasmic dyneins, many subunits of which are encoded by multiple genes. We propose names for the mammalian cytoplasmic dynein subunit genes and proteins that reflect the phylogenetic relationships of the genes and the published studies clarifying the functions of the polypeptides. This nomenclature recognizes the two distinct cytoplasmic dynein complexes and has the flexibility to accommodate the discovery of new subunits and isoforms. PMID:16260502

  2. Autoantibody profiling in APS.

    PubMed

    Roggenbuck, D; Somma, V; Schierack, P; Borghi, M O; Meroni, P L

    2014-10-01

    The international consensus for the classification of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) requires clinical and laboratory criteria to be considered at an equal level for diagnosing APS. Thus, detection of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) being a hallmark of APS has been the object of intensive investigation over the past 40 years. However, appropriate detection of aPL still remains a laboratory challenge due to their heterogeneity comprising autoantibodies reactive to different phospholipid-binding plasma proteins, such as beta-2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI) and prothrombin. The relevance of aPL interacting with phospholipids other than cardiolipin (CL, diphosphatidylglycerol), such as phosphatidylserine (PS), remains elusive with regard to the diagnosis of APS. Recently, the concept of aPL profiling has been introduced to assess the risk of thrombotic complications in patients with APS. New assay techniques, apart from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) recommended by the international consensus for the classification of APS, have been proposed for multiplexing of aPL testing. Line immunoassays (LIAs) employing a novel hydrophobic solid phase for the simultaneous detection of different aPL seem to be an intriguing alternative. We evaluated a novel multiplex LIA employing a hydrophobic membrane coated with different phospholipid (PL)-binding proteins or PLs. The performance characteristics of this new multiplexing assay technique demonstrated its usefulness for aPL profiling. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Early Prediction of Lupus Nephritis Using Advanced Proteomics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    elevated in patients with atherosclerosis, ovarian cancer, and systemic vasculitis , including Kawasaki syndrome [15–18], whereas plasma NGAL levels in...proteinase 3 in patients with anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic autoantibodies-associated systemic vasculitis in remission. Clin Exp Immunol 131:528–535 19

  4. Epitope specificity determines pathogenicity and detectability in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3) are detectable in >90% of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCA titers do not correlate well with disease activity. In vivo and in vi...

  5. Epitope specificity determines pathogenicity and detectability in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3) are detectable in >90% of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCA titers do not correlate well with disease activity. In vivo and in vi...

  6. Autoantibodies in a Three-Year-Old Girl with Visceral Leishmaniasis: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall

    PubMed Central

    Pouladfar, Gholamreza; Jafarpour, Zahra; Pourabbas, Bahman; Geramizadeh, Bita; Dashti, Anahita Sanaei

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), a life-threatening parasitic infection, is endemic in the Mediterranean region. Diagnosis of VL is based on epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory findings. However, sometimes, clinical features and laboratory findings overlap with those of autoimmune diseases. In some cases, autoantibodies are detected in patients with VL and this could be a potential diagnostic pitfall. In this study, we have reported on a three-year-old girl from a VL-endemic area in Iran, who presented with prolonged fever and splenomegaly. Bone marrow examination, serologic tests, and the molecular PCR assay were performed; however, results were inconclusive. The levels of anti-double stranded DNA, cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody, and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody were elevated and, at the end, splenic biopsy was performed. The splenic tissue PCR test detected the DNA of Leishmania infantum. The patient's condition improved with anti-Leishmania therapy, and the autoantibodies disappeared within the following four months. Clinical presentations and laboratory findings of VL and autoimmune diseases may overlap in some patients. PMID:27418985

  7. Mechanisms of Autoantibody-Induced Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Ralf J.; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; Leypoldt, Frank; Kaya, Ziya; Bieber, Katja; McLachlan, Sandra M.; Komorowski, Lars; Luo, Jie; Cabral-Marques, Otavio; Hammers, Christoph M.; Lindstrom, Jon M.; Lamprecht, Peter; Fischer, Andrea; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Tersteeg, Claudia; Sondermann, Peter; Rapoport, Basil; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Probst, Christian; El Beidaq, Asmaa; Schmidt, Enno; Verkman, Alan; Manz, Rudolf A.; Nimmerjahn, Falk

    2017-01-01

    Autoantibodies are frequently observed in healthy individuals. In a minority of these individuals, they lead to manifestation of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or Graves’ disease. Overall, more than 2.5% of the population is affected by autoantibody-driven autoimmune disease. Pathways leading to autoantibody-induced pathology greatly differ among different diseases, and autoantibodies directed against the same antigen, depending on the targeted epitope, can have diverse effects. To foster knowledge in autoantibody-induced pathology and to encourage development of urgently needed novel therapeutic strategies, we here categorized autoantibodies according to their effects. According to our algorithm, autoantibodies can be classified into the following categories: (1) mimic receptor stimulation, (2) blocking of neural transmission, (3) induction of altered signaling, triggering uncontrolled (4) microthrombosis, (5) cell lysis, (6) neutrophil activation, and (7) induction of inflammation. These mechanisms in relation to disease, as well as principles of autoantibody generation and detection, are reviewed herein. PMID:28620373

  8. Autoantibody-associated movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Shekeeb S; Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Brilot, Fabienne; Dale, Russell C

    2013-12-01

    Autoantibodies to the extracellular domain of neuronal proteins cause different neurological conditions with movement disorders as a prominent feature. We reviewed the literature of autoantibody-mediated and autoantibody-associated diseases focusing on anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis, autoimmune basal ganglia encephalitis, Sydenham chorea, and the rare syndrome of progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. NMDAR encephalitis is a diffuse encephalitis with psychiatric and cognitive features associated with autoantibodies against the NR1 subunit of the NMDAR. The movement disorder phenotype is diverse and often generalized in young children. Although orofacial dyskinesia was the initial movement phenotype, chorea, dystonia, catatonia, and stereotypical movements are now described. The stereotypical movements can be bizarre and include cycling movements and compulsive self-injurious behavior. Autoimmune basal ganglia encephalitis is an inflammatory encephalitis localizing to the basal ganglia that is sometimes associated with serum antibodies against dopamine-2 receptor. Although psychiatric features are common, the dominant problem is a movement disorder, with dystonia-parkinsonism being characteristic. Sydenham chorea is the prototypic poststreptococcal autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder and several autoantibodies may be involved in disease generation. The syndrome is characterized by a pure chorea, although hypotonia, dysarthria, and emotional lability are common. Progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus is a rare autoimmune disorder causing rigidity, stimulus sensitive spasms, and myoclonus of nonepileptic origin and is associated with autoantibodies of multiple types including those against the glycine receptor. These disorders are important to recognize and diagnose, as immune therapy can shorten disease duration and improve outcome. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Autoantibodies and immunoglobulins in collagenous colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, J; Tysk, C; Yang, P; Danielsson, D; Järnerot, G

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aetiology and pathogenesis of collagenous colitis are unknown. Autoimmunity has been suggested, but no serological findings have supported such a theory. AIMS AND METHODS: Serum from 38 collagenous colitis patients and 38 matched healthy controls was analysed for autoantibodies--that is, antinuclear antibodies, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, smooth muscle and mitochondrial antibodies, rheumatoid factor and antibodies to thyroglobulin and microsomal antigen, together with antibodies to endomysium, gliadin, and cardiolipin. The serum values of IgA, IgG, IgM, and IgG-subclasses, and complement factors C3 and C4 were also determined. RESULTS: In patients with collagenous colitis the mean value of IgM was significantly increased 2.5 g/l (95% CI; 1.9, 3.2) compared with 1.4 g/l (95% CI; 1.2, 1.7) in controls (p = 0.002). Antinuclear antibodies occurred in nine of 38 patients compared with three of 38 controls, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.11). The results of all other immunoglobulins, complement factors, and specific antibodies showed no statistical difference between patients and controls. CONCLUSIONS: No firm evidence for an autoimmune genesis in collagenous colitis is found in this study, although the findings of a positive ANA-titre in some patients and an increased IgM level might give some support for this hypothesis. PMID:8881813

  10. Autoantibodies against neutrophils and monocytes: tool for diagnosis and marker of disease activity in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, F J; Rasmussen, N; Lobatto, S; Wiik, A; Permin, H; van Es, L A; van der Giessen, M; van der Hem, G K; The, T H

    1985-02-23

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies against extranuclear components of polymorphonuclear granulocytes were detected in 25 of 27 serum samples from patients with active Wegener's granulomatosis and in only 4 of 32 samples from patients without signs of disease activity. In a prospective study of 19 patients these antibodies proved to be better markers of disease activity than several other laboratory measurements used previously. The autoantibodies were disease specific and the titres were related to the results of an in-vitro granulocyte phagocytosis test, in which 7S IgG antibodies were internalised after specific binding to the cell, resulting in gradual formation of ring-like cytoplasmic structures. This autoantibody may have a pathogenetic role in Wegener's granulomatosis. The detection of this antibody is valuable for diagnosis and estimation of disease activity.

  11. Autoantibodies from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis preferentially react with the amino-terminal domain of nuclear pore complex glycoprotein gp210.

    PubMed

    Wesierska-Gadek, J; Hohenauer, H; Hitchman, E; Penner, E

    1995-10-01

    Patients with primary biliary cirrhosis frequently develop autoantibodies directed to gp210, a major glycoprotein of the nuclear pore complex. This protein contains a large glycosylated cisternal domain, a single transmembrane segment, and a short cytoplasmic tail. It has been previously shown that autoantibodies from primary biliary cirrhosis patients exclusively react with the cytoplasmic tail. We demonstrate that autoantibodies against gp210 recognize at least two different epitopes. 4 out of 12 anti-gp210 positive sera reacted with the fragment consisting of the cytoplasmic tail, and 8 sera targeted a novel epitope located within the large glycosylated lumenal domain. Moreover, our data prove that carbohydrate moieties are an essential part of this novel epitope. We propose, therefore, that future screening assays should be performed with antigens possessing both epitopes to detect all sera with anti-gp210 specificity.

  12. Integrin Cytoplasmic Tail Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface adhesion receptors essential for multicellular life. They connect cells to the extracellular environment and transduce chemical and mechanical signals to and from the cell. Intracellular proteins that bind the integrin cytoplasmic tail regulate integrin engagement of extracellular ligands as well as integrin localization and trafficking. Cytoplasmic integrin-binding proteins also function downstream of integrins, mediating links to the cytoskeleton and to signaling cascades that impact cell motility, growth, and survival. Here, we review key integrin-interacting proteins and their roles in regulating integrin activity, localization, and signaling. PMID:24467163

  13. Cytoplasmic Viral Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    den Boon, Johan A.; Diaz, Arturo; Ahlquist, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Many viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm compartmentalize their genome replication and transcription in organelle-like structures that enhance replication efficiency and protection from host defenses. In particular, recent studies with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses have further elucidated the ultrastructure of membrane-bounded RNA replication complexes and their close coordination with virion assembly and budding. The structure, function and assembly of some positive-strand RNA virus replication complexes have parallels and potential evolutionary links with the replicative cores of double-strand RNA virus and retrovirus virions, and more general similarities with the replication factories of cytoplasmic DNA viruses. PMID:20638644

  14. Extrapancreatic autoantibody profiles in type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Burbelo, Peter D; Lebovitz, Evan E; Bren, Kathleen E; Bayat, Ahmad; Paviol, Scott; Wenzlau, Janet M; Barriga, Katherine J; Rewers, Marian; Harlan, David M; Iadarola, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Type I diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by destruction of insulin-producing β-cells in the pancreas. Although several islet cell autoantigens are known, the breadth and spectrum of autoantibody targets has not been fully explored. Here the luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS) antibody profiling technology was used to study islet and other organ-specific autoantibody responses in parallel. Examination of an initial cohort of 93 controls and 50 T1D subjects revealed that 16% of the diabetic subjects showed anti-gastric ATPase autoantibodies which did not correlate with autoantibodies against GAD65, IA2, or IA2-β. A more detailed study of a second cohort with 18 potential autoantibody targets revealed marked heterogeneity in autoantibody responses against islet cell autoantigens including two polymorphic variants of ZnT8. A subset of T1D subjects exhibited autoantibodies against several organ-specific targets including gastric ATPase (11%), thyroid peroxidase (14%), and anti-IgA autoantibodies against tissue transglutaminase (12%). Although a few T1D subjects showed autoantibodies against a lung-associated protein KCNRG (6%) and S100-β (8%), no statistically significant autoantibodies were detected against several cytokines. Analysis of the overall autoantibody profiles using a heatmap revealed two major subgroups of approximately similar numbers, consisting of T1D subjects with and without organ-specific autoantibodies. Within the organ-specific subgroup, there was minimal overlap among anti-gastric ATPase, anti-thyroid peroxidase, and anti-transglutaminase seropositivity, and these autoantibodies did not correlate with islet cell autoantibodies. Examination of a third cohort, comprising prospectively collected longitudinal samples from high-risk individuals, revealed that anti-gastric ATPase autoantibodies were present in several individuals prior to detection of islet autoantibodies and before clinical onset of T1D. Taken together

  15. Standardisation of the factor H autoantibody assay.

    PubMed

    Watson, Rachael; Lindner, Susanne; Bordereau, Pauline; Hunze, Eva-Maria; Tak, Federico; Ngo, Stéphanie; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnes; Marchbank, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The screening of all atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS) patients for factor H autoantibodies is best practice. However, there is no consensus assay for the reporting of factor H autoantibody titres. In this study, three European complement laboratories with expertise in the field of autoantibody testing address this by systematically evaluating several ELISA methods used for the detection of factor H autoantibodies. All methods tested adequately detect high titre samples. However, this study recommends the Paris method for the detection and reporting of factor H autoantibodies to be used when setting up a factor H autoantibody screen. The importance of individual sample background subtraction in these ELISA tests was established. The use of a relative or arbitrary unit index with a common positive and negative serum allowed for consistent comparison of findings from different test centres. Therefore, it is recommended that a standard arbitrary unit scale based on a titration curve from a common positive anti-serum be adopted to allow future establishment of the relative importance of particular titres of factor H autoantibodies in aHUS. Systematic assay for the presence of factor H autoantibodies in patients using the Paris method will provide the longitudinal analysis needed to fully establish the importance of factor H autoantibodies in disease. This will feed into additional research to clarify whether additional factors have a bearing on the phenotype/outcome of autoimmune aHUS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Anti-cytokine autoantibodies in postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Ahmad; Burbelo, Peter D; Browne, Sarah K; Quinlivan, Mark; Martinez, Bianca; Holland, Steven M; Buvanendran, Asokumar; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Mannes, Andrew J; Breuer, Judith; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Iadarola, Michael J

    2015-10-20

    The mechanisms by which varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation causes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), a debilitating chronic pain condition, have not been fully elucidated. Based on previous studies identifying a causative role for anti-cytokine autoantibodies in patients with opportunistic infections, we explored this possibility in PHN. Sera from herpes zoster (HZ) patients without and with PHN (N = 115 and 83, respectively) were examined for the presence of autoantibodies against multiple cytokines, and other known autoantigens. In addition, a cohort of patients with complex regional pain syndrome or neuropathic pain was tested for autoantibodies against selected cytokines. Antibody levels against VZV, Epstein Barr virus, and herpes simplex virus-2 were also measured in the HZ and PHN patients. Patient sera with high levels of anti-cytokine autoantibodies were functionally tested for in vitro neutralizing activity. Six PHN subjects demonstrated markedly elevated levels of single, autoantibodies against interferon-α, interferon-γ, GM-CSF, or interleukin-6. In contrast, the HZ and the pain control group showed low or no autoantibodies, respectively, against these four cytokines. Further analysis revealed that one PHN patient with high levels of anti-interleukin-6 autoantibodies had a markedly depressed antibody level to VZV, potentially reflecting poor T cell immunity against VZV. In vitro functional testing revealed that three of the five anti-cytokine autoantibody positive PHN subjects had neutralizing autoantibodies against interferon-α, GM-CSF or interleukin-6. In contrast, none of the HZ patients without PHN had neutralizing autoantibodies. These results suggest the possibility that sporadic anti-cytokine autoantibodies in some subjects may cause an autoimmune immunodeficiency syndrome leading to uncontrolled VZV reactivation, nerve damage and subsequent PHN.

  17. Myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies with Cytoplasmic Fluorescence Pattern.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Seema; Minz, Ranjana Walker; Goyal, Lekha; Sharma, Nidhi

    2010-01-01

    We report here two rare cases of myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA)-positive Wegener's granulomatosis (limited variant) which deceptively produced a cytoplasmic (C-ANCA) pattern on indirect immunofluorescence.

  18. What do antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) tell us?

    PubMed

    Savige, Judy; Pollock, Wendy; Trevisin, Michelle

    2005-04-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are autoantibodies directed against antigens found in the cytoplasmic granules of neutrophils and monocytes. ANCA testing is usually performed to help diagnose or exclude Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis. The three most commonly used assays are indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and the direct and 'capture' enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for ANCA directed against proteinase 3 (PR3) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Although the International Consensus Statement for Testing and Reporting ANCA recommends that all sera are screened for ANCA by IIF and that IIF-positivity is confirmed by direct ELISAs, some laboratories test by direct ELISA alone, others screen with direct ELISA and confirm positive sera by IIF, and a few use capture ELISAs. This chapter discusses the various forms of vasculitis associated with ANCA, the usefulness of each of the ANCA assays and how ANCA testing can be used in the management of patients with small-vessel vasculitis.

  19. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-09-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation.

  20. Are There Enhanced MBP Autoantibodies in Autism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libbey, Jane E.; Coon, Hilary H.; Kirkman, Nikki J.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Miller, Judith N.; Stevenson, Edward K.; Lainhart, Janet E.; McMahon, William M.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Autoantibodies to central nervous system antigens, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), may play a role in autism. We measured autoantibody titers to MBP in children with autism, both classic onset and regressive onset forms, controls (healthy age- and gender-matched) and individuals with Tourette syndrome via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We…

  1. Are There Enhanced MBP Autoantibodies in Autism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libbey, Jane E.; Coon, Hilary H.; Kirkman, Nikki J.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Miller, Judith N.; Stevenson, Edward K.; Lainhart, Janet E.; McMahon, William M.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Autoantibodies to central nervous system antigens, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), may play a role in autism. We measured autoantibody titers to MBP in children with autism, both classic onset and regressive onset forms, controls (healthy age- and gender-matched) and individuals with Tourette syndrome via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We…

  2. Chronic Malaria Revealed by a New Fluorescence Pattern on the Antinuclear Autoantibodies Test

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Benjamin; Charuel, Jean-Luc; Jaureguiberry, Stéphane; Arnaud, Laurent; Courtin, Regis; Kassab, Petra; Prendki, Virginie; Paris, Luc; Ghillani-Dalbin, Pascale; Thellier, Marc; Caumes, Eric; Amoura, Zahir; Mazier, Dominique; Musset, Lucile; Buffet, Pierre; Miyara, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Background Several clinical forms of malaria such as chronic carriage, gestational malaria or hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly may follow a cryptic evolution with afebrile chronic fatigue sometimes accompanied by anemia and/or splenomegaly. Conventional parasitological tests are often negative or not performed, and severe complications may occur. Extensive explorations of these conditions often include the search for antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA). Methods We analysed fluorescence patterns in the ANA test in patients with either chronic cryptic or acute symptomatic malaria, then conducted a one-year prospective study at a single hospital on all available sera drawn for ANA detections. We then identified autoantibodies differentially expressed in malaria patients and in controls using human protein microarray. Results We uncovered and defined a new, malaria-related, nucleo-cytoplasmic ANA pattern displaying the specific association of a nuclear speckled pattern with diffuse cytoplasmic perinuclearly-enhanced fluorescence. In the one-year prospective analysis, 79% of sera displaying this new nucleo-cytoplasmic fluorescence were from patients with malaria. This specific pattern, not seen in other parasitic diseases, allowed a timely reorientation of the diagnosis toward malaria. To assess if the autoantibody immune response was due to autoreactivity or molecular mimicry we isolated 42 autoantigens, targets of malarial autoantibodies. BLAST analysis indicated that 23 of recognized autoantigens were homologous to plasmodial proteins suggesting autoimmune responses directly driven by the plasmodial infection. Conclusion In patients with malaria in whom parasitological tests have not been performed recognition of this new, malaria-related fluorescence pattern on the ANA test is highly suggestive of the diagnosis and triggers immediate, easy confirmation and adapted therapy. PMID:24551116

  3. Erythrocyte autoantibodies, autoimmune haemolysis, and carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, R J; Booker, D J; Stamps, R

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To examine a large series of patients in whom both red cell autoantibodies and carcinoma are present; and to determine whether this rare occurrence is a true association or a chance event. METHODS--The laboratory records of 160 patients (76 men, 84 women; mean age 68 years) with erythrocyte autoantibodies and confirmed carcinoma were examined for site of tumour origin and clinical and immunohematological findings. To test whether the concomitant occurrence of autoantibodies and carcinoma was fortuitous, data on total population and carcinoma incidence were included in a chi 2 analysis. RESULTS--The association was significant (chi 2 = 97.5, p < 0.0005); erythrocyte autoantibodies and carcinoma were found together 12-13 times more often than expected from their relative frequencies. Autoantibodies occurred with a variety of carcinomas, particularly those of breast, lung, colon, rectum, and prostate; this largely reflected tumour incidence. Adenocarcinoma, squamous, anaplastic, and transitional cell types were all represented. Warm, cold, and mixed autoantibodies were not associated with particular tumour sites or histology. Eighty six patients had haemolysis of varying severity, 37 had metastatic disease, and 28 died within a few months of presentation. CONCLUSIONS--The presence of erythrocyte autoantibodies and carcinoma in the same patient is a true association and probably reflects a fundamental disturbance in immune homeostasis. It tends to occur with a large tumour mass and metastatic disease, and generally indicates a poor prognosis. PMID:8027372

  4. Myasthenia gravis: analysis of serum autoantibody reactivities to 1827 potential human autoantigens by protein macroarrays.

    PubMed

    Becker, Anne; Ludwig, Nicole; Keller, Andreas; Tackenberg, Björn; Eienbröker, Christian; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Fassbender, Klaus; Meese, Eckart; Ruprecht, Klemens

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a disorder of neuromuscular transmission associated with autoantibodies against the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. We have previously developed a customized protein macroarray comprising 1827 potential human autoantigens, which permitted to discriminate sera of patients with different cancers from sera of healthy controls, but has not yet been evaluated in antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. To determine whether autoantibody signatures obtained by protein macroarray separate sera of patients with myasthenia gravis from healthy controls. Sera of patients with acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive myasthenia gravis (n = 25) and healthy controls (n = 32) were analyzed by protein macroarrays comprising 1827 peptide clones. Autoantibody signatures did not separate patients with myasthenia gravis from controls with sufficient sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Intensity values of one antigen (poly A binding protein cytoplasmic 1, p = 0.0045) were higher in patients with myasthenia gravis, but the relevance of this and two further antigens, 40S ribosomal protein S13 (20.8% vs. 0%, p = 0.011) and proteasome subunit alpha type 1 (25% vs. 3.1%, p = 0.035), which were detected more frequently by myasthenia gravis than by control sera, currently remains uncertain. Seroreactivity profiles of patients with myasthenia gravis detected by a customized protein macroarray did not allow discrimination from healthy controls, compatible with the notion that the autoantibody response in myasthenia gravis is highly focussed against the acetylcholine receptor.

  5. Myasthenia Gravis: Analysis of Serum Autoantibody Reactivities to 1827 Potential Human Autoantigens by Protein Macroarrays

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Andreas; Tackenberg, Björn; Eienbröker, Christian; Oertel, Wolfgang H.; Fassbender, Klaus; Meese, Eckart; Ruprecht, Klemens

    2013-01-01

    Background Myasthenia gravis is a disorder of neuromuscular transmission associated with autoantibodies against the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. We have previously developed a customized protein macroarray comprising 1827 potential human autoantigens, which permitted to discriminate sera of patients with different cancers from sera of healthy controls, but has not yet been evaluated in antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. Objective To determine whether autoantibody signatures obtained by protein macroarray separate sera of patients with myasthenia gravis from healthy controls. Methods Sera of patients with acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive myasthenia gravis (n = 25) and healthy controls (n = 32) were analyzed by protein macroarrays comprising 1827 peptide clones. Results Autoantibody signatures did not separate patients with myasthenia gravis from controls with sufficient sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Intensity values of one antigen (poly A binding protein cytoplasmic 1, p = 0.0045) were higher in patients with myasthenia gravis, but the relevance of this and two further antigens, 40S ribosomal protein S13 (20.8% vs. 0%, p = 0.011) and proteasome subunit alpha type 1 (25% vs. 3.1%, p = 0.035), which were detected more frequently by myasthenia gravis than by control sera, currently remains uncertain. Conclusion Seroreactivity profiles of patients with myasthenia gravis detected by a customized protein macroarray did not allow discrimination from healthy controls, compatible with the notion that the autoantibody response in myasthenia gravis is highly focussed against the acetylcholine receptor. PMID:23483977

  6. HLA-DR antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus: association with specificity of autoantibody responses to nuclear antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, J S; Klippel, J H; Penner, E; Reichlin, M; Steinberg, A D; Chused, T M; Scherak, O; Graninger, W; Hartter, E; Zielinski, C C

    1987-01-01

    HLA-DR antigens and autoantibodies to the nuclear or cytoplasmic antigens Ro/SSA, La/SSB, Sm, and RNP were determined in North American and Austrian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Analysis of the association of antibodies to these ribonucleic acid (RNA)-protein antigens with HLA-DR antigens showed that HLA-DR3 was related to the presence of anti-Ro/SSA or anti-La/SSB, or both. In contrast, anti-Sm or anti-RNP, or both were associated with HLA-DR4. HLA-DR5 was associated with absence of these autoantibodies. The data extend evidence for the complexity and heterogeneity of SLE. Moreover, they indicate that, in SLE, genes linked to those coding for HLA-DR antigens, are related to the specificity of autoantibody responses rather than to the primary immunological abnormalities of this disorder. PMID:3498447

  7. Plant cytoplasm preserved by lightning.

    PubMed

    Wang, X

    2004-10-01

    Usually only an organism with hard parts may be preserved in the fossil record. Cytoplasm, which is a physiologically active part of a plant, is rarely seen in the fossil record. Two Cretaceous plant fossils older than 100 million years with exceptional preservation of cytoplasm are reported here. Some cytoplasm is well preserved with subcellular details while other cytoplasm is highly hydrolyzed in the cortex of the same fossil even though both of preservations may be less than 2 microm away. The unique preservation pattern, sharp contrast of preservation in adjacent cells and the exceptional preservation of cytoplasm in the cortex suggest that lightning should play an important role in the preservation of cytoplasm and that cytoplasmic membranes may be more stable than the cell contents. Interpreting the preservation needs knowledge scattering in several formerly unrelated fields of science, including geophysics, botany, biophysics, cytology and microwave fixation technology. This new interpretation of fossilization will shed new light on preservation of cytoplasm and promote cytoplasm fossils from a position of rarity to a position of common research objects available for biological research. The importance of the identification of cytoplasm in fossil lies not in itself but in how much it influences the future research in paleobotany.

  8. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  9. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  10. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA).

    PubMed

    Radice, A; Sinico, R A

    2005-02-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are a sensitive and specific marker for ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis. Using indirect immunofluorescence on ethanol-fixed neutrophils, two major fluoroscopic patterns can be recognised: a diffuse cytoplasmic staining (C-ANCA), and a perinuclear/nuclear staining (P-ANCA). In patients with vasculitis, more of 90% of C-ANCA are directed against proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA) whereas approximately 80-90% of P-ANCA recognise myelperoxidase (MPO-ANCA). Although C-ANCA (PR3-ANCA) is preferentially associated with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), and P-ANCA (MPO-ANCA) with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), idiopathic necrotising crescentic glomerulonephritis (iNCGN) and Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS), there is not absolute specificity. Between 10-20% of patients with classical WG show P-ANCA (MPO-ANCA), and even a larger percentage of patients with MPA or CSS have C-ANCA (PR3-ANCA). Furthermore, it should be stressed that approximately 10-20% of patients with WG or MPA (and 40-50% of cases of CSS) have negative assay for ANCA. The best diagnostic performance is obtained when indirect immunofluorescence is combined with PR3 and MPO-specific ELISAs. ANCA with different and unknown antigen specificity are found in a variety of conditions other than AASV, including inflammatory bowel diseases, other autoimmune diseases, and infections where their clinical significance is unclear. ANCA levels are useful to monitor disease activity but should not be used by themselves to guide treatment. A significant increase in ANCA titres, or the reappearance of ANCA, should alert the clinicians and lead to a stricter patient control.

  11. Autoantibodies in Systemic Sclerosis: Unanswered Questions

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Cristiane; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease characterized by vascular abnormalities, and cutaneous and visceral fibrosis. Serum autoantibodies directed to multiple intracellular antigens are present in more than 95% of patients and are considered a hallmark of SSc. They are helpful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of SSc and are associated with distinctive clinical manifestations. With the advent of more sensitive, multiplexed immunoassays, new and old questions about the relevance of autoantibodies in SSc are emerging. In this review, we discuss the clinical relevance of autoantibodies in SSc emphasizing the more recently published data. Moreover, we will summarize recent advances regarding the stability of SSc autoantibodies over the course of disease, whether they are mutually exclusive and their potential roles in the disease pathogenesis. PMID:25926833

  12. Autoantibodies to Posttranslational Modifications in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Burska, Agata N.; Hunt, Laura; Strollo, Rocky; Ryan, Brent J.; Vital, Ed; Nissim, Ahuva; Winyard, Paul G.; Emery, Paul; Ponchel, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    Autoantibodies have been associated with human pathologies for a long time, particularly with autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Rheumatoid factor (RF) is known since the late 1930s to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The discovery of anticitrullinated protein antibodies in the last century has changed this and other posttranslational modifications (PTM) relevant to RA have since been described. Such PTM introduce neoepitopes in proteins that can generate novel autoantibody specificities. The recent recognition of these novel specificities in RA provides a unique opportunity to understand human B-cell development in vivo. In this paper, we will review the three of the main classes of PTMs already associated with RA: citrullination, carbamylation, and oxidation. With the advancement of research methodologies it should be expected that other autoantibodies against PTM proteins could be discovered in patients with autoimmune diseases. Many of such autoantibodies may provide significant biomarker potential. PMID:24782594

  13. Recent advances in dermatomyositis-specific autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Manabu; Watanabe, Rei; Ishitsuka, Yosuke; Okiyama, Naoko

    2016-11-01

    In dermatomyositis, disease-specific autoantibodies now cover more than 70% of patients. These autoantibodies closely correlate with distinct clinical manifestations. In the past few years, extensive evidence has been accumulated on clinical significance of dermatomyositis-specific autoantibodies including autoantibodies against melanoma differentiation antigen 5 (MDA5), transcriptional intermediary factor 1 (TIF1), nuclear matrix protein 2 (NXP2), and small ubiquitin-like modifier activating enzyme (SAE). Anti-MDA5 antibodies are found with high specificity in clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis presenting rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) especially in Asian population. Similar tendency has been reported in the US/Europe, although the frequency of positivity and the type of ILD may differ. Anti-TIF1 antibodies are present in juvenile and adult dermatomyositis patients with close correlation with malignancy in adult population. Anti-NXP2 antibodies share similar phenotype with anti-TIF1 antibodies, except that anti-NXP2 antibodies are associated with calcinosis and severe muscle disease. Although numbers are still small, patients with anti-SAE antibodies tend to present skin disease first and then progress to muscle weakness with systematic symptoms including dysphagia. Moreover, distinct cutaneous manifestations and muscle histopathology findings for each autoantibody have been reported. 'Autoantibody-based classification' of dermatomyositis subsets is now a useful strategy for comprehending the heterogeneous spectrum of dermatomyositis.

  14. Autoantibodies to GW bodies and other autoantigens in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Stinton, L M; Swain, M; Myers, R P; Shaheen, A A; Fritzler, M J

    2011-02-01

    Autoantibodies to intracellular targets in mitochondria and nuclei are serological hallmarks of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). One of the most recently identified cellular targets of PBC autoantibodies is a novel cytoplasmic structure referred to as GW bodies [GWB, G (glycine) W (tryptophan)-containing bodies (GWB)]. GWB are indentified as discrete cytoplasmic domains that are involved in mRNA processing via the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Key components of GWB include the proteins GW182, Ago2, RNA-associated protein 55 (RAP55) and Ge-1/Hedls. The primary objective was to study the frequency and clinical association of antibodies directed to GWB components, in 109 PBC patients. Autoantibodies to mitochondrial antigen-pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (M2), branched-chain 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase complex and 2-oxo glutarate dehydrogenase complex (3E-BPO), gp210, sp100, promyelocytic leukaemia cell antigen (PML) and liver kidney microsomal-1 antigen (LKM-1) were detected by a line immunoassay and antibodies to GWB (GW182, RAP55, Ge-1, GW2, GW3) and glutamate receptor interacting protein (GRIP)-associated protein-1 (GRASP-1), by an addressable laser bead immunoassay (ALBIA). The most common GWB autoantigen targets were: RAP55-28%, GW182-12%, GW2-2% and antibodies to GRASP-1-17%. By comparison, the frequency of reactivity to established PBC autoantigens was: gp210, 27%; sp100, 27% and PML, 17%. None of the autoantibodies were associated with differences in Mayo risk score or liver decompensation. This study is the first study to show that antibodies to RAP55, GW182 and GRASP-1 are the most common GWB targets in PBC. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2010 British Society for Immunology.

  15. [How can we diagnose and better understand inflammatory myopathies? The usefulness of auto-antibodies].

    PubMed

    Sibilia, Jean; Chatelus, Emmanuel; Meyer, Alain; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Sordet, Christelle; Goetz, Joëlle

    2010-10-01

    The inflammatory myopathies are a group of quite proteiform, systemic auto-immune diseases which include polymyositis, dermatomyositis and inclusion body myopathies. To facilitate the diagnosis, classification criteria (Bohan and Peter, 1975) have been proposed, based essentially on clinical criteria. In addition, over the past fifteen years, auto-antibodies characterizing certain forms of inflammatory myopathy have been identified. One distinguishes schematically: auto-antibodies specific for myositis and auto-antibodies sometimes associated with myositis. Concerning the myositis specific auto-antibodies (MSA), schematically there are a dozen specificities which are classed according to the cellular distribution of the auto-antigen. The most characteristic are certainly the auto-antibodies directed against cytoplasmic antigens: the anti-tRNA synthetases (anti-Jo-1 (PL-1), anti-PL-7, PL-12, EJ, OJ, JS, KS, ZO, YRS), anti-SRP (signal recognition particle), anti-Mas and anti-KJ, anti-Fer (eEF1), anti-Wa and anti-CADM p140. Other auto-antibodies are directed against nuclear auto-antigens: the anti-Mi-2, anti-PMS (PMS1, PMS2) and related antibodies (MLH1, DNA PKcs…), anti-56 kDa, anti-MJ (NXP-2), anti-SAE and anti-p155/p140 (TIF-1γ). Concerning the auto-antibodies sometimes associated with myositis (myositis associated auto-antibodies or MAA), they can also be observed in other auto-immune diseases. These auto-antibodies are directed against nuclear or nucleolar auto-antigens: the anti-PM-Scl, anti-Ku, anti-RNP (U1 RNP and U2 RNP, U4/U6 RNP and U5 RNP), anti-Ro 52 kDa and more rarely, anti-Ro 60 kDa and anti-La. The auto-antibodies related to myositis are biological tools which are of interest in two main ways. They have allowed us to sort out the nosology of these inflammatory myopathies, in particular by defining anti-tRNA synthetase syndrome. It now remains to determine how they might be employed to complement the classical clinico-biological diagnostic criteria

  16. Targeting cancer with a lupus autoantibody#

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, James E.; Chan, Grace; Liu, Yanfeng; Hegan, Denise C.; Dalal, Shibani; Dray, Eloise; Kwon, Youngho; Xu, Yuanyuan; Xu, Xiaohua; Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Geiger, Erik; Liu, Yilun; Gera, Joseph; Sweasy, Joann B.; Sung, Patrick; Rockwell, Sara; Nishimura, Robert N.; Weisbart, Richard H.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is distinct among autoimmune diseases due to its association with circulating autoantibodies reactive against host DNA. The precise role that anti-DNA antibodies play in SLE pathophysiology remains to be elucidated, and potential applications of lupus autoantibodies in cancer therapy have not previously been explored. Here we report the unexpected finding that a cell-penetrating lupus autoantibody, 3E10, has potential as a targeted therapy for DNA-repair deficient malignancies. We find that 3E10 preferentially binds DNA single-strand tails, inhibits key steps in DNA single-strand and double-strand break repair, and sensitizes cultured tumor cells and human tumor xenografts to DNA-damaging therapy, including doxorubicin and radiation. Moreover, we demonstrate that 3E10 alone is synthetically lethal to BRCA2-deficient human cancer cells and selectively sensitizes such cells to low dose doxorubicin. Our results establish an approach to cancer therapy that we expect will be particularly applicable to BRCA2-related malignancies such as breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. In addition, our findings raise the possibility that lupus autoantibodies may be partly responsible for the intrinsic deficiencies in DNA repair and the unexpectedly low rates of breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers observed in SLE patients. In summary, this study provides the basis for the potential use of a lupus anti-DNA antibody in cancer therapy and identifies lupus autoantibodies as a potentially rich source of therapeutic agents. PMID:23100628

  17. Targeting cancer with a lupus autoantibody.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James E; Chan, Grace; Liu, Yanfeng; Hegan, Denise C; Dalal, Shibani; Dray, Eloise; Kwon, Youngho; Xu, Yuanyuan; Xu, Xiaohua; Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Geiger, Erik; Liu, Yilun; Gera, Joseph; Sweasy, Joann B; Sung, Patrick; Rockwell, Sara; Nishimura, Robert N; Weisbart, Richard H; Glazer, Peter M

    2012-10-24

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is distinct among autoimmune diseases because of its association with circulating autoantibodies reactive against host DNA. The precise role that anti-DNA antibodies play in SLE pathophysiology remains to be elucidated, and potential applications of lupus autoantibodies in cancer therapy have not previously been explored. We report the unexpected finding that a cell-penetrating lupus autoantibody, 3E10, has potential as a targeted therapy for DNA repair-deficient malignancies. We find that 3E10 preferentially binds DNA single-strand tails, inhibits key steps in DNA single-strand and double-strand break repair, and sensitizes cultured tumor cells and human tumor xenografts to DNA-damaging therapy, including doxorubicin and radiation. Moreover, we demonstrate that 3E10 alone is synthetically lethal to BRCA2-deficient human cancer cells and selectively sensitizes such cells to low-dose doxorubicin. Our results establish an approach to cancer therapy that we expect will be particularly applicable to BRCA2-related malignancies such as breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. In addition, our findings raise the possibility that lupus autoantibodies may be partly responsible for the intrinsic deficiencies in DNA repair and the unexpectedly low rates of breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers observed in SLE patients. In summary, this study provides the basis for the potential use of a lupus anti-DNA antibody in cancer therapy and identifies lupus autoantibodies as a potentially rich source of therapeutic agents.

  18. Induction of lupus autoantibodies by adjuvants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Satoh, M.; Kuroda, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Behney, K.M.; Mizutani, A.; Akaogi, J.; Nacionales, D.C.; Lorenson, T.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Reeves, W.H.

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to the hydrocarbon oil pristane induces lupus specific autoantibodies in non-autoimmune mice. We investigated whether the capacity to induce lupus-like autoimmunity is a unique property of pristane or is shared by other adjuvant oils. Seven groups of 3-month-old female BALB/cJ mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of pristane, squalene (used in the adjuvant MF59), incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), three different medicinal mineral oils, or saline, respectively. Serum autoantibodies and peritoneal cytokine production were measured. In addition to pristane, the mineral oil Bayol F (IFA) and the endogenous hydrocarbon squalene both induced anti-nRNP/Sm and -Su autoantibodies (20% and 25% of mice, respectively). All of these hydrocarbons had prolonged effects on cytokine production by peritoneal APCs. However, high levels of IL-6, IL-12, and TNF?? production 2-3 months after intraperitoneal injection appeared to be associated with the ability to induce lupus autoantibodies. The ability to induce lupus autoantibodies is shared by several hydrocarbons and is not unique to pristane. It correlates with stimulation of the production of IL-12 and other cytokines, suggesting a relationship with a hydrocarbon's adjuvanticity. The potential to induce autoimmunity may complicate the use of oil adjuvants in human and veterinary vaccines. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The rise and fall of horror autotoxicus and forbidden clones.

    PubMed

    Jennette, J Charles; Falk, Ronald J

    2010-09-01

    Cui and associates show that healthy individuals have natural autoantibodies (NAAs) specific for myeloperoxidase, proteinase 3, and glomerular basement membrane (GBM) with the same specificity as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and anti-GBM antibodies that are pathogenic. Although Ehrlich proposed horror autotoxicus and Burnet envisioned elimination of forbidden clones, NAAs are present in all healthy individuals and play beneficial homeostatic roles. Pathogenic autoimmunity is dysregulation of natural homeostatic autoimmunity rather than onset of a previously absent self-recognition.

  20. In vivo approaches to investigate ANCA-associated vasculitis: lessons and limitations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibody (ANCA)-associated diseases are autoimmune conditions characterized by necrotizing inflammation of small blood vessels. The immunogenesis and etiology of these conditions are unknown, but our knowledge of the immunopathogenesis has increased considerably in recent years. In this review, we discuss the animal models currently used to investigate the mechanisms of vascular injury and to test novel therapies. We outline their advantages and limitations and propose potential directions for future research. PMID:21371348

  1. Rheumatic Disease Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Utiyama, Shirley R R; Zenatti, Katiane B; Nóbrega, Heloisa A J; Soares, Juliana Z C; Skare, Thelma L; Matsubara, Caroline; Muzzilo, Dominique A; Nisihara, Renato M

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (ALDs) are known to be associated with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) and their autoantibodies. We aimed to study the prevalence of SARDs and related autoantibodies, as well as their prognostic implications in a group of patients with ALDs. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty patients with ALDs (38.3% with autoimmune hepatitis; 11.7% with primary biliary cirrhosis; 25% with primary sclerosing cholangitis and 25% with overlap syndrome) were studied for the presence of SARDs and their autoantibodies. There was autoimmune rheumatic disease in 20% of the studied sample. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were the commonest (11.6% and 5%, respectively). Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) were present in 35% of the patients, followed by anti-Ro (20.0%); anti-nucleosome (18.3%); rheumatoid factor (10%) anti-CCP (8.3%); anti-RNP (8.3%); anti-ds-DNA (6.6%); anti-La (3.3%); anti-Sm (3.3%), anti-ribosomal P (3.3%). Anti-Ro (p = 0.0004), anti-La (p = 0.03), anti-RNP (p = 0.04) and anti-Sm (p = 0.03) were commonly found in patients with SARD, but not anti-DNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-ribosomal P. No differences were found in liver function tests regarding to the presence of autoantibodies. There was a high prevalence of SARD and their autoantibodies in ALD patients. Anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-RNP and anti-Sm positivity points to an association with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The presence of autoantibodies was not related to liver function tests.

  2. Cellular Subcompartments through Cytoplasmic Streaming.

    PubMed

    Pieuchot, Laurent; Lai, Julian; Loh, Rachel Ann; Leong, Fong Yew; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Stajich, Jason; Jedd, Gregory

    2015-08-24

    Cytoplasmic streaming occurs in diverse cell types, where it generally serves a transport function. Here, we examine streaming in multicellular fungal hyphae and identify an additional function wherein regimented streaming forms distinct cytoplasmic subcompartments. In the hypha, cytoplasm flows directionally from cell to cell through septal pores. Using live-cell imaging and computer simulations, we identify a flow pattern that produces vortices (eddies) on the upstream side of the septum. Nuclei can be immobilized in these microfluidic eddies, where they form multinucleate aggregates and accumulate foci of the HDA-2 histone deacetylase-associated factor, SPA-19. Pores experiencing flow degenerate in the absence of SPA-19, suggesting that eddy-trapped nuclei function to reinforce the septum. Together, our data show that eddies comprise a subcellular niche favoring nuclear differentiation and that subcompartments can be self-organized as a consequence of regimented cytoplasmic streaming.

  3. Specificity factors in cytoplasmic polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Amanda; Meijer, Hedda A; de Moor, Cornelia H

    2013-01-01

    Poly(A) tail elongation after export of an messenger RNA (mRNA) to the cytoplasm is called cytoplasmic polyadenylation. It was first discovered in oocytes and embryos, where it has roles in meiosis and development. In recent years, however, has been implicated in many other processes, including synaptic plasticity and mitosis. This review aims to introduce cytoplasmic polyadenylation with an emphasis on the factors and elements mediating this process for different mRNAs and in different animal species. We will discuss the RNA sequence elements mediating cytoplasmic polyadenylation in the 3′ untranslated regions of mRNAs, including the CPE, MBE, TCS, eCPE, and C-CPE. In addition to describing the role of general polyadenylation factors, we discuss the specific RNA binding protein families associated with cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements, including CPEB (CPEB1, CPEB2, CPEB3, and CPEB4), Pumilio (PUM2), Musashi (MSI1, MSI2), zygote arrest (ZAR2), ELAV like proteins (ELAVL1, HuR), poly(C) binding proteins (PCBP2, αCP2, hnRNP-E2), and Bicaudal C (BICC1). Some emerging themes in cytoplasmic polyadenylation will be highlighted. To facilitate understanding for those working in different organisms and fields, particularly those who are analyzing high throughput data, HUGO gene nomenclature for the human orthologs is used throughout. Where human orthologs have not been clearly identified, reference is made to protein families identified in man. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23776146

  4. Autoantibodies in Senear-Usher Syndrome: Cross-Reactivity or Multiple Autoimmunity?

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Pérez, María Elena; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Senear-Usher syndrome or pemphigus erythematosus is a pathology that overlaps clinically and serologically with pemphigus foliaceus and lupus erythematosus. Skin biopsies of patients with pemphigus erythematosus reveal acantholysis and deposits of immunoglobulins in desmosomes, and they are positive in the lupus band test. In the present paper, we determined whether the autoantibodies associated with pemphigus erythematosus targeted a single antigen or multiple antigens as a result of the stimulation of independent B cell clones. Our present paper demonstrates that patients with pemphigus erythematosus produce both antiepithelial antibodies specific for desmoglein 1 and 3 and antinuclear antibodies specific for Ro, La, Sm, and double-stranded DNA antigens. After eluting specific anti-epithelial or anti-nuclear antibodies, which were recovered and tested using double-fluorescence assays, a lack of cross-reactivity was demonstrated between desmosomes and nuclear and cytoplasmic lupus antigens. This result suggests that autoantibodies in pemphigus erythematosus are directed against different antigens and that these autoantibodies are produced by independent clones. Given these clinical and serological data, we suggest that pemphigus erythematosus behaves as a multiple autoimmune disease. PMID:23320149

  5. Autoantibodies in senear-usher syndrome: cross-reactivity or multiple autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, María Elena; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Senear-Usher syndrome or pemphigus erythematosus is a pathology that overlaps clinically and serologically with pemphigus foliaceus and lupus erythematosus. Skin biopsies of patients with pemphigus erythematosus reveal acantholysis and deposits of immunoglobulins in desmosomes, and they are positive in the lupus band test. In the present paper, we determined whether the autoantibodies associated with pemphigus erythematosus targeted a single antigen or multiple antigens as a result of the stimulation of independent B cell clones. Our present paper demonstrates that patients with pemphigus erythematosus produce both antiepithelial antibodies specific for desmoglein 1 and 3 and antinuclear antibodies specific for Ro, La, Sm, and double-stranded DNA antigens. After eluting specific anti-epithelial or anti-nuclear antibodies, which were recovered and tested using double-fluorescence assays, a lack of cross-reactivity was demonstrated between desmosomes and nuclear and cytoplasmic lupus antigens. This result suggests that autoantibodies in pemphigus erythematosus are directed against different antigens and that these autoantibodies are produced by independent clones. Given these clinical and serological data, we suggest that pemphigus erythematosus behaves as a multiple autoimmune disease.

  6. Wegener's granulomatosis and autoantibodies to neutrophil antigens

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, D R; Maxwell, A P; Watt, L

    1988-01-01

    We report five cases of Wegener's granulomatosis all of whom had clinical and histological evidence of disease activity at presentation and in whom autoantibodies to neutrophil antigens were detected. This test may prove useful for the diagnosis of this serious condition and help to monitor disease activity during treatment. PMID:3068870

  7. Spectrum of autoantibodies in Tunisian psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Sidhom, Oussama; Laadhar, Lilia; Zitouni, Mondher; Ben Alaya, Nissaf; Rafrafi, Rym; Kallel-Sellami, Marayam; Lahmar, Houria; El Hechmi, Zouhair; Makni, Sondes

    2012-01-01

    One hundred and three psychiatric inpatients (74 men) were assessed for a wide spectrum of autoantibodies including antinuclear, antismooth muscle, antimitochondrial, antiDNA, anti-phospholipid, anti-cardiolipin IgG and IgM, antikeratin, rheumatoid factor, antithyroperoxydase, antigliadin IgA and IgG, antitransgutaminase, and antiendomysium antibodies. Four groups of patients were considered separately, including 47 with schizophrenia, 23 with schizoaffective disorder, 16 with bipolar disorder and 17 patients with other different psychiatric diagnosis. Forty one healthy, age- and sex-matched blood donors were used as a control group. There were no significant difference in the prevalence of the different autoantibodies between patients (N = 103) and controls except for antigliadin IgG (30.1 vs 9.8 respectively, p = 0.01). Presence of autoantibodies was influenced by age but not by sex or treatment. As for diagnosis categories, patients with bipolar disorder presented significantly more autoantibodies than the three other categories and controls. These results point out a possible autoimmune activation in at least a subgroup of psychiatric patients especially amongst those suffering from bipolar disorder.

  8. The spectrum of autoantibodies in IPEX syndrome is broad and includes anti-mitochondrial autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Masanobu; Torgerson, Troy R; Selmi, Carlo; Gambineri, Eleonora; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda; Mannurita, Sara Ciullini; Leung, Patrick S C; Norman, Gary L; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-11-01

    IPEX syndrome is a congenital disorder of immune regulation caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene, which is required for the suppressive function of naturally arising CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells. In this case series we evaluated serum samples from 12 patients with IPEX syndrome for the presence of common autoantibodies associated with a broad range of autoimmune disorders. We note that 75% of patients (9/12) had 1 or more autoantibodies, an incidence far above the cumulative rate observed in the general population. The range of autoantibodies differed between patients and there was no predominant autoantibody or pattern of autoantibodies present in this cohort. Surprisingly, one patient had high-titer anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA) typically associated with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) although the patient had no signs of cholestasis. PBC is a well-characterized autoimmune disease that occurs primarily in women and includes the serological hallmarks of serum AMA and elevated IgM which were both present in this patient. PBC is virtually absent in children with the exception of one reported child with interleukin 2 receptor α (CD25) deficiency which is associated with an IPEX-like regulatory T cell dysfunction. Based on the present data and the available literature we suggest a direct role for CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells in restraining B cell autoantibody production and that defects in regulatory T cells may be crucial to the development of PBC.

  9. [ANCA(antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies)-associated vasculitis in a man with extreme fatigue, fever and progressive renal dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Bakashvili, N; Swaak, A J G; Tervaert, J W Cohen; Dees, A

    2008-04-26

    A 55-year-old man, with no previous history, presented with extreme fatigue and fever and was admitted to hospital. He had progressive renal dysfunction and his serum anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) were markedly elevated. Renal histology was consistent with ANCA-associated vasculitis. The patient was successfully treated with cyclophosphamide and prednisolone. The classification and management of the ANCA-associated vasculitides are described. The classification was guided by the clinical presentation, serology and results of tissue biopsies. The ANCA inflammation had affected the middle sized and small vessels of especially the upper and lower airways, and the kidneys. The antibodies were directed at proteinase-3 (PR3) or myeloperoxidase (MPO). PR3-ANCA is predominantly found in Wegener's granulomatosis, while MPO-ANCA is related to microscopic polyangiitis. Tissue studies showed granulomatous inflammation of the airways which is typical of Wegener's disease. This type of inflammation is absent in microscopic polyangiitis. The initial treatment schedule consists of prednisone 1 mg/kg daily and oral cyclophosphamide 2 mg/kg daily. In the remission phase, the cyclophosphamide is replaced by azathioprine. It is not yet known how long maintenance treatment should be continued and which parameters have prognostic value.

  10. Autoantibodies to Ca2+ binding protein Calnuc is a potential marker in colon cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Lin, Ping; Qiu, Suimin; Peng, Xuan-Xian; Looi, Koksun; Farquhar, Marilyn Gist; Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2007-05-01

    Calnuc is a calcium (Ca2+) binding protein found in both Golgi and cytoplasm, and it may play a role in G protein- and Ca2+-regulated signal transduction events. This study was designed to investigate the possibility of whether Calnuc protein might be a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) that induces autoantibody response in human cancers, and to evaluate the feasibility of the Calnuc antigen-antibody system as a marker in cancer detection. Purified full-length recombinant Calnuc protein was used as an antigen in enzyme-linked immunoassay and Western blotting for the detection of autoantibodies in cancers. Sera from 447 patients with 9 different types of cancer were analyzed. Although the frequency of autoantibody to Calnuc was found to be 4.7% in total groups of cancer, it was not significantly different to that of normal individuals (1.2%). However, the frequency of autoantibody to Calnuc in colon cancer (11.5%) was significantly higher than that in normal individuals (1.2%). The expression analysis of Calnuc in multiple colon cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry on tissue array further confirmed the high specificity of Calnuc in colon cancer. Of 69 colon cancer tissue specimens examined, 41 tissues (59.4%) overexpressed Calnuc, while normal colon tissues did not show any expression of Calnuc. The subcellular distribution analysis of Calnuc examined by subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence indicates that Calnuc is a membrane associated protein and mostly distributed in Golgi, which is consistent with previous reports. With adding Calnuc into a TAA array (including p53, c-myc, cyclin B1, cyclin D1), the cumulative frequency of antibody to multiple TAAs in colon cancer was raised to 65.4% which is significantly higher than the cumulative frequency in normal individuals (6.1%). This indicates that a mini-array of multiple TAAs which includes Calnuc might provide a novel non-invasive approach to enhance antibody detection for colon cancer diagnosis.

  11. Prognostic relevance of Bmi-1 expression and autoantibodies in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Overexpression of Bmi-1 has been observed in a variety of cancers, and it has been suggested to be an independent prognostic marker for the patients. The objective of this study was to determine the level of Bmi-1 expression or its autoantibodies in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and to correlate it with clinicopathologic data. Methods We first examined Bmi-1 expression in ESCC cell lines and tumor samples by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. We then analyzed Bmi-1 protein expression in 171 clinicopathologically characterized ESCC cases by immunohistochemistry. In addition, we detected its autoantibodies in sera of patients with ESCC by ELISA. Results We found that Bmi-1 expression was higher in the immortalized cells, cancer cell lines and most cancer tissue than in non-tumorous control tissue at both mRNA and protein level. In addition, Bmi-1 expression was observed in 64.3% (110 of 171) archive ESCC specimen by immunohistochemistry analysis, and the location of Bmi-1 in ESCC was in the nuclei instead of cytoplasm of tumor cells. There was a significant difference of Bmi-1 expression in patients categorized according to stage (P = 0.003) and pN classification (P = 0.047). Multivariate analysis suggested that Bmi-1 expression was an independent prognostic marker for ESCC patients. A prognostic significance of Bmi-1 was also found in the subgroup of T3~T4 and N1 tumor classification. Bmi-1 autoantibodies were detected in sera of 39.0% (62 of 159) ESCC patients. The correlations between anti-Bmi-1 antibodies and tumor stage (P = 0.040), or lymph node status (P < 0.001) were significant. Conclusions Our results suggest that Bmi-1 protein is a valuable marker of ESCC progression. The presence of Bmi-1 autoantibodies in sera from patients with ESCC may have clinical utility in esophageal cancer diagnosis. PMID:20809956

  12. Targeted cytoplasmic irradiation and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinhua; Zhang, Bo; Wuu, Yen-Ruh; Davidson, Mercy M; Hei, Tom K

    2017-03-01

    The effect of ionizing irradiation on cytoplasmic organelles is often underestimated because the general dogma considers direct DNA damage in the nuclei to be the primary cause of radiation induced toxicity. Using a precision microbeam irradiator, we examined the changes in mitochondrial dynamics and functions triggered by targeted cytoplasmic irradiation with α-particles. Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by targeted cytoplasmic irradiation led to activation of autophagy, which degraded dysfunctional mitochondria in order to maintain cellular energy homeostasis. The activation of autophagy was cytoplasmic irradiation-specific and was not detected in nuclear irradiated cells. This autophagic process was oxyradical-dependent and required the activity of the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin related protein 1 (DRP1). The resultant mitochondrial fission induced phosphorylation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) which leads to further activation of the extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) 1/2 with concomitant inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) to initiate autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy resulted in delayed DNA damage repair and decreased cell viability, which supports the cytoprotective function of autophagy. Our results reveal a novel mechanism in which dysfunctional mitochondria are degraded by autophagy in an attempt to protect cells from toxic effects of targeted cytoplasmic radiation.

  13. Probing the structure of cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    We have used size-fractionated, fluorescent dextrans to probe the structure of the cytoplasmic ground substance of living Swiss 3T3 cells by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and video image processing. The data indicate that the cytoplasm of living cells has a fluid phase viscosity four times greater than water and contains structural barriers that restrict free diffusion of dissolved macromolecules in a size-dependent manner. Assuming these structural barriers comprise a filamentous meshwork, the combined fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and imaging data suggest that the average pore size of the meshwork is in the range of 300 to 400 A, but may be as small as 200 A in some cytoplasmic domains. PMID:2423529

  14. Classification, epidemiology and clinical subgrouping of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Watts, Richard A; Mahr, Alfred; Mohammad, Aladdin J; Gatenby, Paul; Basu, Neil; Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe

    2015-04-01

    It is now 25 years since the first European studies on vasculitis--the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) standardization project. Over that period of time, there have been major developments in the classification of the vasculitides, which has permitted the conduct of high-quality epidemiology studies. Studying the epidemiology of rare diseases such as the ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV) poses considerable challenges to epidemiologists. The first is the need for a clear definition of a case with good differentiation from similar disorders. The second is case capture. The vasculitides are rare, and therefore, a large population is required to determine the incidence and prevalence, and this poses questions of feasibility. A large population increases the risk of incomplete case detection but permits a reasonable number of cases to be collected in a practicable time frame, whereas a smaller population requires a much longer time frame to collect the necessary cases, which may also not be feasible. Statistical methods of capture-recapture analysis enable estimates to be made of the number of missing cases. The third is case ascertainment. The AAV are virtually always managed in secondary care, and therefore, hospital-based case ascertainment may be appropriate. Fourthly, the rarity of the conditions makes prospective case-control studies investigating risk factors difficult to conduct because the population size required to achieve statistical confidence is in excess of that which is readily available. Thus, much of the data on risk factors are derived from retrospective studies with inherent potential bias. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  15. Angiotensin receptor agonistic autoantibodies and hypertension: preeclampsia and beyond.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yang; Kellems, Rodney E

    2013-06-21

    Hypertensive disorders are life-threatening diseases with high morbidity and mortality, affecting billions of individuals worldwide. A multitude of underlying conditions may contribute to hypertension, thus the need for a plethora of treatment options to identify the approach that best meets the needs of individual patients. A growing body of evidence indicates that (1) autoantibodies that bind to and activate the major angiotensin II type I (AT₁) receptor exist in the circulation of patients with hypertensive disorders, (2) these autoantibodies contribute to disease pathophysiology, (3) antibody titers correlate to the severity of the disease, and (4) efforts to block or remove these pathogenic autoantibodies have therapeutic potential. These autoantibodies, termed AT₁ agonistic autoantibodies have been extensively characterized in preeclampsia, a life-threatening hypertensive condition of pregnancy. As reviewed here, these autoantibodies cause symptoms of preeclampsia when injected into pregnant mice. Somewhat surprisingly, these auto antibodies also appear in 3 animal models of preeclampsia. However, the occurrence of AT₁ agonistic autoantibodies is not restricted to pregnancy. These autoantibodies are prevalent among kidney transplant recipients who develop severe transplant rejection and malignant hypertension during the first week after transplantation. AT₁ agonistic autoantibodies are also highly abundant among a group of patients with essential hypertension that are refractory to standard therapy. More recently these autoantibodies have been seen in patients with the autoimmune disease, systemic sclerosis. These 3 examples extend the clinical impact of AT₁ agonistic autoantibodies beyond pregnancy. Research reviewed here raises the intriguing possibility that preeclampsia and other hypertensive conditions are autoimmune diseases characterized by the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies that activate the major angiotensin receptor, AT₁. These

  16. Strategies for building reference standards for autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Joanna; Dellavance, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Producing robust, certified, traceable reference material for autoantibody testing is a vital element in maintaining the validity of results that are generated in the daily clinical laboratory routine. This is a huge challenge because of the high number of variables involved in the detection and measurement of the autoantibodies. The production of such materials is time consuming and needs rigorous attention to detail; this is best achieved by an overarching independent body who will oversee the process in a "not for profit" manner. Much effort has been made to build international standards for quantitative and qualitative assays based on monoclonal antibodies, obtained from affinity purification and plasmapheresis. The big challenge is to respect individual differences in immune response to the same antigen. A promising ongoing initiative is the construction of pools with monospecific samples from different individuals.

  17. Characterization of Ganglionic Acetylcholine Receptor Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Vernino, Steven; Lindstrom, Jon; Hopkins, Steve; Wang, Zhengbei; Low, Phillip A.

    2008-01-01

    In myasthenia gravis (MG), autoantibodies bind to the α1 subunit and other subunits of the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG) is an antibody-mediated neurological disorder caused by antibodies against neuronal AChRs in autonomic ganglia. Subunits of muscle and neuronal AChR are homologous. We examined the specificity of AChR antibodies in patients with MG and AAG. Ganglionic AChR autoantibodies found in AAG patients are specific for AChRs containing the α3 subunit. Muscle and ganglionic AChR antibody specificities are distinct. Antibody crossreactivity between AChRs with different α subunits is uncommon but can occur. PMID:18485491

  18. Muscle autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis: beyond diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Meriggioli, Matthew N; Sanders, Donald B

    2012-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction. A number of molecules, including ion channels and other proteins at the neuromuscular junction, may be targeted by autoantibodies leading to abnormal neuromuscular transmission. In approximately 85% of patients, autoantibodies, directed against the postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor can be detected in the serum and confirm the diagnosis, but in general, do not precisely predict the degree of weakness or response to therapy. Antibodies to the muscle-specific tyrosine kinase are detected in approximately 50% of generalized myasthenia gravis patients who are seronegative for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies, and levels of anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibodies do appear to correlate with disease severity and treatment response. Antibodies to other muscle antigens may be found in the subsets of myasthenia gravis patients, potentially providing clinically useful diagnostic information, but their utility as relevant biomarkers (measures of disease state or response to treatment) is currently unclear. PMID:22882218

  19. Autoantibodies and liver disease: uses and abuses.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Marilyn V; Hirschfield, Gideon M

    2010-04-01

    Confirming whether a patient has autoimmune liver disease is challenging, given its varied presentation and complex definitions. In the continued absence of pathognomonic serum markers, diagnosis requires evaluation of laboratory investigations and, frequently, a liver biopsy - all of which need to be interpreted in the correct clinical context, with an emphasis on exclusion of viral infections, drug toxicity and metabolic disease. However, clear diagnosis is important for appropriate and timely therapy. Autoantibodies remain important tools for clinicians, and were the first proposed serological markers to aid in differentiating viral from chronic autoimmune hepatitis. Their presence is occasionally considered to be synonymous with autoimmune liver disease - a misinterpretation of their clinical significance. The present article summarizes the serum autoantibodies currently investigated in clinical and research practice, along with a description of their value in adult chronic liver diseases, with an emphasis on their appropriate use in the diagnosis and management of patients with autoimmune liver disease.

  20. Strategies for Building Reference Standards for Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, Joanna; Dellavance, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Producing robust, certified, traceable reference material for autoantibody testing is a vital element in maintaining the validity of results that are generated in the daily clinical laboratory routine. This is a huge challenge because of the high number of variables involved in the detection and measurement of the autoantibodies. The production of such materials is time consuming and needs rigorous attention to detail; this is best achieved by an overarching independent body who will oversee the process in a “not for profit” manner. Much effort has been made to build international standards for quantitative and qualitative assays based on monoclonal antibodies, obtained from affinity purification and plasmapheresis. The big challenge is to respect individual differences in immune response to the same antigen. A promising ongoing initiative is the construction of pools with monospecific samples from different individuals. PMID:25972866

  1. Detection of Anti-Pentraxin-3 Autoantibodies in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Simon, Amélie; Subra, Jean-François; Guilpain, Philippe; Jeannin, Pascale; Pignon, Pascale; Blanchard, Simon; Garo, Erwan; Jaillon, Sébastien; Chevailler, Alain; Renier, Gilles; Puéchal, Xavier; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto; Delneste, Yves; Augusto, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3), in common with myeloperoxidase and proteinase 3, is stored in human neutrophil granules and is expressed on apoptotic neutrophil surface. We therefore investigated the presence of anti-PTX3 autoantibodies (aAbs) in the sera of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) patients. Presence of anti-PTX3 autoantibodies was analysed by a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in sera from 150 patients with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), and in sera of 227 healthy subjects (HS), 40 systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, and 25 giant cell arteritis patients (GCA). Using indirect immunofluorescence on fixed human neutrophils, we also analyzed the staining pattern associated with the presence of anti-PTX3 aAbs. Anti-PTX3 aAbs were detected in 56 of 150 (37.3%) of the AAV patients (versus 12 of 227 (5.3%) of HS, p<0.001) and, interestingly, in 7 of 14 MPO and PR3 ANCA negative AAV patients. Moreover, by indirect immunofluorescence on fixed neutrophils, anti-PTX3 aAbs gave rise to a specific cytoplasmic fluorescence pattern distinct from the classical cytoplasmic (c-ANCA), perinuclear (p-ANCA), and atypical (a-ANCA) pattern. Anti-PTX3 aAbs levels were higher in patients with active AAV as compared to patients with inactive disease. Our work suggests that PTX3 is as a novel ANCA antigen. Anti-PTX3 aAbs appear thus as a promising novel biomarker in the diagnosis of AAV, including in patients without detectable MPO and PR3 ANCA.

  2. Detection of Anti-Pentraxin-3 Autoantibodies in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Guilpain, Philippe; Jeannin, Pascale; Pignon, Pascale; Blanchard, Simon; Garo, Erwan; Jaillon, Sébastien; Chevailler, Alain; Renier, Gilles; Puéchal, Xavier; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto; Delneste, Yves; Augusto, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pentraxin 3 (PTX3), in common with myeloperoxidase and proteinase 3, is stored in human neutrophil granules and is expressed on apoptotic neutrophil surface. We therefore investigated the presence of anti-PTX3 autoantibodies (aAbs) in the sera of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) patients. Methods Presence of anti-PTX3 autoantibodies was analysed by a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in sera from 150 patients with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA), and in sera of 227 healthy subjects (HS), 40 systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, and 25 giant cell arteritis patients (GCA). Using indirect immunofluorescence on fixed human neutrophils, we also analyzed the staining pattern associated with the presence of anti-PTX3 aAbs. Results Anti-PTX3 aAbs were detected in 56 of 150 (37.3%) of the AAV patients (versus 12 of 227 (5.3%) of HS, p<0.001) and, interestingly, in 7 of 14 MPO and PR3 ANCA negative AAV patients. Moreover, by indirect immunofluorescence on fixed neutrophils, anti-PTX3 aAbs gave rise to a specific cytoplasmic fluorescence pattern distinct from the classical cytoplasmic (c-ANCA), perinuclear (p-ANCA), and atypical (a-ANCA) pattern. Anti-PTX3 aAbs levels were higher in patients with active AAV as compared to patients with inactive disease. Conclusion Our work suggests that PTX3 is as a novel ANCA antigen. Anti-PTX3 aAbs appear thus as a promising novel biomarker in the diagnosis of AAV, including in patients without detectable MPO and PR3 ANCA. PMID:26797217

  3. [Stiff-person syndrome and related autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Ryo; Tanaka, Keiko

    2013-04-01

    Central nervous system hyperexcitability disorders, known as stiff-man/person syndrome (SPS), are thought to be related to the regulatory disturbance of inhibitory synaptic transmission of motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord. SPS is characterized by stiffness and spasms of the axis and limbs and is divided into two clinical subgroups: classic SPS, which affects the lumbar, trunk, and proximal limb muscles, and SPS-plus syndrome. The latter comprises (1) the stiff-limb subtype, in which symptom is limited to the lower limbs; (2) jerking stiff-man syndrome, characterized by chronically progressive stiffness and myoclonus; and (3) acute-onset and progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. Almost 80% of patients with classic SPS harbor autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65). In approximately 30-40% of patients, SPS accompanies type I diabetes, and anti-GAD65 antibodies are detected frequently in type I diabetes. However, the antibody-recognizing epitopes might be different between SPS and diabetes. Other autoantibodies against glycine receptor α1 (12% of patients with SPS) and GABA(A)-receptor associated protein (70% of patients with SPS) have been reported. In paraneoplastic SPS, anti-amphiphysin antibodies have been shown in patients with breast cancer or small cell lung cancer. One case of mediastinal tumor with anti-gephyrin antibodies has also been reported. However, the roles of these autoantibodies in the pathomechanisms of SPS have not yet been elucidated.

  4. Characterisation of osteoprotegerin autoantibodies in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Real, Ana; Gilbert, Nick; Hauser, Barbara; Kennedy, Nick; Shand, Alan; Gillett, Helen; Gillett, Peter; Goddard, Clive; Cebolla, Ángel; Sousa, Carolina; Fraser, William D; Satsangi, Jack; Ralston, Stuart H; Riches, Philip L

    2015-08-01

    Autoantibodies neutralising the effect of the bone regulatory cytokine osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been described in a patient with severe osteoporosis and coeliac disease. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and epitope specificity of autoantibodies to OPG in patients with coeliac disease, and correlate their presence with bone mineral density. A direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed and used to screen patients with coeliac disease for autoantibodies to OPG. Recombinant fragments of OPG were made to evaluate the epitope specificity and affinity of these antibodies. Phenotype information of the patients was obtained by case note review. Raised titres of antibodies to OPG were found in 7/71 (9.8 %) patients with coeliac disease, compared with 1/72 (1.4 %) non-coeliac osteoporosis clinic control patients (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that a polyclonal antibody response to OPG is raised in these patients capable of recognising different epitopes of OPG with varying affinity. The titre of OPG antibodies was associated with lower bone mineral density Z-score of the hip in coeliac patients on univariate (p < 0.05) and multivariate analysis including age, sex height and weight as covariates (p < 0.01). Polyclonal antibodies to OPG are more common in patients with coeliac disease and are independently associated with lower bone mineral density Z-scores of the hip. Further work is required to establish the clinical utility of testing for OPG antibodies.

  5. Warm reactive autoantibodies: clinical and serologic correlations.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Christine A; Calhoun, Loni; Blackall, Douglas P

    2004-11-01

    Warm reactive autoantibodies are encountered relatively frequently in tertiary care hospitals. We studied 100 consecutive patients with warm autoantibodies to correlate their clinical and serologic features. Study patients (56 male, 44 female) had various diagnoses and a mean age of 53.5 years (range, 3-90 years). Autoimmune hemolysis was documented in 29 patients; 20 patients (69%) in this subset had diseases classically associated with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (hematologic and autoimmune disorders). All study patients demonstrated IgG on their RBCs (direct antiglobulin test [DAT] reactivity range, microscopic to 4+); 49 also demonstrated C3 (reactivity range, microscopic to 3+). The DAT for IgG was 2+ or more in 25 (86%) of 29 patients with hemolysis; the DAT for IgG was 1+ or less in 45 (63%) of 71 patients without hemolysis. In patients with hemolysis, 21 (72%) of 29 had a DAT reactive for C3. These findings may be useful in determining the clinical significance of warm autoantibodies and the extent to which patients should be followed up for hemolysis.

  6. Diagnostic and pathogenic significance of glutamate receptor autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Pleasure, David

    2008-05-01

    Autoantibodies against glutamate receptors, first reported in Rasmussen encephalitis, have been observed in other focal epilepsies, central nervous system ischemic infarcts, transient ischemic attacks, sporadic olivopontocerebellar atrophy, systemic lupus erythematosus, and paraneoplastic encephalopathies. The detection of glutamate receptor autoantibodies is not useful in the evaluation of Rasmussen encephalitis but may be a biomarker for brain ischemia, and it is helpful in diagnosing certain paraneoplastic encephalopathies. Passive transfer of glutamate receptor autoantibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or paraneoplastic encephalopathy suggests that glutamate receptor autoantibodies can actively contribute to neurologic dysfunction.

  7. Characterization of pathogenic human monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanni; Thomson, Christy A.; Allan, Lenka L.; Jackson, Linda M.; Olson, Melanie; Hercus, Timothy R.; Nero, Tracy L.; Turner, Amanda; Parker, Michael W.; Lopez, Angel L.; Waddell, Thomas K.; Anderson, Gary P.; Hamilton, John A.; Schrader, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of pathogenic autoantibodies remains unknown. Idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is caused by autoantibodies against granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We generated 19 monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF from six patients with idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The autoantibodies used multiple V genes, excluding preferred V-gene use as an etiology, and targeted at least four nonoverlapping epitopes on GM-CSF, suggesting that GM-CSF is driving the autoantibodies and not a B-cell epitope on a pathogen cross-reacting with GM-CSF. The number of somatic mutations in the autoantibodies suggests that the memory B cells have been helped by T cells and re-entered germinal centers. All autoantibodies neutralized GM-CSF bioactivity, with general correlations to affinity and off-rate. The binding of certain autoantibodies was changed by point mutations in GM-CSF that reduced binding to the GM-CSF receptor. Those monoclonal autoantibodies that potently neutralize GM-CSF may be useful in treating inflammatory disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, cancer, and pain. PMID:23620516

  8. CYTOPLASMIC GRANULE FORMATION IN MYELOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Fedorko, Martha E.; Hirsch, James G.

    1966-01-01

    The intracellular flow of tritiated lysine as revealed by electron microscope radioautography was studied in heterophilic myelocytes of rabbit marrow. Label over the Golgi complex rose to a maximum of 37% of total cytoplasmic grains 30 min after initial exposure to the tracer and fell to 11% after 3 to 4 hr of incubation. Coincident with decrease in label over the Golgi complex, grain counts over granules rose to 32% after 3 to 4 hr. The time sequence of incorporation and flow of tritiated lysine and the per cent distribution of label was similar in bone marrow myelocytes under in vivo and in vitro conditions. The results demonstrate a function of the Golgi complex in incorporating or packaging certain basic amino acids or proteins into cytoplasmic granules of heterophilic myelocytes. PMID:5961343

  9. Cytoplasmic myosin from Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Myosin is identified and purified from three different established Drosophila melanogaster cell lines (Schneider's lines 2 and 3 and Kc). Purification entails lysis in a low salt, sucrose buffer that contains ATP, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, precipitation with actin in the absence of ATP, gel filtration in a discontinuous KI-KCl buffer system, and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Yield of pure cytoplasmic myosin is 5-10%. This protein is identified as myosin by its cross-reactivity with two monoclonal antibodies against human platelet myosin, the molecular weight of its heavy chain, its two light chains, its behavior on gel filtration, its ATP-dependent affinity for actin, its characteristic ATPase activity, its molecular morphology as demonstrated by platinum shadowing, and its ability to form bipolar filaments. The molecular weight of the cytoplasmic myosin's light chains and peptide mapping and immunochemical analysis of its heavy chains demonstrate that this myosin, purified from Drosophila cell lines, is distinct from Drosophila muscle myosin. Two-dimensional thin layer maps of complete proteolytic digests of iodinated muscle and cytoplasmic myosin heavy chains demonstrate that, while the two myosins have some tryptic and alpha-chymotryptic peptides in common, most peptides migrate with unique mobility. One-dimensional peptide maps of SDS PAGE purified myosin heavy chain confirm these structural data. Polyclonal antiserum raised and reacted against Drosophila myosin isolated from cell lines cross-reacts only weakly with Drosophila muscle myosin isolated from the thoraces of adult Drosophila. Polyclonal antiserum raised against Drosophila muscle myosin behaves in a reciprocal fashion. Taken together our data suggest that the myosin purified from Drosophila cell lines is a bona fide cytoplasmic myosin and is very likely the product of a different myosin gene than the muscle myosin heavy chain gene that has been previously identified and characterized. PMID

  10. Active sliding between cytoplasmic microtubules.

    PubMed

    Koonce, M P; Tong, J; Euteneuer, U; Schliwa, M

    Microtubules are versatile cellular polymers that play a role in cell shape determination and mediate various motile processes such as ciliary and flagellar bending, chromosome movements and organelle transport. That a sliding microtubule mechanism can generate force has been demonstrated in highly ordered structures such as axonemes, and microtubule-based force generation almost certainly contributes to the function of mitotic and meiotic spindles. Most cytoplasmic microtubule arrays, however, do not exhibit the structural regularity of axonemes and some spindles, and often appear disorganized. Yet many cellular activities (such as shape changes during morphogenesis, axonal extension and spindle assembly) involve highly coordinated microtubule behaviour and possibly require force generated by an intermicrotubule sliding mechanism, or perhaps use sliding to move microtubules rapidly into a protrusion for stabilization. Here we show that active sliding between cytoplasmic microtubules can occur in microtubule bundles of the amoeba Reticulomyxa. A force-producing mechanism of this sort could be used by this organism to facilitate the extension of cell processes and to generate the dynamic movements of the cytoplasmic network.

  11. AT2R autoantibodies block angiotensin II and AT1R autoantibody-induced vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Liles, Campbell; Li, Hongliang; Veitla, Vineet; Liles, Jonathan T; Murphy, Taylor A; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Yu, Xichun; Kem, David C

    2015-10-01

    Activating autoantibodies to the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) are associated with hypertensive disorders. The angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) is known to counter-regulate the actions of AT1R. We investigated whether AT2R autoantibodies produced in immunized rabbits will activate AT2R and suppress the vasopressor responses to angiotensin II and AT1R-activating autoantibodies. Five rabbits immunized with a peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop of AT2R developed high AT2R antibody titers. Rabbit anti-AT2R sera failed to directly dilate isolated rat cremaster arterioles; however, when co-perfused with angiotensin II or AT1R-activating autoantibodies, the anti-AT2R sera significantly inhibited their contractile effects. Rabbit anti-AT2R sera recognized a predominant sequence near the N-terminus of the AT2R second extracellular loop. A decoy peptide based on this sequence effectively reversed the opposing effect of the anti-AT2R sera on angiotensin II-induced contraction of rat cremaster arterioles. A similar blockade of the anti-AT2R sera effect was observed with the AT2R antagonist PD 123319 and the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. Rabbit anti-AT2R sera reacted specifically with AT2R. No cross-reactivity with AT1R was observed. Blood pressure did not change in immunized animals. However, the pressor responses to incremental angiotensin II infusions were blunted in immunized animals. Thirteen subjects with primary aldosteronism demonstrated increased AT2R autoantibody levels compared with normal controls. In conclusion, AT2R autoantibodies produced in immunized rabbits have the ability to activate AT2R and counteract the AT1R-mediated vasoconstriction. These autoantibodies provide useful and selective tools for the study of their roles in blood pressure regulation and possible therapeutic intervention. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Distinct Functions of Autoantibodies Against Interferon in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Comprehensive Analysis of Anticytokine Autoantibodies in Common Rheumatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sarthak; Tatouli, Ioanna P; Rosen, Lindsey B; Hasni, Sarfaraz; Alevizos, Ilias; Manna, Zerai G; Rivera, Juan; Jiang, Chao; Siegel, Richard M; Holland, Steven M; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M; Browne, Sarah K

    2016-07-01

    Anticytokine autoantibodies occur across a range of hematologic, pulmonary, and infectious diseases. However, systematic investigation of their presence and significance in autoimmune diseases is lacking. This study was undertaken to examine the distinct functions of anticytokine autoantibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared to patients with other rheumatic diseases and healthy controls. Serum samples from patients with SLE (n = 199), patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) (n = 150), patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 149), and healthy controls (n = 200) were screened for 24 anticytokine autoantibodies using a multiplex bead-based assay. To evaluate the biologic activity of anticytokine autoantibodies, their ability to block cytokine-induced signal transduction or protein expression was measured. RNA sequencing was performed on whole blood in a subset of healthy controls and patients with SLE. Patients with SLE and those with SS had a striking excess of autoantibodies against interferons and the interferon-responsive chemokine interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10). Only autoantibodies against type I interferon, interleukin-12 (IL-12), and IL-22 exhibited neutralizing activity. In SLE, the presence of anti-interferon-γ autoantibodies was correlated with more severe disease activity, higher levels of anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies, and elevated expression of interferon-α/β-inducible genes. Conversely, in SLE patients with blocking anti-interferon-α autoantibodies, the type I interferon gene expression signature was normalized. Anti-type III interferon autoantibodies (λ2, λ3) and anti-IP-10 autoantibodies were newly recognized in SLE patient serum, and autoantibodies against macrophage-colony stimulating factor, IL-4, IL-7, IL-17, and IL-22, none of which have been previously identified in rheumatic conditions, were discovered. Anticytokine autoantibodies are associated with distinct patterns

  13. How Relevant Are GFAP Autoantibodies in Autism and Tourette Syndrome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkman, Nikki J.; Libbey, Jane E.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Coon, Hilary H.; Miller, Judith N.; Stevenson, Edward K.; Lainhart, Janet E.; McMahon, William M.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Controversy exists over the role of autoantibodies to central nervous system antigens in autism and Tourette Syndrome. We investigated plasma autoantibody titers to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in children with classic onset (33) and regressive onset (26) autism, controls (25, healthy age- and gender-matched) and individuals with…

  14. How Relevant Are GFAP Autoantibodies in Autism and Tourette Syndrome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkman, Nikki J.; Libbey, Jane E.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Coon, Hilary H.; Miller, Judith N.; Stevenson, Edward K.; Lainhart, Janet E.; McMahon, William M.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Controversy exists over the role of autoantibodies to central nervous system antigens in autism and Tourette Syndrome. We investigated plasma autoantibody titers to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in children with classic onset (33) and regressive onset (26) autism, controls (25, healthy age- and gender-matched) and individuals with…

  15. Distinguishing persistent insulin autoantibodies with differential risk: nonradioactive bivalent proinsulin/insulin autoantibody assay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liping; Miao, Dongmei; Scrimgeour, Laura; Johnson, Kelly; Rewers, Marian; Eisenbarth, George S

    2012-01-01

    A subset of children develops persistent insulin autoantibodies (IAA; almost always as the only islet autoantibody) without evidence of progression to diabetes. The aim of the current study was the development and characterization of the performance of a nonradioactive fluid phase IAA assay in relation to standard IAA radioassay. We developed a nonradioactive IAA assay where bivalent IAA cross-link two insulin moieties in a fluid phase. The serum samples positive for anti-islet autoantibodies from 150 newly diagnosed patients with diabetes (Barbara Davis Center plus Diabetes Autoantibody Standardization Program [DASP] workshop) and 70 prediabetic subjects who were followed to diabetes were studied. In addition, sequential samples from 64 nondiabetic subjects who were persistently IAA(+) were analyzed. With 99th percentile of specificity, the new assay with the technology from Meso Scale Discovery Company (MSD-IAA) detects as positive 61% (61 of 100) of new-onset patients and 80% (56 of 70) of prediabetic patients compared with our current fluid phase micro-IAA radioassay (mIAA; 44 and 74%, respectively). In addition, MSD-IAA demonstrated better sensitivity than our mIAA from blinded DASP workshop (68 vs. 56% with the same 99% specificity). Of 64 IAA(+) nondiabetic subjects, 25% (8 of 32) who had only IAA and thus the low risk for progression to diabetes were positive with MSD-IAA assay. In contrast, 100% (32 of 32) high-risk children (IAA plus other islet autoantibodies) were positive with MSD-IAA. The IAA detectable by radioassay, but not MSD-IAA, were usually of lower affinity compared with the IAA of the high-risk children. These data suggest that a subset of IAA with current radioassay (not MSD-IAA) represents biologic false positives in terms of autoimmunity leading to diabetes. We hypothesize that factors related to the mechanism of loss of tolerance leading to diabetes determine high affinity and MSD-IAA reactivity.

  16. Autoantibody recognition mechanisms of MUC1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2017-03-01

    The most cost-effective blood-based, noninvasive molecular early cancer biomarkers are based on p53 epitopes and MUC1 tandem repeats. Here we use dimensionally compressed bioinformatic fractal scaling analysis to compare the two distinct and comparable probes, which examine different sections of the autoantibody population, achieving combined sensitivities of order 50%. We explain the experimental observation that glycosylation does not enhance, and can depress, the sensitivity of MUC1 tandem repeat biomarkers. We propose a possible supplementary MUC1 epitope in the SEA region outside the tandem repeats.

  17. (Auto)antibodies in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Severine; Vermeulen, Nathalie; Van Assche, Gert; Bossuyt, Xavier; Rutgeerts, Paul

    2008-06-01

    Patients who have inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) express strong antibody responses to a variety of epitopes. A number of (auto)antibodies have been described in patients who have Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. These markers reflect a loss of tolerance toward bacterial and fungal flora and have been studied for their clinical value in IBD patients. However, currently, they have no place in the diagnostic work up. Their real promise may lie in their use as surrogate markers of complicated aggressive disease as shown in various retrospective studies, but prospective data are lacking.

  18. Colostrum of healthy mothers contains broad spectrum of secretory IgA autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Pribylova, Jaroslava; Krausova, Klara; Kocourkova, Ingrid; Rossmann, Pavel; Klimesova, Klara; Kverka, Miloslav; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena

    2012-12-01

    Human colostrum and milk provide a newborn with immunomodulatory components, ensuring protection and proper development of the immune system. Secretory IgA antibodies in colostrum represent the first line of defence against harmful substances, but their potential spectra of reactivity with autoantigens remains unclear. Here, we characterised the repertoire of natural sectretory IgA autoantibodies in colostrum of healthy mothers. The human colostrum samples from 39 healthy mothers were analyzed for autoantibodies by indirect immunofluorescence, dot blots, immunoblots and ELISA. We found that there is high diversity in reactivities of colostral IgA antibodies to autoantigens among individual samples. Using tissue sections and biochips commonly used for autoimmunity testing, we found that most samples reacted with monkey ovary (79.3%), monkey pancreatic tissue (78.6%), human HEp-2 cells (69%) and monkey adrenal gland (69.0%), fewer samples reacted with monkey liver tissue (47.2%), rat stomach (42.9%), monkey testicular tissue (41.4%), monkey salivary gland (39.3%), rat kidney (32.1%) and monkey cerebellar tissue (17.9%). At the protein level, we detected reactivity of IgA with 21 out of 25 (auto) antigens. The majority of the samples reacted with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, E3 ubiquitin ligase, cytosolic liver antigen, promyelocytic leukemia protein and nuclear pore glycoprotein-210. Using ELISA, we found reactivity of colostral IgA antibodies against examined extractable nuclear antigens, double stranded DNA, phospholipids and neutrophil cytoplasm. The broad spectrum of polyreactive natural autoantibodies present in human colostrum may contribute to proper development of mucosal immune system of the breastfed infant.

  19. Autoantibodies directed against the protease inhibitor calpastatin in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Y; Shimada, Y; Kawara, S; Takehara, K; Sato, S

    2005-01-01

    Psoriasis is believed to be a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, but also exhibits autoantibody production. Calpastatin is an endogenous inhibitor of calpain, a ubiquitous protease that regulates inflammatory processes. Anti-calpastatin autoantibody was first identified as an autoantibody specific to rheumatoid arthritis, but has been also detected in other autoimmune diseases. In this study, we examined the presence and levels of anti-calpastatin antibody in 77 psoriasis patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Compared with normal controls, psoriasis patients exhibited significantly elevated IgG anti-calpastatin antibody levels that were similar to those found in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Remarkably, IgG anti-calpastatin autoantibody in sera from psoriasis patients inhibited calpastatin activity. Calpain II expression was up-regulated in psoriasis skin lesions compared with normal skin while calpastatin expression was normal. The results of this study reveal the presence of anti-calpastatin autoantibody in psoriasis. PMID:15654835

  20. EUROPattern Suite technology for computer-aided immunofluorescence microscopy in autoantibody diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Krause, C; Ens, K; Fechner, K; Voigt, J; Fraune, J; Rohwäder, E; Hahn, M; Danckwardt, M; Feirer, C; Barth, E; Martinetz, T; Stöcker, W

    2015-04-01

    Antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) are highly informative biomarkers in autoimmune diagnostics. The increasing demand for effective test systems, however, has led to the development of a confusingly large variety of different platforms. One of them, the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), is regarded as the common gold standard for ANA screening, as described in a position statement by the American College of Rheumatology in 2009. Technological solutions have been developed aimed at standardization and automation of IIF to overcome methodological limitations and subjective bias in IIF interpretation. In this review, we present the EUROPattern Suite, a system for computer-aided immunofluorescence microscopy (CAIFM) including automated acquisition of digital images and evaluation of IIF results. The system was originally designed for ANA diagnostics on human epithelial cells, but its applications have been extended with the latest system update version 1.5 to the analysis of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and anti-dsDNA antibodies.

  1. Cytoplasmic hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed Central

    al-Baldawi, N F; Abercrombie, R F

    1992-01-01

    The apparent cytoplasmic proton diffusion coefficient was measured using pH electrodes and samples of cytoplasm extracted from the giant neuron of a marine invertebrate. By suddenly changing the pH at one surface of the sample and recording the relaxation of pH within the sample, an apparent diffusion coefficient of 1.4 +/- 0.5 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7) was measured in the acidic or neutral range of pH (6.0-7.2). This value is approximately 5x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the mobile pH buffers (approximately 8 x 10(-6) cm2/s) and approximately 68x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the hydronium ion (93 x 10(-6) cm2/s). A mobile pH buffer (approximately 15% of the buffering power) and an immobile buffer (approximately 85% of the buffering power) could quantitatively account for the results at acidic or neutral pH. At alkaline pH (8.2-8.6), the apparent proton diffusion coefficient increased to 4.1 +/- 0.8 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7). This larger diffusion coefficient at alkaline pH could be explained quantitatively by the enhanced buffering power of the mobile amino acids. Under the conditions of these experiments, it is unlikely that hydroxide movement influences the apparent hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient. PMID:1617134

  2. The occurrence of autoantibodies in infectious mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, R. N. P.; Emond, R. T. D.; Thomas, D. B.; Doniach, D.

    1974-01-01

    Autoantibodies were looked for by immunofluorescence (IFL) in seventy-seven cases of infectious mononucleosis (IM) at the onset of symptoms and on recovery, to determine the time of appearance, duration and range of these responses, and to correlate them with serum immunoglobulin and EB virus antibody titres. Antibodies to lymphocyte membrane demonstrated by IFL, now identified with lymphocytotoxins, were present in 46% of patients in the acute stage, persisting for less than 7 weeks. Antibodies to smooth muscle (SMA) or to contractile fibres in other tissue cells including human thyroid and rat hepatocytes, were present in over 70% of cases, some being entirely of IgM class. The highest titres occurred soon after onset and these antibodies also disappeared during convalescence. By contrast ANA, mitochondrial, microsomal and reticulin antibodies, also thyroid and gastric organ-specific reactivity were seen only occasionally owing to the young age group of the patients. In individual cases there was no correlation between the appearance of lymphocyte antibodies and SMA, or between these and the EB virus antibody titres. The autoantibodies produced in this disease are highly selected. It is suggested that clones of B cells are stimulated to make these antibodies by virtue of being infected with EB virus, and that the T-cell clones in the circulation are more likely expanded in order to terminate the infection. PMID:4619789

  3. Autoantibody recognition mechanisms of p53 epitopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need for economical blood based, noninvasive molecular biomarkers to assist in the detection and diagnosis of cancers in a cost-effective manner at an early stage, when curative interventions are still possible. Serum autoantibodies are attractive biomarkers for early cancer detection, but their development has been hindered by the punctuated genetic nature of the ten million known cancer mutations. A landmark study of 50,000 patients (Pedersen et al., 2013) showed that a few p53 15-mer epitopes are much more sensitive colon cancer biomarkers than p53, which in turn is a more sensitive cancer biomarker than any other protein. The function of p53 as a nearly universal "tumor suppressor" is well established, because of its strong immunogenicity in terms of not only antibody recruitment, but also stimulation of autoantibodies. Here we examine dimensionally compressed bioinformatic fractal scaling analysis for identifying the few sensitive epitopes from the p53 amino acid sequence, and show how it could be used for early cancer detection (ECD). We trim 15-mers to 7-mers, and identify specific 7-mers from other species that could be more sensitive to aggressive human cancers, such as liver cancer. Our results could provide a roadmap for ECD.

  4. Incidence of autoantibodies in the infertile population.

    PubMed

    Cubillos, J; Lucena, A; Lucena, C; Mendoza, J C; Ruiz, H; Arango, A; Quiroga, G; Ferro, J; Lucena, E

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of autoantibodies in patients with no term pregnancies. Patients selected included 43 with primary infertility and 110 with a history of pregnancy loss. In the first group the incidence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and IgG and IgM antiphospholipid antibodies (APL) was 37.2% (p < 0.05) and 53.5% (p < 0.05), respectively. In the group of patients with a history of miscarriage, 31.8% (p < 0.05) were positive for ANA and 38.2% (p < 0.05) for APL. Controls were 35 healthy patients with proven fertility and no history of pregnancy loss or autoimmune disease. In this group the incidence of ANA was 5.7% and 11.4% for APL. The high incidence of autoantibodies found in patients with primary infertility might suggest a direct involvement of these antibodies in reproductive failure and consequently in IVF and assisted fertility procedures. The prevalence of ANA and APL has been extensively described in patients with a history of recurrent pregnancy losses (RPL). In this study we observed antibodies even after the first miscarriage. We therefore conclude that patients with a history of reproductive failure should be immunologically evaluated and treated before undergoing assisted fertilization techniques or before a new pregnancy in those cases of RPL.

  5. Testing for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Savige, J

    2001-09-01

    The most common reason to request a test for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) is to diagnose Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis and to monitor inflammatory activity in these diseases. Several retrospective and prospective studies have suggested that the demonstration of ANCA lacks sensitivity and specificity, but these series have detected ANCA with neutrophil-indirect immunofluorescence alone, have used a disease classification that did not describe microscopic polyangiitis and have included patients with inactive disease. The 'International Consensus Statement on Testing and Reporting ANCA' has been developed to optimize the clinical relevance of ANCA testing by the adoption of standardized testing and reporting procedures. International collaborative efforts continue to focus on improving the tests for ANCA.

  6. Pituitary autoantibodies in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED).

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Damien T; McElduff, Patrick; Peterson, Pärt; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Crock, Patricia A

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is an autosomal recessive disease due to mutations in the AIRE (AutoImmune REgulator) gene. The role of pituitary autoimmunity in APECED is not known. We determined the prevalence of pituitary autoantibodies in a cohort of 67 Finnish patients with APECED from 217 serum samples collected over 26 years by one investigator. Overall, autoantibodies to the 49 kDa cytosolic autoantigen, human pituitary enolase were detected in 39 of the 67 patients (58%). On their first sample, 25 patients had autoantibodies compared to 5 of 68 controls (chi-square, 1df=17.11, p< 0.001; OR=7.32), but subsequently 14 patients seroconverted between 10 and 53 years of age. Once seropositive, all but two of the patients maintained their positive autoantibody status, even over many years. In the current study all but 7 of the 19 patients known to have high titre anti-candidal enolase antibodies had developed autoantibodies directed against human pituitary enolase. Other pituitary autoantibody reactivities were detected against cytosolic proteins of molecular weights 40-, 45-, 60- and 105 kDa in 15%, 16%, 12% and 3% of patients respectively. Autoantibodies to pituitary enolase are markers of neuroendocrine autoimmunity but seem not to be associated with clinical hypopituitarism in APECED patients.

  7. [Occurrence of autoantibodies in patients with alcoholic liver disease].

    PubMed

    Szulzyk, Tomasz; Parfieniuk-Kowerda, Anna; Luto, Magdalena; Lapiński, Tadeusz Wojciech; Flisiak, Robert

    2012-09-01

    Autoantigens are present in normal cells and tissues. However, in physiological conditions autoantigens pose no danger due to the phenomenon of immunologic tolerance. The loss of immunologic tolerance and following autoagression could result from the structure changes of autoantigens as an effect of the activity of chemical factors, such as acetaldehyde, which is metabolite of ethanol. The aim of the study was to evaluate of occurrence of autoantibodies in patients with alcoholic liver disease. Ninety-five patients with chronic alcoholic liver disease and 16 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The presence of autoantibodies against liver proteins were assessed. The occurrence of studied autoantibodies was evaluated with regard to the degree of liver damage. Inclusion criteria were: age over 21 yrs, at least 3-yrs history of alcoholic liver disease, HBV and HCV-negativity, absence of autoimmunological diseases. The presence of autoantibodies AMA-M2, SLA/LP, LKM-1, LC1, anti-F-actin, desmin and miozin in serum was assessed by immunoblotting method and ANA by ELISA. Autoantibodies were demonstrated in sera of 33% of patients. Single isolated autoantibodies were present in 24% of patients, whereas 9% of patients have several autoantibodies. The most prevalent were anti-F-actin (19%) and antinuclear antibodies (11%). Occurrence of anti-F-actin antibodies increased with degree of liver damage. Concluding these results suggest that alcohol may contribute to the activation of autoimmune processes, and particularly against contractile filaments of cells for which F-actin antibodies are produced.

  8. The role of autoantibodies in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Derksen, V F A M; Huizinga, T W J; van der Woude, D

    2017-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by joint inflammation. The presence of autoantibodies in the sera of RA patients has provided many clues to the underlying disease pathophysiology. Based on the presence of several autoantibodies like rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA), anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP), and more recently anti-acetylated protein antibodies RA can be subdivided into seropositive and seronegative disease. The formation of these autoantibodies is associated with both genetic and environmental risk factors for RA, like specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and smoking. Autoantibodies can be detected many years before disease onset in a subset of patients, suggesting a sequence of events in which the first autoantibodies develop in predisposed hosts, before an inflammatory response ensues leading to clinically apparent arthritis. Research on the characteristics and effector functions of these autoantibodies might provide more insight in pathophysiological processes underlying arthritis in RA. Recent data suggests that ACPA might play a role in perpetuating inflammation once it has developed. Furthermore, pathophysiological mechanisms have been discovered supporting a direct link between the presence of ACPA and both bone erosions and pain in RA patients. In conclusion, investigating the possible pathogenic potential of autoantibodies might lead to improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiological processes in rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Clinical associations and potential novel antigenic targets of autoantibodies directed against rods and rings in chronic hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequently associated with extrahepatic autoimmune disorders while interferon (IFN) and ribavirin treatment may exacerbate these conditions. Autoantibodies from HCV patients identify a novel indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) pattern on HEp-2 cells characterized by cytoplasmic rods and rings (RR). Our objectives were to determine the prevalence and clinical associations of RR autoantibodies in HCV patients, and identify related novel autoantibody targets. Methods Sera from 315 patients with HCV (301 treatment naive, 14 treated with interferon and/or ribavirin) were analyzed for the presence of RR antibodies by IIF on commercially available HEp-2 cell substrates. Antibodies to inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase 2 (IMPDH2) and cytidine triphosphate synthase 1 (CTPS1) were detected by addressable laser bead assay and other potential targets were identified by immunoscreening a protein microarray. Clinical and demographic data including HCV genotype, mode of infection, prior antiviral therapy, and histological findings were compared between RR antibody positive (RR+) and negative (RR-) patients. Results The median age of the HCV cohort was 51 years, 61% were male, and 76% were infected with HCV genotype 1 (G1). Four percent (n=14) had been treated with IFN-based therapy (IFN monotherapy, n=3; IFN/ribavirin, n=11); all had a sustained virologic response. In total, 15 patients (5% of the cohort) were RR+. RR+ and RR- patients had similar demographic and clinical characteristics including age, sex, mode of HCV infection, prevalence of the G1 HCV genotype, and moderate to severe fibrosis. Nevertheless, RR+ patients were significantly more likely than RR- cases to have been treated with IFN-based therapy (33% vs. 3%; adjusted odds ratio 20.5 [95% confidence interval 5.1-83.2]; P<0.0005). Only 1/10 RR positive sera had detectable antibodies to IMPHD2 and none had antibodies to CTPS1. Potentially important autoantibody

  10. The use of Tween 20 in immunoblotting assays for the detection of autoantibodies in connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, S; Ghirardello, A; Doria, A; Tonello, M; Bendo, R; Rossini, K; Gambari, P F

    2000-05-26

    Autoantibodies directed against intracellular antigens can be detected by immunoblotting (IB). Due to its high sensitivity this technique has many advantages, but it can give misleading results when the specific bands are weak or blurred against the background staining. To decrease background staining, non-ionic detergents (Tween 20, Triton X-100, Nonidet P-40) are generally used as blocking agents. Moreover, these agents appear to have a renaturating action towards proteins and antigens. Tween 20 has a more pronounced renaturating effect on proteins than other detergents and thereby improves antigen-antibody binding. To evaluate the effect of Tween 20 on specific autoantibody detection by IB, we tested the sera of 162 patients with connective tissue diseases (CTDs) by adding this detergent at certain steps of the IB assay. We found that the use of Tween 20 in the IB procedure significantly improved the binding of autoantibodies to Jo-1, Scl70, (U1)RNP 68 kDa and C, Sm B/B' and D. Moreover, it increased the sensitivity for the detection of anti-Sm D peptide in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) sera with no decrease in specificity. In contrast, the addition of Tween 20 significantly decreased the binding of autoantibodies specific for ribosomal P proteins, La/SSB, Ro/SSA, but not the overall sensitivity and specificity of the method. We conclude that the addition of Tween 20 to standard IB is advantageous for anti-nuclear antigen antibody detection and improves the sensitivity of the method in revealing anti-Sm-positive sera in SLE. However, Tween 20 is not recommended for the detection of anti-cytoplasmic antibodies.

  11. Presence of autoantibodies to peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (cyclosporin A-binding protein) in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Harigai, M; Hara, M; Takahashi, N; Kitani, A; Hirose, T; Suzuki, K; Kawakami, M; Hidaka, T; Kawaguchi, Y; Ishizuka, T

    1992-04-01

    Several autoantibodies against cytoplasmic or nuclear components of cells have been reported in autoimmune diseases. We report here a previously unrecognized autoantibody to peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). PPIase, which catalyzes the cis-trans isomerization of proline imidic peptide bonds in oligopeptides, has recently been found to be identical to cyclophilin, a specific binding protein of a potent immunosuppressant, cyclosporin A. IgG and IgM anti-PPIase antibodies were detected in 40 and 20% of unselected patients with SLE, respectively, by ELISA. The reactivity of these sera was confirmed by immunoblotting experiments. Sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients showed no reactivity and 1 of 8 sera from systemic sclerosis patients and 1 of 25 sera from normal controls showed only weak reactivity. Unexpectedly, the anti-PPIase antibody was unable to inhibit PPIase activity, indicating that the autoantibody recognizes an epitope of PPIase which is different from the active site of PPIase. The levels of the anti-PPIase antibody in SLE patients correlated with remissions and flares of the disease. The anti-PPIase antibody was higher in patients with active SLE than those with inactive disease. The prevalence of the active stage of the disease was significantly higher in IgG anti-PPIase antibody-positive SLE patients as compared to antibody-negative SLE patients. These data define the presence of a new autoantibody against PPIase and its association with the activity and certain clinical manifestations in SLE.

  12. Pemphigus vulgaris autoantibody profiling by proteomic technique.

    PubMed

    Kalantari-Dehaghi, Mina; Anhalt, Grant J; Camilleri, Michael J; Chernyavsky, Alex I; Chun, Sookhee; Felgner, Philip L; Jasinskas, Algis; Leiferman, Kristin M; Liang, Li; Marchenko, Steve; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Pittelkow, Mark R; Zone, John J; Grando, Sergei A

    2013-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a mucocutaneous blistering disease characterized by IgG autoantibodies against the stratified squamous epithelium. Current understanding of PV pathophysiology does not explain the mechanism of acantholysis in patients lacking desmoglein antibodies, which justifies a search for novel targets of pemphigus autoimmunity. We tested 264 pemphigus and 138 normal control sera on the multiplexed protein array platform containing 701 human genes encompassing many known keratinocyte cell-surface molecules and members of protein families targeted by organ-non-specific PV antibodies. The top 10 antigens recognized by the majority of test patients' sera were proteins encoded by the DSC1, DSC3, ATP2C1, PKP3, CHRM3, COL21A1, ANXA8L1, CD88 and CHRNE genes. The most common combinations of target antigens included at least one of the adhesion molecules DSC1, DSC3 or PKP3 and/or the acetylcholine receptor CHRM3 or CHRNE with or without the MHC class II antigen DRA. To identify the PV antibodies most specific to the disease process, we sorted the data based on the ratio of patient to control frequencies of antigen recognition. The frequency of antigen recognition by patients that exceeded that of control by 10 and more times were the molecules encoded by the CD33, GP1BA, CHRND, SLC36A4, CD1B, CD32, CDH8, CDH9, PMP22 and HLA-E genes as well as mitochondrial proteins encoded by the NDUFS1, CYB5B, SOD2, PDHA1 and FH genes. The highest specificity to PV showed combinations of autoantibodies to the calcium pump encoded by ATP2C1 with C5a receptor plus DSC1 or DSC3 or HLA-DRA. The results identified new targets of pemphigus autoimmunity. Novel autoantibody signatures may help explain individual variations in disease severity and treatment response, and serve as sensitive and specific biomarkers for new diagnostic assays in PV patients.

  13. Autoantibodies against CD28 are associated with atopic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Neuber, K; Mähnss, B; Hübner, C; Gergely, H; Weichenthal, M

    2006-01-01

    The B7-1/B7-2-CD28/CTLA-4 pathway is crucial in regulating T cell activation and tolerance. Autoantibodies to surface molecules on lymphocytes have already been described in various immune conditions, such as autoimmune diseases, infections and blood transfusions. The objective of this study was to test sera from healthy individuals and from patients for association of CD28 autoantibodies with inflammatory and non-inflammatory diseases. First, CD28 was obtained by digestion of CD28-Ig fusion protein with trypsin. The cleavage products were separated by sodium dodecyl sulphate–page gel electrophoresis. Additionally, a CD28/GST fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and was used to establish an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of autoantibodies against CD28. Sera from healthy individuals (n = 72) and patients with different inflammatory and non-inflammatory skin diseases (n = 196) were tested for the presence of autoantibodies against CD28. Using mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), purified autoantibodies against CD28 were tested for their effects on CTLA-4-Ig-induced T cell anergy. In this study, for the first time, we describe the existence of autoantibodies against CD28 in humans which are associated with atopic diseases, e.g. allergic rhinitis and asthma. These antibodies stimulate T cells and overcome the CTLA-4-Ig-induced anergy of T cells in an MLR. The existence of autoantibodies against CD28, which may have a T cell-stimulating function, has been shown. The data indicate that autoantibodies against CD28 could be a new immunological mechanism in allergic inflammation. Additionally, autoantibodies against CD28 could be an important new marker to discriminate between atopic diseases and other inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:17034578

  14. Anticytokine autoantibodies in infection and inflammation: an update.

    PubMed

    Barcenas-Morales, Gabriela; Jandus, Peter; Döffinger, Rainer

    2016-12-01

    Concise overview of the field of anticytokine autoantibodies with a focus on recent developments. Advances in particular in the analysis of autoantibodies to IFNγ, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and type I IFN are presented. The target epitope for anti-IFNγ autoantibodies has been found to have high homology to a protein from Aspergillus suggesting molecular mimicry as a mechanism of breaking self-tolerance. A treatment strategy using a recombinant, epitope-depleted version of IFNγ is suggested. Autoantibodies to GM-CSF are associated with disseminated Crytococcus and Nocardia infections thus expanding the spectrum of associated diseases beyond pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Detailed analysis of anti-GM-CSF autoantibody clones derived from pulmonary alveolar proteinosis patients show evidence of high somatic mutation suggesting T cell-dependent affinity maturation; full GM-CSF neutralization is achieved by synergistic binding of antibodies targeting various distinct noncross-reactive epitopes and leading to antigen sequestration and Fc-mediated clearance. Single mAbs in contrast may lead to higher GM-CSF bioavailability. Anti type I IFN-specific autoantibodies derived from autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I patients are of extreme high affinity and negatively correlate with the incidence of type I diabetes and may be thus considered to be protective. Hypomorphic severe combined immune deficiency may be associated with complex anticytokine patterns and the emergence of anti type I IFN autoantibodies correlates with severe viral infection histories. Anticytokine autoantibodies may cause susceptibility to infections. In autoimmune/autoinflammatory conditions, anticytokine autoantibodies may be protective or promote disease.

  15. Dermatomyositis and polymyositis: Clinical presentation, autoantibodies, and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mammen, Andrew L

    2010-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM) are autoimmune myopathies characterized clinically by proximal muscle weakness, muscle inflammation, extramuscular manifestations, and frequently, the presence of autoantibodies. Although there is some overlap, DM and PM are separate diseases with different pathophysiological mechanisms. Furthermore, unique clinical phenotypes are associated with each of the myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) associated with these disorders. This review will focus on the clinical features, pathology, and immunogenetics of PM and DM with an emphasis on the importance of autoantibodies in defining unique phenotypes and, perhaps, as clues to help elucidate the mechanisms of disease.

  16. Critical Role of the Neonatal Fc Receptor (FcRn) in the Pathogenic Action of Antimitochondrial Autoantibodies Synergizing with Anti-desmoglein Autoantibodies in Pemphigus Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yumay; Chernyavsky, Alex; Webber, Robert J; Grando, Sergei A; Wang, Ping H

    2015-09-25

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a life-long, potentially fatal IgG autoantibody-mediated blistering disease targeting mucocutaneous keratinocytes (KCs). PV patients develop pathogenic anti-desmoglein (Dsg) 3 ± 1 and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA), but it remained unknown whether and how AMA enter KCs and why other cell types are not affected in PV. Therefore, we sought to elucidate mechanisms of cell entry, trafficking, and pathogenic action of AMA in PV. We found that PVIgGs associated with neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) on the cell membrane, and the PVIgG-FcRn complexes entered KCs and reached mitochondria where they dissociated. The liberated AMA altered mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration, and ATP production and induced cytochrome c release, although the lack or inactivation of FcRn abolished the ability of PVIgG to reach and damage mitochondria and to cause detachment of KCs. The assays of mitochondrial functions and keratinocyte adhesion demonstrated that although the pathobiological effects of AMA on KCs are reversible, they become irreversible, leading to epidermal blistering (acantholysis), when AMA synergize with anti-Dsg antibodies. Thus, it appears that AMA enter a keratinocyte in a complex with FcRn, become liberated from the endosome in the cytosol, and are trafficked to the mitochondria, wherein they trigger pro-apoptotic events leading to shrinkage of basal KCs uniquely expressing FcRn in epidermis. During recovery, KCs extend their cytoplasmic aprons toward neighboring cells, but anti-Dsg antibodies prevent assembly of nascent desmosomes due to steric hindrance, thus rendering acantholysis irreversible. In conclusion, FcRn is a common acceptor protein for internalization of AMA and, perhaps, for PV autoantibodies to other intracellular antigens, and PV is a novel disease paradigm for investigating and elucidating the role of FcRn in this autoimmune disease and possibly other autoimmune diseases.

  17. Critical Role of the Neonatal Fc Receptor (FcRn) in the Pathogenic Action of Antimitochondrial Autoantibodies Synergizing with Anti-desmoglein Autoantibodies in Pemphigus Vulgaris*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yumay; Chernyavsky, Alex; Webber, Robert J.; Grando, Sergei A.; Wang, Ping H.

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a life-long, potentially fatal IgG autoantibody-mediated blistering disease targeting mucocutaneous keratinocytes (KCs). PV patients develop pathogenic anti-desmoglein (Dsg) 3 ± 1 and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA), but it remained unknown whether and how AMA enter KCs and why other cell types are not affected in PV. Therefore, we sought to elucidate mechanisms of cell entry, trafficking, and pathogenic action of AMA in PV. We found that PVIgGs associated with neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) on the cell membrane, and the PVIgG-FcRn complexes entered KCs and reached mitochondria where they dissociated. The liberated AMA altered mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration, and ATP production and induced cytochrome c release, although the lack or inactivation of FcRn abolished the ability of PVIgG to reach and damage mitochondria and to cause detachment of KCs. The assays of mitochondrial functions and keratinocyte adhesion demonstrated that although the pathobiological effects of AMA on KCs are reversible, they become irreversible, leading to epidermal blistering (acantholysis), when AMA synergize with anti-Dsg antibodies. Thus, it appears that AMA enter a keratinocyte in a complex with FcRn, become liberated from the endosome in the cytosol, and are trafficked to the mitochondria, wherein they trigger pro-apoptotic events leading to shrinkage of basal KCs uniquely expressing FcRn in epidermis. During recovery, KCs extend their cytoplasmic aprons toward neighboring cells, but anti-Dsg antibodies prevent assembly of nascent desmosomes due to steric hindrance, thus rendering acantholysis irreversible. In conclusion, FcRn is a common acceptor protein for internalization of AMA and, perhaps, for PV autoantibodies to other intracellular antigens, and PV is a novel disease paradigm for investigating and elucidating the role of FcRn in this autoimmune disease and possibly other autoimmune diseases. PMID:26260795

  18. Autoantibodies in childhood opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blaes, F; Pike, M G; Lang, B

    2008-09-15

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome or Dancing Eye Syndrome (OMS/DES) is a rare neurological disorder of children, which associates with neuroblastoma (NB) in approximately 50% of cases. We examined sera from five patients with (OMS-NB(+)) and five without NB (OMS-NB(-)) for autoantibodies. OMS-NB(-) IgG bound to the surface of a NB cell line, whereas IgG from OMS-NB(+) and from NB patients without OMS/DES bound only to permeabilised cells. Both OMS-NB(+) and OMS-NB(-) reduced proliferation of NB cells. We also present a case report of a child with OMS/DES without NB who made a complete recovery without treatment. Serum antibodies at presentation bound to the surface and decreased NB cell proliferation but had decreased 9 weeks later when the child was asymptomatic. These results demonstrate that sera from some OMS/DES patients contain IgG antibodies that are potentially pathogenic.

  19. A novel automated indirect immunofluorescence autoantibody evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kivity, Shaye; Gilburd, Boris; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Carrasco, Marina Garcia; Tzafrir, Yaron; Sofer, Yael; Mandel, Matilda; Buttner, Thomas; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Danko, Katalin; Hoyos, Marcos López; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2012-03-01

    Autoantibodies (AAb), especially antinuclear (ANAs) and anticytoplasmatic antibodies (ACyA), are essential diagnosing markers for several autoimmune diseases. The current gold standard method for ANA detection is manual indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on human epithelial-2 (HEp-2) cells. However, this technique is cost and time consuming, and characterized by considerable intra- and interlaboratory variability. Thus, an automated IIF-HEp-2 reader has been developed recently. In the current study, we compared the performance of the automated AAb IIF-HEp-2 interpretation to conventional detection methods. Autoantibody detection by IIF on HEp-2 cells was performed in a total of 260 sera of patients, including 34 with systemic lupus erythematosus, 111 with dermatomyositis or polymyositis, 74 with systemic sclerosis, 41 with rare AAb patterns, and 137 healthy individuals. Visual interpretation and routine immunoassays were compared with a novel automated IIF-HEp-2 system using Aklides pattern recognition algorithms. Positive AAbs were detected in 95-100% of rheumatic patients by automated interpretation, in 74-100% with manual reading, and in 64-100% by immunodot assay. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of fluorescent intensity revealed a high sensitivity and specificity for automated reading of AAb with an agreement ranging from 90% to 95% between manual and automated interpretation (kappa 0.554-0.69) for systemic sclerosis and myositis, respectively. This study demonstrates a good correlation between manual and automated interpretation of AAb including ANA and ACyA in patients with autoimmune diseases. Full automation of HEp-2 cell assay reading may minimize errors in ANA pattern interpretation and thus help in the standardization of ANA assessment.

  20. Autoantibodies to nuclear envelope antigens in chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, K; von Mikecz, A; Buchwald, D; Jones, J; Gerace, L; Tan, E M

    1996-01-01

    We have identified and partially characterized the autoantibodies in sera of 60 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Approximately 52% of the sera were found to react with nuclear envelope antigens. The combination of nuclear rim staining observed in immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis of highly purified nuclear envelope proteins provided initial characterization of these autoantibodies. Further characterization showed that some sera immunoprecipitated the in vitro transcription and translation product of a human cDNA clone encoding the nuclear envelope protein lamin B1. The autoantibodies were of the IgG isotype. The occurrence of autoantibodies to a conserved intracellular protein like lamin B1 provides new laboratory evidence for an autoimmune component in chronic fatigue syndrome. PMID:8878441

  1. An investigation of excess residual cytoplasm in human spermatozoa and its distinction from the cytoplasmic droplet.

    PubMed

    Rengan, Anil K; Agarwal, Ashok; van der Linde, Michelle; du Plessis, Stefan S

    2012-11-17

    Recent studies have shown cytoplasmic droplets to be normal morphological occurrences in human male spermatozoa. When the cytoplasm around the sperm midpiece is present in large amounts, however, pathological effects may transpire. The cytoplasmic droplet then becomes known as excess residual cytoplasm, which can impair overall sperm function and produce higher levels of reactive oxygen species, potentially leading to male infertility. Though the distinction between cytoplasmic droplets and excess residual cytoplasm has been made, some studies fail to recognize the difference and incorrectly label the latter as a cytoplasmic droplet. This review attempts to clarify excess residual cytoplasm's effect on fertility, examine the enzymes responsible, and suggest tests and possible treatment options for those affected by this defect.

  2. Involvement of functional autoantibodies against vascular receptors in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Riemekasten, Gabriela; Philippe, Aurélie; Näther, Melanie; Slowinski, Torsten; Müller, Dominik N; Heidecke, Harald; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Czirják, László; Lukitsch, Ivo; Becker, Mike; Kill, Angela; van Laar, Jacob M; Catar, Rusan; Luft, Friedrich C; Burmester, Gerd R; Hegner, Björn; Dragun, Duska

    2011-03-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) features autoimmunity, vasculopathy and tissue fibrosis. The renin-angiotensin and endothelin systems have been implicated in vasculopathy and fibrosis. A role for autoantibody-mediated receptor stimulation is hypothesised, linking three major pathophysiological features consistent with SSc. Serum samples from 478 patients with SSc (298 in the study cohort and 180 from two further independent cohorts), 372 healthy subjects and 311 control-disease subjects were tested for antibodies against angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) and endothelin-1 type A receptor (ET(A)R) by solid phase assay. Binding specificities were tested by immunoprecipitation. The biological effects of autoantibodies in microvascular endothelial cells in vitro were also determined, as well as the quantitative differences in autoantibody levels on specific organ involvements and their predictive value for SSc-related mortality. Anti-AT(1)R and anti-ET(A)R autoantibodies were detected in most patients with SSc. Autoantibodies specifically bound to respective receptors on endothelial cells. Higher levels of both autoantibodies were associated with more severe disease manifestations and predicted SSc-related mortality. Both autoantibodies exert biological effects as they induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation and increased transforming growth factor β gene expression in endothelial cells which could be blocked with specific receptor antagonists. Functional autoimmunity directed at AT(1)R and ET(A)R is common in patients with SSc. AT(1)R and ET(A)R autoantibodies could contribute to disease pathogenesis and may serve as biomarkers for risk assessment of disease progression.

  3. Pancreatic autoantibodies after pancreas-kidney transplantation - do they matter?

    PubMed

    Martins, La Salete; Henriques, Antonio C; Fonseca, Isabel M; Rodrigues, Anabela S; Oliverira, José C; Dores, Jorge M; Dias, Leonidio S; Cabrita, Antonio M; Silva, José D; Noronha, Irene L

    2014-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence has been documented in simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants (SPKT), but this diagnosis may be underestimated. Antibody monitoring is the most simple, noninvasive, screening test for pancreas autoimmune activity. However, the impact of the positive autoimmune markers on pancreas graft function remains controversial. In our cohort of 105 SPKT, we studied the cases with positive pancreatic autoantibodies. They were immunosuppressed with antithymocyte globulin, tacrolimus, mycophenolate, and steroids. The persistence or reappearance of these autoantibodies after SPKT and factors associated with their evolution and with graft outcome were analyzed. Pancreatic autoantibodies were prospectively monitored. Serum samples were collected before transplantation and at least once per year thereafter. At the end of the follow-up (maximum 138 months), 43.8% of patients were positive (from pre-transplant or after recurrence) for at least one autoantibody - the positive group. Antiglutamic acid decarboxylase was the most prevalent (31.4%), followed by anti-insulin (8.6%) and anti-islet cell autoantibodies (3.8%). Bivariate analysis showed that the positive group had higher fasting glucose, higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), lower C-peptide levels, and a higher number of HLA-matches. Analyzing the sample divided into four groups according to pre-/post-transplant autoantibodies profile, the negative/positive group tended to present the higher HbA1c values. Multivariate analysis confirmed the significant association between pancreas autoimmunity and HbA1c and C-peptide levels. Positivity for these autoantibodies pre-transplantation did not influence pancreas survival. The unfavorable glycemic profile observed in the autoantibody-positive SPKT is a matter of concern, which deserves further attention. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Measurement of Cytoplasmic Streaming in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Sujoy; Williams, Lucy; Palacios, Isabel; Goldstein, Raymond

    2010-11-01

    During stage 9 of Drosophila melanogastor oogenesis flow of the oocyte cytoplasm, driven by kinesin 1 motor protein is observed. This cytoplasmic streaming is analyzed by PIV in both wild type and kinesin light chain mutants, revealing striking statistical differences. Further measurements of the rheology of the oocyte allow for estimations of the mechanical energy needed to generate the observed flows.

  5. Autoantibodies to coagulation factors: from pathophysiology to diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Cugno, Massimo; Gualtierotti, Roberta; Tedeschi, Alberto; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Autoantibodies may develop against coagulation factors altering their function or promoting their rapid clearance. In non-congenitally deficient patients, they are usually in association with autoimmune diseases, malignancies, pregnancy or advanced age. The possible development of coagulation factor autoantibodies should be considered when a patient presents with bleeding symptoms without any prior bleeding diathesis. The most common disorder associated with coagulation factor autoantibodies is acquired factor VIII deficiency, which is characterized by hemorrhages involving soft tissues, muscles and skin; hemarthroses are less frequent than in the inherited form. Acquired deficiencies of von Willebrand factor and factor XIII due to autoantibodies are emerging conditions. Autoantibodies to the other coagulation factors may be associated with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from minimal or no bleeding to life-threatening conditions. The diagnostic approach begins with global coagulation tests: prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). In case of prolonged times, mixing studies (typically using normal plasma in a 1:1 proportion) should be performed. Specific factor and inhibitor assays, assessment of lupus anticoagulant and eventually enzyme immunoassays for specific anti-factor antibodies complete the evaluation. A prompt diagnosis of specific coagulation factor inhibitors is mandatory for starting an appropriate treatment aimed at overcoming the deficient factor, in case of bleeding, and, if possible, at the suppression of the autoantibody's production. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. An autoantibody in narcolepsy disrupts colonic migrating motor complexes.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael W; Reed, Joanne H; Smith, Anthony J F; Gordon, Tom P

    2008-12-03

    Despite strong circumstantial evidence for the autoimmune hypothesis of narcolepsy, conventional immunological methods have failed to detect an autoantibody. This study investigated the real-time effects of narcoleptic immunoglobulins on a spontaneous colonic migrating motor complex (CMMC) preparation. IgG from patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy or healthy controls was added directly to isolated mouse colons undergoing CMMC activity to test for autoantibodies that disrupt colonic motility. The effect of immunoglobulins prepared for clinical intravenous treatment (IVIg) on autoantibody-mediated colonic disruption was also assessed. Narcoleptic IgGs markedly reduced the frequency of CMMCs or irreversibly abolished them. Abrogation of CMMCs was followed by an increase in the resting tension of the colon preparation and appearance of atropine-sensitive phasic smooth muscle contractions. IVIg partially neutralized the inhibitory effect of narcoleptic IgG on the CMMCs. The dramatic effect of narcoleptic IgG on CMMC generation is consistent with an autoantibody-mediated disruption of enteric neural pathways. The ex vivo whole-organ approach allows real-time examination of the physiological effects of the narcoleptic autoantibody and offers a new avenue for exploring the autoimmune basis of narcolepsy. The neutralizing effect of IVIg on the autoantibody provides a rationale for the reported clinical improvement in cataplexy when IVIg are given at disease onset.

  7. Cytoplasmic Streaming - Skylab Student Experiment ED-63

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment (ED-63), Cytoplasmic Streaming, proposed by Cheryl A. Peitz of Arapahoe High School, Littleton, Colorado. Experiment ED-63 was to observe the effect of zero-gravity on cytoplasmic streaming in the aquatic plant named Elodea, commonly called water weed or water thyme. The phenomenon of cytoplasmic streaming is not well understood, but it is recognized as the circulation mechanism of the internal materials or cytoplasm of a cell. Cytoplasm is a gelatinous substance that has the ability to change its viscosity and flow, carrying various cell materials with it. The activity can be stimulated by sunlight or heat. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  8. Cytoplasmic Streaming - Skylab Student Experiment ED-63

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment (ED-63), Cytoplasmic Streaming, proposed by Cheryl A. Peitz of Arapahoe High School, Littleton, Colorado. Experiment ED-63 was to observe the effect of zero-gravity on cytoplasmic streaming in the aquatic plant named Elodea, commonly called water weed or water thyme. The phenomenon of cytoplasmic streaming is not well understood, but it is recognized as the circulation mechanism of the internal materials or cytoplasm of a cell. Cytoplasm is a gelatinous substance that has the ability to change its viscosity and flow, carrying various cell materials with it. The activity can be stimulated by sunlight or heat. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  9. [New autoanti-bodies in rheumatoid arthritis: anti-citrullinated protein or peptide autoanti-bodies and the others].

    PubMed

    Fabien, Nicole; Goetz, Joëlle; Sordet, Christelle; Humbel, René-Louis; Sibilia, Jean

    2008-12-01

    New treatment strategies require that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) be diagnosed as early as possible. New diagnostic markers were required, because rheumatoid factors (RF), until now criteria for classification of RA, are not sufficiently specific and sometimes appear late, thereby limiting their diagnostic usefulness. The objective of this review is to describe the current state of knowledge and more particularly to analyze the interest of new RA autoanti-bodies, called anti-peptide or anti-citrullinated protein anti-bodies (ACPA). Other autoanti-bodies have been described, including anti-Sa, anti-alpha enolase, and anti-calpastatin autoanti-bodies. Nonetheless, their diagnostic value remains limited compared to ACPA. Accordingly, in daily practice today, the only autoanti-bodies that must be tested for to diagnose RA are the ACPAs and RFs. The discovery of ACPA (initially called anti-keratin and anti-perinuclear anti-bodies) was a major step forward for the laboratory diagnosis of RA. The tests most often used routinely areenzyme-linked immunosorbent assays(ELISA) with cyclic citrullinated peptides, whence the name anti-CCP autoanti-bodies. Accordingly, the two terms ACPA and anti-CCP can both be used. The diagnostic value, in particular their specificity, is on the order of 95%, regardless of the method of identification. These markers are very useful and are often present earlier than RF. These ACPA also have prognostic value because they are associated with more aggressive forms of RA. On the other hand, their value over time, in particular, their fluctuation as a function of treatment, is more controversial. In practice, it is recommended to test for both RF and ACPA in a diagnostic work-up for early RA. During follow-up, the value of testing for these autoanti-bodies has not been demonstrated, but additional studies are still necessary with the anti-CCP autoanti-bodies and the new anti-citrullinated protein autoanti-bodies.

  10. Serum Autoantibodies in Chronic Prostate Inflammation in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schlick, Bettina; Massoner, Petra; Lueking, Angelika; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Blattner, Mirjam; Schaefer, Georg; Marquart, Klaus; Theek, Carmen; Amersdorfer, Peter; Zielinski, Dirk; Kirchner, Matthias; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Rubin, Mark A.; Müllner, Stefan; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Klocker, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is frequently observed on histological analysis of malignant and non-malignant prostate specimens. It is a suspected supporting factor for prostate diseases and their progression and a main cause of false positive PSA tests in cancer screening. We hypothesized that inflammation induces autoantibodies, which may be useful biomarkers. We aimed to identify and validate prostate inflammation associated serum autoantibodies in prostate cancer patients and evaluate the expression of corresponding autoantigens. Methods Radical prostatectomy specimens of prostate cancer patients (N = 70) were classified into high and low inflammation groups according to the amount of tissue infiltrating lymphocytes. The corresponding pre-surgery blood serum samples were scrutinized for autoantibodies using a low-density protein array. Selected autoantigens were identified in prostate tissue and their expression pattern analyzed by immunohistochemistry and qPCR. The identified autoantibody profile was cross-checked in an independent sample set (N = 63) using the Luminex-bead protein array technology. Results Protein array screening identified 165 autoantibodies differentially abundant in the serum of high compared to low inflammation patients. The expression pattern of three corresponding antigens were established in benign and cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry and qPCR: SPAST (Spastin), STX18 (Syntaxin 18) and SPOP (speckle-type POZ protein). Of these, SPAST was significantly increased in prostate tissue with high inflammation. All three autoantigens were differentially expressed in primary and/or castration resistant prostate tumors when analyzed in an inflammation-independent tissue microarray. Cross-validation of the inflammation autoantibody profile on an independent sample set using a Luminex-bead protein array, retrieved 51 of the significantly discriminating autoantibodies. Three autoantibodies were significantly upregulated in both screens, MUT

  11. Hydrodynamic property of the cytoplasm is sufficient to mediate cytoplasmic streaming in the Caenorhabiditis elegans embryo

    PubMed Central

    Niwayama, Ritsuya; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2011-01-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming is a type of intracellular transport widely seen in nature. Cytoplasmic streaming in Caenorhabditis elegans at the one-cell stage is bidirectional; the flow near the cortex (“cortical flow”) is oriented toward the anterior, whereas the flow in the central region (“cytoplasmic flow”) is oriented toward the posterior. Both cortical flow and cytoplasmic flow depend on non-muscle-myosin II (NMY-2), which primarily localizes in the cortex. The manner in which NMY-2 proteins drive cytoplasmic flow in the opposite direction from remote locations has not been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the hydrodynamic properties of the cytoplasm are sufficient to mediate the forces generated by the cortical myosin to drive bidirectional streaming throughout the cytoplasm. We quantified the flow velocities of cytoplasmic streaming using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and conducted a three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation using the moving particle semiimplicit method. Our simulation quantitatively reconstructed the quantified flow velocity distribution resolved through PIV analysis. Furthermore, our PIV analyses detected microtubule-dependent flows during the pronuclear migration stage. These flows were reproduced via hydrodynamic interactions between moving pronuclei and the cytoplasm. The agreement of flow dynamics in vivo and in simulation indicates that the hydrodynamic properties of the cytoplasm are sufficient to mediate cytoplasmic streaming in C. elegans embryos. PMID:21730185

  12. Hydrodynamic property of the cytoplasm is sufficient to mediate cytoplasmic streaming in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    PubMed

    Niwayama, Ritsuya; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2011-07-19

    Cytoplasmic streaming is a type of intracellular transport widely seen in nature. Cytoplasmic streaming in Caenorhabditis elegans at the one-cell stage is bidirectional; the flow near the cortex ("cortical flow") is oriented toward the anterior, whereas the flow in the central region ("cytoplasmic flow") is oriented toward the posterior. Both cortical flow and cytoplasmic flow depend on non-muscle-myosin II (NMY-2), which primarily localizes in the cortex. The manner in which NMY-2 proteins drive cytoplasmic flow in the opposite direction from remote locations has not been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the hydrodynamic properties of the cytoplasm are sufficient to mediate the forces generated by the cortical myosin to drive bidirectional streaming throughout the cytoplasm. We quantified the flow velocities of cytoplasmic streaming using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and conducted a three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation using the moving particle semiimplicit method. Our simulation quantitatively reconstructed the quantified flow velocity distribution resolved through PIV analysis. Furthermore, our PIV analyses detected microtubule-dependent flows during the pronuclear migration stage. These flows were reproduced via hydrodynamic interactions between moving pronuclei and the cytoplasm. The agreement of flow dynamics in vivo and in simulation indicates that the hydrodynamic properties of the cytoplasm are sufficient to mediate cytoplasmic streaming in C. elegans embryos.

  13. An investigation of excess residual cytoplasm in human spermatozoa and its distinction from the cytoplasmic droplet

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown cytoplasmic droplets to be normal morphological occurrences in human male spermatozoa. When the cytoplasm around the sperm midpiece is present in large amounts, however, pathological effects may transpire. The cytoplasmic droplet then becomes known as excess residual cytoplasm, which can impair overall sperm function and produce higher levels of reactive oxygen species, potentially leading to male infertility. Though the distinction between cytoplasmic droplets and excess residual cytoplasm has been made, some studies fail to recognize the difference and incorrectly label the latter as a cytoplasmic droplet. This review attempts to clarify excess residual cytoplasm’s effect on fertility, examine the enzymes responsible, and suggest tests and possible treatment options for those affected by this defect. PMID:23159014

  14. Skewed Fc glycosylation profiles of anti-proteinase 3 immunoglobulin G1 autoantibodies from granulomatosis with polyangiitis patients show low levels of bisection, galactosylation, and sialylation.

    PubMed

    Wuhrer, Manfred; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Koeleman, Carolien A M; Selman, Maurice H J; Harper, Lorraine; Jacobs, Bart C; Savage, Caroline O S; Jefferis, Roy; Deelder, André M; Morgan, Matthew

    2015-04-03

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is associated with circulating immunoglobulin (Ig) G anti-proteinase 3 specific (anti-PR3) anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA), which activate cytokine primed neutrophils via Fcgamma receptors. ANCA are class switched IgG antibodies implying T cell help in their production. Glycosylation of IgG Fc, under the control of T cell cytokines, determines the interaction between IgG and its receptors. Previous studies have reported aberrant glycosylation of Ig Fc in GPA patients. We investigated whether aberrant Fc glycosylation was present on anti-PR3 ANCA as well as whole IgG subclass preparations compared to healthy controls and whether this correlated with Birmingham vasculitis activity scores (BVAS), serum cytokines, and time to remission. Here, IgG Fc glycosylation of GPA patients and controls and anti-PR3 ANCA Fc glycosylation were determined by mass spectrometry of glycopeptides. IgG1 and IgG2 subclasses from GPA patients showed reduced galactosylation, sialylation, and bisection compared to healthy controls. Anti-PR3 IgG1 ANCA Fc galactosylation, sialylation, and bisection were reduced compared to total IgG1 in GPA. Galactosylation of anti-PR3 ANCA Fc correlated with inflammatory cytokines and time to remission but not BVAS. Bisection of anti-PR3 ANCA Fc correlated with BVAS. Total IgG1 and anti-PR3 IgG1 Fc galactosylation were weakly correlated, while bisection of IgG1 and anti-PR3 showed no correlation. Our data indicate that aberrant ANCA galactosylation may be driven in an antigen-specific manner.

  15. Autoantibodies and immunoglobulins among atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Kodama, Kazunori; Shimaoka, Katsutaro; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Carter, R.L.; Yamakido, Michio

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to atomic bomb radiation affects immune responsiveness, such as the occurrence of autoantibodies and levels of immunoglobulins. Rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody, anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody and immunoglobulin levels (IgG, IgM, IgA and IgE) were measured among 2,061 individuals exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki whose estimated doses ranged from 0 to 5.6 Gy. The prevalence and titers of rheumatoid factor were found to be increased in the individuals exposed to higher radiation doses. The IgA level in females and the IgM level in both sexes increased as radiation dose increased, although the effects of radiation exposure were not large. No effect of radiation was found on the prevalence of antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody and anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody or on the levels of IgG and IgE. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Anti-cytokine autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cappellano, Giuseppe; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Woldetsadik, Abiy D; Boggio, Elena; Soluri, Maria F; Comi, Cristoforo; Sblattero, Daniele; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Dianzani, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current literature is showing that autoantibodies (AutoAbs) against cytokines are produced in several pathological conditions, including autoimmune diseases, but can also be detected in healthy individuals. In autoimmune diseases, these AutoAbs may also be prognostic markers, either negative (such as AutoAbs to IL-8 and IL-1α in rheumatoid arthritis) or positive (such as AutoAbs to IL-6 in systemic sclerosis and those to osteopontin in rheumatoid arthritis). They may have neutralizing activity and influence the course of the physiological and pathological immune responses. High levels of AutoAbs against cytokines may even lead to immunodeficiency, such as those to IL-17 in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I or those to IFN-γ in mycobacterial infections. Their role in human therapy may be exploited not only through passive immunization but also through vaccination, which may improve the costs for long lasting treatments of autoimmune diseases. Detection and quantification of these AutoAbs can be profoundly influenced by the technique used and standardization of these methods is needed to increase the value of their analysis. PMID:23885320

  17. Autoantibodies in nonautoimmune individuals during infections.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Tatiana; Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Blank, Miri; Matthias, Torsten; Pfeiffer, Sascha; Weis, Ingrid; Toubi, Elias; Singh, Sham; Asherson, Ronald; Fraser, Abigail; Gilburd, Boris; Sapir, Tal; Levy, Yair; Lukac, Janja; Rozman, Blaz; Kveder, Tanja; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2007-06-01

    Infections can act as environmental triggers inducing or promoting autoimmune disease in genetically predisposed individuals. Identification of microbial peptides similar to self-tissues may by molecular mimicry, provide the inducing mechanism for an immune response. The aim of this study was to identify autoantibodies (autoAbs) in nonautoimmune individuals during acute bacterial, viral, or parasitic infections. Specific Abs or specific infections with an increased autoAb load may shed insight into the mechanisms of autoimmune disease. Sera from 88 patients with acute infections (41 bacterial, 23 viral, 17 parasitic, and 7 rickettsial) were tested by the ELISA method for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) 8 Pro, and Abs to thyroid peroxidase (TPO), thyroglobulin, phospholipids, annexin-V, laminin, anti-Saccharomyces cervisiae (ASCA), and prothrombin, along with 80 normal controls. Elevated titers of Abs to annexin-V and prothrombin were the most prevalent in viral, parasitic, and rickettsial infections and to laminin in viral and parasitic infections. Elevated titers of ASCA and ANA were found in viral and bacterial infections. Antiphospholipid Abs were found in parasitic and Q-fever infections. Thirty-four individuals harbored elevated titers of at least two Abs. An autoAb burden was detected in individuals with hepatitis A, hepatitis B, toxoplasma or Q-fever infections. In nonautoimmune individuals with various (bacterial, viral, parasitic, and rickettsial) infections, elevated titers of Abs to annexin-V, prothrombin, laminin, ASCA, ANA, and phospholipids were most frequently detected.

  18. Deep cytoplasmic rearrangements in ventralized Xenopus embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. E.; Denegre, J. M.; Danilchik, M. V.

    1993-01-01

    Following fertilization in Xenopus, dramatic rearrangements of the egg cytoplasm relocalize maternally synthesized egg components. During the first cell cycle the vegetal yolk mass rotates relative to the egg surface, toward the sperm entry point (SEP) (J. P. Vincent, G. F. Oster, and J. C. Gerhart, 1986, Dev. Biol. 113, 484-500), while concomitant deep cytoplasmic rearrangements occur in the animal hemisphere (M. V. Danilchik and J. M. Denegre, 1991, Development 111, 845-856). In this paper we examine the role of vegetal yolk mass rotation in producing the animal cytoplasmic rearrangements. We inhibited rotation by uv-irradiating embryos during the first cell cycle, a treatment that yields an extremely ventralized phenotype. Both uv-irradiated embryos and unirradiated control embryos show cytoplasmic rearrangements in the animal hemisphere during the first cell cycle. Cytoplasmic rearrangements on the SEP side of the embryo associated with the path of the sperm pronucleus, plus a swirl on the anti-SEP (dorsal) side, are seen, whether or not yolk mass rotation has occurred. This result suggests a role for the expanding sperm aster in directing animal hemisphere cytoplasmic movements. In unirradiated control embryos the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl is larger than that in uv-irradiated embryos and often extends into the vegetal hemisphere, consistent with the animal cytoplasm having been pulled dorsally and vegetally by the sliding vegetal yolk mass. Thus the yolk mass rotation may normally enhance the dorsalward cytoplasmic movement, begun by the sperm aster, enough to induce normal axis formation. We extended our observations of unirradiated control and uv-irradiated embryos through early cleavages. The vegetal extent of the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl pattern seen in control embryos persists through the early cleavage period, such that labeled animal cytoplasm extends deep into dorsal third-tier blastomeres at the 32-cell stage. Significantly, in uv-irradiated embryos

  19. Deep cytoplasmic rearrangements in ventralized Xenopus embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. E.; Denegre, J. M.; Danilchik, M. V.

    1993-01-01

    Following fertilization in Xenopus, dramatic rearrangements of the egg cytoplasm relocalize maternally synthesized egg components. During the first cell cycle the vegetal yolk mass rotates relative to the egg surface, toward the sperm entry point (SEP) (J. P. Vincent, G. F. Oster, and J. C. Gerhart, 1986, Dev. Biol. 113, 484-500), while concomitant deep cytoplasmic rearrangements occur in the animal hemisphere (M. V. Danilchik and J. M. Denegre, 1991, Development 111, 845-856). In this paper we examine the role of vegetal yolk mass rotation in producing the animal cytoplasmic rearrangements. We inhibited rotation by uv-irradiating embryos during the first cell cycle, a treatment that yields an extremely ventralized phenotype. Both uv-irradiated embryos and unirradiated control embryos show cytoplasmic rearrangements in the animal hemisphere during the first cell cycle. Cytoplasmic rearrangements on the SEP side of the embryo associated with the path of the sperm pronucleus, plus a swirl on the anti-SEP (dorsal) side, are seen, whether or not yolk mass rotation has occurred. This result suggests a role for the expanding sperm aster in directing animal hemisphere cytoplasmic movements. In unirradiated control embryos the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl is larger than that in uv-irradiated embryos and often extends into the vegetal hemisphere, consistent with the animal cytoplasm having been pulled dorsally and vegetally by the sliding vegetal yolk mass. Thus the yolk mass rotation may normally enhance the dorsalward cytoplasmic movement, begun by the sperm aster, enough to induce normal axis formation. We extended our observations of unirradiated control and uv-irradiated embryos through early cleavages. The vegetal extent of the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl pattern seen in control embryos persists through the early cleavage period, such that labeled animal cytoplasm extends deep into dorsal third-tier blastomeres at the 32-cell stage. Significantly, in uv-irradiated embryos

  20. Autoantibodies in traumatic brain injury and central nervous system trauma.

    PubMed

    Raad, M; Nohra, E; Chams, N; Itani, M; Talih, F; Mondello, S; Kobeissy, F

    2014-12-05

    Despite the debilitating consequences and the widespread prevalence of brain trauma insults including spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), there are currently few effective therapies for most of brain trauma sequelae. As a consequence, there has been a major quest for identifying better diagnostic tools, predictive models, and directed neurotherapeutic strategies in assessing brain trauma. Among the hallmark features of brain injury pathology is the central nervous systems' (CNS) abnormal activation of the immune response post-injury. Of interest, is the occurrence of autoantibodies which are produced following CNS trauma-induced disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and released into peripheral circulation mounted against self-brain-specific proteins acting as autoantigens. Recently, autoantibodies have been proposed as the new generation class of biomarkers due to their long-term presence in serum compared to their counterpart antigens. The diagnostic and prognostic value of several existing autoantibodies is currently being actively studied. Furthermore, the degree of direct and latent contribution of autoantibodies to CNS insult is still not fully characterized. It is being suggested that there may be an analogy of CNS autoantibodies secretion with the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases, in which case, understanding and defining the role of autoantibodies in brain injury paradigm (SCI and TBI) may provide a realistic prospect for the development of effective neurotherapy. In this work, we will discuss the accumulating evidence about the appearance of autoantibodies following brain injury insults. Furthermore, we will provide perspectives on their potential roles as pathological components and as candidate markers for detecting and assessing CNS injury.

  1. Serologic autoantibodies as diagnostic cancer biomarkers--a review.

    PubMed

    Zaenker, Pauline; Ziman, Melanie R

    2013-12-01

    Current diagnostic techniques used for the early detection of cancers are successful but subject to detection bias. A recent focus lies in the development of more accurate diagnostic tools. An increase in serologic autoantibody levels has been shown to precede the development of cancer disease symptoms. Therefore, autoantibody levels in patient blood serum have been proposed as diagnostic biomarkers for early-stage diagnosis of cancers. Their clinical application has, however, been hindered by low sensitivity, specificity, and low predictive value scores. These scores have been shown to improve when panels of multiple diagnostic autoantibody biomarkers are used. A five-marker biomarker panel has been shown to increase the sensitivity of prostate cancer diagnosis to 95% as compared with 12.2% for prostate-specific antigen alone. New potential biomarker panels were also discovered for lung, colon, and stomach cancer diagnosis with sensitivity of 76%, 65.4%, and 50.8%, respectively. Studies in breast and liver cancer, however, seem to favor single markers, namely α-2-HS-glycoprotein and des-γ-carboxyprothrombin with sensitivities of 79% and 89% for the early detection of the cancers. The aim of this review is to discuss the relevance of autoantibodies in cancer diagnosis and to outline the current methodologies used in the detection of autoantibodies. The review concludes with a discussion of the autoantibodies currently used in the diagnosis of cancers of the prostate, breast, lung, colon, stomach, and liver. A discussion of the potential future use of autoantibodies as diagnostic cancer biomarkers is also included in this review.

  2. Cytoplasmic rearrangements associated with amphibian egg symmetrization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malacinski, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Cytoplasmic rearrangements which follow fertilization were mentioned in normal and inverted eggs. A set of yolk compartments was resolved by cytological analyses of both normally oriented and inverted eggs. Those compartments were characterized by their yolk platelet compositions and movement during egg inversion. It is found that during egg inversion the yolk compartments shift minor cytoplasmic compartments which line the egg cortex. Those yolk mass shifts occurred only after the inverted egg was activated. The direction of shift of the major yolk components, rather than the sperm entrance site, determines the dorsal/ventral polarity of the inverted egg. Among different spawnings the rate of shift varied. Eggs that displayed the fastest rate of shift exhibited the highest frequency of developmental abnormalities during organogenesis. Interpretation of novel observations on cytoplasmic organization provide criticism of some earlier models. A new density compartment model is presented as a coherent way to view the organization of the egg cytoplasm and the development of bilateral symmetry.

  3. Cytoplasmic rearrangements associated with amphibian egg symmetrization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malacinski, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Cytoplasmic rearrangements which follow fertilization were mentioned in normal and inverted eggs. A set of yolk compartments was resolved by cytological analyses of both normally oriented and inverted eggs. Those compartments were characterized by their yolk platelet compositions and movement during egg inversion. It is found that during egg inversion the yolk compartments shift minor cytoplasmic compartments which line the egg cortex. Those yolk mass shifts occurred only after the inverted egg was activated. The direction of shift of the major yolk components, rather than the sperm entrance site, determines the dorsal/ventral polarity of the inverted egg. Among different spawnings the rate of shift varied. Eggs that displayed the fastest rate of shift exhibited the highest frequency of developmental abnormalities during organogenesis. Interpretation of novel observations on cytoplasmic organization provide criticism of some earlier models. A new density compartment model is presented as a coherent way to view the organization of the egg cytoplasm and the development of bilateral symmetry.

  4. Definition of human autoimmunity--autoantibodies versus autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Lleo, Ana; Invernizzi, Pietro; Gao, Bin; Podda, Mauro; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-03-01

    The critical function of the immune system is to discriminate self from non-self. Tolerance against self-antigens is a highly regulated process and, in order to maintain it, the immune system must be able to distinguish self-reactive lymphocytes as they develop. The presence of autoantibodies is the consequence of breakdown of tolerance and, although they are an important serological feature of autoimmune diseases, their presence is not exclusive of these conditions. Antibodies against self-antigens are also found in cancer, during massive tissue damage and even in healthy subjects. Natural autoantibodies provide immediate protection against infection and also prevent inflammation by facilitating the clearance of oxidized lipids, oxidized proteins, and apoptotic cells; their role in development of autoimmunity is still unclear. Detection of serum autoantibodies in clinical practice has become more available to clinicians worldwide while providing a powerful diagnostic tool. This review discusses the clinical significance of autoantibodies, their pathogenic mechanisms in autoimmune diseases and, finally, illustrates the technology available for appropriate autoantibody detection.

  5. Effect of age on the induction of autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Goidl, E A; Michelis, M A; Siskind, G W; Weksler, M E

    1981-01-01

    Three experimental models were used to compare the ease of inducing autoantibodies in young and old mice. Autoantibody to thyroglobulin (Tg) induced by immunization with cross-reactive xenogeneic Tg in Freund's complete adjuvant and autoerythrocyte antibody induced by the injection of xenogeneic erythrocytes were studied in C57Bl/6 and BALB/c male mice. In both strains, the anti-thyroglobulin antibody response to lower doses of xenogeneic Tg was significantly lower in old as compared with young animals. There were no detectable differences in incidence or strength of the direct Coombs' test following the administration of rat erythrocytes to old or young animals. In contrast, anti-mouse erythrocyte autoantibody-secreting spleen cells, generated in culture and assayed on bromelin-treated mouse erythrocytes, were more numerous in cultures of spleen cells from old as compared with young mice. These results suggest that the regulation of the autoantibody production which is stimulated by cross-reactive antigens is under different control from the spontaneous age-related increase in autoantibodies. PMID:7021024

  6. Brief Communication: Maternal Plasma Autoantibodies Screening in Fetal Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Charkiewicz, Karol; Zbucka-Kretowska, Monika; Goscik, Joanna; Wolczynski, Slawomir; Lemancewicz, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance in the metabolites levels which can potentially be related to certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities can stimulate mother's immune response to produce autoantibodies directed against proteins. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of 9000 autoantibodies in maternal plasma to detect fetal Down syndrome. Method. We performed 190 amniocenteses and found 10 patients with confirmed fetal Down syndrome (15th–18th weeks of gestation). For the purpose of our control we chose 11 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the expression of autoantibodies in the blood plasma, we used a protein microarray, which allows for simultaneous determination of 9000 proteins per sample. Results. We revealed 213 statistically significant autoantibodies, whose expression decreased or increased in the study group with fetal Down syndrome. The second step was to create a classifier of Down syndrome pregnancy, which includes 14 antibodies. The predictive value of the classifier (specificity and sensitivity) is 100%, classification errors, 0%, cross-validation errors, 0%. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that the autoantibodies may play a role in the pathophysiology of Down syndrome pregnancy. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome pregnancy requires further investigation on larger group of patients. PMID:27042674

  7. Brief Communication: Maternal Plasma Autoantibodies Screening in Fetal Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Charkiewicz, Karol; Zbucka-Kretowska, Monika; Goscik, Joanna; Wolczynski, Slawomir; Lemancewicz, Adam; Laudanski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance in the metabolites levels which can potentially be related to certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities can stimulate mother's immune response to produce autoantibodies directed against proteins. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of 9000 autoantibodies in maternal plasma to detect fetal Down syndrome. Method. We performed 190 amniocenteses and found 10 patients with confirmed fetal Down syndrome (15th-18th weeks of gestation). For the purpose of our control we chose 11 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the expression of autoantibodies in the blood plasma, we used a protein microarray, which allows for simultaneous determination of 9000 proteins per sample. Results. We revealed 213 statistically significant autoantibodies, whose expression decreased or increased in the study group with fetal Down syndrome. The second step was to create a classifier of Down syndrome pregnancy, which includes 14 antibodies. The predictive value of the classifier (specificity and sensitivity) is 100%, classification errors, 0%, cross-validation errors, 0%. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that the autoantibodies may play a role in the pathophysiology of Down syndrome pregnancy. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome pregnancy requires further investigation on larger group of patients.

  8. Neuronal central nervous system syndromes probably mediated by autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Chefdeville, Aude; Honnorat, Jérôme; Hampe, Christiane S.; Desestret, Virginie

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, a rapidly growing number of autoantibodies targeting neuronal cell-surface antigens have been identified in patients presenting with neurological symptoms. Targeted antigens include ionotropic receptors such as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor or the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor, metabotropic receptors such as mGluR1 and mGluR5, and other synaptic proteins, some of them belonging to the voltage-gated potassium channel complex. Importantly, the cell-surface location of these antigens makes them vulnerable to direct antibody-mediated modulation. Some of these autoantibodies, generally targeting ionotropic channels or their partner proteins, define clinical syndromes resembling models of pharmacological or genetic disruption of the corresponding antigen, suggesting a direct pathogenic role of the associated autoantibodies. Moreover, the associated neurological symptoms are usually immunotherapy-responsive, further arguing for a pathogenic effect of the antibodies. Some studies have shown that some patients’ antibodies may have structural and functional in vitro effects on the targeted antigens. Definite proof of the pathogenicity of these autoantibodies has been obtained for just a few through passive transfer experiments in animal models. In this review we present existing and converging evidence suggesting a pathogenic role of some autoantibodies directed against neuronal cell-surface antigens observed in patients with central nervous system disorders. We describe the main clinical symptoms characterizing the patients and discuss conflicting arguments regarding the pathogenicity of these antibodies. PMID:26918657

  9. Regulatory and pathogenetic mechanisms of autoantibodies in SLE.

    PubMed

    Radic, Marko; Herrmann, Martin; van der Vlag, Johan; Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2011-08-01

    In the 53 years since the discovery of anti-DNA autoantibodies in lupus [1, 2, 3] , recalcitrant questions have been pondered and possible answers have been debated. The discovery of anti-DNA autoantibodies presented many puzzles: How is immunological tolerance to native B-form DNA broken? What elicits characteristic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) autoantibodies? Which of the diverse anti-nuclear reactivities are pathogenic? What is the role of autoantibodies in the clinical presentation of disease? How do genetic predisposition and environmental triggers contribute to SLE? These questions were brought into focus by Professor David Stollar in an introductory presentation to an intense, three-day meeting set among the rugged and inspiring scenery of the Norwegian arctic coastline (the Scientific Program is included as supplemental File 1). Other participants presented and discussed topics directed to understanding the origin and clinico-pathological impact of autoantibodies to chromatin and phospholipid antigens. In the following, several aspects of the workshop are discussed.

  10. Engineering stable cytoplasmic intrabodies with designed specificity.

    PubMed

    Donini, Marcello; Morea, Veronica; Desiderio, Angiola; Pashkoulov, Dimitre; Villani, Maria Elena; Tramontano, Anna; Benvenuto, Eugenio

    2003-07-04

    Many attempts have been made to develop antibody fragments that can be expressed in the cytoplasm ("intrabodies") in a stable and functional form. The recombinant antibody fragment scFv(F8) is characterised by peculiarly high in vitro stability and functional folding in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cytoplasm. To dissect the relative contribution of different scFv(F8) regions to cytoplasmic stability and specificity we designed and constructed five chimeric molecules (scFv-P1 to P5) in which several groups of residues important for antigen binding in the poorly stable anti-hen egg lysozyme (HEL) scFv(D1.3) were progressively grafted onto the scFv(F8) scaffold. All five chimeric scFvs were expressed in a soluble form in the periplasm and cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. All the periplasmic oxidised forms and the scFv(P3) extracted from the cytoplasm in reducing conditions had HEL binding affinities essentially identical (K(d)=15nM) to that of the cognate scFv(D1.3) fragment (K(d)=16nM). The successful grafting of the antigen binding properties of D1.3 onto the scFv(F8) opens the road to the exploitation of this molecule as a scaffold for the reshaping of intrabodies with desired specificities to be targeted to the cytoplasm.

  11. Autoantibodies to Agrin in Myasthenia Gravis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bealmear, Beverly; Ragheb, Samia; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Lewis, Richard A.; Lisak, Robert P.; Mei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    To determine if patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) have antibodies to agrin, a proteoglycan released by motor neurons and is critical for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation, we collected serum samples from 93 patients with MG with known status of antibodies to acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle specific kinase (MuSK) and lipoprotein-related 4 (LRP4) and samples from control subjects (healthy individuals and individuals with other diseases). Sera were assayed for antibodies to agrin. We found antibodies to agrin in 7 serum samples of MG patients. None of the 25 healthy controls and none of the 55 control neurological patients had agrin antibodies. Two of the four triple negative MG patients (i.e., no detectable AChR, MuSK or LRP4 antibodies, AChR-/MuSK-/LRP4-) had antibodies against agrin. In addition, agrin antibodies were detected in 5 out of 83 AChR+/MuSK-/LRP4- patients but were not found in the 6 patients with MuSK antibodies (AChR-/MuSK+/LRP4-). Sera from MG patients with agrin antibodies were able to recognize recombinant agrin in conditioned media and in transfected HEK293 cells. These sera also inhibited the agrin-induced MuSK phosphorylation and AChR clustering in muscle cells. Together, these observations indicate that agrin is another autoantigen in patients with MG and agrin autoantibodies may be pathogenic through inhibition of agrin/LRP4/MuSK signaling at the NMJ. PMID:24632822

  12. Autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis: rheumatoid factors and anticitrullinated protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Song, Y W; Kang, E H

    2010-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease, characterized by chronic, erosive polyarthritis and by the presence of various autoantibodies in serum and synovial fluid. Since rheumatoid factor (RF) was first described, a number of other autoantibodies have been discovered in RA patients. The autoantigens recognized by these autoantibodies include cartilage components, chaperones, enzymes, nuclear proteins and citrullinated proteins. However, the clinical significances and pathogenic roles of these antibodies are largely unknown except for RF and anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), whose clinical usefulness has been acknowledged due to their acceptable sensitivities and specificities, and prognostic values. This review presents and discusses the current state of the art regarding RF and ACPA in RA.

  13. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Red Blood Cell Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Quist, Erin; Koepsell, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder caused by autoreactive red blood cell (RBC) antibodies that destroy RBCs. Although autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rare, RBC autoantibodies are encountered frequently and can complicate transfusion workups, impede RBC alloantibody identification, delay distribution of compatible units, have variable clinical significance that ranges from benign to life-threatening, and may signal an underlying disease or disorder. In this review, we discuss the common presenting features of RBC autoantibodies, laboratory findings, ancillary studies that help the pathologist investigate the clinical significance of autoantibodies, and how to provide appropriate patient care and consultation for clinical colleagues. Pathologists must be mindful of, and knowledgeable about, this entity because it not only allows for direct clinical management but also can afford an opportunity to preemptively treat an otherwise silent malignancy or disorder.

  14. Immune Alterations in Patients with Anti-Interferon-γ Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Chruewkamlow, Nuttapol; Mahasongkram, Kodchakorn; Pata, Supansa; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Salee, Parichart; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies against interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) can cause immunodeficiency and are associated with various opportunistic infections. In the present study, we investigated other cellular immune parameters for a better understanding of the immunodeficiency condition in the patients. The numbers of WBC, monocytes and NK cells were increased in patients with anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies (AAbs). Upon TCR activation, T cell proliferation and IL-2 receptor of the patients remained intact. Nonetheless, the Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ and TNF-α) production was up-regulated. The production of Th2 (IL-4) and Th17 (IL-17) cytokines was unchanged. We suggest that, in addition to the presence of anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies, alterations in the cellular immune functions may also contribute to this immunodeficiency. PMID:26727515

  15. Rituximab therapy in pemphigus and other autoantibody-mediated diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Nina A.; Payne, Aimee S.

    2017-01-01

    Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the B cell marker CD20, was initially approved in 1997 by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Since that time, rituximab has been FDA-approved for rheumatoid arthritis and vasculitides, such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis. Additionally, rituximab has been used off-label in the treatment of numerous other autoimmune diseases, with notable success in pemphigus, an autoantibody-mediated skin blistering disease. The efficacy of rituximab therapy in pemphigus has spurred interest in its potential to treat other autoantibody-mediated diseases. This review summarizes the efficacy of rituximab in pemphigus and examines its off-label use in other select autoantibody-mediated diseases. PMID:28184292

  16. Natural autoantibodies and associated B cells in immunity and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Kaiissar; Xu, Yang; Chen, Ching

    2013-03-01

    A substantial proportion of circulating antibodies in healthy individuals exhibit self-reactivity. These antibodies, referred to as natural autoantibodies, are thought to arise naturally without actual antigen stimulation as they are present in human cord blood and in mice housed in germfree conditions and fed an antigen-free diet. Natural autoantibodies are mainly of the IgM class, unmutated, and typically polyreactive. They provide critical early protection against pathogens, and play important roles in maintenance of homeostasis and modulation of innate and adaptive immune responses, thereby conferring protection from rampant autoimmune and inflammatory injuries. In this review, we summarize current information regarding the properties of natural autoantibodies and the B cells that produce them, their roles in immunity and autoimmunity, their mechanisms of action, and their therapeutic potential.

  17. Persistently autoantibody negative (PAN) type 1 diabetes mellitus in children.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Shihab; Ellard, Sian; Woodhead, Helen J; Neville, Kristen A; Walker, Jan L; Craig, Maria E; Armstrong, Taylor; Yu, Liping; Eisenbarth, George S; Hattersley, Andrew T; Verge, Charles F

    2011-05-01

    Autoantibody-negative children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes might have unrecognized monogenic or type 2 diabetes. At diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (between ages 0.5 and 16.3 yr, n = 470), autoantibodies [glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), insulinoma-associated protein 2 (IA2), insulin autoantibodies (IAA), and/or islet cell antibody (ICA)] were positive (ab+) in 330 and negative in 37 (unknown in 103). Autoantibody-negative patients were retested at median diabetes duration of 3.2 yr (range 0.9-16.2) for autoantibodies (GAD, IA2, ZnT8), human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing, non-fasting C-peptide, and sequencing of HNF4A, HNF1A, KCNJ11, and INS. Nineteen (5% of 367) remained persistently autoantibody negative (PAN), 17 were positive on repeat testing (PORT), and 1 refused retesting. No mutations were found in PORT. One PAN was heterozygous for P112L mutation in HNF1A and transferred from insulin to oral gliclazide. Another PAN transferred to metformin and the diagnosis was revised to type 2 diabetes. The remaining 17 PAN were indistinguishable from the ab+ group by clinical characteristics. HLA genotype was at high risk for type 1 diabetes in 82% of remaining PAN and 100% of PORT. After excluding patients with diabetes duration <1 yr, C-peptide was detectable more frequently in the remaining PAN (7/16) and PORT (6/17) than in a random selection of ab+ (3/28, p = 0.03). The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes should be reevaluated in PAN patients, because a subset has monogenic or type 2 diabetes. The remaining PAN have relatively preserved C-peptide compared with ab+, suggesting slower β-cell destruction, but a very high frequency of diabetogenic HLA, implying that type 1B (idiopathic) diabetes is rare. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Alteration of fibroblast phenotype by asbestos-induced autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Pfau, Jean C; Li, Sheng'ai; Holland, Sara; Sentissi, Jami J

    2011-06-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a relentlessly progressive disease for which the etiology can be idiopathic or associated with environmental or occupational exposures. There is not a clear explanation for the chronic and progressive nature of the disease, leaving treatment and prevention options limited. However, there is increasing evidence of an autoimmune component, since fibrotic diseases are often accompanied by production of autoantibodies. Because exposure to silicates such as silica and asbestos can lead to both autoantibodies and pulmonary/pleural fibrosis, these exposures provide an excellent tool for examining the relationship between these outcomes. This study explored the possibility that autoantibodies induced by asbestos exposure in mice would affect fibroblast phenotype. L929 fibroblasts and primary lung fibroblasts were treated with serum IgG from asbestos- or saline-treated mice, and tested for binding using cell-based ELISA, and for phenotypic changes using immunofluorescence, laser scanning cytometry and Sirius Red collagen assay. Autoantibodies in the serum of C57Bl/6 mice exposed to asbestos (but not sera from untreated mice) bound to mouse fibroblasts. The autoantibodies induced differentiation to a myofibroblast phenotype, as demonstrated by increased expression of smooth muscle α-actin (SMA), which was lost when the serum was cleared of IgG. Cells treated with purified IgG of exposed mice produced excess collagen. Using ELISA, we tested serum antibody binding to DNA topoisomerase (Topo) I, vimentin, TGFβ-R, and PDGF-Rα. Antibodies to DNA Topo I and to PDGF-Rα were detected, both of which have been shown by others to be able to affect fibroblast phenotype. The anti-fibroblast antibodies (AFA) also induced STAT-1 activation, implicating the PDGF-R pathway as part of the response to AFA binding. These data support the hypothesis that asbestos induces AFA that modify fibroblast phenotype, and suggest a mechanism whereby autoantibodies may mediate

  19. The Myositis Autoantibody Phenotypes of the Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Huber, Adam M.; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Targoff, Ira N.; Miller, Frederick W.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. In follow-up to our study defining the major clinical subgroup phenotypes of JIIM, we compared demographics, clinical features, laboratory measures, and outcomes among myositis-specific autoantibody (MSA) subgroups, as well as with published data on adult idiopathic inflammatory myopathy patients enrolled in a separate natural history study. In the present study, of 430 patients enrolled in a nationwide registry study who had serum tested for myositis autoantibodies, 374 had either a single specific MSA (n = 253) or no identified MSA (n = 121) and were the subject of the present report. Following univariate analysis, we used random forest classification and exact logistic regression modeling to compare autoantibody subgroups. Anti-p155/140 autoantibodies were the most frequent subgroup, present in 32% of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) or overlap myositis with JDM, followed by anti-MJ autoantibodies, which were seen in 20% of JIIM patients, primarily in JDM. Other MSAs, including anti-synthetase, anti-signal recognition particle (SRP), and anti-Mi-2, were present in only 10% of JIIM patients. Features that characterized the anti-p155/140 autoantibody subgroup included Gottron papules, malar rash, “shawl-sign” rash, photosensitivity, cuticular overgrowth, lowest creatine kinase (CK) levels, and a predominantly chronic illness course. The features that differed for patients with anti-MJ antibodies included muscle cramps, dysphonia, intermediate CK levels, a high frequency of hospitalization, and a monocyclic disease course. Patients with anti-synthetase antibodies had higher frequencies of interstitial lung disease, arthralgia, and “mechanic’s hands,” and had an older age at diagnosis. The anti-SRP group, which had exclusively juvenile polymyositis, was

  20. The myositis autoantibody phenotypes of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Rider, Lisa G; Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Huber, Adam M; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Targoff, Ira N; Miller, Frederick W

    2013-07-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. In follow-up to our study defining the major clinical subgroup phenotypes of JIIM, we compared demographics, clinical features, laboratory measures, and outcomes among myositis-specific autoantibody (MSA) subgroups, as well as with published data on adult idiopathic inflammatory myopathy patients enrolled in a separate natural history study. In the present study, of 430 patients enrolled in a nationwide registry study who had serum tested for myositis autoantibodies, 374 had either a single specific MSA (n = 253) or no identified MSA (n = 121) and were the subject of the present report. Following univariate analysis, we used random forest classification and exact logistic regression modeling to compare autoantibody subgroups. Anti-p155/140 autoantibodies were the most frequent subgroup, present in 32% of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) or overlap myositis with JDM, followed by anti-MJ autoantibodies, which were seen in 20% of JIIM patients, primarily in JDM. Other MSAs, including anti-synthetase, anti-signal recognition particle (SRP), and anti-Mi-2, were present in only 10% of JIIM patients. Features that characterized the anti-p155/140 autoantibody subgroup included Gottron papules, malar rash, "shawl-sign" rash, photosensitivity, cuticular overgrowth, lowest creatine kinase (CK) levels, and a predominantly chronic illness course. The features that differed for patients with anti-MJ antibodies included muscle cramps, dysphonia, intermediate CK levels, a high frequency of hospitalization, and a monocyclic disease course. Patients with anti-synthetase antibodies had higher frequencies of interstitial lung disease, arthralgia, and "mechanic's hands," and had an older age at diagnosis. The anti-SRP group, which had exclusively juvenile polymyositis, was characterized by high

  1. Agalactosyl glycoforms of IgG autoantibodies are pathogenic.

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, T W; Williams, P; Dwek, R A

    1994-01-01

    The glycosylation of IgG results in many different glycoforms. A large body of correlative data (including remission of arthritis during pregnancy) has suggested that IgG molecules lacking galactose were associated with rheumatoid arthritis. We now demonstrate that agalactosyl IgG glycoforms are directly associated with pathogenicity in murine collagen-induced arthritis. We show that passive transfer of an acute synovitis in T-cell-primed mice can be enhanced by using IgG containing autoantibodies to type II collagen when the antibodies are present as the agalactosyl glycoform. Thus, nonpathogenic doses of autoantibodies can be made pathogenic by altering their glycosylation state. PMID:8016124

  2. Tissue transglutaminase is the target in both rodent and primate tissues for celiac disease-specific autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Korponay-Szabó, I R; Sulkanen, S; Halttunen, T; Maurano, F; Rossi, M; Mazzarella, G; Laurila, K; Troncone, R; Mäki, M

    2000-11-01

    Endomysial antibodies have recently been shown to react with tissue transglutaminase. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the tissue distribution of transglutaminase is also compatible with reticulin, jejunal, and fibroblast autoantibody binding patterns. Sera from patients with and without celiac disease, monoclonal tissue transglutaminase antibodies, and sera from mice parenterally immunized against commercially available tissue transglutaminase, transglutaminase complexed with gliadin, or gliadin were used in indirect immunofluorescence and double-staining studies using both rodent and primate tissues as substrates. Also, antibody competition, affinity chromatography, and potassium thiocyanate extraction studies were undertaken. Tissue transglutaminase antibody binding patterns were identical with the extracellular binding patterns seen with celiac patient sera. Human umbilical cord-derived fibroblasts exhibited both cytoplasmic and extracellular matrix staining. Double staining with patients' sera and tissue transglutaminase antibodies showed complete overlapping. Tissue transglutaminase effectively absorbed reticulin-endomysial antibodies from celiac sera, and patients' sera blocked the staining of the monoclonal tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Potassium thiocyanate extraction abolished the staining patterns, but they were elicited again after readdition of tissue transglutaminase. Reticulin, endomysial, and jejunal antibodies detect transglutaminase in both rodent and primate tissues, indicating that these tissue autoantibodies are identical.

  3. Nonmuscle myosin promotes cytoplasmic localization of PBX.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Paliouras, Miltiadis; Rambaldi, Isabel; Lasko, Paul; Featherstone, Mark

    2003-05-01

    In the absence of MEIS family proteins, two mechanisms are known to restrict the PBX family of homeodomain (HD) transcription factors to the cytoplasm. First, PBX is actively exported from the nucleus via a CRM1-dependent pathway. Second, nuclear localization signals (NLSs) within the PBX HD are masked by intramolecular contacts. In a screen to identify additional proteins directing PBX subcellular localization, we identified a fragment of murine nonmuscle myosin II heavy chain B (NMHCB). The interaction of NMHCB with PBX was verified by coimmunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence staining revealed colocalization of NMHCB with cytoplasmic PBX in the mouse embryo distal limb bud. The interaction domain in PBX mapped to a conserved PBC-B region harboring a potential coiled-coil structure. In support of the cytoplasmic retention function, the NMHCB fragment competes with MEIS1A to redirect PBX, and the fly PBX homologue EXD, to the cytoplasm of mammalian and insect cells. Interestingly, MEIS1A also localizes to the cytoplasm in the presence of the NMHCB fragment. These activities are largely independent of nuclear export. We show further that the subcellular localization of EXD is deregulated in Drosophila zipper mutants that are depleted of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain. This study reveals a novel and evolutionarily conserved mechanism controlling the subcellular distribution of PBX and EXD proteins.

  4. Antithyroid Arthritis Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Takaya, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Natsumi; Hiyoshi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 38-year-old Japanese woman with antithyroid arthritis syndrome who experienced severe migratory polyarthritis after the initiation of thiamazole therapy. The patient's symptoms promptly disappeared without any sequelae after the withdrawal of the drug. Antithyroid arthritis syndrome is poorly characterized, and the findings from our literature review indicate that this syndrome exhibits serological features that are distinct from those of antithyroid agent-induced vasculitis syndrome. The absence of autoantibodies, especially anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, may help characterize and diagnose antithyroid arthritis syndrome. Furthermore, physicians' awareness of this syndrome is essential for its diagnosis in clinical practice. PMID:27980264

  5. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts.

  6. Cytoplasmic vacuolization in cell death and survival

    PubMed Central

    Komissarov, Alexey A.; Rafieva, Lola M.; Kostrov, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic vacuolization (also called cytoplasmic vacuolation) is a well-known morphological phenomenon observed in mammalian cells after exposure to bacterial or viral pathogens as well as to various natural and artificial low-molecular-weight compounds. Vacuolization often accompanies cell death; however, its role in cell death processes remains unclear. This can be attributed to studying vacuolization at the level of morphology for many years. At the same time, new data on the molecular mechanisms of the vacuole formation and structure have become available. In addition, numerous examples of the association between vacuolization and previously unknown cell death types have been reported. Here, we review these data to make a deeper insight into the role of cytoplasmic vacuolization in cell death and survival. PMID:27331412

  7. Cytoplasmic Streaming in the Drosophila Oocyte.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Margot E

    2016-10-06

    Objects are commonly moved within the cell by either passive diffusion or active directed transport. A third possibility is advection, in which objects within the cytoplasm are moved with the flow of the cytoplasm. Bulk movement of the cytoplasm, or streaming, as required for advection, is more common in large cells than in small cells. For example, streaming is observed in elongated plant cells and the oocytes of several species. In the Drosophila oocyte, two stages of streaming are observed: relatively slow streaming during mid-oogenesis and streaming that is approximately ten times faster during late oogenesis. These flows are implicated in two processes: polarity establishment and mixing. In this review, I discuss the underlying mechanism of streaming, how slow and fast streaming are differentiated, and what we know about the physiological roles of the two types of streaming.

  8. Cytoplasmic RNA decay pathways - Enzymes and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Łabno, Anna; Tomecki, Rafał; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    RNA decay plays a crucial role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Work conducted over the last decades has defined the major mRNA decay pathways, as well as enzymes and their cofactors responsible for these processes. In contrast, our knowledge of the mechanisms of degradation of non-protein coding RNA species is more fragmentary. This review is focused on the cytoplasmic pathways of mRNA and ncRNA degradation in eukaryotes. The major 3' to 5' and 5' to 3' mRNA decay pathways are described with emphasis on the mechanisms of their activation by the deprotection of RNA ends. More recently discovered 3'-end modifications such as uridylation, and their relevance to cytoplasmic mRNA decay in various model organisms, are also discussed. Finally, we provide up-to-date findings concerning various pathways of non-coding RNA decay in the cytoplasm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis compared for identifying autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase in human serum.

    PubMed

    Harff, G A; Backer, E T

    1990-12-14

    Variant electrophoretic patterns of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes were studied. By radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis, immunoglobulin and light chain class of autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase were identified in nine sera: seven of these sera demonstrated IgG (5 lambda, 2 kappa) autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase, the other two demonstrated IgA (both kappa) autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase, the other two demonstrated IgA (both kappa) autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase. We conclude that radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis are equally effective for identifying auto-antibodies to lactate dehydrogenase in serum. Radial immunodiffusion, however, is easier to perform than immunoelectrophoresis.

  10. Cytoplasmic Estrogen Receptor in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Allison W.; Lannin, Donald R.; Young, Gregory S.; Sherman, Mark E.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Henry, N. Lynn; Ryden, Lisa; Kim, Chungyeul; Love, Richard R.; Schiff, Rachel; Rimm, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose In addition to genomic signaling, it is accepted that ERα has non-nuclear signaling functions, which correlate with tamoxifen resistance in preclinical models. However, evidence for cytoplasmic ER localization in human breast tumors is less established. We sought to determine the presence and implications of non-nuclear ER in clinical specimens. Experimental Design A panel of ERα-specific antibodies (SP1, MC20, F10, 60c, 1D5) were validated by western blot and quantitative immunofluorescent (QIF) analysis of cell lines and patient controls. Then eight retrospective cohorts collected on tissue microarrays were assessed for cytoplasmic ER. Four cohorts were from Yale (YTMA 49, 107, 130, 128) and four others (NCI YTMA 99, South Swedish Breast Cancer Group SBII, NSABP B14, and a Vietnamese Cohort) from other sites around the world. Results Four of the antibodies specifically recognized ER by western and QIF, showed linear increases in amounts of ER in cell line series with progressively increasing ER, and the antibodies were reproducible on YTMA 49 with pearson’s correlations (r2 values)ranging from 0.87-0.94. One antibody with striking cytoplasmic staining (MC20) failed validation. We found evidence for specific cytoplasmic staining with the other 4 antibodies across eight cohorts. The average incidence was 1.5%, ranging from 0 to 3.2%. Conclusions Our data shows ERα present in the cytoplasm in a number of cases using multiple antibodies, while reinforcing the importance of antibody validation. In nearly 3,200 cases, cytoplasmic ER is present at very low incidence, suggesting its measurement is unlikely to be of routine clinical value. PMID:21980134

  11. Autoantibodies in Scurfy Mice and IPEX Patients Recognize Keratin 14

    PubMed Central

    Huter, Eva N.; Natarajan, Kannan; Torgerson, Troy R.; Glass, Deborah D.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    Scurfy mice have a deletion in the Foxp3 gene, resulting in a failure to generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, and they subsequently develop severe CD4+ T-cell-mediated autoimmune inflammation. Multiple organs are involved, but the skin is one of the main organs affected. During the course of disease, Scurfy mice develop autoantibodies; however, the targeted antigens are unknown. In this study, we show that Scurfy mice develop autoantibodies directed against skin antigens. Using western blot analysis, we found that Scurfy serum reacted with proteins in total skin lysate, as well as in a keratinocyte lysate. Most of the Scurfy sera tested identified a major band at 50 kDa. Transfer of Scurfy CD4+ T cells into nu/nu mice yielded autoantibodies with similar reactivity. Further analysis using 2D western blots, followed by peptide mass fingerprinting, identified several keratins as targets. To confirm this observation, we chose one of the identified targets, keratin 14, and prepared recombinant proteins encompassing the N-terminal, middle, and C-terminal portions of the keratin 14 protein. Scurfy serum predominantly recognized the C-terminal fragment. Sera from patients with immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome, the human disease resulting from FOXP3 mutations, also recognized skin antigens, including keratin 14. Thus, the results of our study indicate that autoantibodies in Scurfy mice and patients with IPEX target keratins. PMID:20147963

  12. Autoantibodies in scurfy mice and IPEX patients recognize keratin 14.

    PubMed

    Huter, Eva N; Natarajan, Kannan; Torgerson, Troy R; Glass, Deborah D; Shevach, Ethan M

    2010-05-01

    Scurfy mice have a deletion in the Foxp3 gene, resulting in a failure to generate Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells, and they subsequently develop severe CD4(+) T-cell-mediated autoimmune inflammation. Multiple organs are involved, but the skin is one of the main organs affected. During the course of disease, Scurfy mice develop autoantibodies; however, the targeted antigens are unknown. In this study, we show that Scurfy mice develop autoantibodies directed against skin antigens. Using western blot analysis, we found that Scurfy serum reacted with proteins in total skin lysate, as well as in a keratinocyte lysate. Most of the Scurfy sera tested identified a major band at 50 kDa. Transfer of Scurfy CD4(+) T cells into nu/nu mice yielded autoantibodies with similar reactivity. Further analysis using 2D western blots, followed by peptide mass fingerprinting, identified several keratins as targets. To confirm this observation, we chose one of the identified targets, keratin 14, and prepared recombinant proteins encompassing the N-terminal, middle, and C-terminal portions of the keratin 14 protein. Scurfy serum predominantly recognized the C-terminal fragment. Sera from patients with immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome, the human disease resulting from FOXP3 mutations, also recognized skin antigens, including keratin 14. Thus, the results of our study indicate that autoantibodies in Scurfy mice and patients with IPEX target keratins.

  13. Autoantibodies against CD80 in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xu Min; Liu, Xin Yan; Tang, Ji Hong; Yang, Wei; Ni, Zhen Hua; Chen, Qing Ge; Wang, Xiongbiao

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammation disorder and possibly an autoimmune disease. The components of the autoimmune response in the circulatory system are of considerable interest to clinicians. Because aberrations of costimulation status have been noted in COPD, the presence of autoantibodies to B7 costimulatory factor CD80 were investigated in a cohort of patients. Recombinant rs1CD80 (lacking the transmembrane domain of CD80) was used for Western blot analysis and ELISA to investigate the presence of autoantibodies in sera of patients with stable COPD and in controls without COPD. Cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 were detected using ELISA. Western blot revealed a specific band reacting to rs1CD80 by diluting sera pool of patients, which indicated the existence of autoantibodies to CD80. The serum level of anti-rs1CD80 was higher in patients with COPD than in controls(P=0.0185) and was positively correlated to the serum level of IL-6 (r=0.797, P<0.001) and IL-8 (r=0.608, P<0.001). There was a tendency that more higher level of anti-rs1CD80, more severe COPD stage. The existence of autoantibodies to costimulatory factor CD80 may suggest a pathogenic role of costimulatory factors in COPD. PMID:27867516

  14. Autoantibodies against CD80 in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xu Min; Liu, Xin Yan; Tang, Ji Hong; Yang, Wei; Ni, Zhen Hua; Chen, Qing Ge; Wang, Xiongbiao

    2016-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammation disorder and possibly an autoimmune disease. The components of the autoimmune response in the circulatory system are of considerable interest to clinicians. Because aberrations of costimulation status have been noted in COPD, the presence of autoantibodies to B7 costimulatory factor CD80 were investigated in a cohort of patients. Recombinant rs1CD80 (lacking the transmembrane domain of CD80) was used for Western blot analysis and ELISA to investigate the presence of autoantibodies in sera of patients with stable COPD and in controls without COPD. Cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 were detected using ELISA. Western blot revealed a specific band reacting to rs1CD80 by diluting sera pool of patients, which indicated the existence of autoantibodies to CD80. The serum level of anti-rs1CD80 was higher in patients with COPD than in controls(P=0.0185) and was positively correlated to the serum level of IL-6 (r=0.797, P<0.001) and IL-8 (r=0.608, P<0.001). There was a tendency that more higher level of anti-rs1CD80, more severe COPD stage. The existence of autoantibodies to costimulatory factor CD80 may suggest a pathogenic role of costimulatory factors in COPD.

  15. Bullous pemphigoid autoantibodies directly induce blister formation without complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Hideyuki; Sasaoka, Tetsumasa; Izumi, Kentaro; Nishie, Wataru; Shinkuma, Satoru; Natsuga, Ken; Nakamura, Hideki; Shibaki, Akihiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Complement activation and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells at the dermal/epidermal junction are thought to be essential for blister formation in bullous pemphigoid (BP), an autoimmune blistering disease induced by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen (COL17); however, this theory does not fully explain the pathological features of BP. Recently, the involvement of complement-independent pathways has been proposed. To directly address the question of the necessity of the complement activation in blister formation, we generated C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice. First, we show that passive transfer of autoantibodies from BP patients induced blister formation in neonatal C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice without complement activation. By using newly generated human and murine mAbs against the pathogenic noncollagenous 16A domain of COL17 with high (human IgG1, murine IgG2), low (murine IgG1), or no (human IgG4) complement activation abilities, we demonstrate that the deposition of Abs, and not complements, is relevant to the induction of blister formation in neonatal and adult mice. Notably, passive transfer of BP autoantibodies reduced the amount of COL17 in lesional mice skin, as observed in cultured normal human keratinocytes treated with the same Abs. Moreover, the COL17 depletion was associated with a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In conclusion, the COL17 depletion induced by BP autoantibodies, and not complement activation, is essential for the blister formation under our experimental system.

  16. New Autoantibody Detection Technologies Yield Novel Insights into Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burbelo, Peter D.; O’Hanlon, Terrance P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to highlight recent progress in autoantibody detection technologies and describe how these methods are providing novel information and insights into autoimmune disorders. Recent findings In recent years, alternative methods such as comprehensive phage display, fluid-phase immunoassays, and antigen microarrays have been developed for autoantigen discovery and profiling autoantibody responses. Compared to classic approaches such as Western blot and ELISA, these methods show improved diagnostic performance, the ability to measure antibody responses to multiple targets, and/or allow for more quantitative analyses. Specific notable findings include uncovering previously unrecognized autoantigens, the improved classification of patient clinical phenotypes, and the discovery of pathogenic autoantibodies promoting disease. Summary Advances in immunoassay technologies offer many opportunities for understanding the relationship between autoantibody detection and the myriad complex, clinical phenotypes characteristic of most autoimmune diseases. Further simplification and standardization of these technologies may allow routine integration into clinical practice with improved diagnostic and therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25203116

  17. Mesothelial cell autoantibodies upregulate transcription factors associated with fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gilmer, John; Harding, Tanner; Woods, Linda; Black, Brad; Flores, Raja; Pfau, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Amphibole asbestos exposure is associated with the production of mesothelial cell autoantibodies (MCAA). These MCAA have been linked with pleural fibrotic disease in the asbestos exposed community of Libby, Montana, and induce collagen deposition by cultured mesothelial cells. However, the exact intracellular mechanism by which these autoantibodies cause an increase in collagen deposition remains unknown. This study sought to gain insight into the transcription factors involved in the collagen production after human mesothelial cells are exposed to MCAA. In this study, transcription factor activation profiles were generated from human mesothelial cells (Met5A) treated with serum from Libby subjects, and were compared to cells treated with serum cleared of IgG, and therefore containing no MCAA. Analysis of those profiles indicated C/EBP-beta and hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) are significantly increased in the nucleus, indicating activation, due to MCAA exposure compared to controls. Inhibition of either of these transcription factors significantly reduced collagen 1 deposition by these cells following exposure to MCAA. These data suggest autoantibodies are directly involved in type I collagen deposition and may elucidate potential therapeutic targets for autoantibody mediated fibrosis.

  18. Characterization of autoantibodies to vasoactive intestinal peptide in asthma.

    PubMed

    Paul, S; Said, S I; Thompson, A B; Volle, D J; Agrawal, D K; Foda, H; de la Rocha, S

    1989-07-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a potent relaxant of the airway smooth muscle. In this study, VIP-binding autoantibodies were observed in the plasma of 18% asthma patients and 16% healthy subjects. Immunoprecipitation studies and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and immobilized protein G indicated that the plasma VIP-binding activity was largely due to IgG antibodies. Saturation analysis of VIP binding by the plasmas suggested the presence of one or two classes of autoantibodies, distinguished by their apparent equilibrium affinity constants (Ka). The autoantibodies from asthma patients exhibited a larger VIP-binding affinity compared to those from healthy subjects (Ka 7.8 x 10(9) M-1 and 0.13 x 10(9) M-1, respectively; P less than 0.005). The antibodies were specific for VIP, judged by their poor reaction with peptides bearing partial sequence homology with VIP (peptide histidine isoleucine, growth hormone releasing factor and secretin). IgG prepared from the plasma of an antibody-positive asthma patient inhibited the saturable binding of 125I-VIP by receptors in guinea pig lung membranes (by 39-59%; P less than 0.001). These observations are consistent with a role for the VIP autoantibodies in the airway hyperresponsiveness of asthma.

  19. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system. 866.5870 Section 866.5870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system. 866.5870 Section 866.5870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  5. Personalized medicine in rheumatology: the paradigm of serum autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Sirotti, Silvia; Generali, Elena; Ceribelli, Angela; Isailovic, Natasa; De Santis, Maria; Selmi, Carlo

    2017-12-01

    The sequencing of the human genome is now well recognized as the starting point of personalized medicine. Nonetheless, everyone is unique and can develop different phenotypes of the same disease, despite identical genotypes, as well illustrated by discordant monozygotic twins. To recognize these differences, one of the easiest and most familiar examples of biomarkers capable of identifying and predicting the outcome of patients is represented by serum autoantibodies. In this review, we will describe the concept of personalized medicine and discuss the predictive, prognostic and preventive role of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA), rare autoantibodies and anti-drug antibodies (ADA), to evaluate how these can help to identify different disease immune phenotypes and to choose the best option for treating and monitoring rheumatic patients in everyday practice. The importance of ANA resides in the prediction of clinical manifestations in systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus and their association with malignancies. ACPA have a predictive role in rheumatoid arthritis, they are associated with the development of a more aggressive disease, extra-articular manifestations and premature mortality in RA patients; moreover, they are capable of predicting therapeutic response. Rare autoantibodies are associated with different disease manifestations and also with a greater incidence of cancer. The determination of ADA levels may be useful in patients where the clinical efficacy of TNF-α inhibitor has dropped, for the assessment of a right management. The resulting scenario supports serum autoantibodies as the cornerstone of personalized medicine in autoimmune diseases.

  6. How crowded is the prokaryotic cytoplasm?

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2013-07-11

    We consider biomacromolecular crowding within the cytoplasm of prokaryotic cells as a two-phase system of 'supercrowded' cytogel and 'dilute' cytosol; we simplify and quantify this model for a coccoid cell over a wide range of biomacromolecular crowding. The key result shows that the supercrowded cytogel extends the vectorial character of the plasma membrane deeper into the cytoplasm by about 20-70 nm. We discuss useful physiological insights that this model gives into the functioning of a prokaryotic cell on the micrometer scale. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cytoplasmic Sterility Factors in VICIA FABA L

    PubMed Central

    Edwardson, J. R.; Bond, D. A.; Christie, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    Tissues of cytoplasmic male sterile, maintainer, restorer, and restored lines, and sterile plants which reverted to fertility in Vicia faba were examined in ultrathin sections. Cytoplasmic spherical bodies (CSB), ca. 70 nm in diameter, were observed in tissues of all sterile plants but not in tissues of maintainer, restorer or restored sterile plants. No CSB were observed in a reverted fertile branch of a tiller-sterile plant, nor in 5 of 6 reverted fertile plants. One reverted fertile plant contained CSB in ovules. It is proposed that the CSB are the sites of, or possibly, products of, sterility factors in Vicia faba. PMID:17248701

  8. [The incidence of the pituitary autoantibodies in Addison disease].

    PubMed

    Gut, Paweł; Kosowicz, Jerzy; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Baczyk, Maciej; Sowiński, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    Addison disease (primary insufficience of adrenal cortex) characterized by clinical signs and symptoms associated with deficiency of adrenal hormones. The most frequent etiopathogenesis of Addison disease is related with autoimmunization. In sera of Addison patients are detectable autoantibodies against another endocrine glands. The aim of the study was evaluation of pituitary autoantibodies in Addison disease patients using immunoblotting methods. Studies were performed in 19 Addison disease patients, 16 women (age range: 28-63 yrs, median: 43.5 +/- 8.9) and 3 men (age range: 18-45 yrs, median: 30.6 +/- 9.8). All patients presented signs and symptoms typical of primary insufficiency of adrenal cortex. Sera of control subjects were obtained from 10 healthy blood donors, 7 women, 3 men (age range 21-45 yrs, median: 30.6 +/- 7.1). Incidence of pituitary autoantibodies was assessed by polyacrylamide electrophoresis gel and western-blotting. Pituitary microsomes were obtained from human pituitary tissues by ultracentrifugation and solubilisation in 1% desoxycholic acid. In 14 sera from 19 we detected autoantibodies against pituitary microsomal antigen 67 kDa, 12 sera were recting with 60 kDa and 10 sera with 55 kDa. It is important to note that 10 sera were reacting with 67 and 55 kDa, and 9 sera with 55, 60 and 67 kDa. In sera of Addison disease patients autoantibodies against pituitary microsomal antigens can be frequently detected. The most frequent are antibodies against 55, 60 and 67 kDa antigens.

  9. Diagnostic Utility of Auto-Antibodies in Inflammatory Muscle Diseases.

    PubMed

    Allenbach, Y; Benveniste, O

    2015-01-01

    To date, there are four main groups of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM): polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) and sporadic inclusion body myositis; based on clinical presentation and muscle pathology. Nevertheless, important phenotypical differences (either muscular and/or extra-muscular manifestations) within a group persist. In recent years, the titration of different myositis-specific (or associated) auto-antibodies as a diagnostic tool has increased. This is an important step forward since it may facilitate, at a viable cost, the differential diagnosis between IIM and other myopathies. We have now routine access to assays for the detection of different antibodies. For example, IMNM are related to the presence of anti-SRP or anti-HMGCR. PM is associated with anti-synthetase antibodies (anti-Jo-1, PL-7, PL-12, OJ, and EJ) and DM with anti-Mi-2, anti-SAE, anti-TIF-1-γ and anti-NXP2 (both associated with cancer) or anti-MDA5 antibodies (associated with interstitial lung disease). Today, over 30 myositis specific and associated antibodies have been characterised, and all groups of myositis may present one of those auto-antibodies. Most of them allow identification of homogenous patient groups, more precisely than the classical international classifications of myositis. This implies that classification criteria could be modified accordingly, since these auto-antibodies delineate groups of patients suffering from myositis with consistent clinical phenotype (muscular and extra-muscular manifestations), common prognostic (cancer association, presence of interstitial lung disease, mortality and risk of relapse) and treatment responses. Nevertheless, since numerous auto-antibodies have been recently characterised, the exact prevalence of myositis specific antibodies remains to be documented, and research of new auto-antibodies in the remaining seronegative group is still needed.

  10. Induction of autoantibodies to different interleukin-2 allotypes.

    PubMed

    Matesanz, F; Alcina, A

    1999-05-01

    We report the development of an in vivo system to induce the generation, and study the potential role, of autoantibodies to the lymphokine interleukin-2 (IL-2). To elicit IL-2 autoantibodies, mice were immunized with purified fusion proteins containing the N-terminal region of different IL-2 allotypes, where major changes have been observed. This part of the IL-2 molecule includes a conserved sequence with an essential residue for interacting with the beta-chain of the heterotrimeric IL-2 receptor. Mice bearing an RF IL-2 allotype, immunized with several N-terminal IL-2 fusion proteins, produced IgG antibodies against Mus musculus, C57BL/6, Mus spretus and the self molecule RF IL-2, but there were large differences among then in reactivity. These N-terminal IL-2 immunogens break the maintenance of self tolerance possibly by the introduction of new T cell epitopes on self IL-2. The immunized mice developed a complex set of immunopathologies such as splenomegaly, haemolytic anaemia and lymphoadenopathy with a long latency period after the last immunization. These pathologies resembled those described for IL-2-deficient mice (IL-2(-/-)) and mice injected with anti-IL-2 receptor alpha-antibody. Human IL-2 autoantibodies have been detected in several immune-affected situations and therefore this model would be of interest to study the potential evolution of these autoantibodies in relation to immunopathology. The production of these autoantibodies against conserved epitopes of mouse IL-2 may facilitate studies on the structural homologies between different IL-2 allotypes and from various species, and could be applied to other cytokines. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  11. Recombinant protein to analyze autoantibodies to proteinase 3 in systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Rarok, Agnieszka A; Huitema, Minke G; van der Leij, Marcel J; van der Geld, Ymke M; Berthold, Heike; Schmitt, Jacky; Stegeman, Coen A; Limburg, Pieter C; Kallenberg, Cees G

    2003-10-01

    The presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies with specificity for proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA) usually is detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with purified PR3 as a substrate. We studied the technical performance of direct and capture ELISA using a recombinant proteolytically inactive form of PR3 produced in the baculovirus expression system for the detection of PR3-ANCA in 114 patients with systemic vasculitis at diagnosis. We found that ELISA using recombinant PR3 produced in insect cells is a promising alternative for ELISA with native PR3. We found a correlation between tests using recombinant or native PR3, as well as correlation of the ELISA results with ANCA titers measured by the indirect immunofluorescence technique. However, the specificity for ANCA-associated vasculitis of ELISA with recombinant PR3 was lower than ELISA using native PR3. Compared with the direct assay, capture ELISA is a more sensitive method for PR3-ANCA detection, with both native and recombinant PR3, and its results depend on the monoclonal antibody used to capture the antigen.

  12. Mechanisms of autoantibody production and the relationship between autoantibodies and the clinical manifestations in Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hideki; Kawakami, Atsushi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2006-12-01

    The major target organs of Sjögren's syndrome (SS) are lacrimal glands and salivary glands where prominent lymphocytic infiltration occurs, which may induce varying levels of autoantibody production. Multiple factors, including environmental stress, viral infection, hormonal imbalance, and apoptosis, are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of SS. Production of anti-SS-A/Ro and anti-SS-B/La antibodies is thought to be regulated by the presentation of autoantigens in context with an aberrant expression pattern of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) in situ. Molecular mimicry with some viral sequences is also hypothesized. The apoptosis-resistance phenotype of B cells in labial salivary glands (LSGs) of SS is important in autoantibody production. CD40/CD40L (CD40 ligand) and Bcl-2 family proteins, in tandem with B cell-activating factor (BAFF), are supposed to protect infiltrating lymphocytes from apoptosis. Anti-muscarinic3 receptor antibody plays an important role in cholinergic hyperresponsiveness in SS. Fragmentation of autoantigens such as SS-B/La or alfa-fodrin during the process of apoptosis causes the redistribution of these autoantigens, leading to the production of autoantibodies in SS. In this review, the role of autoantibodies found in SS, corresponding to clinical aspects of each antibody as well as the mechanisms of production, is discussed.

  13. Specificity of islet cell autoantibodies and coexistence with other organ specific autoantibodies in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tsirogianni, Alexandra; Pipi, Elena; Soufleros, Konstantinos

    2009-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) has been shown to be a disease characterized by immune-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing islet beta-cells (beta-cells) in the pancreas. Intensive studies, in both patients and animal models are trying to elucidate the specific antigenic targets that are responsible for islet cell autoimmunity. So far, the most important molecules that have been recognized are the native insulin, the 65-kDa form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD(65)) and the insulinoma-antigen 2 (IA-2). Identification of those specific autoantibodies that are involved in the primary immunological events of the autoimmune disease process will allow the development of novel diagnostic procedures for early detection and initiation of potential therapy prior to irreversible loss of beta-cells. Within the framework of polyglandular disorders, T1DM may coexist with other organ specific autoimmune diseases such as autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD), autoimmune gastritis (AG), celiac disease (CD) and Addison's disease (AD), which are associated with the production of organ-specific autoantibodies. So, as a subset of patients with those autoantibodies will develop clinical disease, screening T1DM patients could prognosticate morbidity relative to unrecognised clinical entities. The close follow-up of patients with organ-specific autoantibodies could lead to seasonable identification of those requiring therapy.

  14. Cytoplasmic Drosha activity generated by alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lisheng; Chen, Kevin; Youngren, Brenda; Kulina, Julia; Yang, Acong; Guo, Zhengyu; Li, Jin; Yu, Peng; Gu, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    RNase III enzyme Drosha interacts with DGCR8 to form the Microprocessor, initiating canonical microRNA (miRNA) maturation in the nucleus. Here, we re-evaluated where Drosha functions in cells using Drosha and/or DGCR8 knock out (KO) cells and cleavage reporters. Interestingly, a truncated Drosha mutant located exclusively in the cytoplasm cleaved pri-miRNA effectively in a DGCR8-dependent manner. In addition, we demonstrated that in vitro generated pri-miRNAs when transfected into cells could be processed to mature miRNAs in the cytoplasm. These results indicate the existence of cytoplasmic Drosha (c-Drosha) activity. Although a subset of endogenous pri-miRNAs become enriched in the cytoplasm of Drosha KO cells, it remains unclear whether pri-miRNA processing is the main function of c-Drosha. We identified two novel in-frame Drosha isoforms generated by alternative splicing in both HEK293T and HeLa cells. One isoform loses the putative nuclear localization signal, generating c-Drosha. Further analysis indicated that the c-Drosha isoform is abundant in multiple cell lines, dramatically variable among different human tissues and upregulated in multiple tumors, suggesting that c-Drosha plays a unique role in gene regulation. Our results reveal a new layer of regulation on the miRNA pathway and provide novel insights into the ever-evolving functions of Drosha. PMID:27471035

  15. Nitrite Reduces Cytoplasmic Acidosis under Anoxia1

    PubMed Central

    Libourel, I.G.L.; van Bodegom, P.M.; Fricker, M.D.; Ratcliffe, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    The ameliorating effect of nitrate on the acidification of the cytoplasm during short-term anoxia was investigated in maize (Zea mays) root segments. Seedlings were grown in the presence or absence of nitrate, and changes in the cytoplasmic and vacuolar pH in response to the imposition of anoxia were measured by in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Soluble ions and metabolites released to the suspending medium by the anoxic root segments were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and volatile metabolites were measured by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The beneficial effect of nitrate on cytoplasmic pH regulation under anoxia occurred despite limited metabolism of nitrate under anoxia, and modest effects on the ions and metabolites, including fermentation end products, released from the anoxic root segments. Interestingly, exposing roots grown and treated in the absence of nitrate to micromolar levels of nitrite during anoxia had a beneficial effect on the cytoplasmic pH that was comparable to the effect observed for roots grown and treated in the presence of nitrate. It is argued that nitrate itself is not directly responsible for improved pH regulation under anoxia, contrary to the usual assumption, and that nitrite rather than nitrate should be the focus for further work on the beneficial effect of nitrate on flooding tolerance. PMID:17071644

  16. Cytoplasmic ATM in neurons modulates synaptic function.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiali; Han, Yu R; Plummer, Mark R; Herrup, Karl

    2009-12-29

    ATM is a PI 3-kinase involved in DNA double-strand break repair. ATM deficiency leads to ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), a syndrome of cancer susceptibility, hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation, immune deficiency, and sterility [1, 2]-phenotypes that can straightforwardly be attributed to a defective response to DNA damage. Yet patients with A-T also suffer from ataxia, speech defects, and abnormal body movements [3-5]-neurological phenotypes whose origins remain largely unexplained. Compounding the discordance, Atm mutations in mouse interfere with DNA repair but have only mild neurological symptoms [6-9], suggesting that the link between DNA damage and the death of neurons can be broken [10-12]. We find that in neurons, ATM protein has a substantial cytoplasmic distribution. We show that in Atm(tm1Awb) mice, hippocampal long-term potentiation is significantly reduced, as is the rate of spontaneous vesicular dye release, suggesting a functional importance of cytoplasmic ATM. In the cytoplasm, ATM forms a complex with two synaptic vesicle proteins, VAMP2 and synapsin-I, both of which must be phosphorylated to bind ATM. Also, cytoplasmic ATM physically associates with the homologous PI 3-kinase, ATR. The neurological symptoms of ataxia-telangiectasia may thus result from defective nonnuclear functions of ATM not associated with DNA repair.

  17. Subunit organization in cytoplasmic dynein subcomplexes

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen J.; Bonilla, Myriam; Rodgers, Michael E.; Schroer, Trina A.

    2002-01-01

    Because cytoplasmic dynein plays numerous critical roles in eukaryotic cells, determining the subunit composition and the organization and functions of the subunits within dynein are important goals. This has been difficult partly because of accessory polypeptide heterogeneity of dynein populations. The motor domain containing heavy chains of cytoplasmic dynein are associated with multiple intermediate, light intermediate, and light chain accessory polypeptides. We examined the organization of these subunits within cytoplasmic dynein by separating the molecule into two distinct subcomplexes. These subcomplexes were competent to reassemble into a molecule with dynein-like properties. One subcomplex was composed of the dynein heavy and light intermediate chains whereas the other subcomplex was composed of the intermediate and light chains. The intermediate and light chain subcomplex could be further separated into two pools, only one of which contained dynein light chains. The two pools had distinct intermediate chain compositions, suggesting that intermediate chain isoforms have different light chain–binding properties. When the two intermediate chain pools were characterized by analytical velocity sedimentation, at least four molecular components were seen: intermediate chain monomers, intermediate chain dimers, intermediate chain monomers with bound light chains, and a mixture of intermediate chain dimers with assorted bound light chains. These data provide new insights into the compositional heterogeneity and assembly of the cytoplasmic dynein complex and suggest that individual dynein molecules have distinct molecular compositions in vivo. PMID:11967380

  18. Cytoplasmic permeation pathway of neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Rudnick, Gary

    2011-09-06

    Ion-coupled solute transporters are responsible for transporting nutrients, ions, and signaling molecules across a variety of biological membranes. Recent high-resolution crystal structures of several transporters from protein families that were previously thought to be unrelated show common structural features indicating a large structural family representing transporters from all kingdoms of life. This review describes studies that led to an understanding of the conformational changes required for solute transport in this family. The first structure in this family showed the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, which is homologous to neurotransmitter transporters, in an extracellularly oriented conformation with a molecule of leucine occluded at the substrate site. Studies with the mammalian serotonin transporter identified positions, buried in the LeuT structure, that defined a potential pathway leading from the cytoplasm to the substrate binding site. Modeling studies utilized an inverted structural repeat within the LeuT crystal structure to predict the conformation of LeuT in which the cytoplasmic permeation pathway, consisting of positions identified in SERT, was open for diffusion of the substrate to the cytoplasm. From the difference between the model and the crystal structures, a simple "rocking bundle" mechanism was proposed, in which a four-helix bundle changed its orientation with respect to the rest of the protein to close the extracellular pathway and open the cytoplasmic one. Subsequent crystal structures from structurally related proteins provide evidence supporting this model for transport.

  19. Two major autoantibody clusters in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ching, Kathryn H; Burbelo, Peter D; Tipton, Christopher; Wei, Chungwen; Petri, Michelle; Sanz, Ignacio; Iadarola, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease of complex clinical presentation and etiology and is likely influenced by numerous genetic and environmental factors. While a large number of susceptibility genes have been identified, the production of antibodies against a distinct subset of nuclear proteins remains a primary distinguishing characteristic in disease diagnosis. However, the utility of autoantibody biomarkers for disease sub-classification and grouping remains elusive, in part, because of the difficulty in large scale profiling using a uniform, quantitative platform. In the present study serological profiles of several known SLE antigens, including Sm-D3, RNP-A, RNP-70k, Ro52, Ro60, and La, as well as other cytokine and neuronal antigens were obtained using the luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS) approach. The resulting autoantibody profiles revealed that 88% of a pilot cohort and 98% of a second independent cohort segregated into one of two distinct clusters defined by autoantibodies against Sm/anti-RNP or Ro/La autoantigens, proteins often involved in RNA binding activities. The Sm/RNP cluster was associated with a higher prevalence of serositis in comparison to the Ro/La cluster (P = 0.0022). However, from the available clinical information, no other clinical characteristics were associated with either cluster. In contrast, evaluation of autoantibodies on an individual basis revealed an association between anti-Sm (P = 0.006), RNP-A (P = 0.018) and RNP-70k (P = 0.010) autoantibodies and mucocutaneous symptoms and between anti-RNP-70k and musculoskeletal manifestations (P = 0.059). Serologically active, but clinically quiescent disease also had a higher prevalence of anti-IFN-α autoantibodies. Based on our findings that most SLE patients belong to either a Sm/RNP or Ro/La autoantigen cluster, these results suggest the possibility that alterations in RNA-RNA-binding protein interactions may play a critical

  20. The heterogeneity of islet autoantibodies and the progression of islet failure in type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Bian, Lingling; Ji, Li; Chen, Yang; Chen, Heng; Gu, Yong; Ma, Bingqin; Gu, Wei; Xu, Xinyu; Shi, Yun; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Dalong; Sun, Zilin; Ma, Jianhua; Jin, Hui; Shi, Xing; Miao, Heng; Xin, Bing; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Zhenwen; Bu, Ruifang; Xu, Lan; Shi, Guangde; Tang, Wei; Li, Wei; Zhou, Dongmei; Liang, Jun; Cheng, Xingbo; Shi, Bimin; Dong, Jixiang; Hu, Ji; Fang, Chen; Zhong, Shao; Yu, Weinan; Lu, Weiping; Wu, Chenguang; Qian, Li; Yu, Jiancheng; Gao, Jialin; Fei, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Xueqin; Cui, Shiwei; Cheng, Jinluo; Xu, Ning; Wang, Guofeng; Han, Guoqing; Xu, Chunrong; Xie, Yun; An, Minmin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhixiao; Cai, Yun; Fu, Qi; Fu, Yu; Zheng, Shuai; Yang, Fan; Hu, Qingfang; Dai, Hao; Jin, Yu; Zhang, Zheng; Xu, Kuanfeng; Li, Yifan; Shen, Jie; Zhou, Hongwen; He, Wei; Zheng, Xuqin; Han, Xiao; Yu, Liping; She, Jinxiong; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is heterogeneous in many facets. The patients suffered from type 1 diabetes present several levels of islet function as well as variable number and type of islet-specific autoantibodies. This study was to investigate prevalence and heterogeneity of the islet autoantibodies and clinical phenotypes of type 1 diabetes mellitus; and also discussed the process of islet failure and its risk factors in Chinese type 1 diabetic patients. A total of 1,291 type 1 diabetic patients were enrolled in this study. Demographic information was collected. Laboratory tests including mixed-meal tolerance test, human leukocyte antigen alleles, hemoglobinA1c, lipids, thyroid function and islet autoantibodies were conducted. The frequency of islet-specific autoantibody in newly diagnosed T1DM patients (duration shorter than half year) was 73% in East China. According to binary logistic regressions, autoantibody positivity, longer duration and lower Body Mass Index were the risk factors of islet failure. As the disease developed, autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase declined as well as the other two autoantibodies against zinc transporter 8 and islet antigen 2. The decrease of autoantibodies was positively correlated with aggressive beta cell destruction. Autoantibodies can facilitate the identification of classic T1DM from other subtypes and predict the progression of islet failure. As there were obvious heterogeneity in autoantibodies and clinical manifestation in different phenotypes of the disease, we should take more factors into consideration when identifying type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  1. Autoantibodies against integral membrane proteins of the nuclear envelope in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Nickowitz, R E; Wozniak, R W; Schaffner, F; Worman, H J

    1994-01-01

    Autoantibodies against nuclear membrane proteins have been identified in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of these autoantibodies in patients with PBC and examine their significance. An assay using recombinant polypeptides was designed to unequivocally detect autoantibodies against gp210 and the lamin B receptor, integral proteins of the nuclear membranes. Autoantibodies against gp210 were detected in 15 of 159 patients with PBC and 0 of 46 controls. Autoantibodies against lamin B receptor were detected in 2 patients with PBC and 0 controls. The presence of these autoantibodies had a sensitivity of 11% and specificity of 100% for the diagnosis of PBC. Autoantibodies against gp210 were present in 4 of 19 (21%) patients with PBC who did not have detectable antimitochondrial antibodies. Patients with PBC and gp210 autoantibodies had a higher incidence of associated arthritis. Autoantibodies against gp210 and the lamin B receptor are present in approximately 10% of patients with PBC. These autoantibodies are highly specific for the diagnosis of PBC and may be useful in diagnosing individuals without antimitochondrial antibodies and in identifying a subgroup of patients with an increased incidence of associated arthritis.

  2. Use of Dried Capillary Blood Sampling for Islet Autoantibody Screening in Relatives: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Bingley, Polly J; Rafkin, Lisa E; Matheson, Della; Steck, Andrea K; Yu, Liping; Henderson, Courtney; Beam, Craig A; Boulware, David C

    2015-12-01

    Islet autoantibody testing provides the basis for assessment of risk of progression to type 1 diabetes. We set out to determine the feasibility and acceptability of dried capillary blood spot-based screening to identify islet autoantibody-positive relatives potentially eligible for inclusion in prevention trials. Dried blood spot (DBS) and venous samples were collected from 229 relatives participating in the TrialNet Pathway to Prevention Study. Both samples were tested for glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet antigen 2, and zinc transporter 8 autoantibodies, and venous samples were additionally tested for insulin autoantibodies and islet cell antibodies. We defined multiple autoantibody positive as two or more autoantibodies in venous serum and DBS screen positive if one or more autoantibodies were detected. Participant questionnaires compared the sample collection methods. Of 44 relatives who were multiple autoantibody positive in venous samples, 42 (95.5%) were DBS screen positive, and DBS accurately detected 145 of 147 autoantibody-negative relatives (98.6%). Capillary blood sampling was perceived as more painful than venous blood draw, but 60% of participants would prefer initial screening using home fingerstick with clinic visits only required if autoantibodies were found. Capillary blood sampling could facilitate screening for type 1 diabetes prevention studies.

  3. Toward a new autoantibody diagnostic orthodoxy: understanding the bad, good and indifferent.

    PubMed

    Fritzler, Marvin J

    2012-08-01

    Rapid advances in diagnostic technologies used to detect autoantibodies have made it difficult for even the most modern laboratory to keep abreast of the changing approaches and platforms, not to mention the clinicians who are hard pressed to keep abreast of evolving diagnostic paradigms attended by these newer techniques. While autoantibody testing is traditionally considered to be primarily serving the realm of diagnostic medicine, there is little doubt that autoantibodies are also being recognized as an approach to providing prognostic and therapeutic information. Accordingly, along with related proteomics, genomics and metabolomics, it is taking on increasing importance in the realm of personalized medicine. In today's world of autoantibody diagnostics, overarching concerns about false-negative and false-positive autoantibodies tests cannot be summarily dismissed by citing pros or cons of any one technology or diagnostic platform, but often point to persisting gaps in our knowledge about, and understanding of, the origin and roles of autoantibodies. Before we can hope to completely understand the enigmas that attend the results of autoantibody diagnostic tests, perhaps it is time to step back and re-examine long-accepted paradigms and beliefs. This review will address some of the issues that impact on autoantibody detection technologies and some of the considerations and issues that will attend a new orthodoxy of autoantibody diagnostics. These issues will be addressed in the context of "bad" (pathogenic), "good" (protective) or "indifferent" (no apparent role in disease) autoantibodies.

  4. Arrest of Cytoplasmic Streaming Induces Algal Proliferation in Green Paramecia

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Shirai, Yohji; Kosaka, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    A green ciliate Paramecium bursaria, bearing several hundreds of endosymbiotic algae, demonstrates rotational microtubule-based cytoplasmic streaming, in which cytoplasmic granules and endosymbiotic algae flow in a constant direction. However, its physiological significance is still unknown. We investigated physiological roles of cytoplasmic streaming in P. bursaria through host cell cycle using video-microscopy. Here, we found that cytoplasmic streaming was arrested in dividing green paramecia and the endosymbiotic algae proliferated only during the arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. Interestingly, arrest of cytoplasmic streaming with pressure or a microtubule drug also induced proliferation of endosymbiotic algae independently of host cell cycle. Thus, cytoplasmic streaming may control the algal proliferation in P. bursaria. Furthermore, confocal microscopic observation revealed that a division septum was formed in the constricted area of a dividing paramecium, producing arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. This is a first report to suggest that cytoplasmic streaming controls proliferation of eukaryotic cells. PMID:18159235

  5. Hybridization using cytoplasmic male sterility, cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance, and herbicide tolerance from nuclear genes

    SciTech Connect

    Beversdorf, W.D.; Erickson, L.R.; Grant, I.

    1987-04-14

    An improved process is described for producing a substantially homogeneous population of plants of a predetermined hybrid variety of crop which is capable of undergoing self-pollination and cross-pollination. The process comprises: growing in a first planting area a substantially random population of cytoplasmic male sterile plants which exhibit cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance to at least one Type A herbicide and exhibit tolerance to at least one Type B herbicide which is attributable solely to homozygous dominant nuclear genes and male fertile plants which are homozygous recessive maintainer plants for the cytoplasmic male sterile plants and which lack the cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance to at least one Type A herbicide and exhibit tolerance to at least one Type B herbicide attributable solely to the homozygous dominant nuclear genes.

  6. The primary structure of rat brain (cytoplasmic) dynein heavy chain, a cytoplasmic motor enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z; Tanaka, Y; Nonaka, S; Aizawa, H; Kawasaki, H; Nakata, T; Hirokawa, N

    1993-01-01

    Overlapping cDNA clones encoding the heavy chain of rat brain cytoplasmic dynein have been isolated. The isolated cDNA clones contain an open reading frame of 13,932 bp encoding 4644 aa (M(r), 532,213). The deduced protein sequence of the heavy chain of rat brain dynein shows significant similarity to sea urchin flagellar beta-dynein (27.0% identical) and to Dictyostelium cytoplasmic dynein (53.5% identical) throughout the entire sequence. The heavy chain of rat brain (cytoplasmic) dynein contains four putative nucleotide-binding consensus sequences [GX4GK(T/S)] in the central one-third region that are highly similar to those of sea urchin and Dictyostelium dyneins. The N-terminal one-third of the heavy chain of rat brain (cytoplasmic) dynein shows high similarity (43.8% identical) to that of Dictyostelium cytoplasmic dynein but poor similarity (19.4% identical) to that of sea urchin flagellar dynein. These results suggested that the C-terminal two-thirds of the dynein molecule is conserved and plays an essential role in microtubule-dependent motility activity, whereas the N-terminal regions are different between cytoplasmic and flagellar dyneins. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7690137

  7. Mechanism of Cytoplasmic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental process in gene expression that depends upon the abundance and accessibility of the mRNA transcript as well as the activity of many protein and RNA-protein complexes. Here we focus on the intricate mechanics of mRNA translation in the cytoplasm of higher plants. This chapter includes an inventory of the plant translational apparatus and a detailed review of the translational processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. The majority of mechanistic studies of cytoplasmic translation have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. The factors and mechanisms of translation are for the most part conserved across eukaryotes; however, some distinctions are known to exist in plants. A comprehensive understanding of the complex translational apparatus and its regulation in plants is warranted, as the modulation of protein production is critical to development, environmental plasticity and biomass yield in diverse ecosystems and agricultural settings. PMID:26019692

  8. Novel WDR72 Mutation and Cytoplasmic Localization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S.-K.; Seymen, F.; Lee, K.-E.; Kang, H.-Y.; Yildirim, M.; Bahar Tuna, E.; Gencay, K.; Hwang, Y.-H.; Nam, K.H.; De La Garza, R.J.; Hu, J.C.-C.; Simmer, J.P.; Kim, J.-W.

    2010-01-01

    The proven candidate genes for amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) are AMELX, ENAM, MMP20, KLK4, FAM83H, and WDR72. We performed mutation analyses on seven families with hypomaturation AI. A novel WDR72 dinucleotide deletion mutation (g.57,426_57,427delAT; c.1467_ 1468delAT; p.V491fsX497) was identified in both alleles of probands from Mexico and Turkey. Haplotype analyses showed that the mutations arose independently in the two families. The disease perfectly segregated with the genotype. Only persons with both copies of the mutant allele were affected. Their hypomineralized enamel suffered attrition and orange-brown staining following eruption. Expression of WDR72 fused to green fluorescent protein showed a cytoplasmic localization exclusively and was absent from the nucleus. We conclude that WDR72 is a cytoplasmic protein that is critical for dental enamel formation. PMID:20938048

  9. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Wong, S N; Shah, V; Dillon, M J

    1998-09-01

    The prevalence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) was studied in 12 children with Wegener's granulomatosis. The serum samples were taken in the active phase of disease and were screened for ANCA by indirect immunofluorescence with normal neutrophils and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using crude neutrophil extract, proteinase 3, myeloperoxidase, cathepsin G, lactoferrin, and elastase as antigens. Of these 12 patients, 10 wre positive for ANCA in the active phase of their illness, and they showed a predominantly cytoplasmic ANCA staining pattern on indirect immunofluorescence. There were high titres of ANCA directed against crude neutrophil extract, proteinase 3, myeloperoxidase, and cathepsin G. IgM isotypes occurred as commonly as IgG isotypes. Therefore, screening for ANCA is usually but not invariably positive in children with Wegener's granulomatosis. Specific diagnosis still relies on clinical and pathological features, and the value of ANCA in the diagnosis of paediatric Wegener's granulomatosis requires further study.

  10. Cytoplasmic RNA Granules and Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wei-Chih; Lloyd, Richard E

    2014-11-01

    RNA granules are dynamic cellular structures essential for proper gene expression and homeostasis. The two principal types of cytoplasmic RNA granules are stress granules, which contain stalled translation initiation complexes, and processing bodies (P bodies), which concentrate factors involved in mRNA degradation. RNA granules are associated with gene silencing of transcripts; thus, viruses repress RNA granule functions to favor replication. This article discusses the breadth of viral interactions with cytoplasmic RNA granules, focusing on mechanisms that modulate the functions of RNA granules and that typically promote viral replication. Currently, mechanisms for virus manipulation of RNA granules can be loosely grouped into three nonexclusive categories: (a) cleavage of key RNA granule factors, (b) regulation of PKR activation, and (c) co-opting of RNA granule factors for new roles in viral replication. Viral modulation of RNA granules supports productive infection by inhibiting their gene-silencing functions and counteracting their role in linking stress sensing with innate immune activation.

  11. Cytoplasmic Volume Modulates Spindle Size During Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Good, Matthew C.; Vahey, Michael D.; Skandarajah, Arunan; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Heald, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and reductive cell divisions during embryogenesis require that intracellular structures adapt to a wide range of cell sizes. The mitotic spindle presents a central example of this flexibility, scaling with the dimensions of the cell to mediate accurate chromosome segregation. To determine whether spindle size regulation is achieved through a developmental program or is intrinsically specified by cell size or shape, we developed a system to encapsulate cytoplasm from Xenopus eggs and embryos inside cell-like compartments of defined sizes. Spindle size was observed to shrink with decreasing compartment size, similar to what occurs during early embryogenesis, and this scaling trend depended on compartment volume rather than shape. Thus, the amount of cytoplasmic material provides a mechanism for regulating the size of intracellular structures. PMID:24233724

  12. Protein microarray applications: Autoantibody detection and posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Atak, Apurva; Mukherjee, Shuvolina; Jain, Rekha; Gupta, Shabarni; Singh, Vedita Anand; Gahoi, Nikita; K P, Manubhai; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2016-10-01

    The discovery of DNA microarrays was a major milestone in genomics; however, it could not adequately predict the structure or dynamics of underlying protein entities, which are the ultimate effector molecules in a cell. Protein microarrays allow simultaneous study of thousands of proteins/peptides, and various advancements in array technologies have made this platform suitable for several diagnostic and functional studies. Antibody arrays enable researchers to quantify the abundance of target proteins in biological fluids and assess PTMs by using the antibodies. Protein microarrays have been used to assess protein-protein interactions, protein-ligand interactions, and autoantibody profiling in various disease conditions. Here, we summarize different microarray platforms with focus on its biological and clinical applications in autoantibody profiling and PTM studies. We also enumerate the potential of tissue microarrays to validate findings from protein arrays as well as other approaches, highlighting their significance in proteomics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. [Autoantibodies in children with chronic inflammatory lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Markina, O A; Iastrebova, N E; Vaneeva, N P; Volkov, I K; Katosova, L K

    2001-01-01

    124 sera of children with chronic bronchitis, chronic pneumonia, bronchial asthma, exogenic allergic alveolitis, congenital developmental defects of the lungs and the syndrome of the situs inversus of organs were examined with a view to study the state of humoral immunity to tissues. The study was carried out by means of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the use of collagen, elastin, DNA (native and denaturated), membrane antigens of the lung, the liver, the small intestine and the large intestine. Among all groups of patients autoimmune disturbances, manifested by a rise in the level of autoantibodies of different specificity, were registered. The degree of manifestation of autoimmune disturbances depended on the kind of pathology. After treatment a decrease in the level of autoantibodies was registered in the examinees.

  14. Anti-Interferon Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy Syndrome Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Meager, Anthony; Visvalingam, Kumuthini; Peterson, Pärt; Möll, Kaidi; Murumägi, Astrid; Krohn, Kai; Eskelin, Petra; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Husebye, Eystein; Kadota, Yoshihisa; Willcox, Nick

    2006-01-01

    Background The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene influences thymic self-tolerance induction. In autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1 (APS1; OMIM 240300), recessive AIRE mutations lead to autoimmunity targetting endocrine and other epithelial tissues, although chronic candidiasis usually appears first. Autoimmunity and chronic candidiasis can associate with thymomas as well. Patients with these tumours frequently also have high titre immunoglobulin G autoantibodies neutralising type I interferon (IFN)–α and IFN-ω, which are secreted signalling proteins of the cytokine superfamily involved in both innate and adaptive immunity. Methods and Findings We tested for serum autoantibodies to type I IFNs and other immunoregulatory cytokines using specific binding and neutralisation assays. Unexpectedly, in 60/60 Finnish and 16/16 Norwegian APS1 patients with both AIRE alleles mutated, we found high titre neutralising immunoglobulin G autoantibodies to most IFN-α subtypes and especially IFN-ω (60% homologous to IFN-α)—mostly in the earliest samples. We found lower titres against IFN-β (30% homologous to IFN-α) in 23% of patients; two-thirds of these (from Finland only) also had low titres against the distantly related “type III IFN” (IFN-λ1; alias interleukin-29). However, autoantibodies to the unrelated type II IFN, IFN-γ, and other immunoregulatory cytokines, such as interleukin-10 and interleukin-12, were much rarer and did not neutralise. Neutralising titres against type I IFNs averaged even higher in patients with APS1 than in patients with thymomas. Anti–type I IFN autoantibodies preceded overt candidiasis (and several of the autoimmune disorders) in the informative patients, and persisted for decades thereafter. They were undetectable in unaffected heterozygous relatives of APS1 probands (except for low titres against IFN-λ1), in APS2 patients, and in isolated cases of the endocrine diseases most typical of APS1, so they appear to be APS1

  15. [Autoantibody detection by indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells].

    PubMed

    Sack, U; Conrad, K; Csernok, E; Frank, I; Hiepe, F; Krieger, T; Kromminga, A; Landenberg, P von; Messer, G; Witte, T; Mierau, R

    2009-06-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by the presence of antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA). Diluted patient sera are typically used to screen for the presence of ANA by immunfluorescence microscopy with fixed HEp-2 cells. Despite high-quality test kits, reports of different laboratories frequently present controversial results. This article recommends unified processing and interpretation of HEp-2 based screening for autoantibodies. Suggestions are made for the selection of high-quality test kits, optimized processing and diagnostic procedures. In addition to a relevant clinical diagnosis and an experienced laboratory specialist, the following procedure is highly recommended to achieve good laboratory practice: Initial HEp-2 based screening by indirect immunofluorescence, starting with a 1:80 serum dilution, and evaluation in a bright fluorescence microscope, pathological values from a titer of 1:160 upwards, internal quality checks and unified interpretation. We aim to improve diagnosis and care of patients with autoimmune diseases as a central focus of the European Autoimmunity Standardization Initiative (EASI).

  16. Childhood Pemphigus Foliaceus with Exclusive Immunoglobulin G Autoantibodies to Desmocollins.

    PubMed

    Geller, Shamir; Gat, Andrea; Harel, Avikam; Mashiah, Jacob; Zeeli, Tal; Eming, Rüdiger; Ishii, Norito; Hertl, Michael; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sprecher, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus refers to a group of potentially fatal blistering skin diseases that are often due to the deleterious effects of autoantibodies directed against desmosomal antigens. Although desmogleins have been mainly implicated as autoantigens in pemphigus, a steadily growing body of evidence suggests that other desmosomal proteins may be causally involved as well. Antibodies directed against desmocollin-3 have been shown to play a direct role in the pathogenesis of several types of pemphigus. Here we describe the case of a child with localized pemphigus foliaceus and immunoglobulin G (IgG) reactivity exclusively directed to desmocollins. The present report suggests that autoantibodies against nondesmoglein antigens may play a role in the pathogenesis of superficial pemphigus, in addition to pemphigus vulgaris, paraneoplastic pemphigus, and IgA pemphigus.

  17. The prediction of type 1 diabetes by multiple autoantibody levels and their incorporation into an autoantibody risk score in relatives of type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Sosenko, Jay M; Skyler, Jay S; Palmer, Jerry P; Krischer, Jeffrey P; Yu, Liping; Mahon, Jeffrey; Beam, Craig A; Boulware, David C; Rafkin, Lisa; Schatz, Desmond; Eisenbarth, George

    2013-09-01

    We assessed whether a risk score that incorporates levels of multiple islet autoantibodies could enhance the prediction of type 1 diabetes (T1D). TrialNet Natural History Study participants (n = 784) were tested for three autoantibodies (GADA, IA-2A, and mIAA) at their initial screening. Samples from those positive for at least one autoantibody were subsequently tested for ICA and ZnT8A. An autoantibody risk score (ABRS) was developed from a proportional hazards model that combined autoantibody levels from each autoantibody along with their designations of positivity and negativity. The ABRS was strongly predictive of T1D (hazard ratio [with 95% CI] 2.72 [2.23-3.31], P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve areas (with 95% CI) for the ABRS revealed good predictability (0.84 [0.78-0.90] at 2 years, 0.81 [0.74-0.89] at 3 years, P < 0.001 for both). The composite of levels from the five autoantibodies was predictive of T1D before and after an adjustment for the positivity or negativity of autoantibodies (P < 0.001). The findings were almost identical when ICA was excluded from the risk score model. The combination of the ABRS and the previously validated Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 Risk Score (DPTRS) predicted T1D more accurately (0.93 [0.88-0.98] at 2 years, 0.91 [0.83-0.99] at 3 years) than either the DPTRS or the ABRS alone (P ≤ 0.01 for all comparisons). These findings show the importance of considering autoantibody levels in assessing the risk of T1D. Moreover, levels of multiple autoantibodies can be incorporated into an ABRS that accurately predicts T1D.

  18. Female Infertility and Serum Auto-antibodies: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Deroux, Alban; Dumestre-Perard, Chantal; Dunand-Faure, Camille; Bouillet, Laurence; Hoffmann, Pascale

    2016-09-14

    On average, 10 % of infertile couples have unexplained infertility. Auto-immune disease (systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-phospholipid syndrome) accounts for a part of these cases. In the last 20 years, aspecific auto-immunity, defined as positivity of auto-antibodies in blood sample without clinical or biological criteria for defined diseases, has been evoked in a subpopulation of infertile women. A systematic review was performed (PUBMED) using the MESH search terms "infertility" and "auto-immunity" or "reproductive technique" or "assisted reproduction" or "in vitro fertilization" and "auto-immunity." We retained clinical and physiopathological studies that were applicable to the clinician in assuming joint management of both infertility associated with serum auto-antibodies in women. Thyroid auto-immunity which affects thyroid function could be a cause of infertility; even in euthyroidia, the presence of anti-thyroperoxydase antibodies and/or thyroglobulin are related to infertility. The presence of anti-phospholipid (APL) and/or anti-nuclear (ANA) antibodies seems to be more frequent in the population of infertile women; serum auto-antibodies are associated with early ovarian failure, itself responsible for fertility disorders. However, there exist few publications on this topic. The methods of dosage, as well as the clinical criteria of unexplained infertility deserve to be standardized to allow a precise response to the question of the role of serum auto-antibodies in these women. The direct pathogenesis of this auto-immunity is unknown, but therapeutic immunomodulators, prescribed on a case-by-case basis, could favor pregnancy even in cases of unexplained primary or secondary infertility.

  19. Autoantibody studies of female patients with reproductive failure.

    PubMed

    Reimand, K; Talja, I; Metsküla, K; Kadastik, U; Matt, K; Uibo, R

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and character of autoimmune derangements in women with reproductive failure. A total of 108 females (age range 17-43, mean 27.5 years), including 16 with primary menstrual cycle disturbances and polycystic ovaries (PCO), 20 with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), 38 with endometriosis (E), and 34 with chronic anovulation, luteal phase insufficiency, subfertility or unexplained infertility (INF) were investigated. A control group of 392 women was formed from an unselected population sample (age range 17-43, mean 31.0 years). All sera were tested by indirect immunofluorescence method to assess common autoantibodies: nuclear (ANA), smooth muscle (SMA), parietal cell (PCA), thyroid microsomal (TMA), reticulin (ARA), mitochondrial (AMA) and liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies (LKMA). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect antibodies against beta2-glycoprotein I (anti-beta 2GPI) and carbonic anhydrase (anti-CA). Our results showed that 40.7% of patients' sera and 14.8% of control sera contained one or more common autoantibodies, ANA and SMA were most frequently detected (difference between two groups P<0.005). Anti-beta 2GPI were found in eight cases (7.4%), including two patients with INF but without other autoantibodies. Anti-CA were revealed in nine cases (8.3%) including patients' PCOS, E and INF. A comparison of patients' clinical data with antibody assay results did not reveal any significant associations. Our results indicate a high prevalence of autoimmune reactions in women with reproductive failure due to the most common causes PCO, PCOS and E as well as in unexplained infertility. This might reflect the propensity to develop autoimmune reactions in such patients, including pathogenic autoimmune reactions to specific target antigens.

  20. Clinical and laboratory aspects of Ro/SSA-52 autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Defendenti, Caterina; Atzeni, Fabiola; Spina, Maria Francesca; Grosso, Silvia; Cereda, Aldo; Guercilena, Giacinto; Bollani, Simona; Saibeni, Simone; Puttini, Piercarlo Sarzi

    2011-01-01

    Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, which were described for the first time in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS), are the most prevalent extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) specificity identified in laboratories. Two types of anti-Ro/SSA antibodies have been described, anti-SSA-52 kDa (aSSA52) and anti-SSA-60 kDa (aSSA60), each specific to different antigens. Anti-Ro/SSA52 autoantibodies are more frequent than other autoantibodies possibly because of the antigen's accessible and ubiquitous nature. The sites involved and the symptoms associated with these autoantibodies depend on the antigen's structural variability. Isolated congenital complete atrioventricular block (CAVB) shows a close association with maternal anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibodies; the highest relative risks of CAVB are seen in offspring of mothers with antibodies against 52-kDa Ro and 48-kDa La proteins. Anti-Ro/SSA52 antibodies have little impact on adult rheumatic autoimmune diseases or adult cardiac arrhythmias, but the course of autoimmune liver diseases is greatly worsened by their presence, and solid tumours tend to relapse. Their diagnostic role in rheumatic diseases is controversial, although a significant association between isolated anti-Ro/SSA52-kDa positivity and myositis and to a lesser extent with systemic sclerosis (SSc) has been described. However, the majority of the specific diagnosis is mostly based on the simultaneous presence of other autoantibodies that seems diagnostically more relevant.

  1. Autoantibodies in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A.; Gadgil, Aneal S.; Otterbein, Leo E.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Stoner, Michael W.; Csizmadia, Eva; Zhang, Yingze; Sciurba, Frank C.; Duncan, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Adaptive immune responses are present in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and it has been postulated that these processes could be autoreactive. Objectives: To ascertain if humoral autoimmunity could play a role in COPD pathogenesis. Methods: Circulating IgG autoantibodies were detected by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were used to evaluate intrapulmonary IgG and complement (C3) deposition in human lung explants. Autoantibody pathogenicity was also investigated with an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay. Measurements and Main Results: The prevalence of anti–HEp-2 epithelial cell autoantibodies in 47 smokers/former smokers with COPD (GOLD stages 1–4) was greater than among 8 subjects with a smoking history but normal spirometry and 21 healthy control subjects who had never smoked (68 vs. 13 vs. 10%, respectively; P < 0.0001). Antibodies against primary pulmonary epithelial cells were found in 12 of 12 patients with COPD versus 3 of 12 never-smoked control subjects (P < 0.001). Self-antigens immunoprecipitated from 34 of 35 (97%) of COPD plasmas (vs. 0/12 never-smoked controls). Antibodies against a particular 130-kD autoantigen (n = 7) were associated with decreased body mass index (23.2 ± 2.1 vs. 29.5 ± 1.0 kg/m2, P = 0.007). Intrapulmonary immune complexes were present in six of six and C3 was seen in five of six COPD lung explants, unlike zero of six and one of six normals, respectively. Cytotoxicity of pulmonary epithelial cells by allogeneic mononuclear cells also increased 46% after incubation with COPD plasmas (n = 10), compared with identical treatments with eight normal specimens (P = 0.03). Conclusions: IgG autoantibodies with avidity for pulmonary epithelium, and the potential to mediate cytotoxicity, are prevalent in patients with COPD. Autoreactive adaptive immune responses may be important in the etiology of this disease. PMID:17975205

  2. Autoantibodies in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A; Gadgil, Aneal S; Otterbein, Leo E; Pilewski, Joseph M; Stoner, Michael W; Csizmadia, Eva; Zhang, Yingze; Sciurba, Frank C; Duncan, Steven R

    2008-01-15

    Adaptive immune responses are present in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and it has been postulated that these processes could be autoreactive. To ascertain if humoral autoimmunity could play a role in COPD pathogenesis. Circulating IgG autoantibodies were detected by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were used to evaluate intrapulmonary IgG and complement (C3) deposition in human lung explants. Autoantibody pathogenicity was also investigated with an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay. The prevalence of anti-HEp-2 epithelial cell autoantibodies in 47 smokers/former smokers with COPD (GOLD stages 1-4) was greater than among 8 subjects with a smoking history but normal spirometry and 21 healthy control subjects who had never smoked (68 vs. 13 vs. 10%, respectively; P < 0.0001). Antibodies against primary pulmonary epithelial cells were found in 12 of 12 patients with COPD versus 3 of 12 never-smoked control subjects (P < 0.001). Self-antigens immunoprecipitated from 34 of 35 (97%) of COPD plasmas (vs. 0/12 never-smoked controls). Antibodies against a particular 130-kD autoantigen (n = 7) were associated with decreased body mass index (23.2 +/- 2.1 vs. 29.5 +/- 1.0 kg/m(2), P = 0.007). Intrapulmonary immune complexes were present in six of six and C3 was seen in five of six COPD lung explants, unlike zero of six and one of six normals, respectively. Cytotoxicity of pulmonary epithelial cells by allogeneic mononuclear cells also increased 46% after incubation with COPD plasmas (n = 10), compared with identical treatments with eight normal specimens (P = 0.03). IgG autoantibodies with avidity for pulmonary epithelium, and the potential to mediate cytotoxicity, are prevalent in patients with COPD. Autoreactive adaptive immune responses may be important in the etiology of this disease.

  3. Autoantibodies and Neuropsychiatric events at diagnosis of SLE

    PubMed Central

    Hanly, J. G.; Urowitz, M. B.; Siannis, F.; Farewell, V.; Gordon, C.; Bae, S.C.; Isenberg, D.; Dooley, M.A.; Clarke, A.; Bernatsky, S.; Gladman, D.; Fortin, P.R.; Manzi, S.; Steinsson, K.; Bruce, I.; Ginzler, E.; Aranow, C.; Wallace, D.J.; Ramsey-Goldman, R.; Van Vollenhoven, R.; Sturfelt, G.; Nived, O.; Sanchez-Guerrero, J.; Alarcón, G.S.; Petri, M.; Khamashta, M.; Zoma, A.; Kalunian, K.; Douglas, J.; Qi, Qiufen; Merrill, J. T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between neuropsychiatric (NP) events with antiphospholipid antibodies (lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin), anti-β2 glycoprotein-I, anti-ribosomal P and anti-NR2 glutamate receptor antibodies in an international inception cohort. Methods NP events were identified using the ACR case definitions and clustered into central/peripheral and diffuse/focal events. Attribution of NP events was determined using decision rules of different stringency (model A and model B). Autoantibodies were measured without knowledge of NP events or their attribution. Results 412 patients (87.3% female; mean (± SD) age of 34.9 ± 13.5 years; mean disease duration 5.0 ± 4.2 months) were studied. There were 214 NP events in 133 (32.3%) patients. NP events attributed to SLE varied from 15% (model A) to 36% (model B). There was no association between autoantibodies and NP events from all causes. However the frequency of anti-ribosomal P antibodies in patients with NP events due to SLE (model A) was 4/24 (16.6%) compared to 3/109 (2.8%) for all other NP events and 24/279 (8.6%) with no NP events (P=0.07). Furthermore anti-ribosomal P antibodies in patients with central NP events attributed to SLE (model A) was 4/20 (20%) vs. 3/107 (2.8%) for other NP events and 24/279 (8.6%) with no NP events (P = 0.04). For diffuse NP events the antibody frequencies were 3/11 (27%) compared to 4/111 (3.6%) and 24/279 (8.6%) respectively (P=0.02). Conclusion NP events at onset of SLE were associated with anti-ribosomal P antibodies, suggesting a pathogenetic role for this autoantibody. There was no association with other autoantibodies. PMID:18311802

  4. Enzymatic autoantibody glycan hydrolysis alleviates autoimmunity against type VII collagen.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Misa; Vafia, Katerina; Kalies, Kathrin; Groth, Stephanie; Westermann, Jürgen; Zillikens, Detlef; Ludwig, Ralf J; Collin, Mattias; Schmidt, Enno

    2012-12-01

    Autoantibody-mediated diseases comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders in which the pathogenic potential of autoantibodies has been clearly demonstrated. In general, their treatment relies on the long-term use of systemic corticosteroids and other immunosuppressants that are associated with considerable adverse reactions. EndoS, an endoglycosidase derived from Streptococcus pyogenes, specifically hydrolyzes the N-linked glycan of native IgG and has previously been shown to modulate the interaction between the Fc portion of autoantibody and Fcγ receptors on leukocytes. Here, different models of autoimmunity to type VII collagen, a structural protein of the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ), were employed to explore the therapeutic potential of EndoS. First, pretreatment of otherwise pathogenic anti-murine type VII collagen (mCOL7) IgG with EndoS significantly reduced split formation at the DEJ in cryosections of murine skin and abrogated clinical disease in mice. Next, the effect of EndoS was also seen when the enzyme was injected into mice after pathogenic anti-mCOL7 IgG had been administered. Finally, to mimic the patient situation even closer, EndoS was applied in mice that had already developed clinical disease after immunization with mCOL7. In all EndoS-treated mice, disease progression was stopped, and in the majority of mice, clinical disease even regressed. Of note, EndoS was shown to hydrolyze already in vivo-bound pathogenic autoantibodies. In addition, EndoS treatment decreased lesional expression of activating FcγRs while increasing FcγRIIB expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Autoimmune disease and multiple autoantibodies in 42 patients with RASopathies.

    PubMed

    Quaio, Caio R D C; Carvalho, Jozélio F; da Silva, Clovis A; Bueno, Cleonice; Brasil, Amanda S; Pereira, Alexandre C; Jorge, Alexander A L; Malaquias, Alexsandra C; Kim, Chong A; Bertola, Débora R

    2012-05-01

    The association of RASopathies [Noonan syndrome (NS) and Noonan-related syndromes] and autoimmune disorders has been reported sporadically. However, a concomitant evaluation of autoimmune diseases and an assessment of multiple autoantibodies in a large population of patients with molecularly confirmed RASopathy have not been performed. The clinical and laboratory features were analyzed in 42 RASopathy patients, the majority of whom had NS and five individuals had Noonan-related disorders. The following autoantibodies were measured: Anti-nuclear antibodies, anti-double stranded DNA, anti-SS-A/Ro, anti-SS-B/La, anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anti-Scl-70, anti-Jo-1, anti-ribosomal P, IgG and IgM anticardiolipin (aCL), thyroid, anti-smooth muscle, anti-endomysial (AE), anti-liver cytosolic protein type 1 (LC1), anti-parietal cell (APC), anti-mitochondrial (AM) antibodies, anti-liver-kidney microsome type 1 antibodies (LKM-1), and lupus anticoagulant. Six patients (14%) fulfilled the clinical criteria for autoimmune diseases [systemic lupus erythematous, polyendocrinopathy (autoimmune thyroiditis and celiac disease), primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS), autoimmune hepatitis, vitiligo, and autoimmune thyroiditis]. Autoimmune antibodies were observed in 52% of the patients. Remarkably, three (7%) of the patients had specific gastrointestinal and liver autoantibodies without clinical findings. Autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies were frequently present in patients with RASopathies. Until a final conclusion of the real incidence of autoimmunity in Rasopathy is drawn, the physicians should be alerted to the possibility of this association and the need for a fast diagnosis, proper referral to a specialist and ultimately, adequate treatment.

  6. Cytoplasmic male sterility in Brassicaceae crops.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Bhat, Shripad R

    2014-05-01

    Brassicaceae crops display strong hybrid vigor, and have long been subject to F1 hybrid breeding. Because the most reliable system of F1 seed production is based on cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), various types of CMS have been developed and adopted in practice to breed Brassicaceae oil seed and vegetable crops. CMS is a maternally inherited trait encoded in the mitochondrial genome, and the male sterile phenotype arises as a result of interaction of a mitochondrial CMS gene and a nuclear fertility restoring (Rf) gene. Therefore, CMS has been intensively investigated for gaining basic insights into molecular aspects of nuclear-mitochondrial genome interactions and for practical applications in plant breeding. Several CMS genes have been identified by molecular genetic studies, including Ogura CMS from Japanese radish, which is the most extensively studied and most widely used. In this review, we discuss Ogura CMS, and other CMS systems, and the causal mitochondrial genes for CMS. Studies on nuclear Rf genes and the cytoplasmic effects of alien cytoplasm on general crop performance are also reviewed. Finally, some of the unresolved questions about CMS are highlighted.

  7. Protein diffusion in mammalian cell cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Thomas; Ihalainen, Teemu O; Hyväluoma, Jari; Dross, Nicolas; Willman, Sami F; Langowski, Jörg; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Timonen, Jussi

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new method for mesoscopic modeling of protein diffusion in an entire cell. This method is based on the construction of a three-dimensional digital model cell from confocal microscopy data. The model cell is segmented into the cytoplasm, nucleus, plasma membrane, and nuclear envelope, in which environment protein motion is modeled by fully numerical mesoscopic methods. Finer cellular structures that cannot be resolved with the imaging technique, which significantly affect protein motion, are accounted for in this method by assigning an effective, position-dependent porosity to the cell. This porosity can also be determined by confocal microscopy using the equilibrium distribution of a non-binding fluorescent protein. Distinction can now be made within this method between diffusion in the liquid phase of the cell (cytosol/nucleosol) and the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm. Here we applied the method to analyze fluorescence recovery after photobleach (FRAP) experiments in which the diffusion coefficient of a freely-diffusing model protein was determined for two different cell lines, and to explain the clear difference typically observed between conventional FRAP results and those of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). A large difference was found in the FRAP experiments between diffusion in the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm and in the cytosol/nucleosol, for all of which the diffusion coefficients were determined. The cytosol results were found to be in very good agreement with those by FCS.

  8. Protein Diffusion in Mammalian Cell Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Hyväluoma, Jari; Dross, Nicolas; Willman, Sami F.; Langowski, Jörg; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Timonen, Jussi

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new method for mesoscopic modeling of protein diffusion in an entire cell. This method is based on the construction of a three-dimensional digital model cell from confocal microscopy data. The model cell is segmented into the cytoplasm, nucleus, plasma membrane, and nuclear envelope, in which environment protein motion is modeled by fully numerical mesoscopic methods. Finer cellular structures that cannot be resolved with the imaging technique, which significantly affect protein motion, are accounted for in this method by assigning an effective, position-dependent porosity to the cell. This porosity can also be determined by confocal microscopy using the equilibrium distribution of a non-binding fluorescent protein. Distinction can now be made within this method between diffusion in the liquid phase of the cell (cytosol/nucleosol) and the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm. Here we applied the method to analyze fluorescence recovery after photobleach (FRAP) experiments in which the diffusion coefficient of a freely-diffusing model protein was determined for two different cell lines, and to explain the clear difference typically observed between conventional FRAP results and those of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). A large difference was found in the FRAP experiments between diffusion in the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm and in the cytosol/nucleosol, for all of which the diffusion coefficients were determined. The cytosol results were found to be in very good agreement with those by FCS. PMID:21886771

  9. Autoantibodies Toward the Angiotensin 2 Type 1 Receptor: A Novel Autoantibody in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Giil, Lasse M; Kristoffersen, Einar K; Vedeler, Christian A; Aarsland, Dag; Nordrehaug, Jan Erik; Winblad, Bengt; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Lund, Anders; Reksten, Tove Ragna

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies with agonist function are described in cardiovascular disorders. Since vascular risk factors are associated with an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), we investigated a potential association between antibodies to the angiotensin 2 type 1 receptor (anti-AT1R) and AD. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the association between anti-AT1R and AD. The secondary objective was to investigate the association between clinical or biomarker features of AD and anti-AT1R. Samples from patients with mild AD participating in a longitudinal study in Western Norway (n = 92, 65 [71%] females, mean age 74.8 [range 50-89]) and age- and gender-matched healthy controls (n = 102) were included. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) AD biomarkers were assessed in a subgroup of patients. Patients were examined annually, including Mini-Mental State Examination. ELISA was used to measure anti-AT1R in serum. Non-parametric tests were used for statistical calculations and a p <  0.05 was considered significant. AD patients had significantly higher levels of anti-AT1R compared with healthy controls (10.2 U/mL versus 8.1 U/mL, p = 0.04). This difference was found only in patients without hypertension and diabetes. Anti-AT1R levels correlated with CSF total tau (p = 0.03) and phosphorylated tau (p = 0.03) levels, and inversely with blood pressure in AD (Spearman R -0.277, p = 0.008). AD is associated with increased levels of anti-AT1R, and the antibodies correlated with CSF total, and phosphorylated tau levels. Further research is needed to understand the blood pressure response in AD without hypertension and a potential link between tau and anti-AT1R in AD.

  10. Autoantibody formation in the alloimmunized red blood cell recipient: clinical and laboratory implications.

    PubMed

    Zumberg, M S; Procter, J L; Lottenberg, R; Kitchens, C S; Klein, H G

    2001-01-22

    Alloimmunization to erythrocyte antigens is a well-characterized complication in heavily transfused patients. Less well recognized, however, is the frequency of autoantibody formation in these previously alloimmunized patients. The autoantibodies are heterogeneous and of variable clinical significance. We describe the clinical history, laboratory evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment in 4 patients who developed autoantibodies in temporal association with alloantibody formation. In one case, the autoantibody found on routine screening had no clinical significance. In another case, the autoantibody made accurate blood typing and subsequent transfusion exceedingly difficult. Two patients experienced hemolysis as a consequence of the autoantibody. The management of both patients included supportive measures, while one patient required glucocorticosteroids and red blood cell transfusion. We review the published literature concerning autoimmunization in the transfused alloimmunized host. The spectrum of clinical consequences is important for the general practitioner to recognize, as these complications may occur during routine blood transfusions.

  11. Sporadic colon cancer murine models demonstrate the value of autoantibody detection for preclinical cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Barderas, Rodrigo; Villar-Vázquez, Roi; Fernández-Aceñero, María Jesús; Babel, Ingrid; Peláez-García, Alberto; Torres, Sofía; Casal, J Ignacio

    2013-10-15

    Although autoantibody detection has been proposed for diagnosis of colorectal cancer, little is known about their initial production and development correlation with cancer progression. Azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-treated mice developed colon adenocarcinoma in the distal colon similar to human sporadic colon cancer. We assessed this model together with AOM and DSS-only models for their applicability to early detection of cancer. All AOM/DSS-treated mice produced autoantibodies to tumor-associated antigens analogous to those observed in human colon cancer patients. Autoantibody response was related to tumor antigen overexpression. Cancer autoantibodies were detected 21 days after starting treatment, when no malignant histopathological features were detectable, and they increased according to tumor progression. When carcinogenesis was induced separately by AOM or DSS, only those mice that developed malignant lesions produced significant levels of autoantibodies. These findings demonstrate that autoantibody development is an early event in tumorigenesis and validates its use for preclinical colon cancer diagnosis.

  12. Extrahepatic manifestations and autoantibodies in patients with hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Himoto, Takashi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection frequently have many extrahepatic manifestations, as persistent HCV infection often triggers lymphoproliferative disorders and metabolic abnormalities. These manifestations primarily include autoimmune disorders such as cryoglobulinemia, Sjögren's syndrome, and autoimmune thyroid disorders. It has been well established that chronic HCV infection plays important roles in the production of non-organ-specific autoantibodies, including antinuclear antibodies and smooth muscle antibodies, and organ-specific autoantibodies such as thyroid autoantibodies. However, the clinical significance of autoantibodies associated with the extrahepatic manifestations caused by HCV infection has not been fully recognized. In this paper, we mainly focus on the relationship between extrahepatic manifestations and the emergence of autoantibodies in patients with HCV infection and discuss the clinical relevance of the autoantibodies in the extrahepatic disorders.

  13. Extrahepatic Manifestations and Autoantibodies in Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Himoto, Takashi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection frequently have many extrahepatic manifestations, as persistent HCV infection often triggers lymphoproliferative disorders and metabolic abnormalities. These manifestations primarily include autoimmune disorders such as cryoglobulinemia, Sjögren's syndrome, and autoimmune thyroid disorders. It has been well established that chronic HCV infection plays important roles in the production of non-organ-specific autoantibodies, including antinuclear antibodies and smooth muscle antibodies, and organ-specific autoantibodies such as thyroid autoantibodies. However, the clinical significance of autoantibodies associated with the extrahepatic manifestations caused by HCV infection has not been fully recognized. In this paper, we mainly focus on the relationship between extrahepatic manifestations and the emergence of autoantibodies in patients with HCV infection and discuss the clinical relevance of the autoantibodies in the extrahepatic disorders. PMID:22988469

  14. Molecular Methods and Protein Synthesis for Definition of Autoantibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    Elvers, Karen T; Williams, Alistair J K

    2016-01-01

    Epitope mapping is the process of experimentally identifying the binding sites, or "epitopes," of antibodies on their target antigens. Understanding the antibody-epitope interaction provides a basis for the rational design of potential preventative vaccines. Islet autoantibodies are currently the best available biomarkers for predicting future type 1 diabetes. These include autoantibodies to the islet beta cell proteins, insulin and the tyrosine phosphatase islet antigen-2 (IA-2) which selectively bind to a small number of dominant epitopes associated with increased risk of disease progression. The major epitope regions of insulin and IA-2 autoantibodies have been identified, but need to be mapped more precisely. In order to characterize these epitopes more accurately, this article describes the methods of cloning and mutagenesis of insulin and IA-2 and subsequent purification of the proteins that can be tested in displacement analysis and used to monitor immune responses, in vivo, to native and mutated proteins in a humanized mouse model carrying the high-risk HLA class II susceptibility haplotype DRB1*04-DQ8.

  15. Autoantibodies in Burkitt's lymphoma patients from the Ugandan prospective study.

    PubMed

    Mori, H; Lenoir, G M; Franklin, R M

    1986-03-01

    Pre- and post syndrome sera from five Burkitt's lymphoma patients who partook in the Ugandan prospective study (A. Geser et al., Int. J. Cancer 29 (1982) 397-400) were investigated with respect to autoantibodies. Neighbours and siblings of these patients served as controls and all of these groups were compared with sera from 50 Caucasian normal controls (CNC). Antibody levels significantly higher than those in CNC were found in all African groups for actin, desmin, vimentin, tubulin, keratin, laminin, and collagen type I. Polyclonal B-cell activation, as measured by antibodies to DNP, and high levels of antibodies to P. falciparum were also found. Anti-DNP and antibodies to malaria were also present in sera from our earlier study on Burkitt's lymphoma (E. Vainio et al., Clin. exp. Immunol. 54 (1983) 387-396). Whereas EBV infected B cells do produce autoantibodies, there is a potentiation of autoantibody formation as a result of infection with malaria, which seems to provide an independent trigger of polyclonal B cell activation. This latter event might be one of the factors which results in a correlation of Burkitt's lymphoma with malaria endemic regions.

  16. Mixed connective tissue disease associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies against proteinase-3 and systemic atherosclerosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Masato; Wada, Yoko; Ohno, Tsukasa; In, Hian; Yahata, Kazuaki; Izumi, Junko; Tanaka, Hisao; Ito, Satoshi; Ueno, Mitsuhiro; Nakano, Masaaki; Gejyo, Fumitake

    2004-10-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with facial spasm, swollen fingers and Raynaud's phenomenon due to cerebrovascular disorder and mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Although she was positive for both antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies against proteinase-3 (PR3-ANCA) and anti-U1 RNP antibodies, she did not meet the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). Physical and histopathological examinations revealed severe systemic atherosclerosis without any of the traditional risk factors. Elevated levels of malondialdehyde-modified LDL and antioxidized LDL autoantibodies, which are considered to be key factors in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, were also detected in the serum of this patient. In this case, systemic atherosclerosis might have been linked to these autoimmune reactions.

  17. Diagnostic Value of Autoantibodies against Ezrin in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan; Liu, Ming; Lin, Jian-Bang; Hong, Xin-Bin; Chen, Wen-Xia; Guo, Hong; Xu, Li-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), one of the most common malignancies worldwide, is a highly aggressive and homogeneous entity occurring in esophageal squamous epithelium, and a reliable noninvasive test for early detection is needed. A recent study showed that serum autoantibodies against Ezrin could be detected in patients with pancreatic cancer. Here, we assessed whether autoantibodies against Ezrin could have diagnostic relevance for early ESCC. We analyzed autoantibodies against Ezrin in sera of 98 normal controls and 149 patients with ESCC. Ezrin autoantibodies levels were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results showed that higher levels of autoantibodies against Ezrin were observed in serum samples from patients with ESCC than in serum from normal controls (P < 0.0001). Based on a cutoff value of 0.319, the sensitivity and specificity of autoantibodies against Ezrin for diagnosis of ESCC were 27.5% and 95.9%, respectively. Compared with normal controls, the positive rate of autoantibodies against Ezrin was significantly elevated in patients with early-stage ESCC (P < 0.0001). Moreover, there was no significant difference of positivity of autoantibodies against Ezrin in ESCC patients categorized according to age, gender, tumor size, tumor invasion depth, tumor site, histological grade, lymph node status, or tumor stage. Our study indicates that the presence of autoantibodies against Ezrin is significantly associated with ESCC. PMID:28298808

  18. Genetic and epitopic analysis of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) autoantibodies: markers of the human thyroid autoimmune response.

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, S M; Rapoport, B

    1995-01-01

    TPO autoantibodies, the hallmark of human autoimmune thyroid disease, are of IgG class and are associated with thyroid destruction and hypothyroidism. Using the immunoglobulin gene combinatorial library approach, a panel of human monoclonal TPO autoantibodies (expressed as Fab) has been generated from thyroid tissue-infiltrating B cells. TPO-specific Fab closely resemble patients' serum autoantibodies in terms of L chain type, IgG subclass, affinities for TPO as well as epitopes recognized by > 80% of TPO autoantibodies in an individual's serum. TPO autoantibody V region genes are not unique; H chain V genes are usually mutated, while L chain V genes are sometimes in germ-line conformation. The autoantibodies recognize an immunodominant region involving conformational, overlapping epitopes in domains A and B. Finally, TPO autoantibody epitopic fingerprints are distinctive for individual sera, are not associated with hypothyroidism, but are conserved over time (indicating a lack of B cell epitope spreading). Evidence for conservation as well as inheritance of the fingerprints in some families, together with VH gene polymorphisms, may provide insight into the genetic basis of human autoimmune thyroid disease. Furthermore, monoclonal human TPO autoantibodies will be invaluable for B cell presentation of TPO to determine the T cell epitopes involved in TPO autoantibody production. PMID:7544244

  19. Screening for autoantibodies in chronic hepatitis C patients has no effect on treatment initiation or outcome.

    PubMed

    Mauss, S; Berger, F; Schober, A; Moog, G; Heyne, R; John, C; Pape, S; Hueppe, D; Pfeiffer-Vornkahl, H; Alshuth, U

    2013-04-01

    Autoantibodies in hepatitis C virus-infected patients may indicate autoimmune hepatitis or other immune-mediated diseases. This may impact safety and efficacy of interferon-based therapy of chronic hepatitis C. We investigated the association between a positive test result for a variety of autoantibodies and the initiation and efficacy of therapy for chronic hepatitis C. We analysed an observational cohort of 24 306 patients for an association between autoantibodies and treatment outcome. 8241 patients were tested simultaneously for antinuclear antibodies (ANA), liver kidney microsomal antibodies (LKM), smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA). Matched-pair analysis was performed matching one autoantibody-positive patient to three controls. Control patients had negative tests for all four antibodies. Analyses were performed for patients with a single positive autoantibody test and for patients with multiple positive autoantibody tests. A positive test result for ANA, LKM, SMA or AMA did not affect the physician's decision to initiate therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. In addition, a positive test for one or multiple autoantibodies did not adversely affect sustained virologic response. There was no difference in fibrosis stage or alanine transaminase at baseline or during therapy irrespective of antibody status. Thyroid dysfunction was more frequent in patients with positive LKM antibodies (P = 0.004). Initiation of therapy for chronic hepatitis C and outcome were not affected by the presence of ANA, LKM, SMA or AMA. Routine testing of these autoantibodies seems not warranted. Determination of autoantibodies should be guided by individualized clinical decisions.

  20. Cytoplasmic beta-catenin in esophageal cancers.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Y; Shiozaki, H; Doki, Y; Yamamoto, M; Utsunomiya, T; Kawanishi, K; Fukuchi, N; Inoue, M; Tsujinaka, T; Monden, M

    1999-04-20

    beta-Catenin has 2 distinct roles in E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and carcinogenesis through APC gene mutation. One occurs at cell-adhesion sites, where cadherins become linked to the actin-based cytoskeleton. The others occur in the cytoplasm and nuclei and are thought to regulate cell transformation. We studied these different beta-catenins and evaluated their significance in carcinogenesis. Fresh surgical specimens were obtained from 22 patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the esophagus. beta-Catenin in the free soluble fraction and the insoluble fraction was immunoblotted separately. At the same time, its localization was observed by immuno-histochemical techniques. In the normal esophageal epithelium, 91% of beta-catenin was detected in the insoluble fraction and beta-catenin staining occurred at the cell membrane, in co-existence with E-cadherin. In cancerous tissues, the amount of soluble beta-catenin was significantly (about 4-fold) higher than in normal tissues. Also, in cancerous tissues with higher amounts of soluble beta-catenin, immuno-histochemical techniques revealed the presence of beta-catenin in the cytoplasm and nuclei, as well as in the cell membrane. However, in samples with lower amounts of beta-catenin, expression was found only at the cell boundaries. The amount of soluble beta-catenin was not associated with the clinico-pathological grading of the tumors. Our results show that the accumulation of free soluble beta-catenin in the cytoplasm and nuclei frequently occurs during carcinogenesis of the squamous epithelium of the esophagus.

  1. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios following microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, C. E.; Xun, L.

    1996-01-01

    The cytoplasmic volume-to-myonucleus ratio in the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles of juvenile rats after 5.4 days of microgravity was studied. Three groups of rats (n = 8 each) were used. The experimental group (space rats) was flown aboard the space shuttle Discovery (NASA, STS-48), while two ground-based groups, one hindlimb suspended (suspended rats), one non-suspended (control), served as controls. Single fibre analysis revealed a significant decrease in cross-sectional area (microns2) in the gastrocnemius for both the space and the suspended rats; in the tibialis anterior only the suspended rats showed a significant decrease. Myonuclei counts (myonuclei per mm) in both the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius were significantly increased in the space rats but not in the suspended rats. The mean myonuclear volume (individual nuclei: microns3) in tibialis anterior fibres from the space rats, and in gastrocnemius fibres from both the space and the suspended rats, was significantly lower than that in the respective control group. Estimation of the total myonuclear volume (microns3 per.mm), however, revealed no significant differences between the three groups in either the tibialis anterior or gastrocnemius. The described changes in the cross-sectional area and myonuclei numbers resulted in significant decreases in the cytoplasmic volume-to-myonucleus ratio (microns3 x 10(3)) in both muscles and for both space and suspended rats (tibialis anterior; 15.6 +/- 0.6 (space), 17.2 +/- 1.0 (suspended), 20.8 +/- 0.9 (control): gastrocnemius; 13.4 +/- 0.4 (space) and 14.9 +/- 1.1 (suspended) versus 18.1 +/- 1.1 (control)). These results indicate that even short periods of unweighting due to microgravity or limb suspension result in changes in skeletal muscle fibres which lead to significant decreases in the cytoplasmic volume-to-myonucleus ratio.

  2. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios following microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, C. E.; Xun, L.

    1996-01-01

    The cytoplasmic volume-to-myonucleus ratio in the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles of juvenile rats after 5.4 days of microgravity was studied. Three groups of rats (n = 8 each) were used. The experimental group (space rats) was flown aboard the space shuttle Discovery (NASA, STS-48), while two ground-based groups, one hindlimb suspended (suspended rats), one non-suspended (control), served as controls. Single fibre analysis revealed a significant decrease in cross-sectional area (microns2) in the gastrocnemius for both the space and the suspended rats; in the tibialis anterior only the suspended rats showed a significant decrease. Myonuclei counts (myonuclei per mm) in both the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius were significantly increased in the space rats but not in the suspended rats. The mean myonuclear volume (individual nuclei: microns3) in tibialis anterior fibres from the space rats, and in gastrocnemius fibres from both the space and the suspended rats, was significantly lower than that in the respective control group. Estimation of the total myonuclear volume (microns3 per.mm), however, revealed no significant differences between the three groups in either the tibialis anterior or gastrocnemius. The described changes in the cross-sectional area and myonuclei numbers resulted in significant decreases in the cytoplasmic volume-to-myonucleus ratio (microns3 x 10(3)) in both muscles and for both space and suspended rats (tibialis anterior; 15.6 +/- 0.6 (space), 17.2 +/- 1.0 (suspended), 20.8 +/- 0.9 (control): gastrocnemius; 13.4 +/- 0.4 (space) and 14.9 +/- 1.1 (suspended) versus 18.1 +/- 1.1 (control)). These results indicate that even short periods of unweighting due to microgravity or limb suspension result in changes in skeletal muscle fibres which lead to significant decreases in the cytoplasmic volume-to-myonucleus ratio.

  3. Connexin Channel Permeability to Cytoplasmic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Andrew L.

    2007-01-01

    Connexin channels are known to be permeable to a variety of cytoplasmic molecules. The first observation of second messenger junctional permeability, made ∼30 years ago, sparked broad interest in gap junction channels as mediators of intercellular molecular signaling. Since then, much has been learned about the diversity of connexin channels with regard to isoform diversity, tissue and developmental distribution, modes of channel regulation, assembly and expression, biochemical modification and permeability, all of which appear to be dynamically regulated. This information has expanded the potential roles of connexin channels in development, physiology and disease, and made their elucidation much more complex - 30 years ago such an orchestra of junctional dynamics was unanticipated. Only recently, however, have investigators been able to directly address, in this more complex framework, the key issue: What specific biological molecules, second messengers and others, are able to permeate the various types of connexin channels, and how well? An important related issue, given the ever-growing list of connexin-related pathologies, is how these permeabilities are altered by disease-causing connexin mutations. Together, many studies show that a variety of cytoplasmic molecules can permeate the different types of connexin channels. A few studies reveal differences in permeation by different molecules through a particular type of connexin channel, and differences in permeation by a particular molecule through different types of connexin channels. This article describes and evaluates the various methods used to obtain these data, presents an annotated compilation of the results, and discusses the findings in the context of what can be inferred about mechanism of selectivity and potential relevance to signaling. The data strongly suggest that highly specific interactions take place between connexin pores and specific biological molecular permeants, and that those

  4. International recommendations for the assessment of autoantibodies to cellular antigens referred to as anti-nuclear antibodies.

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Damoiseaux, Jan; Kallenberg, Cees; Sack, Ulrich; Witte, Torsten; Herold, Manfred; Bossuyt, Xavier; Musset, Lucille; Cervera, Ricard; Plaza-Lopez, Aresio; Dias, Carlos; Sousa, Maria José; Radice, Antonella; Eriksson, Catharina; Hultgren, Olof; Viander, Markku; Khamashta, Munther; Regenass, Stephan; Andrade, Luis Eduardo Coelho; Wiik, Allan; Tincani, Angela; Rönnelid, Johan; Bloch, Donald B; Fritzler, Marvin J; Chan, Edward K L; Garcia-De La Torre, I; Konstantinov, Konstantin N; Lahita, Robert; Wilson, Merlin; Vainio, Olli; Fabien, Nicole; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Meroni, Pierluigi; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are fundamental for the diagnosis of autoimmune diseases, and have been determined by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IIFA) for decades. As the demand for ANA testing increased, alternative techniques were developed challenging the classic IIFA. These alternative platforms differ in their antigen profiles, sensitivity and specificity, raising uncertainties regarding standardisation and interpretation of incongruent results. Therefore, an international group of experts has created recommendations for ANA testing by different methods. Two groups of experts participated in this initiative. The European autoimmunity standardization initiative representing 15 European countries and the International Union of Immunologic Societies/World Health Organization/Arthritis Foundation/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention autoantibody standardising committee. A three-step process followed by a Delphi exercise with closed voting was applied. Twenty-five recommendations for determining ANA (1-13), anti-double stranded DNA antibodies (14-18), specific antibodies (19-23) and validation of methods (24-25) were created. Significant differences between experts were observed regarding recommendations 24-25 (p<0.03). Here, we formulated recommendations for the assessment and interpretation of ANA and associated antibodies. Notably, the roles of IIFA as a reference method, and the importance of defining nuclear and cytoplasmic staining, were emphasised, while the need to incorporate alternative automated methods was acknowledged. Various approaches to overcome discrepancies between methods were suggested of which an improved bench-to-bedside communication is of the utmost importance. These recommendations are based on current knowledge and can enable harmonisation of local algorithms for testing and evaluation of ANA and related autoantibodies. Last but not least, new more appropriate terminologies have been suggested.

  5. Mitochondria and cytoplasmic male sterility in plants.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Huang, Wenchao; Huang, Qi; Qin, Xiaojian; Yu, Changchun; Wang, Lili; Li, Shaoqing; Zhu, Renshan; Zhu, Yingguo

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles in cells not only because they supply over 90% of the cell's energy but also because their dysfunction is associated with disease. Owing to the importance of mitochondria, there are many questions about mitochondria that must be answered. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is a mysterious natural phenomenon, and the mechanism of the origin of CMS is unknown. Despite successful utilization of CMS and restoration of fertility (Rf) in practice, the underlying mechanisms of these processes remain elusive. This review summarizes the genes involved in CMS and Rf, with a special focus on recent studies reporting the mechanisms of the CMS and Rf pathways, and concludes with potential working models.

  6. The autoantigen Ro52 is an E3 ligase resident in the cytoplasm but enters the nucleus upon cellular exposure to nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, Alexander; Oke, Vilija; Elfving, Ase; Nyberg, Filippa; Covacu, Ruxandra; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie

    2008-12-10

    Patients with the systemic autoimmune diseases Sjoegrens's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus often have autoantibodies against the intracellular protein Ro52. Ro52 is an E3 ligase dependent on the ubiquitin conjugation enzymes UBE2D1 and UBE2E1. While Ro52 and UBE2D1 are cytoplasmic proteins, UBE2E1 is localized to the nucleus. Here, we investigate how domains of human Ro52 regulate its intracellular localization. By expressing fluorescently labeled Ro52 and Ro52 mutants in HeLa cells, an intact coiled-coil domain was found to be necessary for the cytoplasmic localization of Ro52. The amino acids 381-470 of the B30.2 region were essential for translocation into the nucleus. Furthermore, after exposure of HeLa cells to the inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO), Ro52 translocated to the nucleus. A nuclear localization of Ro52 in inflamed tissue expressing inducible NO synthetase (iNOS) from cutaneous lupus patients was observed by immunohistochemistry and verified in NO-treated cultures of patient-derived primary keratinocytes. Our results show that the localization of Ro52 is regulated by endogenous sequences, and that nuclear translocation is induced by an inflammatory mediator. This suggests that Ro52 has both cytoplasmic and nuclear substrates, and that Ro52 mediates ubiquitination through UBE2D1 in the cytoplasm and through UBE2E1 in the nucleus.

  7. Cytoplasmic RNA Granules and Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wei-Chih; Lloyd, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    RNA granules are dynamic cellular structures essential for proper gene expression and homeostasis. The two principle types of cytoplasmic RNA granules are stress granules (SGs), which contain stalled translation initiation complexes, and processing bodies (P-bodies, PBs), which concentrate factors involved in mRNA degradation. RNA granules are associated with gene silencing of transcripts, thus, viruses repress RNA granule functions to favor replication. This review discusses the breadth of viral interactions with cytoplasmic RNA granules, focusing on mechanisms that modulate the functions of RNA granules and that typically promote viral replication. Currently mechanisms for virus manipulation of RNA granules can be loosely grouped into three non-exclusive categories; i) cleavage of key RNA granule factors, ii) regulation of PKR activation and iii) co-opting RNA granule factors for new roles in viral replication. Viral repression of RNA granules supports productive infection by inhibiting their gene silencing functions and counteracting their role in linking stress sensing with innate immune activation. PMID:26958719

  8. The Frequency Distribution of Celiac Autoantibodies in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Panjehpour, Tayebeh; Naeini, Farahnaz Fatemi; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Matin, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Alopecia areata (AA) is a noncicatricial (nonscarring) alopecia. The association between AA and celiac disease (CD) is debatable. Several studies declare the relationship between AA and CD as measurement of celiac autoantibodies (anti-gliadin IgA and anti-gliadin IgG), but a few studies consider anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency distribution of celiac autoantibodies (all of them) in patients with AA compared with controls. Methods: This study is a case–control study. Thirty-five patients entered in each group. Anti-gliadin IgA, anti-gliadin IgG, and anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA were tested in all patients. Samples were examined in ELISA method with binding site's kits, and the result was reported as positive/negative. Finally, the frequency distribution of autoantibodies was examined. Results: The age average did not show a significant difference between two groups (P = 0.62). In addition, there was no significant difference between the two groups based on gender (P = 0.15). The prevalence of antibody in case and control groups was 2.85% and 0%, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.31). Conclusions: There may be a relationship between CD and AA, but the absence of statistical association between AA and CD does not mean that there is no relationship between gluten and AA in certain patients. Thus, we have shown here that the biological tests to search for CD do not bring information and proof enough, and it is why we recommend another approach to disclose gluten intolerance in AA patients. PMID:27833723

  9. The Clinical Relevance of Anti-DFS70 Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Karsten; Röber, Nadja; Andrade, Luis E C; Mahler, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Despite all the progress in the establishment of specific autoantibody assays, screening for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells for quality-oriented laboratory diagnosis of ANA associated rheumatic diseases (AARD) remains indispensable but is not without limitations. Recent data on the relevance of the dense fine speckled (DFS) pattern and anti-DFS70 antibodies disclosed novel possibilities to optimize the serological stepwise diagnostics of AARD. The DFS pattern on HEp-2 cells is well differentiated from the classic "homogeneous" ANA pattern associated with dsDNA antibodies. This is the most frequent pattern in high titer ANA-positive healthy persons. The most characteristic ANA specificity associated with DFS pattern is the anti-DFS70 antibody (synonym LEDGF antibody). The prevalence of anti-DFS70 antibodies in AARD patients is significantly lower compared with the prevalence in ANA-positive healthy persons. There is a negative association between anti-DFS70 antibodies and AARD, especially if no concomitant AARD-specific autoantibodies are found. Isolated anti-DFS70 antibodies are detectable in less than 1 % of AARD but are detectable in 2-22 % of healthy persons. In the presence of an isolated anti-DFS70 antibody, the posttest probability for AARD is reduced significantly. The significance of anti-DFS70 antibodies as a criterion that helps to exclude AARD is also confirmed by follow-up studies on anti-DFS70 antibodies of positive, healthy individuals, who did not develop any AARD during a 4 year observation period. Consequently, anti-DFS70 antibodies are valuable novel biomarkers for better interpretation of positive ANA in cases of negative AARD-associated autoantibodies and should be integrated in modified test algorithms to avoid unnecessary referrals and examinations of ANA-positive persons.

  10. Multiplex autoantibody detection for autoimmune liver diseases and autoimmune gastritis.

    PubMed

    Vanderlocht, Joris; van der Cruys, Mart; Stals, Frans; Bakker-Jonges, Liesbeth; Damoiseaux, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Autoantibody detection for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune gastritis (AIG) is traditionally performed by IIF on a combination of tissues. Multiplex line/dot blots (LIA/DIA) offer multiple advantages, i.e. automation, objective reading, no interfering reactivities, no coincidental findings. In the current study we evaluated automated DIA (D-Tek) for detecting autoantibodies related to autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. We tested samples of the Dutch EQC program and compared the results with the consensus of the participating labs. For the autoimmune liver diseases and AIG, respectively, 64 and 36 samples were tested. For anti-mitochondrial and anti-smooth muscle antibodies a concordance rate of 97% and 88% was observed, respectively. The concordance rate for anti-parietal cell antibodies was 92% when samples without EQC consensus (n=15) were excluded. For antibodies against intrinsic factor a concordance of 96% was observed. For all these antibodies discrepancies were identified that relate to the different test characteristics and the preponderance of IIF utilizing labs in the EQC program. In conclusion, we observed good agreement of the tested DIA blots with the consensus results of the Dutch EQC program. Taken together with the logistic advantages these blots are a good alternative for autoantibody detection in the respective diseases. A large prospective multicenter study is warranted to position these novel tests further in the whole spectrum of assays for the detection of these antibodies in a routine autoimmune laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Autoantibodies against matrix metalloproteinase-1 in patients with localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Tomimura, Saori; Ogawa, Fumihide; Iwata, Yohei; Komura, Kazuhiro; Hara, Toshihide; Muroi, Eiji; Takenaka, Motoi; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Minoru; Fujimoto, Manabu; Sato, Shinichi

    2008-10-01

    Localized scleroderma (LSc) is characterized by cutaneous fibrosis and various autoantibodies. To determine the presence or levels of antibodies (Abs) against matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and their clinical relevance in LSc. Anti-MMP-1 Ab was examined by ELISA (Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay) and immunoblotting using human recombinant MMP-1. MMP-1 collagenase activity was determined using biotinylated collagen as substrate and the amount of cleaved biotinylated fragments of collagen by MMP-1 was measured by ELISA. LSc patients exhibited significantly elevated IgG anti-MMP-1 Ab levels relative to normal controls at similar level of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). However, IgG anti-MMP-1 Ab levels were comparable among the 3 LSc subgroups: morphea, linear scleroderma, and generalized morphea. When absorbance values higher than the mean+2S.D. of normal controls were considered positive, IgG or IgM anti-MMP-1 Ab was found in 46% and 49% of total LSc patients and SSc patients, respectively. Anti-MMP-1 Ab was detected most frequently in morphea patients (60%), followed by linear scleroderma patients (47%) and then generalized morphea patients (25%). LSc patients positive for IgG anti-MMP-1 Ab had elevated levels of IgG anti-single-stranded DNA Ab, IgG anti-nucleosome Ab, and shorter disease duration relative to those negative. The presence of anti-MMP-1 Ab in LSc patients was confirmed by immunoblotting. IgG isolated from LSc patients' sera positive for IgG anti-MMP-1 Ab by ELISA inhibited MMP-1 collagenase activity. These results suggest that anti-MMP-1 autoantibody is a novel autoantibody in LSc.

  12. Serum Autoantibody Measurement for the Detection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Catrin H.; Irving, William; Robertson, John F. R.; Murray, Andrea; Parsy-Kowalska, Celine B.; Macdonald, Isabel K.; McElveen, Jane; Allen, Jared; Healey, Graham F.; Thomson, Brian J.; Ryder, Stephen J.; Holdenrieder, Stefan; Chapman, Caroline J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with liver disease, and especially those with Hepatitis B or C, are at an increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) which is the third most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Inadequate screening tests largely account for presentation of advanced tumours and high mortality rates. Early detection of HCC amongst high-risk groups is paramount in improving prognosis. This research aimed to further characterise the previously described humoral immune response raised to tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) in the serum of patients with HCC. Methods Serum from 96 patients with confirmed HCC, 96 healthy controls matched for age and sex, 78 patients with confirmed liver cirrhosis and 91 patients with confirmed chronic liver disease were analysed for the presence of IgG autoantibodies raised to 41 recombinant TAAs/antigen fragments by ELISA. Results Varying autoantibody specificities (97–100%) and sensitivities (0–10%) were observed to individual TAAs. A 21-antigen panel achieved a specificity of 92% and sensitivity of 45% for the detection of HCC. This same panel identified 21% of 169 high-risk controls as having elevated autoantibody levels. A reproducible panel of 10 antigens achieved a specificity of 91% and sensitivity of 41% in HCC. 15% of 152 high-risk controls gave positive results with this panel. Conclusions This minimally invasive blood test has the potential to offer advantages over currently available tools for the identification of HCC amongst pre-disposed patients. Results are comparable to current gold standards in HCC (Ultrasonography) and to similar tests in other cancers (EarlyCDT-Lung). PMID:25093332

  13. Thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase share common epitopes recognized by autoantibodies in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Y; Naito, N; Hiyama, Y; Shimojo, N; Suzuki, N; Tarutani, O; Niimi, H; Nakajima, H; Hosoya, T

    1988-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies specific for human thyroid peroxidase (TPO) were prepared by the hybridoma technique using hyperimmune spleen cells from mice immunized with TPO purified from thyroid glands from patients with Graves' disease. Use of the microenzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method revealed that some of the monoclonal antibodies cross-reacted strongly with human thyroglobulin (Tg). Conversely, monoclonal anti-Tg antibodies cross-reacted with TPO, albeit to a lesser degree. Some anti-Tg autoantibodies in serum from patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis purified by Tg affinity chromatography bound TPO, and such binding was completely inhibited by Tg. Western blotting experiments revealed that thyroid microsomal 103K proteins recognized by mouse monoclonal and polyclonal anti-TPO antibodies were recognized by some monoclonal anti-Tg antibodies and anti-Tg autoantibodies, and conversely, that 19S Tg was recognized by some monoclonal anti-TPO antibodies. TPO was immunoprecipitated by anti-Tg autoantibodies isolated by Tg affinity chromatography. On the other hand, the specificity for TPO of the anti-Tg autoantibodies was not identical with that of anti-TPO autoantibodies. These cross-reactivities were not due to contamination of TPO with Tg or vice versa, or to contamination of the anti-Tg autoantibody preparations with anti-TPO autoantibodies. Taken together, these data indicate that Tg and TPO share common antigenic determinants and that some of those determinants are recognized by autoantibodies in the serum of patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.

  14. The effect of rituximab on anti-platelet autoantibody levels in patients with immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Donald M; Vrbensky, John R; Karim, Nadia; Smith, James W; Liu, Yang; Ivetic, Nikola; Kelton, John G; Nazy, Ishac

    2017-07-01

    Rituximab is an effective therapy resulting in a platelet count improvement in 60% of patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Rituximab depletes B cells; thus, a reduction in platelet autoantibody levels would be anticipated in patients who achieve a clinical response to this treatment. The objectives of this study were to determine whether rituximab was associated with a reduction in platelet autoantibody levels, and to correlate the loss of autoantibodies with the achievement of a treatment response. We performed a case-control study nested within a previous randomized controlled trial of standard therapy plus adjuvant rituximab or placebo. We measured platelet-bound anti-glycoprotein (GP) IIbIIIa and anti-GPIbIX using the antigen capture test. Of 55 evaluable patients, 25 (45%) had a detectable platelet autoantibody at baseline. Rituximab was associated with a significant reduction in anti-GPIIbIIIa levels (P = 0·02) but not anti-GPIbIX levels (P = 0·51) compared with placebo. Neither the presence of an autoantibody at baseline nor the loss of the autoantibody after treatment was associated with a response to rituximab. The subset of patients with persistent autoantibodies after treatment failed to achieve a platelet count response, suggesting that persistence of platelet autoantibodies can be a marker of disease severity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Progress in understanding the diagnostic and pathogenic role of autoantibodies associated with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, May Y.; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review At the time of diagnosis, systemic sclerosis (SSc) is often well established with significant irreversible tissue and organ damage. Definitions of ‘early SSc’ have been proposed, which include the presence of SSc-associated autoantibodies. In addition, functional autoantibodies that are believed to be involved in SSc pathogenesis need to be considered. In this review, recent advances in the diagnostic utility and pathogenic role of autoantibodies in early SSc are summarized. Moreover, we propose a clinical care pathway illustrating how autoantibody testing along with key clinical features can be used to make an earlier diagnosis of SSc. Recent findings Recent evidence has helped to develop a clearer understanding of the natural history, early clinical features, and autoantibodies that are predictors of SSc. The role of functional autoantibodies is leading to innovative approaches to evidence-based interventions and therapies that are based on mechanisms of disease. Summary Despite substantial advances, the high morbidity and mortality that currently characterizes SSc can largely be attributed to a delay in diagnosis, gaps in our understanding of the role of autoantibodies in early disease, and limited effective therapeutic options. An early and accurate diagnosis of SSc and use of autoantibody testing embedded in evidence-based clinical care pathways will help improve SSc-associated clinical outcomes and healthcare expenditures. PMID:27387266

  16. Classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias using anti–myxovirus resistance-protein 1 autoantibody

    PubMed Central

    Hamano, Yoshimasa; Kida, Hiroshi; Ihara, Shoichi; Murakami, Akihiro; Yanagawa, Masahiro; Ueda, Ken; Honda, Osamu; Tripathi, Lokesh P.; Arai, Toru; Hirose, Masaki; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Yano, Yukihiro; Kimura, Tetsuya; Kato, Yasuhiro; Takamatsu, Hyota; Otsuka, Tomoyuki; Minami, Toshiyuki; Hirata, Haruhiko; Inoue, Koji; Nagatomo, Izumi; Takeda, Yoshito; Mori, Masahide; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Kijima, Takashi; Kitaichi, Masanori; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Chronic fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) can be divided into two main types: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a steroid-resistant and progressive disease with a median survival of 2–3 years, and idiopathic non-specific interstitial pneumonia (INSIP), a steroid-sensitive and non-progressive autoimmune disease. Although the clinical courses of these two diseases differ, they may be difficult to distinguish at diagnosis. We performed a comprehensive analysis of serum autoantibodies from patients definitively diagnosed with IPF, INSIP, autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and sarcoidosis. We identified disease-specific autoantibodies and enriched KEGG pathways unique to each disease, and demonstrated that IPF and INSIP are serologically distinct. Furthermore, we discovered a new INSIP-specific autoantibody, anti–myxovirus resistance-1 (MX1) autoantibody. Patients positive for anti-MX1 autoantibody constituted 17.5% of all cases of chronic fibrosing IIPs. Notably, patients rarely simultaneously carried the anti-MX1 autoantibody and the anti–aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase autoantibody, which is common in chronic fibrosing IIPs. Because MX1 is one of the most important interferon-inducible anti-viral genes, we have not only identified a new diagnostic autoantibody of INSIP but also obtained new insight into the pathology of INSIP, which may be associated with viral infection and autoimmunity. PMID:28230086

  17. Systematic review: serum autoantibodies in the early detection of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Werner, Simone; Chen, Hongda; Tao, Sha; Brenner, Hermann

    2015-05-15

    Antibodies against tumor-associated antigens have been found in serum of patients with various types of cancers and may serve as biomarkers for early detection of gastric cancer as well. This systematic review aims to give an overview about known autoantibodies and their diagnostic value in gastric cancer. We conducted a systematic literature search in two databases to identify studies which performed serological testing for autoantibodies in gastric cancer patients and controls. Data on study characteristics and results were extracted independently by two reviewers. Overall, 39 articles reporting the detection of 34 different autoantibodies met the inclusion criteria for this review. The most common antibody detection method was enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the most frequently assessed autoantibody was anti-p53, which was tested in 13 studies. Most antibodies were assessed in only one study and only few authors have evaluated the diagnostic value of combinations of multiple autoantibodies. For single autoantibodies, specificity was generally very high (median: 99.15%), but sensitivity was mostly rather low (median: 12.35%). For some autoantibody combinations, substantially higher sensitivity at reasonably high levels of specificity could be achieved. Development of extended and optimized multimarker panels of autoantibodies might be a promising approach for gastric cancer early detection.

  18. Factor I Autoantibodies in Patients with Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Disease-Associated or an Epiphenomenon?

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, David; Pappworth, Isabel Y.; Anderson, Holly; Hayes, Christine M.; Moore, Iain; Hunze, Eva-Maria; Bennaceur, Karim; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan; Strain, Lisa; Ward, Roy; Plant, Nick; Nailescu, Corina; Goodship, Timothy H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is a disease associated with mutations in the genes encoding the complement regulators factors H and I. In addition, factor H autoantibodies have been reported in ∼10% of patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. This study searched for the presence of factor I autoantibodies in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study screened 175 atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome patients for factor I autoantibodies using ELISA with confirmatory Western blotting. Functional studies using purified immunoglobulin from one patient were subsequently undertaken. Results Factor I autoantibodies were detected in three patients. In one patient with a high titer of autoantibody, the titer was tracked over time and was found to have no association with disease activity. This study found evidence of an immune complex of antibody and factor I in this patient, but purified IgG, isolated from current serum samples, had only a minor effect on fluid phase and cell surface complement regulation. Genetic analysis of the three patients with factor I autoantibodies revealed that they had two copies of the genes encoding factor H–related proteins 1 and 3 and therefore, did not have a deletion commonly associated with factor H autoantibodies in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Two patients, however, had functionally significant mutations in complement factor H. Conclusions These findings reinforce the concept of multiple concurrent risk factors being associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome but question whether autoantibodies per se predispose to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:22223611

  19. Classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias using anti-myxovirus resistance-protein 1 autoantibody.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Yoshimasa; Kida, Hiroshi; Ihara, Shoichi; Murakami, Akihiro; Yanagawa, Masahiro; Ueda, Ken; Honda, Osamu; Tripathi, Lokesh P; Arai, Toru; Hirose, Masaki; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Yano, Yukihiro; Kimura, Tetsuya; Kato, Yasuhiro; Takamatsu, Hyota; Otsuka, Tomoyuki; Minami, Toshiyuki; Hirata, Haruhiko; Inoue, Koji; Nagatomo, Izumi; Takeda, Yoshito; Mori, Masahide; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Kijima, Takashi; Kitaichi, Masanori; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2017-02-23

    Chronic fibrosing idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) can be divided into two main types: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a steroid-resistant and progressive disease with a median survival of 2-3 years, and idiopathic non-specific interstitial pneumonia (INSIP), a steroid-sensitive and non-progressive autoimmune disease. Although the clinical courses of these two diseases differ, they may be difficult to distinguish at diagnosis. We performed a comprehensive analysis of serum autoantibodies from patients definitively diagnosed with IPF, INSIP, autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and sarcoidosis. We identified disease-specific autoantibodies and enriched KEGG pathways unique to each disease, and demonstrated that IPF and INSIP are serologically distinct. Furthermore, we discovered a new INSIP-specific autoantibody, anti-myxovirus resistance-1 (MX1) autoantibody. Patients positive for anti-MX1 autoantibody constituted 17.5% of all cases of chronic fibrosing IIPs. Notably, patients rarely simultaneously carried the anti-MX1 autoantibody and the anti-aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetase autoantibody, which is common in chronic fibrosing IIPs. Because MX1 is one of the most important interferon-inducible anti-viral genes, we have not only identified a new diagnostic autoantibody of INSIP but also obtained new insight into the pathology of INSIP, which may be associated with viral infection and autoimmunity.

  20. Do neuronal autoantibodies cause psychosis? A neuroimmunological perspective.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Ester; Harrison, Paul; Vincent, Angela

    2014-02-15

    In the last decade, autoantibodies targeting proteins on the neuronal surface and that are believed to be directly pathogenic have been described in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. Since then, new antigenic targets have been discovered, and new clinical phenotypes have been recognized. The psychotic disorders are one example of this expanding spectrum. Here, we consider the defining criteria of antibody-mediated central nervous system disease and the extent to which the psychiatric data currently satisfy those criteria. We discuss the implications these findings have for our understanding, nosology, and treatment of psychiatric disorders.

  1. Graphene oxide interfaces in serum based autoantibody quantification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiao; Cheng, Ho; Lehr, Joshua; Patil, Amol V; Davis, Jason J

    2015-01-06

    A reliable quantification of protein markers will undoubtedly underpin profound developments in disease surveillance, diagnostics, and improved therapy. Although there potentially exist numerous means of achieving this, electrochemical impedimetric techniques offer scale of sensitivity, cost, convenience, and a flexibility with which few alternatives can compete. Though there have been marked developments in electroanalytical protein detection, the demands associated with accessing the inherent assay sensitivity in complex biological media largely remains. We report herein the use of cysteamine-graphene oxide modified gold microelectrode arrays in underpinning the ultrasensitive and entirely label free non-faradaic quantification of Parkinson's-relevant autoantibodies in human serum.

  2. [Interstitial lung disease: auto-antibodies in routine practice].

    PubMed

    Papo, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    The clinical, computed tomography, cytological, and histological aspects of interstitial lung disease complicating an autoimmune disease lack specificity. Search for autoantibodies in the serum is thus warranted once the essentially clinical diagnosis has been established. An exhaustive history taking should aim at identifying extrathoracic elements of a possible systemic autoimmune disease. The battery of the biological tests which can be useful are discussed here in light of the diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic, and even conceptual aspects of the disease. For the clinician, a simplified analysis of the main methods and the interpretation of immunological tests is discussed together with new tools currently under development.

  3. Autoantibodies against vinculin in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Minako; Sawai, Setsu; Satoh, Mamoru; Mori, Masahiro; Kazami, Takahiro; Misawa, Sonoko; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Ishibashi, Masumi; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Kado, Sayaka; Kodera, Yoshio; Nomura, Fumio; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-10-15

    To identify the target molecules of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), we used proteomic-based approach in the extracted proteins from porcine cauda equina. Two of 31 CIDP patients had markedly elevated serum autoantibodies against vinculin, a cell adhesion protein. Both of the patients with anti-vinculin antibodies had similar clinical manifestation, which are compatible with those of "typical" CIDP. Immunocytochemistry showed that vinculin was stained at the myelin sheath of the sciatic nerves by serum samples. Our results suggest that vinculin is a possible immunological target molecule in a subpopulation of typical CIDP patients.

  4. Folinic acid treatment for schizophrenia associated with folate receptor autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Ramaekers, V T; Thöny, B; Sequeira, J M; Ansseau, M; Philippe, P; Boemer, F; Bours, V; Quadros, E V

    2014-12-01

    Auto-antibodies against folate receptor alpha (FRα) at the choroid plexus that block N(5)-methyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF) transfer to the brain were identified in catatonic schizophrenia. Acoustic hallucinations disappeared following folinic acid treatment. Folate transport to the CNS prevents homocysteine accumulation and delivers one-carbon units for methyl-transfer reactions and synthesis of purines. The guanosine derivative tetrahydrobiopterin acts as common co-factor for the enzymes producing dopamine, serotonin and nitric oxide. Our study selected patients with schizophrenia unresponsive to conventional treatment. Serum from these patients with normal plasma homocysteine, folate and vitamin B12 was tested for FR autoantibodies of the blocking type on serial samples each week. Spinal fluid was analyzed for MTHF and the metabolites of pterins, dopamine and serotonin. The clinical response to folinic acid treatment was evaluated. Fifteen of 18 patients (83.3%) had positive serum FR auto-antibodies compared to only 1 in 30 controls (3.3%) (χ(2)=21.6; p<0.0001). FRα antibody titers in patients fluctuated over time varying between negative and high titers, modulating folate flux to the CNS, which explained low CSF folate values in 6 and normal values in 7 patients. The mean±SD for CSF MTHF was diminished compared to previously established controls (t-test: 3.90; p=0.0002). A positive linear correlation existed between CSF MTHF and biopterin levels. CSF dopamine and serotonin metabolites were low or in the lower normal range. Administration of folinic acid (0.3-1mg/kg/day) to 7 participating patients during at least six months resulted in clinical improvement. Assessment of FR auto-antibodies in serum is recommended for schizophrenic patients. Clinical negative or positive symptoms are speculated to be influenced by the level and evolution of FRα antibody titers which determine folate flux to the brain with up- or down-regulation of brain folate intermediates

  5. Prevalence of autoantibodies in a group of hereditary angioedema patients.

    PubMed

    Dortas Junior, Sergio Duarte; Valle, Solange Oliveira Rodrigues; Levy, Soloni Afra Pires; Tortora, Rosangela P; Abe, Augusto Tiaqui; Pires, Gisele Viana; Papi, José Angelo de Souza; França, Alfeu Tavares

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary Angioedema is a dominantly inherited disease. Routine screening of autoantibodies (AAB) is not recommended for individuals with Hereditary Angioedema; however, prevalence of these antibodies in Hereditary Angioedema patients is not well documented. We aim to determine the prevalence of AAB so that individuals at risk of developing autoimmune diseases can be identified. Fifteen patients with Hereditary Angioedema attended at Clementino Fraga Filho University Hospital accepted to participate in this study. Prevalence of AAB was 40%. Our data indicate high prevalence of AAB in patients with Hereditary Angioedema. Large-scale studies should be considered to determine the significance of these AAB in the follow-up care of patients with Hereditary Angioedema.

  6. Autoantibody in pemphigus serum, specific for the 59 kD keratin, selectively binds the surface of keratinocytes: evidence for an extracellular keratin domain

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, L.A.; Sampaio, S.A.; Martins, C.R.; Rivitti, E.A.; Macca, M.L.; Roscoe, J.T.; Takahashi, Y.; Labib, R.S.; Patel, H.P.; Mutasim, D.F.

    1987-09-01

    We have identified a novel IgG antikeratin autoantibody in the serum of a Brazilian pemphigus foliaceus patient (Cascas-42). This antibody is specific for the 59 kD acidic murine keratin and its 56.5 kD human counterpart (Moll's catalogue number10), and is distinct from the pemphigus antibody system. Antikeratin autoantibodies present in the Cascas-42 serum were purified by affinity chromatography with a 59 kD murine keratin-agarose column (IAP-Cascas-42 antibodies). The specificity of the IAP-Cascas-42 antibodies was tested by indirect immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy against epidermal cryosections, trypsin-dissociated keratinocytes, and epidermal cell cultures. The serum was also tested with extracts from unlabeled and surface /sup 125/I-labeled keratinocytes (Iodo-Gen method) by immunoblot analysis of one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The IAP-Cascas-42 antibodies bind the intercellular spaces of murine epidermis, and the cell surfaces of viable, dissociated murine keratinocytes, as well as murine epidermal cells in culture by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. These autoantibodies did not stain cytoplasmic keratins and did not react with parallel human epidermal substrates. The Cascas-42 serum identified the 59 kD murine acidic keratin and its 56.5 kD human counterpart in epidermal extracts by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis. In addition, surface radioiodination of viable murine keratinocytes selectively labeled the 59 kD keratin suggesting that a domain of this molecule is exposed on the cell surface. The /sup 125/I-labeled 59 kD keratin was also recognized by the Cascas-42 serum by immunoblotting and autoradiography.

  7. Autoantibody profiling on a plasmonic nano-gold chip for the early detection of hypertensive heart disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyang; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Cauwenberghs, Nicholas; Wheeler, Matthew; Maecker, Holden; Wu, Joseph C; Haddad, Francois; Dai, Hongjie

    2017-07-03

    The role of autoimmunity in cardiovascular (CV) diseases has been increasingly recognized. Autoimmunity is most commonly examined by the levels of circulating autoantibodies in clinical practices. Measurement of autoantibodies remains, however, challenging because of the deficiency of reproducible, sensitive, and standardized assays. The lack of multiplexed assays also limits the potential to identify a CV-specific autoantibody profile. To overcome these challenges, we developed a nanotechnology-based plasmonic gold chip for autoantibody profiling. This approach allowed simultaneous detection of 10 CV autoantibodies targeting the structural myocardial proteins, the neurohormonal regulatory proteins, the vascular proteins, and the proteins associated with apoptosis and coagulation. Autoantibodies were measured in four groups of participants across the continuum of hypertensive heart diseases. We observed higher levels of all 10 CV autoantibodies in hypertensive subjects (n = 77) compared with healthy participants (n = 30), and the autoantibodies investigated were related to each other, forming a highly linked network. In addition, we established that autoantibodies to troponin I, annexin-A5, and beta 1-adrenegic receptor best discriminated hypertensive subjects with adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling or dysfunction (n = 49) from hypertensive subjects with normal LV structure and function (n = 28). By further linking these three significant CV autoantibodies to the innate and growth factors, we revealed a positive but weak association between autoantibodies to troponin I and proinflammatory cytokine IL-18. Overall, we demonstrated that this platform can be used to evaluate autoantibody profiles in hypertensive subjects at risk for heart failure.

  8. Evidence on the pathogenic role of auto-antibodies in acute cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Carbone, F; Nencioni, A; Mach, F; Vuilleumier, N; Montecucco, F

    2013-05-01

    Atherothrombosis is the major determinant of acute ischaemic cardiovascular events, such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Inflammatory processes have been linked to all phases of atherogenesis In particular, the identification of autoimmunity mediators in the complex microenvironment of chronic inflammation has become the focus of attention in both early and advanced atherogenic processes. Auto-antibodies against self-molecules or new epitopes generated by oxidative processes infiltrate atherosclerotic plaques and were shown to modulate the activity of immune cells by binding various types of receptors. However, despite mounting evidence for a pathophysiological role of autoantibodies in atherothrombosis, the clinical relevance for circulating autoantibodies in cardiovascular outcomes is still debated. This review aims at illustrating the mechanisms by which different types of autoantibodies might either promote or repress atherothrombosis and to discuss the clinical studies assessing the role of auto-antibodies as prognostic biomarkers of plaque vulnerability.

  9. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-06-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice.

  10. IgG Autoantibody Response Against Keratinocyte Cadherins in Endemic Pemphigus Foliaceus (Fogo Selvagem)

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Gustavo; Culton, Donna A.; Prisayanh, Phillip; Qaqish, Bahjat F.; James, Kirk; Maldonado, Mike; Aoki, Valeria; Hans-Filho, Gunter; Rivitti, Evandro A.; Diaz, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that autoantibodies against desmoglein 3 and desmoglein 1 are relevant in the pathogenesis of pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus, including its endemic form, Fogo Selvagem (FS). Isolated reports have shown that in certain patients with these diseases, autoantibodies against other desmosomal cadherins and E-cadherin may also be present. The goal of this investigation was to determine if FS patients and normal individuals living in endemic areas possess autoantibodies against other desmosomal cadherins and E-cadherin. Testing a large number of FS and endemic control sera by ELISA we find a consistent and specific autoantibody response against desmoglein 1 and other keratinocyte cadherins in these individuals, which is quite different from US controls. Overall, the highest correlations among the autoantibody responses tested are in the endemic controls, followed by FS patients, and lowest in the US controls. These findings suggest that multiple, perhaps cross reactive, keratinocyte cadherins are recognized by FS patients and endemic controls. PMID:22810308

  11. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-01-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice. PMID:27279139

  12. Structural biology of cytoplasmic and axonemal dyneins.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    Dyneins are microtubule-based, ATP-driven motor proteins with six tandemly linked AAA+ domains, a long N-terminal tail and a coiled-coil stalk. Cytoplasmic dyneins function as individual homodimers and are responsible for minus-end-oriented transport along microtubules. Axonemal dyneins of flagella/cilia are anchored in arrays to peripheral microtubule doublets by their N-terminal tails, and generate sliding motions of adjacent microtubule doublets toward the plus end. The coiled-coil stalk is responsible for communication between the AAA+ domains and the microtubule binding domain. A number of isoforms of axonemal dyneins are integrated to generate bending motion. In this article I will review recent structural studies and address the question as to how dyneins generate force and cause bending in flagella/cilia.

  13. Modeling of Single Molecule Cytoplasmic Dynein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Clare

    2010-03-01

    A living cell has an infrastructure much like that of a city. We will describe the transportation system that consists of roads (filaments) and molecular motors (proteins) that haul cargo along these roads. Dynein is one type of motor protein that walks along microtubules towards the nucleus of the cell. Dynein is more complicated in its structure and function than other motors. Experiments have found that, unlike other motors, dynein can take different size steps along microtubules depending on load and ATP concentration. We use Monte Carlo simulations to model the molecular motor function of cytoplasmic dynein at the single molecule level. The theory relates dynein's enzymatic properties to its mechanical force production. Our simulations reproduce the main features of recent single molecule experiments. We make testable predictions that should guide future experiments related to dynein function.

  14. Anomalous Diffusion of Single Particles in Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Regner, Benjamin M.; Vučinić, Dejan; Domnisoru, Cristina; Bartol, Thomas M.; Hetzer, Martin W.; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2013-01-01

    The crowded intracellular environment poses a formidable challenge to experimental and theoretical analyses of intracellular transport mechanisms. Our measurements of single-particle trajectories in cytoplasm and their random-walk interpretations elucidate two of these mechanisms: molecular diffusion in crowded environments and cytoskeletal transport along microtubules. We employed acousto-optic deflector microscopy to map out the three-dimensional trajectories of microspheres migrating in the cytosolic fraction of a cellular extract. Classical Brownian motion (BM), continuous time random walk, and fractional BM were alternatively used to represent these trajectories. The comparison of the experimental and numerical data demonstrates that cytoskeletal transport along microtubules and diffusion in the cytosolic fraction exhibit anomalous (nonFickian) behavior and posses statistically distinct signatures. Among the three random-walk models used, continuous time random walk provides the best representation of diffusion, whereas microtubular transport is accurately modeled with fractional BM. PMID:23601312

  15. Mechanism and Regulation of Cytoplasmic Dynein

    PubMed Central

    Cianfrocco, Michael A.; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Leschziner, Andres E.; Reck-Peterson, Samara L.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, dynein was the least understood of the cytoskeletal motors. However, a wealth of new structural, mechanistic, and cell biological data is shedding light on how this complicated minus-end–directed, microtubule-based motor works. Cytoplasmic dynein-1 performs a wide array of functions in most eukaryotes, both in interphase, in which it transports organelles, proteins, mRNAs, and viruses, and in mitosis and meiosis. Mutations in dynein or its regulators are linked to neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we begin by providing a synthesis of recent data to describe the current model of dynein’s mechanochemical cycle. Next, we discuss regulators of dynein, with particular focus on those that directly interact with the motor to modulate its recruitment to microtubules, initiate cargo transport, or activate minus-end–directed motility. PMID:26436706

  16. Quantifying intermittent transport in cell cytoplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagache, Thibault; Holcman, David

    2008-03-01

    Active cellular transport is a fundamental mechanism for protein and vesicle delivery, cell cycle, and molecular degradation. Viruses can hijack the transport system and use it to reach the nucleus. Most transport processes consist of intermittent dynamics, where the motion of a particle, such as a virus, alternates between pure Brownian and directed movement along microtubules. In this Rapid Communication, we estimate the mean time for a particle to attach to a microtubule network. This computation leads to a coarse grained equation of the intermittent motion in radial and cylindrical geometries. Finally, by using the degradation activity inside the cytoplasm, we obtain refined asymptotic estimations for the probability and the mean time a virus reaches a small nuclear pore.

  17. Non-ideal Solution Thermodynamics of Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Rodriguez, Lisa U.; McGann, Locksley E.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative description of the non-ideal solution thermodynamics of the cytoplasm of a living mammalian cell is critically necessary in mathematical modeling of cryobiology and desiccation and other fields where the passive osmotic response of a cell plays a role. In the solution thermodynamics osmotic virial equation, the quadratic correction to the linear ideal, dilute solution theory is described by the second osmotic virial coefficient. Herein we report, for the first time, intracellular solution second osmotic virial coefficients for four cell types [TF-1 hematopoietic stem cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), porcine hepatocytes, and porcine chondrocytes] and further report second osmotic virial coefficients indistinguishable from zero (for the concentration range studied) for human hepatocytes and mouse oocytes. PMID:23840923

  18. Physical properties of cytoplasmic intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Block, Johanna; Schroeder, Viktor; Pawelzyk, Paul; Willenbacher, Norbert; Köster, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) constitute a sophisticated filament system in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes. They form bundles and networks with adapted viscoelastic properties and are strongly interconnected with the other filament types, microfilaments and microtubules. IFs are cell type specific and apart from biochemical functions, they act as mechanical entities to provide stability and resilience to cells and tissues. We review the physical properties of these abundant structural proteins including both in vitro studies and cell experiments. IFs are hierarchical structures and their physical properties seem to a large part be encoded in the very specific architecture of the biopolymers. Thus, we begin our review by presenting the assembly mechanism, followed by the mechanical properties of individual filaments, network and structure formation due to electrostatic interactions, and eventually the mechanics of in vitro and cellular networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  19. Autoantibodies to a 140-kd protein in juvenile dermatomyositis are associated with calcinosis.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, H; Wedderburn, L R; Chinoy, H; Betteridge, Z E; North, J; Ollier, W E R; Cooper, R G; Oddis, C V; Ramanan, A V; Davidson, J E; McHugh, N J

    2009-06-01

    The identification of novel autoantibodies in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) may have etiologic and clinical implications. The aim of this study was to describe autoantibodies to a 140-kd protein in children recruited to the Juvenile DM National Registry and Repository for UK and Ireland. Clinical data and sera were collected from children with juvenile myositis. Sera that recognized a 140-kd protein by immunoprecipitation were identified. The identity of the p140 autoantigen was investigated by immunoprecipitation/immunodepletion, using commercial monoclonal antibodies to NXP-2, reference anti-p140, and anti-p155/140, the other autoantibody recently described in juvenile DM. DNA samples from 100 Caucasian children with myositis were genotyped for HLA class II haplotype associations and compared with those from 864 randomly selected UK Caucasian control subjects. Sera from 37 (23%) of 162 patients with juvenile myositis were positive for anti-p140 autoantibodies, which were detected exclusively in patients with juvenile DM and not in patients with juvenile DM-overlap syndrome or control subjects. No anti-p140 antibody-positive patients were positive for other recognized autoantibodies. Immunodepletion suggested that the identity of p140 was consistent with NXP-2 (the previously identified MJ autoantigen). In children with anti-p140 antibodies, the association with calcinosis was significant compared with the rest of the cohort (corrected P < 0.005, odds ratio 7.0, 95% confidence interval 3.0-16.1). The clinical features of patients with anti-p140 autoantibodies were different from those of children with anti-p155/140 autoantibodies. The presence of HLA-DRB1*08 was a possible risk factor for anti-p140 autoantibody positivity. This study has established that anti-p140 autoantibodies represent a major autoantibody subset in juvenile DM. This specificity may identify a further immunogenetic and clinical phenotype within the juvenile myositis spectrum that includes an

  20. [Influence of Anticoagulants on Detection of ITP Platelet-Specific Autoantibodies and Relationship of Autoantibody Types with Glucocorticoid Efficacy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Ge, Jian; Ruan, Min; Zhu, Lin-Yang; Zeng, Qing-Shu; Xia, Rui-Xiang; Ni, He-Yu

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the influence of divalent cation chelator EDTA and heparin sodium on the detection of ITP platelet-specific autoantibodies by the modified monoclonal antibody immobilization of platelet antigen assay (MAIPA) and to explore the relationship between types of platelet specific autoantibodies and glucocorticoid efficacy. The samples were obtained from EDTA- and heparin- anticoagulant ITP patients, respectively, so as to detect the platelet-specific autoantibodies (GPIIb/IIIa and GPIbα) in 140 ITP samples by modified MAIPA, then the differences between these two methods were compared. Out of 140 cases in EDTA group, 55 cases were positive for GPIIb/IIIa, while 76 cases in heparin group were positive for GPIIb/IIIa, 42 cases in both group were repeatable; among them 13 cases were positive in EDTA group and negative in heparin group, while 34 cases were positive in heparin group and negative in EDTA group, there was significant difference between them (x (2) = 9.38, P < 0.05), 62 cases in 140 cases of EDTA group were positive for GPIba, while 51 cases in heparin group were positive for GPIba, 42 cases in both group were repeatabe; among them 20 cases were positive in EDTA group and negative in heparin group, while 9 cases were positive in heparin group and negative in EDTA group, there was no significant difference between them (x (2) = 3.44, P > 0.05). A total of 320 cases received a standard glucocorticoid treatment, out of them 143 cases were positive for GPIbα with effective rate 39.9%, 177 cases were negative for GPIbα with effective rate 79.7%, there was statisticalty significant difference between them (x (2) = 53.115, P < 0.05). EDTA anticoagulant (a divalent cation chelator) has a significant influence on detection of ITP platelet-specific autoantibodies (GPIIb/IIIa) by a modified MAIPA method and the GPIbα antibody positive may be one of the important factors that results in un-sensitivity of ITP patients to glucocorticoid treatment.

  1. Inborn errors of cytoplasmic triglyceride metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang Wei; Yang, Hao; Wang, Shu Pei; Soni, Krishnakant G; Brunel-Guitton, Catherine; Mitchell, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    Triglyceride (TG) synthesis, storage, and degradation together constitute cytoplasmic TG metabolism (CTGM). CTGM is mostly studied in adipocytes, where starting from glycerol-3-phosphate and fatty acyl (FA)-coenzyme A (CoA), TGs are synthesized then stored in cytoplasmic lipid droplets. TG hydrolysis proceeds sequentially, producing FAs and glycerol. Several reactions of CTGM can be catalyzed by more than one enzyme, creating great potential for complex tissue-specific physiology. In adipose tissue, CTGM provides FA as a systemic energy source during fasting and is related to obesity. Inborn errors and mouse models have demonstrated the importance of CTGM for non-adipose tissues, including skeletal muscle, myocardium and liver, because steatosis and dysfunction can occur. We discuss known inborn errors of CTGM, including deficiencies of: AGPAT2 (a form of generalized lipodystrophy), LPIN1 (childhood rhabdomyolysis), LPIN2 (an inflammatory condition, Majeed syndrome, described elsewhere in this issue), DGAT1 (protein loosing enteropathy), perilipin 1 (partial lipodystrophy), CGI-58 (gene ABHD5, neutral lipid storage disease (NLSD) with ichthyosis and "Jordan's anomaly" of vacuolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes), adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, gene PNPLA2, NLSD with myopathy, cardiomyopathy and Jordan's anomaly), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL, gene LIPE, hypertriglyceridemia, and insulin resistance). Two inborn errors of glycerol metabolism are known: glycerol kinase (GK, causing pseudohypertriglyceridemia) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1, childhood hepatic steatosis). Mouse models often resemble human phenotypes but may diverge markedly. Inborn errors have been described for less than one-third of CTGM enzymes, and new phenotypes may yet be identified.

  2. Cytoplasmic peptidoglycan intermediate levels in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Harika; Ayon, Navid J; Gutheil, William G

    2016-02-01

    Intracellular cytoplasmic peptidoglycan (PG) intermediate levels were determined in Staphylococcus aureus during log-phase growth in enriched media. Levels of UDP-linked intermediates were quantitatively determined using ion pairing LC-MS/MS in negative mode, and amine intermediates were quantitatively determined stereospecifically as their Marfey's reagent derivatives in positive mode. Levels of UDP-linked intermediates in S. aureus varied from 1.4 μM for UDP-GlcNAc-Enolpyruvyate to 1200 μM for UDP-MurNAc. Levels of amine intermediates (L-Ala, D-Ala, D-Ala-D-Ala, L-Glu, D-Glu, and L-Lys) varied over a range of from 860 μM for D-Ala-D-Ala to 30-260 mM for the others. Total PG was determined from the D-Glu content of isolated PG, and used to estimate the rate of PG synthesis (in terms of cytoplasmic metabolite flux) as 690 μM/min. The total UDP-linked intermediates pool (2490 μM) is therefore sufficient to sustain growth for 3.6 min. Comparison of UDP-linked metabolite levels with published pathway enzyme characteristics demonstrates that enzymes on the UDP-branch range from >80% saturation for MurA, Z, and C, to <5% saturation for MurB. Metabolite levels were compared with literature values for Escherichia coli, with the major difference in UDP-intermediates being the level of UDP-MurNAc, which was high in S. aureus (1200 μM) and low in E. coli (45 μM).

  3. Increased leptin levels correlate with thyroid autoantibodies in nonobese males.

    PubMed

    MacIver, Nancie J; Thomas, Steven M; Green, Cynthia L; Worley, Gordon

    2016-07-01

    Leptin is an adipokine that regulates body weight and appetite. It is also an inflammatory cytokine that influences immune reactivity and autoimmunity. Leptin levels are increased in obesity and are higher in women than in men. We aimed to determine whether leptin levels, independent of sex and body mass index (BMI), are associated with thyroid autoimmunity. This study uses data from The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) to test the association of leptin and thyroid autoimmunity, independent of BMI. Thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroxine, antithyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies and leptin levels were measured in 2902 men and 3280 women within the NHANES III population. BMI was calculated from height and weight. Women had significantly higher leptin levels and anti-TPO antibody titres than men. Correlation analyses demonstrated that leptin levels were associated with anti-TPO antibody levels in the total population, but when men and women were analysed separately, this association was lost. We then stratified men and women into obese (BMI > 30) or nonobese (BMI ≤ 30) subgroups and determined the association between leptin levels and anti-TPO antibody titres for each subgroup. Using regression analysis, we found that increased leptin levels correlated with thyroid autoantibodies in nonobese males, but not in obese males or in females. Leptin levels correlated with thyroid autoantibody titres in nonobese males. This association was not found in females. Sex and body habitus should therefore be considered in studying the role of leptin in other autoimmune conditions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Obstetric and vascular APS: same autoantibodies but different diseases?

    PubMed

    Meroni, P L; Raschi, E; Grossi, C; Pregnolato, F; Trespidi, L; Acaia, B; Borghi, M O

    2012-06-01

    Beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI)-dependent antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) are the main pathogenic autoantibody population and at the same time the laboratory diagnostic tool for the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). These antibodies are responsible for both the vascular and the obstetric manifestations of the syndrome but the pathogenic mechanisms behind these manifestations are not the same. For example, thrombotic events do not appear to play a major role in APS miscarriages and a direct reactivity of β2GPI-dependent aPLs on decidual and trophoblast cells was reported. A local expression of β2GPI on these tissues was reported both in physiological conditions and in APS women, thus explaining the local tropism of the autoantibodies. The two hit hypothesis was suggested to explain why the vascular manifestations of APS may occur only occasionally in spite of the persistent presence of aPLs. This is not apparently the case for the obstetric variant of the syndrome, making the difference even more striking. A different pathogenesis may also provide the rationale for the well-known fact that the vascular and the obstetric manifestations may occur independently although in a minority of cases.

  5. Possible enhancement of BP180 autoantibody production by herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Koji; Aoyama, Yumi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Niwa, Haruo; Horio, Ai; Nishio, Eiichi; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2016-02-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering disease caused by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen/BP180 (BP180). Although the mechanisms of autoantibody production remain to be elucidated, herpes virus infections have been identified as a possible triggering factor for pemphigus. We report a case of herpes zoster (HZ) having anti-BP180 serum antibodies. The patient developed sudden-onset, tense blisters and edematous erythema on the right anterior chest, shoulder and upper back. Histopathology showed remarkable degeneration of keratinocytes, acantholysis and blister formation with ballooning cells, indicating herpes virus infection. A polymerase chain reaction analysis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) was positive in crusts and effusions from the skin lesions, confirming the definitive diagnosis of HZ. Notably, we found that the patient had anti-BP180 serum antibodies in association with the occurrence of HZ. After successful treatment with valacyclovir hydrochloride for 7 days, the serum levels of anti-BP180 antibodies decreased in accordance with the improvement of skin lesions. These findings suggest that the production of anti-BP180 antibodies could be triggered by the reactivation of VZV. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  6. Autoantibody to MOG suggests two distinct clinical subtypes of NMOSD

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yaping; Li, Yujing; Fu, Ying; Yang, Li; Su, Lei; Shi, Kaibin; Li, Minshu; Liu, Qiang; Borazanci, Aimee; Liu, Yaou; He, Yong; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Vollmer, Timothy L.; Shi, Fu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    We characterized a unique group of patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) who carried autoantibodies of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Among the 125 NMOSD patients, 10 (8.0%) were AQP4- and MOG-ab double positive, and 14 (11.2%) were MOG-ab single positive. The double-positive patients had a multiphase disease course with a high annual relapse rate (P=0.0431), and severe residual disability (P<0.0001). Of the double-positive patients, 70% had MS-like brain lesions, more severe edematous, multifocal regions on spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pronounced decreases of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and atrophy of optic nerves. In contrast, patients with only MOG-ab had a higher ratio of monophasic disease course and mild residual disability. Spinal cord MRI illustrated multifocal cord lesions with mild edema, and brain MRIs showed more lesions around lateral ventricles. NMOSD patients carrying both autoantibodies to AQP4 and MOG existed and exhibited combined features of prototypic NMO and relapsing-remitting form of MS, whereas NMOSD with antibodies to MOG only exhibited an “intermediate” phenotype between NMOSD and MS. Our study suggests that antibodies against MOG might be pathogenic in NMOSD patients and that determination of anti-MOG antibodies maybe instructive for management of NMOSD patients. PMID:26920678

  7. Role of anti-receptor autoantibodies in pathophysiology of scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Berger, Melvin; Steen, Virginia D

    2017-10-01

    The pathophysiology of SSc-mediated organ damage is complex and not well understood. Hallmarks of the disease include skin thickening, vasculopathy and gastrointestinal dysmotility. Diverse anti-nuclear antibodies can be used as biomarkers for classification and prognosis, but their role in producing tissue pathology/organ dysfunction is not established. In contrast, antibodies against cell surface receptors for platelet derived growth factor, angiotensin II, endothelin A, ICAM-1, and type 3 muscarinic acetyl choline receptors may play a major role in skin thickening, vasoconstriction/pulmonary and renal hypertension, ischemia and gastrointestinal dysmotility, respectively. In addition, antibodies to an inhibitory B-lymphocyte surface molecule, CD 22, may allow increased production of other autoantibodies. Each of these types of antibodies have been reported in some SSc patients, and laboratory studies suggest signaling pathways and mechanisms by which they may contribute to disease activity. However, we are far from a consensus on their importance. Additional epidemiologic, mechanistic and physiologic studies are needed. Confirmation of the roles of anti-receptor antibodies and identification of the signaling pathways by which they alter cellular functions would have major implications for treatment of SSc, both in terms of targeting autoantibodies and the cells that produce them, and in the use of small molecules which inhibit their pernicious effects. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Epileptic syndrome in systemic lupus erythematosus and neuronal autoantibody associations.

    PubMed

    Kampylafka, E I; Alexopoulos, H; Fouka, P; Moutsopoulos, H M; Dalakas, M C; Tzioufas, A G

    2016-10-01

    We investigated systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with epilepsy, a major and organic neurological symptom. Our aim was to test patients for the autoimmune epilepsy-associated antibodies anti-GAD, anti-NMDAR, anti-AMPAR1/2, anti-GABABR and anti-VGKC. We tested sera from ten SLE patients with current or previous episodes of epileptic seizures. In addition, sera were tested for staining on primary hippocampal neurons. The patients' clinical and neuroimaging profile, disease activity and accumulated damage scores and therapeutic regimens administered were recorded, and correlations were evaluated. Patients were negative for all anti-neuronal autoantibodies tested, and showed no staining on primary hippocampal cells, which suggests the absence of autoantibodies against neuronal cell surface antigens. Epileptic seizures were all tonic-clonic, and all patients had high disease activity (mean SLE Damage Acticity Index score 19.3 ± 7.3). Six patients had minor or no brain magnetic resonance imaging findings, and three had major findings. 9/10 patients received immunosuppression for 5 ± 4 months, while anti-convulsive treatment was administered to all patients (4.2 ± 3 years). Our results suggest that the majority of SLE-related epileptic seizures cannot be attributed to the action of a single antibody against neuronal antigens. Studies with larger neuropsychiatric SLE populations and stricter inclusion criteria are necessary to verify these findings.

  9. Autoantibodies in biological agent naive patients with psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, S; Schentag, C; Gladman, D

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of autoantibodies in biological agent naive patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods: 94 consecutive, prospectively collected, biological agent naive patients with PsA at the University of Toronto PsA clinic underwent clinical and laboratory assessment. Disease activity was assessed by the number of actively inflamed joints, and the Psoriasis Activity and Severity Index (PASI) score. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA), rheumatoid factor (RF), double stranded DNA (dsDNA), Ro, La, Smith, and RNP were tested. Descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests were used to analyse the data. Results: 44/94 (47%) patients with PsA were ANA positive (⩾1/40); 13/94 (14%) had a clinically significant titre of ⩾1/80. Three per cent had dsDNA antibodies, 2% had RF and anti-Ro antibodies, 1% had anti-RNP antibodies, and none had anti-La or anti-Smith antibodies. Conclusions: The background prevalence of ANA ⩾1/80 in patients with PsA was 14%, with very few patients having specific lupus antibodies. This should serve as a baseline figure for the frequency of autoantibodies in biological agent naive patients with PsA for studies of the use of anti-TNFα agents. PMID:15834057

  10. [Myasthenia gravis and autoantibodies: Pathophysiology of the different subtypes].

    PubMed

    Berrih-Aknin, S; Le Panse, R

    2014-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis is characterized by muscle weakness and abnormal fatigability. It is an autoimmune disease caused by the presence of antibodies against components of the muscle membrane localized at the neuromuscular junction. In most cases, the autoantibodies are directed against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Recently, other targets have been described, such as muscle-specific kinase protein (MuSK) or lipoprotein related protein 4 (LRP4). The origin of the autoimmune response is not known, but thymic abnormalities and defects in immune regulation certainly play a major role in patients with anti-AChR antibodies. Genetic predisposition probably influences the occurrence of the disease. Sex hormones seem to play a role in the early form of the disease. Muscle weakness is fluctuating and worsens with exercise. Myasthenia gravis could be classified according to the location of the affected muscles (ocular versus generalized), the age of onset of symptoms, thymic abnormalities and profile of autoantibodies. These criteria are used to optimize the management and treatment of patients. In this review, we analyze the latest concepts of the pathophysiology of myasthenia gravis according to the different subgroups of the disease, including a description of the role of immunological, genetic and environmental factors. The potential viral hypothesis of this disease is discussed. Finally, we also discuss the biological assays available to validate the diagnosis.

  11. The molecular mechanism and physiological role of cytoplasmic streaming.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Motoki; Ito, Kohji

    2015-10-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming occurs widely in plants ranging from algae to angiosperms. However, the molecular mechanism and physiological role of cytoplasmic streaming have long remained unelucidated. Recent molecular genetic approaches have identified specific myosin members (XI-2 and XI-K as major and XI-1, XI-B, and XI-I as minor motive forces) for the generation of cytoplasmic streaming among 13 myosin XIs in Arabidopsis thaliana. Simultaneous knockout of these myosin XI members led to a reduced velocity of cytoplasmic streaming and marked defects of plant development. Furthermore, the artificial modifications of myosin XI-2 velocity changed plant and cell sizes along with the velocity of cytoplasmic streaming. Therefore, we assume that cytoplasmic streaming is one of the key regulators in determining plant size.

  12. Immunospecific red cell binding of iodine /sup 125/-labeled immunoglobulin G erythrocyte autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Masouredis, S.P.; Branks, M.J.; Garratty, G.; Victoria, E.J.

    1987-09-01

    The primary interaction of autoantibodies with red cells has been studied by using labeled autoantibodies. Immunoglobulin G red cell autoantibodies obtained from IgG antiglobulin-positive normal blood donors were labeled with radioactive iodine and compared with alloanti-D with respect to their properties and binding behavior. Iodine /sup 125/-labeled IgG autoantibody migrated as a single homogeneous peak with the same relative mobility as human IgG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric focusing pattern of labeled autoantibodies varied from donor to donor but was similar to that of alloanti-D, consisting of multiple IgG populations with isoelectric points in the neutral to alkaline range. /sup 125/I-autoantibody bound to all human red cells of common Rh phenotypes. Evidence for immunospecific antibody binding of the labeled autoantibody was based on variation in equilibrium binding to nonhuman and human red cells of common and rare phenotypes, enhanced binding after red cell protease modification, antiglobulin reactivity of cell-bound IgG comparable to that of cell-bound anti-D, and saturation binding in autoantibody excess. Scatchard analysis of two /sup 125/I-autoantibody preparations yielded site numbers of 41,500 and 53,300 with equilibrium constants of 3.7 and 2.1 X 10(8) L X mol-1. Dog, rabbit, rhesus monkey, and baboon red cells were antigen(s) negative by quantitative adsorption studies adsorbing less than 3% of the labeled autoantibody. Reduced ability of rare human D--red blood cells to adsorb the autoantibody and identification of donor autoantibodies that bind to Rh null red blood cells indicated that eluates contained multiple antibody populations of complex specificities in contrast to anti-D, which consists of a monospecific antibody population. Another difference is that less than 70% of the autoantibody IgG was adsorbed by maximum binding red blood cells as compared with greater than 85% for alloanti-D.

  13. Internal Sense of Direction: Sensing and Signaling from Cytoplasmic Chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Kieran D.; Lacal, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Chemoreceptors sense environmental signals and drive chemotactic responses in Bacteria and Archaea. There are two main classes of chemoreceptors: integral inner membrane and soluble cytoplasmic proteins. The latter were identified more recently than integral membrane chemoreceptors and have been studied much less thoroughly. These cytoplasmic chemoreceptors are the subject of this review. Our analysis determined that 14% of bacterial and 43% of archaeal chemoreceptors are cytoplasmic, based on currently sequenced genomes. Cytoplasmic chemoreceptors appear to share the same key structural features as integral membrane chemoreceptors, including the formations of homodimers, trimers of dimers, and 12-nm hexagonal arrays within the cell. Cytoplasmic chemoreceptors exhibit varied subcellular locations, with some localizing to the poles and others appearing both cytoplasmic and polar. Some cytoplasmic chemoreceptors adopt more exotic locations, including the formations of exclusively internal clusters or moving dynamic clusters that coalesce at points of contact with other cells. Cytoplasmic chemoreceptors presumably sense signals within the cytoplasm and bear diverse signal input domains that are mostly N terminal to the domain that defines chemoreceptors, the so-called MA domain. Similar to the case for transmembrane receptors, our analysis suggests that the most common signal input domain is the PAS (Per-Arnt-Sim) domain, but a variety of other N-terminal domains exist. It is also common, however, for cytoplasmic chemoreceptors to have C-terminal domains that may function for signal input. The most common of these is the recently identified chemoreceptor zinc binding (CZB) domain, found in 8% of all cytoplasmic chemoreceptors. The widespread nature and diverse signal input domains suggest that these chemoreceptors can monitor a variety of cytoplasmically based signals, most of which remain to be determined. PMID:25428939

  14. Relationship between nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA in Drosophilia cells.

    PubMed

    Levy, B; McCarthy, B J

    1976-06-01

    Polyadenylated RNA was isolated from nuclei of cultured Drosophila cells, Schneider's line 2, and used as a template to synthesize a complementary DNA probe. Hybridization experiments were performed to study the relationship between nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA. About two-thirds of the nuclear polyadenylated RNA sequences exist in the cytoplasm. Experiments with fractionated cDNA probes demonstrated that RNA sequences that are frequent in the nucleus are also abundant in the cytoplasm. These findings are consistent with a precursor-product relationship in which some polyadenylated molecules in the nucleus are destined for the cytoplasm while other sequences are polyadenylated but not transferred.

  15. [Comparison of clinical characteristics and laboratory parameters of patients with dermatomyositis-specific autoantibodies and autoantibody-negative patients].

    PubMed

    Bodoki, Levente; Budai, Dóra; Nagy-Vincze, Melinda; Griger, Zoltán; Betteridge, Zoe; Dankó, Katalin

    2015-09-06

    Myositis is an autoimmune disease characterised by proximal muscle weakness. The aim of the authors was to determine the frequency of dermatomyositis-specific autoantibodies (anti-Mi-2, anti-transcriptional intermediary factor 1 gamma, anti-nuclear matrix protein 2, anti-small ubiquitin-like modifier activating enzyme, anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene) in a Hungarian myositis population and to compare the clinical features with the characteristics of patients without myositis-specific antibodies. Antibodies were detected using immunoblot and immunoprecipitation. Of the 330 patients with myositis, 48 patients showed dermatomyositis-specific antibody positivity. The frequency of antibodies in these patients was lower than those published in literature Retrospective analysis of clinical findings and medical history revealed that patients with dermatomyositis-specific autoantibody had more severe muscle weakness and severe skin lesions at the beginning of the disease. Antibodies seem to be useful markers for distinct clinical subsets, for predicting the prognosis of myositis and the effectiveness of the therapy.

  16. Epitope specificity determines pathogenicity and detectability in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Aleeza J.; Ooi, Joshua D.; Hess, Jacob J.; van Timmeren, Mirjan M.; Berg, Elisabeth A.; Poulton, Caroline E.; McGregor, JulieAnne; Burkart, Madelyn; Hogan, Susan L.; Hu, Yichun; Winnik, Witold; Nachman, Patrick H.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Niles, John; Heeringa, Peter; Kitching, A. Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen; Jennette, J. Charles; Preston, Gloria A.; Falk, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–associated (ANCA-associated) small vessel necrotizing vasculitis is caused by immune-mediated inflammation of the vessel wall and is diagnosed in some cases by the presence of myeloperoxidase-specific antibodies (MPO-ANCA). This multicenter study sought to determine whether differences in ANCA epitope specificity explain why, in some cases, conventional serologic assays do not correlate with disease activity, why naturally occurring anti-MPO autoantibodies can exist in disease-free individuals, and why ANCA are undetected in patients with ANCA-negative disease. Autoantibodies from human and murine samples were epitope mapped using a highly sensitive epitope excision/mass spectrometry approach. Data indicated that MPO autoantibodies from healthy individuals had epitope specificities different from those present in ANCA disease. Importantly, this methodology led to the discovery of MPO-ANCA in ANCA-negative disease that reacted against a sole linear sequence. Autoantibodies against this epitope had pathogenic properties, as demonstrated by their capacity to activate neutrophils in vitro and to induce nephritis in mice. The confounder for serological detection of these autoantibodies was the presence of a fragment of ceruloplasmin in serum, which was eliminated in purified IgG, allowing detection. These findings implicate immunodominant epitopes in the pathology of ANCA-associated vasculitis and suggest that autoantibody diversity may be common to other autoimmune diseases. PMID:23549081

  17. Demographic associations for autoantibodies in disease-free individuals of a European population

    PubMed Central

    Haller-Kikkatalo, Kadri; Alnek, Kristi; Metspalu, Andres; Mihailov, Evelin; Metsküla, Kaja; Kisand, Kalle; Pisarev, Heti; Salumets, Andres; Uibo, Raivo

    2017-01-01

    The presence of autoantibodies usually precedes autoimmune disease, but is sometimes considered an incidental finding with no clinical relevance. The prevalence of immune-mediated diseases was studied in a group of individuals from the Estonian Genome Project (n = 51,862), and 6 clinically significant autoantibodies were detected in a subgroup of 994 (auto)immune-mediated disease-free individuals. The overall prevalence of individuals with immune-mediated diseases in the primary cohort was 30.1%. Similarly, 23.6% of the participants in the disease-free subgroup were seropositive for at least one autoantibody. Several phenotypic parameters were associated with autoantibodies. The results suggest that (i) immune-mediated diseases are diagnosed in nearly one-third of a random European population, (ii) 6 common autoantibodies are detectable in almost one-third of individuals without diagnosed autoimmune diseases, (iii) tissue non-specific autoantibodies, especially at high levels, may reflect preclinical disease in symptom-free individuals, and (iv) the incidental positivity of anti-TPO in men with positive familial anamnesis of maternal autoimmune disease deserves further medical attention. These results encourage physicians to evaluate autoantibodies in addition to treating a variety of patient health complaints to detect autoimmune-mediated disease early. PMID:28349935

  18. The Significance of Autoantibody Changes Over Time in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Tana, Michele M.; Shums, Zakera; Milo, Jay; Norman, Gary L.; Leung, Patrick S.; Gershwin, M. Eric; Noureddin, Mazen; Kleiner, David E.; Zhao, Xiongce; Heller, Theo; Hoofnagle, Jay H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), the antimitochondrial antibody is a cornerstone of diagnosis, but there have been conflicting reports about the correlation of autoantibodies with disease stage and prognosis. We studied whether autoantibody levels changed over time and sought correlations with clinical outcomes in a cohort of patients with PBC. Methods We tested serial serum samples from patients with PBC at a research institution for several autoantibodies. Long-term clinical follow-up data were used to calculate the slopes (change over time) for autoantibodies, platelet count, Ishak fibrosis score, biopsy copper, and number of portal areas with bile ducts. An adverse clinical outcome was defined as hepatic decompensation, development of hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplantation, or liver-related death. We performed linear or logistic regression or Fisher exact test as appropriate, adjusting for multiple comparisons. Results Twenty-seven patients with PBC with 145 serum samples were studied. Of the cohort, 85% was white, 81% was female, and median follow-up time was 20 years. Of the autoantibodies tested, only sp100 changed significantly over time. The sp100 slope was inversely associated with the Ishak fibrosis slope (parameter estimate, −0.05; P = .0003). Conclusions While changes in most autoantibodies over time do not seem to correlate with clinical outcomes in PBC, a change in the sp100 autoantibody level may have prognostic utility with respect to the development of fibrosis on liver biopsy. PMID:26386081

  19. Patterns of β-cell autoantibody appearance and genetic associations during the first years of life.

    PubMed

    Ilonen, Jorma; Hammais, Anna; Laine, Antti-Pekka; Lempainen, Johanna; Vaarala, Outi; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Olli; Knip, Mikael

    2013-10-01

    We analyzed demographic and genetic differences between children with various diabetes-associated autoantibodies reflecting the autoimmune process. In a prospective birth cohort comprising children with HLA-conferred susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D), the pattern of autoantibody appearance was analyzed in 520 children with advanced β-cell autoimmunity associated with high risk for disease. In 315 cases, a single biochemical autoantibody could be identified in the first positive sample as insulin (insulin autoantibody [IAA]) in 180, as GAD (GAD antibody [GADA]) in 107, and as IA-2 antigen (IA-2 antibody [IA-2A]) in 28. The age at seroconversion differed significantly between the three groups (P = 0.003). IAA as the first autoantibody showed a peak time of appearance during the second year of life, whereas GADA as the first autoantibody peaked later, between 3 and 5 years of age. The risk-associated insulin gene rs689 A/A genotypes were more frequent in children with IAA as the first autoantibody compared with the other children (P = 0.002). The primary autoantigen in the development of β-cell autoimmunity and T1D seems to strongly correlate with age and genetic factors, indicating heterogeneity in the initiation of the disease process.

  20. Anti-IL-1 alpha autoantibodies in patients with rheumatic diseases and in healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, H; Ayabe, T; Kamimura, J; Kashiwagi, H

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a quantitative assay for IgG autoantibodies against IL-1 alpha using protein A-Sepharose CL-4B. We examined the autoantibodies in sera from 107 healthy subjects, 151 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 64 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 16 patients with systemic sclerosis. The frequency of positive sera for the autoantibodies in patients with RA was 16.6%, which was about three times more frequent (P less than 0.01) than that in healthy subjects (5.6%) or that in patients with SLE (4.7%). Only one serum of 16 patients with systemic sclerosis was positive for the autoantibodies. Neutralizing activity of the autoantibodies was demonstrated by murine thymocyte proliferation assay. The concentrations of IgG at 50% inhibition of IL-1 alpha (15 pM) induced thymocyte proliferation ranged between 0.1 and 0.5 mg/ml. A time-course study showed fluctuations of the titres of the autoantibodies in parallel with the disease activity of RA. These results suggest that the anti-IL-1 alpha autoantibodies present in the sera and possibly some other body fluids may be involved in the regulation of IL-1 activity in vivo. Images Fig. 2 PMID:1893621

  1. A radioligand binding assay to measure anti-thyroperoxidase autoantibodies in mice.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Sarah L; Suzuki, Kunimasa; Elliott, John F

    2007-06-30

    Autoimmune (Hashimoto's) thyroiditis is a chronic inflammatory disease which affects >3% of the population and shows an increasing prevalence with increasing age. Anti-thyroid autoantibodies, particularly against thyroperoxidase (also known as thyroid peroxidase or TPO), occur commonly in humans with autoimmune thyroid disease, and assays for anti-TPO autoantibodies are used in clinical diagnosis. In contrast anti-TPO autoantibodies have not been observed in classical mouse models of autoimmune thyroiditis, except in cases where mice were deliberately immunized with TPO. In the past, detection of anti-TPO autoantibodies in mice has relied on an indirect immunofluorescence assay (iIFA) which screens for thyroid follicle membrane staining in frozen sections of mouse thyroid glands. Since recent transgenic mouse models of autoimmune thyroiditis spontaneously develop anti-TPO autoantibodies, an assay other than serial dilution and iIFA would be useful to detect and quantify these autoantibodies. In this paper we describe such an assay, based on the capacity of autoimmune mouse sera to bind to the extracellular domain of mouse TPO which was produced in a radioactively labeled form using a coupled in vitro transcription/translation system. The same approach, using human TPO, could provide a highly sensitive method to detect anti-TPO autoantibodies in humans.

  2. Diabetes autoantibodies do not predict progression to diabetes in adults: the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Dabelea, D.; Ma, Y.; Knowler, W. C.; Marcovina, S.; Saudek, C. D.; Arakaki, R.; White, N. H.; Kahn, S. E.; Orchard, T. J.; Goldberg, R.; Palmer, J.; Hamman, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To determine if the presence of diabetes autoantibodies predicts the development of diabetes among participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program. Methods A total of 3050 participants were randomized into three treatment groups: intensive lifestyle intervention, metformin and placebo. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65 autoantibodies and insulinoma-associated-2 autoantibodies were measured at baseline and participants were followed for 3.2 years for the development of diabetes. Results The overall prevalence of GAD autoantibodies was 4.0%, and it varied across racial/ethnic groups from 2.4% among Asian-Pacific Islanders to 7.0% among non-Hispanic black people. There were no significant differences in BMI or metabolic variables (glucose, insulin, HbA1c, estimated insulin resistance, corrected insulin response) stratified by baseline GAD antibody status. GAD autoantibody positivity did not predict diabetes overall (adjusted hazard ratio 0.98; 95% CI 0.56–1.73) or in any of the three treatment groups. Insulinoma-associated-2 autoantibodies were positive in only one participant (0.033%). Conclusions These data suggest that ‘diabetes autoimmunity’, as reflected by GAD antibodies and insulinoma-associated-2 autoantibodies, in middle-aged individuals at risk for diabetes is not a clinically relevant risk factor for progression to diabetes. PMID:24646311

  3. Autoantibody-producing plasmablasts after B cell depletion identified in muscle-specific kinase myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Panos; Kumar, Aditya; Nowak, Richard J; O'Connor, Kevin C

    2017-09-07

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a B cell-mediated autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission. Pathogenic autoantibodies to muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) can be found in patients with MG who do not have detectable antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). MuSK MG includes immunological and clinical features that are generally distinct from AChR MG, particularly regarding responsiveness to therapy. B cell depletion has been shown to affect a decline in serum autoantibodies and to induce sustained clinical improvement in the majority of MuSK MG patients. However, the duration of this benefit may be limited, as we observed disease relapse in MuSK MG patients who had achieved rituximab-induced remission. We investigated the mechanisms of such relapses by exploring autoantibody production in the reemerging B cell compartment. Autoantibody-expressing CD27+ B cells were observed within the reconstituted repertoire during relapse but not during remission or in controls. Using two complementary approaches, which included production of 108 unique human monoclonal recombinant immunoglobulins, we demonstrated that antibody-secreting CD27hiCD38hi B cells (plasmablasts) contribute to the production of MuSK autoantibodies during relapse. The autoantibodies displayed hallmarks of antigen-driven affinity maturation. These collective findings introduce potential mechanisms for understanding both MuSK autoantibody production and disease relapse following B cell depletion.

  4. Diabetes autoantibodies do not predict progression to diabetes in adults: the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Dabelea, D; Ma, Y; Knowler, W C; Marcovina, S; Saudek, C D; Arakaki, R; White, N H; Kahn, S E; Orchard, T J; Goldberg, R; Palmer, J; Hamman, R F

    2014-09-01

    To determine if the presence of diabetes autoantibodies predicts the development of diabetes among participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program. A total of 3050 participants were randomized into three treatment groups: intensive lifestyle intervention, metformin and placebo. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65 autoantibodies and insulinoma-associated-2 autoantibodies were measured at baseline and participants were followed for 3.2 years for the development of diabetes. The overall prevalence of GAD autoantibodies was 4.0%, and it varied across racial/ethnic groups from 2.4% among Asian-Pacific Islanders to 7.0% among non-Hispanic black people. There were no significant differences in BMI or metabolic variables (glucose, insulin, HbA(1c), estimated insulin resistance, corrected insulin response) stratified by baseline GAD antibody status. GAD autoantibody positivity did not predict diabetes overall (adjusted hazard ratio 0.98; 95% CI 0.56-1.73) or in any of the three treatment groups. Insulinoma-associated-2 autoantibodies were positive in only one participant (0.033%). These data suggest that 'diabetes autoimmunity', as reflected by GAD antibodies and insulinoma-associated-2 autoantibodies, in middle-aged individuals at risk for diabetes is not a clinically relevant risk factor for progression to diabetes. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  5. Evaluation of the diagnostic value of 64 simultaneously measured autoantibodies for early detection of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Werner, Simone; Chen, Hongda; Butt, Julia; Michel, Angelika; Knebel, Phillip; Holleczek, Bernd; Zörnig, Inka; Eichmüller, Stefan B; Jäger, Dirk; Pawlita, Michael; Waterboer, Tim; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-05-03

    Autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been suggested as biomarkers for early detection of gastric cancer. However, studies that systematically assess the diagnostic performance of a large number of autoantibodies are rare. Here, we used bead-based multiplex serology to simultaneously measure autoantibody responses against 64 candidate TAAs in serum samples from 329 gastric cancer patients, 321 healthy controls and 124 participants with other diseases of the upper digestive tract. At 98% specificity, sensitivities for the 64 tested autoantibodies ranged from 0-12% in the training set and a combination of autoantibodies against five TAAs (MAGEA4 + CTAG1 + TP53 + ERBB2_C + SDCCAG8) was able to detect 32% of the gastric cancer patients at a specificity of 87% in the validation set. Sensitivities for early and late stage gastric cancers were similar, while chronic atrophic gastritis, a precursor lesion of gastric cancer, was not detectable. However, the 5-marker combination also detected 26% of the esophageal cancer patients. In conclusion, the tested autoantibodies and combinations alone did not reach sufficient sensitivity for gastric cancer screening. Nevertheless, some autoantibodies, such as anti-MAGEA4, anti-CTAG1 or anti-TP53 and their combinations could possibly contribute to the development of cancer early detection tests (not necessarily restricted to gastric cancer) when being combined with other markers.

  6. Evaluation of the diagnostic value of 64 simultaneously measured autoantibodies for early detection of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Simone; Chen, Hongda; Butt, Julia; Michel, Angelika; Knebel, Phillip; Holleczek, Bernd; Zörnig, Inka; Eichmüller, Stefan B.; Jäger, Dirk; Pawlita, Michael; Waterboer, Tim; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been suggested as biomarkers for early detection of gastric cancer. However, studies that systematically assess the diagnostic performance of a large number of autoantibodies are rare. Here, we used bead-based multiplex serology to simultaneously measure autoantibody responses against 64 candidate TAAs in serum samples from 329 gastric cancer patients, 321 healthy controls and 124 participants with other diseases of the upper digestive tract. At 98% specificity, sensitivities for the 64 tested autoantibodies ranged from 0–12% in the training set and a combination of autoantibodies against five TAAs (MAGEA4 + CTAG1 + TP53 + ERBB2_C + SDCCAG8) was able to detect 32% of the gastric cancer patients at a specificity of 87% in the validation set. Sensitivities for early and late stage gastric cancers were similar, while chronic atrophic gastritis, a precursor lesion of gastric cancer, was not detectable. However, the 5-marker combination also detected 26% of the esophageal cancer patients. In conclusion, the tested autoantibodies and combinations alone did not reach sufficient sensitivity for gastric cancer screening. Nevertheless, some autoantibodies, such as anti-MAGEA4, anti-CTAG1 or anti-TP53 and their combinations could possibly contribute to the development of cancer early detection tests (not necessarily restricted to gastric cancer) when being combined with other markers. PMID:27140836

  7. The Correlation between Peripartum Cardiomyopathy and Autoantibodies against Cardiovascular Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenshu; Wang, Xin; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Juan; Xu, Lin; Chen, Jin; Yang, Xinchun; Zhang, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is characterized by left ventricular systolic dysfunction and heart failure. However, its pathogenesis is not clear. Our preliminary study revealed that autoantibodies against β1-adrenergic receptors (β1R-AABs) and M2-muscarinic receptors (M2R-AABs) participated in heart failure regardless of primary heart disease. Whether β1R-AABs and M2R-AABs participate in the pathogenesis of PPCM is still unknown. Methods Totally 37 diagnosed PPCM patients and 36 normal pregnant women were enrolled in this study. Clinical assessment and 2-dimensional echocardiographic studies as well as the measurement of β1R-AABs or M2R-AABs by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed. Results The positive rates for β1R-AABs and M2R-AABs were 59.5% (22/37) and 45.9% (17/37) in PPCM patients, and 19.4% (7/36) (P<0.001) and 16.67% (6/36) (P<0.001) in normal pregnant women, respectively. Both β1R-AABs and M2R-AABs had a positive correlation with serum expression level of NT-proBNP, left ventricular dimension and NYHA FC (rs: 0.496–0.892, P<0.01). In addition, a negative correlation between the activity of β1R-AABs and M2R-AABs and LVEF, LVFS was observed (rs: −0.488–0.568, P<0.01). Moreover, autoantibodies against cardiovascular receptors increased the risk of the onset of PPCM (OR = 18.786, 95% confidence interval 1.926–183.262, P = 0.012). Conclusions The β1R-AABs and M2R-AABs reveal a significant elevation and are correlated with the increased left ventricular dimension and worse cardiac contraction function. The autoantibodies of cardiovascular receptors are independent risk factors for the onset of PPCM. PMID:24466231

  8. Autoantibodies against serotoninergic 5-HT(4) receptor in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Breidert, M; Wördehoff, S; Hansen, A; Eftekhari, P

    2012-01-01

    Serotoninergic 5-HT(4) receptors have been detected in several tissues including the heart. An autoimmune mechanism may underline the pathogenesis of heart failure. The aim of this work was to look for autoantibodies to the 5-HT(4) receptor in patients with heart failure. We looked for the presence of autoantibodies against 5-HT(4) receptor as well as angiotensin II type (AT1), β(1)-adrenoceptor, and muscarinic M2 receptors in the sera of 176 patients with heart failure (female: n=96, male: n=80) and in 108 controls (female: n=69; male: n=39). The prevalence of 5-HT(4) receptor autoantibodies was 18.8% (n=33) in the group of patients with heart failure and 4.6% (n=5) in the control group (p<0.002). The prevalence of autoantibodies against AT1 was 1.7 (n=3), β(1)-adrenoreceptor 0.6 (n=1), and muscarinic-receptor M2 4.2 (n=5). Female patients with diabetes and heart failure had a positive trend (p=0.07) to the presence of 5-HT(4) receptor autoantibodies. In the group of female heart failure patients we found a significant correlation with the presence of coronary heart disease (p=0.05). The clinical relevance of 5-HT(4) receptor autoantibodies has to be further studied. The prevalence of 5-HT(4) receptor autoantibodies was highly significant in patients with chronic heart failure. It was also a significant correlation between these autoantibodies and the female subgroup with coronary heart disease. It is conceivable that the increased prevalence of autoantibodies against the 5-HT(4) receptor in patients with heart failure is more than just an epiphenomenon.

  9. Serum autoantibodies to myelin peptides distinguish acute disseminated encephalomyelitis from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Van Haren, Keith; Tomooka, Beren H; Kidd, Brian A; Banwell, Brenda; Bar-Or, Amit; Chitnis, Tanuja; Tenembaum, Silvia N; Pohl, Daniela; Rostasy, Kevin; Dale, Russell C; O’Connor, Kevin C; Hafler, David A; Steinman, Lawrence; Robinson, William H

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis share overlapping clinical, radiologic, and laboratory features at onset. Because autoantibodies may contribute to the pathogenesis of both diseases, we sought to identify autoantibody biomarkers capable of distinguishing them. Methods We used custom antigen arrays to profile anti-myelin-peptide autoantibodies in sera derived from individuals with pediatric ADEM (n = 15), pediatric multiple sclerosis (n = 11), and adult multiple sclerosis (n = 15). Using isotype-specific secondary antibodies,we profiled both IgG and IgM reactivities. We used Statistical Analysis of Microarrays to confirm differences in autoantibody reactivity profiles between ADEM and multiple sclerosis samples. We used Prediction Analysis of Microarrays to generate and validate prediction algorithms based on the autoantibody reactivity profiles. Results ADEM was characterized by IgG autoantibodies targeting epitopes derived from myelin basic protein, proteolipid protein, myelin-associated oligodendrocyte basic glycoprotein, and alpha-B-crystallin. In contrast, multiple sclerosis was characterized by IgM autoantibodies targeting myelin basic protein, proteolipid protein, myelin-associated oligodendrocyte basic glycoprotein, and oligodendrocyte specific protein. We generated and validated prediction algorithms that distinguish ADEM serum (sensitivity 62–86%; specificity 56–79%) from multiple sclerosis serum (sensitivity 40–87%; specificity 62–86%) on the basis of combined IgG and IgM anti-myelin autoantibody reactivity to a small number of myelin peptides. Conclusions Combined profiles of serum IgG and IgM autoantibodies identify myelin antigens that may be useful for distinguishing multiple sclerosis from ADEM. Further studies are required to establish clinical utility. Further biological assays are required to delineate the pathogenic potential of these antibodies. PMID:23612879

  10. Induction of various autoantibodies by mutant gene lpr in several strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Izui, S; Kelley, V E; Masuda, K; Yoshida, H; Roths, J B; Murphy, E D

    1984-07-01

    The effect of the autosomal mutant gene lpr (lymphoproliferation) on the development of various autoantibodies and immune complex (IC) glomerulonephritis was investigated in four genetically distinct strains of mice: MRL/ MpJ , C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, and AKR/J. The presence of the lpr gene not only enhanced the production of autoantibodies in the autoimmune MRL/ MpJ strain, but also induced the formation of various kinds of autoantibodies in the three other strains of mice without any apparent predisposition to autoimmune disease. Autoantibodies induced by the lpr gene included anti-double-stranded DNA, anti-single-stranded DNA, anti-IgG, anti-thymocyte, and anti-serum glycoprotein gp70. This indicates that the action of the lpr gene on the development of autoantibody response does not require the particular abnormalities of the MRL genome. The differences in amounts and types of autoantibodies among the lpr strains reflect the difference in the background genome of each strain, suggesting the participation of other genes or factors determining the quantity and/or specificity of autoantibodies. In addition to the development of autoantibodies, the three nonautoimmune strains of mice produced high levels of unidentified IC in the presence of the lpr gene, detectable by the C1q and the conglutinin binding tests. Their glomerular lesions, however, were relatively limited when compared with MRL/ MpJ -lpr/lpr mice, which developed severe glomerulonephritis early in their life. These results suggest that the lpr gene is able to induce the formation of various autoantibodies and IC at significant concentrations in nonautoimmune mice, but for the full manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus there may be a requirement for supplemental genetic abnormalities or factors.

  11. Myeloperoxidase–Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody (ANCA)–Positive and ANCA-Negative Patients With Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Wegener’s)

    PubMed Central

    Miloslavsky, Eli M.; Lu, Na; Unizony, Sebastian; Choi, Hyon K.; Merkel, Peter A.; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Langford, Carol A.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; St.Clair, E. William; Tchao, Nadia K.; Fervenza, Fernando; Monach, Paul A.; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) type and ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) diagnosis with demographic features, disease manifestations, and clinical outcomes. We focused on patients who account for the differences between ANCA type and disease type classifications: anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO)–ANCA–positive and ANCA-negative patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener’s) (GPA). Methods We performed a pooled analysis of the Wegener’s Granulomatosis Etanercept Trial and the Rituximab in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis trial comparing patients with MPO-ANCA–positive GPA and patients with ANCA-negative GPA to patients with proteinase 3 (PR3)–ANCA–positive GPA and patients with MPO-ANCA–positive microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). Results Of the 365 patients analyzed, 273 (75%) had PR3-ANCA–positive GPA, 33 (9%) had MPO-ANCA–positive GPA, 15 (4%) had ANCA-negative GPA, and 44 (12%) had MPO-ANCA–positive MPA. MPO-ANCA–positive GPA patients were younger at diagnosis compared to MPO-ANCA–positive MPA patients (53 versus 61 years; P = 0.02). Their disease manifestations and rates of relapse were similar to those of PR3-ANCA–positive GPA patients. Relapse was more frequent in MPO-ANCA–positive GPA patients than in patients with MPO-ANCA–positive MPA at trial entry as well as at 12 and 18 months. ANCA-negative patients with GPA had lower Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score for Wegener’s Granulomatosis scores at trial entry than PR3-ANCA–positive patients with GPA (4.5 versus 7.7; P < 0.01), primarily because of a lower prevalence of renal involvement. Conclusion We were unable to demonstrate important clinical differences between MPO-ANCA–positive and PR3-ANCA–positive patients with GPA. The risk of relapse was associated more closely with disease type than with ANCA type in this patient cohort. These findings deserve consideration in the assessment of relapse risk in patients with

  12. Substrate specificity of cytoplasmic N-glycosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Naegeli, Andreas; Michaud, Gaëlle; Schubert, Mario; Lin, Chia-Wei; Lizak, Christian; Darbre, Tamis; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Aebi, Markus

    2014-08-29

    N-Linked protein glycosylation is a very common post-translational modification that can be found in all kingdoms of life. The classical, highly conserved pathway entails the assembly of a lipid-linked oligosaccharide and its transfer to an asparagine residue in the sequon NX(S/T) of a secreted protein by the integral membrane protein oligosaccharyltransferase. A few species in the class of γ-proteobacteria encode a cytoplasmic N-glycosylation system mediated by a soluble N-glycosyltransferase (NGT). This enzyme uses nucleotide-activated sugars to modify asparagine residues with single monosaccharides. As these enzymes are not related to oligosaccharyltransferase, NGTs constitute a novel class of N-glycosylation catalyzing enzymes. To characterize the NGT-catalyzed reaction, we developed a sensitive and quantitative in vitro assay based on HPLC separation and quantification of fluorescently labeled substrate peptides. With this assay we were able to directly quantify glycopeptide formation by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae NGT and determine its substrate specificities: NGT turns over a number of different sugar donor substrates and allows for activation by both UDP and GDP. Quantitative analysis of peptide substrate turnover demonstrated a strikingly similar specificity as the classical, oligosaccharyltransferase-catalyzed N-glycosylation, with NX(S/T) sequons being the optimal NGT substrates. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Substrate Specificity of Cytoplasmic N-Glycosyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Naegeli, Andreas; Michaud, Gaëlle; Schubert, Mario; Lin, Chia-Wei; Lizak, Christian; Darbre, Tamis; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Aebi, Markus

    2014-01-01

    N-Linked protein glycosylation is a very common post-translational modification that can be found in all kingdoms of life. The classical, highly conserved pathway entails the assembly of a lipid-linked oligosaccharide and its transfer to an asparagine residue in the sequon NX(S/T) of a secreted protein by the integral membrane protein oligosaccharyltransferase. A few species in the class of γ-proteobacteria encode a cytoplasmic N-glycosylation system mediated by a soluble N-glycosyltransferase (NGT). This enzyme uses nucleotide-activated sugars to modify asparagine residues with single monosaccharides. As these enzymes are not related to oligosaccharyltransferase, NGTs constitute a novel class of N-glycosylation catalyzing enzymes. To characterize the NGT-catalyzed reaction, we developed a sensitive and quantitative in vitro assay based on HPLC separation and quantification of fluorescently labeled substrate peptides. With this assay we were able to directly quantify glycopeptide formation by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae NGT and determine its substrate specificities: NGT turns over a number of different sugar donor substrates and allows for activation by both UDP and GDP. Quantitative analysis of peptide substrate turnover demonstrated a strikingly similar specificity as the classical, oligosaccharyltransferase-catalyzed N-glycosylation, with NX(S/T) sequons being the optimal NGT substrates. PMID:24962585

  14. Molecular analysis of cytoplasmic male sterility

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The ultimate aims of the project are to understand the molecular mechanism of the disruption in pollen development which occurs in cytoplasmic male sterile plants and to understand the control of respiratory energy flow in the higher plant cell. A mitochondrial locus termed S-pcf segregates with sterility and with an alteration in respiration in Petunia. This cloned locus contains three genes, an abnormal fused gene termed pcf, a gene for a subunit of an NADH dehydrogenase complex, and a small ribosomal subunit protein. The pcf gene is comprised of partial sequences of ATPase subunit 9, cytochrome oxidase subunit II, and an unidentified reading frame. Components of the S-Pcf locus will be introduced into the nuclear of a fertile genotype under the control of appropriate regulatory signals, and polypeptide products of introduced genes will be directed to the mitochondrion with a transit peptide. By examining transgenic plants, we can determine what elements of the locus are critical for altered respiration or sterility. Such knowledge could explain how mitochondrial DNA affects pollen development in the large number of plant species which exhibit the agronomically important trait of male sterility. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  15. A physical perspective on cytoplasmic streaming

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Raymond E.; van de Meent, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Organisms show a remarkable range of sizes, yet the dimensions of a single cell rarely exceed 100 µm. While the physical and biological origins of this constraint remain poorly understood, exceptions to this rule give valuable insights. A well-known counterexample is the aquatic plant Chara, whose cells can exceed 10 cm in length and 1 mm in diameter. Two spiralling bands of molecular motors at the cell periphery drive the cellular fluid up and down at speeds up to 100 µm s−1, motion that has been hypothesized to mitigate the slowness of metabolite transport on these scales and to aid in homeostasis. This is the most organized instance of a broad class of continuous motions known as ‘cytoplasmic streaming’, found in a wide range of eukaryotic organisms—algae, plants, amoebae, nematodes and flies—often in unusually large cells. In this overview of the physics of this phenomenon, we examine the interplay between streaming, transport and cell size and discuss the possible role of self-organization phenomena in establishing the observed patterns of streaming. PMID:26464789

  16. Single molecule analysis of cytoplasmic dynein motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Ahmet

    2014-03-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a homodimeric AAA + motor that transports a multitude of cargos towards the microtubule (MT) minus end. The mechanism of dynein motility remains unclear, due to its large size (2.6 MDa) and the complexity of its structure. By tracking the stepping motion of both heads at nanometer resolution, we observed that dynein heads move independently along the MT, in contrast to hand over hand movement of kinesins and myosin. Stepping behavior of the heads varies as a function of interhead separation and establishing the basis of high variability in dynein step size. By engineering the mechanical and catalytic properties of the dynein motor domain, we show that a rigid linkage between monomers and dimerization between N-terminal tail domains are not essential for processive movement. Instead, dynein processivity minimally requires the linker domain of one active monomer to be attached to an inert MT tether retaining only the MT-binding domain. The release of a dynein monomer from the MT can be mediated either by nucleotide binding or external load. Nucleotide dependent release is inhibited by the tension on the linker domain at high interhead separations. Tension dependent release is highly asymmetric, with faster release towards the minus-end. Reversing the asymmetry of the MT binding interface results in plus end directed motility, even though the force was generated by the dynein motor activity. On the basis of these measurements, we propose a model that describes the basis of dynein processivity, directionality and force generation.

  17. Regulation of autophagy by cytoplasmic p53.

    PubMed

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; D'Amelio, Marcello; Criollo, Alfredo; Morselli, Eugenia; Zhu, Changlian; Harper, Francis; Nannmark, Ulf; Samara, Chrysanthi; Pinton, Paolo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Carnuccio, Rosa; Moll, Ute M; Madeo, Frank; Paterlini-Brechot, Patrizia; Rizzuto, Rosario; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Pierron, Gérard; Blomgren, Klas; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Codogno, Patrice; Cecconi, Francesco; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-06-01

    Multiple cellular stressors, including activation of the tumour suppressor p53, can stimulate autophagy. Here we show that deletion, depletion or inhibition of p53 can induce autophagy in human, mouse and nematode cells subjected to knockout, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of p53. Enhanced autophagy improved the survival of p53-deficient cancer cells under conditions of hypoxia and nutrient depletion, allowing them to maintain high ATP levels. Inhibition of p53 led to autophagy in enucleated cells, and cytoplasmic, not nuclear, p53 was able to repress the enhanced autophagy of p53(-/-) cells. Many different inducers of autophagy (for example, starvation, rapamycin and toxins affecting the endoplasmic reticulum) stimulated proteasome-mediated degradation of p53 through a pathway relying on the E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2. Inhibition of p53 degradation prevented the activation of autophagy in several cell lines, in response to several distinct stimuli. These results provide evidence of a key signalling pathway that links autophagy to the cancer-associated dysregulation of p53.

  18. Regulation of autophagy by cytoplasmic p53

    PubMed Central

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M. Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; D'Amelio, Marcello; Criollo, Alfredo; Morselli, Eugenia; Zhu, Changlian; Harper, Francis; Nannmark, Ulf; Samara, Chrysanthi; Pinton, Paolo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Carnuccio, Rosa; Moll, Ute M.; Madeo, Frank; Paterlini-Brechot, Patrizia; Rizzuto, Rosario; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Pierron, Gérard; Blomgren, Klas; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Codogno, Patrice; Cecconi, Francesco; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Multiple cellular stressors, including activation of the tumour suppressor p53, can stimulate autophagy. Here we show that knockout, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of p53 can induce autophagy in human, mouse and nematode cells. Enhanced autophagy improved the survival of p53-deficient cancer cells under conditions of hypoxia and nutrient depletion, allowing them to maintain high ATP levels. Inhibition of p53 led to autophagy in enucleated cells, and cytoplasmic, not nuclear, p53 was able to repress the enhanced autophagy of p53-/- cells. Many different inducers of autophagy (for example, starvation, rapamycin and toxins affecting the endoplasmic reticulum) stimulated proteasome-mediated degradation of p53 through a pathway relying on the E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2. Inhibition of p53 degradation prevented the activation of autophagy in several cell lines, in response to several distinct stimuli. These results provide evidence of a key signalling pathway that links autophagy to the cancer-associated dysregulation of p53. PMID:18454141

  19. Cytoplasmic dynein and early endosome transport

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Xin; Qiu, Rongde; Yao, Xuanli; Arst, Herbert N.; Peñalva, Miguel A.; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule-based distribution of organelles/vesicles is crucial for the function of many types of eukaryotic cells and the molecular motor cytoplasmic dynein is required for transporting a variety of cellular cargos toward the microtubule minus ends. Early endosomes represent a major cargo of dynein in filamentous fungi, and dynein regulators such as LIS1 and the dynactin complex are both required for early endosome movement. In fungal hyphae, kinesin-3 and dynein drive bi-directional movements of early endosomes. Dynein accumulates at microtubule plus ends; this accumulation depends on kinesin-1 and dynactin, and it is important for early endosome movements towards the microtubule minus ends. The physical interaction between dynein and early endosome requires the dynactin complex, and in particular, its p25 component. The FTS-Hook-FHIP (FHF) complex links dynein-dynactin to early endosomes, and within the FHF complex, Hook interacts with dynein-dynactin, and Hook-early endosome interaction depends on FHIP and FTS. PMID:26001903

  20. A physical perspective on cytoplasmic streaming.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Raymond E; van de Meent, Jan-Willem

    2015-08-06

    Organisms show a remarkable range of sizes, yet the dimensions of a single cell rarely exceed 100 µm. While the physical and biological origins of this constraint remain poorly understood, exceptions to this rule give valuable insights. A well-known counterexample is the aquatic plant Chara, whose cells can exceed 10 cm in length and 1 mm in diameter. Two spiralling bands of molecular motors at the cell periphery drive the cellular fluid up and down at speeds up to 100 µm s(-1), motion that has been hypothesized to mitigate the slowness of metabolite transport on these scales and to aid in homeostasis. This is the most organized instance of a broad class of continuous motions known as 'cytoplasmic streaming', found in a wide range of eukaryotic organisms-algae, plants, amoebae, nematodes and flies-often in unusually large cells. In this overview of the physics of this phenomenon, we examine the interplay between streaming, transport and cell size and discuss the possible role of self-organization phenomena in establishing the observed patterns of streaming.

  1. Cytoplasmic inheritance of organelles in brown algae.

    PubMed

    Motomura, Taizo; Nagasato, Chikako; Kimura, Kei

    2010-03-01

    Brown algae, together with diatoms and chrysophytes, are a member of the heterokonts. They have either a characteristic life cycle of diplohaplontic alternation of gametophytic and sporophytic generations that are isomorphic or heteromorphic, or a diplontic life cycle. Isogamy, anisogamy and oogamy have been recognized as the mode of sexual reproduction. Brown algae are the characteristic group having elaborated multicellular organization within the heterokonts. In this study, cytoplasmic inheritance of chloroplasts, mitochondria and centrioles was examined, with special focus on sexual reproduction and subsequent zygote development. In oogamy, chloroplasts and mitochondria are inherited maternally. In isogamy, chloroplasts in sporophyte cells are inherited biparentally (maternal or paternal); however, mitochondria (or mitochondrial DNA) derived from the female gamete only remained during zygote development after fertilization. Centrioles in zygotes are definitely derived from the male gamete, irrespective of the sexual reproduction pattern. Female centrioles in zygotes are selectively broken down within 1-2 h after fertilization. The remaining male centrioles play a crucial role as a part of the centrosome for microtubule organization, mitosis, determination of the cytokinetic plane and cytokinesis, as well as for maintaining multicellularity and regular morphogenesis in brown algae.

  2. A Wolbachia deubiquitylating enzyme induces cytoplasmic incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, John F; Ronau, Judith A; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Wolbachia are obligate intracellular bacteria(1) that infect arthropods, including approximately two-thirds of insect species(2). Wolbachia manipulate insect reproduction by enhancing their inheritance through the female germline. The most common alteration is cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI)(3-5), where eggs from uninfected females fail to develop when fertilized by sperm from Wolbachia-infected males. By contrast, if female and male partners are both infected, embryos are viable. CI is a gene-drive mechanism impacting population structure(6) and causing reproductive isolation(7), but its molecular mechanism has remained unknown. We show that a Wolbachia deubiquitylating enzyme (DUB) induces CI. The CI-inducing DUB, CidB, cleaves ubiquitin from substrates and is encoded in a two-gene operon, and the other protein, CidA, binds CidB. Binding is strongest between cognate partners in cidA-cidB homologues. In transgenic Drosophila, the cidA-cidB operon mimics CI when sperm introduce it into eggs, and a catalytically inactive DUB does not induce sterility. Toxicity is recapitulated in yeast by CidB alone; this requires DUB activity but is rescued by coexpressed CidA. A paralogous operon involves a putative nuclease (CinB) rather than a DUB. Analogous binding, toxicity and rescue in yeast were observed. These results identify a CI mechanism involving interacting proteins that are secreted into germline cells by Wolbachia, and suggest new methods for insect control.

  3. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  4. Genetic contributions to the autoantibody profile in a rabbit model of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed

    Puliyath, Nandakumar; Ray, Satyajit; Milton, Jacqueline; Mage, Rose G

    2008-10-15

    For the development of rabbit models of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), immunoglobulin allotype-defined pedigreed rabbits from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases rabbit resource more closely approximate human populations due to their non-inbred pedigreed structure. In an initial study from this laboratory, peptides (SM and GR) from the spliceosomal Smith (Sm) and the NMDA glutamate receptor NR2b, on branched polylysine backbones (BB) elicited antinuclear and anti-dsDNA autoantibodies typical of SLE, as well as seizures and nystagmus sometimes observed as neurological manifestations in SLE patients. This suggested the feasibility of further selective breeding to develop a more reproducible rabbit model for investigations of SLE. Here we report the results of GR-MAP-8 and control BB immunization on autoantibody responses in a group of 24 rabbits specifically bred and developed from parents and ancestors tested for autoantibody responses. The changes in hematological profile and blood chemistry in the experimental rabbits were evaluated along with autoantibody responses. Elevations of total white blood cell (WBC), monocyte, eosinophil and basophil counts that developed following immunizations were moderately influenced by litter and presence of the antibody heavy chain allotype VH1a1. Autoantibody development followed a sequential pattern with anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) followed by anti-dsDNA and subsequently anti-Sm and anti-RNP similar to SLE patients. High autoantibody levels to one autoantigen were not always associated with antibody response to another. Female rabbits had higher prevalence and levels of autoantibodies similar to human SLE. Higher autoantibody levels of anti-dsDNA and -ANA were observed among some full sibs and the presence of high responder ancestors in the pedigree was associated the augmented responses. We observed significant association between highest antibody responses to GR-MAP-8 and highest anti-dsDNA levels

  5. Statin-associated autoimmune myopathy and anti-HMGCR autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Mohassel, Payam; Mammen, Andrew L

    2013-10-01

    Statins are among the most commonly prescribed medications that significantly reduce cardiovascular risk in selected individuals. However, these drugs can also be associated with muscle symptoms ranging from mild myalgias to severe rhabdomyolysis. Although statin myotoxicity is usually self-limited, in some instances statin-exposed subjects can develop an autoimmune myopathy typically characterized by progressive weakness, muscle enzyme elevations, a necrotizing myopathy on muscle biopsy, and autoantibodies that recognize 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the pharmacologic target of statins. These antibodies are also found in some autoimmune myopathy patients without statin exposure. Importantly, anti-HMGCR antibodies are not found in the vast majority of statin-exposed subjects without autoimmune myopathy, including those with self-limited statin intolerance. Thus, testing for these antibodies may help differentiate those with self-limited statin myopathy who recover after statin discontinuation from those with a progressive statin-associated autoimmune myopathy who typically require immunosuppressive therapy.

  6. Surface-binding autoantibodies to cerebellar neurons in opsoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blaes, Franz; Fühlhuber, Verena; Korfei, Martina; Tschernatsch, Marlene; Behnisch, Wolfgang; Rostasy, Kevin; Hero, Barbara; Kaps, Manfred; Preissner, Klaus T

    2005-08-01

    Childhood opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome can occur with or without associated neuroblastoma. An autoimmune pathogenesis has been discussed for both forms. We show here that the majority of children with opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (10/14) have autoantibodies binding to the surface of isolated rat cerebellar granular neurons. In some patients, these antibodies are masked by IgG binding to ubiquitous surface antigens, which could be removed by preincubation with the nonneuronal control cell line HEK 293. A newly introduced competitive binding assay showed that the surface binding is directed against the same autoantigen in different patients. Therefore, we hypothesize that opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome may be the result of an autoimmune process against a neuronal surface protein.

  7. The spectrum of MOG autoantibody-associated demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Reindl, Markus; Di Pauli, Franziska; Rostásy, Kevin; Berger, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) has been identified as a target of demyelinating autoantibodies in animal models of inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Numerous studies have aimed to establish a role for MOG antibodies in patients with MS, although the results have been controversial. Cell-based immunoassays using MOG expressed in mammalian cells have demonstrated the presence of high-titre MOG antibodies in paediatric patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, MS, aquaporin-4-seronegative neuromyelitis optica, or isolated optic neuritis or transverse myelitis, but only rarely in adults with these disorders. These studies indicate that MOG antibodies could be associated with a broad spectrum of acquired human CNS demyelinating diseases. This Review article discusses the current literature on MOG antibodies, their potential clinical relevance, and their role in the pathogenesis of MOG antibody-associated demyelinating disorders.

  8. Developing improved durum wheat germplasm by altering the cytoplasmic genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In eukaryotic organisms, nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes interact to drive cellular functions. These genomes have co-evolved to form specific nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions that are essential to the origin, success, and evolution of diploid and polyploid species. Hundreds of genetic diseases in h...

  9. Dexamethasone and Acetate Modulate Cytoplasmic Leptin in Bovine Preadipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yonekura, Shinichi; Hirota, Shohei; Tokutake, Yukako; Rose, Michael T.; Katoh, Kazuo; Aso, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Hormonal and nutrient signals regulate leptin synthesis and secretion. In rodents, leptin is stored in cytosolic pools of adipocytes. However, not much information is available regarding the regulation of intracellular leptin in ruminants. Recently, we demonstrated that leptin mRNA was expressed in bovine intramuscular preadipocyte cells (BIP cells) and that a cytoplasmic leptin pool may be present in preadipocytes. In the present study, we investigated the expression of cytoplasmic leptin protein in BIP cells during differentiation as well as the effects of various factors added to the differentiation medium on its expression in BIP cells. Leptin mRNA expression was observed only at 6 and 8 days after adipogenic induction, whereas the cytoplasmic leptin concentration was the highest on day 0 and decreased gradually thereafter. Cytoplasmic leptin was detected at 6 and 8 days after adipogenic induction, but not at 4 days after adipogenic induction. The cytoplasmic leptin concentration was reduced in BIP cells at 4 days after treatment with dexamethasone, whereas cytoplasmic leptin was not observed at 8 days after treatment. In contrast, acetate significantly enhanced the cytoplasmic leptin concentration in BIP cells at 8 days after treatment, although acetate alone did not induce adipocyte differentiation in BIP cells. These results suggest that dexamethasone and acetate modulate the cytoplasmic leptin concentration in bovine preadipocytes. PMID:25049989

  10. Can paternal leakage maintain sexually antagonistic polymorphism in the cytoplasm?

    PubMed Central

    Kuijper, B; Lane, N; Pomiankowski, A

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of studies in multicellular organisms highlight low or moderate frequencies of paternal transmission of cytoplasmic organelles, including both mitochondria and chloroplasts. It is well established that strict maternal inheritance is selectively blind to cytoplasmic elements that are deleterious to males – ’mother's curse’. But it is not known how sensitive this conclusion is to slight levels of paternal cytoplasmic leakage. We assess the scope for polymorphism when individuals bear multiple cytoplasmic alleles in the presence of paternal leakage, bottlenecks and recurrent mutation. When fitness interactions among cytoplasmic elements within an individual are additive, we find that sexually antagonistic polymorphism is restricted to cases of strong selection on males. However, when fitness interactions among cytoplasmic elements are nonlinear, much more extensive polymorphism can be supported in the cytoplasm. In particular, mitochondrial mutants that have strong beneficial fitness effects in males and weak deleterious fitness effects in females when rare (i.e. ’reverse dominance’) are strongly favoured under paternal leakage. We discuss how such epistasis could arise through preferential segregation of mitochondria in sex-specific somatic tissues. Our analysis shows how paternal leakage can dampen the evolution of deleterious male effects associated with predominant maternal inheritance of cytoplasm, potentially explaining why ’mother's curse’ is less pervasive than predicted by earlier work. PMID:25653025

  11. Paraneoplastic autoantibody panels: sensitivity and specificity, a retrospective cohort.

    PubMed

    Albadareen, Rawan; Gronseth, Gary; Goeden, Marcie; Sharrock, Matthew; Lechtenberg, Colleen; Wang, Yunxia

    2017-06-01

    Experts in the autoimmune paraneoplastic field recommend autoantibody testing as "panels" to improve the poor sensitivity of individual autoantibodies in detecting paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS). The sensitivity of those panels was not reported to date in a fashion devoid of incorporation bias. We aimed to assess the collective sensitivity and specificity of one of the commonly used panels in detecting PNS. A single-centered retrospective cohort of all patients tested for paraneoplastic evaluation panel (PAVAL; test ID: 83380) over one year for the suspicion of PNS. Case adjudication was based on newly proposed diagnostic criteria in line with previously published literature, but modified to exclude serological status to avoid incorporation bias. Measures of diagnostic accuracy were subsequently calculated. Cases that failed to show association with malignancy within the follow-up time studied, reflecting a possibly pure autoimmune process was considered paraneoplastic-like syndromes. Out of 321 patients tested, 51 patients tested positive. Thirty-two patients met diagnostic criteria for paraneoplastic/paraneoplastic-like syndromes. The calculated collective sensitivity was 34% (95% CI: 17-53), specificity was 86% (95% CI: 81-90), Youden's index 0.2 and a positive clinical utility index 0.07 suggesting poor utility for case-detection. This is the first reported diagnostic accuracy measures of paraneoplastic panels without incorporation bias. Despite recommended panel testing to improve detection of PNS, sensitivity remains low with poor utility for case-detection. The high-calculated specificity suggests a possible role in confirming the condition in difficult cases suspicious for PNS, when enough supportive evidence is lacking on ancillary testing.

  12. Thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies and perinatal depression risk: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dama, Manish; Steiner, Meir; Lieshout, Ryan Van

    2016-07-01

    While thyroid autoantibodies have been linked to depression in general population samples, it is unclear if the immunological milieu of pregnancy alters this association. As a result, we systematically reviewed the literature to determine if abnormal levels of autoantibodies that target thyroperoxidase (TPO-AB) during the perinatal period are associated with an increased risk of antenatal and postnatal depression. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases were searched through February 2016. Primary studies that examined TPO-AB titers during pregnancy or the postpartum period, and antenatal or postnatal depression were eligible. The quality of each study was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Among the eleven articles selected for synthesis, three of these examined associations between TPO-AB and depression both during pregnancy and in the postpartum period. Three of five studies reported statistically significant associations between elevated TPO-AB titers (TPO-AB+) and concurrent depression at 12-25 weeks gestation. Four of five studies found significant associations between TPO-AB+ status at 12-25 weeks gestation and depression in the postpartum period. Two of four studies found links between postpartum TPO-AB and depression concurrently in the puerperium. Lack of adjustment for confounding variables limits causal inference and conclusions about the predictive power of TPO-AB. Studies suggest that TPO-AB+ in early to mid-pregnancy is associated with concurrent depression and may be predictive of depression in the postpartum period. Future studies with improved methodology are required to better understand the full pathophysiological implications and predictive utility of TPO-AB in perinatal depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Juvenile dermatomyositis and new autoantibodies: Cases and review].

    PubMed

    Guarella, M; Jurquet, A-L; Retornaz, K; Bardin, N; Chastang, M-C; Desjonquere, M; Fabien, N; Belot, A

    2015-12-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is the most common inflammatory myopathy in children. Its diagnosis is usually made on a clinical basis following the criteria of Bohan and Peter (1975). Recently, the presence of myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) have started to be associated with specific outcome in adult patients; the diagnosis and prognosis value of these autoantibodies remains to be identified in children. We report four cases of JDM with MSAs focusing on clinical, biological, and radiological manifestations, and then we describe associated treatment. The cohort comprises four girls with an average age of 8.5 years. The time to diagnosis was 1 week to 4 months. For these patients, the immunologic study found one patient positive for the MDA5 antibody (or CADM 140), one positive for the TIF1γ antibody (or p155/140), and two patients positive for the NXP2 antibody (or p140/MJ). Each patient showed specific and characteristic cutaneous manifestations. For example, the girl positive for the TIF1γ antibody presented the most severe skin disease with urticaria, face edema, and vascularity of the neck and shoulders. However, regarding muscular features, proximal weakness was present in most of the cohort, except for the child positive for the MDA5 antibody, who presented no sign of muscular disease at the beginning with low CK levels. Importantly, acute pancreatitis also affected this patient. Concerning radiological indications, muscular MRI evidenced hyperinflammation, a sign of diffuse myositis, in all these patients. Treatments consisted in corticosteroids together with methotrexate or mycofenolate mofetil associated or not with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. This report highlights the importance of systematic detection and analysis of MSA in diagnosis and characterization of JDM, and describes a new approach that would allow more focused treatments and be a useful predictor of clinical complications and prognosis in JDM-affected subjects. Copyright

  14. B-cell selection and the development of autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The clearest evidence that B cells play an important role in human autoimmunity is that immunotherapies that deplete B cells are very effective treatments for many autoimmune diseases. All people, healthy or ill, have autoreactive B cells, but not at the same frequency. A number of genes influence the level of these autoreactive B cells and whether they are eliminated or not during development at a central checkpoint in the bone marrow (BM) or at a later checkpoint in peripheral lymphoid tissues. These genes include those encoding proteins that regulate signaling through the B-cell receptor complex such as Btk and PTPN22, proteins that regulate innate signaling via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) such as MyD88 and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4, as well as the gene encoding the activation-induced deaminase (AID) essential for B cells to undergo class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation. Recent studies have revealed that TLR signaling elements and AID function not only in peripheral B cells to help mediate effective antibody responses to foreign antigens, but also in the BM to help remove autoreactive B-lineage cells at a very early point in B-cell development. Newly arising B cells that leave the BM and enter the blood and splenic red pulp can express both AID and TLR signaling elements like TLR7, and thus are fully equipped to respond rapidly to antigens (including autoantigens), to isotype class switch, and to undergo somatic hypermutation. These red pulp B cells may thus be an important source of autoantibody-producing cells arising particularly in extrafollicular sites, and indeed may be as significant a source of autoantibody-producing cells as B cells arising from germinal centers. PMID:23281837

  15. Antinucleosome antibody is a major autoantibody in localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Kodera, M; Hasegawa, M; Fujimoto, M; Takehara, K

    2004-12-01

    Localized scleroderma (LSc) exhibits autoimmunity, and antihistone antibody is frequently detected. The major antigens recognized by antihistone antibody are histones H1, H2A and H2B, which are located on the outer side of the nucleosome and are relatively more accessible for antibody binding. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that antihistone antibody is induced by nucleosome or native chromatin as immunogens in LSc. To determine whether antinucleosome antibody is present in patients with LSc. Antinucleosome antibody, antihistone antibody and antidouble-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antibody were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results IgG or IgM antinucleosome antibody was detected more frequently in patients with LSc than was antihistone antibody: in 40 of 49 (82%) vs. 26 of 49 (53%), respectively. No patients had anti-dsDNA antibody. The prevalence of antinucleosome antibody positivity was comparable in the three subgroups of LSc (generalized morphoea, 89%; linear scleroderma, 71%; morphoea, 90%). Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) exhibited a similar frequency of antinucleosome antibody positivity (13 of 15, 87%), but their IgG levels of this autoantibody were much higher than those found in patients with LSc. By contrast, IgM antinucleosome antibody levels were normal in patients with SLE, while they were significantly increased in patients with LSc compared with normal controls. Antinucleosome antibody was also detected at lower frequency in patients with systemic sclerosis (five of 20, 25%) or dermatomyositis (five of 15, 33%). Nucleosome-restricted antibodies, i.e. antibodies that react with the whole nucleosome particle but not with its individual components (histones and dsDNA) were also present in 35% of patients with LSc. Although antinucleosome antibody was not specific to LSc, its high prevalence in LSc indicates that antinucleosome antibody is a major autoantibody in this disease.

  16. A monoclonal autoantibody that promotes central nervous system remyelination in a model of multiple sclerosis is a natural autoantibody encoded by germline immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.; Rodriguez, M.

    1995-03-01

    Antibodies directed against self-Ags are frequently considered detrimental, and have been shown to play a pathogenic role in certain autoimmune diseases. However, the presence of autoreactive Abs in normal individuals suggests that some autoantibodies could participate in normal physiology. Our previous studies demonstrated that monoclonal autoantibodies SCH94.03 and SCH94.32, generated from the splenocytes of uninfected SJL/J mice injected with normal homogenized spinal cord, promote central nervous system remyelination when passively transferred into syngeneic mice chronically infected with Theiler`s murine encephalomyelitis virus, an established experimental model of multiple sclerosis. In this study we show that these two monoclonal autoantibodies are identical, and have phenotypic characteristics of natural autoantibodies. By using a solid phase assay system, SCH94.03 and SCH94.32 showed reactivity toward several protein Ags and chemical haptens, with prominent reactivity toward spectrin, (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl, and fluorescein. Sequence analysis showed that both SCH94.03 and SCH94.32 were encoded by identical germline Ig light chain V{sub K}10/J{sub K}l and heavy chain V23/DFL16.1/J{sub H}2 genes, with no definitive somatic mutations. These results indicate that a natural autoantibody participates in a beneficial physiologic response to central nervous system injury. 60 refs., 7 figs.

  17. The cytoplasm of living cells behaves as a poroelastic material

    PubMed Central

    Moeendarbary, Emad; Valon, Léo; Fritzsche, Marco; Harris, Andrew R.; Moulding, Dale A.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Stride, Eleanor; Mahadevan, L.; Charras, Guillaume T.

    2014-01-01

    The cytoplasm is the largest part of the cell by volume and hence its rheology sets the rate at which cellular shape changes can occur. Recent experimental evidence suggests that cytoplasmic rheology can be described by a poroelastic model, in which the cytoplasm is treated as a biphasic material consisting of a porous elastic solid meshwork (cytoskeleton, organelles, macromolecules) bathed in an interstitial fluid (cytosol). In this picture, the rate of cellular deformation is limited by the rate at which intracellular water can redistribute within the cytoplasm. However, direct supporting evidence for the model is lacking. Here we directly validate the poroelastic model to explain cellular rheology at physiologically relevant timescales using microindentation tests in conjunction with mechanical, chemical and genetic treatments. Our results show that water redistribution through the solid phase of the cytoplasm (cytoskeleton and macromolecular crowders) plays a fundamental role in setting cellular rheology. PMID:23291707

  18. Cytoplasmic streaming velocity as a plant size determinant.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Motoki; Kimura, Atsushi; Yokota, Etsuo; Haraguchi, Takeshi; Shimmen, Teruo; Yamamoto, Keiichi; Nakano, Akihiko; Ito, Kohji

    2013-11-11

    Cytoplasmic streaming is active transport widely occurring in plant cells ranging from algae to angiosperms. Although it has been revealed that cytoplasmic streaming is generated by organelle-associated myosin XI moving along actin bundles, the fundamental function in plants remains unclear. We generated high- and low-speed chimeric myosin XI by replacing the motor domains of Arabidopsis thaliana myosin XI-2 with those of Chara corallina myosin XI and Homo sapiens myosin Vb, respectively. Surprisingly, the plant sizes of the transgenic Arabidopsis expressing high- and low-speed chimeric myosin XI-2 were larger and smaller, respectively, than that of the wild-type plant. This size change correlated with acceleration and deceleration, respectively, of cytoplasmic streaming. Our results strongly suggest that cytoplasmic streaming is a key determinant of plant size. Furthermore, because cytoplasmic streaming is a common system for intracellular transport in plants, our system could have applications in artificial size control in plants.

  19. Long Non-coding RNAs in the Cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Farooq; Shah, Abdullah; Shan, Ge

    2016-04-01

    An enormous amount of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) transcribed from eukaryotic genome are important regulators in different aspects of cellular events. Cytoplasm is the residence and the site of action for many lncRNAs. The cytoplasmic lncRNAs play indispensable roles with multiple molecular mechanisms in animal and human cells. In this review, we mainly talk about functions and the underlying mechanisms of lncRNAs in the cytoplasm. We highlight relatively well-studied examples of cytoplasmic lncRNAs for their roles in modulating mRNA stability, regulating mRNA translation, serving as competing endogenous RNAs, functioning as precursors of microRNAs, and mediating protein modifications. We also elaborate the perspectives of cytoplasmic lncRNA studies. Copyright © 2016 Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Genetics Society of China. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. The cytoplasm of living cells behaves as a poroelastic material.

    PubMed

    Moeendarbary, Emad; Valon, Léo; Fritzsche, Marco; Harris, Andrew R; Moulding, Dale A; Thrasher, Adrian J; Stride, Eleanor; Mahadevan, L; Charras, Guillaume T

    2013-03-01

    The cytoplasm is the largest part of the cell by volume and hence its rheology sets the rate at which cellular shape changes can occur. Recent experimental evidence suggests that cytoplasmic rheology can be described by a poroelastic model, in which the cytoplasm is treated as a biphasic material consisting of a porous elastic solid meshwork (cytoskeleton, organelles, macromolecules) bathed in an interstitial fluid (cytosol). In this picture, the rate of cellular deformation is limited by the rate at which intracellular water can redistribute within the cytoplasm. However, direct supporting evidence for the model is lacking. Here we directly validate the poroelastic model to explain cellular rheology at short timescales using microindentation tests in conjunction with mechanical, chemical and genetic treatments. Our results show that water redistribution through the solid phase of the cytoplasm (cytoskeleton and macromolecular crowders) plays a fundamental role in setting cellular rheology at short timescales.

  1. Nucleotide sequence of Neurospora crassa cytoplasmic initiator tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Gillum, A M; Hecker, L I; Silberklang, M; Schwartzbach, S D; RajBhandary, U L; Barnett, W E

    1977-01-01

    Initiator methionine tRNA from the cytoplasm of Neurospora crassa has been purified and sequenced. The sequence is: pAGCUGCAUm1GGCGCAGCGGAAGCGCM22GCY*GGGCUCAUt6AACCCGGAGm7GU (or D) - CACUCGAUCGm1AAACGAG*UUGCAGCUACCAOH. Similar to initiator tRNAs from the cytoplasm of other eukaryotes, this tRNA also contains the sequence -AUCG- instead of the usual -TphiCG (or A)- found in loop IV of other tRNAs. The sequence of the N. crassa cytoplasmic initiator tRNA is quite different from that of the corresponding mitochondrial initiator tRNA. Comparison of the sequence of N. crassa cytoplasmic initiator tRNA to those of yeast, wheat germ and vertebrate cytoplasmic initiator tRNA indicates that the sequences of the two fungal tRNAs are no more similar to each other than they are to those of other initiator tRNAs. Images PMID:146192

  2. Bulk cytoplasmic actin and its functions in meiosis and mitosis.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Lénárt, Péter

    2011-10-11

    Discussions of actin cell biology generally focus on the cortex, a thin, actin-rich layer of cytoplasm under the plasma membrane. Here we review the much less studied biology of actin filaments deeper in the cytoplasm and their recently revealed functions in mitosis and meiosis that are most prominent in large oocyte, egg and early embryo cells. The cellular functions of cytoplasmic actin range from the assembly and positioning of meiotic spindles to the prevention of cytoplasmic streaming. We discuss the possible use of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms to nucleate and organize actin filaments to achieve these diverse cellular functions, the cell-cycle regulation of these functions, and the many unanswered questions about this largely unexplored mechanism of cytoplasmic organization.

  3. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies Associated With Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Vincent; Lesourd, Anais; Girszyn, Nicolas; Ménard, Jean-Francois; Levesque, Hervé; Caron, Francois; Marie, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine the prevalence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with infective endocarditis (IE) in internal medicine; and to compare clinical and biochemical features and outcome between patients exhibiting IE with and without ANCA. Fifty consecutive patients with IE underwent ANCA testing. The medical records of these patients were reviewed. Of the 50 patients with IE, 12 exhibited ANCA (24%). ANCA-positive patients with IE exhibited: longer duration between the onset of first symptoms and IE diagnosis (P = 0.02); and more frequently: weight loss (P = 0.017) and renal impairment (P = 0.08), lower levels of C-reactive protein (P = 0.0009) and serum albumin (P = 0.0032), involvement of both aortic and mitral valves (P = 0.009), and longer hospital stay (P = 0.016). Under multivariate analysis, significant factors for ANCA-associated IE were: longer hospital stay (P = 0.004), lower level of serum albumin (P = 0.02), and multiple valve involvement (P = 0.04). Mortality rate was 25% in ANCA patients; death was because of IE complications in all these patients. Our study identifies a high prevalence of ANCA in unselected patients with IE in internal medicine (24%). Our findings further underscore that ANCA may be associated with a subacute form of IE leading to multiple valve involvement and more frequent renal impairment. Because death was due to IE complications in all patients, our data suggest that aggressive therapy may be required to improve such patients’ outcome. PMID:26817911

  4. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies, Autoimmune Neutropenia, and Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Peter C.; Sloan, J. Mark; Niles, John L.; Monach, Paul A.; Merkel, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Reports of an association between antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and autoimmune neutropenia have rarely included cases of proven vasculitis. A case of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) with recurrent neutropenia is described and relevant literature on the association between ANCA, neutropenia, and vasculitis is reviewed. Methods Longitudinal clinical assessments and laboratory findings are described in a patient with AAV and recurrent episodes of profound neutropenia from December 2008 – October 2010. A PubMed database search of the medical literature was performed for papers published from 1960 through October 2010 to identify all reported cases of ANCA and neutropenia. Results A 49 year-old man developed recurrent neutropenia, periodic fevers, arthritis, biopsy-proven cutaneous vasculitis, sensorineural hearing loss, epididymitis, and positive tests for ANCA with specificity for antibodies to both proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase. Antineutrophil membrane antibodies were detected during an acute neutropenic phase and were not detectable in a post-recovery sample, whereas ANCA titers did not seem to correlate with neutropenia. An association between ANCA and neutropenia has been reported in 74 cases from 24 studies in the context of drug/toxin exposure, underlying autoimmune disease, or chronic neutropenia without underlying autoimmune disease. In these cases, the presence of atypical ANCA patterns and other antibodies were common; however, vasculitis was uncommon and when it occurred was usually limited to the skin and in cases of underlying toxin exposure. Conclusions ANCA is associated with autoimmune neutropenia, but systemic vasculitis rarely occurs in association with ANCA and neutropenia. The interaction between neutrophils and ANCA may provide insight into understanding both autoimmune neutropenia and AAV. PMID:21507463

  5. Anti-C1q autoantibodies in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Yoshikura, Nobuaki; Kimura, Akio; Hayashi, Yuichi; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2017-09-15

    We examined anti-complement C1q (C1q) autoantibody levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD). We analyzed the correlations between anti-C1q autoantibody levels and the clinical and other CSF characteristics of NMOSD. Serum and CSF anti-C1q autoantibody levels increased during the acute phase of NMOSD, reverting to the same levels as controls during remission. CSF anti-C1q autoantibody levels during the acute phase correlated with several markers reflecting disease severity, Expanded Disability Status Scale worsening, spinal cord lesion length in cases with myelitis, CSF protein and interleukin-6 levels, and CSF/serum albumin ratios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sera of glaucoma patients show autoantibodies against myelin basic protein and complex autoantibody profiles against human optic nerve antigens.

    PubMed

    Joachim, Stephanie C; Reichelt, Jan; Berneiser, Simone; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Grus, Franz H

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to gain more information about the possible immunological mechanisms in glaucoma. We analyzed the complex autoantibody patterns against human optic nerve antigens in sera of patients with glaucoma and tried to identify important antigens. Sera of 133 patients were included: healthy control subjects (n = 44), primary open-angle glaucoma (n = 44), and normal tension glaucoma patients (n = 45). The sera were tested against Western blots of human optic nerve, and antibody bands were visualized with chloronaphthol. IgG antibody patterns were analyzed by multivariate statistical techniques, and the most significant antigens were identified by mass spectrometry (Maldi-TOFTOF). All subjects, even healthy ones, showed different and complex antibody patterns. Glaucoma groups showed specific up- and down-regulations of antibody reactivities compared to the control group. The multivariate analysis of discriminance found significant differences (P < 0.05) in IgG antibody profiles against human optic nerve antigens between both glaucoma groups and healthy subjects. The identified antigens include: myelin basic protein (up-regulated in the POAG group), glial fibrillary acidic protein (down-regulated in the glaucoma groups), and vimentin (down-regulated in the glaucoma groups in comparison to controls). Using human optic nerve antigen, we were able to demonstrate that complex IgG autoantibody patterns exist in sera of patients with glaucoma. Large correlations between the given and our previous studies using bovine optic nerve antigens could be seen. Furthermore, anti-myelin basic protein antibodies, which can also be detected in patients with multiple sclerosis, were found in sera of glaucoma patients.

  7. Cytoplasmic genome substitution in wheat affects the nuclear-cytoplasmic cross-talk leading to transcript and metabolite alterations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alloplasmic lines provide a unique tool to study nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions. Three alloplasmic lines, with nuclear genomes from Triticum aestivum and harboring cytoplasm from Aegilops uniaristata, Aegilops tauschii and Hordeum chilense, were investigated by transcript and metabolite profiling to identify the effects of cytoplasmic substitution on nuclear-cytoplasmic signaling mechanisms. Results In combining the wheat nuclear genome with a cytoplasm of H. chilense, 540 genes were significantly altered, whereas 11 and 28 genes were significantly changed in the alloplasmic lines carrying the cytoplasm of Ae. uniaristata or Ae. tauschii, respectively. We identified the RNA maturation-related process as one of the most sensitive to a perturbation of the nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction. Several key components of the ROS chloroplast retrograde signaling, together with the up-regulation of the ROS scavenging system, showed that changes in the chloroplast genome have a direct impact on nuclear-cytoplasmic cross-talk. Remarkably, the H. chilense alloplasmic line down-regulated some genes involved in the determination of cytoplasmic male sterility without expressing the male sterility phenotype. Metabolic profiling showed a comparable response of the central metabolism of the alloplasmic and euplasmic lines to light, while exposing larger metabolite alterations in the H. chilense alloplasmic line as compared with the Aegilops lines, in agreement with the transcriptomic data. Several stress-related metabolites, remarkably raffinose, were altered in content in the H. chilense alloplasmic line when exposed to high light, while amino acids, as well as organic acids were significantly decreased. Alterations in the levels of transcript, related to raffinose, and the photorespiration-related metabolisms were associated with changes in the level of related metabolites. Conclusion The replacement of a wheat cytoplasm with the cytoplasm of a related species affects

  8. Genome-Wide Assessment of Differential DNA Methylation Associated with Autoantibody Production in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sharon A.; Nititham, Joanne; Elboudwarej, Emon; Quach, Hong L.; Taylor, Kimberly E.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by the development of autoantibodies associated with specific clinical manifestations. Previous studies have shown an association between differential DNA methylation and SLE susceptibility, but have not investigated SLE-related autoantibodies. Our goal was to determine whether DNA methylation is associated with production of clinically relevant SLE-related autoantibodies, with an emphasis on the anti-dsDNA autoantibody. In this study, we characterized the methylation status of 467,314 CpG sites in 326 women with SLE. Using a discovery and replication study design, we identified and replicated significant associations between anti-dsDNA autoantibody production and the methylation status of 16 CpG sites (pdiscovery<1.07E-07 and preplication<0.0029) in 11 genes. Associations were further investigated using multivariable regression to adjust for estimated leukocyte cell proportions and population substructure. The adjusted mean DNA methylation difference between anti-dsDNA positive and negative cases ranged from 1.2% to 19%, and the adjusted odds ratio for anti-dsDNA autoantibody production comparing the lowest and highest methylation tertiles ranged from 6.8 to 18.2. Differential methylation for these CpG sites was also associated with anti-SSA, anti-Sm, and anti-RNP autoantibody production. Overall, associated CpG sites were hypomethylated in autoantibody positive compared to autoantibody negative cases. Differential methylation of CpG sites within the major histocompatibility region was not strongly associated with autoantibody production. Genes with differentially methylated CpG sites represent multiple biologic pathways, and have not been associated with autoantibody production in genetic association studies. In conclusion, hypomethylation of CpG sites within genes from different pathways is associated with anti-dsDNA, anti-SSA, anti-Sm, and anti-RNP production in SLE, and these associations are not explained by

  9. Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure is Associated with Clinical and Autoantibody Phenotypes in Juvenile Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mona; Targoff, Ira N.; Rice, Madeline M.; Miller, Frederick W.; Rider, Lisa G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Genetic and environmental factors may contribute to the etiology of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM), systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by muscle and skin inflammation. We investigated the association between ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure and the clinical and autoantibody expression of JIIM. Methods We assessed the relationship between UVR exposure in the month before symptom onset and prevalence of juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) versus polymyositis (JPM) in 298 patients. Among JDM patients, the association between UVR exposure and myositis autoantibodies was assessed. Regression models were stratified by sex and race. The association between regional UV index in U.S. geoclimatic zones and the clinical and autoantibody subgroups was examined by weighted least squares regression analysis. Results We observed increasing odds of JDM compared with JPM per unit increase in the patients’ highest UV index in the month before symptom onset in girls (OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 1.00–1.40). The average and highest UV indices were associated with increasing odds of anti-p155/140 autoantibodies, which was strongest in white males (OR 1.30 and 1.23, respectively). No association was observed between the UV index and anti-MJ autoantibodies or patients without myositis autoantibodies. Across US geoclimatic regions, the average UV index was associated with increasing odds of JDM and anti-p155/140 autoantibodies but decreasing odds of anti-MJ autoantibodies. Conclusion Short-term UVR exposure prior to illness onset may have a role in the clinical and serologic expression of juvenile myositis. Research examining mechanisms of UVR in JIIM pathogenesis is suggested from these findings. PMID:23658122

  10. Human Traumatic Brain Injury Induces Autoantibody Response against Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and Its Breakdown Products

    PubMed Central

    Mondello, Stefania; Newsom, Kimberly J.; Yang, Zhihui; Yang, Boxuan; Kobeissy, Firas; Guingab, Joy; Glushakova, Olena; Robicsek, Steven; Heaton, Shelley; Buki, Andras; Hannay, Julia; Gold, Mark S.; Rubenstein, Richard; Lu, Xi-chun May; Dave, Jitendra R.; Schmid, Kara; Tortella, Frank; Robertson, Claudia S.; Wang, Kevin K. W.

    2014-01-01

    The role of systemic autoimmunity in human traumatic brain injury (TBI) and other forms of brain injuries is recognized but not well understood. In this study, a systematic investigation was performed to identify serum autoantibody responses to brain-specific proteins after TBI in humans. TBI autoantibodies showed predominant immunoreactivity against a cluster of bands from 38–50 kDa on human brain immunoblots, which were identified as GFAP and GFAP breakdown products. GFAP autoantibody levels increased by 7 days after injury, and were of the IgG subtype predominantly. Results from in vitro tests and rat TBI experiments also indicated that calpain was responsible for removing the amino and carboxyl termini of GFAP to yield a 38 kDa fragment. Additionally, TBI autoantibody staining co-localized with GFAP in injured rat brain and in primary rat astrocytes. These results suggest that GFAP breakdown products persist within degenerating astrocytes in the brain. Anti-GFAP autoantibody also can enter living astroglia cells in culture and its presence appears to compromise glial cell health. TBI patients showed an average 3.77 fold increase in anti-GFAP autoantibody levels from early (0–1 days) to late (7–10 days) times post injury. Changes in autoantibody levels were negatively correlated with outcome as measured by GOS-E score at 6 months, suggesting that TBI patients with greater anti-GFAP immune-responses had worse outcomes. Due to the long lasting nature of IgG, a test to detect anti-GFAP autoantibodies is likely to prolong the temporal window for assessment of brain damage in human patients. PMID:24667434

  11. Human traumatic brain injury induces autoantibody response against glial fibrillary acidic protein and its breakdown products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqun; Zoltewicz, J Susie; Mondello, Stefania; Newsom, Kimberly J; Yang, Zhihui; Yang, Boxuan; Kobeissy, Firas; Guingab, Joy; Glushakova, Olena; Robicsek, Steven; Heaton, Shelley; Buki, Andras; Hannay, Julia; Gold, Mark S; Rubenstein, Richard; Lu, Xi-Chun May; Dave, Jitendra R; Schmid, Kara; Tortella, Frank; Robertson, Claudia S; Wang, Kevin K W

    2014-01-01

    The role of systemic autoimmunity in human traumatic brain injury (TBI) and other forms of brain injuries is recognized but not well understood. In this study, a systematic investigation was performed to identify serum autoantibody responses to brain-specific proteins after TBI in humans. TBI autoantibodies showed predominant immunoreactivity against a cluster of bands from 38-50 kDa on human brain immunoblots, which were identified as GFAP and GFAP breakdown products. GFAP autoantibody levels increased by 7 days after injury, and were of the IgG subtype predominantly. Results from in vitro tests and rat TBI experiments also indicated that calpain was responsible for removing the amino and carboxyl termini of GFAP to yield a 38 kDa fragment. Additionally, TBI autoantibody staining co-localized with GFAP in injured rat brain and in primary rat astrocytes. These results suggest that GFAP breakdown products persist within degenerating astrocytes in the brain. Anti-GFAP autoantibody also can enter living astroglia cells in culture and its presence appears to compromise glial cell health. TBI patients showed an average 3.77 fold increase in anti-GFAP autoantibody levels from early (0-1 days) to late (7-10 days) times post injury. Changes in autoantibody levels were negatively correlated with outcome as measured by GOS-E score at 6 months, suggesting that TBI patients with greater anti-GFAP immune-responses had worse outcomes. Due to the long lasting nature of IgG, a test to detect anti-GFAP autoantibodies is likely to prolong the temporal window for assessment of brain damage in human patients.

  12. Autoantibody-Targeted Treatments for Acute Exacerbations of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Donahoe, Michael; Valentine, Vincent G; Chien, Nydia; Gibson, Kevin F; Raval, Jay S; Saul, Melissa; Xue, Jianmin; Zhang, Yingze; Duncan, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Severe acute exacerbations (AE) of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are medically untreatable and often fatal within days. Recent evidence suggests autoantibodies may be involved in IPF progression. Autoantibody-mediated lung diseases are typically refractory to glucocorticoids and nonspecific medications, but frequently respond to focused autoantibody reduction treatments. We conducted a pilot trial to test the hypothesis that autoantibody-targeted therapies may also benefit AE-IPF patients. Eleven (11) critically-ill AE-IPF patients with no evidence of conventional autoimmune diseases were treated with therapeutic plasma exchanges (TPE) and rituximab, supplemented in later cases with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Plasma anti-epithelial (HEp-2) autoantibodies and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7) were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA, respectively. Outcomes among the trial subjects were compared to those of 20 historical control AE-IPF patients treated with conventional glucocorticoid therapy prior to this experimental trial. Nine (9) trial subjects (82%) had improvements of pulmonary gas exchange after treatment, compared to one (5%) historical control. Two of the three trial subjects who relapsed after only five TPE responded again with additional TPE. The three latest subjects who responded to an augmented regimen of nine TPE plus rituximab plus IVIG have had sustained responses without relapses after 96-to-237 days. Anti-HEp-2 autoantibodies were present in trial subjects prior to therapy, and were reduced by TPE among those who responded to treatment. Conversely, plasma MMP7 levels were not systematically affected by therapy nor correlated with clinical responses. One-year survival of trial subjects was 46+15% vs. 0% among historical controls. No serious adverse events were attributable to the experimental medications. This pilot trial indicates specific treatments that reduce autoantibodies might benefit some severely-ill AE

  13. Prevalence of specific anti-skin autoantibodies in a cohort of patients with inherited epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inherited epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of skin diseases characterized by blistering of the skin and mucous membranes. There are four major types of EB (EB simplex, junctional EB, dystrophic EB and Kindler syndrome) caused by different gene mutations. Dystrophic EB is derived from mutations in the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1), encoding a protein which is the predominant component of the anchoring fibrils at the dermal-epidermal junction. For the first time in literature, we have evaluated the presence of anti-skin autoantibodies in a wider cohort of patients suffering from inherited EB and ascertained whether they may be a marker of disease activity. Methods Sera from patients with inherited EB, 17 with recessive dystrophic EB (RDEB), 10 with EB simplex (EBS) were analysed. As much as 20 patients with pemphigus vulgaris, 21 patients with bullous pemphigoid and 20 healthy subjects were used as controls. Anti-skin autoantibodies were tested in all samples with the Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) method and the currently available ELISA method in order to detect anti-type VII collagen, anti-BP180 and anti-BP230 autoantibodies. Results The mean concentrations of anti-type VII collagen autoantibodies titres, anti-BP180 and anti-BP230 autoantibodies were statistically higher in RDEB patients than in EBS patients. The sensitivity and specificity of the anti-type VII collagen ELISA test were 88.2% and 96.7%. The Birmingham Epidermolysis Bullosa Severity score, which is used to evaluate the severity of the disease, correlated with anti-skin autoantibodies titres. Conclusions The precise pathogenic role of circulating anti-skin autoantibodies in RDEB is unclear. There is a higher prevalence of both anti-type VII collagen and other autoantibodies in patients with RDEB, but their presence can be interpreted as an epiphenomenon. PMID:24007552

  14. A population-based investigation of the autoantibody profile in mothers of children with atrioventricular block.

    PubMed

    Salomonsson, S; Dzikaite, V; Zeffer, E; Eliasson, H; Ambrosi, A; Bergman, G; Fernlund, E; Theander, E; Ohman, A; Rydberg, A; Skogh, T; Wållberg-Jonsson, S; Elfving, A; Fored, M; Ekbom, A; Lundström, U; Mellander, M; Winqvist, O; Sonesson, S-E; Gadler, F; Jonzon, A; Wahren-Herlenius, M

    2011-11-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the antigen specificity and occurrence of individual autoantibodies in mothers of children diagnosed with atrioventricular (AV) block in a nation-wide setting. Patients with AV block detected before 15 years of age were identified using national quality registries as well as a network of pediatric and adult cardiologists and rheumatologists at the six university hospitals in Sweden. Patients with gross heart malformations, surgically or infectiously induced blocks were excluded. Blood samples were obtained from the mothers and maternal autoantibody profile, including the occurrence of antibodies against Ro52, Ro60, La, SmB, SmD, RNP-70k, RNP-A, RNP-C, CENP-C, Scl-70, Jo-1, ribosomal RNP and histones was investigated in 193 mothers of children with AV block by immunoblotting and ELISA. Autoantibody reactivity was detected in 48% (93/193) of the mothers of children with AV block. In autoantibody-positive mothers, the vast majority, 95% (88/93), had antibodies against Ro52, while 63% (59/93) had autoantibodies to Ro60 and 58% (54/93) had autoantibodies to La. In addition, 13% (12/93) of the autoantibody-positive mothers had antibodies to other investigated antigens besides Ro52, Ro60 and La, and of these anti-histone antibodies were most commonly represented, detected in 8% (7/93) of the mothers. In conclusion, this Swedish population-based study confirms that maternal autoantibodies may associate with heart block in the child. Further, our data demonstrate a dominant role of Ro52 antibodies in association with AV block.

  15. Significance of Myositis Autoantibody in Patients with Idiopathic Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ju Sun; Hwang, Jiwon; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Some patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) related to connective tissue disease (CTD) have a delayed diagnosis of the underlying CTD when the ILD is categorized as idiopathic. In this study, we evaluated the frequency of myositis autoantibodies in patients diagnosed with idiopathic ILD and investigated the clinical significance stemming from the presence of the antibodies. Materials and Methods A total 32 patients diagnosed with idiopathic ILD were enrolled in this study. We analyzed a panel of 11 myositis autoantibody specificities in the patients using a line blot immunoassay. Then, we divided them into myositis autoantibody-positive and -negative groups and compared the clinical features and laboratory data between the two groups. Results Of the 32 idiopathic ILD patients, 12 patients had myositis autoantibodies encompassing 9 specificities, except for anti-Mi-2 and anti-PM-Scl 100 (12/32, 38%). Anti-synthetase autoantibodies including Jo-1, EJ, OJ, PL-7, and PL-12 were present in 7 patients (7/32, 22%). The group with myositis autoantibodies presented more frequently with the symptom of mechanic's hand and showed abnormal pulmonary function test results with low forced vital capacity, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, total lung capacity, and high lactate dehydrogenase values in blood when compared with the group without myositis antibodies. Conclusion We strongly suggest that patients undergo an evaluation of myositis autoantibodies, if they are diagnosed with idiopathic ILD in the presence of clinical characteristics including mechanic's hand, arthralgia, and autoantibodies which are insufficient to make a diagnosis of a specific CTD category. PMID:25837172

  16. Autoantibodies to harmonin and villin are diagnostic markers in children with IPEX syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lampasona, Vito; Passerini, Laura; Barzaghi, Federica; Lombardoni, Carlo; Bazzigaluppi, Elena; Brigatti, Cristina; Bacchetta, Rosa; Bosi, Emanuele

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies to enterocyte antigens harmonin (75 kDa USH1C protein) and villin (actin-binding 95 kDa protein) are associated with the Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome. In this study we evaluated the diagnostic value of harmonin and villin autoantibodies in IPEX and IPEX-like syndromes. Harmonin and villin autoantibodies were measured by a novel Luminescent-Immuno-Precipitation-System (LIPS) quantitative assay, in patients with IPEX, IPEX-like syndrome, Primary Immunodeficiencies (PID) with enteropathy, all diagnosed by sequencing of the FOXP3 gene, and in type 1 diabetes (T1D), celiac disease and healthy blood donors as control groups. Harmonin and villin autoantibodies were detected in 12 (92%) and 6 (46%) of 13 IPEX patients, and in none of the IPEX-like, PID, T1D, celiac patients, respectively. All IPEX patients, including one case with late and atypical clinical presentation, had either harmonin and/or villin autoantibodies and tested positive for enterocyte antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. When measured in IPEX patients in remission after immunosuppressive therapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, harmonin and villin autoantibodies became undetectable or persisted at low titers in all cases but one in whom harmonin autoantibodies remained constantly high. In one patient, a peak of harmonin antibodies paralleled a relapse phase of enteropathy. Our study demonstrates that harmonin and villin autoantibodies, measured by LIPS, are sensitive and specific markers of IPEX, differentiate IPEX, including atypical cases, from other early childhood disorders associated with enteropathy, and are useful for screening and clinical monitoring of affected children.

  17. Two cases of erosive oral lichen planus with autoantibodies to desmoglein 3.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Ken; Nishie, Wataru; Natsuga, Ken; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Iwata, Hiroaki; Yamada, Tamaki; Yamashita, Emi; Asaka, Takuya; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the oral mucosa of unknown etiology. Clinically, the erosive type of OLP (erosive OLP) can show features similar to those of pemphigus vulgaris (PV), an autoimmune blistering disorder in which desmoglein (Dsg)3 is targeted. In addition to clinical and histopathological findings, immunological studies, including direct immunofluorescence (IF), indirect IF and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detect autoantibodies to Dsg3, are helpful in differentiating erosive OLP from PV. Here, we show two cases of erosive OLP with autoantibodies to Dsg3. Patient 1 was a 68-year-old woman with chronic erosions of the oral mucosa, in which elevated levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)G autoantibodies to Dsg1 and Dsg3 were detected by ELISA. Patient 2 was an 85-year-old woman with white striae with erosions on the lateral sides of the buccal mucosa with elevated levels of IgG autoantibodies to Dsg3 detected by ELISA. Histopathological findings from both cases showed lichenoid dermatitis, and both direct and indirect IF showed no tissue-bound IgG autoantibodies. From these findings, the diagnosis of erosive OLP was made. Immunological assays revealed both cases to have IgG-directing calcium-independent linear epitopes on Dsg3, which are suggestive of non-pathogenic autoantibodies. In addition, autoantibodies to Dsg3 in patient 2 reacted with a prosequence-possessing precursor form of Dsg3 but not with the mature form of the molecule. The present study suggests that erosive OLP may develop anti-Dsg3 autoantibodies, which should be carefully assessed. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  18. Autoantibodies to Harmonin and Villin Are Diagnostic Markers in Children with IPEX Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lampasona, Vito; Passerini, Laura; Barzaghi, Federica; Lombardoni, Carlo; Bazzigaluppi, Elena; Brigatti, Cristina; Bacchetta, Rosa; Bosi, Emanuele

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies to enterocyte antigens harmonin (75 kDa USH1C protein) and villin (actin-binding 95 kDa protein) are associated with the Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome. In this study we evaluated the diagnostic value of harmonin and villin autoantibodies in IPEX and IPEX-like syndromes. Harmonin and villin autoantibodies were measured by a novel Luminescent-Immuno-Precipitation-System (LIPS) quantitative assay, in patients with IPEX, IPEX-like syndrome, Primary Immunodeficiencies (PID) with enteropathy, all diagnosed by sequencing of the FOXP3 gene, and in type 1 diabetes (T1D), celiac disease and healthy blood donors as control groups. Harmonin and villin autoantibodies were detected in 12 (92%) and 6 (46%) of 13 IPEX patients, and in none of the IPEX-like, PID, T1D, celiac patients, respectively. All IPEX patients, including one case with late and atypical clinical presentation, had either harmonin and/or villin autoantibodies and tested positive for enterocyte antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. When measured in IPEX patients in remission after immunosuppressive therapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, harmonin and villin autoantibodies became undetectable or persisted at low titers in all cases but one in whom harmonin autoantibodies remained constantly high. In one patient, a peak of harmonin antibodies paralleled a relapse phase of enteropathy. Our study demonstrates that harmonin and villin autoantibodies, measured by LIPS, are sensitive and specific markers of IPEX, differentiate IPEX, including atypical cases, from other early childhood disorders associated with enteropathy, and are useful for screening and clinical monitoring of affected children. PMID:24250806

  19. Role of autoantibodies in acquired inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system in children.

    PubMed

    Rostasy, Kevin; Reindl, Markus

    2013-12-01

    The recent detection of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) autoantibodies in acquired inflammatory demyelinating diseases, such as neuromyelitis optica, or acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and multiple sclerosis, in children strongly indicates that B-cell-dependent mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis. This review aims to give an overview of the role of autoantibodies in inflammatory demyelinating pediatric diseases, with a focus on antibodies to AQP4 and MOG.

  20. Emerging concepts regarding B cells and autoantibodies in murine lupus nephritis. B cells have multiple roles; all autoantibodies are not equal.

    PubMed

    Madaio, M P; Shlomchik, M J

    1996-03-01

    Despite observations linking the severity of lupus nephritis to the quantity and location of glomerular immune deposits, it had been difficult to decipher the primary role of B cells and autoantibodies in this process. Newer technologies have provided the means to evaluate the roles of whole B cell populations and individual immunoglobulins in lupus lesions. In this review, recent advances in this area are summarized, with particular emphasis on work from the authors' laboratories. The results implicate a primary role for B cells and immunoglobulins in lupus nephritis, including glomerular, interstitial, and vascular lesions. Multiple antibody-ligand interactions participate in glomerular immune deposit formation in individuals with lupus nephritis. Recent evidence suggests that in situ formation of immune deposits by either cross-reactivity of autoantibodies with intrinsic glomerular antigens (i.e., anti-DNA antibodies with laminin) or direct interaction of autoantibodies with circulating autoantigens lodged within glomeruli (i.e., anti-DNA antibodies with histone/DNA). The predominant autoantibody-glomerular antigen interaction(s) in a given individual influences the principal location of immune deposition, which in turn influences the pathologic and clinical expression of disease. It is believed that these phenomena contribute to the phenotypic diversity commonly observed among individuals with lupus nephritis. Furthermore, these consequences are dependent on properties unique to both subsets of lupus autoantibodies and to their target antigen ligands within the glomerulus. Thus, the autoantibody variable or antigen binding region, along with the nature and location of the target glomerular antigen (or site of circulating antigen deposition), are influential in initiating these perturbations.

  1. Nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in HIV-infected patients in the HAART era

    PubMed Central

    Iordache, Laura; Bengoufa, Djaouida; Taulera, Olivier; Rami, Agathe; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Day, Nesrine; Parrinello, Maguy; Sellier, Pierre-Olivier; Molina, Jean-Michel; Mahr, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Nonorgan-specific autoantibodies (AAbs) are used for diagnosing autoimmune diseases but can also be detected in other conditions. We carried out a cross-sectional study with the aim to screen HIV1-infected patients in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for AAbs and to analyze the association of their presence with hypergammaglobulinemia and immunovirological status. Blood samples from HIV1-infected patients without major concomitant illnesses followed in 2 hospitals in Paris, France were tested for immunovirological status, serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) level, antinuclear antibodies (ANAs), anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA), anti-extractable nuclear antigens (anti-ENAs), anticardiolipin (aCL), anti-β2glycoprotein1 (anti-β2GP1), and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs). Clinically relevant AAbs were defined as ANAs with titers ≥1:160, anti-dsDNA or anti-ENA antibodies; aCL or anti-β2GP1 antibodies with a level ≥40 U/ml; and ANCAs reacting with proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase. We included 92 patients (mean age 47 years, men 55%, sub-Saharan