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Sample records for anti-plane s-wave analytical

  1. Analytical solutions to general anti-plane shear problems in finite elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, David Yang

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a pure complementary energy variational method for solving a general anti-plane shear problem in finite elasticity. Based on the canonical duality-triality theory developed by the author, the nonlinear/nonconvex partial differential equations for the large deformation problem are converted into an algebraic equation in dual space, which can, in principle, be solved to obtain a complete set of stress solutions. Therefore, a general analytical solution form of the deformation is obtained subjected to a compatibility condition. Applications are illustrated by examples with both convex and nonconvex stored strain energies governed by quadratic-exponential and power-law material models, respectively. Results show that the nonconvex variational problem could have multiple solutions at each material point, the complementary gap function and the triality theory can be used to identify both global and local extremal solutions, while the popular convexity conditions (including rank-one condition) provide mainly local minimal criteria and the Legendre-Hadamard condition (i.e., the so-called strong ellipticity condition) does not guarantee uniqueness of solutions. This paper demonstrates again that the pure complementary energy principle and the triality theory play important roles in finite deformation theory and nonconvex analysis.

  2. An analytical solution to separate P-waves and S-waves in the VSP wavefield

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Hiroshi

    1994-12-31

    An analytical solution to separate P-waves and S-waves in the VSP wavefield is derived with combinations of the formal solution of a forward VSP modeling. Some practical applications of this method to synthetic seismograms and field data are investigated and evaluated. Little wave distortion is recognized and the weak wavefield masked by dominant wave trains can be extracted with this method. The decomposed wavefield is expressed in frequency-depth (f-z) domain as a linear combination of up to the third order differential of traces, which is approximated by trace difference sin the practical separation process. In general, five traces with single-component data are required in this process, but the same process is implemented with only three traces in the acoustic case. Two-trace extrapolation is applied to each edge of data gather in order to enhance the accuracy of trace difference. Since the formulas are developed in f-z domain, the influence of anelasticity is taken into account with simplicity and the calculation is carried out fast enough with the benefit of fast Fourier transform (FFT).

  3. Debonding of an elastic inhomogeneity of arbitrary shape in anti-plane shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Yang, Moxuan; Schiavone, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the anti-plane shear problem of a curvilinear crack lying along the interface of an arbitrarily shaped elastic inhomogeneity embedded in an infinite matrix subjected to uniform stresses at infinity. Complex variable and conformal mapping techniques are used to derive an analytical solution in series form. The problem is first reduced to a non-homogeneous Riemann-Hilbert problem, the solution of which can be obtained by evaluating the associated Cauchy integral. A set of linear algebraic equations is obtained from the compatibility condition imposed on the resulting analytic function defined in the inhomogeneity and its Faber series expansion. Each of the unknown coefficients in the corresponding analytic functions can then be uniquely determined by solving the linear algebraic equations, which are written concisely in matrix form. The resulting analytical solution is then used to quantify the displacement jump across the debonded section of the interface as well as the traction distribution along the bonded section of the interface. In addition, our solution allows us to obtain mode-III stress intensity factors at the two crack tips. The solution to the anti-plane problem of a partially debonded elliptical inhomogeneity containing a confocal crack is also derived using a similar method.

  4. Teleseismic S wave microseisms.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota

    2016-08-26

    Although observations of microseisms excited by ocean swells were firmly established in the 1940s, the source locations remain difficult to track. Delineation of the source locations and energy partition of the seismic wave components are key to understanding the excitation mechanisms. Using a seismic array in Japan, we observed both P and S wave microseisms excited by a severe distant storm in the Atlantic Ocean. Although nonlinear forcing of an ocean swell with a one-dimensional Earth model can explain P waves and vertically polarized S waves (SV waves), it cannot explain horizontally polarized S waves (SH waves). The precise source locations may provide a new catalog for exploring Earth's interior.

  5. Teleseismic S wave microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota

    2016-08-01

    Although observations of microseisms excited by ocean swells were firmly established in the 1940s, the source locations remain difficult to track. Delineation of the source locations and energy partition of the seismic wave components are key to understanding the excitation mechanisms. Using a seismic array in Japan, we observed both P and S wave microseisms excited by a severe distant storm in the Atlantic Ocean. Although nonlinear forcing of an ocean swell with a one-dimensional Earth model can explain P waves and vertically polarized S waves (SV waves), it cannot explain horizontally polarized S waves (SH waves). The precise source locations may provide a new catalog for exploring Earth’s interior.

  6. Teleseismic S wave microseisms.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota

    2016-08-26

    Although observations of microseisms excited by ocean swells were firmly established in the 1940s, the source locations remain difficult to track. Delineation of the source locations and energy partition of the seismic wave components are key to understanding the excitation mechanisms. Using a seismic array in Japan, we observed both P and S wave microseisms excited by a severe distant storm in the Atlantic Ocean. Although nonlinear forcing of an ocean swell with a one-dimensional Earth model can explain P waves and vertically polarized S waves (SV waves), it cannot explain horizontally polarized S waves (SH waves). The precise source locations may provide a new catalog for exploring Earth's interior. PMID:27563094

  7. Analysis of a Griffith crack at the interface of two piezoelectric materials under anti-plane loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherrous, M.; Ferdjani, H.

    2016-11-01

    The main objective of this work is the contribution to the study of the piezoelectric structures which contain preexisting defect (crack). For that, we consider a Griffith crack located at the interface of two piezoelectric materials in a semi-infinite plane structure. The structure is subjected to an anti-plane shearing combined with an in-plane electric displacement. Using integral Fourier transforms, the equations of piezoelectricity are converted analytically to a system of singular integral equations. The singular integral equations are further reduced to a system of algebraic equations and solved numerically by using Chebyshev polynomials. The stress intensity factor and the electric displacement intensity factor are calculated and used for the determination of the energy release rate which will be taken as fracture criterion. At the end, numerical results are presented for various parameters of the problem; they are also presented for an infinite plane structure.

  8. Derivation of XBIEM Kernels for Anti-plane/In-plane Problems and Implementation in Anti-plane Rupture Simulation Crossing Bimaterial Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, T.; Kame, N.

    2015-12-01

    We develop an extended boundary integral equation method (XBIEM) to analyse dynamic behavior of rupture crossing a medium interface in 2D. Many faults often lie near medium interfaces in the Earth's heterogeneous crust consisting of various types of rocks. Some faults cross the interfaces, and the theoretical analysis of their dynamic behavior has been awaited. In the development, we focus on the extended parts of XBIEM in comparison to the conventional BIEM, and derive all the 2D displacement and stress kernels in response to a unit boundary traction in explicit discretized forms, which are the ingredients in the extension of BIEM. The final forms of kernels are compact and easy to evaluate numerically. They are implemented in simulating dynamic anti-plane rupture propagation across a bimaterial interface allowing secondary interfacial rupture. Our analysis shows a significant effect of an interfacial medium contrast on the control of dynamic rupture propagation.

  9. Anti-plane transverse waves propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, A-Li; Yan, Dong-Jia; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, anti-plane transverse wave propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures is studied. The localization factor is introduced to characterize the wave propagation behavior. The transfer matrix method based on the nonlocal piezoelectricity continuum theory is used to calculate the localization factor. Additionally, the stiffness matrix method is applied to compute the wave transmission spectra. A cut-off frequency is found, beyond which the elastic waves cannot propagate through the periodic structure. The size effect or the influence of the ratio of the internal to external characteristic lengths on the cut-off frequency and the wave propagation behavior are investigated and discussed. PMID:26518526

  10. Anti-plane transverse waves propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, A-Li; Yan, Dong-Jia; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, anti-plane transverse wave propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures is studied. The localization factor is introduced to characterize the wave propagation behavior. The transfer matrix method based on the nonlocal piezoelectricity continuum theory is used to calculate the localization factor. Additionally, the stiffness matrix method is applied to compute the wave transmission spectra. A cut-off frequency is found, beyond which the elastic waves cannot propagate through the periodic structure. The size effect or the influence of the ratio of the internal to external characteristic lengths on the cut-off frequency and the wave propagation behavior are investigated and discussed.

  11. Crack Growth Mechanisms under Anti-Plane Shear in Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Allison Lynne

    The research conducted for this dissertation focuses on determining the mechanisms associated with crack growth in polymer matrix composite laminates subjected to anti-plane shear (mode III) loading. For mode III split-beam test methods were proposed, and initial evaluations were conducted. A single test method was selected for further evaluation. Using this test method, it was determined that the apparent mode III delamination toughness, GIIIc , depended on geometry, which indicated a true material property was not being measured. Transverse sectioning and optical microscopy revealed an array of transverse matrix cracks, or echelon cracks, oriented at approximately 45° and intersecting the plane of the delamination. Subsequent investigations found the echelon array formed prior to the onset of planar delamination advance and that growth of the planar delamination is always coupled to echelon array formation in these specimens. The evolution of the fracture surfaces formed by the echelon array and planar delamination were studied, and it was found that the development was similar to crack growth in homogenous materials subjected to mode III or mixed mode I-III loading, although the composite laminate architecture constrained the fracture surface development differently than homogenous materials. It was also found that, for split-beam specimens such as those used herein, applying an anti-plane shear load results in twisting of the specimen's uncracked region which gives rise to a mixed-mode I-III load condition. This twisting has been related to the apparent mode III toughness as well as the orientation of the transverse matrix cracks. A finite element model was then developed to study the mechanisms of initial echelon array formation. From this, it is shown that an echelon array will develop, but will become self-limiting prior to the onset of planar delamination growth.

  12. Dynamic stress around a cylindrical nano-inhomogeneity with an interface in a half-plane under anti-plane shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xue-Qian; Zhang, Le-Le; Liu, Jin-Xi

    2012-03-01

    Taking into account the size of the nanostructure, the effect of surface/interface stiffness on the dynamic stress around a cylindrical nano-inhomogeneity embedded in an elastic half-plane subjected to anti-plane shear waves is investigated. The boundary condition at the straight edge of the half-plane is traction free, which is satisfied by the image method. The analytical solutions of displacement fields are expressed by employing a wave function expansion method. The addition theorem for a cylindrical wave function is applied to accomplish the superposition of wave fields in the two half-planes. Analyses show that the effect of the interface properties on the dynamic stress is significantly related to the nano-scale distance between the straight edge and the center of the cylindrical nano-inhomogeneity. The frequency and incident angle of incident waves and the shear modulus ratio of the nano-inhomogeneity to matrix also show different effect on the dynamic stress distribution when the inhomogeneity shrinks to nano-scale. Comparison with the existing results is also given.

  13. A meshfree local RBF collocation method for anti-plane transverse elastic wave propagation analysis in 2D phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hui; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Wang, Yuesheng; Sladek, Jan; Sladek, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a meshfree or meshless local radial basis function (RBF) collocation method is proposed to calculate the band structures of two-dimensional (2D) anti-plane transverse elastic waves in phononic crystals. Three new techniques are developed for calculating the normal derivative of the field quantity required by the treatment of the boundary conditions, which improve the stability of the local RBF collocation method significantly. The general form of the local RBF collocation method for a unit-cell with periodic boundary conditions is proposed, where the continuity conditions on the interface between the matrix and the scatterer are taken into account. The band structures or dispersion relations can be obtained by solving the eigenvalue problem and sweeping the boundary of the irreducible first Brillouin zone. The proposed local RBF collocation method is verified by using the corresponding results obtained with the finite element method. For different acoustic impedance ratios, various scatterer shapes, scatterer arrangements (lattice forms) and material properties, numerical examples are presented and discussed to show the performance and the efficiency of the developed local RBF collocation method compared to the FEM for computing the band structures of 2D phononic crystals.

  14. Non-local dynamic solution of two parallel cracks in a functionally graded piezoelectric material under harmonic anti-plane shear wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Tao; Sang, Jian-Bing; Zhou, Zhen-Gong

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates a functionally graded piezoelectric material (FGPM) containing two parallel cracks under harmonic anti-plane shear stress wave based on the non-local theory. The electric permeable boundary condition is considered. To overcome the mathematical difficulty, a one-dimensional non-local kernel is used instead of a two-dimensional one for the dynamic fracture problem to obtain the stress and the electric displacement fields near the crack tips. The problem is formulated through Fourier transform into two pairs of dual-integral equations, in which the unknown variables are jumps of displacements across the crack surfaces. Different from the classical solutions, that the present solution exhibits no stress and electric displacement singularities at the crack tips.

  15. S-wave refraction survey of alluvial aggregate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, Karl J.; Tuttle, Gary J.; Williams, Jackie M.; Lucius, Jeffrey E.

    2005-01-01

    An S-wave refraction survey was conducted in the Yampa River valley near Steamboat Springs, Colo., to determine how well this method could map alluvium, a major source of construction aggregate. At the field site, about 1 m of soil overlaid 8 m of alluvium that, in turn, overlaid sedimentary bedrock. The traveltimes of the direct and refracted S-waves were used to construct velocity cross sections whose various regions were directly related to the soil, alluvium, and bed-rock. The cross sections were constrained to match geologic logs that were developed from drill-hole data. This constraint minimized the ambiguity in estimates of the thickness and the velocity of the alluvium, an ambiguity that is inherent to the S-wave refraction method. In the cross sections, the estimated S-wave velocity of the alluvium changed in the horizontal direction, and these changes were attributed to changes in composition of the alluvium. The estimated S-wave velocity of the alluvium was practically constant in the vertical direc-tion, indicating that the fine layering observed in the geologic logs could not be detected. The S-wave refraction survey, in conjunction with independent information such as geologic logs, was found to be suitable for mapping the thickness of the alluvium.

  16. Fault zone characterization using P- and S-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawerzinek, Britta; Buness, Hermann; Polom, Ulrich; Tanner, David C.; Thomas, Rüdiger

    2014-05-01

    Although deep fault zones have high potential for geothermal energy extraction, their real usability depends on complex lithological and tectonic factors. Therefore a detailed fault zone exploration using P- and S-wave reflection seismic data is required. P- and S-wave reflection seismic surveys were carried out along and across the eastern border of the Leinetal Graben in Lower Saxony, Germany, to analyse the structural setting, different reflection characteristics and possible anisotropic effects. In both directions the P-wave reflection seismic measurements show a detailed and complex structure. This structure was developed during several tectonic phases and comprises both steeply- and shallowly-dipping faults. In a profile perpendicular to the graben, a strong P-wave reflector is interpreted as shallowly west-dipping fault that is traceable from the surface down to 500 m depth. It is also detectable along the graben. In contrast, the S-waves show different reflection characteristics: There is no indication of the strong P-wave reflector in the S-wave reflection seismic measurements - neither across nor along the graben. Only diffuse S-wave reflections are observable in this region. Due to the higher resolution of S-waves in the near-surface area it is possible to map structures which cannot be detected in P-wave reflection seismic, e.g the thinning of the uppermost Jurassic layer towards the south. In the next step a petrophysical analysis will be conducted by using seismic FD modelling to a) determine the cause (lithological, structural, or a combination of both) of the different reflection characteristics of P- and S-waves, b) characterize the fault zone, as well as c) analyse the influence of different fault zone properties on the seismic wave field. This work is part of the gebo collaborative research programme which is funded by the 'Niedersächsisches Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Kultur' and Baker Hughes.

  17. A Nonparametric Approach to Automated S-Wave Picking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawles, C.; Thurber, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Although a number of very effective P-wave automatic pickers have been developed over the years, automatic picking of S waves has remained more challenging. Most automatic pickers take a parametric approach, whereby some characteristic function (CF), e.g. polarization or kurtosis, is determined from the data and the pick is estimated from the CF. We have adopted a nonparametric approach, estimating the pick directly from the waveforms. For a particular waveform to be auto-picked, the method uses a combination of similarity to a set of seismograms with known S-wave arrivals and dissimilarity to a set of seismograms that do not contain S-wave arrivals. Significant effort has been made towards dealing with the problem of S-to-P conversions. We have evaluated the effectiveness of our method by testing it on multiple sets of microearthquake seismograms with well-determined S-wave arrivals for several areas around the world, including fault zones and volcanic regions. In general, we find that the results from our auto-picker are consistent with reviewed analyst picks 90% of the time at the 0.2 s level and 80% of the time at the 0.1 s level, or better. For most of the large datasets we have analyzed, our auto-picker also makes far more S-wave picks than were made previously by analysts. We are using these enlarged sets of high-quality S-wave picks to refine tomographic inversions for these areas, resulting in substantial improvement in the quality of the S-wave images. We will show examples from New Zealand, Hawaii, and California.

  18. A simple method of predicting S-wave velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Prediction of shear-wave velocity plays an important role in seismic modeling, amplitude analysis with offset, and other exploration applications. This paper presents a method for predicting S-wave velocity from the P-wave velocity on the basis of the moduli of dry rock. Elastic velocities of water-saturated sediments at low frequencies can be predicted from the moduli of dry rock by using Gassmann's equation; hence, if the moduli of dry rock can be estimated from P-wave velocities, then S-wave velocities easily can be predicted from the moduli. Dry rock bulk modulus can be related to the shear modulus through a compaction constant. The numerical results indicate that the predicted S-wave velocities for consolidated and unconsolidated sediments agree well with measured velocities if differential pressure is greater than approximately 5 MPa. An advantage of this method is that there are no adjustable parameters to be chosen, such as the pore-aspect ratios required in some other methods. The predicted S-wave velocity depends only on the measured P-wave velocity and porosity. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  19. Exotic s-wave superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerides.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2016-04-20

    Alkali-doped fullerides (A3C60 with A = K, Rb, Cs) show a surprising phase diagram, in which a high transition-temperature (Tc) s-wave superconducting state emerges next to a Mott insulating phase as a function of the lattice spacing. This is in contrast with the common belief that Mott physics and phonon-driven s-wave superconductivity are incompatible, raising a fundamental question on the mechanism of the high-Tc superconductivity. This article reviews recent ab initio calculations, which have succeeded in reproducing comprehensively the experimental phase diagram with high accuracy and elucidated an unusual cooperation between the electron-phonon coupling and the electron-electron interactions leading to Mott localization to realize an unconventional s-wave superconductivity in the alkali-doped fullerides. A driving force behind the exotic physics is unusual intramolecular interactions, characterized by the coexistence of a strongly repulsive Coulomb interaction and a small effectively negative exchange interaction. This is realized by a subtle energy balance between the coupling with the Jahn-Teller phonons and Hund's coupling within the C60 molecule. The unusual form of the interaction leads to a formation of pairs of up- and down-spin electrons on the molecules, which enables the s-wave pairing. The emergent superconductivity crucially relies on the presence of the Jahn-Teller phonons, but surprisingly benefits from the strong correlations because the correlations suppress the kinetic energy of the electrons and help the formation of the electron pairs, in agreement with previous model calculations. This confirms that the alkali-doped fullerides are a new type of unconventional superconductors, where the unusual synergy between the phonons and Coulomb interactions drives the high-Tc superconductivity.

  20. Exotic s-wave superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2016-04-01

    Alkali-doped fullerides ({{A}3}{{\\text{C}}60} with A  =  K, Rb, Cs) show a surprising phase diagram, in which a high transition-temperature ({{T}\\text{c}} ) s-wave superconducting state emerges next to a Mott insulating phase as a function of the lattice spacing. This is in contrast with the common belief that Mott physics and phonon-driven s-wave superconductivity are incompatible, raising a fundamental question on the mechanism of the high-{{T}\\text{c}} superconductivity. This article reviews recent ab initio calculations, which have succeeded in reproducing comprehensively the experimental phase diagram with high accuracy and elucidated an unusual cooperation between the electron-phonon coupling and the electron-electron interactions leading to Mott localization to realize an unconventional s-wave superconductivity in the alkali-doped fullerides. A driving force behind the exotic physics is unusual intramolecular interactions, characterized by the coexistence of a strongly repulsive Coulomb interaction and a small effectively negative exchange interaction. This is realized by a subtle energy balance between the coupling with the Jahn-Teller phonons and Hund’s coupling within the {{\\text{C}}60} molecule. The unusual form of the interaction leads to a formation of pairs of up- and down-spin electrons on the molecules, which enables the s-wave pairing. The emergent superconductivity crucially relies on the presence of the Jahn-Teller phonons, but surprisingly benefits from the strong correlations because the correlations suppress the kinetic energy of the electrons and help the formation of the electron pairs, in agreement with previous model calculations. This confirms that the alkali-doped fullerides are a new type of unconventional superconductors, where the unusual synergy between the phonons and Coulomb interactions drives the high-{{T}\\text{c}} superconductivity.

  1. P- and S-wave delays caused by thermal plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, Ross; Ritsema, Jeroen; van Keken, Peter E.; Fichtner, Andreas; Goes, Saskia

    2016-08-01

    Many studies have sought to seismically image plumes rising from the deep mantle in order to settle the debate about their presence and role in mantle dynamics, yet the predicted seismic signature of realistic plumes remains poorly understood. By combining numerical simulations of flow, mineral-physics constraints on the relationships between thermal anomalies and wave speeds, and spectral-element method based computations of seismograms, we estimate the delay times of teleseismic S and P waves caused by thermal plumes. Wave front healing is incomplete for seismic periods ranging from 10 s (relevant in traveltime tomography) to 40 s (relevant in waveform tomography). We estimate P-wave delays to be immeasurably small (<0.3 s). S-wave delays are larger than 0.4 s even for S waves crossing the conduits of the thinnest thermal plumes in our geodynamic models. At longer periods (>20 s), measurements of instantaneous phase misfit may be more useful in resolving narrow plume conduits. To detect S-wave delays of 0.4-0.8 s and the diagnostic frequency dependence imparted by plumes, it is key to minimize the influence of the heterogeneous crust and upper mantle. We argue that seismic imaging of plumes will advance significantly if data from wide-aperture ocean-bottom networks were available since, compared to continents, the oceanic crust and upper mantle are relatively simple.

  2. P and S wave delays caused by thermal plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, Ross; Ritsema, Jeroen; van Keken, Peter E.; Fichtner, Andreas; Goes, Saskia

    2016-05-01

    Many studies have sought to seismically image plumes rising from the deep mantle in order to settle the debate about their presence and role in mantle dynamics, yet the predicted seismic signature of realistic plumes remains poorly understood. By combining numerical simulations of flow, mineral-physics constraints on the relationships between thermal anomalies and wave speeds, and spectral-element method based computations of seismograms, we estimate the delay times of teleseismic S and P waves caused by thermal plumes. Wavefront healing is incomplete for seismic periods ranging from 10 s (relevant in traveltime tomography) to 40 s (relevant in waveform tomography). We estimate P wave delays to be immeasurably small (< 0.3 s). S wave delays are larger than 0.4 s even for S waves crossing the conduits of the thinnest thermal plumes in our geodynamic models. At longer periods (> 20 s), measurements of instantaneous phase misfit may be more useful in resolving narrow plume conduits. To detect S wave delays of 0.4-0.8 s and the diagnostic frequency dependence imparted by plumes, it is key to minimize the influence of the heterogeneous crust and upper mantle. We argue that seismic imaging of plumes will advance significantly if data from wide-aperture ocean-bottom networks were available since, compared to continents, the oceanic crust and upper mantle is relatively simple.

  3. P- and S-wave Slowness Anomalies in the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Thorne, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Anomalies in the slowness of teleseisms have been observed in numerous studies, with previous efforts focusing on crust and upper mantle sources for their origin. Little attention has been devoted to the global distribution of P- and S-wave slowness anomalies in the deep Earth. In this study, we use large aperture seismic array data to examine slowness anomalies as a function of depth in the lower mantle. We collected seismic recordings from all broadband seismic stations in North America for earthquakes between January 2004 and June 2015 with moment magnitudes between 5.8 and 7.5, event depths greater than 100 km, and epicentral distances from 40° to 90°. We chose the time range to coincide with the Earthscope seismic experiment. The epicentral distance range used in this study ensured the target phases, direct P and S wave arrivals, turned in the mantle at depths ranging from 1000 to 2800 km. The original data set contained 420 events with 171,696 seismograms. We inspected each seismogram manually and discarded traces without clear P or S arrivals. Our final data set consists of 278 events with 129,748 seismograms. For each event, we grouped the data into 3° radius geographic bins and calculated relative time shifts for each bin using the Automated and Interactive Measurement of Body-wave Arrival Times (AIMBAT) technique. AIMBAT is a python tool for measuring teleseismic arrival times based on the multi-channel cross-correlation (MCCC) method. For each bin, we plotted the relative time shifts as a function of epicentral distances and calculated the corresponding least-square regression line. The slowness (dT/dΔ) can be obtained as the slope of the regression line. The slowness values of all geographic bins were collected to build a slowness profile for each event. In order to identify slowness anomalies, these slowness profiles were compared with synthetic slowness profiles calculated using the 2.5-D axi-symmetric finite-difference methods PSVaxi for P waves

  4. s-Wave collisional frequency shift of a fermion clock.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, Eric L; Zhang, Yi; Stites, Ronald W; Gibble, Kurt; O'Hara, Kenneth M

    2013-04-19

    We report an s-wave collisional frequency shift of an atomic clock based on fermions. In contrast to bosons, the fermion clock shift is insensitive to the population difference of the clock states, set by the first pulse area in Ramsey spectroscopy, θ(1). The fermion shift instead depends strongly on the second pulse area θ(2). It allows the shift to be canceled, nominally at θ(2)=π/2, but correlations perturb the null to slightly larger θ(2). The frequency shift is relevant for optical lattice clocks and increases with the spatial inhomogeneity of the clock excitation field, naturally larger at optical frequencies. PMID:23679589

  5. On the relative scattering of P- and S-waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, P. E.; Phinney, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Using a single-scattering approximation, equations for the scattering attenuation coefficients of P-body and S-body waves are derived. The results are discussed in the light of the energy-renormalization approaches of Wu (1980, 1982) and Sato (1982) to seismic wave scattering. Practical methods for calculating the scattering attenuation coefficients for various earth models are emphasized. The conversions of P-waves to S-waves and S-waves to P-waves are included in the theory. The earth models are assumed to be randomly inhomogeneous, with their properties known only through their average-wavenumber power spectra. The power spectra are approximated with piecewise constant functions, each segment of which contributes to the net frequency-dependent scattering attenuation coefficient. The smallest and largest wavenumbers of a segment can be plotted along with the wavevectors of the incident and scattered waves on a wavenumber diagram. This diagram gives a geometric interpretation for the frequency behavior associated with each spectral segment, including a transition peak that is due entirely to the wavenumber limits of the segment. For regions of the earth where the inhomogeneity spectra are concentrated in a band of wavenumbers, it should be possible to observe such a peak in the apparent attenuation of seismic waves. Both the frequency and distance limits on the accuracy of the theoretical results are given.

  6. Scattering of P and S waves by a spherically symmetric inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, Valeri A.; Johnson, Lane R.

    1996-10-01

    Scattering of an arbitrary elastic wave incident upon a spherically symmetric inclusion is considered and solutions are developed in terms of the spherical vector system of Petrashen, which produces results in terms of displacements rather than displacement potentials and in a form suitable for accurate numerical computations. Analytical expressions for canonical scattering coefficients are obtained for both the cases of incident P waves and incident S waves. Calculations of energy flux in the scattered waves lead to elastic optical theorems for both P and S waves, which relate the scattering cross sections to the amplitude of the scattered fields in the forward direction. The properties of the solutions for a homogeneous elastic sphere, a sphere filled by fluid, and a spherical cavity are illustrated with scattering cross sections that demonstrate important differences between these types of obstacles. A general result is that the frequency dependence of the scattering is defined by the wavelength of the scattered wave rather than the wavelength of the incident wave. This is consistent with the finding that the intensity of the P→S scattering is generally much stronger than the S→P scattering. When averaged over all scattering angles, the mean intensity of the P→S converted waves is 2V {p/2}/V{s/4}times the mean intensity of the S→P converted waves, and this ratio is independent of frequency. The exact solutions reduce to simple and easily used expressions in the case of the low frequency (Rayleigh) approximation and the low contrast (Rayleigh-Born) approximation. The case of energy absorbing inclusions can also be obtained by assigning complex values to the elastic parameters, which leads to the result that an increase in attenuation within the inclusion causes an increased scattering cross section with a marked preference for scattered S waves. The complete generality of the results is demonstrated by showing waves scattered by the earth's core in the

  7. Noncollinear order and gapless superconductivity in s -wave magnetic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Madhuparna; Majumdar, Pinaki

    2016-05-01

    We study the behavior of magnetic superconductors which involve a local attractive interaction between electrons, and a coupling between local moments and the electrons. We solve this Hubbard-Kondo model through a variational minimization at zero temperature and validate the results via a Monte Carlo based on static auxiliary field decomposition of the Hubbard interaction. Over a magnetic coupling window that widens with increasing attractive interaction, the ground state supports simultaneous magnetic and superconducting order. The pairing amplitude remains s -wave like, without significant spatial modulation, while the magnetic phase evolves from a ferromagnet, through noncollinear "spiral" states, to a Néel state with increasing density and magnetic coupling. We find that at intermediate magnetic coupling, the antiferromagnetic-superconducting state is gapless, except for the regime of Néel order. We map out the phase diagram in terms of density, magnetic coupling, and attractive interaction, establish the electron dispersion and effective "Fermi surface" in the ground state, provide an estimate of the magnetic and superconducting temperature scales via Monte Carlo, and compare our results to available data on the borocarbides.

  8. S-wave velocity structure in the SE Tibetan plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jianping; Wang, Weilai; Fang, Lihua; Fan, Liping

    2016-06-01

    We use observations recorded by 23 permanent and 99 temporary stations in the SE Tibetan plateau to obtain the S-wave velocity structure along two profiles by applying joint inversion with receiver functions and surface waves. The two profiles cross West Yunnan block (WYB), the Central Yunnan sub-block (CYB), South China block (SCB), and Nanpanjiang basin (NPB). The profile at ~25°N shows that the Moho interface in the CYB is deeper than those in the WYB and the NPB, and the topography and Moho depth have clear correspondence. Beneath the Xiaojiang fault zone (XJF), there exists a crustal low-velocity zone (LVZ), crossing the XJF and expanding eastward into the SCB. The NPB is shown to be of relatively high velocity. We speculate that the eastward extrusion of the Tibetan plateau may pass through the XJF and affect its eastern region, and is resisted by the rigid NPB, which has high velocity. This may be the main cause of the crustal thickening and uplift of the topography. In the Tengchong volcanic area, the crust is shown to have alternate high- and low-velocity layers, and the upper mantle is shown to be of low velocity. We consider that the magma which exists in the crust is from the upper mantle and that the complex crustal velocity structure is related to magmatic differentiation. Between the Tengchong volcanic area and the XJF, the crustal velocity is relatively high. Combining these observations with other geophysical evidence, it is indicated that rock strength is high and deformation is weak in this area, which is why the level of seismicity is quite low. The profile at ~23°N shows that the variation of the Moho depth is small from the eastern rigid block to the western active block with a wide range of LVZs. We consider that deformation to the south of the SE Tibetan Plateau is weak.

  9. The s-wave repulsion and deeply bound pionic atoms: fact and fancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2003-06-01

    Fits to a large data set of pionic atoms show that the 'missing' s-wave repulsion is accounted for when a density dependence suggested recently by Weise is included in the isovector term of the s-wave pion optical potential. The importance of using large data sets is demonstrated and the role of deeply bound pionic atom states is discussed.

  10. Interaction of a screw dislocation with a nano-sized, arbitrarily shaped inhomogeneity with interface stresses under anti-plane deformations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Schiavone, Peter

    2014-10-01

    We propose an elegant and concise general method for the solution of a problem involving the interaction of a screw dislocation and a nano-sized, arbitrarily shaped, elastic inhomogeneity in which the contribution of interface/surface elasticity is incorporated using a version of the Gurtin-Murdoch model. The analytic function inside the arbitrarily shaped inhomogeneity is represented in the form of a Faber series. The real periodic function arising from the contribution of the surface mechanics is then expanded as a Fourier series. The resulting system of linear algebraic equations is solved through the use of simple matrix algebra. When the elastic inhomogeneity represents a hole, our solution method simplifies considerably. Furthermore, we undertake an analytical investigation of the challenging problem of a screw dislocation interacting with two closely spaced nano-sized holes of arbitrary shape in the presence of surface stresses. Our solutions quite clearly demonstrate that the induced elastic fields and image force acting on the dislocation are indeed size-dependent. PMID:25294965

  11. Majorana modes in a topological insulator/s-wave superconductor heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Zao; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Wang, Qiang-Hua

    2014-09-15

    In a recent experiment, signatures of Majorana fermion (MF) were found in the vortex core threading a heterostructure composed of n layers of topological insulator (TI) deposited on a bulk s-wave superconductor. Here we provide strong theoretical support to the experiment. First, we demonstrate that MF modes appear on both top and bottom layers of TI, and are well separated for n ~ 6. The top MF becomes more extended with increasing n, in agrement with the experiment. Second, we show both analytically and numerically that right at the vortex core the MF mode is always accompanied by another low energy bound state, leading to a zero-bias peak plus a side peak in the local density of states (LDOS) therein. However, a local scalar impurity at the core can wipe out the accompanying side-peak state while leaving the zero-energy MF mode intact. Consequently the LDOS becomes symmetric about the fermi level, and the peak does not branch near the vortex core, in agreement with the experiment. Finally but unfortunately, while the MF is extremely stable against a single local impurity, the stability in terms of the critical impurity strength is reduced drastically for a moderate concentration (e.g., 10%) of impurities.

  12. Predicting S-wave velocities for unconsolidated sediments at low effective pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate S-wave velocities for shallow sediments are important in performing a reliable elastic inversion for gas hydrate-bearing sediments and in evaluating velocity models for predicting S-wave velocities, but few S-wave velocities are measured at low effective pressure. Predicting S-wave velocities by using conventional methods based on the Biot-Gassmann theory appears to be inaccurate for laboratory-measured velocities at effective pressures less than about 4-5 megapascals (MPa). Measured laboratory and well log velocities show two distinct trends for S-wave velocities with respect to P-wave velocity: one for the S-wave velocity less than about 0.6 kilometer per second (km/s) which approximately corresponds to effective pressure of about 4-5 MPa, and the other for S-wave velocities greater than 0.6 km/s. To accurately predict S-wave velocities at low effective pressure less than about 4-5 MPa, a pressure-dependent parameter that relates the consolidation parameter to shear modulus of the sediments at low effective pressure is proposed. The proposed method in predicting S-wave velocity at low effective pressure worked well for velocities of water-saturated sands measured in the laboratory. However, this method underestimates the well-log S-wave velocities measured in the Gulf of Mexico, whereas the conventional method performs well for the well log velocities. The P-wave velocity dispersion due to fluid in the pore spaces, which is more pronounced at high frequency with low effective pressures less than about 4 MPa, is probably a cause for this discrepancy.

  13. Numerical Study of Impurity Effects on Quasiparticles within S-wave and Chiral P-wave Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yusuke; Hayashi, Nobuhiko

    2002-07-01

    The impurity problems within vortex cores of two-dimensional s-wave and chiral p-wave superconductors are studied numerically in the framework of the quasiclassical theory of superconductivity and self-consistent Born approximation under a trial form of the pair potential. The dispersion and impurity scattering rate (the inverse of the relaxation time) of the Andreev bound state localized in vortex cores are deduced from the angular-resoloved local density of states. The energy dependence of the impurity scattering rates depends on the pairing symmetry; particularly, in the chiral p-wave vortex core where chirality and vorticity have opposite sign and hence the total angular momentum is zero, the impurities are ineffective and the scattering rate is vanishingly small. Owing to the cancellation of angular momentum between chirality and vorticity, the chiral p-wave vortex core is similar to locally realized s-wave region and therefore non-magnetic impurity is harmless as a consequence of Anderson’s theorem. The results of the present study confirm the previous results of analytical study [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 69 (2000) 3378] in the Born limit.

  14. Constraining depth range of S wave velocity decrease after large earthquakes near Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chunquan; Delorey, Andrew; Brenguier, Florent; Hadziioannou, Celine; Daub, Eric G.; Johnson, Paul

    2016-06-01

    We use noise correlation and surface wave inversion to measure the S wave velocity changes at different depths near Parkfield, California, after the 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes. We process continuous seismic recordings from 13 stations to obtain the noise cross-correlation functions and measure the Rayleigh wave phase velocity changes over six frequency bands. We then invert the Rayleigh wave phase velocity changes using a series of sensitivity kernels to obtain the S wave velocity changes at different depths. Our results indicate that the S wave velocity decreases caused by the San Simeon earthquake are relatively small (~0.02%) and access depths of at least 2.3 km. The S wave velocity decreases caused by the Parkfield earthquake are larger (~0.2%), and access depths of at least 1.2 km. Our observations can be best explained by material damage and healing resulting mainly from the dynamic stress perturbations of the two large earthquakes.

  15. Oceanic lithospheric S wave velocities from the analysis of P wave polarization at the ocean floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannemann, Katrin; Krüger, Frank; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-09-01

    Our knowledge of the absolute S wave velocities of the oceanic lithosphere is mainly based on global surface wave tomography, local active seismic or compliance measurements using oceanic infragravity waves. The results of tomography give a rather smooth picture of the actual S wave velocity structure and local measurements have limitations regarding the range of elastic parameters or the geometry of the measurement. Here, we use the P wave polarization (apparent P wave incidence angle) of teleseismic events to investigate the S wave velocity structure of the oceanic crust and the upper tens of kilometres of the mantle beneath single stations. In this study, we present an up to our knowledge new relation of the apparent P wave incidence angle at the ocean bottom dependent on the half space S wave velocity. We analyse the angle in different period ranges at ocean bottom stations (OBS) to derive apparent S wave velocity profiles. These profiles are dependent on the S wave velocity as well as on the thickness of the layers in the subsurface. Consequently, their interpretation results in a set of equally valid models. We analyse the apparent P wave incidence angles of an OBS data set which was collected in the Eastern Mid Atlantic. We are able to determine reasonable S wave velocity-depth models by a three step quantitative modelling after a manual data quality control, although layer resonance sometimes influences the estimated apparent S wave velocities. The apparent S wave velocity profiles are well explained by an oceanic PREM model in which the upper part is replaced by four layers consisting of a water column, a sediment, a crust and a layer representing the uppermost mantle. The obtained sediment has a thickness between 0.3 km and 0.9 km with S wave velocities between 0.7 km s-1 and 1.4 km s-1. The estimated total crustal thickness varies between 4 km and 10 km with S wave velocities between 3.5 km s-1 and 4.3 km s-1. We find a slight increase of the total

  16. Site-effect estimations for Taipei Basin based on shallow S-wave velocity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-Chi; Huang, Huey-Chu; Wu, Cheng-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Shallow S-wave velocities have been widely used for earthquake ground-motion site characterization. Thus, the S-wave velocity structures of Taipei Basin, Taiwan were investigated using array records of microtremors at 15 sites (Huang et al., 2015). In this study, seven velocity structures are added to the database describing Taipei Basin. Validity of S-wave velocity structures are first examined using the 1D Haskell method and well-logging data at the Wuku Sewage Disposal Plant (WK) borehole site. Basically, the synthetic results match well with the observed data at different depths. Based on S-wave velocity structures at 22 sites, theoretical transfer functions at five different formations of the sedimentary basin are calculated. According to these results, predominant frequencies for these formations are estimated. If the S-wave velocity of the Tertiary basement is assumed to be 1000 m/s, the predominant frequencies of the Quaternary sediments are between 0.3 Hz (WUK) and 1.4 Hz (LEL) in Taipei Basin while the depths of sediments between 0 m (i.e. at the edge of the basin) and 616 m (i.e. site WUK) gradually increase from southeast to northwest. Our results show good agreement with available geological and geophysical information.

  17. Identification and mitigation of T-S waves using localized dynamic surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitay, Michael; Tuna, Burak A.; Dell'Orso, Haley

    2016-06-01

    The control of transition from a laminar to a turbulent flow over a flat plate using localized dynamic surface modifications was explored experimentally in Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's subsonic wind tunnel. Dynamic surface modification, via a pair of Piezoelectrically Driven Oscillating Surface (PDOS) actuators, was used to excite and control the T-S wave over a flat plate. Creating an upstream, localized small disturbance at the most amplified frequency of fact = 250 Hz led to phase-locking the T-S wave. This enabled observation of the excited T-S wave using phase-locked stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. The growth of the T-S wave as it moved downstream was also measured using this technique (25% growth over four wavelengths of the excited wave). Activation of a downstream PDOS actuator (in addition to the upstream PDOS) at the appropriate amplitude and phase shift resulted in attenuation of the peak amplitude of the coherent velocity fluctuations (by up to 68%) and a substantial reduction of the degree of coherence of the T-S wave. Since the PDOS actuators used in this work were localized, the effect of the control strategy was confined to the region directly downstream of the PDOS actuator.

  18. S-Wave Dispersion Relations: Exact Left Hand E-Plane Discontinuity from the Born Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessis, D.; Temkin, A.

    1999-01-01

    We show, for a superposition of Yukawa potentials, that the left hand cut discontinuity in the complex E plane of the (S-wave) scattering amplitude is given exactly, in an interval depending on n, by the discontinuity of the Born series stopped at order n. This also establishes an inverse and unexpected correspondence of the Born series at positive high energies and negative low energies. We can thus construct a viable dispersion relation (DR) for the partial (S-) wave amplitude. The high numerical precision achievable by the DR is demonstrated for the exponential potential at zero scattering energy. We also briefly discuss the extension of our results to Field Theory.

  19. R h2M o3N : Noncentrosymmetric s -wave superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wensen; Zhao, G. J.; Kim, D. R.; Jin, Chiming; Zhang, J. L.; Ling, Langsheng; Zhang, Lei; Du, Haifeng; Chen, T. Y.; Zang, Jiadong; Tian, Mingliang; Chien, C. L.; Zhang, Yuheng

    2016-09-01

    R h2M o3N , with a noncentrosymmetric β -manganese structure, has been found to be superconducting with critical temperature Tc≈4.3 K . Magnetic field dependence of resistivity, magnetization, and specific heat measurements show that its upper critical field of μ0Hc2 *˜7.41 T comes close to, but does not exceed, the Pauli paramagnetic limit and that the 2 Δ /kBTc value of about 3.62 is in accordance with a conventional s -wave superconductor. Andreev reflection spectroscopy measurements using both normal metal and half-metal show conclusively s -wave pairing with an isotropic gap.

  20. Tomographic Imaging of Upper Mantle P- and S-wave Velocity Heterogeneity Beneath the Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Nyblade, A. A.; Rodgers, A.; Al-Amri, A.

    2005-12-01

    We have studied the three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity structure beneath the Arabian Peninsula estimated from teleseismic travel time delay tomography. We have completed travel time measurements and inversion of a data set provided by King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST: 21 broadband stations and 4 short-period stations). We augmented the KACST data with delay times measured from permanent Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) stations in the region (RAYN, EIL and MRNI) and the 1996 Saudi Arabian PASSCAL Experiment (9 broadband stations). We used 401 earthquakes resulting in 3416 ray paths with P- and PKP-wave arrivals for the P-wave tomography, and 1602 ray paths with S- and SKS-wave arrivals came from 201 earthquakes for the S-wave tomography. Although the total number of rays for the S-wave model is a half of the rays for the P-wave model, the event distribution shows better azimuthal coverage. The P and S wave models yield consistent results. The models show strong low velocity regions beneath the southeastern Arabian Shield and the mid-eastern edge of Arabian Shield. The low velocity anomaly in the southeastern part of the Arabian Shield does not extend north of 21°N and dips to south. It likely represents the northeastern edge of the Afar hotspot. The origin of the low velocity region under the eastern edge of the Arabian Shield is uncertain.

  1. Anomalous fluctuations of s-wave reduced neutron widths of 192,194Pt resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Paul Edward; Becvar, F.; Krticka, Milan; Harvey, John A; Guber, Klaus H

    2010-01-01

    We obtained an unprecedentedly large number of s-wave neutron widths through R-matrix analysis of neutron cross-section measurements on enriched Pt samples. Careful analysis of these data rejects the validity of the Porter-Thomas distribution with a statistical significance of at least 99.997%.

  2. Bright spot validation using comparative P-wave and S-wave seismic sections

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.D.; Pritchett, W.C.

    1984-04-01

    Coincident P-wave and S-wave CDP lines were shot across the Willow Slough and Putah Sink fields, Yolo County, California, by the 1977-78 Conoco P-Wave/Shear-Wave Group Shoot. The fields produce gas from pay sands in the Cretaceous Starkey and Winters formations. Several of the thicker pay sands correlate with amplitude anomalies on the P-wave sections, and these amplitude anomalies are true seismic bright spots. The equivalent events on the S-wave sections are much lower in relative amplitude when the overall gains of the P and S sections are balanced. The difference in the P and S responses is consistent with laboratory experiments which show that introducing gas into the pore space of a liquid-saturated rock dramatically lowers P velocity but minimally affects S velocity. The experimental lines demonstrate that comparison between the amplitudes of P and S is a diagnostic technique that can be sued to distinguish gas-liquid contacts from lithologic interfaces. An S-wave section validates a P-wave bright spot attributed to gas saturation when there is no anomalous amplitude at the equivalent S-wave event.

  3. S-wave velocity measurements applied to the seismic microzonation of Basel, Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havenith, Hans-Balder; Fäh, Donat; Polom, Ulrich; Roullé, Agathe

    2007-07-01

    An extensive S-wave velocity survey had been carried out in the frame of a recent seismic microzonation study of Basel and the border areas between Switzerland, France and Germany. The aim was to better constrain the seismic amplification potential of the surface layers. The survey included single station (H/V spectral ratios) and ambient vibration array measurements carried out by the Swiss team, as well as active S-wave velocity measurements performed by the German and French partners. This paper is focused on the application of the array technique, which consists in recording ambient vibrations with a number of seismological stations. Several practical aspects related to the field measurements are outlined. The signal processing aims to determine the dispersion curves of surface waves contained in the ambient vibrations. The inversion of the dispersion curve provides a 1-D S-wave velocity model for the investigated site down to a depth related to the size of the array. Since the size of arrays is theoretically not limited, arrays are known to be well adapted for investigations in deep sediment basins, such as the Upper Rhine Graben including the area of the city of Basel. In this region, 27 array measurements with varying station configurations have been carried out to determine the S-wave velocity properties of the geological layers down to a depth of 100-250 m. For eight sites, the outputs of the array measurements have been compared with the results of the other investigations using active sources, the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) and S-wave reflection seismics. Borehole information available for a few sites could be used to calibrate the geophysical measurements. By this comparison, the advantages and disadvantages of the array method and the other techniques are outlined with regard to the effectiveness of the methods and the required investigation depth. The dispersion curves measured with the arrays and the SASW technique were also combined

  4. Detailed p- and s-wave velocity models along the LARSE II transect, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, J.M.; Fuis, G.S.; Ryberg, T.; Lutter, W.J.; Catchings, R.D.; Goldman, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Structural details of the crust determined from P-wave velocity models can be improved with S-wave velocity models, and S-wave velocities are needed for model-based predictions of strong ground motion in southern California. We picked P- and S-wave travel times for refracted phases from explosive-source shots of the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, Phase II (LARSE II); we developed refraction velocity models from these picks using two different inversion algorithms. For each inversion technique, we calculated ratios of P- to S-wave velocities (VP/VS) where there is coincident P- and S-wave ray coverage.We compare the two VP inverse velocity models to each other and to results from forward modeling, and we compare the VS inverse models. The VS and VP/VS models differ in structural details from the VP models. In particular, dipping, tabular zones of low VS, or high VP/VS, appear to define two fault zones in the central Transverse Ranges that could be parts of a positive flower structure to the San Andreas fault. These two zones are marginally resolved, but their presence in two independent models lends them some credibility. A plot of VS versus VP differs from recently published plots that are based on direct laboratory or down-hole sonic measurements. The difference in plots is most prominent in the range of VP = 3 to 5 km=s (or VS ~ 1:25 to 2:9 km/s), where our refraction VS is lower by a few tenths of a kilometer per second from VS based on direct measurements. Our new VS - VP curve may be useful for modeling the lower limit of VS from a VP model in calculating strong motions from scenario earthquakes.

  5. S-wave velocity structure of the North China from inversion of Rayleigh wave phase velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao-peng; Zhu, Liang-bao; Wang, Qing-dong; Zhang, Pan; Yang, Ying-hang

    2014-07-01

    We constructed the S-wave velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle (10-100 km) beneath the North China based on the teleseismic data recorded by 187 portable broadband stations deployed in this region. The traditional two-step inversion scheme was adopted. Firstly, we measured the interstation fundamental Rayleigh wave phase velocity of 10-60 s and imaged the phase velocity distributions using the Tarantola inversion method. Secondly, we inverted the 1-D S-wave velocity structure with a grid spacing of 0.25° × 0.25° and constructed the 3-D S-wave velocity structure of the North China. The 3-D S-wave velocity model provides valuable information about the destruction mechanism and geodynamics of the North China Craton (NCC). The S-wave velocity structures in the northwestern and southwestern sides of the North-South Gravity Lineament (NSGL) are obviously different. The southeastern side is high velocity (high-V) while the northeastern side is low velocity (low-V) at the depth of 60-80 km. The upwelling asthenosphere above the stagnated Pacific plate may cause the destruction of the Eastern Block and form the NSGL. A prominent low-V anomaly exists around Datong from 50 to 100 km, which may due to the upwelling asthenosphere originating from the mantle transition zone beneath the Western Block. The upwelling asthenosphere beneath the Datong may also contribute to the destruction of the Eastern Block. The Zhangjiakou-Penglai fault zone (ZPFZ) may cut through the lithosphere and act as a channel of the upwelling asthenosphere. A noticeable low-V zone also exists in the lower crust and upper mantle lid (30-50 km) beneath the Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan (BTT) region, which may be caused by the upwelling asthenosphere through the ZPFZ.

  6. P- and S-wave seismic attenuation for deep natural gas exploration and development

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, Joel; Uden, Richard; Singleton, Scott; Shu, Rone; Mavko, Gary

    2005-04-12

    Using current methods, oil and gas in the subsurface cannot be reliably predicted from seismic data. This causes domestic oil and gas fields to go undiscovered and unexploited, thereby increasing the need to import energy.The general objective of this study was to demonstrate a simple and effective methodology for estimating reservoir properties (gas saturation in particular, but also including lithology, net to gross ratios, and porosity) from seismic attenuation and other attributes using P- and S-waves. Phase I specific technical objectives: Develop Empirical or Theoretical Rock Physics Relations for Qp and Qs; Create P-wave and S-wave Synthetic Seismic Modeling Algorithms with Q; and, Compute P-wave and S-wave Q Attributes from Multi-component Seismic Data. All objectives defined in the Phase I proposal were accomplished. During the course of this project, a new class of seismic analysis was developed based on compressional and shear wave inelastic rock properties (attenuation). This method provides a better link between seismic data and the presence of hydrocarbons. The technique employs both P and S-wave data to better discriminate between attenuation due to hydrocarbons versus energy loss due to other factors such as scattering and geometric spreading. It was demonstrated that P and S attenuation can be computed from well log data and used to generate synthetic seismograms. Rock physics models for P and S attenuation were tested on a well from the Gulf of Mexico. The P- and S-wave Q attributes were computed on multi-component 2D seismic data intersecting this well. These methods generated reasonable results, and most importantly, the Q attributes indicated gas saturation.

  7. P and S wave responses of bacterial biopolymer formation in unconsolidated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Dong-Hwa; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Kwon, Tae-Hyuk; Muhunthan, Balasingam

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the P and S wave responses and permeability reduction during bacterial biopolymer formation in unconsolidated porous media. Column experiments with fine sands, where the model bacteria Leuconostoc mesenteroides were stimulated to produce insoluble biopolymer, were conducted while monitoring changes in permeability and P and S wave responses. The bacterial biopolymer reduced the permeability by more than 1 order of magnitude, occupying ~10% pore volume after 38 days of growth. This substantial reduction was attributed to the bacterial biopolymer with complex internal structures accumulated at pore throats. S wave velocity (VS) increased by more than ~50% during biopolymer accumulation; this indicated that the bacterial biopolymer caused a certain level of stiffening effect on shear modulus of the unconsolidated sediment matrix at low confining stress conditions. Whereas replacing pore water by insoluble biopolymer was observed to cause minimal changes in P wave velocity (VP) due to the low elastic moduli of insoluble biopolymer. The spectral ratio analyses revealed that the biopolymer formation caused a ~50-80% increase in P wave attenuation (1/QP) at the both ultrasonic and subultrasonic frequency ranges, at hundreds of kHz and tens of kHz, respectively, and a ~50-60% increase in S wave attenuation (1/QS) in the frequency band of several kHz. Our results reveal that in situ biopolymer formation and the resulting permeability reduction can be effectively monitored by using P and S wave attenuation in the ultrasonic and subultrasonic frequency ranges. This suggests that field monitoring using seismic logging techniques, including time-lapse dipole sonic logging, may be possible.

  8. Three-dimensional P and S wave velocity structures of southern Peru and their tectonic implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Paul S.; Roecker, Steven W.; Hatzfeld, Denis

    1986-01-01

    Arrival times of compressional and shear (S) waves from microearthquakes recorded in 1981 by an 18-station regional array are used to study the three-dimensional velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of the central Andes. The data suggest a crustal thickness of about 40 km beneath the coast, increasing to about 70 km beneath the Cordillera Occidental. The inverse correlation between the dip in the Moho and the dip of the slab may indicate a broad-scale causal relation between the two. S wave velocities in the mantle between 70 and 130 km depth above the 30-degree dipping slab are low, possibly indicating the presence of a partially melted asthenosphere that may be responsible for the magmatic activity recorded in southern Peru.

  9. J-matrix calculation of electron-helium S-wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, D. A.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.

    2011-09-15

    The J-matrix approach to electron-atom scattering is revised by merging it with the Fano's multiconfiguration interaction matrix elements [U. Fano, Phys. Rev. 140, A67 (1965)]. The revised method is then applied to the S-wave model of the e-He scattering problem demonstrating remarkable computational efficiency and accuracy. In particular, the method is in complete agreement with the convergent-close-coupling elastic, 2{sup 1,3}S excitation and single ionization cross sections for impact energies in the range 0.1-1000 eV. The S-wave resonance structures in the elastic and 2{sup 1,3}S excitation cross sections are highlighted.

  10. Wavelet-based automatic determination of the P- and S-wave arrivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogiatzis, P.; Ishii, M.

    2013-12-01

    The detection of P- and S-wave arrivals is important for a variety of seismological applications including earthquake detection and characterization, and seismic tomography problems such as imaging of hydrocarbon reservoirs. For many years, dedicated human-analysts manually selected the arrival times of P and S waves. However, with the rapid expansion of seismic instrumentation, automatic techniques that can process a large number of seismic traces are becoming essential in tomographic applications, and for earthquake early-warning systems. In this work, we present a pair of algorithms for efficient picking of P and S onset times. The algorithms are based on the continuous wavelet transform of the seismic waveform that allows examination of a signal in both time and frequency domains. Unlike Fourier transform, the basis functions are localized in time and frequency, therefore, wavelet decomposition is suitable for analysis of non-stationary signals. For detecting the P-wave arrival, the wavelet coefficients are calculated using the vertical component of the seismogram, and the onset time of the wave is identified. In the case of the S-wave arrival, we take advantage of the polarization of the shear waves, and cross-examine the wavelet coefficients from the two horizontal components. In addition to the onset times, the automatic picking program provides estimates of uncertainty, which are important for subsequent applications. The algorithms are tested with synthetic data that are generated to include sudden changes in amplitude, frequency, and phase. The performance of the wavelet approach is further evaluated using real data by comparing the automatic picks with manual picks. Our results suggest that the proposed algorithms provide robust measurements that are comparable to manual picks for both P- and S-wave arrivals.

  11. Majorana modes and s-wave topological superfluids in ultracold fermionic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ya-Jie; Li, Ning; Zhou, Jiang; Kou, Su-Peng; Yu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    We present another topological superfluid with s-wave pairing for ultracold fermionic atoms in addition to the chiral topological superfluid proposed by Sato et al (2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 020401), of which edge dislocations host Majorana zero modes that may be utilized as decoherence-free qubits, and quantized vortices trap zero energy modes. The quantum phase fluctuations for topological superfluids and Berezinsky–Kosterlitz–Thouless transition are also discussed.

  12. S -wave nonleptonic hyperon decays and Ξb-→π-Λb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2016-02-01

    The decay Ξb-→π-Λb has recently been observed by the LHCb Collaboration at CERN. In contrast to most weak decays of b -flavored baryons, this process involves the decay of the strange quark in Ξb and thus has features in common with nonleptonic weak decays of hyperons. Thanks to the expected pure S-wave nature of the decay in question in the heavy b quark limit, we find that its amplitude may be related to those for S-wave nonleptonic decays of Λ , Σ , and Ξ in a picture inspired by duality. The calculated branching fraction B (Ξb-→π-Λb)=(6.3 ±4.2 )×10-3 is consistent with the range allowed in the LHCb analysis. The error is dominated by an assumed 30% uncertainty in the amplitude due to possible U(3) violation. A more optimistic view based on sum rules involving nonleptonic hyperon decay S-wave amplitudes reduces the error on the branching fraction to 2.0 ×10-3.

  13. S-Wave Velocity Structure of the Puli Basin, Taiwan, Using the Array Records of Microtremors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Huang, H.

    2009-12-01

    The September 21, 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake induced strong shaking, resulting in severe damage in the Puli area. According to Huang and Tarng (2005), the collapse of many structures during the earthquake was very closely related to the site effects. The Shallow Shear-wave velocities have widely been used for earthquake ground-motion site characterization. Thus, the S-wave velocity structures of the Puli area are investigated using the array records of microtremors at 16 sites. The dispersion curves at these sites are calculated using the F-K method (Capon, 1969); then, the S-wave velocity structures at the Puli area are estimated by employing the surface wave inversion technique (Herrmann, 1991). If the S-wave velocity of bedrock is assumed to be 2000m/sec, the depths of the alluvium at the Puli area are between 360m (ZHO) and 810m (AIL, DAH). Besides, there are 3~4 distinct interfaces in the shallow velocity structure (0~1000m). The depth of the alluvium gradually increases from east to west and the deepest one appears at stations AIL and DAH. The results in this study are similar to those using the seismic exploration method (Wang et al., 2003; Huang, 2008) in the Puli area and the well-logging method at LAC.

  14. ESTIMATION OF S-WAVE VELOCITY STRUCTURE OF FUKUI PLAIN BASED ON MICROTREMOR ARRAY OBSERVATION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Keisuke; Moto, Koudai

    The precise evaluations of Quaternary structure of the region are indispensable in order to accurately predict the seismic damage. However, deep borehole, PS-logging and elastic wave exploration have been executed only on limited points around the Fukui Plain. The problem analyzed in this study is statistical estimation of the 3D S-wave velocity structure down to the Tertiary bedrock of the Fukui Plain based on the data from 75 microtremor array observation sites. The Rayleigh wave phase velocities at each array site were calculated by the spatial autocorrelation method. The phase velocities at each site were inverted to a 1D S-wave profile using a genetic inversion. The 3-components single-site microtremor observations were carried out to compensate the array observations. The 3D S-wave velocity structure around the Fukui plain have been interpolated by using Kriging and Co-Kriging techniques. In the Co-Kriging procedure, the correlations between the estimated depths of Quaternary and the observed predominant periods of the sites were taken into account. The validity of the estimated structure from the microtremor observation was confirmed by comparing with the density structure and with the existing PS-logging data.

  15. Significant seismic anisotropy beneath southern Tibet inferred from splitting of direct S-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arun; Eken, Tuna; Mohanty, Debasis D.; Saikia, Dipankar; Singh, Chandrani; Ravi Kumar, M.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a total of 12008 shear wave splitting measurements obtained using the reference-station technique applied to direct S-waves from 106 earthquakes recorded at 143 seismic stations of the Hi-CLIMB seismic network. The results reveal significant anisotropy in regions of southern Tibet where null or negligible anisotropy has been hitherto reported from SK(K)S measurements. While the individual fast polarization direction (FPD) at each station are found to be consistent, the splitting time delays (TDs) exhibit deviations particularly at stations located south of the Indus-Tsangpo Suture Zone. The fast polarization directions (FPDs) are oriented (a) NE-SW to E-W to the south of the Indus-Tsangpo Suture Zone (b) NE-SW to ENE-SSW between Bangong-Nujiang Suture Zone and the Indus-Tsangpo Suture Zone (ITSZ) and (c) E-W to the extreme north of the profile. The splitting time delays (δt) vary between 0.45 and 1.3 s south of the ITSZ (<30°N latitude), while they range from 0.9 to 1.4 s north of it. The overall trends are similar to SKS/SKKS results. However, the differences may be due to the not so near vertical paths of direct S waves which may sample the anisotropy in a different way in comparison to SKS waves, or insufficient number of SKS observations. The significant anisotropy (∼ 0.8 s) observed beneath Himalaya reveals a complex deformation pattern in the region and can be best explained by the combined effects of deformation related to shear at the base of the lithosphere and subduction related flows with possible contributions from the crust. Additional measurements obtained using direct S-waves provide new constraints in regions with complex anisotropy.

  16. Mantle deformation patterns beneath southern Tibet using splitting of direct-S waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Debasis D.; Eken, Tuna; Singh, Arun; Singh, Chandrani; Kumar, M. Ravi

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a total of 12008 shear wave splitting measurements obtained using the reference station technique applied to direct S-waves from 106 earthquakes recorded at 143 seismic stations of the Hi-CLIMB seismic network. The results reveal significant anisotropy in regions of southern Tibet where null or negligible anisotropy has been hitherto reported from SK(K)S measurements. While the individual fast polarization direction (FPD) at each station are found to be consistent, the splitting time delays (TDs) exhibit deviations particularly at stations located south of the Indus-Tsangpo Suture Zone. The fast polarization directions (FPDs) are oriented (a) NE-SW to E-W to the south of the Indus-Tsangpo Suture Zone (b) NE-SW to ENE-SSW between Bangong-Nujiang Suture Zone and the Indus-Tsangpo Suture Zone (ITSZ) and (c) E-W to the extreme north of the profile. The splitting time delays (dt) vary between 0.45 and 1.3 s south of the ITSZ (<30°N latitude), while they range from 0.9 to 1.4 s north of it. The overall trends are similar to SKS/SKKS results. However, the differences may be due to the not so near vertical paths of direct S waves which may sample the anisotropy in a different way in comparison to SKS waves, or insufficient number of SKS observations. The significant anisotropy (Δ0.8 s) observed beneath Himalaya reveals a complex deformation pattern in the region and can be best explained by the combined effects of deformation related to shear at the base of the lithosphere and subduction related flows with possible contributions from the crust. Additional measurements obtained using direct S-waves provide new constraints in regions with complex anisotropy.

  17. Global S-wave tomography using receiver pairs: an alternative to get rid of earthquake mislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaroli, C.; Lévêque, J.-J.; Schuberth, B. S. A.; Duputel, Z.; Nolet, G.

    2014-11-01

    Global seismic tomography suffers from uncertainties in earthquake parameters routinely published in seismic catalogues. In particular, errors in earthquake location and origin-time may lead to strong biases in measured body wave delay-times and significantly pollute tomographic models. Common ways of dealing with this issue are to incorporate source parameters as additional unknowns into the linear tomographic equations, or to seek combinations of data to minimize the influence of source mislocations. We propose an alternative, physically-based method to desensitize direct S-wave delay-times to errors in earthquake location and origin-time. Our approach takes advantage of the fact that mislocation delay-time biases depend to first order on the earthquake-receiver azimuth, and to second order on the epicentral distance. Therefore, for every earthquake, we compute S-wave differential delay-times between optimized receiver pairs, such that a large part of their mislocation delay-time biases cancels out (for example origin-time fully subtracts out), while the difference of their sensitivity kernels remains sensitive to the model parameters of interest. Considering realistic, randomly distributed source mislocation vectors, as well as various levels of data noise and different synthetic Earths, we demonstrate that mislocation-related model errors are highly reduced when inverting for such differential delay-times, compared to absolute ones. The reduction is particularly rewarding for imaging the upper-mantle and transition zone. We conclude that using optimized receiver pairs is a suitable, low cost alternative to get rid of errors on earthquake location and origin-time for teleseismic direct S-wave traveltimes. Moreover, it can partly remove unilateral rupture propagation effects in cross-correlation delay-times, since they are similar to mislocation effects.

  18. Global S-Wave Tomography Using Receiver Pairs: An Alternative to Get Rid of Earthquake Mislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leveque, J. J.; Zaroli, C.; Schuberth, B. S. A.; Duputel, Z.; Nolet, G.

    2014-12-01

    Global seismic tomography suffers from uncertainties in earthquake parameters routinely published in seismic catalogues. In particular, errors in earthquake location and origin-time may lead to strong biases in measured body-wave delay-times and significantly pollute tomographic models. Common ways of dealing with this issue are to incorporate source parameters as additional unknowns into the linear tomographic equations, or to seek combinations of data to minimise the influence of source mislocations.We propose an alternative, physically-based method to desensitise direct S-wave delay-times to errors in earthquake location and origin-time. Our approach takes advantage of the fact that mislocation delay-time biases depend to first order on the earthquake-receiver azimuth, and to second order on the epicentral distance. Therefore, for every earthquake, we compute S-wave differential delay-times between optimised receiver pairs, such that a large part of their mislocation delay-time biases cancels out (for example origin-time fully subtracts out), while the difference of their sensitivity kernels remains sensitive to the model parameters of interest. Considering realistic, randomly distributed source mislocation vectors, as well as various levels of data noise and different synthetic Earths, we demonstrate that mislocation-related model errors are highly reduced when inverting for such differential delay-times, compared to absolute ones. The reduction is particularly rewarding for imaging the upper-mantle and transition-zone.We conclude that using optimised receiver pairs is a suitable, low cost alternative to get rid of errors on earthquake location and origin-time for teleseismic direct S-wave traveltimes. Moreover, it can partly remove unilateral rupture propagation effects in cross-correlation delay-times, since they are similar to mislocation effects.

  19. Charge independence, charge symmetry breaking in the S-wave nucleon-nucleon interaction, and renormalization

    SciTech Connect

    Alvaro Calle Cordon,Manuel Pavon Valderrama,Enrique Ruiz Arriola

    2012-02-01

    We study the interplay between charge symmetry breaking and renormalization in the NN system for S-waves. We find a set of universality relations which disentangle explicitly the known long distance dynamics from low energy parameters and extend them to the Coulomb case. We analyze within such an approach the One-Boson-Exchange potential and the theoretical conditions which allow to relate the proton-neutron, proton-proton and neutron-neutron scattering observables without the introduction of extra new parameters and providing good phenomenological success.

  20. 3D P and S Wave Velocity Structure and Tremor Locations in the Parkfield Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Thurber, C. H.; Shelly, D. R.; Bennington, N. L.; Cochran, E. S.; Harrington, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    We have assembled a new dataset to refine the 3D seismic velocity model in the Parkfield region. The S arrivals from 184 earthquakes recorded by the Parkfield Experiment to Record MIcroseismicity and Tremor array (PERMIT) during 2010-2011 were picked by a new S wave picker, which is based on machine learning. 74 blasts have been assigned to four quarries, whose locations were identified with Google Earth. About 1000 P and S wave arrivals from these blasts at permanent seismic network were also incorporated. Low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) occurring within non-volcanic tremor (NVT) are valuable for improving the precision of NVT location and the seismic velocity model at greater depths. Based on previous work (Shelley and Hardebeck, 2010), waveforms of hundreds of LFEs in same family were stacked to improve signal qualify. In a previous study (McClement et al., 2013), stacked traces of more than 30 LFE families at the Parkfileld Array Seismic Observatory (PASO) have been picked. We expanded our work to include LFEs recorded by the PERMIT array. The time-frequency Phase Weight Stacking (tf-PWS) method was introduced to improve the stack quality, as direct stacking does not produce clear S-wave arrivals on the PERMIT stations. This technique uses the coherence of the instantaneous phase among the stacked signals to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the stack. We found that it is extremely effective for picking LFE arrivals (Thurber et al., 2014). More than 500 P and about 1000 S arrivals from 58 LFE families were picked at the PERMIT and PASO arrays. Since the depths of LFEs are much deeper than earthquakes, we are able to extend model resolution to lower crustal depths. Both P and S wave velocity structure have been obtained with the tomoDD method. The result suggests that there is a low velocity zone (LVZ) in the lower crust and the location of the LVZ is consistent with the high conductivity zone beneath the southern segment of the Rinconada fault that

  1. Experimental Evidence of s-Wave Superconductivity in Bulk CaC6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamura, G.; Aurino, M.; Cifariello, G.; di Gennaro, E.; Andreone, A.; Emery, N.; Hérold, C.; Marêché, J.-F.; Lagrange, P.

    2006-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the in-plane magnetic penetration depth, λab(T), has been measured in a c-axis oriented polycrystalline CaC6 bulk sample using a high-resolution mutual inductance technique. A clear exponential behavior of λab(T) has been observed at low temperatures, strongly suggesting isotropic s-wave pairing. Data fit using the standard BCS theory yields λab(0)=(720±80)Å and Δ(0)=(1.79±0.08)meV. The ratio 2Δ(0)/kBTc=(3.6±0.2) gives indication for a weakly coupled superconductor.

  2. Constraining the Lithospheric Structure of the Central Andes Using P- and S- wave Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, J. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Central Andean Plateau (CAP) has elevations in excess of 3 km, and is part of the Andean Cordillera that resulted in part from shortening along the western edge of South America as it was compressed between the subducting Nazca plate and underthrusting Brazilian cratonic lithosphere. We calculated P- and S-wave receiver functions for the Central Andean Uplift and Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) temporary deployment of broadband seismometers in the Bolivian orocline (12°-20°S) region to investigate crustal thickness and lithospheric structure. Migration of the receiver functions is done using common conversion point (CCP) stacks through a 3D shear velocity model from ambient noise tomography (Ward et al., 2013). The P- and S-wave receiver functions provide similar estimates of the depth to Moho under the CAP. Crustal thicknesses include 60-65 km thick crust underneath the Bolivian Altiplano, crust that varies from ~70 km to ~50 km underneath the Eastern Cordillera and Interandean zone, and thins to 50 to 40 km crust in the Subandes and the edge of the foreland. The variable crustal thickness of the Eastern Cordillera and Interandean zone ranges from >70 km associated with the Los Frailes volcanic field at 19°-20°S to ~55 km beneath the 6 km peaks of the Cordillera Real at ~16°S. From our S-wave receiver functions, that have no multiples that can interfere with deeper structure, we also identify structures below the Moho. Along a SW-NE line that runs near La Paz where we have our highest station density, the S-wave CCP receiver-function stacks show a strong negative polarity arrival at a depth of ~120 km from the eastern edge of the Altiplano to the Subandean zone. We suggest this may be a good candidate for the base of the CAP lithosphere. In addition, above this depth the mantle is strongly layered, suggesting that there is not a simple high velocity mantle lithosphere associated with the continental lithosphere underthrusting the Andean orogen

  3. Charge transport in the normal metal/diffusive ferromagnet/ s-wave superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Takehito; Tanaka, Yukio; Golubov, Alexander; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Asano, Yasuhiro

    2005-11-01

    Charge transport in the normal metal/insulator/diffusive ferromagnet/insulator/ s-wave superconductor (N/I/DF/I/S) junctions is studied for various situations solving the Usadel equation under the Nazarov's generalized boundary condition. Conductance of the junction is calculated by changing the magnitude of the resistance in DF, Thouless energy in DF, the exchange field in DF, the transparencies of the insulating barriers. We have found a new broad peak around zero voltage as well as zero bias conductance peak splitting and dip splitting.

  4. S-wave K- pi+ system in D+ ---> K- pi+ pi+ decays from Fermilab E791

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, B.T.; /Cincinnati U.

    2005-06-01

    A new approach to the analysis of three body decays is presented. Model-independent results are obtained for the S-wave K{pi} amplitude as a function of K{pi} invariant mass. These are compared with results from K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} elastic scattering, and the prediction of the Watson theorem, that the phase behavior be the same below K{eta}' threshold, is tested. Contributions from I = 1/2 and I = 3/2 are not resolved in this study. If I = 1/2 dominates, however, the Watson theorem does not describe these data well.

  5. Charge symmetry breaking effect for 3H and 3He within s-wave approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filikhin, I.; Suslov, V. M.; Vlahovic, B.

    2016-06-01

    Three-nucleon systems are considered assuming the neutrons and protons to be distinguishable particles. The configuration space Faddeev equations are exploited to calculate ground state energies of 3H and 3He nuclei within an s-wave approach applying the Malfliet-Tjon, Tamagaki G3RS and Afnan-Tang ATS3 NN potentials. We modify the potentials by scaling strength parameters to define nn, pp and np singlet components. The scaling parameters are fixed to reproduce experimental scattering lengths. The charge symmetry breaking energy is numerically evaluated. The relation between nn, pp and np singlet potentials is discussed.

  6. Synthetic p-wave interaction and topological superfluids in s-wave quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Han; Wang, Bin; Zheng, Zhen; Zou, Xubo; Guo, Guangcan

    2016-05-01

    P-wave interaction in cold atoms may give rise to exotic topological superfluids. However, realization of p-wave interaction in cold atom system is experimentally challenging. Here we propose a simple scheme to synthesize effective p-wave interaction in conventional s-wave interacting quantum gases. The key idea is to load atoms into spin-dependent optical lattice potential. Using two concrete examples involving spin-1/2 fermions, we show how the original system can be mapped into a model describing spinless fermions with nearest neighbor p-wave interaction, whose ground state can be a topological superfluid that supports Majorana fermions under proper conditions. Our proposal has the advantage that it does not require spin-orbit coupling or loading atoms onto higher orbitals, which is the key in earlier proposals to synthesize effective p-wave interaction in s-wave quantum gases, and may provide a completely new route for realizing p-wave topological superfluids.

  7. S-wave velocity, basalt chemistry and bathymetry along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Shen; Tanimoto, Toshiro; Stolper, Edward M.

    1994-07-01

    Major element chemistry of mid-ocean ridge basalt, S-wave velocity and bathymetry along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge are correlated on an intermediate length scale, and the large anomalies in these observations are associated with hotspot locations. The best correlations are for at depths of 100-200 km, and there is no correlation for depths of 300 km or deeper. S-Wave velocities are low directly under the Mid-Atlantic Ridge above 100 km, but the low-velocity regions shift away from the ridge at greater depth, and a sinuous strip of asthenospheric low velocity extends along the Atlantic hotspots from the Azores to Tristan da Cunha. These features suggest that common physical processes in the upper mantle produce these anomalies. An inspection of the history of the Atlantic Ocean suggests that the asthenospheric low-velocity strip may record earlier ridge position or possible upwelling in the mantle. Possible interaction between hotspots and the ridge blurs the distinction between passive and active upwellings.

  8. Tomographic Imaging of Upper Mantle P- and S-wave Velocity Heterogeneity Beneath the Arabian Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y; Nyblade, A; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2005-08-30

    We report the estimates of three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity structure beneath the Arabian Peninsula estimated from travel time delay tomography. We have completed travel time measurements and inversion of a partial data set provided by King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). This study builds on previous work by Benoit et al. (2003) following the methods of VanDecar and Crosson (1990) and VanDecar (1991). Data were collected from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network (SANDSN) operated by KACST. The network consists of 38 stations (27 broadband and 11 short-period). We augmented the KACST data with delay times measured from permanent Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) stations in the region (RAYN, EIL and MRNI) and the 1996 Saudi Arabian PASSCAL Experiment. This study shows the inverted P- and S-wave models computed with the combined data with all three different seismic networks (KASCST, IRIS, and the 1996 Saudi Arabian PASSCAL experiment) with best coverage beneath the Arabian Shield. Tomographic images reveal low velocity features in the upper mantle along a north-south line from the southern Asir region to the northeastern portion of the Arabian Shield.

  9. Three-dimensional distribution of S wave reflectors in the northern Kinki district, southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Sho; Iio, Yoshihisa; Katao, Hiroshi; Miura, Tsutomu; Yoneda, Itaru; Sawada, Masayo

    2016-06-01

    Distinct reflected waves (S × S) are observed in the northern Kinki district, southwestern Japan. We conducted a high-resolution reflection analysis by using data from 128 seismic stations with an average spacing of about 5 km. We used a stacking method to obtain three-dimensional distributions of relative reflection strengths of S waves and found a thin planar zone of high reflection strengths at depths of 25-30 km, which we call a S wave reflector. We also found that the zone of high reflection strengths is dipping to the north and that low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) occurred near the edge of the zone at depths around the Moho discontinuity. It is inferred from these results that fluid is concentrated in this zone of high reflection strengths. It is likely that the zone of high reflection strengths is a path of fluid upwelling from the mantle, together with the hypocentral region of LFEs, that is located near the lower edge of the zone. The northern Kinki district is thought to be part of the Niigata-Kobe Tectonic Zone (NKTZ) high strain rates region. The high reflection strengths zone may be associated with high strain rates in the NKTZ.

  10. Three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity structure along the central Alpine Fault, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Thurber, C. H.; Roecker, S. W.; Townend, J.; Rawles, C.; Chamberlain, C. J.; Boese, C. M.; Bannister, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) on the central Alpine Fault, South Island, New Zealand, has motivated a broad range of geophysical and geological studies aiming to characterize the fault system in the locality of the drill site at various scales. We have been developing three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity models of the region by double-difference tomography utilizing datasets from multiple seismic networks (WIZARD, SAMBA, ALFA, GeoNet, and others). In our previous work, the quality of the S-wave model has been poor due to the small number of available S-wave picks. We have utilized a new high-accuracy automatic S-wave picker to increase the number of usable S arrivals by an order of magnitude, thereby dramatically improving the S-wave velocity model. Compared to previous studies, e.g. Eberhart-Phillips and Bannister (2002) and Feenstra et al (2013), our updated P-wave model shows a clear high Vp body (Vp > 6km/s) at depths of 5-15 km near the drill site. With our better resolved S-wave velocity model, we can see a sharp high Vs body (Vs > 3.7 km/s) in the same region. The newly added S-picks help to improve the accuracy of the relocations of the earthquakes . This in turn has highlighted the presence of earthquake swarms within the low velocity zone. Together with the updated earthquake relocations, the P- and S-wave tomography results reveal the Alpine Fault to be marked by a velocity contrast throughout most of the study region. The fault dips steeply from 5 to 20 km depth with an average dip of 50-60° SE, as inferred from the velocity structure and the seismicity.

  11. Fault zone exploration in a geothermal context using P- and S-wave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawerzinek, Britta; Buness, Hermann; Musmann, Patrick; Tanner, David C.; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Thomas, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the collaborative research programme gebo ('Geothermal Energy and High Performance Drilling') we applied seismic P- and S-wave measurements to analyse and characterise fault zones. Fault zones have a high potential for geothermal energy extraction, but their usability depends on complex factors (structure, lithology, tectonics), underlining the need for detailed fault zone exploration and the deeper understanding of the factors' interplay. In this study, we carried out both P- and S-wave reflection seismic surveys parallel and perpendicular to the eastern border of the Leinetal Graben, Lower Saxony, to explore the fault system. The seismic data reveal a high-resolution image of the complex graben structure which comprises both steeply-dipping normal faults and shallowly west-dipping normal faults, which cause a roll-over structure. In addition halokinesis is observed. The structural image of the graben structure indicates independent tectonic development of the uppermost (<500 m) and deeper (>500 m) depth levels. One of the shallowly west-dipping normal faults is traceable from the surface down to 500 m depth. To further investigate this fault zone which shows different reflection characteristics of P- and S-waves, a petrophysical analysis was conducted, including elastic parameter derivation and seismic modelling. Elastic parameters change strongly in the near-surface area, e.g., vs increases from 300 m/s at the surface to 900 m/s at 100 m depth, leading to a decrease in vp/vs from 6 to approx. 2.5. Changes in elastic parameters correlate with the geological interpretation and are in correspondence to literature values for the given lithologies. However, the fault zone itself shows no significant changes in elastic parameters due to the low resolution of the derived seismic velocities. Seismic modelling is a helpful tool to check elastic parameters which are assigned to the fault zone in the model. A comparison between synthetic and field data

  12. Feshbach enhanced s-wave scattering of fermions: direct observation with optimized absorption imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkina, D.; Aycock, L. M.; Stuhl, B. K.; Lu, H.-I.; Williams, R. A.; Spielman, I. B.

    2016-01-01

    We directly measured the normalized s-wave scattering cross-section of ultracold 40K atoms across a magnetic-field Feshbach resonance by colliding pairs of degenerate Fermi gases (DFGs) and imaging the scattered atoms. We extracted the scattered fraction for a range of bias magnetic fields, and measured the resonance location to be B 0 = 20.206(15) mT with width Δ = 1.0(5) mT. To optimize the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of atom number in scattering images, we developed techniques to interpret absorption images in a regime where recoil induced detuning corrections are significant. These imaging techniques are generally applicable to experiments with lighter alkalis that would benefit from maximizing SNR on atom number counting at the expense of spatial imaging resolution.

  13. Feshbach enhanced s-wave scattering of fermions: direct observation with optimized absorption imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkina, Dina; Aycock, Lauren; Stuhl, Benjamin; Lu, Hsin-I.; Williams, Ross; Spielman, Ian

    2016-05-01

    We directly measured the normalized s-wave scattering cross-section of ultracold 40 K atoms across a magnetic-field Feshbach resonance by colliding pairs of degenerate Fermi gases (DFGs) and imaging the scattered atoms. We extracted the scattered fraction for a range of bias magnetic fields, and measured the resonance location to be B 0 = 20.206(15) mT with width Δ = 1.0(5) mT. To optimize the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of atom number in scattering images, we developed techniques to interpret absorption images in a regime where recoil induced detuning corrections are significant. These imaging techniques are generally applicable to experiments with lighter alkalis that would benefit from maximizing SNR on atom number counting at the expense of spatial imaging resolution.

  14. s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen off atomic alkali-metal targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Ghosh, A. S.

    2006-03-15

    We have investigated the s-wave elastic scattering of antihydrogen atoms off atomic alkali-metal targets (Li, Na, K, and Rb) at thermal energies (10{sup -16}-10{sup -4} a.u.) using an atomic orbital expansion technique. The elastic cross sections of these systems at thermal energies are found to be very high compared to H-H and H-He systems. The theoretical models employed in this study are so chosen to consider long-range forces dynamically in the calculation. The mechanism of cooling suggests that Li may be considered to be a good candidate as a buffer gas for enhanced cooling of antihydrogen atoms to ultracold temperature.

  15. Energy space entanglement spectrum of pairing models with s-wave and p-wave symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Laguna, Javier; Berganza, Miguel Ibáñez; Sierra, Germán

    2014-07-01

    We study the entanglement between blocks of energy levels in 1D models for s-wave and p-wave superconductivity. The ground state entanglement entropy and entanglement spectrum (ES) of a block of ℓ levels around the Fermi point is obtained and related to its physical properties. In the superconducting phase at large coupling, the maximal entropy grows with the number of levels L as 1/2ln(L). The number of levels presenting maximal entanglement is shown to estimate the number of Cooper pairs involved in pairing correlations. Moreover, the properties of the ES signal the presence of the Read-Green quantum phase transition in the p +ip model, and of the Moore-Read line, which is difficult to characterize. This work establishes a link between physical properties of superconducting phases and quantum entanglement.

  16. Optimized {gamma}-Multiplicity Based Spin Assignments of s-Wave Neutron Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Becvar, F.; Koehler, Paul Edward; Krticka, Milan; Mitchell, G. E.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    The multiplicity of -ray emission following neutron capture at isolated resonances carries valuable information on the resonance spin. Several methods utilizing this information have been developed. The latest method was recently introduced for analyzing the data from time-of-flight measurements with 4 -calorimetric detection systems. The present paper describes a generalization of this method. The goal is the separation of the -emission yields belonging to the two neutron capturing state spins of isolated (or even unresolved) s-wave neutron resonances on targets with non-zero spin. The formalism for performing this separation is described and then tested on artificially generated data. This new method was applied to the -multiplicity data obtained for the 147Sm(n, )148Sm reaction using the DANCE detector system at the LANSCE facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The analyzing power of the upgraded method is supported by combined dicebox and geant4 simulations of the fluctuation properties of the multiplicity distributions.

  17. Detection of gas and water using HHT by analyzing P- and S-wave attenuation in tight sandstone gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ya-juan; Cao, Jun-xing; Wang, Da-xing; Tian, Ren-fei; Shu, Ya-xiang

    2013-11-01

    A direct detection of hydrocarbons is used by connecting increased attenuation of seismic waves with oil and gas fields. This study analyzes the seismic attenuation of P- and S-waves in one tight sandstone gas reservoir and attempts to give the quantitative distinguishing results of gas and water by the characteristics of the seismic attenuation of P- and S-waves. The Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) is used to better measure attenuation associated with gas saturation. A formation absorption section is defined to compute the values of attenuation using the common frequency sections obtained by the HHT method. Values of attenuation have been extracted from three seismic sections intersecting three different wells: one gas-saturated well, one fully water-saturated well, and one gas- and water- saturated well. For the seismic data from the Sulige gas field located in northwest Ordos Basin, China, we observed that in the gas-saturated media the S-wave attenuation was very low and much lower than the P-wave attenuation. In the fully water-saturated media the S-wave attenuation was higher than the P-wave attenuation. We suggest that the joint application of P- and S-wave attenuation can improve the direct detection between gas and water in seismic sections. This study is hoped to be useful in seismic exploration as an aid for distinguishing gas and water from gas- and water-bearing formations.

  18. Automatic and accurate measurements of P-wave and S-wave polarisation properties with a weighted multi-station complex polarisation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Meersman, K.; van der Baan, M.; Kendall, J.-M.; Jones, R. H.

    2003-04-01

    We present a weighted multi-station complex polarisation analysis to determine P-wave and S-wave polarisation properties of three-component seismic array data. Complex polarisation analysis of particle motion on seismic data was first introduced by Vidale (1986). In its original form, the method is an interpretation of the eigenvalue decomposition of a 3 by 3, complex data-covariance matrix. We have extended the definition of the data-covariance matrix (C) to C=X^HW-1 X, where C now is a 3n by 3n symmetric complex covariance matrix, with n the number of included three-component (3C) stations. X is the data matrix, the columns of which are the analytic signals of the Northern, Eastern and vertical components of the subsequent 3C stations. X^H is the transpose of the complex conjugate of X and W is a diagonal weighting matrix containing the pre-arrival noise levels of all components and all stations. The signals used in the data-matrix are corrected for arrival time differences. The eigenvectors and eigenvalues of C now describe the polarisation properties within the selected analysis window for all included stations. The main advantages of this approach are a better separation of signal and noise in the covariance matrix and the measurement of signal polarisation properties that are not influenced by the presence of polarised white noise. The technique was incorporated in an automated routine to measure the P-wave and S-wave polarisation properties of a microseismic data-set. The data were recorded in the Valhall oilfield in 1998 with a six level 3C vertical linear array with geophones at 20 m intervals between depths of 2100 m and 2200 m. In total 303 microseismic events were analysed and the results compared with manual interpretations. This comparison showed the advantage and high accuracy of the method.

  19. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  20. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  1. Analytical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flannelly, W. G.; Fabunmi, J. A.; Nagy, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical methods for combining flight acceleration and strain data with shake test mobility data to predict the effects of structural changes on flight vibrations and strains are presented. This integration of structural dynamic analysis with flight performance is referred to as analytical testing. The objective of this methodology is to analytically estimate the results of flight testing contemplated structural changes with minimum flying and change trials. The category of changes to the aircraft includes mass, stiffness, absorbers, isolators, and active suppressors. Examples of applying the analytical testing methodology using flight test and shake test data measured on an AH-1G helicopter are included. The techniques and procedures for vibration testing and modal analysis are also described.

  2. Symmetry reduction and boundary modes for Fe chains on an s-wave superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Qin; Wu, Yi-Ming; Liu, Xiong-Jun

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the superconducting phases and boundary modes for a quasi-1D system formed by up to three Fe chains on an s-wave superconductor, motivated by a recent experiment. While the Rashba type spin-orbit coupling together with a magnetic ordering is necessary to drive the system to be of nontrivial topology, we show that the onsite l\\centerdot s spin-orbit term, inter-chain diagonal hopping couplings, and magnetic disorders in the Fe chains are crucial in determining the symmetry classes of superconducting phases, which can be topologically trivial or nontrivial in different parameter regimes. In general multiple low-energy Andreev bound states, as well as a single Majorana zero mode if the phase is topological, are obtained in the ends of Fe chains. The nontrivial symmetry reduction mechanism is uncovered to provide an understanding of the present results, and may explain the zero-bias peak observed in the experiment. The present study can be applied to generic multiple-chain system.

  3. Thorium s-wave neutron widths from 21 to 2006 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.; Ingle, R.W.; Portney, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    A /sup 232/Th total cross section measurement in the resolved resonance region has been requested with a 2% accuracy in order to obtain resonance parameters with a 5% accuracy. These data are required for both fast and light-water breeder reactor studies. Inspection of the prior /sup 232/Th differential data base shows several problems: the thermal cross sections seem inconsistent; the measured capture widths have large uncertanties; the two rather complete sets of measured neutron widths are systematically discrepant; and the differential data appear to give Cd capture ratios and shielded-capture resonance integrals smaller than those required by integral measurements. In order to improve the differential data base we have measured neutron transmission spectra through eight samples of /sup 232/Th. Resonance parameters have been obtained from these data using the computer code S10B. Fits to these data up to 440 eV, which concentrated on the capture widths, have been previously reported. The results of extending these fits to 2.0 keV are reported and discussed in terms of the s-wave strength function and the dilute-capture resonance integral. (WHK)

  4. Optimized γ-multiplicity-based spin assignments of s-wave neutron resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bečvář, F.; Koehler, P. E.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2011-08-01

    The multiplicity of γ-ray emission following neutron capture at isolated resonances carries valuable information on the resonance spin. Several methods utilizing this information have been developed. The latest method was recently introduced for analyzing the data from time-of-flight measurements with 4πγ-calorimetric detection systems. The present paper describes a generalization of this method. The goal is the separation of the γ-emission yields belonging to the two neutron capturing state spins of isolated (or even unresolved) s-wave neutron resonances on targets with non-zero spin. The formalism for performing this separation is described and then tested on artificially generated data. This new method was applied to the γ-multiplicity data obtained for the Sm147(n,γ)Sm148 reaction using the DANCE detector system at the LANSCE facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The analyzing power of the upgraded method is supported by combined DICEBOX and GEANT4 simulations of the fluctuation properties of the γ-multiplicity distributions.

  5. An Evolutionary S-wave Model of the Earth Upper Mantle and Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debayle, E.; Dubuffet, F.; Durand, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present 3D2015_03Sv, an evolutionary S-wave model of the upper mantle. At the time of submitting this abstract, the model is based on the waveform modeling of most Rayleigh waves recorded between 1976 and March 2015, and includes 1,330,210 fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waveforms analyzed at periods between 40 and 400 s. The use of approximate forward theory and modeling allows updating the model with new data on a regular basis, a few days after the publication of the monthly centroid moment tensor (CMT) catalog issued at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. 3D2015_03Sv contains azimuthal anisotropy and achieves a lateral resolution of ~600 km in the upper mantle. Comparison with other seismic models shows that in the uppermost 200 km, the use of massive datasets with large redundancies allows to average errors, so that it is possible to build models that are consistent up to degree 60. In the transition zone, the number of data decreases and the effect of modeling choices is important. The most recent seismic models agree up to degree 15, which represents an improvement compared to the previous generation of models.

  6. Symmetry reduction and boundary modes for Fe chains on an s-wave superconductor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Qin; Wu, Yi-Ming; Liu, Xiong-Jun

    2016-11-30

    We investigate the superconducting phases and boundary modes for a quasi-1D system formed by up to three Fe chains on an s-wave superconductor, motivated by a recent experiment. While the Rashba type spin-orbit coupling together with a magnetic ordering is necessary to drive the system to be of nontrivial topology, we show that the onsite [Formula: see text] spin-orbit term, inter-chain diagonal hopping couplings, and magnetic disorders in the Fe chains are crucial in determining the symmetry classes of superconducting phases, which can be topologically trivial or nontrivial in different parameter regimes. In general multiple low-energy Andreev bound states, as well as a single Majorana zero mode if the phase is topological, are obtained in the ends of Fe chains. The nontrivial symmetry reduction mechanism is uncovered to provide an understanding of the present results, and may explain the zero-bias peak observed in the experiment. The present study can be applied to generic multiple-chain system. PMID:27633482

  7. Y (4260 ) as the first S -wave open charm vector molecular state?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleven, Martin; Wang, Qian; Guo, Feng-Kun; Hanhart, Christoph; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Zhao, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    Since its first observation in 2005, the vector charmonium Y (4260 ) has turned out to be one of the prime candidates for an exotic state in the charmonium spectrum. It was recently proposed that the Y (4260 ) should have a prominent D1D ¯ +c .c . molecular component that is strongly correlated with the production of the charged Zc(3900 ) . In this paper we demonstrate that the nontrivial cross section line shapes of e+e-→J /ψ π π and hcπ π can be naturally explained by the molecular scenario. As a consequence we find a significantly smaller mass for the Y (4260 ) than previously studied. In the e+e-→D ¯ D*π +c .c . process, with the inclusion of an additional S -wave D¯ *π contribution constrained from data on the D D¯ * invariant mass distribution, we obtain a good agreement with the data of the angular distributions. We also predict an unusual line shape of Y (4260 ) in this channel that may serve as a smoking gun for a predominantly molecular nature of Y (4260 ) . Improved measurements of these observables are therefore crucial for a better understanding of the structure of this famous resonance.

  8. Robust sky light polarization detection with an S-wave plate in a light field camera.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Cao, Yu; Liu, Haibo; Liu, Zejin

    2016-05-01

    The sky light polarization navigator has many advantages, such as low cost, no decrease in accuracy with continuous operation, etc. However, current celestial polarization measurement methods often suffer from low performance when the sky is covered by clouds, which reduce the accuracy of navigation. In this paper we introduce a new method and structure based on a handheld light field camera and a radial polarizer, composed of an S-wave plate and a linear polarizer, to detect the sky light polarization pattern across a wide field of view in a single snapshot. Each micro-subimage has a special intensity distribution. After extracting the texture feature of these subimages, stable distribution information of the angle of polarization under a cloudy sky can be obtained. Our experimental results match well with the predicted properties of the theory. Because the polarization pattern is obtained through image processing, rather than traditional methods based on mathematical computation, this method is less sensitive to errors of pixel gray value and thus has better anti-interference performance.

  9. The I=2 ππ S-wave Scattering Phase Shift from Lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Beane, S. R.; Chang, E.; Detmold, W.; Lin, H. W.; Luu, T. C.; Orginos, K.; Parreno, A.; Savage, M. J.; Torok, A.; Walker-Loud, A.

    2012-02-16

    The π+π+ s-wave scattering phase-shift is determined below the inelastic threshold using Lattice QCD. Calculations were performed at a pion mass of mπ ≈ 390 MeV with an anisotropic nf = 2+1 clover fermion discretization in four lattice volumes, with spatial extent L ≈ 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 3.9 fm, and with a lattice spacing of bs ≈ 0.123 fm in the spatial direction and bt bs/3.5 in the time direction. The phase-shift is determined from the energy-eigenvalues of π+π+ systems with both zero and non-zero total momentum in the lattice volume using Luscher's method. Our calculations are precise enoughmore » to allow for a determination of the threshold scattering parameters, the scattering length a, the effective range r, and the shape-parameter P, in this channel and to examine the prediction of two-flavor chiral perturbation theory: mπ2 a r = 3+O(mπ2/Λχ2). Chiral perturbation theory is used, with the Lattice QCD results as input, to predict the scattering phase-shift (and threshold parameters) at the physical pion mass. Our results are consistent with determinations from the Roy equations and with the existing experimental phase shift data.« less

  10. Symmetry reduction and boundary modes for Fe chains on an s-wave superconductor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Qin; Wu, Yi-Ming; Liu, Xiong-Jun

    2016-11-30

    We investigate the superconducting phases and boundary modes for a quasi-1D system formed by up to three Fe chains on an s-wave superconductor, motivated by a recent experiment. While the Rashba type spin-orbit coupling together with a magnetic ordering is necessary to drive the system to be of nontrivial topology, we show that the onsite [Formula: see text] spin-orbit term, inter-chain diagonal hopping couplings, and magnetic disorders in the Fe chains are crucial in determining the symmetry classes of superconducting phases, which can be topologically trivial or nontrivial in different parameter regimes. In general multiple low-energy Andreev bound states, as well as a single Majorana zero mode if the phase is topological, are obtained in the ends of Fe chains. The nontrivial symmetry reduction mechanism is uncovered to provide an understanding of the present results, and may explain the zero-bias peak observed in the experiment. The present study can be applied to generic multiple-chain system.

  11. Form factors and the s-wave component of the two-pion-exchange three-nucleon potential

    SciTech Connect

    Robilotta, M.R.; Isidro Filho, M.P.; Coelho, H.T.; Das, T.K.

    1985-02-01

    We argue that the straightforward introduction of ..pi..N form factors into the s-wave component of the two-pion-exchange three-nucleon potential based on chiral symmetry is not free of problems. These can be avoided by means of a redefinition of the potential which considers its physical content.

  12. Numerical solution of the time dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations for mixed (d + s)-wave superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gonçalves, W. C.; Sardella, E.; Becerra, V. F.; Milošević, M. V.; Peeters, F. M.

    2014-04-15

    The time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau formalism for (d + s)-wave superconductors and their representation using auxiliary fields is investigated. By using the link variable method, we then develop suitable discretization of these equations. Numerical simulations are carried out for a mesoscopic superconductor in a homogeneous perpendicular magnetic field which revealed peculiar vortex states.

  13. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume IV S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (IV), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. S-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1300 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Shear (S) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition, a second average shear wave record was recorded by reversing the polarity of the motion of the T-Rex base plate. In this sense, all the signals recorded in the field were averaged signals. In all cases, the base plate was moving perpendicular to a radial line between the base plate and the borehole which is in and out of the plane of the figure shown in Figure 1.1. The definition of “in-line”, “cross-line”, “forward”, and “reversed” directions in items 2 and 3 of Section 2 was based on the moving direction of the base plate. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas (UT) was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. The Redpath geophone and the UT geophone were properly aligned so that one of the horizontal components in each geophone was aligned with the direction of horizontal shaking of the T-Rex base plate. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows. Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vs Profile at Borehole C4993

  14. Significantly Improving Regional Seismic Amplitude Tomography at Higher Frequencies by Determining S -Wave Bandwidth

    DOE PAGES

    Fisk, Mark D.; Pasyanos, Michael E.

    2016-05-03

    Characterizing regional seismic signals continues to be a difficult problem due to their variability. Calibration of these signals is very important to many aspects of monitoring underground nuclear explosions, including detecting seismic signals, discriminating explosions from earthquakes, and reliably estimating magnitude and yield. Amplitude tomography, which simultaneously inverts for source, propagation, and site effects, is a leading method of calibrating these signals. A major issue in amplitude tomography is the data quality of the input amplitude measurements. Pre-event and prephase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) tests are typically used but can frequently include bad signals and exclude good signals. The deficiencies ofmore » SNR criteria, which are demonstrated here, lead to large calibration errors. To ameliorate these issues, we introduce a semi-automated approach to assess the bandwidth of a spectrum where it behaves physically. We determine the maximum frequency (denoted as Fmax) where it deviates from this behavior due to inflections at which noise or spurious signals start to bias the spectra away from the expected decay. We compare two amplitude tomography runs using the SNR and new Fmax criteria and show significant improvements to the stability and accuracy of the tomography output for frequency bands higher than 2 Hz by using our assessments of valid S-wave bandwidth. We compare Q estimates, P/S residuals, and some detailed results to explain the improvements. Lastly, for frequency bands higher than 4 Hz, needed for effective P/S discrimination of explosions from earthquakes, the new bandwidth criteria sufficiently fix the instabilities and errors so that the residuals and calibration terms are useful for application.« less

  15. Interpretation of S waves generated by near-surface chemical explosions at SAFOD

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, Fred F.; Ellsworth, William L.; Rubinstein, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    A series of near-surface chemical explosions conducted at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) were recorded by high-frequency downhole receiver arrays in separate experiments in November 2003 and May 2005. The 2003 experiment involved ∼100  kg shots detonated along a 46-km-long line (Hole–Ryberg line) centered on SAFOD and recorded by 32 three-component geophones in the pilot hole between 0.8 and 2.0 km depth. The 2005 experiment involved ∼36  kg shots detonated at Parkfield Area Seismic Observatory (PASO) stations (at ∼1–8  km offset) recorded by 80 three-component geophones in the main hole between the surface and 2.4 km depth. These data sample the downgoing seismic wavefield and constrain the shallow velocity and attenuation structure, as well as the first-order characteristics of the source. Using forward modeling on a velocity structure designed for the near field, both observed P- and S-wave energy for the PASO shots are identified with the travel times expected for direct and/or reflected phases. Larger-offset recordings from shots along the Hole–Ryberg line reveal substantial SV and SH energy, especially southwest of SAFOD from the source as indicated by P-to-S amplitude ratios. The generated SV energy is interpreted to arise chiefly from P-to-S conversions at subhorizontal discontinuities. This provides a simple mechanism for often-observed low P-to-S amplitude ratios from nuclear explosions in the far field, as originating from strong near-field wave conversions.

  16. Quantum quench phase diagrams of an s -wave BCS-BEC condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuzbashyan, E. A.; Dzero, M.; Gurarie, V.; Foster, M. S.

    2015-03-01

    We study the dynamic response of an s -wave BCS-BEC (atomic-molecular) condensate to detuning quenches within the two-channel model beyond the weak-coupling BCS limit. At long times after the quench, the condensate ends up in one of three main asymptotic states (nonequilibrium phases), which are qualitatively similar to those in other fermionic condensates defined by a global complex order parameter. In phase I the amplitude of the order parameter vanishes as a power law, in phase II it goes to a nonzero constant, and in phase III it oscillates persistently. We construct exact quench phase diagrams that predict the asymptotic state (including the many-body wave function) depending on the initial and final detunings and on the Feshbach resonance width. Outside of the weak-coupling regime, both the mechanism and the time dependence of the relaxation of the amplitude of the order parameter in phases I and II are modified. Also, quenches from arbitrarily weak initial to sufficiently strong final coupling do not produce persistent oscillations in contrast to the behavior in the BCS regime. The most remarkable feature of coherent condensate dynamics in various fermion superfluids is an effective reduction in the number of dynamic degrees of freedom as the evolution time goes to infinity. As a result, the long-time dynamics can be fully described in terms of just a few new collective dynamical variables governed by the same Hamiltonian only with "renormalized" parameters. Combining this feature with the integrability of the underlying (e.g., the two-channel) model, we develop and consistently present a general method that explicitly obtains the exact asymptotic state of the system.

  17. A 3D S-wave model of the Valhall subsurface from ambient seismic noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, A.; Landes, M.; Shapiro, N.; Singh, S. C.; Roux, P.

    2013-12-01

    We present a depth inversion of Scholte wave group and phase velocity maps obtained from cross-correlation of 6.5 hours of noise data from the Valhall Life of Field Seismic (LoFS) network. We computed 2 690 040 vertical-vertical component cross-correlations from the 2320 available sensors, turning each sensor into a virtual source emitting Scholte waves. We used a traditional straight-ray surface-wave tomography to compute the group velocity map. The phase velocity maps have been computed using the Eikonal tomography method. For every virtual source, we measured the Scholte wave phase travel times to all other stations and interpolated them on a regular grid. This phase travel-time surface is inverted into phase velocity map via applying the eikonal equation. The contributions from all 2320 virtual sources are stacked to create the final phase velocity map of the Valhall subsurface. Scholte wave isotropic phase velocity maps at periods between 0.65 s and 1.6 s show a coherent geomorphological pattern dominated by paleo-channels in the shallower part. We also retrieved the azimuthal anisotropy and its lateral variations showing a characteristic elliptical pattern around the central exploitation platform. The inversion of these maps in depth using the Neighbourhood Algorithm allowed us to create a high resolution 3D S-wave model of the first 600 m of the Valhall subsurface and to precise the locations of geological structures at depth. These results would have important implication for shear wave statics and monitoring of sea-floor subsidence due to oil extraction. The 3D model could also be a good candidate for a starting model used in full-waveform inversions.

  18. Subduction Dynamics in Northwestern South America from SKS and Local S-wave Splitting Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idarraga Garcia, J.; Kendall, J. M.; Vargas Jiménez, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    In order to investigate subduction dynamics between the South America continent and the oceanic Nazca and Caribbean plates, we have obtained 257 high-quality splitting measurements from teleseismic SKS phases and 85 splitting results from slab-related local Sphases arriving at 38 seismic stations in northwestern South America. We used data primarily from the Colombia National Seismological Network. Our first observation is that delay times obtained from SKS splitting (mean value of 1.15 s) are consistently greater than those from the local S splitting (mean value of 0.31 s). This implies that most of the SKSsplitting is due to upper mantle anisotropy beneath or within the subducting slabs. In contrast, the polarizations of local S-waves are consistently aligned with crustal-scale fault systems, which implies that the anisotropy above the slabs is dominated by tectonic features in the overriding crust or lithosphere, and that the mantle wedge is not contributing significantly to the measured splitting. We identify a clear change in SKS fast directions at the trace of the so-called Caldas Tear (~5°N), which represents a boundary in the style of subduction. To the north of Caldas Tear fast directions are consistently parallel to the direction of convergence of the Caribbean plate and Panama arc with South America. Our results support the idea of Caribbean subduction beneath northwestern Colombia, a hotly debated topic in recent years. Fast directions south of the Caldas tear are subparallel to the direction of Nazca-South America convergence. Entrained mantle flow and deformation beneath the subducting Nazca and Caribbean plates are the main cause of the measured SKS splitting. Further inland, the SKS splitting is consistent with mantle flow parallel to the trend of the Eastern Cordillera. We speculate that a change in slab dip may lead to a change in mantle flow and may be responsible for the intermediate-depth nests of seismicity observed beneath Eastern Cordillera.

  19. Landslide characterization using P- and S-wave seismic refraction tomography - The importance of elastic moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, S.; Hagedorn, S.; Dashwood, B.; Maurer, H.; Gunn, D.; Dijkstra, T.; Chambers, J.

    2016-11-01

    In the broad spectrum of natural hazards, landslides in particular are capable of changing the landscape and causing significant human and economic losses. Detailed site investigations form an important component in the landslide risk mitigation and disaster risk reduction process. These investigations usually rely on surface observations, discrete sampling of the subsurface, and laboratory testing to examine properties that are deemed representative of entire slopes. Often this requires extensive interpolations and results in large uncertainties. To compliment and extend these approaches, we present a study from an active landslide in a Lias Group clay slope, North Yorkshire, UK, examining combined P- and S-wave seismic refraction tomography (SRT) as a means of providing subsurface volumetric imaging of geotechnical proxies. The distributions of seismic wave velocities determined from SRT at the study site indicated zones with higher porosity and fissure density that are interpreted to represent the extent and depth of mass movements and weathered bedrock zones. Distinguishing the lithological units was facilitated by deriving the Poisson's ratio from the SRT data as saturated clay and partially saturated sandy silts showed distinctively different Poisson's ratios. Shear and Young's moduli derived from the SRT data revealed the weak nature of the materials in active parts of the landslide (i.e. 25 kPa and 100 kPa respectively). The SRT results are consistent with intrusive (i.e. cone penetration tests), laboratory, and additional geoelectrical data from this site. This study shows that SRT forms a cost-effective method that can significantly reduce uncertainties in the conceptual ground model of geotechnical and hydrological conditions that govern landslide dynamics.

  20. The I=2 ππ S-wave Scattering Phase Shift from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S. R.; Chang, E.; Detmold, W.; Lin, H. W.; Luu, T. C.; Orginos, K.; Parreno, A.; Savage, M. J.; Torok, A.; Walker-Loud, A.

    2012-02-16

    The π+π+ s-wave scattering phase-shift is determined below the inelastic threshold using Lattice QCD. Calculations were performed at a pion mass of mπ ≈ 390 MeV with an anisotropic nf = 2+1 clover fermion discretization in four lattice volumes, with spatial extent L ≈ 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 3.9 fm, and with a lattice spacing of bs ≈ 0.123 fm in the spatial direction and bt bs/3.5 in the time direction. The phase-shift is determined from the energy-eigenvalues of π+π+ systems with both zero and non-zero total momentum in the lattice volume using Luscher's method. Our calculations are precise enough to allow for a determination of the threshold scattering parameters, the scattering length a, the effective range r, and the shape-parameter P, in this channel and to examine the prediction of two-flavor chiral perturbation theory: mπ2 a r = 3+O(mπ2χ2). Chiral perturbation theory is used, with the Lattice QCD results as input, to predict the scattering phase-shift (and threshold parameters) at the physical pion mass. Our results are consistent with determinations from the Roy equations and with the existing experimental phase shift data.

  1. P-wave and s-wave imaging from drill bit seismic data at SAFOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. T.; Miller, D.; Haldorsen, J. B.; Coates, R.; Malin, P.; Shalev, E.

    2005-12-01

    We have used the drill bit seismic technique to develop preliminary images of fracture and shear zones associated with the San Andreas Fault at the SAFOD site, Parkfield, California. Our study included the interpretation of the USGS PSINE surface seismic profile and the drill bit seismic data recorded by three different geophone arrays. Three-component geophones were used in two of the arrays, one of which consisted of a 1.2 km string of geophones in the SAFOD Pilot Hole. The multi-component data allowed us to use both p-wave and s-wave imaging techniques for delineating subsurface structure after updating the velocity models for the site. Our interpretation of the locations and dips of linear features imaged in the migrated drill bit seismic data correlates very well with locations and dips of faults in the PSINE profile. Using the available seismic datasets, we interpret numerous faults to cut the Cenozoic sedimentary cover, the Salinian block, and an apparent wedge of metasediments at the SAFOD site. Based on the structural pattern of downward converging faults and fracture zones, we interpret the fault system to comprise a flower structure that is directly related to the tectonic regime of the San Andreas Fault. The interpretation of a flower structure at SAFOD, which is located 1.8 km SW of the SAF, fits well with the surface geological mapping that has been conducted at the site. This mapping and our data indicates that a pervasive system of fractures and faults trend subparallel to the SAF in a zone up to 3 km SW of the main trace of the fault.

  2. Analytical Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Analytical Microscopy group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we combine two complementary areas of analytical microscopy--electron microscopy and proximal-probe techniques--and use a variety of state-of-the-art imaging and analytical tools. We also design and build custom instrumentation and develop novel techniques that provide unique capabilities for studying materials and devices. In our work, we collaborate with you to solve materials- and device-related R&D problems. This sheet summarizes the uses and features of four major tools: transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, the dual-beam focused-ion-beam workstation, and scanning probe microscopy.

  3. Analytical Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.

    2001-07-01

    Characterizing environmental samples has been exhaustively addressed in the literature for most analytes of environmental concern. One of the weak areas of environmental analytical chemistry is that of radionuclides and samples contaminated with radionuclides. The analysis of samples containing high levels of radionuclides can be far more complex than that of non-radioactive samples. This chapter addresses the analysis of samples with a wide range of radioactivity. The other areas of characterization examined in this chapter are the hazardous components of mixed waste, and special analytes often associated with radioactive materials. Characterizing mixed waste is often similar to characterizing waste components in non-radioactive materials. The largest differences are in associated safety precautions to minimize exposure to dangerous levels of radioactivity. One must attempt to keep radiological dose as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This chapter outlines recommended procedures to safely and accurately characterize regulated components of radioactive samples.

  4. Application of microtremor array measurements to delineate S-wave velocity structures in San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.; Underwood, D.

    2012-12-01

    Microtremor array measurements and three-component microtremor measurements have been performed at four sites in the South Bay of the San Francisco Bay Area (Figure 1). Two seismographs with three-component accelerometers were used for data acquisition. At each site, one seismograph was fixed in one place and data was acquired at that location for the entire survey. Data was acquired by a second seismograph at larger separations ranging from 5 to 4125m from the fixed seismograph. Data acquisition was repeated at each new separation. In each measurement, 10 to 60 minutes of ambient noise was recorded. As the separations of seismographs increased, the record length of ambient noise was increased. The sampling interval used was 10msec. Entire measurements at one site took several hours. Data acquisition was performed in the day-time and the seismographs were placed in relatively quiet places such as in parks or residential areas. A spatial autocorrelation was used for calculating phase velocity and clear dispersion curves were obtained in frequency range from 0.2 to 10 Hz. A joint inversion was applied to the observed dispersion curves, and H/V spectra, and S-wave velocity models were analyzed for four sites. In the inversion, phase velocities of the dispersion curves and the absolute value and peak frequencies of the H/V spectra were used as observation data. The unknown parameters were layer thickness and S-wave velocity. A Genetic Algorithm was used for optimization. Theoretical H/V spectra and phase velocities are generated by calculating the weighted average of the fundamental mode and higher modes (up to the 5th mode) based on medium response. Figure 2 shows comparison of S-wave velocity models obtained by the inversion. We can see that a low velocity layer with S-wave velocity lower than 400m/s exists between depths of 50 to 100m at all sites. Intermediate bedrock with S-wave velocity higher than 1000m/s exists between depths of 500 to 1000m. Deepest bedrock

  5. Vp/Vs ratio in the crust and upper mantle from P- and S-wave receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnik, Lev

    2015-04-01

    In the last years many estimates of crustal thickness are obtained with the H-k technique by Zhu and Kanamory (2000) for P-wave receiver functions (PRFs). This technique assumes that the P and S velocities (Vp and Vs) in the crust do not vary with depth. As the wave-paths of the crustal multiples contain P-wave and S-wave paths, their travel times depend on both Vp and Vs, and the Vp/Vs ratio can be retrieved from the PRFs. I review an alternative technique and summarize the experience of measuring the Vp/Vs ratio as a function of depth from PRFs and S-wave receiver functions (SRFs). Vp and Vs are allowed to vary only with depth. The Earth's medium is modeled by a stack of layers, and the receiver functions are inverted simultaneously for the P-wave and S-wave velocity profiles by using Simulated Annealing. Several thousands of the best-fitting models are retained in order to evaluate uncertainty (non-uniqueness) of the result. The procedure returns robust estimates of Vs and provides useful constraints on Vp and Vp/Vs ratio. There are a few reasons for a sensitivity of this method to Vp. First, the observed apparent incidence angles of the P and S waves depend on Vp and Vs. Second, the travel-times of all multiples in PRFs depend on Vp and Vs. Third, from PRFs we infer the teleseismic travel-time residuals of P and S, which depend on Vp and Vs and are used as constraints in the inversion. Finally, the travel times of the S410p phase in SRFs (S wave converted to P at the 410-km discontinuity) depend on the Vp/Vs ratio. I will discuss application of these techniques in the recent studies of a few regions: 1 - The Indian shield, Himalaya and Tibet, 2 - The Cape Verde hotspot, 3 - Iberia and the Gibraltaer Arc, (4) The Fennoscandian Shield. The obtained Vp/Vs ratio varies with depth between 1.6 and 1.9 in the upper mantle and between 1.6 and 3.0 in the crust. The lowest Vp/Vs ratio is observed in the depleted mantle keels of Precambrian cratons. The high values are

  6. Mantle seismic structure beneath the MELT region of the east pacific rise from P and S wave tomography

    PubMed

    Toomey; Wilcock; Solomon; Hammond; Orcutt

    1998-05-22

    Relative travel time delays of teleseismic P and S waves, recorded during the Mantle Electromagnetic and Tomography (MELT) Experiment, have been inverted tomographically for upper-mantle structure beneath the southern East Pacific Rise. A broad zone of low seismic velocities extends beneath the rise to depths of about 200 kilometers and is centered to the west of the spreading center. The magnitudes of the P and S wave anomalies require the presence of retained mantle melt; the melt fraction near the rise exceeds the fraction 300 kilometers off axis by as little as 1%. Seismic anisotropy, induced by mantle flow, is evident in the P wave delays at near-vertical incidence and is consistent with a half-width of mantle upwelling of about 100 km.

  7. Hadronic production of S-wave and P-wave charmed beauty mesons via heavy quark fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, K.; Yuan, Tzu Chiang

    1995-02-01

    At hadron colliders the dominant production mechanism of ({bar b}c) mesons with large transverse momentum is due to parton fragmentation. The authors compute in a model-independent way the production rates and transverse momentum spectra for S-wave and P-wave ({bar b}c) mesons at the Tevatron via the direct fragmentation of the bottom antiquark as well as the Altarelli-Parisi induced gluon fragmentation. Since all the radially and orbitally excited ({bar b}c) mesons below the BD flavor threshold will cascade into the pseudoscalar ground state B{sub c} through electromagnetic and/or hadronic transitions, they all contribute to the inclusive production of B{sub c}. The contributions of the excited S-wave and P-wave states to the inclusive production of B{sub c} are 58 and 23%, respectively, and hence significant.

  8. Observability of surface Andreev bound states in a topological insulator in proximity to an s-wave superconductor.

    PubMed

    Snelder, M; Golubov, A A; Asano, Y; Brinkman, A

    2015-08-12

    To guide experimental work on the search for Majorana zero-energy modes, we calculate the superconducting pairing symmetry of a three-dimensional topological insulator in combination with an s-wave superconductor. We show how the pairing symmetry changes across different topological regimes. We demonstrate that a dominant p-wave pairing relation is not sufficient to realise a Majorana zero-energy mode useful for quantum computation. Our main result is the relation between odd-frequency pairing and Majorana zero energy modes by using Green functions techniques in three-dimensional topological insulators in the so-called Majorana regime. We discuss thereafter how the pairing relations in the different regimes can be observed in the tunneling conductance of an s-wave proximised three-dimensional topological insulator. We discuss the necessity to incorporate a ferromagnetic insulator to localise the zero-energy bound state to the interface as a Majorana mode.

  9. Anomalously low amplitude of S waves produced by the 3D structures in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, Akiko; Capdeville, Yann; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    mostly overlaps with the northern part of the Pacific large low shear velocity province (LLSVP) revealed in tomographic models. Although the very low amplitudes observed at a distance of about 95° remain unexplained, our results indicate that the boundary of the Pacific LLSVP is sharp, and the amplitude of S waves at these large distances is lowered by strong vertical and/or lateral deflection at the boundary toward the interior of the low velocity province.

  10. S-wave Anisotropy and Crack Distribution at the Coso Geothermal Field, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahovic, G.; Elkibbi, M.; Rial, J. A.

    2001-05-01

    The Coso geothermal area is located along the eastern front of Sierra Nevada, in the southwestern Basin and Range Province. Seismic activity averaging more than 20 microearthquakes per day is the result of both regional tectonics and geothermal production activity [Malin, 1994]. Microseismicity is monitored by the Coso Digital Downhole Seismic Network (CDDSN) recording at 2 ms sampling rate. Continuous operation of the CDDSN since 1990 created a data set of exceptional richness and continuity. We used data accumulated from January 1999 through June 2000 for the study of S wave anisotropy and crack distribution. Understanding the faults and associated fracture system in Coso is fundamental for efficient long-term energy extraction and micro-tectonic models of the area. Strike of cracks in the shear-wave window of each station was determined by plotting rose diagrams of the fast shear-wave polarization directions. Each rose diagram has a clear dominant polarization direction, interpreted as the direction of the local fracture system. Three dominant strike groups were observed: 0 - 20 NE, 40 - 60 NE and 20 - 40 NW. These results are consistent with subsurface crack directions determined by Lou and Rial [1997], and with photographically and magnetically mapped alignments on the surface [Moore and Erskine, 1990], as well as with deep borehole observations. Four stations centered in the geothermal production area were selected for detailed study of variation of arrival time delays between fast and slow shear-waves and changes of polarization of leading shear-wave with time. Preliminary results suggest that for one station in the northeast end of the geothermal field, there is an increase in number of secondary fractures with strike from 10 NW to 30 NE in the data from January to June of 2000, relative to data from January to June of 1999. Statistical significance and reasons for such a change will be further studied, although it is interesting to note that this station

  11. Inference of S-wave velocities from well logs using a Neuro-Fuzzy Logic (NFL) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldana, Milagrosa; Coronado, Ronal; Hurtado, Nuri

    2010-05-01

    The knowledge of S-wave velocity values is important for a complete characterization and understanding of reservoir rock properties. It could help in determining fracture propagation and also to improve porosity prediction (Cuddy and Glover, 2002). Nevertheless the acquisition of S-wave velocity data is rather expensive; hence, for most reservoirs usually this information is not available. In the present work we applied a hybrid system, that combines Neural Networks and Fuzzy Logic, in order to infer S-wave velocities from porosity (φ), water saturation (Sw) and shale content (Vsh) logs. The Neuro-Fuzzy Logic (NFL) technique was tested in two wells from the Guafita oil field, Apure Basin, Venezuela. We have trained the system using 50% of the data randomly taken from one of the wells, in order to obtain the inference equations (Takani-Sugeno-Kang (TSK) fuzzy model). Equations using just one of the parameters as input (i.e. φ, Sw or Vsh), combined by pairs and all together were obtained. These equations were tested in the whole well. The results indicate that the best inference (correlation between inferred and experimental data close to 80%) is obtained when all the parameters are considered as input data. An increase of the equation number of the TSK model, when one or just two parameters are used, does not improve the performance of the NFL. The best set of equations was tested in a nearby well. The results suggest that the large difference in the petrophysical and lithological characteristics between these two wells, avoid a good inference of S-wave velocities in the tested well and allowed us to analyze the limitations of the method.

  12. Comparison of P- and S-wave velocity profiles obtained from surface seismic refraction/reflection and downhole data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction data were acquired on the ground surface at six locations to compare with near-surface seismic-velocity downhole measurements. Measurement sites were in Seattle, WA, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, and the San Fernando Valley, CA. We quantitatively compared the data in terms of the average shear-wave velocity to 30-m depth (Vs30), and by the ratio of the relative site amplification produced by the velocity profiles of each data type over a specified set of quarter-wavelength frequencies. In terms of Vs30, similar values were determined from the two methods. There is <15% difference at four of the six sites. The Vs30 values at the other two sites differ by 21% and 48%. The relative site amplification factors differ generally by less than 10% for both P- and S-wave velocities. We also found that S-wave reflections and first-arrival phase delays are essential for identifying velocity inversions. The results suggest that seismic reflection/refraction data are a fast, non-invasive, and less expensive alternative to downhole data for determining Vs30. In addition, we emphasize that some P- and S-wave reflection travel times can directly indicate the frequencies of potentially damaging earthquake site resonances. A strong correlation between the simple S-wave first-arrival travel time/apparent velocity on the ground surface at 100 m offset from the seismic source and the Vs30 value for that site is an additional unique feature of the reflection/refraction data that could greatly simplify Vs30 determinations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Site amplification at five locations in San Francisco, California: A comparison of S waves, codas, and microtremors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seekins, L.C.; Wennerberg, L.; Margheriti, L.; Liu, Huaibao P.

    1996-01-01

    We compare microtremor data to weak-motion 5-wave and coda recordings at sites in San Francisco in order to clarify the range of applicability of microtremor data to ground-motion prediction. We also compare 5-wave results to coda results. For each type of data, we compute spectral ratios of motions from two soil/rock station pairs and from an uphole/downhole pair in the Marina district. We compute horizontal/vertical ratios (Nakamura's method) at a soil site, a rock site, and the surface and borehole instruments. In the station-pair analyses, microtremor data show amplifications at the same fundamental frequency as S waves, but the frequencies of other peaks do not agree. The amplification at frequencies higher than 2 Hz is greater in the microtremor data. Station-pair ratios of coda data generally show spectral peaks occurring at the same frequencies, but with levels varying from one to four times the amplification from S-wave ratios. Nakamura's method of analyzing microtremors agrees better with S-wave station-pair results than the microtremor station-pair method over a limited frequency band that varies from station to station.

  14. Estimation of shallow S-wave velocity structure in the Puli basin, Taiwan, using array measurements of microtremors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Feng; Huang, Huey-Chu

    2012-05-01

    The September 21, 1999, Chi-Chi earthquake induced strong shaking, resulting in severe damage in the Puli area. According to Huang and Tarng (2005), the collapse of many structures during the earthquake was very closely related to site effects. Shallow shear-wave velocities are widely used for earthquake ground-motion site characterization. Thus, we investigate S-wave velocity structures for the Puli area by performing microtremor array measurements at 16 sites. Dispersion curves at these sites are calculated using the F-K method (Capon, 1969) for the vertical component; S-wave velocity structures for the Puli area are then estimated by surface wave inversion (Herrmann, 1991). If the S-wave velocity of the bedrock is assumed to be 2000 m/s, the depths of the Quaternary sediments in the Puli area are between 300 m (FAL, PIP) and 870 m (DAH). Moreover, there are 3˜6 distinct interfaces in the shallow velocity structure (0˜1000 m). The depth of the bedrock gradually increases from the edge (SIN, PIP) to the center (PUL, DAH) of the basin and the thickest Quaternary sediments appear near Heng-Chih-Cheng (DAH).

  15. Analytical sedimentology

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.W. . Dept. of Geology); McConchie, D.M. . Centre for Coastal Management)

    1994-01-01

    Both a self instruction manual and a cookbook'' guide to field and laboratory analytical procedures, this book provides an essential reference for non-specialists. With a minimum of mathematics and virtually no theory, it introduces practitioners to easy, inexpensive options for sample collection and preparation, data acquisition, analytic protocols, result interpretation and verification techniques. This step-by-step guide considers the advantages and limitations of different procedures, discusses safety and troubleshooting, and explains support skills like mapping, photography and report writing. It also offers managers, off-site engineers and others using sediments data a quick course in commissioning studies and making the most of the reports. This manual will answer the growing needs of practitioners in the field, either alone or accompanied by Practical Sedimentology, which surveys the science of sedimentology and provides a basic overview of the principles behind the applications.

  16. Determination of the s-Wave Scattering Length and the C{sub 6} van der Waals Coefficient of {sup 174}Yb via Photoassociation Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, K.; Kitagawa, M.; Kasa, K.; Tojo, S.; Takahashi, Y.

    2007-05-18

    We report photoassociation spectroscopy of {sup 174}Yb for the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition at 1 {mu}K, where only the s-wave scattering state contributes to the spectra. The wave function of the s-wave scattering state is obtained from the photoassociation efficiency, and we determine that the C{sub 6} potential coefficient is 2300{+-}250 a.u. and the s-wave scattering length is 5.53{+-}0.11 nm. Based on these parameters, we discuss the scattering properties of s- and d-wave states.

  17. Determination of the s-wave scattering length and the C6 van der Waals coefficient of 174Yb via photoassociation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, K; Kitagawa, M; Kasa, K; Tojo, S; Takahashi, Y

    2007-05-18

    We report photoassociation spectroscopy of 174Yb for the 1S(0)-1P1 transition at 1 microK, where only the s-wave scattering state contributes to the spectra. The wave function of the s-wave scattering state is obtained from the photoassociation efficiency, and we determine that the C6 potential coefficient is 2300+/-250 a.u. and the s-wave scattering length is 5.53+/-0.11 nm. Based on these parameters, we discuss the scattering properties of s- and d-wave states. PMID:17677695

  18. Analytical toxicology.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, R J; Widdop, B; Ramsey, J D; Loveland, M

    1988-09-01

    1. Major advances in analytical toxicology followed the introduction of spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques in the 1940s and early 1950s and thin layer chromatography remains important together with some spectrophotometric and other tests. However, gas- and high performance-liquid chromatography together with a variety of immunoassay techniques are now widely used. 2. The scope and complexity of forensic and clinical toxicology continues to increase, although the compounds for which emergency analyses are needed to guide therapy are few. Exclusion of the presence of hypnotic drugs can be important in suspected 'brain death' cases. 3. Screening for drugs of abuse has assumed greater importance not only for the management of the habituated patient, but also in 'pre-employment' and 'employment' screening. The detection of illicit drug administration in sport is also an area of increasing importance. 4. In industrial toxicology, the range of compounds for which blood or urine measurements (so called 'biological monitoring') can indicate the degree of exposure is increasing. The monitoring of environmental contaminants (lead, chlorinated pesticides) in biological samples has also proved valuable. 5. In the near future a consensus as to the units of measurement to be used is urgently required and more emphasis will be placed on interpretation, especially as regards possible behavioural effects of drugs or other poisons. Despite many advances in analytical techniques there remains a need for reliable, simple tests to detect poisons for use in smaller hospital and other laboratories.

  19. Analysis of P and S wave vertical seismic profile data from the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.M.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.

    1988-11-10

    As part of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project at California State well 2--14, vertical seismic profile (VSP) data were collected from P and S wave sources at two distances from the well. Use of a three-component geophone, along with rotation of the recorded data traces into a wave front-based coordinate system, allows analysis of many aspects of seismic wave propagation properties around the well. Standard VSP analysis techniques were used to measure interval P and S wave velocities and to identify reflecting horizons both within and below the survey interval (from 455 to 1735 m). A reflection from below the survey interval, seen with both P and S sources, seems to be associated with a fractured reservoir near 2100 m. Indications of fracturing were observed, including vertical scattering of P waves from a zone near 915 m. Orthogonally polarized shear waves were generated at each offset to study anisotropy by travel time measurement and particle motion analysis of the shear wave arrivals. Three component particle motion analysis of shear wave arrivals was found to be effective for characterizing the subtleties in the S wave splitting throughout the various zones in the well. The SH/sub t/ source (horizontal and transverse to the well) produced complicated, elliptical particle motion while the SV source (in-line with the well) produced linear particle motion. The difference in linearity of particle motion from orthogonally polarized shear wave sources was unexpected and may be related to regional tectonics. Anomalous zones may be related to transition depths in the Salton Sea geothermal field. Travel time difference between SV and SH waves, while clearly observable, indicates only about 1% average anisotropy.

  20. 2.5D S-wave velocity model of the TESZ area in northern Poland from receiver function analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde-Piorko, Monika; Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Receiver function (RF) locally provides the signature of sharp seismic discontinuities and information about the shear wave (S-wave) velocity distribution beneath the seismic station. The data recorded by "13 BB Star" broadband seismic stations (Grad et al., 2015) and by few PASSEQ broadband seismic stations (Wilde-Piórko et al., 2008) are analysed to investigate the crustal and upper mantle structure in the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) in northern Poland. The TESZ is one of the most prominent suture zones in Europe separating the young Palaeozoic platform from the much older Precambrian East European craton. Compilation of over thirty deep seismic refraction and wide angle reflection profiles, vertical seismic profiling in over one hundred thousand boreholes and magnetic, gravity, magnetotelluric and thermal methods allowed for creation a high-resolution 3D P-wave velocity model down to 60 km depth in the area of Poland (Grad et al. 2016). On the other hand the receiver function methods give an opportunity for creation the S-wave velocity model. Modified ray-tracing method (Langston, 1977) are used to calculate the response of the structure with dipping interfaces to the incoming plane wave with fixed slowness and back-azimuth. 3D P-wave velocity model are interpolated to 2.5D P-wave velocity model beneath each seismic station and synthetic back-azimuthal sections of receiver function are calculated for different Vp/Vs ratio. Densities are calculated with combined formulas of Berteussen (1977) and Gardner et al. (1974). Next, the synthetic back-azimuthal sections of RF are compared with observed back-azimuthal sections of RF for "13 BB Star" and PASSEQ seismic stations to find the best 2.5D S-wave models down to 60 km depth. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  1. High-resolution 3-D S-wave Tomography of upper crust structures in Yilan Plain from Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai-Xun; Chen, Po-Fei; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Chen, Li-Wei; Gung, YuanCheng

    2015-04-01

    The Yilan Plain (YP) in NE Taiwan locates on the western YP of the Okinawa Trough and displays high geothermal gradients with abundant hot springs, likely resulting from magmatism associated with the back-arc spreading as attested by the offshore volcanic island (Kueishantao). YP features NS distinctive characteristics that the South YP exhibits thin top sedimentary layer, high on-land seismicity and significant SE movements, relative those of the northern counterpart. A dense network (~2.5 km station interval) of 89 Texan instruments was deployed in Aug. 2014, covering most of the YP and its vicinity. The ray path coverage density of each 0.015 degree cells are greater than 150 km that could provide the robustness assessment of tomographic results. We analyze ambient noise signals to invert a high-resolution 3D S-wave model for shallow velocity structures in and around YP. The aim is to investigate the velocity anomalies corresponding to geothermal resources and the NS geological distinctions aforementioned. We apply the Welch's method to generate empirical Rayleigh wave Green's functions between two stations records of continuous vertical components. The group velocities of thus derived functions are then obtained by the multiple-filter analysis technique measured at the frequency range between 0.25 and 1 Hz. Finally, we implement a wavelet-based multi-scale parameterization technique to construct 3D model of S-wave velocity. Our first month results exhibit low velocity in the plain, corresponding existing sediments, those of whole YP show low velocity offshore YP and those of high-resolution south YP reveal stark velocity contrast across the Sanshin fault. Key words: ambient seismic noises, Welch's method, S-wave, Yilan Plain

  2. Near-surface S-wave velocity measured with six-degree-of-freedom seismic sensor Rotaphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Jiri; Brokesova, Johana

    2015-04-01

    An essential parameter in seismic engineering is the near-surface S-wave velocity. Rotaphone, a six-degree-of-freedom seismic sensor can be used with advantage to retrieve it from collocated rotational and translational measurements. Rotaphone consists of highly sensitive geophones connected to a conjoint datalogger. The geophones are mounted in parallel pairs to a rigid (metal) ground-based frame. The instrument is designed to measure short-period translational ground motion (velocity) and, in addition, differential motion between the paired geophones. The records of those differential motions are used to obtain rotational components. In-situ calibration of individual geophones is performed simultaneously with each measurement, which enables to reach high sensitivity and accuracy of rotational measurements. In our method we utilize seismic waves produced by anthropogenic source - a generator of S waves and rotational ground motions. The generator contains a fixed part (anchored to the ground), a revolving part and a braking mechanism for immediate braking of the rotational part, in which rotational seismic motions are generated by immediately stopping the revolving part, whereby energy is transmitted into the rock massive. The generator produces repeatedly identical source pulses. Due to identity of the source pulses, we can suppress noise by means of stacking data from many generator actions and thus increase the depth range and resolution. The phase velocity retrieval is based on matching relevant acceleration and rotation rate components. Thanks to a near-source distance and high-frequency content of the source pulses, well-known equations for plane-wave approximation must be replaced by more adequate equations relating the individual rotation rate components to the translational ones. These equations are derived under an assumption of spherical wave. The resulting S-wave phase velocity is compared to the value obtained by standard profile measurements. The

  3. S-waves velocity model for the SW-Iberia derived from the IBERSEIS wide-angle seismic reflection transects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomeras, I.; Marti, D.; Carbonell, R.; Ayarza, P.; Simancas, F.; Martinez-Poyatos, D.; Azor, A.; Gonzalez-Lodeiro, F.; Perez-Estaun, A.

    2009-04-01

    The IBERSEIS wide-angle seismic reflection transects acquired in 2003 in SW-Iberia Peninsula provided constraints on the P-wave seismic velocity structure across the three tectonic provinces in the area: the South Portuguesse Zone (SPZ), the Ossa-Morena Zone (OMZ) and the Central Iberia Zone (CIZ). These data were acquired by 650 vertical component seismographs (TEXAN seismic recorders) from the IRIS-PASSCAL Instrument center, using explosive sources with charge sizes ranging from 500 to 1000 kg. Both transects A and B are, approximately, 300 km long with a station spacing of 400 m and of 150 m respectively. The relatively small station spacing favored the lateral correlation of the seismic events and provided enough resolution for the identification of shear-wave arrivals. The most prominent S-wave phase recorded by the vertical component sensors corresponds to the SmS which is nearly horizontal for a velocity reduction of 4600 m/s. This phase can even be followed up to near vertical incidence at 18 s(twtt). A few S-wave crustal arrivals can be also identified, although at small offsets they interfere with the previous P-wave arrivals. The Sn phase can be observed at very far offsets providing additional constraints on the nature of the shallow subcrustal mantle. Furthermore, slant stacks of the shot gathers (tau-p sections) reveal the existing of PS energy. PS phases are more difficult to identify in the shot gathers. Finally, a preliminary S-wave velocity model has been derived by iterative forward modeling to provide additional constraints on the nature of the deep crust and upper mantle beneath the Variscan of SW-Iberia.

  4. Evidence for strong-coupling s-wave superconductivity in MgB2: (11)B NMR Study.

    PubMed

    Kotegawa, H; Ishida, K; Kitaoka, Y; Muranaka, T; Akimitsu, J

    2001-09-17

    We have investigated a gap structure in a newly discovered superconductor, MgB2, through measurement of the (11)B nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate, (11)(1/T(1)). (11)(1/T(1)) is proportional to the temperature (T) in the normal state, and decreases exponentially in the superconducting (SC) state, revealing a tiny coherence peak just below T(c). The T dependence of 1/T(1) in the SC state can be accounted for by an s-wave SC model with a large gap size of 2Delta/k(B)T(c) approximately 5 which suggests it is in a strong-coupling regime.

  5. p{sub x}+ip{sub y} Superfluid from s-Wave Interactions of Fermionic Cold Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chuanwei; Tewari, Sumanta; Lutchyn, Roman M.; Das Sarma, S.

    2008-10-17

    Two-dimensional (p{sub x}+ip{sub y}) superfluids or superconductors offer a playground for studying intriguing physics such as quantum teleportation, non-Abelian statistics, and topological quantum computation. Creating such a superfluid in cold fermionic atom optical traps using p-wave Feshbach resonance is turning out to be challenging. Here we propose a method to create a p{sub x}+ip{sub y} superfluid directly from an s-wave interaction making use of a topological Berry phase, which can be artificially generated. We discuss ways to detect the spontaneous Hall mass current, which acts as a diagnostic for the chiral p-wave superfluid.

  6. The Study on S-Wave Velocity Structure of Upper Crust in Three Gorges Region of Yangtze River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Zhu, P.; Zhou, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The profile of S-wave velocity structure along Badong-Maoping-Tumen is presented using the ambient noise data observed at 10 stations from mobile broadband seismic array which is located at Three Gorges Region. All of available vertical component time series during April and May,2011 have been cross-correlated to estimate the empirical Green functions. Group velocity dispersion curves were measured by applying multiple filtering technique. Using these dispersion curves,we obtain high resolution pure-path dispersions at 0.5-10 second periods. The S-wave velocity structure,which was reconstructed by inverting the pure-path dispersions,reveals the velocity variations of upper crust at Three Gorges Region. Main conclusions are as follows:(1)The velocity variations in the study region have a close relationship with the geological structure and the velocity profile suggests a anticline unit which core area is Huangling block;(2)The relative fast velocity variations beneath Jiuwanxi and its surrounding areas may correspond to the geological structure and earthquake activity there;(3) The high velocity of the upper crustal in Sandouping indicates that the Reservoir Dam of Three Gorges is located at a tectonic stable region.

  7. Triplet Pair Correlations in s-Wave Superfluids as a Signature of the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, I.; Sols, F.; Demler, E.

    2012-10-01

    We show that antiparallel triplet pairing correlations are generated in superfluids with purely s-wave interactions whenever population imbalance enforces anisotropic Fulde-Ferrell (FF) or inhomogeneous Larkin-Ovchinikov (LO) states. These triplet correlations appear in the Cooper pair wave function, while the triplet part of the gap remains zero. The same set of quasiparticle states contributes to the triplet component and to the polarization, thus spatially correlating them. In the LO case, this set forms a narrow band of Andreev states centered on the nodes of the s-wave order parameter. This picture naturally provides a unifying explanation of previous findings that attractive p-wave interaction stabilizes FFLO states. We also study a similar triplet mixing which occurs when a balanced two-component system displays FFLO-type oscillations due to a spin-dependent optical lattice. We discuss how this triplet component can be measured in systems of ultracold atoms using a rapid ramp across a p-wave Feshbach resonance. This should provide a smoking gun signature of FFLO states.

  8. Structural transition, ferro-orbital order and its fluctuation-mediated s-wave superconductivity in iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ōno, Yoshiaki; Yanagi, Yuki; Adachi, Naoko; Yamakawa, Youichi

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the electronic states and the superconductivity in the two-dimensional 16-band d-p model extracted from a tight-binding fit to the band structure of iron pnictides, in the presence of both the Coulomb interaction between Fe d-electrons and the electron-lattice coupling g with the orthorhombic mode which is crucial for reproducing the recently observed ultrasonic softening of the elastic constant C66. Due to the cooperative effects of these interactions, the ferro-orbital order with different occupations of d and d orbitals occurs and induces the tetragonal-orthorhombic structural transition at Ts, together with the stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) order below TN. For a large g case, we obtain the phase diagram consistent with the doped iron pnictides with Ts>TN for x>0, where the s-wave superconductivity is mediated by the ferro-orbital fluctuation which is largely enhanced near the ferro-orbital QCP at xc with Ts→0. On the other hand, for a small g case, the simultaneous phase transition occurs at Ts=TN even for x>0, where the s±-wave superconductivity is mediated by the AFM fluctuation. Both the s-wave states with full superconducting gaps are consistent with most of the experiments but only the former is considered to account for the small Tc-suppression against nonmagnetic impurities.

  9. Theoretical study of large proximity-induced s -wave-like pairing from a d -wave superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wan-Ju; Chao, Sung-Po; Lee, Ting-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    We use the proximity effect to generate effective topological superconductors by placing metals with strong spin-orbit coupling in contact with a superconductor, aiming to produce Majorana zero modes useful for topologically protected quantum computation. In recent experiments, several quintuple layers of Bi2Se3 were epitaxially grown on the high-Tc material Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ , and conflicting experimental results were reported. We use the standard mean-field approach to study this heterostructure and find it is unlikely to have a large proximity-induced superconducting gap. Despite the seemingly correct temperature dependence, the s -wave gap claimed to be observed may not be purely superconducting in origin. Future work on the proximity-induced bulk superconducting gap and the interfacial band structure should shed light on this issue.

  10. The leading twist light-cone distribution amplitudes for the S-wave and P-wave Bc mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ji; Yang, Deshan

    2016-07-01

    The light-cone distribution amplitudes (LCDAs) serve as important nonperturbative inputs for the study of hard exclusive processes. In this paper, we calculate ten LCDAs at twist-2 for the S-wave and P-wave B c mesons up to the next-to-leading order (NLO) of the strong coupling α s and leading order of the velocity expansion. Each one of these ten LCDAs is expressed as a product of a perturbatively calculable distribution and a universal NRQCD matrix-element. By use of the spin symmetry, only two NRQCD matrix-elements will be involved. The reduction of the number of non-perturbative inputs will improve the predictive power of collinear factorization.

  11. The Effect of Crack Orientation on the Nonlinear Interaction of a P-wave with an S-wave

    DOE PAGES

    TenCate, J. A.; Malcolm, A. E.; Feng, X.; Fehler, M. C.

    2016-06-06

    Cracks, joints, fluids, and other pore-scale structures have long been hypothesized to be the cause of the large elastic nonlinearity observed in rocks. It is difficult to definitively say which pore-scale features are most important, however, because of the difficulty in isolating the source of the nonlinear interaction. In this work, we focus on the influence of cracks on the recorded nonlinear signal and in particular on how the orientation of microcracks changes the strength of the nonlinear interaction. We do this by studying the effect of orientation on the measurements in a rock with anisotropy correlated with the presencemore » and alignment of microcracks. We measure the nonlinear response via the traveltime delay induced in a low-amplitude P wave probe by a high-amplitude S wave pump. We find evidence that crack orientation has a significant effect on the nonlinear signal.« less

  12. The effect of crack orientation on the nonlinear interaction of a P wave with an S wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TenCate, J. A.; Malcolm, A. E.; Feng, X.; Fehler, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    Cracks, joints, fluids, and other pore-scale structures have long been hypothesized to be the cause of the large elastic nonlinearity observed in rocks. It is difficult to definitively say which pore-scale features are most important, however, because of the difficulty in isolating the source of the nonlinear interaction. In this work, we focus on the influence of cracks on the recorded nonlinear signal and in particular on how the orientation of microcracks changes the strength of the nonlinear interaction. We do this by studying the effect of orientation on the measurements in a rock with anisotropy correlated with the presence and alignment of microcracks. We measure the nonlinear response via the traveltime delay induced in a low-amplitude P wave probe by a high-amplitude S wave pump. We find evidence that crack orientation has a significant effect on the nonlinear signal.

  13. Characterization of U.S. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Test Sites: A Catalogue of Met-Ocean Data.

    SciTech Connect

    Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-10-01

    This report presents met - ocean data and wave energy characteristics at three U.S. wave energy converter (WEC) test and potential deployment sites . Its purpose is to enable the compari son of wave resource characteristics among sites as well as the select io n of test sites that are most suitable for a developer's device and that best meet their testing needs and objectives . It also provides essential inputs for the design of WEC test devices and planning WEC tests, including the planning of deployment and op eration s and maintenance. For each site, this report catalogues wave statistics recommended in the (draft) International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Specification (IEC 62600 - 101 TS) on Wave Energy Characterization, as well as the frequency of oc currence of weather windows and extreme sea states, and statistics on wind and ocean currents. It also provides useful information on test site infrastructure and services .

  14. Upper-mantle seismic structure beneath SE and Central Brazil from P- and S-wave regional traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Marcelo Peres; Schimmel, Martin; Assumpção, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    We present models for the upper-mantle velocity structure beneath SE and Central Brazil using independent tomographic inversions of P- and S-wave relative arrival-time residuals (including core phases) from teleseismic earthquakes. The events were recorded by a total of 92 stations deployed through different projects, institutions and time periods during the years 1992-2004. Our results show correlations with the main tectonic structures and reveal new anomalies not yet observed in previous works. All interpretations are based on robust anomalies, which appear in the different inversions for P- and S-waves. The resolution is variable through our study volume and has been analyzed through different theoretical test inversions. High-velocity anomalies are observed in the western portion of the São Francisco Craton, supporting the hypothesis that this Craton was part of a major Neoproterozoic plate (San Franciscan Plate). Low-velocity anomalies beneath the Tocantins Province (mainly fold belts between the Amazon and São Francisco Cratons) are interpreted as due to lithospheric thinning, which is consistent with the good correlation between intraplate seismicity and low-velocity anomalies in this region. Our results show that the basement of the Paraná Basin is formed by several blocks, separated by suture zones, according to model of Milani & Ramos. The slab of the Nazca Plate can be observed as a high-velocity anomaly beneath the Paraná Basin, between the depths of 700 and 1200 km. Further, we confirm the low-velocity anomaly in the NE area of the Paraná Basin which has been interpreted by VanDecar et al. as a fossil conduct of the Tristan da Cunha Plume related to the Paraná flood basalt eruptions during the opening of the South Atlantic.

  15. Dynamic Triggering of Microearthquakes by P- and S-waves from the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, A. D.; Sammis, C. G.; Chen, Y.

    2006-12-01

    High-frequency band-pass filtering of acceleration records from the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan earthquake (Mw = 7.5) resolves the continuous signal into a series of relatively short duration discrete energy bursts. We hypothesize that these bursts originate at small shallow events near the individual stations that have been dynamically triggered by the P- and S-waves emanating from the Chi-Chi mainshock. Bursts are observed only during the seismic signal and not in the noise before or after. We show that the bursts are not due to band- pass filtering of instrumentally generated step functions. Our local event hypothesis is supported by the observations of bursts up to 170km from the epicenter. If the bursts originated on the Chi-Chi fault plane, as originally hypothesized by Chen et al. [2006], then they should not be observable at this distance for any reasonable value of crustal attenuation. Moment magnititude calculations for three of the largest amplitude bursts without any distance correction gives Mw = 1.5 1.9, providing a reasonable estimate of event sizes. By observing which of the 200 stations on Taiwan recorded bursts and which did not, we determined that the stresses threshold for triggering is in the range of 10-20 gals for P-wave and 40-100 gals for S-waves. Comparison of these thresholds with those determined for surface waves [Hill et al. (1993), Brodsky et al. (2000), Miyazawa & Mori (2006)] and earth tides [Wilcock (2001), Cochran et al. (2004)] finds that the threshold stress scales as the inverse square root of the wavelength of the dynamic trigger. This scaling is reminiscent of the scaling of the strength of a laboratory sample with the square root of its size, and suggests a similar relation between the wavelength of the dynamic stress and the size of the local events that can be triggered.

  16. Improved estimation of P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, and attenuation factor by iterative structural joint inversion of crosswell seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tieyuan; Harris, Jerry M.

    2015-12-01

    We present an iterative joint inversion approach for improving the consistence of estimated P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity and attenuation factor models. This type of inversion scheme links two or more independent inversions using a joint constraint, which is constructed by the cross-gradient function in this paper. The primary advantages of this joint inversion strategy are: avoiding weighting for different datasets in conventional simultaneous joint inversion, flexible for incorporating prior information, and relatively easy to code. We demonstrate the algorithm with two synthetic examples and two field datasets. The inversions for P- and S-wave velocity are based on ray traveltime tomography. The results of the first synthetic example show that the iterative joint inversion take advantages of both P- and S-wave sensitivity to resolve their ambiguities as well as improve structural similarity between P- and S-wave velocity models. In the second synthetic and field examples, joint inversion of P- and S-wave traveltimes results in an improved Vs velocity model that shows better structural correlation with the Vp model. More importantly, the resultant VP/VS ratio map has fewer artifacts and is better correlated for use in geological interpretation than the independent inversions. The second field example illustrates that the flexible joint inversion algorithm using frequency-shift data gives a structurally improved attenuation factor map constrained by a prior VP tomogram.

  17. Rank-one inverse scattering problem: Reformulation and analytic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartt, K.

    1984-03-01

    Using the K-matrix formalism, we give a simplified reformulation of the S-wave rank-one inverse scattering problem. The resulting Cauchy integral equation, obtained differently by Gourdin and Martin in their first paper, is tailored to rational representations of F(k)=k(δ0). Use of such F(k) permits a simple but general solution without integration, giving analytic form factors having a pole structure like the S matrix that are reducible to rational expressions using Padé approximants. Finally, we show a bound state pole condition is necessary, and makes the form factor unique.

  18. Rank-one inverse scattering problem: Reformulation and analytic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hartt, K.

    1984-03-01

    Using the K-matrix formalism, we give a simplified reformulation of the S-wave rank-one inverse scattering problem. The resulting Cauchy integral equation, obtained differently by Gourdin and Martin in their first paper, is tailored to rational representations of F(k) = k cot(delta/sub 0/). Use of such F(k) permits a simple but general solution without integration, giving analytic form factors having a pole structure like the S matrix that are reducible to rational expressions using Pade approximants. Finally, we show a bound state pole condition is necessary, and makes the form factor unique.

  19. s-wave repulsion in the pion-nucleus optical potential and the subthreshold pion-nucleon T matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, R. S.; Shakin, C. M.

    1981-05-01

    A covariant theory of the pion-nucleus interaction has been used to calculate off-shell matrix elements of the first-order pion-nucleus optical potential in momentum space. The matrix elements are calculated for 16O and 40Ca, as a function of k, the momentum in the π-nucleus center-of-mass system, for W=mπ+MN. (As in our previous studies we have carried out a full integration over the Fermi motion of the target nucleons. Off-shell effects related to nuclear binding are treated carefully.) As this calculation is sensitively dependent upon the subthreshold πN T matrix, two different models for the T matrix are studied. One is the well known separable model of Londergan, McVoy, and Moniz. The second model includes terms describing the direct and crossed Born terms and therefore has the appropriate s- and u-channel nucleon poles. (In the calculations using this model both the pion and the nucleon are allowed to go off the mass shell.) The remaining part of the amplitude in the second model is represented by a separable form. For small k, the matrix elements of the optical potential calculated with these two models are significantly larger than those obtained when use is made of the fixed-scatterer approximation. Phenomenological optical potentials which describe low-energy pion-nucleus scattering data or pionic-atom data exhibit s-wave repulsion which is about 2-8 times that obtained from calculations made in the fixed-scatterer approximation. (The uncertainty in this enhancement factor reflects the uncertainty in the free-space values of the πN scattering lengths). We conclude that the explanation of a significant fraction of the s-wave repulsion in the low energy pion-nucleus interaction may lie in a careful treatment of off-shell effects using a good model for the subthreshold πN T matrix. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Pion-nucleus interactions, off-shell effects in the pion-nucleus interaction at low energy; pionic atoms.

  20. Validation of S-wave Velocity beneath the Ise Bay, Central Japan, Using Continuous Short-period Ambient Noise Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, T.; Yoshimi, M.; Horikawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    We have applied seismic interferometry to three-component ambient noise data recorded around the Ise bay area, central Japan, to validate published three-dimensional S-wave velocity models. For the bay area, detailed seismic velocity structure models have been constructed based on P-wave reflection surveys. There is no direct information on the S-wave velocities beneath the bay and the parameters are assigned by reference to those in a land area. We used one-year continuous data from 20 permanent stations of the NIED Hi-net (High-sensitivity seismograph network) to obtain stacked cross-correlation functions (CCFs) of ambient noise between station pairs that cross the bay. The CCFs were calculated, using one-hour data in the radial-radial (R-R), transverse-transverse (T-T) and vertical-vertical (Z-Z) directions for time lags of ±500s. Horizontal distances between the stations range form 15 km to 103 km. Although the Hi-net stations deploy seismometers with the natural period of 1 s, we found that the yearly stacked CCFs for selected 101 Hi-net station pairs are comparable with those derived from neighboring broadband seismic stations in the frequency range between 0.1 and 0.5 Hz, by deconvolving the instrument response. The CCFs shows clear Rayleigh waves from all directions in the R-R and Z-Z components, and clear Love waves in the T-T component with reasonable signal-to-noise ratios. The derived group velocities and waveforms of the wave trains are variable in the higher frequency range (> 0.2 Hz), indicating deep sedimentary basin beneath the bay. We compared obtained group velocities with theoretical ones to find systematic differences between the expected structure model from the CCFs and the published models in the northwest part of the bay, while the agreements are generally good for many other station pairs. This result indicates that the seismic interferometry technique provides valuable information for validation and improvement of a velocity structure

  1. High frequency measurement of P- and S-wave velocities on crystalline rock massif surface - methodology of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Slavík, Lubomír

    2014-05-01

    For the purpose of non-destructive monitoring of rock properties in the underground excavation it is possible to perform repeated high-accuracy P- and S-wave velocity measurements. This contribution deals with preliminary results gained during the preparation of micro-seismic long-term monitoring system. The field velocity measurements were made by pulse-transmission technique directly on the rock outcrop (granite) in Bedrichov gallery (northern Bohemia). The gallery at the experimental site was excavated using TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) and it is used for drinking water supply, which is conveyed in a pipe. The stable measuring system and its automatic operation lead to the use of piezoceramic transducers both as a seismic source and as a receiver. The length of measuring base at gallery wall was from 0.5 to 3 meters. Different transducer coupling possibilities were tested namely with regard of repeatability of velocity determination. The arrangement of measuring system on the surface of the rock massif causes better sensitivity of S-transducers for P-wave measurement compared with the P-transducers. Similarly P-transducers were found more suitable for S-wave velocity determination then P-transducers. The frequency dependent attenuation of fresh rock massif results in limited frequency content of registered seismic signals. It was found that at the distance between the seismic source and receiver from 0.5 m the frequency components above 40 kHz are significantly attenuated. Therefore for the excitation of seismic wave 100 kHz transducers are most suitable. The limited frequency range should be also taken into account for the shape of electric impulse used for exciting of piezoceramic transducer. The spike pulse generates broad-band seismic signal, short in the time domain. However its energy after low-pass filtration in the rock is significantly lower than the energy of seismic signal generated by square wave pulse. Acknowledgments: This work was partially

  2. P and S wave upper mantle seismic velocity structure beneath the northern Apennines: New evidence for the end of subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Margaret H.; Torpey, Megan; Liszewski, Kelly; Levin, Vadim; Park, Jeffrey

    2011-06-01

    Orogeny in the geologically young northern Apennines is explained by the eastward retreat of a convergence zone in which Adriatic lithosphere subducts to the west. It is unclear, however, whether all of the lithosphere or only the lower portion has subducted since 15 Ma, when the convergence zone lay near Corsica. We combine teleseismic P and S wave arrival time data from the RETREAT seismic network (2003-2006) and surrounding permanent stations to estimate tomographic images of the upper mantle structure beneath the northern Apennines. We image a vertically oriented slab that that extends to only ˜300 km depth. Our slab termination is shallower than previous studies but is confirmed by resolution tests. Furthermore, our images resolve the southern edge of the northern Apennines slab at ˜43°N, with no deep continuity with any slab segment to the south, as earlier proposed. Our results suggest that only a 300-400 km strip of lithosphere has subducted since 15 Ma beneath the northern Tyrrhenian Sea, a length roughly equivalent to the distance from the present-day west coast of Corsica to the crest of the northern Apennines. Although not a definitive indicator, the largely aseismic vertical slab configuration and its limited extent, coupled with other volcanic and geophysical indicators, suggests the delamination scenario of Bird (1979), in which only the lower portion of the continental lithosphere subducts.

  3. Stratigraphy of the Archean western Superior Province from P- and S-wave receiver functions: Further evidence for tectonic accretion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, D. A.; Kendall, J.-M.; Wilson, D. C.; White, D. J.; Sol, S.; Thomson, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Archean western Superior Province in Canada represents the nucleus of the North American continent whose origin has been speculated to be the result of widespread crustal accretion some 2.7 Ga ago. In this paper, crustal and upper-mantle seismic discontinuities beneath the western Superior Province of the Canadian shield are imaged with teleseismic P-to-S and S-to-P converted phases using the receiver function method. Three crustal discontinuities are observed: the Moho, ranging in depth between 38 and 47 km and dipping to the south; and two intra-crustal discontinuities having depths of approximately 15 and 30 km. The crustal discontinuities undulate laterally and often lose continuity, possibly indicating an imbricated structure and/or regions of velocity gradients. In the shallow lithosphere, a positive discontinuity is imaged at approximately 65 km depth and is consistent with earlier refraction and wide-angle reflection results. Additionally, two zones of negative receiver function amplitudes at 55 km depth are observed and are coincident with a region of anomalous tomographic low P- and S-wave velocities as well as a zone of high electrical conductivity. The images for the crust and shallow upper-mantle, when integrated with previous geophysical studies, are consistent with ideas of continental root formation due to imbrication of Archean subducted material and accretion of island arcs observed in surface geology.

  4. Majorana fermions in ferromagnetic chains on the surface of bulk spin-orbit coupled s-wave superconductors.

    PubMed

    Hui, Hoi-Yin; Brydon, P M R; Sau, Jay D; Tewari, S; Das Sarma, S

    2015-01-01

    Majorana fermion (MF) excitations in solid state system have non-Abelian statistics which is essential for topological quantum computation. Previous proposals to realize MF, however, generally requires fine-tuning of parameters. Here we explore a platform which avoids the fine-tuning problem, namely a ferromagnetic chain deposited on the surface of a spin-orbit coupled s-wave superconductor. We show that it generically supports zero-energy topological MF excitations near the two ends of the chain with minimal fine-tuning. Depending on the strength of the ferromagnetic moment in the chain, the number of MFs at each end, n, can be either one or two, and should be revealed by a robust zero-bias peak (ZBP) of height 2 ne(2)/h in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements which would show strong (weak) signals at the ends (middle) of the chain. The role of an approximate chiral symmetry which gives an integer topological invariant to the system is discussed. PMID:25743763

  5. Majorana fermions in ferromagnetic chains on the surface of bulk spin-orbit coupled s-wave superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Hoi-Yin; Brydon, P. M. R.; Sau, Jay D.; Tewari, S.; Sarma, S. Das

    2015-01-01

    Majorana fermion (MF) excitations in solid state system have non-Abelian statistics which is essential for topological quantum computation. Previous proposals to realize MF, however, generally requires fine-tuning of parameters. Here we explore a platform which avoids the fine-tuning problem, namely a ferromagnetic chain deposited on the surface of a spin-orbit coupled s-wave superconductor. We show that it generically supports zero-energy topological MF excitations near the two ends of the chain with minimal fine-tuning. Depending on the strength of the ferromagnetic moment in the chain, the number of MFs at each end, n, can be either one or two, and should be revealed by a robust zero-bias peak (ZBP) of height 2 ne2/h in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements which would show strong (weak) signals at the ends (middle) of the chain. The role of an approximate chiral symmetry which gives an integer topological invariant to the system is discussed. PMID:25743763

  6. Strong enhancement of s -wave superconductivity near a quantum critical point of Ca3Ir4Sn13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, P. K.; Guguchia, Z.; Khasanov, R.; Chinotti, M.; Li, L.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Morenzoni, E.

    2015-11-01

    We report microscopic studies by muon spin rotation/relaxation as a function of pressure of the Ca3Ir4Sn13 and Sr3Ir4Sn13 cubic compounds, which are members of the (Ca1-xSrx)3Ir4Sn13 system displaying superconductivity and a structural phase transition associated with the formation of a charge density wave (CDW). We find a strong enhancement of the superfluid density and a dramatic increase of the pairing strength above a pressure of ≈1.6 GPa, giving direct evidence of the presence of a quantum critical point separating a superconducting phase coexisting with CDW from a pure superconducting phase. The superconducting order parameter in both phases has the same s -wave symmetry. In spite of the conventional phonon-mediated BCS character of the weakly correlated (Ca1-xSrx)3Ir4Sn13 system, the dependence of the effective superfluid density on the critical temperature puts this compound in the "Uemura" plot close to unconventional superconductors. This system exemplifies that conventional BCS superconductors in the presence of competing orders or multiband structure can also display characteristics of unconventional superconductors.

  7. Shallow P- and S-wave velocities and site resonances in the St. Louis region, Missouri-Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Odum, J.K.; Stephenson, W.J.; Herrmann, Robert B.

    2007-01-01

    As part of the seismic hazard-mapping efforts in the St. Louis metropolitan area we determined the compressional and shear-wave velocities (Vp and Vs) to about a 40-m depth at 17 locations in this area. The Vs measurements were made using high-resolution seismic refraction and reflection methods. We find a clear difference in the Vs profiles between sites located on the river floodplains and those located in the upland urban areas of St. Louis. Vs30 (average Vs to 30-m depth) values in floodplain areas range from 200 to 290 m/s (NEHRP category D) and contrast with sites on the upland areas of St. Louis, which have Vs30 values ranging from 410 to 785 m/s (NEHRP categories C and B). The lower Vs30 values and earthquake recordings in the floodplains suggest a greater potential for stronger and more prolonged ground shaking in an earthquake. Spectral analysis of a M3.6 earthquake recorded on the St. Louis-area ANSS seismograph network indicates stronger shaking and potentially damaging S-wave resonant frequencies at NEHRP category D sites compared to ground motions at a rock site located on the Saint Louis University campus. ?? 2007, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  8. Strong enhancement of s -wave superconductivity near a quantum critical point of Ca3Ir4Sn13

    DOE PAGES

    Biswas, P. K.; Guguchia, Z.; Khasanov, R.; Chinotti, M.; Li, L.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Morenzoni, E.

    2015-11-11

    We repormore » t microscopic studies by muon spin rotation/relaxation as a function of pressure of the Ca3Ir4Sn13 and Sr3Ir4Sn13 system displaying superconductivity and a structural phase transition associated with the formation of a charge density wave (CDW). Our findings show a strong enhancement of the superfluid density and a dramatic increase of the pairing strength above a pressure of ≈ 1.6 GPa giving direct evidence of the presence of a quantum critical point separating a superconducting phase coexisting with CDW from a pure superconducting phase. The superconducting order parameter in both phases has the same s-wave symmetry. In spite of the conventional phonon-mediated BCS character of the weakly correlated (Ca1-xSrx)3Ir4Sn13 system the dependence of the effective superfluid density on the critical temperature puts this compound in the “Uemura” plot close to unconventional superconductors. This system exemplifies that conventional BCS superconductors in the presence of competing orders or multi-band structure can also display characteristics of unconventional superconductors.« less

  9. GENERAL P, TYPE-I S, AND TYPE-II S WAVES IN ANELASTIC SOLIDS; INHOMOGENEOUS WAVE FIELDS IN LOW-LOSS SOLIDS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, Roger D.; Wennerberg, Leif

    1985-01-01

    The physical characteristics for general plane-wave radiation fields in an arbitrary linear viscoelastic solid are derived. Expressions for the characteristics of inhomogeneous wave fields, derived in terms of those for homogeneous fields, are utilized to specify the characteristics and a set of reference curves for general P and S wave fields in arbitrary viscoelastic solids as a function of wave inhomogeneity and intrinsic material absorption. The expressions show that an increase in inhomogeneity of the wave fields cause the velocity to decrease, the fractional-energy loss (Q** minus **1) to increase, the deviation of maximum energy flow with respect to phase propagation to increase, and the elliptical particle motions for P and type-I S waves to approach circularity. Q** minus **1 for inhomogeneous type-I S waves is shown to be greater than that for type-II S waves, with the deviation first increasing then decreasing with inhomogeneity. The mean energy densities (kinetic, potential, and total), the mean rate of energy dissipation, the mean energy flux, and Q** minus **1 for inhomogeneous waves are shown to be greater than corresponding characteristics for homogeneous waves, with the deviations increasing as the inhomogeneity is increased for waves of fixed maximum displacement amplitude.

  10. Prediction of maximum P- and S-wave amplitude distributions incorporating frequency- and distance-dependent characteristics of the observed apparent radiation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Manabu; Yoshimoto, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    Frequency-dependent model of the apparent radiation pattern has been extensively incorporated into engineering and scientific applications for high-frequency seismic waves, but distance-dependent properties have not yet been fully taken into account. We investigated the unified characteristics of frequency and distance dependences in both apparent P- and S-wave radiation patterns during local crustal earthquakes. Observed distortions of the apparent P- and S-wave radiation patterns could be simply modeled by using a function of the normalized hypocentral distance, which is a product of the wave number and hypocentral distance. This behavior suggests that major cause of distortion of the apparent radiation pattern is seismic wave scattering and diffraction within the heterogeneous crust. On the basis of observed normalized hypocentral distance dependency, we proposed a method for prediction of spatial distributions of maximum P- and S-wave amplitudes. Our method incorporating normalized hypocentral distance dependence of the apparent radiation pattern reproduced the observed spatial distributions of maximum P- and S-wave amplitudes over a wide frequency and distance ranges successfully.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Estimation of shallow S-wave velocity structure and site response characteristics by microtremor array measurements in Tekirdag region, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagoz, Ozlem; Chimoto, Kosuke; Citak, Seckin; Ozel, Oguz; Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Hatayama, Ken

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we aimed to explore the S-wave velocity structure of shallow soils using microtremors in order to estimate site responses in Tekirdag and surrounding areas (NW Turkey). We collected microtremor array data at 44 sites in Tekirdag, Marmara Ereglisi, Corlu, and Muratlı. The phase velocities of Rayleigh waves were estimated from the microtremor data using a Spatial Autocorrelation method. Then, we applied a hybrid genetic simulated annealing algorithm to obtain a 1D S-wave velocity structure at each site. Comparison between the horizontal-to-vertical ratio of microtremors and computed ellipticities of the fundamental mode Rayleigh waves showed good agreement with validation models. The depth of the engineering bedrock changed from 20 to 50 m in the Tekirdag city center and along the coastline with a velocity range of 700-930 m/s, and it ranged between 10 and 65 m in Marmara Ereglisi. The average S-wave velocity of the engineering bedrock was 780 m/s in the region. We obtained average S-wave velocities in the upper 30 m to compare site amplifications. Empirical relationships between the AVs30, the site amplifications, and also average topographic slopes were established for use in future site effects microzonation studies in the region.

  12. Low velocity crustal flow and crust-mantle coupling mechanism in Yunnan, SE Tibet, revealed by 3D S-wave velocity and azimuthal anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haopeng; Zhu, Liangbao; Su, Youjin

    2016-08-01

    We used teleseismic data recorded by a permanent seismic network in Yunnan, SE Tibet, and measured the interstation Rayleigh wave phase velocity between 10 and 60 s. A two-step inversion scheme was used to invert for the 3D S-wave velocity and azimuthal anisotropy structure of 10-110 km. The results show that there are two low velocity channels between depths of 20-30 km in Yunnan and that the fast axes are sub-parallel to the strikes of the low velocity channels, which supports the crustal flow model. The azimuthal anisotropy pattern is quite complicated and reveals a complex crust-mantle coupling mechanism in Yunnan. The N-S trending Lüzhijiang Fault separates the Dianzhong Block into two parts. In the western Dianzhong Block, the fast axis of the S-wave changes with depth, which indicates that the crust and the lithospheric mantle are decoupled. In the eastern Dianzhong Block and the western Yangtze Craton, the crust and the lithospheric mantle may be decoupled because of crustal flow, despite a coherent S-wave fast axis at depths of 10-110 km. In addition, the difference between the S-wave fast axis in the lithosphere and the SKS splitting measurement suggests that the lithosphere and the upper mantle are decoupled there. In the Baoshan Block, the stratified anisotropic pattern suggests that the crust and the upper mantle are decoupled.

  13. Analytics for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNeill, Sheila; Campbell, Lorna M.; Hawksey, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the development and use of analytics in the context of education. Using Buckingham Shum's three levels of analytics, the authors present a critical analysis of current developments in the domain of learning analytics, and contrast the potential value of analytics research and development with real world…

  14. Let's Talk... Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana G.

    2012-01-01

    Talk about analytics seems to be everywhere. Everyone is talking about analytics. Yet even with all the talk, many in higher education have questions about--and objections to--using analytics in colleges and universities. In this article, the author explores the use of analytics in, and all around, higher education. (Contains 1 note.)

  15. Poisson's ratio model derived from P- and S-wave reflection seismic data at the CO2CRC Otway Project pilot site, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilecke, Thies; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Tanner, David C.; Ziesch, Jennifer; Research Group Protect

    2014-05-01

    Compressional wave (P-wave) reflection seismic field measurements are a standard tool for subsurface exploration. 2-D seismic measurements are often used for overview measurements, but also as near-surface supplement to fill gaps that often exist in 3-D seismic data sets. Such supplementing 2-D measurements are typically simple with respect to field layout. This is an opportunity for the use of shear waves (S-waves). Within the last years, S-waves have become more and more important. One reason is that P- and S-waves are differently sensitive to fluids and pore fill so that the additional S-wave information can be used to enhance lithological studies. Another reason is that S-waves have the advantage of higher spatial resolution. Within the same signal bandwidth they typically have about half the wavelength of P-waves. In near-surface unconsolidated sediments they can even enhance the structural resolution by one order of magnitude. We make use of these capabilities within the PROTECT project. In addition to already existing 2-D P-wave data, we carried out a near surface 2-D S-wave field survey at the CO2CRC Otway Project pilot site, close to Warrnambool, Australia in November 2013. The combined analysis of P-wave and S-wave data is used to construct a Poisson's Ratio 2-D model down to roughly 600 m depth. The Poisson's ratio values along a 1 km long profile at the site are surprisingly high, ranging from 0.47 in the carbonate-dominated near surface to 0.4 at depth. In the literature, average lab measurements of 0.22 for unfissured carbonates and 0.37 for fissured examples have been reported. The high values that we found may indicate areas of rather unconsolidated or fractured material, or enhanced fluid contents, and will be subject of further studies. This work is integrated in a larger workflow towards prediction of CO2 leakage and monitoring strategies for subsurface storage in general. Acknowledgement: This work was sponsored in part by the Australian

  16. Correlation of 1- to 10-Hz earthquake resonances with surface measurements of S-wave reflections and refractions in the upper 50 m

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Frankel, A.D.; Cranswick, E.; Meremonte, M.E.; Odum, J.K.

    2000-01-01

    Resonances observed in earthquake seismograms recorded in Seattle, Washington, the central United States and Sherman Oaks, California, are correlated with each site's respective near-surface seismic velocity profile and reflectivity determined from shallow seismic-reflection/refraction surveys. In all of these cases the resonance accounts for the highest amplitude shaking at the site above 1 Hz. These results show that imaging near-surface reflections from the ground surface can locate impedance structures that are important contributors to earthquake ground shaking. A high-amplitude S-wave reflection, recorded 250-m northeast and 300-m east of the Seattle Kingdome earthquake-recording station, with a two-way travel time of about 0.23 to 0.27 sec (about 18- to 22-m depth) marks the boundary between overlying alluvium (VS < 180 m/sec) and a higher velocity material (VS about 400 m/sec). This reflector probably causes a strong 2-Hz resonance that is observed in the earthquake data for the site near the Kingdome. In the central United States, S-wave reflections from a high-impedance boundary (an S-wave velocity increase from about 200 m/sec to 2000 m/sec) at about 40-m depth corresponds to a strong fundamental resonance at about 1.5 Hz. In Sherman Oaks, strong resonances at about 1.0 and 4 Hz are consistently observed on earthquake seismograms. A strong S-wave reflector at about 40-m depth may cause the 1.0 Hz resonance. The 4.0-Hz resonance is possibly explained by constructive interference between the first overtone of the 1.0-Hz resonance and a 3.25- to 3.9-Hz resonance calculated from an areally consistent impedance boundary at about 10-m depth as determined by S-wave refraction data.

  17. S-wave velocity structure and site effect parameters derived from microtremor arrays in the Western Plain of Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chun-Hsiang; Chen, Chun-Te; Lin, Che-Min; Wen, Kuo-Liang; Huang, Jyun-Yan; Chang, Shun-Chiang

    2016-10-01

    In this study, microtremor array measurements were conducted at 45 sites in the Western Plain of Taiwan. The arrays were approximately 30 m or 60 m in radius, depending on the site. The maximum-likelihood frequency-wavenumber method was adopted to obtain the phase velocities of Rayleigh waves, and then a genetic algorithm technique based on an inversion scheme of the fundamental mode of the Rayleigh waves' dispersion curves was applied to calculate a preliminary S-wave velocity (Vs) profile at each site. Because a layer of thick sediment covers the bedrock in the Western Plain of Taiwan, microtremor arrays in this size range cannot estimate the structure of the entire sediment. Therefore, this study implemented further inversion of the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios of the microtremors to estimate the deeper structures up to the bedrock of Vs greater than 1000 m/s. Previously logged velocity profiles for different depths at or near our study sites were collected and compared with the Vs profiles derived from our microtremor array measurements; the results were found to be highly comparable. Therefore, we could delineate the depth distributions for the layer depths for Vs = 600 m/s and 1000 m/s in this region. The depth for Vs = 600 m/s is approximately 50 m in the piedmont area and approximately 300 m at the coastline; moreover, the depths for Vs = 1000 m/s increase from 200 m in the piedmont area to approximately 1000 m at the coastline. The depths for Vs = 1.0 km/s (Z1.0), which is an important parameter that accounts for the basin effect in recent ground motion prediction equations, are consequently available at the study sites. The distribution of Z1.0 as a function of Vs30 indicates higher similarity to that in Japan than in the San Francisco Bay area.

  18. The limits of ray theory when measuring shear wave splitting in the lowermost mantle with ScS waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacki, Andy; Wookey, James

    2016-09-01

    Observations of shear wave splitting provide unambiguous evidence of the presence of anisotropy in the Earth's lowermost mantle, a region known as D″. Much recent work has attempted to use these observations to place constraints on strain above the core-mantle boundary (CMB), as this may help map flow throughout the mantle. Previously, this interpretation has relied on the assumption that waves can be modelled as infinite-frequency rays, or that the Earth is radially symmetric. Due to computational constraints it has not been possible to test these approximations until now. We use fully three-dimensional, generally-anisotropic simulations of ScS waves at the frequencies of the observations to show that ray methods are sometimes inadequate to interpret the signals seen. We test simple, uniform models, and for a D″ layer as thin as 50 km, significant splitting may be produced, and we find that recovered fast orientations usually reflect the imposed fast orientation above the CMB. Ray theory in these cases provides useful results, though there are occasional, notable differences between forward methods. Isotropic models do not generate apparent splitting. We also test more complex models, including ones based on our current understanding of mineral plasticity and elasticity in D″. The results show that variations of anisotropy over even several hundred kilometres cause the ray-theoretical and finite-frequency calculations to differ greatly. Importantly, models with extreme mineral alignment in D″ yield splitting times not dissimilar to observations (δt ≤ 3 s), suggesting that anisotropy in the lowermost mantle is probably much stronger than previously thought-potentially ˜10 % shear wave anisotropy or more. We show that if the base of the mantle is as complicated as we believe, future studies of lowermost mantle anisotropy will have to incorporate finite-frequency effects to fully interpret observations of shear wave splitting.

  19. Crustal S-wave structure beneath Eastern Black Sea Region revealed by Rayleigh-wave group velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çınar, Hakan; Alkan, Hamdi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the crustal S-wave structure beneath the Eastern Black Sea Region (including the Eastern Black Sea Basin (EBSB) and Eastern Pontides (EP)) has been revealed using inversion of single-station, fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave group velocities in the period range of 4-40 seconds. We used digital broadband recordings of 13 regional earthquakes that recently occurred in the easternmost EBSB recorded at stations of the Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI). The average group-velocity-dispersion curves were generated from 26 paths for the EBSB, and 16 paths for the EP, and they were inverted to determine the average 1-D shear-wave structure of the region. We have created a pseudo-section, roughly depicting the crustal structure of the region based on the group velocity inversion results of all station-earthquake paths. The thickness of the sedimentary layer reaches 12 km in the center of EBSB (Vs = 2.5-3.1 km/s) and decreases 4 km in the EP. There is a thin sedimentary layer in the EP (Vs = 2.7 km/s). A consolidated thin crust that exists in the EBSB possesses a high seismic velocity (Vs = 3.8 km/s). While a thin (∼26 km) and transitional crust exists beneath the EBSB, a thick (about 42 km) continental crust exists beneath the EP where the Conrad is clearly seen at about a 24 km depth. Thick continental crust in the EP region is clearly distinguished from a gradational velocity change (Vs = 3.4-3.8 km/s). The Moho dips approximately southwards, and the Vs velocity (4.25-4.15 km/s) beneath the Moho discontinuity decreases from the EBSB to the EP in the N-S direction. This may be an indication of a southward subduction.

  20. Multiple mantle upwellings beneath the Northern East-African Rift System from relative P- and S-wave traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civiero, Chiara; Hammond, James; Goes, Saskia; Fishwick, Stewart; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Ayele, Atalay; Doubre, Cecile; Goitom, Berhe; Keir, Derek; Kendall, Mike; Leroy, Sylvie; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Rumpker, Georg; Stuart, Graham

    2015-04-01

    Mantle plumes have been invoked as the likely cause of East African Rift volcanism and extension. However, the nature of mantle upwelling is debated, with proposed configurations ranging from a single broad plume, the African Superplume, connected to the LLSVP beneath Southern Africa, to one or more distinct lower-mantle sources along the rift. We present a new relative travel-time tomography model that images detailed P- and S- wave velocities from P,S and SKS phases below the northern East-African, Red Sea and Gulf of Aden rift. Data comes from stations that cover the area from Tanzania to Saudi Arabia. The aperture of the integrated dataset allows us to image for the first time structures of ~100 km length scale down to depths of 900 km beneath this region. Our images provide evidence of at least two low-velocity structures with a diameter of ~200 km that continue through the transition zone and into the lower mantle: the first extends to at least 900 km beneath Afar, and a second reaching at least 750 km depth just west of the Main Ethiopian Rift, a region with off-rift volcanism. Taking into account seismic sensitivity to temperature and thermally controlled phase boundary topography, we interpret these features as multiple focused upwellings from below the transition zone with excess temperatures of 100±50 K. The scale of the upwellings is smaller than any of the previously proposed lower mantle plume sources. This suggests the ponding or flow of deep-plume material below the transition zone may be spawning smaller upper-mantle upwellings.

  1. An objective rationale for the choice of regularisation parameter with application to global multiple-frequency S-wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaroli, C.; Sambridge, M.; Lévêque, J.-J.; Debayle, E.; Nolet, G.

    2013-10-01

    In a linear ill-posed inverse problem, the regularisation parameter (damping) controls the balance between minimising both the residual data misfit and the model norm. Poor knowledge of data uncertainties often makes the selection of damping rather arbitrary. To go beyond that subjectivity, an objective rationale for the choice of damping is presented, which is based on the coherency of delay-time estimates in different frequency bands. Our method is tailored to the problem of global multiple-frequency tomography (MFT), using a data set of 287 078 S-wave delay times measured in five frequency bands (10, 15, 22, 34, and 51 s central periods). Whereas for each ray path the delay-time estimates should vary coherently from one period to the other, the noise most likely is not coherent. Thus, the lack of coherency of the information in different frequency bands is exploited, using an analogy with the cross-validation method, to identify models dominated by noise. In addition, a sharp change of behaviour of the model ℓ∞-norm, as the damping becomes lower than a threshold value, is interpreted as the signature of data noise starting to significantly pollute at least one model component. Models with damping larger than this threshold are diagnosed as being constructed with poor data exploitation. Finally, a preferred model is selected from the remaining range of permitted model solutions. This choice is quasi-objective in terms of model interpretation, as the selected model shows a high degree of similarity with almost all other permitted models (correlation superior to 98% up to spherical harmonic degree 80). The obtained tomographic model is displayed in the mid lower-mantle (660-1910 km depth), and is shown to be compatible with three other recent global shear-velocity models. A wider application of the presented rationale should permit us to converge towards more objective seismic imaging of Earth's mantle.

  2. Multimedia Analysis plus Visual Analytics = Multimedia Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Chinchor, Nancy; Thomas, James J.; Wong, Pak C.; Christel, Michael; Ribarsky, Martin W.

    2010-10-01

    Multimedia analysis has focused on images, video, and to some extent audio and has made progress in single channels excluding text. Visual analytics has focused on the user interaction with data during the analytic process plus the fundamental mathematics and has continued to treat text as did its precursor, information visualization. The general problem we address in this tutorial is the combining of multimedia analysis and visual analytics to deal with multimedia information gathered from different sources, with different goals or objectives, and containing all media types and combinations in common usage.

  3. Analytical Challenges in Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glajch, Joseph L.

    1986-01-01

    Highlights five major analytical areas (electrophoresis, immunoassay, chromatographic separations, protein and DNA sequencing, and molecular structures determination) and discusses how analytical chemistry could further improve these techniques and thereby have a major impact on biotechnology. (JN)

  4. Analyticity without Differentiability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirillova, Evgenia; Spindler, Karlheinz

    2008-01-01

    In this article we derive all salient properties of analytic functions, including the analytic version of the inverse function theorem, using only the most elementary convergence properties of series. Not even the notion of differentiability is required to do so. Instead, analytical arguments are replaced by combinatorial arguments exhibiting…

  5. Josephson effects in the junction formed by DIII-class topological and s-wave superconductors with an embedded quantum dot

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Shan, Wan-Fei; Wu, Hai-Na; Gong, Wei-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the Josephson effects in the junction formed by the indirect coupling between DIII-class topological and s-wave superconductors via an embedded quantum dot. Due to the presence of two kinds of superconductors, three dot-superconductor coupling manners are considered, respectively. As a result, the Josephson current is found to oscillate in period 2π. More importantly, the presence of Majorana doublet in the DIII-class superconductor renders the current finite at the case of zero phase difference, with its sign determined by the fermion parity of such a junction. In addition, the dot-superconductor coupling plays a nontrivial role in adjusting the Josephson current. When the s-wave superconductor couples to the dot in the weak limit, the current direction will have an opportunity to reverse. It is believed that these results will be helpful for understanding the transport properties of the DIII-class superconductor. PMID:27324426

  6. Josephson effects in the junction formed by DIII-class topological and s-wave superconductors with an embedded quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Shan, Wan-Fei; Wu, Hai-Na; Gong, Wei-Jiang

    2016-06-21

    We investigate the Josephson effects in the junction formed by the indirect coupling between DIII-class topological and s-wave superconductors via an embedded quantum dot. Due to the presence of two kinds of superconductors, three dot-superconductor coupling manners are considered, respectively. As a result, the Josephson current is found to oscillate in period 2π. More importantly, the presence of Majorana doublet in the DIII-class superconductor renders the current finite at the case of zero phase difference, with its sign determined by the fermion parity of such a junction. In addition, the dot-superconductor coupling plays a nontrivial role in adjusting the Josephson current. When the s-wave superconductor couples to the dot in the weak limit, the current direction will have an opportunity to reverse. It is believed that these results will be helpful for understanding the transport properties of the DIII-class superconductor.

  7. The effect of s-wave scattering length on self-trapping and tunneling phenomena of Fermi gases in one-dimensional accelerating optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wei; Dou, Fu-Quan; Sun, Jian-An; Duan, Wen-Shan

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the tunneling dynamics of the Fermi gases in an optical lattice in the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) regime. The three critical scattering lengths and the system energies are found in different cases of Josephson oscillation (JO), oscillating-phase-type self-trapping (OPTST), running-phase-type self-trapping (RPTST), and self-trapping (ST). It is found that the s-wave scattering lengths have a crucial role on the tunneling dynamics. By adjusting the scattering length in the adiabatic condition, the transition probability changes with the adiabatic periodicity and a rectangular periodic pattern emerges. The periodicity of the rectangular wave depends on the system parameters such as the periodicity of the adjustable parameter, the s-wave scattering length. Project supported by the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA01020304) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11275156, 91026005, 11365020, and 11047010).

  8. Joint inversion of normal-mode and finite-frequency S-wave data using an irregular tomographic grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaroli, Christophe; Lambotte, Sophie; Lévêque, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Global-scale tomographic models should aim at satisfying the full seismic spectrum. For this purpose, and to better constrain isotropic 3-D variations of shear velocities in the mantle, we tackle a joint inversion of spheroidal normal-mode structure coefficients and multiple-frequency S-wave delay times. In all previous studies for which normal modes were jointly inverted for, with body and/or surface waves, the mantle was laterally parametrized with uniform basis functions, such as spherical harmonics, equal-area blocks and evenly spaced spherical splines. In particular, spherical harmonics naturally appear when considering the Earth's free oscillations. However, progress towards higher resolution joint tomography requires a movement away from such uniform parametrization to overcome its computational inefficiency to adapt to local variations in resolution. The main goal of this study is to include normal modes into a joint inversion based upon a non-uniform parametrization that is adapted to the spatially varying smallest resolving length of the data. Thus, we perform the first joint inversion of normal-mode and body-wave data using an irregular tomographic grid, optimized according to ray density. We show how to compute the projection of 3-D sensitivity kernels for both data sets onto our parametrization made up of spherical layers spanned with irregular Delaunay triangulations. This approach, computationally efficient, allows us to map into the joint model multiscale structural informations from data including periods in the 10-51 s range for body waves and 332-2134 s for normal modes. Tomographic results are focused on the 400-2110 km depth range, where our data coverage is the most relevant. We discuss the potential of a better resolution where the grid is fine, compared to spherical harmonics up to degree 40, as the number of model parameters is similar. Our joint model seems to contain coherent structural components beyond degree 40, such as those related

  9. Determination of Bedrock Variations and S-wave Velocity Structure in the NW part of Turkey for Earthquake Hazard Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozel, A. O.; Arslan, M. S.; Aksahin, B. B.; Genc, T.; Isseven, T.; Tuncer, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Tekirdag region (NW Turkey) is quite close to the North Anatolian Fault which is capable of producing a large earthquake. Therefore, earthquake hazard mitigation studies are important for the urban areas close to the major faults. From this point of view, integration of different geophysical methods has important role for the study of seismic hazard problems including seismotectonic zoning. On the other hand, geological mapping and determining the subsurface structure, which is a key to assist management of new developed areas, conversion of current urban areas or assessment of urban geological hazards can be performed by integrated geophysical methods. This study has been performed in the frame of a national project, which is a complimentary project of the cooperative project between Turkey and Japan (JICA&JST), named as "Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in the Marmara Region and Disaster Education". With this principal aim, this study is focused on Tekirdag and its surrounding region (NW of Turkey) where some uncertainties in subsurface knowledge (maps of bedrock depth, thickness of quaternary sediments, basin geometry and seismic velocity structure,) need to be resolved. Several geophysical methods (microgravity, magnetic and single station and array microtremor measurements) are applied and the results are evaluated to characterize lithological changes in the region. Array microtremor measurements with several radiuses are taken in 30 locations and 1D-velocity structures of S-waves are determined by the inversion of phase velocities of surface waves, and the results of 1D structures are verified by theoretical Rayleigh wave modelling. Following the array measurements, single-station microtremor measurements are implemented at 75 locations to determine the predominant frequency distribution. The predominant frequencies in the region range from 0.5 Hz to 8 Hz in study area. On the other hand, microgravity and magnetic measurements are performed on

  10. An Objective Rationale for the Choice of Regularisation Parameter with Application to Global Multiple-Frequency S-Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaroli, C.; Sambridge, M.; Leveque, J. J.; Debayle, E.; Nolet, G.

    2014-12-01

    In a linear ill-posed inverse problem, the regularisation parameter (damping) controls the balance between minimising both the residual data misfit and the model norm. Poor knowledge of data uncertainties often makes the selection of damping rather arbitrary. To go beyond that subjectivity, an objective rationale for the choice of damping is presented, which is based on the coherency of delay-time estimates in different frequency bands. Our method is tailored to the problem of global Multiple-Frequency Tomography, using a data set of 287078 S-wave delay-times measured in five frequency bands (10, 15, 22, 34, 51 s central periods). Whereas for each ray path the delay-time estimates should vary coherently from one period to the other, the noise most likely is not coherent. Thus, the lack of coherency of the information in different frequency bands is exploited, using an analogy with the cross-validation method, to identify models dominated by noise.In addition, a sharp change of behaviour of the model infinity-norm, as the damping becomes lower than a threshold value, is interpreted as the signature of data noise starting to significantly pollute at least one model component. Models with damping larger than this threshold are diagnosed as being constructed with poor data exploitation.Finally, a preferred model is selected from the remaining range of permitted model solutions. This choice is quasi-objective in terms of model interpretation, as the selected model shows a high degree of similarity with almost all other permitted models. The obtained tomographic model is displayed in mid lower-mantle (660-1910 km depth), and is shown to be mostly compatible with three other recent global shear-velocity models, while significant differences can be noticed. A wider application of the presented rationale should permit us to converge towards more objective seismic imaging of the Earth's mantle, using as much as possible of the relevant structural information in the data

  11. P-Wave and S-Wave Velocity Structure of Submarine Landslide Associated With Gas Hydrate Layer on Frontal Ridge of Northern Cascadia Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, T.; Lu, H.; Yelisetti, S.; Spence, G.

    2015-12-01

    The submarine landslide associated with gas hydrate is a potential risk for environment and engineering projects, and thus from long time ago it has been a hot topic of hydrate research. The study target is Slipstream submarine landslide, one of the slope failures observed on the frontal ridges of the Northern Cascadia accretionary margin off Vancouver Island. The previous studies indicated a possible connection between this submarine landslide feature and gas hydrate, whose occurrence is indicated by a prominent bottom-simulating reflector (BSR), at a depth of ~265-275 m beneath the seafloor (mbsf). The OBS (Ocean Bottom Seismometer) data collected during SeaJade (Seafloor Earthquake Array - Japan Canada Cascadia Experiment) project were used to derive the subseafloor velocity structure for both P- and S-wave using travel times picked from refraction and reflection events. The P-wave velocity structure above the BSR showed anomalous high velocities of about 2.0 km/s at shallow depths of 100 mbsf, closely matching the estimated depth of the glide plane (100 ± 10 m). Forward modelling of S-waves was carried out using the data from the OBS horizontal components. The S-wave velocities, interpreted in conjunction with the P-wave results, provide the key constraints on the gas hydrate distribution within the pores. The hydrate distribution in the pores is important for determining concentrations, and also for determining the frame strength which is critical for controlling slope stability of steep frontal ridges. The increase in S-wave velocity suggests that the hydrate is distributed as part of the load-bearing matrix to increase the rigidity of the sediment.

  12. Surface seismic measurements of near-surface P-and S-wave seismic velocities at earthquake recording stations, Seattle, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Frankel, A.D.; Odum, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    We measured P-and S-wave seismic velocities to about 40-m depth using seismic-refraction/reflection data on the ground surface at 13 sites in the Seattle, Washington, urban area, where portable digital seismographs recently recorded earthquakes. Sites with the lowest measured Vs correlate with highest ground motion amplification. These sites, such as at Harbor Island and in the Duwamish River industrial area (DRIA) south of the Kingdome, have an average Vs in the upper 30 m (V??s30) of 150 to 170 m/s. These values of V??s30 place these sites in soil profile type E (V??s30 < 180 m/s). A "rock" site, located at Seward Park on Tertiary sedimentary deposits, has a V??S30 of 433 m/s, which is soil type C (V??s30: 360 to 760 m/s). The Seward Park site V??s30 is about equal to, or up to 200 m/s slower than sites that were located on till or glacial outwash. High-amplitude P-and S-wave seismic reflections at several locations appear to correspond to strong resonances observed in earthquake spectra. An S-wave reflector at the Kingdome at about 17 to 22 m depth probably causes strong 2-Hz resonance that is observed in the earthquake data near the Kingdome.

  13. From d-wave to s-wave pairing in the iron-pnictide superconductor (Ba, K)Fe2As2

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, J.-Ph.; Juneau-Fecteau, A.; Gordon, R.T.; Rene de Cotret, S.; Doiron-Leyraud, N.; Luo, X.G.; Shakeripour, H.; Chang, J.; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Kim, Hyunsoo; Prozorov, Ruslan; Saito, T.; Fukazawa, H.; Kohori, Y.; Kihou, K.; Lee, C.H.; Iyo, A.; Eisaki, H.; Shen, B.; Wen, H.-W.; Taillefer, Louis

    2012-07-17

    The nature of the pairing state in iron-based superconductors is the subject of much debate. Here we argue that in one material, the stoichiometric iron pnictide KFe2As2, there is overwhelming evidence for a d-wave pairing state, characterized by symmetry-imposed vertical line nodes in the superconducting gap. This evidence is reviewed, with a focus on thermal conductivity and the strong impact of impurity scattering on the critical temperature Tc. We then compare KFe2As2 to Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2, obtained by Ba substitution, where the pairing symmetry is s-wave and the Tc is ten times higher. The transition from d-wave to s-wave within the same crystal structure provides a rare opportunity to investigate the connection between band structure and pairing mechanism. We also compare KFe2As2 to the nodal iron-based superconductor LaFePO, for which the pairing symmetry is probably not d-wave, but more likely s-wave with accidental line nodes.

  14. Study of the S-wave Kπ → Amplitude Using the Decay D+ → K-π+π+

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, Ana Amelia Bergamini

    2007-02-01

    In this work the S-wave component of the Kπ amplitude from decay of D+ → K+π+π+ it is directly measured. The data come from the Fermilab E831/FOCUS experiment. The amplitude measurement is made using the partial wave analysis without any preliminary assumption about the nature of the S-wave component of the Kπ system. The phase and magnitude of the S-wave amplitude are generic functions to be determined directly through the Dalitz plot fit. For the sake of comparison, our results the same decay is analyzed using the isobar model, which is the standard way to analyze the Dalitz plot. The data fit obtained with the partial wave analysis is better than the data fit from the isobar model. The phase variation with respect to the invariant mass Kπ is compared with the measurement of the phase Δ$0\\atop{I=1/2}$ (m) from Kπ → Kπ scattering. The difference between both analysis is discussed considering: a difference in the composition of the isospin components I = 1/2 and I = 3/2 of the Kπ system between D+ decay and the Kπ → Kπ scattering; and the final state interaction involving all particles from decay.

  15. Dynamical stability of dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates with temporal modulation of the s-wave scattering length.

    PubMed

    Sabari, S; Jisha, Chandroth P; Porsezian, K; Brazhnyi, Valeriy A

    2015-09-01

    We study the stabilization properties of dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate by temporal modulation of short-range two-body interaction. Through both analytical and numerical methods, we analyze the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii equation with short-range two-body and long-range, nonlocal, dipolar interaction terms. We derive the equation of motion and effective potential of the dipolar condensate by variational method. We show that there is an enhancement of the condensate stability due to the inclusion of dipolar interaction in addition to the two-body contact interaction. We also show that the stability of the dipolar condensate increases in the presence of time varying two-body contact interaction; the temporal modification of the contact interaction prevents the collapse of dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate. Finally we confirm the semi-analytical prediction through the direct numerical simulations of the governing equation.

  16. EMPIRICAL OBSERVATIONS OF EARTHQUAKE-EXPLOSION DISCRIMINATION USING P/S RATIOS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE SOURCES OF EXPLOSION S-WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W R; Matzel, E; Pasyanos, M; Harris, D B; Gok, R; Ford, S R

    2007-06-28

    We continue exploring methodologies to improve earthquake-explosion discrimination using regional amplitude ratios such as P/S. The earliest simple source models predicted P/S wave amplitudes for explosions should be much larger than for earthquakes across the body wave spectrum. However empirical observations show the separation of explosions from earthquakes using regional P/S amplitudes is strongly frequency dependent, with relatively poor separation at low frequencies ({approx} 1 Hz) and relatively good separation at high frequencies (> {approx}3 Hz). We demonstrate this using closely located pairs of earthquakes and explosions recorded on common, publicly available stations at test sites around the world e.g. Nevada, Lop Nor, Novaya Zemlya, Semipalatinsk, India, Pakistan, and North Korea. We show this pattern appears to have little dependence on the point source variability revealed by longer period surface wave modeling. For example regional waveform modeling shows strong tectonic release from the May 1998 India test in contrast with very little tectonic release in the recent North Korea test, but the P/S discrimination behavior is similar in both events, using the limited regional data available. While accepted explosion P-wave models have been available for many years, the frequency behavior of the P/S discriminant has inspired a variety of competing models to explain how explosions generate S-waves. We briefly review some of these models in the context of the P/S discriminant observations. One hypothesis is that S-waves are generated mainly from conversion of P-waves and surface waves, so S-waves from explosions can be predicted from the P-wave models via a frequency dependent transfer function. A different hypothesis is that significant generation of S-waves comes from the CLVD (compensated linear vector dipole) component created by spall above the explosion. A recent model by Fisk (2006) shows the explosion S-wave spectra can be modeled using the P

  17. A non-parametric method for automatic determination of P-wave and S-wave arrival times: application to local micro earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawles, Christopher; Thurber, Clifford

    2015-08-01

    We present a simple, fast, and robust method for automatic detection of P- and S-wave arrivals using a nearest neighbours-based approach. The nearest neighbour algorithm is one of the most popular time-series classification methods in the data mining community and has been applied to time-series problems in many different domains. Specifically, our method is based on the non-parametric time-series classification method developed by Nikolov. Instead of building a model by estimating parameters from the data, the method uses the data itself to define the model. Potential phase arrivals are identified based on their similarity to a set of reference data consisting of positive and negative sets, where the positive set contains examples of analyst identified P- or S-wave onsets and the negative set contains examples that do not contain P waves or S waves. Similarity is defined as the square of the Euclidean distance between vectors representing the scaled absolute values of the amplitudes of the observed signal and a given reference example in time windows of the same length. For both P waves and S waves, a single pass is done through the bandpassed data, producing a score function defined as the ratio of the sum of similarity to positive examples over the sum of similarity to negative examples for each window. A phase arrival is chosen as the centre position of the window that maximizes the score function. The method is tested on two local earthquake data sets, consisting of 98 known events from the Parkfield region in central California and 32 known events from the Alpine Fault region on the South Island of New Zealand. For P-wave picks, using a reference set containing two picks from the Parkfield data set, 98 per cent of Parkfield and 94 per cent of Alpine Fault picks are determined within 0.1 s of the analyst pick. For S-wave picks, 94 per cent and 91 per cent of picks are determined within 0.2 s of the analyst picks for the Parkfield and Alpine Fault data set

  18. P-wave and S-wave traveltime residuals in Caledonian and adjacent units of Northern Europe and Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejrani, Babak; Balling, Niels; Holm Jacobsen, Bo; Kind, Rainer; Tilmann, Frederik; England, Richard; Bom Nielsen, Søren

    2014-05-01

    This work combines P-wave and S-wave travel time residuals from in total 477 temporary and 56 permanent stations deployed across Caledonian and adjacent units in Northern Europe and Greenland (Tor, Gregersen et al. 2002; SVEKALAPKO, Sandoval et al., 2003; CALAS, Medhus et al, 2012a; MAGNUS, Weidle et al. 2010; SCANLIPS south, England & Ebbing 2012; SCANLIPS north, Hejrani et al. 2012; JULS Hejrani et al. 2013; plus permanent stations in the region). We picked data from 2002 to 2012 (1221 events) using a cross correlation technique on all waveforms recorded for each event. In this way we achieve maximum consistency of relative residuals over the whole region (Medhus et al. 2012b). On the European side 18362 P-wave travel time residuals was delivered. In East Greenland 1735 P-wave residuals were recovered at the Central Fjord array (13 stations) and 2294 residuals from the sparse GLISN-array (23 stations). Likewise, we picked a total of 6034 residuals of the SV phase (For the Tor and SVEKALAPKO projects we used data from Amaru et al. 2008). Relative residuals within the region are mainly due to sub-crustal uppermost mantle velocity anomalies. A dominant subvertical boundary was detected by Medhus et al. (2012), running along the Tornquist zone, east of the Oslo Graben and crossing under high topography of the southern Scandes. We delineated this boundary in more detail, tracking it towards the Atlantic margin north of Trondheim. Further north (Scanlips north), a similar subvertical upper mantle boundary seems to be present close to the coast, coinciding with the edge of the stretched crust. The North German Caledonides were probed by the new JULS (JUtland Lower Saxony) profile which closes the gap between Tor and CALAS arrays. Mantle structure found by the Tor project was confirmed, and modelling was extended to the eastern edge of the North Sea. References: Amaru, M. L., Spakman, W., Villaseñor, A., Sandoval, S., Kissling, E., 2008, A new absolute arrival time data

  19. Analytical Chemistry in Russia.

    PubMed

    Zolotov, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    Research in Russian analytical chemistry (AC) is carried out on a significant scale, and the analytical service solves practical tasks of geological survey, environmental protection, medicine, industry, agriculture, etc. The education system trains highly skilled professionals in AC. The development and especially manufacturing of analytical instruments should be improved; in spite of this, there are several good domestic instruments and other satisfy some requirements. Russian AC has rather good historical roots.

  20. Science Update: Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1980-01-01

    Briefly discusses new instrumentation in the field of analytical chemistry. Advances in liquid chromatography, photoacoustic spectroscopy, the use of lasers, and mass spectrometry are also discussed. (CS)

  1. Learning Analytics Considered Harmful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dringus, Laurie P.

    2012-01-01

    This essay is written to present a prospective stance on how learning analytics, as a core evaluative approach, must help instructors uncover the important trends and evidence of quality learner data in the online course. A critique is presented of strategic and tactical issues of learning analytics. The approach to the critique is taken through…

  2. Validating Analytical Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ember, Lois R.

    1977-01-01

    The procedures utilized by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC) to develop, evaluate, and validate analytical methods for the analysis of chemical pollutants are detailed. Methods validated by AOAC are used by the EPA and FDA in their enforcement programs and are granted preferential treatment by the courts. (BT)

  3. Analytical mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  4. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  5. Extreme Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Pascucci, Valerio

    2012-05-08

    Extreme-scale visual analytics (VA) is about applying VA to extreme-scale data. The articles in this special issue examine advances related to extreme-scale VA problems, their analytical and computational challenges, and their real-world applications.

  6. Signals: Applying Academic Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Kimberly E.

    2010-01-01

    Academic analytics helps address the public's desire for institutional accountability with regard to student success, given the widespread concern over the cost of higher education and the difficult economic and budgetary conditions prevailing worldwide. Purdue University's Signals project applies the principles of analytics widely used in…

  7. Teaching the Analytical Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Using a survey of 138 writing programs, I argue that we must be more explicit about what we think students should get out of analysis to make it more likely that students will transfer their analytical skills to different settings. To ensure our students take analytical skills with them at the end of the semester, we must simplify the task we…

  8. Quo vadis, analytical chemistry?

    PubMed

    Valcárcel, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an open, personal, fresh approach to the future of Analytical Chemistry in the context of the deep changes Science and Technology are anticipated to experience. Its main aim is to challenge young analytical chemists because the future of our scientific discipline is in their hands. A description of not completely accurate overall conceptions of our discipline, both past and present, to be avoided is followed by a flexible, integral definition of Analytical Chemistry and its cornerstones (viz., aims and objectives, quality trade-offs, the third basic analytical reference, the information hierarchy, social responsibility, independent research, transfer of knowledge and technology, interfaces to other scientific-technical disciplines, and well-oriented education). Obsolete paradigms, and more accurate general and specific that can be expected to provide the framework for our discipline in the coming years are described. Finally, the three possible responses of analytical chemists to the proposed changes in our discipline are discussed. PMID:26631024

  9. Quo vadis, analytical chemistry?

    PubMed

    Valcárcel, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an open, personal, fresh approach to the future of Analytical Chemistry in the context of the deep changes Science and Technology are anticipated to experience. Its main aim is to challenge young analytical chemists because the future of our scientific discipline is in their hands. A description of not completely accurate overall conceptions of our discipline, both past and present, to be avoided is followed by a flexible, integral definition of Analytical Chemistry and its cornerstones (viz., aims and objectives, quality trade-offs, the third basic analytical reference, the information hierarchy, social responsibility, independent research, transfer of knowledge and technology, interfaces to other scientific-technical disciplines, and well-oriented education). Obsolete paradigms, and more accurate general and specific that can be expected to provide the framework for our discipline in the coming years are described. Finally, the three possible responses of analytical chemists to the proposed changes in our discipline are discussed.

  10. S-wave attenuation in northeastern Sonora, Mexico, near the faults that ruptured during the earthquake of 3 May 1887 Mw 7.5.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Escobar, Gina P; Castro, Raúl R

    2014-01-01

    We used a new data set of relocated earthquakes recorded by the Seismic Network of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (RESNES) to characterize the attenuation of S-waves in the fault zone of the 1887 Sonora earthquake (M w 7.5). We determined spectral attenuation functions for hypocentral distances (r) between 10 and 140 km using a nonparametric approach and found that in this fault zone the spectral amplitudes decay slower with distance at low frequencies (f < 4 Hz) compared to those reported in previous studies in the region using more distant recordings. The attenuation functions obtained for 23 frequencies (0.4 ≤ f ≤ 63.1 Hz) permit us estimating the average quality factor Q S  = (141 ± 1.1 )f ((0.74 ± 0.04)) and a geometrical spreading term G(r) = 1/r (0.21). The values of Q estimated for S-wave paths traveling along the fault system that rupture during the 1887 event, in the north-south direction, are considerably lower than the average Q estimated using source-station paths from multiple stations and directions. These results indicate that near the fault zone S waves attenuate considerably more than at regional scale, particularly at low frequencies. This may be the result of strong scattering near the faults due to the fractured upper crust and higher intrinsic attenuation due to stress concentration near the faults.

  11. S-wave attenuation in northeastern Sonora, Mexico, near the faults that ruptured during the earthquake of 3 May 1887 Mw 7.5.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Escobar, Gina P; Castro, Raúl R

    2014-01-01

    We used a new data set of relocated earthquakes recorded by the Seismic Network of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (RESNES) to characterize the attenuation of S-waves in the fault zone of the 1887 Sonora earthquake (M w 7.5). We determined spectral attenuation functions for hypocentral distances (r) between 10 and 140 km using a nonparametric approach and found that in this fault zone the spectral amplitudes decay slower with distance at low frequencies (f < 4 Hz) compared to those reported in previous studies in the region using more distant recordings. The attenuation functions obtained for 23 frequencies (0.4 ≤ f ≤ 63.1 Hz) permit us estimating the average quality factor Q S  = (141 ± 1.1 )f ((0.74 ± 0.04)) and a geometrical spreading term G(r) = 1/r (0.21). The values of Q estimated for S-wave paths traveling along the fault system that rupture during the 1887 event, in the north-south direction, are considerably lower than the average Q estimated using source-station paths from multiple stations and directions. These results indicate that near the fault zone S waves attenuate considerably more than at regional scale, particularly at low frequencies. This may be the result of strong scattering near the faults due to the fractured upper crust and higher intrinsic attenuation due to stress concentration near the faults. PMID:25674476

  12. Three-dimensional seismic tomography from P wave and S wave microearthquake travel times and rock physics characterization of the Campi Flegrei Caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, T.; Virieux, J.; Capuano, P.; Russo, G.

    2005-03-01

    The Campi Flegrei (CF) Caldera experiences dramatic ground deformations unsurpassed anywhere in the world. The source responsible for this phenomenon is still debated. With the aim of exploring the structure of the caldera as well as the role of hydrothermal fluids on velocity changes, a multidisciplinary approach dealing with three-dimensional delay time tomography and rock physics characterization has been followed. Selected seismic data were modeled by using a tomographic method based on an accurate finite difference travel time computation which simultaneously inverts P wave and S wave first-arrival times for both velocity model parameters and hypocenter locations. The retrieved P wave and S wave velocity images as well as the deduced Vp/Vs images were interpreted by using experimental measurements of rock physical properties on CF samples to take into account steam/water phase transition mechanisms affecting P wave and S wave velocities. Also, modeling of petrophysical properties for site-relevant rocks constrains the role of overpressured fluids on velocity. A flat and low Vp/Vs anomaly lies at 4 km depth under the city of Pozzuoli. Earthquakes are located at the top of this anomaly. This anomaly implies the presence of fractured overpressured gas-bearing formations and excludes the presence of melted rocks. At shallow depth, a high Vp/Vs anomaly located at 1 km suggests the presence of rocks containing fluids in the liquid phase. Finally, maps of the Vp*Vs product show a high Vp*Vs horseshoe-shaped anomaly located at 2 km depth. It is consistent with gravity data and well data and might constitute the on-land remainder of the caldera rim, detected below sea level by tomography using active source seismic data.

  13. Constraints on Mantle Composition of Western North American from Direct P and S Wave Velocities of Mantle Peridodite to 10 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Chen, T.; Qi, X.; Zou, Y.; Liebermann, R. C.; Li, B.

    2014-12-01

    An important geophysical approach to constrain the mineralogical composition of the mantle is to compare the elasticity of candidate compositional models with seismic profiles (e.g., PREM and AK135). In this study, a series of polycrystalline aggregates of peridotite KLB-1 (from Kilbourne Hole, New Mexico) were hot-pressed at 3-8 GPa 1200-1400°C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Electron Microprobe Analysis (EPMA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the texture, grain size, and composition of these well-sintered specimens. The fractions of each constituent phase in the aggregates were obtained from mass balance analysis. P and S wave velocities of two specimens hot pressed at 3 GPa were measured up to 10GPa at room temperature using ultrasonic interferometry. Based on the phase fractions from this study as well as the temperature dependence of P and S wave velocities for mantle minerals, the velocities of the KLB-1 peridotite along 1200-1400 oC adiabatic mantle geotherms were obtained and compared well with the seismic models of western North America, the region where these peridotite KLB-1 samples were collected. These comparisons provide unprecedented constraints on the composition of the upper mantle in this region and help us understand the nature of thermal and tectonic processes of the Rio Grande Rift.

  14. Robustness of s-wave pairing symmetry in iron-based superconductors and its implications for fundamentals of magnetically driven high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiangping; Yuan, Jing

    2016-10-01

    Based on the assumption that the superconducting state belongs to a single irreducible representation of lattice symmetry, we propose that the pairing symmetry in all measured iron-based superconductors is generally consistent with the A 1 g s-wave. Robust s-wave pairing throughout the different families of iron-based superconductors at different doping regions signals two fundamental principles behind high- T c superconducting mechanisms: (i) the correspondence principle: the short-range magnetic-exchange interactions and the Fermi surfaces act collaboratively to achieve high- T c superconductivity and determine pairing symmetries; (ii) the magnetic-selection pairing rule: superconductivity is only induced by the magnetic-exchange couplings from the super-exchange mechanism through cation-anion-cation chemical bonding. These principles explain why unconventional high- T c superconductivity appears to be such a rare but robust phenomena, with its strict requirements regarding the electronic environment. The results will help us to identify new electronic structures that can support high- T c superconductivity.

  15. Investigating P- and S-wave velocity structure beneath the Marmara region (Turkey) and the surrounding area from local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Gulten; Özel, Nurcan Meral; Koulakov, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the crustal structure beneath the Marmara region and the surrounding area in the western part of the North Anatolian fault zone. These areas have high seismicity and are of critical significance to earthquake hazards. The study was based on travel-time tomography using local moderate and micro-earthquakes occurring in the study area recorded by the Multi-Disciplinary Earthquake Research in High Risk Regions of Turkey project and Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute. We selected 2131 earthquakes and a total of 92,858 arrival times, consisting of 50,044 P-wave and 42,814 S-wave arrival times. We present detailed crustal structure down to 50 km depth beneath the Marmara region for P- and S-wave velocities using the LOTOS code based on iterative inversion. We used the distributions of the resulting seismic parameters ( Vp, Vs) to pick out significant geodynamical features. The high-velocity anomalies correlate well with fracturing segments of the North Anatolian fault. High seismicity is mostly concentrated in these segments. In particular, low velocities were observed beneath the central Marmara Sea at 5 km depth.

  16. Enzymes in Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Myer M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents tabular information concerning recent research in the field of enzymes in analytic chemistry, with methods, substrate or reaction catalyzed, assay, comments and references listed. The table refers to 128 references. Also listed are 13 general citations. (CS)

  17. Extreme Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A; Potok, Thomas E; Pullum, Laura L; Ramanathan, Arvind; Shipman, Galen M; Thornton, Peter E; Potok, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Given the scale and complexity of today s data, visual analytics is rapidly becoming a necessity rather than an option for comprehensive exploratory analysis. In this paper, we provide an overview of three applications of visual analytics for addressing the challenges of analyzing climate, text streams, and biosurveilance data. These systems feature varying levels of interaction and high performance computing technology integration to permit exploratory analysis of large and complex data of global significance.

  18. AN INVESTIGATION TO DOCUMENT MORROW RESERVOIRS THAT CAN BE BETTER DETECTED WITH SEISMIC SHEAR (S) WAVES THAN WITH COMPRESSIONAL (P) WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Cottman

    2001-10-19

    Pennsylvanian-age Morrow reservoirs are a key component of a large fluvial-deltaic system that extends across portions of Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. A problem that operators have to solve in some Morrow plays in this multi-state area is that many of the fluvial channels within the Morrow interval are invisible to seismic compressional (P) waves. This P-wave imaging problem forces operators in such situations to site infill, field-extension, and exploration wells without the aid of 3-D seismic technology. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate seismic technology that can improve drilling success in Morrow plays. Current P-wave technology commonly results in 80-percent of Morrow exploration wells not penetrating economic reservoir facies. Studies at Colorado School of Mines have shown that some of the Morrow channels that are elusive as P-wave targets create robust shear (S) wave reflections (Rampton, 1995). These findings caused Visos Energy to conclude that exploration and field development of Morrow prospects should be done by a combination of P-wave and S-wave seismic imaging. To obtain expanded information about the P and S reflectivity of Morrow facies, 9-component vertical seismic profile (9-C VSP) data were recorded at three locations along the Morrow trend. These data were processed to create P and S images of Morrow stratigraphy. These images were then analyzed to determine if S waves offer an alternative to P waves, or perhaps even an advantage over P waves, in imaging Morrow reservoir targets. The study areas where these field demonstrations were done are defined in Figure 1. Well A was in Sherman County, Texas; well B in Clark County, Kansas; and well C in Cheyenne County, Colorado. Technology demonstrated at these sites can be applied over a wide geographical area and influence operators across the multi-state region spanned by Morrow channel plays. The scope of the investigation described here is significant on the

  19. Finite-frequency tomography of P and S waves in the Carpathian-Pannonian region: Implications for geodynamics of the continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Y.; Stuart, G. W.; Houseman, G. A.; Dando, B. D.; Ionescu, C.; Hegedus, E.; Radovanovic, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Carpathian-Pannonian system which is the most tectonically active region in Eastern and Central Europe, represents an unique geodynamical case in continental collision zone for studying the interaction between the surface tectonic processes and the deep lithospheric and mantle processes. Particularly, the geodynamical processes involved in the formation of both Pannonian basin and Vrancea seismogenic zone are still debated today. Here, we present high-resolution upper mantle structures beneath the region from finite-frequency tomography using P and S waves in order to bring constraints on geodynamical models. We have selected teleseismic earthquakes with magnitude greater than 5.5, which occurred between 2005 and 2010. The data were recorded on 57 temporary stations deployed in the South Carpathian Project, 56 temporary stations deployed in the earlier Carpathian Basins Project (CBP), and 50 permanent broadband stations. The differential travel times are measured in high, intermediate and low frequencies (0.5-2.0 Hz, 0.1-0.5 Hz and 0.03-0.1 Hz for both P-wave, 0.1-0.5 Hz, 0.05-0.1 Hz and 0.02-0.05 Hz for S-wave), and are inverted according to the 3-D finite-frequency formulation to produce P and S-wave velocity maps at different depths in the mantle. Our images show the presence of a sub-vertical fast material beneath the eastern Alps which extends across the centre of the Pannonian region below ~ 300 km depth. It extends downward into the mantle transition zone and appears to spread outward beneath the entire basin. The upper mantle below the Pannonian basin is dominated by a slow anomaly extending down to ~ 300 km depth. We suggest that a late stage of gravitational instability with detachment of cold mantle lithospheric downwellings is occurring beneath the eastern Alps in the present-day. The same mechanism could also have occurred below the Pannonian basin in the past and though explain the mantle lithospheric extension. In the Vrancea Zone, the seismicity

  20. The upper mantle structure of the central Rio Grande rift region from teleseismic P and S wave travel time delays and attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, P.D.; Davis, P.M.; Baldridge, W.S.; Olsen, K.H.; Glahn, A.; Achauer, U.; Spence, W.

    1996-01-01

    The lithosphere beneath a continental rift should be significantly modified due to extension. To image the lithosphere beneath the Rio Grande rift (RGR), we analyzed teleseismic travel time delays of both P and S wave arrivals and solved for the attenuation of P and S waves for four seismic experiments spanning the Rio Grande rift. Two tomographic inversions of the P wave travel time data are given: an Aki-Christofferson-Husebye (ACH) block model inversion and a downward projection inversion. The tomographic inversions reveal a NE-SW to NNE-SSW trending feature at depths of 35 to 145 km with a velocity reduction of 7 to 8% relative to mantle velocities beneath the Great Plains. This region correlates with the transition zone between the Colorado Plateau and the Rio Grande rift and is bounded on the NW by the Jemez lineament, a N52??E trending zone of late Miocene to Holocene volcanism. S wave delays plotted against P wave delays are fit with a straight line giving a slope of 3.0??0.4. This correlation and the absolute velocity reduction imply that temperatures in the lithosphere are close to the solidus, consistent with, but not requiring, the presence of partial melt in the mantle beneath the Rio Grande rift. The attenuation data could imply the presence of partial melt. We compare our results with other geophysical and geologic data. We propose that any north-south trending thermal (velocity) anomaly that may have existed in the upper mantle during earlier (Oligocene to late Miocene) phases of rifting and that may have correlated with the axis of the rift has diminished with time and has been overprinted with more recent structure. The anomalously low-velocity body presently underlying the transition zone between the core of the Colorado Plateau and the rift may reflect processes resulting from the modern (Pliocene to present) regional stress field (oriented WNW-ESE), possibly heralding future extension across the Jemez lineament and transition zone.

  1. Temporal variation of the Rayleigh admittance: Implication for S-wave velocity changes in the toe of the Nankai accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonegawa, Takashi; Araki, Eiichiro; Kimura, Toshinori; Nakamura, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    A cabled seafloor network with 20 stations (DONET: Dense Oceanfloor Network System for Earthquake and Tsunamis) has been constructed on the accretionary prism at the Nankai subduction zone of Japan between March 2010 and August 2011, which means that the observation period became more than 4 years. Each station contains broadband seismometers and absolute and differential pressure gauges. In this study, we estimated the Rayleigh admittance at the seafloor for each station, i.e., an amplitude transfer function from pressure to displacement in the frequency band of microseisms, particularly for the fundamental Rayleigh mode of 0.1-0.2 Hz. The pattern of the transfer function depends on the S-wave velocity structure at shallow depths beneath stations (Ruan et al., 2014, JGR). Therefore, plotting the Rayleigh admittance as functions of time and frequency, we investigated temporal variations of S-wave velocity within the accretionary prism. We calculated the displacement seismogram by removing the instrument response from the velocity seismogram for each station. The pressure record observed at the differential pressure gauge was used in this study because of a high resolution of the pressure observation. In the frequency domain, we smoothed the two kinds of spectra (displacement and pressure) with ±2 neighboring samples, and estimated the amplitude transfer function of displacement/pressure. Here, we used the ambient noise of the two records. To display their temporal variations, we plot the averaged transfer function with intervals of 7 days. As a result, we found a long-term temporal variation of the Rayleigh admittance at two stations. These stations are located at the southern part of the array and near the trench, where the activities of very-low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) within the accretionary prism on 2004, 2009, and 2011 have been previously reported. The admittance at a frequency of 0.1 Hz has gradually decreased during the observation period, which

  2. Advances in analytical chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendale, W. F.; Congo, Richard T.; Nielsen, Bruce J.

    1991-01-01

    Implementation of computer programs based on multivariate statistical algorithms makes possible obtaining reliable information from long data vectors that contain large amounts of extraneous information, for example, noise and/or analytes that we do not wish to control. Three examples are described. Each of these applications requires the use of techniques characteristic of modern analytical chemistry. The first example, using a quantitative or analytical model, describes the determination of the acid dissociation constant for 2,2'-pyridyl thiophene using archived data. The second example describes an investigation to determine the active biocidal species of iodine in aqueous solutions. The third example is taken from a research program directed toward advanced fiber-optic chemical sensors. The second and third examples require heuristic or empirical models.

  3. Competing on talent analytics.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Thomas H; Harris, Jeanne; Shapiro, Jeremy

    2010-10-01

    Do investments in your employees actually affect workforce performance? Who are your top performers? How can you empower and motivate other employees to excel? Leading-edge companies such as Google, Best Buy, Procter & Gamble, and Sysco use sophisticated data-collection technology and analysis to answer these questions, leveraging a range of analytics to improve the way they attract and retain talent, connect their employee data to business performance, differentiate themselves from competitors, and more. The authors present the six key ways in which companies track, analyze, and use data about their people-ranging from a simple baseline of metrics to monitor the organization's overall health to custom modeling for predicting future head count depending on various "what if" scenarios. They go on to show that companies competing on talent analytics manage data and technology at an enterprise level, support what analytical leaders do, choose realistic targets for analysis, and hire analysts with strong interpersonal skills as well as broad expertise.

  4. Frontiers in analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, I.

    1988-12-15

    Doing more with less was the modus operandi of R. Buckminster Fuller, the late science genius, and inventor of such things as the geodesic dome. In late September, chemists described their own version of this maxim--learning more chemistry from less material and in less time--in a symposium titled Frontiers in Analytical Chemistry at the 196th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Los Angeles. Symposium organizer Allen J. Bard of the University of Texas at Austin assembled six speakers, himself among them, to survey pretty widely different areas of analytical chemistry.

  5. Monitoring the analytic surface.

    PubMed

    Spence, D P; Mayes, L C; Dahl, H

    1994-01-01

    How do we listen during an analytic hour? Systematic analysis of the speech patterns of one patient (Mrs. C.) strongly suggests that the clustering of shared pronouns (e.g., you/me) represents an important aspect of the analytic surface, preconsciously sensed by the analyst and used by him to determine when to intervene. Sensitivity to these patterns increases over the course of treatment, and in a final block of 10 hours shows a striking degree of contingent responsivity: specific utterances by the patient are consistently echoed by the analyst's interventions. PMID:8182248

  6. Finite temperature theory of spin-orbit coupled fermions in three dimensions in the presence of external Zeeman fields and tunable s-wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Philip; Baym, Gordon; Sa de Melo, Carlos

    We develop a finite temperature theory of ultracold three-dimensional Fermi gases in the presence of artificial spin-orbit coupling, Zeeman fields, and tunable s-wave interactions. With the inclusion of quadratic fluctuations, we compute both the critical temperature for superfluidity and the population of bound and unbound fermions throughout the evolution from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) to Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) regimes. In particular, we show that in the BEC regime, spin-orbit coupling is capable of increasing the critical temperature relative to the no-field case, by inducing a triplet component to the superfluid order parameter, while decreasing the many-body effective mass. We also derive the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation to sixth-order in the superfluid order parameter, and obtain explicit expressions for the coefficients of the effective theory valid across the entire evolution from BCS to BEC superfluidity.

  7. Final Data Report: P- and S-Wave Velocity Logging Borings C4993, C4996, and C4997 Part B: Overall Logs

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, John; Steller, Robert

    2007-03-20

    Insitu borehole P- and S-wave velocity measurements were collected in three borings located within the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) boundaries at the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington. Geophysical data acquisition was performed between August and October of 2006 by Rob Steller, Charles Carter, Antony Martin and John Diehl of GEOVision. Data analysis was performed by Rob Steller and John Diehl, and reviewed by Antony Martin of GEOVision, and report preparation was performed by John Diehl and reviewed by Rob Steller. The work was performed under subcontract with Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division with Marty Gardner as Battelle’s Technical Representative and Alan Rohay serving as the Technical Administrator for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This report describes the field measurements, data analysis, and results of this work.

  8. Final Data Report: P- and S-Wave Velocity Logging Borings C4993, C4996, and C4997 Part A: Interval Logs

    SciTech Connect

    Steller, Robert; Diehl, John

    2007-02-01

    Insitu borehole P- and S-wave velocity measurements were collected in three borings located within the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) boundaries at the Hanford Site, southeastern Washington. Geophysical data acquisition was performed between August and October of 2006 by Rob Steller, Charles Carter, Antony Martin and John Diehl of GEOVision. Data analysis was performed by Rob Steller and John Diehl, and reviewed by Antony Martin of GEOVision, and report preparation was performed by John Diehl and reviewed by Rob Steller. The work was performed under subcontract with Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division with Marty Gardner as Battelle’s Technical Representative and Alan Rohay serving as the Technical Administrator for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This report describes the field measurements, data analysis, and results of this work.

  9. Volovik effect and Fermi-liquid behavior in the s-wave superconductor CaPd2As2: As75 NMR-NQR measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Ding, Q. -P.; Wiecki, P.; Anand, V. K.; Sangeetha, N. S.; Lee, Y.; Johnston, D. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-04-07

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the collapsed-tetragonal CaPd2As2 superconductor (SC) with a transition temperature of 1.27 K have been investigated by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. The temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts indicate the absence of magnetic correlations in the normal state. In the SC state, 1/T1 measured by 75As NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter (HS) peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially at lower T, confirming a conventional s-wave SC. Additionally, the Volovik effect, also known as the Doppler shift effect, hasmore » been clearly evidenced by the observation of the suppression of the HS peak with applied magnetic field.« less

  10. Characterization of U.S. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Test Sites: A Catalogue of Met-Ocean Data, 2nd Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Ann R. Dallman; Neary, Vincent S.

    2015-09-01

    This report presents met-ocean data and wave energy characteristics at eight U.S. wave energy converter (WEC) test and potential deployment sites. Its purpose is to enable the comparison of wave resource characteristics among sites as well as the selection of test sites that are most suitable for a developer's device and that best meet their testing needs and objectives. It also provides essential inputs for the design of WEC test devices and planning WEC tests, including the planning of deployment, and operations and maintenance. For each site, this report catalogues wave statistics recommended in the International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Speci cation (IEC 62600-101 TS) on Wave Energy Characterization, as well as the frequency of occurrence of weather windows and extreme sea states, and statistics on wind and ocean currents. It also provides useful information on test site infrastructure and services.

  11. Joint inversion of teleseismic S-wave relative arrival times and Rayleigh wave phase and amplitude deviations in the Pacific Northwest, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, L. S.; Forsyth, D. W.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    The multitude of tectonic processes at work in the Pacific Northwest has complicated efforts to understand the relationship between the bi-modal volcanic tracks of the High Lava Plains in Oregon and the Snake River Plains in Oregon and Idaho, the Miocene Columbia River Flood Basalts, and Basin and Range extension. In the relative compact area comprising Oregon, Idaho, southern Washington, and northernmost Nevada and California, we have the subduction of the Juan de Fuca slab, the Mendocino Triple Junction and associated slab edge, the northern margin of Basin and Range extension, and suggestions of a mantle (perhaps plume-like) upwelling associated with the Yellowstone -Snake River Plain. In order to understand the interplay between these different tectonic driving forces and their respective consequences, much work has been done to image the existing structures using seismic tomography. A number of recent studies have used body waves, surface waves, ambient noise, and various joint inversions to improve the resolution of these images in this very complicated area. We present results from a newly developed joint surface wave-teleseismic S-wave inversion that combines the ability of teleseismic S waves to image deeper structures and to improve lateral resolution with the vertical resolution, and resolution at shallower depths, of the two-plane-wave Rayleigh wave tomography method. The data for this project come from the 100+ stations of the High Lava Plains seismic deployment, together with data from EarthScope Transportable Array stations. The high station density, together with the new joint inversion technique, allow us an unprecedented image of those upper mantle structures that are responsible for the tectonic development of this complex region.

  12. Model-independent measurement of S-wave K-π+ systems using D+→Kππ decays from Fermilab E791

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Devmal, S.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; Neto, J. R. T. De Mello; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K. S.; Santoro, A. F. S.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.; Dunwoodie, W. M.

    2006-02-01

    A model-independent partial-wave analysis of the S-wave component of the Kπ system from decays of D+ mesons to the three-body K-π+π+ final state is described. Data come from the Fermilab E791 experiment. Amplitude measurements are made independently for ranges of K-π+ invariant mass, and results are obtained below 825MeV/c2, where previous measurements exist only in two mass bins. This method of parametrizing a three-body decay amplitude represents a new approach to analyzing such decays. Though no model is required for the S-wave, a parametrization of the relatively well-known reference P- and D-waves, optimized to describe the data used, is required. In this paper, a Breit-Wigner model is adopted to describe the resonances in these waves. The observed phase variation for the S-, P-, and D-waves do not match existing measurements of I=(1)/(2) K-π+ scattering in the invariant mass range in which scattering is predominantly elastic. If the data are mostly I=(1)/(2), this observation indicates that the Watson theorem, which requires these phases to have the same dependence on invariant mass, may not apply to these decays without allowing for some interaction with the other pion. The production rate of K-π+ from these decays, if assumed to be predominantly I=(1)/(2), is also found to have a significant dependence on invariant mass in the region above 1.25GeV/c2. These measurements can provide a relatively model-free basis for future attempts to determine which strange scalar amplitudes contribute to the decays.

  13. Mantle Composition and Temperature of Western North America Revealed from Direct P and S Wave Velocities of KLB-1 Peridotite to the Condition of Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Chen, T.; Qi, X.; Zou, Y.; Liebermann, R. C.; Li, B.

    2015-12-01

    Comparing the elasticity of candidate compositional models with seismic profiles (e.g., PREM and AK135) is one of the most important geophysical approaches to constrain the mineralogical composition of the mantle. However in such averaging schemes (e.g., Voigt-Reuss-Hill), it is difficult to take into account all of the mineralogical and chemical complexities; we therefore undertook elasticity study of a natural mantle rock sample at high pressures and temperatures. In this study, a series of polycrystalline aggregates of peridotite KLB-1 (from Kilbourne Hole, New Mexico) were hot-pressed at pressures of 3-15 GPa and temperatures of 1200-1400°C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Electron Microprobe Analysis (EPMA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the texture, grain size, and composition of these well-sintered specimens. For the first time in history, the P and S wave velocities of a pyrolitic multiphase aggregate were directly measured at mantle transition zone pressures and temperatures using ultrasonic interferometry. Based on the phase fractions from EPMA and the P and S wave velocities from in situ measurement at high pressure and high temperature, the velocities of the KLB-1 peridotite along 1200-1400 oC adiabatic mantle geotherms were obtained and compare well with the seismic models of western North America, the region where these peridotite KLB-1 samples were collected. The comparison with regional seismic models of western North America (e.g., GCA and TNA/TNA2) as well as global seismic models (PREM and AK135) place unprecedented constraints on the composition, temperature and density profiles for the upper mantle in this region, which can help us understand the nature of thermal and tectonic processes of the Rio Grande Rift.

  14. Analytical Services Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Church, Shane; Nigbor, Mike; Hillman, Daniel

    2005-03-30

    Analytical Services Management System (ASMS) provides sample management services. Sample management includes sample planning for analytical requests, sample tracking for shipping and receiving by the laboratory, receipt of the analytical data deliverable, processing the deliverable and payment of the laboratory conducting the analyses. ASMS is a web based application that provides the ability to manage these activities at multiple locations for different customers. ASMS provides for the assignment of single to multiple samples for standard chemical and radiochemical analyses. ASMS is a flexible system which allows the users to request analyses by line item code. Line item codes are selected based on the Basic Ordering Agreement (BOA) format for contracting with participating laboratories. ASMS also allows contracting with non-BOA laboratories using a similar line item code contracting format for their services. ASMS allows sample and analysis tracking from sample planning and collection in the field through sample shipment, laboratory sample receipt, laboratory analysis and submittal of the requested analyses, electronic data transfer, and payment of the laboratories for the completed analyses. The software when in operation contains business sensitive material that is used as a principal portion of the Kaiser Analytical Management Services business model. The software version provided is the most recent version, however the copy of the application does not contain business sensitive data from the associated Oracle tables such as contract information or price per line item code.

  15. Analytical Services Management System

    2005-03-30

    Analytical Services Management System (ASMS) provides sample management services. Sample management includes sample planning for analytical requests, sample tracking for shipping and receiving by the laboratory, receipt of the analytical data deliverable, processing the deliverable and payment of the laboratory conducting the analyses. ASMS is a web based application that provides the ability to manage these activities at multiple locations for different customers. ASMS provides for the assignment of single to multiple samples for standardmore » chemical and radiochemical analyses. ASMS is a flexible system which allows the users to request analyses by line item code. Line item codes are selected based on the Basic Ordering Agreement (BOA) format for contracting with participating laboratories. ASMS also allows contracting with non-BOA laboratories using a similar line item code contracting format for their services. ASMS allows sample and analysis tracking from sample planning and collection in the field through sample shipment, laboratory sample receipt, laboratory analysis and submittal of the requested analyses, electronic data transfer, and payment of the laboratories for the completed analyses. The software when in operation contains business sensitive material that is used as a principal portion of the Kaiser Analytical Management Services business model. The software version provided is the most recent version, however the copy of the application does not contain business sensitive data from the associated Oracle tables such as contract information or price per line item code.« less

  16. Challenges for Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, James J.; Kielman, Joseph

    2009-09-23

    Visual analytics has seen unprecedented growth in its first five years of mainstream existence. Great progress has been made in a short time, yet great challenges must be met in the next decade to provide new technologies that will be widely accepted by societies throughout the world. This paper sets the stage for some of those challenges in an effort to provide the stimulus for the research, both basic and applied, to address and exceed the envisioned potential for visual analytics technologies. We start with a brief summary of the initial challenges, followed by a discussion of the initial driving domains and applications, as well as additional applications and domains that have been a part of recent rapid expansion of visual analytics usage. We look at the common characteristics of several tools illustrating emerging visual analytics technologies, and conclude with the top ten challenges for the field of study. We encourage feedback and collaborative participation by members of the research community, the wide array of user communities, and private industry.

  17. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Analytical Chemistry and Material Development Group maintains a capability in chemical analysis, materials R&D failure analysis and contamination control. The uniquely qualified staff and facility support the needs of flight projects, science instrument development and various technical tasks, as well as Cal Tech.

  18. Analytics: Changing the Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana G.

    2013-01-01

    In this third and concluding discussion on analytics, the author notes that we live in an information culture. We are accustomed to having information instantly available and accessible, along with feedback and recommendations. We want to know what people think and like (or dislike). We want to know how we compare with "others like me."…

  19. Raman-scattering measurements and theory of the energy-momentum spectrum for underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCuO(8+δ) superconductors: evidence of an s-wave structure for the pseudogap.

    PubMed

    Sakai, S; Blanc, S; Civelli, M; Gallais, Y; Cazayous, M; Méasson, M-A; Wen, J S; Xu, Z J; Gu, G D; Sangiovanni, G; Motome, Y; Held, K; Sacuto, A; Georges, A; Imada, M

    2013-09-01

    We reveal the full energy-momentum structure of the pseudogap of underdoped high-Tc cuprate superconductors. Our combined theoretical and experimental analysis explains the spectral-weight suppression observed in the B2g Raman response at finite energies in terms of a pseudogap appearing in the single-electron excitation spectra above the Fermi level in the nodal direction of momentum space. This result suggests an s-wave pseudogap (which never closes in the energy-momentum space), distinct from the d-wave superconducting gap. Recent tunneling and photoemission experiments on underdoped cuprates also find a natural explanation within the s-wave pseudogap scenario. PMID:25166695

  20. Analytical caustic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    This document discusses the determination of caustic surfaces in terms of rays, reflectors, and wavefronts. Analytical caustics are obtained as a family of lines, a set of points, and several types of equations for geometries encountered in optics and microwave applications. Standard methods of differential geometry are applied under different approaches: directly to reflector surfaces, and alternatively, to wavefronts, to obtain analytical caustics of two sheets or branches. Gauss/Seidel aberrations are introduced into the wavefront approach, forcing the retention of all three coefficients of both the first- and the second-fundamental forms of differential geometry. An existing method for obtaining caustic surfaces through exploitation of the singularities in flux density is examined, and several constant-intensity contour maps are developed using only the intrinsic Gaussian, mean, and normal curvatures of the reflector. Numerous references are provided for extending the material of the present document to the morphologies of caustics and their associated diffraction patterns.

  1. Requirements for Predictive Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Hiltbrand

    2012-03-01

    It is important to have a clear understanding of how traditional Business Intelligence (BI) and analytics are different and how they fit together in optimizing organizational decision making. With tradition BI, activities are focused primarily on providing context to enhance a known set of information through aggregation, data cleansing and delivery mechanisms. As these organizations mature their BI ecosystems, they achieve a clearer picture of the key performance indicators signaling the relative health of their operations. Organizations that embark on activities surrounding predictive analytics and data mining go beyond simply presenting the data in a manner that will allow decisions makers to have a complete context around the information. These organizations generate models based on known information and then apply other organizational data against these models to reveal unknown information.

  2. Analytic ICF Hohlraum Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M D; Hammer, J

    2003-08-27

    We apply recent analytic solutions to the radiation diffusion equation to problems of interest for ICF hohlraums. The solutions provide quantitative values for absorbed energy which are of use for generating a desired radiation temperature vs. time within the hohlraum. Comparison of supersonic and subsonic solutions (heat front velocity faster or slower, respectively, than the speed of sound in the x-ray heated material) suggests that there may be some advantage in using high Z metallic foams as hohlraum wall material to reduce hydrodynamic losses, and hence, net absorbed energy by the walls. Analytic and numerical calculations suggest that the loss per unit area might be reduced {approx} 20% through use of foam hohlraum walls. Reduced hydrodynamic motion of the wall material may also reduce symmetry swings, as found for heavy ion targets.

  3. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  4. Analytical applications of aptamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombelli, S.; Minunni, M.; Mascini, M.

    2007-05-01

    Aptamers are single stranded DNA or RNA ligands which can be selected for different targets starting from a library of molecules containing randomly created sequences. Aptamers have been selected to bind very different targets, from proteins to small organic dyes. Aptamers are proposed as alternatives to antibodies as biorecognition elements in analytical devices with ever increasing frequency. This in order to satisfy the demand for quick, cheap, simple and highly reproducible analytical devices, especially for protein detection in the medical field or for the detection of smaller molecules in environmental and food analysis. In our recent experience, DNA and RNA aptamers, specific for three different proteins (Tat, IgE and thrombin), have been exploited as bio-recognition elements to develop specific biosensors (aptasensors). These recognition elements have been coupled to piezoelectric quartz crystals and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) devices as transducers where the aptamers have been immobilized on the gold surface of the crystals electrodes or on SPR chips, respectively.

  5. Analytic holographic superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Christopher P.

    2010-06-01

    We investigate a holographic superconductor that admits an analytic treatment near the phase transition. In the dual 3+1-dimensional field theory, the phase transition occurs when a scalar operator of scaling dimension two gets a vacuum expectation value. We calculate current-current correlation functions along with the speed of second sound near the critical temperature. We also make some remarks about critical exponents. An analytic treatment is possible because an underlying Heun equation describing the zero mode of the phase transition has a polynomial solution. Amusingly, the treatment here may generalize for an order parameter with any integer spin, and we propose a Lagrangian for a spin-two holographic superconductor.

  6. Avatars in Analytical Gaming

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Cowell, Amanda K.

    2009-08-29

    This paper discusses the design and use of anthropomorphic computer characters as nonplayer characters (NPC’s) within analytical games. These new environments allow avatars to play a central role in supporting training and education goals instead of planning the supporting cast role. This new ‘science’ of gaming, driven by high-powered but inexpensive computers, dedicated graphics processors and realistic game engines, enables game developers to create learning and training opportunities on par with expensive real-world training scenarios. However, there needs to be care and attention placed on how avatars are represented and thus perceived. A taxonomy of non-verbal behavior is presented and its application to analytical gaming discussed.

  7. Industrial Analytics Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Industrial Analytics Corporation

    2004-01-30

    The lost foam casting process is sensitive to the properties of the EPS patterns used for the casting operation. In this project Industrial Analytics Corporation (IAC) has developed a new low voltage x-ray instrument for x-ray radiography of very low mass EPS patterns. IAC has also developed a transmitted visible light method for characterizing the properties of EPS patterns. The systems developed are also applicable to other low density materials including graphite foams.

  8. Competing on analytics.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Thomas H

    2006-01-01

    We all know the power of the killer app. It's not just a support tool; it's a strategic weapon. Companies questing for killer apps generally focus all their firepower on the one area that promises to create the greatest competitive advantage. But a new breed of organization has upped the stakes: Amazon, Harrah's, Capital One, and the Boston Red Sox have all dominated their fields by deploying industrial-strength analytics across a wide variety of activities. At a time when firms in many industries offer similar products and use comparable technologies, business processes are among the few remaining points of differentiation--and analytics competitors wring every last drop of value from those processes. Employees hired for their expertise with numbers or trained to recognize their importance are armed with the best evidence and the best quantitative tools. As a result, they make the best decisions. In companies that compete on analytics, senior executives make it clear--from the top down--that analytics is central to strategy. Such organizations launch multiple initiatives involving complex data and statistical analysis, and quantitative activity is managed atthe enterprise (not departmental) level. In this article, professor Thomas H. Davenport lays out the characteristics and practices of these statistical masters and describes some of the very substantial changes other companies must undergo in order to compete on quantitative turf. As one would expect, the transformation requires a significant investment in technology, the accumulation of massive stores of data, and the formulation of company-wide strategies for managing the data. But, at least as important, it also requires executives' vocal, unswerving commitment and willingness to change the way employees think, work, and are treated.

  9. Anisotropic feature inferred from receiver functions and S-wave splitting in and around the high strain rate zone, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, K.; Takeda, T.; Sekiguchi, S.

    2012-12-01

    By the recent dense GPS observation, the high strain rate zone (HSRZ) crossing the central Japan was discovered. In the HSRZ, E-W compressive stress field is observed, and large earthquakes with M>6 are frequently occurred. In this study, we try to reveal depth-dependent anisotropic feature in this region by using teleseismic receiver functions (RFs) and S-wave splitting information. As a target, we select NIED Hi-net stations N.TGWH and N.TSTH, which are located inside and outside of the HSRZ respectively. For RF analysis, we choose M>5.5 teleseismic events from October 2000 to November 2011. Low-pass filters with fc = 1 and 2 Hz are applied to estimate RFs. In the radial RFs, we find clear positive phase arrivals at 4 to 4.5 s in delay time for both stations. Since this time delay corresponds to 35 km-depth velocity discontinuity existence, these phases may be the converted phases generated at the Moho discontinuity. Seeing the back-azimuth paste-ups of the transverse RFs, we can find polarity changes of later phases at 4 to 4.5 s in delay time at the N.TSTH station. This polarity change occurs for direction of N0E (north), N180E (south), and N270E (west). Although we have no data in N90E (east) direction, this feature implies that anisotropic rocks may exist around the Moho. In order to check this feature, we consider 6-layered subsurface model and compare synthetic RFs with the observation. The first three layers are for thick sediments and upper crust including a dipping velocity interface. The fourth, fifth and sixth layer corresponds to the mid crust, lower crust and uppermost mantle, respectively. The best model infers that the mid- and lower-crust beneath the N.TSTH station should have strong anisotropy whose fast axis directs to the N-S, though the fast axis in the uppermost mantle seems to show E-W direction. Moreover, to explain the observation, the symmetric axes in the lower crust and the uppermost mantle should be dipping about 20 degrees. To check

  10. Visual Analytics: How Much Visualization and How Much Analytics?

    SciTech Connect

    Keim, Daniel; Mansmann, Florian; Thomas, James J.

    2009-12-16

    The term Visual Analytics has been around for almost five years by now, but still there are on-going discussions about what it actually is and in particular what is new about it. The core of our view on Visual Analytics is the new enabling and accessible analytic reasoning interactions supported by the combination of automated and visual analytics. In this paper, we outline the scope of Visual Analytics using two problem and three methodological classes in order to work out the need for and purpose of Visual Analytics. Thereby, the respective methods are explained plus examples of analytic reasoning interaction leading to a glimpse into the future of how Visual Analytics methods will enable us to go beyond what is possible when separately using the two methods.

  11. A compendium of P- and S-wave velocities from surface-to-borehole logging; summary and reanalysis of previously published data and analysis of unpublished data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.

    2003-01-01

    For over 28 years, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been acquiring seismic velocity and geologic data at a number of locations in California, many of which were chosen because strong ground motions from earthquakes were recorded at the sites. The method for all measurements involves picking first arrivals of P- and S-waves from a surface source recorded at various depths in a borehole (as opposed to noninvasive methods, such as the SASW method [e.g., Brown et al., 2002]). The results from most of the sites are contained in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Reports (see References). Until now, none of the results have been available as computer files, and before 1992 the interpretation of the arrival times was in terms of piecemeal interval velocities, with no attempt to derive a layered model that would fit the travel times in an overall sense (the one exception is Porcella, 1984). In this report I reanalyze all of the arrival times in terms of layered models for P- and for S-wave velocities at each site, and I provide the results as computer files. In addition to the measurements reported in the open-file reports, I also include some borehole results from other reports, as well as some results never before published. I include data for 277 boreholes (at the time of this writing; more will be added to the web site as they are obtained), all in California (I have data from boreholes in Washington and Utah, but these will be published separately). I am also in the process of interpreting travel time data obtained using a seismic cone penetrometer at hundreds of sites; these data can be interpreted in the same way of those obtained from surface-to-borehole logging. When available, the data will be added to the web site (see below for information on obtaining data from the World Wide Web (WWW)). In addition to the basic borehole data and results, I provide information concerning strong-motion stations that I judge to be close enough to the boreholes

  12. MERRA Analytic Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnase, J. L.; Duffy, D. Q.; McInerney, M. A.; Tamkin, G. S.; Thompson, J. H.; Gill, R.; Grieg, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    MERRA Analytic Services (MERRA/AS) is a cyberinfrastructure resource for developing and evaluating a new generation of climate data analysis capabilities. MERRA/AS supports OBS4MIP activities by reducing the time spent in the preparation of Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data used in data-model intercomparison. It also provides a testbed for experimental development of high-performance analytics. MERRA/AS is a cloud-based service built around the Virtual Climate Data Server (vCDS) technology that is currently used by the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) to deliver Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) data to the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF). Crucial to its effectiveness, MERRA/AS's servers will use a workflow-generated realizable object capability to perform analyses over the MERRA data using the MapReduce approach to parallel storage-based computation. The results produced by these operations will be stored by the vCDS, which will also be able to host code sets for those who wish to explore the use of MapReduce for more advanced analytics. While the work described here will focus on the MERRA collection, these technologies can be used to publish other reanalysis, observational, and ancillary OBS4MIP data to ESGF and, importantly, offer an architectural approach to climate data services that can be generalized to applications and customers beyond the traditional climate research community. In this presentation, we describe our approach, experiences, lessons learned,and plans for the future.; (A) MERRA/AS software stack. (B) Example MERRA/AS interfaces.

  13. Proficiency analytical testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Groff, J.H.; Schlecht, P.C.

    1994-03-01

    The Proficiency Analytical Testing (PAT) Program is a collaborative effort of the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) and researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The PAT Program provides quality control reference samples to over 1400 occupational health and environmental laboratories in over 15 countries. Although one objective of the PAT Program is to evaluate the analytical ability of participating laboratories, the primary objective is to assist these laboratories in improving their laboratory performance. Each calendar quarter (designated a round), samples are mailed to participating laboratories and the data are analyzed to evaluate laboratory performance on a series of analyses. Each mailing and subsequent data analysis are completed in time for participants to obtain repeat samples and to correct analytical problems before the next calendar quarter starts. The PAT Program currently includes four sets of samples. A mixture of 3 of the 4 possible metals, and 3 of the 15 possible organic solvents are rotated for each round. Laboratories are evaluated for each analysis by comparing their reported results against an acceptable performance limit for each PAT Program sample the laboratory analyses. Reference laboratories are preselected to provide the performance limits for each sample. These reference laboratories must meet the following criteria: (1) the laboratory was rated proficient in the last PAT evaluation of all the contaminants in the Program; and (2) the laboratory, if located in the United States, is AIHA accredited. Data are acceptable if they fall within the performance limits. Laboratories are rated based upon performance in the PAT Program over the last year (i.e., four calendar quarters), as well as on individual contaminant performance and overall performance. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  14. Proficiency analytical testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Schlecht, P.C.; Groff, J.H.

    1994-06-01

    The Proficiency Analytical Testing (PAT) Program is a collaborative effort of the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) and researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The PAT Program provides quality control reference samples to over 1400 occupational health and environmental laboratories in over 15 countries. Although one objective of the PAT Program is to evaluate the analytical ability of participating laboratories, the primary objective is to assist these laboratories in improving their laboratory performance. Each calendar quarter (designated a round), samples are mailed to participating laboratories and the data are analyzed to evaluate laboratory performance on a series of analyses. Each mailing and subsequent data analysis is completed in time for participants to obtain repeat samples and to correct analytical problems before the next calendar quarter starts. The PAT Program currently includes four sets of samples. A mixture of 3 of the 4 possible metals, and 3 of the 15 possible organic solvents are rotated for each round. Laboratories are evaluated for each analysis by comparing their reported results against an acceptable performance limit for each PAT Program sample the laboratory analyses. Reference laboratories are preselected to provide the performance limits for each sample. These reference laboratories must meet the following criteria: (1) the laboratory was rated proficient in the last PAT evaluation of all the contaminants in the Program; and (2) the laboratory, if located in the United States, is AIHA accredited. Data are acceptable if they fall within the performance limits. Laboratories are rated based upon performance in the PAT Program over the last year (i.e., four calendar quarters), as well as on individual contaminant performance and overall performance. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  15. Analytical chemistry of nickel.

    PubMed

    Stoeppler, M

    1984-01-01

    Analytical chemists are faced with nickel contents in environmental and biological materials ranging from the mg/kg down to the ng/kg level. Sampling and sample treatment have to be performed with great care at lower levels, and this also applies to enrichment and separation procedures. The classical determination methods formerly used have been replaced almost entirely by different forms of atomic absorption spectrometry. Electroanalytical methods are also of increasing importance and at present provide the most sensitive approach. Despite the powerful methods available, achieving reliable results is still a challenge for the analyst requiring proper quality control measures.

  16. Automation of analytical isotachophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thormann, Wolfgang

    1985-01-01

    The basic features of automation of analytical isotachophoresis (ITP) are reviewed. Experimental setups consisting of narrow bore tubes which are self-stabilized against thermal convection are considered. Sample detection in free solution is discussed, listing the detector systems presently used or expected to be of potential use in the near future. The combination of a universal detector measuring the evolution of ITP zone structures with detector systems specific to desired components is proposed as a concept of an automated chemical analyzer based on ITP. Possible miniaturization of such an instrument by means of microlithographic techniques is discussed.

  17. Indirect dark matter signatures in the cosmic dark ages. I. Generalizing the bound on s -wave dark matter annihilation from Planck results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies by Planck provide a sensitive probe of dark matter annihilation during the cosmic dark ages, and specifically constrain the annihilation parameter feff⟨σ v ⟩/mχ. Using new results (paper II) for the ionization produced by particles injected at arbitrary energies, we calculate and provide feff values for photons and e+e- pairs injected at keV-TeV energies; the feff value for any dark matter model can be obtained straightforwardly by weighting these results by the spectrum of annihilation products. This result allows the sensitive and robust constraints on dark matter annihilation presented by the Planck collaboration to be applied to arbitrary dark matter models with s -wave annihilation. We demonstrate the validity of this approach using principal component analysis. As an example, we integrate over the spectrum of annihilation products for a range of Standard Model final states to determine the CMB bounds on these models as a function of dark matter mass, and demonstrate that the new limits generically exclude models proposed to explain the observed high-energy rise in the cosmic ray positron fraction. We make our results publicly available at http://nebel.rc.fas.harvard.edu/epsilon.

  18. Scattering states of the Majorana-bound-state-supporting vortices at the interface of a topological insulator and an s-wave superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durst, Adam

    We consider an isolated vortex in the 2D proximity-induced superconducting state formed at the interface of a 3D topological insulator (TI) and an s-wave superconductor (sSC). Prior calculations of the bound states of this system famously revealed a zero-energy state that is its own conjugate, a Majorana fermion bound to the vortex core. We calculate, not the bound states, but the scattering states of this system, and ask how the spin-momentum-locked massless Dirac form of the single-particle Hamiltonian, inherited from the TI surface, affects the cross section for scattering Bogoliubov quasiparticles from the vortex. As in the case of an ordinary superconductor, this is a two-channel problem with the vortex mixing particle-like and hole-like excitations. And as in the ordinary case, the same-channel differential cross section diverges in the forward direction due to the Aharonov-Bohm effect, resulting in an infinite total cross section but finite transport and skew cross sections. We calculate the transport and skew cross sections numerically, via a partial wave analysis, as a function of both quasiparticle excitation energy and chemical potential. Novel effects emerge as particle-like or hole-like excitations are tuned through the Dirac point.

  19. Theoretical and numerical comparison of 3D numerical schemes for their accuracy with respect to P-wave to S-wave speed ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moczo, P.; Kristek, J.; Galis, M.; Chaljub, E.; Chen, X.; Zhang, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Numerical modeling of earthquake ground motion in sedimentary basins and valleys often has to account for the P-wave to S-wave speed ratios (VP/VS) as large as five and even larger, mainly in sediments below groundwater level. The ratio can attain values larger than 10 - the unconsolidated lake sediments in Ciudad de México are a good example. At the same time, accuracy of the numerical schemes with respect to VP/VS has not been sufficiently analyzed. The numerical schemes are often applied without adequate check of the accuracy. We present theoretical analysis and numerical comparison of 18 3D numerical time-domain explicit schemes for modeling seismic motion for their accuracy with the varying VP/VS. The schemes are based on the finite-difference, spectral-element, finite-element and discontinuous-Galerkin methods. All schemes are presented in a unified form. Theoretical analysis compares accuracy of the schemes in terms of local errors in amplitude and vector difference. In addition to the analysis we compare numerically simulated seismograms with exact solutions for canonical configurations. We compare accuracy of the schemes in terms of the local errors, grid dispersion and full wavefield simulations with respect to the structure of the numerical schemes.

  20. Determination of the S-Wave Pi Pi Scattering Lengths From a Study of K - to Pi - Pi0 Pi0 Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Batley, J.R.; Culling, A.J.; Kalmus, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; Munday, D.J.; Slater, M.W.; Wotton, S.A.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bocquet, G.; Cabibbo, N.; Ceccucci, A.; Cundy, D.; Falaleev, V.; Fidecaro, M.; Gatignon, L.; Gonidec, A.; Kubischta, W.; Norton, A.; Maier, A.; Patel, M.; Peters, A.; /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Birmingham U. /Dubna, JINR /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Sofiya U. /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /INFN, Perugia /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Northwestern U. /Dubna, JINR /Chicago U., EFI /Marseille, CPPM /Chicago U., EFI /Edinburgh U. /George Mason U. /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Florence /Modena U. /INFN, Florence /INFN, Florence /Urbino U. /INFN, Florence /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Bonn U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Northwestern U. /SLAC /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /UCLA /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Frascati /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /CERN /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /Siegen U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Bern U. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Madrid, CIEMAT /Vienna, OAW

    2012-03-29

    We report the results from a study of the full sample of {approx}6.031 x 10{sup 7} K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} decays recorded by the NA48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS. As first observed in this experiment, the {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} invariant mass (M{sub 00}) distribution shows a cusp-like anomaly in the region around M{sub 00} = 2m{sub +}, where m{sub +} is the charged pion mass. This anomaly has been interpreted as an effect due mainly to the final state charge exchange scattering process {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} in K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay. Fits to the M{sub 00} distribution using two different theoretical formulations provide the presently most precise determination of a{sub 0} - a{sub 2}, the difference between the {pi}{pi} S-wave scattering lengths in the isospin I = 0 and I = 2 states. Higher-order {pi}{pi} rescattering terms, included in the two formulations, allow also an independent, though less precise, determination of a{sub 2}.

  1. Scattering states of a vortex in the proximity-induced superconducting state at the interface of a topological insulator and an s -wave superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durst, Adam C.

    2016-02-01

    We consider an isolated vortex in the two-dimensional proximity-induced superconducting state formed at the interface of a three-dimensional strong topological insulator (TI) and an s -wave superconductor. Prior calculations of the bound states of this system famously revealed a zero-energy state that is its own conjugate, a Majorana fermion bound to the vortex core. We calculate, not the bound states, but the scattering states of this system, and ask how the spin-momentum-locked massless Dirac form of the single-particle Hamiltonian, inherited from the TI surface, affects the cross section for scattering Bogoliubov quasiparticles from the vortex. As in the case of an ordinary superconductor, this is a two-channel problem with the vortex mixing particlelike and holelike excitations. As in the ordinary case, the same-channel differential cross section diverges in the forward direction due to the Aharonov-Bohm effect, resulting in an infinite total cross section but finite transport and skew cross sections. We calculate the transport and skew cross sections numerically, via a partial wave analysis, as a function of both quasiparticle excitation energy and chemical potential. Novel effects emerge as particlelike or holelike excitations are tuned through the Dirac point.

  2. A Simultaneous Multi-phase Approach to Determine P-wave and S-wave Attenuation of the Crust and Upper Mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E; Walter, W R; Matzel, E M

    2009-02-26

    We have generalized the methodology of our regional amplitude tomography from the Lg phase to the four primary regional phases (Pn, Pg, Sn, Lg). Differences in the geometrical spreading, source term, site term, and travel paths are accounted for, while event source parameters such as seismic moment are consistent among phases. In the process, we have developed the first regional attenuation model that uses the amplitudes of four regional phases to determine a comprehensive P-wave and S-wave attenuation model of the crust and upper mantle. When applied to an area encompassing the Middle East, eastern Europe, western Asia, south Asia, and northeast Africa for the 1-2 Hz passband, we find large differences in the attenuation of the lithosphere across the region. The tectonic Tethys collision zone has high attenuation, while stable outlying regions have low attenuation. While crust and mantle Q variations are often consistent, we do find several notable areas where they differ considerably, but are appropriate given the region's tectonic history. Lastly, the relative values of Qp and Qs indicate that scattering Q is likely the dominant source of attenuation in the crust at these frequencies.

  3. Crustal and upper mantle S-wave velocity structures across the Taiwan Strait from ambient seismic noise and teleseismic Rayleigh wave analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Yao, H.; Wu, F. T.; Liang, W.; Huang, B.; Lin, C.; Wen, K.

    2013-12-01

    Although orogeny seems to have stopped in western Taiwan large and small earthquakes do occur in the Taiwan Strait. Limited studies have focused on this region before and were barely within reach for comprehensive projects like TAICRUST and TAIGER for logistical reasons; thus, the overall crustal structures of the Taiwan Strait remain unknown. Time domain empirical Green's function (TDEGF) from ambient seismic noise to determine crustal velocity structure allows us to study an area using station pairs on its periphery. This research aims to resolve 1-D average crustal and upper mantle S-wave velocity (Vs) structures alone paths of several broadband station-pairs across the Taiwan Strait; 5-120 s Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion data derived by combining TDEGF and traditional surface wave two-station method (TS). The average Vs structures show significant differences in the upper 15 km as expected. In general, the highest Vs are observed in the coastal area of Mainland China and the lowest Vs appear along the southwest offshore of the Taiwan Island; they differ by about 0.6-1.1 km/s. For different parts of the Strait, the Vs are lower in the middle by about 0.1-0.2 km/s relative to those in the northern and southern parts. The overall crustal thickness is approximately 30 km, much thinner and less variable than under the Taiwan Island.

  4. Experimental evidence for s-wave pairing symmetry in superconducting Cu(x)Bi2Se3 single crystals using a scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed

    Levy, Niv; Zhang, Tong; Ha, Jeonghoon; Sharifi, Fred; Talin, A Alec; Kuk, Young; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2013-03-15

    Topological superconductors represent a newly predicted phase of matter that is topologically distinct from conventional superconducting condensates of Cooper pairs. As a manifestation of their topological character, topological superconductors support solid-state realizations of Majorana fermions at their boundaries. The recently discovered superconductor Cu(x)Bi(2)Se(3) has been theoretically proposed as an odd-parity superconductor in the time-reversal-invariant topological superconductor class, and point-contact spectroscopy measurements have reported the observation of zero-bias conductance peaks corresponding to Majorana states in this material. Here we report scanning tunneling microscopy measurements of the superconducting energy gap in Cu(x)Bi(2)Se(3) as a function of spatial position and applied magnetic field. The tunneling spectrum shows that the density of states at the Fermi level is fully gapped without any in-gap states. The spectrum is well described by the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory with a momentum independent order parameter, which suggests that Cu(x)Bi(2)Se(3) is a classical s-wave superconductor contrary to previous expectations and measurements.

  5. Anomalous scaling of ΔC versus T c in the Fe-based superconductors: the {S}_{+/- }-wave pairing state model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Yunkyu; Stewart, G. R.

    2016-02-01

    The strong power law behavior of the specific heat jump {{Δ }}C versus T c ({{Δ }}C/{T}{{c}}∼ {T}{{c}}α ,α ≈ 2), first observed by Bud’ko et al (2009 Phys. Rev. B 79 220516), has been confirmed with several families of the Fe-based superconducting compounds with various dopings. We have tested a minimal two band BCS model to understand this anomalous behavior and showed that this non-BCS relation between {{Δ }}C versus T c is a generic property of the multiband superconducting state paired by a dominant interband interaction ({V}{inter}\\gt {V}{intra}) reflecting the relation \\frac{{{{Δ }}}{{h}}}{{{{Δ }}}{{e}}}∼ \\sqrt{\\frac{{N}{{e}}}{{N}{{h}}}} near T c, as in the {S}+/- -wave pairing state. We also found that this {{Δ }}C versus T c power law can continuously change from the ideal BNC scaling to a considerable deviation by a moderate variation of the impurity scattering rate {{{Γ }}}0 (non-pair-breaking). As a result, our model provides a consistent explanation why the electron-doped Fe-based superconductors follow the ideal BNC scaling very well while the hole-doped systems often show varying degree of deviations.

  6. Quality Indicators for Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheffel, Maren; Drachsler, Hendrik; Stoyanov, Slavi; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a framework of quality indicators for learning analytics that aims to standardise the evaluation of learning analytics tools and to provide a mean to capture evidence for the impact of learning analytics on educational practices in a standardised manner. The criteria of the framework and its quality indicators are based on…

  7. The analytic renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Finite temperature Euclidean two-point functions in quantum mechanics or quantum field theory are characterized by a discrete set of Fourier coefficients Gk, k ∈ Z, associated with the Matsubara frequencies νk = 2 πk / β. We show that analyticity implies that the coefficients Gk must satisfy an infinite number of model-independent linear equations that we write down explicitly. In particular, we construct "Analytic Renormalization Group" linear maps Aμ which, for any choice of cut-off μ, allow to express the low energy Fourier coefficients for |νk | < μ (with the possible exception of the zero mode G0), together with the real-time correlators and spectral functions, in terms of the high energy Fourier coefficients for |νk | ≥ μ. Operating a simple numerical algorithm, we show that the exact universal linear constraints on Gk can be used to systematically improve any random approximate data set obtained, for example, from Monte-Carlo simulations. Our results are illustrated on several explicit examples.

  8. Normality in analytical psychology.

    PubMed

    Myers, Steve

    2013-12-01

    Although C.G. Jung's interest in normality wavered throughout his career, it was one of the areas he identified in later life as worthy of further research. He began his career using a definition of normality which would have been the target of Foucault's criticism, had Foucault chosen to review Jung's work. However, Jung then evolved his thinking to a standpoint that was more aligned to Foucault's own. Thereafter, the post Jungian concept of normality has remained relatively undeveloped by comparison with psychoanalysis and mainstream psychology. Jung's disjecta membra on the subject suggest that, in contemporary analytical psychology, too much focus is placed on the process of individuation to the neglect of applications that consider collective processes. Also, there is potential for useful research and development into the nature of conflict between individuals and societies, and how normal people typically develop in relation to the spectrum between individuation and collectivity.

  9. Analytic pion form factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomon, Earle L.; Pacetti, Simone

    2016-09-01

    The pion electromagnetic form factor and two-pion production in electron-positron collisions are simultaneously fitted by a vector dominance model evolving to perturbative QCD at large momentum transfer. This model was previously successful in simultaneously fitting the nucleon electromagnetic form factors (spacelike region) and the electromagnetic production of nucleon-antinucleon pairs (timelike region). For this pion case dispersion relations are used to produce the analytic connection of the spacelike and timelike regions. The fit to all the data is good, especially for the newer sets of timelike data. The description of high-q2 data, in the timelike region, requires one more meson with ρ quantum numbers than listed in the 2014 Particle Data Group review.

  10. ANALYTIC MODELING OF STARSHADES

    SciTech Connect

    Cash, Webster

    2011-09-01

    External occulters, otherwise known as starshades, have been proposed as a solution to one of the highest priority yet technically vexing problems facing astrophysics-the direct imaging and characterization of terrestrial planets around other stars. New apodization functions, developed over the past few years, now enable starshades of just a few tens of meters diameter to occult central stars so efficiently that the orbiting exoplanets can be revealed and other high-contrast imaging challenges addressed. In this paper, an analytic approach to the analysis of these apodization functions is presented. It is used to develop a tolerance analysis suitable for use in designing practical starshades. The results provide a mathematical basis for understanding starshades and a quantitative approach to setting tolerances.

  11. VERDE Analytic Modules

    2008-01-15

    The Verde Analytic Modules permit the user to ingest openly available data feeds about phenomenology (storm tracks, wind, precipitation, earthquake, wildfires, and similar natural and manmade power grid disruptions and forecast power outages, restoration times, customers outaged, and key facilities that will lose power. Damage areas are predicted using historic damage criteria of the affected area. The modules use a cellular automata approach to estimating the distribution circuits assigned to geo-located substations. Population estimates servedmore » within the service areas are located within 1 km grid cells and converted to customer counts by conversion through demographic estimation of households and commercial firms within the population cells. Restoration times are estimated by agent-based simulation of restoration crews working according to utility published prioritization calibrated by historic performance.« less

  12. Analytics for Metabolic Engineering.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Christopher J; Chan, Leanne Jade G; Nhan, Melissa; Adams, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the promise of metabolic engineering has been slowed by challenges related to moving beyond proof-of-concept examples to robust and economically viable systems. Key to advancing metabolic engineering beyond trial-and-error research is access to parts with well-defined performance metrics that can be readily applied in vastly different contexts with predictable effects. As the field now stands, research depends greatly on analytical tools that assay target molecules, transcripts, proteins, and metabolites across different hosts and pathways. Screening technologies yield specific information for many thousands of strain variants, while deep omics analysis provides a systems-level view of the cell factory. Efforts focused on a combination of these analyses yield quantitative information of dynamic processes between parts and the host chassis that drive the next engineering steps. Overall, the data generated from these types of assays aid better decision-making at the design and strain construction stages to speed progress in metabolic engineering research.

  13. VERDE Analytic Modules

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-15

    The Verde Analytic Modules permit the user to ingest openly available data feeds about phenomenology (storm tracks, wind, precipitation, earthquake, wildfires, and similar natural and manmade power grid disruptions and forecast power outages, restoration times, customers outaged, and key facilities that will lose power. Damage areas are predicted using historic damage criteria of the affected area. The modules use a cellular automata approach to estimating the distribution circuits assigned to geo-located substations. Population estimates served within the service areas are located within 1 km grid cells and converted to customer counts by conversion through demographic estimation of households and commercial firms within the population cells. Restoration times are estimated by agent-based simulation of restoration crews working according to utility published prioritization calibrated by historic performance.

  14. Normality in Analytical Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Although C.G. Jung’s interest in normality wavered throughout his career, it was one of the areas he identified in later life as worthy of further research. He began his career using a definition of normality which would have been the target of Foucault’s criticism, had Foucault chosen to review Jung’s work. However, Jung then evolved his thinking to a standpoint that was more aligned to Foucault’s own. Thereafter, the post Jungian concept of normality has remained relatively undeveloped by comparison with psychoanalysis and mainstream psychology. Jung’s disjecta membra on the subject suggest that, in contemporary analytical psychology, too much focus is placed on the process of individuation to the neglect of applications that consider collective processes. Also, there is potential for useful research and development into the nature of conflict between individuals and societies, and how normal people typically develop in relation to the spectrum between individuation and collectivity. PMID:25379262

  15. Surface electronic structure and evidence of plain s -wave superconductivity in (L i0.8F e0.2)OHFeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y. J.; Zhang, W. H.; Ren, M. Q.; Liu, X.; Lu, X. F.; Wang, N. Z.; Niu, X. H.; Fan, Q.; Miao, J.; Tao, R.; Xie, B. P.; Chen, X. H.; Zhang, T.; Feng, D. L.

    2016-10-01

    (L i0.8F e0.2)OHFeSe is a newly discovered intercalated iron-selenide superconductor with a Tc above 40 K, which is much higher than the Tc of bulk FeSe (8 K). Here we report a systematic study of (L i0.8F e0.2)OHFeSe by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We observed two kinds of surface terminations, namely FeSe and (L i0.8F e0.2)OH surfaces. On the FeSe surface, the superconducting state is fully gapped with double coherence peaks, and a vortex core state with split peaks near EF is observed. Through quasiparticle interference (QPI) measurements, we clearly observed intra- and interpocket scatterings in between the electron pockets at the M point, as well as some evidence of scattering that connects Γ and M points. Upon applying the magnetic field, the QPI intensity of all the scattering channels are found to behave similarly. Furthermore, we studied impurity effects on the superconductivity by investigating intentionally introduced impurities and intrinsic defects. We observed that magnetic impurities such as Cr adatoms can induce in-gap states and suppress superconductivity. However, nonmagnetic impurities such as Zn adatoms do not induce visible in-gap states. Meanwhile, we show that Zn adatoms can induce in-gap states in thick FeSe films, which is believed to have an s±-wave pairing symmetry. Our experimental results suggest it is likely that (L i0.8F e0.2)OHFeSe is a plain s -wave superconductor, whose order parameter has the same sign on all Fermi surface sections.

  16. Finite frequency effects on apparent S-wave splitting in the D″ layer: comparison between ray theory and full-wave synthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgeaud, Anselme F. E.; Konishi, Kensuke; Kawai, Kenji; Geller, Robert J.

    2016-10-01

    We conduct a numerical experiment to investigate potential bias in measurements of S-wave splitting (apparent differences between the arrival times of SH and SV phases) for waves propagating close to the core-mantle boundary (CMB) in the D″ layer. The bias is defined as the discrepancy between shear wave splitting measured from finite frequency synthetic seismograms (`apparent splitting') and the splitting predicted by ray theory, which is a high-frequency approximation. For simple isotropic models, we find biases which are typically between 0.5 and 4 s, depending on the model, the Q structure and the dominant period of the synthetics. The bias increases for lower frequencies or lower Q values. The epicentral distance at which the bias starts depends on the frequency and the Q structure. We also compute synthetics for models based on mineral physics (using the elastic constants under lower-mantle pressure and temperature conditions, taking into account the phase transition from Mg-perovskite to Mg-post-perovskite) and geodynamics (the thermal boundary layer) and find that the depth of the positive velocity jump associated with the phase transition and the depth range over which the velocity decreases (due to temperature increases) in the thermal boundary layer significantly influence the wavefield in the lowermost mantle. For example, in cold regions beneath subduction zones, wavefields for SH and SV differ greatly due to the steep velocity decrease close to the CMB. For complex models, apparent splitting can also arise from the possibility that low amplitude direct phases might be overlooked, and larger amplitude later phases might instead incorrectly be picked as the direct arrival. Biases of the type investigated in this study combine with other sources of uncertainty for splitting in D″ (e.g. the correction for upper-mantle anisotropy and the difference between SH and SV ray paths) to make a precise evaluation of the anisotropy in D″ difficult.

  17. High-resolution imaging of the Kaapvaal Craton using P and S wave receiver functions and P- and S- finite frequency tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssof, M.; Thybo, H.; Levander, A.; Artemieva, I. M.

    2012-12-01

    We are investigating the Kaapvaal craton with Ps- and Sp-wave receiver functions and P- and S- finite-frequency body wave tomography. We have produced 3D common conversion point (CCP) stacks of Ps and Sp receiver functions image volumes for comparison to 3D body wave finite-frequency travel-time inversions. These two methods together provide high vertical and lateral resolution of the upper mantle beneath the Kaapvaal craton. For a conversion point d, we have calculated the ray path of converted phases PdS and Sdp and their arrival times relative to P and S, respectively, by ray tracing the 1D AK135 velocity model. About ~1000 individual S-wave receiver functions and ~7000 P-wave receiver functions have been converted to depth and laterally migrated to their conversion point in 3D using the 1D reference velocity model, with signals stacked for signal enhancement. Converted wave imaging and traveltime tomography complement one another: The tomograms provide the laterally variable velocity structures needed for image focusing. The converted wave images provide higher resolution images of both lateral and vertical impedance changes, removing some of the smearing inherent in tomographic methods. In our particular case of investigating the Kaapvaal craton, the seismic imaging has confirmed the existence of a boundary beneath the Kaapvaal at 350 km, which we speculate is an unusually deep Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB). The topography of the LAB varies considerably from shallow depths (150 km) beneath the non-Archean regions to the deepest point (350 km) beneath the center of the Kaapvaal craton. In the receiver functions the LAB appears as a strong negative amplitude (in comparison to the Moho) beneath the Kaapvaal craton including under its edges, but it is a much weaker signal under the surrounding mobile belts. Our new model of Kaapvaal craton enhances the evidence for the existence of extremely deep cratonic keel, which reach 350 km with clear layered

  18. Evaluation of P- and S- Wave Velocities at CGS Geotechnical Arrays Using Wave Propagation Analysis of Strong Ground-Motion Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, H. R.; Shakal, A. F.; Hagos, L. Z.

    2014-12-01

    The average compressional and shear wave velocities of ground layers at the California Geological Survey's instrumented geotechnical arrays are evaluated by analyzing the strong ground-motion records of the earthquakes. The Normalized Input-Output Minimization Method (NIOM) has been employed to correlate the ground motion waveforms recorded at various depths of the geotechnical arrays, and to calculate the P- and S- wave travel times and velocities between the depths at which the seismic sensors have been installed. As of August 2014, the California Geological Survey's Strong-Motion Instrumentation Program (CGS CSMIP) operates 35 geotechnical arrays, a large number of them with cooperation of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). As of this date, 140 records from 68 earthquakes with magnitude 3.5 and larger have been recorded at 28 geotechnical arrays. The records are available for download through the Center for Engineering Strong Motion Data (CESMD), the joint center of the U.S. Geological Survey and the California Geological Survey. The velocities obtained in this study for the cases of weak and strong shaking are compared with the measured velocities at the geotechnical array sites obtained using geophysical methods such as SASW, PS suspension logging and downhole methods. The average shear wave velocities in the upper 30 m of the geotechnical arrays from this study are compared with the Vs30 values from geophysical investigations. Application of wave propagation analysis is especially important in studying the dynamic characteristics of ground layers during high stress ground shaking and yields average values for a larger area under a site as opposed to the area in the very close vicinity of the geotechnical array.

  19. Finite frequency effects on apparent S-wave splitting in the D″ layer: comparison between ray theory and full-wave synthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgeaud, Anselme F. E.; Konishi, Kensuke; Kawai, Kenji; Geller, Robert J.

    2016-07-01

    We conduct a numerical experiment to investigate potential bias in measurements of S-wave splitting (apparent differences between the arrival times of SH and SV phases) for waves propagating close to the core-mantle boundary (CMB) in the D″ layer. The bias is defined as the discrepancy between shear wave splitting measured from finite frequency synthetic seismograms ("apparent splitting") and the splitting predicted by ray theory, which is a high-frequency approximation. For simple isotropic models, we find biases which are typically between 0.5 s and 4 s, depending on the model, the Q structure, and the dominant period of the synthetics. The bias increases for lower frequencies or lower Q values. The epicentral distance at which the bias starts depends on the frequency and the Q structure. We also compute synthetics for models based on mineral physics (using the elastic constants under lower mantle pressure and temperature conditions, taking into account the phase transition from Mg-perovskite to post-perovskite) and geodynamics (the thermal boundary layer) and find that the depth of the positive velocity jump associated with the phase transition and the depth range over which the velocity decreases (due to temperature increases) in the thermal boundary layer significantly influence the wavefield in the lowermost mantle. For example, in cold regions beneath subduction zones, wavefields for SH and SV differ greatly due to the steep velocity decrease close to the CMB. For complex models, apparent splitting can also arise from the possibility that low amplitude direct phases might be overlooked, and larger amplitude later phases might instead incorrectly be picked as the direct arrival. Biases of the type investigated in this study combine with other sources of uncertainty for splitting in D″ (e.g., the correction for upper mantle anisotropy and the difference between SH and SV raypaths) to make a precise evaluation of the anisotropy in D″ difficult.

  20. S-wave velocities and anisotropy of typical rocks from Yunkai metamorphic complex and constraints on the composition of the crust beneath Southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Shaocheng; Wang, Qian; Shao, Tongbin; Endo, Hiroto; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Salisbury, Matthew H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to constrain the interpretation of seismic data from receiver functions and deep profiles of the crust beneath southern China (Cathaysia and Yangtze blocks), we have measured S-wave velocities (Vs) and splitting as a function of hydrostatic confining pressure up to 650 MPa for 22 representative samples (i.e., granite, diorite, felsic gneiss and mylonite, amphibolite, schist, and marble) from the Yunkai metamorphic complex (China) that represent the crystalline basement beneath the region. The experimental data were combined with electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) analysis of rock-forming minerals to constrain variations of Vp/Vs ratios and understand the origin of seismic anisotropy. The crusts beneath the Yangtze and Cathaysia blocks have different average thicknesses (H = 35.4 ± 6.3 km and 29.8 ± 1.8 km, respectively) but display almost the same Vp/Vs values (1.73 ± 0.08 and 1.74 ± 0.04, respectively). These ratios correspond to an average of bimodally distributed granitic and gabbroic lithologies which are dominant, respectively, in the upper and lower crusts, instead a homogeneous andesitic composition of the overall crust. Positive and negative correlations between H and Vp/Vs occur in west and east parts of southern China, respectively. The negative correlation indicates basaltic underplating from a partially molten mantle wedge above the subducting Pacific plate into the southern China crust, whereas the positive correlation implies that much larger thinning strain has taken place in the high temperature mafic lower crust (high temperature) than in the low temperature felsic upper crust during Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic extension.

  1. Generation of new continental crust and terrane accretion in Southeastern Alaska and Western British Columbia: constraints from P- and S-wave wide-angle seismic data (ACCRETE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Igor B.; Smithson, Scott B.; Chen, Jingru; Hollister, Lincoln S.

    2001-11-01

    The ACCRETE study addresses the question of continental assemblage in southeastern Alaska and western British Columbia through accretion of exotic terranes and generation of new crust by magmatic addition in a former continental arc. We present results of wide-angle P- and S-wave seismic interpretation of a 300-km long marine-land seismic line across the contacts between accreted terranes and Coast Mountains. Additional constraints on the model are obtained from correlation with geologic mapping. Our results indicate that the Coast Shear Zone (CSZ) is a nearly vertical fault zone probably related to a transpressive regime. West of the CSZ, the mid-Cretaceous (90 Ma) thrust belt is rooted in the deep crust and is truncated by the CSZ. From the interpretation of the imaged sub-vertical reflecting zones, we infer the positions of the Alexander-Wrangellia terrane boundary (AWB) and of Tertiary extensional grabens within Dixon Entrance near its intersection with the profile. The observed values of Vp and Vp/Vs in the lower crust of the Alexander terrane are similar to those of oceanic crust and distinctly different from the Coast Mountains Batholith (CMB) to the northeast. The crust under the CMB (32 km) is thinner than the average continental crust, and the Moho is sharp (˜200 m) and highly reflective. The low-velocity mantle (7.9 km/s) suggests high temperature consistent with the stability of garnet in mafic rocks in the lower crust. The lower crustal velocity of 6.9 km/s supports a lower crust composed of interlayered garnet pyroxene granulite and quartzofeldspathic-restite related to batholith generation. The crustal section under the CMB is seismically identical to the lower two thirds of normal crust, heated and inflated by intrusions of tonalite, and gabbro interlayered with restites from batholith generation and uplifted during exhumation.

  2. Nonlocal effect of a varying in-space Zeeman field on supercurrent and helix state in a spin-orbit-coupled s -wave superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'shukov, A. G.

    2016-02-01

    A weak parallel Zeeman field combined with spin-orbit coupling can induce the supercurrent in an s -wave two-dimensional superconductor. At the same time, the thermodynamic equilibrium state of such a system is characterized by the helix phase in which the order parameter varies in space as exp(i Q .r ) . In this state, the electric current that is induced by the Zeeman interaction is exactly counterbalanced by the current produced by the gradient of the order parameter. We studied the interplay of the helix state and magnetoelectric current in the case of a varying in-space Zeeman field, as it might be realized in hybrid heterostructures with magnetic and superconducting layers. The theoretical analysis was based on Usadel equations for Green functions in a dirty superconductor. It is shown that even weak inhomogeneity produces a strong long-range effect on the magnetoelectric current and the order-parameter phase. Consequently, depending on the macroscopic shape of such an inhomogeneity, either the helix state with the zero supercurrent, or a locally uniform state with the finite supercurrent, is realized. A mixture of these two extreme situations is also possible. It is also shown that the current can be induced at a large distance from a ferromagnetic island embedded into a superconductor. Quantum effects associated with the magnetoelectric effect are briefly discussed for multiply connected systems. The theory proposes an alternative point of view on the interplay of the magnetoelectric effect and helix phase in spin-orbit coupled superconductors. It also suggests an interesting method that enables us to couple superconducting and magnetic circuits.

  3. Analytic integrable systems: Analytic normalization and embedding flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang

    In this paper we mainly study the existence of analytic normalization and the normal form of finite dimensional complete analytic integrable dynamical systems. More details, we will prove that any complete analytic integrable diffeomorphism F(x)=Bx+f(x) in (Cn,0) with B having eigenvalues not modulus 1 and f(x)=O(|) is locally analytically conjugate to its normal form. Meanwhile, we also prove that any complete analytic integrable differential system x˙=Ax+f(x) in (Cn,0) with A having nonzero eigenvalues and f(x)=O(|) is locally analytically conjugate to its normal form. Furthermore we will prove that any complete analytic integrable diffeomorphism defined on an analytic manifold can be embedded in a complete analytic integrable flow. We note that parts of our results are the improvement of Moser's one in J. Moser, The analytic invariants of an area-preserving mapping near a hyperbolic fixed point, Comm. Pure Appl. Math. 9 (1956) 673-692 and of Poincaré's one in H. Poincaré, Sur l'intégration des équations différentielles du premier order et du premier degré, II, Rend. Circ. Mat. Palermo 11 (1897) 193-239. These results also improve the ones in Xiang Zhang, Analytic normalization of analytic integrable systems and the embedding flows, J. Differential Equations 244 (2008) 1080-1092 in the sense that the linear part of the systems can be nonhyperbolic, and the one in N.T. Zung, Convergence versus integrability in Poincaré-Dulac normal form, Math. Res. Lett. 9 (2002) 217-228 in the way that our paper presents the concrete expression of the normal form in a restricted case.

  4. 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves in a biotite gneiss, measured in oil as the pressure medium: Comparison with velocity measurements in a multi-anvil pressure apparatus and with texture-based calculated data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokajíček, T.; Kern, H.; Svitek, T.; Ivankina, T.

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasonic measurements of the 3D velocity distribution of P- and S-waves were performed on a spherical sample of a biotite gneiss from the Outokumpu scientific drill hole. Measurements were done at room temperature and pressures up to 400 and 70 MPa, respectively, in a pressure vessel with oil as a pressure medium. A modified transducer/sample assembly and the installation of a new mechanical system allowed simultaneous measurements of P- and S-wave velocities in 132 independent directions of the sphere on a net in steps of 15°. Proper signals for P- and S-waves could be recorded by coating the sample surface with a high-viscosity shear wave gel and by temporal point contacting of the transmitter and receiver transducers with the sample surface during the measurements. The 3D seismic measurements revealed a strong foliation-related directional dependence (anisotropy) of P- and S-wave velocities, which is confirmed by measurements in a multi-anvil apparatus on a cube-shaped specimen of the same rock. Both experimental approaches show a marked pressure sensitivity of P- and S-wave velocities and velocity anisotropies. With increasing pressure, P- and S-wave velocities increase non-linearly due to progressive closure of micro-cracks. The reverse is true for velocity anisotropy. 3D velocity calculations based on neutron diffraction measurements of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of major minerals show that the intrinsic bulk anisotropy is basically caused by the CPO of biotite constituting about 23 vol.% of the rock. Including the shape of biotite grains and oriented low-aspect ratio microcracks into the modelling increases bulk anisotropy. An important finding from this study is that the measurements on the sample sphere and on the sample cube displayed distinct differences, particularly in shear wave velocities. It is assumed that the differences are due to the different geometries of the samples and the configuration of the transducer-sample assembly

  5. Hanford transuranic analytical capability

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, C.B.

    1995-02-24

    With the current DOE focus on ER/WM programs, an increase in the quantity of waste samples that requires detailed analysis is forecasted. One of the prime areas of growth is the demand for DOE environmental protocol analyses of TRU waste samples. Currently there is no laboratory capacity to support analysis of TRU waste samples in excess of 200 nCi/gm. This study recommends that an interim solution be undertaken to provide these services. By adding two glove boxes in room 11A of 222S the interim waste analytical needs can be met for a period of four to five years or until a front end facility is erected at or near the 222-S facility. The yearly average of samples is projected to be approximately 600 samples. The figure has changed significantly due to budget changes and has been downgraded from 10,000 samples to the 600 level. Until these budget and sample projection changes become firmer, a long term option is not recommended at this time. A revision to this document is recommended by March 1996 to review the long term option and sample projections.

  6. Analytics for Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Christopher J.; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Nhan, Melissa; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the promise of metabolic engineering has been slowed by challenges related to moving beyond proof-of-concept examples to robust and economically viable systems. Key to advancing metabolic engineering beyond trial-and-error research is access to parts with well-defined performance metrics that can be readily applied in vastly different contexts with predictable effects. As the field now stands, research depends greatly on analytical tools that assay target molecules, transcripts, proteins, and metabolites across different hosts and pathways. Screening technologies yield specific information for many thousands of strain variants, while deep omics analysis provides a systems-level view of the cell factory. Efforts focused on a combination of these analyses yield quantitative information of dynamic processes between parts and the host chassis that drive the next engineering steps. Overall, the data generated from these types of assays aid better decision-making at the design and strain construction stages to speed progress in metabolic engineering research. PMID:26442249

  7. Analytical laboratory quality audits

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, William D.

    2001-06-11

    Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

  8. New tomographic images of P- , S- wave velocity and Q on the Philippine Sea Slab beneath Tokyo: Implication to seismotectonics and seismic hazard in the Tokyo metropolitan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Naoshi; Sakai, Shin'ichi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Panayotopoulos, Yannis; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kasahara, Keiji; Kimura, Hisanor; Honda, Ryou

    2013-04-01

    The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates the next great M7+ earthquake in the Tokyo metropolitan region will cause 11,000 fatalities and 112 trillion yen (1 trillion US) economic loss at worst case if it occur beneath northern Tokyo bay with M7.3. However, the estimate is based on a source fault model by conventional studies about the PSP geometry. To evaluate seismic hazard due to the great quake we need to clarify the geometry of PSP and also the Pacific palate (PAP) that subducs beneath PSP. We identify those plates with use of seismic tomography and available deep seismic reflection profiling and borehole data in southern Kanto area. We deployed about 300 seismic stations in the greater Tokyo urban region under the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area. We obtain clear P- and S- wave velocity (Vp and Vs) and Q tomograms which show a clear image of PSP and PAP. A depth to the top of PSP, 20 to 30 kilometer beneath northern part of Tokyo bay, is about 10 km shallower than previous estimates based on the distribution of seismicity (Ishida, 1992). This shallower plate geometry changes estimations of strong ground motion for seismic hazards analysis within the Tokyo region. Based on elastic wave velocities of rocks and minerals, we interpreted the tomographic images as petrologic images. Tomographic images revealed the presence of two stepwise velocity increase of the top layer of the subducting PSP slab. Rock velocity data reveals that subducting PSP crust transforms from blueschists to amphibolites at depth of 30km and amphibolites to eclogites at depth of 50km, which suggest that dehydration reactions occurs in subducting crust of basaltic compositions during prograde metamorphism and water is released from the subducting PSP crust. Tomograms show evidence for a low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the area just north of Tokyo bay. A Q tomogram show a low Q zone in PSP slab. We interpret the LVZ as a

  9. S-wave triggering of tremor beneath the Parkfield, California, section of the San Andreas fault by the 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake: observations and theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, David P.; Peng, Zhigang; Shelly, David R.; Aiken, Chastity

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic stresses that are associated with the energetic seismic waves generated by the Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake off the northeast coast of Japan triggered bursts of tectonic tremor beneath the Parkfield section of the San Andreas fault (SAF) at an epicentral distance of ∼8200  km. The onset of tremor begins midway through the ∼100‐s‐period S‐wave arrival, with a minor burst coinciding with the SHSH arrival, as recorded on the nearby broadband seismic station PKD. A more pronounced burst coincides with the Love arrival, followed by a series of impulsive tremor bursts apparently modulated by the 20‐ to 30‐s‐period Rayleigh wave. The triggered tremor was located at depths between 20 and 30 km beneath the surface trace of the fault, with the burst coincident with the S wave centered beneath the fault 30 km northwest of Parkfield. Most of the subsequent activity, including the tremor coincident with the SHSH arrival, was concentrated beneath a stretch of the fault extending from 10 to 40 km southeast of Parkfield. The seismic waves from the Tohoku epicenter form a horizontal incidence angle of ∼14°, with respect to the local strike of the SAF. Computed peak dynamic Coulomb stresses on the fault at tremor depths are in the 0.7–10 kPa range. The apparent modulation of tremor bursts by the small, strike‐parallel Rayleigh‐wave stresses (∼0.7  kPa) is likely enabled by pore pressure variations driven by the Rayleigh‐wave dilatational stress. These results are consistent with the strike‐parallel dynamic stresses (δτs) associated with the S, SHSH, and surface‐wave phases triggering small increments of dextral slip on the fault with a low friction (μ∼0.2). The vertical dynamic stresses δτd do not trigger tremor with vertical or oblique slip under this simple Coulomb failure model.

  10. P-and S-wave velocities of exhumed metasediments from the Aleutian subduction megathrust: Implications for the interpretation of low velocity zones and fault reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, P.; Bate, C.; Saffer, D. M.; Abers, G. A.; Shillington, D. J.; Keranen, K. M.; Becel, A.; Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction zones are host to the planet's largest recorded earthquakes and tsunamis. The strength and slip behavior of the megathrust plate interface is tightly linked to the in situ conditions and physical state of sediments that are entrained along the plate interface. The mechanical properties of these sediments change as they are heated, consolidated, and metamorphosed with progressive subduction and burial beneath the forearc; understanding this evolution of rock properties is essential toward quantitative interpretation of geophysical signatures in the context of stress state, pore fluid pressure, and composition down-dip along the megathrust. In particular, observed zones of high-amplitude seismic reflectivity, low P- and S-wave velocities (Vp and Vs), and high Vp/Vs along subduction megathrusts have been widely interpreted to indicate near-lithostatic pore fluid pressure, yet the role of low-velocity and highly anisotropic metasediments along and beneath the plate interface remain weakly constrained. To address this question, we conducted triaxial deformation experiments on a suite of argillaceous metasedimentary fault zone rocks exhumed from ~12-15 depth in the Aleutian subduction zone, in order to define Vp and Vs at mean effective stresses up to ~100 MPa. In our experiments we observed a rapid increase in Vp with increasing effective stress that we interpret to be microcrack closure. We also observed significant velocity anisotropy in samples tested perpendicular and parallel to foliation with respective Vp of 5.0 km/s and 5.9 km/s (17% anisotropy) at peak stress. Velocity predictions based on whole rock composition and simple assumptions about pore structure and volume tend to over predict observed velocities, but this discrepancy may be reconciled if pores are highly elongate. Synthetic waveform modeling shows that these wavespeeds are broadly consistent with observed reflectivity and low-frequency low velocity zones at 20-40 km depth (10-30 km from

  11. Crustal and upper-mantle structure beneath ice-covered regions in Antarctica from S-wave receiver functions and implications for heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, C.; Nyblade, A.; Hansen, S. E.; Wiens, D. A.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Aster, R. C.; Huerta, A. D.; Shore, P.; Wilson, T.

    2016-03-01

    S-wave receiver functions (SRFs) are used to investigate crustal and upper-mantle structure beneath several ice-covered areas of Antarctica. Moho S-to-P (Sp) arrivals are observed at ˜6-8 s in SRF stacks for stations in the Gamburtsev Mountains (GAM) and Vostok Highlands (VHIG), ˜5-6 s for stations in the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) and the Wilkes Basin (WILK), and ˜3-4 s for stations in the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS) and the Marie Byrd Land Dome (MBLD). A grid search is used to model the Moho Sp conversion time with Rayleigh wave phase velocities from 18 to 30 s period to estimate crustal thickness and mean crustal shear wave velocity. The Moho depths obtained are between 43 and 58 km for GAM, 36 and 47 km for VHIG, 39 and 46 km for WILK, 39 and 45 km for TAM, 19 and 29 km for WARS and 20 and 35 km for MBLD. SRF stacks for GAM, VHIG, WILK and TAM show little evidence of Sp arrivals coming from upper-mantle depths. SRF stacks for WARS and MBLD show Sp energy arriving from upper-mantle depths but arrival amplitudes do not rise above bootstrapped uncertainty bounds. The age and thickness of the crust is used as a heat flow proxy through comparison with other similar terrains where heat flow has been measured. Crustal structure in GAM, VHIG and WILK is similar to Precambrian terrains in other continents where heat flow ranges from ˜41 to 58 mW m-2, suggesting that heat flow across those areas of East Antarctica is not elevated. For the WARS, we use the Cretaceous Newfoundland-Iberia rifted margins and the Mesozoic-Tertiary North Sea rift as tectonic analogues. The low-to-moderate heat flow reported for the Newfoundland-Iberia margins (40-65 mW m-2) and North Sea rift (60-85 mW m-2) suggest that heat flow across the WARS also may not be elevated. However, the possibility of high heat flow associated with localized Cenozoic extension or Cenozoic-recent magmatic activity in some parts of the WARS cannot be ruled out.

  12. Subtractive renormalization of the NN interaction in chiral effective theory up to next-to-next-to-leading order: S waves

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.-J.; Elster, Ch.; Phillips, D. R.

    2009-10-15

    We extend our subtractive-renormalization method to evaluate the {sup 1}S{sub 0} and {sup 3}S{sub 1}-{sup 3}D{sub 1} NN-scattering phase shifts up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in chiral effective theory. We show that, if energy-dependent contact terms are employed in the NN potential, the {sup 1}S{sub 0} phase shift can be obtained by carrying out two subtractions on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation. These subtractions use knowledge of the the scattering length and the {sup 1}S{sub 0} phase shift at a specific energy to eliminate the low-energy constants in the contact interaction from the scattering equation. For the J=1 coupled channel, a similar renormalization can be achieved by three subtractions that employ knowledge of the {sup 3}S{sub 1}scattering length, the {sup 3}S{sub 1} phase shift at a specific energy, and the {sup 3}S{sub 1}-{sup 3}D{sub 1} generalized scattering length. In both channels a similar method can be applied to a potential with momentum-dependent contact terms, except that in that case one of the subtractions must be replaced by a fit to one piece of experimental data. This method allows the use of arbitrarily high cutoffs in the Lippmann-Schwinger equation. We examine the NNLO S-wave phase shifts for cutoffs as large as 19 GeV and show that the presence of linear energy dependence in the NN potential creates spurious poles in the scattering amplitude. In consequence the results are in conflict with empirical data over appreciable portions of the considered cutoff range. We also identify problems with the use of cutoffs greater than 1 GeV when momentum-dependent contact interactions are employed. These problems are ameliorated, but not eliminated, by the use of spectral-function regularization for the two-pion exchange part of the NN potential.

  13. Acquisition of time-lapse, 6-component, P- and S-wave, crosswell seismic survey with orbital vibrator and of time-lapse VSP for CO2 injection monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, Tom; Daley, T.M.; Myer, L.R.; Majer, E.L.

    2004-07-15

    Using an orbital vibrator source (2-components), and a 40 level 3-component geophone string, a 6-component crosswell survey was acquired before and after a CO2 injection in a saline aquifer. Decomposition of the two source components and component rotation of both source and sensors created good separation of P- and S-wave energy allowing independent analysis of travel time and reflectivity. A time-lapse VSP was also acquired.

  14. The Case for Assessment Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Cath

    2013-01-01

    Learning analytics is a relatively new field of inquiry and its precise meaning is both contested and fluid (Johnson, Smith, Willis, Levine & Haywood, 2011; LAK, n.d.). Ferguson (2012) suggests that the best working definition is that offered by the first Learning Analytics and Knowledge (LAK) conference: "the measurement, collection,…

  15. Understanding Education Involving Geovisual Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenliden, Linnea

    2013-01-01

    Handling the vast amounts of data and information available in contemporary society is a challenge. Geovisual Analytics provides technology designed to increase the effectiveness of information interpretation and analytical task solving. To date, little attention has been paid to the role such tools can play in education and to the extent to which…

  16. [Photonic crystals for analytical chemistry].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Li, Jincheng

    2009-09-01

    Photonic crystals, originally created to control the transmission of light, have found their increasing value in the field of analytical chemistry and are probable to become a hot research area soon. This review is hence composed, focusing on their analytical chemistry-oriented applications, including especially their use in chromatography, capillary- and chip-based electrophoresis.

  17. Information Theory in Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckschlager, Karel; Stepanek, Vladimir

    1982-01-01

    Discusses information theory in analytical practice. Topics include information quantities; ways of obtaining formulas for the amount of information in structural, qualitative, and trace analyses; and information measures in comparing and optimizing analytical methods and procedures. Includes tables outlining applications of information theory to…

  18. A Comparison Study of the Dynamic Amplification Characteristics of the Major Domestic Seismic Observation Sites using Background Noise and S-wave Energy of Ground Motions from 15 Fukuoka Earthquakes Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Kwon, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Observed ground motions are mainly composed of 3 main factors such as seismic source, seismic wave attenuation and site amplification. Among them, site amplification is also important factor and should be considered to estimate soil-structure dynamic interaction with more reliability. Though various estimation methods are suggested, this study used the method by Castro et. al.(1997) for estimating site amplification. This method has been extended to background noise, coda waves and S waves recently for estimating site amplification. This study applied the Castro et. al.(1997)'s method to the background noise. This study analysed more than 298 background noises from 15 macro earthquakes including main Fukuoka earthquake (2005/03/20, M=6.5) and then compared to results from S waves(2013), at 8 main domestic seismic stations. The results showed that most of the domestic seismic stations gave similar results to those from S waves(2013). Each station showed its own characteristics of site amplification property in low, high and specific resonance frequency ranges. Comparison of this study to other studies can give us much information about dynamic amplification of domestic sites characteristics and site classification.

  19. Relationship Between Low-Velocity S-wave Anomalies, Asthenospheric Dynamics and Basaltic Volcanism in the Intraplate Setting of the Basin and Range, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbetts, A. K.; Smith, E. I.; Conrad, C. P.; Lee, C.; Plank, T.; Yang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Pliocene to Recent intraplate mafic volcanic rocks of the Basin and Range Province mostly formed by asthenospheric melting, as determined from calculated melting temperatures ranging from 1249-1521 degrees C. Here asthenosphere is defined by mantle rheology and temperature and not by geochemistry. The duration of melting in a volcanic field may be related to the size and shape of pockets of low velocity asthenosphere moving under the areas of volcanism. Seismic S-wave velocity profiles constrained by ambient noise and earthquake tomography of the mantle (Yang et al., 2008) show low velocity pockets, which may correspond to higher temperatures and/or higher water contents. The lack of wider scale volcanism in the Basin and Range despite large scale anomalies indicates that the anomalies are not the only cause of melting. The observed smaller scale magmatism can be explained by circulatory flow driven by the small scale structure of the anomalies causing localized melting within the anomalies. By applying an asthenospheric shear flow velocity of 0 cm/yr at the base of the lithosphere and 5 cm/yr east at depth (Silver & Holt 2002, Conrad et al., 2007), the distance the mantle has moved since the time of volcanism can be calculated for basalts of known age. Past positions of low-velocity anomalies in the asthenosphere combined with depths and temperatures of melting calculated using the silica-liquid geobarometer (Lee et al., 2009) were used to determine if a low velocity anomaly existed under an area of volcanism at the depth of melting and time of eruption. The data constraints used for calculating depths and temperatures of melting are dry, MgO > 7.5 wt.%, SiO2 > 44 wt.%, and Fe as 90% Fe2+. Depths and temperatures of melting were calculated for San Francisco in AZ; Amboy, Pisgah, Death Valley, Coso, Big Pine, Cima, Long Valley, in CA; Crater Flat, Lunar Crater, Reveille in NV; and Black Rock, Hurricane, Snow Canyon, UT; and others all of which have known ages. Ages

  20. Source Spectra of Near Kamchatka Earthquakes: Recovering them from S-Wave Spectra, and Determination of Scaling for Three Corner Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. A.; Guseva, E. M.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a procedure for mass determination of the "source-controlled f max"—an important though not conventional parameter of earthquake source spectrum, relabeled here as "the third corner frequency," f c3, and discuss the results of its application. f max is the upper cutoff frequency of Fourier acceleration spectrum of a record of a local earthquake; both source and path attenuation contribute to f max. Most researchers believe the role of attenuation (" κ" parameter) to be dominating or exclusive. Still, source effect on f max is sometimes revealed. If real, it may be important for source physics. To understand better the f max phenomena, the constituents of f max must be accurately separated. With this goal, we process seismograms of moderate earthquakes from Kamchatka subduction zone. First, we need reliable estimates of attenuation to recover source spectra. To this goal, an iterative processing procedure is constructed, that adjusts the attenuation model until the recovered source acceleration spectra become, on the average, flat up either to f c3, or up to the high-frequency limit of the frequency range analyzed. The latter case occurs when f c3 is non-existent or unobservable. Below f c3, the double-corner source spectral model is thought to be valid, and the lower bound of acceleration spectral plateau is considered as the second corner frequency of earthquake source spectrum, fc2. The common corner frequency, f c1, is also estimated. Following this approach, more than 500 S-wave spectra of M = 4-6.5 Kamchatka earthquakes with hypocentral distances 80-220 km were analyzed. In about 80 % of the cases, f c3 is clearly manifested; the remaining cases show, at high frequency, flat source acceleration spectra. In addition, in about 2/3 of cases, f c2 is clearly above f c1, showing that double-corner spectra may dominate even at moderate magnitudes. Scaling behavior was examined for each of the corners. The f c1 vs. M 0 trend is common and close to

  1. Cautions Concerning Electronic Analytical Balances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bruce B.; Wells, John D.

    1986-01-01

    Cautions chemists to be wary of ferromagnetic samples (especially magnetized samples), stray electromagnetic radiation, dusty environments, and changing weather conditions. These and other conditions may alter readings obtained from electronic analytical balances. (JN)

  2. Numerical integration of analytic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanović, Gradimir V.; Tošić, Dobrilo ð.; Albijanić, Miloljub

    2012-09-01

    A weighted generalized N-point Birkhoff-Young quadrature of interpolatory type for numerical integration of analytic functions is considered. Special cases of such quadratures with respect to the generalized Gegenbauer weight function are derived.

  3. Analytic Methods in Investigative Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2001-01-01

    Suggests an alternative proof by analytic methods, which is more accessible than rigorous proof based on Euclid's Elements, in which students need only apply standard methods of trigonometry to the data without introducing new points or lines. (KHR)

  4. Trends in Analytical Scale Separations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgenson, James W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses recent developments in the instrumentation and practice of analytical scale operations. Emphasizes detection devices and procedures in gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, electrophoresis, supercritical fluid chromatography, and field-flow fractionation. (JN)

  5. Laboratory Workhorse: The Analytical Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Douglas W.

    1979-01-01

    This report explains the importance of various analytical balances in the water or wastewater laboratory. Stressed is the proper procedure for utilizing the equipment as well as the mechanics involved in its operation. (CS)

  6. Liposomes: Technologies and Analytical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesorka, Aldo; Orwar, Owe

    2008-07-01

    Liposomes are structurally and functionally some of the most versatile supramolecular assemblies in existence. Since the beginning of active research on lipid vesicles in 1965, the field has progressed enormously and applications are well established in several areas, such as drug and gene delivery. In the analytical sciences, liposomes serve a dual purpose: Either they are analytes, typically in quality-assessment procedures of liposome preparations, or they are functional components in a variety of new analytical systems. Liposome immunoassays, for example, benefit greatly from the amplification provided by encapsulated markers, and nanotube-interconnected liposome networks have emerged as ultrasmall-scale analytical devices. This review provides information about new developments in some of the most actively researched liposome-related topics.

  7. Analytical multikinks in smooth potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Brito, G. P.; Correa, R. A. C.; de Souza Dutra, A.

    2014-03-01

    In this work we present an approach that can be systematically used to construct nonlinear systems possessing analytical multikink profile configurations. In contrast with previous approaches to the problem, we are able to do it by using field potentials that are considerably smoother than the ones of the doubly quadratic family of potentials. This is done without losing the capacity of writing exact analytical solutions. The resulting field configurations can be applied to the study of problems from condensed matter to braneworld scenarios.

  8. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    DOEpatents

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  9. Visual Analytics Technology Transition Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtz, Jean; Cook, Kristin A.; Whiting, Mark A.; Lemon, Douglas K.; Greenblatt, Howard

    2009-09-23

    The authors provide a description of the transition process for visual analytic tools and contrast this with the transition process for more traditional software tools. This paper takes this into account and describes a user-oriented approach to technology transition including a discussion of key factors that should be considered and adapted to each situation. The progress made in transitioning visual analytic tools in the past five years is described and the challenges that remain are enumerated.

  10. Analytical Sociology: A Bungean Appreciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Poe Yu-ze

    2012-10-01

    Analytical sociology, an intellectual project that has garnered considerable attention across a variety of disciplines in recent years, aims to explain complex social processes by dissecting them, accentuating their most important constituent parts, and constructing appropriate models to understand the emergence of what is observed. To achieve this goal, analytical sociologists demonstrate an unequivocal focus on the mechanism-based explanation grounded in action theory. In this article I attempt a critical appreciation of analytical sociology from the perspective of Mario Bunge's philosophical system, which I characterize as emergentist systemism. I submit that while the principles of analytical sociology and those of Bunge's approach share a lot in common, the latter brings to the fore the ontological status and explanatory importance of supra-individual actors (as concrete systems endowed with emergent causal powers) and macro-social mechanisms (as processes unfolding in and among social systems), and therefore it does not stipulate that every causal explanation of social facts has to include explicit references to individual-level actors and mechanisms. In this sense, Bunge's approach provides a reasonable middle course between the Scylla of sociological reification and the Charybdis of ontological individualism, and thus serves as an antidote to the untenable "strong program of microfoundations" to which some analytical sociologists are committed.

  11. Climate Analytics as a Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnase, John L.; Duffy, Daniel Q.; McInerney, Mark A.; Webster, W. Phillip; Lee, Tsengdar J.

    2014-01-01

    Climate science is a big data domain that is experiencing unprecedented growth. In our efforts to address the big data challenges of climate science, we are moving toward a notion of Climate Analytics-as-a-Service (CAaaS). CAaaS combines high-performance computing and data-proximal analytics with scalable data management, cloud computing virtualization, the notion of adaptive analytics, and a domain-harmonized API to improve the accessibility and usability of large collections of climate data. MERRA Analytic Services (MERRA/AS) provides an example of CAaaS. MERRA/AS enables MapReduce analytics over NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data collection. The MERRA reanalysis integrates observational data with numerical models to produce a global temporally and spatially consistent synthesis of key climate variables. The effectiveness of MERRA/AS has been demonstrated in several applications. In our experience, CAaaS is providing the agility required to meet our customers' increasing and changing data management and data analysis needs.

  12. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S. M. Reza; Navidi, Fatemeh; Beard, Daniel A.; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined. PMID:26229957

  13. Authenticity and the analytic process.

    PubMed

    Boccara, Paolo; Gaddini, Andrea; Riefolo, Giuseppe

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we first make a differentiation between phenomena that can be defined as spontaneous and others that can be defined as authentic. We then attempt to present authenticity as a process rather than an outcome. Finally, we try to understand the location of authentic phenomena in the sensorial and pre-symbolic communicative register. We situate authentic phenomena in the register of sensorial and pre-symbolic communication. The authentic process becomes manifest, step by step in the analytic process (Borgogno, 1999), through the vivid iconic and sensorial elements that happen to cross the analytic field. Through two brief clinical vignettes, we seek to document the progression of the analytic process, in one case through the analyst's capacity for rêverie (Bion, 1962; Ogden, 1994, 1997; Ferro, 2002, 2007), and in the other through the sensorial elements with which analyst and patient are able to tune in to each other.

  14. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S M Reza; Navidi, Fatemeh; Beard, Daniel A; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined.

  15. Analytical Chemistry of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Evan M.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the focus of intense research, owing primarily to its wide-ranging biological and physiological actions. A requirement for understanding its origin, activity, and regulation is the need for accurate and precise measurement techniques. Unfortunately, analytical assays for monitoring NO are challenged by NO’s unique chemical and physical properties, including its reactivity, rapid diffusion, and short half-life. Moreover, NO concentrations may span pM to µM in physiological milieu, requiring techniques with wide dynamic response ranges. Despite such challenges, many analytical techniques have emerged for the detection of NO. Herein, we review the most common spectroscopic and electrochemical methods, with special focus on the fundamentals behind each technique and approaches that have been coupled with modern analytical measurement tools or exploited to create novel NO sensors. PMID:20636069

  16. Analytical Applications of NMR: Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1982-01-01

    Highlights a symposium on analytical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), discussing pulse Fourier transformation technique, two-dimensional NMR, solid state NMR, and multinuclear NMR. Includes description of ORACLE, an NMR data processing system at Syracuse University using real-time color graphics, and algorithms for…

  17. Analytical SAR-GMTI principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumekh, Mehrdad; Majumder, Uttam K.; Barnes, Christopher; Sobota, David; Minardi, Michael

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides analytical principles to relate the signature of a moving target to parameters in a SAR system. Our objective is to establish analytical tools that could predict the shift and smearing of a moving target in a subaperture SAR image. Hence, a user could identify the system parameters such as the coherent processing interval for a subaperture that is suitable to localize the signature of a moving target for detection, tracking and geolocating the moving target. The paper begins by outlining two well-known SAR data collection methods to detect moving targets. One uses a scanning beam in the azimuth domain with a relatively high PRF to separate the moving targets and the stationary background (clutter); this is also known as Doppler Beam Sharpening. The other scheme uses two receivers along the track to null the clutter and, thus, provide GMTI. We also present results on implementing our SAR-GMTI analytical principles for the anticipated shift and smearing of a moving target in a simulated code. The code would provide a tool for the user to change the SAR system and moving target parameters, and predict the properties of a moving target signature in a subaperture SAR image for a scene that is composed of both stationary and moving targets. Hence, the SAR simulation and imaging code could be used to demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the above analytical principles to predict the properties of a moving target signature in a subaperture SAR image.

  18. An Overview of Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clow, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Learning analytics, the analysis and representation of data about learners in order to improve learning, is a new lens through which teachers can understand education. It is rooted in the dramatic increase in the quantity of data about learners and linked to management approaches that focus on quantitative metrics, which are sometimes antithetical…

  19. FPI: FM Success through Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickling, Duane

    2013-01-01

    The APPA Facilities Performance Indicators (FPI) is perhaps one of the most powerful analytical tools that institutional facilities professionals have at their disposal. It is a diagnostic facilities performance management tool that addresses the essential questions that facilities executives must answer to effectively perform their roles. It…

  20. Exploratory Analysis in Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, David; de Freitas, Sara

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes the methods, observations, challenges and implications for exploratory analysis drawn from two learning analytics research projects. The cases include an analysis of a games-based virtual performance assessment and an analysis of data from 52,000 students over a 5-year period at a large Australian university. The complex…

  1. Visual analytics of brain networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaiming; Guo, Lei; Faraco, Carlos; Zhu, Dajiang; Chen, Hanbo; Yuan, Yixuan; Lv, Jinglei; Deng, Fan; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Tuo; Hu, Xintao; Zhang, Degang; Miller, L Stephen; Liu, Tianming

    2012-05-15

    Identification of regions of interest (ROIs) is a fundamental issue in brain network construction and analysis. Recent studies demonstrate that multimodal neuroimaging approaches and joint analysis strategies are crucial for accurate, reliable and individualized identification of brain ROIs. In this paper, we present a novel approach of visual analytics and its open-source software for ROI definition and brain network construction. By combining neuroscience knowledge and computational intelligence capabilities, visual analytics can generate accurate, reliable and individualized ROIs for brain networks via joint modeling of multimodal neuroimaging data and an intuitive and real-time visual analytics interface. Furthermore, it can be used as a functional ROI optimization and prediction solution when fMRI data is unavailable or inadequate. We have applied this approach to an operation span working memory fMRI/DTI dataset, a schizophrenia DTI/resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) dataset, and a mild cognitive impairment DTI/R-fMRI dataset, in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of visual analytics. Our experimental results are encouraging.

  2. Microcomputer Applications in Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Joseph W.

    The first part of this paper addresses the following topics: (1) the usefulness of microcomputers; (2) applications for microcomputers in analytical chemistry; (3) costs; (4) major microcomputer systems and subsystems; and (5) which microcomputer to buy. Following these brief comments, the major focus of the paper is devoted to a discussion of…

  3. Analytical Chemistry and the Microchip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Robert K.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical techniques used at various points in making microchips are described. They include: Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (silicon purity); optical emission spectroscopy (quantitative thin-film composition); X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (chemical changes in thin films); wet chemistry, instrumental analysis (process chemicals);…

  4. Analytical Methods for Online Searching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigil, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical methods for facilitating comparison of multiple sets during online searching are illustrated by description of specific searching methods that eliminate duplicate citations and a factoring procedure based on syntactic relationships that establishes ranked sets. Searches executed in National Center for Mental Health database on…

  5. Faculty Workload: An Analytical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discussions of practices in higher education have tended toward muck-raking and self-styled exposure of cynical self-indulgence by faculty and administrators at the expense of students and their families, as usually occurs during periods of economic duress, rather than toward analytical studies designed to foster understanding This article…

  6. Analytical Sociology: A Bungean Appreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Poe Yu-ze

    2012-01-01

    Analytical sociology, an intellectual project that has garnered considerable attention across a variety of disciplines in recent years, aims to explain complex social processes by dissecting them, accentuating their most important constituent parts, and constructing appropriate models to understand the emergence of what is observed. To achieve…

  7. Visual Analytics of Brain Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kaiming; Guo, Lei; Faraco, Carlos; Zhu, Dajiang; Chen, Hanbo; Yuan, Yixuan; Lv, Jinglei; Deng, Fan; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Tuo; Hu, Xintao; Zhang, Degang; Miller, L Stephen; Liu, Tianming

    2014-01-01

    Identification of regions of interest (ROIs) is a fundamental issue in brain network construction and analysis. Recent studies demonstrate that multimodal neuroimaging approaches and joint analysis strategies are crucial for accurate, reliable and individualized identification of brain ROIs. In this paper, we present a novel approach of visual analytics and its open-source software for ROI definition and brain network construction. By combining neuroscience knowledge and computational intelligence capabilities, visual analytics can generate accurate, reliable and individualized ROIs for brain networks via joint modeling of multimodal neuroimaging data and an intuitive and real-time visual analytics interface. Furthermore, it can be used as a functional ROI optimization and prediction solution when fMRI data is unavailable or inadequate. We have applied this approach to an operation span working memory fMRI/DTI dataset, a schizophrenia DTI/resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) dataset, and a mild cognitive impairment DTI/R-fMRI dataset, in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of visual analytics. Our experimental results are encouraging. PMID:22414991

  8. 40 CFR 1065.750 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 1065.750 Section... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.750 Analytical gases. Analytical gases must meet the accuracy and purity specifications of...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.750 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Analytical gases. 1065.750 Section... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.750 Analytical gases. Analytical gases must meet the accuracy and purity specifications of...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.750 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Analytical gases. 1065.750 Section... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.750 Analytical gases. Analytical gases must meet the accuracy and purity specifications of...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.750 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 1065.750 Section... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.750 Analytical gases. Analytical gases must meet the accuracy and purity specifications of...

  12. Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent “experiment” that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University of Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.

  13. Waste minimization in analytical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Smith, L.L.; Crain, J.S.; Boparai, A.S.; Kiely, J.T.; Yaeger, J.S. Schilling, J.B.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) will require a large number of waste characterizations over a multi-year period to accomplish the Department`s goals in environmental restoration and waste management. Estimates vary, but two million analyses annually are expected. The waste generated by the analytical procedures used for characterizations is a significant source of new DOE waste. Success in reducing the volume of secondary waste and the costs of handling this waste would significantly decrease the overall cost of this DOE program. Selection of appropriate analytical methods depends on the intended use of the resultant data. It is not always necessary to use a high-powered analytical method, typically at higher cost, to obtain data needed to make decisions about waste management. Indeed, for samples taken from some heterogeneous systems, the meaning of high accuracy becomes clouded if the data generated are intended to measure a property of this system. Among the factors to be considered in selecting the analytical method are the lower limit of detection, accuracy, turnaround time, cost, reproducibility (precision), interferences, and simplicity. Occasionally, there must be tradeoffs among these factors to achieve the multiple goals of a characterization program. The purpose of the work described here is to add waste minimization to the list of characteristics to be considered. In this paper the authors present results of modifying analytical methods for waste characterization to reduce both the cost of analysis and volume of secondary wastes. Although tradeoffs may be required to minimize waste while still generating data of acceptable quality for the decision-making process, they have data demonstrating that wastes can be reduced in some cases without sacrificing accuracy or precision.

  14. Analytical and numerical study of Gauss-Bonnet holographic superconductors with Power-Maxwell field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykhi, Ahmad; Salahi, Hamid Reza; Montakhab, Afshin

    2016-04-01

    We provide an analytical as well as a numerical study of the holographic s-wave superconductors in Gauss-Bonnet gravity with Power-Maxwell electrodynamics. We limit our study to the case where scalar and gauge fields do not have an effect on the background metric. We use a variational method, based on Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problem for our analytical study, as well as a numerical shooting method in order to compare with our analytical results. Interestingly enough, we observe that unlike Born-Infeld-like nonlinear electrodynamics which decrease the critical temperature compared to the linear Maxwell field, the Power-Maxwell electrodynamics is able to increase the critical temperature of the holographic superconductors in the sublinear regime. We find that requiring the finite value for the gauge field on the asymptotic boundary r → ∞, restricts the power parameter, q, of the Power-Maxwell field to be in the range 1 /2 < q < ( d - 1) /2. Our study indicates that it is quite possible to make condensation easier as q decreases in its allowed range. We also find that for all values of q, the condensation can be affected by the Gauss-Bonnet coefficient α. However, the presence of the Gauss-Bonnet term makes the transition slightly harder. Finally, we obtain an analytic expression for the order parameter and thus obtain the associated critical exponent near the phase transition. We find that the critical exponent has its universal value of β = 1 /2 regardless of the parameters q, α as well as dimension d, consistent with mean-field values obtained in previous studies.

  15. Visual Analytics for MOOC Data.

    PubMed

    Qu, Huamin; Chen, Qing

    2015-01-01

    With the rise of massive open online courses (MOOCs), tens of millions of learners can now enroll in more than 1,000 courses via MOOC platforms such as Coursera and edX. As a result, a huge amount of data has been collected. Compared with traditional education records, the data from MOOCs has much finer granularity and also contains new pieces of information. It is the first time in history that such comprehensive data related to learning behavior has become available for analysis. What roles can visual analytics play in this MOOC movement? The authors survey the current practice and argue that MOOCs provide an opportunity for visualization researchers and that visual analytics systems for MOOCs can benefit a range of end users such as course instructors, education researchers, students, university administrators, and MOOC providers. PMID:26594957

  16. Analytical Spectroscopy Using Modular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Brian M.; Danielson, Neil D.; Lorigan, Gary A.; Sommer, André J.

    2003-12-01

    This article describes the development of three analytical spectroscopy experiments that compare the determination of salicylic acid (SA) content in aspirin tablets. The experiments are based on UV vis, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopies and utilize modular spectroscopic components. Students assemble their own instruments, optimize them with respect to signal-to-noise, generate calibration curves, determine the SA content in retail aspirin tablets, and assign features in the respective spectra to functional groups within the active material. Using this approach in the discovery-based setting, the students gain invaluable insight into method-specific parameters, such as instrumental components, sample preparation, and analytical capability. In addition, the students learn the fundamentals of fiber optics and signal processing using the low-cost CCD based spectroscopic components.

  17. Visual Analytics for MOOC Data.

    PubMed

    Qu, Huamin; Chen, Qing

    2015-01-01

    With the rise of massive open online courses (MOOCs), tens of millions of learners can now enroll in more than 1,000 courses via MOOC platforms such as Coursera and edX. As a result, a huge amount of data has been collected. Compared with traditional education records, the data from MOOCs has much finer granularity and also contains new pieces of information. It is the first time in history that such comprehensive data related to learning behavior has become available for analysis. What roles can visual analytics play in this MOOC movement? The authors survey the current practice and argue that MOOCs provide an opportunity for visualization researchers and that visual analytics systems for MOOCs can benefit a range of end users such as course instructors, education researchers, students, university administrators, and MOOC providers.

  18. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-01

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology. PMID:23614661

  19. Analytical methods under emergency conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlet, J.

    1983-01-01

    This lecture discusses methods for the radiochemical determination of internal contamination of the body under emergency conditions, here defined as a situation in which results on internal radioactive contamination are needed quickly. The purpose of speed is to determine the necessity for medical treatment to increase the natural elimination rate. Analytical methods discussed include whole-body counting, organ counting, wound monitoring, and excreta analysis. 12 references. (ACR)

  20. [Free thyroxine immunoassay: analytical review].

    PubMed

    Doggui, Radhouene; Ingrand, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones assays (T4 and T3) are limited to the free forms with hormonal activity, the only ones useful for the assessment of thyroid function. Free thyroxine assays are part of prescribed parameters by the physician once known plasma TSH concentration. A reference method exists, but immunoassays are the most commonly technics used in current practice. After a reminder of the iodothyronine biochemistry and physiology, the authors discuss preanalytical and analytical steps in detail, focusing on the possible pitfalls.

  1. Proteomics: analytical tools and techniques.

    PubMed

    MacCoss, M J; Yates, J R

    2001-09-01

    Scientists have long been interested in measuring the effects of different stimuli on protein expression and metabolism. Analytical methods are being developed for the automated separation, identification, and quantitation of all of the proteins within the cell. Soon, investigators will be able to observe the effects of an experiment on every protein (as opposed to a selected few). This review presents a discussion of recent technological advances in proteomics in addition to exploring current methodological limitations.

  2. Analytical optical scattering in clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phanord, Dieudonne D.

    1989-01-01

    An analytical optical model for scattering of light due to lightning by clouds of different geometry is being developed. The self-consistent approach and the equivalent medium concept of Twersky was used to treat the case corresponding to outside illumination. Thus, the resulting multiple scattering problem is transformed with the knowledge of the bulk parameters, into scattering by a single obstacle in isolation. Based on the size parameter of a typical water droplet as compared to the incident wave length, the problem for the single scatterer equivalent to the distribution of cloud particles can be solved either by Mie or Rayleigh scattering theory. The super computing code of Wiscombe can be used immediately to produce results that can be compared to the Monte Carlo computer simulation for outside incidence. A fairly reasonable inverse approach using the solution of the outside illumination case was proposed to model analytically the situation for point sources located inside the thick optical cloud. Its mathematical details are still being investigated. When finished, it will provide scientists an enhanced capability to study more realistic clouds. For testing purposes, the direct approach to the inside illumination of clouds by lightning is under consideration. Presently, an analytical solution for the cubic cloud will soon be obtained. For cylindrical or spherical clouds, preliminary results are needed for scattering by bounded obstacles above or below a penetrable surface interface.

  3. Networked analytical sample management system

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrigan, W.J.; Spencer, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Since 1982, the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has operated a computer-controlled analytical sample management system. The system, pogrammed in COBOL, runs on the site IBM 3081 mainframe computer. The system provides for the following subtasks: sample logging, analytical method assignment, worklist generation, cost accounting, and results reporting. Within these subtasks the system functions in a time-sharing mode. Communications between subtasks are done overnight in a batch mode. The system currently supports management of up to 3000 samples a month. Each sample requires, on average, three independent methods. Approximately 100 different analytical techniques are available for customized input of data. The laboratory has implemented extensive computer networking using Ethernet. Electronic mail, RS/1, and online literature searches are in place. Based on our experience with the existing sample management system, we have begun a project to develop a second generation system. The new system will utilize the panel designs developed for the present LIMS, incorporate more realtime features, and take advantage of the many commercial LIMS systems.

  4. Developing regionalized models of lithospheric thickness and velocity structure across Eurasia and the Middle East from jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Julia, J; Nyblade, A; Hansen, S; Rodgers, A; Matzel, E

    2009-07-06

    In this project, we are developing models of lithospheric structure for a wide variety of tectonic regions throughout Eurasia and the Middle East by regionalizing 1D velocity models obtained by jointly inverting P-wave and S-wave receiver functions with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities. We expect the regionalized velocity models will improve our ability to predict travel-times for local and regional phases, such as Pg, Pn, Sn and Lg, as well as travel-times for body-waves at upper mantle triplication distances in both seismic and aseismic regions of Eurasia and the Middle East. We anticipate the models will help inform and strengthen ongoing and future efforts within the NNSA labs to develop 3D velocity models for Eurasia and the Middle East, and will assist in obtaining model-based predictions where no empirical data are available and for improving locations from sparse networks using kriging. The codes needed to conduct the joint inversion of P-wave receiver functions (PRFs), S-wave receiver functions (SRFs), and dispersion velocities have already been assembled as part of ongoing research on lithospheric structure in Africa. The methodology has been tested with synthetic 'data' and case studies have been investigated with data collected at an open broadband stations in South Africa. PRFs constrain the size and S-P travel-time of seismic discontinuities in the crust and uppermost mantle, SRFs constrain the size and P-S travel-time of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and dispersion velocities constrain average S-wave velocity within frequency-dependent depth-ranges. Preliminary results show that the combination yields integrated 1D velocity models local to the recording station, where the discontinuities constrained by the receiver functions are superimposed to a background velocity model constrained by the dispersion velocities. In our first year of this project we will (i) generate 1D velocity models for open broadband seismic stations in the

  5. Analyte detection using an active assay

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor; Bailey, Charles L.; Evanskey, Melissa R.

    2010-11-02

    Analytes using an active assay may be detected by introducing an analyte solution containing a plurality of analytes to a lacquered membrane. The lacquered membrane may be a membrane having at least one surface treated with a layer of polymers. The lacquered membrane may be semi-permeable to nonanalytes. The layer of polymers may include cross-linked polymers. A plurality of probe molecules may be arrayed and immobilized on the lacquered membrane. An external force may be applied to the analyte solution to move the analytes towards the lacquered membrane. Movement may cause some or all of the analytes to bind to the lacquered membrane. In cases where probe molecules are presented, some or all of the analytes may bind to probe molecules. The direction of the external force may be reversed to remove unbound or weakly bound analytes. Bound analytes may be detected using known detection types.

  6. VA²: A Visual Analytics Approach for // Evaluating Visual Analytics Applications.

    PubMed

    Blascheck, Tanja; John, Markus; Kurzhals, Kuno; Koch, Steffen; Ertl, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation has become a fundamental part of visualization research and researchers have employed many approaches from the field of human-computer interaction like measures of task performance, thinking aloud protocols, and analysis of interaction logs. Recently, eye tracking has also become popular to analyze visual strategies of users in this context. This has added another modality and more data, which requires special visualization techniques to analyze this data. However, only few approaches exist that aim at an integrated analysis of multiple concurrent evaluation procedures. The variety, complexity, and sheer amount of such coupled multi-source data streams require a visual analytics approach. Our approach provides a highly interactive visualization environment to display and analyze thinking aloud, interaction, and eye movement data in close relation. Automatic pattern finding algorithms allow an efficient exploratory search and support the reasoning process to derive common eye-interaction-thinking patterns between participants. In addition, our tool equips researchers with mechanisms for searching and verifying expected usage patterns. We apply our approach to a user study involving a visual analytics application and we discuss insights gained from this joint analysis. We anticipate our approach to be applicable to other combinations of evaluation techniques and a broad class of visualization applications.

  7. Analytic three-loop static potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Roman N.; Smirnov, Alexander V.; Smirnov, Vladimir A.; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    We present analytic results for the three-loop static potential of two heavy quarks. The analytic calculation of the missing ingredients is outlined, and results for the singlet and octet potential are provided.

  8. Spectrofluorometric analytical applications of cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Elbashir, Abdalla A; Dsugi, Nuha Fathi Ali; Mohmed, Tamador Omer Mohamoud; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2014-02-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are a family of cyclic oligosaccharides composed of α-(1,4)-linked glucopyranose subunits. The most important feature of CDs is their ability to form inclusion complexes (host-guest complexes) with a very wide range of solid, liquid and gaseous compounds by a molecular complexation. During the last decade, a considerable number of research papers has been focused on the use of CDs to enhance fluorescence intensity of different analytes and to develop CD-induced spectrofluorimetric method. In this review, the various spectrofluorimetric methods based on host-inclusion complex are presented.

  9. Technical, analytical and computer support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of a rigorous mathematical model for the design and performance analysis of cylindrical silicon-germanium thermoelectric generators is reported that consists of two parts, a steady-state (static) and a transient (dynamic) part. The material study task involves the definition and implementation of a material study that aims to experimentally characterize the long term behavior of the thermoelectric properties of silicon-germanium alloys as a function of temperature. Analytical and experimental efforts are aimed at the determination of the sublimation characteristics of silicon germanium alloys and the study of sublimation effects on RTG performance. Studies are also performed on a variety of specific topics on thermoelectric energy conversion.

  10. Analytic signals and harmonic measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Tao

    2006-02-01

    We prove that a sufficient and necessary condition for Hei[Theta](s)=-iei[Theta](s), where H is Hilbert transformation, [Theta] is a continuous and strictly increasing function with [Theta](R)=2[pi], is that d[Theta](s) is a harmonic measure on the line. The counterpart result for the periodic case is also established. The study is motivated by, and has significant impact to time-frequency analysis, especially to aspects of analytic signals inducing instantaneous amplitude and frequency. As a by-product we introduce the theory of Hardy-space-preserving weighted trigonometric series and Fourier transformations induced by harmonic measures in the respective contexts.

  11. Predictive analytics can support the ACO model.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Predictive analytics can be used to rapidly spot hard-to-identify opportunities to better manage care--a key tool in accountable care. When considering analytics models, healthcare providers should: Make value-based care a priority and act on information from analytics models. Create a road map that includes achievable steps, rather than major endeavors. Set long-term expectations and recognize that the effectiveness of an analytics program takes time, unlike revenue cycle initiatives that may show a quick return.

  12. 7 CFR 94.303 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Analytical methods. 94.303 Section 94.303 Agriculture... POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Processed Poultry Products § 94.303 Analytical methods. The analytical methods... latest edition of the Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC INTERNATIONAL, Suite 500, 481 North...

  13. 7 CFR 94.103 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Analytical methods. 94.103 Section 94.103 Agriculture... POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Voluntary Analyses of Egg Products § 94.103 Analytical methods. The analytical methods used by the Science and Technology Division laboratories to perform voluntary analyses for...

  14. Application and Evaluation of Analytic Gaming

    SciTech Connect

    Riensche, Roderick M.; Martucci, Louis M.; Scholtz, Jean; Whiting, Mark A.

    2009-08-31

    We describe an "analytic gaming" framework and methodology, and introduce formal methods for evaluation of the analytic gaming process. This process involves conception, development, and playing of games that are informed by predictive models and driven by players. Evaluation of analytic gaming examines both the process of game development and the results of game play exercises.

  15. Analytics: What We're Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblinger, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few months, EDUCAUSE has been focusing on analytics. As people hear from experts, meet with association members, and watch the marketplace evolve, a number of common themes are emerging. Conversations have shifted from "What is analytics?" to "How do we get started, and how do we use analytics well?" What people are hearing from…

  16. 7 CFR 94.303 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Analytical methods. 94.303 Section 94.303 Agriculture... POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Processed Poultry Products § 94.303 Analytical methods. The analytical methods... latest edition of the Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC INTERNATIONAL, Suite 500, 481 North...

  17. 7 CFR 94.103 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Analytical methods. 94.103 Section 94.103 Agriculture... POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Voluntary Analyses of Egg Products § 94.103 Analytical methods. The analytical methods used by the Science and Technology Division laboratories to perform voluntary analyses for...

  18. 7 CFR 93.4 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PROCESSED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Citrus Juices and Certain Citrus Products § 93.4 Analytical methods. (a) The majority of analytical methods for citrus products are found in the Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC...-2417. (b) Other analytical methods for citrus products may be used as approved by the AMS...

  19. 7 CFR 93.4 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... PROCESSED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Citrus Juices and Certain Citrus Products § 93.4 Analytical methods. (a) The majority of analytical methods for citrus products are found in the Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC...-2417. (b) Other analytical methods for citrus products may be used as approved by the AMS...

  20. 7 CFR 93.4 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... PROCESSED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Citrus Juices and Certain Citrus Products § 93.4 Analytical methods. (a) The majority of analytical methods for citrus products are found in the Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC...-2417. (b) Other analytical methods for citrus products may be used as approved by the AMS...

  1. 7 CFR 93.4 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PROCESSED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Citrus Juices and Certain Citrus Products § 93.4 Analytical methods. (a) The majority of analytical methods for citrus products are found in the Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC...-2417. (b) Other analytical methods for citrus products may be used as approved by the AMS...

  2. 7 CFR 93.4 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PROCESSED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Citrus Juices and Certain Citrus Products § 93.4 Analytical methods. (a) The majority of analytical methods for citrus products are found in the Official Methods of Analysis of AOAC...-2417. (b) Other analytical methods for citrus products may be used as approved by the AMS...

  3. Integrated Array/Metadata Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misev, Dimitar; Baumann, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Data comes in various forms and types, and integration usually presents a problem that is often simply ignored and solved with ad-hoc solutions. Multidimensional arrays are an ubiquitous data type, that we find at the core of virtually all science and engineering domains, as sensor, model, image, statistics data. Naturally, arrays are richly described by and intertwined with additional metadata (alphanumeric relational data, XML, JSON, etc). Database systems, however, a fundamental building block of what we call "Big Data", lack adequate support for modelling and expressing these array data/metadata relationships. Array analytics is hence quite primitive or non-existent at all in modern relational DBMS. Recognizing this, we extended SQL with a new SQL/MDA part seamlessly integrating multidimensional array analytics into the standard database query language. We demonstrate the benefits of SQL/MDA with real-world examples executed in ASQLDB, an open-source mediator system based on HSQLDB and rasdaman, that already implements SQL/MDA.

  4. Analytic theories of allometric scaling.

    PubMed

    Agutter, Paul S; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2011-04-01

    During the 13 years since it was first advanced, the fractal network theory (FNT), an analytic theory of allometric scaling, has been subjected to a wide range of methodological, mathematical and empirical criticisms, not all of which have been answered satisfactorily. FNT presumes a two-variable power-law relationship between metabolic rate and body mass. This assumption has been widely accepted in the past, but a growing body of evidence during the past quarter century has raised questions about its general validity. There is now a need for alternative theories of metabolic scaling that are consistent with empirical observations over a broad range of biological applications. In this article, we briefly review the limitations of FNT, examine the evidence that the two-variable power-law assumption is invalid, and outline alternative perspectives. In particular, we discuss quantum metabolism (QM), an analytic theory based on molecular-cellular processes. QM predicts the large variations in scaling exponent that are found empirically and also predicts the temperature dependence of the proportionality constant, issues that have eluded models such as FNT that are based on macroscopic and network properties of organisms.

  5. Automation and quality in analytical laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Valcarcel, M.; Rios, A.

    1994-05-01

    After a brief introduction to the generic aspects of automation in analytical laboratories, the different approaches to quality in analytical chemistry are presented and discussed to establish the following different facets emerging from the combination of quality and automation: automated analytical control of quality of products and systems; quality control of automated chemical analysis; and improvement of capital (accuracy and representativeness), basic (sensitivity, precision, and selectivity), and complementary (rapidity, cost, and personnel factors) analytical features. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of this marriage of convenience in present and future analytical chemistry. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Using business analytics to improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Jose; Delaney, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Orlando Health has brought its hospital and physician practice revenue cycle systems into better balance using four sets of customized analytics: Physician performance analytics gauge the total net revenue for every employed physician. Patient-pay analytics provide financial risk scores for all patients on both the hospital and physician practice sides. Revenue management analytics bridge the gap between the back-end central business office and front-end physician practice managers and administrators. Enterprise management analytics allow the hospitals and physician practices to share important information about common patients. PMID:26665541

  7. Analytical model for ramp compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Quanxi; Jiang, Shaoen; Wang, Zhebin; Wang, Feng; Hu, Yun; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-08-01

    An analytical ramp compression model for condensed matter, which can provide explicit solutions for isentropic compression flow fields, is reported. A ramp compression experiment can be easily designed according to the capability of the loading source using this model. Specifically, important parameters, such as the maximum isentropic region width, material properties, profile of the pressure pulse, and the pressure pulse duration can be reasonably allocated or chosen. To demonstrate and study this model, laser-direct-driven ramp compression experiments and code simulation are performed successively, and the factors influencing the accuracy of the model are studied. The application and simulation show that this model can be used as guidance in the design of a ramp compression experiment. However, it is verified that further optimization work is required for a precise experimental design.

  8. Graph Analytics for Signature Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Lo, Chaomei

    2013-06-01

    Within large amounts of seemingly unstructured data it can be diffcult to find signatures of events. In our work we transform unstructured data into a graph representation. By doing this we expose underlying structure in the data and can take advantage of existing graph analytics capabilities, as well as develop new capabilities. Currently we focus on applications in cybersecurity and communication domains. Within cybersecurity we aim to find signatures for perpetrators using the pass-the-hash attack, and in communications we look for emails or phone calls going up or down a chain of command. In both of these areas, and in many others, the signature we look for is a path with certain temporal properties. In this paper we discuss our methodology for finding these temporal paths within large graphs.

  9. Serious Gaming for Predictive Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Riensche, Roderick M.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Danielson, Gary R.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Butner, R. Scott; Miller, Sarah M.; Franklin, Lyndsey; Zuljevic, Nino

    2009-03-24

    We describe a methodology and architecture to support the development of games in a predictive analytics context. These games serve as part of an overall family of systems designed to gather input knowledge, calculate results of complex predictive technical and social models, and explore those results in an engaging fashion. The games provide an environment shaped and driven in part by the outputs of the models, allowing users to exert influence over a limited set of parameters, and displaying the results when those actions cause changes in the underlying model. We have crafted a prototype system in which we are implementing test versions of games driven by models in such a fashion, using a flexible architecture to allow for future continuation and expansion of this work.

  10. Quality analytics of Internet pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Baert, B; De Spiegeleer, B

    2010-09-01

    Trading pharmaceutical products through the Internet poses several challenges related to legal responsibilities, good distribution practices, information content and patient use, financial implications, but also regarding product quality. One of the major concerns is the well-known phenomenon of counterfeited and/or substandard drugs commercialized through rogue Internet sites. Therefore, controlling and assuring the quality of those products has become an important and challenging task for the authorities. This review gives an overview of the different quality attributes that can be evaluated to have a complete understanding of the quality of the finished pharmaceutical product traded through the Internet, as well as the current analytical techniques that serve this objective. Aspects considered are labelling and packaging, physicochemical quality attributes, identification and assay of active substances and/or excipients, impurity profiling, biopharmaceutical testing and data interpretation.

  11. Advanced epidemiologic and analytical methods.

    PubMed

    Albanese, E

    2016-01-01

    Observational studies are indispensable for etiologic research, and are key to test life-course hypotheses and improve our understanding of neurologic diseases that have long induction and latency periods. In recent years a plethora of advanced design and analytic techniques have been developed to strengthen the robustness and ultimately the validity of the results of observational studies, and to address their inherent proneness to bias. It is the responsibility of clinicians and researchers to critically appraise and appropriately contextualize the findings of the exponentially expanding scientific literature. This critical appraisal should be rooted in a thorough understanding of advanced epidemiologic methods and techniques commonly used to formulate and test relevant hypotheses and to keep bias at bay. PMID:27637951

  12. Risk analytics for hedge funds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareek, Ankur

    2005-05-01

    The rapid growth of the hedge fund industry presents significant business opportunity for the institutional investors particularly in the form of portfolio diversification. To facilitate this, there is a need to develop a new set of risk analytics for investments consisting of hedge funds, with the ultimate aim to create transparency in risk measurement without compromising the proprietary investment strategies of hedge funds. As well documented in the literature, use of dynamic options like strategies by most of the hedge funds make their returns highly non-normal with fat tails and high kurtosis, thus rendering Value at Risk (VaR) and other mean-variance analysis methods unsuitable for hedge fund risk quantification. This paper looks at some unique concerns for hedge fund risk management and will particularly concentrate on two approaches from physical world to model the non-linearities and dynamic correlations in hedge fund portfolio returns: Self Organizing Criticality (SOC) and Random Matrix Theory (RMT).Random Matrix Theory analyzes correlation matrix between different hedge fund styles and filters random noise from genuine correlations arising from interactions within the system. As seen in the results of portfolio risk analysis, it leads to a better portfolio risk forecastability and thus to optimum allocation of resources to different hedge fund styles. The results also prove the efficacy of self-organized criticality and implied portfolio correlation as a tool for risk management and style selection for portfolios of hedge funds, being particularly effective during non-linear market crashes.

  13. Analytical design of intelligent machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saridis, George N.; Valavanis, Kimon P.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of designing 'intelligent machines' to operate in uncertain environments with minimum supervision or interaction with a human operator is examined. The structure of an 'intelligent machine' is defined to be the structure of a Hierarchically Intelligent Control System, composed of three levels hierarchically ordered according to the principle of 'increasing precision with decreasing intelligence', namely: the organizational level, performing general information processing tasks in association with a long-term memory; the coordination level, dealing with specific information processing tasks with a short-term memory; and the control level, which performs the execution of various tasks through hardware using feedback control methods. The behavior of such a machine may be managed by controls with special considerations and its 'intelligence' is directly related to the derivation of a compatible measure that associates the intelligence of the higher levels with the concept of entropy, which is a sufficient analytic measure that unifies the treatment of all the levels of an 'intelligent machine' as the mathematical problem of finding the right sequence of internal decisions and controls for a system structured in the order of intelligence and inverse order of precision such that it minimizes its total entropy. A case study on the automatic maintenance of a nuclear plant illustrates the proposed approach.

  14. Graph signatures for visual analytics.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pak Chung; Foote, Harlan; Chin, George; Mackey, Patrick; Perrine, Ken

    2006-01-01

    We present a visual analytics technique to explore graphs using the concept of a data signature. A data signature, in our context, is a multidimensional vector that captures the local topology information surrounding each graph node. Signature vectors extracted from a graph are projected onto a low-dimensional scatterplot through the use of scaling. The resultant scatterplot, which reflects the similarities of the vectors, allows analysts to examine the graph structures and their corresponding real-life interpretations through repeated use of brushing and linking between the two visualizations. The interpretation of the graph structures is based on the outcomes of multiple participatory analysis sessions with intelligence analysts conducted by the authors at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The paper first uses three public domain data sets with either well-known or obvious features to explain the rationale of our design and illustrate its results. More advanced examples are then used in a customized usability study to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach. The study results reveal not only the limitations and weaknesses of the traditional approach based solely on graph visualization, but also the advantages and strengths of our signature-guided approach presented in the paper.

  15. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOEpatents

    Barney, David M.

    1990-01-01

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  16. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOEpatents

    Barney, David M.

    1989-01-01

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  17. Analytic Model of Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2004-08-02

    A simple analytic model allows prediction of rate constants and size effect behavior before a hydrocode run if size effect data exists. At infinite radius, it defines not only detonation velocity but also average detonation rate, pressure and energy. This allows the derivation of a generalized radius, which becomes larger as the explosive becomes more non-ideal. The model is applied to near-ideal PBX 9404, in-between ANFO and most non-ideal AN. The power of the pressure declines from 2.3, 1.5 to 0.8 across this set. The power of the burn fraction, F, is 0.8, 0 and 0, so that an F-term is important only for the ideal explosives. The size effect shapes change from concave-down to nearly straight to concave-up. Failure is associated with ideal explosives when the calculated detonation velocity turns in a double-valued way. The effect of the power of the pressure may be simulated by including a pressure cutoff in the detonation rate. The models allows comparison of a wide spectrum of explosives providing that a single detonation rate is feasible.

  18. Analytic Model of Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2004-11-15

    A simple analytic model allows prediction of rate constants and size effect behavior before a hydrocode run if size effect data exists. At infinite radius, it defines not only detonation velocity but also average detonation rate, pressure and energy. This allows the derivation of a generalized radius, which becomes larger as the explosive becomes more non-ideal. The model is applied to near-ideal PBX 9404, in-between ANFO and most non-ideal AN. The power of the pressure declines from 2.3, 1.5 to 0.8 across this set. The power of the burn fraction, F, is 0.8, 0 and 0, so that an F-term is important only for the ideal explosives. The size effect shapes change from concave-down to nearly straight to concave-up. Failure is associated with ideal explosives when the calculated detonation velocity turns in a double-valued way. The effect of the power of the pressure may be simulated by including a pressure cutoff in the detonation rate. The models allows comparison of a wide spectrum of explosives providing that a single detonation rate is feasible.

  19. Method of identity analyte-binding peptides

    DOEpatents

    Kauvar, Lawrence M.

    1990-01-01

    A method for affinity chromatography or adsorption of a designated analyte utilizes a paralog as the affinity partner. The immobilized paralog can be used in purification or analysis of the analyte; the paralog can also be used as a substitute for antibody in an immunoassay. The paralog is identified by screening candidate peptide sequences of 4-20 amino acids for specific affinity to the analyte.

  20. Analytical admittance characterization of high mobility channel

    SciTech Connect

    Mammeri, A. M.; Mahi, F. Z.; Varani, L.

    2015-03-30

    In this contribution, we investigate the small-signal admittance of the high electron mobility transistors field-effect channels under a continuation branching of the current between channel and gate by using an analytical model. The analytical approach takes into account the linearization of the 2D Poisson equation and the drift current along the channel. The analytical equations discuss the frequency dependence of the admittance at source and drain terminals on the geometrical transistor parameters.

  1. Method of identity analyte-binding peptides

    DOEpatents

    Kauvar, L.M.

    1990-10-16

    A method for affinity chromatography or adsorption of a designated analyte utilizes a paralog as the affinity partner. The immobilized paralog can be used in purification or analysis of the analyte; the paralog can also be used as a substitute for antibody in an immunoassay. The paralog is identified by screening candidate peptide sequences of 4--20 amino acids for specific affinity to the analyte. 5 figs.

  2. Measurement of the I =1 /2 K π S -wave amplitude from Dalitz plot analyses of ηc→K K ¯π in two-photon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Brown, D. N.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Pennington, M. R.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Heß, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; BaBar Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We study the processes γ γ →KS0K±π∓ and γ γ →K+K-π0 using a data sample of 519 fb-1 recorded with the BABAR detector operating at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at center-of-mass energies at and near the Υ (n S ) (n =2 , 3, 4) resonances. We observe ηc decays to both final states and perform Dalitz plot analyses using a model-independent partial wave analysis technique. This allows a model-independent measurement of the mass-dependence of the I =1 /2 K π S -wave amplitude and phase. A comparison between the present measurement and those from previous experiments indicates similar behavior for the phase up to a mass of 1.5 GeV /c2. In contrast, the amplitudes show very marked differences. The data require the presence of a new a0(1950 ) resonance with parameters m =1931 ±14 ±22 MeV /c2 and Γ =271 ±22 ±29 MeV .

  3. Strong enhancement of s-wave superconductivity near a quantum critical point of (Ca1-xSrx)3Ir4Sn13 and (Ca1-xSrx)3Rh4Sn13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morenzoni, Elvezio; Biswas, Pabitra; Guguchia, Zurab; Khasanov, Rustem; Chinotti, Manuel; Krieger, Jonas; Li, L.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, Cedomir; Pomjakushina, Ekaterina

    We report microscopic studies by muon spin rotation as a function of pressure of the (Ca1-xSrx)3Ir4Sn13 and (Ca1-xSrx)3Rh4Sn13 cubic compounds, which display superconductivity and a structural phase transition associated with the formation of a charge density wave (CDW). In Ca3Ir4Sn13 we find a strong enhancement of the superfluid density and a dramatic increase of the pairing strength above a pressure of ~ 1 . 6 GPa giving direct evidence of the presence of a quantum critical point separating a superconducting phase coexisting with CDW from a pure superconducting phase. The superconducting order parameter in both phases has the same s-wave symmetry. Similar behavior is found in the other family. In spite of the conventional phonon-mediated BCS character of these weakly correlated 3-4-13 systems, the dependence of the effective superfluid density on the critical temperature put these compounds in the ``Uemura'' plot close to unconventional superconductors. These systems exemplify that conventional BCS superconductors can also display characteristics of unconventional superconductors. Supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation and by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-SC00112704.

  4. 7 CFR 98.4 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... MEALS, READY-TO-EAT (MRE's), MEATS, AND MEAT PRODUCTS MRE's, Meats, and Related Meat Food Products § 98.... Army Individual Protection Directorate's Military Specifications, approved analytical test...

  5. Teaching Analytical Chemistry with Automatic Analyzers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Leo

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of using automated analytical procedures in providing rapid, inexpensive alternatives to traditional methods and in teaching skills used in many professions and industry. (CP)

  6. Size separation of analytes using monomeric surfactants

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Wei, Wei

    2005-04-12

    A sieving medium for use in the separation of analytes in a sample containing at least one such analyte comprises a monomeric non-ionic surfactant of the of the general formula, B-A, wherein A is a hydrophilic moiety and B is a hydrophobic moiety, present in a solvent at a concentration forming a self-assembled micelle configuration under selected conditions and having an aggregation number providing an equivalent weight capable of effecting the size separation of the sample solution so as to resolve a target analyte(s) in a solution containing the same, the size separation taking place in a chromatography or electrophoresis separation system.

  7. Analytical techniques and instrumentation: A compilation. [analytical instrumentation, materials performance, and systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Technical information is presented covering the areas of: (1) analytical instrumentation useful in the analysis of physical phenomena; (2) analytical techniques used to determine the performance of materials; and (3) systems and component analyses for design and quality control.

  8. Demonstrating Success: Web Analytics and Continuous Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftus, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    As free and low-cost Web analytics tools become more sophisticated, libraries' approach to user analysis can become more nuanced and precise. Tracking appropriate metrics with a well-formulated analytics program can inform design decisions, demonstrate the degree to which those decisions have succeeded, and thereby inform the next iteration in the…

  9. Empire: An Analytical Category for Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coloma, Roland Sintos

    2013-01-01

    In this article Roland Sintos Coloma argues for the relevance of empire as an analytical category in educational research. He points out the silence in mainstream studies of education on the subject of empire, the various interpretive approaches to deploying empire as an analytic, and the importance of indigeneity in research on empire and…

  10. A Functional Analytic Approach to Group Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenberghe, Luc

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a particular view on the use of Functional Analytical Psychotherapy (FAP) in a group therapy format. This view is based on the author's experiences as a supervisor of Functional Analytical Psychotherapy Groups, including groups for women with depression and groups for chronic pain patients. The contexts in which this approach…

  11. Divulging Personal Information within Learning Analytics Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ifenthaler, Dirk; Schumacher, Clara

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if students are prepared to release any personal data in order to inform learning analytics systems. Besides the well-documented benefits of learning analytics, serious concerns and challenges are associated with the application of these data driven systems. Most notably, empirical evidence regarding…

  12. The Evolving Leadership Path of Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Kluse, Michael; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Gracio, Deborah K.

    2012-01-02

    This is a requested book chapter for an internationally authored book on visual analytics and related fields, coordianted by a UK university and to be published by Springer in 2012. This chapter is an overview of the leadship strategies that PNNL's Jim Thomas and other stakeholders used to establish visual analytics as a field, and how those strategies may evolve in the future.

  13. Modern analytical chemistry in the contemporary world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šíma, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Students not familiar with chemistry tend to misinterpret analytical chemistry as some kind of the sorcery where analytical chemists working as modern wizards handle magical black boxes able to provide fascinating results. However, this approach is evidently improper and misleading. Therefore, the position of modern analytical chemistry among sciences and in the contemporary world is discussed. Its interdisciplinary character and the necessity of the collaboration between analytical chemists and other experts in order to effectively solve the actual problems of the human society and the environment are emphasized. The importance of the analytical method validation in order to obtain the accurate and precise results is highlighted. The invalid results are not only useless; they can often be even fatal (e.g., in clinical laboratories). The curriculum of analytical chemistry at schools and universities is discussed. It is referred to be much broader than traditional equilibrium chemistry coupled with a simple description of individual analytical methods. Actually, the schooling of analytical chemistry should closely connect theory and practice.

  14. Analyticity and Features of Semantic Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Danny D.

    The findings reported in this paper are the result of an experiment to determine the empirical validity of such semantic concepts as analytic, synthetic, and contradictory. Twenty-eight university students were presented with 156 sentences to assign to one of four semantic categories: (1) synthetic ("The dog is a poodle"), (2) analytic ("The tulip…

  15. Analytic solutions for Dp branes in SFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, L.; Giaccari, S.; Tolla, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    This is the follow-up of a previous paper [JHEP 08 (2011) 158] of ours, where we calculated the energy of a proposed analytic lump solution in SFT representing a D24-brane. Here we propose a similar analytic solution for a D p-brane, for any p, and compute its energy.

  16. 40 CFR 89.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 89.312 Section 89... Provisions § 89.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of all calibration gases must not be exceeded. The expiration date of the calibration gases stated by the gas manufacturer shall be recorded. (b) Pure...

  17. 40 CFR 89.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Analytical gases. 89.312 Section 89.312....312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of all calibration gases must not be exceeded. The expiration date of the calibration gases stated by the gas manufacturer shall be recorded. (b) Pure gases....

  18. 40 CFR 91.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Analytical gases. 91.312 Section 91... Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. Record the expiration date stated by the gas supplier for each calibration gas. (b) Pure gases. The required purity of the gases...

  19. 40 CFR 91.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 91.312 Section 91... Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. Record the expiration date stated by the gas supplier for each calibration gas. (b) Pure gases. The required purity of the gases...

  20. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  1. 40 CFR 92.112 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 92.112 Section 92...) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.112 Analytical gases. (a) Gases for the CO and CO2 analyzers shall be single blends of CO and CO2, respectively, using...

  2. 40 CFR 90.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 90.312 Section 90... Provisions § 90.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. The expiration date stated by the gas supplier must be recorded. (b) Pure gases. The required purity of the...

  3. 40 CFR 90.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Analytical gases. 90.312 Section 90... Provisions § 90.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. The expiration date stated by the gas supplier must be recorded. (b) Pure gases. The required purity of the...

  4. 40 CFR 92.112 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Analytical gases. 92.112 Section 92...) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.112 Analytical gases. (a) Gases for the CO and CO2 analyzers shall be single blends of CO and CO2, respectively, using...

  5. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  6. 40 CFR 89.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 89.312 Section 89... Provisions § 89.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of all calibration gases must not be exceeded. The expiration date of the calibration gases stated by the gas manufacturer shall be recorded. (b) Pure...

  7. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  8. 40 CFR 91.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Analytical gases. 91.312 Section 91.312... EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 91.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. Record the expiration date stated by...

  9. 40 CFR 91.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 91.312 Section 91... Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. Record the expiration date stated by the gas supplier for each calibration gas. (b) Pure gases. The required purity of the gases...

  10. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  11. 40 CFR 90.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 90.312 Section 90... Provisions § 90.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. The expiration date stated by the gas supplier must be recorded. (b) Pure gases. The required purity of the...

  12. 40 CFR 89.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Analytical gases. 89.312 Section 89... Provisions § 89.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of all calibration gases must not be exceeded. The expiration date of the calibration gases stated by the gas manufacturer shall be recorded. (b) Pure...

  13. 40 CFR 91.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 91.312 Section 91... Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. Record the expiration date stated by the gas supplier for each calibration gas. (b) Pure gases. The required purity of the gases...

  14. 40 CFR 92.112 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Analytical gases. 92.112 Section 92.112... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.112 Analytical gases. (a) Gases for... as the diluent. (b) Gases for the hydrocarbon analyzer shall be single blends of propane using...

  15. 40 CFR 89.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 89.312 Section 89... Provisions § 89.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of all calibration gases must not be exceeded. The expiration date of the calibration gases stated by the gas manufacturer shall be recorded. (b) Pure...

  16. 40 CFR 90.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 90.312 Section 90... Provisions § 90.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. The expiration date stated by the gas supplier must be recorded. (b) Pure gases. The required purity of the...

  17. 40 CFR 90.312 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Analytical gases. 90.312 Section 90.312... § 90.312 Analytical gases. (a) The shelf life of a calibration gas may not be exceeded. The expiration date stated by the gas supplier must be recorded. (b) Pure gases. The required purity of the gases...

  18. 40 CFR 92.112 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical gases. 92.112 Section 92...) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.112 Analytical gases. (a) Gases for the CO and CO2 analyzers shall be single blends of CO and CO2, respectively, using...

  19. 40 CFR 92.112 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Analytical gases. 92.112 Section 92...) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.112 Analytical gases. (a) Gases for the CO and CO2 analyzers shall be single blends of CO and CO2, respectively, using...

  20. 40 CFR 86.1514 - Analytical gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide on a dry basis. (b) If the raw CO sampling system specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used. (c) If a CVS sampling system is used, the analytical gases specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, shall be used....

  1. Using perioperative analytics to optimize OR performance.

    PubMed

    Rempfer, Doug

    2015-06-01

    In the past, the data hospitals gleaned from operating rooms (ORs) tended to be static and lacking in actionable information. Hospitals can improve OR performance by applying OR analytics, such as evaluation of turnover times and expenses, which provide useful intelligence. Having the information is important, but success depends on aligning staff behavior to effectively achieve improvement strategies identified using the analytics.

  2. When Learning Analytics Meets E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerkawski, Betul C.

    2015-01-01

    While student data systems are nothing new and most educators have been dealing with student data for many years, learning analytics has emerged as a new concept to capture educational big data. Learning analytics is about better understanding of the learning and teaching process and interpreting student data to improve their success and learning…

  3. Technology Enhanced Analytics (TEA) in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Ben Kei; Butson, Russell

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the role of Big Data Analytics in addressing contemporary challenges associated with current changes in institutions of higher education. The paper first explores the potential of Big Data Analytics to support instructors, students and policy analysts to make better evidence based decisions. Secondly, the paper presents an…

  4. 40 CFR 141.89 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical methods. 141.89 Section 141...) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Control of Lead and Copper § 141.89 Analytical methods. (a... shall be conducted with the methods in § 141.23(k)(1). (1) Analyses for alkalinity,...

  5. 40 CFR 141.89 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Analytical methods. 141.89 Section 141...) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Control of Lead and Copper § 141.89 Analytical methods. (a... shall be conducted with the methods in § 141.23(k)(1). (1) Analyses for alkalinity,...

  6. Nucleic acid-coupled colorimetric analyte detectors

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah H.; Jonas, Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for the direct detection of analytes and membrane conformational changes through the detection of color changes in biopolymeric materials. In particular, the present invention provide for the direct colorimetric detection of analytes using nucleic acid ligands at surfaces of polydiacetylene liposomes and related molecular layer systems.

  7. Analytical Tools in School Finance Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, R. L.

    This paper discusses the problem of analyzing variations in the educational opportunities provided by different school districts and describes how to assess the impact of school finance alternatives through use of various analytical tools. The author first examines relatively simple analytical methods, including calculation of per-pupil…

  8. Microfabricated field calibration assembly for analytical instruments

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex L.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Simonson, Robert J.

    2011-03-29

    A microfabricated field calibration assembly for use in calibrating analytical instruments and sensor systems. The assembly comprises a circuit board comprising one or more resistively heatable microbridge elements, an interface device that enables addressable heating of the microbridge elements, and, in some embodiments, a means for positioning the circuit board within an inlet structure of an analytical instrument or sensor system.

  9. 40 CFR 140.5 - Analytical procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) MARINE SANITATION DEVICE STANDARD § 140.5 Analytical procedures. In determining the composition and quality of effluent discharge from marine sanitation devices, the procedures contained in 40 CFR part 136... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical procedures. 140.5...

  10. Analytical design of soliton molecules in fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moubissi, A.-B.; Nse Biyoghe, S.; Mback, C. B. L.; Ekogo, T. B.; Ben-Bolie, G. H.; Kofane, T. C.; Tchofo Dinda, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present an analytical method for designing fiber systems for a highly stable propagation of soliton molecules. This analytical design uses the variational equations of the soliton molecule to determine the parameters of the most suitable fiber system for any desired soliton, thus reducing dramatically the cost of the whole procedure of design, for both the appropriate fiber system and the desired soliton molecule.

  11. Method and apparatus for detecting an analyte

    DOEpatents

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Hesketh, Peter J.

    2011-11-29

    We describe the use of coordination polymers (CP) as coatings on microcantilevers for the detection of chemical analytes. CP exhibit changes in unit cell parameters upon adsorption of analytes, which will induce a stress in a static microcantilever upon which a CP layer is deposited. We also describe fabrication methods for depositing CP layers on surfaces.

  12. NC CATCH: Advancing Public Health Analytics.

    PubMed

    Studnicki, James; Fisher, John W; Eichelberger, Christopher; Bridger, Colleen; Angelon-Gaetz, Kim; Nelson, Debi

    2010-01-01

    The North Carolina Comprehensive Assessment for Tracking Community Health (NC CATCH) is a Web-based analytical system deployed to local public health units and their community partners. The system has the following characteristics: flexible, powerful online analytic processing (OLAP) interface; multiple sources of multidimensional, event-level data fully conformed to common definitions in a data warehouse structure; enabled utilization of available decision support software tools; analytic capabilities distributed and optimized locally with centralized technical infrastructure; two levels of access differentiated by the user (anonymous versus registered) and by the analytical flexibility (Community Profile versus Design Phase); and, an emphasis on user training and feedback. The ability of local public health units to engage in outcomes-based performance measurement will be influenced by continuing access to event-level data, developments in evidence-based practice for improving population health, and the application of information technology-based analytic tools and methods.

  13. Writing analytic element programs in Python.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Mark; Kelson, Victor A

    2009-01-01

    The analytic element method is a mesh-free approach for modeling ground water flow at both the local and the regional scale. With the advent of the Python object-oriented programming language, it has become relatively easy to write analytic element programs. In this article, an introduction is given of the basic principles of the analytic element method and of the Python programming language. A simple, yet flexible, object-oriented design is presented for analytic element codes using multiple inheritance. New types of analytic elements may be added without the need for any changes in the existing part of the code. The presented code may be used to model flow to wells (with either a specified discharge or drawdown) and streams (with a specified head). The code may be extended by any hydrogeologist with a healthy appetite for writing computer code to solve more complicated ground water flow problems. PMID:19473273

  14. Light-emitting diodes for analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Macka, Mirek; Piasecki, Tomasz; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are playing increasingly important roles in analytical chemistry, from the final analysis stage to photoreactors for analyte conversion to actual fabrication of and incorporation in microdevices for analytical use. The extremely fast turn-on/off rates of LEDs have made possible simple approaches to fluorescence lifetime measurement. Although they are increasingly being used as detectors, their wavelength selectivity as detectors has rarely been exploited. From their first proposed use for absorbance measurement in 1970, LEDs have been used in analytical chemistry in too many ways to make a comprehensive review possible. Hence, we critically review here the more recent literature on their use in optical detection and measurement systems. Cloudy as our crystal ball may be, we express our views on the future applications of LEDs in analytical chemistry: The horizon will certainly become wider as LEDs in the deep UV with sufficient intensity become available.

  15. Writing analytic element programs in Python.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Mark; Kelson, Victor A

    2009-01-01

    The analytic element method is a mesh-free approach for modeling ground water flow at both the local and the regional scale. With the advent of the Python object-oriented programming language, it has become relatively easy to write analytic element programs. In this article, an introduction is given of the basic principles of the analytic element method and of the Python programming language. A simple, yet flexible, object-oriented design is presented for analytic element codes using multiple inheritance. New types of analytic elements may be added without the need for any changes in the existing part of the code. The presented code may be used to model flow to wells (with either a specified discharge or drawdown) and streams (with a specified head). The code may be extended by any hydrogeologist with a healthy appetite for writing computer code to solve more complicated ground water flow problems.

  16. ARPEFS as an analytic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Schach von Wittenau, A.E.

    1991-04-01

    Two modifications to the ARPEFS technique are introduced. These are studied using p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) as a model system. The first modification is the obtaining of ARPEFS {chi}(k) curves at temperatures as low as our equipment will permit. While adding to the difficulty of the experiment, this modification is shown to almost double the signal-to-noise ratio of normal emission p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) {chi}(k) curves. This is shown by visual comparison of the raw data and by the improved precision of the extracted structural parameters. The second change is the replacement of manual fitting of the Fourier filtered {chi}(k) curves by the use of the simplex algorithm for parameter determination. Again using p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) data, this is shown to result in better agreement between experimental {chi}(k) curves and curves calculated based on model structures. The improved ARPEFS is then applied to p(2 {times} 2)S/Ni(111) and ({radical}3 {times} {radical}3) R30{degree}S/Ni(111). For p(2 {times} 2)S/Cu(001) we find a S-Cu bond length of 2.26 {Angstrom}, with the S adatom 1.31 {Angstrom} above the fourfold hollow site. The second Cu layer appears to be corrugated. Analysis of the p(2 {times} 2)S/Ni(111) data indicates that the S adatom adatom adsorbs onto the FCC threefold hollow site 1.53 {Angstrom} above the Ni surface. The S-Ni bond length is determined to be 2.13 {Angstrom}, indicating an outwards shift of the first layer Ni atoms. We are unable to assign a unique structure to ({radical}3 {times} {radical}3)R30{degree}S/Ni(111). An analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of ARPEFS as an experimental and analytic technique is presented, along with a summary of problems still to be addressed.

  17. Developing Guidelines for Assessing Visual Analytics Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtz, Jean

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we develop guidelines for evaluating visual analytic environments based on a synthesis of reviews for the entries to the 2009 Visual Analytics Science and Technology (VAST) Symposium Challenge and from a user study with professional intelligence analysts. By analyzing the 2009 VAST Challenge reviews we gained a better understanding of what is important to our reviewers, both visualization researchers and professional analysts. We also report on a small user study with professional analysts to determine the important factors that they use in evaluating visual analysis systems. We then looked at guidelines developed by researchers in various domains and synthesized these into an initial set for use by others in the community. In a second part of the user study, we looked at guidelines for a new aspect of visual analytic systems – the generation of reports. Future visual analytic systems have been challenged to help analysts generate their reports. In our study we worked with analysts to understand the criteria they used to evaluate the quality of analytic reports. We propose that this knowledge will be useful as researchers look at systems to automate some of the report generation.1 Based on these efforts, we produced some initial guidelines for evaluating visual analytic environment and for evaluation of analytic reports. It is important to understand that these guidelines are initial drafts and are limited in scope because of the type of tasks for which the visual analytic systems used in the studies in this paper were designed. More research and refinement is needed by the Visual Analytics Community to provide additional evaluation guidelines for different types of visual analytic environments.

  18. Time From the Beginning of the Right Ventricle Isovolumetric Contraction to the Peak of the S Wave: A New TDI Indicator for the Non-Invasive Estimation of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Parsaee, Mozhgan; Ghaderi, Fereshteh; Alizadehasl, Azin; Bakhshandeh, Hooman

    2016-01-01

    Background Echocardiography is a key screening tool in the diagnostic algorithm of pulmonary hypertension (PH). In addition, tissue doppler imaging (TDI) is a promising method for the noninvasive estimation of pulmonary artery pressure (PAP). Objectives The aim of this study was to validate the accuracy of measuring the time from the beginning of the right ventricular isovolumetric contraction time (RV IVRT) to the peak of the S wave in the TDI of the base of the RV free wall (time to peak or TTP), as an indicator for the non-invasive estimation of pulmonary hypertension. Patients and Methods In this diagnostic test study, 60 consecutive patients referred for right heart catheterization (RHC) were enrolled. A pulse-wave TDI was performed before the cardiac catheterization, with a mean interval of 1 hour between the two measurements. The TDI variables, such as the RV IVRT, myocardial performance index (MPI), and the new “time to peak” parameter, were measured at the lateral basal RV free wall. The patients were divided into two sub-groups according to the RHC findings: no-PH (mean PAP < 25 mmHg) and PH (mean PAP ≥ 25 mmHg) groups. Then, we calculated the specificity and sensitivity of the TDI parameters (including the TTP) for the diagnosis of PH. Results In our study, the TTP showed a significant inverse relationship with the PAP. Based on our results, a TTP of less than 127 ms could be used to predict PH, with a sensitivity and specificity of about 70% (AUC = 0.746 ± 0.064). Conclusions Based on the results of this study, we suggest the use of a novel “time from the beginning of isovolumetric contraction to the peak of the S wave” (TTP) parameter in the TDI of the base of the RV free wall to predict PH with acceptable accuracy in comparison with RHC.

  19. Deriving Earth Science Data Analytics Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempler, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Data Analytics applications have made successful strides in the business world where co-analyzing extremely large sets of independent variables have proven profitable. Today, most data analytics tools and techniques, sometimes applicable to Earth science, have targeted the business industry. In fact, the literature is nearly absent of discussion about Earth science data analytics. Earth science data analytics (ESDA) is the process of examining large amounts of data from a variety of sources to uncover hidden patterns, unknown correlations, and other useful information. ESDA is most often applied to data preparation, data reduction, and data analysis. Co-analysis of increasing number and volume of Earth science data has become more prevalent ushered by the plethora of Earth science data sources generated by US programs, international programs, field experiments, ground stations, and citizen scientists.Through work associated with the Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) Federation, ESDA types have been defined in terms of data analytics end goals. Goals of which are very different than those in business, requiring different tools and techniques. A sampling of use cases have been collected and analyzed in terms of data analytics end goal types, volume, specialized processing, and other attributes. The goal of collecting these use cases is to be able to better understand and specify requirements for data analytics tools and techniques yet to be implemented. This presentation will describe the attributes and preliminary findings of ESDA use cases, as well as provide early analysis of data analytics toolstechniques requirements that would support specific ESDA type goals. Representative existing data analytics toolstechniques relevant to ESDA will also be addressed.

  20. Hanford analytical sample projections 1996--2001

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, S.M.

    1996-06-26

    This document summarizes the biannual Hanford sample projections for fiscal years 1996 to 2001. Sample projections are based on inputs submitted to Analytical Services covering Environmental Restoration, Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Solid Waste, Liquid Effluents, Spent Nuclear Fuels, Transition Projects, Analytical Services, Site Monitoring, and Industrial Hygiene. This information will be used by Hanford Analytical Services to assure that laboratories and resources are available and effectively utilized to meet these documented needs. Sample projections are categorized by radiation level, protocol, sample matrix and Program. Analyses requirements are also presented.

  1. Visual Text Analytics for Impromptu Analysts

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Oriana J.; Best, Daniel M.; Bruce, Joseph R.; Dowson, Scott T.; Larmey, Christopher S.

    2011-10-23

    The Scalable Reasoning System (SRS) is a lightweight visual analytics framework that makes analytical capabilities widely accessible to a class of users we have deemed “impromptu analysts.” By focusing on a deployment of SRS, the Lessons Learned Explorer (LLEx), we examine how to develop visualizations around analytical-oriented goals and data availability. We discuss how to help impromptu analysts to explore deeper patterns. Through designing consistent interactions, we arrive at an interdependent view capable of showcasing patterns. With the combination of SRS widget visualizations and interactions around the underlying textual data, we aim to transition the casual, infrequent user into a viable–albeit impromptu–analyst.

  2. Analytical Ultrasonics in Materials Research and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1986-01-01

    Research results in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing structural materials from metals and ceramics to composites are presented. General topics covered by the conference included: status and advances in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing material microstructures and mechanical properties; status and prospects for ultrasonic measurements of microdamage, degradation, and underlying morphological factors; status and problems in precision measurements of frequency-dependent velocity and attenuation for materials analysis; procedures and requirements for automated, digital signal acquisition, processing, analysis, and interpretation; incentives for analytical ultrasonics in materials research and materials processing, testing, and inspection; and examples of progress in ultrasonics for interrelating microstructure, mechanical properites, and dynamic response.

  3. Analytical Aspects of Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engen, John R.; Wales, Thomas E.

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the analytical aspects of measuring hydrogen exchange by mass spectrometry (HX MS). We describe the nature of analytical selectivity in hydrogen exchange, then review the analytical tools required to accomplish fragmentation, separation, and the mass spectrometry measurements under restrictive exchange quench conditions. In contrast to analytical quantitation that relies on measurements of peak intensity or area, quantitation in HX MS depends on measuring a mass change with respect to an undeuterated or deuterated control, resulting in a value between zero and the maximum amount of deuterium that can be incorporated. Reliable quantitation is a function of experimental fidelity and to achieve high measurement reproducibility, a large number of experimental variables must be controlled during sample preparation and analysis. The method also reports on important qualitative aspects of the sample, including conformational heterogeneity and population dynamics.

  4. 7 CFR 91.23 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Chemical Exposure Research Branch, EPA Office of Research and Development... Evaluating Solid Waste Physical/Chemical Methods, Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Solid Waste, SW... and Engineering Center's Military Specifications, approved analytical test methods noted therein,...

  5. 40 CFR 140.5 - Analytical procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) MARINE SANITATION DEVICE STANDARD § 140.5 Analytical procedures. In determining the composition and quality of effluent discharge from marine sanitation devices, the procedures contained in 40 CFR part...

  6. 7 CFR 94.4 - Analytical methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., Gaithersburg, MD 20877-2417. (d) Manual of Analytical Methods for the Analysis of Pesticide Residues in Human...), Volumes I and II, Food and Drug Administration, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN),...

  7. Analytical prediction of aerospace vehicle vibration environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilby, J. F.; Piersol, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    Considerable attention has been given recently to the formulation and validation of analytical models for the prediction of aerospace vehicle vibration response to acoustic and fluctuating pressures. This paper summarizes the development of such analytical models for two applications, (1) structural vibrations of the Space Shuttle orbiter vehicle due to broadband rocket noise and aerodynamic boundary layer turbulence, and (2) structural vibrations of general aviation aircraft due to discrete frequency propeller and reciprocating engine exhaust noise. In both cases, the spatial exterior excitations are convected pressure fields which are described on the basis of measured cross spectra (coherence and phase) information. Structural modal data are obtained from analytical predictions, and structural responses to appropriate excitation fields are calculated. The results are compared with test data, and the strengths and weaknesses of the analytical models are assessed.

  8. Sensor for detecting and differentiating chemical analytes

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Dechang; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-07-05

    A sensor for detecting and differentiating chemical analytes includes a microscale body having a first end and a second end and a surface between the ends for adsorbing a chemical analyte. The surface includes at least one conductive heating track for heating the chemical analyte and also a conductive response track, which is electrically isolated from the heating track, for producing a thermal response signal from the chemical analyte. The heating track is electrically connected with a voltage source and the response track is electrically connected with a signal recorder. The microscale body is restrained at the first end and the second end and is substantially isolated from its surroundings therebetween, thus having a bridge configuration.

  9. Analytical Applications of Monte Carlo Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guell, Oscar A.; Holcombe, James A.

    1990-01-01

    Described are analytical applications of the theory of random processes, in particular solutions obtained by using statistical procedures known as Monte Carlo techniques. Supercomputer simulations, sampling, integration, ensemble, annealing, and explicit simulation are discussed. (CW)

  10. ANALYTICAL ELEMENT MODELING OF COASTAL AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four topics were studied concerning the modeling of groundwater flow in coastal aquifers with analytic elements: (1) practical experience was obtained by constructing a groundwater model of the shallow aquifers below the Delmarva Peninsula USA using the commercial program MVAEM; ...

  11. Analytical and Radiochemistry for Nuclear Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert Ernest; Dry, Donald E.; Kinman, William Scott; Podlesak, David; Tandon, Lav

    2015-05-26

    Information about nonproliferation nuclear forensics, activities in forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory, radio analytical work at LANL, radiochemical characterization capabilities, bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities, and future interests in forensics interactions.

  12. Report: Analytical Chemistry in a Changing World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laitinen, H. A.

    1980-01-01

    Examines some of the changes that have occurred in the field of analytic chemistry, with emphasis on how the field has adapted to changes in science and technology. Current trends also are identified and discussed. (CS)

  13. Diversity of learning psychoanalysis and analytical psychology.

    PubMed

    Rudakova, Tatiana

    2002-04-01

    As the subject of this Conference is 'Diversity and its Limits: New Directions in Analytical Psychology and Psychoanalysis', I would like to investigate some aspects of education at our Institute--the East European Institute of Psychoanalysis--from the point of view of the meeting of West and East. I will look at the influence of this diversity on the formation and development of psychoanalysis and analytical psychology in Russia.

  14. Analytic modeling of aerosol size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepack, A.; Box, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical functions commonly used for representing aerosol size distributions are studied parametrically. Methods for obtaining best fit estimates of the parameters are described. A catalog of graphical plots depicting the parametric behavior of the functions is presented along with procedures for obtaining analytical representations of size distribution data by visual matching of the data with one of the plots. Examples of fitting the same data with equal accuracy by more than one analytic model are also given.

  15. Building Adoption of Visual Analytics Software

    SciTech Connect

    Chinchor, Nancy; Cook, Kristin A.; Scholtz, Jean

    2012-01-05

    Adoption of technology is always difficult. Issues such as having the infrastructure necessary to support the technology, training for users, integrating the technology into current processes and tools, and having the time, managerial support, and necessary funds need to be addressed. In addition to these issues, the adoption of visual analytics tools presents specific challenges that need to be addressed. This paper discusses technology adoption challenges and approaches for visual analytics technologies.

  16. Analytic Coleman-de Luccia Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xi; Harlow, Daniel; /Stanford U., ITP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2012-02-16

    We present the necessary and sufficient conditions for a Euclidean scale factor to be a solution of the Coleman-de Luccia equations for some analytic potential V ({psi}), with a Lorentzian continuation describing the growth of a bubble of lower-energy vacuum surrounded by higher-energy vacuum. We then give a set of explicit examples that satisfy the conditions and thus are closed-form analytic examples of Coleman-de Luccia geometries.

  17. Fast optical proximity correction: analytical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shioiri, Satomi; Tanabe, Hiroyoshi

    1995-05-01

    In automating optical proximity correction, calculation speed becomes important. In this paper we present a novel method for calculating proximity corrected features analytically. The calculation will take only several times the amount it takes to calculate intensity of one point on wafer. Therefore, the calculation will become extremely faster than conventional repetitive aerial image calculations. This method is applied to a simple periodic pattern. The simulated results show great improvement on linearity after correction and have proved the effectiveness of this analytical method.

  18. Collaborative Analytical Toolbox version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2008-08-21

    The purpose of the Collaborative Analytical Toolbox (CAT) is to provide a comprehensive, enabling, collaborative problem solving environment that enables users to more effectively apply and improve their analytical and problem solving capabilities. CAT is a software framework for integrating other tools and data sources. It includes a set of core services for collaboration and information exploration and analysis, and a framework that facilitates quickly integrating new ideas, techniques, and tools with existing data sources.

  19. Organic materials able to detect analytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Aimee (Inventor); Swager, Timothy M. (Inventor); Zhu, Zhengguo (Inventor); Bulovic, Vladimir (Inventor); Madigan, Conor Francis (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to polymers with lasing characteristics that allow the polymers to be useful in detecting analytes. In one aspect, the polymer, upon an interaction with an analyte, may exhibit a change in a lasing characteristic that can be determined in some fashion. For example, interaction of an analyte with the polymer may affect the ability of the polymer to reach an excited state that allows stimulated emission of photons to occur, which may be determined, thereby determining the analyte. In another aspect, the polymer, upon interaction with an analyte, may exhibit a change in stimulated emission that is at least 10 times greater with respect to a change in the spontaneous emission of the polymer upon interaction with the analyte. The polymer may be a conjugated polymer in some cases. In one set of embodiments, the polymer includes one or more hydrocarbon side chains, which may be parallel to the polymer backbone in some instances. In another set of embodiments, the polymer may include one or more pendant aromatic rings. In yet another set of embodiments, the polymer may be substantially encapsulated in a hydrocarbon. In still another set of embodiments, the polymer may be substantially resistant to photobleaching. In certain aspects, the polymer may be useful in the detection of explosive agents, such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT).

  20. Graph analytics-lessons learned and challenges ahead.

    PubMed

    Pak Chung Wong; Chaomei Chen; Gorg, C; Shneiderman, B; Stasko, J; Thomas, J

    2011-01-01

    Lessons learned from developing four graph analytics applications reveal good research practices and grand challenges for future research. The application domains include electric-power-grid analytics, social-network and citation analytics, text and document analytics, and knowledge domain analytics.

  1. Regional crustal structures along several paths in India and its surrounding regions using local P- and S-wave travel times and regional waveforms recorded from the March 28, 1999 Chamoli earthquake sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, C. K.; Ichinose, G. A.; Kayal, J. R.; Bhattacharya, S. N.; Shukla, A. K.

    2001-12-01

    The March 28, 1999 Chamoli earthquake (Mw 6.8) in northwest India generated a large sequence of aftershocks (M_ w> 4.0) which were recorded by a temporary network ofshort-period stations deployed by various organizations, namely India Meteorological Department (IMD), Geological Survey of India (GSI), National Geophysical Research Institute (NGRI) and Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology (WIHG) in India. We inverted the local P- and S-wave arrival times from about 20 local stations jointly for all available aftershocks implementing a technique which optimizes both earthquake locations and crustal velocity model. Of these, seven events were recorded by more than 5 stations locating within 5o of the epicenters withazimuthal gap not greater than 90o. We used these events to compute the station correctionsfor local stations and applied these station corrections to relocate the entire sequence of the Chamoli aftershocks. The relocation vectors which indicate the direction toward which the events would move from the reference locations (in this case the GSI locations) suggest that for the majority of the seismic events they show movement towards the epicentral locations of the mainshock. The new locations of these events also show improvements in the error ellipse measurements. We have also investigated variations in crustal models using regional broadband seismograms from the mainshock recorded by the IMD stations in India (IMD, 2000). Using a crustal model developed earlier by Bhattacharya using surface-wave dispersion for northern India as a starting model, we conducted a systematic analysis of surface-wave dispersion characteristics recorded at these broadband stations. We synthesized f-k seismograms andexamined the relative amplitude of the Pnl waves to the surface waves and their absolutetravel-time differences. We used focal mechanism and depth that were independently determined by modeling teleseismic depth phases, pP and sP, and by modeling regional seismograms

  2. The forensic validity of visual analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbacher, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    The wider use of visualization and visual analytics in wide ranging fields has led to the need for visual analytics capabilities to be legally admissible, especially when applied to digital forensics. This brings the need to consider legal implications when performing visual analytics, an issue not traditionally examined in visualization and visual analytics techniques and research. While digital data is generally admissible under the Federal Rules of Evidence [10][21], a comprehensive validation of the digital evidence is considered prudent. A comprehensive validation requires validation of the digital data under rules for authentication, hearsay, best evidence rule, and privilege. Additional issues with digital data arise when exploring digital data related to admissibility and the validity of what information was examined, to what extent, and whether the analysis process was sufficiently covered by a search warrant. For instance, a search warrant generally covers very narrow requirements as to what law enforcement is allowed to examine and acquire during an investigation. When searching a hard drive for child pornography, how admissible is evidence of an unrelated crime, i.e. drug dealing. This is further complicated by the concept of "in plain view". When performing an analysis of a hard drive what would be considered "in plain view" when analyzing a hard drive. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the issues of digital forensics and the related issues as they apply to visual analytics and identify how visual analytics techniques fit into the digital forensics analysis process, how visual analytics techniques can improve the legal admissibility of digital data, and identify what research is needed to further improve this process. The goal of this paper is to open up consideration of legal ramifications among the visualization community; the author is not a lawyer and the discussions are not meant to be inclusive of all differences in laws between states and

  3. Analytical quality by design: a tool for regulatory flexibility and robust analytics.

    PubMed

    Peraman, Ramalingam; Bhadraya, Kalva; Padmanabha Reddy, Yiragamreddy

    2015-01-01

    Very recently, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a few new drug applications (NDA) with regulatory flexibility for quality by design (QbD) based analytical approach. The concept of QbD applied to analytical method development is known now as AQbD (analytical quality by design). It allows the analytical method for movement within method operable design region (MODR). Unlike current methods, analytical method developed using analytical quality by design (AQbD) approach reduces the number of out-of-trend (OOT) results and out-of-specification (OOS) results due to the robustness of the method within the region. It is a current trend among pharmaceutical industry to implement analytical quality by design (AQbD) in method development process as a part of risk management, pharmaceutical development, and pharmaceutical quality system (ICH Q10). Owing to the lack explanatory reviews, this paper has been communicated to discuss different views of analytical scientists about implementation of AQbD in pharmaceutical quality system and also to correlate with product quality by design and pharmaceutical analytical technology (PAT).

  4. Analytical Quality by Design: A Tool for Regulatory Flexibility and Robust Analytics

    PubMed Central

    Bhadraya, Kalva; Padmanabha Reddy, Yiragamreddy

    2015-01-01

    Very recently, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a few new drug applications (NDA) with regulatory flexibility for quality by design (QbD) based analytical approach. The concept of QbD applied to analytical method development is known now as AQbD (analytical quality by design). It allows the analytical method for movement within method operable design region (MODR). Unlike current methods, analytical method developed using analytical quality by design (AQbD) approach reduces the number of out-of-trend (OOT) results and out-of-specification (OOS) results due to the robustness of the method within the region. It is a current trend among pharmaceutical industry to implement analytical quality by design (AQbD) in method development process as a part of risk management, pharmaceutical development, and pharmaceutical quality system (ICH Q10). Owing to the lack explanatory reviews, this paper has been communicated to discuss different views of analytical scientists about implementation of AQbD in pharmaceutical quality system and also to correlate with product quality by design and pharmaceutical analytical technology (PAT). PMID:25722723

  5. Knowledge Generation Model for Visual Analytics.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Dominik; Stoffel, Andreas; Stoffel, Florian; Kwon, Bum Chul; Ellis, Geoffrey; Keim, Daniel A

    2014-12-01

    Visual analytics enables us to analyze huge information spaces in order to support complex decision making and data exploration. Humans play a central role in generating knowledge from the snippets of evidence emerging from visual data analysis. Although prior research provides frameworks that generalize this process, their scope is often narrowly focused so they do not encompass different perspectives at different levels. This paper proposes a knowledge generation model for visual analytics that ties together these diverse frameworks, yet retains previously developed models (e.g., KDD process) to describe individual segments of the overall visual analytic processes. To test its utility, a real world visual analytics system is compared against the model, demonstrating that the knowledge generation process model provides a useful guideline when developing and evaluating such systems. The model is used to effectively compare different data analysis systems. Furthermore, the model provides a common language and description of visual analytic processes, which can be used for communication between researchers. At the end, our model reflects areas of research that future researchers can embark on. PMID:26356874

  6. Applications of Business Analytics in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Michael J.; Marsolo, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    The American healthcare system is at a crossroads, and analytics, as an organizational skill, figures to play a pivotal role in its future. As more healthcare systems capture information electronically and as they begin to collect more novel forms of data, such as human DNA, how will we leverage these resources and use them to improve human health at a manageable cost? In this article, we argue that analytics will play a fundamental role in the transformation of the American healthcare system. However, there are numerous challenges to the application and use of analytics, namely the lack of data standards, barriers to the collection of high-quality data, and a shortage of qualified personnel to conduct such analyses. There are also multiple managerial issues, such as how to get end users of electronic data to employ it consistently for improving healthcare delivery, and how to manage the public reporting and sharing of data. In this article, we explore applications of analytics in healthcare, barriers and facilitators to its widespread adoption, and how analytics can help us achieve the goals of the modern healthcare system: high-quality, responsive, affordable, and efficient care. PMID:25429161

  7. Analytic thinking reduces belief in conspiracy theories.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Voracek, Martin; Stieger, Stefan; Tran, Ulrich S; Furnham, Adrian

    2014-12-01

    Belief in conspiracy theories has been associated with a range of negative health, civic, and social outcomes, requiring reliable methods of reducing such belief. Thinking dispositions have been highlighted as one possible factor associated with belief in conspiracy theories, but actual relationships have only been infrequently studied. In Study 1, we examined associations between belief in conspiracy theories and a range of measures of thinking dispositions in a British sample (N=990). Results indicated that a stronger belief in conspiracy theories was significantly associated with lower analytic thinking and open-mindedness and greater intuitive thinking. In Studies 2-4, we examined the causational role played by analytic thinking in relation to conspiracist ideation. In Study 2 (N=112), we showed that a verbal fluency task that elicited analytic thinking reduced belief in conspiracy theories. In Study 3 (N=189), we found that an alternative method of eliciting analytic thinking, which related to cognitive disfluency, was effective at reducing conspiracist ideation in a student sample. In Study 4, we replicated the results of Study 3 among a general population sample (N=140) in relation to generic conspiracist ideation and belief in conspiracy theories about the July 7, 2005, bombings in London. Our results highlight the potential utility of supporting attempts to promote analytic thinking as a means of countering the widespread acceptance of conspiracy theories. PMID:25217762

  8. Sensor arrays for detecting analytes in fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Freund, Michael S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A sensor array for detecting an analyte in a fluid, comprising at least first and second chemically sensitive resistors electrically connected to an electrical measuring apparatus, wherein each of the chemically sensitive resistors comprises a mixture of nonconductive material and a conductive material. Each resistor provides an electrical path through the mixture of nonconductive material and the conductive material. The resistors also provide a difference in resistance between the conductive elements when contacted with a fluid comprising an analyte at a first concentration, than when contacted with an analyte at a second different concentration. A broad range of analytes can be detected using the sensors of the present invention. Examples of such analytes include, but are not limited to, alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, dienes, alicyclic hydrocarbons, arenes, alcohols, ethers, ketones, aldehydes, carbonyls, carbanions, polynuclear aromatics, organic derivatives, biomolecules, sugars, isoprenes, isoprenoids and fatty acids. Moreover, applications for the sensors of the present invention include, but are not limited to, environmental toxicology, remediation, biomedicine, material quality control, food monitoring and agricultural monitoring.

  9. Analytic thinking reduces belief in conspiracy theories.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Voracek, Martin; Stieger, Stefan; Tran, Ulrich S; Furnham, Adrian

    2014-12-01

    Belief in conspiracy theories has been associated with a range of negative health, civic, and social outcomes, requiring reliable methods of reducing such belief. Thinking dispositions have been highlighted as one possible factor associated with belief in conspiracy theories, but actual relationships have only been infrequently studied. In Study 1, we examined associations between belief in conspiracy theories and a range of measures of thinking dispositions in a British sample (N=990). Results indicated that a stronger belief in conspiracy theories was significantly associated with lower analytic thinking and open-mindedness and greater intuitive thinking. In Studies 2-4, we examined the causational role played by analytic thinking in relation to conspiracist ideation. In Study 2 (N=112), we showed that a verbal fluency task that elicited analytic thinking reduced belief in conspiracy theories. In Study 3 (N=189), we found that an alternative method of eliciting analytic thinking, which related to cognitive disfluency, was effective at reducing conspiracist ideation in a student sample. In Study 4, we replicated the results of Study 3 among a general population sample (N=140) in relation to generic conspiracist ideation and belief in conspiracy theories about the July 7, 2005, bombings in London. Our results highlight the potential utility of supporting attempts to promote analytic thinking as a means of countering the widespread acceptance of conspiracy theories.

  10. Knowledge Generation Model for Visual Analytics.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Dominik; Stoffel, Andreas; Stoffel, Florian; Kwon, Bum Chul; Ellis, Geoffrey; Keim, Daniel A

    2014-12-01

    Visual analytics enables us to analyze huge information spaces in order to support complex decision making and data exploration. Humans play a central role in generating knowledge from the snippets of evidence emerging from visual data analysis. Although prior research provides frameworks that generalize this process, their scope is often narrowly focused so they do not encompass different perspectives at different levels. This paper proposes a knowledge generation model for visual analytics that ties together these diverse frameworks, yet retains previously developed models (e.g., KDD process) to describe individual segments of the overall visual analytic processes. To test its utility, a real world visual analytics system is compared against the model, demonstrating that the knowledge generation process model provides a useful guideline when developing and evaluating such systems. The model is used to effectively compare different data analysis systems. Furthermore, the model provides a common language and description of visual analytic processes, which can be used for communication between researchers. At the end, our model reflects areas of research that future researchers can embark on.

  11. Applications of Business Analytics in Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Ward, Michael J; Marsolo, Keith A; Froehle, Craig M

    2014-09-01

    The American healthcare system is at a crossroads, and analytics, as an organizational skill, figures to play a pivotal role in its future. As more healthcare systems capture information electronically and as they begin to collect more novel forms of data, such as human DNA, how will we leverage these resources and use them to improve human health at a manageable cost? In this article, we argue that analytics will play a fundamental role in the transformation of the American healthcare system. However, there are numerous challenges to the application and use of analytics, namely the lack of data standards, barriers to the collection of high-quality data, and a shortage of qualified personnel to conduct such analyses. There are also multiple managerial issues, such as how to get end users of electronic data to employ it consistently for improving healthcare delivery, and how to manage the public reporting and sharing of data. In this article, we explore applications of analytics in healthcare, barriers and facilitators to its widespread adoption, and how analytics can help us achieve the goals of the modern healthcare system: high-quality, responsive, affordable, and efficient care.

  12. Stimuli-responsive materials in analytical separation.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Rosa A; Carro, Antonia M; Concheiro, Angel; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    This review focuses on the fundamentals of stimuli-responsive materials and their applications to three common separation techniques, namely extraction, chromatography, and electrophoresis. Although still little investigated, materials that switch their affinity for the analyte on and off as a function of tiny changes in physical and biochemical variables offer relevant advantages for analyte extraction, concentration, and separation. Temperature and/or pH-responsive polymers in the form of chains or networks, which are dispersed in the sample as free entities or after being grafted onto beads (which may incorporate magnetic cores), enable quantitative capture and/or elution of the analyte under mild conditions and without needing organic solvents. Regarding liquid-chromatography separation, responsive stationary phases enable the implementation of "all-in-water" procedures in which retention times are modulated by means of temperature or pH gradients. Other stimuli that can be externally applied, for example light or magnetic fields, can also be used for efficient extraction or separation of the target substance without altering the composition of the sample matrix. Moreover, stimuli-responsiveness enables straightforward recycling of solid and/or stationary phases for a prolonged lifetime. Improved understanding of the phase transitions of stimuli-responsive materials and design of suitable formats for analytical applications should enable wider and more successful application of stimuli-responsive materials in analytical separations. PMID:25910881

  13. Single-analyte to multianalyte fluorescence sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavigne, John J.; Metzger, Axel; Niikura, Kenichi; Cabell, Larry A.; Savoy, Steven M.; Yoo, J. S.; McDevitt, John T.; Neikirk, Dean P.; Shear, Jason B.; Anslyn, Eric V.

    1999-05-01

    The rational design of small molecules for the selective complexation of analytes has reached a level of sophistication such that there exists a high degree of prediction. An effective strategy for transforming these hosts into sensors involves covalently attaching a fluorophore to the receptor which displays some fluorescence modulation when analyte is bound. Competition methods, such as those used with antibodies, are also amenable to these synthetic receptors, yet there are few examples. In our laboratories, the use of common dyes in competition assays with small molecules has proven very effective. For example, an assay for citrate in beverages and an assay for the secondary messenger IP3 in cells have been developed. Another approach we have explored focuses on multi-analyte sensor arrays with attempt to mimic the mammalian sense of taste. Our system utilizes polymer resin beads with the desired sensors covalently attached. These functionalized microspheres are then immobilized into micromachined wells on a silicon chip thereby creating our taste buds. Exposure of the resin to analyte causes a change in the transmittance of the bead. This change can be fluorescent or colorimetric. Optical interrogation of the microspheres, by illuminating from one side of the wafer and collecting the signal on the other, results in an image. These data streams are collected using a CCD camera which creates red, green and blue (RGB) patterns that are distinct and reproducible for their environments. Analysis of this data can identify and quantify the analytes present.

  14. Metabolomics and diabetes: analytical and computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Sas, Kelli M; Karnovsky, Alla; Michailidis, George; Pennathur, Subramaniam

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes is characterized by altered metabolism of key molecules and regulatory pathways. The phenotypic expression of diabetes and associated complications encompasses complex interactions between genetic, environmental, and tissue-specific factors that require an integrated understanding of perturbations in the network of genes, proteins, and metabolites. Metabolomics attempts to systematically identify and quantitate small molecule metabolites from biological systems. The recent rapid development of a variety of analytical platforms based on mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance have enabled identification of complex metabolic phenotypes. Continued development of bioinformatics and analytical strategies has facilitated the discovery of causal links in understanding the pathophysiology of diabetes and its complications. Here, we summarize the metabolomics workflow, including analytical, statistical, and computational tools, highlight recent applications of metabolomics in diabetes research, and discuss the challenges in the field. PMID:25713200

  15. Gaining analytic control of parton showers

    SciTech Connect

    Tackmann, Frank; Bauer, Christian W.; Tackmann, Frank J.

    2007-05-14

    Parton showers are widely used to generate fully exclusive final states needed to compare theoretical models to experimental observations. While, in general, parton showers give a good description of the experimental data, the precise functional form of the probability distribution underlying the event generation is generally not known. The reason is that realistic parton showers are required to conserve four-momentum at each vertex. In this paper we investigate in detail how four-momentum conservation is enforced in a standard parton shower and why this destroysthe analytic control of the probability distribution. We show how to modify a parton shower algorithm such that it conserves four-momentum at each vertex, but for which the full analytic form of the probability distribution is known. We then comment how this analytic control can be used to match matrix element calculations with parton showers, and to estimate effects of power corrections and other uncertainties in parton showers.

  16. SAAF: SANS data Analysis using Analytical Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinkui

    2011-01-01

    The recently completed Extended Q-Range Small Angle Scattering Diffractometer (EQ-SANS) has put the focus on its software needs with renewed urgency. In a series of efforts, we aim at providing a complete set of software solutions on the EQ-SANS instrument. These programs include initial data processing, data correction and reduction, analytical model fitting to the scattering data, Monte Carlo simulation for structure determination, and virtual instrument simulation for experiment planning. SAAF is one such program for analytical data modeling. It takes the reduced EQ-SANS data and allows users to fit the data to analytical models. These models are easy to write. They can either be user written, or from the pre-supplied model library.

  17. Metabolomics and Diabetes: Analytical and Computational Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Sas, Kelli M.; Karnovsky, Alla; Michailidis, George

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by altered metabolism of key molecules and regulatory pathways. The phenotypic expression of diabetes and associated complications encompasses complex interactions between genetic, environmental, and tissue-specific factors that require an integrated understanding of perturbations in the network of genes, proteins, and metabolites. Metabolomics attempts to systematically identify and quantitate small molecule metabolites from biological systems. The recent rapid development of a variety of analytical platforms based on mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance have enabled identification of complex metabolic phenotypes. Continued development of bioinformatics and analytical strategies has facilitated the discovery of causal links in understanding the pathophysiology of diabetes and its complications. Here, we summarize the metabolomics workflow, including analytical, statistical, and computational tools, highlight recent applications of metabolomics in diabetes research, and discuss the challenges in the field. PMID:25713200

  18. Analytical and Computational Aspects of Collaborative Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia M.; Lewis, Robert Michael

    2000-01-01

    Bilevel problem formulations have received considerable attention as an approach to multidisciplinary optimization in engineering. We examine the analytical and computational properties of one such approach, collaborative optimization. The resulting system-level optimization problems suffer from inherent computational difficulties due to the bilevel nature of the method. Most notably, it is impossible to characterize and hence identify solutions of the system-level problems because the standard first-order conditions for solutions of constrained optimization problems do not hold. The analytical features of the system-level problem make it difficult to apply conventional nonlinear programming algorithms. Simple examples illustrate the analysis and the algorithmic consequences for optimization methods. We conclude with additional observations on the practical implications of the analytical and computational properties of collaborative optimization.

  19. Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, Mary E.; Farish, Thomas J.

    2012-05-16

    The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be

  20. Analytical Chemistry and Measurement Science: (What Has DOE Done for Analytical Chemistry?)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Shults, W. D.

    1989-04-01

    Over the past forty years, analytical scientists within the DOE complex have had a tremendous impact on the field of analytical chemistry. This paper suggests six "high impact" research/development areas that either originated within or were brought to maturity within the DOE laboratories. "High impact" means they lead to new subdisciplines or to new ways of doing business.

  1. An analytic model for the Phobos surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, Thomas C.

    1991-01-01

    Analytic expressions are derived to model the surface topography and the normal to the surface of Phobos. The analytic expressions are comprised of a spherical harmonic expansion for the global figure of Phobos, augmented by addition terms for the large crater Stickney and other craters. Over 300 craters were measured in more than 100 Viking Orbiter images to produce the model. In general, the largest craters were measured since they have a significant effect on topography. The topographic model derived has a global spatial and topographic accuracy ranging from about 100 m in areas having the highest resolution and convergent, stereo coverage, up to 500 m in the poorest areas.

  2. An analytic model for the PHOBOS surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, T. C.

    1991-02-01

    Analytic expressions are derived to model the surface topography and the normal to the surface of Phobos. The analytic expressions are comprised of a spherical harmonic expansion for the global figure of Phobos, augmented by addition terms for the large crater Stickney and other craters. Over 300 craters were measured in more than 100 Viking Orbiter images to produce the model. In general, the largest craters were measured since they have a significant effect on topography. The topographic model derived has a global spatial and topographic accuracy ranging from about 100 m in areas having the highest resolution and convergent, stereo coverage, up to 500 m in the poorest areas.

  3. Magnetic solids in analytical chemistry: a review.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Arteaga, K; Rodriguez, J A; Barrado, E

    2010-08-01

    Magnetic solids are widely used in detection and analytical systems because of the performance advantages they offer compared to similar solids that lack magnetic properties. These solids can be used to pre-concentrate analytes and for the magnetic separation and molecular identification of biomolecules, and organic and inorganic species. Magnetic solid separation techniques also offer benefits over centrifugation, filtration, and solid-phase extraction. In this review, we describe the synthesis, characterization and applications of a series of solids including silica supports, carbon nanotubes, alumina, organic polymers and other materials, mostly containing magnetite or paramagnetic metals. Also addressed are the future perspectives of magnetic solid applications.

  4. Analytic gain in probabilistic decompression sickness models.

    PubMed

    Howle, Laurens E

    2013-11-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a disease known to be related to inert gas bubble formation originating from gases dissolved in body tissues. Probabilistic DCS models, which employ survival and hazard functions, are optimized by fitting model parameters to experimental dive data. In the work reported here, I develop methods to find the survival function gain parameter analytically, thus removing it from the fitting process. I show that the number of iterations required for model optimization is significantly reduced. The analytic gain method substantially improves the condition number of the Hessian matrix which reduces the model confidence intervals by more than an order of magnitude. PMID:24209920

  5. Efficient evaluation of analytic Fukui functions.

    PubMed

    Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Melin, Junia; Ortiz, J V; Merino, Gabriel

    2008-12-14

    An efficient method for the analytic evaluation of Fukui functions is proposed. Working equations are derived and numerical results are used to validate the method on medium size set of molecules. In addition to the obvious advantages of analytic differentiation, the proposed method is efficient enough to be considered a practical alternative to the finite difference formulation used routinely. The reliability of the approximations used here is demonstrated and discussed. Problems found in other methods for prediction of electrophilic centers are corrected automatically when using the new method.

  6. Quality assurance management plan special analytical support

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, M.L.

    1997-01-30

    It is the policy of Special Analytical Support (SAS) that the analytical aspects of all environmental data generated and processed in the laboratory, subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), WDOE or other project specific requirements, be of known and acceptable quality. It is the intention of this QAPP to establish and assure that an effective quality controlled management system is maintained in order to meet the quality requirements of the intended use(s) of the data.

  7. Analytical studies of coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    2009-05-04

    Under certain assumptions and simplifications, we studied a few physics processes of Coherent Electron Cooling using analytical approach. In the modulation process, the effect due to merging the ion beam with the electron beam is studied under single kick approximation. In the free electron laser (FEL) amplifier, we studied the amplification of the electron density modulation using 1D analytical approach. Both the electron charge density and the phase space density are derived in the frequency domain. The solutions are then transformed into the space domain through Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT).

  8. Analytic solutions for optimal statistical arbitrage trading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, William K.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we derive analytic formulae for statistical arbitrage trading where the security price follows an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. By framing the problem in terms of the first-passage time of the process, we derive expressions for the mean and variance of the trade length and the return. We examine the problem of choosing an optimal strategy under two different objective functions: the expected return, and the Sharpe ratio. An exact analytic solution is obtained for the case of maximising the expected return.

  9. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  10. Analytical modeling for microwave and optical metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Alessio; Soric, Jason; Alù, Andrea; Toscano, Alessandro; Bilotti, Filiberto

    2016-06-01

    A metasurface is an artificial structure composed by an ultrathin surface textured at a subwavelength scale. In the last years, metasurfaces have been revealed to be particularly useful in the design of electromagnetic scattering cancellation devices operating at microwave and optical frequencies. In this contribution we summarize our results about the analytical modelling of microwave and optical metasurfaces composed, respectively, by patterned metallic surfaces and arrays of plasmonic nanoparticles. The analytical results are compared with the numerical ones obtained with a proper set of full-wave simulations showing an excellent agreement.

  11. service line analytics in the new era.

    PubMed

    Spence, Jay; Seargeant, Dan

    2015-08-01

    To succeed under the value-based business model, hospitals and health systems require effective service line analytics that combine inpatient and outpatient data and that incorporate quality metrics for evaluating clinical operations. When developing a framework for collection, analysis, and dissemination of service line data, healthcare organizations should focus on five key aspects of effective service line analytics: Updated service line definitions. Ability to analyze and trend service line net patient revenues by payment source. Access to accurate service line cost information across multiple dimensions with drill-through capabilities. Ability to redesign key reports based on changing requirements. Clear assignment of accountability.

  12. Analytic gain in probabilistic decompression sickness models.

    PubMed

    Howle, Laurens E

    2013-11-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a disease known to be related to inert gas bubble formation originating from gases dissolved in body tissues. Probabilistic DCS models, which employ survival and hazard functions, are optimized by fitting model parameters to experimental dive data. In the work reported here, I develop methods to find the survival function gain parameter analytically, thus removing it from the fitting process. I show that the number of iterations required for model optimization is significantly reduced. The analytic gain method substantially improves the condition number of the Hessian matrix which reduces the model confidence intervals by more than an order of magnitude.

  13. Analytic solution for vertical launch into orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boltz, Frederick W.

    1989-01-01

    An approximate analytic solution is presented for the motion and heating of nonlifting spacecraft launched vertically for ascending flight through the atmosphere into earth orbit. The solution is based on Chapman's Z-function transformation of the equations of motion with the assumption of an exponential atmosphere. The transformed equations have been modified to include the effects of thrusting with mass loss. It is assumed that the vehicle negotiates a gravity turn during ascent so that the thrust vector is aligned in the flight-path direction. Numerical results are presented to document the analytic solution and provide evidence of the useful information generated by it.

  14. Analytic solutions of the relativistic Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatta, Yoshitaka; Martinez, Mauricio; Xiao, Bo-Wen

    2015-04-01

    We present new analytic solutions to the relativistic Boltzmann equation within the relaxation time approximation. We first obtain spherically expanding solutions which are the kinetic counterparts of the exact solutions of the Israel-Stewart equation in the literature. This allows us to compare the solutions of the kinetic and hydrodynamic equations at an analytical level. We then derive a novel boost-invariant solution of the Boltzmann equation which has an unconventional dependence on the proper time. The existence of such a solution is also suggested in second-order hydrodynamics and fluid-gravity correspondence.

  15. Retail video analytics: an overview and survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Jonathan; Fan, Quanfu; Gabbur, Prasad; Haas, Norman; Pankanti, Sharath; Trinh, Hoang

    2013-03-01

    Today retail video analytics has gone beyond the traditional domain of security and loss prevention by providing retailers insightful business intelligence such as store traffic statistics and queue data. Such information allows for enhanced customer experience, optimized store performance, reduced operational costs, and ultimately higher profitability. This paper gives an overview of various camera-based applications in retail as well as the state-ofthe- art computer vision techniques behind them. It also presents some of the promising technical directions for exploration in retail video analytics.

  16. Pregnant journeys in group analytic psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Elizabeth A

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the dynamic complexities that are triggered when a group member becomes pregnant. Through clinical illustrations taken from a weekly analytical group, the developmental processes and resonances found in such groups are discussed, alongside the technical challenges they pose on the leader. The scant literature on this topic and how it impacts on the therapeutic space is reviewed from individual and group analytic literature. This paper then extends the figuration of groups as types of metaphorical maternal container (Foulkes, 1964). In particular, this view is developed using the concept of primary maternal preoccupation (Winnicott, 1956) and simultaneously challenged with that of enclaves (O'Shaughnessy, 1992).

  17. service line analytics in the new era.

    PubMed

    Spence, Jay; Seargeant, Dan

    2015-08-01

    To succeed under the value-based business model, hospitals and health systems require effective service line analytics that combine inpatient and outpatient data and that incorporate quality metrics for evaluating clinical operations. When developing a framework for collection, analysis, and dissemination of service line data, healthcare organizations should focus on five key aspects of effective service line analytics: Updated service line definitions. Ability to analyze and trend service line net patient revenues by payment source. Access to accurate service line cost information across multiple dimensions with drill-through capabilities. Ability to redesign key reports based on changing requirements. Clear assignment of accountability. PMID:26548137

  18. Ethical and Privacy Principles for Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardo, Abelardo; Siemens, George

    2014-01-01

    The massive adoption of technology in learning processes comes with an equally large capacity to track learners. Learning analytics aims at using the collected information to understand and improve the quality of a learning experience. The privacy and ethical issues that emerge in this context are tightly interconnected with other aspects such as…

  19. Extended Analytic Device Optimization Employing Asymptotic Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynsys, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Analytic optimization of a thermoelectric junction often introduces several simplifying assumptionsincluding constant material properties, fixed known hot and cold shoe temperatures, and thermallyinsulated leg sides. In fact all of these simplifications will have an effect on device performance,ranging from negligible to significant depending on conditions. Numerical methods, such as FiniteElement Analysis or iterative techniques, are often used to perform more detailed analysis andaccount for these simplifications. While numerical methods may stand as a suitable solution scheme,they are weak in gaining physical understanding and only serve to optimize through iterativesearching techniques. Analytic and asymptotic expansion techniques can be used to solve thegoverning system of thermoelectric differential equations with fewer or less severe assumptionsthan the classic case. Analytic methods can provide meaningful closed form solutions and generatebetter physical understanding of the conditions for when simplifying assumptions may be valid.In obtaining the analytic solutions a set of dimensionless parameters, which characterize allthermoelectric couples, is formulated and provide the limiting cases for validating assumptions.Presentation includes optimization of both classic rectangular couples as well as practically andtheoretically interesting cylindrical couples using optimization parameters physically meaningful toa cylindrical couple. Solutions incorporate the physical behavior for i) thermal resistance of hot andcold shoes, ii) variable material properties with temperature, and iii) lateral heat transfer through legsides.

  20. New analytic formula for edge bootstrap current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. S.; Koh, S.; Menard, J.; Weitzner, H.; Choe, W.

    2012-10-01

    The edge bootstrap current plays a critical role in the equilibrium and stability of the steep edge pedestal plasma. The pedestal plasma has an unconventional and difficult neoclassical property, as compared with the core plasma. A drift-kinetic particle code XGC0, equipped with a mass-momentum-energy conserving collision operator, is used to study the edge bootstrap current in a realistic diverted magnetic field geometry with a self-consistent radial electric field. When the edge electrons are in the low collisionality banana regime, surprisingly, the present kinetic simulation confirms that the existing analytic expressions (represented by O. Sauter, et. al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 1999) are still valid in this unconventional region, except in a thin radial layer in contact with the magnetic separatrix. However, when the pedestal electrons are in plateau-collisional regime, there is a significant deviation of numerical results from the existing analytic formulas. The deviation occurs in different ways between a conventional aspect ratio tokamak and a tight aspect ratio tokamak. A new analytic fitting formula, as a simple modification to the Sauter formula, is obtained to bring the analytic expression to a better agreement with the edge kinetic simulation results.

  1. Recent Studies in Functional Analytic Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Rafael Ferro

    2008-01-01

    Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP), based on the principles of radical behaviorism, emphasizes the impact of eventualities that occur during therapeutic sessions, the therapist-client interaction context, functional equivalence between environments, natural reinforcement and shaping by the therapist. This paper reviews recent studies of FAP…

  2. Digital Analytics in Professional Work and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Richard; Fenwick, Tara

    2016-01-01

    In a wide range of fields, professional practice is being transformed by the increasing influence of digital analytics: the massive volumes of big data, and software algorithms that are collecting, comparing and calculating that data to make predictions and even decisions. Researchers in a number of social sciences have been calling attention to…

  3. Analytical Methods for Trace Metals. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the theoretical concepts involved in the methods listed in the Federal Register as approved for determination of trace metals. Emphasis is on laboratory operations. This course is intended for chemists and technicians with little or no experience in analytical methods for trace metals. Students should have…

  4. Assessment of Critical-Analytic Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Nathaniel J.; Afflerbach, Peter P.; Croninger, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    National policy and standards documents, including the National Assessment of Educational Progress frameworks, the "Common Core State Standards" and the "Next Generation Science Standards," assert the need to assess critical-analytic thinking (CAT) across subject areas. However, assessment of CAT poses several challenges for…

  5. Algorithmic and analytical methods in network biology.

    PubMed

    Koyutürk, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    During the genomic revolution, algorithmic and analytical methods for organizing, integrating, analyzing, and querying biological sequence data proved invaluable. Today, increasing availability of high-throughput data pertaining to functional states of biomolecules, as well as their interactions, enables genome-scale studies of the cell from a systems perspective. The past decade witnessed significant efforts on the development of computational infrastructure for large-scale modeling and analysis of biological systems, commonly using network models. Such efforts lead to novel insights into the complexity of living systems, through development of sophisticated abstractions, algorithms, and analytical techniques that address a broad range of problems, including the following: (1) inference and reconstruction of complex cellular networks; (2) identification of common and coherent patterns in cellular networks, with a view to understanding the organizing principles and building blocks of cellular signaling, regulation, and metabolism; and (3) characterization of cellular mechanisms that underlie the differences between living systems, in terms of evolutionary diversity, development and differentiation, and complex phenotypes, including human disease. These problems pose significant algorithmic and analytical challenges because of the inherent complexity of the systems being studied; limitations of data in terms of availability, scope, and scale; intractability of resulting computational problems; and limitations of reference models for reliable statistical inference. This article provides a broad overview of existing algorithmic and analytical approaches to these problems, highlights key biological insights provided by these approaches, and outlines emerging opportunities and challenges in computational systems biology.

  6. Biochemical Applications in the Analytical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Cynthia; Ruttencutter, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An HPLC and a UV-visible spectrophotometer are identified as instruments that helps to incorporate more biologically-relevant experiments into the course, in order to increase the students understanding of selected biochemistry topics and enhances their ability to apply an analytical approach to biochemical problems. The experiment teaches…

  7. Sensor arrays for detecting analytes in fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Freund, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Chemical sensors for detecting analytes in fluids comprise first and second conductive elements (e.g. electrical leads) electrically coupled to and separated by a chemically sensitive resistor which provides an electrical path between the conductive elements. The resistor comprises a plurality of alternating nonconductive regions (comprising a nonconductive organic polymer) and conductive regions (comprising a conductive material) transverse to the electrical path. The resistor provides a difference in resistance between the conductive elements when contacted with a fluid comprising a chemical analyte at a first concentration, than when contacted with a fluid comprising the chemical analyte at a second different concentration. Arrays of such sensors are constructed with at least two sensors having different chemically sensitive resistors providing dissimilar such differences in resistance. Variability in chemical sensitivity from sensor to sensor is provided by qualitatively or quantitatively varying the composition of the conductive and/or nonconductive regions. An electronic nose for detecting an analyte in a fluid may be constructed by using such arrays in conjunction with an electrical measuring device electrically connected to the conductive elements of each sensor.

  8. Sensors for detecting analytes in fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Severin, Erik (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Chemical sensors for detecting analytes in fluids comprise first and second conductive elements (e.g., electrical leads) electrically coupled to and separated by a chemically sensitive resistor which provides an electrical path between the conductive elements. The resistor comprises a plurality of alternating nonconductive regions (comprising a nonconductive organic polymer) and conductive regions (comprising a conductive material) transverse to the electrical path. The resistor provides a difference in resistance between the conductive elements when contacted with a fluid comprising a chemical analyte at a first concentration, than when contacted with a fluid comprising the chemical analyte at a second different concentration. Arrays of such sensors are constructed with at least two sensors having different chemically sensitive resistors providing dissimilar such differences in resistance. Variability in chemical sensitivity from sensor to sensor is provided by qualitatively or quantitatively varying the composition of the conductive and/or nonconductive regions. An electronic nose for detecting an analyte in a fluid may be constructed by using such arrays in conjunction with an electrical measuring device electrically connected to the conductive elements of each sensor.

  9. Analytical model of internally coupled ears.

    PubMed

    Vossen, Christine; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; van Hemmen, J Leo

    2010-08-01

    Lizards and many birds possess a specialized hearing mechanism: internally coupled ears where the tympanic membranes connect through a large mouth cavity so that the vibrations of the tympanic membranes influence each other. This coupling enhances the phase differences and creates amplitude differences in the tympanic membrane vibrations. Both cues show strong directionality. The work presented herein sets out the derivation of a three dimensional analytical model of internally coupled ears that allows for calculation of a complete vibration profile of the membranes. The analytical model additionally provides the opportunity to incorporate the effect of the asymmetrically attached columella, which leads to the activation of higher membrane vibration modes. Incorporating this effect, the analytical model can explain measurements taken from the tympanic membrane of a living lizard, for example, data demonstrating an asymmetrical spatial pattern of membrane vibration. As the analytical calculations show, the internally coupled ears increase the directional response, appearing in large directional internal amplitude differences (iAD) and in large internal time differences (iTD). Numerical simulations of the eigenfunctions in an exemplary, realistically reconstructed mouth cavity further estimate the effects of its complex geometry.

  10. Reimagining Khan Analytics for Student Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Jim

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I describe preliminary work on a new research project in learning analytics at Arizona State University. In conjunction with an innovative remedial mathematics course using Khan Academy and student coaches, this study seeks to measure the effectiveness of visualized data in assisting student coaches as they help remedial math…

  11. Beyond Clickometry: Analytics for Constructivist Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrichson, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes some current trends in Learning Management System's analytics. It points out that while the analysis of access log patterns -- clickometry--is by far the most common form of analysis available in LMS systems its value is limited at best. Being a measure of behavior in its most basic sense clickometry is best suited for…

  12. Sensors for detecting analytes in fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Severin, Erik (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Chemical sensors for detecting analytes in fluids comprise first and second conductive elements (e.g., electrical leads) electrically coupled to and separated by a chemically sensitive resistor which provides an electrical path between the conductive elements. The resistor comprises a plurality of alternating nonconductive regions (comprising a nonconductive organic polymer) and conductive regions (comprising a conductive material) transverse to the electrical path. The resistor provides a difference in resistance between the conductive elements when contacted with a fluid comprising a chemical analyte at a first concentration, than when contacted with a fluid comprising the chemical analyte at a second different concentration. Arrays of such sensors are constructed with at least two sensors having different chemically sensitive resistors providing dissimilar such differences in resistance. Variability in chemical sensitivity from sensor to sensor is provided by qualitatively or quantitatively varying the composition of the conductive and/or nonconductive regions. An electronic nose for detecting an analyte in a fluid may be constructed by using such arrays in conjunction with an electrical measuring device electrically connected to the conductive elements of each sensor.

  13. Sensors for detecting analytes in fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Severin, Erik (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Chemical sensors for detecting analytes in fluids comprise first and second conductive elements (e.g., electrical leads) electrically coupled to and separated by a chemically sensitive resistor which provides an electrical path between the conductive elements. The resistor comprises a plurality of alternating nonconductive regions (comprising a nonconductive organic polymer) and conductive regions (comprising a conductive material) transverse to the electrical path. The resistor provides a difference in resistance between the conductive elements when contacted with a fluid comprising a chemical analyte at a first concentration, than when contacted with a fluid comprising the chemical analyte at a second different concentration. Arrays of such sensors are constructed with at least two sensors having different chemically sensitive resistors providing dissimilar such differences in resistance. Variability in chemical sensitivity from sensor to sensor is provided by qualitatively or quantitatively varying the composition of the conductive and/or nonconductive regions. An electronic nose for detecting an analyte in a fluid may be constructed by using such arrays in conjunction with an electrical measuring device electrically connected to the conductive elements of each sensor.

  14. Analytical Reasoning Skills: Improving Performance with Notations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eskritt, Michelle; Arthurs, Carol

    2006-01-01

    In this study we explored the effect of notations that undergraduates produce on their reasoning abilities. Participants solved four analytical reasoning problems, making notes to solve two problems and solving two without notations. Most participants produced notes when given the opportunity. The production of higher quality notes did not aid…

  15. Algorithmic and analytical methods in network biology

    PubMed Central

    Koyutürk, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    During genomic revolution, algorithmic and analytical methods for organizing, integrating, analyzing, and querying biological sequence data proved invaluable. Today, increasing availability of high-throughput data pertaining functional states of biomolecules, as well as their interactions, enables genome-scale studies of the cell from a systems perspective. The past decade witnessed significant efforts on the development of computational infrastructure for large-scale modeling and analysis of biological systems, commonly using network models. Such efforts lead to novel insights into the complexity of living systems, through development of sophisticated abstractions, algorithms, and analytical techniques that address a broad range of problems, including the following: (1) inference and reconstruction of complex cellular networks; (2) identification of common and coherent patterns in cellular networks, with a view to understanding the organizing principles and building blocks of cellular signaling, regulation, and metabolism; and (3) characterization of cellular mechanisms that underlie the differences between living systems, in terms of evolutionary diversity, development and differentiation, and complex phenotypes, including human disease. These problems pose significant algorithmic and analytical challenges because of the inherent complexity of the systems being studied; limitations of data in terms of availability, scope, and scale; intractability of resulting computational problems; and limitations of reference models for reliable statistical inference. This article provides a broad overview of existing algorithmic and analytical approaches to these problems, highlights key biological insights provided by these approaches, and outlines emerging opportunities and challenges in computational systems biology. PMID:20836029

  16. Analytical solutions to constrained hypersonic flight trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping

    1993-01-01

    The flight trajectory of aerospace vehicles subject to a class of path constraints is considered. The constrained dynamics is shown to be a natural two-time-scale system. Asymptotic analytical solutions are obtained. Problems of trajectory optimization and guidance can be dramatically simplified with these solutions. Applications in trajectory design for an aerospace plane strongly support the theoretical development.

  17. Analytical solutions to constrained hypersonic flight trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping

    1992-01-01

    The flight trajectory of aerospace vehicles subject to a class of path constraints is considered. The constrained dynamics is shown to be a natural two-time-scale system. Asymptotic analytical solutions are obtained. Problems of trajectory optimization and guidance can be dramatically simplified with these solutions. Applications in trajectory design for an aerospace plane strongly support the theoretical development.

  18. Analytic Solutions of the Vector Burgers Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerney, Steven; Schmahl, Edward J.; Musielak, Z. E.

    1996-01-01

    The well-known analytical solution of Burgers' equation is extended to curvilinear coordinate systems in three dimensions by a method that is much simpler and more suitable to practical applications than that previously used. The results obtained are applied to incompressible flow with cylindrical symmetry, and also to the decay of an initially linearly increasing wind.

  19. Prioritizing pesticide compounds for analytical methods development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norman, Julia E.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Nowell, Lisa H.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a periodic need to re-evaluate pesticide compounds in terms of priorities for inclusion in monitoring and studies and, thus, must also assess the current analytical capabilities for pesticide detection. To meet this need, a strategy has been developed to prioritize pesticides and degradates for analytical methods development. Screening procedures were developed to separately prioritize pesticide compounds in water and sediment. The procedures evaluate pesticide compounds in existing USGS analytical methods for water and sediment and compounds for which recent agricultural-use information was available. Measured occurrence (detection frequency and concentrations) in water and sediment, predicted concentrations in water and predicted likelihood of occurrence in sediment, potential toxicity to aquatic life or humans, and priorities of other agencies or organizations, regulatory or otherwise, were considered. Several existing strategies for prioritizing chemicals for various purposes were reviewed, including those that identify and prioritize persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic compounds, and those that determine candidates for future regulation of drinking-water contaminants. The systematic procedures developed and used in this study rely on concepts common to many previously established strategies. The evaluation of pesticide compounds resulted in the classification of compounds into three groups: Tier 1 for high priority compounds, Tier 2 for moderate priority compounds, and Tier 3 for low priority compounds. For water, a total of 247 pesticide compounds were classified as Tier 1 and, thus, are high priority for inclusion in analytical methods for monitoring and studies. Of these, about three-quarters are included in some USGS analytical method; however, many of these compounds are included on research methods that are expensive and for which there are few data on environmental samples. The remaining quarter of Tier 1

  20. 40 CFR 140.5 - Analytical procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 140.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MARINE SANITATION DEVICE STANDARD § 140.5 Analytical procedures. In determining the composition and quality of effluent discharge from marine sanitation devices, the procedures contained in 40 CFR part...