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Sample records for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies

  1. Neutrophil anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody proteins: bactericidal increasing protein, lactoferrin, cathepsin, and elastase as serological markers of inflammatory bowel and other diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakidi, Kallirroi S.; Tsianos, Vasileios E.; Karvounis, Evaggelos; Christodoulou, Dimitrios K.; Katsanos, Konstantinos H.; Tsianos, Epameinondas V.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract comprising Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Although the pathogenesis of the disease is not clearly defined yet, environmental, genetic and other factors contribute to the onset of the disease. Apart from the clinical and histopathological findings, several serological biomarkers are also employed to detect IBD. One of the most thoroughly studied biomarker is anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA). We herein provide an overview of the current knowledge on the use of ANCA and certain ANCA proteins, such as bactericidal increasing protein, lactoferrin, cathepsin G and elastase, as serological markers for IBD and other diseases. PMID:27366026

  2. Reduced CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and interleukin-10(+) regulatory B cells in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis permit increased circulating autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Aybar, L T; McGregor, J G; Hogan, S L; Hu, Y; Mendoza, C E; Brant, E J; Poulton, C J; Henderson, C D; Falk, R J; Bunch, D O

    2015-05-01

    Pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is B cell-dependent, although how particular B cell subsets modulate immunopathogenesis remains unknown. Although their phenotype remains controversial, regulatory B cells (Bregs ), play a role in immunological tolerance via interleukin (IL)-10. Putative CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD27(+) Bregs were evaluated in addition to their CD5(+) subsets in 69 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). B cell IL-10 was verified by flow cytometry following culture with CD40 ligand and cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG) DNA. Patients with active disease had decreased levels of CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells and IL-10(+) B cells compared to patients in remission and healthy controls (HCs). As IL-10(+) and CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells normalized in remission within an individual, ANCA titres decreased. The CD5(+) subset of CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells decreases in active disease and rebounds during remission similarly to IL-10-producing B cells. Moreover, CD5(+) B cells are enriched in the ability to produce IL-10 compared to CD5(neg) B cells. Together these results suggest that CD5 may identify functional IL-10-producing Bregs . The malfunction of Bregs during active disease due to reduced IL-10 expression may thus permit ANCA production.

  3. Reduced CD5+CD24hiCD38hi and interleukin-10+ regulatory B cells in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis permit increased circulating autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Aybar, L T; McGregor, J G; Hogan, S L; Hu, Y; Mendoza, C E; Brant, E J; Poulton, C J; Henderson, C D; Falk, R J; Bunch, D O

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is B cell-dependent, although how particular B cell subsets modulate immunopathogenesis remains unknown. Although their phenotype remains controversial, regulatory B cells (Bregs), play a role in immunological tolerance via interleukin (IL)-10. Putative CD19+CD24hiCD38hi and CD19+CD24hiCD27+ Bregs were evaluated in addition to their CD5+ subsets in 69 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). B cell IL-10 was verified by flow cytometry following culture with CD40 ligand and cytosine–phosphate–guanosine (CpG) DNA. Patients with active disease had decreased levels of CD5+CD24hiCD38hi B cells and IL-10+ B cells compared to patients in remission and healthy controls (HCs). As IL-10+ and CD5+CD24hiCD38hi B cells normalized in remission within an individual, ANCA titres decreased. The CD5+ subset of CD24hiCD38hi B cells decreases in active disease and rebounds during remission similarly to IL-10-producing B cells. Moreover, CD5+ B cells are enriched in the ability to produce IL-10 compared to CD5neg B cells. Together these results suggest that CD5 may identify functional IL-10-producing Bregs. The malfunction of Bregs during active disease due to reduced IL-10 expression may thus permit ANCA production. PMID:25376552

  4. Reduced CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and interleukin-10(+) regulatory B cells in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis permit increased circulating autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Aybar, L T; McGregor, J G; Hogan, S L; Hu, Y; Mendoza, C E; Brant, E J; Poulton, C J; Henderson, C D; Falk, R J; Bunch, D O

    2015-05-01

    Pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is B cell-dependent, although how particular B cell subsets modulate immunopathogenesis remains unknown. Although their phenotype remains controversial, regulatory B cells (Bregs ), play a role in immunological tolerance via interleukin (IL)-10. Putative CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD27(+) Bregs were evaluated in addition to their CD5(+) subsets in 69 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). B cell IL-10 was verified by flow cytometry following culture with CD40 ligand and cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG) DNA. Patients with active disease had decreased levels of CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells and IL-10(+) B cells compared to patients in remission and healthy controls (HCs). As IL-10(+) and CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells normalized in remission within an individual, ANCA titres decreased. The CD5(+) subset of CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells decreases in active disease and rebounds during remission similarly to IL-10-producing B cells. Moreover, CD5(+) B cells are enriched in the ability to produce IL-10 compared to CD5(neg) B cells. Together these results suggest that CD5 may identify functional IL-10-producing Bregs . The malfunction of Bregs during active disease due to reduced IL-10 expression may thus permit ANCA production. PMID:25376552

  5. False-positive myeloperoxidase binding activity due to DNA/anti-DNA antibody complexes: a source for analytical error in serologic evaluation of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Jethwa, H S; Nachman, P H; Falk, R J; Jennette, J C

    2000-09-01

    Anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies (anti-MPO) are a major type of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA). While evaluating anti-MPO monoclonal antibodies from SCG/Kj mice, we observed several hybridomas that appeared to react with both MPO and DNA. Sera from some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) also react with MPO and DNA. We hypothesized that the MPO binding activity is a false-positive result due to the binding of DNA, contained within the antigen binding site of anti-DNA antibodies, to the cationic MPO. Antibodies from tissue culture supernatants from 'dual reactive' hybridomas were purified under high-salt conditions (3 M NaCl) to remove any antigen bound to antibody. The MPO and DNA binding activity were measured by ELISA. The MPO binding activity was completely abrogated while the DNA binding activity remained. The MPO binding activity was restored, in a dose-dependent manner, by the addition of increasing amount of calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) to the purified antibody. Sera from six patients with SLE that reacted with both MPO and DNA were treated with DNase and showed a decrease in MPO binding activity compared with untreated samples. MPO binding activity was observed when CT-DNA was added to sera from SLE patients that initially reacted with DNA but not with MPO. These results suggest that the DNA contained within the antigen binding site of anti-DNA antibodies could bind to the highly cationic MPO used as substrate antigen in immunoassays, resulting in a false-positive test.

  6. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis: two case reports and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies are typically detected in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis, but are also present in a number of chronic inflammatory non-vasculitic conditions like rheumatoid arthritis. Rare cases of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener’s granulomatosis, a vasculitic disorder frequently associated with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been described in literature. Case presentation We report two middle-aged female patients with rheumatoid arthritis who developed anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and symptoms reminiscent of granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Despite the lack of antibodies specific for proteinase 3 and the absence of a classical histology, we report a probable case of granulomatosis with polyangiitis in the first patient, and consider rheumatoid vasculitis in the second patient. Conclusion Taken together with previous reports, these cases highlight that anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies have to be evaluated very carefully in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In this context, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies detected by indirect immunofluorescence appear to have a low diagnostic value for granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Instead they may have prognostic value for assessing the course of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:23253567

  7. The clinical presentation and therapy of diseases related to anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA).

    PubMed

    Weiner, Maria; Segelmark, Mårten

    2016-10-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are a family of autoantibodies that react with proteins predominantly expressed in cytoplasmic granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs). ANCA was initially detected using indirect immunofluorescence, allowing for different patterns such as p-ANCA (perinuclear) and c-ANCA (cytoplasmic) to be distinguished. Today it is common to detect the antibodies by immunochemical assays such as ELISA using purified proteins as antigens. The strongest association with ANCA is found in the pauci-immune small vessel vasculitides granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). There is compelling evidence that ANCA contributes to the pathogenesis in these conditions. ANCA also occurs in 30%-40% of patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) and anti-GBM disease, but is uncommon in other forms of vasculitis. ANCA with different specificities have been described with varying frequencies in diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, endocarditis, chronic infections and hematopoietic malignancies. ANCA can also develop as an adverse event during pharmacological treatment. These entities are treated quite differently, with therapies ranging from immunosuppressive agents over antibiotics to simply removing the causative drug. A positive ANCA test thus requires a careful diagnostic work-up. PMID:27481040

  8. The clinical presentation and therapy of diseases related to anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA).

    PubMed

    Weiner, Maria; Segelmark, Mårten

    2016-10-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are a family of autoantibodies that react with proteins predominantly expressed in cytoplasmic granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs). ANCA was initially detected using indirect immunofluorescence, allowing for different patterns such as p-ANCA (perinuclear) and c-ANCA (cytoplasmic) to be distinguished. Today it is common to detect the antibodies by immunochemical assays such as ELISA using purified proteins as antigens. The strongest association with ANCA is found in the pauci-immune small vessel vasculitides granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). There is compelling evidence that ANCA contributes to the pathogenesis in these conditions. ANCA also occurs in 30%-40% of patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) and anti-GBM disease, but is uncommon in other forms of vasculitis. ANCA with different specificities have been described with varying frequencies in diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, endocarditis, chronic infections and hematopoietic malignancies. ANCA can also develop as an adverse event during pharmacological treatment. These entities are treated quite differently, with therapies ranging from immunosuppressive agents over antibiotics to simply removing the causative drug. A positive ANCA test thus requires a careful diagnostic work-up.

  9. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide stimulates production of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in ANCA associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, Plinio R; Jeffs, Lisa; Nitschke, Jodie; Patel, Mittal; Sarvestani, Ghafar; Cassidy, John; Hissaria, Pravin; Gillis, David; Au Peh, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Background Wegener's Granulomatosis and Microscopic Polyangiitis are life-threatening systemic necrotizing vasculitides of unknown aetiology. The appearance of circulating antibodies to neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens (ANCA) is strongly associated with the development of the disease. A link between infection and disease has long been suspected, and the appearance of ANCA antibodies has been reported following bacterial and viral infections. The depletion of circulating B cells with monoclonal antibody therapy can induce remission, and this observation suggests a pathogenic role for B cells in this disease. As bacterial DNA is known to induce B cell proliferation and antibody production via TLR-9 stimulation, we have explored the possibility that unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotide, as found in bacterial and viral DNA, may play a role in stimulating circulating autoreactive B cells to produce ANCA in patients with vasculitis. Results We have confirmed that unmethylated CpG oligonucleotide is a potent stimulator of antibody production by PBMC in vitro. The stimulation of PBMC with CpG oligonucleutides resulted in the production of similar amounts of IgG in both ANCA+ patients and normal controls. In spite of this, PR3 ANCA+ patients synthesised significantly higher amount of IgG ANCA than normal controls. In MPO ANCA+ patients, there was a tendency for patients to produce higher amount of ANCA than controls, however, the difference did not reach significance. Furthermore, we were able to detect circulating MPO-reactive B cells by ELISpot assay from the peripheral blood of 2 MPO+ ANCA vasculitis patients. Together, this indicates that circulating anti-neutrophil autoreactive B cells are present in ANCA+ vasculitis patients, and they are capable of producing antibodies in response to CpG stimulation. Of note, CpG also induced the production of the relevant autoantibodies in patients with other types of autoimmune diseases. Conclusion Circulating ANCA autoreactive B

  10. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody vasculitis presenting with bilateral renal vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Michael Gregory

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis presenting with bilateral renal vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli in a patient who also had a lupus anticoagulant and anti-cardiolipin antibodies. Although the link between venous thrombosis and ANCA vasculitis is well established, the coexistence of renal vein thrombosis is unusual. Furthermore, despite the positive ANCA, he was initially negative for antibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase-3 (PR3), illustrating that a positive ANCA may be significant despite a negative test for antibodies to MPO and PR3. PMID:26069771

  11. A historical essay on detection of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Niels; Wiik, Allan; Jayne, David R

    2015-04-01

    In this essay we describe a number of the known and not so known experiences of the early anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) days, explaining why and how we reached consensus on the standard indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) techniques, the naming of the two principal C- and P-ANCA patterns, why we chose to use IIF as the standard technique, how the solid phase assays have developed and where we stand today, the use of ANCA for diagnosis and the importance of using several techniques for that purpose, how ANCA titres are related to disease activity and the clinical impact of this, and finally the implications of ANCA being a natural, polyclonal antibody response against various epitopes in relation to diagnostics and disease patterns.

  12. Recent advances in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, B.; John, G. T.; O’Callaghan, C.; Ranganathan, D.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is an uncommon inflammatory disease of small to medium-sized vessels that frequently presents with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and renal failure though it can affect any organ system. If untreated, the vast majority of patients will die within a year. Current treatments improve prognosis but affected patients remain at a substantially higher risk of death and adverse outcomes. We review the classification of the disease, our understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology, and propose future directions for research. We also evaluate the evidence supporting established treatment regimens and the progress of clinical trials for newer treatments to inform the design of future studies. PMID:27051131

  13. Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody in Behçet’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Duzgun, Nursen; Sahin, Mehmet; Ayaslioglu, Ergin

    2006-01-01

    Anti neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) is strongly associated with some vasculitic disorders. Behçet’s disease (BD) is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. In this study, ANCA was found to be positive in 8 out of 66 patients (10.2%) with BD by combination testing consisting of immunofluorescence and ELISA [one patient showed an atypical pattern by indirect immunofloresence techique, 6 patients were reactive to bacterial-permeability increasing protein (BPI) and one patient was reactive to Cathepsin G in ELISA]. There were no vascular manifestations such as veneous or arterial thrombosis and arterial aneurysms in ANCA-positive patients with BD. The results suggest that ANCA may be found in a minority of BD as those in previous published studies. PMID:23674967

  14. Possible intrinsic association of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis coexisting with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huifang; Xiong, Jiachuan; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Ying; Nie, Ling; Wang, Yiqin; Zhao, Jinghong

    2016-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a life-threatening condition that causes renal failure. Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant proliferation of monoclonal plasma cells in the blood that can also cause renal failure. The two diseases have high morbidity and mortality rates in the elderly, with a poor prognosis. A 64-year-old female presented to Xinqiao Hospital (Chonqing, China) with fatigue and a poor appetite that had been apparent for 6 weeks. Laboratory tests revealed a serum creatinine level of 10.31 mg/dl, a cytoplasmic ANCA titer of 1:10, a positive result for myeloperoxidase and a serum globulin level of 3.96 g/dl. A renal biopsy revealed crescent glomerulonephritis, combined with the rapid progression of renal function. Based on these observations (ANCA titer, crescent glomerulonephritis and rapid progression of renal function) a diagnosis of AAV was established. MM was confirmed by serum immunofixation electrophoresis combined with bone marrow aspiration. The present study discusses what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of AAV coexisting with MM in order to highlight it as a clinical concern. PMID:27602144

  15. Current and novel biomarkers in anti-neutrophil cytoplasm-associated vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Draibe, Juliana Bordignon; Fulladosa, Xavier; Cruzado, Josep Maria; Torras, Joan; Salama, Alan David

    2016-08-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is characterized by a variable disease course, with up to 50% of patients having one relapse within 5 years and many progressing to end-stage organ damage despite modern treatment strategies. Moreover, complications arising from treatment dominate the causes of mortality and morbidity both early and late during disease, especially in the elderly and those with severe renal involvement, and there is additional uncertainty as to how long treatment should be continued. There is, therefore, an urgent clinical need to identify robust biomarkers to better predict treatment responses, risk of disease relapse and eventual complete clinical and immunological quiescence. To date, no such biomarkers exist, but better understanding of disease pathogenesis and the underlying immune dysfunction has provided some potential candidates linked to the discovery of new antibodies, different leukocyte activation states, the role of the alternative complement pathway and markers of vascular activation. With all promising new biomarkers, there is the need to rapidly replicate and validate early findings using large biobanks of samples that could be brought together by leaders in the field.

  16. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in cholesterol embolism: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Heng-Yuan; Chen, Shi-Zhi; Huang, Ji-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol embolism is a multisystemic disorder with clinical manifestations that resemble vasculitis. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are a defining feature of ANCA-associated vasculitis, and the presence of ANCA in cholesterol embolism complicates its differential diagnosis and treatment. At present, the role of ANCA in cholesterol embolism remains unclear and no effective treatment is currently available. The present study reports the case of an Asian male who presented with spontaneous cholesterol embolism with proteinase 3 (PR3)-specific ANCA, subacute interstitial nephritis and late-developing skin lesions. The 69-year-old patient was admitted to The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University (Xiamen, China) complaining of chest tightness, fatigue, progressive renal failure and refractory hypertension. In addition, transient eosinophilia was detected. Following immunosuppressive therapy with steroids and cyclophosphamide for 6 months, hemodialysis treatment was initiated. Skin lesions appeared at >1 month following hemodialysis initiation; however, they were gradually improved following treatment with atorvastatin and anti-platelet aggregation therapy for 5 months. The patient was maintained on hemodialysis for ~2 years and exhibited general good health at the most recent follow-up. In addition, 11 cases of cholesterol embolism associated with ANCA reported in the literature were discussed in the present study. PMID:27446313

  17. Current and novel biomarkers in anti-neutrophil cytoplasm-associated vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Draibe, Juliana Bordignon; Fulladosa, Xavier; Cruzado, Josep Maria; Torras, Joan; Salama, Alan David

    2016-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is characterized by a variable disease course, with up to 50% of patients having one relapse within 5 years and many progressing to end-stage organ damage despite modern treatment strategies. Moreover, complications arising from treatment dominate the causes of mortality and morbidity both early and late during disease, especially in the elderly and those with severe renal involvement, and there is additional uncertainty as to how long treatment should be continued. There is, therefore, an urgent clinical need to identify robust biomarkers to better predict treatment responses, risk of disease relapse and eventual complete clinical and immunological quiescence. To date, no such biomarkers exist, but better understanding of disease pathogenesis and the underlying immune dysfunction has provided some potential candidates linked to the discovery of new antibodies, different leukocyte activation states, the role of the alternative complement pathway and markers of vascular activation. With all promising new biomarkers, there is the need to rapidly replicate and validate early findings using large biobanks of samples that could be brought together by leaders in the field. PMID:27478594

  18. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated Pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis complicating Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Jei; Wu, Hau-Shin; Chu, Tzong-Shinn

    2011-07-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disease, characterized by specific autoimmune antibodies anti-Ro and anti-La, and it can involve multiple organs, such as the kidneys, lungs, muscles, and nervous system. The most common renal complication of Sjögren's syndrome is tubulointerstitial nephritis, and glomerulonephritis is relatively uncommon. We report the case of an 86-year-old man presenting with recurrent fever, poor appetite, decreased salivary secretion, and body weight loss. Laboratory investigation revealed that serum creatinine was 4.2 mg/dL, proteinuria was 3+, and there was microscopic hematuria. Positive perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, anti-Ro, and anti-La antibodies were detected. Renal biopsy showed crescentic glomerulonephritis with scanty immune complex deposition. The patient was diagnosed with primary Sjögren's syndrome complicated with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with positive anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody. Unlike the patients of other case reports, our patient's renal function did not recover after immunosuppressant treatment, and he finally received long-term hemodialysis. Pauci-immune glomerulonephritis is a rare renal complication of Sjögren's syndrome, and progress to renal failure in such patients is possible.

  19. Elevated serum levels of two anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in a lung cancer patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Okauchi, Shinichiro; Tamura, Tomohiro; Kagohashi, Katsunori; Kawaguchi, Mio; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A 71-year-old woman with arthralgia and lung fibrosis was referred to Mito Kyodo General Hospital (Mito, Japan) for a mass, which was incidentally observed on a chest radiograph. The chest computed tomography scan demonstrated fibrotic lesions in the lower lobes of the lung and a nodule in the left upper lobe. The serum levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and proteinase 3 (PR3)-ANCA were 60.3 and 7.5 U/ml, respectively. A transbronchial biopsy obtained from the nodule in the left upper lobe of the lung revealed a lung adenocarcinoma and the patient underwent standard upper lobectomy of the left lung. Subsequent to the resection, the serum levels of PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA returned to 10.0 and <1.0 U/ml, respectively. Notably, titers of antinuclear antibodies were also decreased during the postoperative course. Although elevated serum ANCA levels are rarely seen in lung cancer, they may be associated with the occurrence of lung cancer in certain patients, as observed in the present case. PMID:27699023

  20. Rare type of pancreatitis as the first presentation of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Tomoya; Adachi, Takeya; Tabeya, Tetsuya; Nakagaki, Suguru; Yabana, Takashi; Goto, Akira; Kondo, Yoshihiro; Kasai, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A pancreatic tumor was suspected on the abdominal ultrasound of a 72-year-old man. Abdominal computed tomography showed pancreatic enlargement as well as a diffuse, poorly enhanced area in the pancreas; endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography failed to provide a definitive diagnosis. Based on the trend of improvement of the pancreatic enlargement, the treatment plan involved follow-up examinations. Later, he was hospitalized with an alveolar hemorrhage and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis; he tested positive for myeloperoxidase-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and was diagnosed with ANCA-related vasculitis, specifically microscopic polyangiitis. It appears that factors such as thrombus formation caused by the vasculitis in the early stages of ANCA-related vasculitis cause abnormal distribution of the pancreatic blood flow, resulting in non-uniform pancreatitis. Pancreatic lesions in ANCA-related vasculitis are very rare. Only a few cases have been reported previously. Therefore, we report our case and a review of the literature. PMID:26900301

  1. Elevated serum levels of two anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in a lung cancer patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Okauchi, Shinichiro; Tamura, Tomohiro; Kagohashi, Katsunori; Kawaguchi, Mio; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A 71-year-old woman with arthralgia and lung fibrosis was referred to Mito Kyodo General Hospital (Mito, Japan) for a mass, which was incidentally observed on a chest radiograph. The chest computed tomography scan demonstrated fibrotic lesions in the lower lobes of the lung and a nodule in the left upper lobe. The serum levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and proteinase 3 (PR3)-ANCA were 60.3 and 7.5 U/ml, respectively. A transbronchial biopsy obtained from the nodule in the left upper lobe of the lung revealed a lung adenocarcinoma and the patient underwent standard upper lobectomy of the left lung. Subsequent to the resection, the serum levels of PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA returned to 10.0 and <1.0 U/ml, respectively. Notably, titers of antinuclear antibodies were also decreased during the postoperative course. Although elevated serum ANCA levels are rarely seen in lung cancer, they may be associated with the occurrence of lung cancer in certain patients, as observed in the present case.

  2. A historical study of American patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody negative pauci-immune glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shivani; Havill, John; Rahman, M Hafizur; Geetha, Duvuru

    2016-04-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) play an important role in the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis. The lack of ANCA antibodies may indicate a variation in clinical presentation and outcomes of this disease. We identified 74 adult patients between 1995 and 2009 with the diagnosis of pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. Demographics, histological features, and treatment outcomes were compared between ANCA-positive and ANCA-negative patients. These factors were correlated with renal function at presentation and follow-up. Of the 74 patients, 57 were ANCA-positive, and 17 were ANCA-negative. Demographics and mean Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score were similar between ANCA-negative and ANCA-positive patients at presentation. Renal function was significantly worse at presentation in the ANCA-negative patients (eGFR 16.59 vs. 31.89 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.03). Patients in the ANCA-negative group had a significantly higher interstitial fibrosis score compared to the ANCA-positive group (2.1 vs.1.6, p = 0.04). The median time to remission was shorter in the ANCA-negative patients (51 vs. 78 days, p = 0.01). Long-term renal function and 1-year patient and renal survival were similar between ANCA-negative and ANCA-positive patients. Baseline eGFR, percentage of normal glomeruli, glomerular sclerosis, and tubulointerstitial scarring predicted eGFR at 1 year in both groups similarly. This is the first historical review of American patients with pauci-immune glomerulonephritis, comparing patients with ANCA-negative and ANCA-positive serology. Although ANCA-negative patients present with lower eGFR and more interstitial fibrosis, 1-year and long-term outcomes in both groups are similar.

  3. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-enriched IgG induces adhesion of human T lymphocytes to extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Y; Lider, O; Gilburd, B; Hershkoviz, R; Meroni, P L; Wiik, A; Shoenfeld, Y

    1997-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) can activate neutrophils to adhere to endothelium, degranulate, and cause endothelial cell injury. These data have lead to the hypothesis that the T cell inflammatory response causing the vasculitis in Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is secondary to stimulation of neutrophils by ANCA. So far there is no evidence for a direct effect of ANCA on lymphocytes. The present study was designed to examine whether lymphocytes can be directly stimulated by ANCA to adhere to endothelial extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Human and mouse ANCA-enriched IgG were tested for their ability to increase adhesion of human T lymphocytes to fibronectin, laminin, and intact ECM. Incubation of human T lymphocytes with human ANCA-enriched IgG increased adhesion of the lymphocytes in a dose-dependent manner to fibronectin, laminin, and intact ECM (the percentage adhesion to intact ECM was 55.7 +/- 3.1 and 45.0 +/- 1.0% for lymphocytes incubated with human IgG containing ANCA or control human IgG, respectively; P = 0.0045). The same induction of adhesion to fibronectin, laminin, and intact ECM was observed when the cells were incubated with the F(ab)2 fragment of ANCA-enriched IgG. Similarly, ANCA-enriched IgG produced in mice increased the adhesion of lymphocytes to fibronectin (the percentage adhesion to fibronectin was 29.7 +/- 4.3 and 16.6 +/- 1.9% for lymphocytes incubated with mouse IgG-ANCA or control mouse IgG, respectively; P = 0.0008). These results may suggest that ANCA can directly stimulate lymphocytes to adhere to endothelial ECM and to induce the vasculitic lesions of WG. It remains to be shown by which mechanisms ANCA stimulate lymphocytes to adhere to ECM. PMID:9175913

  4. Mycophenolate mofetil in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis: a prospective pharmacokinetics and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Chaigne, B; Gatault, P; Darrouzain, F; Barbet, C; Degenne, D; François, M; Szymanski, P; Rabot, N; Golea, G; Diot, E; Maillot, F; Lebranchu, Y; Nivet, H; Paintaud, G; Halimi, J-M; Guillevin, L; Büchler, M

    2014-05-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis (AAV) treatment strategy is based on immunosuppressive agents. Little information is available concerning mycophenolic acid (MPA) and the area under the curve (AUC) in patients treated for AAV. We evaluated the variations in pharmacokinetics for MPA in patients with AAV and the relationship between MPA-AUC and markers of the disease. MPA blood concentrations were measured through the enzyme-multiplied immunotechnique (C(0), C(30), C(1), C(2), C(3), C(4), C(6) and C(9)) to determine the AUC. Eighteen patients were included in the study. The median (range) MPA AUC(0-12) was 50·55 (30·9-105·4) mg/h/l. The highest coefficient of determination between MPA AUC and single concentrations was observed with C(3) (P < 0·0001) and C(2) (P < 0·0001) and with C(4) (P < 0·0005) or C(0) (P < 0·001). Using linear regression, the best estimation of MPA AUC was provided by a model including C(30), C(2) and C(4): AUC = 8·5 + 0·77 C(30) + 4·0 C(2) + 1·7 C(4) (P < 0·0001). Moreover, there was a significant relationship between MPA AUC(0-12) and lymphocyte count (P < 0·01), especially CD19 (P < 0·005), CD8 (P < 0·05) and CD56 (P < 0·05). Our results confirm the interindividual variability of MPA AUC in patients treated with MMF in AAV and support a personalized therapy according to blood levels of MPA.

  5. Long-term Prognosis of Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Negative Renal Vasculitis: Cohort Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mi-Yeon; Baek, Seon Ha; Ahn, Shin-Young; Kim, Sejoong; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have reported on the long-term prognosis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-negative renal vasculitis. Between April 2003 and December 2013, 48 patients were diagnosed with renal vasculitis. Their ANCA status was tested using indirect immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. During a median (interquartile range) follow-up duration of 933.5 (257.5–2,079.0) days, 41.7% of patients progressed to end stage renal disease (ESRD) and 43.8% died from any cause. Of 48 patients, 6 and 42 were ANCA-negative and positive, respectively. The rate of ESRD within 3 months was higher in ANCA-negative patients than in ANCA-positive patients (P = 0.038). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, ANCA-negative patients showed shorter renal survival than did ANCA-positive patients (log-rank P = 0.033). In univariate Cox-proportional hazard regression analysis, ANCA-negative patients showed increased risk of ESRD, with a hazard ratio 3.190 (95% confidence interval, 1.028–9.895, P = 0.045). However, the effect of ANCA status on renal survival was not statistically significant in multivariate analysis. Finally, ANCA status did not significantly affect patient survival. In conclusion, long-term patient and renal survival of ANCA-negative renal vasculitis patients did not differ from those of ANCA-positive renal vasculitis patients. Therefore, different treatment strategy depending on ANCA status might be unnecessary. PMID:27051237

  6. Elevated Expression of Pentraxin 3 in Anti-neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Glomerulonephritis with Normal Serum C-reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Risa; Nakai, Kentaro; Fujii, Hideki; Goto, Shunsuke; Hara, Shigeo; Imai, Naofumi; Nishi, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    A 20-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with an elevated serum creatinine level of 1.61 mg/dL and a normal C-reactive protein level of less than 0.1 mg/dL. Her myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) titer was slightly increased at 9.2 U/mL; a kidney biopsy revealed that 23 of 32 glomeruli had crescents. The expression of pentraxin 3 was detected in her kidney and her plasma pentraxin 3 level was elevated at 63.53 ng/mL. Plasma pentraxin 3 levels may be an activity marker for ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis, particularly when serum C-reactive protein levels are within the normal limits.

  7. Dual anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis in a patient with Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Hee; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Kim, Min-Kyung

    2016-09-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that primarily affects exocrine glands. Renal involvement of Sjögren's syndrome may lead to tubulointerstitial disease, whereas secondary glomerulopathies such as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-related pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis are rarely observed. In addition, crescent glomerulonephritis that is simultaneously positive for both myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA and proteinase 3 (PR3)-ANCA has never been reported in Sjögren's syndrome. Here, we report a case of pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis exhibiting positivity for both MPO- and PR3-ANCAs in a patient with primary Sjögren's syndrome. A 71-year-old female was hospitalized for cough, blood-tinged sputum, and dyspnea two weeks after diagnosis with Sjögren's syndrome. On admission, serum anti-nuclear antibody, anti-Ro/SS-A antibody, MPO-ANCA, and PR3-ANCA were all positive, and serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine (Cr) levels were 42.7 and 2.9 mg/dL, respectively. On the seventh day of hospitalization, the patient's serum Cr level was 5.7 mg/dL, indicating rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Renal biopsy resulted in the diagnosis of ANCA-related pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis, for which intravenous methylprednisolone (7 mg/kg/day) was administered for three consecutive days, followed by combination therapy with oral prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) and intravenous cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m(2)). The patient was positive in the Schirmer's I test, and a salivary gland biopsy showed sialadenitis with lympho-plasmacytic infiltrations. On day 28 of hospitalization, the patient was discharged after amelioration of respiratory symptoms and azotemia. At 6 months after discharge, the patient continued to receive appropriate daily medications and was negative for both MPO- and PR3-ANCAs, with a slight elevation in serum Cr levels. PMID:27384449

  8. Relevance of classic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (C-ANCA)-mediated inhibition of proteinase 3-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexation to disease activity in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Dolman, K M; Stegeman, C A; van de Wiel, B A; Hack, C E; von dem Borne, A E; Kallenberg, C G; Goldschmeding, R

    1993-09-01

    In the sera of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), C-ANCA can be detected that are directed against proteinase 3 (PR3). We have previously observed that C-ANCA interfere with PR3 proteolytic activity and with complexation of PR3 with its major physiologic inhibitor, alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT). In the present study we investigated whether this inhibitory effect of C-ANCA on PR3-alpha 1AT complexation correlates with clinical activity of WG. Serial serum samples of eight consecutive patients with histologically proven relapses of WG were tested. At the moment of relapse all sera revealed inhibitory activity towards PR3-alpha 1AT complexation (median 22%, range 10-59%). Disease activity score (r = 0.87, P < 0.02) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (r = 0.66, P < 0.1) correlated with C-ANCA inhibition of PR3-alpha 1AT complexation, while they did not correlate with the C-ANCA titre detected by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) nor with IgG anti-PR3 antibody level measured by ELISA. The inhibitory effect of C-ANCA on PR3-alpha 1AT complexation had risen significantly at the moment of relapse compared with values 3 months (P < 0.05) and 6 months (P < 0.01) before relapse. Eight patients with established WG and positive for C-ANCA but without clinical evidence of relapse served as controls. In this group no inhibitory effect of C-ANCA on PR3-alpha 1AT complexation was observed in 7/8 patients sera. Sera of one control patient contained moderate C-ANCA inhibitory activity towards PR3-alpha 1AT complexation, which remained at a constant level during the 6 months period of observation. Thus, disease activity in WG appears to be more closely related to C-ANCA inhibitory activity towards PR3-alpha 1AT complexation.

  9. T lymphocyte responses to anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA) antigens are present in patients with ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis and persist during disease remission

    PubMed Central

    King, W J; Brooks, C J; Holder, R; Hughes, P; Adu, D; Savage, C O S

    1998-01-01

    ANCA with specificity for myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3) are present in patients with systemic vasculitis. The aim of this work was to determine whether such patients have T cell responses to these antigens and whether these responses are related to disease activity. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 45 patients and 19 controls were cultured with ANCA antigens and proliferation measured. The antigens used were heat-inactivated (HI) MPO, HI PR3, native (non-HI) PR3, HI whole α-granules, and 25 overlapping peptides covering the entire PR3 sequence. Significant responses to both whole PR3 preparations were seen from patient and control groups, and to the α-granules from the patient group. Patients responded at all stages of disease: active, remitting, treated or untreated. Only two patients responded significantly to MPO. Responses were significantly higher with the patient group than the control group to all four whole ANCA antigens. Responses to those PR3 peptides containing epitopes known to be recognized by ANCA were detected from one patient. Thus, these studies demonstrate that T cells from vasculitis patients can proliferate to PR3 and occasionally to associated ANCA antigens. Further, responses may persist even after disease remission has been achieved. PMID:9649227

  10. A novel class of autoantigens of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis: the lysosomal membrane glycoprotein h-lamp-2 in neutrophil granulocytes and a related membrane protein in glomerular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis (NCGN) is frequently associated with circulating antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA). It is established that ANCA are specific for soluble enzymes of granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMN), such as myeloperoxidase (MPO) or protease 3 (PR3). The purpose of this study was to identify membrane proteins of PMNs, and/or glomerular cells, as additional autoantigenic ANCA targets. When membrane protein fractions were prepared from PMNs and isolated human glomeruli, and immunoblotted with ANCA sera of NCGN patients, two bands with apparent molecular masses of 170 and 80-110 kD (gp170/80-110) were labeled in PMNs, and a 130-kD glycoprotein (gp130) in glomeruli. Gp130 was purified, and monoclonal and rabbit antibodies (Abs) were produced which showed the same double specificity as the patient's ANCA. Using these probes, evidence was provided that gp170/80-110 is identical with human lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (h-lamp-2), because both proteins were immunologically cross-reactive and screening of a cDNA expression library from human promyelocytic leukemia cells with anti- gp130 Ab yielded a clone derived from h-lamp-2. Gp170/80-110 was localized primarily in granule membranes of resting PMNs, and was translocated to the cell surfaces by activation with FMLP. By contrast, gp130 was localized in the surface membranes of endothelial cells of human glomerular and renal interstitial capillaries, rather than in lysosomes, as found for h-lamp-2. Potential clinical relevance of autoantibodies to gp170/80-110 and gp130 was assessed in a preliminary trial, in which ANCA sera of patients (n = 16) with NCGN were probed with purified or recombinant antigens. Specific reactivity was detected in approximately 90% of cases with active phases of NCGN, and frequently also in combination with autoantibodies specific for PR3 or MPO. Collectively, these data provide evidence that h-lamp-2 in PMNs and a

  11. [Autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yasushi

    2005-06-01

    The autoantibody test gives significant information for diagnosis of autoimmune diseases. Since the finding of the LE-cell in 1948, dozens of autoantibodies have been found. Anti nuclear antibody (ANA) is the essential test for the screening of autoantibodies. Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) is the conventional method for the detection of ANA. IIF can detect a wide spectrum of ANA and gives abundant information obtained from a staining pattern. However under the recent circumstances of using advanced fluorescent microscopes and reagents we often have difficulty interpreting positive results seen in normal individuals and in detailed staining patterns. ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), detecting disease specific autoantibodies alone, is one solution. Some antibodies such as anti-DNA or anti-ENA (extractable nuclear antigen) have a strong relation to specific diseases. These autoantibodies have been detected by IIF, RIA (radioimmunoassay) or DID (double immune diffusion). With the progress of molecular biology many autoantigens have been characterized. Now ELISA is a typical way to detect autoantibodies because purified or recombinant antigens are easily available. Though RF (rheumatoid factor) is the historical autoantibody detected in RA patients, the specificity to RA is low. The new anti-CCP is promising from its high specificity and sensitivity. Now we can choose various kind of autoantibody tests, not only conventional ones but also newly developed ones. For diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune diseases, understanding of both clinical significance and methodology is important.

  12. Interference of Wegener's granulomatosis autoantibodies with neutrophil Proteinase 3 activity.

    PubMed

    van de Wiel, B A; Dolman, K M; van der Meer-Gerritsen, C H; Hack, C E; von dem Borne, A E; Goldschmeding, R

    1992-12-01

    Classic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (C-ANCA) are disease-specific markers of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). The possible pathogenetic role of these autoantibodies, which are directed against Proteinase 3 (PR3), is not yet clear. We studied the effect of C-ANCA on PR3 proteolytic activity and on the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT). C-ANCA IgG from eight patients with active WG significantly inhibited PR3 proteolytic activity, particularly towards elastin (median 84.2% inhibition). C-ANCA IgG significantly inhibited the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1AT (median 58.8% inhibition). Moreover, addition of purified PR3 to C-ANCA-positive sera from WG patients yielded less complexes with alpha 1AT (median 44.8%) compared with sera containing perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (P-ANCA) or ANCA-negative sera. These findings indicate the existence of a hitherto unknown property of C-ANCA, which may be of importance in the pathogenesis of WG.

  13. Autoantibodies in the diagnosis and management of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J; Norman, Gary L

    2003-10-01

    Autoantibodies are nonpathogenic manifestations of immune reactivity, and they may occur in acute and chronic liver diseases. Autoantibodies may be consequences rather than causes of the liver injury, and they should be regarded as diagnostic clues rather than etiologic markers. Conventional autoantibodies used in the categorization of autoimmune liver disease are antinuclear antibodies, smooth muscle antibodies, antibodies to liver/kidney microsome type 1, antimitochondrial antibodies, and atypical perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Ancillary autoantibodies that enhance diagnostic specificity, have prognostic connotation, or direct treatment are antibodies to endomysium, tissue transglutaminase, histones, doubled-stranded DNA, and actin. Autoantibodies that have an emerging diagnostic and prognostic significance are antibodies to soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas, asialoglycoprotein receptor, liver cytosol type 1, and nuclear pore complex antigens. Autoantibodies of uncertain clinical value that remain under investigation are antibodies to chromatin, lactoferrin, and Saccharomyces cervisiae. Continued recognition and characterization of autoantibodies should improve diagnostic precision, provide prognostic indices, and elucidate target autoantigens. These advances may in turn clarify pathogenic mechanisms, facilitate the development of animal models, and generate novel site-specific therapies. PMID:14506390

  14. Pathophysiological importance of anti-neutrophil antibodies in vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Neil; Erwig, Lars-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of Review In this review we endeavour to provide a brief overview of the recent advances in understanding of how anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) contribute to the pathophysiology of Vasculitis. Recent Findings Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of ANCA associated vasculitides. Compelling evidence from in vitro studies and experimental models in conjunction with clinical trials has confirmed that ANCA directly contribute to the evolution and progression of the disease process. A new ANCA, directed against human lysosome membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2), has recently been described as a sensitive and specific marker for renal vasculitis and we discuss its potential impact for diagnosis and therapy. Furthermore, high throughput approaches are starting to identify genetic patterns that may identify patients likely to respond to specific therapy or having a high probability of relapse. Summary It has become increasingly clear, over the last two decades that ANCA IgG is pathogenic in vasculitis. Novel therapies aimed at selected cell populations or blocking specific pathogenic pathways offer hope for more selectively treating this heterogeneous group of patients, while avoiding non-specific immunosuppression and its adverse effects. PMID:20975556

  15. Human autoantibodies to diacyl-phosphatidylethanolamine recognize a specific set of discrete cytoplasmic domains

    PubMed Central

    Laurino, C C F C; Fritzler, M J; Mortara, R A; Silva, N P; Almeida, I C; Andrade, L E C

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize a novel human autoantibody–autoantigen system represented as cytoplasmic discrete speckles (CDS) in indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). A distinct CDS IIF pattern represented by 3–20 discrete speckles dispersed throughout the cytoplasm was identified among other cytoplasmic speckled IIF patterns. The cytoplasmic domains labelled by human anti-CDS-1 antibodies did not co-localize with endosome/lysosome markers EEA1 and LAMP-2, but showed partial co-localization with glycine–tryptophan bodies (GWB). CDS-1 sera did not react with several cellular extracts in immunoblotting and did not immunoprecipitate recombinant GW182 or EEA1 proteins. The typical CDS-1 IIF labelling pattern was abolished after delipidation of HEp-2 cells. Moreover, CDS-1 sera reacted strongly with a lipid component co-migrating with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC)-immunostaining of HEp-2 cell total lipid extracts. The CDS-1 major molecular targets were established by electrospray ionization–mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), HPTLC-immunostaining and chemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as diacyl-PE species, containing preferentially a cis-C18 : 1 fatty acid chain at C-2 of the glycerol moiety, namely 1,2-cis-C18 : 1-PE and 1-C16 : 0-2-cis-C18 : 1-PE. The clinical association of CDS-1 sera included a variety of systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases but they were also observed in patients with no evidence of autoimmune disease. PMID:16487257

  16. Wegener's granulomatosis autoantibodies identify a novel diisopropylfluorophosphate-binding protein in the lysosomes of normal human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Goldschmeding, R; van der Schoot, C E; ten Bokkel Huinink, D; Hack, C E; van den Ende, M E; Kallenberg, C G; von dem Borne, A E

    1989-11-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) specifically associated with Wegener's granulomatosis were found to be directed against a saline-soluble glycoprotein triplet that migrates on SDS gels as distinct bands of Mr 29,000, 30,500, and 32,000 and is present in the azurophilic granules. This antigen was specifically recognized by all cytoplasmic-staining (C)-ANCA-positive sera from patients with Wegener's disease. C-ANCA antigen bound [3H]diisopropylfluorophosphate, which indicates that it is a serine protease, but it could clearly be distinguished from the serine proteases elastase and cathepsin G. Stimulation of cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils with FMLP induced release of C-ANCA antigen. This indicates that in vivo C-ANCA might interact with the C-ANCA antigen after its release upon inflammatory stimulation. We further demonstrate that in some perinuclear staining (P-ANCA) patients' sera autoantibodies against other myeloid lysosomal enzymes can be detected, such as antimyeloperoxidase and antielastase. C-ANCA and P-ANCA thus represent a novel class of autoantibodies directed against myeloid lysosomal enzymes. The originally described Wegener-specific C-ANCA show an apparently uniform specificity for the 29,000 serine protease. In contrast, P-ANCA may recognize myeloperoxidase as well as elastase and/or other antigens.

  17. Serum antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies in inflammatory bowel disease are mainly associated with ulcerative colitis. A correlation study between perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies and clinical parameters, medical, and surgical treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Oudkerk Pool, M; Ellerbroek, P M; Ridwan, B U; Goldschmeding, R; von Blomberg, B M; Peña, A S; Dolman, K M; Bril, H; Dekker, W; Nauta, J J

    1993-01-01

    Perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies have recently been demonstrated in the sera of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Three hundred and sixty six sera obtained from 120 patients with ulcerative colitis, 105 patients suffering from Crohn's disease and 49 non-inflammatory bowel disease controls were tested in two laboratories, using an indirect immunofluorescence assay. In addition, a fixed-neutrophil enzyme linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA) was evaluated in one of the two laboratories. The results in the immunofluorescence test showed a high degree of correlation between the two laboratories (Kappa coefficient = 0.8). Ninety five of the 120 (79%) ulcerative colitis patients had a positive test whereas only 14 of the 105 (13%) patients with Crohn's disease were positive. Sera from four patients suffering from primary sclerosing cholangitis were positive as well as four of the 45 control sera (9%). The sensitivity of the perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody immunofluorescence test for the diagnosis of ulcerative colitis was 0.75 with a specificity of 0.88 and a positive predictive value of 0.88 (all sera). In the ELISA technique 37 of 94 ulcerative colitis sera and one of the 68 Crohn's disease sera were positive. In the control group only one of the patients suffering from primary sclerosing cholangitis reacted positively (32 non-inflammatory bowel disease sera tested). The ELISA technique had a high specificity (0.97), but a low sensitivity (0.39). There was no relation of perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in ulcerative colitis patients or in Crohn's disease patients with disease activity, duration of illness, localisation, extent of disease, previous bowel operations or medical treatment. The clinical significance of perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positive and negative subsets in both groups of patients thus remains unexplained. Our study confirms that determination of serum antineutrophil

  18. Anti-neutrophil cell antibodies in newly diagnosed patients with type-1-diabetes.

    PubMed

    Parlapiano, C; Marangi, M; Campana, E; Giovanniello, T; Pantone, P; Suraci, C; Sanguigni, S

    1999-01-01

    Both anti neutrophil cell antibodies and anti endothelial cell antibodies were found in 7 out of 30 newly-diagnosed type-1 diabetic patients. This confirms the abnormal activation of the immunological system in the early stage of type-1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:10482047

  19. Cinical and pathological characteristics of Chinese patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody associated systemic vasculitides: a study of 426 patients from a single centre

    PubMed Central

    Chen, M; Yu, F; Zhang, Y; Zhao, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) are serological markers of ANCA associated systemic vasculitides (AASV), which is one of the most common multisystem autoimmune diseases. Features of Chinese patients with AASV have not been fully investigated. Objective: To analyse the clinical and pathological characteristics of Chinese patients with AASV. Methods: 426 Chinese patients with AASV diagnosed in the past eight years were retrospectively studied and their clinical and pathological data were analysed. Results: Of the 426 patients, 87 (20.4%) were Wegener's granulomatosis, 337 (79.1%) were microscopic polyangiitis and two (0.5%) were Churg-Strauss syndrome. Only 201 of 426 (47.2%) patients were diagnosed within three months. Clinically, the patients had multisystem involvement. Altogether 371 of 426 (87.1%) had kidney involvement and 260 of 426 (61.0%) had lung involvement. The prevalences of renal involvement and fatigue were significantly higher in patients with MPO-ANCA than that in patients with PR3-ANCA; the prevalences of ophthalmic, nasal involvement, rash, and arthragia were significantly higher in patients with PR3-ANCA than those in patients with MPO-ANCA. The one and five year death rates were 13.1% and 22.4%, respectively. The percentage of patients progressing to end stage renal disease at one and five years was 15.9% and 27.1%, respectively. Conclusions: AASV is not a rare autoimmune disease in Chinese people. Kidney and lung were the most vulnerable organs. For patients with multiorgan damage, an ANCA test should be performed to make an early diagnosis and to start treatment in time. PMID:16272238

  20. Longitudinal Study of a Human Drug-Induced Model of Autoantibody to Cytoplasmic Rods/Rings following HCV Therapy with Ribavirin and Interferon-α

    PubMed Central

    Keppeke, Gerson Dierley; Nunes, Eunice; Ferraz, Maria Lucia Gomes; Silva, Eduardo Antônio Benedito; Granato, Celso; Chan, Edward K. L.; Andrade, Luís Eduardo C.

    2012-01-01

    Background A novel pattern in the indirect immunofluorescence antinuclear antibody assay on HEp-2 cells (IIF-HEp-2) characterized by cytoplasmic rods and rings (RR) was reported in HCV patients, but stringent disease specificity studies and longitudinal analysis are lacking. We investigated the clinical significance of anti-RR in an HCV cohort with up to a 12-month treatment follow up. Methodology/Results 597 patients (342 HCV, 55 HCV/HIV, 200 non-HCV) were screened and titered for anti-RR. Serial samples were available from 78 of 176 treated and 27 of 166 untreated patients. Anti-RR was detected in 14.1% of 342 HCV patients, 9.1% of 55 HCV/HIV, 3.4% of 29 Hepatitis B, and none of 171 non-HCV (p<0.0001; HCV versus non-HCV). Anti-RR was present in 38% of 108 patients receiving interferon-α/ribavirin, but none in 26 receiving either interferon-α or ribavirin, or 166 untreated patients (p<0.0001). Other IIF-HEp-2 patterns were more frequently associated with interferon-α treatment alone (52.2%) as compared to interferon-α/ribavirin (25%), ribavirin alone (33.3%), and no therapy (26.5%). Anti-RR frequency was not associated with sex, age, ethnicity, HCV genotype or viral load. Anti-RR occurred only after initiation of treatment, beginning as early as 1 month (6%), but by the sixth month >47% tested positive for anti-RR. The anti-RR titer generally increased with sustained treatment and remained high in 53% of patients. After treatment, anti-RR titer was negative in 41%. Non-responders to HCV therapy were 77% in anti-RR-positive versus 64% in anti-RR-negative patients. Response to treatment was not associated with anti-RR titer or the dynamics of anti-RR reactivity during and after treatment. Conclusions The exquisite association of anti-RR reactivity with combined interferon-α/ribavirin therapy in HCV patients represents a unique model for drug-induced autoantibody generation in humans as demonstrated by the fact that a significant fraction of patients who have

  1. Auto-Antibodies and Their Association with Clinical Findings in Women Diagnosed with Microscopic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsson, Bodil

    2013-01-01

    Background Microscopic colitis (MC) is a disease manifested by diarrhoea and is divided into collagenous and lymphocytic colitis. The aetiology is unknown, but auto-immunity is suggested. Auto-antibodies have been only rarely examined in this entity. The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence of auto-antibodies, and to examine associations between the presence of antibodies and clinical findings. Methods and Findings Women with MC verified by biopsy and younger than 73 years, at any Department of Gastroenterology, in the district of Skåne, between 2002 and 2010 were invited to participate in this study. The patients were asked to complete both a questionnaire describing their medical history and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). Blood samples were collected. Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), and antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD), islet antigens-like insulin 2 (anti-IA2), thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), and thyrotropin receptor (TRAK) were analysed. Of 240 women identified, 133 were finally included in the study, median age 63 (59–67) years. Apart from the MC diagnosis, 52% also suffered from irritable bowel syndrome, 31% from hypertension and 31% from allergy. The prevalence of ANA (14%), ASCA IgG (13%), and anti-TPO antibodies (14%) for these patients was slightly higher than for the general population, and were found together with other concomitant diseases. Patients had more of all gastrointestinal symptoms compared with norm values, irrespective of antibody expression. Conclusions Women with MC have a slightly increased prevalence of some auto-antibodies. These antibodies are not associated with symptoms, but are expressed in patients with concomitant diseases, obscuring the pathophysiology and clinical picture of MC. PMID:23776613

  2. [Rituximab therapy in the treatment of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) -positive interstitial pneumonia: case report].

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Tokiko; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Kumon, Saeko; Akiyama, Kenichi; Iwabuchi, Yuko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Takahito; Takei, Takashi; Nitta, Kosaku

    2016-01-01

    We report a patient treated with rituximab for interstitial pneumonia (IP) associated with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and who was undergoing hemodialysis. A 59-year-old woman who had been treated with tacrolimus for 1 year for rheumatic arthritis was referred to the Department of Nephrology for fatigue, fever, weight loss, and rapidly developing renal dysfunction. On the first admission, severe renal dysfunction, proteinuria, hematuria, and an elevated titer of MPO-ANCA were observed, and the woman was diagnosed with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis because of MPA. At that point, IP was found to be present but not active. Although steroid semipulse therapy following an initial prednisolone (PSL) administration of 40 mg/day, IVCY, and plasma exchange were administered, renal dysfunction did not recover, and the patient required maintenance hemodialysis. Upon discharge, a high titer of MPO-ANCA was continuously observed. Nine months after the initiation of hemodialysis, respiratory discomfort and desaturation developed. Interstitial shadow and ground glass opacity were seen on a CT scan, and the patient was diagnosed with exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia caused by MPA recurrence. At the second admission, acute findings identified by imaging techniques had improved. However, the high titer of MPO-ANCA continued in spite of the steroid semi-pulse therapy following PSL administration, and rituximab corresponding to 200 mg/weekly for 1 month was also administered. The dose of rituximab was decreased subsequently because the patient was judged to be compromised by the hemodialysis. At the same time, internal administration of sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim was initiated. After the rituximab treatment, MPO-ANCA antibodies gradually decreased, and the respiratory condition improved. Five months after the rituximab treatment, respiratory dysfunction recurred. Based on the CT findings and a high level of β-D-glycan, the patient was diagnosed with ARDS due to pneumocystis pneumonia. In this case, rituximab was effective for IP due to MPA, but pneumocystis pneumonia could not be prevented in spite of prophylactic antibiotics. This case suggests that deliberative dose adjustments, careful patient observation, and prophylactic measures for infection are critical in rituximab treatment. PMID:26950980

  3. Circulating anti-brain autoantibodies in schizophrenia and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Margari, Francesco; Petruzzelli, Maria Giuseppina; Mianulli, Rossana; Campa, Maria Gloria; Pastore, Adriana; Tampoia, Marilina

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, an inflammatory autoimmune process, autoantibodies mediated, has been porposed as having a role in the development of different psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to assay organ-specific and non organ-specific circulating autoantibodies in schizophrenia, mood disorders and healthy controls; among organ-specific autoantibodies we focused on different fluorescence patterns of anti-brain autoantibodies against rat and monkey's sections of hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebellum. Serum samples from 50 acutelly ill patients (30 schizophrenia and 20 mood disorders) and from 20 healthy controls were collected. Autoantibodies were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and chemiluminescence immunoassay. We found a significant difference for circulating autoantibodies to hypothalamus, hippocampus and cerebellum and for anti-nuclear autoantibodies in both schizophrenia and mood disorders when compared to the control group. Referring to the two groups of patients only, circulating antibodies anti-hypothalamus were found significant higher in mood disorders rather than in schizophrenia, with specific regard to nuclear and cytoplasmic staining of the neurons. These data suggest an aspecific diffuse brain involvement of anti-brain autoantibodies in acute phases of schizophrenia and mood disorders. The greater involvement of the hypothalamus in mood disorders highlights the close relationship between autoimmunity, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and affective disorders.

  4. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides.

  5. [Autoantibodies in systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Żebryk, Paweł; Puszczewicz, Mariusz

    2015-05-22

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare connective tissue disorder, which leads to progressive fibrosis of many organs. Its course is characterized by the presence of two classical autoantibodies: anti-topoisomerase I (ATA, Scl-70) and anti-centromere (ACA). In recent years, the presence of antibodies against a wider range of antigens was demonstrated, namely: RNA polymerase III, fibrillarin, NOR90, Th/To, PM-Scl-100, PM-Scl-75, Ku, PDGFR, but their clinical significance is relatively little known and until recently the methods of their assessment were available only in specialized laboratories. More and more reports in the literature indicate existence of links between the presence of selected autoantibodies with clinical correlations i.e. anti-RNA polymerase III with scleroderma renal crisis or anti-Ku and myositis, arthritis and joint contractures. The importance of autoantibodies in the diagnostic process was underlined by their inclusion into the new ACR/EULAR 2013 classification criteria for systemic sclerosis. This work reviews the current knowledge on the clinical significance of autoantibodies in systemic sclerosis.

  6. [Autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Motomura, Masakatsu; Narita Masuda, Tomoko

    2013-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused by the failure of neuromuscular transmission mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies (Abs). Generally, patients with MG are divided into 3 groups: (1) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive MG (AChR-MG: 80%), (2) muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase antibody-positive MG (MuSK-MG: 5-10%), which are AChR-associated transmembrane post-synaptic proteins involved in AChR aggregation, and (3) double-seronegative MG. In 2011, autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4) were identified in Japanese MG patients, and thereafter, have been reported in Germany and USA. We developed a simple technique termed Gaussia luciferase immunoprecipitation (GLIP) for detecting the antibodies to Lrp4. Our results showed that 9 generalized MG patients out of 300 without AChR Ab were positive for Lrp4 antibodies. These antibodies inhibit the binding of Lrp4 to its ligand and predominantly belong to the IgG1 subclass. In other studies, Lrp4 Ab-positive sera inhibited agrin-induced aggregation of AChRs in cultured myotubes, suggesting a pathogenic role in the dysfunction of the neuromuscular endplate. Further understanding of the structure and function of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) through newly discovered autoantibodies may provide specific clinical information and treatment for MG. PMID:23568991

  7. Autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Sener, Asli Gamze

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology characterized by clinical, histological, and immunological features, generally including circulating autoantibodies and a high total serum and/or gamma globulin. Liver-related autoantibodies are very significant for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and the sclerosing cholangitis types in adults and children. This article intends to review recent studies that investigate autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases from a microbiological perspective.

  8. TSH RECEPTOR AUTOANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, Krzysztof; Morshed, Syed A.; Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F.

    2009-01-01

    Thyrotropin receptor autoantibodies (TSHR-Abs) of the stimulating variety are the hallmark of Graves’ disease. The presence of immune defects leading to synthesis of TSHR-Abs causes hyperthyroidism and is associated with other extrathyroidal manifestations. Further characterization of these antibodies has now been made possible by the generation of monoclonal antibodies with this unique stimulating capacity as well as similar TSHR-Abs not associated with hyperthyroidism. Their present classification divides TSHR-Abs into stimulating, blocking (competing with TSH binding) and neutral (no signaling). Recent studies using monoclonal TSHR-Abs has revealed that stimulating and blocking antibodies bind to the receptor using mostly conformational epitopes, whilst neutral antibodies utilize exclusively linear peptides. Subtle differences in epitopes for stimulating and blocking antibodies account for the diversity of their biological actions. Recently non-classical signaling elicited by neutral antibodies has also been described, raising the need for a new classification of TSHR-Abs. PMID:19332151

  9. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy and autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Encephalopathy occasionally occurs in association with thyroid disorders, but most of these are treatable. These encephalopathies include a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with hypothyroidism, called myxedema encephalopathy. Moreover, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) has been recognized as a new clinical disease based on an autoimmune mechanism associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Steroid treatment was successfully administered to these patients. Recently, we discovered that the serum autoantibodies against the NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) are highly specific diagnostic biomarkers for HE. Further, we analyzed serum anti-NAE autoantibodies and the clinical features in many cases of HE from institutions throughout Japan and other countries. Approximately half of assessed HE patients carry anti-NAE antibodies. The age was widely distributed with 2 peaks (20-30 years and 50-70 years). Most HE patients were in euthyroid states, and all patients had anti-thyroid (TG) antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies. Anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies were observed in some cases. The common neuropsychiatry features are consciousness disturbance and psychosis, followed by cognitive dysfunction, involuntary movements, seizures, and ataxia. Abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow on brain SPECT were common findings, whereas abnormal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rare. HE patients have various clinical phenotypes such as the acute encephalopathy form, the chronic psychiatric form, and other particular clinical forms, including limbic encephalitis, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)-like form. The cerebellar ataxic form of HE clinically mimics spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and is characterized by the absence of nystagmus, absent or mild cerebellar atrophy, and lazy background activities on EEG. Taken together, these data suggest that the possibility of

  10. Autoantibody profiling in APS.

    PubMed

    Roggenbuck, D; Somma, V; Schierack, P; Borghi, M O; Meroni, P L

    2014-10-01

    The international consensus for the classification of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) requires clinical and laboratory criteria to be considered at an equal level for diagnosing APS. Thus, detection of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) being a hallmark of APS has been the object of intensive investigation over the past 40 years. However, appropriate detection of aPL still remains a laboratory challenge due to their heterogeneity comprising autoantibodies reactive to different phospholipid-binding plasma proteins, such as beta-2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI) and prothrombin. The relevance of aPL interacting with phospholipids other than cardiolipin (CL, diphosphatidylglycerol), such as phosphatidylserine (PS), remains elusive with regard to the diagnosis of APS. Recently, the concept of aPL profiling has been introduced to assess the risk of thrombotic complications in patients with APS. New assay techniques, apart from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) recommended by the international consensus for the classification of APS, have been proposed for multiplexing of aPL testing. Line immunoassays (LIAs) employing a novel hydrophobic solid phase for the simultaneous detection of different aPL seem to be an intriguing alternative. We evaluated a novel multiplex LIA employing a hydrophobic membrane coated with different phospholipid (PL)-binding proteins or PLs. The performance characteristics of this new multiplexing assay technique demonstrated its usefulness for aPL profiling.

  11. Epitope specificity determines pathogenicity and detectability in ANCA-associated vasculitis

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3) are detectable in >90% of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCA titers do not correlate well with disease activity. In vivo and in vi...

  12. Autoantibodies in a Three-Year-Old Girl with Visceral Leishmaniasis: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall

    PubMed Central

    Pouladfar, Gholamreza; Jafarpour, Zahra; Pourabbas, Bahman; Geramizadeh, Bita; Dashti, Anahita Sanaei

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), a life-threatening parasitic infection, is endemic in the Mediterranean region. Diagnosis of VL is based on epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory findings. However, sometimes, clinical features and laboratory findings overlap with those of autoimmune diseases. In some cases, autoantibodies are detected in patients with VL and this could be a potential diagnostic pitfall. In this study, we have reported on a three-year-old girl from a VL-endemic area in Iran, who presented with prolonged fever and splenomegaly. Bone marrow examination, serologic tests, and the molecular PCR assay were performed; however, results were inconclusive. The levels of anti-double stranded DNA, cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody, and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody were elevated and, at the end, splenic biopsy was performed. The splenic tissue PCR test detected the DNA of Leishmania infantum. The patient's condition improved with anti-Leishmania therapy, and the autoantibodies disappeared within the following four months. Clinical presentations and laboratory findings of VL and autoimmune diseases may overlap in some patients. PMID:27418985

  13. Autoantibodies in a Three-Year-Old Girl with Visceral Leishmaniasis: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Pouladfar, Gholamreza; Jafarpour, Zahra; Babaei, Amir Hossein; Pourabbas, Bahman; Geramizadeh, Bita; Dashti, Anahita Sanaei

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), a life-threatening parasitic infection, is endemic in the Mediterranean region. Diagnosis of VL is based on epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory findings. However, sometimes, clinical features and laboratory findings overlap with those of autoimmune diseases. In some cases, autoantibodies are detected in patients with VL and this could be a potential diagnostic pitfall. In this study, we have reported on a three-year-old girl from a VL-endemic area in Iran, who presented with prolonged fever and splenomegaly. Bone marrow examination, serologic tests, and the molecular PCR assay were performed; however, results were inconclusive. The levels of anti-double stranded DNA, cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody, and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody were elevated and, at the end, splenic biopsy was performed. The splenic tissue PCR test detected the DNA of Leishmania infantum. The patient's condition improved with anti-Leishmania therapy, and the autoantibodies disappeared within the following four months. Clinical presentations and laboratory findings of VL and autoimmune diseases may overlap in some patients. PMID:27418985

  14. Cytoplasmic dynein nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, K. Kevin; Fisher, Elizabeth M.C.; Gibbons, Ian R.; Hays, Thomas S.; Holzbaur, Erika L.F.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Porter, Mary E.; Schroer, Trina A.; Vaughan, Kevin T.; Witman, George B.; King, Stephen M.; Vallee, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of names has been used in the literature for the subunits of cytoplasmic dynein complexes. Thus, there is a strong need for a more definitive consensus statement on nomenclature. This is especially important for mammalian cytoplasmic dyneins, many subunits of which are encoded by multiple genes. We propose names for the mammalian cytoplasmic dynein subunit genes and proteins that reflect the phylogenetic relationships of the genes and the published studies clarifying the functions of the polypeptides. This nomenclature recognizes the two distinct cytoplasmic dynein complexes and has the flexibility to accommodate the discovery of new subunits and isoforms. PMID:16260502

  15. Myositis autoantibodies and clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ghirardello, Anna; Borella, Elisabetta; Beggio, Marianna; Franceschini, Franco; Fredi, Micaela; Doria, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Autoantibodies are powerful diagnostic tools in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, especially for confirming the diagnosis and contributing to the definition of disease subsets. They are present in over 80 % of patients with immuno-mediated myositis and directed towards ubiquitously expressed intracellular complexes. Most of these autoantibodies are reported also in other autoimmune diseases, while some are considered myositis-specific. Myositis autoantibodies are traditionally categorized in two groups, based on their diagnostic accuracy: myositis-specific antibodies (MSA) and myositis-associated antibodies (MAA), the latter mostly occurring in myositis-overlap syndromes. Besides the so-called traditional MSA, including anti-synthetases, anti-SRP and anti-Mi-2 antibodies, additional newly conceived immune targets have been recently identified, mostly in patients with severe forms of dermatomyositis or necrotizing myopathy. They mainly encompass enzymatic proteins essentially involved in the regulation of gene transcription or post-translational modifications, i.e., TIF1-γ, NXP-2, MDA5, SAE and HMGCR. Among the MAA, anti-PM/Scl and anti-Ku characterize an overlap polydermatomyositis/systemic sclerosis syndrome with severe interstitial lung involvement.

  16. Standardisation of the factor H autoantibody assay.

    PubMed

    Watson, Rachael; Lindner, Susanne; Bordereau, Pauline; Hunze, Eva-Maria; Tak, Federico; Ngo, Stéphanie; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnes; Marchbank, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The screening of all atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS) patients for factor H autoantibodies is best practice. However, there is no consensus assay for the reporting of factor H autoantibody titres. In this study, three European complement laboratories with expertise in the field of autoantibody testing address this by systematically evaluating several ELISA methods used for the detection of factor H autoantibodies. All methods tested adequately detect high titre samples. However, this study recommends the Paris method for the detection and reporting of factor H autoantibodies to be used when setting up a factor H autoantibody screen. The importance of individual sample background subtraction in these ELISA tests was established. The use of a relative or arbitrary unit index with a common positive and negative serum allowed for consistent comparison of findings from different test centres. Therefore, it is recommended that a standard arbitrary unit scale based on a titration curve from a common positive anti-serum be adopted to allow future establishment of the relative importance of particular titres of factor H autoantibodies in aHUS. Systematic assay for the presence of factor H autoantibodies in patients using the Paris method will provide the longitudinal analysis needed to fully establish the importance of factor H autoantibodies in disease. This will feed into additional research to clarify whether additional factors have a bearing on the phenotype/outcome of autoimmune aHUS. PMID:23891327

  17. Autoantibodies: diagnostic fingerprints and etiologic perplexities.

    PubMed

    Fritzler, M J

    1997-02-01

    Autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic rheumatic diseases, organ-specific autoimmune diseases and paraneoplastic syndromes. Cell biologists have used autoantibodies as probes to define the structure and function of novel macromolecules and to determine the chromosomal location of their respective genes. The observation that many autoantibodies appear before the clinical expression of disease suggests that they are not epiphenomena. Some autoantibodies are disease-specific markers and are in aid to establishing a diagnosis. Although it has been difficult to link autoantibodies to pathogenesis, they can be used to predict disease progression and outcome. For example, autoantibodies directed against topoisomerase are associated with progression of scleroderma to diffuse skin involvement and severe systemic disease, whereas antibodies to centromere proteins predict a more slowly progressive disease and development of a limited variant of scleroderma. Certain models of autoantibody production hold promise of a clearer understanding of the mechanisms that underlie autoimmunity. Drugs such as procainamide and hydralazine induce the production of chromatin autoantibodies. Exposure to heavy metals (e.g., mercury) is also linked to the development of autoantibodies. The data provide evidence that the autoimmune response is driven by autoantigens, which are multimolecular complexes involved in essential cellular functions.

  18. Are There Enhanced MBP Autoantibodies in Autism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libbey, Jane E.; Coon, Hilary H.; Kirkman, Nikki J.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Miller, Judith N.; Stevenson, Edward K.; Lainhart, Janet E.; McMahon, William M.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Autoantibodies to central nervous system antigens, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), may play a role in autism. We measured autoantibody titers to MBP in children with autism, both classic onset and regressive onset forms, controls (healthy age- and gender-matched) and individuals with Tourette syndrome via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We…

  19. Cytoplasmic Viral Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    den Boon, Johan A.; Diaz, Arturo; Ahlquist, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Many viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm compartmentalize their genome replication and transcription in organelle-like structures that enhance replication efficiency and protection from host defenses. In particular, recent studies with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses have further elucidated the ultrastructure of membrane-bounded RNA replication complexes and their close coordination with virion assembly and budding. The structure, function and assembly of some positive-strand RNA virus replication complexes have parallels and potential evolutionary links with the replicative cores of double-strand RNA virus and retrovirus virions, and more general similarities with the replication factories of cytoplasmic DNA viruses. PMID:20638644

  20. Autoantibodies as predictive tools in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nihtyanova, Svetlana I; Denton, Christopher P

    2010-02-01

    The pathogenetic role of autoantibodies in systemic sclerosis (SSc) remains unclear, but these autoantibodies have been established as strong predictors of disease outcome and the pattern of organ complications in patients with this condition. The three most frequently observed types of SSc-specific autoantibody-anti-centromere antibodies, anti-topoisomerase antibodies and anti-RNA polymerase III antibodies-are found in over 50% of patients; the presence of each is generally exclusive of the others. Although a lot less frequently observed, antibodies directed against U3RNP and Th/To are also specific for scleroderma, whereas anti-Pm/Scl, anti-Ku and anti-U1RNP antibodies are seen mainly in patients with overlap syndromes. Up to 11% of patients with SSc can test negative for antinuclear antibodies. Strong links exist between autoantibody specificities and disease presentation and outcome, which make autoantibodies essential assessment tools in patients with SSc.

  1. High levels of autoantibodies against drug-metabolizing enzymes in SLA/LP-positive AIH-1 sera.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Masakazu; Tanaka, Yuta; Kuno, Takuya; Matsufuji, Tamiko; Matsufuji, Senya; Murakami, Yasuko; Mizutani, Takaharu

    2004-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis type 1 (AIH-1) is characterized by the detection of smooth muscle autoantibodies, antinuclear antibodies and antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies, and AIH-2 is characterized by the presence of autoantibodies against LKM, which contain drug-metabolizing enzymes. In this study, we measured the levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes in AIH-1 patients (ANA-positive). We exhaustively investigated the level of autoantibodies against major CYPs and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases of typical phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes, a transporter (MDR1), and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase in 4 patients with AIH-1 and 6 controls, as a case report. Two (Patients 3 and 4) of the AIH patients exhibited high levels of autoantibodies, while two (Patients 1 and 2) of the patients and the controls did not. The levels of autoantibodies against CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, UGT1A6 and human liver microsomes in Patients 3 and 4 sera were over 2(3) times the levels in Patient 1, Patient 2 and the control sera. Meanwhile, the levels of autoantibodies against CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2C9, UGT2B7, MDR1 and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase were 2-2(2) higher in Patients 3 and 4 than in the other subjects. We found that the pattern of elevation in the Patient 3 serum was not parallel with that in Patient 4. Thus, we found high levels of autoantibodies against drug-metabolizing enzymes in AIH-1 patients.

  2. Chloroplast and Cytoplasmic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Louise E.; Advani, Vimal R.

    1970-01-01

    Three pea (Pisum sativum) leaf chloroplast enzymes—triose phosphate isomerase, glyceric acid 3-phosphate kinase, and fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase—have been separated from the corresponding cytoplasmic enzymes by isoelectric focusing. These three enzymes of the reductive pentose phosphate cycle are therefore distinct proteins, not identical with the analogous enzymes of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. PMID:16657347

  3. Antivimentin autoantibodies in angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Dellagi, K; Brouet, J C; Seligmann, M

    1984-01-26

    We evaluated the prevalence and specificity of smooth-muscle autoantibodies in 20 serum samples obtained from patients with angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. Smooth-muscle antibodies in high titers were detected in 75 per cent of the samples. No such antibodies were found in 30 normal control serum samples or in 10 samples from patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 1 of 12 from patients with other types of polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia were positive. The antibodies were polyclonal and belonged to the IgM, IgG, and IgA classes. They reacted with vimentin, the major polypeptide of the intermediate-filament cytoskeleton of mesenchymal cells. The pattern of tissue reactivity and absorption experiments both show that these antibodies recognize special antigenic determinants of the vimentin polypeptide that are shared by vimentin and other classes of intermediate-filament proteins - namely, keratin and desmin. The frequency of this unusual autoantibody activity in angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy suggests that, like hypergammaglobulinemia and a positive Coombs' test, it may represent a useful serologic marker for the disease.

  4. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-09-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation.

  5. Autoantibodies in Systemic Sclerosis: Unanswered Questions

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Cristiane; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease characterized by vascular abnormalities, and cutaneous and visceral fibrosis. Serum autoantibodies directed to multiple intracellular antigens are present in more than 95% of patients and are considered a hallmark of SSc. They are helpful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of SSc and are associated with distinctive clinical manifestations. With the advent of more sensitive, multiplexed immunoassays, new and old questions about the relevance of autoantibodies in SSc are emerging. In this review, we discuss the clinical relevance of autoantibodies in SSc emphasizing the more recently published data. Moreover, we will summarize recent advances regarding the stability of SSc autoantibodies over the course of disease, whether they are mutually exclusive and their potential roles in the disease pathogenesis. PMID:25926833

  6. Autoantibodies to Posttranslational Modifications in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Burska, Agata N.; Hunt, Laura; Strollo, Rocky; Ryan, Brent J.; Vital, Ed; Nissim, Ahuva; Winyard, Paul G.; Emery, Paul; Ponchel, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    Autoantibodies have been associated with human pathologies for a long time, particularly with autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Rheumatoid factor (RF) is known since the late 1930s to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The discovery of anticitrullinated protein antibodies in the last century has changed this and other posttranslational modifications (PTM) relevant to RA have since been described. Such PTM introduce neoepitopes in proteins that can generate novel autoantibody specificities. The recent recognition of these novel specificities in RA provides a unique opportunity to understand human B-cell development in vivo. In this paper, we will review the three of the main classes of PTMs already associated with RA: citrullination, carbamylation, and oxidation. With the advancement of research methodologies it should be expected that other autoantibodies against PTM proteins could be discovered in patients with autoimmune diseases. Many of such autoantibodies may provide significant biomarker potential. PMID:24782594

  7. Detection of autoantibodies using chemiluminescence technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Michael; Bentow, Chelsea; Serra, Josep; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Context: Although autoantibody detection methods such as indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have been available for many years and are still in use the innovation of fast, fully automated instruments using chemiluminescence technology in recent years has led to rapid adoption in autoimmune disease diagnostics. In 2009, BIO-FLASH, a fully automated, random access chemiluminescent analyzer, was introduced, proceeded by the development of the QUANTA Flash chemiluminescent immunoassays (CIA) for autoimmune diagnostics. Objective: To summarize the evolution of CIAs for the detection of autoantibodies and to review their performance characteristics. Methods: Pubmed was screened for publications evaluating novel QUANTA Flash assays and how they compare to traditional methods for the detection of autoantibodies. In addition, comparative studies presented at scientific meetings were summarized. Results: Several studies were identified that compared the novel CIAs with conventional methods for autoantibody detection. The agreements ranged from moderate to excellent depending on the assay. The studies show how the CIA technology has enhanced the analytical and clinical performance characteristics of many autoantibody assays supporting both diagnosis and follow-up testing. Conclusion: CIA has started to improve the diagnostic testing of autoantibodies as an aid in the diagnosis of a broad range of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26525648

  8. Epidermal cytoplasmic antibodies. (Incidence and clinical significance).

    PubMed

    Betterle, C; Peserico, A; Bersani, G; Rigon, F; Del Prete, G

    1977-01-01

    Antibodies to epidermal cytoplasmic antigens were detected by the indirect immunofluorescence (IF) technique in 36% of 100 adult healthy subjects and in 17.6% of 17 normal newborn infants. This type of autoantibody occurred in 33% of 100 cases with vitiligo, in 32.5% of 40 cases with psoriasis, in 55.3% of patients with malignant tumours and in 72.7% of subjects with malignant melanoma. The frequency of the autoimmune reactions was statistically significant only in patients with malignant neoplasms. In the majority of positive cases the IF pattern involved the upper layers of the epidermal cells (U-CYT). The basal layer was generally negative. Only a few cases showed a pattern involving both the upper and the basal layers (G-CYT). However, a wide variation in staining was noted when sera were tested on different skin specimens or different sections of the same skin. To identify the nature of the target antigen(s), absorption experiments of sera were attempted with lyophilized and particulate antigens. Animal and human blood cells and lyophilized homogenates of malignant tumours failed to absorb the autoimmune activity of positive sera. Only a powder preparation of keratin induced a decrease in antibody titres. It is postulated that they are the result of an antigenic stimulation by exogenous substances commonly present in the environment.

  9. Comparison of different test systems for simultaneous autoantibody detection in connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Eissfeller, Petra; Sticherling, Michael; Scholz, Dietmar; Hennig, Kirsten; Lüttich, Tanja; Motz, Manfred; Kromminga, Arno

    2005-06-01

    The serological diagnosis of connective tissue diseases (CTDs) is based on the analysis of circulating autoantibodies to cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins (extractable nuclear antigens [ENAs]). The determination of autoantibody specificities supports the clinical diagnosis of the type of CTD and also often the prognosis of the disease. The former indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) technique still provides a useful screening method that currently is supplemented by a range of different techniques allowing the exact determination of single autoantibody specificities. These ENA profiling techniques include ELISA, immunoblotting, line-blot assays, and flow cytometric bead-based multiplex assays. The novel line immunoassay (LIA) from Mikrogen has been introduced in a recent study as a suitable technique for the simultaneous detection of autoantibodies in a routine clinical laboratory, providing comparable results as ELISA and ELiA (both from Pharmacia Diagnostics) (see Damoiseaux et al., this volume). In this study, LIAs from three different manufacturers were performed in 30 serum samples from patients with dermatological manifestations and 27 samples from SLE patients with renal involvement. The line assays from Mikrogen (recomLine ANA/ENA), Innogenetics (Inno-Lia ANA Update), and Imtec (ANA-LIA) were compared for antigen composition, handling, and statistical analysis including sensitivity and concordance. Autoantibody frequencies detected by the Mikrogen, Innogenetics, and Imtec line assays were 14.0%, 19.3%, and 15.8% for RNP; 14.0%, 22.8%, and 14.0% for Sm; 26.3%, 31.6%, and 40.3% for SSA; 3.5%, 12.3%, and 14.0% for SSB; and 3.5%, 14.0%, and 10.5% for histones. Our studies show that the line assay format is an easy-to-use, sensitive, and specific method for ENA antibody detection in human sera.

  10. [How can we diagnose and better understand inflammatory myopathies? The usefulness of auto-antibodies].

    PubMed

    Sibilia, Jean; Chatelus, Emmanuel; Meyer, Alain; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Sordet, Christelle; Goetz, Joëlle

    2010-10-01

    The inflammatory myopathies are a group of quite proteiform, systemic auto-immune diseases which include polymyositis, dermatomyositis and inclusion body myopathies. To facilitate the diagnosis, classification criteria (Bohan and Peter, 1975) have been proposed, based essentially on clinical criteria. In addition, over the past fifteen years, auto-antibodies characterizing certain forms of inflammatory myopathy have been identified. One distinguishes schematically: auto-antibodies specific for myositis and auto-antibodies sometimes associated with myositis. Concerning the myositis specific auto-antibodies (MSA), schematically there are a dozen specificities which are classed according to the cellular distribution of the auto-antigen. The most characteristic are certainly the auto-antibodies directed against cytoplasmic antigens: the anti-tRNA synthetases (anti-Jo-1 (PL-1), anti-PL-7, PL-12, EJ, OJ, JS, KS, ZO, YRS), anti-SRP (signal recognition particle), anti-Mas and anti-KJ, anti-Fer (eEF1), anti-Wa and anti-CADM p140. Other auto-antibodies are directed against nuclear auto-antigens: the anti-Mi-2, anti-PMS (PMS1, PMS2) and related antibodies (MLH1, DNA PKcs…), anti-56 kDa, anti-MJ (NXP-2), anti-SAE and anti-p155/p140 (TIF-1γ). Concerning the auto-antibodies sometimes associated with myositis (myositis associated auto-antibodies or MAA), they can also be observed in other auto-immune diseases. These auto-antibodies are directed against nuclear or nucleolar auto-antigens: the anti-PM-Scl, anti-Ku, anti-RNP (U1 RNP and U2 RNP, U4/U6 RNP and U5 RNP), anti-Ro 52 kDa and more rarely, anti-Ro 60 kDa and anti-La. The auto-antibodies related to myositis are biological tools which are of interest in two main ways. They have allowed us to sort out the nosology of these inflammatory myopathies, in particular by defining anti-tRNA synthetase syndrome. It now remains to determine how they might be employed to complement the classical clinico-biological diagnostic criteria

  11. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  12. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  13. The clinical relevance of autoantibodies in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Ho, Khanh T; Reveille, John D

    2003-01-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is associated with several autoantibodies, each of which is useful in the diagnosis of affected patients and in determining their prognosis. Anti-centromere antibodies (ACA) and anti-Scl-70 antibodies are very useful in distinguishing patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) from healthy controls, from patients with other connective tissue disease, and from unaffected family members. Whereas ACA often predict a limited skin involvement and the absence of pulmonary involvement, the presence of anti-Scl-70 antibodies increases the risk for diffuse skin involvement and scleroderma lung disease. Anti-fibrillarin autoantibodies (which share significant serologic overlap with anti-U3-ribonucleoprotein antibodies) and anti-RNA-polymerase autoantibodies occur less frequently and are also predictive of diffuse skin involvement and systemic disease. Anti-Th/To and PM-Scl, in contrast, are associated with limited skin disease, but anti-Th/To might be a marker for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Other autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens have less specificity for SSc, including anti-Ro, which is a risk factor for sicca symptoms in patients with SSc, and anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein, which in high titer is seen in patients with SSc/systemic lupus erythematosus/polymyositis overlap syndromes. Limited reports of other autoantibodies (anti-Ku, antiphospholipid) have not established them as being clinically useful in following patients with SSc.

  14. New autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease causing articular cartilage and bone destruction. Since irreversible joint destruction can be prevented by intervention at the early stages of disease, early diagnosis of RA is important. In this study, we identified new autoantibodies in the sera of patients with early (less than one year) RA. Methods We screened the sera of 20 RA patients with disease duration less than one year, 19 RA patients with disease duration more than five years and 23 controls on 8,268 human protein arrays. We confirmed the validity of protein array detection by ELISA assays. We then performed epitope mapping with overlapping 15-mers to analyze RA sera reactivity. Results WIBG (within BGCN homolog (Drosophila)), GABARAPL2 (GABA(A) receptor associated protein like 2) and ZNF706 (zinc finger protein 706) proteins are preferentially recognized by autoantibodies from early RA patients. Of interest, autoantibodies to WIBG are very specific for early RA. Indeed, 33% of early RA patients' sera recognize WIBG versus 5% of RA patients with disease duration more than 5 years and 2% of controls. We identified three linear peptides on WIBG GABARAPL2 and ZNF706 that are preferentially recognized by sera of early RA patients. Conclusions We identified new autoantibodies associated with RA with disease duration less than one year. These autoantibodies could be used as diagnosis markers in RA patients. PMID:23886014

  15. Targeting cancer with a lupus autoantibody#

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, James E.; Chan, Grace; Liu, Yanfeng; Hegan, Denise C.; Dalal, Shibani; Dray, Eloise; Kwon, Youngho; Xu, Yuanyuan; Xu, Xiaohua; Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Geiger, Erik; Liu, Yilun; Gera, Joseph; Sweasy, Joann B.; Sung, Patrick; Rockwell, Sara; Nishimura, Robert N.; Weisbart, Richard H.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is distinct among autoimmune diseases due to its association with circulating autoantibodies reactive against host DNA. The precise role that anti-DNA antibodies play in SLE pathophysiology remains to be elucidated, and potential applications of lupus autoantibodies in cancer therapy have not previously been explored. Here we report the unexpected finding that a cell-penetrating lupus autoantibody, 3E10, has potential as a targeted therapy for DNA-repair deficient malignancies. We find that 3E10 preferentially binds DNA single-strand tails, inhibits key steps in DNA single-strand and double-strand break repair, and sensitizes cultured tumor cells and human tumor xenografts to DNA-damaging therapy, including doxorubicin and radiation. Moreover, we demonstrate that 3E10 alone is synthetically lethal to BRCA2-deficient human cancer cells and selectively sensitizes such cells to low dose doxorubicin. Our results establish an approach to cancer therapy that we expect will be particularly applicable to BRCA2-related malignancies such as breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. In addition, our findings raise the possibility that lupus autoantibodies may be partly responsible for the intrinsic deficiencies in DNA repair and the unexpectedly low rates of breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers observed in SLE patients. In summary, this study provides the basis for the potential use of a lupus anti-DNA antibody in cancer therapy and identifies lupus autoantibodies as a potentially rich source of therapeutic agents. PMID:23100628

  16. Induction of lupus autoantibodies by adjuvants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Satoh, M.; Kuroda, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Behney, K.M.; Mizutani, A.; Akaogi, J.; Nacionales, D.C.; Lorenson, T.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Reeves, W.H.

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to the hydrocarbon oil pristane induces lupus specific autoantibodies in non-autoimmune mice. We investigated whether the capacity to induce lupus-like autoimmunity is a unique property of pristane or is shared by other adjuvant oils. Seven groups of 3-month-old female BALB/cJ mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of pristane, squalene (used in the adjuvant MF59), incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), three different medicinal mineral oils, or saline, respectively. Serum autoantibodies and peritoneal cytokine production were measured. In addition to pristane, the mineral oil Bayol F (IFA) and the endogenous hydrocarbon squalene both induced anti-nRNP/Sm and -Su autoantibodies (20% and 25% of mice, respectively). All of these hydrocarbons had prolonged effects on cytokine production by peritoneal APCs. However, high levels of IL-6, IL-12, and TNF?? production 2-3 months after intraperitoneal injection appeared to be associated with the ability to induce lupus autoantibodies. The ability to induce lupus autoantibodies is shared by several hydrocarbons and is not unique to pristane. It correlates with stimulation of the production of IL-12 and other cytokines, suggesting a relationship with a hydrocarbon's adjuvanticity. The potential to induce autoimmunity may complicate the use of oil adjuvants in human and veterinary vaccines. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel autoantibodies and clinical phenotypes in adult and juvenile myositis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Autoantibodies targeting intracellular proteins involved in key processes are detected in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. These myositisspecific autoantibodies have been increasingly demonstrated to correlate with distinct clinical phenotypes within the myositis spectrum. This review highlights the clinical associations of the myositisspecific autoantibodies, with particular attention to the recently identified and characterized novel myositis autoantibodies: p155/140, p140 (MJ), CADM-140 (MDA5), SAE, and 200/100. PMID:21457520

  18. The rise and fall of horror autotoxicus and forbidden clones.

    PubMed

    Jennette, J Charles; Falk, Ronald J

    2010-09-01

    Cui and associates show that healthy individuals have natural autoantibodies (NAAs) specific for myeloperoxidase, proteinase 3, and glomerular basement membrane (GBM) with the same specificity as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and anti-GBM antibodies that are pathogenic. Although Ehrlich proposed horror autotoxicus and Burnet envisioned elimination of forbidden clones, NAAs are present in all healthy individuals and play beneficial homeostatic roles. Pathogenic autoimmunity is dysregulation of natural homeostatic autoimmunity rather than onset of a previously absent self-recognition.

  19. The rise and fall of horror autotoxicus and forbidden clones.

    PubMed

    Jennette, J Charles; Falk, Ronald J

    2010-09-01

    Cui and associates show that healthy individuals have natural autoantibodies (NAAs) specific for myeloperoxidase, proteinase 3, and glomerular basement membrane (GBM) with the same specificity as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and anti-GBM antibodies that are pathogenic. Although Ehrlich proposed horror autotoxicus and Burnet envisioned elimination of forbidden clones, NAAs are present in all healthy individuals and play beneficial homeostatic roles. Pathogenic autoimmunity is dysregulation of natural homeostatic autoimmunity rather than onset of a previously absent self-recognition. PMID:20805814

  20. Heterogeneity of Maize Cytoplasmic Genomes among Male-Sterile Cytoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Pring, D. R.; Levings, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    Maize mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA's were prepared from normal (fertile) lines or single crosses and from members of the T, C, and S groups of male-sterile cytoplasms. Restriction endonucleases HindIII, BamI, EcoRI, and SalI were used to restrict the DNA, and the resultant fragments were electrophoresed in agarose gels. The results show that the N (fertile), T, C, and S cytoplasms each contained distinct mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). These distinctive patterns were unaffected by nuclear genotype. No evidence of paternal inheritance of mtDNA was observed. Chloroplast DNA (ctDNA) from the N, C, and T cytoplasms was indistinguishable by HindIII, SalI, or EcoRI endonuclease digestion. The S cytoplasm ctDNA, however, was slightly different from that of other cytoplasms, as indicated by a slight displacement of one band in HindIII digests. The molecular weight of maize ctDNA was estimated to be as high as 88 x 106. Estimates of the minimum molecular weight of maize mtDNA ranged from 116–131 x 106, but the patterns were to complex for an unambiguous determination. Based on HindIII data, a comparison of the molecular weight of mtDNA bands common to the N, T. C, and S cytoplasms suggests that C cytoplasm most closely resembles N cytoplasm. The T and S sources are more divergent from the C and N cytoplasms. These results indicate a possible gradation of relatedness among male-sterile cytoplasms. The marked variation in mtDNA, with apparently less variation in ctDNA, represents circumstantial, but compelling, evidence that mtDNA may be involved in the male sterility and disease susceptibility traits in maize. PMID:17248823

  1. Autoantibodies in senear-usher syndrome: cross-reactivity or multiple autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, María Elena; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Senear-Usher syndrome or pemphigus erythematosus is a pathology that overlaps clinically and serologically with pemphigus foliaceus and lupus erythematosus. Skin biopsies of patients with pemphigus erythematosus reveal acantholysis and deposits of immunoglobulins in desmosomes, and they are positive in the lupus band test. In the present paper, we determined whether the autoantibodies associated with pemphigus erythematosus targeted a single antigen or multiple antigens as a result of the stimulation of independent B cell clones. Our present paper demonstrates that patients with pemphigus erythematosus produce both antiepithelial antibodies specific for desmoglein 1 and 3 and antinuclear antibodies specific for Ro, La, Sm, and double-stranded DNA antigens. After eluting specific anti-epithelial or anti-nuclear antibodies, which were recovered and tested using double-fluorescence assays, a lack of cross-reactivity was demonstrated between desmosomes and nuclear and cytoplasmic lupus antigens. This result suggests that autoantibodies in pemphigus erythematosus are directed against different antigens and that these autoantibodies are produced by independent clones. Given these clinical and serological data, we suggest that pemphigus erythematosus behaves as a multiple autoimmune disease. PMID:23320149

  2. Autoantibodies in renal diseases - clinical significance and recent developments in serological detection.

    PubMed

    Mastroianni-Kirsztajn, Gianna; Hornig, Nora; Schlumberger, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune dysfunctions are the "bête noire" in a range of debilitating nephropathies. Autoimmune-mediated damage to the kidneys can be triggered by autoantibodies directed against specific proteins or renal structures, for example, the phospholipase A2 receptor or the glomerular basement membrane, resulting in glomerular diseases such as primary membranous nephropathy or Goodpasture's disease. Moreover, secondary damage to the kidney can be part of the wide-reaching effects of systemic autoimmune diseases such as vasculitis or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) - the latter counts lupus nephritis among its most severe manifestations. Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by non-organ-specific autoantibodies, directed for example against neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens in systemic vasculitis and against double-stranded DNA and nucleosomes in SLE. A large variety of innovative and highly specific and sensitive autoantibody tests have been developed in the last years that are available to identify autoimmune kidney diseases at an early stage. Thus, serological in vitro diagnostics allow for appropriate interventional therapy in order to prevent disease progression often resulting in need of dialysis and transplantation. PMID:26029207

  3. Autoantibodies in Renal Diseases – Clinical Significance and Recent Developments in Serological Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mastroianni-Kirsztajn, Gianna; Hornig, Nora; Schlumberger, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune dysfunctions are the “bête noire” in a range of debilitating nephropathies. Autoimmune-mediated damage to the kidneys can be triggered by autoantibodies directed against specific proteins or renal structures, for example, the phospholipase A2 receptor or the glomerular basement membrane, resulting in glomerular diseases such as primary membranous nephropathy or Goodpasture’s disease. Moreover, secondary damage to the kidney can be part of the wide-reaching effects of systemic autoimmune diseases such as vasculitis or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) – the latter counts lupus nephritis among its most severe manifestations. Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by non-organ-specific autoantibodies, directed for example against neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens in systemic vasculitis and against double-stranded DNA and nucleosomes in SLE. A large variety of innovative and highly specific and sensitive autoantibody tests have been developed in the last years that are available to identify autoimmune kidney diseases at an early stage. Thus, serological in vitro diagnostics allow for appropriate interventional therapy in order to prevent disease progression often resulting in need of dialysis and transplantation. PMID:26029207

  4. Autoantibodies in renal diseases - clinical significance and recent developments in serological detection.

    PubMed

    Mastroianni-Kirsztajn, Gianna; Hornig, Nora; Schlumberger, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune dysfunctions are the "bête noire" in a range of debilitating nephropathies. Autoimmune-mediated damage to the kidneys can be triggered by autoantibodies directed against specific proteins or renal structures, for example, the phospholipase A2 receptor or the glomerular basement membrane, resulting in glomerular diseases such as primary membranous nephropathy or Goodpasture's disease. Moreover, secondary damage to the kidney can be part of the wide-reaching effects of systemic autoimmune diseases such as vasculitis or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) - the latter counts lupus nephritis among its most severe manifestations. Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by non-organ-specific autoantibodies, directed for example against neutrophil cytoplasmic antigens in systemic vasculitis and against double-stranded DNA and nucleosomes in SLE. A large variety of innovative and highly specific and sensitive autoantibody tests have been developed in the last years that are available to identify autoimmune kidney diseases at an early stage. Thus, serological in vitro diagnostics allow for appropriate interventional therapy in order to prevent disease progression often resulting in need of dialysis and transplantation.

  5. Autoantibodies interacting with purified native thyrotropin receptor.

    PubMed

    Atger, M; Misrahi, M; Young, J; Jolivet, A; Orgiazzi, J; Schaison, G; Milgrom, E

    1999-11-01

    Native thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography from membrane extracts of stably transfected L cells. An ELISA test was devised to study anti-TSHR autoantibodies directly. Comparison of native TSHR with bacterially expressed, denatured TSHR showed that the latter was not recognized by the autoantibodies, suggesting that they bind to conformational epitopes only present on the native receptor. The use of deglycosylated TSHR and of purified receptor ectodomain (alpha-subunit) showed that the autoantibodies recognized only the protein backbone moiety of the receptor and that their epitopes were localized entirely in its ectodomain. Autoantibodies were detected in 45 of 48 subjects with untreated Graves' disease and in 26 of 47 healthy volunteers. The affinity for the receptor was similar in the two groups (Kd = 0.25-1 x 10-10 M) and the autoantibodies belonged to the IgG class in all cases. Although the concentration of autoantibodies was higher in Graves' disease patients (3.50 +/- 0.36 mg.L-1) than in control subjects (1.76 +/- 0.21) (mean +/- SEM), there was an overlap between the groups. Receptor-stimulating autoantibodies (TSAb) were studied by measuring cAMP synthesis in stably transfected HEK 293 cells. Their characteristics (recognition of alpha-subunit, of deglycosylated TSHR, nonrecognition of bacterially expressed denatured receptor) were similar to those of the antibodies detected by the ELISA test. TSAb were only found in individuals with Graves' disease. The ELISA test measures total anti-TSHR antibodies, whereas the test using adenylate cyclase stimulation measures antibodies that recognize specific epitopes involved in receptor activation. Our observations thus disprove the hypothesis according to which Graves' disease is related to the appearance of anti-TSHR antibodies not present in normal subjects. Actually, anti-TSHR antibodies exist in many euthyroid subjects, in some cases even at concentrations higher than those

  6. Cellular Subcompartments through Cytoplasmic Streaming.

    PubMed

    Pieuchot, Laurent; Lai, Julian; Loh, Rachel Ann; Leong, Fong Yew; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Stajich, Jason; Jedd, Gregory

    2015-08-24

    Cytoplasmic streaming occurs in diverse cell types, where it generally serves a transport function. Here, we examine streaming in multicellular fungal hyphae and identify an additional function wherein regimented streaming forms distinct cytoplasmic subcompartments. In the hypha, cytoplasm flows directionally from cell to cell through septal pores. Using live-cell imaging and computer simulations, we identify a flow pattern that produces vortices (eddies) on the upstream side of the septum. Nuclei can be immobilized in these microfluidic eddies, where they form multinucleate aggregates and accumulate foci of the HDA-2 histone deacetylase-associated factor, SPA-19. Pores experiencing flow degenerate in the absence of SPA-19, suggesting that eddy-trapped nuclei function to reinforce the septum. Together, our data show that eddies comprise a subcellular niche favoring nuclear differentiation and that subcompartments can be self-organized as a consequence of regimented cytoplasmic streaming.

  7. Photoreactivation of a Cytoplasmic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferkorn, E. R.; Boyle, Mary K.

    1972-01-01

    Ultraviolet light-inactivated frog virus 3 is efficiently photoreactivated by chick embryo cells. A cellular enzyme is presumably responsible for this repair of viral deoxyribonucleic acid, for the phenomenon is insensitive to an inhibitor of protein synthesis and is not seen in mammalian cells that are known to lack photoreactivating enzyme. Since frog virus 3 is a cytoplasmic virus, functionally significant amounts of photoreactivating enzyme are probably present in the cytoplasm of chick embryo cells. PMID:5062749

  8. Specificity factors in cytoplasmic polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Amanda; Meijer, Hedda A; de Moor, Cornelia H

    2013-01-01

    Poly(A) tail elongation after export of an messenger RNA (mRNA) to the cytoplasm is called cytoplasmic polyadenylation. It was first discovered in oocytes and embryos, where it has roles in meiosis and development. In recent years, however, has been implicated in many other processes, including synaptic plasticity and mitosis. This review aims to introduce cytoplasmic polyadenylation with an emphasis on the factors and elements mediating this process for different mRNAs and in different animal species. We will discuss the RNA sequence elements mediating cytoplasmic polyadenylation in the 3' untranslated regions of mRNAs, including the CPE, MBE, TCS, eCPE, and C-CPE. In addition to describing the role of general polyadenylation factors, we discuss the specific RNA binding protein families associated with cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements, including CPEB (CPEB1, CPEB2, CPEB3, and CPEB4), Pumilio (PUM2), Musashi (MSI1, MSI2), zygote arrest (ZAR2), ELAV like proteins (ELAVL1, HuR), poly(C) binding proteins (PCBP2, αCP2, hnRNP-E2), and Bicaudal C (BICC1). Some emerging themes in cytoplasmic polyadenylation will be highlighted. To facilitate understanding for those working in different organisms and fields, particularly those who are analyzing high throughput data, HUGO gene nomenclature for the human orthologs is used throughout. Where human orthologs have not been clearly identified, reference is made to protein families identified in man.

  9. Multiple autoantibodies following cytomegalovirus infection: virus distribution and specificity of autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomaeus, W N; O'Donoghue, H; Foti, D; Lawson, C M; Shellam, G R; Reed, W D

    1988-01-01

    Multiple autoantibodies were found in the sera of BALB/c, C57BL/10 and C3H mice following mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. The complex pattern of intra-organ, intratissue and intracellular reactivity observed by immunoperoxidase histochemistry suggested that many autoantibodies of varying specificities were elicited. This evidence from immunoperoxidase histochemistry was confirmed by immunoblot, where autoantibodies binding to polypeptides of a variety of sizes and tissues of origin were observed. In addition to these central findings, the tissue and organ distribution of MCMV in three mouse strains of differing genetic resistance were described. No correlation was found between the distribution of virus and the tissue and organ specificity of the autoantibodies produced following infection. Inflammatory responses accompanied MCMV infection in a number of tissues. In BALB/c mice, myocarditis and salivary gland inflammation were evident at Day 56 post-infection in the absence of MCMV, but in the presence of autoantibodies to cardiac muscle and salivary duct epithelium. This model for virus-induced autoimmunity can be applied to studies of the relationship between virus infection, autoimmunity and disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:2842252

  10. Strategies for building reference standards for autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Joanna; Dellavance, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Producing robust, certified, traceable reference material for autoantibody testing is a vital element in maintaining the validity of results that are generated in the daily clinical laboratory routine. This is a huge challenge because of the high number of variables involved in the detection and measurement of the autoantibodies. The production of such materials is time consuming and needs rigorous attention to detail; this is best achieved by an overarching independent body who will oversee the process in a "not for profit" manner. Much effort has been made to build international standards for quantitative and qualitative assays based on monoclonal antibodies, obtained from affinity purification and plasmapheresis. The big challenge is to respect individual differences in immune response to the same antigen. A promising ongoing initiative is the construction of pools with monospecific samples from different individuals.

  11. Muscle autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis: beyond diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Meriggioli, Matthew N; Sanders, Donald B

    2012-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction. A number of molecules, including ion channels and other proteins at the neuromuscular junction, may be targeted by autoantibodies leading to abnormal neuromuscular transmission. In approximately 85% of patients, autoantibodies, directed against the postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor can be detected in the serum and confirm the diagnosis, but in general, do not precisely predict the degree of weakness or response to therapy. Antibodies to the muscle-specific tyrosine kinase are detected in approximately 50% of generalized myasthenia gravis patients who are seronegative for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies, and levels of anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibodies do appear to correlate with disease severity and treatment response. Antibodies to other muscle antigens may be found in the subsets of myasthenia gravis patients, potentially providing clinically useful diagnostic information, but their utility as relevant biomarkers (measures of disease state or response to treatment) is currently unclear. PMID:22882218

  12. Euthyroid Graves' ophthalmopathy with negative autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Mehtap

    2005-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune-based hyperthyroidism in which a number of different antibodies directed against thyroid tissue plays a role. Graves' ophthalmopathy is thought to be a consequence of this autoimmune basis and occurs in some patients with Graves' disease. On occasional cases, the disease may present only with ophthalmopathy without hyperthyroidism. A 32-year-old woman with euthyroid Graves' ophthalmopathy and negative thyroid autoantibodies, including TSH receptor antibody, is presented here. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16334503

  13. Autoantibodies: Focus on anti-DNA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Nina; Winkler, Thomas H; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the days of Ehrlich and the birth of humoral immunity, self-reactivity or 'horror autotoxicus' as referred to by Paul Ehrlich, has been of great concern. For instance, in patients with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), anti-nuclear and anti-DNA antibodies have been recognized for many years. Despite this, the exact mechanism as to how the immune system fails to protect the individual and allows these autoantibodies to develop in this and other systemic autoimmune diseases remains uncertain. So how can we explain their presence? Evidence suggests that B cells expressing autoreactive antibodies do not normally arise but rather undergo negative selection as they develop. In light of this, it might seem contradictory that not all autoreactive B cell clones are eliminated, although this may not even be the intention since autoantibodies are also found in healthy individuals and may even protect from autoimmunity. Here, we will discuss autoantibodies, in particular those recognizing DNA, with regard to their reactivity and their potentially pathogenic or protective properties. PMID:21776330

  14. Characterisation of osteoprotegerin autoantibodies in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Real, Ana; Gilbert, Nick; Hauser, Barbara; Kennedy, Nick; Shand, Alan; Gillett, Helen; Gillett, Peter; Goddard, Clive; Cebolla, Ángel; Sousa, Carolina; Fraser, William D; Satsangi, Jack; Ralston, Stuart H; Riches, Philip L

    2015-08-01

    Autoantibodies neutralising the effect of the bone regulatory cytokine osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been described in a patient with severe osteoporosis and coeliac disease. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and epitope specificity of autoantibodies to OPG in patients with coeliac disease, and correlate their presence with bone mineral density. A direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed and used to screen patients with coeliac disease for autoantibodies to OPG. Recombinant fragments of OPG were made to evaluate the epitope specificity and affinity of these antibodies. Phenotype information of the patients was obtained by case note review. Raised titres of antibodies to OPG were found in 7/71 (9.8 %) patients with coeliac disease, compared with 1/72 (1.4 %) non-coeliac osteoporosis clinic control patients (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that a polyclonal antibody response to OPG is raised in these patients capable of recognising different epitopes of OPG with varying affinity. The titre of OPG antibodies was associated with lower bone mineral density Z-score of the hip in coeliac patients on univariate (p < 0.05) and multivariate analysis including age, sex height and weight as covariates (p < 0.01). Polyclonal antibodies to OPG are more common in patients with coeliac disease and are independently associated with lower bone mineral density Z-scores of the hip. Further work is required to establish the clinical utility of testing for OPG antibodies.

  15. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    PubMed

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed.

  16. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    PubMed

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed. PMID:26852594

  17. Characterization of pathogenic human monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanni; Thomson, Christy A.; Allan, Lenka L.; Jackson, Linda M.; Olson, Melanie; Hercus, Timothy R.; Nero, Tracy L.; Turner, Amanda; Parker, Michael W.; Lopez, Angel L.; Waddell, Thomas K.; Anderson, Gary P.; Hamilton, John A.; Schrader, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of pathogenic autoantibodies remains unknown. Idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is caused by autoantibodies against granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We generated 19 monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF from six patients with idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The autoantibodies used multiple V genes, excluding preferred V-gene use as an etiology, and targeted at least four nonoverlapping epitopes on GM-CSF, suggesting that GM-CSF is driving the autoantibodies and not a B-cell epitope on a pathogen cross-reacting with GM-CSF. The number of somatic mutations in the autoantibodies suggests that the memory B cells have been helped by T cells and re-entered germinal centers. All autoantibodies neutralized GM-CSF bioactivity, with general correlations to affinity and off-rate. The binding of certain autoantibodies was changed by point mutations in GM-CSF that reduced binding to the GM-CSF receptor. Those monoclonal autoantibodies that potently neutralize GM-CSF may be useful in treating inflammatory disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, cancer, and pain. PMID:23620516

  18. Probing the structure of cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    We have used size-fractionated, fluorescent dextrans to probe the structure of the cytoplasmic ground substance of living Swiss 3T3 cells by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and video image processing. The data indicate that the cytoplasm of living cells has a fluid phase viscosity four times greater than water and contains structural barriers that restrict free diffusion of dissolved macromolecules in a size-dependent manner. Assuming these structural barriers comprise a filamentous meshwork, the combined fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and imaging data suggest that the average pore size of the meshwork is in the range of 300 to 400 A, but may be as small as 200 A in some cytoplasmic domains. PMID:2423529

  19. How Relevant Are GFAP Autoantibodies in Autism and Tourette Syndrome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkman, Nikki J.; Libbey, Jane E.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Coon, Hilary H.; Miller, Judith N.; Stevenson, Edward K.; Lainhart, Janet E.; McMahon, William M.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Controversy exists over the role of autoantibodies to central nervous system antigens in autism and Tourette Syndrome. We investigated plasma autoantibody titers to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in children with classic onset (33) and regressive onset (26) autism, controls (25, healthy age- and gender-matched) and individuals with…

  20. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own tissues) in serum and other body fluids... the body's own tissues are injured by autoantibodies). (b) Classification. Class II...

  1. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    PubMed

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target.

  2. Autoantibodies against retinal proteins in paraneoplastic and autoimmune retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Adamus, Grazyna; Ren, Gaoying; Weleber, Richard G

    2004-01-01

    Background Autoimmune retinal degeneration may occur in patients who present with sudden or, less commonly, subacute loss of vision of retinal origin, associated with an abnormal ERG, through the action of autoantibodies against retinal proteins. Often the patients are initially diagnosed with or suspected of having a paraneoplastic retinopathy (PR), such as cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR). However, there is limited information on the occurrence, the specificity of autoantibodies in these patients, and their association with clinical symptoms. Methods Sera were obtained from 193 retinopathy patients who presented with clinical symptoms resembling PR or autoimmune retinopathy (AR), including sudden painless loss of vision, typically associated with visual field defects and photopsias, and abnormal rod and/or cone responses on the electroretinogram (ERG). Sera were tested for the presence of anti-retinal autoantibodies by Western blot analysis using proteins extracted from human retina and by immunohistochemistry. Autoantibody titers against recoverin and enolase were measured by ELISA. Results We identified a higher prevalence of anti-retinal autoantibodies in retinopathy patients. Ninety-one patients' sera (47.1%) showed autoantibodies of various specificities with a higher incidence of antibodies present in retinopathy patients diagnosed with cancer (33/52; 63.5%; p = 0.009) than in retinopathy patients without cancer (58/141; 41.1%). The average age of PR patients was 62.0 years, and that of AR patients was 55.9 years. Autoantibodies against recoverin (p23) were only present in the sera of PR patients, autoantibodies against unknown p35 were more common in patients with AR, while anti-enolase (anti-p46) autoantibodies were nearly equally distributed in the sera of patients with PR and those with AR. In the seropositive patients, the autoantibodies persisted over a long period of time – from months to years. A rebound in anti-recoverin autoantibody titer was

  3. Autoantibodies in systemic autoimmune diseases: specificity and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Suurmond, Jolien; Diamond, Betty

    2015-06-01

    In this Review we focus on the initiation of autoantibody production and autoantibody pathogenicity, with a special emphasis on the targeted antigens. Release of intracellular antigens due to excessive cell death or to ineffective clearance of apoptotic debris, modification of self-antigens during inflammatory responses, and molecular mimicry contribute to the initiation of autoantibody production. We hypothesize that those autoreactive B cells that survive and produce pathogenic autoantibodies have specificity for self-antigens that are TLR ligands. Such B cells experience both B cell receptor (BCR) activation and TLR engagement, leading to an escape from tolerance. Moreover, the autoantibodies they produce form immune complexes that can activate myeloid cells and thereby establish the proinflammatory milieu that further negates tolerance mechanisms of both B and T cells. PMID:25938780

  4. Autoantibodies in adult patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies in Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Graciela N; Gargiulo, María De Los Ángeles; Pérez, Nicolás; Collado, María Victoria; Suárez, Lorena V; Khoury, Marina; Sarano, Judith F

    2016-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies(IIM) are a heterogeneous group of diseases of the skeletal muscle. On the basis of clinical, serologic and histological differences, they are classified in dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), inclusion body myositis and immunomediated necrotizing myopathy. Autoantibodies directed against nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens are present with variable frequencies among studies. Myositis-specific antibodies (MSAs) are useful in IIM because they contribute to the diagnosis, help to identify different clinical subsets, and have prognostic value. This study aimed to explore the frequency of autoantibodies, especially MSAs, and their relationship with clinical features in adult patients with DM, PM and overlap syndrome. Medical records were reviewed. Myositis-associated antibodies (non-specific) and MSAs (anti Jo-1, PL-7, PL-12, Mi-2 and SRP) were measured using commercial kits. Twelve patients had MSAs, an overall frequency similar to those of international series, but PL-12 and Mi-2 were more frequent than Jo-1, which is the most frequently observed elsewhere. All five patients with Mi-2 had classical DM with a favorable response to treatment. Interstitial pneumonia (n: 4) and/or treatment-refractory disease (n: 3) were found in the presence of anti-PL-12, alone or associated with anti-SRP and/or Jo-1. In conclusion, the coexistence of AEM, a rare finding, was found in three patients. The presence of MSAs aided to the diagnosis of IIM, in particular in those patients without available or conclusive biopsy results.

  5. Autoantibodies in adult patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies in Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Graciela N; Gargiulo, María De Los Ángeles; Pérez, Nicolás; Collado, María Victoria; Suárez, Lorena V; Khoury, Marina; Sarano, Judith F

    2016-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies(IIM) are a heterogeneous group of diseases of the skeletal muscle. On the basis of clinical, serologic and histological differences, they are classified in dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), inclusion body myositis and immunomediated necrotizing myopathy. Autoantibodies directed against nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens are present with variable frequencies among studies. Myositis-specific antibodies (MSAs) are useful in IIM because they contribute to the diagnosis, help to identify different clinical subsets, and have prognostic value. This study aimed to explore the frequency of autoantibodies, especially MSAs, and their relationship with clinical features in adult patients with DM, PM and overlap syndrome. Medical records were reviewed. Myositis-associated antibodies (non-specific) and MSAs (anti Jo-1, PL-7, PL-12, Mi-2 and SRP) were measured using commercial kits. Twelve patients had MSAs, an overall frequency similar to those of international series, but PL-12 and Mi-2 were more frequent than Jo-1, which is the most frequently observed elsewhere. All five patients with Mi-2 had classical DM with a favorable response to treatment. Interstitial pneumonia (n: 4) and/or treatment-refractory disease (n: 3) were found in the presence of anti-PL-12, alone or associated with anti-SRP and/or Jo-1. In conclusion, the coexistence of AEM, a rare finding, was found in three patients. The presence of MSAs aided to the diagnosis of IIM, in particular in those patients without available or conclusive biopsy results. PMID:27295700

  6. Autoantibodies against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in cerebrospinal fluids from Pug dogs with necrotizing meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Masahiro; Matsuki, Naoaki; Fujiwara, Kaori; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Pham, Ngoc T; Tamahara, Satoshi; Ono, Kenichiro

    2007-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluids (CSFs) from 9 Pug dogs with necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME: Pug dog encephalitis) were examined to identify the antigens for anti-astrocyte autoantibodies. Each CSF exhibited a positive reaction to the cytoplasm of cultured canine astrocytes by an indirect fluorescent antibody test. In an immunoblotting analysis on normal canine brain proteins, eight of 9 CSFs showed a common band of 52 kDa, corresponding to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and all of 9 CSFs reacted with purified bovine GFAP. From these results, GFAP is one of the common autoantigens in Pug dogs with NME. On the other hand, the reactivity of CSFs to chymotrypsin-digested bovine GFAP fragments were variable among dogs, indicating that the antibodies in the CSFs recognized different epitopes on GFAP.

  7. The occurrence of autoantibodies in infectious mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, R. N. P.; Emond, R. T. D.; Thomas, D. B.; Doniach, D.

    1974-01-01

    Autoantibodies were looked for by immunofluorescence (IFL) in seventy-seven cases of infectious mononucleosis (IM) at the onset of symptoms and on recovery, to determine the time of appearance, duration and range of these responses, and to correlate them with serum immunoglobulin and EB virus antibody titres. Antibodies to lymphocyte membrane demonstrated by IFL, now identified with lymphocytotoxins, were present in 46% of patients in the acute stage, persisting for less than 7 weeks. Antibodies to smooth muscle (SMA) or to contractile fibres in other tissue cells including human thyroid and rat hepatocytes, were present in over 70% of cases, some being entirely of IgM class. The highest titres occurred soon after onset and these antibodies also disappeared during convalescence. By contrast ANA, mitochondrial, microsomal and reticulin antibodies, also thyroid and gastric organ-specific reactivity were seen only occasionally owing to the young age group of the patients. In individual cases there was no correlation between the appearance of lymphocyte antibodies and SMA, or between these and the EB virus antibody titres. The autoantibodies produced in this disease are highly selected. It is suggested that clones of B cells are stimulated to make these antibodies by virtue of being infected with EB virus, and that the T-cell clones in the circulation are more likely expanded in order to terminate the infection. PMID:4619789

  8. Caspr2 autoantibodies target multiple epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Abby L.; Lai, Yongjie; Dalmau, Josep; Scherer, Steven S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To better understand the mechanisms of autoantibodies to the axonal protein contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2) by studying their target epitopes. Methods: A plasmid for expressing Caspr2 was modified so that the various extracellular subdomains were deleted individually and in groups. Cultured cells were transfected to express these constructs and assayed by immunofluorescence staining with a commercial Caspr2 antibody and a panel of patient sera known to react with Caspr2. Western blotting was also performed. The role of glycosylation in immunogenicity was tested with tunicamycin and PNGase F treatment. Results: Patient antibodies bound to the extracellular domain of Caspr2. Neither native protein structure nor glycosylation was required for immunoreactivity. Caspr2 constructs with single or multidomain deletions were expressed on the plasma membrane. All deletion constructs were recognized by patients' sera, although reactivity was significantly reduced with deletion of the discoidin-like subdomain and strongly reduced or abolished with larger deletions of multiple N-terminal subdomains. Caspr2 with all subdomains deleted except the discoidin-like domain was still recognized by the antibodies. Conclusion: Caspr2 autoantibodies recognize multiple target epitopes in the extracellular domain of Caspr2, including one in the discoidin-like domain. Reactivity for some epitopes is not dependent on glycosylation or native protein structure. PMID:26185774

  9. Autoantibody recognition mechanisms of p53 epitopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need for economical blood based, noninvasive molecular biomarkers to assist in the detection and diagnosis of cancers in a cost-effective manner at an early stage, when curative interventions are still possible. Serum autoantibodies are attractive biomarkers for early cancer detection, but their development has been hindered by the punctuated genetic nature of the ten million known cancer mutations. A landmark study of 50,000 patients (Pedersen et al., 2013) showed that a few p53 15-mer epitopes are much more sensitive colon cancer biomarkers than p53, which in turn is a more sensitive cancer biomarker than any other protein. The function of p53 as a nearly universal "tumor suppressor" is well established, because of its strong immunogenicity in terms of not only antibody recruitment, but also stimulation of autoantibodies. Here we examine dimensionally compressed bioinformatic fractal scaling analysis for identifying the few sensitive epitopes from the p53 amino acid sequence, and show how it could be used for early cancer detection (ECD). We trim 15-mers to 7-mers, and identify specific 7-mers from other species that could be more sensitive to aggressive human cancers, such as liver cancer. Our results could provide a roadmap for ECD.

  10. Hydroxychloroquine protects melanocytes from autoantibody-induced injury by reducing the binding of antigen-antibody complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Guang; Hu, Wen-Zhi; Ma, Hui-Jun; Liu, Wen; Yang, Qing-Qi; Zhao, Guang

    2016-08-01

    Vitiligo is a polygenic autoimmune disorder characterized by loss of pigmentation due to melanocyte destruction. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is an effective immunosuppressant widely used in the treatment of autoimmune disorders. As generalized vitiligo (GV) is commonly considered to be a T cell and autoantibody-induced immune disorder, the present study aimed to determine whether HCQ protects melanocytes from autoantibody‑induced disruption. Anti‑melanocyte antibodies were obtained from the serum of patients with progressive GV and the effects of HCQ on prevent the autoantibody‑induced disruption of melanocytes was observed. Cell‑based ELISA, indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting were used to analyze the autoantibody content of sera samples obtained from 32 patients with progressive GV. The cytotoxicity of HCQ was detected by MTT assay, and 1 µg/ml HCQ was applied to human primary melanocytes (HMCs) to examine whether it could exert protective effects against autoantibody‑induced immune injury. Flow cytometry was used to measure autoantibody binding to the surface of HMCs. Complement‑dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody‑dependent cell‑mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) were monitored by MTT and lactate dehydrogenase‑releasing assays. The concentration of autoantibodies in sera samples taken from GV patients was significantly higher than in controls, particularly in patients who had >10% of their body surface affected by vitiligo. The majority of the autoantibodies presented in the HMCs and human keratinocytes (HKCs) and were predominantly localized to the cell surface and cytoplasm. The molecular weights of the autoantigens were identified as 30, 37‑39, 42, 53, 60‑75, 90, 100, 110, and 126 kDa; the 30 kDa protein was observed only in HMCs. The addition of HCQ at a concentration of 1 µg/ml produced no significant cytotoxicity in HMCs and was demonstrated to reduce the binding of GV immunoglobulin G (IgG) to the surface of HMCs

  11. Auto-Antibodies to β-F1-ATPase and Vimentin in Malignant Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Creaney, Jenette; Dick, Ian M.; Yeoman, Deborah; Wong, Sarah; Robinson, Bruce W. S.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with Malignant Mesothelioma (MM) develop unidentified auto-antibodies to MM tumour antigens. This study was conducted to identify the targets of MM patient auto-antibodies in order to try to understand more of the anti-tumour response and to determine if these antibodies might be helpful for diagnosis or prognostication. Using MM patient sera in a Western immunoblott screening strategy, no common immunoreactive proteins were identified. The sera from one long-term survivor recognised a protein band of 50–60 kDa present in cell lysates from four of five MM cell lines tested. The immunoreactive proteins in this band were identified by 2D electrophoretic separation of a MM cell line protein lysate, followed by analysis of excised immunoreactive proteins on a MALDI TOF mass spectrometer and peptide mass fingerprinting. The immunoreactive proteins identified were vimentin (accession gi55977767) and the ATP synthase (F1-ATPase) beta chain (accession gi114549 and gi47606749). ELISA assays were developed for antibodies to these proteins. Neither vimentin (median and 95% CI 0.346; 0.32–0.468 for MM patients, 0.327; 0.308–0.428 for controls) nor ß-F1-ATPase (0.257; 0.221–0.453 for MM patients, 0.263; 0.22–0.35 for controls) showed significant differences in autoantibody levels between a group of MM patients and controls. Using a dichotomized antibody level (high, low) for these targets we demonstrated that vimentin antibody levels were not associated with survival. In contrast, high ß-F1-ATPase antibody levels were significantly associated with increased median survival (18 months) compared to low ß F1 ATPase antibody levels (9 months; p = 0.049). Immunohistochemical analysis on a MM tissue microarray showed cytoplasmic staining in 28 of 33 samples for vimentin and strong cytoplasmic staining in14 and weak in 16 samples for ß-F1-ATPase. Therefore antibodies to neither vimentin nor ß-F1-ATPase are useful for differential diagnosis of MM, however

  12. Antihelper T cell autoantibody in acquired agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, A; Sicklick, M; Mehra, V; Rosen, F S; Levey, R H

    1981-01-01

    A patient with acquired agammaglobulinemia had an antihelper T cell factor that was identified as an immunoglobulin of the IgG class. The factor specifically bound to the TH2- T cell subset and, in the presence of complement, abolished the helper effect of normal T cells. The antihelper T cell antibody preceded by several years the appearance of suppressor TH2+Ia+ T cells, at which time the clinical course rapidly deteriorated. Plasmapheresis resulted in lymphocytosis and reappearance of a functionally intact helper T cell population. It did not affect the suppressor cells. Conversely, total thymectomy resulted in a temporary disappearance of the TH2+Ia+ suppressor cells, but did not decrease the levels of the autoantibody to helper T cells. Neither of these treatments reversed the state of agammaglobulinemia. PMID:6450224

  13. Cytoplasmic hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed Central

    al-Baldawi, N F; Abercrombie, R F

    1992-01-01

    The apparent cytoplasmic proton diffusion coefficient was measured using pH electrodes and samples of cytoplasm extracted from the giant neuron of a marine invertebrate. By suddenly changing the pH at one surface of the sample and recording the relaxation of pH within the sample, an apparent diffusion coefficient of 1.4 +/- 0.5 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7) was measured in the acidic or neutral range of pH (6.0-7.2). This value is approximately 5x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the mobile pH buffers (approximately 8 x 10(-6) cm2/s) and approximately 68x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the hydronium ion (93 x 10(-6) cm2/s). A mobile pH buffer (approximately 15% of the buffering power) and an immobile buffer (approximately 85% of the buffering power) could quantitatively account for the results at acidic or neutral pH. At alkaline pH (8.2-8.6), the apparent proton diffusion coefficient increased to 4.1 +/- 0.8 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7). This larger diffusion coefficient at alkaline pH could be explained quantitatively by the enhanced buffering power of the mobile amino acids. Under the conditions of these experiments, it is unlikely that hydroxide movement influences the apparent hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient. PMID:1617134

  14. Pancreatic autoantibodies after pancreas-kidney transplantation - do they matter?

    PubMed

    Martins, La Salete; Henriques, Antonio C; Fonseca, Isabel M; Rodrigues, Anabela S; Oliverira, José C; Dores, Jorge M; Dias, Leonidio S; Cabrita, Antonio M; Silva, José D; Noronha, Irene L

    2014-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence has been documented in simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants (SPKT), but this diagnosis may be underestimated. Antibody monitoring is the most simple, noninvasive, screening test for pancreas autoimmune activity. However, the impact of the positive autoimmune markers on pancreas graft function remains controversial. In our cohort of 105 SPKT, we studied the cases with positive pancreatic autoantibodies. They were immunosuppressed with antithymocyte globulin, tacrolimus, mycophenolate, and steroids. The persistence or reappearance of these autoantibodies after SPKT and factors associated with their evolution and with graft outcome were analyzed. Pancreatic autoantibodies were prospectively monitored. Serum samples were collected before transplantation and at least once per year thereafter. At the end of the follow-up (maximum 138 months), 43.8% of patients were positive (from pre-transplant or after recurrence) for at least one autoantibody - the positive group. Antiglutamic acid decarboxylase was the most prevalent (31.4%), followed by anti-insulin (8.6%) and anti-islet cell autoantibodies (3.8%). Bivariate analysis showed that the positive group had higher fasting glucose, higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), lower C-peptide levels, and a higher number of HLA-matches. Analyzing the sample divided into four groups according to pre-/post-transplant autoantibodies profile, the negative/positive group tended to present the higher HbA1c values. Multivariate analysis confirmed the significant association between pancreas autoimmunity and HbA1c and C-peptide levels. Positivity for these autoantibodies pre-transplantation did not influence pancreas survival. The unfavorable glycemic profile observed in the autoantibody-positive SPKT is a matter of concern, which deserves further attention.

  15. Complement Factor H Autoantibodies are Associated with Early Stage NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Amornsiripanitch, Nita; Hong, Shaolin; Campa, Michael J.; Frank, Michael M.; Gottlin, Elizabeth B.; Patz, Edward F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In order to discover diagnostic biomarkers associated with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we searched for autoantibodies preferentially present in stage I patients compared to patients with advanced stage disease. Here we describe an autoantibody against complement factor H (CFH) and its association with early stage NSCLC. Experimental Design Immunoblots were used to detect autoantibodies in the sera of stage I NSCLC patients. An autoantibody recognizing a 150 kDa protein was discovered and the protein was identified by mass spectrometry. The association of the autoantibody with early stage disease was suggested by the results of immunoblot analysis with sera from 28 stage I patients and 28 stage III/IV patients. This association was confirmed by protein microarray of sera from 125 NSCLC patients of all stages as well as 125 age, gender, and smoking history matched controls. Results The immunoreactive protein was identified as CFH. By immunoblot analysis, anti-CFH autoantibody was found in 50% of stage I NSCLC patients and 11% of late stage NSCLC patients (P=0.003). By protein microarray analysis, patients with stage I NSCLC had a significantly higher incidence of anti-CFH antibody than those with late stage NSCLC (P=0.0051). The percentage of sera with a positive level of CFH autoantibody was 30.4% in stage I, 21.1% in stage II, 12.5% in stage III, 7.4% in stage IV and 8.0% in the control group. Conclusions These findings suggest that in patients with NSCLC, CFH autoantibody is a molecular marker associated with early stage disease. PMID:20515868

  16. Design and Measurement of Nonislet-Specific Autoantibodies for the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium Autoantibody Workshop.

    PubMed

    Akolkar, Beena; Hilner, Joan; Nierras, Concepcion R

    2015-10-01

    The Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) comprised groups of investigators from many countries throughout the world, with a common goal of identifying genes predisposing to type 1 diabetes. The T1DGC ascertained and collected samples from families with two or more affected siblings with type 1 diabetes and generated a broad array of clinical, genetic, and immunologic data. The T1DGC Autoantibody Workshop was designed to distribute data for analyses to discover genes associated with autoantibodies in those with type 1 diabetes. In the T1DGC-affected sibling pair families, three T1DGC Network laboratories measured antibodies to the islet autoantigens GAD65 and the intracellular portion of protein tyrosine phosphatase (IA-2A). The availability of extensive genetic data provided an opportunity to investigate the associations between type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases for which autoantibodies could be measured. Measurements of additional nonislet autoantibodies, including thyroid peroxidase, tissue transglutaminase, 21-hydroxylase, and the potassium/hydrogen ion transporter H+/K+-ATPase, were performed by the T1DGC laboratory at the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, Aurora, CO. Measurements of all autoantibodies were transmitted to the T1DGC Coordinating Center, and the data were made available to members of the T1DGC Autoantibody Working Groups for analysis in conjunction with existing T1DGC genetic data. This article describes the design of the T1DGC Autoantibody Workshop and the quality-control procedures to maintain and monitor the performance of each laboratory and provides the quality-control results for the nonislet autoantibody measurements. PMID:26405071

  17. Induction of lupus-related specific autoantibodies by non-specific inflammation caused by an intraperitoneal injection of n-hexadecane in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yoshiki; Ono, Nobutaka; Akaogi, Jun; Nacionales, Dina C; Yamasaki, Yoshioki; Barker, Tolga T; Reeves, Westley H; Satoh, Minoru

    2006-02-01

    A single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of pristane, incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), or the adjuvant oil squalene, but not high molecular weight medicinal mineral oils, induces lupus-related autoantibodies to nRNP/Sm and -Su in non-autoimmune strains of mice. This ability appears to be associated with the low molecular weight and adjuvanticity of hydrocarbon. n-Hexadecane (C(16)H(34)), which is present in petroleum, has adjuvant activity and induces arthritis in rodents like other lupus-inducing oils. In addition to dietary exposure to n-hexadecane in mineral oils, exposure also occurs via inhalation of oil mist, jet fuel, or diesel exhaust or by absorption through the skin. Since n-hexadecane is a low molecular weight adjuvant hydrocarbon oil similar to other lupus-inducing hydrocarbons, the present study examined whether it can also induce lupus-related autoantibodies in mice. Female BALB/cJ mice received a single i.p. injection of 0.5 ml of n-hexadecane, pristane, or saline (control). Pathology and serology (immunoglobulin levels, autoantibodies by immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and ELISA) were examined 3 months later. Unexpectedly, all n-hexadecane-treated mice, but none in the other groups, developed inflammatory ascites within 2.5 months. n-Hexadecane induced hypergammaglobulinemia (IgG1, IgG2a), antinuclear (titer>1:160, 67%) and -cytoplasmic antibodies (58%) and autoantibodies to nRNP/Sm (25%), Su (33%), ssDNA (83%), and chromatin (100%). Therefore, non-specific inflammation caused by n-hexadecane resulted in the production of a limited set of specific autoantibodies. These previously unrecognized immunological effects of n-hexadecane may have implications in monitoring human exposure to hydrocarbons and in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  18. Serum Autoantibodies in Chronic Prostate Inflammation in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schlick, Bettina; Massoner, Petra; Lueking, Angelika; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Blattner, Mirjam; Schaefer, Georg; Marquart, Klaus; Theek, Carmen; Amersdorfer, Peter; Zielinski, Dirk; Kirchner, Matthias; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Rubin, Mark A.; Müllner, Stefan; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Klocker, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is frequently observed on histological analysis of malignant and non-malignant prostate specimens. It is a suspected supporting factor for prostate diseases and their progression and a main cause of false positive PSA tests in cancer screening. We hypothesized that inflammation induces autoantibodies, which may be useful biomarkers. We aimed to identify and validate prostate inflammation associated serum autoantibodies in prostate cancer patients and evaluate the expression of corresponding autoantigens. Methods Radical prostatectomy specimens of prostate cancer patients (N = 70) were classified into high and low inflammation groups according to the amount of tissue infiltrating lymphocytes. The corresponding pre-surgery blood serum samples were scrutinized for autoantibodies using a low-density protein array. Selected autoantigens were identified in prostate tissue and their expression pattern analyzed by immunohistochemistry and qPCR. The identified autoantibody profile was cross-checked in an independent sample set (N = 63) using the Luminex-bead protein array technology. Results Protein array screening identified 165 autoantibodies differentially abundant in the serum of high compared to low inflammation patients. The expression pattern of three corresponding antigens were established in benign and cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry and qPCR: SPAST (Spastin), STX18 (Syntaxin 18) and SPOP (speckle-type POZ protein). Of these, SPAST was significantly increased in prostate tissue with high inflammation. All three autoantigens were differentially expressed in primary and/or castration resistant prostate tumors when analyzed in an inflammation-independent tissue microarray. Cross-validation of the inflammation autoantibody profile on an independent sample set using a Luminex-bead protein array, retrieved 51 of the significantly discriminating autoantibodies. Three autoantibodies were significantly upregulated in both screens, MUT

  19. Anti-cytokine autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cappellano, Giuseppe; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Woldetsadik, Abiy D; Boggio, Elena; Soluri, Maria F; Comi, Cristoforo; Sblattero, Daniele; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Dianzani, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current literature is showing that autoantibodies (AutoAbs) against cytokines are produced in several pathological conditions, including autoimmune diseases, but can also be detected in healthy individuals. In autoimmune diseases, these AutoAbs may also be prognostic markers, either negative (such as AutoAbs to IL-8 and IL-1α in rheumatoid arthritis) or positive (such as AutoAbs to IL-6 in systemic sclerosis and those to osteopontin in rheumatoid arthritis). They may have neutralizing activity and influence the course of the physiological and pathological immune responses. High levels of AutoAbs against cytokines may even lead to immunodeficiency, such as those to IL-17 in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I or those to IFN-γ in mycobacterial infections. Their role in human therapy may be exploited not only through passive immunization but also through vaccination, which may improve the costs for long lasting treatments of autoimmune diseases. Detection and quantification of these AutoAbs can be profoundly influenced by the technique used and standardization of these methods is needed to increase the value of their analysis. PMID:23885320

  20. Autoantibodies and immunoglobulins among atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Kodama, Kazunori; Shimaoka, Katsutaro; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Carter, R.L.; Yamakido, Michio

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to atomic bomb radiation affects immune responsiveness, such as the occurrence of autoantibodies and levels of immunoglobulins. Rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody, anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody and immunoglobulin levels (IgG, IgM, IgA and IgE) were measured among 2,061 individuals exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki whose estimated doses ranged from 0 to 5.6 Gy. The prevalence and titers of rheumatoid factor were found to be increased in the individuals exposed to higher radiation doses. The IgA level in females and the IgM level in both sexes increased as radiation dose increased, although the effects of radiation exposure were not large. No effect of radiation was found on the prevalence of antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody and anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody or on the levels of IgG and IgE. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Neuronal autoantibodies in patients with Rasmussen's encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Samanci, Bedia; Tektürk, Pınar; Tüzün, Erdem; Erdağ, Ece; Kınay, Demet; Yapıcı, Zuhal; Baykan, Betül

    2016-06-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis (RE) is a rare disease with unknown pathophysiology. To disclose whether anti-neuronal autoimmunity participates in the aetiology of RE, various neuronal autoantibodies (NAAbs) were investigated in sera of patients with RE and controls. The study included five patients who fulfilled the RE diagnostic criteria (clinical, EEG, and MRI findings) as the patient group, and 50 multiple sclerosis patients and 50 healthy subjects as the control groups. Sera were evaluated for various NAAbs by radioimmunoassay or cell-based assays. All sera were also screened for uncharacterized antibodies to neuronal cell surface or synapse antigens by indirect immunofluorescence using hippocampal cell cultures. The mean age at onset of seizures was 8.3±3.4 years (range: 4-13.5) and mean follow-up time was 11.2±5.4 years (range: 5-19). All patients had unihemispheric atrophy of the cerebral cortex and epilepsia partialis continua. Two of the patients had moderate cognitive impairment, while the others were severely affected, as shown by neuropsychological testing. NAAb positivity was not detected in any of the patients. Immune aetiology is thought to have a role in RE, but the responsible players have not yet been elucidated. Our extensive antibody screening in a small number of patients does not support the presence of antigen-specific anti-neuronal autoimmunity in RE pathophysiology. PMID:27248684

  2. Autoantibodies in nonautoimmune individuals during infections.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Tatiana; Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Blank, Miri; Matthias, Torsten; Pfeiffer, Sascha; Weis, Ingrid; Toubi, Elias; Singh, Sham; Asherson, Ronald; Fraser, Abigail; Gilburd, Boris; Sapir, Tal; Levy, Yair; Lukac, Janja; Rozman, Blaz; Kveder, Tanja; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2007-06-01

    Infections can act as environmental triggers inducing or promoting autoimmune disease in genetically predisposed individuals. Identification of microbial peptides similar to self-tissues may by molecular mimicry, provide the inducing mechanism for an immune response. The aim of this study was to identify autoantibodies (autoAbs) in nonautoimmune individuals during acute bacterial, viral, or parasitic infections. Specific Abs or specific infections with an increased autoAb load may shed insight into the mechanisms of autoimmune disease. Sera from 88 patients with acute infections (41 bacterial, 23 viral, 17 parasitic, and 7 rickettsial) were tested by the ELISA method for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) 8 Pro, and Abs to thyroid peroxidase (TPO), thyroglobulin, phospholipids, annexin-V, laminin, anti-Saccharomyces cervisiae (ASCA), and prothrombin, along with 80 normal controls. Elevated titers of Abs to annexin-V and prothrombin were the most prevalent in viral, parasitic, and rickettsial infections and to laminin in viral and parasitic infections. Elevated titers of ASCA and ANA were found in viral and bacterial infections. Antiphospholipid Abs were found in parasitic and Q-fever infections. Thirty-four individuals harbored elevated titers of at least two Abs. An autoAb burden was detected in individuals with hepatitis A, hepatitis B, toxoplasma or Q-fever infections. In nonautoimmune individuals with various (bacterial, viral, parasitic, and rickettsial) infections, elevated titers of Abs to annexin-V, prothrombin, laminin, ASCA, ANA, and phospholipids were most frequently detected. PMID:17894023

  3. Are autoantibodies the targets of B-cell-directed therapy?

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, David S; Grammer, Amrie C; Ning, Tony C; Lipsky, Peter E

    2011-09-01

    B-cell-directed therapy-the use of agents that eliminate B cells or block cytokines important for B-cell function-is emerging as a promising approach to the treatment of rheumatic disease. Target diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), display diverse patterns of autoantibody production and aberrant activation of B cells. Despite the success of this general approach, the mechanisms by which B-cell-directed therapy ameliorates disease, and the role of autoantibodies as biomarkers of clinical response remain unclear. Importantly, although B-cell-directed therapy can reduce the production of some autoantibodies, the effects can be variable and heterogeneous, probably reflecting the critical (but ill-defined) roles of different B-cell and plasma cell populations in autoantibody production. Future studies during clinical trials of these agents are needed to define which B-cell and autoantibody populations are affected (or ought to be), and to discover informative biomarkers of clinical response that can be used to advance this therapeutic approach.

  4. Brief Communication: Maternal Plasma Autoantibodies Screening in Fetal Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Charkiewicz, Karol; Zbucka-Kretowska, Monika; Goscik, Joanna; Wolczynski, Slawomir; Lemancewicz, Adam; Laudanski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance in the metabolites levels which can potentially be related to certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities can stimulate mother's immune response to produce autoantibodies directed against proteins. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of 9000 autoantibodies in maternal plasma to detect fetal Down syndrome. Method. We performed 190 amniocenteses and found 10 patients with confirmed fetal Down syndrome (15th-18th weeks of gestation). For the purpose of our control we chose 11 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the expression of autoantibodies in the blood plasma, we used a protein microarray, which allows for simultaneous determination of 9000 proteins per sample. Results. We revealed 213 statistically significant autoantibodies, whose expression decreased or increased in the study group with fetal Down syndrome. The second step was to create a classifier of Down syndrome pregnancy, which includes 14 antibodies. The predictive value of the classifier (specificity and sensitivity) is 100%, classification errors, 0%, cross-validation errors, 0%. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that the autoantibodies may play a role in the pathophysiology of Down syndrome pregnancy. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome pregnancy requires further investigation on larger group of patients.

  5. Brief Communication: Maternal Plasma Autoantibodies Screening in Fetal Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Charkiewicz, Karol; Zbucka-Kretowska, Monika; Goscik, Joanna; Wolczynski, Slawomir; Lemancewicz, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance in the metabolites levels which can potentially be related to certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities can stimulate mother's immune response to produce autoantibodies directed against proteins. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of 9000 autoantibodies in maternal plasma to detect fetal Down syndrome. Method. We performed 190 amniocenteses and found 10 patients with confirmed fetal Down syndrome (15th–18th weeks of gestation). For the purpose of our control we chose 11 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the expression of autoantibodies in the blood plasma, we used a protein microarray, which allows for simultaneous determination of 9000 proteins per sample. Results. We revealed 213 statistically significant autoantibodies, whose expression decreased or increased in the study group with fetal Down syndrome. The second step was to create a classifier of Down syndrome pregnancy, which includes 14 antibodies. The predictive value of the classifier (specificity and sensitivity) is 100%, classification errors, 0%, cross-validation errors, 0%. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that the autoantibodies may play a role in the pathophysiology of Down syndrome pregnancy. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome pregnancy requires further investigation on larger group of patients. PMID:27042674

  6. Detection of at-risk pregnancy by means of highly sensitive assays for thyroid autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Stagnaro-Green, A.; Roman, S.H.; Cobin, R.H.; El-Harazy, E.; Alvarez-Marfany, M.; Davies, T.F. )

    1990-09-19

    The authors screened 552 women who presented to their obstetrician in the first trimester of pregnancy using highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for the presence of thyroglobulin and thyroidperoxidase autoantibodies and found an incidence of positivity of 19.6%. The tendency to secrete detectable levels of thyroid autoantibodies was significantly correlated with an increased rate of miscarriage. Thyroid autoantibody-positive women miscarried at a rate of 17%, compared with 8.4% for the autoantibody-negative women. Individual levels of thyroglobulin and thyroidperoxidase autoantibodies were similarly related to this increased miscarriage rate, with no evidence of autoantibody specificity in the relationship. Furthermore, the increase in miscarriages could not be explained by differences in thyroid hormone levels, the presence of cardiolipin autoantibodies, maternal age, gestational age at the time of maternal entry into the study, or previous obstetric history. They conclude that thyroid autoantibodies are an independent marker of at-risk pregnancy.

  7. Measurement of Cytoplasmic Streaming in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Sujoy; Williams, Lucy; Palacios, Isabel; Goldstein, Raymond

    2010-11-01

    During stage 9 of Drosophila melanogastor oogenesis flow of the oocyte cytoplasm, driven by kinesin 1 motor protein is observed. This cytoplasmic streaming is analyzed by PIV in both wild type and kinesin light chain mutants, revealing striking statistical differences. Further measurements of the rheology of the oocyte allow for estimations of the mechanical energy needed to generate the observed flows.

  8. Cytoplasmic Streaming - Skylab Student Experiment ED-63

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment (ED-63), Cytoplasmic Streaming, proposed by Cheryl A. Peitz of Arapahoe High School, Littleton, Colorado. Experiment ED-63 was to observe the effect of zero-gravity on cytoplasmic streaming in the aquatic plant named Elodea, commonly called water weed or water thyme. The phenomenon of cytoplasmic streaming is not well understood, but it is recognized as the circulation mechanism of the internal materials or cytoplasm of a cell. Cytoplasm is a gelatinous substance that has the ability to change its viscosity and flow, carrying various cell materials with it. The activity can be stimulated by sunlight or heat. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  9. Selected autoantibodies and normal-tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Skonieczna, Katarzyna; Grabska-Liberek, Iwona; Terelak-Borys, Barbara; Jamrozy-Witkowska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Background Although intraocular pressure is an important risk factor in glaucoma, there is growing body evidence indicating an immunological component in the pathogenesis of normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). The aim of this study was to determine if NTG coexists with elevated levels of autoantibodies detected in rheumatic diseases. Material/Methods We enrolled 105 patients into the study: 35 with NTG, 34 with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), and 36 controls. All patients underwent ophthalmic examination and blood tests. Blood was examined for the level of: antibodies against antinuclear antibodies (ANA), antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (ENA), immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, IgM), rheumatoid factor, anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA), and antiphospholipid antibodies (anticardiolipin antibodies, beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies, antiprothrombin antibodies). Results The level of ANA was increased among 6 patients in the NTG group (17.1%), 8 in the POAG group (23.5%), and 6 in the control group (16.5%). The difference was not statistically significant (p=0.97). None of the patients in the NTG, POAG, or control group had positive antibodies to ENA. The level of immunoglobulins IgG, IgM, and IgA in the 3 groups was similar and within normal values. The median level of rheumatoid factor and ACPA was the highest in the NTG group, but it was within normal laboratory values. There was a statistically significant difference between antiprothrombin antibodies IgG between the NTG and POAG group (p=0.01), but not between the NTG and control group (p=0.24). Conclusions The results of our study do not confirm the hypothesis that NTG coexists with elevated blood levels of antibodies, which are a characteristic feature of rheumatic diseases. PMID:25016491

  10. Autoantibodies to Agrin in Myasthenia Gravis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bealmear, Beverly; Ragheb, Samia; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Lewis, Richard A.; Lisak, Robert P.; Mei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    To determine if patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) have antibodies to agrin, a proteoglycan released by motor neurons and is critical for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation, we collected serum samples from 93 patients with MG with known status of antibodies to acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle specific kinase (MuSK) and lipoprotein-related 4 (LRP4) and samples from control subjects (healthy individuals and individuals with other diseases). Sera were assayed for antibodies to agrin. We found antibodies to agrin in 7 serum samples of MG patients. None of the 25 healthy controls and none of the 55 control neurological patients had agrin antibodies. Two of the four triple negative MG patients (i.e., no detectable AChR, MuSK or LRP4 antibodies, AChR-/MuSK-/LRP4-) had antibodies against agrin. In addition, agrin antibodies were detected in 5 out of 83 AChR+/MuSK-/LRP4- patients but were not found in the 6 patients with MuSK antibodies (AChR-/MuSK+/LRP4-). Sera from MG patients with agrin antibodies were able to recognize recombinant agrin in conditioned media and in transfected HEK293 cells. These sera also inhibited the agrin-induced MuSK phosphorylation and AChR clustering in muscle cells. Together, these observations indicate that agrin is another autoantigen in patients with MG and agrin autoantibodies may be pathogenic through inhibition of agrin/LRP4/MuSK signaling at the NMJ. PMID:24632822

  11. Autoantibodies to agrin in myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Shen, Chengyong; Bealmear, Beverly; Ragheb, Samia; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Lewis, Richard A; Lisak, Robert P; Mei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    To determine if patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) have antibodies to agrin, a proteoglycan released by motor neurons and is critical for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation, we collected serum samples from 93 patients with MG with known status of antibodies to acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle specific kinase (MuSK) and lipoprotein-related 4 (LRP4) and samples from control subjects (healthy individuals and individuals with other diseases). Sera were assayed for antibodies to agrin. We found antibodies to agrin in 7 serum samples of MG patients. None of the 25 healthy controls and none of the 55 control neurological patients had agrin antibodies. Two of the four triple negative MG patients (i.e., no detectable AChR, MuSK or LRP4 antibodies, AChR-/MuSK-/LRP4-) had antibodies against agrin. In addition, agrin antibodies were detected in 5 out of 83 AChR+/MuSK-/LRP4- patients but were not found in the 6 patients with MuSK antibodies (AChR-/MuSK+/LRP4-). Sera from MG patients with agrin antibodies were able to recognize recombinant agrin in conditioned media and in transfected HEK293 cells. These sera also inhibited the agrin-induced MuSK phosphorylation and AChR clustering in muscle cells. Together, these observations indicate that agrin is another autoantigen in patients with MG and agrin autoantibodies may be pathogenic through inhibition of agrin/LRP4/MuSK signaling at the NMJ. PMID:24632822

  12. DNA-damaging autoantibodies and cancer: the lupus butterfly theory.

    PubMed

    Noble, Philip W; Bernatsky, Sasha; Clarke, Ann E; Isenberg, David A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Hansen, James E

    2016-07-01

    Autoantibodies reactive against host DNA are detectable in the circulation of most people with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The long-held view that antibodies cannot penetrate live cells has been disproved. A subset of lupus autoantibodies penetrate cells, translocate to nuclei, and inhibit DNA repair or directly damages DNA. The result of these effects depends on the microenvironment and genetic traits of the cell. Some DNA-damaging antibodies alone have little impact on normal cells, but in the presence of other conditions, such as pre-existing DNA-repair defects, can become highly toxic. These findings raise new questions about autoimmunity and DNA damage, and reveal opportunities for new targeted therapies against malignancies particularly vulnerable to DNA damage. In this Perspectives article, we review the known associations between SLE, DNA damage and cancer, and propose a theory for the effects of DNA-damaging autoantibodies on SLE pathophysiology and cancer risk. PMID:27009542

  13. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Red Blood Cell Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Quist, Erin; Koepsell, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder caused by autoreactive red blood cell (RBC) antibodies that destroy RBCs. Although autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rare, RBC autoantibodies are encountered frequently and can complicate transfusion workups, impede RBC alloantibody identification, delay distribution of compatible units, have variable clinical significance that ranges from benign to life-threatening, and may signal an underlying disease or disorder. In this review, we discuss the common presenting features of RBC autoantibodies, laboratory findings, ancillary studies that help the pathologist investigate the clinical significance of autoantibodies, and how to provide appropriate patient care and consultation for clinical colleagues. Pathologists must be mindful of, and knowledgeable about, this entity because it not only allows for direct clinical management but also can afford an opportunity to preemptively treat an otherwise silent malignancy or disorder.

  14. Immune Alterations in Patients with Anti-Interferon-γ Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Chruewkamlow, Nuttapol; Mahasongkram, Kodchakorn; Pata, Supansa; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Salee, Parichart; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies against interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) can cause immunodeficiency and are associated with various opportunistic infections. In the present study, we investigated other cellular immune parameters for a better understanding of the immunodeficiency condition in the patients. The numbers of WBC, monocytes and NK cells were increased in patients with anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies (AAbs). Upon TCR activation, T cell proliferation and IL-2 receptor of the patients remained intact. Nonetheless, the Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ and TNF-α) production was up-regulated. The production of Th2 (IL-4) and Th17 (IL-17) cytokines was unchanged. We suggest that, in addition to the presence of anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies, alterations in the cellular immune functions may also contribute to this immunodeficiency.

  15. Autoantibodies against small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein complexes and their clinical associations

    PubMed Central

    VAN EENENNAAM, H; VOGELZANGS, J H P; BISSCHOPS, L; TE BOOME, L C J; SEELIG, H P; RENZ, M; DE ROOIJ, D -J; BROUWER, R; PLUK, H; PRUIJN, G J M; VAN VENROOIJ, W J; VAN DEN HOOGEN, F H J

    2002-01-01

    Sera from patients suffering from systemic autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and systemic sclerosis (SSc) have been shown to contain reactivities to nuclear components. Autoantibodies specifically targeting nucleolar antigens are found most frequently in patients suffering from SSc or SSc overlap syndromes. We determined the prevalence and clinical significance of autoantibodies directed to nucleolar RNA-protein complexes, the so-called small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein complexes (snoRNPs). A total of 172 patient sera with antinucleolar antibodies were analysed by immunoprecipitation. From 100 of these patients clinical information was obtained by chart review. Autoantibodies directed to snoRNPs were detected not only in patients suffering from SSc and primary Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), but also in patients suffering from SLE, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and myositis (PM/DM). Antibodies against box C/D small snoRNPs can be subdivided in antifibrillarin positive and antifibrillarin negative reactivity. Antifibrillarin-positive patient sera were associated with a poor prognosis in comparison with antifibrillarin negative (reactivity with U3 or U8 snoRNP only) patient sera. Anti-Th/To autoantibodies were associated with SSc, primary RP and SLE and were found predominantly in patients suffering from decreased co-diffusion and oesophagus motility and xerophthalmia. For the first time autoantibodies that recognize box H/ACA snoRNPs are described, identifying this class of snoRNPs as a novel autoantigenic activity. Taken together, our data show that antinucleolar patient sera directed to small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein complexes are found frequently in other diseases than SSc and that categorization of diagnoses and clinical manifestations based on autoantibody profiles seems particularly informative in patient sera recognizing box C/D snoRNPs. PMID:12452846

  16. Anti-Ku autoantibodies: series of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Gryga, Krzysztof; Milewski, Mamert; Zółciński, Marek; Dyczek, Andrzej; Musiał, Jacek

    2009-01-01

    Autoantibodies directed against nuclear protein Ku are infrequently detected. If present, they are found in high titers in patients with connective tissue overlap syndromes. This article describes 5 patients with anti-Ku antibodies in whom systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, idiopathic lung fibrosis or scleroderma - polymyositis overlap syndrome were diagnosed. Interestingly, signs and symptoms of transient cranial neuropathy involving trigeminal and facial nerves were reported by 3 patients. Cranial nerve neuropathy has not been described in patients with anti-Ku autoantibodies previously.

  17. The Myositis Autoantibody Phenotypes of the Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Huber, Adam M.; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Targoff, Ira N.; Miller, Frederick W.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. In follow-up to our study defining the major clinical subgroup phenotypes of JIIM, we compared demographics, clinical features, laboratory measures, and outcomes among myositis-specific autoantibody (MSA) subgroups, as well as with published data on adult idiopathic inflammatory myopathy patients enrolled in a separate natural history study. In the present study, of 430 patients enrolled in a nationwide registry study who had serum tested for myositis autoantibodies, 374 had either a single specific MSA (n = 253) or no identified MSA (n = 121) and were the subject of the present report. Following univariate analysis, we used random forest classification and exact logistic regression modeling to compare autoantibody subgroups. Anti-p155/140 autoantibodies were the most frequent subgroup, present in 32% of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) or overlap myositis with JDM, followed by anti-MJ autoantibodies, which were seen in 20% of JIIM patients, primarily in JDM. Other MSAs, including anti-synthetase, anti-signal recognition particle (SRP), and anti-Mi-2, were present in only 10% of JIIM patients. Features that characterized the anti-p155/140 autoantibody subgroup included Gottron papules, malar rash, “shawl-sign” rash, photosensitivity, cuticular overgrowth, lowest creatine kinase (CK) levels, and a predominantly chronic illness course. The features that differed for patients with anti-MJ antibodies included muscle cramps, dysphonia, intermediate CK levels, a high frequency of hospitalization, and a monocyclic disease course. Patients with anti-synthetase antibodies had higher frequencies of interstitial lung disease, arthralgia, and “mechanic’s hands,” and had an older age at diagnosis. The anti-SRP group, which had exclusively juvenile polymyositis, was

  18. The myositis autoantibody phenotypes of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Rider, Lisa G; Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Huber, Adam M; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Targoff, Ira N; Miller, Frederick W

    2013-07-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. In follow-up to our study defining the major clinical subgroup phenotypes of JIIM, we compared demographics, clinical features, laboratory measures, and outcomes among myositis-specific autoantibody (MSA) subgroups, as well as with published data on adult idiopathic inflammatory myopathy patients enrolled in a separate natural history study. In the present study, of 430 patients enrolled in a nationwide registry study who had serum tested for myositis autoantibodies, 374 had either a single specific MSA (n = 253) or no identified MSA (n = 121) and were the subject of the present report. Following univariate analysis, we used random forest classification and exact logistic regression modeling to compare autoantibody subgroups. Anti-p155/140 autoantibodies were the most frequent subgroup, present in 32% of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) or overlap myositis with JDM, followed by anti-MJ autoantibodies, which were seen in 20% of JIIM patients, primarily in JDM. Other MSAs, including anti-synthetase, anti-signal recognition particle (SRP), and anti-Mi-2, were present in only 10% of JIIM patients. Features that characterized the anti-p155/140 autoantibody subgroup included Gottron papules, malar rash, "shawl-sign" rash, photosensitivity, cuticular overgrowth, lowest creatine kinase (CK) levels, and a predominantly chronic illness course. The features that differed for patients with anti-MJ antibodies included muscle cramps, dysphonia, intermediate CK levels, a high frequency of hospitalization, and a monocyclic disease course. Patients with anti-synthetase antibodies had higher frequencies of interstitial lung disease, arthralgia, and "mechanic's hands," and had an older age at diagnosis. The anti-SRP group, which had exclusively juvenile polymyositis, was characterized by high

  19. Thyroid Autoantibodies in Pregnancy: Their Role, Regulation and Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Balucan, Francis S.; Morshed, Syed A.; Davies, Terry F.

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies to thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase are common in the euthyroid population and are considered secondary responses and indicative of thyroid inflammation. By contrast, autoantibodies to the TSH receptor are unique to patients with Graves' disease and to some patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Both types of thyroid antibodies are useful clinical markers of autoimmune thyroid disease and are profoundly influenced by the immune suppression of pregnancy and the resulting loss of such suppression in the postpartum period. Here, we review these three types of thyroid antibodies and their antigens and how they relate to pregnancy itself, obstetric and neonatal outcomes, and the postpartum. PMID:23691429

  20. The myositis autoantibody phenotypes of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Rider, Lisa G; Shah, Mona; Mamyrova, Gulnara; Huber, Adam M; Rice, Madeline Murguia; Targoff, Ira N; Miller, Frederick W

    2013-07-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, characteristic rashes, and other systemic features. In follow-up to our study defining the major clinical subgroup phenotypes of JIIM, we compared demographics, clinical features, laboratory measures, and outcomes among myositis-specific autoantibody (MSA) subgroups, as well as with published data on adult idiopathic inflammatory myopathy patients enrolled in a separate natural history study. In the present study, of 430 patients enrolled in a nationwide registry study who had serum tested for myositis autoantibodies, 374 had either a single specific MSA (n = 253) or no identified MSA (n = 121) and were the subject of the present report. Following univariate analysis, we used random forest classification and exact logistic regression modeling to compare autoantibody subgroups. Anti-p155/140 autoantibodies were the most frequent subgroup, present in 32% of patients with juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) or overlap myositis with JDM, followed by anti-MJ autoantibodies, which were seen in 20% of JIIM patients, primarily in JDM. Other MSAs, including anti-synthetase, anti-signal recognition particle (SRP), and anti-Mi-2, were present in only 10% of JIIM patients. Features that characterized the anti-p155/140 autoantibody subgroup included Gottron papules, malar rash, "shawl-sign" rash, photosensitivity, cuticular overgrowth, lowest creatine kinase (CK) levels, and a predominantly chronic illness course. The features that differed for patients with anti-MJ antibodies included muscle cramps, dysphonia, intermediate CK levels, a high frequency of hospitalization, and a monocyclic disease course. Patients with anti-synthetase antibodies had higher frequencies of interstitial lung disease, arthralgia, and "mechanic's hands," and had an older age at diagnosis. The anti-SRP group, which had exclusively juvenile polymyositis, was characterized by high

  1. Anti-DNA autoantibodies and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Blatt, N B; Glick, G D

    1999-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease that affects most of the organs and tissues of the body, causing glomerulonephritis, arthritis, and cerebritis. SLE can be fatal with nephritis, in particular, predicting a poor outcome for patients. In this review, we highlight what has been learned about SLE from the study of mouse models, and pay particular attention to anti-DNA autoantibodies, both as pathological agents of lupus nephritis and as DNA-binding proteins. We summarize the current approaches used to treat SLE and discuss the targeting of anti-DNA autoantibodies as a new treatment for lupus nephritis.

  2. Deep cytoplasmic rearrangements in ventralized Xenopus embryos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. E.; Denegre, J. M.; Danilchik, M. V.

    1993-01-01

    Following fertilization in Xenopus, dramatic rearrangements of the egg cytoplasm relocalize maternally synthesized egg components. During the first cell cycle the vegetal yolk mass rotates relative to the egg surface, toward the sperm entry point (SEP) (J. P. Vincent, G. F. Oster, and J. C. Gerhart, 1986, Dev. Biol. 113, 484-500), while concomitant deep cytoplasmic rearrangements occur in the animal hemisphere (M. V. Danilchik and J. M. Denegre, 1991, Development 111, 845-856). In this paper we examine the role of vegetal yolk mass rotation in producing the animal cytoplasmic rearrangements. We inhibited rotation by uv-irradiating embryos during the first cell cycle, a treatment that yields an extremely ventralized phenotype. Both uv-irradiated embryos and unirradiated control embryos show cytoplasmic rearrangements in the animal hemisphere during the first cell cycle. Cytoplasmic rearrangements on the SEP side of the embryo associated with the path of the sperm pronucleus, plus a swirl on the anti-SEP (dorsal) side, are seen, whether or not yolk mass rotation has occurred. This result suggests a role for the expanding sperm aster in directing animal hemisphere cytoplasmic movements. In unirradiated control embryos the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl is larger than that in uv-irradiated embryos and often extends into the vegetal hemisphere, consistent with the animal cytoplasm having been pulled dorsally and vegetally by the sliding vegetal yolk mass. Thus the yolk mass rotation may normally enhance the dorsalward cytoplasmic movement, begun by the sperm aster, enough to induce normal axis formation. We extended our observations of unirradiated control and uv-irradiated embryos through early cleavages. The vegetal extent of the anti-SEP (dorsal) swirl pattern seen in control embryos persists through the early cleavage period, such that labeled animal cytoplasm extends deep into dorsal third-tier blastomeres at the 32-cell stage. Significantly, in uv-irradiated embryos

  3. Cytoplasmic rearrangements associated with amphibian egg symmetrization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malacinski, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Cytoplasmic rearrangements which follow fertilization were mentioned in normal and inverted eggs. A set of yolk compartments was resolved by cytological analyses of both normally oriented and inverted eggs. Those compartments were characterized by their yolk platelet compositions and movement during egg inversion. It is found that during egg inversion the yolk compartments shift minor cytoplasmic compartments which line the egg cortex. Those yolk mass shifts occurred only after the inverted egg was activated. The direction of shift of the major yolk components, rather than the sperm entrance site, determines the dorsal/ventral polarity of the inverted egg. Among different spawnings the rate of shift varied. Eggs that displayed the fastest rate of shift exhibited the highest frequency of developmental abnormalities during organogenesis. Interpretation of novel observations on cytoplasmic organization provide criticism of some earlier models. A new density compartment model is presented as a coherent way to view the organization of the egg cytoplasm and the development of bilateral symmetry.

  4. Thoughts about the classification of small vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Falk, Ronald J; Jennette, J Charles

    2004-01-01

    The classification of small vessel vasculitis has markedly changed over the past 150 years. With the discovery of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA), renewed interest in the field has spawned investigations into the immunopathogenesis of small vessel vasculitis. This review will describe the historical basis of the classification of vasculitis, the current nosology based on the Chapel Hill Nomenclature for vasculitis and then both pathogenic and clinical reasons that support the use of the term "ANCA small vessel vasculitis" to describe the pauci-immune necrotizing small vessel vasculitides, including microscopic polyangiitis, Wegener's granulomatosis, the Churg-Strauss syndrome and pauci-immune necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis. PMID:15599883

  5. Bullous pemphigoid autoantibodies directly induce blister formation without complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Hideyuki; Sasaoka, Tetsumasa; Izumi, Kentaro; Nishie, Wataru; Shinkuma, Satoru; Natsuga, Ken; Nakamura, Hideki; Shibaki, Akihiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Complement activation and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells at the dermal/epidermal junction are thought to be essential for blister formation in bullous pemphigoid (BP), an autoimmune blistering disease induced by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen (COL17); however, this theory does not fully explain the pathological features of BP. Recently, the involvement of complement-independent pathways has been proposed. To directly address the question of the necessity of the complement activation in blister formation, we generated C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice. First, we show that passive transfer of autoantibodies from BP patients induced blister formation in neonatal C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice without complement activation. By using newly generated human and murine mAbs against the pathogenic noncollagenous 16A domain of COL17 with high (human IgG1, murine IgG2), low (murine IgG1), or no (human IgG4) complement activation abilities, we demonstrate that the deposition of Abs, and not complements, is relevant to the induction of blister formation in neonatal and adult mice. Notably, passive transfer of BP autoantibodies reduced the amount of COL17 in lesional mice skin, as observed in cultured normal human keratinocytes treated with the same Abs. Moreover, the COL17 depletion was associated with a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In conclusion, the COL17 depletion induced by BP autoantibodies, and not complement activation, is essential for the blister formation under our experimental system.

  6. The Choice of Laboratory Methodology Influences Autoantibody Test Results

    PubMed Central

    Rönnelid, Johan

    2015-01-01

    During the last 25 years, clinical autoantibody determinations have changed dramatically. Old and slow techniques with high diagnostic specificity have been replaced with automated and faster techniques that most often have a higher diagnostic sensitivity at the expense of a lower diagnostic specificity. Newer techniques are mostly quantitative, allowing for follow-up of autoantibody levels. Whereas the older procedures utilized autoantigens in soluble and native states, most modern techniques rely on autoantigens attached to surfaces, with the risk of exposure of denatured epitopes. Comparisons between antibody measurement techniques can be obtained from the results of external quality assessment programs. As the main objective for external quality assessment is the monitoring of clinical laboratories, they cannot focus on the kind of low-level and often polyreactive sera, which are common in the real world and in which a single definite target response cannot be easily defined. Such common sera are very useful, however, for analysis of differences between autoantibody measurement techniques. The European Consensus Finding Study Group on Autoantibodies has been working with this approach for 28 years. PMID:26284075

  7. MHC associations with clinical and autoantibody manifestations in European SLE.

    PubMed

    Morris, D L; Fernando, M M A; Taylor, K E; Chung, S A; Nititham, J; Alarcón-Riquelme, M E; Barcellos, L F; Behrens, T W; Cotsapas, C; Gaffney, P M; Graham, R R; Pons-Estel, B A; Gregersen, P K; Harley, J B; Hauser, S L; Hom, G; Langefeld, C D; Noble, J A; Rioux, J D; Seldin, M F; Vyse, T J; Criswell, L A

    2014-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a clinically heterogeneous disease affecting multiple organ systems and characterized by autoantibody formation to nuclear components. Although genetic variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is associated with SLE, its role in the development of clinical manifestations and autoantibody production is not well defined. We conducted a meta-analysis of four independent European SLE case collections for associations between SLE sub-phenotypes and MHC single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and variant HLA amino acids. Of the 11 American College of Rheumatology criteria and 7 autoantibody sub-phenotypes examined, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibody subsets exhibited the highest number and most statistically significant associations. HLA-DRB1*03:01 was significantly associated with both sub-phenotypes. We found evidence of associations independent of MHC class II variants in the anti-Ro subset alone. Conditional analyses showed that anti-Ro and anti-La subsets are independently associated with HLA-DRB1*0301, and that the HLA-DRB1*03:01 association with SLE is largely but not completely driven by the association of this allele with these sub-phenotypes. Our results provide strong evidence for a multilevel risk model for HLA-DRB1*03:01 in SLE, where the association with anti-Ro and anti-La antibody-positive SLE is much stronger than SLE without these autoantibodies.

  8. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system. 866.5870 Section 866.5870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system. 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system. 866.5870 Section 866.5870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  14. Autoantibodies against neuronal progenitors in sera from children with autism.

    PubMed

    Mazur-Kolecka, Bozena; Cohen, Ira L; Gonzalez, Maripaz; Jenkins, Edmund C; Kaczmarski, Wojciech; Brown, W Ted; Flory, Michael; Frackowiak, Janusz

    2014-04-01

    The pathological role of autoantibodies in development of CNS disorders is a new idea with growing interest among neuroscientists. The involvement of autoimmune response in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been suggested by the presence of multiple brain-specific autoantibodies in children with ASD and in their mothers. The possibility of the effect of autoimmunity on neurogenesis and postnatal brain plasticity has not been determined. The presence of autoantibodies against human neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) stimulated for neuronal differentiation in culture was tested in sera from children with autism (n=20) and age-matched controls (n=18) by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Immunoreactivity against multiple NPCs proteins of molecular sizes of approximately 55 kDa, 105 kDa, 150 kDa, and 210 kDa in sera from individuals with autism had a higher incidence and was stronger than in control sera which immunoreacted mainly with a 150 kDa protein. The sera from children with autism immunoreacted the strongest with NPCs expressing neuronal markers Tuj1 and doublecortin, but not astrocyte marker GFAP. The epitopes recognized by antibodies from sera were not human-specific because they detected also NPCs in situ in murine hippocampus. The autoimmune reactions against NPCs suggest an impaired tolerance to neural antigens in autism. These autoantibodies may be symptomatic for autism and furthermore, their presence suggests that autoimmunity may affect postnatal neuronal plasticity particularly after impairment of blood-brain barrier. Future studies will determine the diagnostic value of the presence of autoantibodies in autism and the therapeutic value of prevention of autoimmunity in autism. PMID:23838310

  15. Induction of Cytoplasmic Rods and Rings Structures by Inhibition of the CTP and GTP Synthetic Pathway in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carcamo, Wendy C.; Satoh, Minoru; Kasahara, Hideko; Terada, Naohiro; Hamazaki, Takashi; Chan, Jason Y. F.; Yao, Bing; Tamayo, Stephanie; Covini, Giovanni; von Mühlen, Carlos A.; Chan, Edward K. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cytoplasmic filamentous rods and rings (RR) structures were identified using human autoantibodies as probes. In the present study, the formation of these conserved structures in mammalian cells and functions linked to these structures were examined. Methodology/Principal Findings Distinct cytoplasmic rods (∼3–10 µm in length) and rings (∼2–5 µm in diameter) in HEp-2 cells were initially observed in immunofluorescence using human autoantibodies. Co-localization studies revealed that, although RR had filament-like features, they were not enriched in actin, tubulin, or vimentin, and not associated with centrosomes or other known cytoplasmic structures. Further independent studies revealed that two key enzymes in the nucleotide synthetic pathway cytidine triphosphate synthase 1 (CTPS1) and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase 2 (IMPDH2) were highly enriched in RR. CTPS1 enzyme inhibitors 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine and Acivicin as well as the IMPDH2 inhibitor Ribavirin exhibited dose-dependent induction of RR in >95% of cells in all cancer cell lines tested as well as mouse primary cells. RR formation by lower concentration of Ribavirin was enhanced in IMPDH2-knockdown HeLa cells whereas it was inhibited in GFP-IMPDH2 overexpressed HeLa cells. Interestingly, RR were detected readily in untreated mouse embryonic stem cells (>95%); upon retinoic acid differentiation, RR disassembled in these cells but reformed when treated with Acivicin. Conclusions/Significance RR formation represented response to disturbances in the CTP or GTP synthetic pathways in cancer cell lines and mouse primary cells and RR are the convergence physical structures in these pathways. The availability of specific markers for these conserved structures and the ability to induce formation in vitro will allow further investigations in structure and function of RR in many biological systems in health and diseases. PMID:22220215

  16. Reorganization of cytoplasmic structures during cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Q A; Chang, D C

    1991-11-01

    In order to provide a better understanding of the dynamic process of cell fusion, we studied the reorganization of cytoplasmic structures in electro-fused CV-1 cells. Using fluorescence microscopy and double staining methods, we examined correlations between the structural patterns of the major cytoskeletal proteins (microtubules, actin and vimentin intermediate filaments) and the distribution of various organelles (endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nuclei) at different stages of cell fusion. Our results suggest that microtubules appear to play a primary role in the process of cytoplasmic reorganization. At the early stage of cell fusion, microtubules were observed to infiltrate rapidly into the newly formed cytoplasmic bridges and establish a connection between the cytoskeletal networks of fusing cells. The reorganization of microtubules was found to be correlated with the redistribution of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), vimentin intermediate filaments, mitochondria, and the aggregation of nuclei. The F-actin system, on the other hand, appeared to be independent of the reorganization of the other cytoplasmic structures. The principal function of F-actin during cell fusion is probably to widen the cytoplasmic bridges by lamellipodial extension.

  17. The heterogeneity of islet autoantibodies and the progression of islet failure in type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Bian, Lingling; Ji, Li; Chen, Yang; Chen, Heng; Gu, Yong; Ma, Bingqin; Gu, Wei; Xu, Xinyu; Shi, Yun; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Dalong; Sun, Zilin; Ma, Jianhua; Jin, Hui; Shi, Xing; Miao, Heng; Xin, Bing; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Zhenwen; Bu, Ruifang; Xu, Lan; Shi, Guangde; Tang, Wei; Li, Wei; Zhou, Dongmei; Liang, Jun; Cheng, Xingbo; Shi, Bimin; Dong, Jixiang; Hu, Ji; Fang, Chen; Zhong, Shao; Yu, Weinan; Lu, Weiping; Wu, Chenguang; Qian, Li; Yu, Jiancheng; Gao, Jialin; Fei, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Xueqin; Cui, Shiwei; Cheng, Jinluo; Xu, Ning; Wang, Guofeng; Han, Guoqing; Xu, Chunrong; Xie, Yun; An, Minmin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhixiao; Cai, Yun; Fu, Qi; Fu, Yu; Zheng, Shuai; Yang, Fan; Hu, Qingfang; Dai, Hao; Jin, Yu; Zhang, Zheng; Xu, Kuanfeng; Li, Yifan; Shen, Jie; Zhou, Hongwen; He, Wei; Zheng, Xuqin; Han, Xiao; Yu, Liping; She, Jinxiong; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is heterogeneous in many facets. The patients suffered from type 1 diabetes present several levels of islet function as well as variable number and type of islet-specific autoantibodies. This study was to investigate prevalence and heterogeneity of the islet autoantibodies and clinical phenotypes of type 1 diabetes mellitus; and also discussed the process of islet failure and its risk factors in Chinese type 1 diabetic patients. A total of 1,291 type 1 diabetic patients were enrolled in this study. Demographic information was collected. Laboratory tests including mixed-meal tolerance test, human leukocyte antigen alleles, hemoglobinA1c, lipids, thyroid function and islet autoantibodies were conducted. The frequency of islet-specific autoantibody in newly diagnosed T1DM patients (duration shorter than half year) was 73% in East China. According to binary logistic regressions, autoantibody positivity, longer duration and lower Body Mass Index were the risk factors of islet failure. As the disease developed, autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase declined as well as the other two autoantibodies against zinc transporter 8 and islet antigen 2. The decrease of autoantibodies was positively correlated with aggressive beta cell destruction. Autoantibodies can facilitate the identification of classic T1DM from other subtypes and predict the progression of islet failure. As there were obvious heterogeneity in autoantibodies and clinical manifestation in different phenotypes of the disease, we should take more factors into consideration when identifying type 1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27225179

  18. Rotavirus disrupts cytoplasmic P bodies during infection.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Rahul; Mukherjee, Arpita; Patra, Upayan; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta

    2015-12-01

    Cytoplasmic Processing bodies (P bodies), the RNA-protein aggregation foci of translationally stalled and potentially decaying mRNA, have been reported to be differentially modulated by viruses. Rotavirus, the causative agent of acute infantile gastroenteritis is a double stranded RNA virus which completes its entire life-cycle exclusively in host cell cytoplasm. In this study, the fate of P bodies was investigated upon rotavirus infection. It was found that P bodies get disrupted during rotavirus infection. The disruption occurred by more than one different mechanism where deadenylating P body component Pan3 was degraded by rotavirus NSP1 and exonuclease XRN1 along with the decapping enzyme hDCP1a were relocalized from cytoplasm to nucleus. Overall the study highlights decay and subcellular relocalization of P body components as novel mechanisms by which rotavirus subverts cellular antiviral responses.

  19. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    PubMed

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts.

  20. Cytoplasmic Sterility Factors in VICIA FABA L

    PubMed Central

    Edwardson, J. R.; Bond, D. A.; Christie, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    Tissues of cytoplasmic male sterile, maintainer, restorer, and restored lines, and sterile plants which reverted to fertility in Vicia faba were examined in ultrathin sections. Cytoplasmic spherical bodies (CSB), ca. 70 nm in diameter, were observed in tissues of all sterile plants but not in tissues of maintainer, restorer or restored sterile plants. No CSB were observed in a reverted fertile branch of a tiller-sterile plant, nor in 5 of 6 reverted fertile plants. One reverted fertile plant contained CSB in ovules. It is proposed that the CSB are the sites of, or possibly, products of, sterility factors in Vicia faba. PMID:17248701

  1. Childhood Pemphigus Foliaceus with Exclusive Immunoglobulin G Autoantibodies to Desmocollins.

    PubMed

    Geller, Shamir; Gat, Andrea; Harel, Avikam; Mashiah, Jacob; Zeeli, Tal; Eming, Rüdiger; Ishii, Norito; Hertl, Michael; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sprecher, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus refers to a group of potentially fatal blistering skin diseases that are often due to the deleterious effects of autoantibodies directed against desmosomal antigens. Although desmogleins have been mainly implicated as autoantigens in pemphigus, a steadily growing body of evidence suggests that other desmosomal proteins may be causally involved as well. Antibodies directed against desmocollin-3 have been shown to play a direct role in the pathogenesis of several types of pemphigus. Here we describe the case of a child with localized pemphigus foliaceus and immunoglobulin G (IgG) reactivity exclusively directed to desmocollins. The present report suggests that autoantibodies against nondesmoglein antigens may play a role in the pathogenesis of superficial pemphigus, in addition to pemphigus vulgaris, paraneoplastic pemphigus, and IgA pemphigus. PMID:26758100

  2. The role of B cells and autoantibodies in neuropsychiatric lupus.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Stock, Ariel D; Chalmers, Samantha A; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-09-01

    The central nervous system manifestations of SLE (neuropsychiatric lupus, NPSLE) occur frequently, though are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Symptoms of NPSLE can be quite diverse, including chronic cognitive and emotional manifestations, as well as acute presentations, such as stroke and seizures. Although the pathogenesis of NPSLE has yet to be well characterized, B-cell mediated damage is believed to be an important contributor. B-cells and autoantibodies may traverse the blood brain barrier promoting an inflammatory environment consisting of glia activation, neurodegeneration, and consequent averse behavioral outcomes. This review will evaluate the various suggested roles of B-cells and autoantibodies in NPSLE, as well as therapeutic modalities targeting these pathogenic mediators.

  3. Distinctive autoantibody profile in Mexican Mestizo systemic sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S; Hinojosa-Azaola, Andrea; Martinez-Reyes, Cynthia; Nuñez-Alvarez, Carlos A; Torrico-Lavayen, Rocío; García-Hernández, José Luis; Cabiedes-Contreras, Javier

    2011-11-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) shows variable clinical expression among different ethnic groups. Herein, we describe the clinical features, prevalence of organ involvement, and autoantibody profile in Mexican Mestizo SSc patients and we compare them with patients from other ethnic groups.We included 139 SSc patients. They underwent clinical evaluation and were tested for antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anticentromere antibodies (ACA), anti-topoisomerase I, anti-RNA polymerase III, anti-U1 RNP, anti-U3 RNP, anti-U11/U12 RNP, anti-Th/To, anti-PM-Scl, anti-Ku, antinucleosome, anti-double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), anti-Sm, anti-SSA, and anti-SSB antibodies. Female predominance (93.5%) was noted; 56.8% of patients had limited cutaneous SSc; 91% had peripheral vascular involvement; 70% had joint involvement; 27% had musculoskeletal damage; 66% had gastrointestinal involvement; 41% had interstitial lung disease; 32% had pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); 11% had cardiac involvement; and in 1.4% renal involvement was observed. Our patients showed lower frequency of renal crisis and higher frequency of PAH than patients from other ethnic groups; also they showed higher frequency of ACA than Japanese and African American patients, higher frequency of anti-topoisomerase I than Caucasian and African American patients, higher frequency of anti-PM-Scl and anti-Ku and lower frequency of anti-RNA Pol III than the other ethnic groups. High frequencies of antinucleosome (41%) and anti-dsDNA (63%) were identified. SSc-specific autoantibody frequencies are different in our patients and in those from other ethnic groups; associations of autoantibodies with clinical manifestations are confirmed in our patients. Ethnicity and the interaction of gene and environmental factors may influence the clinical picture and autoantibody profile in SSc patients.

  4. Autoantibody formation after alloimmunization inducing bystander immune hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Mota, M; Bley, C; Aravechia, M G; Hamerschlak, N; Sakashita, A; Kutner, J M; Castiho, L

    2009-01-01

    The development of RBC autoantibodies resulting from or associated with allogeneic blood transfusions is not an easily determined complication of RBC transfusions. This report discusses one patient who developed RBC autoantibodies in association with an allogeneic blood transfusion and alloimmunization leading to a temporary bystander immune hemolysis. A 72-year-old woman was hospitalized as a result of severe anemia and received two units of ABO- and D-compatible RBCs. She had a history of two pregnancies 40 years before, but no history of RBC transfusion, and her antibody screen was negative. On the tenth day after transfusion her hemoglobin dropped, and alloanti-c was identified in her serum and eluate. At this time she received another two units of compatible blood according to her phenotype (group O, R1R1, K:-1). After 48 hours, she developed joint pain, pyrexia, and hemoglobinuria, and her Hb dropped from 9.2 g/dL to 5.3 g/ dL. The direct antiglobulin test was positive, an IgG autoantibody was present in the eluate, and the antibody investigation revealed the presence of anti-Jk(b) in addition to the previously identified alloanti-c. Her genotype was determined, and, based on the findings, two additional units were selected, found to be compatible, and transfused without incident. Transfusions were discontinued, and she was treated with IVIG and corticosteroids. Her Hb increased to 9.7 g/dL, and the patient made an uneventful recovery. It was concluded that transfusion of incompatible RBCs induced the formation of an autoantibody in this patient, resulting in lysis of bystander RBCs. The need for additional blood transfusion was successfully avoided by treatment with IVIG, steroid therapy, and rituximab.

  5. [Progress of Autoantibody Examinations for Connective Tissue Diseases].

    PubMed

    Akashi, Kengo; Saegusa, Jun; Morinobu, Akio

    2015-05-01

    Connective tissue diseases are chronic inflammatory diseases that can affect multiple organs and, thus, have a broad spectrum of clinical presentations. Various autoantibodies are detected in patients with connective tissue diseases, represented by anti-nuclear antibody for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM), Sjögren's syndrome, and mixed connective tissue disease. Assessment of the autoantibody profile is fundamental for the clinical management of patients with connective tissue diseases, providing important data for the diagnosis, clinical characterization, and disease activity evaluation. Anti-ribosomal P antibody and anti-NMDA receptor antibody are associated with neuropsychiatric SLE. Anti-synthetase syndrome comprises the association of myositis (PM/DM), interstitial lung disease, fever, Raynaud's phenomenon, mechanic's hands, and anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase antibodies. Anti-MDA5 antibody is detected in patients with clinically amyopathic DM, often complicated by rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease. Between 50 and 75% of malignancy-associated DM patients are positive for anti-TIF1-γ antibody. Anti-RNA polymerase III antibody is associated with diffuse cutaneous SSc and renal crisis. This review focuses on the importance and usefulness of these autoantibodies for the diagnosis and management of patients with connective tissue diseases in clinical practice.

  6. Implications of a Vasodilatory Human Monoclonal Autoantibody in Postural Hypotension*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongliang; Zuccolo, Jonathan; Kem, David C.; Zillner, Caitlin; Lee, Jiyeon; Smith, Kenneth; James, Judith A.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Yu, Xichun

    2013-01-01

    Functional autoantibodies to the autonomic receptors are increasingly recognized in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. To date, no human activating monoclonal autoantibodies to these receptors have been available. In this study, we describe for the first time a β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR)-activating monoclonal autoantibody (C5F2) produced from the lymphocytes of a patient with idiopathic postural hypotension. C5F2, an IgG3 isotype, recognizes an epitope in the N terminus of the second extracellular loop (ECL2) of β2AR. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed high binding affinity for the β2AR ECL2 peptide. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence demonstrated specific binding to β2AR in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, CHO cells expressing human β2AR, and rat aorta. C5F2 stimulated cyclic AMP production in β2AR-transfected CHO cells and induced potent dilation of isolated rat cremaster arterioles, both of which were specifically blocked by the β2AR-selective antagonist ICI-118551 and by the β2AR ECL2 peptide. This monoclonal antibody demonstrated sufficient activity to produce postural hypotension in its host. Its availability provides a unique opportunity to identify previously unrecognized causes and new pharmacological management of postural hypotension and other cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24043632

  7. Disseminated Talaromyces marneffei and Mycobacterium abscessus in a Patient With Anti-Interferon-γ Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pruetpongpun, Nattapol; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Damronglerd, Pansachee; Suthiwartnarueput, Worapop; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Rujanavej, Sasinuch; Suwantarat, Nuntra

    2016-01-01

    Anti-interferon (IFN)-γ autoantibodies are increasingly recognized as a cause of adult-onset immunodeficiency and increased risk for infections with intracellular pathogens. We report on disseminated Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei and Mycobacterium abscessus infection in a 72-year-old, human immunodeficiency virus noninfected, Thai man with anti-IFN-γ autoantibody. The patient was successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy and rituximab to control B cell-derived autoantibodies. PMID:27419165

  8. Subunit organization in cytoplasmic dynein subcomplexes

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen J.; Bonilla, Myriam; Rodgers, Michael E.; Schroer, Trina A.

    2002-01-01

    Because cytoplasmic dynein plays numerous critical roles in eukaryotic cells, determining the subunit composition and the organization and functions of the subunits within dynein are important goals. This has been difficult partly because of accessory polypeptide heterogeneity of dynein populations. The motor domain containing heavy chains of cytoplasmic dynein are associated with multiple intermediate, light intermediate, and light chain accessory polypeptides. We examined the organization of these subunits within cytoplasmic dynein by separating the molecule into two distinct subcomplexes. These subcomplexes were competent to reassemble into a molecule with dynein-like properties. One subcomplex was composed of the dynein heavy and light intermediate chains whereas the other subcomplex was composed of the intermediate and light chains. The intermediate and light chain subcomplex could be further separated into two pools, only one of which contained dynein light chains. The two pools had distinct intermediate chain compositions, suggesting that intermediate chain isoforms have different light chain–binding properties. When the two intermediate chain pools were characterized by analytical velocity sedimentation, at least four molecular components were seen: intermediate chain monomers, intermediate chain dimers, intermediate chain monomers with bound light chains, and a mixture of intermediate chain dimers with assorted bound light chains. These data provide new insights into the compositional heterogeneity and assembly of the cytoplasmic dynein complex and suggest that individual dynein molecules have distinct molecular compositions in vivo. PMID:11967380

  9. Detection of cytoplasmic glycosylation associated with hydroxyproline.

    PubMed

    West, Christopher M; van der Wel, Hanke; Blader, Ira J

    2006-01-01

    A special class of glycosylation occurs on a proline residue of the cytoplasmic/nuclear protein Skp1 in the social amoeba Dictyostelium. For this glycosylation to occur, the proline must first be hydroxylated by the action of a soluble prolyl 4-hydroxylase acting on the protein. Cytoplasmic prolyl 4-hydroxylases are dioxygen-dependent enzymes that have low affinity for their O2 substrate and, therefore, have been implicated in O2-sensing in Dictyostelium, as well as in vertebrates and invertebrates. The sugar-hydroxyproline linkage has low abundance, is resistant to alkali cleavage and known glycosidases, and does not bind known lectins. However, initial screens for this modification can be made by assessing changes in electrophoretic mobility of candidate proteins after treatment of cells with prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors, and/or by metabolic labeling with [3H]sugar precursors. In addition, cytoplasmic hydroxylation/glycosylation can be assessed by assaying for cytoplasmic glycosyltransferases. Here we describe these methods and examples of their use in analyzing Skp1 glycosylation in Dictyostelium and the apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis in humans. PMID:17132515

  10. Reconstitution of the human cytoplasmic dynein complex.

    PubMed

    Trokter, Martina; Mücke, Norbert; Surrey, Thomas

    2012-12-18

    Cytoplasmic dynein is the major motor protein responsible for microtubule minus-end-directed movements in most eukaryotic cells. It transports a variety of cargoes and has numerous functions during spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. It is a large complex of about 1.4 MDa composed of six different subunits, interacting with a multitude of different partners. Most biochemical studies have been performed either with the native mammalian cytoplasmic dynein complex purified from tissue or, more recently, with recombinant dynein fragments from budding yeast and Dictyostelium. Hardly any information exists about the properties of human dynein. Moreover, experiments with an entire human dynein complex prepared from recombinant subunits with a well-defined composition are lacking. Here, we reconstitute a complete cytoplasmic dynein complex using recombinant human subunits and characterize its biochemical and motile properties. Using analytical gel filtration, sedimentation-velocity ultracentrifugation, and negative-stain electron microscopy, we demonstrate that the smaller subunits of the complex have an important structural function for complex integrity. Fluorescence microscopy experiments reveal that while engaged in collective microtubule transport, the recombinant human cytoplasmic dynein complex is an active, microtubule minus-end-directed motor, as expected. However, in contrast to recombinant dynein of nonmetazoans, individual reconstituted human dynein complexes did not show robust processive motility, suggesting a more intricate mechanism of processivity regulation for the human dynein complex. In the future, the comparison of reconstituted dynein complexes from different species promises to provide molecular insight into the mechanisms regulating the various functions of these large molecular machines.

  11. Heterogeneity of autoantibodies in 100 patients with autoimmune myositis: insights into clinical features and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Martial; Fritzler, Marvin J; Targoff, Ira N; Troyanov, Yves; Senécal, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, mutual associations, clinical manifestations, and diagnoses associated with serum autoantibodies, as detected using recently available immunoassays, in patients with autoimmune myositis (AIM). Sera and clinical data were collected from 100 patients with AIM followed longitudinally. Sera were screened cross-sectionally for 21 autoantibodies by multiplex addressable laser bead immunoassay, line blot immunoassay, immunoprecipitation of in vitro translated recombinant protein, protein A assisted immunoprecipitation, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Diagnoses were determined using the Bohan and Peter classification as well as recently proposed classifications. Relationships between autoantibodies and clinical manifestations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. One or more autoantibodies encompassing 19 specificities were present in 80% of the patients. The most common autoantibodies were anti-Ro52 (30% of patients), anti-Ku (23%), anti-synthetases (22%), anti-U1RNP (15%), and anti-fibrillarin (14%). In the presence of autoantibodies to Ku, synthetases, U1RNP, fibrillarin, PM-Scl, or scleroderma autoantigens, at least one more autoantibody was detected in the majority of sera and at least two more autoantibodies in over one-third of sera. The largest number of concurrent autoantibodies was six autoantibodies. Overall, 44 distinct combinations of autoantibodies were counted. Most autoantibodies were unrestricted to any AIM diagnostic category. Distinct clinical syndromes and therapeutic responses were associated with anti-Jo-1, anti-fibrillarin, anti-U1RNP, anti-Ro, anti-Ro52, and autoantibodies to scleroderma autoantigens. We conclude that a significant proportion of AIM patients are characterized by complex associations of autoantibodies. Certain myositis autoantibodies are markers for distinct overlap syndromes and predict therapeutic outcomes. The ultimate clinical features, disease course

  12. Anti-cytokine autoantibodies are associated with opportunistic infection in patients with thymic neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Burbelo, Peter D.; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Zaman, Rifat; Kristosturyan, Ervand; Rajan, Arun; Ding, Li; Ching, Kathryn H.; Berman, Arlene; Oliveira, Joao B.; Hsu, Amy P.; Klimavicz, Caitlin M.; Iadarola, Michael J.; Holland, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with thymic malignancy have high rates of autoimmunity leading to a variety of autoimmune diseases, most commonly myasthenia gravis caused by anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies. High rates of autoantibodies to cytokines have also been described, although prevalence, spectrum, and functionality of these anti-cytokine autoantibodies are poorly defined. To better understand the presence and function of anti-cytokine autoantibodies, we created a luciferase immunoprecipitation system panel to search for autoantibodies against 39 different cytokines and examined plasma from controls (n = 30) and patients with thymic neoplasia (n = 17). In this screen, our patients showed statistically elevated, but highly heterogeneous immunoreactivity against 16 of the 39 cytokines. Some patients showed autoantibodies to multiple cytokines. Functional testing proved that autoantibodies directed against interferon-α, interferon-β, interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-12p35, IL-12p40, and IL-17A had biologic blocking activity in vitro. All patients with opportunistic infection showed multiple anti-cytokine autoantibodies (range 3-11), suggesting that anti-cytokine autoantibodies may be important in the pathogenesis of opportunistic infections in patients with thymic malignancy. This study was registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00001355. PMID:20716769

  13. A systematic review of serum autoantibodies as biomarkers for pancreatic cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Dumstrei, Karin; Chen, Hongda; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the western world. Patients with pancreatic cancer have poor prognosis, partly due to difficulties in detecting it at early stages. While different markers have been associated with pancreatic cancer, many of them show suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Serum autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens have recently emerged as early stage biomarkers for different types of cancers. Given the urgent need for early and reliable biomarkers for pancreatic cancer, we undertook a systematic review of the published literature to identify primary articles that evaluated serum autoantibodies in pancreatic cancer detection by searching PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge. Two reviewers extracted data on study characteristics and results independently. Overall, 31 studies evaluating 124 individual serum autoantibodies in pancreatic cancer detection met the inclusion criteria. In general, single autoantibody markers showed relatively low sensitivities at high specificity. A combination of markers, either multiple serum autoantibodies or serum autoantibodies combined with tumor-associated markers, led to a better diagnostic performance. However, most of the analyzed autoantibodies have only been reported in single studies and therefore need to be independently validated. We conclude that serum autoantibodies might present an option as biomarkers for early detection of pancreatic cancer, but more work is needed to identify and validate autoantibody signatures that are associated with early stage pancreatic cancer. PMID:26840568

  14. Heterogeneity of autoantibodies in 100 patients with autoimmune myositis: insights into clinical features and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Martial; Fritzler, Marvin J; Targoff, Ira N; Troyanov, Yves; Senécal, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, mutual associations, clinical manifestations, and diagnoses associated with serum autoantibodies, as detected using recently available immunoassays, in patients with autoimmune myositis (AIM). Sera and clinical data were collected from 100 patients with AIM followed longitudinally. Sera were screened cross-sectionally for 21 autoantibodies by multiplex addressable laser bead immunoassay, line blot immunoassay, immunoprecipitation of in vitro translated recombinant protein, protein A assisted immunoprecipitation, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Diagnoses were determined using the Bohan and Peter classification as well as recently proposed classifications. Relationships between autoantibodies and clinical manifestations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. One or more autoantibodies encompassing 19 specificities were present in 80% of the patients. The most common autoantibodies were anti-Ro52 (30% of patients), anti-Ku (23%), anti-synthetases (22%), anti-U1RNP (15%), and anti-fibrillarin (14%). In the presence of autoantibodies to Ku, synthetases, U1RNP, fibrillarin, PM-Scl, or scleroderma autoantigens, at least one more autoantibody was detected in the majority of sera and at least two more autoantibodies in over one-third of sera. The largest number of concurrent autoantibodies was six autoantibodies. Overall, 44 distinct combinations of autoantibodies were counted. Most autoantibodies were unrestricted to any AIM diagnostic category. Distinct clinical syndromes and therapeutic responses were associated with anti-Jo-1, anti-fibrillarin, anti-U1RNP, anti-Ro, anti-Ro52, and autoantibodies to scleroderma autoantigens. We conclude that a significant proportion of AIM patients are characterized by complex associations of autoantibodies. Certain myositis autoantibodies are markers for distinct overlap syndromes and predict therapeutic outcomes. The ultimate clinical features, disease course

  15. Hybridization using cytoplasmic male sterility, cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance, and herbicide tolerance from nuclear genes

    SciTech Connect

    Beversdorf, W.D.; Erickson, L.R.; Grant, I.

    1987-04-14

    An improved process is described for producing a substantially homogeneous population of plants of a predetermined hybrid variety of crop which is capable of undergoing self-pollination and cross-pollination. The process comprises: growing in a first planting area a substantially random population of cytoplasmic male sterile plants which exhibit cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance to at least one Type A herbicide and exhibit tolerance to at least one Type B herbicide which is attributable solely to homozygous dominant nuclear genes and male fertile plants which are homozygous recessive maintainer plants for the cytoplasmic male sterile plants and which lack the cytoplasmic herbicide tolerance to at least one Type A herbicide and exhibit tolerance to at least one Type B herbicide attributable solely to the homozygous dominant nuclear genes.

  16. Nuclear and cytoplasmic actin in dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Soyer-Gobillard, M O; Ausseil, J; Géraud, M L

    1996-01-01

    Experiments using monoclonal and polyclonal anti-actin antibodies allowed us to demonstrate the presence of F- or G-actin in original protists, dinoflagellates, either by biochemistry, immunofluorescence and in TEM. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and immunoblottings made either from total or nuclear protein extracts revealed the presence of a 44-kDa band reacting with monoclonal anti-actin antibody in two species, Prorocentrum micans and Crypthecodinium cohnii, and thus demonstrated the presence of actin in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. After squash preparation of P micans cells, actin was identified within the nucleus and in some regions of the cytoplasm by immunofluorescence microscopy. Labelling of both the nucleolus and the centrosome region was evident together with amorphous nucleoplasmic material surrounding the chromosomes. The use of cryosections of intact P micans and C cohnii cells for immunofluorescence along with staining with DAPI to delineate the chromosomes themselves, yielded finer resolution of the intranuclear network labelling pattern and allowed us to complete our observations, in particular on the cytoplasmic labelling. In P micans, in addition to the centrosome region, the cytoplasmic channels passing through the nucleus in dividing cells are labelled. In C cohnii, the cortex, the centrosome region, the cytoplasmic channels, the region surrounding the nucleus, the filaments linking it to the cortex and the cleavage furrow are also labelled. In the nucleus of the two species, there is a prominent "weft' of fine actin filaments in the nucleoplasm forming a matrix of varying density around the persistent chromosomes. This actin matrix, of unknown function, is most conspicuous at the end of the S-phase of the cell cycle. Fluorescent derivatives of phalloidin, used as diagnostic cytochemical probes for polymeric actin (F-actin), gave similar results. Positive TEM immunolabelling of intranuclear actin confirms its presence in the nucleoplasm, in the

  17. The primary structure of rat brain (cytoplasmic) dynein heavy chain, a cytoplasmic motor enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z; Tanaka, Y; Nonaka, S; Aizawa, H; Kawasaki, H; Nakata, T; Hirokawa, N

    1993-01-01

    Overlapping cDNA clones encoding the heavy chain of rat brain cytoplasmic dynein have been isolated. The isolated cDNA clones contain an open reading frame of 13,932 bp encoding 4644 aa (M(r), 532,213). The deduced protein sequence of the heavy chain of rat brain dynein shows significant similarity to sea urchin flagellar beta-dynein (27.0% identical) and to Dictyostelium cytoplasmic dynein (53.5% identical) throughout the entire sequence. The heavy chain of rat brain (cytoplasmic) dynein contains four putative nucleotide-binding consensus sequences [GX4GK(T/S)] in the central one-third region that are highly similar to those of sea urchin and Dictyostelium dyneins. The N-terminal one-third of the heavy chain of rat brain (cytoplasmic) dynein shows high similarity (43.8% identical) to that of Dictyostelium cytoplasmic dynein but poor similarity (19.4% identical) to that of sea urchin flagellar dynein. These results suggested that the C-terminal two-thirds of the dynein molecule is conserved and plays an essential role in microtubule-dependent motility activity, whereas the N-terminal regions are different between cytoplasmic and flagellar dyneins. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7690137

  18. Mechanism of Cytoplasmic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental process in gene expression that depends upon the abundance and accessibility of the mRNA transcript as well as the activity of many protein and RNA-protein complexes. Here we focus on the intricate mechanics of mRNA translation in the cytoplasm of higher plants. This chapter includes an inventory of the plant translational apparatus and a detailed review of the translational processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. The majority of mechanistic studies of cytoplasmic translation have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. The factors and mechanisms of translation are for the most part conserved across eukaryotes; however, some distinctions are known to exist in plants. A comprehensive understanding of the complex translational apparatus and its regulation in plants is warranted, as the modulation of protein production is critical to development, environmental plasticity and biomass yield in diverse ecosystems and agricultural settings. PMID:26019692

  19. Cytoplasmic male sterility in Brassicaceae crops.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Bhat, Shripad R

    2014-05-01

    Brassicaceae crops display strong hybrid vigor, and have long been subject to F1 hybrid breeding. Because the most reliable system of F1 seed production is based on cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), various types of CMS have been developed and adopted in practice to breed Brassicaceae oil seed and vegetable crops. CMS is a maternally inherited trait encoded in the mitochondrial genome, and the male sterile phenotype arises as a result of interaction of a mitochondrial CMS gene and a nuclear fertility restoring (Rf) gene. Therefore, CMS has been intensively investigated for gaining basic insights into molecular aspects of nuclear-mitochondrial genome interactions and for practical applications in plant breeding. Several CMS genes have been identified by molecular genetic studies, including Ogura CMS from Japanese radish, which is the most extensively studied and most widely used. In this review, we discuss Ogura CMS, and other CMS systems, and the causal mitochondrial genes for CMS. Studies on nuclear Rf genes and the cytoplasmic effects of alien cytoplasm on general crop performance are also reviewed. Finally, some of the unresolved questions about CMS are highlighted. PMID:24987289

  20. Cytoplasmic male sterility in Brassicaceae crops

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Bhat, Shripad R.

    2014-01-01

    Brassicaceae crops display strong hybrid vigor, and have long been subject to F1 hybrid breeding. Because the most reliable system of F1 seed production is based on cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), various types of CMS have been developed and adopted in practice to breed Brassicaceae oil seed and vegetable crops. CMS is a maternally inherited trait encoded in the mitochondrial genome, and the male sterile phenotype arises as a result of interaction of a mitochondrial CMS gene and a nuclear fertility restoring (Rf) gene. Therefore, CMS has been intensively investigated for gaining basic insights into molecular aspects of nuclear-mitochondrial genome interactions and for practical applications in plant breeding. Several CMS genes have been identified by molecular genetic studies, including Ogura CMS from Japanese radish, which is the most extensively studied and most widely used. In this review, we discuss Ogura CMS, and other CMS systems, and the causal mitochondrial genes for CMS. Studies on nuclear Rf genes and the cytoplasmic effects of alien cytoplasm on general crop performance are also reviewed. Finally, some of the unresolved questions about CMS are highlighted. PMID:24987289

  1. Aptamer BC 007 - A broad spectrum neutralizer of pathogenic autoantibodies against G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Haberland, Annekathrin; Holtzhauer, Martin; Schlichtiger, Alice; Bartel, Sabine; Schimke, Ingolf; Müller, Johannes; Dandel, Michael; Luppa, Peter B; Wallukat, Gerd

    2016-10-15

    The effect of autoantibodies on G-protein coupled receptors in the pathogenesis of diseases, especially of the heart and vascular system, is an increasingly accepted fact today. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is the most intensively investigated pathological situation of these. With DCM, autoantibodies against the β1-adrenoceptor and the muscarinic M2-receptor have been found in high percentage of investigated patients. Immunoadsorption for autoantibody removal has already shown a long-term beneficial therapeutic effect, but has remained limited in its application because of the complexity of this method. A new easy applicable treatment strategy has, therefore, been discovered. Because of intra- and inter-loop epitope variability of the β1-adrenoceptor specific autoantibodies and also the occurrence of further autoantibodies of this class such as the ones against the β2- and α1-adrenoceptor, the ETA-, proteinase activated-, and the AT1-receptors in different pathological situations, this newly discovered broad-spectrum neutralizer of all these autoantibodies - aptamer BC 007 - is under development. The binding and neutralizing effect was investigated applying a bioassay of spontaneously beating neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) - technology. The usefulness of aptamer BC 007 to specify column technology for the removal of serum autoantibodies was also demonstrated. The presented data suggest that aptamer BC 007 might be an appropriate molecule candidate to support future research about the meaning of G-protein-coupled receptor autoantibodies.

  2. Progress in understanding the diagnostic and pathogenic role of autoantibodies associated with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, May Y.; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review At the time of diagnosis, systemic sclerosis (SSc) is often well established with significant irreversible tissue and organ damage. Definitions of ‘early SSc’ have been proposed, which include the presence of SSc-associated autoantibodies. In addition, functional autoantibodies that are believed to be involved in SSc pathogenesis need to be considered. In this review, recent advances in the diagnostic utility and pathogenic role of autoantibodies in early SSc are summarized. Moreover, we propose a clinical care pathway illustrating how autoantibody testing along with key clinical features can be used to make an earlier diagnosis of SSc. Recent findings Recent evidence has helped to develop a clearer understanding of the natural history, early clinical features, and autoantibodies that are predictors of SSc. The role of functional autoantibodies is leading to innovative approaches to evidence-based interventions and therapies that are based on mechanisms of disease. Summary Despite substantial advances, the high morbidity and mortality that currently characterizes SSc can largely be attributed to a delay in diagnosis, gaps in our understanding of the role of autoantibodies in early disease, and limited effective therapeutic options. An early and accurate diagnosis of SSc and use of autoantibody testing embedded in evidence-based clinical care pathways will help improve SSc-associated clinical outcomes and healthcare expenditures. PMID:27387266

  3. Anti-dsDNA Antibodies are one of the many autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shu Man; Dai, Chao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Gaskin, Felicia

    2015-01-01

    Anti-dsDNA antibodies are the most studied antibodies of the lupus-related autoantibodies. The dogma is that these are the most important autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. In this review, evidence is presented to show that these antibodies (as measured by modern clinical laboratories) are not the most important autoantibodies in the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus, and are of limited value in clinical correlation and in predicting disease flares. In addition, they are not likely to be the initiating autoantibodies in lupus nephritis. Thus, several pervasively held beliefs on anti-dsDNA antibodies are not valid. We suggest that anti-dsDNA antibodies should be considered as just one of the many autoantibodies associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:26594353

  4. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-06-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice.

  5. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-01-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice. PMID:27279139

  6. Anti-heat shock protein autoantibody profiling in breast cancer using customized protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liu; Gehin, Thomas; Chevolot, Yann; Souteyrand, Eliane; Mangé, Alain; Solassol, Jérôme; Laurenceau, Emmanuelle

    2016-02-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are over-expressed in a wide range of human cancers. It results in the stimulation of the immune system and consequently in elevated concentration of anti-HSP autoantibodies. Elevated anti-HSP autoantibodies were found in breast cancer patients, and they are associated with tumor metastasis. Therefore, screening these autoantibodies could be of diagnostic and prognostic values. Protein microarrays have already demonstrated their great potential as a diagnostic tool. However, protein diversity requires optimization of the microarray fabrication to achieve high sensitivity and specificity. In this study, seven HSPs were immobilized on six different surface chemistries. After evaluation and optimization with purified antibodies of the six surface chemistries, two surfaces were selected to detect anti-HSP autoantibodies in breast cancer sera. Multiplex detection of anti-HSP autoantibodies allowed discrimination of breast cancer patients (50) from healthy controls (26) with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 100%. PMID:26715250

  7. Experimental erythrocyte autoantibodies. V. Induction and suppression of red blood cell autoantibodies in mice injected with rat bromelain-treated red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, K O; McAuliffe, A

    1983-10-01

    Mice injected with rat red blood cells (RBC), or rat bromelain-treated (brom) RBC, produce RBC autoantibodies and suppressor cells that specifically inhibit the autoimmune response without inhibiting the net production of antibodies against rat RBC. It has been investigated whether suppressor cells induced by injections of rat RBC are effective in preventing autoantibody production induced by rat brom RBC and vice versa. Autoantibodies were induced in C3H mice by weekly ip injections, each 0.2 ml, of a 6% suspension of rat RBC or rat brom RBC. Autoantibody production was assayed using Coombs' test. Suppressor cells were present in the spleens of mice positive in Coombs' tests and were shown by intravenous injections of 40 X 10(6) viable cells per mouse into untreated syngeneic mice 18 hr before the first injection of rat RBC or rat brom RBC. Autoantibodies eluted from mice positive in Coombs' tests after injections of rat RBC or brom RBC were absorbed by either type of rat RBC but not by RBC from sheep. This suggests that rat RBC and rat brom RBC display antigens that are similar, if not identical, to autoantigens on the mouse RBC. Spleen cells from mice injected with rat RBC suppressed autoantibodies induced by both rat RBC and rat brom RBC. In contrast, spleen cells from mice injected with rat brom RBC suppressed autoantibodies induced by rat brom RBC but not those induced by unmodified rat RBC. This differential suppression may be due to the removal from rat RBC, by bromelain, of a suppressor site and/or autoantigens of some specificities. Thus rat brom RBC may not induce the total range of specificities of autoantibodies, and of suppressor cells, induced by rat RBC.

  8. IgG and IgM autoantibody differences in discoid and systemic lupus patients

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Benjamin F.; Tseng, Lin-chiang; Lee, Thomas; Vasquez, Rebecca; Li, Quan Z.; Zhang, Song; Karp, David R.; Olsen, Nancy J.; Mohan, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus (SLE) patients with discoid lupus (DLE) were reported to have milder disease. To test this observation, we employed sandwich arrays containing 98 autoantigens to compare autoantibody profiles of SLE subjects without DLE (DLE−SLE+) (N=9), SLE subjects with DLE (DLE+SLE+) (N=10), DLE subjects without SLE (DLE+SLE−) (N=11), and healthy controls (N=11). We validated differentially expressed autoantibodies using immunoassays in DLE−SLE+ (N=18), DLE+SLE+ (N=17), DLE+SLE− (N=23), and healthy subjects (N=22). Arrays showed 15 IgG autoantibodies (ten against nuclear antigens) and four IgM autoantibodies that were differentially expressed (q-value<0.05). DLE−SLE+ subjects had higher IgG autoantibodies against dsDNA, ssDNA, dsRNA, histone H2A and H2B, and SS-A (52 kDa) than all other groups including DLE+SLE+ subjects (p<0.05). Immunoassays measuring anti-dsDNA, -ssDNA, and -SS-A (52 kDa) IgG autoantibodies showed similar trends (p<0.05). Healthy and DLE+SLE−subjects expressed higher IgM autoantibodies against alpha beta crystallin, lipopolysaccharide, heat shock cognate 70, and desmoglein-3 than DLE+SLE+ and DLE−SLE+ subjects. IgG:IgM ratios of autoantibodies against nuclear antigens progressively rose from healthy to DLE−SLE+ subjects. In conclusion, lower IgG autoantibodies against nuclear antigens in DLE+SLE+ versus DLE−SLE+ subjects suggest that DLE indicates lower disease severity. Higher IgM autoantibodies against selected antigens in healthy and DLE+SLE−subjects may be non-pathogenic. PMID:22763789

  9. The autoantigen Ro52 is an E3 ligase resident in the cytoplasm but enters the nucleus upon cellular exposure to nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, Alexander; Oke, Vilija; Elfving, Ase; Nyberg, Filippa; Covacu, Ruxandra; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie

    2008-12-10

    Patients with the systemic autoimmune diseases Sjoegrens's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus often have autoantibodies against the intracellular protein Ro52. Ro52 is an E3 ligase dependent on the ubiquitin conjugation enzymes UBE2D1 and UBE2E1. While Ro52 and UBE2D1 are cytoplasmic proteins, UBE2E1 is localized to the nucleus. Here, we investigate how domains of human Ro52 regulate its intracellular localization. By expressing fluorescently labeled Ro52 and Ro52 mutants in HeLa cells, an intact coiled-coil domain was found to be necessary for the cytoplasmic localization of Ro52. The amino acids 381-470 of the B30.2 region were essential for translocation into the nucleus. Furthermore, after exposure of HeLa cells to the inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO), Ro52 translocated to the nucleus. A nuclear localization of Ro52 in inflamed tissue expressing inducible NO synthetase (iNOS) from cutaneous lupus patients was observed by immunohistochemistry and verified in NO-treated cultures of patient-derived primary keratinocytes. Our results show that the localization of Ro52 is regulated by endogenous sequences, and that nuclear translocation is induced by an inflammatory mediator. This suggests that Ro52 has both cytoplasmic and nuclear substrates, and that Ro52 mediates ubiquitination through UBE2D1 in the cytoplasm and through UBE2E1 in the nucleus.

  10. Usage of cancer associated autoantibodies in the detection of disease

    PubMed Central

    Dudas, Steven P.; Chatterjee, Madhumita; Tainsky, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts toward deciphering the complexity of the tumor specific proteome by profiling immune responses generated against tumor associated antigens (TAAs) holds great promise for predicting the presence of cancer long before the development of clinical symptoms. The immune system is capable of sensing aberrant expression of certain cellular components involved in tumorigenesis and the resultant autoantibody response provides insights to the targets that are responsible for eliciting immunogenicity to these cellular components. Analysis of the cancer-specific humoral immune response has led to panels of biomarkers that are specific and sensitive biomarkers of disease. Using multianalyte-based in vitro analytical discovery platforms which can be easily adapted into clinical diagnostic screening tests, body fluids such as serum, plasma saliva, or urine can be interrogated to detect autoantibodies against natural or recombinant antigens, which may possess etiologic significance to cancer. Non-invasive screening tests exhibiting high specificity and sensitivity to detect early stage cancer in the heterogeneous population of cancer patients potentially have the greatest impact in decreasing mortality rates. Overall, this review summarizes different experimental approaches in the development of diagnostic screening tests for the early detection of cancer and their implementation in the development of clinical multianalyte biomarker assays. PMID:20938086

  11. Novel Diabetes Autoantibodies and Prediction of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies are currently the most robust biomarkers of type 1 diabetes and are frequently used to establish entry criteria for the participation of genetically at-risk individuals in secondary prevention/intervention clinical trials. Since their original description almost 40 years ago, considerable efforts have been devoted toward identifying the precise molecular targets that are recognized. Such information can have significant benefit for developing improved metrics for identifying/stratifying of at-risk subjects, developing potential therapeutic targets, and advancing understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. Currently, four major molecular targets ([pro]insulin, GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8) have been confirmed, with approximately 94% of all subjects with a clinical diagnosis of type 1 diabetes expressing autoantibodies to at least one of these molecules at clinical onset. In this review, we summarize some of the salient properties of these targets that might contribute to their autoantigenicity and methods that have been used in attempts to identify new components of the humoral autoresponse. PMID:23900975

  12. Autoantibody-Associated Central Nervous System Neurologic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Linnoila, Jenny; Pittock, Sean J

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune neurology is a rapidly evolving new subspecialty driven by the discovery of novel neural- (neuronal- or glial-) specific autoantibodies and their target antigens. The neurologic manifestations affecting the central nervous system include encephalitis, dementia, epilepsy, and movement and sleep disorders. Laboratory testing is now available for most of these neural-specific autoantibodies, which serve as diagnostic markers, in some instances directing the physician toward specific cancer types (e.g., N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antibodies for teratoma, collapsin response mediator protein 5 for small-cell lung cancer) and assisting in therapeutic decision making. Antibodies targeting intracellular proteins serve as markers of cytotoxic effector T-cell-mediated injury, which is generally poorly responsive to immunotherapy. By contrast, antibodies targeting extracellular plasma membrane proteins may act as pathogenic effectors and often infer good responses to immunotherapy. Diagnosing these conditions and implementing treatment as early into the clinical course as possible ensures the best possible clinical outcomes. An adequate immunotherapy trial to assess maximum reversibility of symptoms, as assessed through objective functional measures, is crucial and can help to determine whether maintenance therapy is needed. PMID:27643908

  13. Obstetric and vascular APS: same autoantibodies but different diseases?

    PubMed

    Meroni, P L; Raschi, E; Grossi, C; Pregnolato, F; Trespidi, L; Acaia, B; Borghi, M O

    2012-06-01

    Beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI)-dependent antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) are the main pathogenic autoantibody population and at the same time the laboratory diagnostic tool for the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). These antibodies are responsible for both the vascular and the obstetric manifestations of the syndrome but the pathogenic mechanisms behind these manifestations are not the same. For example, thrombotic events do not appear to play a major role in APS miscarriages and a direct reactivity of β2GPI-dependent aPLs on decidual and trophoblast cells was reported. A local expression of β2GPI on these tissues was reported both in physiological conditions and in APS women, thus explaining the local tropism of the autoantibodies. The two hit hypothesis was suggested to explain why the vascular manifestations of APS may occur only occasionally in spite of the persistent presence of aPLs. This is not apparently the case for the obstetric variant of the syndrome, making the difference even more striking. A different pathogenesis may also provide the rationale for the well-known fact that the vascular and the obstetric manifestations may occur independently although in a minority of cases.

  14. Subclasses of immunoglobulins and autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Outschoorn, I; Rowley, M J; Cook, A D; Mackay, I R

    1993-01-01

    The differing capacity of subclasses of IgG to bind to protein A and protein G was used in a sequential affinity purification procedure to examine immunoglobulin isotypes and subclasses in autoimmune disease. The utility of the procedure is that affinity-purified fractions containing particular isotypes and subclasses of immunoglobulin can be analyzed for their content of autoantibodies using standard techniques. For each of four autoimmune diseases studied, chronic active hepatitis, Sjogren's syndrome, primary biliary cirrhosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, there were characteristic protein elution profiles and the various disease-specific autoantibodies showed preferential distributions among the isotypes and subclasses. Moreover there was not an absolute correlation between an increased level of a particular subclass and the occurrence of antibodies of that subclass. The occurrence of highly disease-specific immunoglobulin subclass profiles suggests that the hypergammaglobulinemia associated with autoimmunity cannot be attributed entirely to polyclonal B-cell activation. Rather, there are disease-specific alterations in isotype subclass switching which may reflect different cytokine-dependent influences on autoimmune B cells and their products.

  15. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios following microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, C. E.; Xun, L.

    1996-01-01

    The cytoplasmic volume-to-myonucleus ratio in the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles of juvenile rats after 5.4 days of microgravity was studied. Three groups of rats (n = 8 each) were used. The experimental group (space rats) was flown aboard the space shuttle Discovery (NASA, STS-48), while two ground-based groups, one hindlimb suspended (suspended rats), one non-suspended (control), served as controls. Single fibre analysis revealed a significant decrease in cross-sectional area (microns2) in the gastrocnemius for both the space and the suspended rats; in the tibialis anterior only the suspended rats showed a significant decrease. Myonuclei counts (myonuclei per mm) in both the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius were significantly increased in the space rats but not in the suspended rats. The mean myonuclear volume (individual nuclei: microns3) in tibialis anterior fibres from the space rats, and in gastrocnemius fibres from both the space and the suspended rats, was significantly lower than that in the respective control group. Estimation of the total myonuclear volume (microns3 per.mm), however, revealed no significant differences between the three groups in either the tibialis anterior or gastrocnemius. The described changes in the cross-sectional area and myonuclei numbers resulted in significant decreases in the cytoplasmic volume-to-myonucleus ratio (microns3 x 10(3)) in both muscles and for both space and suspended rats (tibialis anterior; 15.6 +/- 0.6 (space), 17.2 +/- 1.0 (suspended), 20.8 +/- 0.9 (control): gastrocnemius; 13.4 +/- 0.4 (space) and 14.9 +/- 1.1 (suspended) versus 18.1 +/- 1.1 (control)). These results indicate that even short periods of unweighting due to microgravity or limb suspension result in changes in skeletal muscle fibres which lead to significant decreases in the cytoplasmic volume-to-myonucleus ratio.

  16. Mitochondria and cytoplasmic male sterility in plants.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Huang, Wenchao; Huang, Qi; Qin, Xiaojian; Yu, Changchun; Wang, Lili; Li, Shaoqing; Zhu, Renshan; Zhu, Yingguo

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles in cells not only because they supply over 90% of the cell's energy but also because their dysfunction is associated with disease. Owing to the importance of mitochondria, there are many questions about mitochondria that must be answered. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is a mysterious natural phenomenon, and the mechanism of the origin of CMS is unknown. Despite successful utilization of CMS and restoration of fertility (Rf) in practice, the underlying mechanisms of these processes remain elusive. This review summarizes the genes involved in CMS and Rf, with a special focus on recent studies reporting the mechanisms of the CMS and Rf pathways, and concludes with potential working models.

  17. [Measurement of antiganglioside autoantibodies by immunodot-blot assay: clinical importance in peripheral neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Caudie, C; Vial, C; Petiot, P; Bancel, J; Later, R; Gonnaud, P M

    1999-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated measurement data and clinical relevance of autoantibodies to gangliosides in peripheral neuropathies (PN). The IgG and IgM antiganglioside autoantibodies were determined by our own immunodot-blot assay on membrane and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa) in sera of 1,342 patients with peripheral neuropathies. Anti-GM1 and anti-GD1b autoantibodies formed a part of the normal autoantibody repertoire and were common place in 12% of normal subjects and in 14% of disease control groups. Polyclonal IgM antiganglioside autoantibodies were detected in chronic PN, polyclonal IgG antiganglioside autoantibodies were detected in acute PN. Polyclonal IgM anti-GM1 and anti-GD1b autoantibodies were detected in 35 patients out of 48 with treatable multifocal motor neuropathy with persistent conduction blocks. These autoantibodies well discriminated between suspected motor peripheral neuropathies and motor neuron diseases (sensitivity 73%, specificity 83%, positive predictive value 60%, negative predictive value 91%). Monoclonal IgM autoantibodies reacted strongly with gangliosides in 15 patients out of 77 with M-IgM neuropathy (19%). M-IgM autoantibodies differed in their fine specificities with different principal target antigens as demonstrated with cross-reactivity. Such findings provide further evidence for a relationship between neurological syndromes and antiganglioside antibody profiles and also suggest that different gangliosides could be principal target antigens such as GM1, GD1b, GT1b, GD1a or GM2. Polyclonal IgG anti-GM1 and anti-GD1b autoantibodies were detected in 21 patients out of 22 with acute motor axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome with antecedent of infection by Campylobacter jejuni, polyclonal IgG anti-GQ1b autoantibodies in 9 patients out of 10 with Miller-Fisher syndrome. Detection of antiganglioside autoantibodies by immunodot-blot assay which is simple and quick in testing a large panel of gangliosides has become very

  18. Immunospecific red cell binding of iodine /sup 125/-labeled immunoglobulin G erythrocyte autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Masouredis, S.P.; Branks, M.J.; Garratty, G.; Victoria, E.J.

    1987-09-01

    The primary interaction of autoantibodies with red cells has been studied by using labeled autoantibodies. Immunoglobulin G red cell autoantibodies obtained from IgG antiglobulin-positive normal blood donors were labeled with radioactive iodine and compared with alloanti-D with respect to their properties and binding behavior. Iodine /sup 125/-labeled IgG autoantibody migrated as a single homogeneous peak with the same relative mobility as human IgG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric focusing pattern of labeled autoantibodies varied from donor to donor but was similar to that of alloanti-D, consisting of multiple IgG populations with isoelectric points in the neutral to alkaline range. /sup 125/I-autoantibody bound to all human red cells of common Rh phenotypes. Evidence for immunospecific antibody binding of the labeled autoantibody was based on variation in equilibrium binding to nonhuman and human red cells of common and rare phenotypes, enhanced binding after red cell protease modification, antiglobulin reactivity of cell-bound IgG comparable to that of cell-bound anti-D, and saturation binding in autoantibody excess. Scatchard analysis of two /sup 125/I-autoantibody preparations yielded site numbers of 41,500 and 53,300 with equilibrium constants of 3.7 and 2.1 X 10(8) L X mol-1. Dog, rabbit, rhesus monkey, and baboon red cells were antigen(s) negative by quantitative adsorption studies adsorbing less than 3% of the labeled autoantibody. Reduced ability of rare human D--red blood cells to adsorb the autoantibody and identification of donor autoantibodies that bind to Rh null red blood cells indicated that eluates contained multiple antibody populations of complex specificities in contrast to anti-D, which consists of a monospecific antibody population. Another difference is that less than 70% of the autoantibody IgG was adsorbed by maximum binding red blood cells as compared with greater than 85% for alloanti-D.

  19. Structural responses of amoebae to the injection of heterologous cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Flickinger, C J; Read, G A; Kabana, E M

    1980-10-01

    Responses to the introduction of heterologous cytoplasm and the fate of foreign organelles were investigated in amoebae. Heterologous cytoplasm was transferred by microinjection from Pelomyxa carolinensis to Amoeba discoides. In control experiments, homologous cytoplasm was transferred from one A. discoides to another. Recipient cells were observed by light microscopy, and samples were prepared for ultrastructural study at intervals between 15 min nad 3 days after operation. Recipients of heterologous cytoplasm showed two main responses. First, about 40% recipients expelled small amounts of cytoplasm by a blebbing process within 30 min after injection. Second, organelles were segregated and broken down in membrane-bounded cytoplasmic vacuoles between 6 h and 2 days after operation. Acid phosphatase reaction product was observed in these vacuoles along with altered organelles. Use of electron-dense thoria particles to mark donor cells demonstrated the presence of injected cytoplasm in the vacuoles. In contrast, when amoebae were injected with homologous cytoplasm, none was expelled and vacuoles containing degenerating organelles were uncommon. The survival rate and general appearance of recipients of heterologous cytoplasm were much poorer than those of homologous recipients, and most of the former died by I week after operation. It is postulated that amoeba are capable of recognizing heterologous organelles introduced into the cytoplasm and that they respond by expulsion and/or destruction of the foreign cellular components. The previously described lethal effect of heterologous cytoplasm was confirmed. PMID:7462341

  20. PTEN functions by recruitment to cytoplasmic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Naguib, Adam; Bencze, Gyula; Cho, Hyejin; Zheng, Wu; Tocilj, Ante; Elkayam, Elad; Faehnle, Christopher R; Jaber, Nadia; Pratt, Christopher P; Chen, Muhan; Zong, Wei-Xing; Marks, Michael S; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Pappin, Darryl J; Trotman, Lloyd C

    2015-04-16

    PTEN is proposed to function at the plasma membrane, where receptor tyrosine kinases are activated. However, the majority of PTEN is located throughout the cytoplasm. Here, we show that cytoplasmic PTEN is distributed along microtubules, tethered to vesicles via phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P), the signature lipid of endosomes. We demonstrate that the non-catalytic C2 domain of PTEN specifically binds PI(3)P through the CBR3 loop. Mutations render this loop incapable of PI(3)P binding and abrogate PTEN-mediated inhibition of PI 3-kinase/AKT signaling. This loss of function is rescued by fusion of the loop mutant PTEN to FYVE, the canonical PI(3)P binding domain, demonstrating the functional importance of targeting PTEN to endosomal membranes. Beyond revealing an upstream activation mechanism of PTEN, our data introduce the concept of PI 3-kinase signal activation on the vast plasma membrane that is contrasted by PTEN-mediated signal termination on the small, discrete surfaces of internalized vesicles. PMID:25866245

  1. The epididymis, cytoplasmic droplets and male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Trevor G

    2011-01-01

    The potential of spermatozoa to become motile during post-testicular maturation, and the relationship between the cytoplasmic droplet and fertilizing capacity are reviewed. Post-testicular maturation of spermatozoa involves the autonomous induction of motility, which can occur in vivo in testes with occluded excurrent ducts and in vitro in testicular explants, and artefactual changes in morphology that appear to occur in the testis in vitro. Both modifications may reflect time-dependent oxidation of disulphide bonds of head and tail proteins. Regulatory volume decrease (RVD), which counters sperm swelling at ejaculation, is discussed in relation to loss of cytoplasmic droplets and consequences for fertility. It is postulated that: (i) fertile males possess spermatozoa with sufficient osmolytes to drive RVD at ejaculation, permitting the droplet to round up and pinch off without membrane rupture; and (ii) infertile males possess spermatozoa with insufficient osmolytes so that RVD is inadequate, the droplet swells and the resulting flagellar angulation prevents droplet loss. Droplet retention at ejaculation is a harbinger of infertility caused by failure of the spermatozoon to negotiate the uterotubal junction or mucous and reach the egg. In this hypothesis, the epididymis regulates fertility indirectly by the extent of osmolyte provision to spermatozoa, which influences RVD and therefore droplet loss. Man is an exception, because ejaculated human spermatozoa retain their droplets. This may reflect their short midpiece, approximating head length, permitting a swollen droplet to extend along the entire midpiece; this not only obviates droplet migration and flagellar angulation but also hampers droplet loss. PMID:21076437

  2. Cytoplasmic RNA Granules and Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wei-Chih; Lloyd, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    RNA granules are dynamic cellular structures essential for proper gene expression and homeostasis. The two principle types of cytoplasmic RNA granules are stress granules (SGs), which contain stalled translation initiation complexes, and processing bodies (P-bodies, PBs), which concentrate factors involved in mRNA degradation. RNA granules are associated with gene silencing of transcripts, thus, viruses repress RNA granule functions to favor replication. This review discusses the breadth of viral interactions with cytoplasmic RNA granules, focusing on mechanisms that modulate the functions of RNA granules and that typically promote viral replication. Currently mechanisms for virus manipulation of RNA granules can be loosely grouped into three non-exclusive categories; i) cleavage of key RNA granule factors, ii) regulation of PKR activation and iii) co-opting RNA granule factors for new roles in viral replication. Viral repression of RNA granules supports productive infection by inhibiting their gene silencing functions and counteracting their role in linking stress sensing with innate immune activation. PMID:26958719

  3. Effect of superposition and masking between red blood cell autoantibodies and alloantibodies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Wang, D Q

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the law of superposition and masking between autoantibodies and alloantibodies, and to ensure the detection of alloantibodies and to improve the safety of warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia patients. Eight kinds of commercial IgG red blood cell antibody reagents were serially diluted, and 3 kinds of antibodies at dilutions showing a continuous gradual decline in agglutination strength with the corresponding antigen red blood cells were treated as the target antibodies. Anti-D and anti-M were treated as simulated autoantibodies, and anti-Fya was treated as a simulated alloantibody. Four concentrations, 4+, 3+, 2+ and 1+, of autoantibodies and three concentrations, 3+, 2+ and 1+, of alloantibodies were combined, and 12 kinds of hybrid antibodies were detected and evaluated by the anti-human globulin micro-column gel assay. When the simulated strong autoantibody (4+) was used, the alloantibodies (3+, 2+, 1+) had no effect on the final agglutination strength; when the strength of agglutination produced by the simulated autoantibody was less than 4+, and at the same time there were alloantibodies (3+, 2+, 1+), the differences in agglutination strength with a panel of RBCs could be clearly observed. Strong autoantibodies (4+) can exert a masking effect, leading to alloantibodies being undetected; autoantibodies less than 4+, will produce the superimposed effect with alloantibodies, resulting in differences in agglutination strength. PMID:25036516

  4. The Significance of Autoantibody Changes Over Time in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Tana, Michele M.; Shums, Zakera; Milo, Jay; Norman, Gary L.; Leung, Patrick S.; Gershwin, M. Eric; Noureddin, Mazen; Kleiner, David E.; Zhao, Xiongce; Heller, Theo; Hoofnagle, Jay H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), the antimitochondrial antibody is a cornerstone of diagnosis, but there have been conflicting reports about the correlation of autoantibodies with disease stage and prognosis. We studied whether autoantibody levels changed over time and sought correlations with clinical outcomes in a cohort of patients with PBC. Methods We tested serial serum samples from patients with PBC at a research institution for several autoantibodies. Long-term clinical follow-up data were used to calculate the slopes (change over time) for autoantibodies, platelet count, Ishak fibrosis score, biopsy copper, and number of portal areas with bile ducts. An adverse clinical outcome was defined as hepatic decompensation, development of hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplantation, or liver-related death. We performed linear or logistic regression or Fisher exact test as appropriate, adjusting for multiple comparisons. Results Twenty-seven patients with PBC with 145 serum samples were studied. Of the cohort, 85% was white, 81% was female, and median follow-up time was 20 years. Of the autoantibodies tested, only sp100 changed significantly over time. The sp100 slope was inversely associated with the Ishak fibrosis slope (parameter estimate, −0.05; P = .0003). Conclusions While changes in most autoantibodies over time do not seem to correlate with clinical outcomes in PBC, a change in the sp100 autoantibody level may have prognostic utility with respect to the development of fibrosis on liver biopsy. PMID:26386081

  5. Evaluation of the diagnostic value of 64 simultaneously measured autoantibodies for early detection of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Simone; Chen, Hongda; Butt, Julia; Michel, Angelika; Knebel, Phillip; Holleczek, Bernd; Zörnig, Inka; Eichmüller, Stefan B.; Jäger, Dirk; Pawlita, Michael; Waterboer, Tim; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been suggested as biomarkers for early detection of gastric cancer. However, studies that systematically assess the diagnostic performance of a large number of autoantibodies are rare. Here, we used bead-based multiplex serology to simultaneously measure autoantibody responses against 64 candidate TAAs in serum samples from 329 gastric cancer patients, 321 healthy controls and 124 participants with other diseases of the upper digestive tract. At 98% specificity, sensitivities for the 64 tested autoantibodies ranged from 0–12% in the training set and a combination of autoantibodies against five TAAs (MAGEA4 + CTAG1 + TP53 + ERBB2_C + SDCCAG8) was able to detect 32% of the gastric cancer patients at a specificity of 87% in the validation set. Sensitivities for early and late stage gastric cancers were similar, while chronic atrophic gastritis, a precursor lesion of gastric cancer, was not detectable. However, the 5-marker combination also detected 26% of the esophageal cancer patients. In conclusion, the tested autoantibodies and combinations alone did not reach sufficient sensitivity for gastric cancer screening. Nevertheless, some autoantibodies, such as anti-MAGEA4, anti-CTAG1 or anti-TP53 and their combinations could possibly contribute to the development of cancer early detection tests (not necessarily restricted to gastric cancer) when being combined with other markers. PMID:27140836

  6. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Disease-Related Autoantibodies in Individuals at Increased Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mikuls, Ted R.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Deane, Kevin D.; Payne, Jeffrey B.; O'Dell, James R.; Yu, Fang; Sayles, Harlan; Weisman, Michael H.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Buckner, Jane H.; Keating, Richard M.; Derber, Lezlie A.; Robinson, William H.; Holers, V. Michael; Norris, Jill M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relationship of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) with the presence of autoantibodies in individuals at risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Participants included: 1) a cohort enriched with HLA-DR4 and 2) those at risk for RA by virtue of having a first-degree relative with RA. None satisfied 1987 ACR RA classification criteria. Autoantibodies measured included anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) and rheumatoid factor (RF; nephelometry, IgA, IgM, IgG). Individuals were considered autoantibody positive (n = 113) with ≥ 1 positive autoantibody with individuals further categorized as `high-risk' (n = 38; positive ACPA or ≥ 2 RF assays). Autoantibody negative individuals served as comparators (n = 171). Antibody to Pg, P. intermedia (Pi), and F. nucleatum (Fn) were measured. Associations of bacterial antibodies with group status were examined using logistic regression. Results Anti-Pg concentrations were higher in high-risk (p = 0.011) and autoantibody positive group (p = 0.010) than in the autoantibody negative group. There were no group differences in anti-Pi or anti-Fn concentrations. After multivariable adjustment, anti-Pg concentrations (but not anti-Pi or anti-Fn) were significantly associated with autoantibody positive and high-risk status (p < 0.05). Conclusion Immunity to Pg, but not Pi or Fn, is significantly associated with the presence of RA-related autoantibodies in individuals at risk for RA. These results support the hypothesis that infection with Pg may play a central role in the early loss of tolerance to self-antigens in RA pathogenesis. PMID:22736291

  7. Elevated Plasma P-Selectin Autoantibodies in Primary Sjögren Syndrome Patients with Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ya-Hui; Zhou, Peng-Fei; Long, Guang-Feng; Tian, Xin; Guo, Yu-Fan; Pang, Ai-Ming; Di, Ran; Shen, Yan-Na; Liu, Yun-De; Cui, Yu-Jie

    2015-11-28

    BACKGROUND Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is one of the most common chronic systemic autoimmune diseases, and thrombocytopenia is one of the hematological manifestations of pSS. When platelet and endothelial cells are activated, P-selectin is expressed on the cell surface. This study aimed to investigate the role of P-selectin autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia in pSS. MATERIAL AND METHODS P-selectin autoantibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 38 pSS patients without thrombocytopenia and 32 pSS patients with thrombocytopenia, 32 idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients, and 35 healthy controls. RESULTS The plasma P-selectin autoantibodies (A490) in ITP patients and pSS patients with/without thrombocytopenia were significantly higher than those in healthy controls, but there were no significant differences between ITP patients and pSS patients with thrombocytopenia. The positive rate of P-selectin autoantibodies in pSS patients with thrombocytopenia was significantly higher than that in ITP patients. The platelet count was lower in P-selectin autoantibodies-positive patients, while among pSS patients with thrombocytopenia, the platelet count was lower in P-selectin autoantibodies-positive patients than in P-selectin autoantibodies-negative patients. In ITP patients and pSS patients with thrombocytopenia, the platelet count was lower in P-selectin autoantibodies-positive patients. CONCLUSIONS Elevated plasma P-selectin autoantibodies may play a role in the pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia in pSS patients.

  8. Complete atrioventricular block in adult Sjögren's syndrome with anti-Ro autoantibody.

    PubMed

    Sung, Myung Jun; Park, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Lee, Young-Soo; Park, Chul-Yeon; Choe, Jung-Yoon

    2011-06-01

    Anti-Ro autoantibody is associated with Sjögren's syndrome (SS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and neonatal lupus syndrome (i.e., congenital complete heart block in newborns). Generally, the adult atrioventricular (AV) node is believed to be relatively resistant to the scarring effects of anti-Ro/anti-La autoantibodies. However, there have been some reports of adult complete AV block in SS and SLE patients. Here, we report a case of complete heart block in primary SS with anti-Ro autoantibodies, with no other risk factor for the development of heart block, and review their etiological association.

  9. Protein microarrays: a new tool for the study of autoantibodies in immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Jacob M; Utz, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity is highly coincident with immunodeficiency. In a small but growing number of primary immunodeficiencies, autoantibodies are diagnostic of a given disease and implicated in disease pathogenesis. In order to improve our understanding of the role of autoantibodies in immunodeficiencies and to discover novel autoantibodies, new proteomic tools are needed. Protein microarrays have the ability to screen for reactivity to hundreds to many thousands of unique autoantigens simultaneously on a single chip using minimal serum input. Here, we review different types of protein microarrays and how they can be useful in framing the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies. PMID:25904912

  10. Statin-associated autoimmune myopathy and anti-HMGCR autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Mohassel, Payam; Mammen, Andrew L

    2013-10-01

    Statins are among the most commonly prescribed medications that significantly reduce cardiovascular risk in selected individuals. However, these drugs can also be associated with muscle symptoms ranging from mild myalgias to severe rhabdomyolysis. Although statin myotoxicity is usually self-limited, in some instances statin-exposed subjects can develop an autoimmune myopathy typically characterized by progressive weakness, muscle enzyme elevations, a necrotizing myopathy on muscle biopsy, and autoantibodies that recognize 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the pharmacologic target of statins. These antibodies are also found in some autoimmune myopathy patients without statin exposure. Importantly, anti-HMGCR antibodies are not found in the vast majority of statin-exposed subjects without autoimmune myopathy, including those with self-limited statin intolerance. Thus, testing for these antibodies may help differentiate those with self-limited statin myopathy who recover after statin discontinuation from those with a progressive statin-associated autoimmune myopathy who typically require immunosuppressive therapy.

  11. Clinical significance of autoantibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Minoru

    2014-08-01

    Antimitochondrial, anti-gp210, anti-sp100, and anticentromere antibodies are specifically detected in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). In clinical practice, they are useful for the diagnosis of PBC or for evaluating disease severity, clinical phenotype, and long-term outcome. In the typical or classical form of PBC which shows slow progressive loss of small bile ducts with a parallel increase in liver fibrosis, anti-gp210 antibodies are a strong risk factor for progression to jaundice and hepatic failure, whereas the presence of anticentromere antibodies is a risk factor for progression to cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Of note, the autoimmune repertoire, which is established during the early stage of the disease process, can influence the clinical phenotype and the long-term prognosis of PBC. Because the natural course of PBC is being altered by treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid, the clinical significance of these PBC-specific autoantibodies awaits re-evaluation in various ethnicities.

  12. The SL autoantibody-antigen system: clinical and biochemical studies.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, R M; Morgan, S H; Bunn, C C; Gainey, R C; Hughes, G R; Mathews, M B

    1986-01-01

    A recently described autoantibody, SL, was found in serum from 27 patients with autoimmune disease, including 20 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) where the frequently was 7%. Analysis of clinical, serological, and HLA data from 119 SLE patients showed no positive associations with anti-SL antibody apart from a higher frequency of non-infective fever. Most SL positive sera contained other precipitins, notably antibodies to Ro(SS-A) and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA. Anti-SL IgG recognised a protein of 32 000 daltons without associated RNA. This polypeptide was distinguished from a similarly sized component of the Sm and RNP ribonucleoprotein particles by demonstrating different products of partial proteolysis. Although anti-SL antibody is of limited clinical importance, it occurs with twice the frequency of anti-SM antibody in white patients with SLE. Preliminary studies indicate that SL and the Japanese Ki system are identical. Images PMID:3487291

  13. A monoclonal autoantibody that promotes central nervous system remyelination in a model of multiple sclerosis is a natural autoantibody encoded by germline immunoglobulin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.; Rodriguez, M.

    1995-03-01

    Antibodies directed against self-Ags are frequently considered detrimental, and have been shown to play a pathogenic role in certain autoimmune diseases. However, the presence of autoreactive Abs in normal individuals suggests that some autoantibodies could participate in normal physiology. Our previous studies demonstrated that monoclonal autoantibodies SCH94.03 and SCH94.32, generated from the splenocytes of uninfected SJL/J mice injected with normal homogenized spinal cord, promote central nervous system remyelination when passively transferred into syngeneic mice chronically infected with Theiler`s murine encephalomyelitis virus, an established experimental model of multiple sclerosis. In this study we show that these two monoclonal autoantibodies are identical, and have phenotypic characteristics of natural autoantibodies. By using a solid phase assay system, SCH94.03 and SCH94.32 showed reactivity toward several protein Ags and chemical haptens, with prominent reactivity toward spectrin, (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl, and fluorescein. Sequence analysis showed that both SCH94.03 and SCH94.32 were encoded by identical germline Ig light chain V{sub K}10/J{sub K}l and heavy chain V23/DFL16.1/J{sub H}2 genes, with no definitive somatic mutations. These results indicate that a natural autoantibody participates in a beneficial physiologic response to central nervous system injury. 60 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Cytoplasmic sensing of viral nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Habjan, Matthias; Pichlmair, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Viruses are the most abundant pathogens on earth. A fine-tuned framework of intervening pathways is in place in mammalian cells to orchestrate the cellular defence against these pathogens. Key for this system is sensor proteins that recognise specific features associated with nucleic acids of incoming viruses. Here we review the current knowledge on cytoplasmic sensors for viral nucleic acids. These sensors induce expression of cytokines, affect cellular functions required for virus replication and directly target viral nucleic acids through degradation or sequestration. Their ability to respond to a given nucleic acid is based on both the differential specificity of the individual proteins and the downstream signalling or adaptor proteins. The cooperation of these multiple proteins and pathways plays a key role in inducing successful immunity against virus infections.

  15. Quantifying intermittent transport in cell cytoplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagache, Thibault; Holcman, David

    2008-03-01

    Active cellular transport is a fundamental mechanism for protein and vesicle delivery, cell cycle, and molecular degradation. Viruses can hijack the transport system and use it to reach the nucleus. Most transport processes consist of intermittent dynamics, where the motion of a particle, such as a virus, alternates between pure Brownian and directed movement along microtubules. In this Rapid Communication, we estimate the mean time for a particle to attach to a microtubule network. This computation leads to a coarse grained equation of the intermittent motion in radial and cylindrical geometries. Finally, by using the degradation activity inside the cytoplasm, we obtain refined asymptotic estimations for the probability and the mean time a virus reaches a small nuclear pore.

  16. Physical properties of cytoplasmic intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Block, Johanna; Schroeder, Viktor; Pawelzyk, Paul; Willenbacher, Norbert; Köster, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) constitute a sophisticated filament system in the cytoplasm of eukaryotes. They form bundles and networks with adapted viscoelastic properties and are strongly interconnected with the other filament types, microfilaments and microtubules. IFs are cell type specific and apart from biochemical functions, they act as mechanical entities to provide stability and resilience to cells and tissues. We review the physical properties of these abundant structural proteins including both in vitro studies and cell experiments. IFs are hierarchical structures and their physical properties seem to a large part be encoded in the very specific architecture of the biopolymers. Thus, we begin our review by presenting the assembly mechanism, followed by the mechanical properties of individual filaments, network and structure formation due to electrostatic interactions, and eventually the mechanics of in vitro and cellular networks. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  17. Recognition of oxidized albumin and thyroid antigens by psoriasis autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shobaili, Hani A.; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Rasheed, Zafar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the role of reactive-oxygen-species (ROS) induced epitopes on human-serum-albumin (HSA) and thyroid antigens in psoriasis autoimmunity. Methods: This study was performed in the College of Medicine, Qassim University, Buraidah, Saudi Arabia between May 2014 and February 2015. The study was designed to explore the role of ROS-induced epitopes in psoriasis autoimmunity. Singlet-oxygen (or ROS)-induced epitopes on protein (ROS-epitopes-albumin) was characterized by in-vitro and in-vivo. Thyroid antigens were prepared from rabbit thyroid, and thyroglobulin was isolated from thyroid extract. Immunocross-reactions of protein-A purified anti-ROS-epitopes-HSA-immunoglobulin G (IgGs) with thyroid antigen, thyroglobulin, and their oxidized forms were determined. Binding characteristics of autoantibodies in chronic plaque psoriasis patients (n=26) against ROS-epitopes-HSA and also with native and oxidized thyroid antigens were screened, and the results were compared with age-matched controls (n=22). Results: The anti-ROS-epitopes-HSA-IgGs showed cross-reactions with thyroid antigen, thyroglobulin and with their oxidized forms. High degree of specific binding by psoriasis IgGs to ROS-epitopes-HSA, ROS-thyroid antigen and ROS-thyroglobulin was observed. Immunoglobulin G from normal-human-controls showed negligible binding with all tested antigens. Moreover, sera from psoriasis patients had higher levels of carbonyl contents compared with control sera. Conclusion: Structural alterations in albumin, thyroid antigens by ROS, generate unique neo-epitopes that might be one of the factors for the induction of autoantibodies in psoriasis. PMID:26620982

  18. [Juvenile dermatomyositis and new autoantibodies: Cases and review].

    PubMed

    Guarella, M; Jurquet, A-L; Retornaz, K; Bardin, N; Chastang, M-C; Desjonquere, M; Fabien, N; Belot, A

    2015-12-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is the most common inflammatory myopathy in children. Its diagnosis is usually made on a clinical basis following the criteria of Bohan and Peter (1975). Recently, the presence of myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) have started to be associated with specific outcome in adult patients; the diagnosis and prognosis value of these autoantibodies remains to be identified in children. We report four cases of JDM with MSAs focusing on clinical, biological, and radiological manifestations, and then we describe associated treatment. The cohort comprises four girls with an average age of 8.5 years. The time to diagnosis was 1 week to 4 months. For these patients, the immunologic study found one patient positive for the MDA5 antibody (or CADM 140), one positive for the TIF1γ antibody (or p155/140), and two patients positive for the NXP2 antibody (or p140/MJ). Each patient showed specific and characteristic cutaneous manifestations. For example, the girl positive for the TIF1γ antibody presented the most severe skin disease with urticaria, face edema, and vascularity of the neck and shoulders. However, regarding muscular features, proximal weakness was present in most of the cohort, except for the child positive for the MDA5 antibody, who presented no sign of muscular disease at the beginning with low CK levels. Importantly, acute pancreatitis also affected this patient. Concerning radiological indications, muscular MRI evidenced hyperinflammation, a sign of diffuse myositis, in all these patients. Treatments consisted in corticosteroids together with methotrexate or mycofenolate mofetil associated or not with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. This report highlights the importance of systematic detection and analysis of MSA in diagnosis and characterization of JDM, and describes a new approach that would allow more focused treatments and be a useful predictor of clinical complications and prognosis in JDM-affected subjects. PMID:26598044

  19. CYP2E1 autoantibodies in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Sutti, Salvatore; Rigamonti, Cristina; Vidali, Matteo; Albano, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune reactions involving cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) are a feature of idiosyncratic liver injury induced by halogenated hydrocarbons and isoniazid, but are also detectable in about one third of the patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC). In these latter the presence of anti-CYP2E1 auto-antibodies is an independent predictor of extensive necro-inflammation and fibrosis and worsens the recurrence of hepatitis following liver transplantation, indicating that CYP2E1-directed autoimmunity can contribute to hepatic injury. The molecular characterization of the antigens recognized by anti-CYP2E1 auto-antibodies in ALD and CHC has shown that the targeted conformational epitopes are located in close proximity on the molecular surface. Furthermore, these epitopes can be recognized on CYP2E1 expressed on hepatocyte plasma membranes where they can trigger antibody-mediated cytotoxicity. This does not exclude that T cell-mediated responses against CYP2E1 might also be involved in causing hepatocyte damage. CYP2E1 structural modifications by reactive metabolites and molecular mimicry represent important factors in the breaking of self-tolerance against CYP2E1 in, respectively, ALD and CHC. However, genetic or acquired interferences with the mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of the immune system are also likely to contribute. More studies are needed to better characterize the impact of anti-CYP2E1 autoimmunity in liver diseases particularly in relation to the fact that common metabolic alterations such as obesity and diabetes stimulates hepatic CYP2E1 expression.

  20. Thyrotropin receptor autoantibodies (TSHRAbs): epitopes, origins and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Leonard D; Harii, Norikazu

    2003-01-01

    Epitopes for > 95% stimulating thyrotropin receptor autoantibodies (TSHRAbs) causally implicated in Graves' disease (Basedow's disease or primary hyperthyroidism) have been identified on on the N-terminal portion of the TSHR extracellular domain, residues 8-165. If the stimulating TSHRAb activity is solely dependent on this region, it is termed homogeneous; if its activity is only largely related to this region, it is termed heterogeneous. The presence of a heterogeneous stimulating TSHRAb in a patient is associated with rapid responses to propylthiouracil or methimazole and may be predictive of long term remission with these oral immunosuppressives. Epitopes for two different Graves' autoantibodies that inhibit TSH binding, TSH binding inhibition immunoglobulins or TBIIs, have also been identified on this region of the TSHR. They do not increase cAMP levels, although one may activate the inositol phosphate, Ca++, arachidonate release signal system. The epitope of blocking TSHRAbs with the ability to inhibit TSH binding (TBII activity), TSH activity, and stimulating TSHRAb activity, and that are causally implicated in the primary hypothyroidism of patients with idiopathic myxedema or some patients with Hashimoto's disease have, in contrast, been largely identified largely on the C-terminal portion of the TSHR extracellular domain, residues 270-395. They have been implicated as important in pregnancy where they attenuate the signs and symptoms of Graves' hyperthyroidism. The appearance of these blocking TSHRAbs during pregnancy in Graves' patients might cause overt or occult hypothyroidism, with resultant effects on fetal development and postnatal intelligence levels. The different TSHRAbs can exist in the same patient at any moment in time, potentially making disease expression a sum of their activities. Assays taking advantage of the epitope mapping findings enable us to detect individual TSHRAbs within a single patient and to better understand their clinical

  1. Anti-fibrillarin autoantibodies in mercury-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Hultman, P; Eneström, S; Pollard, K M; Tan, E M

    1989-12-01

    Using indirect immunofluorescence (IF) with HEp-2 cells as a substrate serially bled SJL mice were found to gradually develop a high titre of anti-nucleolar antibodies (ANuA) after 3-5 weeks of s.c. injections of 1.6 mg HgCl2/kg body weight every third day. The ANuA showed a clumpy nucleolar pattern of localization and were composed of all IgG subclasses, but contained, in comparison with the antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in MRL-lpr/lpr mice, significantly lower titres of IgG2a and only traces of IgG3. Immunoblotting analysis using purified mouse liver nucleoli revealed that the sera with ANuA identified the same 34-kD nucleolar protein which was targeted by a human scleroderma serum containing autoantibodies monospecific for fibrillarin. In addition, a fraction of the mercury-treated SJL mice developed serum antibodies reacting with 10-15 and 60-70 kD nucleolar proteins in immunoblotting. The presence of serum autoantibodies reacting with the 10-15 kD proteins correlated with significantly increased titres of anti-histone antibodies of the IgG class in ELISA. Some mercury-treated SJL mice also developed a significantly increased titre of anti-histone antibodies of the IgM class. B10.S mice treated with mercuric chloride consistently developed ANuA, which also targeted a 34-kD nucleolar protein. Since anti-fibrillarin antibodies are specific markers of scleroderma, the present animal model may be valuable for studies of the immunological aberrations which are likely to induce this autoimmune response.

  2. Fine binding characteristics of human autoantibodies-partial molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kalsi, Jatinderpal; Bunting, Karen; Ravirajan, Chelliah T; Latchman, David S; Pearl, Laurence H; Isenberg, David A

    2004-07-01

    The fine binding characteristics of three well-characterized human autoantibodies B3, RH14 (anti-DNA) and UK4 (anti-cardiolipin) in their IgG and cloned Fab formats, were investigated. Although in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice B3 and RH14 both induce proteinuria, only RH14 induces early features of lupus nephritis, whereas UK4 exhibits lupus anticoagulant activity. RH14 exhibited up to 10 fold higher binding to DNA compared to that shown by B3 or UK4 and involved significant electrostatic and phosphate group interactions. Only RH14 exhibited strong anti-Sm cross-reactivity residing on the C-terminus of the antigen as determined by the use of 76 overlapping 15mer peptides. Chain shuffling experiments indicate that anti-Sm/RNP and anti-Jo-1 activities of B3 and UK4 co-exist on one of the two chains (light, B3; heavy, UK4). The present study provides evidence that a human anti-DNA antibody can also be an anti-ENA antibody. Furthermore, the anti-DNA antibodies also exhibited cross-reactivity against glutathione-S-transferase and DNA polymerase PolIV of bacterial origin. This is the first demonstration of the presence of such cross-reactivities on lupus anti-DNA antibodies. We now demonstrate that subsets of sera from the patients with lupus, recognise these antigens. This observation may in some cases provide a mechanism for the common expression of a variety of autoantibodies observed in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

  3. Inborn errors of cytoplasmic triglyceride metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang Wei; Yang, Hao; Wang, Shu Pei; Soni, Krishnakant G; Brunel-Guitton, Catherine; Mitchell, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    Triglyceride (TG) synthesis, storage, and degradation together constitute cytoplasmic TG metabolism (CTGM). CTGM is mostly studied in adipocytes, where starting from glycerol-3-phosphate and fatty acyl (FA)-coenzyme A (CoA), TGs are synthesized then stored in cytoplasmic lipid droplets. TG hydrolysis proceeds sequentially, producing FAs and glycerol. Several reactions of CTGM can be catalyzed by more than one enzyme, creating great potential for complex tissue-specific physiology. In adipose tissue, CTGM provides FA as a systemic energy source during fasting and is related to obesity. Inborn errors and mouse models have demonstrated the importance of CTGM for non-adipose tissues, including skeletal muscle, myocardium and liver, because steatosis and dysfunction can occur. We discuss known inborn errors of CTGM, including deficiencies of: AGPAT2 (a form of generalized lipodystrophy), LPIN1 (childhood rhabdomyolysis), LPIN2 (an inflammatory condition, Majeed syndrome, described elsewhere in this issue), DGAT1 (protein loosing enteropathy), perilipin 1 (partial lipodystrophy), CGI-58 (gene ABHD5, neutral lipid storage disease (NLSD) with ichthyosis and "Jordan's anomaly" of vacuolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes), adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, gene PNPLA2, NLSD with myopathy, cardiomyopathy and Jordan's anomaly), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL, gene LIPE, hypertriglyceridemia, and insulin resistance). Two inborn errors of glycerol metabolism are known: glycerol kinase (GK, causing pseudohypertriglyceridemia) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1, childhood hepatic steatosis). Mouse models often resemble human phenotypes but may diverge markedly. Inborn errors have been described for less than one-third of CTGM enzymes, and new phenotypes may yet be identified. PMID:25300978

  4. Inborn errors of cytoplasmic triglyceride metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang Wei; Yang, Hao; Wang, Shu Pei; Soni, Krishnakant G; Brunel-Guitton, Catherine; Mitchell, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    Triglyceride (TG) synthesis, storage, and degradation together constitute cytoplasmic TG metabolism (CTGM). CTGM is mostly studied in adipocytes, where starting from glycerol-3-phosphate and fatty acyl (FA)-coenzyme A (CoA), TGs are synthesized then stored in cytoplasmic lipid droplets. TG hydrolysis proceeds sequentially, producing FAs and glycerol. Several reactions of CTGM can be catalyzed by more than one enzyme, creating great potential for complex tissue-specific physiology. In adipose tissue, CTGM provides FA as a systemic energy source during fasting and is related to obesity. Inborn errors and mouse models have demonstrated the importance of CTGM for non-adipose tissues, including skeletal muscle, myocardium and liver, because steatosis and dysfunction can occur. We discuss known inborn errors of CTGM, including deficiencies of: AGPAT2 (a form of generalized lipodystrophy), LPIN1 (childhood rhabdomyolysis), LPIN2 (an inflammatory condition, Majeed syndrome, described elsewhere in this issue), DGAT1 (protein loosing enteropathy), perilipin 1 (partial lipodystrophy), CGI-58 (gene ABHD5, neutral lipid storage disease (NLSD) with ichthyosis and "Jordan's anomaly" of vacuolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes), adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, gene PNPLA2, NLSD with myopathy, cardiomyopathy and Jordan's anomaly), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL, gene LIPE, hypertriglyceridemia, and insulin resistance). Two inborn errors of glycerol metabolism are known: glycerol kinase (GK, causing pseudohypertriglyceridemia) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1, childhood hepatic steatosis). Mouse models often resemble human phenotypes but may diverge markedly. Inborn errors have been described for less than one-third of CTGM enzymes, and new phenotypes may yet be identified.

  5. Cytoplasmic peptidoglycan intermediate levels in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Harika; Ayon, Navid J; Gutheil, William G

    2016-02-01

    Intracellular cytoplasmic peptidoglycan (PG) intermediate levels were determined in Staphylococcus aureus during log-phase growth in enriched media. Levels of UDP-linked intermediates were quantitatively determined using ion pairing LC-MS/MS in negative mode, and amine intermediates were quantitatively determined stereospecifically as their Marfey's reagent derivatives in positive mode. Levels of UDP-linked intermediates in S. aureus varied from 1.4 μM for UDP-GlcNAc-Enolpyruvyate to 1200 μM for UDP-MurNAc. Levels of amine intermediates (L-Ala, D-Ala, D-Ala-D-Ala, L-Glu, D-Glu, and L-Lys) varied over a range of from 860 μM for D-Ala-D-Ala to 30-260 mM for the others. Total PG was determined from the D-Glu content of isolated PG, and used to estimate the rate of PG synthesis (in terms of cytoplasmic metabolite flux) as 690 μM/min. The total UDP-linked intermediates pool (2490 μM) is therefore sufficient to sustain growth for 3.6 min. Comparison of UDP-linked metabolite levels with published pathway enzyme characteristics demonstrates that enzymes on the UDP-branch range from >80% saturation for MurA, Z, and C, to <5% saturation for MurB. Metabolite levels were compared with literature values for Escherichia coli, with the major difference in UDP-intermediates being the level of UDP-MurNAc, which was high in S. aureus (1200 μM) and low in E. coli (45 μM). PMID:26612730

  6. The molecular mechanism and physiological role of cytoplasmic streaming.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Motoki; Ito, Kohji

    2015-10-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming occurs widely in plants ranging from algae to angiosperms. However, the molecular mechanism and physiological role of cytoplasmic streaming have long remained unelucidated. Recent molecular genetic approaches have identified specific myosin members (XI-2 and XI-K as major and XI-1, XI-B, and XI-I as minor motive forces) for the generation of cytoplasmic streaming among 13 myosin XIs in Arabidopsis thaliana. Simultaneous knockout of these myosin XI members led to a reduced velocity of cytoplasmic streaming and marked defects of plant development. Furthermore, the artificial modifications of myosin XI-2 velocity changed plant and cell sizes along with the velocity of cytoplasmic streaming. Therefore, we assume that cytoplasmic streaming is one of the key regulators in determining plant size.

  7. Production of erythrocyte autoantibodies in NZB mice is inhibited by CD4 antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, G G; Hutchings, P R; Roitt, I M; Lydyard, P M

    1994-01-01

    NZB mice spontaneously develop haemolytic anaemia as the result of production of erythrocyte autoantibodies. The mechanisms leading to breakdown in tolerance to erythrocyte autoantigens are unknown. Antibodies to CD4 have been successfully used to treat several murine models of autoimmune disease. In this study we injected NZB mice with non-depleting CD4 antibodies and were able to prevent and abrogate erythrocyte autoantibody production in young (Coombs' negative) and old (Coombs' positive) mice, respectively. Our data indicate the dependency of autoantibody production on CD4+ T cells. However, withdrawal of anti-CD4 antibodies resulted in the appearance of erythrocyte autoantibodies, showing that under these conditions we were unable to re-establish tolerance to autoantigens on erythrocytes using anti-CD4 treatment. PMID:8187337

  8. Internal Sense of Direction: Sensing and Signaling from Cytoplasmic Chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Kieran D.; Lacal, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Chemoreceptors sense environmental signals and drive chemotactic responses in Bacteria and Archaea. There are two main classes of chemoreceptors: integral inner membrane and soluble cytoplasmic proteins. The latter were identified more recently than integral membrane chemoreceptors and have been studied much less thoroughly. These cytoplasmic chemoreceptors are the subject of this review. Our analysis determined that 14% of bacterial and 43% of archaeal chemoreceptors are cytoplasmic, based on currently sequenced genomes. Cytoplasmic chemoreceptors appear to share the same key structural features as integral membrane chemoreceptors, including the formations of homodimers, trimers of dimers, and 12-nm hexagonal arrays within the cell. Cytoplasmic chemoreceptors exhibit varied subcellular locations, with some localizing to the poles and others appearing both cytoplasmic and polar. Some cytoplasmic chemoreceptors adopt more exotic locations, including the formations of exclusively internal clusters or moving dynamic clusters that coalesce at points of contact with other cells. Cytoplasmic chemoreceptors presumably sense signals within the cytoplasm and bear diverse signal input domains that are mostly N terminal to the domain that defines chemoreceptors, the so-called MA domain. Similar to the case for transmembrane receptors, our analysis suggests that the most common signal input domain is the PAS (Per-Arnt-Sim) domain, but a variety of other N-terminal domains exist. It is also common, however, for cytoplasmic chemoreceptors to have C-terminal domains that may function for signal input. The most common of these is the recently identified chemoreceptor zinc binding (CZB) domain, found in 8% of all cytoplasmic chemoreceptors. The widespread nature and diverse signal input domains suggest that these chemoreceptors can monitor a variety of cytoplasmically based signals, most of which remain to be determined. PMID:25428939

  9. Significance of Myositis Autoantibody in Patients with Idiopathic Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ju Sun; Hwang, Jiwon; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Some patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) related to connective tissue disease (CTD) have a delayed diagnosis of the underlying CTD when the ILD is categorized as idiopathic. In this study, we evaluated the frequency of myositis autoantibodies in patients diagnosed with idiopathic ILD and investigated the clinical significance stemming from the presence of the antibodies. Materials and Methods A total 32 patients diagnosed with idiopathic ILD were enrolled in this study. We analyzed a panel of 11 myositis autoantibody specificities in the patients using a line blot immunoassay. Then, we divided them into myositis autoantibody-positive and -negative groups and compared the clinical features and laboratory data between the two groups. Results Of the 32 idiopathic ILD patients, 12 patients had myositis autoantibodies encompassing 9 specificities, except for anti-Mi-2 and anti-PM-Scl 100 (12/32, 38%). Anti-synthetase autoantibodies including Jo-1, EJ, OJ, PL-7, and PL-12 were present in 7 patients (7/32, 22%). The group with myositis autoantibodies presented more frequently with the symptom of mechanic's hand and showed abnormal pulmonary function test results with low forced vital capacity, diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, total lung capacity, and high lactate dehydrogenase values in blood when compared with the group without myositis antibodies. Conclusion We strongly suggest that patients undergo an evaluation of myositis autoantibodies, if they are diagnosed with idiopathic ILD in the presence of clinical characteristics including mechanic's hand, arthralgia, and autoantibodies which are insufficient to make a diagnosis of a specific CTD category. PMID:25837172

  10. Extensive morphea profunda with autoantibodies and benign tumors: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Budamakuntla, Leelavathy; Malvankar, Dipali

    2012-01-01

    The term deep morphea describes a variant of morphea (localised scleroderma) in which inflammation and sclerosis are found in the deep dermis, panniculus, fascia or superficial muscle. It is sometimes associated with autoantibodies. We report the case of a 49 year-old male who had morphea profunda (radiologically and histopathologically confirmed) affecting mainly the left side of the body with face, trunk and limb involvement, along with autoantibody production and associated neurofibromas and lipomas. PMID:23189258

  11. Generation of Antigen Microarrays to Screen for Autoantibodies in Heart Failure and Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chruscinski, Andrzej; Huang, Flora Y. Y.; Nguyen, Albert; Lioe, Jocelyn; Tumiati, Laura C.; Kozuszko, Stella; Tinckam, Kathryn J.; Rao, Vivek; Dunn, Shannon E.; Persinger, Michael A.; Levy, Gary A.; Ross, Heather J.

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies directed against endogenous proteins including contractile proteins and endothelial antigens are frequently detected in patients with heart failure and after heart transplantation. There is evidence that these autoantibodies contribute to cardiac dysfunction and correlate with clinical outcomes. Currently, autoantibodies are detected in patient sera using individual ELISA assays (one for each antigen). Thus, screening for many individual autoantibodies is laborious and consumes a large amount of patient sample. To better capture the broad-scale antibody reactivities that occur in heart failure and post-transplant, we developed a custom antigen microarray technique that can simultaneously measure IgM and IgG reactivities against 64 unique antigens using just five microliters of patient serum. We first demonstrated that our antigen microarray technique displayed enhanced sensitivity to detect autoantibodies compared to the traditional ELISA method. We then piloted this technique using two sets of samples that were obtained at our institution. In the first retrospective study, we profiled pre-transplant sera from 24 heart failure patients who subsequently received heart transplants. We identified 8 antibody reactivities that were higher in patients who developed cellular rejection (2 or more episodes of grade 2R rejection in first year after transplant as defined by revised criteria from the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation) compared with those who did have not have rejection episodes. In a second retrospective study with 31 patients, we identified 7 IgM reactivities that were higher in heart transplant recipients who developed antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) compared with control recipients, and in time course studies, these reactivities appeared prior to overt graft dysfunction. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the autoantibody microarray technique outperforms traditional ELISAs as it uses less patient sample, has

  12. Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure is Associated with Clinical and Autoantibody Phenotypes in Juvenile Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mona; Targoff, Ira N.; Rice, Madeline M.; Miller, Frederick W.; Rider, Lisa G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Genetic and environmental factors may contribute to the etiology of the juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM), systemic autoimmune diseases characterized by muscle and skin inflammation. We investigated the association between ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure and the clinical and autoantibody expression of JIIM. Methods We assessed the relationship between UVR exposure in the month before symptom onset and prevalence of juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) versus polymyositis (JPM) in 298 patients. Among JDM patients, the association between UVR exposure and myositis autoantibodies was assessed. Regression models were stratified by sex and race. The association between regional UV index in U.S. geoclimatic zones and the clinical and autoantibody subgroups was examined by weighted least squares regression analysis. Results We observed increasing odds of JDM compared with JPM per unit increase in the patients’ highest UV index in the month before symptom onset in girls (OR = 1.18; 95% CI = 1.00–1.40). The average and highest UV indices were associated with increasing odds of anti-p155/140 autoantibodies, which was strongest in white males (OR 1.30 and 1.23, respectively). No association was observed between the UV index and anti-MJ autoantibodies or patients without myositis autoantibodies. Across US geoclimatic regions, the average UV index was associated with increasing odds of JDM and anti-p155/140 autoantibodies but decreasing odds of anti-MJ autoantibodies. Conclusion Short-term UVR exposure prior to illness onset may have a role in the clinical and serologic expression of juvenile myositis. Research examining mechanisms of UVR in JIIM pathogenesis is suggested from these findings. PMID:23658122

  13. Role of PPM1A and anti-PPM1A Autoantibodies in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Sokolove, Jeremy; Lindstrom, Tamsin M.; Yoo, Bin; Lee, Chang-Keun; Reveille, John D.; Taurog, Joel D.; Robinson, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is driven by immunemediated processes, little is known about the presence and role of autoantibodies in this disease. Methods We performed human protein microarray analysis of sera derived from patients with AS and other autoimmune disorders to identify autoantibodies associated specifically with AS, and identified autoantibody targeting of protein phosphatase magnesium-dependent 1A (PPM1A) in AS. We performed ELISA analysis of sera from two independent AS cohorts to confirm autoantibody targeting of PPM1A, and to assess associations between levels of anti-PPM1A antibodies and AS disease severity or response (as measured by BASDAI score) to anti-TNF therapy. Levels of anti-PPM1A antibodies were also evaluated in sera from transgenic rats overexpressing HLA-B27 and human β2-microglobulin. The expression of PPM1A was assessed by immunohistochemistry in synovial tissues from patients with AS, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. The role of PPM1A on osteoblast differentiation was investigated by gene knock-down and overexpression. Results AS was associated with autoantibody targeting of PPM1A, and levels of anti-PPM1A autoantibodies were significantly higher in patients with more advanced sacroiliitis and correlated with BASDAI score after treatment with anti-TNF agents. The levels of anti-PPM1A autoantibodies were also higher in sera of transgenic rats that are prone to develop AS than in those that are not. PPM1A was expressed in AS synovial tissue, and PPM1A overexpression promoted osteoblast differentiation, whereas PPM1A knockdown suppressed it. Conclusions Anti-PPM1A autoantibodies are present in AS, and our findings suggest that PPM1A may contribute to the pathogenic bone ankylosis characteristic of AS. PMID:24980965

  14. Human Traumatic Brain Injury Induces Autoantibody Response against Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and Its Breakdown Products

    PubMed Central

    Mondello, Stefania; Newsom, Kimberly J.; Yang, Zhihui; Yang, Boxuan; Kobeissy, Firas; Guingab, Joy; Glushakova, Olena; Robicsek, Steven; Heaton, Shelley; Buki, Andras; Hannay, Julia; Gold, Mark S.; Rubenstein, Richard; Lu, Xi-chun May; Dave, Jitendra R.; Schmid, Kara; Tortella, Frank; Robertson, Claudia S.; Wang, Kevin K. W.

    2014-01-01

    The role of systemic autoimmunity in human traumatic brain injury (TBI) and other forms of brain injuries is recognized but not well understood. In this study, a systematic investigation was performed to identify serum autoantibody responses to brain-specific proteins after TBI in humans. TBI autoantibodies showed predominant immunoreactivity against a cluster of bands from 38–50 kDa on human brain immunoblots, which were identified as GFAP and GFAP breakdown products. GFAP autoantibody levels increased by 7 days after injury, and were of the IgG subtype predominantly. Results from in vitro tests and rat TBI experiments also indicated that calpain was responsible for removing the amino and carboxyl termini of GFAP to yield a 38 kDa fragment. Additionally, TBI autoantibody staining co-localized with GFAP in injured rat brain and in primary rat astrocytes. These results suggest that GFAP breakdown products persist within degenerating astrocytes in the brain. Anti-GFAP autoantibody also can enter living astroglia cells in culture and its presence appears to compromise glial cell health. TBI patients showed an average 3.77 fold increase in anti-GFAP autoantibody levels from early (0–1 days) to late (7–10 days) times post injury. Changes in autoantibody levels were negatively correlated with outcome as measured by GOS-E score at 6 months, suggesting that TBI patients with greater anti-GFAP immune-responses had worse outcomes. Due to the long lasting nature of IgG, a test to detect anti-GFAP autoantibodies is likely to prolong the temporal window for assessment of brain damage in human patients. PMID:24667434

  15. Autoantibodies to Harmonin and Villin Are Diagnostic Markers in Children with IPEX Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lampasona, Vito; Passerini, Laura; Barzaghi, Federica; Lombardoni, Carlo; Bazzigaluppi, Elena; Brigatti, Cristina; Bacchetta, Rosa; Bosi, Emanuele

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies to enterocyte antigens harmonin (75 kDa USH1C protein) and villin (actin-binding 95 kDa protein) are associated with the Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome. In this study we evaluated the diagnostic value of harmonin and villin autoantibodies in IPEX and IPEX-like syndromes. Harmonin and villin autoantibodies were measured by a novel Luminescent-Immuno-Precipitation-System (LIPS) quantitative assay, in patients with IPEX, IPEX-like syndrome, Primary Immunodeficiencies (PID) with enteropathy, all diagnosed by sequencing of the FOXP3 gene, and in type 1 diabetes (T1D), celiac disease and healthy blood donors as control groups. Harmonin and villin autoantibodies were detected in 12 (92%) and 6 (46%) of 13 IPEX patients, and in none of the IPEX-like, PID, T1D, celiac patients, respectively. All IPEX patients, including one case with late and atypical clinical presentation, had either harmonin and/or villin autoantibodies and tested positive for enterocyte antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. When measured in IPEX patients in remission after immunosuppressive therapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, harmonin and villin autoantibodies became undetectable or persisted at low titers in all cases but one in whom harmonin autoantibodies remained constantly high. In one patient, a peak of harmonin antibodies paralleled a relapse phase of enteropathy. Our study demonstrates that harmonin and villin autoantibodies, measured by LIPS, are sensitive and specific markers of IPEX, differentiate IPEX, including atypical cases, from other early childhood disorders associated with enteropathy, and are useful for screening and clinical monitoring of affected children. PMID:24250806

  16. Cytoplasmic incorporation of a ribonucleic acid precursor in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    PLAUT, W; RUSTAD, R C

    1957-07-25

    The question of RNA synthesis in enucleate cytoplasm of Amoeba has been approached experimentally by incubating enucleate amoebae in a labelled RNA precursor and determining the incorporation into RNA autoradiographically. The results indicate that there is a cytoplasmic incorporation mechanism which can operate in the absence of the nucleus. A comparison is made between Acetabularia and Amoeba with respect to the origins of cytoplasmic RNA. It is concluded that the existing data are consistent with the assumption that some cytoplasmic RNA is of nuclear origin in both organisms.

  17. Infective organisms in the cytoplasm of Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    ROTH, L E; DANIELS, E W

    1961-02-01

    Evidence from electron and phase microscopy is given which shows that infective organisms are present in the cytoplasm of Amoeba proteus. Vesicles containing living organisms have been observed after repeated washing and starvation of the amebae for a period of 2 weeks. Exposure to gamma-radiation in conjunction with starvation, repeated washing, isolation of single amebae, refeeding with contaminant-free Tetrahymena, and clone selection has produced clones with reduced cytoplasmic infection. These findings are discussed in regard to the autoradiographic studies of other investigators on Amoeba proteus. The controversies over whether DNA and RNA are synthesized in the cytoplasm may be resolved by the finding of cytoplasmic infection.

  18. Detection of multiple autoantibodies in patients with ankylosing spondylitis using nucleic acid programmable protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Wright, Cynthia; Sibani, Sahar; Trudgian, David; Fischer, Roman; Kessler, Benedikt; LaBaer, Joshua; Bowness, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common, inflammatory rheumatic disease that primarily affects the axial skeleton and is associated with sacroiliitis, uveitis, and enthesitis. Unlike other autoimmune rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus, autoantibodies have not yet been reported to be a feature of AS. We therefore wished to determine whether plasma from patients with AS contained autoantibodies and, if so, characterize and quantify this response in comparison to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy controls. Two high density nucleic acid programmable protein arrays expressing a total of 3498 proteins were screened with plasma from 25 patients with AS, 17 with RA, and 25 healthy controls. Autoantigens identified were subjected to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to determine the patterns of signaling cascades or tissue origin. 44% of patients with ankylosing spondylitis demonstrated a broad autoantibody response, as compared with 33% of patients with RA and only 8% of healthy controls. Individuals with AS demonstrated autoantibody responses to shared autoantigens, and 60% of autoantigens identified in the AS cohort were restricted to that group. The autoantibody responses in the AS patients were targeted toward connective, skeletal, and muscular tissue, unlike those of RA patients or healthy controls. Thus, patients with AS show evidence of systemic humoral autoimmunity and multispecific autoantibody production. Nucleic acid programmable protein arrays constitute a powerful tool to study autoimmune diseases.

  19. Autoantibodies to the epidermal growth factor receptor in systemic sclerosis, lupus, and autoimmune mice.

    PubMed

    Planque, Stephanie; Zhou, Yong-Xin; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Sinha, Meenal; O'Connor-Mccourt, Maureen; Arnett, Frank C; Paul, Sudhir

    2003-02-01

    Autoantibodies to the recombinant extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (exEGFR) were detected by ELISA in the serum of Fas-defective old MRL/MpJ/lpr and C3H/HeJ/gld mice, but not young mice from these strains, or nonautoimmune young and old BALB/c, MRL/MpJ/++, and C3H/HeJ/MMTV mice. Compared with control human subjects without autoimmune disease, the frequency of exEGFR-binding autoantibodies was increased in scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) patients and to a lesser extent in lupus patients. Phage autoantibodies (Fv fragments) isolated from a lupus library by selection on a linear epitope of EGFR (residues 294-310) displayed the ability to bind exEGFR. Treatment of EGFR-expressing A431 cells with autoantibodies purified by affinity chromatography on immobilized exEGFR resulted in specific staining of the cells. Short-lived but strong inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis was observed in the presence of the autoantibodies. We concluded that autoantibody responses to EGFR hold the potential of fulfilling a pathogenic role in autoimmune disease.

  20. Induction of osteoclastogenesis and bone loss by human autoantibodies against citrullinated vimentin

    PubMed Central

    Harre, Ulrike; Georgess, Dan; Bang, Holger; Bozec, Aline; Axmann, Roland; Ossipova, Elena; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Baum, Wolfgang; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Szarka, Eszter; Sarmay, Gabriella; Krumbholz, Grit; Neumann, Elena; Toes, Rene; Scherer, Hans-Ulrich; Catrina, Anca Irinel; Klareskog, Lars; Jurdic, Pierre; Schett, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmunity is complicated by bone loss. In human rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the most severe inflammatory joint disease, autoantibodies against citrullinated proteins are among the strongest risk factors for bone destruction. We therefore hypothesized that these autoantibodies directly influence bone metabolism. Here, we found a strong and specific association between autoantibodies against citrullinated proteins and serum markers for osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in RA patients. Moreover, human osteoclasts expressed enzymes eliciting protein citrullination, and specific N-terminal citrullination of vimentin was induced during osteoclast differentiation. Affinity-purified human autoantibodies against mutated citrullinated vimentin (MCV) not only bound to osteoclast surfaces, but also led to robust induction of osteoclastogenesis and bone-resorptive activity. Adoptive transfer of purified human MCV autoantibodies into mice induced osteopenia and increased osteoclastogenesis. This effect was based on the inducible release of TNF-α from osteoclast precursors and the subsequent increase of osteoclast precursor cell numbers with enhanced expression of activation and growth factor receptors. Our data thus suggest that autoantibody formation in response to citrullinated vimentin directly induces bone loss, providing a link between the adaptive immune system and bone. PMID:22505457

  1. Induction of osteoclastogenesis and bone loss by human autoantibodies against citrullinated vimentin.

    PubMed

    Harre, Ulrike; Georgess, Dan; Bang, Holger; Bozec, Aline; Axmann, Roland; Ossipova, Elena; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Baum, Wolfgang; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Szarka, Eszter; Sarmay, Gabriella; Krumbholz, Grit; Neumann, Elena; Toes, Rene; Scherer, Hans-Ulrich; Catrina, Anca Irinel; Klareskog, Lars; Jurdic, Pierre; Schett, Georg

    2012-05-01

    Autoimmunity is complicated by bone loss. In human rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the most severe inflammatory joint disease, autoantibodies against citrullinated proteins are among the strongest risk factors for bone destruction. We therefore hypothesized that these autoantibodies directly influence bone metabolism. Here, we found a strong and specific association between autoantibodies against citrullinated proteins and serum markers for osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in RA patients. Moreover, human osteoclasts expressed enzymes eliciting protein citrullination, and specific N-terminal citrullination of vimentin was induced during osteoclast differentiation. Affinity-purified human autoantibodies against mutated citrullinated vimentin (MCV) not only bound to osteoclast surfaces, but also led to robust induction of osteoclastogenesis and bone-resorptive activity. Adoptive transfer of purified human MCV autoantibodies into mice induced osteopenia and increased osteoclastogenesis. This effect was based on the inducible release of TNF-α from osteoclast precursors and the subsequent increase of osteoclast precursor cell numbers with enhanced expression of activation and growth factor receptors. Our data thus suggest that autoantibody formation in response to citrullinated vimentin directly induces bone loss, providing a link between the adaptive immune system and bone. PMID:22505457

  2. Molecular analysis of cytoplasmic male sterility

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The ultimate aims of the project are to understand the molecular mechanism of the disruption in pollen development which occurs in cytoplasmic male sterile plants and to understand the control of respiratory energy flow in the higher plant cell. A mitochondrial locus termed S-pcf segregates with sterility and with an alteration in respiration in Petunia. This cloned locus contains three genes, an abnormal fused gene termed pcf, a gene for a subunit of an NADH dehydrogenase complex, and a small ribosomal subunit protein. The pcf gene is comprised of partial sequences of ATPase subunit 9, cytochrome oxidase subunit II, and an unidentified reading frame. Components of the S-Pcf locus will be introduced into the nuclear of a fertile genotype under the control of appropriate regulatory signals, and polypeptide products of introduced genes will be directed to the mitochondrion with a transit peptide. By examining transgenic plants, we can determine what elements of the locus are critical for altered respiration or sterility. Such knowledge could explain how mitochondrial DNA affects pollen development in the large number of plant species which exhibit the agronomically important trait of male sterility. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Evolution of Wolbachia cytoplasmic incompatibility types.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Stephen L

    2004-10-01

    The success of obligate endosymbiotic Wolbachia infections in insects is due in part to cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), whereby Wolbachia bacteria manipulate host reproduction to promote their invasion and persistence within insect populations. The observed diversity of CI types raises the question of what the evolutionary pathways are by which a new CI type can evolve from an ancestral type. Prior evolutionary models assume that Wolbachia exists within a host individual as a clonal infection. While endosymbiotic theory predicts a general trend toward clonality, Wolbachia provides an exception in which there is selection to maintain diversity. Here, evolutionary trajectories are discussed that assume that a novel Wolbachia variant will co-exist with the original infection type within a host individual as a superinfection. Relative to prior models, this assumption relaxes requirements and allows additional pathways for the evolution of novel CI types. In addition to describing changes in the Wolbachia infection frequency associated with the hypothesized evolutionary events, the predicted impact of novel CI variants on the host population is also described. This impact, resulting from discordant evolutionary interests of symbiont and host, is discussed as a possible cause of Wolbachia loss from the host population or host population extinction. The latter is also discussed as the basis for an applied strategy for the suppression of insect pest populations. Model predictions are discussed relative to a recently published Wolbachia genome sequence and prior characterization of CI in naturally and artificially infected insects.

  4. Cytoplasmic dynein and early endosome transport

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Xin; Qiu, Rongde; Yao, Xuanli; Arst, Herbert N.; Peñalva, Miguel A.; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule-based distribution of organelles/vesicles is crucial for the function of many types of eukaryotic cells and the molecular motor cytoplasmic dynein is required for transporting a variety of cellular cargos toward the microtubule minus ends. Early endosomes represent a major cargo of dynein in filamentous fungi, and dynein regulators such as LIS1 and the dynactin complex are both required for early endosome movement. In fungal hyphae, kinesin-3 and dynein drive bi-directional movements of early endosomes. Dynein accumulates at microtubule plus ends; this accumulation depends on kinesin-1 and dynactin, and it is important for early endosome movements towards the microtubule minus ends. The physical interaction between dynein and early endosome requires the dynactin complex, and in particular, its p25 component. The FTS-Hook-FHIP (FHF) complex links dynein-dynactin to early endosomes, and within the FHF complex, Hook interacts with dynein-dynactin, and Hook-early endosome interaction depends on FHIP and FTS. PMID:26001903

  5. Wolbachia and cytoplasmic incompatibility in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Sinkins, Steven P

    2004-07-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited bacteria that induce cytoplasmic incompatibility in mosquitoes, and are able to use these patterns of sterility to spread themselves through populations. For this reason they have been proposed as a gene drive system for mosquito genetic replacement, as well as for the reduction of population size or for modulating population age structure in order to reduce disease transmission. Here, recent progress in the study of mosquito Wolbachia is reviewed. We now have much more comprehensive estimates of the parameters that can affect the spread of Wolbachia through natural populations from low starting frequencies, and for waves of spread to be maintained in the face of partial barriers to gene flow. In Aedes albopictus these dynamics are extremely favourable, with very high maternal transmission fidelity and levels of incompatibility recorded. Correspondence between measurements taken in the lab and field is much better than in the Drosophila simulans model system. Important research goals are also discussed, including Wolbachia transformation, interspecific transfer and the elucidation of the mechanisms of incompatibility and rescue; all will be aided by a wealth of new Wolbachia genome information.

  6. A physical perspective on cytoplasmic streaming

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Raymond E.; van de Meent, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Organisms show a remarkable range of sizes, yet the dimensions of a single cell rarely exceed 100 µm. While the physical and biological origins of this constraint remain poorly understood, exceptions to this rule give valuable insights. A well-known counterexample is the aquatic plant Chara, whose cells can exceed 10 cm in length and 1 mm in diameter. Two spiralling bands of molecular motors at the cell periphery drive the cellular fluid up and down at speeds up to 100 µm s−1, motion that has been hypothesized to mitigate the slowness of metabolite transport on these scales and to aid in homeostasis. This is the most organized instance of a broad class of continuous motions known as ‘cytoplasmic streaming’, found in a wide range of eukaryotic organisms—algae, plants, amoebae, nematodes and flies—often in unusually large cells. In this overview of the physics of this phenomenon, we examine the interplay between streaming, transport and cell size and discuss the possible role of self-organization phenomena in establishing the observed patterns of streaming. PMID:26464789

  7. Single molecule analysis of cytoplasmic dynein motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Ahmet

    2014-03-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a homodimeric AAA + motor that transports a multitude of cargos towards the microtubule (MT) minus end. The mechanism of dynein motility remains unclear, due to its large size (2.6 MDa) and the complexity of its structure. By tracking the stepping motion of both heads at nanometer resolution, we observed that dynein heads move independently along the MT, in contrast to hand over hand movement of kinesins and myosin. Stepping behavior of the heads varies as a function of interhead separation and establishing the basis of high variability in dynein step size. By engineering the mechanical and catalytic properties of the dynein motor domain, we show that a rigid linkage between monomers and dimerization between N-terminal tail domains are not essential for processive movement. Instead, dynein processivity minimally requires the linker domain of one active monomer to be attached to an inert MT tether retaining only the MT-binding domain. The release of a dynein monomer from the MT can be mediated either by nucleotide binding or external load. Nucleotide dependent release is inhibited by the tension on the linker domain at high interhead separations. Tension dependent release is highly asymmetric, with faster release towards the minus-end. Reversing the asymmetry of the MT binding interface results in plus end directed motility, even though the force was generated by the dynein motor activity. On the basis of these measurements, we propose a model that describes the basis of dynein processivity, directionality and force generation.

  8. Model for bidirectional movement of cytoplasmic dynein.

    PubMed

    Sumathy, S; Satyanarayana, S V M

    2015-09-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein exhibits a directional processive movement on microtubule filaments and is known to move in steps of varying length based on the number of ATP molecules bound to it and the load that it carries. It is experimentally observed that dynein takes occasional backward steps and the frequency of such backward steps increases as the load approaches the stall force. Using a stochastic process model, we investigate the bidirectional movement of single head of a dynein motor. The probability for backward step is implemented based on fluctuation theorem of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. We find that the movement of dynein motor is characterized with negative velocity implying backward motion beyond stall force. We observe that the motor moves backward for super stall forces by hydrolyzing the ATP exactly the same way as it does while moving forward for sub-stall forces. Movement of dynein is also simulated using a kinetic Monte Carlo method and the simulated velocities are in good agreement with velocities obtained using a stochastic rate equation model.

  9. Cytoplasmic dynein and early endosome transport.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xin; Qiu, Rongde; Yao, Xuanli; Arst, Herbert N; Peñalva, Miguel A; Zhang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Microtubule-based distribution of organelles/vesicles is crucial for the function of many types of eukaryotic cells and the molecular motor cytoplasmic dynein is required for transporting a variety of cellular cargos toward the microtubule minus ends. Early endosomes represent a major cargo of dynein in filamentous fungi, and dynein regulators such as LIS1 and the dynactin complex are both required for early endosome movement. In fungal hyphae, kinesin-3 and dynein drive bi-directional movements of early endosomes. Dynein accumulates at microtubule plus ends; this accumulation depends on kinesin-1 and dynactin, and it is important for early endosome movements towards the microtubule minus ends. The physical interaction between dynein and early endosome requires the dynactin complex, and in particular, its p25 component. The FTS-Hook-FHIP (FHF) complex links dynein-dynactin to early endosomes, and within the FHF complex, Hook interacts with dynein-dynactin, and Hook-early endosome interaction depends on FHIP and FTS.

  10. Tropomyosin-Mediated Regulation of Cytoplasmic Myosins.

    PubMed

    Manstein, Dietmar J; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2016-08-01

    The ability of the actin-based cytoskeleton to rapidly reorganize is critical for maintaining cell organization and viability. The plethora of activities in which actin polymers participate require different biophysical properties, which can vary significantly between the different events that often occur simultaneously at separate cellular locations. In order to modify the biophysical properties of an actin polymer for a particular function, the cell contains diverse actin-binding proteins that modulate the growth, regulation and molecular interactions of actin-based structures according to functional requirements. In metazoan and yeast cells, tropomyosin is a key regulator of actin-based structures. Cells have the capacity to produce multiple tropomyosin isoforms, each capable of specifically associating as copolymers with actin at distinct cellular locations to fine-tune the functional properties of discrete actin structures. Here, we present a unifying theory in which tropomyosin isoforms critically define the surface landscape of copolymers with cytoplasmic β- or γ-actin. Decoration of filamentous actin with different tropomyosin isoforms determines the identity and modulates the activity of the interacting myosin motor proteins. Conversely, changes in the nucleotide state of actin and posttranslational modifications affect the composition, morphology, subcellular localization and allosteric coupling of the associated actin-based superstructures. PMID:27060364

  11. A physical perspective on cytoplasmic streaming.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Raymond E; van de Meent, Jan-Willem

    2015-08-01

    Organisms show a remarkable range of sizes, yet the dimensions of a single cell rarely exceed 100 µm. While the physical and biological origins of this constraint remain poorly understood, exceptions to this rule give valuable insights. A well-known counterexample is the aquatic plant Chara, whose cells can exceed 10 cm in length and 1 mm in diameter. Two spiralling bands of molecular motors at the cell periphery drive the cellular fluid up and down at speeds up to 100 µm s(-1), motion that has been hypothesized to mitigate the slowness of metabolite transport on these scales and to aid in homeostasis. This is the most organized instance of a broad class of continuous motions known as 'cytoplasmic streaming', found in a wide range of eukaryotic organisms-algae, plants, amoebae, nematodes and flies-often in unusually large cells. In this overview of the physics of this phenomenon, we examine the interplay between streaming, transport and cell size and discuss the possible role of self-organization phenomena in establishing the observed patterns of streaming.

  12. Anti-ETAR and anti-AT1R autoantibodies are elevated in patients with endstage cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Budding, K; van de Graaf, E A; Hoefnagel, T; Kwakkel-van Erp, J M; van Kessel, D A; Dragun, D; Hack, C E; Otten, H G

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies against endothelin-1 type A receptor (ETAR) are present in systemic sclerosis complicated by lung fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. As increased serum levels and local overproduction of endothelin-1 in the airways are reported in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, we reasoned that anti-ETAR antibodies could be prevalent in endstage CF patients prior to lung transplantation (LTx). Also, ETAR autoantibodies are frequently associated with autoantibodies against the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). We analyzed the presence of anti-ETAR and anti-AT1R autoantibodies in 43 LTx patients (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), n=20; CF, n=13; interstitial lung disease (ILD), n=1). We observed overall higher anti-ETAR and anti-AT1R autoantibody titers in sera taken prior to LTx in the CF patient group as compared to COPD. No difference was found in autoantibody levels between patients with CF versus ILD. In sera taken post-LTx we found the same difference in anti-ETAR and anti-AT1R autoantibody titers between patients with CF versus COPD. No difference was found in antibody titers between sera taken prior to or 6 months after LTx. There was no association between autoantibody levels and other relevant demographic parameters, and we found no association between autoantibody titers and the development of the bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Both autoantibody titers were strongly correlated. We hypothesize that due to prolonged exposure to bacterial infection, increased levels of AT1R and ETAR result in a deregulated immune response causing autoantibody formation. Further research is expedient to elucidate the occurrence of autoantibodies against ETAR and AT1R and their role in disease progression.

  13. A study of type-1 diabetes associated autoantibodies in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hallford, Philomena; Clair, David St; Halley, Lorna; Mustard, Colette; Wei, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological studies revealed an association between type-1 diabetes (T1D) and schizophrenia but the findings reported to date have been controversial. To clarify the inconsistency across studies, T1D-associated autoantibodies were examined in plasma samples collected from 272 patients with schizophrenia and 276 control subjects. An in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using three linear peptide antigens, one of which was derived from glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and two were derived from insulinoma-associated antigen 2 (IA2). Mann-Whitney U test showed a significant decrease in the levels of plasma IgG against the IA2b antigen in schizophrenia patients as compared to control subjects (Z=-3.54, p=0.0007), while no significant difference was found between these two groups either in anti-IA2a IgG levels (Z=-1.62, p=0.105) or in anti-GAD IgG levels (Z=-1.63, p=0.104). Linear regression analysis indicated no association of antipsychotic medication with the levels of plasma IgG against IA2a, IA2b or GAD, while the levels of plasma IgG for these 3 peptide antigens were significantly correlated with each other. Binary logistic regression showed that neither the DQ2.5 variant nor the DQ8 variant was associated with circulating levels of 3 T1D-associated autoantibodies in both the patient group and the control group. The coefficient of variation was 10.7% for anti-IA2a IgG assay, 10.1% for anti-IA2b IgG assay and 10.7% for anti-GAD IgG assay. The present work suggests that T1D-associated antibodies are unlikely to confer risk of schizophrenia and that the in-house ELISA developed with linear peptide antigens is highly reproducible. PMID:27474348

  14. Developing improved durum wheat germplasm by altering the cytoplasmic genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In eukaryotic organisms, nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes interact to drive cellular functions. These genomes have co-evolved to form specific nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions that are essential to the origin, success, and evolution of diploid and polyploid species. Hundreds of genetic diseases in h...

  15. Dexamethasone and Acetate Modulate Cytoplasmic Leptin in Bovine Preadipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yonekura, Shinichi; Hirota, Shohei; Tokutake, Yukako; Rose, Michael T.; Katoh, Kazuo; Aso, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Hormonal and nutrient signals regulate leptin synthesis and secretion. In rodents, leptin is stored in cytosolic pools of adipocytes. However, not much information is available regarding the regulation of intracellular leptin in ruminants. Recently, we demonstrated that leptin mRNA was expressed in bovine intramuscular preadipocyte cells (BIP cells) and that a cytoplasmic leptin pool may be present in preadipocytes. In the present study, we investigated the expression of cytoplasmic leptin protein in BIP cells during differentiation as well as the effects of various factors added to the differentiation medium on its expression in BIP cells. Leptin mRNA expression was observed only at 6 and 8 days after adipogenic induction, whereas the cytoplasmic leptin concentration was the highest on day 0 and decreased gradually thereafter. Cytoplasmic leptin was detected at 6 and 8 days after adipogenic induction, but not at 4 days after adipogenic induction. The cytoplasmic leptin concentration was reduced in BIP cells at 4 days after treatment with dexamethasone, whereas cytoplasmic leptin was not observed at 8 days after treatment. In contrast, acetate significantly enhanced the cytoplasmic leptin concentration in BIP cells at 8 days after treatment, although acetate alone did not induce adipocyte differentiation in BIP cells. These results suggest that dexamethasone and acetate modulate the cytoplasmic leptin concentration in bovine preadipocytes. PMID:25049989

  16. Translation of tobacco mosaic virus RNA In Acetabularia cell cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Cairns, E; Sarkar, S; Schweiger, H G

    1978-11-01

    Isolated Acetabularia nuclei were microinjected with Tobacco Mosaic Virus RNA and then implanted into an anucleate posterior fragment of an Acetabularia cell. Injected RNA was translated in the Acetabularia cytoplasm from the first to twelfth day after implantation of the nuclei. The production of specific virus proteins was detected and localized in the Acetabularia cytoplasm by an immunofluorescence precipitation technique.

  17. Can paternal leakage maintain sexually antagonistic polymorphism in the cytoplasm?

    PubMed Central

    Kuijper, B; Lane, N; Pomiankowski, A

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of studies in multicellular organisms highlight low or moderate frequencies of paternal transmission of cytoplasmic organelles, including both mitochondria and chloroplasts. It is well established that strict maternal inheritance is selectively blind to cytoplasmic elements that are deleterious to males – ’mother's curse’. But it is not known how sensitive this conclusion is to slight levels of paternal cytoplasmic leakage. We assess the scope for polymorphism when individuals bear multiple cytoplasmic alleles in the presence of paternal leakage, bottlenecks and recurrent mutation. When fitness interactions among cytoplasmic elements within an individual are additive, we find that sexually antagonistic polymorphism is restricted to cases of strong selection on males. However, when fitness interactions among cytoplasmic elements are nonlinear, much more extensive polymorphism can be supported in the cytoplasm. In particular, mitochondrial mutants that have strong beneficial fitness effects in males and weak deleterious fitness effects in females when rare (i.e. ’reverse dominance’) are strongly favoured under paternal leakage. We discuss how such epistasis could arise through preferential segregation of mitochondria in sex-specific somatic tissues. Our analysis shows how paternal leakage can dampen the evolution of deleterious male effects associated with predominant maternal inheritance of cytoplasm, potentially explaining why ’mother's curse’ is less pervasive than predicted by earlier work. PMID:25653025

  18. The cytoplasm of living cells behaves as a poroelastic material

    PubMed Central

    Moeendarbary, Emad; Valon, Léo; Fritzsche, Marco; Harris, Andrew R.; Moulding, Dale A.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Stride, Eleanor; Mahadevan, L.; Charras, Guillaume T.

    2014-01-01

    The cytoplasm is the largest part of the cell by volume and hence its rheology sets the rate at which cellular shape changes can occur. Recent experimental evidence suggests that cytoplasmic rheology can be described by a poroelastic model, in which the cytoplasm is treated as a biphasic material consisting of a porous elastic solid meshwork (cytoskeleton, organelles, macromolecules) bathed in an interstitial fluid (cytosol). In this picture, the rate of cellular deformation is limited by the rate at which intracellular water can redistribute within the cytoplasm. However, direct supporting evidence for the model is lacking. Here we directly validate the poroelastic model to explain cellular rheology at physiologically relevant timescales using microindentation tests in conjunction with mechanical, chemical and genetic treatments. Our results show that water redistribution through the solid phase of the cytoplasm (cytoskeleton and macromolecular crowders) plays a fundamental role in setting cellular rheology. PMID:23291707

  19. The cytoplasm of living cells behaves as a poroelastic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeendarbary, Emad; Valon, Léo; Fritzsche, Marco; Harris, Andrew R.; Moulding, Dale A.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Stride, Eleanor; Mahadevan, L.; Charras, Guillaume T.

    2013-03-01

    The cytoplasm is the largest part of the cell by volume and hence its rheology sets the rate at which cellular shape changes can occur. Recent experimental evidence suggests that cytoplasmic rheology can be described by a poroelastic model, in which the cytoplasm is treated as a biphasic material consisting of a porous elastic solid meshwork (cytoskeleton, organelles, macromolecules) bathed in an interstitial fluid (cytosol). In this picture, the rate of cellular deformation is limited by the rate at which intracellular water can redistribute within the cytoplasm. However, direct supporting evidence for the model is lacking. Here we directly validate the poroelastic model to explain cellular rheology at short timescales using microindentation tests in conjunction with mechanical, chemical and genetic treatments. Our results show that water redistribution through the solid phase of the cytoplasm (cytoskeleton and macromolecular crowders) plays a fundamental role in setting cellular rheology at short timescales.

  20. Cytoplasmic streaming velocity as a plant size determinant.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Motoki; Kimura, Atsushi; Yokota, Etsuo; Haraguchi, Takeshi; Shimmen, Teruo; Yamamoto, Keiichi; Nakano, Akihiko; Ito, Kohji

    2013-11-11

    Cytoplasmic streaming is active transport widely occurring in plant cells ranging from algae to angiosperms. Although it has been revealed that cytoplasmic streaming is generated by organelle-associated myosin XI moving along actin bundles, the fundamental function in plants remains unclear. We generated high- and low-speed chimeric myosin XI by replacing the motor domains of Arabidopsis thaliana myosin XI-2 with those of Chara corallina myosin XI and Homo sapiens myosin Vb, respectively. Surprisingly, the plant sizes of the transgenic Arabidopsis expressing high- and low-speed chimeric myosin XI-2 were larger and smaller, respectively, than that of the wild-type plant. This size change correlated with acceleration and deceleration, respectively, of cytoplasmic streaming. Our results strongly suggest that cytoplasmic streaming is a key determinant of plant size. Furthermore, because cytoplasmic streaming is a common system for intracellular transport in plants, our system could have applications in artificial size control in plants.

  1. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies Associated With Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Vincent; Lesourd, Anais; Girszyn, Nicolas; Ménard, Jean-Francois; Levesque, Hervé; Caron, Francois; Marie, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine the prevalence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with infective endocarditis (IE) in internal medicine; and to compare clinical and biochemical features and outcome between patients exhibiting IE with and without ANCA. Fifty consecutive patients with IE underwent ANCA testing. The medical records of these patients were reviewed. Of the 50 patients with IE, 12 exhibited ANCA (24%). ANCA-positive patients with IE exhibited: longer duration between the onset of first symptoms and IE diagnosis (P = 0.02); and more frequently: weight loss (P = 0.017) and renal impairment (P = 0.08), lower levels of C-reactive protein (P = 0.0009) and serum albumin (P = 0.0032), involvement of both aortic and mitral valves (P = 0.009), and longer hospital stay (P = 0.016). Under multivariate analysis, significant factors for ANCA-associated IE were: longer hospital stay (P = 0.004), lower level of serum albumin (P = 0.02), and multiple valve involvement (P = 0.04). Mortality rate was 25% in ANCA patients; death was because of IE complications in all these patients. Our study identifies a high prevalence of ANCA in unselected patients with IE in internal medicine (24%). Our findings further underscore that ANCA may be associated with a subacute form of IE leading to multiple valve involvement and more frequent renal impairment. Because death was due to IE complications in all patients, our data suggest that aggressive therapy may be required to improve such patients’ outcome. PMID:26817911

  2. Affinity maturation of immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies during development of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, A; Ankelo, M; Simell, S; Ilonen, J; Knip, M; Simell, O; Hinkkanen, A E

    2007-05-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by ingestion of wheat gluten and related cereals in genetically predisposed individuals. Circulating immunoglobulin A (IgA) class autoantibodies against tissue transglutaminase (IgA-TGA) are highly specific and sensitive serological markers for CD, which is ultimately confirmed by duodenal biopsy. Although CD is considered a life-long disorder, transient or fluctuating IgA-TGA seropositivity has been observed in asymptomatic individuals on a gluten-containing diet. We set out to explore possible differences in the maturation of IgA-TGA avidity between individuals progressing to CD and subjects remaining healthy despite occasional expression of autoantibodies. We developed a time-resolved fluorometric IgA-TGA assay based on human recombinant tissue transglutaminase (tTG), and further modified the method to also measure urea-dependent avidity of the autoantibodies. We measured the autoantibody titres and avidities of sequential serum samples from 10 children developing CD and 10 children presenting transient or fluctuating autoantibodies. Both the initial titres at seroconversion and peak values of transient/fluctuating IgA-TGA were significantly lower than corresponding autoantibody titres in samples drawn from individuals with progressing CD (P = 0.004 and P = 0.0002, respectively). However, there were no statistically significant differences in the initial or peak avidity index values between the two groups of children. The avidity index values increased during the follow-up period (P = 0.013 for both groups) with no significant difference in the rate of avidity maturation between children with transient/fluctuating IgA-TGA and children developing CD. According to our results, high autoantibody titres have a higher predictive value than avidity maturation of TGA-IgA in screening for CD.

  3. A panel of autoantibodies as potential early diagnostic serum biomarkers in patients with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Huangfu, Mingmei; Xu, Shuang; Li, Siyao; Sun, Baosheng; Lee, Kuang-Hui; Liu, Linlin; Sun, Shilong

    2016-07-01

    The study was designed to test whether circulating autoantibodies against associated antigens (TAAs) were altered in early cervical cancer and benign cervical tumors. A total of 111 cervical cancer patients, 137 cervical benign tumor patients, and 160 healthy volunteers matched in age were recruited in this study. The expression of autoantibodies was tested using in-house developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with linear peptide envelope antigens derived from TAAs. One-way ANOVA test showed that there was no difference in the CD25 autoantibody expression among the cervical cancer group, benign tumor group, and healthy control group (P = 0.063; P = 0.191). The expression of autoantibodies against survivin and TP53 in the cervical cancer group was significantly higher than that in the benign tumor group (P < 0.001; P < 0.001). The levels of autoantibodies against cyclinB-1 and ANXA-1 were higher in the cervical cancer group than in the healthy control group (P = 0.010; P = 0.001), while autoantibodies in the cervical cancer group showed no difference in expression compared with that in the benign tumor group. The panel of five TAAs showed a sensitivity of 37.8 % and a specificity of 90 %, which was much higher than the sensitivity of the single-TAA testing group. The data from this study further support our previous hypothesis that the detection of autoantibodies for the diagnosis of a specific cancer type can be enhanced using a panel of several selected TAAs as target antigens.

  4. Autoantibodies to evolutionarily conserved epitopes of enolase in a patient with discoid lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Gitlits, V M; Sentry, J W; Matthew, M L; Smith, A I; Toh, B H

    1997-01-01

    Although the pathology of discoid lupus erythematosus is well documented the causative agents are not known. Here, we report the identity of the target antigen of an autoantibody present in high titre in the serum of a patient with discoid lupus erythematosus. We have demonstrated that the antigen is enolase; first, because it has properties consistent with this glycolytic enzyme (47,000 MW, cytosolic localization and ubiquitous tissue distribution). Secondly, limited amino acid sequence determination after trypsin digestion shows identity with alpha-enolase. Finally, the autoimmune serum immunoblots rabbit and yeast enolase and predominantly one isoelectric form of enolase (PI approximately 6.1). These results indicate that the reactive autoepitopes are highly conserved from man to yeast. The results also suggest that the autoantibodies are most reactive to the alpha-isoform of enolase, although it is possible that they may also be reactive with gamma-enolase, and have least reactivity to beta-enolase. The anti-enolase autoantibodies belong to the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) isotype. This is the first report of IgG1 autoantibodies to evolutionarily conserved autoepitopes of enolase in the serum of a patient with discoid lupus erythematosus. Previous reports of autoantibodies to enolase have suggested associations with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I and cancer-associated retinopathy. This report and an earlier report of what is likely to be enolase autoantibodies in two patients without systemic disease suggest that enolase autoantibodies have a broad association and are not restricted to any particular disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9486109

  5. Predictors of slow progression to diabetes in children with multiple islet autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Steck, Andrea K; Dong, Fran; Waugh, Kathleen; Frohnert, Brigitte I; Yu, Liping; Norris, Jill M; Rewers, Marian J

    2016-08-01

    Although most children with multiple islet autoantibodies develop type 1 diabetes, rate of progression is highly variable. The goal of this study was to explore potential factors involved in rate of progression to diabetes in children with multiple islet autoantibodies. The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) has followed 118 children with multiple islet autoantibodies for progression to diabetes. After excluding 27 children currently diabetes-free but followed for <10 years, the study population was grouped into: rapid progressors (N = 39) who developed diabetes in <5 years; moderate progressors (N = 25), diagnosed with diabetes within 5-10 years; and slow progressors (N = 27), diabetes-free for >10 years. Islet autoimmunity appeared at 4.0 ± 3.5, 3.2 ± 1.8 and 5.8 ± 3.1 years of age in rapid, moderate and slow progressors, respectively (p = 0.006). Insulin autoantibody levels were lower in slow progressors compared to moderate and rapid progressors. The groups did not differ by gender, ethnicity, family history, susceptibility HLA and non-HLA genes. The rate of development of individual islet autoantibodies including mIAA, GADA, IA-2A and ZnT8A were all slower in the slow versus moderate/rapid progressors. In multivariate analyses, older age at seroconversion and lower initial mIAA levels independently predicted slower progression to diabetes. Later onset of islet autoimmunity and lower autoantibody levels predicted slower progression to diabetes among children with multiple islet autoantibodies. These factors may need to be considered in the design of trials to prevent type 1 diabetes.

  6. Functional Characterization of Autoantibodies against Complement Component C3 in Patients with Lupus Nephritis*

    PubMed Central

    Vasilev, Vasil V.; Noe, Remi; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnes; Chauvet, Sophie; Lazarov, Valentin J.; Deliyska, Boriana P.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Dimitrov, Jordan D.; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a complication of the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Because the complement system plays a critical role in orchestrating inflammatory and immune responses as well as in the clearance of immune complexes, autoreactivity to complement components may have considerable pathological consequences. Autoantibodies against the central complement component C3 have been reported in systemic lupus erythematosus, but their molecular mechanism and functional relevance are not well understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and the functional properties of the anti-C3 autoantibodies. Anti-C3 autoantibodies were measured in plasma of 39 LN patients, and identification of their epitopes on the C3 molecule was performed. By using surface plasmon resonance, we analyzed the influence of patient-derived IgG antibodies on the interaction of C3b with Factor B, Factor H, and complement receptor 1. The capacity of these antibodies to dysregulate the C3 convertase on the surface of endothelial cell was measured by flow cytometry. Here we report that the frequency of anti-C3 autoantibodies in LN is ∼30%. They inhibited interactions of the negative complement regulators Factor H and complement receptor 1 with C3b. An enhanced C3 deposition was also observed on human endothelial cells in the presence of C3 autoantibodies. In addition, anti-C3 autoantibody levels correlated with disease activity. In conclusion, the anti-C3 autoantibodies in LN may contribute to the autoimmune pathology by their capacity to overactivate the complement system. PMID:26245903

  7. [Interferon alpha antibodies show no cross reactions with typical autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Görg, S; Klouche, M; Wilhelm, D; Kirchner, H

    1993-04-01

    Patients treated with natural human interferon alpha develop anti-interferon antibodies (IFN-AB) only in very rare cases. By contrast, patients with autoimmune disorders are able to generate high-titered IFN-AB against endogenous interferon alpha. One explanation for the development of auto-IFN-AB could be cross-reactivity with typical autoimmune antigens. We investigated the cross-reactivity of 3 high-titered IgG IFN-AB of female autoimmune patients (aged 32, 36, 74 years; two severe cases of SLE, one case of autoimmune thyroiditis) as well as 25 low-titered natural IgM IFN-AB of healthy blood donors (aged 19-48 years). Typical autoimmune antigens including dsDNA, ENA, as well as natural interferon beta and recombinant interferon gamma are not able to inhibit binding of IFN-AB to interferon alpha in an ELISA test system. Preincubation of sera containing either dsDNA antibodies (dsDNA-AB) (24 patients), thyroid peroxidase (TPO-AB) (9 patients) or thyroglobulin (TG-AB) (12 patients) with interferon alpha resulted in no change in the respective autoantibody titer. These data suggest that there is no cross-reactivity between IFN-alpha-AB and dsDNA-AB, TPO-AB or TG-AB. Thus, an explanation for the occurrence of IFN-AB in autoimmune disorders cannot be found in a cross-reaction between interferon alpha with typical autoimmune antigens.

  8. [Autoantibodies and their clinical characteristics in systemic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Yasuhito

    2013-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by microvascular damage and excessive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs with autoimmune background. One representative feature of the immunological abnormalities in SSc patients is the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA). More than 90% of patients with SSc are positive for ANA. Although a role of ANA in the pathogenesis in SSc remains unclear, the particular ANA are often indicative of clinical feature, disease course, and overall severity. Therefore, subgrouping patients based on the type of autoantibodies present can be useful in diagnosis and management. Anticentromere antibody (ACA), anti-DNA topoisomerase I antibody (Ab), and anti-RNA polymerase Ab are the representative autoAbs found in patients with SSc. Other serum ANA found in SSc include anti-Th/To Ab, anti-U3RNP Ab, anit-human upstream-binding protein (hUBF) Ab, anti-centriole Ab, anti-U1RNP Ab, anti-Ku Ab, and anti-PM-Scl Ab. It is documented that the prevalence of SSc-related Abs and clinical characteristics of patients with SSc are influenced by ethnicity. Identifying several SSc-related Abs requires a complicated technique that include immunoprecipitation assay. Establishment of a system routinely available to screen ANA specificities such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is needed.

  9. [Detection of autoantibodies to polymerized human serum albumin].

    PubMed

    Manns, M; Müller, M; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1984-11-01

    Binding activity of antibodies against polymerized human serum albumin (pHSA) was measured in the serum of 348 patients with various hepatic and non-hepatic diseases and in the serum of 108 control persons. The methods used were passive hemagglutination (PH) with antigen loaded human erythrocytes and radial immunodiffusion (ID). In the PH-method only HBsAg-positive sera reacted. Blocking experiments with pHSA, polymerized bovine serum albumin (pBSA) and monomeric human serum albumin (mHSA) showed, that the PH-method measures HBsAG associated receptors for pHSA. In HBeAG-positive cases titers were significantly higher than in anti-HBe-positive sera. Using the ID-method it could be shown, that 40% of sera of patients with liver diseases (n = 272), 37% of patients with LED (n = 27), 72% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 32), 6% of patients with glomerulonephritis (n = 17) and 2% of normal persons (n = 108) reacted. These sera reacted in the immunodiffusion assay with pHSA and pBSA but not with mHSA. Autoantibodies against non species specific determinants of pHSA which are not specific for liver diseases and possibly due to disturbed immunoregulation can be demonstrated by immunodiffusion. They may possibly be modulators of the pHSA mediated binding of hepatitis B-virus to hepatocytes.

  10. Autoantibody to the gastrin receptor in pernicious anemia

    SciTech Connect

    de Aizpurua, H.J.; Ungar, B.; Toh, B.H.

    1985-08-22

    The authors examined serum IgG fractions from 20 patients with pernicious anemia and 25 control subjects for their capacity to inhibit binding of (/sup 125/I)15-leu human gastrin-17 to parietal-cell-enriched gastric mucosal cells. IgG fractions from six patients reduced gastrin binding by 45.6 +/- 12.2 per cent, as compared with a reduction of 1.8 +/- 0.7 per cent by fractions from the 25 controls. The fractions from these six patients also reduced gastrin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake by gastric cells (an index of gastric acid secretory activity in vitro) by 50.2 +/- 8.4 per cent (mean +/- S.D.), as compared with 9.2 +/- 4.1 per cent for the controls. IgG fractions from six other patients that did not reduce gastrin binding also inhibited gastrin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake, by 48.1 +/- 9.1 per cent. These reductions in gastrin binding and aminopyrine uptake were abolished by absorption of the IgG fractions with suspensions of viable gastric mucosal cells but not by absorption with liver or kidney cells. The IgG fractions did not inhibit (/sup 3/H)histamine binding or histamine-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake. These results suggest that serum IgG from some patients with pernicious anemia contains autoantibodies to the gastrin receptor.

  11. Autoantibodies against Leydig cells in patients after spermatic cord torsion.

    PubMed Central

    Zanchetta, R; Mastrogiacomo, I; Graziotti, P; Foresta, C; Betterle, C

    1984-01-01

    This study is aimed at searching for the presence of circulating antibodies against frozen sections of human testis, ovary and trophoblast in patients that had spermatic cord torsion. Sixty-eight sera samples were studied. Nine patients (13.2%) were positive for organ specific anti-testis autoantibodies. Six patients were positive for antibodies against Leydig cells: five were positive only with the indirect immunofluorescence technique of complement fixing (ITT/CF), the sixth patient was positive only with the indirect immunofluorescence technique (ITT). The other three patients were positive for antibodies against germ line cells: two patients were positive with both techniques, the third was positive only with indirect immunofluorescence technique. Eight of these patients were negative for antibodies against adrenal cortex while only one case was positive with indirect immunofluorescence technique both on adrenal cortex and Leydig cells. Human lyophilized testis absorbed the reactive antibodies against Leydig cells and germ line cells, while adrenal cortex and lyophilized testosterone were ineffective. This study shows the identification of a specific antibody against Leydig cells and germ line cells in patients after spermatic cord torsion. PMID:6362937

  12. SLAP deficiency decreases dsDNA autoantibody production.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lisa K; Pennington, Luke F; Shaw, Laura A; Brown, Meredith; Treacy, Eric C; Friend, Samantha F; Hatlevik, Øyvind; Rubtsova, Kira; Rubtsov, Anatoly V; Dragone, Leonard L

    2014-02-01

    Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP) adapts c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, to activated components of the BCR signaling complex regulating BCR levels and signaling in developing B cells. Based on this function, we asked whether SLAP deficiency could decrease the threshold for tolerance and eliminate development of autoreactive B cells in two models of autoantibody production. First, we sensitized mice with a dsDNA mimetope that causes an anti-dsDNA response. Despite equivalent production of anti-peptide antibodies compared to BALB/c controls, SLAP(-/-) mice did not produce anti-dsDNA. Second, we used the 56R tolerance model. SLAP(-/-) 56R mice had decreased levels of dsDNA-reactive antibodies compared to 56R mice due to skewed light chain usage. Thus, SLAP is a critical regulator of B-cell development and function and its deficiency leads to decreased autoreactive B cells that are otherwise maintained by inefficient receptor editing or failed negative selection.

  13. Liver abnormalities and liver membrane autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Kushimoto, K; Nagasawa, K; Ueda, A; Mayumi, T; Ishii, Y; Yamauchi, Y; Tada, Y; Tsukamoto, H; Kusaba, T; Niho, Y

    1989-01-01

    The hepatic involvement of 57 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was studied with special reference to liver membrane autoantibody (LMA). Liver abnormalities were found predominantly in patients with active SLE (27/48 (56%) in active SLE v 3/20 (15%) in inactive SLE). They were, however, rather mild or moderate and tended to disappear as the disease activity of SLE decreased. In this respect the liver abnormalities observed in this study differed from those in patients with lupoid hepatitis. The incidence of LMA in active SLE (8/11 (73%] was significantly greater than that in inactive SLE (4/12 (33%)). The mean LMA index value in active SLE was 8.3, which was also greater than the 2.9 in inactive SLE. Furthermore, in active SLE the mean LMA titre was significantly higher in patients with liver abnormalities than in those without. These results suggest that LMA may be associated with the activity of SLE and may be one of the factors which cause transient liver abnormalities. Images PMID:2596885

  14. Thyroid Dysfunction and Autoantibodies Association with Hypertensive Disorders during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Azin; Adabi, Khadijeh; Nekuie, Sepideh; Jahromi, Elham Kazemi; Solati, Mehrdad; Sobhani, Alireza; Karmostaji, Hoda; Jahanlou, Alireza Shahab

    2012-01-01

    Background. Thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity are relatively common in reproductive age and have been associated with adverse health outcomes for both mother and child, including hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. Objective. To survey the relation between thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity and incidence and severity of pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders. Method. In this case control study 48 hypertensive patients in 4 subgroups (gestational hypertension, mild preeclampsia, severe preeclampsia, eclampsia) and 50 normotensive ones were studied. The samples were nulliparous and matched based on age and gestational age and none of them had previous history of hypertensive or thyroid disorders and other underlying systemic diseases or took medication that might affect thyroid function. Their venous blood samples were collected using electrochemiluminescence and ELISA method and thyroid hormones and TSH and autoantibodies were measured. Results. Hypertensive patients had significant lower T3 concentration compared with normotensive ones with mean T3 values 152.5 ± 48.93 ng/dL, 175.36 ± 58.07 ng/dL respectively. Anti-TPO concentration is higher in control group 6.07 ± 9.02 IU/mL compared with 2.27 ± 2.94 IU/mL in cases. Conclusion. The severity of preeclampsia and eclampsia was not associated with thyroid function tests. The only significant value was low T3 level among pregnancy, induced hypertensive patients. PMID:22848832

  15. Role of Natural Autoantibodies and Natural IgM Anti-Leucocyte Autoantibodies in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Peter Isaac

    2016-01-01

    We review how polyreactive natural IgM autoantibodies (IgM-NAA) protect the host from invading micro-organisms and host neo-antigens that are constantly being produced by oxidation mechanisms and cell apoptosis. Second, we discuss how IgM-NAA and IgM anti-leukocyte antibodies (IgM-ALA) inhibits autoimmune inflammation by anti-idiotypic mechanisms, enhancing removal of apoptotic cells, masking neo-antigens, and regulating the function of dendritic cells (DC) and effector cells. Third, we review how natural IgM prevents autoimmune disorders arising from pathogenic IgG autoantibodies, triggered by genetic mechanisms (e.g., SLE) or micro-organisms, as well as by autoreactive B and T cells that have escaped tolerance mechanisms. Studies in IgM knockout mice have clearly demonstrated that regulatory B and T cells require IgM to effectively regulate inflammation mediated by innate, adaptive, and autoimmune mechanisms. It is, therefore, not surprising why the host positively selects such autoreactive B1 cells that generate IgM-NAA, which are also evolutionarily conserved. Fourth, we show that IgM-ALA levels and their repertoire can vary in normal humans and disease states and this variation may partly explain the observed differences in the inflammatory response after infection, ischemic injury, or after a transplant. We also show how protective IgM-NAA can be rendered pathogenic under non-physiological conditions. We also review IgG-NAA that are more abundant than IgM-NAA in plasma. However, we need to understand if the (Fab)2 region of IgG-NAA has physiological relevance in non-disease states, as in plasma, their functional activity is blocked by IgM-NAA having anti-idiotypic activity. Some IgG-NAA are produced by B2 cells that have escaped tolerance mechanisms and we show how such pathogenic IgG-NAA are regulated to prevent autoimmune disease. The Fc region of IgG-NAA can influence inflammation and B cell function in vivo by binding to activating and inhibitory Fc

  16. Muscarinic type 3 receptor autoantibodies are associated with anti-SSA/Ro autoantibodies in Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Jian; Williams, Adrienne E.G.; Park, Yun-Jong; Choi, Kevin; Chan, Annie L.; Reeves, Westley H.; Bubb, Michael R.; Lee, Yun Jong; Park, Kyungpyo; Stewart, Carol M.; Cha, Seunghee

    2016-01-01

    Anti-muscarinic type 3 receptor autoantibodies (anti-M3R) are reported as potential inhibitors of saliva secretion in Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS). However, despite extensive efforts to establish an anti-M3R detection method, there is no clinical test available for these autoantibodies. The purpose of this study was to propose inclusion of anti-M3R testing for SjS diagnosis through investigation of their prevalence using a modified In-Cell Western (ICW) assay. A stable cell line expressing human M3R tagged with GFP (M3R-GFP) was established to screen unadsorbed and adsorbed plasma from primary SjS (n = 24), rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n = 18), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n = 18), and healthy controls (HC, n = 23). Anti-M3R abundance was determined by screening for the intensity of human IgG interacting with M3R-GFP cells by ICW assay, as detected by an anti-human IgG IRDye800-conjugated secondary antibody and normalized to GFP. Method comparisons and receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC)-curve analyses were performed to evaluate the diagnostic value of our current approaches. Furthermore, clinical parameters of SjS were also analyzed in association with anti-M3R. Anti-M3R was significantly elevated in SjS plasma in comparison with HC, SLE, or RA (P < 0.01). SjS anti-M3R intensities were greater than two-standard deviations above the HC mean for both unadsorbed (16/24, 66.67%) and adsorbed (18/24, 75%) plasma samples. Furthermore, anti-M3R was associated with anti-SjS-related-antigen A/Ro positivity (P = 0.0353). Linear associations for anti-M3R intensity indicated positive associations with focus score (R2 = 0.7186, P < 0.01) and negative associations with saliva flow rate (R2 = 0.3052, P < 0.05). Our study strongly supports our rationale to propose inclusion of anti-M3R for further testing as a non-invasive serological marker for SjS diagnosis. PMID:27460476

  17. Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) autoantibodies suppress the MuSK pathway and ACh receptor retention at the mouse neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Morsch, Marco; Reddel, Stephen W; Liang, Simon X; Phillips, William D

    2014-01-01

    Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) autoantibodies from myasthenia gravis patients can block the activation of MuSK in vitro and/or reduce the postsynaptic localization of MuSK. Here we use a mouse model to examine the effects of MuSK autoantibodies upon some key components of the postsynaptic MuSK pathway and upon the regulation of junctional ACh receptor (AChR) numbers. Mice became weak after 14 daily injections of anti-MuSK-positive patient IgG. The intensity and area of AChR staining at the motor endplate was markedly reduced. Pulse-labelling of AChRs revealed an accelerated loss of pre-existing AChRs from postsynaptic AChR clusters without a compensatory increase in incorporation of (newly synthesized) replacement AChRs. Large, postsynaptic AChR clusters were replaced by a constellation of tiny AChR microaggregates. Puncta of AChR staining also appeared in the cytoplasm beneath the endplate. Endplate staining for MuSK, activated Src, rapsyn and AChR were all reduced in intensity. In the tibialis anterior muscle there was also evidence that phosphorylation of the AChR β-subunit-Y390 was reduced at endplates. In contrast, endplate staining for β-dystroglycan (through which rapsyn couples AChR to the synaptic basement membrane) remained intense. The results suggest that anti-MuSK IgG suppresses the endplate density of MuSK, thereby down-regulating MuSK signalling activity and the retention of junctional AChRs locally within the postsynaptic membrane scaffold. PMID:24860174

  18. Impact of troponin I-autoantibodies in chronic dilated and ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Doesch, Andreas O; Mueller, Susanne; Nelles, Manfred; Konstandin, Mathias; Celik, Sultan; Frankenstein, Lutz; Goeser, Stefan; Kaya, Ziya; Koch, Achim; Zugck, Christian; Katus, Hugo A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of circulating troponin I (TNI)-autoantibodies in plasma of patients with chronic heart failure. Sera of 390 heart failure patients were tested for the presence of anti-TNI antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), including 249 (63.8% of total) patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and 141 (36.2% of total) patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). A total of 72 patients (18.5% of total) were female and 318 (81.5% of total) were male. Mean patient age was 54.6 ± 11.3 years and mean follow-up time was 3.8 ± 3.2 years. TNI-autoantibodies (titer of ≥1:40) were detected in 73 out of 390 patients (18.7% of total). In TNI-autoantibody positive patients mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 27.6 ± 5.8%, compared to 25.8 ± 5.9% in TNI-autoantibody negative patients, P = 0.03. The combined end-point of death (n = 118, 30.3% of total) or heart transplantation (HTX) (n = 44, 11.3% of total) was reached in 162 patients (41.5% of total). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated superior survival (combined end-point of death or HTX) in patients with DCM versus ICM (P = 0.0198) and TNI-autoantibody positive patients versus TNI-autoantibody negative patients (P = 0.0348). Further subgroup analysis revealed a favorable outcome in TNI-positive patients with heart failure if the patients suffered from DCM (P = 0.0334), whereas TNI-autoantibody status in patients with ICM was not associated with survival (P = 0.8486). In subsequent multivariate Weibull-analysis, a positive TNI serostatus was associated with a significantly lower all-cause mortality in DCM patients (P = 0.0492). The presence of TNI-autoantibodies in plasma is associated with an improved survival in patients with chronic DCM, but not ICM. This might possibly indicate a prophylactic effect of TNI-autoantibodies in this subgroup of patients, encouraging further studies into possible protective

  19. Impact of troponin I-autoantibodies in chronic dilated and ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Doesch, Andreas O; Mueller, Susanne; Nelles, Manfred; Konstandin, Mathias; Celik, Sultan; Frankenstein, Lutz; Goeser, Stefan; Kaya, Ziya; Koch, Achim; Zugck, Christian; Katus, Hugo A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of circulating troponin I (TNI)-autoantibodies in plasma of patients with chronic heart failure. Sera of 390 heart failure patients were tested for the presence of anti-TNI antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), including 249 (63.8% of total) patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and 141 (36.2% of total) patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). A total of 72 patients (18.5% of total) were female and 318 (81.5% of total) were male. Mean patient age was 54.6 ± 11.3 years and mean follow-up time was 3.8 ± 3.2 years. TNI-autoantibodies (titer of ≥1:40) were detected in 73 out of 390 patients (18.7% of total). In TNI-autoantibody positive patients mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 27.6 ± 5.8%, compared to 25.8 ± 5.9% in TNI-autoantibody negative patients, P = 0.03. The combined end-point of death (n = 118, 30.3% of total) or heart transplantation (HTX) (n = 44, 11.3% of total) was reached in 162 patients (41.5% of total). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated superior survival (combined end-point of death or HTX) in patients with DCM versus ICM (P = 0.0198) and TNI-autoantibody positive patients versus TNI-autoantibody negative patients (P = 0.0348). Further subgroup analysis revealed a favorable outcome in TNI-positive patients with heart failure if the patients suffered from DCM (P = 0.0334), whereas TNI-autoantibody status in patients with ICM was not associated with survival (P = 0.8486). In subsequent multivariate Weibull-analysis, a positive TNI serostatus was associated with a significantly lower all-cause mortality in DCM patients (P = 0.0492). The presence of TNI-autoantibodies in plasma is associated with an improved survival in patients with chronic DCM, but not ICM. This might possibly indicate a prophylactic effect of TNI-autoantibodies in this subgroup of patients, encouraging further studies into possible protective

  20. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Ke-Mian; Chang, Chia-Chun; Shen, Qing-Ji; Sung, Li-Ying; Liu, Ji-Long

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  1. Differences in catalytic properties between cerebral cytoplasmic and mitochondrial hexokinases.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M F; Bachelard, H S

    1977-03-01

    1. Clear kinetic differences between cytoplasmic and mitochondrial forms of type-I cerebral hexokinase were demonstrated from experiments performed under identical conditions on three (cytoplasmic, bound mitochondrial and solubilized mitochondrial) preparations of the enzyme. 2. Whereas the Michaelis constant for glucose (KmGlc) was consistent, that for MgATP2- (KmATP) was lower in the cytoplasmic than in the two mitochondrial preparations. The substrate dissociation constants (KsGlc and KsATP) were both higher in the cytoplasmic than in the mitochondrial preparations. A further difference in the substrate kinetic patterns was that KmATP=KmATP for the cytoplasmic enzyme, in contrast with the mitochondrial enzyme, where KmATP was clearly not equal to KsATP [Bachelard et al. (1971) Biochem. J. 123, 707-715]. 3. Dead-end inhibition produced by N-acetyl-glucosamine and by AMP also exhibited different quantitative kinetic patterns for the two enzyme sources. Both inhibitions gave Ki values similar or equal to those of Ki' for the cytoplasmic activity, whereas Ki was clearly not equal to Ki' for the mitochondrial activity. 4. All of these studies demonstrated the similarity of the two mitochondrial activities (particulate and solubilized), which were both clearly different from the cytoplasmic activity. 5. The analysis gives a practical example of our previous theoretical treatment on the derivation of true inhibition constants. 6. The results are discussed in terms of the function of cerebral hexokinases.

  2. Single cytoplasmic dynein molecule movements: characterization and comparison with kinesin.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Khan, S; Sheetz, M P

    1995-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a major microtubule motor for minus-end directed movements including retrograde axonal transport. To better understand the mechanism by which cytoplasmic dynein converts ATP energy into motility, we have analyzed the nanometer-level displacements of latex beads coated with low numbers of cytoplasmic dynein molecules. Cytoplasmic dynein-coated beads exhibited greater lateral movements among microtubule protofilaments (ave. 5.1 times/microns of displacement) compared with kinesin (ave. 0.9 times/micron). In addition, dynein moved rearward up to 100 nm over several hundred milliseconds, often in correlation with off-axis movements from one protofilament to another. We suggest that single molecules of cytoplasmic dynein move the beads because 1) there is a linear dependence of bead motility on dynein/bead ratio, 2) the binding of beads to microtubules studied by laser tweezers is best fit by a first-order Poisson, and 3) the run length histogram of dynein beads follows a first-order decay. At the cellular level, the greater disorder of cytoplasmic dynein movements may facilitate transport by decreasing the duration of collisions between kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein-powered vesicles. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 9 PMID:8580344

  3. Tumour-Associated Autoantibodies as Diagnostic Biomarkers for Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xia, J; Shi, J; Wang, P; Song, C; Wang, K; Zhang, J; Ye, H

    2016-06-01

    Tumour-associated autoantibodies may be promising biomarkers that could facilitate breast cancer (BC) diagnosis and improve patient outcomes. This review aims to identify the tumour-associated autoantibodies with the greatest diagnostic potential. Systematic searches were conducted using PubMed and Web of Science. The most studied tumour-associated autoantibody was included in a meta-analysis, and its clinical value was determined using Fagan's nomogram. The analysis included 84 studies regarding tumour-associated autoantibodies with the diagnostic value. Anti-p53 antibody was the most frequently studied autoantibody, followed by autoantibodies against MUC1, HER2 and cyclin B1. Although individual tumour-associated autoantibodies showed low diagnostic sensitivity, combinations of autoantibodies offered relatively high sensitivity. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was the most common detection method, and nucleic acid programmable protein microarrays appeared preferable to common protein microarrays. As the most commonly studied autoantibody, anti-p53 antibody was included in a meta-analysis. When it had been detected using ELISA and cut-off values were defined as the mean +2 or 3 standard deviations, the summary area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the presence of BC was 0.78. Fagan's nomogram showed post-test probabilities of 32% and 6% for positive and negative results, respectively. Mammography might be supplemented by the use of tumour-associated autoantibodies as biomarkers for BC diagnosis in younger women with increased risks of BC. Even though several studies have investigated the diagnostic use of tumour-associated autoantibodies as biomarkers for BC detection, a high-quality prospective study is needed to validate their diagnostic value in practice. PMID:26991924

  4. Cancer biomarkers defined by autoantibody signatures to aberrant O-glycopeptide epitopes.

    PubMed

    Wandall, Hans H; Blixt, Ola; Tarp, Mads A; Pedersen, Johannes W; Bennett, Eric P; Mandel, Ulla; Ragupathi, Govind; Livingston, Phil O; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Taylor-Papadimitriou, Joyce; Burchell, Joy; Clausen, Henrik

    2010-02-15

    Autoantibodies to cancer antigens hold promise as biomarkers for early detection of cancer. Proteins that are aberrantly processed in cancer cells are likely to present autoantibody targets. The extracellular mucin MUC1 is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many cancers; thus, we evaluated whether autoantibodies generated to aberrant O-glycoforms of MUC1 might serve as sensitive diagnostic biomarkers for cancer. Using an antibody-based glycoprofiling ELISA assay, we documented that aberrant truncated glycoforms were not detected in sera of cancer patients. An O-glycopeptide microarray was developed that detected IgG antibodies to aberrant O-glycopeptide epitopes in patients vaccinated with a keyhole limpet hemocyanin-conjugated truncated MUC1 peptide. We detected cancer-associated IgG autoantibodies in sera from breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer patients against different aberrent O-glycopeptide epitopes derived from MUC1. These autoantibodies represent a previously unaddressed source of sensitive biomarkers for early detection of cancer. The methods we have developed for chemoenzymatic synthesis of O-glycopeptides on microarrays may allow for broader mining of the entire cancer O-glycopeptidome. PMID:20124478

  5. Practical Evaluation of Methods for Detection and Specificity of Autoantibodies to Extractable Nuclear Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Orton, Susan M.; Peace-Brewer, Amy; Schmitz, John L.; Freeman, Kristie; Miller, William C.; Folds, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Detection and specificity of autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) play a critical role in the diagnosis and management of autoimmune disease. Historically, the detection of these antibodies has employed double immunodiffusion (DID). Autoantibody specificity was correlated with diagnoses by this technique. Enzyme immunoassays have been developed by multiple manufacturers to detect and identify the specificity ENA autoantibodies. To address the relationship of ENA detection by DID and enzyme immunoassay, the performances of five immunoassays were compared. These included two DID and three enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISA) (both screening and individual antigen profile kits). The sample set included 83 ENA-positive, antinuclear-antibody (ANA)-positive specimens, 77 ENA-negative, ANA-positive specimens, and 20 ENA- and ANA-negative specimens. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by two methods: first, by using the in-house DID result as the reference standard, and second, by using latent class analysis, which evaluates each kit result independently. Overall, the results showed that the ELISA methods were more sensitive for detection of ENA autoantibodies than DID techniques, but presence and/or specific type of ENA autoantibody did not always correlate with the patient's clinical presentation. Regardless of the testing strategy an individual laboratory uses, clear communication with the clinical staff regarding the significance of a positive result is imperative. The laboratory and the clinician must both be aware of the sensitivity and specificity of each testing method in use in the clinical laboratory. PMID:15013979

  6. Voltage-gated potassium channels autoantibodies in a child with rasmussen encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Marie-Aude; Dubois-Teklali, Fanny; Vercueil, Laurent; Sabourdy, Cécile; Nugues, Frédérique; Vincent, Angela; Oliver, Viviana; Bulteau, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a severe epileptic and inflammatory encephalopathy of unknown etiology, responsible for focal neurological signs and cognitive decline. The current leading hypothesis suggests a sequence of immune reactions induced by an indeterminate factor. This sequence is thought to be responsible for the production of autoantibody-mediated central nervous system degeneration. However, these autoantibodies are not specific to the disease and not all patients present with them. We report the case of a 4-year-old girl suffering from RE displaying some atypical features such as fast evolution and seizures of left parietal onset refractory to several antiepileptics, intravenous immunoglobulins, and corticosteroids. Serum autoantibodies directed against voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC) were evidenced at 739 pM, a finding never previously reported in children. This screening was performed because of an increased signal in the temporolimbic areas on brain magnetic resonance imaging, which was similar to what is observed during limbic encephalitis. The patient experienced epilepsia partialis continua with progressive right hemiplegia and aphasia. She underwent left hemispherotomy at the age of 5.5 years after which she became seizure free with great cognitive improvement. First described in adults, VGKC autoantibodies have been recently described in children with various neurological manifestations. The implication of VGKC autoantibodies in RE is a new observation and opens up new physiopathological and therapeutic avenues of investigation.

  7. Neural Autoantibody Evaluation in Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Population-Based Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Pittock, Sean J.; Lennon, Vanda A.; Dege, Carissa L.; Talley, Nicholas J.; Richard Locke, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Our goal is to investigate the serum profile of neural autoantibodies in community-based patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or functional dyspepsia. The pathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, including IBS and dyspepsia, are unknown. Theories range from purely psychological to autoimmune alterations in GI tract neuromuscular function. Methods The study subjects, based in Olmsted County, MN, reported symptoms of functional dyspepsia or IBS (n = 69), or were asymptomatic controls (n = 64). Their coded sera were screened for antibodies targeting neuronal, glial, and muscle autoantigens. Results The prevalence of neural autoantibodies with functional GI disorders did not differ significantly from controls (17% vs. 13%; P = 0.43). In no case was a neuronal or glial nuclear autoantibody or enteric neuronal autoantibody identified. Neuronal cation channel antibodies were identified in 9% of cases (voltage-gated potassium channel [VGKC] in one dyspepsia case and one IBS case, ganglionic acetylcholine receptor [AChR] in four IBS cases) and in 6% of controls (ganglionic AChR in one, voltage-gated calcium channel [VGCC], N-type, in two and VGKC in one; P = 0.36). The frequency of glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD65) autoantibodies was similar in cases (10%) and controls (5%; P = 0.23). Conclusions Our data do not support neural autoimmunity as the basis for most IBS or functional dyspepsia cases. PMID:21181442

  8. Fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia due to immunoglobulin g autoantibody exacerbated by epstein-barr virus.

    PubMed

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Simmons, Julie H; Jones, Mary Rose; Palavecino, Elizabeth L; Pomper, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Most cases of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) are caused by the production of an autoantibody that targets determinants on red blood cells (RBCs). This autoantibody can be immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgM, or IgA. Some autoantibodies react optimally at 0° to 4°C (ie, cold agglutinin) and usually are clinically insignificant. High-titer cold agglutinins are associated with IgM autoantibody and complement fixation induced by infectious agents, including the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). This case report describes a 31-year-old man who had jaundice, a hemoglobin of 6.0 gdL, and was diagnosed with a hemolytic crisis of AIHA. He received a total of 11 RBC transfusions during a 15-hour period without sustained response and later died. The direct antiglobulin test results for this patient were positive, whereas the cold-agglutinin-testing results were negative. We detected EBV DNA in blood via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We report a rare case of AIHA associated with an IgG autoantibody and exacerbated by EBV infection, causing a fatal hemolytic anemia.

  9. Presence of retinal pericyte-reactive autoantibodies in diabetic retinopathy patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingjun; Li, Yan; Payne, John; Srivastava, Sunil; Fan, Xingjun; Fung, John; Li, Xiaorong; Kern, Timothy S.; Lin, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The loss of retinal pericytes (RPCs) is a hallmark of early stage diabetic retinopathy (DR), but the mechanism underlying RPC death is unclear. Although it was postulated in previous studies using bovine RPCs that autoantibodies against RPCs might develop and induce RPC death, it is unknown whether autoantibodies against cell-surface antigens on human RPCs exist in DR patients, whether such autoantibodies contribute to RPC damage/loss, and if they do, through which mechanism. We screened serum samples from DR patients and controls using primary human RPCs and found that that levels of IgGs reactive to RPCs were significantly higher in the DR group than the control group. Serum samples with higher RPC-reactive IgG levels induced more severe complement-mediated RPC damage than those with lower RPC-reactive IgG levels. We also assessed levels of the complement-activation products C3a, C4a and C5a in these serum samples, and found that serum levels of C3a and C5a, but not C4a, were higher in the DR group than control group. These data provide evidence the first time showing that autoantibodies against RPCs can develop in DR patients, and that these autoantibodies could contribute to pericyte damage through complement activation. PMID:26839120

  10. Autoantibody Targets and their Cancer Relationship in the Pathogenicity of Paraneoplastic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Adamus, Grazyna

    2009-01-01

    Paraneoplastic retinopathies (PR), including cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) or the closely related melanoma-associated retinopathy (MAR) occur in a small subset of patients with retinal degeneration and systemic cancer. This autoimmune syndrome is characterized by sudden, progressive loss of vision in association with circulating anti-retinal autoantibodies. The PR syndromes are heterogeneous, may produce a number of ocular symptoms, and may be associated with several different neoplasms, including lung, breast, prostate, gynecological, and colon cancer, melanoma, and hematologic malignancies. We examined the onset of retinopathy in correlation to the diagnosis of cancer and the presence of specific anti-retinal autoantibodies in PR patients. In some patients without diagnosed malignant tumors, the onset of ocular symptoms and the presence of autoantibodies preceded the diagnosis of cancer by months to years, including anti-recoverin, anti-transducin-α, and anti-carbonic anhydrase II antibodies. Although anti-retinal autoantibodies may not be a good predictor of a specific neoplasm, they can be used as biomarkers for different subtypes of retinopathy. Identification of autoantibodies involved in autoimmune-mediated PR will help elucidate the mechanisms underlying the PR syndromes and develop targeted therapies for these sight-threatening disorders. PMID:19168157

  11. Immune thrombocytopenia: antiplatelet autoantibodies inhibit proplatelet formation by megakaryocytes and impair platelet production in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Iraqi, Muna; Perdomo, Jose; Yan, Feng; Choi, Philip Y-I; Chong, Beng H.

    2015-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia is an autoimmune disease mediated by antiplatelet autoantibodies that cause platelet destruction and suppression of platelet production. In vitro effects of autoantibodies on megakaryocyte production and maturation have been reported recently. However, the impact of these autoantibodies on crucial megakaryocyte functions, proplatelet formation and subsequent platelet release, has not been evaluated. We examined the effects of serum and IgG from 19 patients with immune thrombocytopenia using day 8 or 9 megakaryocytes (66.3 ± 10.6% CD41+), derived from cord blood hematopoietic stem cells (CD34+). The number of proplatelet-bearing megakaryocytes, the number of platelets released in the culture, total megakaryocyte numbers, ploidy pattern and caspase activation were measured at various times after treatment. After 5 days of treatment the number of proplatelet-bearing megakaryocytes was significantly decreased by 13 immune thrombocytopenia autoantibodies relative to the control group (P<0.0001) and this decrease was accompanied by a corresponding reduction of platelet release. Other features, including total megakaryocyte numbers, maturation and apoptosis, were not affected by immune thrombocytopenia antibodies. Treating the megakaryocytes with the thrombopoietin receptor agonists romiplostim and eltrombopag reversed the effect of the autoantibodies on megakaryocytes by restoring their capacity to form proplatelets. We conclude that antiplatelet antibodies in immune thrombocytopenia inhibit proplatelet formation by megakaryocytes and hence the ability of the megakaryocytes to release platelets. Treatment with either romiplostim or eltrombopag regenerates proplatelet formation from the megakaryocytes. PMID:25682608

  12. The diagnostic utility of folate receptor autoantibodies in blood.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Jeffrey M; Ramaekers, Vincent Th; Quadros, Edward V

    2013-03-01

    Folate supplementation reduces the risk of neural tube defect (NTD) pregnancy, and folinic acid has been used to correct cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) in children with developmental disorders. In the absence of systemic folate deficiency, the discovery of autoantibodies (AuAbs) to folate receptor α (FRα) that block the uptake of folate offers one mechanism to explain the response to folate in these disorders. The association of FRα AuAbs with pregnancy-related complications, CFD syndrome, and autism spectrum disorders and response to folate therapy is highly suggestive of the involvement of these AuAbs in the disruption of brain development and function via folate pathways. The two types of antibodies identified in the serum of patients are blocking antibody and binding antibody. The two antibodies can be measured by the specific assays described and exert their pathological effects either by functional blocking of folate transport as previously shown or hypothetically by disrupting the FR by an antigen-antibody-mediated inflammatory response. We have identified both IgG and IgM AuAbs in these conditions. The predominant antibodies in women with NTD pregnancy belong to the IgG1 and IgG2 isotype and in CFD children, the IgG1 and IgG4 isotype. This review describes the methods used to measure these AuAbs, their binding characteristics, affinity, cross-reactivity, and potential mechanisms by which folate therapy could work. Because these AuAbs are associated with various pathologies during fetal and neonatal development, early detection and intervention could prevent or reverse the consequences of exposure to these AuAbs. PMID:23314538

  13. Human Blood Autoantibodies in the Detection of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Negm, Ola H; Hamed, Mohamed R; Schoen, Robert E; Whelan, Richard L; Steele, Robert J; Scholefield, John; Dilnot, Elizabeth M; Shantha Kumara, H M C; Robertson, John F R; Sewell, Herbert F

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignancy in the western world. Early detection and diagnosis of all cancer types is vital to improved prognosis by enabling early treatment when tumours should be both resectable and curable. Sera from 3 different cohorts; 42 sera (21 CRC and 21 matched controls) from New York, USA, 200 sera from Pittsburgh, USA (100 CRC and 100 controls) and 20 sera from Dundee, UK (10 CRC and 10 controls) were tested against a panel of multiple tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) using an optimised multiplex microarray system. TAA specific IgG responses were interpolated against the internal IgG standard curve for each sample. Individual TAA specific responses were examined in each cohort to determine cutoffs for a robust initial scoring method to establish sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of combinations of TAAs provided good discrimination between cancer-positive and normal serum. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the sample sets tested against a panel of 32 TAAs were 61.1% and 80.9% respectively for 6 antigens; p53, AFP, K RAS, Annexin, RAF1 and NY-CO16. Furthermore, the observed sensitivity in Pittsburgh sample set in different clinical stages of CRC; stage I (n = 19), stage II (n = 40), stage III (n = 34) and stage IV (n = 6) was similar (73.6%, 75.0%, 73.5% and 83.3%, respectively), with similar levels of sensitivity for right and left sided CRC. We identified an antigen panel of sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection of CRC, based upon serum profiling of autoantibody response using a robust multiplex antigen microarray technology. This opens the possibility of a blood test for screening and detection of early colorectal cancer. However this panel will require further validation studies before they can be proposed for clinical practice. PMID:27383396

  14. Human Blood Autoantibodies in the Detection of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Negm, Ola H.; Hamed, Mohamed R.; Schoen, Robert E.; Whelan, Richard L.; Steele, Robert J.; Scholefield, John; Dilnot, Elizabeth M.; Shantha Kumara, H. M. C.; Robertson, John F. R.; Sewell, Herbert F.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignancy in the western world. Early detection and diagnosis of all cancer types is vital to improved prognosis by enabling early treatment when tumours should be both resectable and curable. Sera from 3 different cohorts; 42 sera (21 CRC and 21 matched controls) from New York, USA, 200 sera from Pittsburgh, USA (100 CRC and 100 controls) and 20 sera from Dundee, UK (10 CRC and 10 controls) were tested against a panel of multiple tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) using an optimised multiplex microarray system. TAA specific IgG responses were interpolated against the internal IgG standard curve for each sample. Individual TAA specific responses were examined in each cohort to determine cutoffs for a robust initial scoring method to establish sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of combinations of TAAs provided good discrimination between cancer-positive and normal serum. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the sample sets tested against a panel of 32 TAAs were 61.1% and 80.9% respectively for 6 antigens; p53, AFP, K RAS, Annexin, RAF1 and NY-CO16. Furthermore, the observed sensitivity in Pittsburgh sample set in different clinical stages of CRC; stage I (n = 19), stage II (n = 40), stage III (n = 34) and stage IV (n = 6) was similar (73.6%, 75.0%, 73.5% and 83.3%, respectively), with similar levels of sensitivity for right and left sided CRC. We identified an antigen panel of sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection of CRC, based upon serum profiling of autoantibody response using a robust multiplex antigen microarray technology. This opens the possibility of a blood test for screening and detection of early colorectal cancer. However this panel will require further validation studies before they can be proposed for clinical practice. PMID:27383396

  15. The effect of platelet autoantibodies on the course of the disease and clinical response of patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Sikorska, A; Konopka, L; Maślanka, K

    2008-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated the response to treatment of 409 idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients who were tested for the presence of platelet-associated autoantibodies by direct-platelet immunofluorescence test (PIFT) and for the presence of plasma antibodies directed against the GPIIb/IIIa, GPIb and GPIa/IIa by monoclonal antibody immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA). In patients with platelet autoantibodies in comparison with patients without antibodies more frequently were observed the chronic form of disease (83.5%vs. 68.5%) and severe symptoms of haemorrhage diathesis (17.3%vs. 6.9%). Evaluation of the treatment response (to corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs and splenectomy) referred to patients with complete response, e.g. complete remission defined as platelet count of >100 x 10(9)/l for at least 2 years. The percentage of complete response in the whole population of ITP patients, both with and without autoantibodies regardless of the method of treatment, was similar (about 54%). However, the presence of platelet autoantibodies had effect on patients treated with corticosteroids: complete response approximately 71% (36/51) of patients with autoantibodies and in 60% (72/120) of patients without antibodies, as well as in patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs (cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, vincristin and vinblastin); complete response approximately 51% (11/21) of patients with autoantibodies and in 34.8% (6/17) of patients without autoantibodies. The presence of autoantibodies had no effect on the response of splenectomy patients. PMID:18190469

  16. The relevance of the IgG subclass of autoantibodies for blister induction in autoimmune bullous skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Sitaru, Cassian; Mihai, Sidonia; Zillikens, Detlef

    2007-04-01

    Autoimmune bullous skin diseases are characterized by autoantibodies and T cells specific to structural proteins maintaining cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion in the skin. Existing clinical and experimental evidence generally supports a pathogenic role of autoantibodies for blister formation. These autoantibodies belong to several IgG subclasses, which associate with different functional properties and may thus determine the pathogenic potential of IgG antibodies. In pemphigus diseases, binding of IgG to keratinocytes is sufficient to cause intraepidermal blisters without engaging innate immune effectors and IgG4 autoantibodies seem to mainly mediate acantholysis. In contrast, in most subepidermal autoimmune blistering diseases, complement activation and recruitment and activation of leukocytes by autoantibodies are required for blister induction. In these conditions, tissue damage is thought to be mainly mediated by IgG1, but not IgG4 autoantibodies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the pathogenic relevance of the IgG subclass of autoantibodies for blister formation. Characterization of the pathogenically relevant subclass(es) of autoantibodies not only provides mechanistic insights, but should greatly facilitate the development of improved therapeutic modalities of autoimmune blistering diseases.

  17. An increased frequency of autoantibody-inducing CD4+ T cells in pre-diseased lupus-prone mice.

    PubMed

    Busser, Brian W; Cancro, Michael P; Laufer, Terri M

    2004-07-01

    Pathogenic autoantibody production in murine models of lupus is dependent on autoreactive CD4+ helper T cells. However, the mechanisms which permit the selection and maintenance of this autoantibody-inducing CD4+ T-cell repertoire are currently unknown. We hypothesized that the peripheral CD4+ T-cell repertoire of lupus-prone mice was enriched with autoantibody-inducing specificities. To test this, we utilized the splenic focus assay to determine if pre-diseased lupus-prone (NZB x NZW)F(1) mice have an elevated frequency of autoreactive CD4+ T lymphocytes capable of supporting autoantibody production. The splenic focus limiting dilution assay permits anti-nuclear antibodies to be generated from contact-dependent T-B interactions in vitro. We show that young, pre-diseased lupus-prone mice have an elevated frequency of autoantibody-inducing CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, these autoantibody-inducing CD4+ T-cell responses are also present in the thymus. Therefore, an elevated frequency of autoantibody-inducing CD4+ T cells predisposes lupus-prone mice to the development of autoantibodies.

  18. Shared idiotypes and restricted immunoglobulin variable region heavy chain genes characterize murine autoantibodies of various specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Monestier, M; Manheimer-Lory, A; Bellon, B; Painter, C; Dang, H; Talal, N; Zanetti, M; Schwartz, R; Pisetsky, D; Kuppers, R

    1986-01-01

    The study of the Ig variable region heavy chain (VH) genes used to encode antibodies specific for self-epitopes from murine hybridomas showed that three VH families are primarily utilized: VH J558, the largest family, and VH QPC52 and VH 7183, the families most proximal to the Ig joining region heavy chain genes. These monoclonal autoantibodies express cross-reactive idiotopes shared by rheumatoid factors and antibodies specific for Sm. The expression of these idiotypes is independent of major histocompatibility complex and Ig constant region heavy chain haplotypes, self-antigen specificity, and even the VH gene family utilized. Though the experiments described here are limited to murine autoantibodies, similarities exist between murine and human autoimmune diseases. Studies that aim to investigate the relationship between VH gene expression and the presence of cross-reactive idiotypes among human autoantibodies should enable us to better understand the mechanisms of autoimmunity and self-tolerance. Images PMID:2427543

  19. Label-free nanoplasmonic sensing of tumor-associate autoantibodies for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Soler, Maria; Estevez, M-Carmen; Villar-Vazquez, Roi; Casal, J Ignacio; Lechuga, Laura M

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is treatable and curable when detected at early stages. However there is a lack of less invasive and more specific screening and diagnosis methods which would facilitate its prompt identification. Blood circulating autoantibodies which are immediately produced by the immune system at tumor appearance have become valuable biomarkers for preclinical diagnosis of cancer. In this work, we present the rapid and label-free detection of colorectal cancer autoantibodies directly in blood serum or plasma using a recently developed nanoplasmonic biosensor. Our nanoplasmonic device offers sensitive and real-time quantification of autoantibodies with excellent selectivity and reproducibility, achieving limits of detection around 1 nM (150-160 ng mL(-1)). A preliminary evaluation of clinical samples of colorectal cancer patients has shown good correlation with ELISA. These results demonstrate the reliability of the nanobiosensor strategy and pave the way towards the achievement of a sensitive diagnostic tool for early detection of colorectal cancer.

  20. [Detection and characterization of anti-red cell autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemias].

    PubMed

    Kamesaki, T; Kajii, E

    1996-09-01

    Autoimmuine hemolytic anemias (AIHA) are classified into two groups of warm type and cold type according to the thermal properties of the anti-red cell autoantibody. A positive result of the antiglobulin test (DAT) confirms the presence of autoantibodies on red cells. DAT-negative AIHA are diagnosed by means of the elevation of red blood cell-associated IgG. The sera in low titer cold agglutinin disease show a low cold agglutinin titer but a high titer in the presence of bovine albumin. The antigenic specificity of warm reacting autoantibodies has been demonstrated, by using immunoblot and immunoprecipitation, such as Rh-related proteins, band 3, glycophorin A or Wrb antigen.

  1. Autoantibodies in Alzheimer’s disease: potential biomarkers, pathogenic roles, and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianming; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a prevalent and debilitating neurodegenerative disorder in the elderly. The etiology of AD has not been fully defined and currently there is no cure for this devastating disease. Compelling evidence suggests that the immune system plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of AD. Autoantibodies against a variety of molecules have been associated with AD. The roles of these autoantibodies in AD, however, are not well understood. This review attempts to summarize recent findings on these autoantibodies and explore their potential as diagnostic/ prognostic biomarkers for AD, their roles in the pathogenesis of AD, and their implications in the development of effective immunotherapies for AD. PMID:27476881

  2. [Significance of autoantibodies in the diagnosis of non-A, non-B hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Manns, M; Arnold, W; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1984-09-01

    Various autoantibodies against different components of the hepatocytes have been demonstrated in chronic active hepatitis (CAH) which is an etiologically heterogeneous disease. These antibodies are essentially antinuclear antibodies (ANA), antibodies against liver cell membranes (LMA), antibodies against a microsomal antigen from liver and kidney (LKM), antibodies against soluble liver antigen (SLA) and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA). These various autoantibodies mentioned could not be demonstrated in 18 patients with clearly established acute and 27 patients with clearly established acute and 27 patients with clearly established chronic hepatitis non-A-non-B. In addition these autoantibodies could not be found in our own cases of clearly established hepatitis non-A-non-B after the acute stage of the disease. Testing for the presence of these antibodies thus helps essentially to differentiate the autoimmunologically caused form of CAH from the CAH non-A-non-B.

  3. Cross-species cloning: influence of cytoplasmic factors on development.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong-Hua; Zhu, Zuo-Yan

    2014-06-01

    It is widely accepted that the crosstalk between naive nucleus and maternal factors deposited in the egg cytoplasm before zygotic genome activation is crucial for early development. This crosstalk may also exert some influence on later development. It is interesting to clarify the relative roles of the zygotic genome and the cytoplasmic factors in development. Cross-species nuclear transfer (NT) between two distantly related species provides a unique system to study the relative role and crosstalk between egg cytoplasm and zygotic nucleus in development. In this review, we will summarize the recent progress of cross-species NT, with emphasis on the cross-species NT in fish and the influence of cytoplasmic factors on development. Finally, we conclude that the developmental process and its evolution should be interpreted in a systemic way, rather than in a way that solely focuses on the role of the nuclear genome.

  4. Stabilization and Degradation Mechanisms of Cytoplasmic Ataxin-1

    PubMed Central

    Kohiyama, Mayumi F.; Lagalwar, Sarita

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation-prone proteins in neurodegenerative disease disrupt cellular protein stabilization and degradation pathways. The neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is caused by a coding polyglutamine expansion in the Ataxin-1 gene (ATXN1), which gives rise to the aggregation-prone mutant form of ATXN1 protein. Cerebellar Purkinje neurons, preferentially vulnerable in SCA1, produce ATXN1 protein in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. Cytoplasmic stabilization of ATXN1 by phosphorylation and 14-3-3-mediated mechanisms ultimately drive translocation of the protein to the nucleus where aggregation may occur. However, experimental inhibition of phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding results in rapid degradation of ATXN1, thus preventing nuclear translocation and cellular toxicity. The exact mechanism of cytoplasmic ATXN1 degradation is currently unknown; further investigation of degradation may provide future therapeutic targets. This review examines the present understanding of cytoplasmic ATXN1 stabilization and potential degradation mechanisms during normal and pathogenic states. PMID:27168726

  5. Nuclear Proteins Hijacked by Mammalian Cytoplasmic Plus Strand RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. PMID:25818028

  6. Regulation of cytoplasmic streaming in Vallisneria mesophyll cells.

    PubMed

    Takagi, S; Nagai, R

    1983-07-01

    Induction and cessation of the rotational cytoplasmic streaming in Vallisneria mesophyll cells could be controlled by external stimuli. In cells that had been kept in darkness the cytoplasm remained quiescent. However, when the cells were treated in the dark with EGTA solution (10 mM or 20 mM buffered with 10 mM-Tris-maleate at pH 7.0), rotational cytoplasmic streaming was induced. When the cells were transferred again to artificial pond water in the dark, the induced streaming was inhibited; that is, only 50% of the observed cells exhibited active streaming after 2 h. When the cells were irradiated continuously with far-red light (lambda max = 750 nm, 0.4 W/m2) in the same external medium, the induced streaming was inhibited almost completely within 2 h. The relative quantum effectiveness of monochromatic light (450--800 nm) in producing cessation of streaming was also investigated. Irradiation with light of 450, 550 and 600 nm was almost as effective as darkness. Light of 500 and 650 nm was less effective than dark exposure. Only irradiation at 750 nm stopped streaming in almost all cells. But when calcium was excluded from the external medium, the effect of far-red light decreased to almost the dark control level. Light of 800 nm also inhibited the streaming but the effect was much less than that of far-red light. Microfilaments in bundles with the long axis parallel to the streaming direction were localized in the vicinity of the cell membrane. Their configuration, localization and distribution were the same in the present experimental system irrespective of whether the cytoplasm was streaming or quiescent. Intracellular calcium was examined by electron microscopic cytochemistry and X-ray microanalysis. In cells with streaming induced by EGTA, only a small amount of calcium-containing precipitates formed in the cytoplasm in the presence of antimony. A few precipitates were found in the chloroplasts, the middle lamella of the cell wall and at the border between

  7. Anti-rods/rings autoantibody generation in hepatitis C patients during interferon-α/ribavirin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Keppeke, Gerson Dierley; Calise, S John; Chan, Edward KL; Andrade, Luis Eduardo C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can lead to disabling liver diseases with progression to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite the recent availability of more effective and less toxic therapeutic options, in most parts of the world the standard treatment consists of a weekly injection of pegylated interferon α (IFN-α) together with a daily dose of ribavirin. HCV patients frequently present circulating non-organ-specific autoantibodies demonstrating a variety of staining patterns in the indirect immunofluorescence assay for antinuclear antibodies (ANA). Between 20% to 40% of HCV patients treated with IFN-α and ribavirin develop autoantibodies showing a peculiar ANA pattern characterized as rods and rings (RR) structures. The aim of this article is to review the recent reports regarding RR structures and anti-rods/rings (anti-RR) autoantibody production by HCV patients after IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Anti-RR autoantibodies first appear around the sixth month of treatment and reach a plateau around the twelfth month. After treatment completion, anti-RR titers decrease/disappear in half the patients and remain steady in the other half. Some studies have observed a higher frequency of anti-RR antibodies in relapsers, i.e., patients in which circulating virus reappears after initially successful therapy. The main target of anti-RR autoantibodies in HCV patients is inosine-5’-monophosphate dehydrogenase 2 (IMPDH2), the rate-limiting enzyme involved in the guanosine triphosphate biosynthesis pathway. Ribavirin is a direct IMPDH2 inhibitor and is able to induce the formation of RR structures in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, these observations led to the hypothesis that anti-RR autoantibody production is a human model of immunologic tolerance breakdown that allows us to explore the humoral autoimmune response from the beginning of the putative triggering event: exposure to ribavirin and interferon. PMID

  8. Immunoglobulin Gene Polymorphisms are Susceptibility Factors for Clinical and Autoantibody Subgroups of the Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Rider, Lisa G.; Schiffenbauer, Adam; Targoff, Ira N.; Malley, Karen; Pandey, Janardan P.; Miller, Frederick W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate possible associations of GM and KM markers in European Americans (EA) and African Americans (AA) with adult and juvenile forms of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). Methods We performed serologic analyses of polymorphic determinants associated with immunoglobulin gamma heavy (GM) and kappa light chains (KM) in large populations of EA (n=514: 297 adults and 217 juveniles) and AA IIM patients (n=109: 73 adults and 50 juveniles) representing the major clinicopathologic and autoantibody groups. Results For EA dermatomyositis (DM) patients, the GM 3 23 5,13 phenotype was a risk factor for both adults (OR=2.2; Pc=0.020) and juveniles (OR=2.2; Pc=0.0013). Of interest, the GM 13 allotype was a risk factor for juvenile DM (JDM) for both EA (OR=3.9; Pc<0.0001) and AA (OR=4.8; Pc=0.033). However, the GM 1,3,17 5,13,21 phenotype was a risk factor for JDM in EA but not in AA. Among the IIM autoantibody groups, GM 3 23 5,13 was a risk factor for EA adults with anti-Jo-1 autoantibodies (OR=3.4; Pc=0.0031), while the GM 3 allotype was protective for adults with anti-threonyl tRNA synthetase or anti-RNP autoantibodies (OR=0.1; Pc=0.047 and OR=0.2; Pc=0.034, respectively). In contrast, GM 6 was a risk factor for AA adults with anti-SRP autoantibodies (OR=7.5; Pc=0.041). Conclusions These data suggest that polymorphic alleles of GM and KM loci are differentially associated with IIM subgroups defined by age, ethnicity, clinical features and autoantibodies, and expand the list of immune response genes possibly important in the pathogenesis of myositis. PMID:18821675

  9. Autoantibodies associated with prenatal and childhood exposure to environmental chemicals in Faroese children.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Christa E; Grandjean, Philippe; Weihe, Pál; El-Fawal, Hassan A N

    2014-11-01

    Methylmercury, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are ubiquitous and persistent environmental chemicals with known or suspected toxic effects on the nervous system and the immune system. Animal studies have shown that tissue damage can elicit production of autoantibodies. However, it is not known if autoantibodies similarly will be generated and detectable in humans following toxicant exposures. Therefore, we conducted a pilot study to investigate if autoantibodies specific for neural and non-neural antigens could be detected in children at age 7 years who have been exposed to environmental chemicals. Both prenatal and age-7 exposures to mercury, PCBs, and PFCs were measured in 38 children in the Faroe Islands who were exposed to widely different levels of these chemicals due to their seafood-based diet. Concentrations of IgM and IgG autoantibodies specific to both neural (neurofilaments, cholineacetyltransferase, astrocyte glial fibrillary acidic protein, and myelin basic protein) and non-neural (actin, desmin, and keratin) antigens were measured and the associations of these autoantibody concentrations with chemical exposures were assessed using linear regression. Age-7 blood-mercury concentrations were positively associated with titers of multiple neural- and non-neural-specific antibodies, mostly of the IgM isotype. Additionally, prenatal blood-mercury and -PCBs were negatively associated with anti-keratin IgG and prenatal PFOS was negatively associated with anti-actin IgG. These exploratory findings demonstrate that autoantibodies can be detected in the peripheral blood following exposure to environmental chemicals. The unexpected association of exposures with antibodies specific for non-neural antigens suggests that these chemicals may have toxicities that have not yet been recognized.

  10. Skin microbiota-associated inflammation precedes autoantibody induced tissue damage in experimental epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

    PubMed

    Ellebrecht, Christoph T; Srinivas, Girish; Bieber, Katja; Banczyk, David; Kalies, Kathrin; Künzel, Sven; Hammers, Christoph M; Baines, John F; Zillikens, Detlef; Ludwig, Ralf J; Westermann, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a chronic autoimmune blistering skin disease characterized by autoantibodies against type VII collagen (COL7). Immunization of SJL/J mice with recombinant murine COL7 results in break of tolerance and skin blisters. Strikingly, despite circulating autoantibodies, the same genetic background and identical environmental conditions, 20% of mice remain healthy. To elucidate the regulation of the transition from the presence of autoantibodies to overt autoimmune disease, we characterized the innate and adaptive immune response of mice that remain healthy after immunization and compared it to mice that developed skin disease. Both clinically healthy and diseased SJL/J mice showed circulating autoantibodies and deposition of complement-fixing IgG2c autoantibodies and C3 at the dermal-epidermal junction. However, only in diseased animals significant neutrophil infiltration and increase in FcgRIV expression were observed in the skin. In contrast, the expression of T cell signature cytokines in the T cell zone of the draining lymph node was comparable between clinically healthy and diseased animals after immunization. Surprisingly, health was associated with a decreased expression of CD11c, TNFA and KC (CXCL1) in the skin prior to immunization and could be predicted with a negative predictive value of >80%. Furthermore, mice that did not develop clinical disease showed a significantly higher richness and distinctly clustered diversity of their skin microbiota before immunization. Our data indicate that the decision whether blisters develop in the presence of autoantibodies is governed in the skin rather than in the lymph node, and that a greater richness of cutaneous bacterial species appears to be protective. PMID:26341384

  11. Lupus anti-ribosomal P autoantibody proteomes express convergent biclonal signatures.

    PubMed

    Al Kindi, M A; Colella, A D; Beroukas, D; Chataway, T K; Gordon, T P

    2016-04-01

    Lupus-specific anti-ribosomal P (anti-Rib-P) autoantibodies have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological complications in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of the present study was to determine variable (V)-region signatures of secreted autoantibody proteomes specific for the Rib-P heterocomplex and investigate the molecular basis of the reported cross-reactivity with Sm autoantigen. Anti-Rib-P immunoglobulins (IgGs) were purified from six anti-Rib-P-positive sera by elution from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) plates coated with either native Rib-P proteins or an 11-amino acid peptide (11-C peptide) representing the conserved COOH-terminal P epitope. Rib-P- and 11-C peptide-specific IgGs were analysed for heavy (H) and light (L) chain clonality and V-region expression using an electrophoretic and de-novo and database-driven mass spectrometric sequencing workflow. Purified anti-Rib-P and anti-SmD IgGs were tested for cross-reactivity on ELISA and their proteome data sets analysed for shared clonotypes. Anti-Rib-P autoantibody proteomes were IgG1 kappa-restricted and comprised two public clonotypes defined by unique H/L chain pairings. The major clonotypic population was specific for the common COOH-terminal epitope, while the second shared the same pairing signature as a recently reported anti-SmD clonotype, accounting for two-way immunoassay cross-reactivity between these lupus autoantibodies. Sequence convergence of anti-Rib-P proteomes suggests common molecular pathways of autoantibody production and identifies stereotyped clonal populations that are thought to play a pathogenic role in neuropsychiatric lupus. Shared clonotypic structures for anti-Rib-P and anti-Sm responses suggest a common B cell clonal origin for subsets of these lupus-specific autoantibodies.

  12. Autoantibody Specificities and Type I Interferon Pathway Activation in Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies.

    PubMed

    Ekholm, L; Vosslamber, S; Tjärnlund, A; de Jong, T D; Betteridge, Z; McHugh, N; Plestilova, L; Klein, M; Padyukov, L; Voskuyl, A E; Bultink, I E M; Michiel Pegtel, D; Mavragani, C P; Crow, M K; Vencovsky, J; Lundberg, I E; Verweij, C L

    2016-08-01

    Myositis is a heterogeneous group of autoimmune diseases, with different pathogenic mechanisms contributing to the different subsets of disease. The aim of this study was to test whether the autoantibody profile in patients with myositis is associated with a type I interferon (IFN) signature, as in patients with systemic lupus erythematous (SLE). Patients with myositis were prospectively enrolled in the study and compared to healthy controls and to patients with SLE. Autoantibody status was analysed using an immunoassay system and immunoprecipitation. Type I IFN activity in whole blood was determined using direct gene expression analysis. Serum IFN-inducing activity was tested using peripheral blood cells from healthy donors. Blocking experiments were performed by neutralizing anti-IFNAR or anti-IFN-α antibodies. Patients were categorized into IFN high and IFN low based on an IFN score. Patients with autoantibodies against RNA-binding proteins had a higher IFN score compared to patients without these antibodies, and the IFN score was related to autoantibody multispecificity. Patients with dermatomyositis (DM) and inclusion body myositis (IBM) had a higher IFN score compared to the other subgroups. Serum type I IFN bioactivity was blocked by neutralizing anti-IFNAR or anti-IFN-α antibodies. To conclude, a high IFN score was not only associated with DM, as previously reported, and IBM, but also with autoantibody monospecificity against several RNA-binding proteins and with autoantibody multispecificity. These studies identify IFN-α in sera as a trigger for activation of the type I IFN pathway in peripheral blood and support IFN-α as a possible target for therapy in these patients. PMID:27173897

  13. Autoantibodies to iron-binding proteins in pigs infested with Sarcoptes scabiei.

    PubMed

    Toet, Hayley M; Fischer, Katja; Mounsey, Kate E; Sandeman, R Mark

    2014-09-15

    Despite the availability of effective treatments, Sarcoptes scabiei remains a major health problem in the pig industry. Unsuccessful control of the disease is often due to the lack of reliable detection methods, with current tests relying on skin scrapings and crude antigen ELISAs. A previous analysis of antigens in pig skin scrapings reported that anti-transferrin antibodies were present in S. scabiei infected animals and that this finding might be considered as a useful diagnostic tool. This paper confirms IgG autoantibodies against transferrin, including the first report of IgM autoantibodies, in both naturally and experimentally infected pigs using ELISA and dot blot assays. Autoantibodies were also detected in pigs to ferritin and to a lesser extent lactoferrin. Immunoblotting confirmed the presence of IgG and IgM autoantibodies in mange positive pigs, as well as IgM antibodies to transferrin and albumin in mange negative pigs. These findings suggest the presence of natural autoantibodies to transferrin and albumin in pigs. The development of the IgG autoimmune response may either be a host mechanism for limiting iron to the mite via antibody mediated clearance, the result of host exposure to mite iron-binding homologues or because of a mite-induced antigenic change to host transferrin. Further investigation into the formation of these autoantibodies may provide insights into the importance of iron in scabies infections and the development and perseverance of S. scabiei infections in pigs. The specificity and sensitivity of the anti-transferrin response reinforces its potential in the diagnosis of scabies in pigs. PMID:25085772

  14. Immunohistochemical expression of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin in gastrointestinal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Michiko; Sangawa, Akiko; Yamao, Naoki; Kamoshida, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    Survivin is a protein that is highly expressed in many embryonic tissues, as well as most human tumors. Prior studies have reported both positive and negative correlations between survivin expression and cancer prognosis, but these associations remain controversial. In the present study, we assessed the expression of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin in gastrointestinal carcinomas. Using these data, we determined the correlation between nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin and, further, investigated correlations between survivin expression and clinicopathological parameters. Seventy-two advanced gastric adenocarcinomas and 78 colorectal adenocarcinomas were analyzed for survivin expression by immunohistochemistry. Expression of both nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin was significantly higher in colorectal carcinomas than in gastric carcinomas (P < 0.01). There was a positive correlation between nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of survivin (r = 0.42, P < 0.001). In gastric carcinomas, the level of survivin protein expression was associated with tumor differentiation, patient age, and lymphatic invasion (P < 0.05, 0.01, and 0.01, respectively). In colorectal carcinomas, the level of nuclear survivin expression was significantly higher in females than in males (P < 0.05). There were no significant associations between survivin expression and most of the clinicopathological parameters. Nevertheless, there was a trend towards an inverse correlation between nuclear survivin expression and tumor aggressiveness in gastric carcinoma; there was a similar trend for cytoplasmic survivin expression. In summary, our results suggest that levels of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin expression differ between gastric carcinoma and colorectal carcinoma.

  15. Immunohistochemical expression of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin in gastrointestinal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shintani, Michiko; Sangawa, Akiko; Yamao, Naoki; Kamoshida, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    Survivin is a protein that is highly expressed in many embryonic tissues, as well as most human tumors. Prior studies have reported both positive and negative correlations between survivin expression and cancer prognosis, but these associations remain controversial. In the present study, we assessed the expression of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin in gastrointestinal carcinomas. Using these data, we determined the correlation between nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin and, further, investigated correlations between survivin expression and clinicopathological parameters. Seventy-two advanced gastric adenocarcinomas and 78 colorectal adenocarcinomas were analyzed for survivin expression by immunohistochemistry. Expression of both nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin was significantly higher in colorectal carcinomas than in gastric carcinomas (P < 0.01). There was a positive correlation between nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of survivin (r = 0.42, P < 0.001). In gastric carcinomas, the level of survivin protein expression was associated with tumor differentiation, patient age, and lymphatic invasion (P < 0.05, 0.01, and 0.01, respectively). In colorectal carcinomas, the level of nuclear survivin expression was significantly higher in females than in males (P < 0.05). There were no significant associations between survivin expression and most of the clinicopathological parameters. Nevertheless, there was a trend towards an inverse correlation between nuclear survivin expression and tumor aggressiveness in gastric carcinoma; there was a similar trend for cytoplasmic survivin expression. In summary, our results suggest that levels of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin expression differ between gastric carcinoma and colorectal carcinoma. PMID:24294379

  16. tRNA travels from the cytoplasm to organelles

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Mary Anne T.; Hopper, Anita K.

    2011-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) encoded by the nuclear genome are surprisingly dynamic. Although tRNAs function in protein synthesis occurring on cytoplasmic ribosomes, tRNAs can transit from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and then again return to the cytoplasm by a process known as the tRNA retrograde process. Subsets of the cytoplasmic tRNAs are also imported into mitochondria and function in mitochondrial protein synthesis. The numbers of tRNA species that are imported into mitchondria differ among organisms, ranging from just a few to the entire set needed to decode mitochondrially encoded mRNAs. For some tRNAs, import is dependent on the mitochondrial protein import machinery, whereas the majority of tRNA mitochondrial import is independent of this machinery. Although cytoplasmic proteins and proteins located on the mitochondrial surface participating in the tRNA import process have been described for several organisms, the identity of these proteins differ among organisms. Likewise, the tRNA determinants required for mitochondrial import differ among tRNA species and organisms. Here, we present an overview and discuss the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanisms involved in the tRNA retrograde process and continue with an overview of tRNA import into mitochondria. Finally, we highlight areas of future research to understand the function and regulation of movement of tRNAs between the cytoplasm and organelles. PMID:21976284

  17. Transverse Myelitis Associated with Anti-Ro (SSA) Autoantibodies: A Record of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Melikyan, G; Abdelrahman, M H; D'Suoza, A; Akhtar, N; Elzouki, A N; Hammoudeh, M

    2012-01-01

    Transverse myelitis (TM) is an inflammatory process involving a restricted area of the spinal cord. The usual dramatic presentation makes TM a medical emergency. Early detection and aggressive therapy are required in order to improve the prognosis. The association of this unique clinical phenotype and autoantibody provides circumstantial evidence that an autoimmune aetiology might be involved. We describe two cases of TM associated with anti-Ro (SSA) autoantibodies without connective tissue disease manifestations. The two patients were treated successfully with IV steroids and cyclophosphamide.

  18. Autoantibody-Targeted Treatments for Acute Exacerbations of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, Michael; Valentine, Vincent G.; Chien, Nydia; Gibson, Kevin F.; Raval, Jay S.; Saul, Melissa; Xue, Jianmin; Zhang, Yingze; Duncan, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe acute exacerbations (AE) of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are medically untreatable and often fatal within days. Recent evidence suggests autoantibodies may be involved in IPF progression. Autoantibody-mediated lung diseases are typically refractory to glucocorticoids and nonspecific medications, but frequently respond to focused autoantibody reduction treatments. We conducted a pilot trial to test the hypothesis that autoantibody-targeted therapies may also benefit AE-IPF patients. Methods Eleven (11) critically-ill AE-IPF patients with no evidence of conventional autoimmune diseases were treated with therapeutic plasma exchanges (TPE) and rituximab, supplemented in later cases with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Plasma anti-epithelial (HEp-2) autoantibodies and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7) were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA, respectively. Outcomes among the trial subjects were compared to those of 20 historical control AE-IPF patients treated with conventional glucocorticoid therapy prior to this experimental trial. Results Nine (9) trial subjects (82%) had improvements of pulmonary gas exchange after treatment, compared to one (5%) historical control. Two of the three trial subjects who relapsed after only five TPE responded again with additional TPE. The three latest subjects who responded to an augmented regimen of nine TPE plus rituximab plus IVIG have had sustained responses without relapses after 96-to-237 days. Anti-HEp-2 autoantibodies were present in trial subjects prior to therapy, and were reduced by TPE among those who responded to treatment. Conversely, plasma MMP7 levels were not systematically affected by therapy nor correlated with clinical responses. One-year survival of trial subjects was 46+15% vs. 0% among historical controls. No serious adverse events were attributable to the experimental medications. Conclusion This pilot trial indicates specific treatments that reduce autoantibodies

  19. Predictors of Progression From the Appearance of Islet Autoantibodies to Early Childhood Diabetes: The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY)

    PubMed Central

    Vehik, Kendra; Bonifacio, Ezio; Lernmark, Ake; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Hagopian, William A.; She, JinXiong; Simell, Olli; Akolkar, Beena; Krischer, Jeffrey; Schatz, Desmond; Rewers, Marian J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE While it is known that there is progression to diabetes in <10 years in 70% of children with two or more islet autoantibodies, predictors of the progression to diabetes are only partially defined. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study has observed 8,503 children who were at increased genetic risk for autoimmune diabetes. Insulin autoantibodies (IAAs), GAD65 autoantibodies (GADAs), and insulinoma-associated protein 2 autoantibodies (IA-2As) were measured every 3 months until 4 years of age and every 6 months thereafter; if results were positive, the autoantibodies were measured every 3 months. RESULTS Life table analysis revealed that the cumulative incidence of diabetes by 5 years since the appearance of the first autoantibody differed significantly by the number of positive autoantibodies (47%, 36%, and 11%, respectively, in those with three autoantibodies, two autoantibodies, and one autoantibody, P < 0.001). In time-varying survival models adjusted for first-degree relative status, number of autoantibodies, age at first persistent confirmed autoantibodies, and HLA genotypes, higher mean IAA and IA-2A levels were associated with an increased risk of type 1 diabetes in children who were persistently autoantibody positive (IAAs: hazard ratio [HR] 8.1 [95% CI 4.6–14.2]; IA-2A: HR 7.4 [95% CI 4.3–12.6]; P < 0.0001]). The mean GADA level did not significantly affect the risk of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS In the TEDDY study, children who have progressed to diabetes usually expressed two or more autoantibodies. Higher IAA and IA-2A levels, but not GADA levels, increased the risk of diabetes in those children who were persistently autoantibody positive. PMID:25665818

  20. Effects of Autoantibodies to the Insulin Receptor on Isolated Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, C. Ronald; Baird, Kathleen; Flier, Jeffrey S.; Jarrett, David B.

    1977-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the insulin receptor have been detected in the sera of several patients with the Type B syndrome of insulin resistance and acanthosis nigricans. In this study we have used three of these sera (B-1, B-2, and B-3) as probes of the insulin receptor in isolated rat adipocytes. Preincubation of adipocytes with each of the three sera resulted in an inhibition of subsequent [125I]insulin binding. 50% inhibition of binding occurred with serum dilutions of 1:5 to 1:7,500. As in our previous studies with other tissues, Scatchard analysis of the insulin-binding data was curvilinear consistent with negative cooperativity. Computer analysis suggested that in each case the inhibition of binding was due to a decrease in receptor affinity rather than a change in available receptor number. In addition to the effects on insulin binding, adipocytes pretreated with antireceptor sera also showed alterations in biological responses. All three sera produced some stimulation of basal glucose oxidation. With serum B-3, maximal stimulation of glucose oxidation occurred at a serum concentration that inhibited binding by only 10-15%, whereas with serum B-2 the dilution curves for inhibition of binding and stimulation of glucose oxidation were superimposable. Serum B-1 behaved as a partial agonist; that is, it inhibited binding more effectively than it stimulated glucose oxidation. Cells pretreated with this serum in a concentration which inhibited binding by 80% also showed a five-fold shift to the right in the dose response of insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation, whereas spermine-stimulated glucose oxidation was unaffected. Serum B-2, which contained the highest titer of antireceptor antibodies, also stimulated 2-deoxy-glucose transport, as well as glucose incorporation into lipid and glycogen. Both the ability of the serum to inhibit binding and stimulate glucose utilization were enriched in purified immunoglobulin fractions and retained in the F(ab′)2 fragment of the

  1. From autoantibody research to standardized diagnostic assays in the management of human diseases - report of the 12th Dresden Symposium on Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Conrad, K; Andrade, L E C; Chan, E K L; Mahler, M; Meroni, P L; Pruijn, G J M; Steiner, G; Shoenfeld, Y

    2016-07-01

    Testing for autoantibodies (AABs) is becoming more and more relevant, not only for diagnosing autoimmune diseases (AIDs) but also for the differentiation of defined AID subtypes with different clinical manifestations, course and prognosis as well as the very early diagnosis for adequate management in the context of personalized medicine. A major challenge to improve diagnostic accuracy is to harmonize or even standardize AAB analyses. This review presents the results of the 12th Dresden Symposium on Autoantibodies that focused on several aspects of improving autoimmune diagnostics. Topics that are addressed include the International Consensus on ANA Patterns (ICAP) and the International Autoantibody Standardization (IAS) initiatives, the optimization of diagnostic algorithms, the description and evaluation of novel disease-specific AABs as well as the development and introduction of novel assays into routine diagnostics. This review also highlights important developments of recent years, most notably the improvement in diagnosing and predicting the course of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, and of autoimmune neurological, gastrointestinal and liver diseases; the potential diagnostic role of anti-DFS70 antibodies and tumor-associated AABs. Furthermore, some hot topics in autoimmunity regarding disease pathogenesis and management are described. PMID:27252254

  2. Myositis-specific and -associated autoantibodies: a review from the clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Lacomis, D; Oddis, C V

    2000-09-01

    Twenty-five percent to 50% of patients with polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM) have autoantibodies that are specific for or associated with the presence of myositis. Because of a relatively low sensitivity for the diagnosis of PM or DM, these autoantibodies are inadequate as a screening test for PM or DM in patients with suspected inflammatory myopathy. However, they may be used to support the diagnosis of myositis, and they help exclude the diagnosis of inclusion body myositis in which autoantibodies are infrequent. In addition, these antibodies are associated with homogeneous syndromes with the following reproducible clinical features and prognosis: (I) the antisynthetases generally occur with moderately severe myositis, often in association with interstitial lung disease. Raynaud's phenomenon, and arthropathy; (2) anti-SRP is a marker of severe PM with associated cardiac disease and high mortality; (3) anti-Mi-2 occurs in generally corticosteroid-responsive DM associated with a potentially severe rash; and (4) the myositis-associated autoantibodies anti-PM-ScI and anti-Ku portend a moderately favorable prognosis. Anti-PH-Scl occurs in systemic sclerosis, often in association with arthropathy and Raynaud's syndrome. Anti-Ku occurs in systemic sclerosis and other connective tissue diseases with or without myositis. Thus, both myositis-specific and -associated antibodies have clinical use in the diagnosis of PM and DM and are predictive of certain clinical syndromes and responses to treatment.

  3. Autoantibodies Affect Brain Density Reduction in Nonneuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Cheng, Yuqi; Lai, Aiyun; Lv, Zhaoping; Yu, Hongjun; Luo, Chunrong; Shan, Baoci; Xu, Lin; Xu, Xiufeng

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between autoantibodies and brain density reduction in SLE patients without major neuropsychiatric manifestation (NPSLE). Ninety-five NPSLE patients without obvious cerebral deficits, as determined by conventional MRI, as well as 89 control subjects, underwent high-resolution structural MRI. Whole-brain density of grey matter (GMD) and white matter (WMD) were calculated for each individual, and correlations between the brain density, symptom severity, immunosuppressive agent (ISA), and autoantibody levels were assessed. The GMD and WMD of the SLE group decreased compared to controls. GMD was negatively associated with SLE activity. The WMD of patients who received ISA treatment were higher than that in the patients who did not. The WMD of patients with anticardiolipin (ACL) or anti-SSB/La antibodies was lower than in patients without these antibodies, while the GMD was lower in patients with anti-SM or anti-U1RNP antibodies. Thus, obvious brain atrophy can occur very early even before the development of significant symptoms and specific autoantibodies might contribute to the reduction of GMD or WMD in NPSLE patients. However, ISAs showed protective effects in minimizing GMD and WMD reduction. The presence of these specific autoantibodies might help identify early brain damage in NPSLE patients. PMID:26090505

  4. [Hypothyroidism Associated to TSH Hormone-Receptor Autoantibodies with Blocking Activity Assessed In Vitro].

    PubMed

    Marques, Pedro; Chikh, Karim; Charrié, Anne; Pina, Rosa; Bugalho, Maria João; Lopes, Lurdes

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor autoantibodies normally causes hyperthyroidism. However, they might have blocking activity causing hypothyroidism. A 11-year-old girl followed due to type 1 diabetes mellitus, celiac disease and euthyroid lymphocytic thyroiditis at diagnosis. Two years after the initial evaluation, thyroid-stimulating hormone was suppressed with normal free T4; nine months later, a biochemical evolution to hypothyroidism with thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor autoantibodies elevation was seen; the patient remained always asymptomatic. Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected with the recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone -receptor, and then exposed to the patient's serum; it was estimated a 'moderate' blocking activity of these thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor autoantibodies, and concomitantly excluded stimulating action. In this case, the acknowledgment of the blocking activity of the serum thyroid-stimulating hormone-receptor autoantibodies, supported the hypothesis of a multifactorial aetiology of the hypothyroidism, which in the absence of the in vitro tests, we would consider only as a consequence of the destructive process associated to lymphocytic thyroiditis.

  5. Delineation of autoantibody repertoire through differential proteogenomics in hepatitis C virus-induced cryoglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Ogishi, Masato; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies cross-reactive to pathogens and autoantigens are considered pivotal in both infection control and accompanying autoimmunity. However, the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies largely remain elusive without a priori knowledge of disease-specific autoantigens. Here, through a novel quantitative proteogenomics approach, we demonstrated a successful identification of immunoglobulin variable heavy chain (VH) sequences highly enriched in pathological immune complex from clinical specimens obtained from a patient with hepatitis C virus-induced cryoglobulinemia (HCV-CG). Reconstructed single-domain antibodies were reactive to both HCV antigens and potentially liver-derived human proteins. Moreover, over the course of antiviral therapy, a substantial “de-evolution” of a distinct sub-repertoire was discovered, to which proteomically identified cryoprecipitation-prone autoantibodies belonged. This sub-repertoire was characterized by IGHJ6*03-derived, long, hydrophobic complementarity determining region (CDR-H3). This study provides a proof-of-concept of de novo mining of autoantibodies and corresponding autoantigen candidates in a disease-specific context in human, thus facilitating future reverse-translational research for the discovery of novel biomarkers and the development of antigen-specific immunotherapy against various autoantibody-related disorders. PMID:27403724

  6. Natural and disease-specific autoantibodies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Daffa, N I; Tighe, P J; Corne, J M; Fairclough, L C; Todd, I

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmunity may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Studies have identified disease-specific autoantibodies (DSAAbs) in COPD patients, but natural autoantibodies (NAAbs) may also play a role. Previous studies have concentrated on circulating autoantibodies, but lung-associated autoantibodies may be most important. Our aim was to investigate NAAbs and DSAAbs in the circulation and lungs of COPD smoking (CS) patients compared to smokers (S) without airway obstruction and subjects who have never smoked (NS). Immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies that bind to lung tissue components were significantly lower in the circulation of CS patients than NS (with intermediate levels in S), as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The levels of antibodies to collagen-1 (the major lung collagen) detected by ELISA were also reduced significantly in CS patients' sera compared to NS. The detection of these antibodies in NS subjects indicates that they are NAAbs. The occurrence of DSAAbs in some CS patients and S subjects was indicated by high levels of serum IgG antibodies to cytokeratin-18 and collagen-5; furthermore, antibodies to collagen-5 eluted from homogenized lung tissue exposed to low pH (0·1 M glycine, pH 2·8) were raised significantly in CS compared to S and NS. Thus, this study supports a role in COPD for both NAAbs and DSAAbs.

  7. Chronic rejection of a lung transplant is characterized by a profile of specific autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Peter H; Burton, Christopher M; Carlsen, Jørn; Steinbrüchel, Daniel; Andersen, Claus B; Sahar, Eli; Domany, Eytan; Cohen, Irun R; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Iversen, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) continues to be the major limitation to long-term survival after lung transplantation. The specific aetiology and pathogenesis of OB are not well understood. To explore the role of autoreactivity in OB, we spotted 751 different self molecules onto glass slides, and used these antigen microarrays to profile 48 human serum samples for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM autoantibodies; 27 patients showed no or mild bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS; a clinical correlate of OB) and 15 patients showed medium to severe BOS. We now report that these BOS grades could be differentiated by a profile of autoantibodies binding to 28 proteins or their peptides. The informative autoantibody profile included down-regulation as well as up-regulation of both IgM and IgG specific reactivities. This profile was evaluated for robustness using a panel of six independent test patients. Analysis of the functions of the 28 informative self antigens showed that eight of them are connected in an interaction network involved in apoptosis and protein metabolism. Thus, a profile of autoantibodies may reflect pathological processes in the lung allograft, suggesting a role for autoimmunity in chronic rejection leading to OB. PMID:20201985

  8. Necrobiosis lipoidica associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and positive detection of ANA and ASMA autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Borgia, Francesco; Russo, Giuseppina T; Villari, Provvidenza; Guarneri, Fabrizio; Cucinotta, Domenico; Cannavò, Serafinella P

    2015-07-01

    Necrobiosis lipoidica (NL) is a rare idiopathic cutaneous condition exceptionally associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. We describe the first case of NL, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and positive detection of autoantibodies. Appropriate screening for NL in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis may clarify its real incidence and the existence of a common pathogenetic pathway. PMID:26273437

  9. Necrobiosis lipoidica associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and positive detection of ANA and ASMA autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Borgia, Francesco; Russo, Giuseppina T; Villari, Provvidenza; Guarneri, Fabrizio; Cucinotta, Domenico; Cannavò, Serafinella P

    2015-07-01

    Necrobiosis lipoidica (NL) is a rare idiopathic cutaneous condition exceptionally associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. We describe the first case of NL, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and positive detection of autoantibodies. Appropriate screening for NL in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis may clarify its real incidence and the existence of a common pathogenetic pathway.

  10. Augmentation of Autoantibodies by Helicobacter pylori in Parkinson's Disease Patients May Be Linked to Greater Severity.

    PubMed

    Suwarnalata, Gunasekaran; Tan, Ai Huey; Isa, Hidayah; Gudimella, Ranganath; Anwar, Arif; Loke, Mun Fai; Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Lim, Shen-Yang; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Its etiology remains elusive and at present only symptomatic treatments exists. Helicobacter pylori chronically colonizes the gastric mucosa of more than half of the global human population. Interestingly, H. pylori positivity has been found to be associated with greater of PD motor severity. In order to investigate the underlying cause of this association, the Sengenics Immunome protein array, which enables simultaneous screening for autoantibodies against 1636 human proteins, was used to screen the serum of 30 H. pylori-seropositive PD patients (case) and 30 age- and gender-matched H. pylori-seronegative PD patients (control) in this study. In total, 13 significant autoantibodies were identified and ranked, with 8 up-regulated and 5 down-regulated in the case group. Among autoantibodies found to be elevated in H. pylori-seropositive PD were included antibodies that recognize Nuclear factor I subtype A (NFIA), Platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB) and Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A3 (eIFA3). The presence of elevated autoantibodies against proteins essential for normal neurological functions suggest that immunomodulatory properties of H. pylori may explain the association between H. pylori positivity and greater PD motor severity. PMID:27100827

  11. Identification of Tetraspanin-7 as a Target of Autoantibodies in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Kerry A; Richardson, Carolyn C; Ravishankar, Aarthi; Brigatti, Cristina; Liberati, Daniela; Lampasona, Vito; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Morgan, Diana; Feltbower, Richard G; Christie, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    The presence of autoantibodies to multiple-islet autoantigens confers high risk for the development of type 1 diabetes. Four major autoantigens are established (insulin, glutamate decarboxylase, IA2, and zinc transporter-8), but the molecular identity of a fifth, a 38-kDa membrane glycoprotein (Glima), is unknown. Glima antibodies have been detectable only by immunoprecipitation from extracts of radiolabeled islet or neuronal cells. We sought to identify Glima to enable efficient assay of these autoantibodies. Mouse brain and lung were shown to express Glima. Membrane glycoproteins from extracts of these organs were enriched by detergent phase separation, lectin affinity chromatography, and SDS-PAGE. Proteins were also immunoaffinity purified from brain extracts using autoantibodies from the sera of patients with diabetes before SDS-PAGE. Eluates from gel regions equivalent to 38 kDa were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for protein identification. Three proteins were detected in samples from the brain and lung extracts, and in the immunoaffinity-purified sample, but not in the negative control. Only tetraspanin-7, a multipass transmembrane glycoprotein with neuroendocrine expression, had physical characteristics expected of Glima. Tetraspanin-7 was confirmed as an autoantigen by demonstrating binding to autoantibodies in type 1 diabetes. We identify tetraspanin-7 as a target of autoimmunity in diabetes, allowing its exploitation for diabetes prediction and immunotherapy. PMID:26953162

  12. Prenatal Exposure to Autism-Specific Maternal Autoantibodies Alters Proliferation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells, Enlarges Brain, and Increases Neuronal Size in Adult Animals.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica; Camacho, Jasmin; Fox, Elizabeth; Miller, Elaine; Ariza, Jeanelle; Kienzle, Devon; Plank, Kaela; Noctor, Stephen C; Van de Water, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) affect up to 1 in 68 children. Autism-specific autoantibodies directed against fetal brain proteins have been found exclusively in a subpopulation of mothers whose children were diagnosed with ASD or maternal autoantibody-related autism. We tested the impact of autoantibodies on brain development in mice by transferring human antigen-specific IgG directly into the cerebral ventricles of embryonic mice during cortical neurogenesis. We show that autoantibodies recognize radial glial cells during development. We also show that prenatal exposure to autism-specific maternal autoantibodies increased stem cell proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the embryonic neocortex, increased adult brain size and weight, and increased the size of adult cortical neurons. We propose that prenatal exposure to autism-specific maternal autoantibodies directly affects radial glial cell development and presents a viable pathologic mechanism for the maternal autoantibody-related prenatal ASD risk factor.

  13. Mutualistic Wolbachia infection in Aedes albopictus: accelerating cytoplasmic drive.

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Stephen L; Marsland, Eric J; Rattanadechakul, Wanchai

    2002-01-01

    Maternally inherited rickettsial symbionts of the genus Wolbachia occur commonly in arthropods, often behaving as reproductive parasites by manipulating host reproduction to enhance the vertical transmission of infections. One manipulation is cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), which causes a significant reduction in brood hatch and promotes the spread of the maternally inherited Wolbachia infection into the host population (i.e., cytoplasmic drive). Here, we have examined a Wolbachia superinfection in the mosquito Aedes albopictus and found the infection to be associated with both cytoplasmic incompatibility and increased host fecundity. Relative to uninfected females, infected females live longer, produce more eggs, and have higher hatching rates in compatible crosses. A model describing Wolbachia infection dynamics predicts that increased fecundity will accelerate cytoplasmic drive rates. To test this hypothesis, we used population cages to examine the rate at which Wolbachia invades an uninfected Ae. albopictus population. The observed cytoplasmic drive rates were consistent with model predictions for a CI-inducing Wolbachia infection that increases host fecundity. We discuss the relevance of these results to both the evolution of Wolbachia symbioses and proposed applied strategies for the use of Wolbachia infections to drive desired transgenes through natural populations (i.e., population replacement strategies). PMID:11901124

  14. Evidence for a cytoplasmic microprocessor of pri-miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Jillian S; Langlois, Ryan A; Pham, Alissa M; Tenoever, Benjamin R

    2012-07-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of noncoding RNAs that fine-tune gene expression through post-transcriptional silencing. While miRNA biogenesis occurs in a stepwise fashion, initiated by the nuclear microprocessor, rare noncanonical miRNAs have also been identified. Here we characterize the molecular components and unique attributes associated with the processing of virus-derived cytoplasmic primary miRNAs (c-pri-miRNAs). RNA in situ hybridization and inhibition of cellular division demonstrated a complete lack of nuclear involvement in c-pri-miRNA cleavage while genetic studies revealed that maturation still relied on the canonical nuclear RNase III enzyme, Drosha. The involvement of Drosha was mediated by a dramatic relocalization to the cytoplasm following virus infection. Deep sequencing analyses revealed that the cytoplasmic localization of Drosha does not impact the endogenous miRNA landscape during infection, despite allowing for robust synthesis of virus-derived miRNAs in the cytoplasm. Taken together, this research describes a unique function for Drosha in the processing of highly structured cytoplasmic RNAs in the context of virus infection.

  15. Assessment of cytoplasm conductivity by nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Denzi, Agnese; Merla, Caterina; Palego, Cristiano; Paffi, Alessandra; Ning, Yaqing; Multari, Caroline R; Cheng, Xuanhong; Apollonio, Francesca; Hwang, James C M; Liberti, Micaela

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a new method for the better assessment of cytoplasm conductivity, which is critical to the development of electroporation protocols as well as insight into fundamental mechanisms underlying electroporation. For this goal, we propose to use nanosecond electrical pulses to bypass the complication of membrane polarization and a single cell to avoid the complication of the application of the "mixing formulas." Further, by suspending the cell in a low-conductivity medium, it is possible to force most of the sensing current through the cytoplasm for a more direct assessment of its conductivity. For proof of principle, the proposed technique was successfully demonstrated on a Jurkat cell by comparing the measured and modeled currents. The cytoplasm conductivity was best assessed at 0.32 S/m and it is in line with the literature. The cytoplasm conductivity plays a key role in the understanding of the basis mechanism of the electroporation phenomenon, and in particular, a large error in the cytoplasm conductivity determination could result in a correspondingly large error in predicting electroporation. Methods for a good estimation of such parameter become fundamental.

  16. Diagnostic and prognostic significance of circulating tumor suppressor gene p53 autoantibodies in patients with gestational trophoblastic tumors.

    PubMed

    Shaarawy, Mohamed; Sheiba, Mamdouh

    2004-01-01

    Seventy-two patients with gestational trophoblastic tumors (GTTs) and 20 first-trimester healthy pregnant women (controls) participated in this study. According to the WHO scoring system, GTTs were subgrouped into 24 hydatiform mole spontaneous regression (HMSR), 18 postmolar high-risk (PMHR) and 16 low- and 14 high-risk cases of choriocarcinoma. Patients with choriocarcinoma were treated with hysterectomy and methotrexate chemotherapy, whereas molar pregnancy was managed by either oxytocin infusion followed by suction evacuation or by hysterectomy. Serum p53 autoantibodies were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and serum hCGbeta was determined by radioimmunoassay before and throughout the 12 months after treatment. p53 autoantibodies were not detected in normal pregnancy and cases of HMSR but were detected in all cases of PMHR and choriocarcinoma. Concentrations of p53 autoantibodies were higher in choriocarcinoma than in PMHR cases. Serial measurements of p53 autoantibodies dropped to an undetectable level within 1 and 6 months after treatment in cases of PMHR and low-risk choriocarcinoma, respectively. Decreasing values of p53 autoantibodies in high-risk choriocarcinoma remained higher than the cut-off level of controls. There was a significant positive correlation between p53 autoantibodies and serum hCGbeta concentration in GTTs. In conclusion, detection of p53 autoantibodies has a high potential for the differential diagnosis of GTTs and their serial measurements are clinically useful to monitor disease progression and to assess response to therapy in GTTs.

  17. Agonistic autoantibodies to the α(1) -adrenergic receptor and the β(2) -adrenergic receptor in Alzheimer's and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Karczewski, P; Hempel, P; Kunze, R; Bimmler, M

    2012-05-01

    Although primary causes of Alzheimer's and vascular dementia are unknown, the importance of preceding vascular lesions is widely accepted. Furthermore, there is strong evidence for the involvement of autoimmune mechanisms. Here, we report the presence of agonistic autoantibodies directed at adrenergic receptors in the circulation of patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's and vascular dementia. In 59% of these patients, agonistic autoantibodies against the α(1) -adrenergic receptor and the β(2) -adrenergic receptor were identified. The majority of positive patients (66%) contained both types of autoantibodies in combination. In a control group of patients with neurological impairments others than Alzheimer's and vascular dementia, only 17% were found to harbour these autoantibodies. The autoantibodies to the α(1) -adrenergic receptor interacted preferably with the extracellular loop1 of the receptor. They were further studied in IgG preparations from the column regenerate of a patient who underwent immunoadsorption. The α(1) -adrenergic receptor autoantibodies specifically bound to the extracellular loop1 peptide of the receptor with an apparent EC(50) value of 30 nm. They mobilized intracellular calcium in a clonal cell line expressing the human form of the α(1) -adrenergic receptor. Our data support the notion that autoimmune mechanisms play a significant role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's and vascular dementia. We suggest that agonistic autoantibodies to the α(1) -adrenergic and the β(2) -adrenergic receptor may contribute to vascular lesions and increased plaque formation.

  18. Genetic linkage of IgG autoantibody production in relation to lupus nephritis in New Zealand hybrid mice.

    PubMed

    Vyse, T J; Drake, C G; Rozzo, S J; Roper, E; Izui, S; Kotzin, B L

    1996-10-15

    F1 hybrids of New Zealand black (NZB) and New Zealand white (NZW) mice are a model of human systemic lupus erythematosus. These mice develop a severe immune com-plex-mediated nephritis, in which antinuclear autoantibodies are believed to play the major role. We used a genetic analysis of (NZB x NZW)F1 x NZW backcross mice to provide insight into whether different autoantibodies are subject to separate genetic influences and to determine which autoantibodies are most important in the development of lupus-like nephritis. The results showed one set of loci that coordinately regulated serum levels of IgG antibodies to double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA, total histones, and chromatin, which overlapped with loci that were linked to the production of autoantibodies to the viral glycoprotein, gp70. Loci linked with anti-gp70 compared with antinuclear antibodies demonstrated the strongest linkage with renal disease, suggesting that autoantibodies to gp70 are the major pathogenic antibodies in this model of lupus nephritis. Interestingly, a distal chromosome 4 locus, Nba1, was linked with nephritis but not with any of the autoantibodies measured, suggesting that it contributes to renal disease at a checkpoint distal to autoantibody production.

  19. Generation of Two-color Antigen Microarrays for the Simultaneous Detection of IgG and IgM Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Chruscinski, Andrzej; Huang, Flora Y Y; Ulndreaj, Antigona; Chua, Conan; Fehlings, Michael; Rao, Vivek; Ross, Heather J; Levy, Gary A

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies, which are antibodies against self-antigens, are present in many disease states and can serve as markers for disease activity. The levels of autoantibodies to specific antigens are typically detected with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. However, screening for multiple autoantibodies with ELISA can be time-consuming and requires a large quantity of patient sample. The antigen microarray technique is an alternative method that can be used to screen for autoantibodies in a multiplex fashion. In this technique, antigens are arrayed onto specially coated microscope slides with a robotic microarrayer. The slides are probed with patient serum samples and subsequently fluorescent-labeled secondary antibodies are added to detect binding of serum autoantibodies to the antigens. The autoantibody reactivities are revealed and quantified by scanning the slides with a scanner that can detect fluorescent signals. Here we describe methods to generate custom antigen microarrays. Our current arrays are printed with 9 solid pins and can include up to 162 antigens spotted in duplicate. The arrays can be easily customized by changing the antigens in the source plate that is used by the microarrayer. We have developed a two-color secondary antibody detection scheme that can distinguish IgG and IgM reactivities on the same slide surface. The detection system has been optimized to study binding of human and murine autoantibodies. PMID:27685156

  20. Antiretroviral Therapy Normalizes Autoantibody Profile of HIV Patients by Decreasing CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhefeng; Du, Ling; Hu, Ningjie; Byrd, Daniel; Amet, Tohti; Desai, Mona; Shepherd, Nicole; Lan, Jie; Han, Renzhi; Yu, Qigui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune manifestations are common in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients. However, the autoantibody spectrum associated with HIV infection and the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains to be determined. The plasma autoantibody spectrum for HIV patients was characterized by protein microarrays containing 83 autoantigens and confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were analyzed by flow cytometry and their effects on autoantibodies production were determined by B cell ELISpot. Higher levels of autoantibody and higher prevalence of elevated autoantibodies were observed in ART-naive HIV patients compared to healthy subjects and HIV patients on ART. The highest frequency of CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR+ cells was observed in ART-naive HIV patients and was associated with the quantity of elevated autoantibodies. In addition, CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR+ cells other than Tregs or MDSCs boost the B cell response in a dose-dependent manner by in vitro assay. In summary, HIV infection leads to elevation of autoantibodies while ART suppresses the autoimmune manifestation by decreasing CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR+ cells in vivo. The roles of CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR+ cells on disease progression in HIV patients needs further assessment. PMID:27082567

  1. An Autoimmune Myositis-Overlap Syndrome Associated With Autoantibodies to Nuclear Pore Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Senécal, Jean-Luc; Isabelle, Catherine; Fritzler, Marvin J.; Targoff, Ira N.; Goldstein, Rose; Gagné, Michel; Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Joyal, France; Troyanov, Yves; Dabauvalle, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune myositis encompasses various myositis-overlap syndromes, each being identified by the presence of serum marker autoantibodies. We describe a novel myositis-overlap syndrome in 4 patients characterized by the presence of a unique immunologic marker, autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes. The clinical phenotype was characterized by prominent myositis in association with erosive, anti-CCP, and rheumatoid factor-positive arthritis, trigeminal neuralgia, mild interstitial lung disease, Raynaud phenomenon, and weight loss. The myositis was typically chronic, relapsing, and refractory to corticosteroids alone, but remitted with the addition of a second immunomodulating drug. There was no clinical or laboratory evidence for liver disease. The prognosis was good with 100% long-term survival (mean follow-up 19.5 yr). By indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells, sera from all 4 patients displayed a high titer of antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) with a distinct punctate peripheral (rim) fluorescent pattern of the nuclear envelope characteristic of nuclear pore complexes. Reactivity with nuclear pore complexes was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. In a cohort of 100 French Canadian patients with autoimmune myositis, the nuclear pore complex fluorescent ANA pattern was restricted to these 4 patients (4%). It was not observed in sera from 393 adult patients with systemic sclerosis (n = 112), mixed connective tissue disease (n = 35), systemic lupus (n = 94), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 45), or other rheumatic diseases (n = 107), nor was it observed in 62 normal adults. Autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes were predominantly of IgG isotype. No other IgG autoantibody markers for defined connective tissue diseases or overlap syndromes were present, indicating a selective and highly focused immune response. In 3 patients, anti-nuclear pore complex autoantibody titers varied in parallel with myositis activity, suggesting a pathogenic

  2. Rapid assays for detection of anti-islet autoantibodies: implications for organ donor screening.

    PubMed

    Maniatis, A K; Yu, L; Miao, D; Nelson, K; Eisenbarth, G S

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of the current study was to develop and evaluate rapid assays for autoantibodies to GAD65 (GAA), ICA512bdc/IA-2 (ICA512AA), and insulin (microIAA, mIAA) as a potential tool for identification of cadaveric pancreas donors who were at high risk for developing diabetes. The study included 154 new onset diabetic, prediabetic, and healthy control subjects. Subjects were evaluated for all three autoantibodies in three separate assays: (1) standard (std) assay with a 24-h or 72-h incubation at 4 degrees C (combined GAA/ICA512AA or mIAA, respectively), (2) rapid assay with 1-h room temperature (RT) incubation, and (3) rapid assay with 2-h RT incubation. The serum samples from 777 organ donors were also evaluated for all three autoantibodies and all the positive samples from standard assay evaluated with the 1-h incubation assay. Simple linear regression analyses revealed excellent correlation between the standard assay and the rapid assays for all three autoantibodies, as follows: (1) GAA: std vs. 1 h (R2=0.85) and std vs. 2 h (R2=0.83), (2) ICA512AA: std vs. 1 h (R2=0.85) and std vs. 2 h (R2=0.84), and (3) mIAA: std vs. 1 h (R2=0.70) and std vs. 2 h (R2=0.64). Comparison of assay correlation rates between subject cohorts revealed no significant differences. Compared to their respective standard assays, the 1-h RT GAA assay missed 3.2% and identified an additional 1.3% of samples, the 1-h RT ICA512AA assay had no discordant samples, and the 1-h RT mIAA assay missed 7.1% and identified an additional 5.8% of samples. We analysed a series of 777 stored serum samples from cadaveric donors. Two of 777 (0.25%) were positive for two autoantibodies (both GAA and ICA512AA) and 23 of 777 (3.0%) one autoantibody (11 IAA; 12 GAA). The rapid analysis for all three autoantibodies could be completed in less than 3 h with comparable concordance rates to the more time-consuming standard assays, making these assays an attractive option for organ donor screening to identify

  3. Autoantibody profiles in systemic sclerosis: predictive value for clinical evaluation and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Yasuhito

    2010-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is thought to be an autoimmune disease, as autoantibodies against a variety of extractable nuclear antigens can be detected in patient sera. Subgrouping patients based on the type of autoantibodies present can be useful in diagnosis and management. Anti-centromere antibodies (ACA) and anti-topoisomerase I antibodies (anti-topo I) are the classic autoantibodies associated with SSc. ACA are associated with limited cutaneous involvement and isolated pulmonary hypertension, whereas anti-topo I are associated with diffuse skin involvement and pulmonary fibrosis. ACA are predictors for a favorable prognosis, while anti-topo I are correlated with a poor prognosis and SSc-related mortality. Additionally, anti-RNA polymerase antibodies (anti-RNAP) are associated with diffuse cutaneous disease and renal involvement. Anti-nucleolar antibodies define multiple subgroups of patients with SSc. Of these, anti-Th/To antibodies (anti-Th/To) and anti-PM-Scl antibodies (anti-PM-Scl) are associated with limited cutaneous SSc (lSSc), whereas anti-U3RNP antibodies (anti-U3RNP) are associated with diffuse cutaneous SSc (dSSc). In addition, anti-Th/To and anti-U3RNP can be predictors for a less favorable prognosis with a higher frequency of organ involvement, such as pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and renal crisis. Other autoantibodies are less frequently reported: anti-Ku antibodies, anti-U1RNP antibodies, anti-human upstream-binding factor, and anti-U11/U12 antibodies. These antibodies are generally less specific to SSc, but also define clinically distinct patient subsets. Thus, characterization of autoantibodies in SSc together with knowledge of disease characteristics intrinsic to distinct patient populations is helpful for assessing the clinical presentation and prognosis of this disease, and for monitoring patients with SSc.

  4. Molecular characterization of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region repertoire of human autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Victor, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    The molecular structures of the light chain variable regions encoding human autoantibodies have been studied in detail. The variable region repertoire among this group of antibodies is diverse. There is no evidence for preferential utilization of specific V[sub L] gene families or over-representation of certain V[sub L] gene segments in autoantibodies. Many autoreactive antibodies utilize direct copies of known germline gene segments with little evidence of somatic mutation, supporting the conclusion that at least some germline gene segments encode autoreactivity. Additionally, the structures of several autoantibodies are clearly the product of somatic mutation. Lastly, affinity maturation has been demonstrated in two clonally related IgM rheumatoid factors suggestive of an antigen driven response. The heterogeneity of the V[sub L] region repertoire in human autoantibodies challenges evidence in the literature suggesting that the majority of human autoantibodies utilize the same or closely related germline gene segments with no evidence of somatic mutation. In addition, this study has documented that variation in the length of the light chain is a common feature in human antibodies. Length variation is confined to the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joint of CDR3 and occurs in all V[sub k] gene families. Analysis of the structures of the V[sub k]-J[sub k] joints suggests that both germline derived and non-germline encoded nucleotides (N-segments), probably the result of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase activity, contribute to the junctional diversity of the immunoglobulin light chain variable region. Thus, length variation at the V[sub L]-J[sub L] joint is a frequent event having the potential to expand the diversity of the antibody molecule.

  5. Assessment of the Frequency of Autoantibodies in Chronic Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Acay, Akif; Demir, Kasim; Asik, Gulsah; Tunay, Havva; Acarturk, Gursel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the occurrence frequency of auto-antibodies and autoimmune diseases in patients with chronic hepatitis B or C. Methods: A total of 67 patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B and 77 patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C infection based on HBs Ag, Anti HCV, HBe Ag, Anti HBe Ag, HBV DNA, HCV RNA, liver ultrasound, and liver biopsy results as well as 48 healthy individuals were included in this study. ANA, anti dsDNA, anti LKM, Anti-SMA, AMA, C-ANCA, P-ANCA, anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-Scl-70, anti Jo-1, anti-U1snRNP, anti-centromere, anti-Jo-1, anti tpo, and anti tg were studied in all individuals in each study group. Results: ANA positivity was detected in 8 (12%), 15 (19%) and 2 (4%) individuals in HBV, HCV and control groups, respectively. The difference between the groups was significant (P=0.04). Similarly, anti Tg was positive in one subject in HBV group, in 6 subjects (7%) in HCV group, and in one subject among controls, the difference being significant (P=0.04). There were no significant differences between the study groups in the frequency of other auto-antibodies. Conclusion: Similar to studies involving patients who received interferon and/or antiviral agents, an increased frequency of auto-antibodies was also detected in our patient group consisting of interferon and anti-viral naive subjects. The increase in the frequency of auto-antibodies reached statistical significance among individuals with HCV infection. Thus, pre-treatment assessment of auto-antibodies in newly diagnosed cases of chronic hepatitis B or hepatitis C infection may provide beneficial information on the future occurrence of auto-immune responses in these patients. PMID:25878633

  6. Myositis-specific autoantibodies are specific for myositis compared to genetic muscle disease

    PubMed Central

    Casciola-Rosen, Livia; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Lloyd, Thomas E.; Wagner, Kathryn R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the specificity of myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) for autoimmune myopathy compared with inherited muscle diseases. Methods: Serum samples from 47 patients with genetically confirmed inherited muscle diseases were screened for the most common MSAs, including those recognizing TIF1γ, NXP2, Mi2, MDA5, Jo1, SRP, and HMGCR. We compared these results with the findings in a cohort of patients with dermatomyositis (DM) previously screened for anti-TIF1γ, -NXP2, -Mi2, -MDA5, and -Jo1. Results: Overall, the presence of anti-TIF1γ, -NXP2, -Mi2, -MDA5, or -Jo1 was 96% specific and 67% sensitive for DM compared to patients with genetic muscle diseases. No patients with inherited muscle disease had anti-SRP or anti-HMGCR autoantibodies. Only 2 patients with genetic muscle disease had a MSA. One patient with anti-Mi2 autoantibodies had both genetically confirmed facioscapulohumeral dystrophy and dermatomyositis based on a typical skin rash and partial response to immunosuppressive medications. A second patient with anti-Jo-1 autoantibodies had both genetically defined limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (i.e., calpainopathy) and a systemic autoimmune process based on biopsy-confirmed lupus nephritis, sicca symptoms, and anti-Ro52 autoantibodies. Conclusions: The MSAs tested for in this study are highly specific for autoimmune muscle disease and are rarely, if ever, found in patients who only have genetic muscle disease. In patients with genetic muscle disease, the presence of a MSA should suggest the possibility of a coexisting autoimmune process. PMID:26668818

  7. Biotoxicity assays for fruiting body lectins and other cytoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Künzler, Markus; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Butschi, Alex; Garbani, Mattia; Lüthy, Peter; Hengartner, Michael O; Aebi, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that a specific class of fungal lectins, commonly referred to as fruiting body lectins, play a role as effector molecules in the defense of fungi against predators and parasites. Hallmarks of these fungal lectins are their specific expression in reproductive structures, fruiting bodies, and/or sclerotia and their synthesis on free ribosomes in the cytoplasm. Fruiting body lectins are released upon damage of the fungal cell and bind to specific carbohydrate structures of predators and parasites, which leads to deterrence, inhibition of growth, and development or even killing of these organisms. Here, we describe assays to assess the toxicity of such lectins and other cytoplasmic proteins toward three different model organisms: the insect Aedes aegypti, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. All three assays are based on heterologous expression of the examined proteins in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli and feeding of these recombinant bacteria to omnivorous and bacterivorous organisms. PMID:20816208

  8. Ionizing Radiation Induces HMGB1 Cytoplasmic Translocation and Extracellular Release

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; He, Li; Bao, Guoqiang; He, Xin; Fan, Saijun; Wang, Haichao

    2016-01-01

    Objective A nucleosomal protein, HMGB1, can be secreted by activated immune cells or passively released by dying cells, thereby amplifying rigorous inflammatory responses. In this study we aimed to test the possibility that ionizing radiation similarly induces cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation and extracellular release. Method Human skin fibroblast (GM0639) and bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells and animals (rats) were exposed to X-ray radiation, and HMGB1 translocation and release were assessed by immunocytochemistry and immunoassay, respectively. Results At a wide dose range (4.0 – 12.0 Gy), X-ray radiation induced a dramatic cytoplasmic HMGB1 translocation, and triggered a time- and dose-dependent HMGB1 release both in vitro and in vivo. The radiation-mediated HMGB1 release was associated with noticeable chromosomal DNA damage and loss of cell viability. Conclusion radiation induces HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation and extracellular release through active secretion and passive leakage processes. PMID:27331198

  9. Increased incidence of anti-dsDNA autoantibody concentration in sera of workers occupationally exposed to diisocyanates.

    PubMed

    Czuppon, A B; Marczynski, B; Scheer, E; Hartmann, R; Baur, X

    1993-01-01

    Sera of 87 industrial workers with a history of occupational exposition to various diisocyanates, toluene diisocyanate, hexamethylene diisocyanate and methylene-diphenyl diisocyanate were analyzed for antibodies to isocyanate-conjugated human serum albumin and for anti-dsDNA autoantibodies. Ten workers (approx. 11%) were shown to have elevated anti-dsDNA autoantibody concentrations and 13 revealed antibodies to isocyanate-modified human serum albumin. The overlap of both tests being positive was calculated at about 40%. It would seem, therefore, that routine estimation of anti-dsDNA autoantibodies could provide additional useful information for the clinical diagnosis of occupational health impairment due to isocyanate exposure.

  10. [Interaction of chagasic autoantibodies with the third extracellular domain of the human heart muscarinic receptor. Functional and pathological implications].

    PubMed

    Goin, J C; Pérez Leirós, C; Borda, E; Sterin-Borda, L

    1996-01-01

    Herein we demonstrate by ELISA and immunoblotting the presence in the sera of chagasic patients of circulating autoantibodies against the third extracellular domain of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by using a synthetic peptide corresponding to the sequence 169-192 of the receptor. Immunoaffinity purified antipeptide antibodies displayed cardiac muscarinic activity as decreased contractility and cAMP production and increased cGMP levels. These effects were specifically blocked by the synthetic peptide and by atropine. A strong association between the existence of circulating autoantibodies and the presence of dysautonomia was shown, making these autoantibodies an appropriate marker of heart autonomic dysfunction.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeny of cultivated and wild beets: relationships among cytoplasmic male-sterility-inducing and nonsterilizing cytoplasms.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Satsuki; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2007-11-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), the maternally inherited failure to produce functional pollen, has been used in the breeding of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris). At least three different sources of CMS can be distinguished from one another as well as from normal fertile cytoplasm by polymorphisms in their mitochondrial genomes. Here we analyzed 50 accessions of cultivated and wild beets to investigate the phylogenetic relationships among male-sterility-inducing and normal cytoplasms. The haplotypes were characterized by the nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial cox2-cox1 spacer region and mitochondrial minisatellite loci. The results indicated that (1) a normal cytoplasm line, cv. TK81-O, was situated at the major core node of the haplotype network, and (2) the three sterilizing cytoplasms in question derived independently from the core haplotype. The evolutionary pathway was investigated by physical mapping study of the mitochondrial genome of a wild beet (B. vulgaris ssp. orientalis) accession BGRC56777 which shared the same mitochondrial haplotype with TK81-O, but was not identical to TK81-O for the RFLP profiles of mitochondrial DNA. Interestingly, three sets of inverted repeated sequences appeared to have been involved in a series of recombination events during the course of evolution between the BGRC56777 and the TK81-O mitochondrial genomes.

  12. Autoantibodies to duodenal gastric-inhibitory-peptide (GIP) cells and to secretin (S) cells in patients with coeliac disease, tropical sprue and maturity-onset diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Mirakian, R; Bottazzo, G F; Doniach, D

    1980-01-01

    The presence of autoantibodies detected by immunofluorescence to single endocrine cells, of human duodenum is described in three groups of patients and two control groups. Of 173 coeliac cases, four had GIP cell antibodies, one had secretin cell antibodies and twenty-one reacted with both cell types. Of twelve tropical sprue sera, four reacted with the same two cells. Among fifty elderly diabetics treated with hypoglycaemic drugs, seven sera gave a positive cytoplasmic IFL on duodenal substrate. Four were identified as GIP cells by use of the appropriate hormone antiserum and three reactions were against cells distinct from those stained by anti-GIP, -secretin, -somatostatin, -glucagon and -gastrin. Additional gut hormone antisera will have to be tested to identify these APUD cells. Thirty blood donors and seventy-three sera from autoimmune endocrine patients gave entirely negative results on unfixed cryostat sections of duodenal mucosa. Although impaired GIP and secretin responses have been reported in coeliac disease, and abnormal GIP values were found in Type II diabetes, there is as yet no data to correlate these metabolic dificiencies with the presence of endocrine cell antibodies in the serum. These studies are in progress. Images p39-a p39-b p39-c PMID:7002390

  13. Colicin S8 export: extracellular and cytoplasmic colicin are different.

    PubMed

    Garcia Diaz, Maria-Elena; Concepción Curbelo, Juan Luis

    2003-12-01

    The properties of colicin S8 are different for the cytoplasmic, periplasmic and extracellular protein. Interactions with its specific receptors reflect this. Active cell extracts separate into a non-anionic along with an anionic fraction by DEAE-Sephacell chromatography. Previously, we have purified cell-associated colicin S8 as an aggregation of highly related polypeptides; cytoplasmic colicin S8 seems to be post-translationally processed into an aggregation of polypeptides of molecular mass ranging from 45,000 Da to 60,000 Da. We suggest that a conformational change to colicin S8 may occur related to the export process.

  14. Aortic valve replacement in a patient with MPO-ANCA-positive Goodpasture disease.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Go; Asano, Ryota; Sato, Atsuhiko; Tatsuishi, Wataru; Nakano, Kiyoharu

    2016-12-01

    Goodpasture disease (GD) is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by the development of pathologic autoantibodies against both glomerular and alveolar basal membranes. Approximately one third of the patients with GD are also positive for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA). In this case report, a 74-year-old woman was diagnosed as having myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA-positive GD with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS). She underwent immunosuppressive therapy and plasmapheresis that led to GD remission. Whether a cardiac surgery affects a MPO-ANCA-positive GD in remission is unknown. We reported the outcomes after aortic valve replacement for severe AS in a patient with MPO-ANCA-positive GD. PMID:27654701

  15. Twenty-five years of RENHIS: a history of histopathological studies within EUVAS.

    PubMed

    van Daalen, Emma; Ferrario, Franco; Noël, Laure-Hélène; Waldherr, Rüdiger; Hagen, E Christiaan; Bruijn, Jan A; Bajema, Ingeborg M

    2015-04-01

    In the early 1990s, an international working group of experienced renal pathologists, the Renal Histology group, set up a scoring system for biopsies with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated glomerulonephritis. This scoring system subdivided glomerular, interstitial and vascular lesions and served as a tool for the evaluation of all renal biopsies from studies of the European Vasculitis Study Group (EUVAS). Histopathological studies gave new insights into the prediction of renal outcome in patients with ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis. Percentage of normal glomeruli and a selected number of interstitial parameters were reliable predictors of long-term follow-up glomerular filtration rate in all studies. Out of these results, a histopathological classification distinguishing focal, crescentic, mixed and sclerotic classes of ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis was developed. Until today, 13 studies have validated this classification system. Future studies will try to determine if and how renal histology could be helpful in guiding treatment of ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis.

  16. Cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP): New approach for the delivery of biomolecules into cytoplasm in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Daeyou; Jeon, Choonju; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Mi-Seon; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Bae, Yong-Soo . E-mail: ysbae04@skku.edu

    2006-05-01

    The protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV-1 TAT has been extensively documented with regard to its membrane transduction potential, as well as its efficient delivery of biomolecules in vivo. However, the majority of PTD and PTD-conjugated molecules translocate to the nucleus rather than to the cytoplasm after transduction, due to the functional nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Here, we report a cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP), which was deliberately designed to ensure the efficient cytoplasmic delivery of the CTP-fused biomolecules. In comparison with PTD, CTP and its fusion partners exhibited a clear preference for cytoplasmic localization, and also markedly enhanced membrane transduction potential. Unlike the mechanism underlying PTD-mediated transduction, CTP-mediated transduction occurs independently of the lipid raft-dependent macropinocytosis pathway. The CTP-conjugated Smac/DIABLO peptide (Smac-CTP) was also shown to be much more efficient than Smac-PTD in the blockage of the antiapoptotic properties of XIAP, suggesting that cytoplasmic functional molecules can be more efficiently targeted by CTP-mediated delivery. In in vivo trafficking studies, CTP-fused {beta}-gal exhibited unique organ tropisms to the liver and lymph nodes when systemically injected into mice, whereas PTD-{beta}-gal exhibited no such tropisms. Taken together, our findings implicate CTP as a novel delivery peptide appropriate for (i) molecular targeting to cytoplasmic compartments in vitro, (ii) the development of class I-associated CTL vaccines, and (iii) special drug delivery in vivo, without causing any untoward effects on nuclear genetic material.

  17. Autoantibodies predate the onset of systemic lupus erythematosus in northern Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Autoantibodies have a central role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The presence of autoantibodies preceding disease onset by years has been reported both in patients with SLE and in those with rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting a gradual development of these diseases. Therefore, we sought to identify autoantibodies in a northern European population predating the onset of symptoms of SLE and their relationship to presenting symptoms. Methods The register of patients fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology criteria for SLE and with a given date of the onset of symptoms was coanalysed with the register of the Medical Biobank, Umeå, Sweden. Thirty-eight patients were identified as having donated blood samples prior to symptom onset. A nested case-control study (1:4) was performed with 152 age- and sex-matched controls identified from within the Medical Biobank register (Umeå, Sweden). Antibodies against anti-Sjögren's syndrome antigen A (Ro/SSA; 52 and 60 kDa), anti-Sjögren's syndrome antigen B, anti-Smith antibody, ribonucleoprotein, scleroderma, anti-histidyl-tRNA synthetase antibody, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), centromere protein B and histones were analysed using the AtheNA Multi-Lyte ANA II Plus Test System on a Bio-Plex Array Reader (Luminex200). Antinuclear antibodies test II (ANA II) results were analysed using indirect immunofluorescence on human epidermal 2 cells at a sample dilution of 1:100. Results Autoantibodies against nuclear antigens were detected a mean (±SD) of 5.6 ± 4.7 years before the onset of symptoms and 8.7 ± 5.6 years before diagnosis in 63% of the individuals who subsequently developed SLE. The sensitivity (45.7%) was highest for ANA II, with a specificity of 95%, followed by anti-dsDNA and anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, both with sensitivities of 20.0% at specificities of 98.7% and 97.4%, respectively. The odds ratios (ORs) for predicting disease were 18.13 for anti-dsDNA (95% confidence interval (95% CI), 3.58 to

  18. Further analysis of cytoplasmic polyadenylation in Xenopus embryos and identification of embryonic cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Simon, R; Richter, J D

    1994-12-01

    Early development in Xenopus laevis is programmed in part by maternally inherited mRNAs that are synthesized and stored in the growing oocyte. During oocyte maturation, several of these messages are translationally activated by poly(A) elongation, which in turn is regulated by two cis elements in the 3' untranslated region, the hexanucleotide AAUAAA and a cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE) consisting of UUUUUAU or similar sequence. In the early embryo, a different set of maternal mRNAs is translationally activated. We have shown previously that one of these, C12, requires a CPE consisting of at least 12 uridine residues, in addition to the hexanucleotide, for its cytoplasmic polyadenylation and subsequent translation (R. Simon, J.-P. Tassan, and J.D. Richter, Genes Dev. 6:2580-2591, 1992). To assess whether this embryonic CPE functions in other maternal mRNAs, we have chosen Cl1 RNA, which is known to be polyadenylated during early embryogenesis (J. Paris, B. Osborne, A. Couturier, R. LeGuellec, and M. Philippe, Gene 72:169-176, 1988). Wild-type as well as mutated versions of Cl1 RNA were injected into fertilized eggs and were analyzed for cytoplasmic polyadenylation at times up to the gastrula stage. This RNA also required a poly(U) CPE for cytoplasmic polyadenylation in embryos, but in this case the CPE consisted of 18 uridine residues. In addition, the timing and extent of cytoplasmic poly(A) elongation during early embryogenesis were dependent upon the distance between the CPE and the hexanucleotide. Further, as was the case with Cl2 RNA, Cl1 RNA contains a large masking element that prevents premature cytoplasmic polyadenylation during oocyte maturation. To examine the factors that may be involved in the cytoplasmic polyadenylation of both C12 and C11 RNAs, we performed UV cross-linking experiments in egg extracts. Two proteins with sizes of ~36 and ~45 kDa interacted specifically with the CPEs of both RNAs, although they bound preferentially to the C12

  19. Experimental Analysis of Cell Function Using Cytoplasmic Streaming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssens, Peter; Waldhuber, Megan

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory exercise investigates the phenomenon of cytoplasmic streaming in the fresh water alga "Nitella". Students use the fungal toxin cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, to investigate the mechanism of streaming. Students use simple statistical methods to analyze their data. Typical student data are provided. (Contains 3…

  20. Cytoplasmic Domains and Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channel Gating

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Francisco; Domínguez, Pedro; de la Peña, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    The basic architecture of the voltage-dependent K+ channels (Kv channels) corresponds to a transmembrane protein core in which the permeation pore, the voltage-sensing components and the gating machinery (cytoplasmic facing gate and sensor–gate coupler) reside. Usually, large protein tails are attached to this core, hanging toward the inside of the cell. These cytoplasmic regions are essential for normal channel function and, due to their accessibility to the cytoplasmic environment, constitute obvious targets for cell-physiological control of channel behavior. Here we review the present knowledge about the molecular organization of these intracellular channel regions and their role in both setting and controlling Kv voltage-dependent gating properties. This includes the influence that they exert on Kv rapid/N-type inactivation and on activation/deactivation gating of Shaker-like and eag-type Kv channels. Some illustrative examples about the relevance of these cytoplasmic domains determining the possibilities for modulation of Kv channel gating by cellular components are also considered. PMID:22470342

  1. Nuclear repulsion enables division autonomy in a single cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cori A.; Eser, Umut; Korndorf, Therese; Borsuk, Mark E.; Skotheim, Jan M.; Gladfelter, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Current models of cell cycle control, based on classic studies of fused cells, predict that nuclei in a shared cytoplasm respond to the same CDK activities to undergo synchronous cycling. However, synchrony is rarely observed in naturally occurring syncytia, such as the multinucleate fungus Ashbya gossypii. In this system, nuclei divide asynchronously raising the question of how nuclear timing differences are maintained despite sharing a common milieu. Results We observe that neighboring nuclei are highly variable in division cycle duration and neighbors repel one another to space apart and demarcate their own cytoplasmic territories. The size of these territories increases as a nucleus approaches mitosis and can influence cycling rates. This non-random nuclear spacing is regulated by microtubules and is required for nuclear asynchrony, as nuclei that transiently come in very close proximity will partially synchronize. Sister nuclei born of the same mitosis are generally not persistent neighbors over their lifetimes yet remarkably retain similar division cycle times. This indicates that nuclei carry a memory of their birth state that influences their division timing and supports that nuclei subdivide a common cytosol into functionally distinct yet mobile compartments. Conclusions These findings support that nuclei use cytoplasmic microtubules to establish “cells within cells.” Individual compartments appear to push against one another to compete for cytoplasmic territory and insulate the division cycle. This provides a mechanism by which syncytial nuclei can spatially organize cell cycle signaling and suggests size control can act in a system without physical boundaries. PMID:24094857

  2. Optomechatronic System For Automated Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulev, Assen; Tiankov, Tihomir; Ignatova, Detelina; Kostadinov, Kostadin; Roussev, Ilia; Trifonov, Dimitar; Penchev, Valentin

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a complex optomechatronic system for In-Vitro Fertilization (IVF), offering almost complete automation of the Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) procedure. The compound parts and sub-systems, as well as some of the computer vision algorithms, are described below. System capabilities for ICSI have been demonstrated on infertile oocyte cells.

  3. Structure of human cytoplasmic dynein-2 primed for its powerstroke

    PubMed Central

    Urnavicius, Linas; Carter, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the dynein family, consisting of cytoplasmic and axonemal isoforms, are motors that move towards the minus ends of microtubules. Cytoplasmic dynein-1 (dynein-1) plays roles in mitosis and cellular cargo transport1, and is implicated in viral infections2 and neurodegenerative diseases3. Cytoplasmic dynein-2 (dynein-2) carries out intraflagellar transport4 and is associated with human skeletal ciliopathies5. Dyneins share a conserved motor domain that couples cycles of ATP hydrolysis with conformational changes to produce movement6-9. Here we present the crystal structure of the human cytoplasmic dynein-2 motor bound to the ATP-hydrolysis transition state analogue ADP.vanadate (ADP.Vi)10. The structure reveals a closure of the motor’s ring of six AAA+ domains (ATPases associated with various cellular activites: AAA1-AAA6). This induces a steric clash with the linker, the key element for the generation of movement, driving it into a conformation that is primed to produce force. Ring closure also changes the interface between the stalk and buttress coiled-coil extensions of the motor domain. This drives helix sliding in the stalk that causes the microtubule binding domain (MTBD) at its tip to release from the microtubule. Our structure answers the key questions of how ATP hydrolysis leads to linker remodelling and microtubule affinity regulation. PMID:25470043

  4. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-05-15

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication.

  5. Membrane binding of human phospholipid scramblase 1 cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed

    Posada, Itziar M D; Sánchez-Magraner, Lissete; Hervás, Javier H; Alonso, Alicia; Monaco, Hugo L; Goñi, Félix M

    2014-07-01

    Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (SCR) consists of a large cytoplasmic domain and a small presumed transmembrane domain near the C-terminal end of the protein. Previous studies with the SCRΔ mutant lacking the C-terminal portion (last 28 aa) revealed the importance of this C-terminal moiety for protein function and calcium-binding affinity. The present contribution is intended to elucidate the effect of the transmembrane domain suppression on SCRΔ binding to model membranes (lipid monolayers and bilayers) and on SCRΔ reconstitution in proteoliposomes. In all cases the protein cytoplasmic domain showed a great affinity for lipid membranes, and behaved in most aspects as an intrinsic membrane protein. Assays have been performed in the presence of phosphatidylserine, presumably important for the SCR cytoplasmic domain to be electrostatically anchored to the plasma membrane inner surface. The fusion protein maltose binding protein-SCR has also been studied as an intermediate case of a molecule that can insert into the bilayer hydrophobic core, yet it is stable in detergent-free buffers. Although the intracellular location of SCR has been the object of debate, the present data support the view of SCR as an integral membrane protein, in which not only the transmembrane domain but also the cytoplasmic moiety play a role in membrane docking of the protein.

  6. Cytoplasmic mechanisms of axonal and dendritic growth in neurons.

    PubMed

    Heidemann, S R

    1996-01-01

    The structural mechanisms responsible for the gradual elaboration of the cytoplasmic elongation of neurons are reviewed. In addition to discussing recent work, important older work is included to inform newcomers to the field how the current perspective arose. The highly specialized axon and the less exaggerated dendrite both result from the advance of the motile growth cone. In the area of physiology, studies in the last decade have directly confirmed the classic model of the growth cone pulling forward and the axon elongating from this tension. Particularly in the case of the axon, cytoplasmic elongation is closely linked to the formation of an axial microtubule bundle from behind the advancing growth cone. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the expression of microtubule-associated proteins during neuronal differentiation to stiffen and stabilize axonal microtubules, providing specialized structural support. Studies of membrane organelle transport along the axonal microtubules produced an explosion of knowledge about ATPase molecules serving as motors driving material along microtubule rails. However, most aspects of the cytoplasmic mechanisms responsible for neurogenesis remain poorly understood. There is little agreement on mechanisms for the addition of new plasma membrane or the addition of new cytoskeletal filaments in the growing axon. Also poorly understood are the mechanisms that couple the promiscuous motility of the growth cone to the addition of cytoplasmic elements.

  7. Gravity-dependent polarity of cytoplasmic streaming in Nitellopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayne, R.; Staves, M. P.; Leopold, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    The internodal cells of the characean alga Nitellopsis obtusa were chosen to investigate the effect of gravity on cytoplasmic streaming. Horizontal cells exhibit streaming with equal velocities in both directions, whereas in vertically oriented cells, the downward-streaming cytoplasm flows ca. 10% faster than the upward-streaming cytoplasm. These results are independent of the orientation of the morphological top and bottom of the cell. We define the ratio of the velocity of the downward- to the upward-streaming cytoplasm as the polar ratio (PR). The normal polarity of a cell can be reversed (PR < 1) by treatment with neutral red (NR). The NR effect may be the result of membrane hyperpolarization, caused by the opening of K+ channels. The K+ channel blocker TEA Cl- inhibits the NR effect. External Ca2+ is required for normal graviresponsiveness. The [Ca2+] of the medium determines the polarity of cytoplasmic streaming. Less than 1 micromole Ca2+ resulted in a PR < 1 while greater than 1 micromole Ca2+ resulted in the normal gravity response. The voltage-dependent Ca(2+)-channel blocker, nifedipine, inhibited the gravity response in a reversible manner, while treatment with LaCl3 resulted in a PR < 1, indicating the presence of two types of Ca2+ channels. A new model for graviperception is presented in which the whole cell acts as the gravity sensor, and the plasma membrane acts as the gravireceptor. This is supported by ligation and UV irradiation experiments which indicate that the membranes at both ends of the cell are required for graviperception. The density of the external medium also affects the PR of Nitellopsis. Calculations are presented that indicate that the weight of the protoplasm may provide enough potential energy to open ion channels.

  8. Identification of the Immunodominant Epitope Region in Phospholipase A2 Receptor-Mediating Autoantibody Binding in Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Liyo; Lam, Vinson; Waldman, Meryl; Glassock, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is a common cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults. Recent clinical studies established that >70% of patients with idiopathic (also called primary) MN (IMN) possess circulating autoantibodies targeting the M-type phospholipase A2 receptor-1 (PLA2R) on the surface of glomerular visceral epithelial cells (podocytes). In situ, these autoantibodies trigger the formation of immune complexes, which are hypothesized to cause enhanced glomerular permeability to plasma proteins. Indeed, the level of autoantibody in circulation correlates with the severity of proteinuria in patients. The autoantibody only recognizes the nonreduced form of PLA2R, suggesting that disulfide bonds determine the antigenic epitope conformation. Here, we identified the immunodominant epitope region in PLA2R by probing isolated truncated PLA2R extracellular domains with sera from patients with IMN that contain anti-PLA2R autoantibodies. Patient sera specifically recognized a protein complex consisting of the cysteine-rich (CysR), fibronectin-like type II (FnII), and C-type lectin-like domain 1 (CTLD1) domains of PLA2R only under nonreducing conditions. Moreover, absence of either the CysR or CTLD1 domain prevented autoantibody recognition of the remaining domains. Additional analysis suggested that this three-domain complex contains at least one disulfide bond required for conformational configuration and autoantibody binding. Notably, the three-domain complex completely blocked the reactivity of autoantibodies from patient sera with the full-length PLA2R, and the reactivity of patient sera with the three-domain complex on immunoblots equaled the reactivity with full-length PLA2R. These results indicate that the immunodominant epitope in PLA2R is exclusively located in the CysR-FnII-CTLD1 region. PMID:25205735

  9. Identification of the immunodominant epitope region in phospholipase A2 receptor-mediating autoantibody binding in idiopathic membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kao, Liyo; Lam, Vinson; Waldman, Meryl; Glassock, Richard J; Zhu, Quansheng

    2015-02-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is a common cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults. Recent clinical studies established that >70% of patients with idiopathic (also called primary) MN (IMN) possess circulating autoantibodies targeting the M-type phospholipase A2 receptor-1 (PLA2R) on the surface of glomerular visceral epithelial cells (podocytes). In situ, these autoantibodies trigger the formation of immune complexes, which are hypothesized to cause enhanced glomerular permeability to plasma proteins. Indeed, the level of autoantibody in circulation correlates with the severity of proteinuria in patients. The autoantibody only recognizes the nonreduced form of PLA2R, suggesting that disulfide bonds determine the antigenic epitope conformation. Here, we identified the immunodominant epitope region in PLA2R by probing isolated truncated PLA2R extracellular domains with sera from patients with IMN that contain anti-PLA2R autoantibodies. Patient sera specifically recognized a protein complex consisting of the cysteine-rich (CysR), fibronectin-like type II (FnII), and C-type lectin-like domain 1 (CTLD1) domains of PLA2R only under nonreducing conditions. Moreover, absence of either the CysR or CTLD1 domain prevented autoantibody recognition of the remaining domains. Additional analysis suggested that this three-domain complex contains at least one disulfide bond required for conformational configuration and autoantibody binding. Notably, the three-domain complex completely blocked the reactivity of autoantibodies from patient sera with the full-length PLA2R, and the reactivity of patient sera with the three-domain complex on immunoblots equaled the reactivity with full-length PLA2R. These results indicate that the immunodominant epitope in PLA2R is exclusively located in the CysR-FnII-CTLD1 region.

  10. Combination of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin A for improved detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yu-Hui; Xu, Yi-Wei; Qiu, Si-Qi; Hong, Chao-Qun; Zhai, Tian-Tian; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2014-09-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in Southern China and Southeast Asia, and early detection remains a challenge. Autoantibodies have been found to precede the manifestations of symptomatic cancer by several months to years, making their identification of particular relevance for early detection. In the present study, the diagnostic value of serum autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 in NPC patients was evaluated. The study included 112 patients with NPC and 138 normal controls. Serum levels of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and classical Epstein-Barr virus marker, viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin A (VCA-IgA), were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Measurement of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and VCA-IgA demonstrated a sensitivity/specificity of 42.9/94.9% [95% confidence interval (CI), 33.7-52.6/89.4-97.8%] and 55.4/95.7% (95% CI, 45.7-64.7/90.4-98.2%), respectively. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve for autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 (0.821; 95% CI, 0.771-0.871) was marginally lower than that for VCA-IgA (0.860; 95% CI, 0.810-0.910) in NPC. The combination of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 and VCA-IgA yielded an enhanced sensitivity of 80.4% (95% CI, 71.6-87.0%) and a specificity of 90.6% (95% CI, 84.1-94.7%). Moreover, detection of autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 could differentiate early-stage NPC patients from normal controls. Our results suggest that autoantibodies against NY-ESO-1 may serve as a potential biomarker, as a supplement to VCA-IgA, for the screening and diagnosis of NPC.

  11. Autoantibodies that stabilize the molecular interaction of Ku antigen with DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit.

    PubMed

    Satoh, M; Ajmani, A K; Stojanov, L; Langdon, J J; Ogasawara, T; Wang, J; Dooley, M A; Richards, H B; Winfield, J B; Carter, T H; Reeves, W H

    1996-09-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) consists of a DNA binding subunit (Ku autoantigen), and a catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). In the present study, human autoantibodies that recognize novel antigenic determinants of DNA-PK were identified. One type of autoantibody stabilized the interaction of DNA-PKcs with Ku and recognized the DNA-PKcs -Ku complex, but not bio-chemically purified DNA-PKcs. Another type recognized purified DNA-PKcs. Autoantibodies to Ku (p70/p80 heterodimer), 'stabilizing' antibodies, and antibodies to DNA-PKcs comprise a linked autoantibody set, since antibodies recognizing purified DNA-PKcs were strongly associated with stabilizing antibodies, whereas stabilizing antibodies were strongly associated with anti-Ku. This hierarchical pattern of autoantibodies specific for components of DNA-PK (anti-Ku > stabilizing antibodies > anti-DNA-PKcs) may have implications for the pathogenesis of autoimmunity to DNA-PK and other chromatin particles. The data raise the possibility that altered antigen processing and/or stabilization of the DNA-PKcs-Ku complex due to autoantibody binding could play a role in spreading autoimmunity from Ku to the weakly associated antigen DNA-PKcs.

  12. Autoantibodies targeting galactose-deficient IgA1 associate with progression of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Berthoux, Francois; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Thibaudin, Lise; Yanagawa, Hiroyuki; Maillard, Nicolas; Mariat, Christophe; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Julian, Bruce A; Novak, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Mesangial and circulating IgA1 with aberrantly glycosylated hinge region O-glycans characterize IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Unlike healthy individuals, some IgA1 is galactose deficient in patients with IgAN, leaving terminal N-acetylgalactosamine residues in the hinge region exposed. Circulating autoantibodies that recognize such galactose-deficient IgA1 as an autoantigen, or the levels of the autoantigen itself, may allow prediction of disease progression. Here, we analyzed serum samples obtained at diagnosis for autoantigen and autoantibodies from 97 patients with IgAN selected from our prospective cohort according to their absolute renal risk for progression to dialysis or death (0, very low; 1, low; 2, high; 3, very high). We also analyzed samples from controls comprising 30 healthy volunteers and 30 patients with non-IgAN disease. The mean follow-up was 13.8 years. We found that mean serum levels of total autoantigen, normalized IgG autoantibody, and total IgA autoantibody were significantly higher in patients than in the combined controls (all P≤0.01). Furthermore, increasing levels correlated with worse clinical outcomes. In Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses, IgG autoantibody levels ≥1.33 predicted dialysis or death (both P≤0.01). In conclusion, these data suggest that serum levels of IgG and IgA autoantibodies strongly associate with the progression of IgAN nephropathy.

  13. Drug-like actions of autoantibodies against receptors of the autonomous nervous system and their impact on human heart function

    PubMed Central

    Herda, LR; Felix, SB; Boege, F

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies against cholinergic and adrenergic receptors (adrenoceptors) are frequent in serum of patients with chronic heart failure. Their prevalence is associated with Chagas' disease, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and ischaemic heart disease. Among the epitopes targeted are first and second extracellular loops of the β-adrenergic (β-adrenoceptor) and M2 muscarinic receptor. β1-adrenoceptor autoantibodies affect radioligand binding and cardiomyocyte function similar to agonists. Corresponding rodent immunizations induce symptoms compatible with chronic heart failure that are reversible upon removal of the antibodies, transferable via the serum and abrogated by adrenergic antagonists. In DCM patients, prevalence and stimulatory efficacy of β1-adrenoceptor autoantibodies are correlated to the decline in cardiac function, ventricular arrhythmia and higher incidence of cardiac death. In conclusion, such autoantibodies seem to cause or promote chronic human left ventricular dysfunction by acting on their receptor targets in a drug-like fashion. However, the pharmacology of this interaction is poorly understood. It is unclear how the autoantibodies trigger changes in receptor activity and second messenger coupling and how that is related to the pathogenesis and severity of the associated diseases. Here, we summarize the available evidence regarding these issues and discuss these findings in the light of recent knowledge about the conformational activation of the human β2-adrenoceptor and the properties of bona fide cardiopathogenic autoantibodies derived from immune-adsorption therapy of DCM patients. These considerations might contribute to the conception of therapy regimen aimed at counteracting or neutralizing cardiopathogenic receptor autoantibodies. PMID:22220626

  14. Rapid and reversible responses to IVIG in autoimmune neuromuscular diseases suggest mechanisms of action involving competition with functionally important autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Melvin; McCallus, Daniel E; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is widely used in autoimmune neuromuscular diseases whose pathogenesis is undefined. Many different effects of IVIG have been demonstrated in vitro, but few studies actually identify the mechanism(s) most important in vivo. Doses and treatment intervals are generally chosen empirically. Recent studies in Guillain-Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy show that some effects of IVIG are readily reversible and highly dependent on the serum IgG level. This suggests that in some autoantibody-mediated neuromuscular diseases, IVIG directly competes with autoantibodies that reversibly interfere with nerve conduction. Mechanisms of action of IVIG which most likely involve direct competition with autoantibodies include: neutralization of autoantibodies by anti-idiotypes, inhibition of complement deposition, and increasing catabolism of pathologic antibodies by saturating FcRn. Indirect immunomodulatory effects are not as likely to involve competition and may not have the same reversibility and dose-dependency. Pharmacodynamic analyses should be informative regarding most relevant mechanism(s) of action of IVIG as well as the role of autoantibodies in the immunopathogenesis of each disease. Better understanding of the role of autoantibodies and of the target(s) of IVIG could lead to more efficient use of this therapy and better patient outcomes. PMID:24200120

  15. Molecular analysis of snRNAs and scRNAs using autoantibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Flores, G; Martinez, F; Reyes, P A; Cortes, J J

    1997-01-01

    Immunoprecipitation analysis of total HeLa cells RNA extract by protein A-Sheparose purified autoantibodies and pCp 32P-3' end labeling RNAs revealed that U1, U2, U4 and U5 snRNAs are related with anti-Sm or U1nRNP autoantibodies, while the hY1, hY3, hY4 and hY5 scRNAs were related to anti-SSA/Ro autoantibodies present in sera of patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. The authors detected molecular snRNAs and scRNAs specificities by autoantibodies in 71 sera, the molecular RNA specificity for anti-Sm (U1, U2, U4 and U5 snRNAs) was present in 39%; anti-SSA/Ro sera reacted against scRNAs (hY1, hY3, hY4 and hY5) in 36%, then anti-U1nRNP sera recognized U1 snRNA in 13% of sera and anti-rRNP related with rRNA were recognized in 8%. Twenty-nine SLE sera were RNA negative. A molecular characterization of the autoantibodies in sera from SLE patients may be a useful tool for clinical and laboratory diagnosis of SLE, and the use of autoantibodies as molecular probes allows to continue exploring some basic mechanism of gene expression.

  16. Detection of anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibodies in the sera of Chinese neuromyelitis optica patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Su, Weiheng; Wang, Jie; Pisani, Francesco; Frigeri, Antonio; Ma, Tonghui

    2013-03-15

    In this study, we recruited 10 neuromyelitis optica patients, two multiple sclerosis patients and two myelitis patients. Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79) cells transfected with a human aquaporin-4-mCherry fusion protein gene were used to detect anti-aquaporin-4 antibody in neuromyelitis optica patient sera by immunofluorescence. Anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibody was stably detected by immunofluorescence in neuromyelitis optica patient sera exclusively. The sensitivity of the assay for neuromyelitis optica was 90% and the specificity for neuromyelitis optica was 100%. The anti-aquaporin-4 antibody titers in sera were tested with serial dilutions until the signal disappeared. A positive correlation was detected between Expanded Disability Status Scale scores and serum anti-aquaporin-4 antibody titers. The anti-aquaporin-4 antibody assay is highly sensitive and specific in the sera of Chinese neuromyelitis optica patients. Detection of aquaporin-4 autoantibody is important for the diagnosis and treatment of neuromyelitis optica.

  17. Clinical and histological findings associated with autoantibodies detected by RNA immunoprecipitation in inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeaki; Yonekawa, Takahiro; Kuwana, Masataka; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Okazaki, Yuka; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Suzuki, Norihiro; Nishino, Ichizo

    2014-09-15

    Of 207 adult patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, detection of autoantibodies by RNA immunoprecipitation showed that 99 patients (48%) were antibody-positive. We divided these 99 into five subgroups: anti-signal recognition particle (SRP), anti-aminoacyl transfer RNA synthetase, anti-Ku, anti-U1RNP, and anti-SSA/B. Younger age at onset, severe weakness, muscle atrophy, elevated creatine kinase, and necrosis in muscle fibers without inflammatory cell infiltration were found significantly more frequently among the patients with anti-SRP antibodies (n=41) compared to the antibody-negative patients (n=108). Autoantibody detection by RNA immunoprecipitation can provide useful information associated with clinical and histological findings.

  18. Association of reversible splenial lesion syndrome (RESLES) with Anti-VGKC autoantibody syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gilder, Thomas R; Hawley, Jason S; Theeler, Brett J

    2016-05-01

    A 50-year-old male presented with complaints of fatigue, confusion, and memory problems. Neurological evaluation revealed altered cognition, unsteady gait, ataxia, dysmetria, and weakness. MRI of the brain was initially unremarkable. Over several days, the patient experienced improvement of symptoms and a follow-up MRI revealed a small lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum seen on diffusion weighted and T2 sequences. The patient was discovered to have elevated anti-voltage gated potassium channel serum autoantibodies. Follow-up MRI revealed resolution of the splenial lesion. The patient was treated with intravenous immune globulin, and improved back to his pre-treatment baseline. We believe this to be the first case of a reversible splenial lesion syndrome as a manifestation of the anti-voltage gated potassium channel autoantibody syndrome, and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism.

  19. Immunoadsorber for specific apheresis of autoantibodies in the treatment of bullous pemphigoid.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, Michael; Dworschak, Jenny; Ebermann, Kristin; Komorowski, Lars; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Stöcker, Winfried; Zillikens, Detlef; Probst, Christian; Schmidt, Enno

    2016-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering skin disease associated with autoantibodies against two hemidesmosomal proteins, BP180 (type XVII collagen) and BP230. As the pathogenic relevance of antibodies against the immunodominant NC16A domain of BP180 has been clearly demonstrated, specific removal of these antibodies should be a rational therapeutic approach. Here, we evaluated three recombinant forms of bacterially produced BP180 NC16A, a monomer, trimer, and tetramer, together with different matrices for their efficacy to specifically adsorb autoantibodies from BP plasma samples. An adsorber consisting of NC16A-trimer coupled to NHS-activated Sepharose 4 Fast Flow revealed satisfying adsorption rates and a high specificity. The NC16A-trimer adsorber was regenerable and autoclavable. It has the potential to be used for specific immunoadsorption to treat severe and refractory BP and other pemphigoid diseases associated with BP180 NC16A reactivity. PMID:26498290

  20. Antiepidermis autoantibodies induced by anti-PD-1 therapy in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Brunet-Possenti, Florence; Mignot, Sabine; Deschamps, Lydia; Descamps, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    Skin rashes induced by anti-PD-1s are often reported; however, their immunological profiles are currently unknown. We report the case of an atypical eruption induced by pembrolizumab, associated with the occurrence of antiepidermis autoantibodies. As the onset of lesions was concomitant with the favorable tumor response, we suggest that this hybrid rash belongs to a new category of paraneoplastic syndrome, reflecting the intense immunomodulation induced by pembrolizumab. With the increasing use of anti-PD-1s, this kind of report may become frequent. For a better understanding of immune-related adverse events, physicians should document the immunological characteristics of atypical skin toxicities. Moreover, the kinetics of induced autoantibodies could provide a proxy measure of anti-PD-1 activity after treatment disruption. PMID:27482939

  1. Association of reversible splenial lesion syndrome (RESLES) with Anti-VGKC autoantibody syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gilder, Thomas R; Hawley, Jason S; Theeler, Brett J

    2016-05-01

    A 50-year-old male presented with complaints of fatigue, confusion, and memory problems. Neurological evaluation revealed altered cognition, unsteady gait, ataxia, dysmetria, and weakness. MRI of the brain was initially unremarkable. Over several days, the patient experienced improvement of symptoms and a follow-up MRI revealed a small lesion in the splenium of the corpus callosum seen on diffusion weighted and T2 sequences. The patient was discovered to have elevated anti-voltage gated potassium channel serum autoantibodies. Follow-up MRI revealed resolution of the splenial lesion. The patient was treated with intravenous immune globulin, and improved back to his pre-treatment baseline. We believe this to be the first case of a reversible splenial lesion syndrome as a manifestation of the anti-voltage gated potassium channel autoantibody syndrome, and propose a pathophysiologic mechanism. PMID:26743064

  2. Synthetic Peptide-Based ELISA and ELISpot Assay for Identifying Autoantibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    Pozsgay, Judit; Szarka, Eszter; Huber, Krisztina; Babos, Fruzsina; Magyar, Anna; Hudecz, Ferenc; Sarmay, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is an invaluable diagnostic tool to detect serum autoantibody binding to target antigen. To map the autoantigenic epitope(s), overlapping synthetic peptides covering the total sequence of a protein antigen are used. A large set of peptides synthesized on the crown of pins can be tested by Multipin ELISA for fast screening. Next, to validate the results, the candidate epitope peptides are resynthesized by solid-phase synthesis, coupled to ELISA plate directly, or in a biotinylated form, bound to neutravidin-coated surface and the binding of autoantibodies from patients' sera is tested by indirect ELISA. Further, selected epitope peptides can be applied in enzyme-linked immunospot assay to distinguish individual, citrullinated peptide-specific autoreactive B cells in a pre-stimulated culture of patients' lymphocytes. PMID:26490479

  3. Catalytic autoantibodies against myelin basic protein (MBP) isolated from serum of autistic children impair in vitro models of synaptic plasticity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Cuchacovich, Miguel; Francos, Rina; Cuchacovich, Stephanie; Blanco, Angel; Sandoval, Rodrigo; Gomez, Cristian Farias; Valenzuela, Javier A; Ray, Rupa; Pizzo, Salvatore V

    2015-10-15

    Autoantibodies from autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) patients react with multiple proteins expressed in the brain. One such autoantibody targets myelin basic protein (MBP). ASD patients have autoantibodies to MBP of both the IgG and IgA classes in high titers, but no autoantibodies of the IgM class. IgA autoantibodies act as serine proteinases and degrade MBP in vitro. They also induce a decrease in long-term potentiation in the hippocampi of rats either perfused with or previously inoculated with this IgA. Because this class of autoantibody causes myelin sheath destruction in multiple sclerosis (MS), we hypothesized a similar pathological role for them in ASD.

  4. High prevalence of autoantibodies to RNA helicase A in Mexican patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Autoantibodies to RNA helicase A (RHA) were reported as a new serological marker of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) associated with early stage of the disease. Anti-RHA and other autoantibodies in Mexican SLE patients and their correlation with clinical and immunological features were examined. Methods Autoantibodies in sera from 62 Mexican SLE patients were tested by immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled K562 cell extract and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (anti-U1RNP/Sm, ribosomal P, β2GPI, and dsDNA). Anti-RHA was screened based on the immunoprecipitation of the 140-kDa protein, the identity of which was verified by Western blot using rabbit anti-RHA serum. Clinical and immunological characteristics of anti-RHA-positive patients were analyzed. Results Anti-RHA was detected in 23% (14/62) of patients, a prevalence higher than that of anti-Sm (13%, 8/62). Prevalence and levels of various autoantibodies were not clearly different between anti-RHA (+) vs. (-) cases, although there was a trend of higher levels of anti-RHA antibodies in patients without anti-U1RNP/Sm (P = 0.07). Both anti-RHA and -Sm were common in cases within one year of diagnosis; however, the prevalence and levels of anti-RHA in patients years after diagnosis did not reduce dramatically, unlike a previous report in American patients. This suggests that the high prevalence of anti-RHA in Mexican patients may be due to relatively stable production of anti-RHA. Conclusions Anti-RHA was detected at high prevalence in Mexican SLE patients. Detection of anti-RHA in races in which anti-Sm is not common should be clinically useful. Racial difference in the clinical significance of anti-RHA should be clarified in future studies. PMID:20064217

  5. Prevalence of Autoantibodies and HLA DR, DQ in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Usha; Singh, Gyanendra; Agrawal, Neeraj Kumar; Singh, Rana Gopal; Kumar, Shashi Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type I diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is caused by autoimmune destruction of β-cells of pancreas. Two forms of T1DM are known called as 1A (autoimmune) and 1B (idiopathic). Aim Aim was to study the prevalence of Anti-TTG IgA, Anti-TPO, GADA, ZnT8 and IA-2 autoantibodies and HLA DR and DQ genes and its diagnostic value in T1DM. Materials and Methods Thirty four T1DM patients, 59 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and 28 healthy controls were included in study. Antibodies levels were estimated by ELISA and HLA typing was performed by SSP-PCR method. Result The prevalence of various autoantibodies in T1DM were Anti-TTG 14.7%, Anti-TPO 17.65%, GADA 38.23%, ZnT8 11.76% and IA-2 5.88%. Only GADA and ZnT8 were significantly positive in T1DM. GADA (66.67%) and ZnT8 (33.33%) positivity was more in patients below 15 years age while levels of other antibodies were higher after 15 years age. All autoantibodies were detected in higher frequency in T1DM than in T2DM and controls. HLA DR and DQ typing showed highly significant increase in DRB1*0301 (61.76%, p=0.00) and DQB1*0201 (64.71%, p=0.00) in T1DM. Subjects with HLA DRB1*0301 and DQB1*0201 had 80-100% positive prevalence of GADA, ZnT8, IA-2, Anti-TTG and Anti-TPO autoantibodies. Conclusion Combination of GADA antibody with DRB1 and DQB1 estimation improved diagnosis of T1A than insulin antigen specific antibodies alone.

  6. Prevalence of Autoantibodies and HLA DR, DQ in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Usha; Singh, Gyanendra; Agrawal, Neeraj Kumar; Singh, Rana Gopal; Kumar, Shashi Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type I diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is caused by autoimmune destruction of β-cells of pancreas. Two forms of T1DM are known called as 1A (autoimmune) and 1B (idiopathic). Aim Aim was to study the prevalence of Anti-TTG IgA, Anti-TPO, GADA, ZnT8 and IA-2 autoantibodies and HLA DR and DQ genes and its diagnostic value in T1DM. Materials and Methods Thirty four T1DM patients, 59 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and 28 healthy controls were included in study. Antibodies levels were estimated by ELISA and HLA typing was performed by SSP-PCR method. Result The prevalence of various autoantibodies in T1DM were Anti-TTG 14.7%, Anti-TPO 17.65%, GADA 38.23%, ZnT8 11.76% and IA-2 5.88%. Only GADA and ZnT8 were significantly positive in T1DM. GADA (66.67%) and ZnT8 (33.33%) positivity was more in patients below 15 years age while levels of other antibodies were higher after 15 years age. All autoantibodies were detected in higher frequency in T1DM than in T2DM and controls. HLA DR and DQ typing showed highly significant increase in DRB1*0301 (61.76%, p=0.00) and DQB1*0201 (64.71%, p=0.00) in T1DM. Subjects with HLA DRB1*0301 and DQB1*0201 had 80-100% positive prevalence of GADA, ZnT8, IA-2, Anti-TTG and Anti-TPO autoantibodies. Conclusion Combination of GADA antibody with DRB1 and DQB1 estimation improved diagnosis of T1A than insulin antigen specific antibodies alone. PMID:27630850

  7. Autoantibodies to endostatin in patients with breast cancer: correlation to endostatin levels and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bachelot, T; Ratel, D; Menetrier-Caux, C; Wion, D; Blay, J-Y; Berger, F

    2006-01-01

    Circulating autoantibodies to self-antigens overexpressed by cancer cells are common in cancer patients. As specific proteins are expressed during neoangiogenesis, a similar phenomenon might occur with particular antigens of tumour vessels. Collagen XVIII, from which endostatin is cleaved, is highly expressed in the perivascular basement membrane of tumour-associated blood vessels and autoantibodies to endostatin have been reported in cancer patients. The present study analyses the incidence of naturally occurring autoantibodies to endostatin in the sera of breast cancer patients and their relation to endostatin serum levels and patient clinical outcome. Serum samples from 36 patients with localised breast cancer and 59 patients with a fully documented history of metastatic breast cancer were used. The immunoreactivity of serum samples was tested against purified recombinant human endostatin and endostatin levels were determined by immunoassay. We could detect anti-endostatin antibodies in the sera of 66% of the patients with localised disease and 42% of the patients with metastatic disease (P=0.03). There was no correlation between the presence of antibodies to endostatin and circulating levels of endostatin. The detection of autoantibodies to endostatin was associated with better prognosis in metastatic breast cancer patients (median survival time: 20 vs 8 months, P=0.03), as was the presence of low levels of serum endostatin (median survival time: 20 vs 9 months, P=0.007). These results show that a natural immune reaction against endostatin can occur in breast cancer patients. This could have important therapeutic implications with regard to endostatin therapy and raises the question of a possible role of this humoral reaction against endostatin in the neoplastic process. PMID:16552441

  8. Autoantibodies to endostatin in patients with breast cancer: correlation to endostatin levels and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Bachelot, T; Ratel, D; Menetrier-Caux, C; Wion, D; Blay, J-Y; Berger, F

    2006-04-10

    Circulating autoantibodies to self-antigens overexpressed by cancer cells are common in cancer patients. As specific proteins are expressed during neoangiogenesis, a similar phenomenon might occur with particular antigens of tumour vessels. Collagen XVIII, from which endostatin is cleaved, is highly expressed in the perivascular basement membrane of tumour-associated blood vessels and autoantibodies to endostatin have been reported in cancer patients. The present study analyses the incidence of naturally occurring autoantibodies to endostatin in the sera of breast cancer patients and their relation to endostatin serum levels and patient clinical outcome. Serum samples from 36 patients with localised breast cancer and 59 patients with a fully documented history of metastatic breast cancer were used. The immunoreactivity of serum samples was tested against purified recombinant human endostatin and endostatin levels were determined by immunoassay. We could detect anti-endostatin antibodies in the sera of 66% of the patients with localised disease and 42% of the patients with metastatic disease (P=0.03). There was no correlation between the presence of antibodies to endostatin and circulating levels of endostatin. The detection of autoantibodies to endostatin was associated with better prognosis in metastatic breast cancer patients (median survival time: 20 vs 8 months, P = 0.03), as was the presence of low levels of serum endostatin (median survival time: 20 vs 9 months, P = 0.007). These results show that a natural immune reaction against endostatin can occur in breast cancer patients. This could have important therapeutic implications with regard to endostatin therapy and raises the question of a possible role of this humoral reaction against endostatin in the neoplastic process. PMID:16552441

  9. Paving the Way to Understand Autoantibody-Mediated Epilepsy on the Molecular Level

    PubMed Central

    Seebohm, Guiscard; Piccini, Ilaria; Strutz-Seebohm, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Correct function of neuronal networks is enabled by a delicate interplay among neurons communicating with each other. One of the keys is the communication at chemical synapses where neurotransmitters like glutamate, GABA, and glycine enable signal transfer over the synaptic cleft. Thereby, the neurotransmitters are released from the presynapse and bind as ligands to specific receptors at the postsynaptic side to allow for modulation of the postsynaptic membrane potentials. The postsynaptic electrical signal, which is highly modulated by voltage-gated ion channels, spreads over the dendritic tree and is thus integrated to allow for generation of action potentials at the axon hillock. This concert of receptors and voltage-gated ion channels depends on correct function of all its components. Misfunction of receptors and/or voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC) leads to diverse adverse effects in patients. Such malfunctions can be the result of inherited genetic alterations or pharmacological side effects by drugs. Recently, autoantibodies targeting receptor or channel complexes like NMDAR, AMPAR, GABA-receptors, glycine receptors, LGI1 or CASPR2 (previously termed as VGKC-complex antibodies) have been discovered. The presence of specific autoantibodies against these targets associates with severe forms of antibody-mediated encephalitis. Understanding the molecular details of autoantibody actions on receptor and VGKC complexes is highly desirable and may open the path to develop specific therapies to treat humoral autoimmune encephalitis. Here, we summarize the current knowledge and discuss technical approaches to fill the gap of knowledge. These techniques include electrophysiology, biochemical approaches for epitope mapping, and in silico modeling to simulate molecular interactions between autoantibody and its molecular target. PMID:26217297

  10. Paving the Way to Understand Autoantibody-Mediated Epilepsy on the Molecular Level.

    PubMed

    Seebohm, Guiscard; Piccini, Ilaria; Strutz-Seebohm, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Correct function of neuronal networks is enabled by a delicate interplay among neurons communicating with each other. One of the keys is the communication at chemical synapses where neurotransmitters like glutamate, GABA, and glycine enable signal transfer over the synaptic cleft. Thereby, the neurotransmitters are released from the presynapse and bind as ligands to specific receptors at the postsynaptic side to allow for modulation of the postsynaptic membrane potentials. The postsynaptic electrical signal, which is highly modulated by voltage-gated ion channels, spreads over the dendritic tree and is thus integrated to allow for generation of action potentials at the axon hillock. This concert of receptors and voltage-gated ion channels depends on correct function of all its components. Misfunction of receptors and/or voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC) leads to diverse adverse effects in patients. Such malfunctions can be the result of inherited genetic alterations or pharmacological side effects by drugs. Recently, autoantibodies targeting receptor or channel complexes like NMDAR, AMPAR, GABA-receptors, glycine receptors, LGI1 or CASPR2 (previously termed as VGKC-complex antibodies) have been discovered. The presence of specific autoantibodies against these targets associates with severe forms of antibody-mediated encephalitis. Understanding the molecular details of autoantibody actions on receptor and VGKC complexes is highly desirable and may open the path to develop specific therapies to treat humoral autoimmune encephalitis. Here, we summarize the current knowledge and discuss technical approaches to fill the gap of knowledge. These techniques include electrophysiology, biochemical approaches for epitope mapping, and in silico modeling to simulate molecular interactions between autoantibody and its molecular target.

  11. Erythrocyte membrane proteins reactive with human (warm-reacting) anti-red cell autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Leddy, J P; Falany, J L; Kissel, G E; Passador, S T; Rosenfeld, S I

    1993-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies of 20 patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AHA) were used in immunoaffinity assays with surface-radioiodinated human red blood cells (RBCs), and detergent-solubilized products were analyzed by SDS-PAGE/autoradiography. Four membrane proteins were identified as candidate autoantigens: a nonglycosylated polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 34 kD (p34) that was expressed in all available RBC phenotypes except Rhnull but differed consistently in apparent molecular mass from the 32-kD Rh(D) polypeptide co-isolated by IgG allo-anti-D; a heterogenous 37-55-kD glycoprotein, also deficient in Rhnull RBCs, which disappeared after deglycosylation by N-glycanase, with the appearance of a sharp, new approximately 31-kD band distinct from p34 and from Rh(D) polypeptide; a approximately 100-kD major membrane glycoprotein identified by immunoblotting as the band 3 anion transporter; and glycophorin A (GPA), also confirmed by immunoblotting. GP37-55 was not seen in the absence of p34, and both proteins are likely to be members of the Rh family. Indeed, a 34-kD polypeptide band and 37-55-kD poly-disperse "smear," isolated concurrently from the same labeled RBCs by IgG allo-anti-e, were indistinguishable from their autoantibody-isolated counterparts and may well be the same protein identified at different epitopes by the auto- and allo-antibodies. Individual AHA patients' autoantibodies isolated p34 and gp37-55, alone or in combination with band 3 (nine cases); strong band 3 alone (five cases); and combinations of band 3 with GPA (six cases). The autoantibodies of three additional patients whose AHA had been induced by alpha-methyldopa also isolated p34 and gp37-55. Images PMID:8473510

  12. Identification of Autoantibodies against Transthyretin for the Screening and Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Saurabh; Ghosh, Sreejoyee; Singh, Lalit Kumar; Sarkar, Ashish; Malhotra, Rajesh; Garg, Onkar Prasad; Singh, Yogendra; Sharma, Radhey Shyam; Bhakuni, Darshan Singh; Das, Taposh Kumar; Biswas, Sagarika

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, autoimmune, systemic and inflammatory rheumatic disease that leads to inflammation of the joints and surrounding tissues. Identification of novel protein(s) associated with severity of RA is a prerequisite for better understanding of pathogenesis of this disease that may also have potential to serve as novel biomarkers in the diagnosis of RA. Present study was undertaken to compare the amount of autoantigens and autoantibodies in the plasma of RA patients in comparison to healthy controls. Plasma samples were collected from the patients suffering from RA, Osteoarthritis (OA), Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and healthy volunteers. The screening of plasma proteins were carried out using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by identification of differentially expressed protein by MALDI-TOF MS/MS. Among several differentially expressed proteins, transthyretin (TTR) has been identified as one of the protein that showed significantly up regulated expression in the plasma of RA patients. The results were further validated by Western blot analysis and ELISA. In comparison to OA synovium, an exclusive significantly high expression of TTR in RA has been validated through IHC, Western blotting and IEM studies. Most importantly, the increase in expression of TTR with the progression of severity of RA condition has been observed. The autoantibodies against TTR present in the RA plasma were identified using immunoprecipitation-Western methods. The significant production of autoantibodies was validated by ELISA and Western blot analysis using recombinant pure protein of TTR. Hence, these novel observations on increase in TTR expression with the increase in severity of RA conditions and significant production of autoantibodies against TTR clearly suggest that a systematic studies on the role TTR in the pathogenesis of RA is immediately required and TTR may be used as a serum diagnostic marker together with other biochemical

  13. THSD7A staining of membranous glomerulopathy in clinical practice reveals cases with dual autoantibody positivity.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christopher P; Cossey, L Nicholas; Beck, Laurence H

    2016-04-01

    Thrombospondin type I domain-containing 7A (THSD7A) is a known antigenic target of autoantibodies leading to primary membranous glomerulopathy and was reported to account for ~10% of phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R)-negative membranous glomerulopathy. It has been proposed that PLA2R and THSD7A autoantibodies are mutually exclusive in membranous glomerulopathy. We validated an immunohistochemical assay to investigate for THSD7A-associated membranous glomerulopathy and utilized it in 258 consecutive native kidney biopsies, which showed membranous glomerulopathy in our laboratory, with the exception of membranous lupus nephritis. Membranous glomerulopathy stained positive for THSD7A-only in 7 (3%) cases, PLA2R-only in 141 (55%) cases, and showed dual positivity for THSD7A and PLA2R in 2 (1%) cases. Serologic testing for antibodies to PLA2R and THSD7A was performed in a subset of these patients. There was 100% correlation between positive THSD7A and/or PLA2R tissue staining and the presence of the corresponding autoantibodies in the serum including the two cases with dual positive THSD7A and PLA2R antibodies. We describe and provide a protocol for detection of THSD7A-associated membranous glomerulopathy in clinical practice. The cases with dual THSD7A and PLA2R positivity show that these autoantibodies are not mutually exclusive. They also emphasize the importance of using a panel-based approach when subtyping membranous glomerulopathy as a patient could conceptually be identified and treated based on anti-PLA2R titers, but still have anti-THSD7A antibodies driving persistent disease.

  14. THSD7A staining of membranous glomerulopathy in clinical practice reveals cases with dual autoantibody positivity

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Christopher P; Cossey, L Nicholas; Beck, Laurence H

    2016-01-01

    Thrombospondin type I domain-containing 7A (THSD7A) is a known antigenic target of autoantibodies leading to primary membranous glomerulopathy and was reported to account for ~10% of phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R)-negative membranous glomerulopathy. It has been proposed that PLA2R and THSD7A autoantibodies are mutually exclusive in membranous glomerulopathy. We validated an immunohistochemical assay to investigate for THSD7A-associated membranous glomerulopathy and utilized it in 258 consecutive native kidney biopsies, which showed membranous glomerulopathy in our laboratory, with the exception of membranous lupus nephritis. Membranous glomerulopathy stained positive for THSD7A-only in 7 (3%) cases, PLA2R-only in 141 (55%) cases, and showed dual positivity for THSD7A and PLA2R in 2 (1%) cases. Serologic testing for antibodies to PLA2R and THSD7A was performed in a subset of these patients. There was 100% correlation between positive THSD7A and/or PLA2R tissue staining and the presence of the corresponding autoantibodies in the serum including the two cases with dual positive THSD7A and PLA2R antibodies. We describe and provide a protocol for detection of THSD7A-associated membranous glomerulopathy in clinical practice. The cases with dual THSD7A and PLA2R positivity show that these autoantibodies are not mutually exclusive. They also emphasize the importance of using a panel-based approach when subtyping membranous glomerulopathy as a patient could conceptually be identified and treated based on anti-PLA2R titers, but still have anti-THSD7A antibodies driving persistent disease. PMID:26847174

  15. Uncommon structural motifs dominate the antigen binding site in human autoantibodies reactive with basement membrane collagen.

    PubMed

    Foster, Mary H; Buckley, Elizabeth S; Chen, Benny J; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Clark, Amy G

    2016-08-01

    Autoantibodies mediate organ destruction in multiple autoimmune diseases, yet their origins in patients remain poorly understood. To probe the genetic origins and structure of disease-associated autoantibodies, we engrafted immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and immunized with the non-collagenous-1 (NC1) domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. This antigen is expressed in lungs and kidneys and is targeted by autoantibodies in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), prototypic human organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Using Epstein Barr virus transformation and cell fusion, six human anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen monoclonal autoantibodies (mAb) were recovered, including subsets reactive with human kidney and with epitopes recognized by patients' IgG. Sequence analysis reveals a long to exceptionally long heavy chain complementarity determining region3 (HCDR3), the major site of antigen binding, in all six mAb. Mean HCDR3 length is 25.5 amino acids (range 20-36), generated from inherently long DH and JH genes and extended regions of non-templated N-nucleotides. Long HCDR3 are suited to forming noncontiguous antigen contacts and to binding recessed, immunologically silent epitopes hidden from conventional antibodies, as seen with self-antigen crossreactive broadly neutralizing anti-HIV Ig (bnAb). The anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen mAb also show preferential use of unmutated variable region genes that are enriched among human chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies that share features with natural polyreactive Ig. Our findings suggest unexpected relationships between pathogenic anti-collagen Ig, bnAb, and autoreactive Ig associated with malignancy, all of which arise from B cells expressing unconventional structural elements that may require transient escape from tolerance for successful expansion. PMID:27450516

  16. Integrative analysis correlates donor transcripts to recipient autoantibodies in primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Peter H; Burton, Christopher M; Sahar, Eli; Domany, Eytan; Cohen, Irun R; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Iversen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Up to one in four lung-transplanted patients develop pulmonary infiltrates and impaired oxygenation within the first days after lung transplantation. Known as primary graft dysfunction (PGD), this condition increases mortality significantly. Complex interactions between donor lung and recipient immune system are the suspected cause. We took an integrative, systems-level approach by first exploring whether the recipient's immune response to PGD includes the development of long-lasting autoreactivity. We next explored whether proteins displaying such differential autoreactivity also display differential gene expression in donor lungs that later develop PGD compared with those that did not. We evaluated 39 patients from whom autoantibody profiles were already available for PGD based on chest radiographs and oxygenation data. An additional nine patients were evaluated for PGD based on their medical records and set aside for validation. From two recent donor lung gene expression studies, we reanalysed and paired gene profiles with autoantibody profiles. Primary graft dysfunction can be distinguished by a profile of differentially reactive autoantibodies binding to 17 proteins. Functional analysis showed that 12 of these proteins are part of a protein–protein interaction network (P=3 × 10−6) involved in proliferative processes. A nearest centroid classifier assigned correct PGD grades to eight out of the nine patients in the validation cohort (P=0·048). We observed significant positive correlation (r=0·63, P=0·011) between differences in IgM reactivity and differences in gene expression levels. This connection between donor lung gene expression and long-lasting recipient IgM autoantibodies towards a specific set of proteins suggests a mechanism for the development of autoimmunity in PGD. PMID:21070236

  17. Identification of a major epitope recognized by PLA2R autoantibodies in primary membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Fresquet, Maryline; Jowitt, Thomas A; Gummadova, Jennet; Collins, Richard; O'Cualain, Ronan; McKenzie, Edward A; Lennon, Rachel; Brenchley, Paul E

    2015-02-01

    Phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R) is a target autoantigen in 70% of patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy. We describe the location of a major epitope in the N-terminal cysteine-rich ricin domain of PLA2R that is recognized by 90% of human anti-PLA2R autoantibodies. The epitope was sensitive to reduction and SDS denaturation in the isolated ricin domain and the larger fragment containing the ricin, fibronectin type II, first and second C-type lectin domains (CTLD). However, in nondenaturing conditions the epitope was protected against reduction in larger fragments, including the full-length extracellular region of PLA2R. To determine the composition of the epitope, we isolated immunoreactive tryptic fragments by Western blotting and analyzed them by mass spectrometry. The identified peptides were tested as inhibitors of autoantibody binding to PLA2R by surface plasmon resonance. Two peptides from the ricin domain showed strong inhibition, with a longer sequence covering both peptides (31-mer) producing 85% inhibition of autoantibody binding to PLA2R. Anti-PLA2R antibody directly bound this 31-mer peptide under nondenaturing conditions and binding was sensitive to reduction. Analysis of PLA2R and the PLA2R-anti-PLA2R complex using electron microscopy and homology-based representations allowed us to generate a structural model of this major epitope and its antibody binding site, which is independent of pH-induced conformational change in PLA2R. Identification of this major PLA2R epitope will enable further therapeutic advances for patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy, including antibody inhibition therapy and immunoadsorption of circulating autoantibodies.

  18. Identification of a Major Epitope Recognized by PLA2R Autoantibodies in Primary Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Fresquet, Maryline; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Gummadova, Jennet; Collins, Richard; O’Cualain, Ronan; McKenzie, Edward A.; Brenchley, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R) is a target autoantigen in 70% of patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy. We describe the location of a major epitope in the N-terminal cysteine-rich ricin domain of PLA2R that is recognized by 90% of human anti-PLA2R autoantibodies. The epitope was sensitive to reduction and SDS denaturation in the isolated ricin domain and the larger fragment containing the ricin, fibronectin type II, first and second C-type lectin domains (CTLD). However, in nondenaturing conditions the epitope was protected against reduction in larger fragments, including the full-length extracellular region of PLA2R. To determine the composition of the epitope, we isolated immunoreactive tryptic fragments by Western blotting and analyzed them by mass spectrometry. The identified peptides were tested as inhibitors of autoantibody binding to PLA2R by surface plasmon resonance. Two peptides from the ricin domain showed strong inhibition, with a longer sequence covering both peptides (31-mer) producing 85% inhibition of autoantibody binding to PLA2R. Anti-PLA2R antibody directly bound this 31-mer peptide under nondenaturing conditions and binding was sensitive to reduction. Analysis of PLA2R and the PLA2R-anti-PLA2R complex using electron microscopy and homology-based representations allowed us to generate a structural model of this major epitope and its antibody binding site, which is independent of pH-induced conformational change in PLA2R. Identification of this major PLA2R epitope will enable further therapeutic advances for patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy, including antibody inhibition therapy and immunoadsorption of circulating autoantibodies. PMID:25288605

  19. High incidence of pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic sclerosis patients with anti-centriole autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Matsushita, Takashi; Hasegawa, Minoru; Ueda-Hayakawa, Ikuko; Sato, Sinichi; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2015-09-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc)-related autoantibodies are useful tools in identifying clinically homogenous subsets of patients and predicting their prognosis. In this report, we described five SSc patients with anti-centriole antibodies. All five patients were females and had digital ulcers/gangrene. Four of five (80%) patients had pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). None of the five patients had active pulmonary fibrosis or developed renal crisis. Anti-centriole antibodies may be a marker for PAH and digital ulcers/gangrene.

  20. Thyroglobulin Autoantibodies Are Associated with Refractoriness to Antithyroid Drug Treatment for Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Katahira, Masahito; Ogata, Hidetada

    2016-01-01

    Objective The recurrence rate associated with antithyroid drug (ATD) treatment for Graves' disease (GD) is high compared with that for radioiodine therapy or surgery. It is important to identify patients in whom remission is unlikely, so that they are not given treatment that is destined to fail. The objective of this study was thus to evaluate factors influencing the prognosis of GD patients treated with ATDs. Patients One hundred and sixty-one patients were divided into two groups: 100 patients who could not discontinue ATDs for eight years or more (refractory group) and 61 patients who achieved remission within eight years after starting ATD treatment (nonrefractory group). The groups were compared in terms of age, thyroid function and thyroid-related autoantibodies at diagnosis, and the durations to the recovery of thyroid function and thyroid-related autoantibodies. Results The baseline levels of free triiodothyronine (T3), free thyroxine (T4), thyroid-stimulating antibodies (TSAbs) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibodies (TRAbs) were high, and the age at diagnosis and the baseline level of thyroglobulin autoantibodies (TgAbs) were low in the refractory group compared with those in the nonrefractory group. The durations to the recovery of TSH, free T4, TRAb and TSAb levels were longer in the refractory group than in the nonrefractory group. No significant difference was observed with regard to thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies. Conclusion We compared the clinical features of these two groups in order to identify factors influencing the prognosis of GD patients treated with ATDs. A low baseline level of TgAbs is associated with the refractoriness of GD to ATD treatment. PMID:27301499

  1. Selective autoantibody production by Yaa+ B cells in autoimmune Yaa(+)- Yaa- bone marrow chimeric mice

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The accelerated autoimmune syndrome observed in BXSB/MpJ male mice is associated with the presence on the Y chromosome of an as yet unidentified mutant gene, designated Y chromosome-linked autoimmune acceleration (Yaa). To study the mechanisms by which the Yaa gene accelerates and/or induces the production of autoantibodies, we have developed double-congenic bone marrow chimeras containing B cells from autoimmune males carrying the Yaa gene, and from nonautoimmune male or female mice lacking it and differing by the Igh allotype. The analysis of the allotype of total immunoglobulins and anti-DNA antibodies in Yaa+ male-normal female (Yaa-) chimeric mice revealed that the selective activation of B cells from autoimmune Yaa+ male mice was responsible for the hypergammaglobulinemia and autoantibody production. This phenomenon was not due to an anti-HY interaction between female T helper cells and male B cells, because first, Yaa+ B cells were selectively stimulated to produce autoantibodies in Yaa+ male-Yaa- male chimeric mice; and second, normal male and female chimeras failed to develop an autoimmune syndrome. In addition, the fact that both B cell populations in Yaa(+)-Yaa- chimeras similarly responded to a foreign antigen, human IgG, argues against the possibility that the selective activation of Yaa+ B cells may be due to their hyper-responsiveness to T helper signals. We propose that a cognate interaction of T helper cells with Yaa+ B cells, because of possible T cell recognition of a Yaa-related molecule expressed on Yaa+ B cells, may be responsible for the acceleration and/or induction of autoantibodies in BXSB/MpJ mice. PMID:1834759

  2. Mechanodelivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Nyssa T.; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U.; Yang, Haw

    2014-04-01

    Nanotechnology has opened up the opportunity to probe, sense, and manipulate the chemical environment of biological systems with an unprecedented level of spatiotemporal control. A major obstacle to the full realization of these novel technologies is the lack of a general, robust, and simple method for the delivery of arbitrary nanostructures to the cytoplasm of intact live cells. Here, we identify a new delivery modality, based on mechanical disruption of the plasma membrane, which efficiently mediates the delivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. We use two distinct execution modes, two adherent cell lines, and three sizes of semiconducting nanocrystals, or quantum dots, to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. As the underlying mechanism is purely physical, we anticipate that such ``mechanodelivery'' can be generalized to other modes of execution as well as to the cytoplasmic introduction of a structurally diverse array of functional nanomaterials.Nanotechnology has opened up the opportunity to probe, sense, and manipulate the chemical environment of biological systems with an unprecedented level of spatiotemporal control. A major obstacle to the full realization of these novel technologies is the lack of a general, robust, and simple method for the delivery of arbitrary nanostructures to the cytoplasm of intact live cells. Here, we identify a new delivery modality, based on mechanical disruption of the plasma membrane, which efficiently mediates the delivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. We use two distinct execution modes, two adherent cell lines, and three sizes of semiconducting nanocrystals, or quantum dots, to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. As the underlying mechanism is purely physical, we anticipate that such ``mechanodelivery'' can be generalized to other modes of execution as well as to the cytoplasmic introduction of a structurally diverse array of functional nanomaterials

  3. Demonstration and characterization of anti-human mitochondria autoantibodies in idiopathic hypoparathyroidism and in other conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Betterle, C; Caretto, A; Zeviani, M; Pedini, B; Salviati, C

    1985-01-01

    We studied 32 patients with idiopathic hypoparathyroidism (IHP), 19 patients with organ-specific autoimmune diseases (OSAD) without IHP, 50 normal controls and a known serum with anti-mitochondrial autoantibodies (AMA). Patients' sera were tested by the classical indirect immunofluorescent technique and by the indirect immunofluorescent complement fixation technique on unfixed cryostat sections of normal human parathyroid, pancreas, thyroid, stomach, kidney, and rat kidney. Five out of 32 patients with IHP, three out of 19 patients with OSAD without IHP and one out of 50 normal controls revealed a bright reactivity against oxyphil cells and a weak reactivity against chief cells of normal parathyroid. These sera also brightly reacted with mitochondria-rich cells and weakly with the remaining cells of only human tissues. The absorption of positive sera with human mitochondria completely abolished this positivity but the absorption with rat mitochondria failed to prevent this reaction. This reactivity was due to an anti-human mitochondrial autoantibody (AHMA) of IgG class. By non-competitive ELISA and Western blot we also demonstrated that every AHMA-positive serum mainly reacted against a human mitochondrial membrane-bound protein of approximate mol. wt. of 46 kd, while the AMA-positive serum reacted against different mitochondrial antigens. The present study shows that a specific parathyroid autoantibody was not detectable in patients with IHP. Images Fig. 3 PMID:3910313

  4. Maternal celiac disease autoantibodies bind directly to syncytiotrophoblast and inhibit placental tissue transglutaminase activity

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Naheed; Baker, Philip N; Robinson, Nicola J; Aplin, John D

    2009-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) occurs in as many as 1 in 80 pregnant women and is associated with poor pregnancy outcome, but it is not known if this is an effect on maternal nutrient absorption or, alternatively, if the placenta is an autoimmune target. The major autoantigen, tissue transglutaminase (tTG), has previously been shown to be present in the maternal-facing syncytiotrophoblast plasma membrane of the placenta. Methods ELISA was used to demonstrate the presence of antibodies to tissue transglutaminase in a panel of CD sera. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the binding of IgA autoantibodies from CD serum to term placenta. In addition, novel direct binding and activity assays were developed to mimic the in vivo exposure of the villous placenta to maternal autoantibody. Results and Discussion CD IgA autoantibodies located to the syncytial surface of the placenta significantly more than IgA antibodies in control sera (P < 0.0001). The distribution of antigen was similar to that observed using a monoclonal antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Staining was reduced by pre-absorption of CD serum with recombinant human tissue transglutaminase. In direct binding assays, autoimmune immunoglobulin A (IgA) from the maternal compartment became associated with antigen at the syncytial surface of the placenta, as a result of which transglutaminase activity at this site was inhibited. Conclusion These data indicate that direct immune effects in untreated CD women may compromise placental function. PMID:19228395

  5. The Prevalence of Autoantibodies in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I

    PubMed Central

    Schreurs, Marco W. J.; de Mos, Marissa; Stronks, Dirk L.; Huygen, Frank J. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity has been suggested as one of the pathophysiologic mechanisms that may underlie complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Screening for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) is one of the diagnostic tests, which is usually performed if a person is suspected to have a systemic autoimmune disease. Antineuronal antibodies are autoantibodies directed against antigens in the central and/or peripheral nervous system. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of these antibodies in CRPS patients with the normal values of those antibodies in the healthy population. Twenty seven (33%) of the 82 CRPS patients of whom serum was available showed a positive ANA test. This prevalence is significantly higher than in the general population. Six patients (7.3%) showed a positive result for typical antineuronal antibodies. This proportion, however, does not deviate from that in the general population. Our findings suggest that autoantibodies may be associated with the pathophysiology of CRPS, at least in a subset of patients. Further research is needed into defining this subset and into the role of autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of CRPS. PMID:25741131

  6. The use and abuse of commercial kits used to detect autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fritzler, Marvin J; Wiik, Allan; Fritzler, Mark L; Barr, Susan G

    2003-01-01

    The detection of autoantibodies in human sera is an important approach to the diagnosis and management of patients with autoimmune conditions. To meet market demands, manufacturers have developed a wide variety of easy to use and cost-effective diagnostic kits that are designed to detect a variety of human serum autoantibodies. A number of studies over the past two decades have suggested that there are limitations and concerns in the use and clinical application of test results derived from commercial kits. It is important to appreciate that there is a complex chain of users and circumstances that contributes to variations in the apparent reliability of commercial kits. The goal of this review is to identify the principal links in this chain, to identify the factors that weaken the chain and to propose a plan of resolution. It is suggested that a higher level of commitment and partnership between all of the participants is required to achieve the goal of improving the quality of patient care through the use of autoantibody testing and analysis. PMID:12823850

  7. Identification of autoantibodies to glial fibrillary acidic protein in spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Hergenroeder, Georgene W; Moore, Anthony N; Schmitt, Karl M; Redell, John B; Dash, Pramod K

    2016-01-20

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating injury causing significant morbidity and mortality. Experimental studies have demonstrated that SCI induced cellular damage and disruption of the blood-spinal cord barrier can initiate an autoimmune response. This response is thought to be pathogenic and contribute to poor outcome. The objective of this research was to investigate whether human SCI mounts an autoimmune response to self-antigens. Plasma samples were collected longitudinally from SCI patients (n=18) at acute (T1, <48 h) and subacute (T2, 2-4 weeks) time points to probe western blots of human brain homogenates in order to screen patients for the presence of putative autoantibodies. To identify the corresponding antigens, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, western blot and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses were performed. We found that four of 18 patients (22%) had novel immunoreactive bands ranging in size from 36 to 42 kDa present in subacute, but not in acute, plasma samples suggesting postinjury production. To identify the cross-reacting antigens, we separated brain proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified nine immunoreactive spots. Amino acid sequence analysis of these spots identified peptides that mapped to glial fibrillary acidic protein. Our results suggest that ∼ 22% of SCI patients generated autoantibodies to glial fibrillary acidic protein. Future studies will be required to determine whether these autoantibodies contribute to the pathogenic sequelae of SCI.

  8. Autoantibody activity of immunoglobulins isolated from B-cell follicular lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Dighiero, G; Hart, S; Lim, A; Borche, L; Levy, R; Miller, R A

    1991-08-01

    Previous work with monoclonal Igs (MIgs) has demonstrated that a high proportion of paraproteins bind to self-antigens such as the Fc fragment of IgG, Ii blood group antigens, cytoskeleton proteins, DNA, and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Recent work in CLL indicates that CD5+ B lymphocytes are frequently committed to production of autoantibodies. We have examined the antibody specificity of MIgs derived from the tumor cells of 31 different patients with CD5- B-cell lymphomas. Our results indicate that the tumor cells from 8 of these 31 patients (25.8%) express Igs with autoantibody activity. In two cases antibody activity was multispecific. In four cases, antibody activity was exclusively directed against the Fc fragment of IgG, whereas the two other cases bound to both Fc fragment of IgG and nuclear antigens. Most non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) are derived from CD5- B cells. These results indicate that like CLL, NHL also express Igs that frequently have autoantibody activity.

  9. Development of autoantibodies against muscle-specific FHL1 in severe inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Inka; Wick, Cecilia; Hallgren, Åsa; Tjärnlund, Anna; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Andrade, Felipe; Thompson, Kathryn; Coley, William; Phadke, Aditi; Diaz-Gallo, Lina-Marcela; Bottai, Matteo; Nennesmo, Inger; Chemin, Karine; Herrath, Jessica; Johansson, Karin; Wikberg, Anders; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Zubarev, Roman A; Danielsson, Olof; Krystufkova, Olga; Vencovsky, Jiri; Landegren, Nils; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Padyukov, Leonid; Kämpe, Olle; Lundberg, Ingrid E

    2015-12-01

    Mutations of the gene encoding four-and-a-half LIM domain 1 (FHL1) are the causative factor of several X-linked hereditary myopathies that are collectively termed FHL1-related myopathies. These disorders are characterized by severe muscle dysfunction and damage. Here, we have shown that patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) develop autoimmunity to FHL1, which is a muscle-specific protein. Anti-FHL1 autoantibodies were detected in 25% of IIM patients, while patients with other autoimmune diseases or muscular dystrophies were largely anti-FHL1 negative. Anti-FHL1 reactivity was predictive for muscle atrophy, dysphagia, pronounced muscle fiber damage, and vasculitis. FHL1 showed an altered expression pattern, with focal accumulation in the muscle fibers of autoantibody-positive patients compared with a homogeneous expression in anti-FHL1-negative patients and healthy controls. We determined that FHL1 is a target of the cytotoxic protease granzyme B, indicating that the generation of FHL1 fragments may initiate FHL1 autoimmunity. Moreover, immunization of myositis-prone mice with FHL1 aggravated muscle weakness and increased mortality, suggesting a direct link between anti-FHL1 responses and muscle damage. Together, our findings provide evidence that FHL1 may be involved in the pathogenesis not only of genetic FHL1-related myopathies but also of autoimmune IIM. Importantly, these results indicate that anti-FHL1 autoantibodies in peripheral blood have promising potential as a biomarker to identify a subset of severe IIM.

  10. Autoantibodies to tumor-associated antigens as biomarkers in cancer immunodiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weihong; Peng, Bo; Lu, Yumin; Xu, Weijia; Qian, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2011-01-01

    Cancer sera contain antibodies that react with a unique group of autologous cellular antigens called tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), and therefore these autoantibodies can be considered as reporters from the immune system, to identify authentic TAAs involved in the malignant transformation. Once a TAA is identified, different approaches would be used to comprehensively characterize and validate the identified TAA/anti-TAA systems that are potential biomarkers in cancer immunodiagnosis. In this manner, several novel TAAs such as p62 and p90 have been identified in our previous studies. p62, a member of IGF-II mRNA binding proteins (IMPs), is an oncofetal protein absent in adult tissues, the presence of anti-p62 autoantibodies relates to abnormal expression of p62 in tumor cells. p90 was recently characterized as an inhibitor of the tumor suppressor PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A), and an autoantibody to p90 appears in high frequency in prostate cancer. The present review will focus on the recent advances in studies mainly associated with these two novel TAAs as biomarkers in cancer immunodiagnosis. PMID:21167321

  11. Detection and Characterization of Autoantibodies to Neuronal Cell-Surface Antigens in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    van Coevorden-Hameete, Marleen H.; Titulaer, Maarten J.; Schreurs, Marco W. J.; de Graaff, Esther; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A. E.; Hoogenraad, Casper C.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis (AIE) is a group of disorders in which autoantibodies directed at antigens located on the plasma membrane of neurons induce severe neurological symptoms. In contrast to classical paraneoplastic disorders, AIE patients respond well to immunotherapy. The detection of neuronal surface autoantibodies in patients’ serum or CSF therefore has serious consequences for the patients’ treatment and follow-up and requires the availability of sensitive and specific diagnostic tests. This mini-review provides a guideline for both diagnostic and research laboratories that work on the detection of known surface autoantibodies and/or the identification of novel surface antigens. We discuss the strengths and pitfalls of different techniques for anti-neuronal antibody detection: (1) Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence on rat/primate brain sections; (2) Immunocytochemistry (ICC) of living cultured hippocampal neurons; and (3) Cell Based Assay (CBA). In addition, we discuss the use of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis for the detection of novel neuronal surface antigens, which is a crucial step in further disease classification and the development of novel CBAs. PMID:27303263

  12. M-type Phospholipase A2 Receptor Autoantibodies and Renal Function in Patients with Primary Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hoxha, Elion; Harendza, Sigrid; Pinnschmidt, Hans; Panzer, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Loss of renal function in patients with primary membranous nephropathy cannot be reliably predicted by laboratory or clinical markers at the time of diagnosis. M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies have been shown to be associated with changes in proteinuria. Their eventual effect on renal function, however, is unclear. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In this prospective, open, multicenter study, the potential role of M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies levels on the increase of serum creatinine in 118 consecutive patients with membranous nephropathy and positivity for serum M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies was analyzed. Patients were included in the study between April of 2010 and December of 2012 and observed until December of 2013. The clinical end point was defined as an increase of serum creatinine by ≥25% and serum creatinine reaching ≥1.3 mg/dl. Results Patients were divided into tertiles according to their M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibody levels at the time of inclusion in the study: tertile 1 levels=20–86 units/ml (low), tertile 2 levels=87–201 units/ml (medium), and tertile 3 levels ≥202 units/ml (high). The median follow-up time of all patients in the study was 27 months (interquartile range=18–33 months). The clinical end point was reached in 69% of patients with high M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies levels (tertile 3) but only 25% of patients with low M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies levels. The average time to reach the study end point was 17.7 months in patients with high M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies levels and 30.9 months in patients with low M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies levels. A multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that high M-type phospholipase A2 receptor autoantibodies levels—in addition to men and older age—are an independent predictor for progressive loss of renal

  13. Phytochrome activation of two nuclear genes requires cytoplasmic protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, E; Green, P J; Wong, M; Chua, N H

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of protein synthesis inhibitors on light-induced expression of two plant nuclear genes, Cab and rbcS, in wheat, pea and transgenic tobacco. Light activation of these two genes is very sensitive to cycloheximide, an inhibitor of cytoplasmic protein synthesis but not to chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of organellar protein synthesis. Studies with chimeric gene constructs in transgenic tobacco seedlings show that cycloheximide exerts its effect at the transcriptional level. As a control, we show that the expression of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter is enhanced by cycloheximide treatment, irrespective of the coding sequence used. Escape-time analyses with green wheat seedlings show that the cycloheximide block for Cab gene expression is after the primary signal transduction step linked to phytochrome photoconversion. Our results suggest that phytochrome activation of Cab and rbcS is mediated by a labile protein factor(s) synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes. Images PMID:2583082

  14. Chara myosin and the energy of cytoplasmic streaming.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Keiichi; Shimada, Kiyo; Ito, Khoji; Hamada, Saeko; Ishijima, Akio; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Tazawa, Masashi

    2006-10-01

    Recently, it was found that myosin generating very fast cytoplasmic streaming in Chara corallina has very high ATPase activity. To estimate the energy consumed by this myosin, its concentration in the internodal cells of C. corallina was determined by quantitative immunoblot. It was found that the concentration of Chara myosin was considerably high (200 nM) and the amount of ATP consumed by this myosin would exceed that supplied by dark respiration if all myosin molecules were fully activated by the interaction with actin. These results and model calculations suggested that the energy required to generate cytoplasmic streaming is very small and only one-hundredth of the existing myosin is enough to maintain the force for the streaming in the Chara cell.

  15. Automated nucleus and cytoplasm segmentation of overlapping cervical cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhi; Carneiro, Gustavo; Bradley, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe an algorithm for accurately segmenting the individual cytoplasm and nuclei from a clump of overlapping cervical cells. Current methods cannot undertake such a complete segmentation due to the challenges involved in delineating cells with severe overlap and poor contrast. Our approach initially performs a scene segmentation to highlight both free-lying cells, cell clumps and their nuclei. Then cell segmentation is performed using a joint level set optimization on all detected nuclei and cytoplasm pairs. This optimisation is constrained by the length and area of each cell, a prior on cell shape, the amount of cell overlap and the expected gray values within the overlapping regions. We present quantitative nuclei detection and cell segmentation results on a database of synthetically overlapped cell images constructed from real images of free-lying cervical cells. We also perform a qualitative assessment of complete fields of view containing multiple cells and cell clumps.

  16. Genetic analysis of the cytoplasmic dynein subunit families.

    PubMed

    Pfister, K Kevin; Shah, Paresh R; Hummerich, Holger; Russ, Andreas; Cotton, James; Annuar, Azlina Ahmad; King, Stephen M; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles.

  17. Genetic Analysis of the Cytoplasmic Dynein Subunit Families

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles. PMID:16440056

  18. Cytoplasmic Dynein Antagonists with Improved Potency and Isoform Selectivity.

    PubMed

    See, Stephanie K; Hoogendoorn, Sascha; Chung, Andrew H; Ye, Fan; Steinman, Jonathan B; Sakata-Kato, Tomoyo; Miller, Rand M; Cupido, Tommaso; Zalyte, Ruta; Carter, Andrew P; Nachury, Maxence V; Kapoor, Tarun M; Chen, James K

    2016-01-15

    Cytoplasmic dyneins 1 and 2 are related members of the AAA+ superfamily (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) that function as the predominant minus-end-directed microtubule motors in eukaryotic cells. Dynein 1 controls mitotic spindle assembly, organelle movement, axonal transport, and other cytosolic, microtubule-guided processes, whereas dynein 2 mediates retrograde trafficking within motile and primary cilia. Small-molecule inhibitors are important tools for investigating motor protein-dependent mechanisms, and ciliobrevins were recently discovered as the first dynein-specific chemical antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that ciliobrevins directly target the heavy chains of both dynein isoforms and explore the structure-activity landscape of these inhibitors in vitro and in cells. In addition to identifying chemical motifs that are essential for dynein blockade, we have discovered analogs with increased potency and dynein 2 selectivity. These antagonists effectively disrupt Hedgehog signaling, intraflagellar transport, and ciliogenesis, making them useful probes of these and other cytoplasmic dynein 2-dependent cellular processes.

  19. Bidirectional helical motility of cytoplasmic dynein around microtubules.

    PubMed

    Can, Sinan; Dewitt, Mark A; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2014-07-28

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a molecular motor responsible for minus-end-directed cargo transport along microtubules (MTs). Dynein motility has previously been studied on surface-immobilized MTs in vitro, which constrains the motors to move in two dimensions. In this study, we explored dynein motility in three dimensions using an MT bridge assay. We found that dynein moves in a helical trajectory around the MT, demonstrating that it generates torque during cargo transport. Unlike other cytoskeletal motors that produce torque in a specific direction, dynein generates torque in either direction, resulting in bidirectional helical motility. Dynein has a net preference to move along a right-handed helical path, suggesting that the heads tend to bind to the closest tubulin binding site in the forward direction when taking sideways steps. This bidirectional helical motility may allow dynein to avoid roadblocks in dense cytoplasmic environments during cargo transport.

  20. Cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells: the role of wall slip.

    PubMed

    Wolff, K; Marenduzzo, D; Cates, M E

    2012-06-01

    We present a computer simulation study, via lattice Boltzmann simulations, of a microscopic model for cytoplasmic streaming in algal cells such as those of Chara corallina. We modelled myosin motors tracking along actin lanes as spheres undergoing directed motion along fixed lines. The sphere dimension takes into account the fact that motors drag vesicles or other organelles, and, unlike previous work, we model the boundary close to which the motors move as walls with a finite slip layer. By using realistic parameter values for actin lane and myosin density, as well as for endoplasmic and vacuole viscosity and the slip layer close to the wall, we find that this simplified view, which does not rely on any coupling between motors, cytoplasm and vacuole other than that provided by viscous Stokes flow, is enough to account for the observed magnitude of streaming velocities in intracellular fluid in living plant cells.

  1. Influenza A Virus Assembly Intermediates Fuse in the Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Lakdawala, Seema S.; Wu, Yicong; Wawrzusin, Peter; Kabat, Juraj; Broadbent, Andrew J.; Lamirande, Elaine W.; Fodor, Ervin; Altan-Bonnet, Nihal; Shroff, Hari; Subbarao, Kanta

    2014-01-01

    Reassortment of influenza viral RNA (vRNA) segments in co-infected cells can lead to the emergence of viruses with pandemic potential. Replication of influenza vRNA occurs in the nucleus of infected cells, while progeny virions bud from the plasma membrane. However, the intracellular mechanics of vRNA assembly into progeny virions is not well understood. Here we used recent advances in microscopy to explore vRNA assembly and transport during a productive infection. We visualized four distinct vRNA segments within a single cell using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and observed that foci containing more than one vRNA segment were found at the external nuclear periphery, suggesting that vRNA segments are not exported to the cytoplasm individually. Although many cytoplasmic foci contain multiple vRNA segments, not all vRNA species are present in every focus, indicating that assembly of all eight vRNA segments does not occur prior to export from the nucleus. To extend the observations made in fixed cells, we used a virus that encodes GFP fused to the viral polymerase acidic (PA) protein (WSN PA-GFP) to explore the dynamics of vRNA assembly in live cells during a productive infection. Since WSN PA-GFP colocalizes with viral nucleoprotein and influenza vRNA segments, we used it as a surrogate for visualizing vRNA transport in 3D and at high speed by inverted selective-plane illumination microscopy. We observed cytoplasmic PA-GFP foci colocalizing and traveling together en route to the plasma membrane. Our data strongly support a model in which vRNA segments are exported from the nucleus as complexes that assemble en route to the plasma membrane through dynamic colocalization events in the cytoplasm. PMID:24603687

  2. Influenza a virus assembly intermediates fuse in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Lakdawala, Seema S; Wu, Yicong; Wawrzusin, Peter; Kabat, Juraj; Broadbent, Andrew J; Lamirande, Elaine W; Fodor, Ervin; Altan-Bonnet, Nihal; Shroff, Hari; Subbarao, Kanta

    2014-03-01

    Reassortment of influenza viral RNA (vRNA) segments in co-infected cells can lead to the emergence of viruses with pandemic potential. Replication of influenza vRNA occurs in the nucleus of infected cells, while progeny virions bud from the plasma membrane. However, the intracellular mechanics of vRNA assembly into progeny virions is not well understood. Here we used recent advances in microscopy to explore vRNA assembly and transport during a productive infection. We visualized four distinct vRNA segments within a single cell using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and observed that foci containing more than one vRNA segment were found at the external nuclear periphery, suggesting that vRNA segments are not exported to the cytoplasm individually. Although many cytoplasmic foci contain multiple vRNA segments, not all vRNA species are present in every focus, indicating that assembly of all eight vRNA segments does not occur prior to export from the nucleus. To extend the observations made in fixed cells, we used a virus that encodes GFP fused to the viral polymerase acidic (PA) protein (WSN PA-GFP) to explore the dynamics of vRNA assembly in live cells during a productive infection. Since WSN PA-GFP colocalizes with viral nucleoprotein and influenza vRNA segments, we used it as a surrogate for visualizing vRNA transport in 3D and at high speed by inverted selective-plane illumination microscopy. We observed cytoplasmic PA-GFP foci colocalizing and traveling together en route to the plasma membrane. Our data strongly support a model in which vRNA segments are exported from the nucleus as complexes that assemble en route to the plasma membrane through dynamic colocalization events in the cytoplasm. PMID:24603687

  3. Nucleoporin Nup98 mediates galectin-3 nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Funasaka, Tatsuyoshi; Balan, Vitaly; Raz, Avraham; Wong, Richard W.

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Nuclear pore protein Nup98 is a novel binding partner of galectin-3. •Nup98 transports galectin-3 into cytoplasm. •Nup98 depletion leads to galectin-3 nuclear transport and induces growth retardation. •Nup98 may involve in ß-catenin pathway through interaction with galectin-3. -- Abstract: Nucleoporin Nup98 is a component of the nuclear pore complex, and is important in transport across the nuclear pore. Many studies implicate nucleoporin in cancer progression, but no direct mechanistic studies of its effect in cancer have been reported. We show here that Nup98 specifically regulates nucleus–cytoplasm transport of galectin-3, which is a ß-galactoside-binding protein that affects adhesion, migration, and cancer progression, and controls cell growth through the ß-catenin signaling pathway in cancer cells. Nup98 interacted with galectin-3 on the nuclear membrane, and promoted galectin-3 cytoplasmic translocation whereas other nucleoporins did not show these functions. Inversely, silencing of Nup98 expression by siRNA technique localized galectin-3 to the nucleus and retarded cell growth, which was rescued by Nup98 transfection. In addition, Nup98 RNA interference significantly suppressed downstream mRNA expression in the ß-catenin pathway, such as cyclin D1 and FRA-1, while nuclear galectin-3 binds to ß-catenin to inhibit transcriptional activity. Reduced expression of ß-catenin target genes is consistent with the Nup98 reduction and the galectin-3–nucleus translocation rate. Overall, the results show Nup98’s involvement in nuclear–cytoplasm translocation of galectin-3 and ß-catenin signaling pathway in regulating cell proliferation, and the results depicted here suggest a novel therapeutic target/modality for cancers.

  4. Toxicological studies of pesticides on cytoplasmic streaming in Nitella.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sudhir Kumar; Fatma, Tasneem

    2004-07-01

    In the present study, changes in velocity of cytoplasmic streaming in the giant internodal cells of Nitella for varying concentration of the pesticides, 2,4-D, dieldrin, malathion, methyl parathion and endosulfan, were measured. Marked decrease in the velocity of cytoplasmic streaming was found at the concentrations of 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100mM. Dieldrin was the most toxic to all the pesticides investigated, followed by methyl parathion, endosulfan, malathion and 2,4-D. Threshold values for dieldrin, methylparathion, endosulfan, malathion and 2,4-D as indicated by the onset of decrease in the normal cytoplasmic streaming velocity were less than 6.25 x 10(-6), 2.5 x 10(-5), 5 x 10(-5), 5 x 10(-5) and 1.25 x 10(-5)M respectively. Cessation of streaming was noticed above 1mM in dieldrin and above 10mM when exposed to methylparathion and endosulfan. Cessation of streaming was not seen up to 100mM concentration of 2,4-D and malathion.

  5. Female breast carcinomas: nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins versus steroid receptors.

    PubMed

    Bryś, M; Romanowicz-Makowska, H; Nawrocka, A; Krajewska, W M

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins of human female breast cancer were analysed by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Oestrogen receptor and progesterone receptor expression was determined by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. The electropherograms were developed by silver nitrate staining and quantitative analysis was carried out by video densitometer using the software Gel-Pro Analyzer. Nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins of breast carcinomas and normal tissue differed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Nuclear polypeptides of 108, 53 and 48 kD as well as the 36 kD cytoplasmic polypeptide were specific for tumour samples, while the 51 kD nuclear polypeptide was detected only in normal tissue. Quantitative differences in band density were noted in the 32 kD nuclear polypeptide. This polypeptide was expressed in greatest concentration in infiltrating ductal carcinomas which also indicated the greatest oestrogen receptor gene expression. This relationship appeared to be statistically significant (p < 0.005). No correlations were evident between the 32 kD protein expression and the progesterone receptor gene expression in any of the tissue types examined, nor between the 32 kD protein and the patient's age or tumour grade. PMID:10756981

  6. Sequences determining the cytoplasmic localization of a chemoreceptor domain.

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, L; Bailey, J; Manoil, C

    1995-01-01

    The Escherichia coli serine chemoreceptor (Tsr) is a protein with a simple topology consisting of two membrane-spanning sequences (TM1 and TM2) separating a large periplasmic domain from N-terminal and C-terminal cytoplasmic regions. We analyzed the contributions of several sequence elements to the cytoplasmic localization of the C-terminal domain by using chemoreceptor-alkaline phosphatase gene fusions. The principal findings were as follows. (i) The cytoplasmic localization of the C-terminal domain depended on TM2 but was quite tolerant of mutations partially deleting or introducing charged residues into the sequence. (ii) The basal level of C-terminal domain export was significantly higher in proteins with the wild-type periplasmic domain than in derivatives with a shortened periplasmic domain, suggesting that the large size of the wild-type domain promotes partial membrane misinsertion. (iii) The membrane insertion of deletion derivatives with a single spanning segment (TM1 or TM2) could be controlled by either an adjacent positively charged sequence or an adjacent amphipathic sequence. The results provide evidence that the generation of the Tsr membrane topology is an overdetermined process directed by an interplay of sequences promoting and opposing establishment of the normal structure. PMID:7730259

  7. Genetic studies on cytoplasmic male sterility in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Laughnan, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Our research concerns the basic mechanisms of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and fertility restoration in maize. The molecular determination of CMS is in the DNA of the mitochondria (mtDNA) but specific nuclear restorer-of-fertility (Rf) genes can overrule the male-sterile effect of the cytoplasm. Our approach to the study of the Rf genes is threefold. We are attempting to tag the cms-S Rf genes and the cms-T Rf2 gene with controlling elements (CEs). Since we have identified a number of spontaneous Rf genes for cms-S and have demonstrated that they are themselves transposable, we are also searching for cases in which an Rf gene is inserted into a wild-type gene. The other aspect of our research involves the nuclear control over the organization of the mitochondrial genome. We found that the changes in mtDNA organization upon cytoplasmic reversion to fertility were characteristic of the nuclear background in which the reversion event occurred. We have investigated whether these differences are a reflection of differences in the organization of the mtDNA genome before reversion.

  8. Alterations in hepatic pericanalicular cytoplasm during enhanced bile secretory activity.

    PubMed

    Jones, A L; Schmucker, D L; Mooney, J S; Ockner, R K; Adler, R D

    1979-04-01

    In an attempt to demonstrate the morphology of the bile secretory apparatus, male rats were restrained and maintained on an isocaloric diet with (experimental) and without (control) taurocholate, which was continuously infused via a duodenal cannula. This method of taurocholate administration promotes a 2-fold increase in the bile acid pool size and bile secretory rate and increases the transport maximum of taurocholate by approximately 50%. After 48 hours, the livers from both the control and experimental animals were perfusion-fixed and whole hepatocytes as well as pericanalicular cytoplasm (defined as a 1-micron. wide zone of cytoplasm adjacent to the bile canaliculus) in both centrolobular and periportal cells were subjected to a stereologic analysis. Although taurocholate infusion produced relatively few changes in the amounts of organelles or inclusionswithin hepatocytes, it caused highly significant increases in the amount ofGolgi-rich area, Golgi membranes, and the number of vesicles with diameters greater than 1000 A in the pericanalicular area of cytoplasm. In addition to these changes, which occurred in both central and periportal zones, decreases in the volume of lysosomes and the surface area of smooth surfaced endoplasmic reticulum were observed. These data provide new evidence that the "bile secretory apparatus" may encompass several hepatocellular components which include the Golgi complex and a vesicular transport system.

  9. Nuclear versus perinuclear and cytoplasmic calcium in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, J; Yu, H

    1996-11-01

    We measured fluorescence from the calcium indicator Fluo-3 in multinucleated osteoclasts. In the initial state, each nucleus is surrounded by a ring of bright fluorescence. Following activation of purinergic receptors by 100 microM ATP there is a pulse of cellular fluorescence increase, and nuclear fluorescence intensity becomes greater than that of the cytoplasm. This is followed by a period during which the fluorescence of the cell decreases below that of the initial state. During the pulsed increase following purinergic receptor activation, the perinuclear fluorescence intensity does not increase as much as that in the nuclear centers and, following this pulse, the perinuclear fluorescence intensity decreases more than that in the nuclear centers, relative to the initial state. Measurements in which Mn2+ was introduced into the cell show that the number of Fluo-3 molecules per unit horizontal area in the nuclear centers is slightly greater than that in the perinuclear regions, and more than twice that in the surrounding cytoplasm. These results show that there is a much higher free calcium concentration in the perinuclear regions than in the nuclear centers in the initial state, with a release of free calcium from the perinuclear regions following activation of the purinergic receptors. These data also provide evidence that the free calcium concentration in the nuclear centers is lower than in the cytoplasm in the initial state.

  10. Cytoplasmic Control of Sense-Antisense mRNA Pairs.

    PubMed

    Sinturel, Flore; Navickas, Albertas; Wery, Maxime; Descrimes, Marc; Morillon, Antonin; Torchet, Claire; Benard, Lionel

    2015-09-22

    Transcriptome analyses have revealed that convergent gene transcription can produce many 3'-overlapping mRNAs in diverse organisms. Few studies have examined the fate of 3'-complementary mRNAs in double-stranded RNA-dependent nuclear phenomena, and nothing is known about the cytoplasmic destiny of 3'-overlapping messengers or their impact on gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that the complementary tails of 3'-overlapping mRNAs can interact in the cytoplasm and promote post-transcriptional regulatory events including no-go decay (NGD) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genome-wide experiments confirm that these messenger-interacting mRNAs (mimRNAs) form RNA duplexes in wild-type cells and thus have potential roles in modulating the mRNA levels of their convergent gene pattern under different growth conditions. We show that the post-transcriptional fate of hundreds of mimRNAs is controlled by Xrn1, revealing the extent to which this conserved 5'-3' cytoplasmic exoribonuclease plays an unexpected but key role in the post-transcriptional control of convergent gene expression. PMID:26344770

  11. Nucleoporin Nup98 mediates galectin-3 nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Funasaka, Tatsuyoshi; Balan, Vitaly; Raz, Avraham; Wong, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleoporin Nup98 is a component of the nuclear pore complex, and is important in transport across the nuclear pore. Many studies implicate nucleoporin in cancer progression, but no direct mechanistic studies of its effect in cancer have been reported. We show here that Nup98 specifically regulates nucleus–cytoplasm transport of galectin-3, which is a β-galactoside-binding protein that affects adhesion, migration, and cancer progression, and controls cell growth through the β-catenin signaling pathway in cancer cells. Nup98 interacted with galectin-3 on the nuclear membrane, and promoted galectin-3 cytoplasmic translocation whereas other nucleoporins did not show these functions. Inversely, silencing of Nup98 expression by siRNA technique localized galectin-3 to the nucleus and retarded cell growth, which was rescued by Nup98 transfection. In addition, Nup98 RNA interference significantly suppressed downstream mRNA expression in the β-catenin pathway, such as cyclin D1 and FRA-1, while nuclear galectin-3 binds to β-catenin to inhibit transcriptional activity. Reduced expression of β-catenin target genes is consistent with the Nup98 reduction and the galectin-3–nucleus translocation rate. Overall, the results show Nup98’s involvement in nuclear–cytoplasm translocation of galectin-3 and β-catenin signaling pathway in regulating cell proliferation, and the results depicted here suggest a novel therapeutic target/modality for cancers. PMID:23541576

  12. Increased cytoplasm viscosity hampers aggregate polar segregation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Samuel M D; Neeli-Venkata, Ramakanth; Goncalves, Nadia S M; Santinha, João A; Martins, Leonardo; Tran, Huy; Mäkelä, Jarno; Gupta, Abhishekh; Barandas, Marilia; Häkkinen, Antti; Lloyd-Price, Jason; Fonseca, José M; Ribeiro, Andre S

    2016-02-01

    In Escherichia coli, under optimal conditions, protein aggregates associated with cellular aging are excluded from midcell by the nucleoid. We study the functionality of this process under sub-optimal temperatures from population and time lapse images of individual cells and aggregates and nucleoids within. We show that, as temperature decreases, aggregates become homogeneously distributed and uncorrelated with nucleoid size and location. We present evidence that this is due to increased cytoplasm viscosity, which weakens the anisotropy in aggregate displacements at the nucleoid borders that is responsible for their preference for polar localisation. Next, we show that in plasmolysed cells, which have increased cytoplasm viscosity, aggregates are also not preferentially located at the poles. Finally, we show that the inability of cells with increased viscosity to exclude aggregates from midcell results in enhanced aggregate concentration in between the nucleoids in cells close to dividing. This weakens the asymmetries in aggregate numbers between sister cells of subsequent generations required for rejuvenating cell lineages. We conclude that the process of exclusion of protein aggregates from midcell is not immune to stress conditions affecting the cytoplasm viscosity. The findings contribute to our understanding of E. coli's internal organisation and functioning, and its fragility to stressful conditions. PMID:26507787

  13. A cross-sectional study of autoantibody profiles in the Waikato systemic sclerosis cohort, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Chang, Winston S J; Schollum, Joanna; White, Douglas H N; Solanki, Kamal K

    2015-11-01

    The autoantibody profiles in New Zealand systemic sclerosis patients have not previously been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the autoantibody profiles of patients in the Waikato Hospital Systemic Sclerosis Clinic cohort. The EUROLINE (IgG) Systemic Sclerosis panel test kit (which tests for Scl-70, CENP-A, CENP-B, RP11, RP155, Fib, NOR90, Th/To, PM100, PM75, Ku, PDGFR and Ro-52) was selected for the purpose of this study. All patients attending the Waikato Hospital Systemic Sclerosis clinic were invited to participate. These patients were categorised by systemic sclerosis subtypes [1]. Results were compared with previously published data, including the EUSTAR database. Sixty patients (56 female) were recruited, with a median age of 61 years (range 29-81 years). Forty-one had limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (lcSSc). Of these lcSSc patients, 31 (75.6%) were positive for CENP-A and CENP-B (anti-centromere) antibodies, 12 (29.3%) for Ro-52 antibodies, 5 (12.2%) for RP11 and RP155, 4 (9.8%) for Scl-70 and 1 (2.4%) each for anti-Fib and Th/To antibodies. Fifteen patients had diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc), of which 7 patients (47.6%) were positive for RP11 and RP155, 4 (26.7%) for Scl-70. Three dcSSc patients did not have either of these two major antibodies, but of these 15 dcSSc patients, 4 patients (26.7%) were positive also for Ro-52, 2 (13.3%) for anti-Ku, and 1 (6.7%) each for anti-Fib and NOR90. Four patients had overlap syndrome (OLS), 1 had CENP-A and CENP-B antibodies, 1 had Ro-52 autoantibodies 1 had anti-Ku antibodies. Three patients had no autoantibodies. This is the first study to look at the autoantibody profile of SSc patients in New Zealand. A higher prevalence of antibodies against centromere and RNA polymerase III was demonstrated in our group compared with the EUSTAR database suggesting that antibody prevalence may vary geographically.

  14. Nucleosome: a major immunogen for pathogenic autoantibody-inducing T cells of lupus

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Only a fraction (12%) of 268 "autoreactive" T cell clones derived from lupus-prone mice can selectively induce the production of pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies in vitro and accelerate the development of lupus nephritis when transferred in vivo. The CDR3 loops of T cell receptor beta chains expressed by these pathogenic T helper (Th) clones contain a recurrent motif of anionic residues suggesting that they are selected by autoantigens with cationic residues. Herein, we found that approximately 50% of these pathogenic Th clones were specific for nucleosomal antigens, but none of them responded to cationic idiopeptides shared by variable regions of pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies. Nucleosomes did not stimulate the T cells as a nonspecific mitogen or superantigen. Only the pathogenic Th cells of lupus responded to nucleosomal antigens that were processed and presented via the major histocompatibility class II pathway. Although the presentation of purified mononucleosomes to the Th clones could be blocked by inhibitors of endosomal proteases, neither of the two components of the nucleosomes--free DNA or histones by themselves-- could stimulate the Th clones. Thus critical peptide epitopes for the Th cells were probably protected during uptake and processing of the nucleosome particle as a whole. The nucleosome-specific Th clones preferentially augmented the production of IgG autoantibodies to histone-DNA complex in vitro. In vivo, nucleosome-specific, CD4+ T cells were not detectable in normal mice, but they were found in the spleens of lupus-prone mice as early as 1 mo of age, long before other autoimmune manifestations. Immunization of young, preautoimmune lupus mice with nucleosomes augmented the production of autoantibodies and markedly accelerated the development of severe glomerulonephritis. Previously, crude preparations containing nucleosomes were shown by others to have polyclonal mitogenic activity for B cells from normal as well as lupus mice

  15. Surface plasmon resonance reveals a different pattern of proinsulin autoantibodies concentration and affinity in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Trabucchi, Aldana; Guerra, Luciano L; Faccinetti, Natalia I; Iacono, Rubén F; Poskus, Edgardo; Valdez, Silvina N

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) is characterized by autoimmune aggression against pancreatic beta cells resulting in absolute deficiency of insulin secretion. The first detectable sign of emerging autoimmunity during the preclinical asymptomatic period is the appearance of diabetes-related autoantibodies. In children at risk for type 1 DM, high-affinity Insulin autoantibodies reactive to proinsulin, are associated with diabetes risk. Autoantibodies are usually measured by radioligand binding assay (RBA) that provides quasi-quantitative values reflecting potency (product between concentration and affinity) of specific autoantibodies. Aiming to improve the characterization of the specific humoral immune response, we selected surface plasmon resonance (SPR) as an alternative method to measure proinsulin autoantibodies (PAA). This novel technology has allowed real time detection of antibodies interaction and kinetic analysis. Herein, we have employed SPR to characterize the PAA present in sera from 28 childhood-onset (mean age 8.31±4.20) and 23 adult-onset diabetic patients (≥65 years old, BMI<30) in terms of concentration and affinity. When evaluating comparatively samples from both groups, childhood-onset diabetic patients presented lower PAA concentrations and higher affinities (median 67.12×10(-9) M and 3.50×10(7) M(-1), respectively) than the adults (median 167.4×10(-9) M and 0.84×10(7) M(-1), respectively). These results are consistent with those from the reference method RBA (Standard Deviation score median 9.49 for childhood-onset group and 5.04 for adult-onset group) where the binding can be directly related to the intrinsic affinity of the antibody, suggesting that there is a different etiopathogenic pathway between both types of clinical presentation of the disease. This technology has shown to be a useful tool for the characterization of PAAs parameters as an alternative to radioimmunoassay, with high versatility and reproducibility associated to low

  16. Detection of four diabetes specific autoantibodies in a single radioimmunoassay: an innovative high-throughput approach for autoimmune diabetes screening

    PubMed Central

    Tiberti, C; Yu, L; Lucantoni, F; Panimolle, F; Spagnuolo, I; Lenzi, A; Eisenbarth, G S; Dotta, F

    2011-01-01

    Highly sensitive and specific radioimmunoassays have been validated for autoantibodies reacting with the four major autoantigens identified so far in autoimmune diabetes. However, the analysis of this large number of autoantigens has increased the costs and time necessary for complete autoantibody screenings. Our aim was to demonstrate that it is possible to detect the immunoreactivity against a combination of four different autoantigens by a single assay, this representing a rapid, low-cost first approach to evaluate humoral autoimmunity in diabetes. By using this novel multi-autoantigen radioimmunoassay (MAA), in subsequent steps we analysed 830 sera, 476 of known and 354 of unknown diabetes-specific immunoreactivity, collected from various groups of individuals including type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients, autoantibody-positive patients with a clinical diagnosis of type 2 diabetes (LADA), prediabetic subjects, individuals at risk to develop autoimmune diabetes, siblings of type 1 diabetic patients, coeliac patients and healthy control subjects. All sera reacting with one or more of the four autoantigens by single assays also resulted positive with MAA, as well as eight of 24 type 1 diabetic patients classified initially as autoantibody-negative at disease onset based on single autoantibody assays. In addition, MAA showed 92% sensitivity and 99% specificity by analysing 140 blinded sera from type 1 diabetic patients and control subjects provided in the 2010 Diabetes Autoantibody Standardization Program. MAA is the first combined method also able to evaluate, in addition to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and tyrosine phosphatase (IA)-2, insulin and islet beta-cell zinc cation efflux transporter (ZnT8) autoantibodies. It appears to be particularly appropriate as a first-line approach for large-scale population-based screenings of anti-islet autoimmunity. PMID:22059988

  17. Autoantibodies to nervous system-specific proteins are elevated in sera of flight crew members: biomarkers for nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Abou-Donia, Mohamed B; Abou-Donia, Martha M; ElMasry, Eman M; Monro, Jean A; Mulder, Michel F A

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive study reports the results of assays performed to detect circulating autoantibodies in a panel of 7 proteins associated with the nervous system (NS) in sera of 12 healthy controls and a group of 34 flight crew members including both pilots and attendants who experienced adverse effects after exposure to air emissions sourced to the ventilation system in their aircrafts and subsequently sought medical attention. The proteins selected represent various types of proteins present in nerve cells that are affected by neuronal degeneration. In the sera samples from flight crew members and healthy controls, immunoglobin (IgG) was measured using Western blotting against neurofilament triplet proteins (NFP), tubulin, microtubule-associated tau proteins (tau), microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2), myelin basic protein (MBP), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and glial S100B protein. Significant elevation in levels of circulating IgG-class autoantibodies in flight crew members was found. A symptom-free pilot was sampled before symptoms and then again afterward. This pilot developed clinical problems after flying for 45 h in 10 d. Significant increases in autoantibodies were noted to most of the tested proteins in the serum of this pilot after exposure to air emissions. The levels of autoantibodies rose with worsening of his condition compared to the serum sample collected prior to exposure. After cessation of flying for a year, this pilot's clinical condition improved, and eventually he recovered and his serum autoantibodies against nervous system proteins decreased. The case study with this pilot demonstrates a temporal relationship between exposure to air emissions, clinical condition, and level of serum autoantibodies to nervous system-specific proteins. Overall, these results suggest the possible development of neuronal injury and gliosis in flight crew members anecdotally exposed to cabin air emissions containing organophosphates. Thus, increased

  18. Non-HLA type 1 diabetes genes modulate disease risk together with HLA-DQ and islet autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Maziarz, M; Hagopian, W; Palmer, JP; Sanjeevi, CB; Kockum, I; Breslow, N; Lernmark, Å

    2015-01-01

    The possible interrelations between HLA-DQ, non-HLA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and islet autoantibodies were investigated at clinical onset in 1-34 year old type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients (n=305) and controls (n=203). Among the non-HLA SNPs reported by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium, 24% were supported in this Swedish replication set including that the increased risk of minor PTPN22 allele and high risk HLA was modified by GAD65 autoantibodies. The association between T1D and the minor AA+AC genotype in ERBB3 gene was stronger among IA-2 autoantibody-positive patients (comparison p=0.047). The association between T1D and the common insulin (AA) genotype was stronger among insulin autoantibody (IAA)-positive patients (comparison p=0.008). In contrast, the association between T1D and unidentified 26471 gene was stronger among IAA-negative (comparison p=0.049) and IA-2 autoantibody-negative (comparison p=0.052) patients. Finally, the association between IL2RA and T1D was stronger among IAA-positive than among IAA-negative patients (comparison p=0.028). These results suggest that the increased risk of T1D by non-HLA genes is often modified by both islet autoantibodies and HLA-DQ. The interactions between non-HLA genes, islet autoantibodies and HLA-DQ should be taken into account in T1D prediction studies as well as in prevention trials aimed at inducing immunological tolerance to islet autoantigens. PMID:26513234

  19. Differential clearance mechanisms, neutrophil extracellular trap degradation and phagocytosis, are operative in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with distinct autoantibody specificities.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Sudhir Kumar; Rai, Richa; Singh, Vikas Vikram; Rai, Madhukar; Rai, Geeta

    2015-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are generally presented with autoantibodies against either dsDNA or RNA-associated antigens (also known as extractable nuclear antigens, ENA) or both. However, the mechanisms and processes that lead to this distinctive autoantibody profile are not well understood. Defects in clearance mechanism i.e. phagocytosis may lead to enhanced microbial and cellular debris of immunogenic potential. In addition to defective phagocytosis, impaired neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) degradation has been recently reported in SLE patients. However, the extent to which both these clearance processes (NET-degradation and phagocytosis) are operative in serologically distinguished subsets of SLE patients is not established. Therefore, in this report, we evaluated NET-degradation and phagocytosis efficiency among SLE patients with different autoantibody specificities. SLE patients were classified into three subsets based on their autoantibody profile (anti-dsDNA, anti-ENA or both) as determined by ELISA. NET-degradation by SLE and control sera was assessed by sytox orange-based fluorescence assay. Neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis in the presence of SLE and control sera was determined by flowcytometry. The segregation of SLE patients revealed significant differences in NET-degradation and phagocytosis in SLE patients with autoantibodies against dsDNA and ENA. We report that NET-degradation efficiency was significantly impaired in SLE patients with anti-dsDNA autoantibodies and not in those with anti-ENA autoantibodies. In contrast to NET-degradation, neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis was impaired in all three subsets independent of autoantibody specificity. These observations suggest that varying clearance mechanisms are operative in SLE subsets with anti-dsDNA or anti-ENA autoantibodies. The results outlined in this manuscript also suggest that sub-grouping of SLE patients could be useful in delineating the molecular and pathological

  20. Inhibitory autoantibodies against ADAMTS-13 in patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura bind ADAMTS-13 protease and may accelerate its clearance in vivo

    PubMed Central

    SHELAT, S. G.; SMITH, P.; AI, J.; ZHENG, X. L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Many patients with acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) harbor autoantibodies that may bind and/or inhibit ADAMTS-13 proteolytic activity and accelerate its clearance in vivo. Methods To test this hypothesis, we determined ADAMTS-13 activity and antigen levels in parallel plasma samples from patients clinically diagnosed with TTP. Collagen binding, GST-VWF73 and FRETS-VWF73 assays were used to determine ADAMTS-13 activity and to detect inhibitory autoantibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoprecipitation plus Western blotting (IP/WB) were used to detect total anti-ADAMTS-13 IgG (inhibitory and non-inhibitory). Results Among 40 patients with TTP (21 idiopathic and 19 non-idiopathic), inhibitory autoantibodies were detected (by FRETS-VWF73) in 52% of idiopathic and 0% of non-idiopathic TTP patients. In contrast, non-inhibitory IgG autoantibodies were detected in 29% of idiopathic and 50% of non-idiopathic TTP patients. The concentration of inhibitory IgG autoantibody in idiopathic TTP patients was significantly higher than that of non-inhibitory IgG in either idiopathic or non-idiopathic TTP patients. Idiopathic TTP patients demonstrated significantly reduced ADAMTS-13 activity compared with non-idiopathic patients, but only slightly lower ADAMTS-13 antigen levels. Interestingly, patients with inhibitory autoantibodies exhibited significantly lower ADAMTS-13 antigen levels than those with only non-inhibitory IgG autoantibodies or no autoantibody. Serial plasma exchanges increased levels of ADAMTS-13 activity and antigen concurrently in patients with inhibitory autoantibodies. Conclusion The identification of severe ADAMTS-13 deficiency and autoantibodies or inhibitors appears to be assay-dependent; the inhibitory IgG autoantibodies, in addition to binding and inhibiting ADAMTS-13 proteolytic activity, may accelerate ADAMTS-13 clearance in vivo. PMID:16879212

  1. Thyroid Autoantibodies in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Subjects with and without Thyroid Disease: Implications for Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ilias, Ioannis; Karagiorga, Vasiliki; Paraskevas, George; Bougea, Anastasia; Bourbouli, Mara; Pappa, Athina; Nikopoulou, Stamatina; Kapaki, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Plasma antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (anti-Tg) are widely used in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroiditis. No research has compared anti-TPO and anti-Tg both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy individuals vis-à-vis patients with thyroid disease. Methods. We measured anti-TPO and anti-Tg antibodies in plasma and CSF in nine subjects (mean age ± SD: 73 ± 6 years) with hypothyroidism and nine subjects (mean age ± SD: 73 ± 8 years) without thyroid disease. Results. The concentration of anti-TPO autoantibodies in CSF was very low compared to plasma in both subjects with thyroid and without thyroid disease (P = 0.007). CSF anti-Tg autoantibodies titers were very low compared to the plasma in subjects with thyroid disease (P = 0.004), whereas, in subjects without thyroid disease, this difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.063). Conclusions. Thyroid autoantibodies levels were low in plasma and CSF; we did not observe any transfer of thyroid autoantibodies from the peripheral blood to the CSF. Therefore, regarding Hashimoto's encephalopathy, where elevated antithyroid autoantibodies are often measured in blood, it is more likely that thyroiditis and encephalopathy represent nonspecific, but distinct, events of an aggressive immune system. PMID:26798549

  2. S100B and S100B autoantibody as biomarkers for early detection of brain metastases in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Puvenna, Vikram; Brennan, Chanda; Mahmoud, Shamseldeen; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Phillips, Michael; Janigro, Damir; Mazzone, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background S100B is an astrocytic protein that enters the blood stream when there is disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Over time, antibodies against S100B develop in the sera of patients who experience persistent or repeated BBB disruptions. We explored the use of serum S100B protein and S100B autoantibodies for the detection of brain metastasis in patients with lung cancer. Methods One hundred and twenty eight untreated patients with lung cancer who had brain imaging performed as part of their routine evaluation, participated. Serum S100B protein levels were measured by direct ELISA and S100B autoantibody levels by reverse ELISA. These levels in patients with brain metastases were compared alone and in combination to those without brain metastases. Results Eighteen (14%) patients had brain metastasis at the time of lung cancer diagnosis. An S100B cutoff of 0.058 ng/mL had a sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 43% for brain metastasis. When an autoantibody threshold of <2.00 absorbance units was used in conjunction with S100B, the sensitivity remained at 89%, and the specificity increased to 58%. The overall accuracy was 51% with S100B alone, improving to 62.5% when combined with autoantibodies. Conclusions Serum S100B and S100B autoantibody levels may help to identify which lung cancer patients have brain metastases. PMID:27652205

  3. T cells are required for the production of blister-inducing autoantibodies in experimental epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

    PubMed

    Sitaru, Ana Gabriela; Sesarman, Alina; Mihai, Sidonia; Chiriac, Mircea T; Zillikens, Detlef; Hultman, Per; Solbach, Werner; Sitaru, Cassian

    2010-02-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is a prototypical organ-specific autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies against type VII collagen of the dermal-epidermal junction. Although mechanisms of autoantibody-induced blister formation were extensively characterized, the initiation of autoantibody production in autoimmune blistering diseases is still poorly defined. In the current study, we addressed the role of T cells for the production of blister-inducing autoantibodies in mice immunized with type VII collagen. To detect autoreactive type VII collagen-specific T cells, lymph node cells from immunized SJL mice were stimulated in vitro with recombinant Ag, and their proliferation was measured by radioactive thymidine incorporation and flow cytometry analysis of CFSE-labeled cells. Interestingly, using synthetic peptides of the immunogen, partly different T and B cell epitopes in mice immunized with type VII collagen were demonstrated. In contrast to wild-type mice, immunization with type VII collagen of SJL athymic nude mice lacking T cells did not induce an autoimmune response and blistering phenotype. Importantly, SJL nude mice repleted with T cells from immunized wild-type mice showed a robust and durable autoantibody production resulting in subepidermal blistering disease in the recipients. Our present results demonstrate that T cells are required for the initiation of autoimmunity against type VII collagen in experimental epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and provide a basis for developing T cell-directed immunomodulatory strategies for this and related autoimmune diseases.

  4. S100B and S100B autoantibody as biomarkers for early detection of brain metastases in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Puvenna, Vikram; Brennan, Chanda; Mahmoud, Shamseldeen; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Phillips, Michael; Janigro, Damir; Mazzone, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background S100B is an astrocytic protein that enters the blood stream when there is disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Over time, antibodies against S100B develop in the sera of patients who experience persistent or repeated BBB disruptions. We explored the use of serum S100B protein and S100B autoantibodies for the detection of brain metastasis in patients with lung cancer. Methods One hundred and twenty eight untreated patients with lung cancer who had brain imaging performed as part of their routine evaluation, participated. Serum S100B protein levels were measured by direct ELISA and S100B autoantibody levels by reverse ELISA. These levels in patients with brain metastases were compared alone and in combination to those without brain metastases. Results Eighteen (14%) patients had brain metastasis at the time of lung cancer diagnosis. An S100B cutoff of 0.058 ng/mL had a sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 43% for brain metastasis. When an autoantibody threshold of <2.00 absorbance units was used in conjunction with S100B, the sensitivity remained at 89%, and the specificity increased to 58%. The overall accuracy was 51% with S100B alone, improving to 62.5% when combined with autoantibodies. Conclusions Serum S100B and S100B autoantibody levels may help to identify which lung cancer patients have brain metastases.

  5. Genesis and evolution of antichromatin autoantibodies in murine lupus implicates T-dependent immunization with self antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Burlingame, R W; Rubin, R L; Balderas, R S; Theofilopoulos, A N

    1993-01-01

    Autoantibodies reacting with chromatin and its components, histones and DNA, are characteristic of the human autoimmune disease SLE and drug-induced lupus, but the mechanisms of their induction remain unknown. Serial serum samples collected over short intervals from lupus-prone MRL/MP-lpr/lpr and BXSB mice were tested by ELISA on chromatin and its substructures to characterize the initial autoimmune response to these antigens. Direct binding studies demonstrated that the early autoantibodies recognized discontinuous epitopes on native chromatin and the (H2A-H2B)-DNA subnucleosome. As the immune response progressed, native DNA and other chromatin constituents generally became antigenic. Based on adsorption studies and IgG subclass restriction, antibodies to native DNA were more related to chromatin than to denatured DNA. The kinetics of autoantibody appearance and the Ig class distribution were similar to the kinetics and distribution seen in antibodies induced by immunization with an exogenous T-dependent antigen. These results are most consistent with the view that autoantibodies reacting with chromatin are generated by autoimmunization with chromatin, and antibodies to native DNA are a subset of the wide spectrum of antichromatin autoantibodies. Images PMID:8473512

  6. Mitochondrial and Cytoplasmic ROS Have Opposing Effects on Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Schaar, Claire E.; Dues, Dylan J.; Spielbauer, Katie K.; Machiela, Emily; Cooper, Jason F.; Senchuk, Megan; Hekimi, Siegfried; Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are highly reactive, oxygen-containing molecules that can cause molecular damage within the cell. While the accumulation of ROS-mediated damage is widely believed to be one of the main causes of aging, ROS also act in signaling pathways. Recent work has demonstrated that increasing levels of superoxide, one form of ROS, through treatment with paraquat, results in increased lifespan. Interestingly, treatment with paraquat robustly increases the already long lifespan of the clk-1 mitochondrial mutant, but not other long-lived mitochondrial mutants such as isp-1 or nuo-6. To genetically dissect the subcellular compartment in which elevated ROS act to increase lifespan, we deleted individual superoxide dismutase (sod) genes in clk-1 mutants, which are sensitized to ROS. We find that only deletion of the primary mitochondrial sod gene, sod-2 results in increased lifespan in clk-1 worms. In contrast, deletion of either of the two cytoplasmic sod genes, sod-1 or sod-5, significantly decreases the lifespan of clk-1 worms. Further, we show that increasing mitochondrial superoxide levels through deletion of sod-2 or treatment with paraquat can still increase lifespan in clk-1;sod-1 double mutants, which live shorter than clk-1 worms. The fact that mitochondrial superoxide can increase lifespan in worms with a detrimental level of cytoplasmic superoxide demonstrates that ROS have a compartment specific effect on lifespan – elevated ROS in the mitochondria acts to increase lifespan, while elevated ROS in the cytoplasm decreases lifespan. This work also suggests that both ROS-dependent and ROS-independent mechanisms contribute to the longevity of clk-1 worms. PMID:25671321

  7. Mitochondrial and cytoplasmic ROS have opposing effects on lifespan.

    PubMed

    Schaar, Claire E; Dues, Dylan J; Spielbauer, Katie K; Machiela, Emily; Cooper, Jason F; Senchuk, Megan; Hekimi, Siegfried; Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M

    2015-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are highly reactive, oxygen-containing molecules that can cause molecular damage within the cell. While the accumulation of ROS-mediated damage is widely believed to be one of the main causes of aging, ROS also act in signaling pathways. Recent work has demonstrated that increasing levels of superoxide, one form of ROS, through treatment with paraquat, results in increased lifespan. Interestingly, treatment with paraquat robustly increases the already long lifespan of the clk-1 mitochondrial mutant, but not other long-lived mitochondrial mutants such as isp-1 or nuo-6. To genetically dissect the subcellular compartment in which elevated ROS act to increase lifespan, we deleted individual superoxide dismutase (sod) genes in clk-1 mutants, which are sensitized to ROS. We find that only deletion of the primary mitochondrial sod gene, sod-2 results in increased lifespan in clk-1 worms. In contrast, deletion of either of the two cytoplasmic sod genes, sod-1 or sod-5, significantly decreases the lifespan of clk-1 worms. Further, we show that increasing mitochondrial superoxide levels through deletion of sod-2 or treatment with paraquat can still increase lifespan in clk-1;sod-1 double mutants, which live shorter than clk-1 worms. The fact that mitochondrial superoxide can increase lifespan in worms with a detrimental level of cytoplasmic superoxide demonstrates that ROS have a compartment specific effect on lifespan - elevated ROS in the mitochondria acts to increase lifespan, while elevated ROS in the cytoplasm decreases lifespan. This work also suggests that both ROS-dependent and ROS-independent mechanisms contribute to the longevity of clk-1 worms.

  8. Pro-autophagic polyphenols reduce the acetylation of cytoplasmic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pietrocola, Federico; Mariño, Guillermo; Lissa, Delphine; Vacchelli, Erika; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Zamzami, Naoufal; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol contained in red wine that has been amply investigated for its beneficial effects on organismal metabolism, in particular in the context of the so-called “French paradox,” i.e., the relatively low incidence of coronary heart disease exhibited by a population with a high dietary intake of cholesterol and saturated fats. At least part of the beneficial effect of resveratrol on human health stems from its capacity to promote autophagy by activating the NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 1. However, the concentration of resveratrol found in red wine is excessively low to account alone for the French paradox. Here, we investigated the possibility that other mono- and polyphenols contained in red wine might induce autophagy while affecting the acetylation levels of cellular proteins. Phenolic compounds found in red wine, including anthocyanins (oenin), stilbenoids (piceatannol), monophenols (caffeic acid, gallic acid) glucosides (delphinidin, kuronamin, peonidin) and flavonoids (catechin, epicatechin, quercetin, myricetin), were all capable of stimulating autophagy, although with dissimilar potencies. Importantly, a robust negative correlation could be established between autophagy induction and the acetylation levels of cytoplasmic proteins, as determined by a novel immunofluorescence staining protocol that allows for the exclusion of nuclear components from the analysis. Inhibition of sirtuin 1 by both pharmacological and genetic means abolished protein deacetylation and autophagy as stimulated by resveratrol, but not by piceatannol, indicating that these compounds act through distinct molecular pathways. In support of this notion, resveratrol and piceatannol synergized in inducing autophagy as well as in promoting cytoplasmic protein deacetylation. Our results highlight a cause-effect relationship between the deacetylation of cytoplasmic proteins and autophagy induction by red wine components. PMID:23070521

  9. Symmetrical infantile thalamic degeneration with focal cytoplasmic calcification.

    PubMed

    Ambler, M; O'Neil, W

    1975-10-27

    Infantile thalamic degeneration is a rare clinico-pathological entity. Restricted location of the lesion and peculiar cytopathological changes serve to distinguish this disorder from other common encephalopathies. Optical and ultrastructural studies demonstrate cytoplasmic calcopherules in previously viable cells. According to current concepts of acute cellular reactions to injury and mechanism of intracellular calcification, the cytological changes cannot be attributed to either hypoxic ischemic cell change or dystrophic calcification. By analogy to other human and pathological material, the most likely basis for nondystrophic calcopherule formation is toxic or infectious injury with local synthesis, or autophagic or phagolysosomal degradation of cellular debris of specific chemical composition favoring calcium deposition.

  10. NUCLEAR DNA AND CYTOPLASMIC DNA FROM TISSUES OF HIGHER PLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Yasuo; Bassel, Alix; Stern, Herbert

    1965-01-01

    Young wheat roots were labeled with 32P-inorganic phosphate. Following the labeling period, roots were homogenized in a sucrose medium and fractionated into nuclei, cytoplasmic particles (including proplastids and mitochondria), and a soluble fraction containing most of the microsomes. DNA prepared from the particles had a higher buoyant density than that from the nuclei and showed a marked loss in total label if the roots were exposed to non-radioactive medium for 48 hours prior to fractionation of the cells. PMID:5885425

  11. Rituximab as Successful Adjunct Treatment in a Patient With Disseminated Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection Due to Acquired Anti–Interferon-γ Autoantibody

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Christopher A.; Merkel, Patricia A.; Chan, Edward D.; Lenz, Laurel L.; Wolf, Molly L.; Alam, Rafeul; Frankel, Stephen K.; Fischer, Aryeh; Gogate, Shaila; Perez-Velez, Carlos M.; Knight, Vijaya

    2014-01-01

    An acquired immune deficiency due to interferon gamma (IFN-γ) autoantibodies was diagnosed in a 78-year-old Japanese man with treatment-refractory disseminated nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. In addition to standard antimycobacterial therapy, he was successfully treated with rituximab to eliminate B cells and thereby the autoantibody. Subsequently, he obtained a sustained remission from infection. PMID:24336756

  12. Frequency of Diabetes and Thyroid Autoantibodies in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes and Their Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ka Young; Kim, Yun Hee; Yang, Eun Mi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand the frequency of autoimmune thyroid and diabetes antibodies in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) compared with their siblings. Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA), islet cell antibodies (ICA), insulin autoantibodies (IAA), and thyroid autoantibodies were studied in all subjects. The rates of positive GADA and IAA were significantly higher in probands compared to in siblings (p<0.001) or controls (p<0.001). All pancreatic autoantibodies were not significantly different between the siblings and the healthy controls. Thyroid antiperoxidase antibody (TPOAb) and antithyroglobulin antibody (TGAb) were significantly different between the probands and the control subjects (p=0.002 and p=0.018, respectively). The rates of TPOAb and TGAb positivity in siblings were higher than in those of the controls, but there was no significant difference between the two groups. However, thyroid autoimmunity (TA) was significantly different among the groups (p=0.004). Siblings of the TA-positive probands were shown to have a greater prevalence of thyroid antibodies than did the controls (p=0.022), but siblings of the TA-negative probands did not have such a prevalence compared with the control subjects. The prevalence of pancreatic and thyroid antibodies positivity in probands was statistically significant compared with the siblings and the controls. Siblings of TA-positive probands revealed a greater prevalence of thyroid antibodies than did the controls. Therefore, the screening for TA in siblings, particularly siblings of TA-positive probands, is as important as it is in probands. PMID:27231679

  13. CSF herpes virus and autoantibody profiles in the evaluation of encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Linnoila, Jenny J.; Binnicker, Matthew J.; Majed, Masoud; Klein, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report the frequency of coexisting herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus 1 [HSV-1] or HSV-2, varicella zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus [EBV], cytomegalovirus, or human herpes virus 6 [HHV-6]) and autoantibodies in patients with encephalitis (herpes or autoimmune) in clinical laboratory service. Methods: Three groups were evaluated for herpes viruses and antibodies: group 1—patients whose CSF was positive for a herpes virus by real-time PCR over a period of 6 months; group 2—patients whose CSF was positive for an autoimmune encephalitis–associated antibody over 5 years (e.g., NMDA receptor [NMDA-R] antibody), and the same number of controls without autoimmune/infectious disease; and group 3—incidental autoimmune parainfectious encephalitis cases encountered over 1 year. Results: In group 1, antibodies were detected in 27 of 100 herpes PCR-positive CSF specimens (CSFs), either unclassified neural or nonneural in all but one patient with NMDA-R antibody detected after EBV infection. Antibodies were also detected in 3 of 7 CSFs submitted for repeat PCR testing (unclassified, 2; AMPA receptor, 1). In group 2, herpes viruses were detected in 1 of 77 controls (HHV-6) and 4 of 77 patients with autoimmune encephalitis (EBV, 2; HHV-6, 2); autoantibodies targeted NMDA-R in 3/4 and GABAB-R in 1/4. In group 3, NMDA-R antibody was detected in 7 patients post–HSV-1 encephalitis. Of the remaining 3 patients, 2 had unclassified neural antibodies detected, and one had GABAB-R autoimmunity. Concomitant neoplasms were discovered in 2 patients each from groups 2 and 3. Conclusions: Autoantibodies and herpes virus DNA frequently coexist in encephalitic CSF. Some patients develop parainfectious autoimmunity following viral CNS infection (usually HSV-1 encephalitis). The significance of detecting herpes nucleic acids in others remains unclear. PMID:27308306

  14. An italian multicenter study for application of a diagnostic algorithm in autoantibody testing.

    PubMed

    Bonaguri, Chiara; Melegari, Alessandra; Dall'Aglio, PierPaolo; Ballabio, Andrea; Terenziani, Paolo; Russo, Annalisa; Battistelli, Luisita; Aloe, Rosalia; Camisa, Roberta; Campaniello, Giovanna; Sartori, Elisabetta; Monica, Cesare

    2009-09-01

    The presence in the serum of specific autoantibodies, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA), and antiextractable nuclear antigens (anti-ENA), is one of the diagnostic criteria for autoimmune rheumatic disease, and the requests for these tests in the last few years have grown remarkably. A guideline for reducing clinically inappropriate requests in autoantibody testing (ANA, anti-dsDNA, anti-ENA) has been applied in the Parma Hospital since 2007. The results for the period January-December 2007 were compared to those of the previous period January-December 2006, and a significant reduction in the number of anti-dsDNA (23.9%) and anti-ENA (20.7%) was found. The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of a similar guideline in a wide area (Parma, Modena, Piacenza, Reggio-Emilia) with reference to the diagnosis of autoimmune rheumatic disease. This project, supported by a regional grant for innovative research projects, was started in January 2008 and consists of three different steps: (1) a study group of clinicians and laboratory physicians to evaluate the diagnostic criteria, the analytical procedures, and the number of tests performed in different hospitals; (2) developing common guidelines for autoantibody testing that takes into account the different clinical needs with the aim of improving efficiency and clinical effectiveness of diagnosis and monitoring; and (3) assessing compliance with the guidelines in the different hospitals that are evaluating the second-level test (anti-dsDNA, anti-ENA) decrease. We think that the validation of guidelines for the laboratory diagnosis of autoimmune rheumatic disease can represent a tool for improving patients' outcomes and economic efficiency.

  15. Thyroid autoantibodies are rare in nonhuman great apes and hypothyroidism cannot be attributed to thyroid autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Aliesky, Holly; Courtney, Cynthia L; Rapoport, Basil; McLachlan, Sandra M

    2013-12-01

    The great apes include, in addition to Homo, the genera Pongo (orangutans), Gorilla (gorillas), and Pan, the latter comprising two species, P. troglodytes (chimpanzees) and P. paniscus (bonobos). Adult-onset hypothyroidism was previously reported in 4 individual nonhuman great apes. However, there is scarce information on normal serum thyroid hormone levels and virtually no data for thyroid autoantibodies in these animals. Therefore, we examined thyroid hormone levels and TSH in all nonhuman great ape genera including adults, adolescents, and infants. Because hypothyroidism in humans is commonly the end result of thyroid autoimmunity, we also tested healthy and hypothyroid nonhuman great apes for antibodies to thyroglobulin (Tg), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and the TSH receptor (TSHR). We established a thyroid hormone and TSH database in orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobos (447 individuals). The most striking differences are the greatly reduced free-T4 and free-T3 levels in orangutans and gorillas vs chimpanzees and bonobos, and conversely, elevated TSH levels in gorillas vs Pan species. Antibodies to Tg and TPO were detected in only 2.6% of adult animals vs approximately 10% in humans. No animals with Tg, TPO, or TSHR antibodies exhibited thyroid dysfunction. Conversely, hypothyroid nonhuman great apes lacked thyroid autoantibodies. Moreover, thyroid histology in necropsy tissues was similar in euthyroid and hypothyroid individuals, and lymphocytic infiltration was absent in 2 hypothyroid animals. In conclusion, free T4 and free T3 are lower in orangutans and gorillas vs chimpanzees and bonobos, the closest living human relatives. Moreover, thyroid autoantibodies are rare and hypothyroidism is unrelated to thyroid autoimmunity in nonhuman great apes.

  16. HLA Antigens in Malay Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Association with Clinical and Autoantibody Expression

    PubMed Central

    Azizah, MR; Ainol, SS; Kong, NCT; Normaznah, Y; Rahim, MN

    2001-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that certain genes within the major histocompatibility complex predispose to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and may influence clinical and autoantibody expression. Thus, we studied the frequency of HLA-DR, -DQA, -DQB and -DPB alleles in ethnic Malays with SLE to determine the role of these genes in determining disease susceptibility and their association with clinical and immunological manifestations. Methods: Fifty-six Malay SLE patients were enrolled into the study. Demographic, clinical and immunological findings were obtained from medical records. HLA-DR, DQ and DP typing were done using modified PCR-RELP. Controls were from ethnically-matched healthy individuals. Results: We found a strongly significant association of the DR2 and DQB1 *0501 and DQB1 *0601 (pcorr=0.03, rr=3.83, pcorr=0.0036, rr=4.56 and pcorr=0.0048 and rr=6.0, respectively). There was also a weak increase of DQB1 *0.201 and DPB1 *0.0901 with a weak decrease of DQA1 *0601 and DQB1 *0503 and *0301 which were not significant after corrections for multiple comparisons were made. There was a significant positive association of DR2 and DQB1 *0501 with renal involvement and DR8 with alopecia. A nonsignificant increase of DQB1 *0503 in patients with photosensitivity was noted. Significant autoantibody associations were also found: DQB1 *0601 with anti-Sm/RNP, DR2 with antiSSA (Ro)/SSB (La), and DR2, DQB1 *0501 and *0601 with antibodies to ds DNA. There was no specific DR, DQ or DP associations with age of disease onset (below 30 years or those at or above 30 years). Conclusion: Our data suggests the role of the HLA class II genes in conferring SLE susceptibility and in clinical and autoantibody expression PMID:11590899

  17. Restricted specificity of the autoantibody response in Goodpasture's syndrome demonstrated by two-dimensional western blotting.

    PubMed

    Derry, C J; Dunn, M J; Rees, A J; Pusey, C D

    1991-12-01

    The autoantigen in Goodpasture's syndrome is known to be contained within the non-collagenous (NC1) domain of type IV collagen. We have examined the specificity of autoantibodies to glomerular basement membrane (GBM) using the technique of 2-D electrophoresis followed by Western blotting. Protein stains of 2-D gels of collagenase-digested human GBM revealed extensive charge and size heterogeneity. Major components were of mol. wt 24-30 kD and 43-56 kD, corresponding to monomeric and dimeric subunits of NCl. Western blotting of 2-D gels with IgG from patients with anti-GBM disease demonstrated that the most antigenic components migrated as cationic 28-kD monomers (pI 10) and similarly charged dimers, although other components were recognized less strongly. The mobility of the strongly antigenic polypeptides was different to that of the known alpha 1 and alpha 2 chains of type IV collagen. Autoantibodies from all 20 patients studied showed the same pattern of reactivity, regardless of their clinical features (in particular, the presence or absence of pulmonary haemorrhage) or HLA type. A monoclonal antibody (P1) to human GBM bound in a similar pattern, particularly recognizing the cationic components. 2-D gels of affinity-purified GBM from a P1 column showed enrichment of the 28-kD monomers, which were recognized by human autoantibodies on Western blotting. These results demonstrate that the autoimmune response in Goodpasture's syndrome is of restricted specificity, and support the suggestion that the major autoantigenic determinant is present on the novel alpha 3 chain of type IV collagen. PMID:1747953

  18. RIA of thyroglobulin using monoclonal antibodies: Minimal interference by anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, T.; Koizumi, M.; Sakahara, H.; Ohta, H.; Kohsaka, T.; Misaki, T.; Iida, Y.; Kasagi, K.; Endo, K.; Konishi, J.

    1985-05-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) is considered to be secreted from the thyroid gland with the stimulation of TSH and/or thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins. However its use as a prognostic marker for Graves' disease is hampered by anti-Tg autoantibodies in patients' serum. In order to resolve this drawback, the authors have developed monoclonal antibodies to human Tg with very little cross-reactivities with autoantiobodies. Nine monoclonal antibodies were produced by the immunization with Tg prepared from Graves' thyroid and one of them (IgGl), designated as 59A, showed the highest affinity to Tg (3.6 x 10/sup 40/M/sup -1/) and the least cross-reactivity with anti-Tg autoantibodies. The binding of I-125 labeled 59A to beads coated with Tg was not inhibited by the addition of purified IgG obtained from various thyroid diseases except a few Hashimoto's patients with very high titer of anti-Tg antibodies, although the binding of other monoclonal antibodies to Tg was greatly influenced even in the presence of Graves' IgG. The sensitivity of the assay using 59A was enough to detect 20ng Tg/ml and Tg concentrations, in patients with no detectable anti-Tg antibodies, were comparable to those determined by the conventional RIA kit (Eiken), using radioiodinated Tg and polyclonal rabbit anti-Tg antiserum. Further, the shelf-life of I-125 labeled monoclonal antibody was much longer than the radioiodinated Tg. These results indicated that RIA of Tg using monoclonal antibodies would be useful for measuring Tg values not only in patients with thyroid cancer but also in Graves' disease with anti-Tg autoantibodies.

  19. The Relationship of Cytokines IL-13 and IL-17 with Autoantibodies Profile in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Siloşi, Isabela; Boldeanu, Mihail Virgil; Cojocaru, Manole; Biciuşcă, Viorel; Pădureanu, Vlad; Bogdan, Maria; Badea, Ramona Georgiana; Avramescu, Carmen; Petrescu, Ileana Octavia; Petrescu, Florin; Siloşi, Cristian A

    2016-01-01

    Aims. In the present study, we aimed to assess the concentrations of IL-13 and IL-17 in serum of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA), the investigation of correlation between the concentrations of these cytokines and disease activity score, and the concentration of some autoantibodies and the evaluation of the utility of IL-13 and -17 concentration measurements as markers of disease activity. Materials and Methods. Serum samples were collected from 30 patients and from 28 controls and analysed parameters. Results. The serum concentrations of IL-13, IL-17, anti-CCP, and IgM-RF were statistically significantly higher in patients with eRA, compared to the controls. IL-13 concentrations in the severe and moderate groups with eRA were statistically higher than in the mild and control groups. Also, in the case of IL-17, serum concentrations increased proportionally with the disease activity of eRA. We observe that concentrations of IL-13 and -17 did not correlate with autoantibodies. IL-17 concentration significantly positively correlated with CRP, while IL-13 concentration significantly negatively correlated with CRP. Disease activity score, DAS28, was strongly positively correlated with levels of ESR and weakly positively correlated with concentrations of anti-RA33 autoantibodies. IL-13 has a higher diagnostic utility than IL-17, CRP, ESR, IgM-RF, and anti-CCP as markers of disease activity. Conclusions. The presence of higher IL-13 and IL-17 serum levels in patients, compared with those of controls, confirms that these markers, found with high specificity, might be involved in the pathogenesis of eRA. IL-13 and IL-17 might be of better usefulness in the prediction of eRA activity status than IgM-RF and anti-CCP. PMID:27579330

  20. Autoantibodies to citrullinated proteins induce joint pain independent of inflammation via a chemokine-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wigerblad, Gustaf; Bas, Duygu B; Fernades-Cerqueira, Cátia; Krishnamurthy, Akilan; Rogoz, Katarzyna; Kato, Jungo; Sandor, Katalin; Su, Jie; Jimenez–Andrade, Juan Miguel; Finn, Anja; Bersellini Farinotti, Alex; Amara, Khaled; Lundberg, Karin; Holmdahl, Rikard; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Malmström, Vivianne; Catrina, Anca I; Klareskog, Lars; Svensson, Camilla I

    2016-01-01

    Objective An interesting and so far unexplained feature of chronic pain in autoimmune disease is the frequent disconnect between pain and inflammation. This is illustrated well in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) where pain in joints (arthralgia) may precede joint inflammation and persist even after successful anti-inflammatory treatment. In the present study, we have addressed the possibility that autoantibodies against citrullinated proteins (ACPA), present in RA, may be directly responsible for the induction of pain, independent of inflammation. Methods Antibodies purified from human patients with RA, healthy donors and murinised monoclonal ACPA were injected into mice. Pain-like behaviour was monitored for up to 28 days, and tissues were analysed for signs of pathology. Mouse osteoclasts were cultured and stimulated with antibodies, and supernatants analysed for release of factors. Mice were treated with CXCR1/2 (interleukin (IL) 8 receptor) antagonist reparixin. Results Mice injected with either human or murinised ACPA developed long-lasting pronounced pain-like behaviour in the absence of inflammation, while non-ACPA IgG from patients with RA or control monoclonal IgG were without pronociceptive effect. This effect was coupled to ACPA-mediated activation of osteoclasts and release of the nociceptive chemokine CXCL1 (analogue to human IL-8). ACPA-induced pain-like behaviour was reversed with reparixin. Conclusions The data suggest that CXCL1/IL-8, released from osteoclasts in an autoantibody-dependent manner, produces pain by activating sensory neurons. The identification of this new pain pathway may open new avenues for pain treatment in RA and also in other painful diseases associated with autoantibody production and/or osteoclast activation. PMID:26613766

  1. The Relationship of Cytokines IL-13 and IL-17 with Autoantibodies Profile in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Siloşi, Isabela; Boldeanu, Mihail Virgil; Cojocaru, Manole; Badea, Ramona Georgiana

    2016-01-01

    Aims. In the present study, we aimed to assess the concentrations of IL-13 and IL-17 in serum of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA), the investigation of correlation between the concentrations of these cytokines and disease activity score, and the concentration of some autoantibodies and the evaluation of the utility of IL-13 and -17 concentration measurements as markers of disease activity. Materials and Methods. Serum samples were collected from 30 patients and from 28 controls and analysed parameters. Results. The serum concentrations of IL-13, IL-17, anti-CCP, and IgM-RF were statistically significantly higher in patients with eRA, compared to the controls. IL-13 concentrations in the severe and moderate groups with eRA were statistically higher than in the mild and control groups. Also, in the case of IL-17, serum concentrations increased proportionally with the disease activity of eRA. We observe that concentrations of IL-13 and -17 did not correlate with autoantibodies. IL-17 concentration significantly positively correlated with CRP, while IL-13 concentration significantly negatively correlated with CRP. Disease activity score, DAS28, was strongly positively correlated with levels of ESR and weakly positively correlated with concentrations of anti-RA33 autoantibodies. IL-13 has a higher diagnostic utility than IL-17, CRP, ESR, IgM-RF, and anti-CCP as markers of disease activity. Conclusions. The presence of higher IL-13 and IL-17 serum levels in patients, compared with those of controls, confirms that these markers, found with high specificity, might be involved in the pathogenesis of eRA. IL-13 and IL-17 might be of better usefulness in the prediction of eRA activity status than IgM-RF and anti-CCP. PMID:27579330

  2. Thyroid Autoantibodies Are Rare in Nonhuman Great Apes and Hypothyroidism Cannot Be Attributed to Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Aliesky, Holly; Courtney, Cynthia L.; Rapoport, Basil

    2013-01-01

    The great apes include, in addition to Homo, the genera Pongo (orangutans), Gorilla (gorillas), and Pan, the latter comprising two species, P. troglodytes (chimpanzees) and P. paniscus (bonobos). Adult-onset hypothyroidism was previously reported in 4 individual nonhuman great apes. However, there is scarce information on normal serum thyroid hormone levels and virtually no data for thyroid autoantibodies in these animals. Therefore, we examined thyroid hormone levels and TSH in all nonhuman great ape genera including adults, adolescents, and infants. Because hypothyroidism in humans is commonly the end result of thyroid autoimmunity, we also tested healthy and hypothyroid nonhuman great apes for antibodies to thyroglobulin (Tg), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and the TSH receptor (TSHR). We established a thyroid hormone and TSH database in orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobos (447 individuals). The most striking differences are the greatly reduced free-T4 and free-T3 levels in orangutans and gorillas vs chimpanzees and bonobos, and conversely, elevated TSH levels in gorillas vs Pan species. Antibodies to Tg and TPO were detected in only 2.6% of adult animals vs approximately 10% in humans. No animals with Tg, TPO, or TSHR antibodies exhibited thyroid dysfunction. Conversely, hypothyroid nonhuman great apes lacked thyroid autoantibodies. Moreover, thyroid histology in necropsy tissues was similar in euthyroid and hypothyroid individuals, and lymphocytic infiltration was absent in 2 hypothyroid animals. In conclusion, free T4 and free T3 are lower in orangutans and gorillas vs chimpanzees and bonobos, the closest living human relatives. Moreover, thyroid autoantibodies are rare and hypothyroidism is unrelated to thyroid autoimmunity in nonhuman great apes. PMID:24092641

  3. Novel identification of the IRF7 region as an anticentromere autoantibody propensity locus in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, F David; Gutala, Ramana; Simeón, Carmen P; Carreira, Patricia; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Vicente-Rabaneda, Esther; García-Hernández, Francisco J; de la Peña, Paloma García; Fernández-Castro, Mónica; Martínez-Estupiñán, Lina; Egurbide, María Victoria; Tsao, Betty P; Gourh, Pravitt; Agarwal, Sandeep K; Assassi, Shervin; Mayes, Maureen D; Arnett, Frank C; Tan, Filemon K; Martín, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Objective Systemic sclerosis (SSc) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are related chronic autoimmune diseases of complex aetiology in which the interferon (IFN) pathway plays a key role. Recent studies have reported an association between IRF7 and SLE which confers a risk to autoantibody production. A study was undertaken to investigate whether the IRF7 genomic region is also involved in susceptibility to SSc and the main clinical features. Methods Two case-control sets of Caucasian origin from the USA and Spain, comprising a total of 2316 cases of SSc and 2347 healthy controls, were included in the study. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PHRF1-IRF7-CDHR5 locus were genotyped using TaqMan allelic discrimination technology. A meta-analysis was performed to test the overall effect of these genetic variants on SSc. Results Four out of five analysed SNPs were Significantly associated with the presence of anticentromere autoantibodies (ACA) in the patients with SSc in the combined analysis (rs1131665: pFDR=6.14 × 10−4, OR=0.78; rs4963128: pFDR=6.14 × 10−4, OR=0.79; rs702966: pFDR=3.83 × 10−3, OR=0.82; and rs2246614: pFDR=3.83 × 10−3, OR=0.83). Significant p values were also obtained when the disease was tested globally; however, the statistical significance was lost when the ACA-positive patients were excluded from the study, suggesting that these associations rely on ACA positivity. Conditional logistic regression and allelic combination analyses suggested that the functional IRF7 SNP rs1131665 is the most likely causal variant. Conclusions The results show that variation in the IRF7 genomic region is associated with the presence of ACA in patients with SSc, supporting other evidence that this locus represents a common risk factor for autoantibody production in autoimmune diseases. PMID:21926187

  4. Development of autoantibodies against muscle-specific FHL1 in severe inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Inka; Wick, Cecilia; Hallgren, Åsa; Tjärnlund, Anna; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Andrade, Felipe; Thompson, Kathryn; Coley, William; Phadke, Aditi; Diaz-Gallo, Lina-Marcela; Bottai, Matteo; Nennesmo, Inger; Chemin, Karine; Herrath, Jessica; Johansson, Karin; Wikberg, Anders; Ytterberg, A. Jimmy; Zubarev, Roman A.; Danielsson, Olof; Krystufkova, Olga; Vencovsky, Jiri; Landegren, Nils; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Padyukov, Leonid; Kämpe, Olle; Lundberg, Ingrid E.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of the gene encoding four-and-a-half LIM domain 1 (FHL1) are the causative factor of several X-linked hereditary myopathies that are collectively termed FHL1-related myopathies. These disorders are characterized by severe muscle dysfunction and damage. Here, we have shown that patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) develop autoimmunity to FHL1, which is a muscle-specific protein. Anti-FHL1 autoantibodies were detected in 25% of IIM patients, while patients with other autoimmune diseases or muscular dystrophies were largely anti-FHL1 negative. Anti-FHL1 reactivity was predictive for muscle atrophy, dysphagia, pronounced muscle fiber damage, and vasculitis. FHL1 showed an altered expression pattern, with focal accumulation in the muscle fibers of autoantibody-positive patients compared with a homogeneous expression in anti-FHL1–negative patients and healthy controls. We determined that FHL1 is a target of the cytotoxic protease granzyme B, indicating that the generation of FHL1 fragments may initiate FHL1 autoimmunity. Moreover, immunization of myositis-prone mice with FHL1 aggravated muscle weakness and increased mortality, suggesting a direct link between anti-FHL1 responses and muscle damage. Together, our findings provide evidence that FHL1 may be involved in the pathogenesis not only of genetic FHL1-related myopathies but also of autoimmune IIM. Importantly, these results indicate that anti-FHL1 autoantibodies in peripheral blood have promising potential as a biomarker to identify a subset of severe IIM. PMID:26551678

  5. Autoantibodies to transcription intermediary factor (TIF)1β associated with dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Myositis specific autoantibodies are associated with unique clinical subsets and are useful biomarkers in polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM). A 120 kD protein recognized by certain patients with DM was identified and clinical features of patients with this specificity were characterized. Methods The 120 kD protein recognized by a prototype serum was purified and identified by mass spectrometry and immunological methods. Autoantibody to this 120 kD protein was screened in sera from 2,356 patients with various diagnoses from four countries, including 254 PM/DM, by immunoprecipitation of 35S-methionine labeled K562 cell extracts. Clinical information of patients with this specificity was collected. Results The 120 kD protein, which exactly comigrated with PL-12, was identified as transcription intermediary factor TIF1β (TRIM28) by mass spectrometry and validated by immunoassays. By immunofluorescence, anti-TIF1β positivity showed a fine-speckled nuclear staining pattern. Four cases of anti-TIF1β were identified; all are women, one each in a Japanese, African American, Caucasian, and Mexican individual. Three had a diagnosis of DM and one case was classified as having an undifferentiated connective tissue disease with an elevated CPK but without significant muscle symptoms. This individual also had a history of colon cancer, cervical squamous metaplasia and fibroid tumors of the uterus. Myopathy was mild in all cases and resolved without treatment in one case. The anti-TIF1β specificity was not found in other conditions. Conclusions Anti-TIF1β is a new DM autoantibody associated with a mild form of myopathy. Whether it has an association with malignancy, as in the case of anti-TIF1γ, or other unique features will need to be evaluated in future studies. PMID:22513056

  6. Characterization of a new highly sensitive immunometric assay for thyroglobulin with reduced interference from autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Marianne Nordlund; Nome, Ragnhild; Sandven, Ingvill; Paus, Elisabeth; Bjøro, Trine

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) with sensitive immunoassays are of great importance for the management of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinomas. However, interference of circulating autoantibodies to Tg (hTgAb) hampers the usefulness of most assays. We have produced a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) selected to bind Tg in the presence of Tg autoantibodies and developed a sensitive immunoassay for Tg with minor interference by hTgAbs. The antibodies were characterized by cross-inhibition and immunoassay combination studies, as well as affinity estimation. The within-run and total imprecision of the assay were determined with 2664 samples in 60 separate runs. The most sensitive assay combination with superior protection against autoantibodies consisted of two solid phase mAbs and two tracer mAbs with distinct binding sites. The assay was linear and displayed a wide dynamic range up to 1342 μg/l with a functional sensitivity of 0.1 μg/l and a total imprecision of less than 10 %. There was good agreement between the new high sensitive immunofluorometric assay (IFMA) and two well-established Tg assays from Brahms Kryptor and Roche Diagnostics. Mean difference between the new IFMA and the Kryptor assay was 0.059 μg/l with a 95 % confidence interval of -0.032 to 0.151 μg/l, whereas the mean difference between the new IFMA and the Roche assay was -0.80 μg/l with a 95 % confidence interval of -1.24 to -0.35 μg/l.

  7. High IgE in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients is complexed with anti-IgE autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Millauer, N; Zuercher, A W; Miescher, S M; Gerber, H A; Seitz, M; Stadler, B M

    1999-01-01

    This study presents data on more than 300 RA and allergic patients analysed for their serum levels of anti-immunoglobulin isotype autoantibodies and IgE. We observed high levels of IgE in sera of RA and allergic patients. Interestingly, we measured significantly higher specific IgE levels against Alternaria but not against nine other allergens in the RA compared with the allergic group. As expected, anti-IgG autoantibodies (rheumatoid factors (RF)) of different isotypes were detected in sera from RA patients only. However, we found increased titres of complexed anti-IgE autoantibodies in all RF+ groups and in the allergic group. These findings may explain why despite elevated IgE levels a decreased prevalence of allergic diseases in RA patients has been observed. PMID:9933440

  8. Brazilian pemphigus foliaceus anti-desmoglein 1 autoantibodies cross-react with sand fly salivary LJM11 antigen

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Ye; Jeong, Joseph S.; Maldonado, Mike; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Gomes, Regis; Evangelista, Flor; Qaqish, Bahjat; Aoki, Valeria; Hans, Gunter; Rivitti, Evandro A.; Eaton, Donald; Diaz, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    The environmental factors that contribute to the development of autoimmune diseases are largely unknown. Endemic pemphigus foliaceus in humans, known as Fogo Selvagem (FS) in Brazil, is mediated by pathogenic IgG4 autoantibodies against desmoglein1 (Dsg1). Clusters of FS overlap with those of leishmaniasis, a disease transmitted by sand fly (Lutzomyia longipalpis) bites. In this study we show that salivary antigens from the sand fly, and specifically the LJM11 salivary protein, are recognized by FS antibodies. Anti-Dsg1 monoclonal autoantibodies derived from FS patients also cross-react with LJM11. Mice immunized with LJM11 generate anti-Dsg1 antibodies. Thus, insect bites may deliver salivary antigens that initiate a cross-reactive IgG4 antibody response in genetically susceptible individuals and lead to subsequent FS. Our findings establish a clear relationship between an environmental, non-infectious antigen and the development of potentially pathogenic autoantibodies in an autoimmune disease. PMID:22798673

  9. Detection of mouse hepatitis virus infection by assay of anti-liver autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Patricia A; Gómez, Karina A; Coutelier, Jean-Paul; Retegui, Lilia A

    2002-12-01

    The observation that mice infected with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) develop autoantibodies directed mainly to liver fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) enabled the development of an ELISA applicable to the detection of MHV-infection. The method, based on the titration of antibodies to semipurified FAH from rat liver, is easy, economical, and does not require the isolation of viral proteins from large MHV stocks. Furthermore, since sera from mice immunized with a purified fraction of the rat liver enzyme do react with its homologous protein, this antiserum can be used as a positive control avoiding the manipulation of samples from MHV-infected animals.

  10. Preferential dependence of autoantibody production in murine lupus on CD86 costimulatory molecule.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, A; Azuma, M; Kodera, S; Nuriya, S; Terashi, A; Abe, M; Hirose, S; Shirai, T; Yagita, H; Okumura, K

    1995-11-01

    Blockade of the interactions between CD28/CTLA-4 and their ligands, CD80 (B7, B7.1)/CD86 (B70, B7.2), seems an attractive means to induce antigen-specific peripheral tolerance in organ transplantation and autoimmune disease. Recently, diversities between CD80 and CD86 in expression, regulation, and function have been reported in certain cell populations and murine experimental disease models. To investigate the possible differential role of CD80 and CD86 in the development of lupus, we treated lupus-prone NZB/W F1 mice with specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against CD80, CD86, or both. The treatment with a combination of anti-CD80 and CD86 mAb before the onset of lupus completely prevented autoantibody production and nephritis, and prolonged survival. Interestingly, we found that anti-CD86 mAb alone, but not anti-CD80 mAb, efficiently inhibited autoantibody production. Subclass study on IgG anti-double-stranded (ds) DNA antibody revealed that the treatment with anti-CD86 mAb almost completely inhibited both IgG1 and IgG2b, but not IgG2a production. The incomplete reduction of IgG2a anti-dsDNA antibody by anti-CD86 mAb was compensated by the addition of anti-CD80 mAb. A significant reduction of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-2, interferon-gamma, IL-4 and IL-6 was observed in mice treated with a combination of anti-CD80 and CD86 mAb or anti-CD86 mAb alone. Treatment with both mAb after the onset of lupus resulted in a significantly prolonged survival with reduction of autoantibody production. These results suggest that CD86 plays a more critical role in autoantibody production, and CD86, but not CD80, contributes to Th2-mediated Ig production. However, the blockade of both CD80 and CD86 are required for preventing the development and progression of lupus.

  11. Studies of Filipino patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: autoantibody profile of first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Navarra, S V; Ishimori, M I; Uy, E A; Hamijoyo, L; Sama, J; James, J A; Holers, V M; Weisman, M H

    2011-04-01

    This study surveyed the frequency of autoantibodies among un-affected first-degree relatives (FDRs) of Filipino systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with healthy un-related Filipino controls. The sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of the autoantibodies for SLE diagnosis were also assessed in this Filipino cohort. Filipino patients included in the University of Santo Tomas (UST) Lupus Database and un-affected FDRs were recruited. Healthy controls included those with no known personal or family history of autoimmune disease. The following autoantibodies were tested in all subjects: anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), anti-dsDNA, anti-Ro/SSA, anti-chromatin, anti-thyroid microsome, and anti-cardiolipin antibodies. Participants included 232 SLE patients, 546 FDRs, and 221 healthy controls. Median age of patients was 27 (range 8-66) years with median disease duration of 27.5 (range 1-292) months. Median age of FDRs was 42.0 (range 5-87) years. Compared with healthy controls, there were significantly more FDRs with positive ANA at titers 1 : 40 to 1 : 160 (p < 0.001) and 1 : 320 (p = 0.003), anti-Ro/SSA (4.94% versus 0.45%, p = 0.003), and anti-dsDNA ≥ 5.0 IU/ml (4.58% versus 1.36%, p = 0.031). ANA titer ≥1  :  160, anti-dsDNA, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-chromatin had the highest predictive value for SLE diagnosis. These findings reinforce the role of genetic influence in SLE risk among Filipinos, with a significant proportion of un-affected FDRs of SLE patients testing positive for autoantibodies compared with healthy Filipino controls. A longitudinal observational study in this same cohort will determine which proportion of these un-affected FDRs will evolve into clinical SLE disease in the future.

  12. Autoantibodies against phospholipase A2 receptor in Korean patients with membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yun Jung; Yang, Seung Hee; Kim, Dong Ki; Kang, Shin-Wook; Kim, Yon Su

    2013-01-01

    The data were presented in abstract form at the 45(th) meeting of the American Society of Nephrology, October 30-November 04 2012, San Diego, CA, USA. Circulating autoantibodies against M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) are important pathogenic antibodies of idiopathic membranous nephropathy (MN) in adults. However, previous studies on the clinical impact of anti-PLA2R antibodies demonstrated several limitations, including insufficient numbers of study subjects and different time points and methods for anti-PLA2R antibody measurement. To verify the clinical significance of anti-PLA2R antibodies in Korean patients with MN, we measured autoantibodies in serum samples obtained at the time of biopsy from a total of 100 patients with idiopathic MN who had not yet received immunosuppressive treatment. We detected anti-PLA2R antibody in 69 patients, and we observed that autoantibody reactivity reflected the severity of disease activity. Proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia were more severe in patients with anti-PLA2R than in those without the autoantibodies (2.95 g/g vs. 6.85 g/g, P = 0.003; 3.1 g/dL vs. 2.5 g/dL, P = 0.004, respectively). Additionally, the clinical severities worsened proportionally as the levels of anti-PLA2R antibodies increased (P = 0.015 and P for trend <0.001 for proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia, respectively). However, neither the levels nor the presence or absence of anti-PLA2R antibody showed a significant correlation with clinical outcomes, such as remission rate and time to remission. In conclusion, we observed that anti-PLA2R antibodies are highly prevalent in Korean patients with idiopathic MN and that they reflect the clinical disease activity before the administration of immunosuppressive treatment. However, the levels of anti-PLA2R antibody at the time of kidney biopsy may not predict the clinical outcomes in current clinical practice.

  13. GAD65 epitope mapping and search for novel autoantibodies in GAD-associated neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Fouka, P; Alexopoulos, H; Akrivou, S; Trohatou, O; Politis, P K; Dalakas, M C

    2015-04-15

    Antibodies against Glutamic-acid-decarboxylase (GAD65) are seen in various CNS excitability disorders including stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia, encephalitis and epilepsy. To explore pathogenicity, we examined whether distinct epitope specificities or other co-existing antibodies may account for each disorder. The epitope recognized by all 27 tested patients, irrespective of clinical phenotype, corresponded to the catalytic core of GAD. No autoantibodies against known GABAergic antigens were found. In a screen for novel specificities using live hippocampal neurons, three epilepsy patients, but no other, were positive. We conclude that no GAD-specific epitope defines any neurological syndrome but other antibody specificities may account for certain phenotypes.

  14. Autoantibodies against bromelainized mouse erythrocyte: strain distribution of serum idiotype expression and relative peritoneal cell activity.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, A; Poncet, P; Bussard, A

    1986-10-15

    Previously, we demonstrated that the naturally occurring mouse autoantibodies directed against bromelainized mouse red blood cells (BrMRBC) comprised a family of structurally related molecules bearing a common idiotypic determinant (CP) based on structural and idiotypic analysis of a series of anti-BrMRBC monoclonal autoantibodies derived from a fusion of peritoneal cells (PerC) with plasmacytomas. In the present studies, we have evaluated the quantitative expression of circulating CP idiotype related to autoantibodies against BrMRBC in relation to specific PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity in an individual mouse of different strains. The data presented here show no direct relationship between serum CP idiotype expression and PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity in an individual mouse of all strains tested. However, the circulating CP idiotype content is higher in strains, viz., CBA/J, NZB, C3H, BXSB, and Biozzi high responder (H) mice which exhibit a high perC autoantibody secretory activity against BrMRBC. The strains such as BALB/c, DBA2, SJL/J, CBA/N, and Biozzi low responder (L) express little or no circulating CP idiotype with a corresponding small or no PerC anti-BrMRBC activity. Furthermore, the PerC "auto"-immune phenomenon is markedly expressed in the normal CBA/J strain since these mice show a higher percentage ratio of CP idiotype over serum IgM (2.68%) as well as highest PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity (11,319 +/- 18,029 plaques per million viable cells) compared to other normal and autoimmune strains tested. Nevertheless, the highest circulating serum CP idiotype (49.4 micrograms/ml) is observed in the autoimmune NZB mouse. The immunodeficient CBA/N mice fail to express detectable levels of CP idiotype in their serum. The experiments conducted in genetically selected outbred Biozzi (H and L) strain have revealed remarkable differences in serum CP idiotype expression as well as PerC anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming activity in these two

  15. The possible relationship between allergic manifestations and elevated serum levels of brain specific auto-antibodies in autistic children.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Gehan Ahmed; Al-Ayadhi, Laila Yousef

    2013-08-15

    Etiology of autism has become an area of a significant controversy. Allergy induced autism is an area of research wherein immune responses to some allergens may play a pathogenic role in autism. Allergy may induce the production of brain specific auto-antibodies in a subgroup of autistic children. We are the first to investigate the possible link between allergic manifestations and serum levels of both anti-myelin basic protein (anti-MBP) and anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (anti-MAG) brain-specific auto-antibodies, which were measured by ELISA method, in 42 autistic children in comparison to 42 healthy-matched children. Allergic manifestations (bronchial asthma, atopic dermatitis and/or allergic rhinitis) were found in 47.6% of autistic patients. Increased serum levels of anti-MBP and anti-MAG auto-antibodies were found in 57.1% and 66.7%, respectively of autistic children. In addition, 78.5% of autistic children had increased serum levels of both anti-MBP and/or anti-MAG auto-antibodies. Autistic patients with allergic manifestations had significantly higher serum levels of anti-MBP and anti-MAG auto-antibodies than those without these manifestations (P<0.001 and P=0.001, respectively). In conclusion, allergy may be a contributing factor to the increased serum levels of anti-MBP and anti-MAG auto-antibodies in some autistic children. Indeed, we need to know more about the links between allergy, immune system and brain in autism for finding new therapeutic modalities in autism.

  16. Maternal autoantibodies are associated with abnormal brain enlargement in a subgroup of children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Nordahl, Christine Wu; Braunschweig, Daniel; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Lee, Aaron; Rogers, Sally; Ashwood, Paul; Amaral, David G; Van de Water, Judy

    2013-05-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is very heterogeneous and multiple subtypes and etiologies likely exist. The maternal immune system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of ASD. Previous studies have identified the presence of specific maternal IgG autoantibodies with reactivity to fetal brain proteins at 37 and 73kDa in up to 12% of mothers of children with ASD. The current study evaluates the presence of these autoantibodies in an independent cohort of mothers of 181 preschool-aged male children (131 ASD, 50 typically developing (TD) controls). We also investigated whether ASD children born to mothers with these autism-specific maternal IgG autoantibodies exhibit a distinct neural phenotype by evaluating total brain volume using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Of the 131 ASD children, 10 (7.6%) were born to mothers with the 37/73kDa IgG autoantibodies (ASD-IgG). The mothers of the remaining ASD children and all TD controls were negative for these paired autoantibodies. While both ASD groups exhibited abnormal brain enlargement that is commonly observed in this age range, the ASD-IgG group exhibited a more extreme 12.1% abnormal brain enlargement relative to the TD controls. In contrast, the remaining ASD children exhibited a smaller 4.4% abnormal brain enlargement relative to TD controls. Lobar and tissue type analyses revealed that the frontal lobe is selectively enlarged in the ASD-IgG group and that both gray and white matter are similarly affected. These results suggest that maternal autoantibodies associated with autism spectrum disorder may impact brain development leading to abnormal enlargement.

  17. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) testing: detection methods and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Sinico, Renato Alberto; Radice, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are considered the diagnostic biomarker of some necrotising vasculitis such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and, to a lesser extent, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA). According to the current recommendations, combining indirect immunofluorescence and proteinase 3 (PR3) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) antigen specific immunometric assays, in the proper clinical setting, assures the best diagnostic specificity. When such conditions are satisfied, ANCA are detected in up to 90% of patients with active generalised GPA and MPA and in about 40% of patients with EGPA. Cytoplasmic ANCA (C-ANCA) with specificity for PR3 are usually found in patients with GPA whereas perinuclear ANCA (P-ANCA) in patients with MPA and EGPA. However, ANCA antigen specificity is more closely associated with disease phenotype and prognosis than clinical diagnosis. The clinical value of serial ANCA testing in monitoring disease activity is still debated. Recently, new promising developments in methodology and techniques (computer-based image analysis of immunofluorescence patterns, novel generation of PR3-/MPO-ANCA immunometric assays and multiplex technology) have been proposed but studies comparing the performances of the different assays are scarce. PMID:24854381