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Sample records for anti-tumor effects synergistically

  1. Magnolol and honokiol exert a synergistic anti-tumor effect through autophagy and apoptosis in human glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Chen; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Huang, Hua-Yin; Chen, Jang-Yi; Chen, Ying

    2016-05-17

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a malignant brain tumor associated with a high mortality rate. The aim of this study is to investigate the synergistic effects of honokiol (Hono) and magnolol (Mag), extracted from Magnolia officinalis, on cytotoxicity and inhibition of human GBM tumor progression in cellular and animal models. In comparison with Hono or Mag alone, co-treatment with Hono and Mag (Hono-Mag) decreased cyclin A, D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 2, 4, 6 significantly, leading to cell cycle arrest in U87MG and LN229 human glioma cells. In addition, phosphorylated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K), p-Akt, and Ki67 were decreased after Hono-Mag treatment, showing proliferation inhibition. Hono-Mag treatment also reduced p-p38 and p-JNK but elevated p-ERK expression. Besides, Hono-Mag treatment induced autophagy and intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. Both ERK and autophagy inhibitors enhanced Hono-Mag-induced apoptosis in LN229 cells, indicating a rescuer role of ERK. In human GBM orthotopic xenograft model, the Hono-Mag treatment inhibited the tumor progression and induced apoptosis more efficiently than Temozolomide, Hono, or Mag group. In conclusion, the Hono-Mag exerts a synergistic anti-tumor effect by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing autophagy and apoptosis in human GBM cells. The Hono-Mag may be applied as an adjuvant therapy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of GBM treatment.

  2. Synergistic effect of CTLA-4 blockade and cancer chemotherapy in the induction of anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Lesterhuis, W Joost; Salmons, Joanne; Nowak, Anna K; Rozali, Esdy N; Khong, Andrea; Dick, Ian M; Harken, Julie A; Robinson, Bruce W; Lake, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Several chemotherapeutics exert immunomodulatory effects. One of these is the nucleoside analogue gemcitabine, which is widely used in patients with lung cancer, ovarian cancer, breast cancer, mesothelioma and several other types of cancer, but with limited efficacy. We hypothesized that the immunopotentiating effects of this drug are partly restrained by the inhibitory T cell molecule CTLA-4 and thus could be augmented by combining it with a blocking antibody against CTLA-4, which on its own has recently shown beneficial clinical effects in the treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma. Here we show, using two non-immunogenic murine tumor models, that treatment with gemcitabine chemotherapy in combination with CTLA-4 blockade results in the induction of a potent anti-tumor immune response. Depletion experiments demonstrated that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are required for optimal therapeutic effect. Mice treated with the combination exhibited tumor regression and long-term protective immunity. In addition, we show that the efficacy of the combination is moderated by the timing of administration of the two agents. Our results show that immune checkpoint blockade and cytotoxic chemotherapy can have a synergistic effect in the treatment of cancer. These results provide a basis to pursue combination therapies with anti-CTLA-4 and immunopotentiating chemotherapy and have important implications for future studies in cancer patients. Since both drugs are approved for use in patients our data can be immediately translated into clinical trials.

  3. Enhancement of anti-tumor activity of Newcastle disease virus by the synergistic effect of cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Lv, Zheng; Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Yin, Jie-Chao; Wang, Hui; Sun, Tian; Chen, Li-Qun; Bai, Fu-Liang; Wu, Wei; Ren, Gui-Ping; Li, De-Shan

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate enhancement of anti-tumor effects of the lentogenic Newcastle disease virus Clone30 strain (NDV rClone30) expressing cytosine deaminase (CD) gene against tumor cells and in murine groin tumor-bearing models. Cytotoxic effects of the rClone30-CD/5-FC on the HepG2 cell line were examined by an MTT method. Anti-tumor activity of rClone30-CD/5-FC was examined in H22 tumor-bearing mice. Compared to the rClone30-CD virus treatment alone, NDV rClone30-CD/5-FC at 0.1 and 1 MOIs exerted significant cytotoxic effects (P<0.05) on HepG2 cells. For treatment of H22 tumor-bearing mice, recombinant NDV was injected together with 5-FC given by either intra-tumor injection or tail vein injection. When 5-FC was administered by intra-tumor injection, survival for the rClone30-CD/5-FC-treated mice was 4/6 for 80 days period vs 1/6 , 0/6 and 0/6 for the mice treated with rClone30-CD, 5-FC and saline alone, respectively. When 5-FC was given by tail vein injection, survival for the rClone30-CD/5-FC-treated mice was 3/6 vs 2/6 , 0/6 and 0/6 for the mice treated with rClone30-CD, 5-FC or saline alone, respectively. In this study, NDV was used for the first time to deliver the suicide gene for cancer therapy. Incorporation of the CD gene in the lentogenic NDV genome together with 5-FC significantly enhances cell death of HepG2 tumor cells in vitro, decreases tumor volume and increases survival of H22 tumor-bearing mice in vivo.

  4. Resveratrol synergistically augments anti-tumor effect of 5-FU in vitro and in vivo by increasing S-phase arrest and tumor apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Jiening; Chen, Xueyan; Gao, Haixia; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Huajun

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have shown that natural dietary agents, in combination with chemical agents, can improve the therapeutic response of cancers to chemotherapy and reduce the associated side-effects. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential and mechanisms of anticancer effects for the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and resveratrol (Res). In these studies, we employed the cancer cell lines TE-1 and A431 and an animal model of skin cancer. The presented results provide the first evidence that Res can enhance the anti-tumor potency of 5-FU by inducing S-phase arrest. The combination of Res and 5-FU demonstrates synergistic efficacy, causing tumor regression in a two-stage model of mouse skin carcinogenesis induced by DMBA and TPA. There was clear evidence of Res augmenting the growth inhibitory effect of 5-FU on the TE-1 and A431 cancer cells in vitro. In the in vivo studies, the tumor regression rate in the combination group increased significantly after four weeks of treatment (P < 0.01). The combination of 5-FU and Res significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells and the level of activated caspase-3, cleaved PARP and p53 proteins as well as increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. In conclusion, the 5-FU/Res combination enabled a more effective inhibition of cell growth and the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells than 5-FU alone. The results of this study suggest that chemotherapy using natural dietary agents with chemical agents represents a superior cancer treatment option. PMID:25736303

  5. Resveratrol synergistically augments anti-tumor effect of 5-FU in vitro and in vivo by increasing S-phase arrest and tumor apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dun, Jiening; Chen, Xueyan; Gao, Haixia; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Huajun; Zhang, Yongjian

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have shown that natural dietary agents, in combination with chemical agents, can improve the therapeutic response of cancers to chemotherapy and reduce the associated side-effects. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential and mechanisms of anticancer effects for the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and resveratrol (Res). In these studies, we employed the cancer cell lines TE-1 and A431 and an animal model of skin cancer. The presented results provide the first evidence that Res can enhance the anti-tumor potency of 5-FU by inducing S-phase arrest. The combination of Res and 5-FU demonstrates synergistic efficacy, causing tumor regression in a two-stage model of mouse skin carcinogenesis induced by DMBA and TPA. There was clear evidence of Res augmenting the growth inhibitory effect of 5-FU on the TE-1 and A431 cancer cells in vitro. In the in vivo studies, the tumor regression rate in the combination group increased significantly after four weeks of treatment (P < 0.01). The combination of 5-FU and Res significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells and the level of activated caspase-3, cleaved PARP and p53 proteins as well as increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. In conclusion, the 5-FU/Res combination enabled a more effective inhibition of cell growth and the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells than 5-FU alone. The results of this study suggest that chemotherapy using natural dietary agents with chemical agents represents a superior cancer treatment option.

  6. Preparation of the core-shell structure adriamycin lipiodol microemulsions and their synergistic anti-tumor effects with diethyldithiocarbamate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Daocheng, Wu; Mingxi, Wan

    2010-11-01

    We prepared the core-shell structure adriamycin lipiodol microemulsions (ADM-CSLMs) and evaluated their in vivo antitumor effects in combination with Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC). Two types of ADM-CSLMs, adriamycin liposome-lipiodol microemulsion(ADM-LLM) and adriamycin microsphere lipiodol microemulsion (ADM-MLM), were prepared through the emulsification method. The drug loading and encapsulation efficiency of ADM-CSLMs were measured by the high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC). The size and shape of the ADM-CSLMs were determined by an atom force microscopy (AFM), a transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and a particle size analyzer, respectively. The synergistic effects of DDC and ADM-CSLMs for cancer treatment of carcinoma drug-resistance cell was evaluated by the MTT method, the activation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was detected by chemiluminescence, and the ADM accumulation in cells was measured by flow cytometry. Walker-256 carcinoma was transplanted to the livers of the male SD rats, ADM-CSLMs were administrated to the livers of the rats by intervention hepatic artery embolization through microsurgery. The tumor growth and animal survival were evaluated. The results show that the average diameter of ADM-LLM and ADM-MLM were 4.23 ± 1.2 μm and 4.67 ± 1.4 μm, respectively, and their ADM encapsulation efficiency were 83.7% and 87.2% with respect to loading efficiency of 82 μg/ml and 91 μg/ml. The tumor growth and animal survival in two of the ADM-CSLMs combined with DDC groups were significantly higher than that of ADM only treatment, ADM liposome combined with DDC (P < 0.01), as well as the ADM microsphere combined with DDC (P < 0.01). Therefore, ADM-CSLMs are useful carriers for the treatment of carcinoma and their anti-tumor effect can be enhanced by DDC in a suitable concentration.

  7. Synergistic effects of host B7-H4 deficiency and gemcitabine treatment on tumor regression and anti-tumor T cell immunity in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Leung, Joanne; St-Onge, Philippe; Stagg, John; Suh, Woong-Kyung

    2017-04-01

    B7-H4 (B7x/B7S1), a B7 family inhibitor of T cell activity, is expressed in multiple human cancers and correlates with decreased infiltrating lymphocytes and poor prognosis. In murine models, tumor-expressed B7-H4 enhances tumor growth and reduces T cell immunity, and blockade of tumor-B7-H4 rescues T cell activity and lowers tumor burden. This implicates B7-H4 as a target for cancer immunotherapy, yet limits the efficacy of B7-H4 blockade exclusively to patients with B7-H4+ tumors. Given the expression of B7-H4 on host immune cells, we have previously shown that BALB/c mice lacking host B7-H4 have enhanced anti-tumor profiles, yet similar 4T1 tumor growth relative to control. Given that T cell-mediated immunotherapies work best for tumors presenting tumor-associated neoantigens, we further investigated the function of host B7-H4 in the growth of a more immunogenic derivative, 4T1-12B, which is known to elicit strong anti-tumor CD8 T cell responses due to expression of a surrogate tumor-specific antigen, firefly luciferase. Notably, B7-H4 knockout hosts not only mounted greater tumor-associated anti-tumor T cell responses, but also displayed reduced tumors. Additionally, B7-H4-deficiency synergized with gemcitabine to further inhibit tumor growth, often leading to tumor eradication and the generation of protective T cell immunity. These findings imply that inhibition of host B7-H4 can enhance anti-tumor T cell immunity in immunogenic cancers, and can be combined with other anti-cancer therapies to further reduce tumor burden regardless of tumor-B7-H4 positivity.

  8. β-Carotene synergistically enhances the anti-tumor effect of 5-fluorouracil on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanting; Zhu, Xiangzhan; Huang, Tuanjie; Chen, Lei; Liu, Yanxia; Li, Qinghua; Song, Jishi; Ma, Shanshan; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Bo; Guan, Fangxia

    2016-11-02

    Recently, we reported that β-carotene exhibited anticancer activity against human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells in vitro. In the present study, we examined a novel therapeutic strategy by combining β-carotene with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human esophageal cancer in vitro and in vivo, and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. We found that the combination of 5-FU and β-carotene displayed greater growth inhibitory effects than did either compound alone in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells. In addition, the combination of 5-FU and β-carotene displayed greater tumor growth inhibition in an Eca109 xenograft mouse model than did a single agent with low systemic toxicity. β-Carotene enhanced 5-FU-induced apoptosis. TUNEL staining revealed that the rate of TUNEL-positive cells was markedly increased in tumor tissues after treatment with 5-FU and β-carotene. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry revealed the down-regulation of Bcl-2 and PCNA and the up-regulation of Bax and caspase-3 in tumor tissues. Further studies demonstrated that the combined administration of 5-FU and β-carotene significantly down-regulated the protein levels of Cav-1, p-AKT, p-NF-κB, p-mTOR and p-p70S6K in Eca109 cells more effectively than did 5-FU alone. These data suggested that the combined therapy of 5-FU and β-carotene exerted synergistic antitumor effects in vivo and in vitro and could constitute a novel therapeutic treatment for ESCC.

  9. Synergistic anti-tumor effects of the combination of a benzofuroxan derivate and sorafenib on NCI-H460 human large cell lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Sarah Fernandes; Alexandre de Azevedo, Ricardo; Salomon, Maria Alejandra Clavijo; Jorge, Salomão Dória; Levy, Débora; Bydlowski, Sérgio Paulo; Rodrigues, Cecília Pessoa; Pizzo, Célia Regina; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; Ferreira, Adilson Kleber

    2014-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent and lethal human cancer in the world. Because is still an unsolved health issue, new compounds or therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Furoxans are presented as potentials candidates for lung cancer treatment. Accordingly, we evaluated the efficacy of a benzofuroxan derivative, BFD-22, alone and combined with sorafenib against NCI-H460 cell line. We showed that BFD-22 has cytotoxic effects on the NCI-H460 cells. Importantly, the Combination Index (CI) evaluation revels that BFD-22 combined with sorafenib has a stronger cytotoxic effect. In addition, the combination induces apoptosis through extrinsic pathway, leading to TRAIL-R1/DR4-triggered apoptosis. Furthermore, BFD-22 combined with sorafenib increases ROS production and simultaneously reduces perlecan expression in the NCI-H460 cells. In accordance, tumor cells were arrested in the S-phase, and these anti-proliferative effects also inhibit cell migration. This is the first study reporting an advantage of BFD-22 combined with sorafenib as a new therapeutic strategy in the fight against lung cancer.

  10. Fibrinogen facilitates the anti-tumor effect of nonnative endostatin

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Huadong; Fu, Yan; Lei, Qingxin; Han, Qing; Ploplis, Victoria A.; Castellino, Francis J.; Li, Ling; Luo, Yongzhang

    2009-01-01

    Endostatin is a potent inhibitor of tumor angiogenesis. Interestingly, nonnative endostatin also exhibits an anti-tumor effect, which remains a mystery so far. Here we show that intravenous injection of nonnative endostatin results in tumor inhibition effect. Soluble and active endostatin is isolated from human blood after the addition of nonnative endostatin in vitro. By fractionation of the whole blood, we surprisingly identify fibrinogen specifically binding to and inhibiting the aggregation of nonnative endostatin. Moreover, the anti-tumor activity of nonnative endostatin is substantially impaired in fibrinogen-deficient mice. Our studies demonstrate that fibrinogen facilitates the anti-tumor effect of nonnative endostatin, which also provides new insights into the novel physiological function of fibrinogen. PMID:19167351

  11. Redox-responsive mesoporous selenium delivery of doxorubicin targets MCF-7 cells and synergistically enhances its anti- tumor activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuang; Yu, Qianqian; Pan, Jiali; Zhou, Yanhui; Cao, Chengwen; Ouyang, Jian-Ming; Liu, Jie

    2017-03-03

    To reduce the side effects and enhance the anti-tumor activities of anticancer drugs in the clinic, the use of nano mesoporous materials, with mesoporous silica (MSN) being the best-studied, has become an effective method of drug delivery. In this study, we successfully synthesized mesoporous selenium (MSe) nanoparticles and first introduced them to the field of drug delivery. Loading MSe with doxorubicin (DOX) is mainly driven by the physical adsorption mechanism of the mesopores, and our results demonstrated that MSe could synergistically enhance the antitumor activity of DOX. Coating the surface of MSe@DOX with Human serum albumin (HSA) generated a unique redox-responsive nanoparticle (HSA-MSe@DOX) that demonstrated glutathione-dependent drug release, increased tumor-targeting effects and enhanced cellular uptake throug nanoparticle interact with SPARC in MCF-7 cells. In vitro, HSA-MSe@DOX prominently induced cancer cell toxicity by synergistically enhancing the effects of MSe and DOX. Moreover, HSA-MSe@DOX possessed tumor-targeting abilities in tumor-bearing nude mice and not only decreased the side effects associated with DOX, but also enhanced its antitumor activity. Therefore, HSA-MSe@DOX is a promising new drug that warrants further evaluation in the treatments of tumors.

  12. Anti-tumor effects of an engineered 'killer' transfer RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dong-hui; Lee, Jiyoung; Frankenberger, Casey; Geslain, Renaud; Rosner, Marsha; Pan, Tao

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA with anti-cancer effects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA induced protein misfolding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA as anti-tumor agent. -- Abstract: A hallmark of cancer cells is their ability to continuously divide; and rapid proliferation requires increased protein translation. Elevating levels of misfolded proteins can elicit growth arrest due to ER stress and decreased global translation. Failure to correct prolonged ER stress eventually results in cell death via apoptosis. tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) is an engineered human tRNA{sup Ser} with an anticodon coding for isoleucine. Here we test the possibility that tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) can be an effective killing agent of breast cancer cells and can effectively inhibit tumor-formation in mice. We found that tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) exert strong effects on breast cancer translation activity, cell viability, and tumor formation. Translation is strongly inhibited by tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) in both tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells. tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) significantly decreased the number of viable cells over time. A short time treatment with tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) was sufficient to eliminate breast tumor formation in a xenograft mouse model. Our results indicate that tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) can inhibit breast cancer metabolism, growth and tumor formation. This RNA has strong anti-cancer effects and presents an opportunity for its development into an anti-tumor agent. Because tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) corrupts the protein synthesis mechanism that is an integral component of the cell, it would be extremely difficult for tumor cells to evolve and develop resistance against this anti-tumor agent.

  13. Amplexicaule A exerts anti-tumor effects by inducing apoptosis in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Guangwen; Wan, Dingrong; He, Feng; Loaec, Morgann; Ding, Yali; Li, Jun; Dovat, Sinisa; Yang, Gaungzhong; Song, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the main treatment for patients with breast cancer metastases, but natural alternatives have been receiving attention for their potential as novel anti-tumor reagents. Amplexicaule A (APA) is a flavonoid glucoside isolated from rhizomes of Polygonum amplexicaule D. Don var. sinense Forb (PADF). We found that APA has anti-tumor effects in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. APA increased levels of cleaved caspase-3,-8,-9 and PARP, which resulted from suppression of MCL-1 and BCL-2 expression in the cells. APA also inactivated the Akt/mTOR pathway in breast cancer cells. Thus, APA exerts a strong anti-tumor effect on breast cancer cells, most likely through induction of apoptosis. Our study is the first to identify this novel anti-tumor compound and provides a new strategy for isolation and separation of single compounds from herbs. PMID:26943775

  14. Advanced research on anti-tumor effects of amygdalin.

    PubMed

    Song, Zuoqing; Xu, Xiaohong

    2014-08-01

    Malignant tumors are the major disease that cause serious damage to human health, and have been listed as the premier diseases which seriously threatened human health by World Health Organization (WHO). In recent years the development of antitumor drugs has been gradually transformed from cytotoxic drugs to improving the selectivity of drugs, overcoming multidrug resistance, development of new targeted drugs and low toxicity with high specificity drugs. Amygdalin is a natural product that owns antitumor activity, less side effects, widely sourced and relatively low priced. All these features make the amygdalin a promising antitumor drugs, if combined with conditional chemotherapy drugs, which can produce synergistic effect. In this paper, we summarized the pharmacological activity, toxicity and antitumor activity of amygdalin, mainly focused on the advanced research of amygdalin on its antitumor effects in recent years, providing new insights for the development of new anticancer drugs, new targets searching and natural antitumor mechanism investigations.

  15. Synergistic anti-tumor actions of luteolin and silibinin prevented cell migration and invasion and induced apoptosis in glioblastoma SNB19 cells and glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Ray, Swapan K

    2015-12-10

    Glioblastoma is the most lethal brain tumor. Failure of conventional chemotherapies prompted the search for natural compounds for treatment of glioblastoma. Plant-derived flavonoids could be alternative medicine for inhibiting not only glioblastoma cells but also glioblastoma stem cells (GSC). Two plant-derived flavonoids are luteolin (LUT) and silibinin (SIL). We investigated anti-tumor mechanisms of LUT and SIL in different human glioblastoma cells and GSC and found significant synergistic inhibition of human glioblastoma LN18 and SNB19 cells and GSC following treatment with combination of 20µM LUT and 50µM SIL. Combination of 20µM LUT and 50µM SIL was more effective than a conventional chemotherapeutic agent (BCNU or TMZ). We continued our studies with SNB19 cells and GSC and found dramatic inhibition of cell migration from spheroids and also cell invasion through matrigel following treatment with combination of LUT and SIL. This combination was highly effective to block angiogenesis and survival pathways leading to induction of apoptosis. Inhibition of PKCα, XIAP, and iNOS ultimately caused induction of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis. Collectively, synergistic efficacy of LUT and SIL could be a promising therapy to inhibit cell migration and invasion and induce apoptosis in different glioblastoma cells including GSC.

  16. Gecko Proteins Exert Anti-Tumor Effect against Cervical Cancer Cells Via PI3-Kinase/Akt Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ae-Jin; Chung, Chung-Nam; Kim, Hye-Jin; Bae, Kil Soo; Choi, Song; Jun, Woo Jin; Shim, Sang In; Kang, Tae-Hong; Leem, Sun-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Anti-tumor activity of the proteins from Gecko (GP) on cervical cancer cells, and its signaling mechanisms were assessed by viable cell counting, propidium iodide (PI) staining, and Western blot analysis. GP induced the cell death of HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner while it did not affect the viability of normal cells. Western blot analysis showed that GP decreased the activation of Akt, and co-administration of GP and Akt inhibitors synergistically exerted anti-tumor activities on HeLa cells, suggesting the involvement of PI3-kinase/Akt pathway in GP-induced cell death of the cancer cells. Indeed, the cytotoxic effect of GP against HeLa cells was inhibited by overexpression of constituvely active form of Akt in HeLa cells. The candidates of the functional proteins in GP were analyzed by Mass-spectrum. Taken together, our results suggest that GP elicits anti-tumor activity against HeLa cells by inhibition of PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. PMID:23118562

  17. The anti-tumor histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA and the natural flavonoid curcumin exhibit synergistic neuroprotection against amyloid-beta toxicity.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jia; Li, Yan; Camarillo, Cynthia; Yao, Yue; Zhang, Yina; Xu, Chun; Jiang, Lihong

    2014-01-01

    With the trend of an increasing aged population worldwide, Alzheimer's disease (AD), an age-related neurodegenerative disorder, as one of the major causes of dementia in elderly people is of growing concern. Despite the many hard efforts attempted during the past several decades in trying to elucidate the pathological mechanisms underlying AD and putting forward potential therapeutic strategies, there is still a lack of effective treatments for AD. The efficacy of many potential therapeutic drugs for AD is of main concern in clinical practice. For example, large bodies of evidence show that the anti-tumor histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suberoylanilidehydroxamic acid (SAHA), may be of benefit for the treatment of AD; however, its extensive inhibition of HDACs makes it a poor therapeutic. Moreover, the natural flavonoid, curcumin, may also have a potential therapeutic benefit against AD; however, it is plagued by low bioavailability. Therefore, the integrative effects of SAHA and curcumin were investigated as a protection against amyloid-beta neurotoxicity in vitro. We hypothesized that at low doses their synergistic effect would improve therapeutic selectivity, based on experiments that showed that at low concentrations SAHA and curcumin could provide comprehensive protection against Aβ25-35-induced neuronal damage in PC12 cells, strongly implying potent synergism. Furthermore, network analysis suggested that the possible mechanism underlying their synergistic action might be derived from restoration of the damaged functional link between Akt and the CBP/p300 pathway, which plays a crucial role in the pathological development of AD. Thus, our findings provided a feasible avenue for the application of a synergistic drug combination, SAHA and curcumin, in the treatment of AD.

  18. Synergistic effect of programmed cell death protein 1 blockade and secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine in the induction of anti-tumor immunity by a therapeutic cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Moeini, Soheila; Saeidi, Mohsen; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Mondanizadeh, Mahdieh; Shirian, Sadegh; Mohebi, Alireza; Gorji, Ali; Ghaemi, Amir

    2017-02-01

    The use of DNA vaccines has become an attractive approach for generating antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CTLs), which can mediate protective antitumor immunity. The potency of DNA vaccines encoding weakly immunogenic tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) can be improved by using an adjuvant injected together with checkpoint antibodies. In the current study, we evaluated whether the therapeutic effects of a DNA vaccine encoding human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) E7 can be enhanced by combined application of an immune checkpoint blockade directed against the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway and secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine (SLC) also known as CCL21 adjuvant, in a mouse cervical cancer model. The therapeutic effects of the DNA vaccine in combination with CCL21 adjuvant plus PD-1 blockade was evaluated using a tumor growth curve. To further investigate the mechanism underlying the antitumor response, cytolytic and lymphocyte proliferation responses in splenocytes were measured using non-radioactive cytotoxicity and MTT assays, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and IL-10 expression in the tumor and the levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 in supernatants of spleno-lymphocyte cultures were measured using ELISA. The immune efficacy was evaluated by in vivo tumor regression assay. The results showed that vaccination with a DNA vaccine in combination with the CCL21 adjuvant plus PD-1 blockade greatly enhanced cytotoxic T lymphocyte production and lymphocyte proliferation rates and greatly inhibited tumor progression. Moreover, the vaccine in combination with adjuvant and blockade significantly reduced intratumoral VEGF, IL-10 and splenic IL-4 but induced the expression of splenic IFN-γ. This formulation could be an effective candidate for a vaccine against cervical cancers and merits further investigation.

  19. STING activator c-di-GMP enhances the anti-tumor effects of peptide vaccines in melanoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zili; Celis, Esteban

    2015-08-01

    Therapeutic vaccines to induce anti-tumor CD8 T cells have been used in clinical trials for advanced melanoma patients, but the clinical response rate and overall survival time have not improved much. We believe that these dismal outcomes are caused by inadequate number of antigen-specific CD8 T cells generated by most vaccines. In contrast, huge CD8 T cell responses readily occur during acute viral infections. High levels of type-I interferon (IFN-I) are produced during these infections, and this cytokine not only exhibits anti-viral activity but also promotes CD8 T cell responses. The studies described here were performed to determine whether promoting the production of IFN-I could enhance the potency of a peptide vaccine. We report that cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP), which activates the stimulator of interferon genes, potentiated the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of a peptide vaccine against mouse B16 melanoma. The synergistic effects of c-di-GMP required co-administration of costimulatory anti-CD40 antibody, the adjuvant poly-IC, and were mediated in part by IFN-I. These findings demonstrate that peptides representing CD8 T cell epitopes can be effective inducers of large CD8 T cell responses in vaccination strategies that mimic acute viral infections.

  20. Effects of Androgen Ablation on Anti-Tumor Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Eradication of established tumors by vaccination with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles delivering human papillomavirus 16 E7...Androgen Ablation (AA) constitutes the most common therapy for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. While initially effective at reducing tumor burden...most patients recur with androgen insensitive disease. There exists a clear need to augment the clinical efficacy of hormone-based therapies , and

  1. Characterization and anti-tumor effects of chondroitin sulfate-chitosan nanoparticles delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chieh-Shen; Tang, Sung-Ling; Chiang, Chiao-Hsi; Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Hong, Po-Da; Yeh, Ming-Kung

    2014-11-01

    We prepared chondroitin sulfate (ChS)-chitosan (CS) nanoparticles (NPs) as a delivery carrier, and doxorubicin (Dox) was used as a model drug. The physicochemical properties and biological activities of the Dox-ChS-CS NPs including the release profile, cell cytotoxicity, cellular internalization, and in vivo anti-tumor effects were evaluated. The ChS-CS NPs and Dox-ChS-CS NPs had a mean size of 262.0 ± 15.0 and 369.4 ± 77.4 nm, and a zeta potential of 30.2 ± 0.9 and 20.6 ± 3.1 mV, respectively. In vitro release tests showed that the 50 % release time for the Dox-ChS-CS NPs was 20 h. Two hepatoma cell models, HepG2 and HuH6, were used for evaluating the cytotoxicity and cell uptake efficiency of the Dox-ChS-CS NPs. A significant difference was observed between doxorubicin solution and the Dox-ChS-CS NPs in the cellular uptake within 60 min ( p < 0.01). For the in vivo human xenograft-nude mouse model, the Dox-ChS-CS NPs were more effective with less body weight loss and anti-tumor growth suppression in comparison with the Dox solution. The prepared Dox-ChS-CS NPs offer a new effective targeting nanoparticle delivery system platform for anti-tumor therapy.

  2. Anti-tumor effects of peptide analogs targeting neuropeptide hormone receptors on mouse pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Ullrich, M; Schally, A V; Bergmann, R; Pietzsch, J; Gebauer, L; Gondek, K; Qin, N; Pacak, K; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Eisenhofer, G; Bornstein, S R

    2013-05-22

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare but potentially lethal chromaffin cell tumor with currently no effective treatment. Peptide hormone receptors are frequently overexpressed on endocrine tumor cells and can be specifically targeted by various anti-tumor peptide analogs. The present study carried out on mouse pheochromocytoma cells (MPCs) and a more aggressive mouse tumor tissue-derived (MTT) cell line revealed that these cells are characterized by pronounced expression of the somatostatin receptor 2 (sst2), growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor and the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor. We further demonstrated significant anti-tumor effects mediated by cytotoxic somatostatin analogs, AN-162 and AN-238, by LHRH antagonist, Cetrorelix, by the cytotoxic LHRH analog, AN-152, and by recently developed GHRH antagonist, MIA-602, on MPC and for AN-152 and MIA-602 on MTT cells. Studies of novel anti-tumor compounds on these mouse cell lines serve as an important basis for mouse models of metastatic pheochromocytoma, which we are currently establishing.

  3. Anti-Tumor Effects From Dendritic Cell-Based Cancer Immunotherapy Using Liposomal Bubbles and Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Yusuke; Suzuki, Ryo; Hirata, Keiichi; Nomura, Tetsuya; Utoguchi, Naoki; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer immunotherapy has the potential to be a minimally invasive therapy that could prevent cancer metastasis and recurrence. Recently, in order to induce effective anti-tumor immunity, we developed a novel antigen delivery system for DCs by the combination of ultrasound (US) and liposomal bubbles (Bubble Liposomes: BLs) with entrapped perfluoropropane gas. In this study, we investigated the induction of antigen specific immune responses in vivo and the anti-tumor effect caused by immunization of DCs treated with BLs and US. For the immunization of DCs which had delivered antigen, using BLs and US, the mice induced antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were found to be the main effector cells in DC-based cancer immunotherapy. In addition, immunization with DCs that had been pulsed with antigen using BLs and US completely suppressed tumor growth Therefore, immunization of DCs with this antigen delivery system has promise for the efficient induction of anti-tumor immune responses.

  4. Anti-tumor effect of bevacizumab on a xenograft model of feline mammary carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    MICHISHITA, Masaki; OHTSUKA, Aya; NAKAHIRA, Rei; TAJIMA, Tsuyoshi; NAKAGAWA, Takayuki; SASAKI, Nobuo; ARAI, Toshiro; TAKAHASHI, Kimimasa

    2015-01-01

    Feline mammary carcinomas are characterized by rapid progression and metastases. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of tumor angiogenesis, proliferation and metastasis. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a single drug therapy of bevacizumab on a xenograft model of feline mammary carcinoma expressing VEGF protein. Bevacizumab treatment suppressed tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis and enhancing apoptosis; however, it did not affect the tumor proliferation index. Thus, bevacizumab had anti-tumor effects on a xenograft model, and this may be useful for the treatment of feline mammary carcinoma. PMID:26616000

  5. Combined inhibition of MEK and Plk1 has synergistic anti-tumor activity in NRAS mutant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Vujic, I; Sanlorenzo, M; Ma, J; Kim, ST; Kleffel, S; Schatton, T; Rappersberger, K; Gutteridge, R; Ahmad, N; Ortiz/Urda, S

    2015-01-01

    About one third of cancers harbor activating mutations in rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (RAS) oncogenes. In melanoma, aberrant neuroblastoma-RAS (NRAS) signaling fuels tumor progression in about 20% of patients. Current therapeutics for NRAS driven malignancies barely impact overall survival. To date, pathway interference downstream of mutant NRAS seems to be the most promising approach. In this study, data revealed that mutant NRAS induced Plk1 expression, and pharmacologic inhibition of Plk1 stabilized the size of NRAS mutant melanoma xenografts. The combination of MEK and Plk1 inhibitors resulted in a significant growth reduction of NRAS mutant melanoma cells in vitro, and regression of xenografted NRAS mutant melanoma in vivo. Independent cell cycle arrest and increased induction of apoptosis underlies the synergistic effect of this combination. Data further suggest that the p53 signaling pathway is of key importance to the observed therapeutic efficacy. This study provides in vitro, in vivo and first mechanistic data, that a MEK/Plk1 inhibitor combination might be a promising treatment approach for patients with NRAS driven melanoma. Since mutant NRAS signaling is similar across different malignancies, this inhibitor combination could also offer a previously unreported treatment modality for NRAS mutant tumors of other cell origins. PMID:26016894

  6. Anti-tumor effects of cimetidine on hepatocellular carcinomas in diethylnitrosamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Koichiro; Sato, Shuichi; Miyake, Tatsuya; Okamoto, Eisuke; Ishine, Junichi; Ishihara, Shunji; Amano, Yuji; Adachi, Kyoichi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2008-02-01

    Cimetidine is known to have an anti-tumor effect on certain types of malignancies, though on hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs), its effect remains unclear. We studied the anti-tumor effects of cimetidine on chemically-induced HCCs in rats. Four-week-old male Wistar rats (n=105) were divided into 4 groups. Those in groups A and B were administered diethylnitrosamine (DEN) intraperitoneally at 100 mg/kg body weight every week for 6 weeks, during which rats in group A were given tap water and those in group B received cimetidine (100 mg/kg/day) in their drinking water. Rats in groups C and D were administered saline instead of DEN and given tap water with 100 mg/kg/day of cimetidine, respectively. The animals were sacrificed at 7, 12, 22 and 32 weeks after the first administration of drugs and examined. Liver nodules were observed only in groups A and B, with the number of nodules, maximum diameter of the largest nodule, and liver weight significantly lower in group B. Immunohistochemistry findings showed that glutathione S-transferase placental-positive preneoplastic foci were significantly decreased in group B. Cimetidine treatment decreased the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive hepatocytes and tended to enhance natural killer (NK) cell activity in splenic lymphocytes. In addition, flow cytometry revealed that the proportion of NK cells among total splenic lymphocytes was not affected by cimetidine treatment. Our results showed that cimetidine has an inhibiting effect on hepatocarcinogenesis.

  7. Anti-tumor effects of metformin on head and neck carcinoma cell lines: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rêgo, Daniela Fortunato; Elias, Silvia Taveira; Amato, AngéLica Amorim; Canto, Graziela De Luca; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva

    2017-01-01

    Metformin is commonly used for treating type 2 diabetes, and may also reduce cancer risk. Previous studies have demonstrated the association between metformin use and a decreased risk of head and neck cancer. Therefore, the aim of the present systematic review was to summarize the available literature on the in vitro anti-tumor effects of metformin on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Research studies were obtained from Cochrane Library, Embase, LILACS, MEDLINE and PubMed databases, without time or language restrictions. Only in vitro studies analyzing the effects of metformin on HNSCC cell lines were included. The authors methodically appraised all the selected studies according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation method to make a judgment of the evidence quality. Of the 388 identified reports, 11 studies met the inclusion criteria and were used for qualitative analysis. These studies demonstrated that metformin is important in inhibiting cell proliferation, inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and in regulating proteins involved in carcinogenesis pathways, which corroborates its potential in vitro anti-tumor effects. The present systematic review highlights the biological mechanisms of metformin used alone or together with traditional therapies for cancer. Though very limited, currently available preclinical evidence shows that metformin exerts a potential effect on head and neck carcinoma. PMID:28356929

  8. Macrophage PPARγ inhibits Gpr132 to mediate the anti-tumor effects of rosiglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wing Yin; Huynh, HoangDinh; Chen, Peiwen; Peña-Llopis, Samuel; Wan, Yihong

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) significantly contributes to cancer progression. Human cancer is enhanced by PPARγ loss-of-function mutations, but inhibited by PPARγ agonists such as TZD diabetes drugs including rosiglitazone. However, it remains enigmatic whether and how macrophage contributes to PPARγ tumor-suppressive functions. Here we report that macrophage PPARγ deletion in mice not only exacerbates mammary tumor development but also impairs the anti-tumor effects of rosiglitazone. Mechanistically, we identify Gpr132 as a novel direct PPARγ target in macrophage whose expression is enhanced by PPARγ loss but repressed by PPARγ activation. Functionally, macrophage Gpr132 is pro-inflammatory and pro-tumor. Genetic Gpr132 deletion not only retards inflammation and cancer growth but also abrogates the anti-tumor effects of PPARγ and rosiglitazone. Pharmacological Gpr132 inhibition significantly impedes mammary tumor malignancy. These findings uncover macrophage PPARγ and Gpr132 as critical TAM modulators, new cancer therapeutic targets, and essential mediators of TZD anti-cancer effects. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18501.001 PMID:27692066

  9. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma activates lactate in Ringer's solution for anti-tumor effects.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Kae; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Utsumi, Fumi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2016-11-08

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a novel approach for wound healing, blood coagulation, and cancer therapy. A recent discovery in the field of plasma medicine is that non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma not only directly but also indirectly affects cells via plasma-treated liquids. This discovery has led to the use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma as a novel chemotherapy. We refer to these plasma-treated liquids as plasma-activated liquids. We chose Ringer's solutions to produce plasma-activated liquids for clinical applications. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that plasma-activated Ringer's lactate solution has anti-tumor effects, but of the four components in Ringer's lactate solution, only lactate exhibited anti-tumor effects through activation by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear magnetic resonance analyses indicate that plasma irradiation generates acetyl and pyruvic acid-like groups in Ringer's lactate solution. Overall, these results suggest that plasma-activated Ringer's lactate solution is promising for chemotherapy.

  10. Effect of Tea Polyphenol Compounds on Anticancer Drugs in Terms of Anti-Tumor Activity, Toxicology, and Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianhua; Han, Jie; Xiao, Hao; Qiao, Jinping; Han, Mei

    2016-12-14

    Multidrug resistance and various adverse side effects have long been major problems in cancer chemotherapy. Recently, chemotherapy has gradually transitioned from mono-substance therapy to multidrug therapy. As a result, the drug cocktail strategy has gained more recognition and wider use. It is believed that properly-formulated drug combinations have greater therapeutic efficacy than single drugs. Tea is a popular beverage consumed by cancer patients and the general public for its perceived health benefits. The major bioactive molecules in green tea are catechins, a class of flavanols. The combination of green tea extract or green tea catechins and anticancer compounds has been paid more attention in cancer treatment. Previous studies demonstrated that the combination of chemotherapeutic drugs and green tea extract or tea polyphenols could synergistically enhance treatment efficacy and reduce the adverse side effects of anticancer drugs in cancer patients. In this review, we summarize the experimental evidence regarding the effects of green tea-derived polyphenols in conjunction with chemotherapeutic drugs on anti-tumor activity, toxicology, and pharmacokinetics. We believe that the combination of multidrug cancer treatment with green tea catechins may improve treatment efficacy and diminish negative side effects.

  11. Effect of Tea Polyphenol Compounds on Anticancer Drugs in Terms of Anti-Tumor Activity, Toxicology, and Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianhua; Han, Jie; Xiao, Hao; Qiao, Jinping; Han, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance and various adverse side effects have long been major problems in cancer chemotherapy. Recently, chemotherapy has gradually transitioned from mono-substance therapy to multidrug therapy. As a result, the drug cocktail strategy has gained more recognition and wider use. It is believed that properly-formulated drug combinations have greater therapeutic efficacy than single drugs. Tea is a popular beverage consumed by cancer patients and the general public for its perceived health benefits. The major bioactive molecules in green tea are catechins, a class of flavanols. The combination of green tea extract or green tea catechins and anticancer compounds has been paid more attention in cancer treatment. Previous studies demonstrated that the combination of chemotherapeutic drugs and green tea extract or tea polyphenols could synergistically enhance treatment efficacy and reduce the adverse side effects of anticancer drugs in cancer patients. In this review, we summarize the experimental evidence regarding the effects of green tea-derived polyphenols in conjunction with chemotherapeutic drugs on anti-tumor activity, toxicology, and pharmacokinetics. We believe that the combination of multidrug cancer treatment with green tea catechins may improve treatment efficacy and diminish negative side effects. PMID:27983622

  12. Antioxidants Impair Anti-Tumoral Effects of Vorinostat, but Not Anti-Neoplastic Effects of Vorinostat and Caspase-8 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Bergadà, Laura; Yeramian, Andree; Sorolla, Annabel

    2014-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitor, Vorinostat, applied as a single therapy or in combination with caspase-8 downregulation exhibits high anti-tumoral activity on endometrial carcinoma cell lines. In the present study, we have assessed the signalling processes underlying anti-tumoral effects of Vorinostat. Increasing evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species are responsible for histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell killing. We have found that Vorinostat induces formation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage. To investigate the role of oxidative stress as anti-neoplastic mechanism, we have evaluated the effects of different antioxidants (Bha, Nac and Tiron) on endometrial carcinoma cell line Ishikawa treated with Vorinostat. We show that Bha, Nac and Tiron markedly inhibited the cytotoxic effects of Vorinostat, increasing cell viability in vitro. We found that all three antioxidants did not inhibited accumulation of acetyl Histone H4, so that antioxidants did not inhibit Vorinostat activity. Finally, we have evaluated the effects of antioxidants on anti-tumoral activity of Vorinostat as monotherapy or in combination with caspase-8 downregulation in vivo. Interestingly, antioxidants blocked the reduction of tumour growth caused by Vorinostat, but they were unable to inhibit anti-tumoral activity of Vorinostat plus caspase-8 inhibition. PMID:24651472

  13. Synergistic anti-tumor therapy by a comb-like multifunctional antibody nanoarray with exceptionally potent activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huafei; Sun, Yun; Chen, Di; Zhao, He; Zhao, Mengxin; Zhu, Xiandi; Ke, Changhong; Zhang, Ge; Jiang, Cheng; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Fulei; Wei, Huafeng; Li, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Simultaneously blocking multiple mediators offers new hope for the treatment of complex diseases. However, the curative potential of current combination therapy by chronological administration of separate monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or multi-specific mAbs is still moderate due to inconvenient manipulation, low cooperative effectors, poor pharmacokinetics and insufficient tumor accumulation. Here, we describe a facile strategy that arms distinct mAbs with cooperative effectors onto a long chain to form a multicomponent comb-like nano mAb. Unlike dissociative parental mAbs, the multifunctional mAb nanoarray (PL-RB) constructed from type I/II anti-CD20 mAbs shows good pharmacokinetics. This PL-RB simultaneously targets distinct epitopes on a single antigen (Ag) and neighboring Ags on different lymphocytes. This unique intra- and intercellular Ag cross-linking endows the multifunctional mAb nanoarray with potent apoptosis activity. The exceptional apoptosis, complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) that are synchronously evoked by the nano PL-RB are further synergistically promoted via enhanced permeability and retention (EPR), which resulted in high intratumor accumulation and excellent anti-lymphoma efficiency.

  14. Composition and mechanism of anti-tumor effects of Hericium erinaceus mushroom extracts in tumor-bearing mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated anti-tumor effects of the following four extracts of freeze-dried Hericium erinaceus mushrooms in Balb/c mice intracutaneously transplanted on the backs with CT-26 colon cancer cells: HWE, hot-water extraction by boiling in water for 3 h; MWE, microwaving in 50% ethanol/water at 60 W...

  15. Rare sugar D-allose enhances anti-tumor effect of 5-fluorouracil on the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HuH-7.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Kamitori, Kazuyo; Sanada, Keiko; Horii, Mariko; Dong, Youyi; Sui, Li; Tokuda, Masaaki

    2008-09-01

    d-Allose is a novel anti-tumor monosaccharide that causes cell growth inhibition, specifically of the cancer cells, by inducing the tumor suppressor gene thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP). The commonly used anti-tumor drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), blocks the cell cycle by inhibiting thymidylate synthase, and is also known to induce TXNIP gene expression. In this study, we examined the synergistic effect of d-allose and 5-FU and the role of TXNIP on cancer cell growth. The treatment of HuH-7 cells with d-allose or 5-FU inhibited the cell growth in a dose-dependent manner (75.2+/-2.7% with 50 mM d-allose and 66.1+/-2.7% with 0.5 mug/ml 5-FU) and d-allose enhanced the anti-tumor effect of 5-FU (55.3+/-1.1 %). TUNEL analysis did not show any evidence of apoptosis with either d-allose or 5-FU treatment. 5-FU suppressed the expression of p27(kip1), p53, and cyclin E, whereas d-allose induced p53 and reduced cyclins D, A, and E. The expression of p27(kip1) remained unchanged by d-allose at transcriptional level, but increased at the protein level suggesting an increase in protein stability by TXNIP. d-Allose and to a lesser extent 5-FU induced TXNIP expression significantly (808.4+/-122.9% and 186.8+/-32.9%, respectively) and the combination of both further enhanced TXNIP expression. As d-allose has no known side effects on normal cells, the combination of d-allose and 5-FU might be a potent candidate for cancer therapy.

  16. The augmented anti-tumor effects of Antrodia camphorata co-fermented with Chinese medicinal herb in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Lai; Huang, Zih-Ning; Hsieh, Hsiao-Hui; Yu, Wen-Chun; Tzeng, Win-Yu; Lee, Guo-Yang; Chen, Yi-Peng; Chang, Chia-Yu; Chuu, Jiunn-Jye

    2009-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata, unique fungal specie, has been used as a folk medicine in Taiwan for many years. The purpose of this study was to compare the extracts from the solid-state culture of A. camphorata co-fermented with Chinese medicinal herb (AC-CF) with two other extracts from fruiting bodies (AC-FB) or solid-state culture (AC-SS), for their anti-tumor effects in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. We measured in vitro cell proliferation, percentage of apoptosis, population distribution of cell cycles, Western blot analysis of multiple drugs resistance-1 (MDR-1), and apoptosis-related proteins in HepG2 cells treated with three different preparations of A. camphorate extracts. Our results showed that AC-CF had better anti-proliferation effect on human hepatoma HepG2 cells than AC-FB or AC-SS dose-dependently. In addition, AC-CF in combination with anti-tumor agents (mitomycin C or methotrexate) showed better adjuvant anti-tumor effects than AC-FB or AC-SS. We further demonstrated the augmented adjuvant anti-tumor effects of AC-CF not only through down regulation of MDR-1 expression but also through a COX-2 dependent apoptosis pathway, involving down-regulation of COX-2 and p-AKT and up-regulation of PARP-1. In conclusion, in this study, we have demonstrated a novel strategy of fermenting A. camphorata with Chinese medicinal herb (AC-CF), which augmented their anti-tumor effects in human hepatoma HepG2 cells as compared to the traditional ones (AC-FB or AC-SS).

  17. Anti-tumor Effects of Plasma Activated Media and Correlation with Hydrogen Peroxide Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, Mounir; Mohades, Soheila; Barekzi, Nazir; Maruthamuthu, Venkat; Razavi, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Plasma activated media (PAM) can induce death in cancer cells. In our research, PAM is produced by exposing liquid culture medium to a helium plasma pencil. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the aqueous state are known factors in anti-tumor effects of PAM. The duration of plasma exposure determines the concentrations of reactive species produced in PAM. Stability of the plasma generated reactive species and their lifetime depend on parameters such as the chemical composition of the medium. Here, a complete cell culture medium was employed to make PAM. Later, PAM was used to treat SCaBER cancer cells either as an immediate PAM (right after exposure) or as an aged-PAM (after storage). SCaBER (ATCC®HTB-3™) is an epithelial cell line from a human bladder with the squamous carcinoma disease. A normal epithelial cell line from a kidney tissue of a dog - MDCK (ATCC®CCL-34™) - was used to analyze the selective effect of PAM. Correspondingly, we measured the concentration of hydrogen peroxide- as a stable species with biological impact on cell viability- in both immediate PAM and aged-PAM. In addition, we report on the effect of serum supplemented in PAM on the H2O2 concentration measured by Amplex red assay kit. Finally, we evaluate the effects of PAM on growth and morphological changes in MDCK cells using fluorescence microscopy.

  18. TWEAK mediates anti-tumor effect of tumor-infiltrating macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Kaduka, Yuki; Takeda, Kazuyoshi . E-mail: ktakeda@med.juntendo.ac.jp; Nakayama, Masafumi; Kinoshita, Katsuyuki; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko

    2005-06-03

    TWEAK induces diverse cellular responses, including pro-inflammatory chemokine production, migration, proliferation, and cell death through the TWEAK receptor, Fn14. In the present study, we examined the effect of TWEAK or Fn14 expression in tumor cells on tumor outgrowth in vivo. Administration of neutralizing anti-TWEAK mAb significantly reduced the frequency of tumor rejection and shortened the survival of mice intraperitoneally inoculated with TWEAK-sensitive Fn14-expressing tumor cells. Moreover, anti-TWEAK mAb treatment promoted the subcutaneous growth of TWEAK-sensitive Fn14-expressing tumor cells, and this promotion was abolished by the inhibition of macrophage infiltration but not NK cell depletion. In contrast, administration of anti-TWEAK mAb had no apparent effect on the growth of TWEAK-resistant tumor cells, even if tumor cells expressed Fn14. On the other hand, TWEAK expression in tumor cells had no significant effect on subcutaneous tumor growth. These results indicate that TWEAK mediates anti-tumor effect of macrophages in vivo.

  19. Saffron and natural carotenoids: Biochemical activities and anti-tumor effects.

    PubMed

    Bolhassani, Azam; Khavari, Afshin; Bathaie, S Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Saffron, a spice derived from the flower of Crocus sativus, is rich in carotenoids. Two main natural carotenoids of saffron, crocin and crocetin, are responsible for its color. Preclinical studies have shown that dietary intake of some carotenoids have potent anti-tumor effects both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting their potential preventive and/or therapeutic roles in several tissues. The reports represent that the use of carotenoids without the potential for conversion to vitamin A may provide further protection and avoid toxicity. The mechanisms underlying cancer chemo-preventive activities of carotenoids include modulation of carcinogen metabolism, regulation of cell growth and cell cycle progression, inhibition of cell proliferation, anti-oxidant activity, immune modulation, enhancement of cell differentiation, stimulation of cell-to-cell gap junction communication, apoptosis and retinoid-dependent signaling. Taken together, different hypotheses for the antitumor actions of saffron and its components have been proposed such as a) the inhibitory effect on cellular DNA and RNA synthesis, but not on protein synthesis; b) the inhibitory effect on free radical chain reactions; c) the metabolic conversion of naturally occurring carotenoids to retinoids; d) the interaction of carotenoids with topoisomerase II, an enzyme involved in cellular DNA-protein interaction. Furthermore, the immunomodulatory activity of saffron was studied on driving toward Th1 and Th2 limbs of the immune system. In this mini-review, we briefly describe biochemical and immunological activities and chemo-preventive properties of saffron and natural carotenoids as an anticancer drug.

  20. Influence of tumors on protective anti-tumor immunity and the effects of irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Foulds, Gemma A.; Radons, Jürgen; Kreuzer, Mira; Multhoff, Gabriele; Pockley, Alan G.

    2012-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity plays important roles in the development and progression of cancer and it is becoming apparent that tumors can influence the induction of potentially protective responses in a number of ways. The prevalence of immunoregulatory T cell populations in the circulation and tumors of patients with cancer is increased and the presence of these cells appears to present a major barrier to the induction of tumor immunity. One aspect of tumor-mediated immunoregulation which has received comparatively little attention is that which is directed toward natural killer (NK) cells, although evidence that the phenotype and function of NK cell populations are modified in patients with cancer is accumulating. Although the precise mechanisms underlying these localized and systemic immunoregulatory effects remain unclear, tumor-derived factors appear, in part at least, to be involved. The effects could be manifested by an altered function and/or via an influence on the migratory properties of individual cell subsets. A better insight into endogenous immunoregulatory mechanisms and the capacity of tumors to modify the phenotype and function of innate and adaptive immune cells might assist the development of new immunotherapeutic approaches and improve the management of patients with cancer. This article reviews current knowledge relating to the influence of tumors on protective anti-tumor immunity and considers the potential influence that radiation-induced effects might have on the prevalence, phenotype, and function of innate and adaptive immune cells in patients with cancer. PMID:23378947

  1. The Safety and Anti-Tumor Effects of Ozonated Water in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kohei; Azuma, Kazuo; Mori, Takuro; Kawamoto, Kinya; Murahata, Yusuke; Tsuka, Takeshi; Osaki, Tomohiro; Ito, Norihiko; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Itoh, Fumio; Okamoto, Yoshiharu

    2015-10-22

    Ozonated water is easier to handle than ozone gas. However, there have been no previous reports on the biological effects of ozonated water. We conducted a study on the safety of ozonated water and its anti-tumor effects using a tumor-bearing mouse model and normal controls. Local administration of ozonated water (208 mM) was not associated with any detrimental effects in normal tissues. On the other hand, local administration of ozonated water (20.8, 41.6, 104, or 208 mM) directly into the tumor tissue induced necrosis and inhibited proliferation of tumor cells. There was no significant difference in the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells following administration of ozonated water. The size of the necrotic areas was dependent on the concentration of ozonated water. These results indicate that ozonated water does not affect normal tissue and damages only the tumor tissue by selectively inducing necrosis. There is a possibility that it exerts through the production of reaction oxygen species (ROS). In addition, the induction of necrosis rather than apoptosis is very useful in tumor immunity. Based on these results, we believe that administration of ozonated water is a safe and potentially simple adjunct or alternative to existing antineoplastic treatments.

  2. An evaluation of anti-tumor effect and toxicity of PEGylated ursolic acid liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianqian; Zhao, Tingting; Liu, Yanping; Xing, Shanshan; Li, Lei; Gao, Dawei

    2016-02-01

    Therapy of solid tumors mediated by nano-drug delivery has attracted considerable interest. In our previous study, ursolic acid (UA) was successfully encapsulated into PEGylated liposomes. The study aimed to evaluate the tumor inhibition effect and cytotoxicity of the PEGylated UA liposomes by U14 cervical carcinoma-bearing mice. The liposomes were spherical particles with mean particle diameters of 127.2 nm. The tumor inhibition rate of PEGylated UA liposomes was 53.60 % on U14 cervical carcinoma-bearing mice, which was greater than those of the UA solution (18.25 %) and traditional UA liposome groups (40.75 %). The tumor cells apoptosis rate of PEGylated UA liposomes was 25.81 %, which was significantly higher than that of the traditional UA liposomes (13.37 %). Moreover, the kidney and liver did not emerge the pathological changes in UA therapeutic mice by histopathological analysis, while there were significant differences on tumor tissues among three UA formulation groups. The PEGylated UA liposomes exhibited higher anti-tumor activity and lower cytotoxicity, and the main reason was that the coating PEG layer improved UA liposome properties, such as enhancing the stability of liposomes, promoting the effect of slow release, and prolonging the time of blood circulation. This may shed light on the development of PEGylated nano-vehicles.

  3. Anti-tumor effects of Astragalus on hepatocellular carcinoma in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lian-Kun; Kuang, Wen-Juan; Huang, Yun-Feng; Xie, Han-Hong; Chen, Guo; Zhou, Qing-Chun; Wang, Bin-Rong; Wan, Li-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study is to investigate the anti-proliferation activity of Astragalus on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and its mechanism. Materials and Methods: Hepatic cancer H22 bearing mice were used to study the anti-hepatocarcinoma activity of Astragalus in vivo. The growth curve and inhibitory rate of tumor growth were measured. Cell apoptosis of each group was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). Protein expression of Bax and Bcl-2 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 13.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL) was used for standard statistical analysis including one-way ANOVA and Student's t-test. A value of P<0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Astragalus significantly inhibited the growth of H22 carcinoma, with an inhibitory rate of 17.28-52.36%. FCM and immunohistochemical assay show that the cell apoptosis rate and protein expression of Bax and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio of H22 transplanted tumor in Astragalus treated group were significantly higher than the control group (P<0.05). The protein expression of Bcl-2 was significantly lower than control (P<0.05). Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that Astragalus has significant anti-tumor effect in vivo in inducing apoptosis of H22 tumor cells by promoting protein expression of Bax, decreasing protein expression of Bcl-2 gene, and markedly increasing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. PMID:22345875

  4. Anti-tumor effects of dehydroaltenusin, a specific inhibitor of mammalian DNA polymerase {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Naoki; Kokai, Yasuo; Ohtani, Seiji; Sahara, Hiroeki; Kuriyama, Isoko; Kamisuki, Shinji; Takahashi, Shunya; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Sugawara, Fumio; Yoshida, Hiromi; Sato, Noriyuki; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki . E-mail: mizushin@nutr.kobegakuin.ac.jp

    2007-01-12

    In the screening of selective inhibitors of eukaryotic DNA polymerases (pols), dehydroaltenusin was found to be an inhibitor of pol {alpha} from a fungus (Alternaria tennuis). We succeeded in chemically synthesizing dehydroaltenusin, and the compound inhibited only mammalian pol {alpha} with IC{sub 50} value of 0.5 {mu}M, and did not influence the activities of other replicative pols such as pols {delta} and {epsilon}, but also showed no effect on pol {alpha} activity from another vertebrate, fish, or from a plant species. Dehydroaltenusin also had no influence on the other pols and DNA metabolic enzymes tested. The compound also inhibited the proliferation of human cancer cells with LD{sub 50} values of 38.0-44.4 {mu}M. In an in vivo anti-tumor assay on nude mice bearing solid tumors of HeLa cells, dehydroaltenusin was shown to be a promising suppressor of solid tumors. Histopathological examination revealed that increased tumor necrosis and decreased mitotic index were apparently detected by the compound in vivo. Therefore, dehydroaltenusin could be of interest as not only a mammalian pol {alpha}-specific inhibitor, but also as a candidate drug for anti-cancer treatment.

  5. Anti-tumor effects of genetic vaccines against HPV major oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Marcelo Nazário; Paolini, Francesca; Massa, Silvia; Curzio, Gianfranca; Illiano, Elena; Duarte Silva, Anna Jéssica; Franconi, Rosella; Bissa, Massimiliano; Morghen, Carlo De Giuli; de Freitas, Antonio Carlos; Venuti, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Expression of HPV E5, E6 and E7 oncogenes are likely to overcome the regulation of cell proliferation and to escape immunological control, allowing uncontrolled growth and providing the potential for malignant transformation. Thus, their three oncogenic products may represent ideal target antigens for immunotherapeutic strategies. In previous attempts, we demonstrated that genetic vaccines against recombinant HPV16 E7 antigen were able to affect the tumor growth in a pre-clinical mouse model. To improve this anti-HPV strategy we developed a novel approach in which we explored the effects of E5-based genetic immunization. We designed novel HPV16 E5 genetic vaccines based on two different gene versions: whole E5 gene and E5Multi. The last one is a long multi epitope gene designed as a harmless E5 version. Both E5 genes were codon optimized for mammalian expression. In addition, we demonstrated that HPV 16 E5 oncogene is expressed in C3 mouse cell line making it an elective model for the study of E5 based vaccine. In this mouse model the immunological and biological activity of the E5 vaccines were assessed in parallel with the activity of anti-E7 and anti-E6 vaccines already reported to be effective in an immunotherapeutic setting. These E7 and E6 vaccines were made with mutated oncogenes, the E7GGG mutant that does not bind pRb and the E6F47R mutant that is less effective in inhibiting p53, respectively. Results confirmed the immunological activity of genetic formulations based on attenuated HPV16 oncogenes and showed that E5-based genetic immunization provided notable anti-tumor effects.

  6. Promotion of initial anti-tumor effect via polydopamine modified doxorubicin-loaded electrospun fibrous membranes

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ziming; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Xiaohu; Qiu, Wangwang; Chen, Xinliang; Zheng, Qi; Cui, Wenguo

    2014-01-01

    Drug-loaded electrospun PLLA membranes are not conducive to adhesion between materials and tissues due to the strong hydrophobicity of PLLA, which possibly attenuate the drugs’ effect loaded on the materials. In the present work, we developed a facile method to improve the hydrophilicity of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded electrospun PLLA fibrous membranes, which could enhance the anti-tumor effect at the early stage after implantation. A mussel protein, polydopamine (PDA), could be easily grafted on the surface of hydrophobic DOX-loaded electrospun PLLA membranes (PLLA-DOX/pDA) in water solution. The morphology analysis of PLLA-DOX/pDA fibers displayed that though the fiber diameter was slightly swollen, they still maintained a 3D fibrous structure, and the XPS analysis certified that pDA had successfully been grafted onto the surface of the fibers. The results of surface wettability analysis showed that the contact angle decreased from 136.7° to 0° after grafting. In vitro MTT assay showed that the cytotoxicity of PLLA-DOX/pDA fibers was the strongest, and the stereologic cell counting assay demonstrated that the adhesiveness of PLLA/pDA fiber was significantly better than PLLA fiber. In vivo tumor-bearing mice displayed that, after one week of implantation, the tumor apoptosis and necrosis of PLLA-DOX/pDA fibers were the most obvious from histopathology and TUNEL assay. The caspase-3 activity of PLLA-DOX/pDA group was the highest using biochemical techniques, and the Bax: Bcl-2 ratio increased significantly in PLLA-DOX/pDA group through qRT-PCR analysis. All the results demonstrated that pDA can improve the affinity of the electrospun PLLA membranes and enhance the drug effect on tumors. PMID:25337186

  7. Gold nanoparticles enhance anti-tumor effect of radiotherapy to hypoxic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jae-Won; Chung, Ui Seok; Koh, Won-Gun; Keum, Ki Chang; Koom, Woong Sub

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hypoxia can impair the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Therefore, a new strategy is necessary for enhancing the response to RT. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of nanoparticles and RT is effective in eliminating the radioresistance of hypoxic tumors. Materials and Methods Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) consisting of a silica core with a gold shell were used. CT26 colon cancer mouse model was developed to study whether the combination of RT and GNPs reduced hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) was used as a hypoxia marker. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining were conducted to evaluate cell death. Results Hypoxic tumor cells had an impaired response to RT. GNPs combined with RT enhanced anti-tumor effect in hypoxic tumor compared with RT alone. The combination of GNPs and RT decreased tumor cell viability compare to RT alone in vitro. Under hypoxia, tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed a higher response than that shown by tumors treated with RT alone. When a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger was added, the enhanced antitumor effect of GNPs + RT was diminished. Conclusion In the present study, hypoxic tumors treated with GNPs + RT showed favorable responses, which might be attributable to the ROS production induced by GNPs + RT. Taken together, GNPs combined with RT seems to be potential modality for enhancing the response to RT in hypoxic tumors. PMID:27730800

  8. Immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects of Nigella glandulifera freyn and sint seeds on ehrlich ascites carcinoma in mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Aikemu, Ainiwaer; Xiaerfuding, Xiadiya; Shiwenhui, Chengyufeng; Abudureyimu, Meiliwan; Maimaitiyiming, Dilinuer

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study investigated the immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects of Nigella glandulifera Freyn and Sint seeds (NGS) on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma in a mouse model. Materials and Methods: Kunming mice with transplanted Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAC) were treated with NGS by oral administration. On the 11th day after the EAC implant, mouse thymus, liver, spleen and kidney tumors were removed for histopathological analysis. Blood samples were taken for hematological and biochemical analyses. Results: The results indicate that NGS treatment leads to an increase in TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-2 blood serum levels. Absence of viable EAC and presence of necrotic cells were observed in the tumor tissue of the NGS-treated animals. Conclusions: The study results indicated that a water extract of NGS had the highest anti-tumor effect. Moreover, NGS treatment also showed an increase in the immune system activity. PMID:23929999

  9. Doxorubicin loaded silica nanorattles actively seek tumors with improved anti-tumor effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fuping; Li, Linlin; Liu, Tianlong; Hao, Nanjing; Liu, Huiyu; Tan, Longfei; Li, Hongbo; Huang, Xinglu; Peng, Bo; Yan, Chuanmiao; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiaoli; Chen, Dong; Tang, Fangqiong

    2012-05-01

    Silica nanorattles (SNs) have proven to be promising vehicles for drug delivery. In order to further enhance efficacy and minimize adverse effects, active targeted delivery to tumors is necessary. In this work, SNs modified with a tumor specific targeting ligand, folic acid (FA), was used as carrier of doxorubicin (DOX) (DOX-FA-SNs). Drug loading, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of DOX-FA-SNs in vitro in human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa cells) were evaluated. DOX-FA-SNs showed a higher cytotoxicity in human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa cells) than DOX loaded carboxyl (-COOH) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) modified SNs (DOX-COOH-SNs and DOX-PEG-SNs, respectively). However, DOX-FA-SNs showed lower cytotoxicity in folate receptor negative normal mouse fibroblast cells (L929 cells) compared with free DOX. In vivo tumor-targeted fluorescence imaging indicated specific tumor targeting and uptake of FA-SNs in nude mice bearing subcutaneous HeLa cell-derived xenograft tumors. In vivo anti-tumor experiments demonstrated that DOX-FA-SNs (10 mg kg-1 of DOX) significantly regressed the tumor growth and reduced toxicity compared with free DOX. These results have great significance in developing and optimizing SNs as effective intracellular delivery and specific tumor targeting vehicles.Silica nanorattles (SNs) have proven to be promising vehicles for drug delivery. In order to further enhance efficacy and minimize adverse effects, active targeted delivery to tumors is necessary. In this work, SNs modified with a tumor specific targeting ligand, folic acid (FA), was used as carrier of doxorubicin (DOX) (DOX-FA-SNs). Drug loading, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of DOX-FA-SNs in vitro in human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa cells) were evaluated. DOX-FA-SNs showed a higher cytotoxicity in human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa cells) than DOX loaded carboxyl (-COOH) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) modified SNs (DOX-COOH-SNs and DOX-PEG-SNs, respectively). However, DOX

  10. Anti-tumor effects of the Notch pathway in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Amaury G; Yang, Yanwen; Reynoso, David; Katz, Daniela; Trent, Jonathan C; Hughes, Dennis P

    2012-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are driven by gain-of-function mutations of KIT or PDGFRa. The introduction of imatinib has significantly extended survival for patients. However, most patients develop resistances. Notch signaling is a conserved developmental pathway known to play a critical role in the development of several cancers, functioning as a tumor promoter or a tumor suppressor. Given that the normal progenitor cell for GIST, the interstitial cell of Cajal, has characteristics similar to those of cells of neuroendocrine origin, we hypothesized that Notch pathway impacts the biology of GIST cells. In this study, we retrovirally and pharmacologically manipulated the Notch pathway in human GIST cells. We also performed a retrospective analysis of a cohort on 15 primary tumors to determine the role of Hes1, a major target gene of Notch, as a prognostic marker for GIST. Constitutively, active intracellular domain of Notch1 (ICN1) expression potently induced growth arrest and downregulated KIT expression in vitro. Additionally, treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid caused dose-dependent upregulation of Notch1 expression and a parallel decrease in viability in these cells. Retroviral silencing of downstream targets of Notch (dominant-negative Hes1) and pharmacological inhibition of Notch activation (γ-secretase inhibition) partially rescued GIST cells from suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid treatment. GIST patients with high Hes1 mRNA levels have a significantly longer relapse-free survival. These results identify a novel anti-tumor effect of Notch1 and cross talk between the Notch and KIT pathways. Thus, activation of this pathway by treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors is an appealing potential therapeutic strategy for GISTs. Précis: This study is the first report of the tumor suppressor effects of Notch pathway in gastrointestinal stromal tumors via a negative feedback with the oncogene KIT and may

  11. Supercritical-Carbon Dioxide Fluid Extract from Chrysanthemum indicum Enhances Anti-Tumor Effect and Reduces Toxicity of Bleomycin in Tumor-Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hong-Mei; Sun, Chao-Yue; Liang, Jia-Li; Xu, Lie-Qiang; Zhang, Zhen-Biao; Luo, Dan-Dan; Chen, Han-Bin; Huang, Yong-Zhong; Wang, Qi; Lee, David Yue-Wei; Yuan, Jie; Li, Yu-Cui

    2017-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM), a family of anti-tumor drugs, was reported to exhibit severe side effects limiting its usage in clinical treatment. Therefore, finding adjuvants that enhance the anti-tumor effect and reduce the detrimental effect of BLM is a prerequisite. Chrysanthemum indicum, an edible flower, possesses abundant bioactivities; the supercritical-carbon dioxide fluid extract from flowers and buds of C. indicum (CISCFE) have strong anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and lung protective effects. However, the role of CISCFE combined with BLM treatment on tumor-bearing mice remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the potential synergistic effect and the underlying mechanism of CISCFE combined with BLM in the treatment of hepatoma 22 (H22) tumor-bearing mice. The results suggested that the oral administration of CISCFE combined with BLM could markedly prolong the life span, attenuate the BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis, suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6), tumor necrosis factor-α, activities of myeloperoxidase, and malondiadehyde. Moreover, CISCFE combined with BLM promoted the ascites cell apoptosis, the activities of caspases 3 and 8, and up-regulated the protein expression of p53 and down-regulated the transforming growth factor-β1 by activating the gene expression of miR-29b. Taken together, these results indicated that CISCFE could enhance the anti-cancer activity of BLM and reduce the BLM-induced pulmonary injury in H22 tumor-bearing mice, rendering it as a potential adjuvant drug with chemotherapy after further investigation in the future. PMID:28245556

  12. Synergistic innate and adaptive immune response to combination immunotherapy with anti-tumor antigen antibodies and extended serum half-life IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Eric F.; Gai, Shuning A.; Opel, Cary F.; Kwan, Byron H.; Surana, Rishi; Mihm, Martin C.; Kauke, Monique J.; Moynihan, Kelly D.; Angelini, Alessandro; Williams, Robert T.; Stephan, Matthias T.; Kim, Jacob S.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Weiner, Louis M.; Dranoff, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cancer immunotherapies under development have generally focused on either stimulating T-cell immunity or driving antibody-directed effector functions of the innate immune system such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). We find that a combination of an anti-tumor antigen antibody and an untargeted IL-2 fusion protein with delayed systemic clearance induces significant tumor control in aggressive isogenic tumor models via a concerted innate and adaptive response involving neutrophils, NK cells, macrophages, and CD8+ T-cells. This combination therapy induces an intratumoral “cytokine storm” and extensive lymphocyte infiltration. Adoptive transfer of anti-tumor T-cells together with this combination therapy leads to robust cures of established tumors and establishment of immunological memory. PMID:25873172

  13. Comparison of the Anti-tumor Effects of Two Platinum Agents (Miriplatin and Fine-Powder Cisplatin)

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Shobu Nitta, Norihisa Ohta, Shinichi Sonoda, Akinaga Otani, Hideji Tomozawa, Yuki Nitta-Seko, Ayumi Tsuchiya, Keiko Tanka, Toyohiko Takahashi, Masashi Murata, Kiyoshi

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of miriplatin-lipidol and fine-powder cisplatin-lipiodol suspensions. Methods: Assessment of the cytotoxicity of two drugs was performed: a soluble derivative of miriplatin (DPC) and fine-powder cisplatin. We randomly divided 15 rabbits with transplanted VX2 liver tumors into three equal groups. They were infused via the proper hepatic artery with a miriplatin-lipiodol suspension (ML), a fine-powder cisplatin-lipiodol suspension (CL), or saline (control) and the tumor growth rate was determined on MR images acquired before and 7 days after treatment. The concentration of platinum (PCs) in blood was assayed immediately, and 10, 30, and 60 min, and 24 h and 7 days after drug administration. Its concentration in tumor and surrounding normal liver tissues was determined at 7 days postadministration. Results: At high concentrations, fine-powder cisplatin exhibited stronger cytotoxicity than DPC. At low concentrations, both agents manifested weak cytotoxicity. While there was no difference between the tumor growth rate of the ML and the CL groups, the difference between the controls and ML- and CL-treated rabbits was significant. The blood PCs peaked at 10 min and then gradually decreased over time. On the other hand, no platinum was detected at any point after the administration of ML. There was no difference between the ML and CL groups in the PCs in tumor tissues; however, in normal hepatic tissue, the PCs were higher in ML- than CL-treated rabbits. Conclusions: We confirmed the anti-tumor effect of ML and CL. There was no significant difference between the anti-tumor effect of ML and CL at 7 days postadministration.

  14. Acute inflammation induces immunomodulatory effects on myeloid cells associated with anti-tumor responses in a tumor mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Mohamed L.; Attia, Zeinab I.; Galal, Sohaila M.

    2015-01-01

    Given the self nature of cancer, anti-tumor immune response is weak. As such, acute inflammation induced by microbial products can induce signals that result in initiation of an inflammatory cascade that helps activation of immune cells. We aimed to compare the nature and magnitude of acute inflammation induced by toll-like receptor ligands (TLRLs) on the tumor growth and the associated inflammatory immune responses. To induce acute inflammation in tumor-bearing host, CD1 mice were inoculated with intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) (5 × 105 cells/mouse), and then treated with i.p. injection on day 1, day 7 or days 1 + 7 with: (1) polyinosinic:polycytidylic (poly(I:C)) (TLR3L); (2) Poly-ICLC (clinical grade of TLR3L); (3) Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) (coding for TLR9L); (4) Complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) (coding for TLR9L); and (5) Incomplete Freund’s Adjuvant (IFA). Treatment with poly(I:C), Poly-ICLC, BCG, CFA, or IFA induced anti-tumor activities as measured by 79.1%, 75.94%, 73.94%, 71.88% and 47.75% decreases, respectively in the total number of tumor cells collected 7 days after tumor challenge. Among the tested TLRLs, both poly(I:C) (TLR3L) and BCG (contain TLR9L) showed the highest anti-tumor effects as reflected by the decrease in the number of EAc cells. These effects were associated with a 2-fold increase in the numbers of inflammatory cells expressing the myeloid markers CD11b+Ly6G+, CD11b+Ly6G−, and CD11b+Ly6G−. We concluded that Provision of the proper inflammatory signal with optimally defined magnitude and duration during tumor growth can induce inflammatory immune cells with potent anti-tumor responses without vaccination. PMID:26966565

  15. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma activates lactate in Ringer’s solution for anti-tumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Kae; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Utsumi, Fumi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a novel approach for wound healing, blood coagulation, and cancer therapy. A recent discovery in the field of plasma medicine is that non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma not only directly but also indirectly affects cells via plasma-treated liquids. This discovery has led to the use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma as a novel chemotherapy. We refer to these plasma-treated liquids as plasma-activated liquids. We chose Ringer’s solutions to produce plasma-activated liquids for clinical applications. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that plasma-activated Ringer’s lactate solution has anti-tumor effects, but of the four components in Ringer’s lactate solution, only lactate exhibited anti-tumor effects through activation by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear magnetic resonance analyses indicate that plasma irradiation generates acetyl and pyruvic acid-like groups in Ringer’s lactate solution. Overall, these results suggest that plasma-activated Ringer’s lactate solution is promising for chemotherapy. PMID:27824103

  16. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma activates lactate in Ringer’s solution for anti-tumor effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Kae; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Utsumi, Fumi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2016-11-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a novel approach for wound healing, blood coagulation, and cancer therapy. A recent discovery in the field of plasma medicine is that non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma not only directly but also indirectly affects cells via plasma-treated liquids. This discovery has led to the use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma as a novel chemotherapy. We refer to these plasma-treated liquids as plasma-activated liquids. We chose Ringer’s solutions to produce plasma-activated liquids for clinical applications. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that plasma-activated Ringer’s lactate solution has anti-tumor effects, but of the four components in Ringer’s lactate solution, only lactate exhibited anti-tumor effects through activation by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear magnetic resonance analyses indicate that plasma irradiation generates acetyl and pyruvic acid-like groups in Ringer’s lactate solution. Overall, these results suggest that plasma-activated Ringer’s lactate solution is promising for chemotherapy.

  17. Tranilast enhances the anti-tumor effects of tamoxifen on human breast cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tamoxifen is the most widely used anti-estrogen for the treatment of breast cancer. Studies show that the combination therapy with other substances that helps the activity of tamoxifen. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of tamoxifen when used in combination with tranilast on human breast cancer cells. Results Two MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines were treated with tamoxifen and/or tranilast. The cell viability and cytotoxicity was assessed using MTT and LDH assays; the apoptotic effects were examined by TUNEL assay, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and DNA laddering, also the expression levels of bax and bcl-2 genes were detected by real-time RT-PCR. The mRNA expression of TGF-β ligands and receptors examined using real-time RT-PCR and TGF-β1 protein secretion levels were also evaluated by ELISA assay. Inhibitory effect of these drugs on invasion and metastasis were tested by wound healing and matrigel invasion assay. We found that combination of these drugs led to a marked increase in growth and proliferation inhibition compared to either agent alone. Furthermore, bax and bcl-2 affected by tamoxifen and/or tranilast and resulted in a significant increase in bax and decrease in bcl-2 mRNA expression. In addition, treatment with tamoxifen and/or tranilast resulted in significant decreased in TGF-β1, 2, 3, TGF-βRI and II mRNA and TGF-β1 protein levels while TGF-βRIII mRNA level was increased and invasion was also inhibited. Conclusions These findings indicate that tranilast, by synergistic effect, enhances the activity of tamoxifen and the TGF-β pathway is a target for this combination therapy, therefore; we propose that this combined treatment may be suitable selection in prevention of breast cancer. PMID:24143895

  18. A New Ex Vivo Method for Effective Expansion and Activation of Human Natural Killer Cells for Anti-Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Tang, Ruihua; Li, Jing; Liu, Yaxiong; Ye, Linjie; Shao, Dongyan; Jin, Mingliang; Huang, Qingsheng; Shi, Junling

    2015-12-01

    Preserving the activities of natural killer (NK) cells in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after ex vivo expansion and activation is critical for NK cell-based therapy. Collected from human PBMCs, the NK cells were expanded and activated. The expressions of surface receptors, cytotoxicity against tumor cells, and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of the NK cells before and after expansion and activation were, respectively, compared. After expansion, the ADCC activity of healthy human NK cells was improved by 32 %, and the cytotoxicity against four types of tumor cells was increased by 19, 29, 26, and 28 %, respectively. The positive expression rates for the activating receptors NKG2D, CD94, NKp46, NKp30, and NKp44 of healthy human NK cells expanded ex vivo were increased by 60, 40, 20, 40, and 63 %, respectively, whereas those for the inhibitory receptors CD158b, NKB1, and NKAT showed no significant changes. The addition of an immunologically active peptide, "TKD," during cell expansion further increased NK cytotoxicity by approximately 10 %. The expanded and activated NK cells from cancer patients achieved average purity which was greater than 90 %, and the cytotoxicity against K562 cells was increased by more than 17 %. Compared with resting NK cells, NK cells both from healthy volunteers and cancer patients expanded and activated ex vivo using our method were significantly more active and demonstrated significantly increased anti-tumor activity. This method could be therefore used as a new and effective approach to meet requirements for anti-tumor immunotherapy.

  19. Inhibition of iNOS activity enhances the anti-tumor effects of alpha-galactosylceramide in established murine cancer model.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroyasu; Ando, Tatsuya; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2015-12-08

    Alpha-garactosylceramide (GalCer) has been shown to have anti-tumor effect in the basic research and clinical studies. However, anti-tumor effect of GalCer is limited. The administration of GalCer increases the production of IFN-γ which is involved in the suppression of tumor growth. On the other hand, the enhancement of IFN-γ production increases immunosuppressive factors such as nitric oxide. This suppressive action might impair the anti-tumor effect of GalCer. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-tumor effect of GalCer in the absence of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In lung metastatic model, the number of tumor nodules in the lung of iNOS-KO mice treated with GalCer was significantly reduced compared with that of WT mice treated with GalCer. Moreover, L-NAME, which is the inhibitor for iNOS, enhanced the anti-tumor effect of GalCer in lung metastatic model. The frequency of CD8+ cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid increased in iNOS-KO mice treated with GalCer. The administration of GalCer increased the frequency of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the lung from tumor-bearing WT mice, but the increase of MDSCs in the lung was not induced in iNOS-KO mice. The subcutaneous tumor experiments revealed that the administration of GalCer in the absence of iNOS expression significantly enhanced the induction of tumor antigen-specific response. Finally, our results indicated that the inhibition of iNOS expression could enhance the therapeutic efficacy of GalCer via the increase of tumor antigen-specific immune response and the suppression of MDSCs.

  20. Anti-tumor angiogenesis effect of a new compound: B-9-3 through interference with VEGFR2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qin; Chen, Wei; Chen, Wen

    2016-05-01

    B-9-3, a derivative of harmine, was first synthesized in our laboratory. We have reported that B-9-3 has an anti-proliferative effect against human lung cancer cells via induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell migration. In the present study, we first studied that the anti-tumor angiogenesis effect and the molecular mechanism of B-9-3-induced tumor vascular degrade and mortify in lung cancer. In vitro, the results showed that B-9-3 selectively inhibited the proliferation of endothelial cells IC50 = 6.16 μg/ml) and vascular fibroblasts (IC50 = 12.59 μg/ml) and induced regression of tumor cells of the following: Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC), Mouse fore-stomach carcinoma (MFC), Human ovarian cancer (SK-OV-3), and prostate cancer (22RV1). Moreover, B-9-3 could significantly increase the apoptosis rate (80.95 %) of vascular endothelial cells, while inhibiting migration of endothelial cells, capillary tube formation of endothelial cells, neovascularization of the rat thoracic aorta ring, and the angiogenesis of chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) predominantly through blocking VEGFR2 signaling pathway. In vivo, we investigated the anti-tumor rate and the signal transduction mechanism of B-9-3 by LCC-bearing C57BL/6 mice. The data showed that the tumor inhibition ratio of high dose (20 mg/kg) of B-9-3 was 72.9 %, and quantification of CD34 marker indicated a marked reduction in the number of neovessels after B-9-3 treatment as compared with control group (66.87 %). Remarkably, using IHC and q-RT-PCR, we found that downregulation of the expression of VEGFR2, VEGF-A, and TGFβ1 in tumor confers enhancement to the angiogenesis effect of B-9-3. These data suggest that the angiogenesis inhibitor B-9-3 selectively induces apoptosis of endothelial cells, in part through disruption of VEGF-A/VEGFR2 signaling.

  1. Ganoderma lucidum exerts anti-tumor effects on ovarian cancer cells and enhances their sensitivity to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sufen; Ye, Gang; Fu, Guodong; Cheng, Jian-Xin; Yang, Burton B; Peng, Chun

    2011-05-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a herbal mushroom known to have many health benefits, including the inhibition of tumor cell growth. However, the effect of Ganoderma lucidum on epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), the most fatal gynecological malignancy, has not yet been reported. In this study, we determined whether Ganoderma lucidum regulates EOC cell activity. Using several cell lines derived from EOC, we found that Ganoderma lucidum strongly decreased cell numbers in a dose-dependent manner. Ganoderma lucidum also inhibited colony formation, cell migration and spheroid formation. In particular, Ganoderma lucidum was effective in inhibiting cell growth in both chemosensitive and chemoresistant cells and the treatment with Ganoderma lucidum significantly enhanced the effect of cisplatin on EOC cells. Furthermore, Ganoderma lucidum induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and also induced apoptosis by activating caspase 3. Finally, Ganoderma lucidum increased p53 but inhibited Akt expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that Ganoderma lucidum exerts multiple anti-tumor effects on ovarian cancer cells and can enhance the sensitivity of EOC cells to cisplatin.

  2. Anti-tumor effects of bemiparin in HepG2 and MIA PaCa-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Alur, İhsan; Dodurga, Yavuz; Seçme, Mücahit; Elmas, Levent; Bağcı, Gülseren; Gökşin, İbrahim; Avcı, Çığır Biray

    2016-07-10

    Recent researches have demonstrated improved survival in oncologic patients treated with low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) which are anticoagulant drugs. We evaluated "second generation" LMWH bemiparin and its in vitro anti-tumor effects on HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma and MIA PaCa-2 cancer cells. The aim of the study is to investigate anti-cancer mechanism of bemiparin in HepG2 and Mia-Paca-2 cancer cells. Cytotoxic effects of bemiparin were determined by XTT assay. IC50 dose of bemiparin was found to be 200 IU/mL in the 48th hour in the MiaPaCa-2 cell line and 50 IU/mL in the 48th hour in the HepG2 cell line. CCND1 (cyclin D1), CDK4, CDK6, p21, p16, p53, caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-8, Bcl-2, BID, DR4, DR5, FADD, TRADD, Bax, gene mRNA expressions were evaluated by Real-time PCR. Real-time PCR analysis showed that CCND1 expression was reduced in HepG2 dose the group cells when compared with the control group cells and p53, caspase-3, caspase p21, caspase-8 and expressions were increased in the dose group cells when compared with the control group cells. CCND1, CDK4 and CDK6 expressions were reduced in MIA PaCa-2 dose group cells when compared with the control group cells and p53 expression was increased in the dose group cells when compared with the control group cells. Other expressions of genes were found statistically insignificant both of cell lines. It was found that bemiparin in HepG2 and MIA PaCa-2 cells suppressed invasion, migration, and colony formation by using matrigel invasion chamber, and colony formation assay, respectively. In conclusion, it is thought that bemiparin indicates anti-tumor activity by affecting cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, invasion, migration, and colony formation on cancer cells.

  3. Anti-tumoral effects of a trypsin inhibitor derived from buckwheat in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chong-Zhi; Feng, Ma-Li; Hao, Xu-Liang; Zhao, Zhi-Juan; Li, Yu-Ying; Wang, Zhuan-Hua

    2015-08-01

    Native buckwheat, a common component of food products and medicine, has been observed to inhibit cancer cell proliferation in vitro. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anti-tumoral effects of recombinant buckwheat trypsin inhibitor (rBTI) on hepatic cancer cells and the mechanism of apoptosis involved. Apoptosis in the H22 cell line induced by rBTI was identified using MTT assays, DNA electrophoresis, flow cytometry, morphological observation of the nuclei, measurement of cytochrome C and assessment of caspase activation. It was identified that rBTI decreases cell viability by inducing apoptosis, as evidenced by the formation of apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation. rBTI-induced apoptosis occurred in association with mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to the release of cytochrome C from the mitochondria to the cytosol, as well as the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that rBTI specifically inhibited the growth of the H22 hepatic carcinoma cell line in vitro and in vivo in a concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner, while there were minimal effects on the 7702 normal liver cell line. In addition, rBTI‑induced apoptosis in H22 cells was, at least in part, mediated by a mitochondrial pathway via caspase-9.

  4. Triterpenoids Amplify Anti-Tumoral Effects of Mistletoe Extracts on Murine B16.F10 Melanoma In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Strüh, Christian M.; Jäger, Sebastian; Kersten, Astrid; Schempp, Christoph M.; Scheffler, Armin; Martin, Stefan F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Mistletoe extracts are often used in complementary cancer therapy although the efficacy of that therapy is controversially discussed. Approved mistletoe extracts contain mainly water soluble compounds of the mistletoe plant, i.e. mistletoe lectins. However, mistletoe also contains water-insoluble triterpenoids (mainly oleanolic acid) that have anti-tumorigenic effects. To overcome their loss in watery extracts we have solubilized mistletoe triterpenoids with cyclodextrins, thus making them available for in vivo cancer experiments. Experimental design B16.F10 subcutaneous melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice were treated with new mistletoe extracts containing both water soluble compounds and solubilized triterpenoids. Tumor growth and survival was monitored. In addition, histological examinations of the tumor material and tumor surrounding tissue were performed. Results Addition of solubilized triterpenoids increased the anti-tumor effects of the mistletoe extracts, resulting in reduced tumor growth and prolonged survival of the mice. Histological examination of the treated tumors showed mainly tumor necrosis and some apoptotic cells with active caspase-3 and TUNEL staining. A significant decrease of CD31-positive tumor blood vessels was observed after treatment with solubilized triterpenoids and different mistletoe extracts. Conclusion We conclude that the addition of solubilized mistletoe triterpenoids to conventional mistletoe extracts improves the efficacy of mistletoe treatment and may represent a novel treatment option for malignant melanoma. PMID:23614029

  5. Effects of extraction methods on the yield, chemical structure and anti-tumor activity of polysaccharides from Cordyceps gunnii mycelia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen-Yuan; Dong, Fengying; Liu, Xiaocui; Lv, Qian; YingYang; Liu, Fei; Chen, Ling; Wang, Tiantian; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Yongmin

    2016-04-20

    This study was to investigate the effects of different extraction methods on the yield, chemical structure and antitumor activity of polysaccharides from Cordyceps gunnii (C. gunnii) mycelia. Five extraction methods were used to extract crude polysaccharides (CPS), which include room-temperature water extraction (RWE), hot-water extraction (HWE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and cellulase-assisted extraction (CAE). Then Sephadex G-100 was used for purification of CPS. As a result, the antitumor activities of CPS and PPS on S180 cells were evaluated. Five CPS and purified polysaccharides (PPS) were obtained. The yield of CPS by microwave-assisted extraction (CPSMAE) was the highest and its anti-tumor activity was the best and its macromolecular polysaccharide (3000-1000kDa) ratio was the largest. The PPS had the same monosaccharide composition, but their obvious difference was in the antitumor activity and the physicochemical characteristics, such as intrinsic viscosity, specific rotation, scanning electron microscopy and circular dichroism spectra.

  6. Incorporation of lapatinib into human serum albumin nanoparticles with enhanced anti-tumor effects in HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xu; Zheng, Xiaoyao; Pang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Zheming; Zhang, Qizhi

    2015-12-01

    Lapatinib, a selective small-molecule dual-tyrosine kinase inhibitor of HER2 and EGFR, is effective in HER2-positive patients with advanced metastatic breast cancer. However, its low and variable oral absorption, large required daily dose and serious gastrointestinal side effects all limit its clinical use. Intravenous administration offers a good option to overcome these disadvantages. However, the poor solubility of lapatinib in water and organic solvents causes lapatinib to fail in a common injectable preparation. Considering lapatinib's high albumin binding ability (>99%), in this study, we developed human serum albumin nanoparticles loaded with lapatinib (LHNPs) by Nab technology for intravenous administration and investigated its efficacy against HER2-positive breast cancer. Raman shift, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies demonstrated that lapatinib was successfully incorporated into nanoparticles, and LHNPs exhibited good stability and sustained-release effect in vitro. LHNPs could be effectively taken up by SKBr3 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and the uptake was mediated by energy-dependent endocytosis, which involved clathrin-dependent pinocytosis. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo data indicated that LHNPs presented the strong ability to induce apoptosis and superior anti-tumor efficacy in tumor-bearing mice to the commercial tablet Tykerb through the inhibition of HER2 phosphorylation. Subchronic toxicity assays indicated that LHNPs had no hepatic or kidney toxicity. With mature technology for industrial production and enhanced therapeutic effects, LHNPs are likely to have great potential as a safe therapeutic candidate against HER2-positive breast cancer in the clinic.

  7. Anti-tumor activity and the mechanism of SIP-S: A sulfated polysaccharide with anti-metastatic effect.

    PubMed

    Zong, Aizhen; Liu, Yuhong; Zhang, Yan; Song, Xinlei; Shi, Yikang; Cao, Hongzhi; Liu, Chunhui; Cheng, Yanna; Jiang, Wenjie; Du, Fangling; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-09-20

    Our previous studies demonstrated that SIP-S had anti-metastatic activity and inhibited the growth of metastatic foci. Here we report the anti-tumor and immunoregulatory potential of SIP-S. SIP-S could significantly inhibit tumor growth in S180-bearing mice, and the inhibition rates was 43.7% at 30 mg/kg d. Besides, SIP-S could improve the thymus and spleen indices of S180-bearing mice and the mice treated with CTX. The combination of SIP-S (15 mg/kg d) with CTX (12.5 mg/kg d) showed higher anti-tumor potency than CTX (25 mg/kg d) alone. These results indicated that SIP-S had immunoenhancing and anticancer activity, and the immunoenhancing activity might be one mechanism for its anti-tumor activity. Flow cytometry results showed that SIP-S could induce tumor cells apoptosis. Western blot analysis indicated that SIP-S could upregulate the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins, caspase-3, -8, -9 and Bax, and downregulate the expression of anti-apoptotic protein PARP-1 in tumor cells in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, SIP-S has anti-tumor activity, which may be associated with its immunostimulating and pro-apoptotic activity.

  8. Anti-tumoral effect of desmethylclomipramine in lung cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bongiorno-Borbone, Lucilla; Giacobbe, Arianna; Compagnone, Mirco; Eramo, Adriana; De Maria, Ruggero; Peschiaroli, Angelo; Melino, Gerry

    2015-07-10

    Lung cancer is the most feared of all cancers because of its heterogeneity and resistance to available treatments. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the cell population responsible for lung cancer chemoresistance and are a very good model for testing new targeted therapies. Clomipramine is an FDA-approved antidepressant drug, able to inhibit in vitro the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch and potentiate the pro-apoptotic effects of DNA damaging induced agents in several cancer cell lines. Here, we investigated the potential therapeutic effect of desmethylclomipramine (DCMI), the active metabolite of Clomipramine, on the CSCs homeostasis. We show that DCMI inhibits lung CSCs growth, decreases their stemness potential and increases the cytotoxic effect of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. Being DCMI an inhibitor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch, we also verified the effect of Itch deregulation on CSCs survival. We found that the siRNA-mediated depletion of Itch induces similar anti-proliferative effects on lung CSCs, suggesting that DCMI might exert its effect, at least in part, by inhibiting Itch. Notably, Itch expression is a negative prognostic factor in two primary lung tumors datasets, supporting the potential clinical relevance of Itch inhibition to circumvent drug resistance in the treatment of lung cancer.

  9. Anti-tumoral effect of desmethylclomipramine in lung cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bongiorno-Borbone, Lucilla; Giacobbe, Arianna; Compagnone, Mirco; Eramo, Adriana; De Maria, Ruggero; Peschiaroli, Angelo; Melino, Gerry

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most feared of all cancers because of its heterogeneity and resistance to available treatments. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the cell population responsible for lung cancer chemoresistance and are a very good model for testing new targeted therapies. Clomipramine is an FDA-approved antidepressant drug, able to inhibit in vitro the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch and potentiate the pro-apoptotic effects of DNA damaging induced agents in several cancer cell lines. Here, we investigated the potential therapeutic effect of desmethylclomipramine (DCMI), the active metabolite of Clomipramine, on the CSCs homeostasis. We show that DCMI inhibits lung CSCs growth, decreases their stemness potential and increases the cytotoxic effect of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. Being DCMI an inhibitor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Itch, we also verified the effect of Itch deregulation on CSCs survival. We found that the siRNA-mediated depletion of Itch induces similar anti-proliferative effects on lung CSCs, suggesting that DCMI might exert its effect, at least in part, by inhibiting Itch. Notably, Itch expression is a negative prognostic factor in two primary lung tumors datasets, supporting the potential clinical relevance of Itch inhibition to circumvent drug resistance in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:26219257

  10. The anti-tumor effect of p53 gene-loaded hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ruibo; Yang, Xinyan; Chen, Cen; Chen, Kan; Wang, Shibing; Xie, Chungang; Ren, Xiaoyuan; Kong, Xiangdong

    2014-04-01

    This research focused on anti-tumor effect of pEGFP-C1-p53 (p53) gene-loaded hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. Four kinds of HAp nanoparticles, spherical HAp nanoparticles (S-HAp, diameter: 50 nm), needle-like HAp nanoparticles (N-HAp, average length: 110 nm and width: 30 nm), rod-like HAp nanoparticles (R-HAp, average length: 100 nm and width: 30 nm), and short-rod-like HAp nanoparticles (SR-HAp, average length: 40 nm and width: 30 nm), were prepared initially. The HAp nanoparticles with or without being modified by PEI (named HAp and HAp-PEI, respectively) have excellent biocompatibility as shown by MTT assay and crystal violet staining tests. Then, the subsequent MTT, Hocehst staining tests, and Western blot showed that the killing effect of p53-loaded HAp-PEI (HAp-PEI-p53) was effective with fair selectivity toward Hep-3B and HuH-7 cells' cell lines. Moreover, HAp-PEI-p53 could inhibit the tumor growth in vivo, and the mechanism of tumor growth inhibition was verified by the hematoxylin and eosin staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling, P53 protein immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscope of the tumor cell in vivo. We found that HAp-PEI-p53 has good anti-cancer effect in vitro and in vivo, especially for the S-HAp-PEI-p53. Tumor metastasis could be suppressed significantly by the S-HAp-PEI-p53 and N-HAp-PEI-p53 treatments by the in vivo imaging system. All these results lead to the conclusion that the particle sizes of HAp ranging from 100 to 200 nm are appropriate for cancer gene therapy and may be widely used in anti-cancer investigation.

  11. Anti-tumor effect of Radix Paeoniae Rubra extract on mice bladder tumors using intravesical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mei-Yi; Chiang, Su-Yin; Li, Yi-Zhen; Chen, Mei-Fang; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Wu, Jin-Yi; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Radix Paeoniae Rubra (RPR) is the dried root of Paeonia lactiflora Pallas and Paeonia veitchii Lynch, and is a herbal medicine that is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of blood-heat and blood-stasis syndrome, similarly to Cortex Moutan. The present study identified the same three components in RPR and Cortex Moutan extracts. In addition, it has been reported that RPR has an anti-cancer effect. Bladder cancer is the seventh most common type of cancer worldwide. Due to the high recurrence rate, identifying novel drugs for bladder cancer therapy is essential. In the present study, RPR extract was evaluated as a bladder cancer therapy in vitro and in vivo. The present results revealed that RPR extract reduced the cell viability of bladder cancer cells with a half maximal inhibitory concentration of 1–3 mg/ml, and had an extremely low cytotoxic effect on normal urothelial cells. Additionally, RPR decreased certain cell cycle populations, predominantly cells in the G1 phase, and caused a clear sub-G increase. In a mouse orthotopic bladder tumor model, intravesical application of RPR extract decreased the bladder tumor size without altering the blood biochemical parameters of the mice. In summary, the present results demonstrate the anti-proliferative properties of RPR extract on bladder cancer cells, and its anti-bladder tumor effect in vivo. Compared to Cortex Moutan extract, RPR extract may provide a more effective alternative therapeutic strategy for the intravesical therapy of superficial bladder cancer. PMID:27446367

  12. Chemical constituents of Murraya siamensis: three coumarins and their anti-tumor promoting effect.

    PubMed

    Ito, Chihiro; Itoigawa, Masataka; Onoda, Saori; Hosokawa, Atsuko; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri; Okuda, Toshimitsu; Tokuda, Harukuni; Nishino, Hoyoku; Furukawa, Hiroshi

    2005-03-01

    Isolation and structure elucidation of three coumarins, murrayacoumarins A, B, and C, together with eight known coumarins, from the leaves of Murraya siamensis Craib collected in Thailand are described. Results of a primary screening of inhibitory effects of seven of these compounds on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation in Raji cells are also presented.

  13. Novel Imidazopyridine Derivatives Possess Anti-Tumor Effect on Human Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Matthew A; Lyons, Anastesia S; Muniyan, Sakthivel; D'Cunha, Napoleon; Robinson, Tashika; Hoelting, Kyle; Dwyer, Jennifer G; Bu, Xiu R; Batra, Surinder K; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death afflicting United States males. Most treatments to-date for metastatic PCa include androgen-deprivation therapy and second-generation anti-androgens such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide. However, a majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these therapies and relapse into the lethal, castration-resistant form of PCa to which no adequate treatment option remains. Hence, there is an immediate need to develop effective therapeutic agents toward this patient population. Imidazopyridines have recently been shown to possess Akt kinase inhibitory activity; thus in this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of novel imidazopyridine derivatives HIMP, M-MeI, OMP, and EtOP on different human castration-resistant PCa cells. Among these compounds, HIMP and M-MeI were found to possess selective dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition: they reduced castration-resistant PCa cell proliferation and spared benign prostate epithelial cells. Using LNCaP C-81 cells as the model system, these compounds also reduced colony formation as well as cell adhesion and migration, and M-MeI was the most potent in all studies. Further investigation revealed that while HIMP primarily inhibits PCa cell growth via suppression of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, M-MeI can inhibit both PI3K/Akt and androgen receptor pathways and arrest cell growth in the G2 phase. Thus, our results indicate the novel compound M-MeI to be a promising candidate for castration-resistant PCa therapy, and future studies investigating the mechanism of imidazopyridine inhibition may aid to the development of effective anti-PCa agents.

  14. Novel Imidazopyridine Derivatives Possess Anti-Tumor Effect on Human Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muniyan, Sakthivel; D’Cunha, Napoleon; Robinson, Tashika; Hoelting, Kyle; Dwyer, Jennifer G.; Bu, Xiu R.; Batra, Surinder K.; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death afflicting United States males. Most treatments to-date for metastatic PCa include androgen-deprivation therapy and second-generation anti-androgens such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide. However, a majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these therapies and relapse into the lethal, castration-resistant form of PCa to which no adequate treatment option remains. Hence, there is an immediate need to develop effective therapeutic agents toward this patient population. Imidazopyridines have recently been shown to possess Akt kinase inhibitory activity; thus in this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of novel imidazopyridine derivatives HIMP, M-MeI, OMP, and EtOP on different human castration-resistant PCa cells. Among these compounds, HIMP and M-MeI were found to possess selective dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition: they reduced castration-resistant PCa cell proliferation and spared benign prostate epithelial cells. Using LNCaP C-81 cells as the model system, these compounds also reduced colony formation as well as cell adhesion and migration, and M-MeI was the most potent in all studies. Further investigation revealed that while HIMP primarily inhibits PCa cell growth via suppression of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, M-MeI can inhibit both PI3K/Akt and androgen receptor pathways and arrest cell growth in the G2 phase. Thus, our results indicate the novel compound M-MeI to be a promising candidate for castration-resistant PCa therapy, and future studies investigating the mechanism of imidazopyridine inhibition may aid to the development of effective anti-PCa agents. PMID:26121643

  15. Effects of psoralens as anti-tumoral agents in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Panno, Maria Luisa; Giordano, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    This review examines the biological properties of coumarins, widely distributed at the highest levels in the fruit, followed by the roots, stems and leaves, by considering their beneficial effects in the prevention of some diseases and as anti-cancer agents. These compounds are well known photosensitizing drugs which have been used as pharmaceuticals for a broad number of therapeutic applications requiring cell division inhibitors. Despite this, even in the absence of ultraviolet rays they are active. The current paper mainly focuses on the effects of psoralens on human breast cancer as they are able to influence many aspects of cell behavior, such as cell growth, survival and apoptosis. In addition, analytical and pharmacological data have demonstrated that psoralens antagonize some metabolizing enzymes, affect estrogen receptor stability and counteract cell invasiveness as well as cancer drug resistance. The scientific findings summarized highlight the pleiotropic functions of phytochemical drugs, given that recently their target signals and how these are modified in the cells have been identified. The encouraging results in this field suggest that multiple modulating strategies based on coumarin drugs in combination with canonical chemotherapeutic agents or radiotherapy could be a useful approach to address the treatment of many types of cancer. PMID:25114850

  16. Anti-Tumor Effects of Atractylenolide-I on Human Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Long, Fangyi; Wang, Ting; Jia, Ping; Wang, Huafei; Qing, Yi; Xiong, Tingting; He, Mengjie; Wang, Xiaoli

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Atractylenolide-I (AT-I), a naturally occurring sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz, on human ovarian cancer cells. Material/Methods The viability and anchorage-independent growth of ovarian cancer cells were evaluated using MTT and colony formation assay, respectively. Cell cycle and apoptosis were detected with flow cytometry analysis. The level of cyclin B1 and CDK1 was measured using qPCR and ELISA analysis. The expression of Bax, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3, cytochrome c, AIF, and Bcl-2, and phosphorylation level of PI3K, AKT, and mTOR were determined with Western blot analysis. Results AT-I decreased the cell viability and suppressed anchorage-independent growth of A2780 cells. Cell cycle was arrested in G2/M phase transition by AT-I treatment, which was related to decreased expression of cyclin B1 and CDK1 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the treatment induced apoptosis, as shown by up-regulation of Bax, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3, and cytosolic release of cytochrome c and AIF, and down-regulation of Bcl-2, in a dose-dependent manner. Then, the effects of AT-I on PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways were examined to further investigate the underlying anti-cancer mechanism of AT-I, and the results showed that treatment with AT-I significantly decreased the phosphorylation level of PI3K, Akt, and mTOR. Conclusions This study demonstrated that AT-I induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in ovarian cancer cells. These results suggest that AT-I might be a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:28141785

  17. Ras pathway activation in hepatocellular carcinoma and anti-tumoral effect of combined sorafenib and rapamycin in vivo☆

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Pippa; Toffanin, Sara; Villanueva, Augusto; Chiang, Derek Y.; Minguez, Beatriz; Cabellos, Laia; Savic, Radoslav; Hoshida, Yujin; Lim, Kiat Hon; Melgar-Lesmes, Pedro; Yea, Steven; Peix, Judit; Deniz, Kemal; Fiel, M. Isabel; Thung, Swan; Alsinet, Clara; Tovar, Victoria; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Bruix, Jordi; Roayaie, Sasan; Schwartz, Myron; Friedman, Scott L.; Llovet, Josep M.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims The success of sorafenib in the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has focused interest on the role of Ras signaling in this malignancy. We investigated the molecular alterations of the Ras pathway in HCC and the antineoplastic effects of sorafenib in combination with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR pathway, in experimental models. Methods Gene expression (qRT-PCR, oligonucleotide microarray), DNA copy number changes (SNP-array), methylation of tumor suppressor genes (methylation-specific PCR) and protein activation (immunohistochemistry) were analysed in 351 samples. Anti-tumoral effects of combined therapy targeting the Ras and mTOR pathways were evaluated in cell lines and HCC xenografts. Results Different mechanisms accounted for Ras pathway activation in HCC. H-ras was up-regulated during different steps of hepatocarcinogenesis. B-raf was overexpressed in advanced tumors and its expression was associated with genomic amplification. Partial methylation of RASSF1A and NORE1A was detected in 89% and 44% of tumors respectively, and complete methylation was found in 11 and 4% of HCCs. Activation of the pathway (pERK immunostaining) was identified in 10.3% of HCC. Blockade of Ras and mTOR pathways with sorafenib and rapamycin reduced cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in cell lines. In vivo, the combination of both compounds enhanced tumor necrosis and ulceration when compared with sorafenib alone. Conclusions Ras activation results from several molecular alterations, such as methylation of tumor suppressors and amplification of oncogenes (B-raf). Sorafenib blocks signaling and synergizes with rapamycin in vivo, preventing tumor progression. These data provide the rationale for testing this combination in clinical studies. PMID:19665249

  18. Exploring the anti-tumoral effects of tick saliva and derived components.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana Carolina Prado; Szabó, Matias Pablo Juan; Oliveira, Carlo Jose Freire; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa

    2015-08-01

    Ticks are blood-feeding arthropods with an outstanding ability to remain attached to its host for considerable periods while blood-feeding and remaining unnoticed. Their success results from the ability to modulate hemostatic and host immune responses. The ability to "bypass" a host's defenses, prevent blood clotting and wound healing makes ticks utterly interesting animals for the development of new drugs. Studies worldwide on various tick species have shown that tick saliva possesses a wide array of lipidic and proteic biomolecules with useful properties. These include not only immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet and anti-clotting properties, but also cytotoxic and cytolitic properties that act against various cell types, and anti-angiogenic properties, which have gained increasing prominence. We searched PubMed, Science Direct, Elsevier and other sites for publications regarding tick saliva and its effects on cancer cells and angiogenesis. Our aim was to compile a list of molecules with potential for host adaptation and for the development of new cancer treatment drugs.

  19. Inhibition of the HER2-YB1-AR axis with Lapatinib synergistically enhances Enzalutamide anti-tumor efficacy in castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, Masaki; Bishop, Jennifer L.; Takeuchi, Ario; Nip, Ka Mun; Cordonnier, Thomas; Beraldi, Eliana; Kuruma, Hidetoshi; Gleave, Martin E.; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2015-01-01

    Incurable castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is driven by androgen receptor (AR) activation. Potent therapies that prevent AR signaling, such as Enzalutamide (ENZ), are mainstay treatments for CRPC; however patients eventually progress with ENZ resistant (ENZR) disease. In this study, we investigated one mechanism of ENZ resistance, and tried to improve therapeutic efficiency of ENZ. We found HER2 expression is increased in ENZR tumors and cell lines, and is induced by ENZ treatment of LNCaP cells. ENZ-induced HER2 overexpression was dependent on AKT-YB1 activation and modulated AR activity. HER2 dependent AR activation in LNCaP and ENZR cells was effectively blocked by treatment with the EGFR/HER2 inhibitor Lapatinib, which reduced cell viability and increased apoptosis. Despite efficacy in vitro, in vivo monotherapy with Lapatinib did not prevent ENZR tumor growth. However, combination treatment of Lapatinib with ENZ most effectively induced cell death in LNCaP cells in vitro and was more effective than ENZ alone in preventing tumor growth in an in vivo model of CRPC. These results suggest that while HER2 overexpression and subsequent AR activation is a targetable mechanism of resistance to ENZ, therapy using Lapatinib is only a rational therapeutic approach when used in combination with ENZ in CRPC. PMID:25871401

  20. Anti-tumor effects of recombinant human macrophage colony-stimulating factor, alone or in combination with local irradiation, in mice inoculated with Lewis lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Shen, R N; Lin, Z H; Aukerman, S L; Ralph, P; Broxmeyer, H E

    1991-01-02

    Recombinant human (rhu) macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) was evaluated for efficacy, either alone or in combination with local X-irradiation (LR), in mice inoculated subcutaneously (s.c.) with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. The size of the primary tumor and numbers of lung metastases, 21 days after tumor inoculation and 15 days after the start of treatment, were reduced by 87% in tumor-bearing mice treated with 20 micrograms/dose M-CSF s.c. twice a day for 5 days. LR (800 cGy) to the tumor once a week for 2 weeks had a moderate anti-tumor effect and enhanced the anti-tumor effect of M-CSF. Hematological parameters, including nucleated cellularity in peripheral blood, femoral marrow, spleen and peritoneal exudate, as well as marrow and splenic granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells, and numbers of splenic Thy 1.2+ cell and peritoneal mast cells, were perturbed in LLC-bearing mice, and were influenced by treatment with M-CSF and LR. Treatment with M-CSF plus LR, but not with either agent alone, was associated with a significant, although slight, enhancement in survival time for LLC-bearing mice. Inability to obtain a better survival-enhancing effect appeared to be related to the limited treatment, since the anti-tumor effects of M-CSF were more notable early on in disease progression and were related to the dose of M-CSF used. The effects of M-CSF were most probably indirect ones on the host immune system. M-CSF, in combination with LR, may be of benefit in the treatment of human tumors that have metastatic potential.

  1. Anti-tumor effects of (1→3)-β-d-glucan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in S180 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Mo, Li; Chen, Yafei; Li, Wenjian; Guo, Shuai; Wang, Xuzhao; An, Hailong; Zhan, Yong

    2017-02-01

    (1→3)-β-d-Glucan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a typical polysaccharide with various biological effects and is considered a candidate for the prevention and treatment of cancer in vitro. Research into the function of (1→3)-β-d-glucan in tumor-bearing animals in vivo, however, is limited. Here, we investigated the effects of (1→3)-β-d-glucan from S. cerevisiae on S180 tumor-bearing mice and on the immunity of the tumor-bearing host. The molecular mechanisms underlying the observed effects were investigated. (1→3)-β-d-Glucan was shown to exert anti-tumor effects without toxicity in normal mouse cells. The volume and weight of S180 tumors decreased dramatically following treatment with (1→3)-β-d-glucan, and treatment with the polysaccharide was furthermore shown to increase the tumor inhibition rate in a dose-dependent manner. Spleen index, T lymphocyte subsets (CD4 and CD8), as well as interleukins (IL)-2, (IL-2, IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α were assayed to detect the immunoregulatory and anti-tumor effects after (1→3)-β-d-glucan intragastrical administration. (1→3)-β-d-Glucan was shown to significantly potentiate the mouse immune responses by, among other effects, decreasing the ratio of CD4 to CD8. The expression levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α were also significantly increased by (1→3)-β-d-glucan. These results suggest that (1→3)-β-d-glucan enhances the host's immune function during the tumor inhibition process. S180 tumor cells treated with (1→3)-β-d-glucan also exhibited significant apoptotic characteristics. (1→3)-β-d-glucan increased the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2 at the translation level by up-regulating Bax expression and down-regulating Bcl-2 expression, resulting in the initiation of cell apoptosis in S180 tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, these results indicate that the anti-tumor effects exerted by (1→3)-β-d-glucan may be attributed to the polysaccharide's immunostimulating properties and apoptosis

  2. Identification of Optimal Insertion Site in Recombinant Newcastle Disease Virus (rNDV) Vector Expressing Foreign Gene to Enhance Its Anti-Tumor Effect

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ziye; He, Jinjiao; Rasoul, Lubna M.; Liu, Yunye; Che, Ruixiang; Ding, Yun; Guo, Xiaocheng; Yang, Jiarui; Zou, Dehua; Zhang, Hua; Li, Deshan; Cao, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (rNDV) is tumor selective and intrinsically oncolytic, which has been developed as a vector to express exogenous genes to enhance its oncolytic efficacy. Our previous studies found that insertion sites of foreign gene in rNDV vector affected its expression and anti-tumor activities. However, the optimal insertion site for foreign genes remains unknown. In this study, we inserted the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) and IL2 genes into four different intergenic regions of the rNDV using reverse genetics technology. Recombinants rNDV-EGFPs and rNDV-IL2s were successfully rescued, which displayed the similar growth kinetics with parental virus. Both EGFP mRNA and protein levels were most abundant in HepG2 cells, when EGFP gene was inserted between the NP/P site of the rNDV. Similarly, the IL-2 expressed by HepG2 cells infected with rNDV-IL2 was highest, when IL2 was inserted into NP/P site. To test whether these rNDVs that express higher foreign genes could induce stronger anti-tumor response, we treated the H22-oxter-tumor-bearing C57BL/6J mice with rNDV-IL2s and then examined the oncolytic efficacy. The results showed that rNDV-IL2-NP/P had the strongest inhibition of murine hepatoma carcinoma tumors. The splenocytes isolated from the mice treated with rNDV-IL2-NP/P reached the highest degrees of CD4+ T and CD8+ T cells. In addition, animals’ survival rate in rNDV-IL2-NP/P-treated group was higher than that of other groups. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NP and P gene junction in rNDV is the optimal insertion site for foreign genes expression to enhance rNDV’s anti-tumor effects. PMID:27736965

  3. Synergistic Effects in Sonochemical Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Raymond M. G.; Pisano, Michael A.; Tortora, George; Sawicki, Edward

    1967-01-01

    The synergistic effects observed during the sterilization of Bacillus subtilis var. niger ATCC 9372 by the combined action of ethylene or propylene oxide with high-intensity airborne sound waves (34.8 kc/sec) were investigated. It has been shown that the number of surviving spores deposited on paper strips decreases exponentially with the sound intensity at sample level. Reductions of the order of one-third of the time required for standard propylene oxide sterilization have been observed by using the combined action of sound waves with gaseous sterilization. At the present time, maximal synergistic effects seem to be achieved for the following experimental conditions: propylene oxide concentration, 500 to 1,000 mg/liter; acoustic intensity, 161 to 162 db; contact time, 80 min; temperature, 60 C; and relative humidity, 40%. The basic mechanism involved in sonochemical sterilization seems to be more of a physical (accelerated gas diffusion) than a chemical nature. PMID:4965941

  4. Anti-tumor effect of cimetidine via inhibiting angiogenesis factors in N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine-induced mouse and rat bladder carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chihara, Yoshitomo; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Miyake, Makito; Hiasa, Yoshio; Hirao, Yoshihiko

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the anti-tumor effect and mechanisms of cimetidine in N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN)-induced bladder carcinogenesis model. Sixty-three male BALB/c mice and 67 male Wister rats were treated with BBN and cimetidine to examine the anti-tumor effect of cimetidine. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived endothelial growth factor (PDECGF), and E-selectin were examined to compare their expression in the tumor tissues. In mice, the tumor growth was reduced by cimetidine (p=0.011). The expression of PDECGF was reduced in the cimetidine-treated group (p=0.016). In rats, treatment of cimetidine reduced tumor growth (p=0.0001). Moreover, the expression of VEGF and PDECGF was reduced (p=0.02 and <0.001, respectively). The expression of E-selectin did not correlate with the tumor growth in either mice or rats. In mice, long-term cimetidine treatment proved very effective for inhibiting the tumor growth, but in rats, BBN after treatment with cimetidine showed the least tumor growth-inhibitory effect. In conclusion, cimetidine may have an inhibitory effect on tumor growth in bladder carcinogenesis via reducing the expression of angiogenesis factors including VEGF and PDECGF.

  5. Magnetic poly epsilon-caprolactone nanoparticles containing Fe3O4 and gemcitabine enhance anti-tumor effect in pancreatic cancer xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Gang, Jingu; Park, Seong-Bae; Hyung, Woochan; Choi, Eric H; Wen, Jing; Kim, Han-Soo; Shul, Young-Gun; Haam, Seungjoo; Song, Si Young

    2007-07-01

    We prepared magnetic (Fe(3)O(4)) poly epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) nanoparticles (mean diameter 164 +/- 3 nm) containing an anticancer drug (gemcitabine) using emulsion-diffusion method in order to develop more efficient drug delivery for cancer treatment. Nanoparticles were smooth, well individualized and homogeneous in size. The values of magnetizations for the magnetic PCL nanoparticles were observed around 10.2 emu/g at 2000 Oe magnetic field intensity and showed super-paramagnetic property. In case of the drug, the drug loading contents was 18.6% and entrapment efficiency was 52.2%. The anti-tumor effects caused by these particles were examined using nude mice bearing subcutaneous human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells (HPAC) in vivo. We divided that these mice were randomly assigned to one of five treatment groups for experimental contrast. The antitumor effect was showed with 15-fold higher dose when compared to free gemcitabine. From the result, the magnetic PCL nanoparticles may provide a therapeutic benefit by delivering drugs efficiently to magnetically targeted tumor tissues, thus achieving safe and successful anti-tumor effects with low toxicity.

  6. A new magnetic nanocapsule containing 5-fluorouracil: in vivo drug release, anti-tumor, and pro-apoptotic effects on CT26 cells allograft model.

    PubMed

    Shakeri-Zadeh, Ali; Shiran, Mohammad-Bagher; Khoee, Sepideh; Sharifi, Ali Mohammad; Ghaznavi, Habib; Khoei, Samideh

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to create an optimized method for preparation of 5-fluorouracil-loaded magnetic poly lactic-co-glycolic acid nanocapsules and to investigate its potential as multifunctional carriers to deliver therapeutic agents for tumor-targeted therapies. The in vitro release of the newly synthesized 5-fluorouracil-loaded poly lactic-co-glycolic acid magnetic nanocapsules was investigated in phosphate-buffered saline medium using the dialysis method. In vivo release studies of the magnetic nanocapsules were performed in rabbits. Finally, the targeting properties, anti-tumor, and pro-apoptotic effects of this new magnetic nanocapsule on CT26 cells allograft model were studied. The effective diameter of nanocapsules was 67.2 nm. In vivo release investigations showed that 5-fluorouracil has a sustained release profile, prolonged lifetime in the rabbit plasma, and increased tissue appetency when loaded into the magnetic nanocapsule. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed that the magnetic nanocapsules were successfully targeted to the tumor. Additionally, the anti-tumor studies revealed that the targeted therapy with magnetic nanocapsules containing 5-fluorouracil effectively inhibits the growth of tumors compared with 5-fluorouracil alone (P < 0.01). The present study demonstrates that this new magnetic nanocapsule can be considered a new nanotechnology-based cancer chemotherapy agent in vivo.

  7. Anti-tumor effect of adipose tissue derived-mesenchymal stem cells expressing interferon-β and treatment with cisplatin in a xenograft mouse model for canine melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin ok; Lee, Hee woo; Seo, Kyoung won; Kang, Sung keun; Ra, Jeong chan; Youn, Hwa young

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) are attractive cell-therapy vehicles for the delivery of anti-tumor molecules into the tumor microenvironment. The innate tropism of AT-MSCs for tumors has important implications for effective cellular delivery of anti-tumor molecules, including cytokines, interferon, and pro-drugs. The present study was designed to determine the possibility that the combination of stem cell-based gene therapy with low-dose cisplatin would improve therapeutic efficacy against canine melanoma. The IFN-β transduced canine AT-MSCs (cAT-MSC-IFN-β) inhibited the growth of LMeC canine melanoma cells in direct and indirect in vitro co-culture systems. In animal experiments using BALB/c nude mouse xenografts, which developed by injecting LMeC cells, the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β and low-dose cisplatin significantly reduced tumor volume compared with the other treatment groups. Fluorescent microscopic analysis with a TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling) assay of tumor section provided evidence for homing of cAT-MSC-IFN-β to the tumor site and revealed that the combination treatment of cAT-MSC-IFN-β with low-dose cisplatin induced high levels of cell apoptosis. These findings may prove useful in further explorations of the application of these combined approaches to the treatment of malignant melanoma and other tumors.

  8. Suppression of HSP27 increases the anti-tumor effects of quercetin in human leukemia U937 cells

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, XI; DONG, XIU-SHUAI; GAO, HAI-YAN; JIANG, YONG-FANG; JIN, YING-LAN; CHANG, YU-YING; CHEN, LI-YAN; WANG, JING-HUA

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a natural flavonoid, inhibits the growth of leukemia cells and induces apoptosis. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) has been reported to promote the development of leukemia by protecting tumor cells from apoptosis through various mechanisms. The present study investigated the effects of small hairpin (sh)RNA-mediated HSP27 knockdown on the anti-cancer effects of quercetin in U937 human leukemia cells. Cells were transfected with recombinant lentiviral vector pCMV-G-NR-U6-shHSP27 (shHSP27), which expressed shRNA specifically targeting the HSP27 gene, alone or in combination with quercetin. The results showed that shHSP27 and quercetin synergistically inhibited U937 cell proliferation and induced apoptosis by decreasing the Bcl2-to-Bax ratio. Furthermore, this combined treatment significantly suppressed the infiltration of tumor cells and the expression of angiogenesis-associated proteins HIF1α and VEGF. Compared with shHSP27 or quercetin alone, shHSP27 plus quercetin markedly decreased the protein expression of cyclinD1 and thus blocked the cell cycle at G1 phase. The Notch/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway is important in tumor aggressiveness; quercetin plus shHSP27 significantly decreased Notch 1 expression and the phosphorylation levels of the downstream signaling proteins AKT and mTOR. The inhibitory effects of quercetin plus shHSP27 on this pathway may thus have been responsible for the cell cycle arrest, inhibition of proliferations and infiltration as well as enhancement of apoptosis. Therefore, these findings collectively suggested that suppression of HSP27 expression amplified the anti-cancer effects of quercetin in U937 human leukemia cells, and that quercetin in combination with shHSP27 represents a promising therapeutic strategy for human leukemia. PMID:26648539

  9. The anti-tumor effect of A3 adenosine receptors is potentiated by pulsed electromagnetic fields in cultured neural cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Setti, Stefania; Cadossi, Ruggero; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2012-01-01

    A(3) adenosine receptors (ARs) play a pivotal role in the development of cancer and their activation is involved in the inhibition of tumor growth. The effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on cancer have been controversially discussed and the detailed mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In the past we have demonstrated that PEMFs increased A(2A) and A(3)AR density and functionality in human neutrophils, human and bovine synoviocytes, and bovine chondrocytes. In the same cells, PEMF exposure increased the anti-inflammatory effect mediated by A(2A) and/or A(3)ARs. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate if PEMF exposure potentiated the anti-tumor effect of A(3)ARs in PC12 rat adrenal pheochromocytoma and U87MG human glioblastoma cell lines in comparison with rat cortical neurons. Saturation binding assays and mRNA analysis revealed that PEMF exposure up-regulated A(2A) and A(3)ARs that are well coupled to adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP production. The activation of A(2A) and A(3)ARs resulted in the decrease of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) levels in tumor cells, whilst only A(3)ARs are involved in the increase of p53 expression. A(3)AR stimulation mediated an inhibition of tumor cell proliferation evaluated by thymidine incorporation. An increase of cytotoxicity by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and apoptosis by caspase-3 activation in PC12 and U87MG cells, but not in cortical neurons, was observed following A(3)AR activation. The effect of the A(3)AR agonist in tumor cells was enhanced in the presence of PEMFs and blocked by using a well-known selective antagonist. Together these results demonstrated that PEMF exposure significantly increases the anti-tumor effect modulated by A(3)ARs.

  10. The Anti-Tumor Effect of A3 Adenosine Receptors Is Potentiated by Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields in Cultured Neural Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Setti, Stefania; Cadossi, Ruggero; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2012-01-01

    A3 adenosine receptors (ARs) play a pivotal role in the development of cancer and their activation is involved in the inhibition of tumor growth. The effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on cancer have been controversially discussed and the detailed mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In the past we have demonstrated that PEMFs increased A2A and A3AR density and functionality in human neutrophils, human and bovine synoviocytes, and bovine chondrocytes. In the same cells, PEMF exposure increased the anti-inflammatory effect mediated by A2A and/or A3ARs. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate if PEMF exposure potentiated the anti-tumor effect of A3ARs in PC12 rat adrenal pheochromocytoma and U87MG human glioblastoma cell lines in comparison with rat cortical neurons. Saturation binding assays and mRNA analysis revealed that PEMF exposure up-regulated A2A and A3ARs that are well coupled to adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP production. The activation of A2A and A3ARs resulted in the decrease of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) levels in tumor cells, whilst only A3ARs are involved in the increase of p53 expression. A3AR stimulation mediated an inhibition of tumor cell proliferation evaluated by thymidine incorporation. An increase of cytotoxicity by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and apoptosis by caspase-3 activation in PC12 and U87MG cells, but not in cortical neurons, was observed following A3AR activation. The effect of the A3AR agonist in tumor cells was enhanced in the presence of PEMFs and blocked by using a well-known selective antagonist. Together these results demonstrated that PEMF exposure significantly increases the anti-tumor effect modulated by A3ARs. PMID:22761760

  11. Comparison of the anti-tumor effects of denosumab and zoledronic acid on the neoplastic stromal cells of giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Lau, Carol P Y; Huang, Lin; Wong, Kwok Chuen; Kumta, Shekhar Madhukar

    2013-01-01

    Denosumab and Zoledronic acid (ZOL) are two antiresorptive drugs currently in use for treating osteoporosis. They have different mechanisms of action but both have been shown to delay the onset of skeletal-related events in patients with giant cell tumor of bone (GCT). However, the anti-tumor mechanisms of denosumab on the neoplastic GCT stromal cells remain unknown. In this study, we focused on the direct effects of denosumab on the neoplastic GCT stromal cells and compared with ZOL. The microscopic view demonstrated a reduced cell growth in ZOL-treated but not in denosumab-treated GCT stromal cells. ZOL was found to exhibit a dose-dependent inhibition in cell growth in all GCT stromal cell lines tested and cause apoptosis in two out of three cell lines. In contrast, denosumab only exerted a minimal inhibitory effect in one cell line and did not induce any apoptosis. ZOL significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in two GCT stromal cell lines whereas their protein levels remained unchanged. On the contrary, denosumab did not regulate RANKL and OPG expression at both mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, the protein expression of Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (M-CSF), Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP), and Collagen α1 Type I were not regulated by denosumab and ZOL either. Our findings provide new insights in the anti-tumor effect of denosumab on GCT stromal cells and raise a concern that tumor recurrence may occur after the withdrawal of the drug.

  12. Advances in the study of berberine and its derivatives: a focus on anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor effects in the digestive system

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Kun; Li, Zhao; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Hao-yue; Li, Bo; Zhu, Wei-liang; Shi, Ji-ye; Jia, Qi; Li, Yi-ming

    2017-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that inflammation, particularly chronic inflammation, can increase the risk of cancer and that the simultaneous treatment of inflammation and cancer may produce excellent therapeutic effects. Berberine, an alkaloid isolated from Rhizoma coptidis, has broad applications, particularly as an antibacterial agent in the clinic with a long history. Over the past decade, many reports have demonstrated that this natural product and its derivatives have high activity against both cancer and inflammation. In this review, we summarize the advances in studing berberine and its derivatives as anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor agents in the digestive system; we also discuss their structure-activity relationship. These data should be useful for the development of this natural product as novel anticancer drugs with anti-inflammation activity. PMID:27917872

  13. Polypeptide-based nanogels co-encapsulating a synergistic combination of doxorubicin with 17-AAG show potent anti-tumor activity in ErbB2-driven breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Desale, Swapnil S; Raja, Srikumar M; Kim, Jong Oh; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Soni, Kruti S; Luan, Haitao; Williams, Stetson H; Bielecki, Timothy A; Feng, Dan; Storck, Matthew; Band, Vimla; Cohen, Samuel M; Band, Hamid; Bronich, Tatiana K

    2015-06-28

    ErbB2-driven breast cancers constitute 20-25% of the cases diagnosed within the USA. The humanized anti-ErbB2 monoclonal antibody, Trastuzumab (Herceptin™; Genentech), with chemotherapy is the current standard of treatment. Novel agents and strategies continue to be explored, given the challenges posed by Trastuzumab-resistance development in most patients. The HSP90 inhibitor, 17-allylaminodemethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), which induces ErbB2 degradation and attenuates downstream oncogenic signaling, is one such agent that showed significant promise in early phase I and II clinical trials. Its low water solubility, potential toxicities and undesirable side effects observed in patients, partly due to the Cremophor-based formulation, have been discouraging factors in the advancement of this promising drug into clinical use. Encapsulation of 17-AAG into polymeric nanoparticle formulations, particularly in synergistic combination with conventional chemotherapeutics, represents an alternative approach to overcome these problems. Herein, we report an efficient co-encapsulation of 17-AAG and doxorubicin, a clinically well-established and effective modality in breast cancer treatment, into biodegradable and biocompatible polypeptide-based nanogels. Dual drug-loaded nanogels displayed potent cytotoxicity in a breast cancer cell panel and exerted selective synergistic anticancer activity against ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cell lines. Analysis of ErbB2 degradation confirmed efficient 17-AAG release from nanogels with activity comparable to free 17-AAG. Furthermore, nanogels containing both 17-AAG and doxorubicin exhibited superior antitumor efficacy in vivo in an ErbB2-driven xenograft model compared to the combination of free drugs. These studies demonstrate that polypeptide-based nanogels can serve as novel nanocarriers for encapsulating 17-AAG along with other chemotherapeutics, providing an opportunity to overcome solubility issues and thereby exploit its full

  14. Apigenin sensitizes colon cancer cells to anti-tumor activity of ABT-263

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Huanjie; Jing, Kai; Mahmoud, Esraa; Huang, Haihong; Fang, Xianjun; Yu, Chunrong

    2013-01-01

    Apigenin is an edible plant-derived flavonoid that shows modest anti-tumor activities in vitro and in vivo. Apigenin treatment resulted in cell growth arrest and apoptosis in various types of tumors by modulating several signaling pathways. In the present study, we evaluated interactions between apigenin and ABT-263 in colon cancer cells. We observed a synergistic effect between apigenin and ABT-263 on apoptosis of colon cancer cells. ABT-263 alone induced limited cell death while upregulating expression of Mcl-1, a potential mechanism for the acquired resistance to ABT-263. The presence of apigenin antagonized ABT-263-induced Mcl-1 upregulation and dramatically enhanced ABT-263-induced cell death. Meanwhile, apigenin suppressed AKT and ERK activation. Inactivation of either AKT or ERK by lentivirus-transduced shRNA or treatment with specific small molecule inhibitors of these pathways enhanced ABT-263-induced cell death, mirroring the effect of apigenin. Moreover, the combination response was associated with upregulation of Bim and activation of Bax. Downregulation of Bax eliminated the synergistic effect of apigenin and ABT-263 on cell death. Xenograft studies in SCID mice showed that the combined treatment with apigenin and ABT-263 inhibited tumor growth by up to 70% without obvious adverse effects, while either agent only inhibited around 30%. Our results demonstrate a novel strategy to enhance ABT-263 induced anti-tumor activity in human colon cancer cells by apigenin via inhibition of the Mcl-1, AKT and ERK pro-survival regulators. PMID:24126433

  15. Ifosfamide in combination with paclitaxel or doxorubicin: regimens which effectively mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells while demonstrating anti-tumor activity in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Prince, H M; Gardyn, J; Millward, M J; Rischin, D; Francis, P; Gates, P; Chapple, P; Quinn, M; Juneja, S; Wolf, M; Januszewicz, E H; Richardson, G; Scarlett, J; Briggs, P; Brettell, M; Toner, G C

    1999-03-01

    For patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) who undergo high-dose therapy with autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplantation, an important prerequisite is a mobilization regimen that efficiently mobilizes PBPCs while producing an effective anti-tumor effect. We prospectively evaluated ifosfamide-based chemotherapy for mobilization efficiency, toxicity and disease response in 37 patients. Patients received two cycles of the ifosfamide-based regimen; ifosfamide (5 g/m2 with conventional-dose cycle and 6 g/m2 with mobilization cycle) with either 50 mg/m2 doxorubicin (if limited prior anthracycline and/or progression more than 12 months after an anthracycline-based regimen) or 175 mg/m2 paclitaxel. For the mobilization cycle, all patients received additional G-CSF (10 microg/kg SC, daily) commencing 24 h after completion of chemotherapy. The target yield was >6x10(6) CD34+ cells/kg, sufficient to support the subsequent three cycles of high-dose therapy. The mobilization therapy was well tolerated and the peak days for peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells were days 10-13 with no significant differences in the PB CD34+ cells mobilization kinetics between the ifosfamide-doxorubicin vs. ifosfamide-paclitaxel regimens. The median PBPC CD34+ cell content ranged from 2.9 to 4.0x10(6)/kg per day during days 9-14. After a median of 3 (range 1-5) collection days, the median total CD34+ cell, CFU-GM and MNC for all 44 individual sets of collections was 9.2x10(6)/kg (range 0.16-54.9), 37x10(4)/kg (range 5.7-247) and 7.3x10(8)/kg (range 2.1-26.1), respectively. The PBPC target yield was achieved in 35 of the 37 patients. The overall response rate for the 31 evaluable patients was 68% with 10% having progressive disease. Thirty-three patients have subsequently received high-dose therapy consisting of three planned cycles of high-dose ifosfamide, thiotepa and paclitaxel with each cycle supported with PBPCs. Rapid neutrophil and platelet recovery has been

  16. Isorhamnetin augments the anti-tumor effect of capeciatbine through the negative regulation of NF-κB signaling cascade in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Manu, Kanjoormana A; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Ramachandran, Lalitha; Li, Feng; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M E; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Arfuso, Frank; Kumar, Alan Prem; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Sethi, Gautam

    2015-07-10

    Development of drug resistance to standard chemotherapy is a common phenomenon that leads to poor prognosis in patients. Thus, novel agents that can attenuate chemoresistance are urgently needed. Therefore, we analyzed whether isorhamnetin (IH), a 3'-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, can enhance the potential efficacy of capecitabine in gastric cancer. The potential effect of IH on viability was analyzed by MTT assay, apoptosis by flow cytometric analysis, and NF-κB activation by DNA binding as well as Western blot assays. The in vivo effect of IH was also examined on the growth of subcutaneously implanted tumors in nude mice. IH inhibited the viability, potentiated the apoptotic effects of capecitabine, abrogated NF-κB activation, and suppressed the expression of various NF-κB regulated gene products in tumor cells. In a gastric cancer xenograft model, administration of IH alone (1 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) significantly suppressed the tumor growth alone as well as in combination with capecitabine. IH further reduced NF-κB activation and the expression of various proliferative and oncogenic biomarkers in tumor tissues. Overall, our results demonstrate that IH can significantly enhance the anti-tumor effects of capecitabine through the negative regulation of NF-κB regulated oncogenic genes.

  17. Anti-tumor and anti-invasion effects of a combination of 4-methylumbelliferone and ionizing radiation in human fibrosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Saga, Ryo; Monzen, Satoru; Chiba, Mitsuru; Yoshino, Hironori; Nakamura, Toshiya; Hosokawa, Yoichiro

    2017-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a major component of the extracellular matrix that is synthesized in excess in cancer tissues. 4-methylumbelliferone (MU) inhibits the synthesis of HA and is closely related to the invasion and metastasis of cancer. However, the effects of MU in conjunction with cancer radiotherapy remain unknown. The present study assessed the anti-tumor and anti-invasion effects of the concomitant use of ionizing radiation (IR) and 100 µM MU on human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. Cell viability and cellular invasion potency assays were performed. There was a greater decrease in the viability of cells cultured with a combination of 2 Gy IR and MU compared with untreated control cells. In addition, cell cycle distribution analysis demonstrated that a higher proportion of these cells were in the sub-G1 phase and higher fractions of annexin-V positive, propidium iodide positive cells (i.e., apoptotic cells) were observed. HA concentration in the 2 Gy irradiated culture was similar to that in the non-irradiated control culture, however, it significantly decreased following the administration of both MU alone and 2 Gy IR with MU. Furthermore, treatment with 2 Gy IR and MU resulted in a significant decrease in the invasion rate and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MPP-9 expression. Taken together, these results suggest that the administration of MU with 2 Gy IR is effective at reducing HA production, cell invasion and the metastatic potential of cancer cells. PMID:28123575

  18. Regulation of local host-mediated anti-tumor mechanisms by cytokines: direct and indirect effects on leukocyte recruitment and angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, M.; McCormick, K. L.; Volker, K.; Ortaldo, J. R.; Wigginton, J. M.; Brunda, M. J.; Wiltrout, R. H.; Fogler, W. E.

    1997-01-01

    The regulation of tumor growth by cytokine-induced alterations in host effector cell recruitment and activation is intimately associated with leukocyte adhesion and angiogenic modulation. In the present study, we have developed a novel tumor model to investigate this complex series of events in response to cytokine administration. Gelatin sponges containing recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor (rhFGFb) and B16F10 melanoma cells were implanted onto the serosal surface of the left lateral hepatic lobe in syngeneic C57BL/6 mice. The tumor model was characterized by progressive tumor growth initially localized within the sponge and the subsequent development of peritoneal carcinomatosis. Microscopic examination of the sponge matrix revealed well developed tumor-associated vascular structures and areas of endothelial cell activation as evidenced by leukocyte margination. Treatment of mice 3 days after sponge implantation with a therapeutic regimen consisting of pulse recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) combined with recombinant murine interleukin-12 (rmIL-12) resulted in a marked hepatic mononuclear infiltrate and inhibition of tumor growth. In contrast to the control group, sponges from mice treated with rhIL-2/rmIL-12 demonstrated an overall lack of cellularity and vascular structure. The regimen of rhIL-2 in combination with rmIL-12 was equally effective against gelatin sponge implants of rhFGFb/B16F10 melanoma in SCID mice treated with anti-asialo-GM1 in the absence of a mononuclear infiltration, suggesting that T, B, and/or NK cells were not the principal mediators of the anti-tumor response in this tumor model. The absence of vascularity within the sponge after treatment suggests that a potential mechanism of rhIL-2/rmIL-12 anti-tumor activity is the inhibition of neovascular growth associated with the establishment of tumor lesions. This potential mechanism could be dissociated from the known activities of these two cytokines to induce the

  19. Anti-tumor effect in human breast cancer by TAE226, a dual inhibitor for FAK and IGF-IR in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kurio, Naito; Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Fukazawa, Takuya; Takaoka, Munenori; Okui, Tatsuo; Hassan, Nur Mohammad Monsur; Honami, Tatsuki; Hatakeyama, Shinji; Ikeda, Masahiko; Naomoto, Yoshio; Sasaki, Akira

    2011-05-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a 125-kDa non-receptor type tyrosine kinase that localizes to focal adhesions. FAK overexpression is frequently found in invasive and metastatic cancers of the breast, colon, thyroid, and prostate, but its role in osteolytic metastasis is not well understood. In this study, we have analyzed anti-tumor effects of the novel FAK Tyr{sup 397} inhibitor TAE226 against bone metastasis in breast cancer by using TAE226. Oral administration of TAE226 in mice significantly decreased bone metastasis and osteoclasts involved which were induced by MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and increased the survival rate of the mouse models of bone metastasis. TAE226 also suppressed the growth of subcutaneous tumors in vivo and the proliferation and migration of MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro. Significantly, TAE226 inhibited the osteoclast formation in murine pre-osteoclastic RAW264.7 cells, and actin ring and pit formation in mature osteoclasts. Moreover, TAE226 inhibited the receptor activator for nuclear factor {kappa} B Ligand (RANKL) gene expression induced by parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) in bone stromal ST2 cells and blood free calcium concentration induced by PTHrP administration in vivo. These findings suggest that FAK was critically involved in osteolytic metastasis and activated in tumors, pre-osteoclasts, mature osteoclasts, and bone stromal cells and TAE226 can be effectively used for the treatment of cancer induced bone metastasis and other bone diseases.

  20. Efficient anti-tumor effect of photodynamic treatment with polymeric nanoparticles composed of polyethylene glycol and polylactic acid block copolymer encapsulating hydrophobic porphyrin derivative.

    PubMed

    Ogawara, Ken-ichi; Shiraishi, Taro; Araki, Tomoya; Watanabe, Taka-ichi; Ono, Tsutomu; Higaki, Kazutaka

    2016-01-20

    To develop potent and safer formulation of photosensitizer for cancer photodynamic therapy (PDT), we tried to formulate hydrophobic porphyrin derivative, photoprotoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (PppIX-DME), into polymeric nanoparticles composed of polyethylene glycol and polylactic acid block copolymer (PN-Por). The mean particle size of PN-Por prepared was around 80nm and the zeta potential was determined to be weakly negative. In vitro phototoxicity study for PN-Por clearly indicated the significant phototoxicity of PN-Por for three types of tumor cells tested (Colon-26 carcinoma (C26), B16BL6 melanoma and Lewis lung cancer cells) in the PppIX-DME concentration-dependent fashion. Furthermore, it was suggested that the release of PppIX-DME from PN-Por would gradually occur to provide the sustained release of PppIX-DME. In vivo pharmacokinetics of PN-Por after intravenous administration was evaluated in C26 tumor-bearing mice, and PN-Por exhibited low affinity to the liver and spleen and was therefore retained in the blood circulation for a long time, leading to the efficient tumor disposition of PN-Por. Furthermore, significant and highly effective anti-tumor effect was confirmed in C26 tumor-bearing mice with the local light irradiation onto C26 tumor tissues after PN-Por injection. These findings indicate the potency of PN-Por for the development of more efficient PDT-based cancer treatments.

  1. The increasingly anti-tumor effect of a colonic carcinoma DNA vaccine carrying HER2 by the adjuvanticity of IL-12.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ping; Zhang, Chunhua; Bian, Xiaoxia; Guo, Yanjun; Wei, Yueguang; Zhang, Li; Liu, Zhaoyang; Wang, Xiuying; Huang, Shumin

    2016-09-23

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of recombinant DNA vaccine-based human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) and Interleukin 12 (IL-12) on the development of colonic carcinoma in mice and the potential immune mechanisms involved. Recombinant plasmids pVAX1-HER2, pVAX1-IL-12 and pVAX1-HER2-IL-12 were constructed, and injected into female mice intramuscularly (i.m.) followed by an electric pulse. The humoral and cellular immune responses after immunization were examined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT), respectively. To evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of the plasmids, a mouse model with a HER2-expressing tumor was designed. Mice vaccinated with the HER2-IL-12 plasmid generated the strongest inhibition efficacy on the growth of HER2-expressing tumors and prolonged mouse survival. These observations emphasized the potential of IL-12 as an adjuvant for DNA vaccines and of vaccines based on HER2 and IL-12 as a promising treatment for colonic carcinoma.

  2. Interleukin-35 limits anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Turnis, Meghan E.; Sawant, Deepali V.; Szymczak-Workman, Andrea L.; Andrews, Lawrence P.; Delgoffe, Greg M.; Yano, Hiroshi; Beres, Amy J.; Vogel, Peter; Workman, Creg J.; Vignali, Dario A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T (Treg) cells pose a major barrier to effective anti-tumor immunity. Although Treg cell depletion enhances tumor rejection, the ensuing autoimmune sequelae limits its utility in the clinic and highlights the need for limiting Treg cell activity within the tumor microenvironment. Interleukin-35 (IL-35) is a Treg cell-secreted cytokine that inhibits T cell proliferation and function. Using an IL-35 reporter mouse, we observed substantial enrichment of IL-35+ Treg cells in tumors. Neutralization with an IL-35-specific antibody or Treg cell-restricted deletion of IL-35 production limited tumor growth in multiple murine models of human cancer. Limiting intratumoral IL-35 enhanced T cell proliferation, effector function, antigen-specific responses, and long-term T cell memory. Treg cell-derived IL-35 promoted the expression of multiple inhibitory receptors (PD1, TIM3, LAG3), thereby facilitating intratumoral T cell exhaustion. These findings reveal previously unappreciated roles for IL-35 in limiting anti-tumor immunity and contributing to T cell dysfunction in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26872697

  3. Interleukin-35 Limits Anti-Tumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Turnis, Meghan E; Sawant, Deepali V; Szymczak-Workman, Andrea L; Andrews, Lawrence P; Delgoffe, Greg M; Yano, Hiroshi; Beres, Amy J; Vogel, Peter; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2016-02-16

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells pose a major barrier to effective anti-tumor immunity. Although Treg cell depletion enhances tumor rejection, the ensuing autoimmune sequelae limits its utility in the clinic and highlights the need for limiting Treg cell activity within the tumor microenvironment. Interleukin-35 (IL-35) is a Treg cell-secreted cytokine that inhibits T cell proliferation and function. Using an IL-35 reporter mouse, we observed substantial enrichment of IL-35(+) Treg cells in tumors. Neutralization with an IL-35-specific antibody or Treg cell-restricted deletion of IL-35 production limited tumor growth in multiple murine models of human cancer. Limiting intratumoral IL-35 enhanced T cell proliferation, effector function, antigen-specific responses, and long-term T cell memory. Treg cell-derived IL-35 promoted the expression of multiple inhibitory receptors (PD1, TIM3, LAG3), thereby facilitating intratumoral T cell exhaustion. These findings reveal previously unappreciated roles for IL-35 in limiting anti-tumor immunity and contributing to T cell dysfunction in the tumor microenvironment.

  4. The miR-21/PTEN/Akt signaling pathway is involved in the anti-tumoral effects of zoledronic acid in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fragni, M; Bonini, S A; Bettinsoli, P; Bodei, S; Generali, D; Bottini, A; Spano, P F; Memo, M; Sigala, S

    2016-05-01

    Preclinical data indicate a direct anti-tumor effect of zoledronic acid (ZA) outside the skeleton, but its molecular mechanism is still not completely clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-cancer effects of ZA in human breast cancer cell lines, suggesting that they may in part be mediated via the miR-21/PTEN/Akt signaling pathway. The effect of ZA on cell viability was measured by MTT assay, and cell death induction was analyzed using either a double AO/EtBr staining and M30 ELISA assay. A Proteome Profiler Human Apoptosis Array was executed to evaluate the molecular basis of ZA-induced apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis was executed by flow cytometry. The effect of ZA on miR-21 expression was quantified by qRT-PCR, and the amount of PTEN protein and its targets were analyzed by Western blot. ZA inhibited cell growth in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, through the activation of cell death pathways and arrest of cell cycle progression. ZA downregulated the expression of miR-21, resulting in dephosphorilation of Akt and Bad and in a significant increase of p21 and p27 proteins expression. These results were observed also in MDA-MB-231 cells, commonly used as an experimental model of bone metastasis of breast cancer. This study revealed, for the first time, an involvement of the miR-21/PTEN/Akt signaling pathway in the mechanism of ZA anti-cancer actions in breast cancer cells. We would like to underline that this pathway is present both in the hormone responsive BC cell line (MCF-7) as well as in a triple negative cell line (MDA-MB-231). Taken together these results reinforce the use of ZA in clinical practice, suggesting the role of miR-21 as a possible mediator of its therapeutic efficacy.

  5. Melatonin enhances the anti-tumor effect of fisetin by inhibiting COX-2/iNOS and NF-κB/p300 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yi, Canhui; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Zhenlong; Xiao, Yao; Wang, Jingshu; Qiu, Huijuan; Yu, Wendan; Tang, Ranran; Yuan, Yuhui; Guo, Wei; Deng, Wuguo

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is a hormone identified in plants and pineal glands of mammals and possesses diverse physiological functions. Fisetin is a bio-flavonoid widely found in plants and exerts antitumor activity in several types of human cancers. However, the combinational effect of melatonin and fisetin on antitumor activity, especially in melanoma treatment, remains unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that melatonin could enhance the antitumor activity of fisetin in melanoma cells and identified the underlying molecular mechanisms. The combinational treatment of melanoma cells with fisetin and melatonin significantly enhanced the inhibitions of cell viability, cell migration and clone formation, and the induction of apoptosis when compared with the treatment of fisetin alone. Moreover, such enhancement of antitumor effect by melatonin was found to be mediated through the modulation of the multiply signaling pathways in melanoma cells. The combinational treatment of fisetin with melatonin increased the cleavage of PARP proteins, triggered more release of cytochrome-c from the mitochondrial inter-membrane, enhanced the inhibition of COX-2 and iNOS expression, repressed the nuclear localization of p300 and NF-κB proteins, and abrogated the binding of NF-κB on COX-2 promoter. Thus, these results demonstrated that melatonin potentiated the anti-tumor effect of fisetin in melanoma cells by activating cytochrome-c-dependent apoptotic pathway and inhibiting COX-2/iNOS and NF-κB/p300 signaling pathways, and our study suggests the potential of such a combinational treatment of natural products in melanoma therapy.

  6. Resveratrol potentiates the in vitro and in vivo anti-tumoral effects of curcumin in head and neck carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Masuelli, Laura; Di Stefano, Enrica; Fantini, Massimo; Mattera, Rosanna; Benvenuto, Monica; Marzocchella, Laura; Sacchetti, Pamela; Focaccetti, Chiara; Bernardini, Roberta; Tresoldi, Ilaria; Izzi, Valerio; Mattei, Maurizio; Frajese, Giovanni Vanni; Lista, Florigio; Modesti, Andrea; Bei, Roberto

    2014-11-15

    The survival rate of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) patients has not considerably changed over the last two decades. Polyphenols inhibit the growth of cancer cells. We determined whether the combination of Resveratrol (RES) and Curcumin (CUR) enhanced their in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities on HNSCC cell lines compared to the single compounds. We provide evidence that RES potentiated the apoptotic effect and reduced the IC50 of CUR on HNSCC cell lines. The model of compounds interaction indicated the onset of an additive effect of the two compounds compared to the single treatment after decrease of their concentrations. RES+CUR compared to CUR increased the PARP-1 cleavage, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, the inhibition of ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation, and the expression of LC3 II simultaneously with the formation of autophagic vacuoles. RES and CUR induced cytoplasmic NF-κB accumulation. RES+CUR administrations were safe in BALB/c mice and reduced the growth of transplanted salivary gland cancer cells (SALTO) more efficiently than CUR. Overall, combinations of CUR and RES was more effective in inhibiting in vivo and in vitro cancer growth than the treatment with CUR. Additional studies will be needed to define the therapeutic potential of these compounds in combination.

  7. Resveratrol potentiates the in vitro and in vivo anti-tumoral effects of curcumin in head and neck carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Masuelli, Laura; Stefano, Enrica Di; Fantini, Massimo; Mattera, Rosanna; Benvenuto, Monica; Marzocchella, Laura; Sacchetti, Pamela; Focaccetti, Chiara; Bernardini, Roberta; Tresoldi, Ilaria; Izzi, Valerio; Mattei, Maurizio; Frajese, Giovanni Vanni; Lista, Florigio; Modesti, Andrea; Bei, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The survival rate of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) patients has not considerably changed over the last two decades. Polyphenols inhibit the growth of cancer cells. We determined whether the combination of Resveratrol (RES) and Curcumin (CUR) enhanced their in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities on HNSCC cell lines compared to the single compounds. We provide evidence that RES potentiated the apoptotic effect and reduced the IC50 of CUR on HNSCC cell lines. The model of compounds interaction indicated the onset of an additive effect of the two compounds compared to the single treatment after decrease of their concentrations. RES+CUR compared to CUR increased the PARP-1 cleavage, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, the inhibition of ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation, and the expression of LC3 II simultaneously with the formation of autophagic vacuoles. RES and CUR induced cytoplasmic NF-κB accumulation. RES+CUR administrations were safe in BALB/c mice and reduced the growth of transplanted salivary gland cancer cells (SALTO) more efficiently than CUR. Overall, combinations of CUR and RES was more effective in inhibiting in vivo and in vitro cancer growth than the treatment with CUR. Additional studies will be needed to define the therapeutic potential of these compounds in combination. PMID:25296980

  8. The Fruit Hull of Gleditsia sinensis Enhances the Anti-Tumor Effect of cis-Diammine Dichloridoplatinum II (Cisplatin)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chang-Woo; Yoon, Seong Hoon; Kim, Yun Seong; Kim, Jong-In

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has substantial mortality worldwide, and chemotherapy is a routine regimen for the treatment of patients with lung cancer, despite undesirable effects such as drug resistance and chemotoxicity. Here, given a possible antitumor effect of the fruit hull of Gleditsia sinensis (FGS), we tested whether FGS enhances the effectiveness of cis-diammine dichloridoplatinum (II) (CDDP), a chemotherapeutic drug. We found that CDDP, when administered with FGS, significantly decreased the viability and increased the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells, which were associated with the increase of p21 and decreases of cyclin D1 and CDK4. Concordantly, when combined with FGS, CDDP significantly reduced the volume and weight of tumors derived from LLC subcutaneously injected into C57BL/6 mice, with concomitant increases of phosphor-p53 and p21 in tumor tissue. Together, these results show that FGS could enhance the antitumor activity of CDDP, suggesting that FGS can be used as a complementary measure to enhance the efficacy of a chemotherapeutic agent such as CDDP. PMID:27721894

  9. In Vivo Anti-Tumor Effects of Flavokawain A in 4T1 Breast Cancer Cell-Challenged Mice.

    PubMed

    Abu, Nadiah; Mohamed, Nurul Elyani; Yeap, Swee Keong; Lim, Kian Lam; Akhtar, M Nadeem; Zulfadli, Aimi Jamil; Kee, Beh Boon; Abdullah, Mohd Puad; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2015-01-01

    Flavokawain A is a chalcone that can be found in the kava-kava plant (Piper methsyticum) extract. The kava-kava plant has been reported to possess anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities. The state of the immune system, and the inflammatory process play vital roles in the progression of cancer. The immunomodulatary effects and the anti-inflammatory effects of flavokawain A in a breast cancer murine model have not been studied yet. Thus, this study aimed to elucidate the basic mechanism as to how flavokawain A regulates and enhance the immune system as well as impeding the inflammatory process in breast cancer-challenged mice. Based on our study, it is interesting to note that flavokawain A increased the T cell population; both Th1 cells and CTLs, aside from the natural killer cells. The levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 were also elevated in the serum of flavokawain A-treated mice. Apart from that, flavokawain A also decreased the weight and volume of the tumor, and managed to induce apoptosis in them. In terms of inflammation, flavokawain A-treated mice had reduced level of major pro-inflammatory mediators; NO, iNOS, NF-KB, ICAM and COX-2. Overall, flavokawain A has the potential to not only enhance antitumor immunity, but also prevents the inflammatory process in a cancer-prone microenvironment.

  10. Visible light and/or UVA offer a strong amplification of the anti-tumor effect of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Bernd, August

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, a dietary pigment from the plant Curcuma longa, inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in different cell lines. The therapeutic benefit is hampered by a very low absorption after trans-dermal or oral application. Therefore, great efforts were undertaken to enhance the effectiveness of curcumin. Recently, it was demonstrated that curcumin offers the described effects also at low concentrations (0.2-1 μg/ml) when applied in combination with UVA or visible light. The efficacy of this combination was shown in human epidermal keratinocytes and in a panel of other cell species in vitro as well as in a xenograft tumor model with A431 tumor cells injected subcutaneously in the flanks of NMRI nude mice in vivo. The treatment of keratinocytes with curcumin and light resulted in the inhibition of cell growth, and in the induction of apoptosis, whereas no toxic cell membrane damage was detectable. The treatment of tumor bearing nude mice with curcumin and visible light resulted in reduced tumor volumes, reduced proliferation rates, and the induction of apoptosis in the tumors. On the molecular level inhibition of extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 and epidermal growth factor receptor was observed which may aid to inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. This review covers the experiences of the new combination treatment of human tumors.

  11. Anti-tumor effects of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF): implication for cancer therapy. A mini-review.

    PubMed

    Belkacemi, Louiza; Zhang, Shaun Xiaoliu

    2016-01-08

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is a secreted glycoprotein and a non-inhibitory member of the serine protease inhibitor (serpin) family. It is widely expressed in human fetal and adult tissues but its expression decreases with age and in malignant tissues. The main anti-cancer activities of PEDF derive from its dual effects, either indirectly on the tumor microenvironment (indirect antitumor action) or directly on the tumor itself (direct antitumor influence). The indirect antitumor activities of PEDF were uncovered from the early findings that it stimulates retinoblastoma cell differentiation and that additionally it possesses anti-angiogenic, anti-tumorigenic and anti-metastatic properties. The mechanisms of its direct antitumor effect, however, have not been fully elucidated. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of the multifunctional activities of PEDF and, in particular, its anti-cancer signaling mechanisms. Additionally, we discuss the possibility of using novel phosphaplatin compounds that can upregulate PEDF expression as a chemotherapy for cancer treatment.

  12. Effects of Psoralen as an Anti-tumor Agent in Human Breast Cancer MCF-7/ADR Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Cheng, Kai; Han, Yong; Zhang, Guoqiang; Dong, Jianli; Cui, Yuzhen; Yang, Zhenlin

    2016-05-01

    Psoralen is a major active component of Psoralea corylifolia. In the present study, we analyzed psoralen-induced changes in human breast cancer MCF-7/ADR cells and investigated the underlying mechanisms of the anticancer effect on MCF-7/ADR cells. We measured cell viability by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay to evaluate the cytotoxicity and multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal activity of psoralen. The cell cycle distribution and apoptosis, accumulation and efflux of rhodamine123 (Rh123), and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression levels of MCF-7/ADR cells treated with psoralen were all detected by flow cytometry (FCM). We assessed P-gp ATPase activity by monitoring ATP consumption. We evaluated the activity of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and the expression of E-cadherin, vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) involved in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The results showed that psoralen inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7/ADR cells as shown by G0/G1 phase arrest rather than encouraging apoptosis. It was also observed that psoralen reversed MDR through inhibiting ATPase activity rather than reducing P-gp expression. Our results further showed that psoralen inhibited the migration abilities of MCF-7/ADR cells by repressing EMT possibly through inhibiting the activation of NF-κB. Our findings provided a systematic and detailed description of the anti-cancer effect of psoralen on MCF-7/ADR cells for the exploration of natural compounds as novel anticancer agents.

  13. Low dose angiostatic treatment counteracts radiotherapy-induced tumor perfusion and enhances the anti-tumor effect

    PubMed Central

    Kleibeuker, Esther A.; Fokas, Emmanouil; Allen, Philip D.; Kersemans, Veerle; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Beech, John; Im, Jaehong H.; Smart, Sean C.; Castricum, Kitty C.; van den Berg, Jaap; Schulkens, Iris A.; Hill, Sally A.; Harris, Adrian L.; Slotman, Ben J.; Verheul, Henk M.

    2016-01-01

    The extent of tumor oxygenation is an important factor contributing to the efficacy of radiation therapy (RTx). Interestingly, several preclinical studies have shown benefit of combining RTx with drugs that inhibit tumor blood vessel growth, i.e. angiostatic therapy. Recent findings show that proper scheduling of both treatment modalities allows dose reduction of angiostatic drugs without affecting therapeutic efficacy. We found that whilst low dose sunitinib (20 mg/kg/day) did not affect the growth of xenograft HT29 colon carcinoma tumors in nude mice, the combination with either single dose RTx (1x 5Gy) or fractionated RTx (5x 2Gy/week, up to 3 weeks) substantially hampered tumor growth compared to either RTx treatment alone. To better understand the interaction between RTx and low dose angiostatic therapy, we explored the effects of RTx on tumor angiogenesis and tissue perfusion. DCE-MRI analyses revealed that fractionated RTx resulted in enhanced perfusion after two weeks of treatment. This mainly occurred in the center of the tumor and was accompanied by increased tissue viability and decreased hypoxia. These effects were accompanied by increased expression of the pro-angiogenic growth factors VEGF and PlGF. DCE-MRI and contrast enhanced ultrasonography showed that the increase in perfusion and tissue viability was counteracted by low-dose sunitinib. Overall, these data give insight in the dynamics of tumor perfusion during conventional 2 Gy fractionated RTx and provide a rationale to combine low dose angiostatic drugs with RTx both in the palliative as well as in the curative setting. PMID:27780936

  14. Hsa-let-7g miRNA regulates the anti-tumor effects of gastric cancer cells under oxidative stress through the expression of DDR genes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haiqing; Zhao, Xuanzhong; Jin, Zhao; Hou, Mingxing

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress is linked to increased risk of gastric cancer (GC). Recent reports have found that hsa-let-7 g microRNA (miRNA) has properties of anti-tumor and resistance to damages induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). Dysregulation of hsa-let-7 g was present in GC in vivo and in vitro under exogenous stress. However, we didn't know whether there are regulatory mechanisms of hsa-let-7 g in GC under oxidative stress. This study was aimed at investigating the effects of hsa-let-7 g microRNA (miRNA) on GC under oxidative stress. The results showed that H2O2 induced the increase of DNA damage response (DDR) genes (ATM, H2AX and Chk1) and downregulation of hsa-let-7 g in GC cells. Further study confirmed Hsa-let-7 g caused the apoptosis and loss of proliferation in GC cells exposed to H2O2 associated with repression of DDR system. Yet, we found let-7 g didn't target DDR genes (ATM, H2AX and Chk1) directly. In addition, data revealed hsa-let-7 g miRNA increased the sensitivity of GC to X-rays involving in ATM regulation as well according to application of X-rays (another DDR inducer). In conclusion, Hsa-let-7 g miRNA increased the sensitivity of GC to oxidative stress by repression activation of DDR indirectly. Let-7 g improved the effects of X-rays on GC cells involving in DDR regulation as well.

  15. Improved in vivo anti-tumor effects of IgA-Her2 antibodies through half-life extension and serum exposure enhancement by FcRn targeting.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Saskia; Nederend, Maaike; Jansen, J H Marco; Reiding, Karli R; Jacobino, Shamir R; Meeldijk, Jan; Bovenschen, Niels; Wuhrer, Manfred; Valerius, Thomas; Ubink, Ruud; Boross, Peter; Rouwendal, Gerard; Leusen, Jeanette H W

    2016-01-01

    Antibody therapy is a validated treatment approach for several malignancies. All currently clinically applied therapeutic antibodies (Abs) are of the IgG isotype. However, not all patients respond to this therapy and relapses can occur. IgA represents an alternative isotype for antibody therapy that engages FcαRI expressing myeloid effector cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes. IgA Abs have been shown to effectively kill tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. However, due to the short half-life of IgA Abs in mice, daily injections are required to reach an effect comparable to IgG Abs. The relatively long half-life of IgG Abs and serum albumin arises from their capability of interacting with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). As IgA Abs lack a binding site for FcRn, we generated IgA Abs with the variable regions of the Her2-specific Ab trastuzumab and attached an albumin-binding domain (ABD) to the heavy or light chain (HCABD/LCABD) to extend their serum half-life. These modified Abs were able to bind albumin from different species in vitro. Furthermore, tumor cell lysis of IgA-Her2-LCABD Abs in vitro was similar to unmodified IgA-Her2 Abs. Pharmacokinetic studies in mice revealed that the serum exposure and half-life of the modified IgA-Her2 Abs was extended. In a xenograft mouse model, the modified IgA1 Abs exhibited a slightly, but significantly, improved anti-tumor response compared to the unmodified Ab. In conclusion, empowering IgA Abs with albumin-binding capacity results in in vitro and in vivo functional Abs with an enhanced exposure and prolonged half-life.

  16. Anti-tumor effects of Ganoderma lucidum (reishi) in inflammatory breast cancer in in vivo and in vitro models.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Arroyo, Ivette J; Rosario-Acevedo, Raysa; Aguilar-Perez, Alexandra; Clemente, Pedro L; Cubano, Luis A; Serrano, Juan; Schneider, Robert J; Martínez-Montemayor, Michelle M

    2013-01-01

    The medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) was tested as a potential therapeutic for Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) using in vivo and in vitro IBC models. IBC is a lethal and aggressive form of breast cancer that manifests itself without a typical tumor mass. Studies show that IBC tissue biopsies overexpress E-cadherin and the eukaryotic initiation factor 4GI (eIF4GI), two proteins that are partially responsible for the unique pathological properties of this disease. IBC is treated with a multimodal approach that includes non-targeted systemic chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation. Because of its non-toxic and selective anti-cancer activity, medicinal mushroom extracts have received attention for their use in cancer therapy. Our previous studies demonstrate these selective anti-cancer effects of Reishi, where IBC cell viability and invasion, as well as the expression of key IBC molecules, including eIF4G is compromised. Thus, herein we define the mechanistic effects of Reishi focusing on the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, a regulator of cell survival and growth. The present study demonstrates that Reishi treated IBC SUM-149 cells have reduced expression of mTOR downstream effectors at early treatment times, as we observe reduced eIF4G levels coupled with increased levels of eIF4E bound to 4E-BP, with consequential protein synthesis reduction. Severe combined immunodeficient mice injected with IBC cells treated with Reishi for 13 weeks show reduced tumor growth and weight by ∼50%, and Reishi treated tumors showed reduced expression of E-cadherin, mTOR, eIF4G, and p70S6K, and activity of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK1/2). Our results provide evidence that Reishi suppresses protein synthesis and tumor growth by affecting survival and proliferative signaling pathways that act on translation, suggesting that Reishi is a potential natural therapeutic for breast and other cancers.

  17. Anti-Tumor Effects of Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) in Inflammatory Breast Cancer in In Vivo and In Vitro Models

    PubMed Central

    Suarez-Arroyo, Ivette J.; Rosario-Acevedo, Raysa; Aguilar-Perez, Alexandra; Clemente, Pedro L.; Cubano, Luis A.; Serrano, Juan; Schneider, Robert J.; Martínez-Montemayor, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    The medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) was tested as a potential therapeutic for Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) using in vivo and in vitro IBC models. IBC is a lethal and aggressive form of breast cancer that manifests itself without a typical tumor mass. Studies show that IBC tissue biopsies overexpress E-cadherin and the eukaryotic initiation factor 4GI (eIF4GI), two proteins that are partially responsible for the unique pathological properties of this disease. IBC is treated with a multimodal approach that includes non-targeted systemic chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation. Because of its non-toxic and selective anti-cancer activity, medicinal mushroom extracts have received attention for their use in cancer therapy. Our previous studies demonstrate these selective anti-cancer effects of Reishi, where IBC cell viability and invasion, as well as the expression of key IBC molecules, including eIF4G is compromised. Thus, herein we define the mechanistic effects of Reishi focusing on the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, a regulator of cell survival and growth. The present study demonstrates that Reishi treated IBC SUM-149 cells have reduced expression of mTOR downstream effectors at early treatment times, as we observe reduced eIF4G levels coupled with increased levels of eIF4E bound to 4E-BP, with consequential protein synthesis reduction. Severe combined immunodeficient mice injected with IBC cells treated with Reishi for 13 weeks show reduced tumor growth and weight by ∼50%, and Reishi treated tumors showed reduced expression of E-cadherin, mTOR, eIF4G, and p70S6K, and activity of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK1/2). Our results provide evidence that Reishi suppresses protein synthesis and tumor growth by affecting survival and proliferative signaling pathways that act on translation, suggesting that Reishi is a potential natural therapeutic for breast and other cancers. PMID:23468988

  18. Production Conditions Affect the In Vitro Anti-Tumoral Effects of a High Concentration Multi-Strain Probiotic Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Cinque, Benedetta; La Torre, Cristina; Lombardi, Francesca; Palumbo, Paola; Van der Rest, Michel

    2016-01-01

    A careful selection of the probiotic agent, standardization of the dose and detailed characterization of the beneficial effects are essential when considering use of a probiotic for the dietary management of serious diseases. However, changes in the manufacturing processes, equipment or facilities can result in differences in the product itself due to the live nature of probiotics. The need to reconfirm safety and/or efficacy for any probiotic product made at a different factory is therefore mandatory. Recently, under the brand VSL#3®, a formulation produced by a manufacturer different from the previous one, has been commercialized in some European countries (the UK and Holland). VSL#3 is a high concentration multi-strain preparation which has been recognized by the main Gastroenterology Associations for the dietary management of pouchitis as well as ulcerative colitis. We have compared the “original” VSL#3 produced in USA with the “newfound” VSL#3 produced in Italy. According to our results, the “newfound” VSL#3 has 130–150% more “dead bacteria” compared to the “original” product, raising concerns for the well-known association between dead microbes with adverse effects. The abilities of bacterial lysates from the two formulations to influence in vitro viability and proliferation of different tumor cell lines also resulted different. The repair of previously scratched monolayers of various adherent tumor cell lines (i.e. HT1080, and Caco-2 cells) was inhibited more significantly by the “original” VSL#3 when compared to the “newfound” VSL#3. Tumor cell cycle profile, in particular cell cycle arrest and apoptotic death of the cancer cells, further confirms that the “original” VSL#3 has a better functional profile than the “newfound” VSL#3, at least in in vitro. Our data stress the importance of the production conditions for the “newfound” VSL#3 considering that this product is intended to be used for the dietary management

  19. Development, characterization and anti-tumor effect of a sequential sustained-release preparation containing ricin and cobra venom cytotoxin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiu-Juan; Ke, Li-Ming; Yang, Jing; Lin, Li-Wu; Xue, En-Sheng; Wang, Yan; Yu, Li-Yun; Chen, Zhi-Kui

    2012-07-01

    Cobra venom cytotoxin (CVC) loaded in poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres was mixed with ricin and encapsulated in a thermosensitive PLGA-PEG-PLGA hydrogel for this study. This sequential sustained-release preparation (SSRP) containing ricin and CVC could avoid burst release effect of CVC from microspheres. In addition, in SSRP, the two biotoxins have different drug release rates and antitumor mechanisms, which can be complementary to each other. Ricin has a faster release rate than CVC. It can combine with the tumor cell membrane and enter the cell, inhibiting protein synthesis within 2 weeks. Whereas CVC releases slowly in 5 weeks directly dissolving the tumor cell membrane and killing the cells which are less-sensitive to ricin. The in vivo experiments showed that intratumoral injection of SSRP could inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma growth significantly, and the tumor growth inhibition rate reached 73.5%. It appears that a new medicine preparation for cancer local treatment should be further studied for clinical applications.

  20. [Anti-tumor effect of the whole worm extract of Ascaris lumbricoides on Lewis lung carcinoma in mice].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Jun-Ping; Huang, Yan-Qin; Liang, Hua; Yuan, Keng

    2013-12-01

    Forty-five C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into five groups (A-E). Group B and D served as the control group of A and C. Each mouse of group A was intraperitoneally injected with 0.1 ml whole worm extract of Ascaris lumbricoides every other day, and 10 days later injected with 0.1 ml Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells at right axillary subcutaneously region. Mice of group B were injected with normal saline and then developed tumor model. Each mouse of group C was injected with 0.1 ml LLC cells, and two days later, injected with 0.1 ml whole worm extract of A. lumbricoides every other day for 5 times. After the tumor model developed, mice in group D were injected with normal saline. Group E was the negative control group. Time intervals between implantation and active growth and tumor weight were recorded. Tumor inhibition rate was calculated. The average time interval between tumor implantation and measurable tumor growth for groups A, B, C and D was (7.0 +/-1.1), (6.0 +/- 0.7), (9.0 +/- 1.2) and (7.0 +/- 0.9) days. Tumor weight of [(338.9 +/- 282.2) mg] (P < 0.05). The tumor inhibition rate group A [(722.2 +/- 413.5) mg] was heavier than that of group B was the highest in group C (33.3%). Tumor weight of group C [(237.8 +/- 101.8) mg] was lighter than that of group D [(356.7 +/- 176.9) mg] (P < 0.05). The results indicated that the tumor formation is affected by the whole worm extract of A. lumbricoides which may have an inhibitory effect on tumour growth.

  1. Anti-Tumor Effects of Novel 5-O-Acyl Plumbagins Based on the Inhibition of Mammalian DNA Replicative Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Moe; Kuriyama, Isoko; Maruo, Sayako; Kuramochi, Kouji; Tsubaki, Kazunori; Yoshida, Hiromi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    We previously found that vitamin K3 (menadione, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) inhibits the activity of human mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (pol γ). In this study, we focused on plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), and chemically synthesized novel plumbagins conjugated with C2:0 to C22:6 fatty acids (5-O-acyl plumbagins). These chemically modified plumbagins enhanced mammalian pol inhibition and their cytotoxic activity. Plumbagin conjugated with chains consisting of more than C18-unsaturated fatty acids strongly inhibited the activities of calf pol α and human pol γ. Plumbagin conjugated with oleic acid (C18:1-acyl plumbagin) showed the strongest suppression of human colon carcinoma (HCT116) cell proliferation among the ten synthesized 5-O-acyl plumbagins. The inhibitory activity on pol α, a DNA replicative pol, by these compounds showed high correlation with their cancer cell proliferation suppressive activity. C18:1-Acyl plumbagin selectively inhibited the activities of mammalian pol species, but did not influence the activities of other pols and DNA metabolic enzymes tested. This compound inhibited the proliferation of various human cancer cell lines, and was the cytotoxic inhibitor showing strongest inhibition towards HT-29 colon cancer cells (LD50 = 2.9 µM) among the nine cell lines tested. In an in vivo anti-tumor assay conducted on nude mice bearing solid tumors of HT-29 cells, C18:1-acyl plumbagin was shown to be a promising tumor suppressor. These data indicate that novel 5-O-acyl plumbagins act as anti-cancer agents based on mammalian DNA replicative pol α inhibition. Moreover, the results suggest that acylation of plumbagin is an effective chemical modification to improve the anti-cancer activity of vitamin K3 derivatives, such as plumbagin. PMID:24520419

  2. The anti-tumor effect of cross-reacting material 197, an inhibitor of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, in human resistant ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiao-han; Deng, Suo; Li, Meng; Lu, Mei-song

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HB-EGF over-expression in A2780/Taxol, A2780/CDDP cells and the matched xenografts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRM197 induces enhanced apoptosis in A2780/Taxol and A2780/CDDP cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRM197 arrests A2780/Taxol and A2780/CDDP cells at G0/G1 phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRM197 suppressed the A2780/Taxol and A2780/CDDP growth of xenografts. -- Abstract: Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a promising target for ovarian cancer therapy. Cross-reacting material 197 (CRM197), a specific HB-EGF inhibitor, has been proven to represent possible chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer. However, the effect of CRM197 on the resistant ovarian carcinoma cells has not been sufficiently elucidated. Here, we found that HB-EGF was over-expressed in a paclitaxel-resistant human ovarian carcinoma cell line (A2780/Taxol) and a cisplatin-resistant cell line (A2780/CDDP), as well as the xenograft mouse tissue samples with these cells. To investigate the possible significance of the HB-EGF over-expression in A2780/Taxol and A2780/CDDP cells, we inhibited HB-EGF expression by CRM197 to investigate the effect of CRM197 treatment on these cells. We observed that CRM197 significantly induced anti-proliferative activity in a dose-dependent manner with the cell-cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and enhanced apoptosis in A2780/Taxol and A2780/CDDP cells. The sensitive ovarian carcinoma parental cell line (A2780), A2780/Taxol and A2780/CDDP cells formed tumors in nude mice, and enhanced tumorigenicity was observed in drug-resistant tumors. Furthermore, we observed that CRM197 significantly suppressed the growth of drug-resistant ovarian cancer xenografts in vivo (p < 0.001). These results suggest that CRM197 as an HB-EGF-targeted agent has potent anti-tumor activity in paclitaxel- and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer which over-express HB-EGF.

  3. The Effects of Different Purifying Methods on the Chemical Properties, in Vitro Anti-Tumor and Immunomodulatory Activities of Abrus cantoniensis Polysaccharide Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shaowei; Fu, Xiong; Brennan, Margaret A.; Brennan, Charles S.; Chun, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Abrus cantoniensis (Hance) is a popular Chinese vegetable consumed as a beverage, soup or folk medicine. To fully exploit the potential of the polysaccharide in Abrus cantoniensis, nine polysaccharide fractions of Abrus cantoniensis were isolated and purified (AP-AOH30-1, AP-AOH30-2, AP-AOH80-1, AP-AOH80-2, AP-ACl-1, AP-ACl-2, AP-ACl-3, AP-H and AP-L). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and gas chromatography (GC) were used to characterize these Abrus polysaccharides fractions (APF). In vitro anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activities were also investigated and compared using the rank-sum ratio (RSR) method. Results demonstrated significant differences in the structure and bioactivities among APF, which were associated to the process used for their purification. Among the APF, AP-ACl-3 yield was 613.5 mg/kg of product and consisted of rhamnose (9.8%), arabinose (8.9%), fructose (3.0%), galactose (9.9%), glucose (4.3%), galacturonic acid (3.0%) and glucuronic acid (61.1%) with a molecular weight of 4.4 × 104 Da. Furthermore, AP-ACl-3 exhibited considerable bioactivities significantly preventing the migration of MCF-7 cells and stimulating lymphocyte proliferation along with nitric oxide (NO) production of peritoneal macrophages. AP-ACl-3 could be explored as a novel potential anti-tumor and immunomodulatory agent. PMID:27058538

  4. In vivo pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and the anti-tumor effect of cyclic RGD-modified doxorubicin-loaded polymers in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Li, Yuan; Chen, Binbin; Zou, Meijuan

    2016-10-01

    In our previous study, we successfully produced and characterized a multifunctional drug delivery system with doxorubicin (RC/GO/DOX), which was based on graphene oxide (GO) and cyclic RGD-modified chitosan (RC). Its characteristics include: pH-responsiveness, active targeting of hepatocarcinoma cells, and efficient loading with controlled drug release. Here, we report the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and anti-tumor efficacy of RC/GO/DOX polymers in tumor-bearing nude mice. The objective of this study is to assess its targeting potential for tumors. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution profiles demonstrated that tumor accumulation of RC/GO/DOX polymers was almost three times higher than the others, highlighting the efficacy of the active targeting strategy. Furthermore, the tumor inhibition rate of RC/GO/DOX polymers was 56.64%, 2.09 and 2.93 times higher than that of CS/GO/DOX polymers (without modification) and the DOX solution, respectively. Anti-tumor efficacy results indicated that the tumor growth was better controlled by RC/GO/DOX polymers than the others. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining showed remarkable changes in tumor histology. Compared with the saline group, the tumor section from the RC/GO/DOX group revealed a marked increase in the quantity of apoptotic and necrotic cells, and a reduction in the quantity of the blood vessels. Together, these studies show that this new system could be regarded as a suitable form of DOX-based treatment of the hepatocellular carcinoma.

  5. Virus-stimulated neutrophils in the tumor microenvironment enhance T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chin Yang; Tai, Jiayu A.; Li, Sumin; Nishikawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) fosters tumors by attenuating anti-tumor immunity, reinforcing tumor cell survival and increasing angiogenesis. Among the constituents of the TME, here, we focused on tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs). First, we found that the combination of poly I:C and inactivated Sendai virus particles (hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope; HVJ-E) synergistically suppressed tumor growth in the B16-F10 melanoma mouse model. In this model, poly I:C contributed to the recruitment of CD11b+Ly6G+ neutrophils to the TME, and co-injection of poly I:C and HVJ-E increased CD11b+Ly6G+FAS+ TAN in the TME. Depletion of neutrophils abolished the synergistic anti-tumor effect of HVJ-E and poly I:C in B16-F10 tumors. We revealed that C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CXCL2) is produced in the TME by poly I:C, but HVJ-E enhanced neutrophil infiltration of the TME does not occur. An anti-CXCL2 antibody inhibited the tumor suppression by HVJ-E+poly I:C. HVJ-E in combination with recombinant CXCL2 protein or CXCL2 pDNA suppressed mouse melanoma by increasing cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity against B16-F10 melanoma, which was abolished by an anti-Ly6G antibody. HVJ-E directly and indirectly increased FAS and ICAM-1 expression in cultured bone marrow-derived naïve neutrophils. Thus, HVJ-E activates anti-tumor immunity via anti-tumorigenic neutrophils in the TME. An HVJ-E vector containing the CXCL2 gene may be applicable as a novel cancer gene therapy strategy. PMID:27259252

  6. Construction of a fusion plasmid containing the PSCA gene and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and its anti-tumor effect in an animal model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mai, T.J.; Ma, R.; Li, Z.; Bi, S.C.

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is a negative regulator of T cell activation, which competes with CD28 for B7.1/B7.2 binding, and which has a greater affinity. Fusion of specific antigens to extracellular domain of CTLA4 represents a promising approach to increase the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. In this study, we evaluated this interesting approach for CTLA4 enhancement on prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA)-specific immune responses and its anti-tumor effects in a prostate cancer mouse model. Consequently, we constructed a DNA vaccine containing the PSCA and the CTLA-4 gene. Vaccination with the CTLA4-fused DNA not only induced a much higher level of anti-PSCA antibody, but also increased PSCA-specific T cell response in mice. To evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of the plasmids, murine models with PSCA-expressing tumors were generated. After injection of the tumor-bearing mouse model, the plasmid carrying the CTLA4 and PSCA fusion gene showed stronger inhibition of tumor growth than the plasmid expressing PSCA alone. These observations emphasize the potential of the CTLA4-fused DNA vaccine, which could represent a promising approach for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:27783810

  7. Anti-tumor activities of luteolin and silibinin in glioblastoma cells: overexpression of miR-7-1-3p augmented luteolin and silibinin to inhibit autophagy and induce apoptosis in glioblastoma in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Ray, Swapan K

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma is the deadliest brain tumor in humans. High systemic toxicity of conventional chemotherapies prompted the search for natural compounds for controlling glioblastoma. The natural flavonoids luteolin (LUT) and silibinin (SIL) have anti-tumor activities. LUT inhibits autophagy, cell proliferation, metastasis, and angiogenesis and induces apoptosis; while SIL activates caspase-8 cascades to induce apoptosis. However, synergistic anti-tumor effects of LUT and SIL in glioblastoma remain unknown. Overexpression of tumor suppressor microRNA (miR) could enhance the anti-tumor effects of LUT and SIL. Here, we showed that 20 µM LUT and 50 µM SIL worked synergistically for inhibiting growth of two different human glioblastoma U87MG (wild-type p53) and T98G (mutant p53) cell lines and natural combination therapy was more effective than conventional chemotherapy (10 µM BCNU or 100 µM TMZ). Combination of LUT and SIL caused inhibition of growth of glioblastoma cells due to induction of significant amounts of apoptosis and complete inhibition of invasion and migration. Further, combination of LUT and SIL inhibited rapamycin (RAPA)-induced autophagy, a survival mechanism, with suppression of PKCα and promotion of apoptosis through down regulation of iNOS and significant increase in expression of the tumor suppressor miR-7-1-3p in glioblastoma cells. Our in vivo studies confirmed that overexpression of miR-7-1-3p augmented anti-tumor activities of LUT and SIL in RAPA pre-treated both U87MG and T98G tumors. In conclusion, our results clearly demonstrated that overexpression of miR-7-1-3p augmented the anti-tumor activities of LUT and SIL to inhibit autophagy and induce apoptosis for controlling growth of different human glioblastomas in vivo.

  8. Adoptive transfer of natural killer cells promotes the anti-tumor efficacy of T cells.

    PubMed

    Goding, Stephen R; Yu, Shaohong; Bailey, Lisa M; Lotze, Michael T; Basse, Per H

    2016-07-01

    The density of NK cells in tumors correlates positively with prognosis in many types of cancers. The average number of infiltrating NK cells is, however, quite modest (approximately 30 NK cells/sq.mm), even in tumors deemed to have a "high" density of infiltrating NK cells. It is unclear how such low numbers of tumor-infiltrating NK cells can influence outcome. Here, we used ovalbumin-expressing tumor cell lines and TCR transgenic, OVA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (OT-I-CTLs) to determine whether the simultaneous attack by anti-tumor CTLs and IL-2-activated NK (A-NK) cells synergistically increases the overall tumor cell kill and whether upregulation of tumor MHC class-I by NK cell-derived interferon-gamma (IFNγ) improves tumor-recognition and kill by anti-tumor CTLs. At equal E:T ratios, A-NK cells killed OVA-expressing tumor cells better than OT-I-CTLs. The cytotoxicity against OVA-expressing tumor cells increased by combining OT-I-CTLs and A-NK cells, but the increase was additive rather than synergistic. A-NK cells adenovirally-transduced to produce IL-12 (A-NK(IL-12)) produced high amounts of IFNγ. The addition of a low number of A-NK(IL-12) cells to OT-I-CTLs resulted in a synergistic, albeit modest, increase in overall cytotoxicity. Pre-treatment of tumor cells with NK cell-conditioned medium increased tumor MHC expression and sensitivity to CTL-mediated killing. Pre-treatment of CTLs with NK cell-conditioned medium had no effect on CTL cytotoxicity. In vivo, MHC class-I expression by OVA-expressing B16 melanoma lung metastases increased significantly within 24-48h after adoptive transfer of A-NK(IL-12) cells. OT-I-CTLs and A-NK(IL-12) cells localized selectively and equally well into OVA-expressing B16 lung metastases and treatment of mice bearing 7-days-old OVA-B16 lung metastases with both A-NK(IL-12) cells and OT-I-CTLs lead to a significant prolongation of survival. Thus, an important function of tumor-infiltrating NK cells may be to increase

  9. Cocktails of ricin A-chain immunotoxins against different antigens on Hodgkin and Sternberg-Reed cells have superior anti-tumor effects against H-RS cells in vitro and solid Hodgkin tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Engert, A; Gottstein, C; Bohlen, H; Winkler, U; Schön, G; Manske, O; Schnell, R; Diehl, V; Thorpe, P

    1995-10-09

    Three ricin A-chain immunotoxins (ITs) recognizing different antigens on Hodgkin-Reed/Sternberg (H-RS) cells were evaluated for their anti-tumor effects when used in combination as "cocktails". These ITs, BB10.dgA (CD25), HRS3.dgA (CD30), and IRac.dgA (70 kDa), strongly inhibited the growth of L540Cy H-RS cells in vitro. The protein synthesis of this cell line was reduced more efficiently by the combination of 2 of these ITs than by BB10.dgA, HRS3.dgA or IRac.dgA alone. A cocktail of all 3 ITs was most effective in vitro. This was at least in part due to the non-homogeneous distribution of CD25, CD30 or IRac on the L540Cy H-RS target cells and to the fact that subpopulations deficient in one antigen nevertheless expressed appreciable levels of the other target antigens. IT cocktails were also superior as anti-tumor agents in nude mice with solid L540Cy tumors. Ninety percent of mice treated with cocktails containing 2 or 3 ITs had continuous complete remissions (CCR), as compared with only 40% of mice treated with the same dose of a single IT. Analysis of 7 L540Cy sub-lines re-established ex vivo from mice that relapsed after having achieved complete remission (CR) after therapy with a single IT showed that the surviving tumor cells were antigen-deficient variants which were resistant to the original IT, but which could be killed by ITs directed against other target antigens. Thus, IT cocktails give superior results against human H-RS cells, both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Inhibitory effects of chlorophyllin, hemin and tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin on oxidative DNA damage and mouse skin inflammation induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate as a possible anti-tumor promoting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwang Kyun; Park, Jae Hee; Jung, Youn Joo; Chung, Won Yoon

    2003-12-09

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) from both endogenous and exogenous sources can cause oxidative DNA damage and dysregulated cell signaling, which are involved in the multistage process of carcinogenesis such as tumor initiation, promotion and progression. A number of structurally different anticarcinogenic agents inhibit inflammation and tumor promotion as they reduce ROS production and oxidative DNA damage. Evidence suggests that porphyrins can interfere with the actions of various carcinogens and mutagens by forming face-to-face complexes and their antimutagenic or antigenotoxic effects may also be attributed to their antioxidant activities. However, little is known regarding the anti-tumor promoting potential and mechanism of the porphyrin compounds. Based on our previous results on the inhibitory effects of chlorophyllin (CHL), hemin and tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin (TBAP) against two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis, we have investigated their anti-tumor promoting mechanisms. In the present work, CHL, hemin and TBAP reduced superoxide anion generation by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in differentiated HL-60 cells and the production of hydroxyl radicals by Fenton reaction. Porphyrins exert a dose-related inhibition of his(+) reversion in Salmonella typhimurium TA102 induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH). DNA strand breaks by ROS derived from H(2)O(2)/Cu(II) and the formation of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) in calf thymus DNA treated with H(2)O(2)/UV also were inhibited markedly by porphyrins in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, CHL, hemin and TBAP decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and H(2)O(2) formation as well as epidermal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity in mouse skin treated with TPA. These results demonstrate that the antioxidative properties of porphyrins are important for inhibiting TPA-induced tumor promotion.

  11. Anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activities of an exopolysaccharide from Rhizopus nigricans on CT26 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Cao, Jianfeng; Chen, Guochuang; Xu, Yanghui; Lu, Jingbo; Fang, Fang; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-07-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activities of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) from Rhizopus nigricans. Our results showed EPS could significantly inhibit the tumor growth and increase the immune organs index of CT26 tumor-bearing mice. EPS treatment increased the productions of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in serum. The increase of percentage of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells among total spleen T lymphocyte was also observed. Furthermore, EPS remarkably stimulate spleen lymphocytes proliferation in the absence or presence of mitogens. In addition, we found that EPS had synergistic effect with chemotherapy and improved immunosuppressive effect induced by 5-Fu. In summary, these findings indicated that the antitumor effects of EPS might be partly due to immune function activation and it might have potential to be used in the treatment for colorectal cancer.

  12. Anti-tumor effects of a novel retinoic acid metabolism blocking agent VN/14-1 in the N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced rat mammary carcinoma model and its effects on the uterus

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Shangle; Hu, Haiqing; Gediya, Lalji K.; Purushottamachar, Puranik; Godbole, Abhijit M.; Njar, Vincent C. O.

    2014-01-01

    VN/14-1 [4-(±)-(1H-Imidazol-1-yl)-(E)-retinoic acid], a novel retinoic acid metabolism blocking agent (RAMBA), works by inhibiting the breakdown of all-trans-retinoic acid. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of VN/14-1 on the N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced rat mammary carcinoma model, and peripheral organ effects on the uteri of immature ovariectomized (OVX) rats. In tumor burden experiments, after 56 days of administration of VN/14-1 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg/day, significant tumor reductions in mean tumor weight of 19.1, 34.4, and 44.3%, compared to tumors in control animals occurred. Cumulative tumor growth was also significantly slower in a dose-dependent manner in groups receiving 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg/day of VN/14-1 compared to growth rates in the control group. Tumor apoptosis was significant increases in animals treated with 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg/day of VN/14-1. In uterotrophic experiments, immature OVX rats given VN/14-1 significantly reduced uterine weight and blocked endometrial stimulation induced by unopposed β-estradiol (E2). In both rat models, adverse toxicities included weakness, anorexia, and reduction in body weight in the groups given the highest dose of 20 mg/kg/day. In summary, VN/14-1 inhibited tumor growth in the MNU-induced estrogen receptor (ER)-positive rat mammary tumor model, and antagonized the stimulatory effect of estrogens on the uterus. The studies suggest that VN/14-1 may be a useful novel therapy for ER-positive breast cancer. PMID:21842418

  13. Anti-tumoral activity of native compound morelloflavone in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianfeng; Ai, Hongyan; Sun, Deke; Wu, Tao; He, Jian; Xu, Zhai; Ding, Li; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the anti-tumoral activity of morelloflavone substances with different structures. We also studied the possible link between morelloflavone structure and its function. Various types of chromatographic techniques were used to isolate and screen morelloflavone substances from the extracts of gambogic tree trunk and the morelloflavone structures were identified by analytical techniques such as high resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetism. Anti-tumoral activities of different compounds were investigated and the link between the antitumor activity and the structure of compound was exaimed. Our results showed that the isolated morelloflavone substances demonstrated a certain level of antitumor activity. The compound no. 1 had the strongest effect to inhibit glioma U87 and C6 cells followed by compound no. 2 while compound no. 5 was the weakest among them. We conducted a preliminary analysis on the structure-function relationship through the structure comparison and we concluded that the antitumor effects of morelloflavone substances with different structures were significantly different from each other. Thus, the glucose chain in C4 position of biflavone structure can enhance the antitumor activity of the compound in glioma cells. Additionally, the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in biflavone compounds may also play a role in enhancing the antitumor activity and inhibition rate. PMID:27900007

  14. Anti-tumor efficacy of BEZ235 is complemented by its anti-angiogenic effects via downregulation of PI3K-mTOR-HIF1alpha signaling in HER2-defined breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Nandini; Sun, Yuliang; Carlson, Jennifer H; Wu, Hui; Lin, Xiaoqian; Leyland-Jones, Brian; De, Pradip

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the PI3K-mTOR pathway via HER2: HER3-mediated signaling in HER2+ breast cancers pose one of the major threats towards the success of trastuzumab. First, trastuzumab cannot perturb survival/proliferative signals following HER2: HER3 heterodimerization in HER2+ tumor cells. Second, trastuzumab treatment has been reported to cause drug-mediated resistance in over 50% of HER2+ breast cancers. We have reported that treatment with an anti-angiogenic drug imparted a significant anti-tumor advantage when combined with trastuzumab plus pertuzumab in the trastuzumab-resistant model of HER2+ breast cancers (PMID: 23959459). The very fact as revealed by our study that an inclusion of anti-angiogenic drug conferred a significant anti-tumor advantage when combined with dual anti-HER2 therapy clearly indicated a critical and indispensable role of angiogenesis in these tumors. Hence, we hypothesized that BEZ235 a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor will have an effect on the tumor as well as the angiogenic stromal compartments. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of BEZ235 was determined in HER2+ trastuzumab-sensitive, trastuzumab-resistant and HER2 amplified/PIK3CA mutated cell lines. BEZ235 alone and in combination with trastuzumab was tested on the tumor as well as stromal compartments. AKT-mTOR signal was suppressed following BEZ235 treatment in a concentration and time-dependent manner. AnnexinV, cl-CASPASE3, SURVIVIN and p-FOXO1 indicated that BEZ235-induced cell death occurred predominantly via an apoptotic pathway. Heregulin-induced HIF1α synthesis was also significantly decreased. Oncoprint data (cBioPortal) representing PAM50 Her2 enriched tumors (TCGA, Nature 2012) and Her2-positive breast tumors (TCGA, cell 2015) showed 91.4% genetic alterations and 79.2% genetic alterations in a set of four genes comprised of PIK3CA, ERBB2, VEGFA and HIF1alpha. The co-occurrence of HIF1alpha with VEGFA in PAM50 Her2 enriched tumors (TCGA, Nature 2012) and the co-occurrence of HIF1alpha

  15. 15-Deoxy-{Delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2} enhanced the anti-tumor activity of camptothecin against renal cell carcinoma independently of topoisomerase-II and PPAR{gamma} pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Fujita, Megumi; Koma, Hiromi; Yamamori, Motohiro; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Okamura, Noboru; Yagami, Tatsurou

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} A topoisomerase-I inhibitor, camptothecin, exhibited synergistically toxicity with 15d-PGJ{sub 2}. {yields} The combination of 15d-PGJ{sub 2} and a topoisomerase-II inhibitor, doxorubicine, did not cause synergistic cell growth inhibition. {yields} A PPAR{gamma} antagonist did not prevent Caki-2 from undergoing 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced cytotoxicity. {yields} The treatment of camptothecin combined with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} activated caspase-3 more than the separate treatment. -- Abstract: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is chemoresistant cancer. Although several clinical trials were conducted to explore effective medications, the chemoresistance of RCC has not yet been conquered. An endogenous ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), 15-deoxy-{Delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ{sub 2}), induces apoptosis in RCC. Here, we examined synergistic effects of several carcinostatics on the anti-tumor activity of 15d-PGJ{sub 2} in Caki-2 cell line by MTT assay. A topoisomerase-I inhibitor, camptothecin (CPT), exhibited synergistically toxicity with 15d-PGJ{sub 2}, but neither 5-fluorouracil nor cisplatin did. The combination of 15d-PGJ{sub 2} and a topoisomerase-II inhibitor, doxorubicine, did not cause synergistic cell growth inhibition. The synergistic effect of topoisomerase-I and II inhibitors was not also detected. A PPAR{gamma} antagonist, GW9662, did not prevent Caki-2 from undergoing 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced cytotoxicity. The treatment of CPT combined with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} activated caspase-3 more than the separate treatment. These results suggest that 15d-PGJ{sub 2} exhibited the anti-tumor activity synergistically with CPT independent of topoisomerase-II and PPAR{gamma}.

  16. Inhibition of heat-shock protein 90 sensitizes liver cancer stem-like cells to magnetic hyperthermia and enhances anti-tumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma-burdened nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Tang, Qiusha; Miao, Fengqin; An, Yanli; Li, Mengfei; Han, Yong; Wang, Xihui; Wang, Juan; Liu, Peidang; Chen, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the thermoresistance and expression of heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) in magnetic hyperthermia-treated human liver cancer stem-like cells (LCSCs) and the effects of a heat-shock protein HSP90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxgeldanamycin (17-AAG) on hepatocellular carcinoma-burdened nude mice. Methods CD90+ LCSCs were isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting from BEL-7404. Spheroid formation, proliferation, differentiation, drug resistance, and tumor formation assays were performed to identify stem cell characteristics. CD90-targeted thermosensitive magnetoliposomes (TMs)-encapsulated 17-AAG (CD90@17-AAG/TMs) was prepared by reverse-phase evaporation and its characteristics were studied. Heat tolerance in CD90+ LCSCs and the effect of CD90@17-AAG/TMs-mediated heat sensitivity were examined in vitro and in vivo. Results CD90+ LCSCs showed significant stem cell-like properties. The 17-AAG/TMs were successfully prepared and were spherical in shape with an average size of 128.9±7.7 nm. When exposed to magnetic hyperthermia, HSP90 was up-regulated in CD90+ LCSCs. CD90@17-AAG/TMs inhibited the activity of HSP90 and increased the sensitivity of CD90+ LCSCs to magnetic hyperthermia. Conclusion The inhibition of HSP90 could sensitize CD90+ LCSCs to magnetic hyperthermia and enhance its anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26677324

  17. Stimulation of anti-tumor immunity by photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mroz, Pawel; Hashmi, Javad T; Huang, Ying-Ying; Lange, Norbert; Hamblin, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a rapidly developing cancer treatment that utilizes the combination of nontoxic dyes and harmless visible light to destroy tumors by generating reactive oxygen species. PDT produces tumor-cell destruction in the context of acute inflammation that acts as a ‘danger signal’ to the innate immune system. Activation of the innate immune system increases the priming of tumor-specific T lymphocytes that have the ability to recognize and destroy distant tumor cells and, in addition, lead to the development of an immune memory that can combat recurrence of the cancer at a later point in time. PDT may be also successfully combined with immunomodulating strategies that are capable of overcoming or bypassing the escape mechanisms employed by the progressing tumor to evade immune attack. This article will cover the role of the immune response in PDT anti-tumor effectiveness. It will highlight the milestones in the development of PDT-mediated anti-tumor immunity and emphasize the combination strategies that may improve this therapy. PMID:21162652

  18. Autophagy and the functional roles of Atg5 and beclin-1 in the anti-tumor effects of 3beta androstene 17alpha diol neuro-steroid on malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Graf, Martin R; Jia, Wentao; Johnson, Ross S; Dent, Paul; Mitchell, Clint; Loria, Roger M

    2009-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that the anti-tumor activity of the neuro-steroid, 3beta androstene 17alpha diol (17alpha-AED) on malignant glioma cells is mediated by the induction of autophagy. 17alpha-AED can inhibit the proliferation an induce cell death of multiple, unrelated gliomas with an IC(50) between 8 and 25muM. 17alpha-AED treatment induced the formation of autophagosomes and acidic vesicular organelles in human malignant gliomas which was blocked by bafilomycin A1 or 3-methyladenine. Cleavage of microtubule-associated protein-light chain 3 (LC3), an essential step in autophagosome formation, was detected in human malignant glioma cells exposed to 17alpha-AED. In 17alpha-AED treated T98G glioma cells there was an increase in the autophagy related proteins Atg5 and beclin-1. Silencing of ATG5 or beclin-1 with small interfering RNA significantly reduced the incidence of autophagy in 17alpha-AED treated malignant gliomas and attenuated the cytotoxic effects of the neuro-steroid indicating that the induction of autophagy mediates the anti-glioma activity of 17alpha-AED rather than serving as a cyto-protective response. These results demonstrate that 17alpha-AED possesses significant anti-glioma activity when used at pharmacologically relevant concentrations in vitro and the cytotoxic effects are resultant from the induction of autophagy.

  19. Anti-Tumor Effects of Peptide Therapeutic and Peptide Vaccine Antibody Co-targeting HER-1 and HER-2 in Esophageal Cancer (EC) and HER-1 and IGF-1R in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC).

    PubMed

    Overholser, Jay; Ambegaokar, Kristen Henkins; Eze, Siobhan M; Sanabria-Figueroa, Eduardo; Nahta, Rita; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Kaumaya, Pravin T P

    2015-07-06

    Despite the promise of targeted therapies, there remains an urgent need for effective treatment for esophageal cancer (EC) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Current FDA-approved drugs have significant problems of toxicity, safety, selectivity, efficacy and development of resistance. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that rationally designed peptide vaccines/mimics are a viable therapeutic strategy for blocking aberrant molecular signaling pathways with high affinity, specificity, potency and safety. Specifically, we postulate that novel combination treatments targeting members of the EGFR family and IGF-1R will yield significant anti-tumor effects in in vitro models of EC and TNBC possibly overcoming mechanisms of resistance. We show that the combination of HER-1 and HER-2 or HER-1 and IGF-1R peptide mimics/vaccine antibodies exhibited enhanced antitumor properties with significant inhibition of tumorigenesis in OE19 EC and MDA-MB-231 TNBC cell lines. Our work elucidates the mechanisms of HER-1/IGF-1R and HER-1/HER-2 signaling in these cancer cell lines, and the promising results support the rationale for dual targeting with HER-1 and HER-2 or IGF-1R as an improved treatment regimen for advanced therapy tailored to difference types of cancer.

  20. Synergistic effect of reduced polypeptide micelle for co-delivery of doxorubicin and TRAIL against drug-resistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chong; Gong, Chunai; Xia, Qingming; Gao, Yuan; Gao, Shen

    2016-01-01

    Cationic peptides as a non-viral gene vector have become a hotspot of research because of their high transfection efficcacy and safety. Based on our previous study, we synthesized a cationic reduction-responsive vector based on disulfide cross-linked L-arginine, L-histidine and lipoic acid (LHRss) as the co-carrier of both doxorubicin (DOX) and the necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (pTRAIL). The LHRss/DOX/TRAIL construct has reduction-sensitive behavior and an enhanced endosomal escape ability to increase the cytotoxicity of DOX and the transfection efficiency. Further, the LHRss/DOX/TRAIL construct increased the accumulation of DOX and promoted the expression of pTRAIL, thus increasing cellular apoptosis by 83.7% in MCF-7/ADR cells. In addition, the in vivo biodistribution results showed that the LHRss/DOX/TRAIL construct could target tumors well. The in vivo anti-tumor effect study demonstrated that the LHRss/DOX/TRAIL construct inhibited tumor growth markedly, with a tumor inhibitory rate of 94.0%. The co-delivery system showed a significant synergistic anti-tumor effect. The LHRss/DOX/TRAIL construct may prove to be a promising co-delivery vector for the effective treatment of drug resistant breast cancer. PMID:27557520

  1. A new cell counting method to evaluate anti-tumor compound activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Jian; Zhang, Xiu-Rong; Zhang, Lei; Li, Qing-Hua; Wang, Lin; Shi, Li-Hong; Fang, Chun-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Determining cell quantity is a common problem in cytology research and anti-tumor drug development. A simple and low-cost method was developed to determine monolayer and adherent-growth cell quantities. The cell nucleus is located in the cytoplasm, and is independent. Thus, the nucleus cannot make contact even if the cell density is heavy. This phenomenon is the foundation of accurate cell-nucleus recognition. The cell nucleus is easily recognizable in images after fluorescent staining because it is independent. A one-to-one relationship exists between the nucleus and the cell; therefore, this method can be used to determine the quantity of proliferating cells. Results indicated that the activity of the histone deacetylase inhibitor Z1 was effective after this method was used. The nude-mouse xenograft model also revealed the potent anti-tumor activity of Z1. This research presents a new anti-tumor-drug evaluation method.

  2. Pharmacological Modulation of Anti-Tumor Immunity Induced by Oncolytic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Nicole E.; Krishnan, Ramya; Diallo, Jean-Simon

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) not only kill cancer cells by direct lysis but also generate a significant anti-tumor immune response that allows for prolonged cancer control and in some cases cures. How to best stimulate this effect is a subject of intense investigation in the OV field. While pharmacological manipulation of the cellular innate anti-viral immune response has been shown by several groups to improve viral oncolysis and spread, it is increasingly clear that pharmacological agents can also impact the anti-tumor immune response generated by OVs and related tumor vaccination strategies. This review covers recent progress in using pharmacological agents to improve the activity of OVs and their ability to generate robust anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:25101247

  3. Identification of the anti-tumor activity and mechanisms of nuciferine through a network pharmacology approach

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Quan; Li, Rui; Li, Hui-ying; Cao, Yu-bing; Bai, Ming; Fan, Xiao-jing; Wang, Shu-yan; Zhang, Bo; Li, Shao

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Nuciferine is an aporphine alkaloid extracted from lotus leaves, which is a raw material in Chinese medicinal herb for weight loss. In this study we used a network pharmacology approach to identify the anti-tumor activity of nuciferine and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: The pharmacological activities and mechanisms of nuciferine were identified through target profile prediction, clustering analysis and functional enrichment analysis using our traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) network pharmacology platform. The anti-tumor activity of nuciferine was validated by in vitro and in vivo experiments. The anti-tumor mechanisms of nuciferine were predicted through network target analysis and verified by in vitro experiments. Results: The nuciferine target profile was enriched with signaling pathways and biological functions, including “regulation of lipase activity”, “response to nicotine” and “regulation of cell proliferation”. Target profile clustering results suggested that nuciferine to exert anti-tumor effect. In experimental validation, nuciferine (0.8 mg/mL) markedly inhibited the viability of human neuroblastoma SY5Y cells and mouse colorectal cancer CT26 cells in vitro, and nuciferine (0.05 mg/mL) significantly suppressed the invasion of 6 cancer cell lines in vitro. Intraperitoneal injection of nuciferine (9.5 mg/mL, ip, 3 times a week for 3 weeks) significantly decreased the weight of SY5Y and CT26 tumor xenografts in nude mice. Network target analysis and experimental validation in SY5Y and CT26 cells showed that the anti-tumor effect of nuciferine was mediated through inhibiting the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway and IL-1 levels in SY5Y and CT26 cells. Conclusion: By using a TCM network pharmacology method, nuciferine is identified as an anti-tumor agent against human neuroblastoma and mouse colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo, through inhibiting the PI3K-AKT signaling pathways and IL-1 levels. PMID:27180984

  4. Ten tandem repeats of {beta}-hCG 109-118 enhance immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of {beta}-hCG C-terminal peptide carried by mycobacterial heat-shock protein HSP65

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yankai; Yan Rong; He Yi; Liu Wentao; Cao Rongyue; Yan Ming; Li Taiming; Liu Jingjing; Wu Jie . E-mail: wu_jie97@yahoo.com.cn

    2006-07-14

    The {beta}-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin ({beta}-hCG) is secreted by many kinds of tumors and it has been used as an ideal target antigen to develop vaccines against tumors. In view of the low immunogenicity of this self-peptide,we designed a method based on isocaudamer technique to repeat tandemly the 10-residue sequence X of {beta}-hCG (109-118), then 10 tandemly repeated copies of the 10-residue sequence combined with {beta}-hCG C-terminal 37 peptides were fused to mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 to construct a fusion protein HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 as an immunogen. In this study, we examined the effect of the tandem repeats of this 10-residue sequence in eliciting an immune by comparing the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of the two immunogens, HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 and HSP65-{beta}hCGCTP37 (without the 10 tandem repeats). Immunization of mice with the fusion protein HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 elicited much higher levels of specific anti-{beta}-hCG antibodies and more effectively inhibited the growth of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in vivo than with HSP65-{beta}hCGCTP37, which should suggest that HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 may be an effective protein vaccine for the treatment of {beta}-hCG-dependent tumors and multiple tandem repeats of a certain epitope are an efficient method to overcome the low immunogenicity of self-peptide antigens.

  5. Anti-tumor effects on the combination of photodynamic therapy with arsenic compound in TC-1 cells implanted C57BL/6 mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyu Wan; Wen, Lan Ying; Bae, Su Mi; Park, Choong Hak; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Lee, Doo Yun; Ahn, Woong Shick

    2009-06-01

    The effects of As4O6 were studied as adjuvant on photodynamic therapy. As4O6 is considered to have anticancer activity via several biological actions such as free radical producing and inhibition of VEGF expression. In vitro experiments, cell proliferation and morphology were determined by MTT assay. Also, quantitative PCR array was performed to study the synergetic mechanism. Additionally, this study was supported by the finding that combination of photodynamic therapy and As4O6 shows an inhibition effect of tumor growth in C57BL/6 mice with TC-1 cells xenographs in vivo. Radachlorin and As4O6 significantly inhibited TC-1 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Antiproliferative effect of combination treatment was significantly higher than those of TC-1 cells treated with either photodynamic therapy or As4O6 (62.4 and 52.5% decrease, respectively, compared to photodynamic therapy or As4O6 alone, P < 0.05). In addition, cell proliferation in combination of photodynamic therapy and As4O6 treatment significantly decreased by 77.4% compared to vehicle-only treated TC-1 cells (P < 0.05). Cell survival pathway (Naip1, Tert and Aip1) and p53-dependent pathway (Bax, p21Cip1, Fas, Gadd45, IGFBP-3 and Mdm-2) were markedly increased by combination treatment of photodynamic therapy and As4O6. Besides, the immunology response NEAT pathway (Ly- 12, CD178 and IL-2) also modulated after combination treatment of photodynamic therapy and As4O6. This combination effect apparently shows a same pattern in vivo model. These findings suggest the benefit of the combination treatment of photodynamic therapy and As4O6 for the inhibition of cervical cancer growth.

  6. Effects of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha and anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 antibodies on ischemia/reperfusion lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chi-Huei

    2006-10-31

    Inhibition of neutrophil activation and adherence to endothelium by antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1), respectively, might attenuate ischemia-reperfusion injury (I/R). I/R was conducted in an isolated rat lung model. Anti-TNF-alpha antibody and/or anti-ICAM-1 antibody were added before ischemia or after reperfusion. Hemodynamic changes, lung weight gain (LWG), capillary filtration coefficients (Kfc), and pathologic changes were assessed to evaluate the severity of I/R. The LWG, Kfc, pathological changes and lung injury score of treatment groups with anti-TNF-alpha antibody treatment, either pre-ischemia or during reperfusion, were less than those observed in control groups. Similar findings were found in group treated with anti-ICAM-1 antibody or combination therapy during reperfusion. In contrast, pre-I/R treatment with anti-ICAM-1 antibody induced severe lung edema and failure to complete the experimental procedure. No additional therapeutic effect was found in combination therapy. We conclude that TNF-alpha and ICAM-1 play important roles in I/R. Anti-TNF-alpha antibody has therapeutic and preventive effects on I/R. However, combined therapy with anti-TNF-alpha antibody and anti-ICAM-1 antibody may have no additive effect and need further investigation.

  7. Anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor-promoting effects of 5-deprenyllupulonol C and other compounds from Hop (Humulus lupulus L.).

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Hiroyuki; Kohno, Hideki; Tokuda, Harukuni; Suzuki, Nobutaka; Yasukawa, Ken; Kimura, Yumiko; Manosroi, Aranya; Manosroi, Jiradej; Akihisa, Toshihiro

    2012-06-01

    A new phloroglucinol derivative, 5-deprenyllupulonol C (1), along with four other phloroglucinol derivatives, 2-5, five chalcones, 6-10, four flavanones, 11-14, two flavonol glycosides, 15 and 16, and five triterpenoids, 17-21, were isolated from the female inflorescence pellet extracts of hop (Humulus lupulus L.). Upon evaluation of these compounds against the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) in Raji cells, twelve compounds, i.e., 1-4, 11-14, 17-19, and 21, showed potent inhibitory effects on EBV-EA induction, with IC₅₀ values in the range of 215-393 mol ratio/32 pmol TPA. In addition, eleven compounds, i.e., 1-4, 6, 11, 12, 14, 17, 18, and 20, were found to inhibit TPA-induced inflammation (1 μg/ear) in mice, with ID₅₀ values in the range of 0.13-1.06 μmol per ear. Further, lupulone C (2) and 6-prenylnaringenin (14) exhibited inhibitory effects on skin-tumor promotion in an in vivo two-stage mouse-skin carcinogenesis test based on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) as initiator and with TPA as promoter.

  8. Vandetanib induces a marked anti-tumor effect and amelioration of ectopic Cushing’s syndrome in a medullary thyroid carcinoma patient

    PubMed Central

    Bseiso, Hashem; Lev-Cohain, Naama; Gross, David J

    2016-01-01

    Summary A 55-year-old woman diagnosed with sporadic MTC underwent total thyroidectomy 20 years ago. After the first surgery, elevated calcitonin levels in parallel with local disease persistence were noted and therefore she underwent repeated neck dissections. During follow-up, multiple foci of metastatic disease were noted in the neck and mediastinal lymph nodes, lungs and bones; however, the disease had an indolent course for a number of years, in parallel with a calcitonin doubling time of more than two years and without significant symptoms. During a routine follow-up visit 2 years ago, findings suggestive of Cushing’s syndrome were observed on physical examination. The biochemical evaluation demonstrated markedly elevated serum calcitonin level, in parallel with lack of cortisol suppression after an overnight 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test, lack of cortisol and ACTH suppression after high-dose IV dexamethasone 8 mg, elevated plasma ACTH up to 79 pg/mL (normal <46 pg/mL) and elevated 24-h urinary free cortisol up to 501 µg/24 h (normal 9–90 µg/24 h). After a negative pituitary MRI, she underwent IPSS, which was compatible with EAS. Whole-body CT demonstrated progressive disease at most of the tumor sites. Treatment with vandetanib at a dosage of 200 mg/day was commenced. The patient showed a significant, rapid and consistent clinical improvement already after two months of treatment, in parallel with biochemical improvement, whereas a decrease in tumor size was demonstrated on follow-up CT. Learning points: Ectopic Cushing’s syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion (EAS) by MTC is an uncommon and a poor prognostic event, being associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We demonstrate that vandetanib is effective in controlling the signs and symptoms related to the EAS in patients with advanced progressive MTC. We demonstrate that vandetanib is effective in decreasing tumor size and in inducing tumor control. PMID:27855236

  9. Genetically engineered stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase and interferon-β migrate to human lung cancer cells and have potentially therapeutic anti-tumor effects.

    PubMed

    Yi, Bo-Rim; O, Si-Na; Kang, Nam-Hee; Hwang, Kyung-A; Kim, Seung U; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Kim, Yun-Bae; Heo, Gang-Joon; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that genetically engineered stem cells (GESTECs) produce suicide enzymes that convert non-toxic pro-drugs to toxic metabolites which selectively migrate toward tumor sites and reduce tumor growth. In the present study, we evaluated whether these GESTECs are capable of migrating to lung cancer cells and examined the potential therapeutic efficacy of gene-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy against lung cancer cells in vitro. A modified transwell migration assay was performed to determine the migratory capacity of GESTECs to lung cancer cells. GESTECs [i.e., HB1.F3.CD or HB1.F3.CD.interferon-β (IFN-β)] engineered to express a suicide gene, cytosine deaminase (CD), selectively migrated toward lung cancer cells. Treatment of a human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line (A549, a lung carcinoma derived from human lung epithelial cells) with the pro-drug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) in the presence of HB1.F3.CD or HB1.F3.CD.IFN-β cells resulted in the inhibition of lung cancer cell growth. Based on the data presented herein, we suggest that GESTECs expressing CD may have a potent advantage for selective treatment of lung cancers. Furthermore, GESTECs expressing fusion genes (i.e., CD and IFN-β) may have a synergic antitumor effect on lung cancer cells.

  10. Prophylactic vaccines are potent activators of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and drive effective anti-tumor responses in melanoma patients at the cost of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bol, Kalijn F; Aarntzen, Erik H J G; Pots, Jeanette M; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A M; van de Rakt, Mandy W M M; Scharenborg, Nicole M; de Boer, Annemiek J; van Oorschot, Tom G M; Croockewit, Sandra A J; Blokx, Willeke A M; Oyen, Wim J G; Boerman, Otto C; Mus, Roel D M; van Rossum, Michelle M; van der Graaf, Chantal A A; Punt, Cornelis J A; Adema, Gosse J; Figdor, Carl G; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Schreibelt, Gerty

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy is explored worldwide in cancer patients, predominantly with DC matured with pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2. We studied the safety and efficacy of vaccination with monocyte-derived DC matured with a cocktail of prophylactic vaccines that contain clinical-grade Toll-like receptor ligands (BCG, Typhim, Act-HIB) and prostaglandin E2 (VAC-DC). Stage III and IV melanoma patients were vaccinated via intranodal injection (12 patients) or combined intradermal/intravenous injection (16 patients) with VAC-DC loaded with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and mRNA encoding tumor antigens gp100 and tyrosinase. Tumor antigen-specific T cell responses were monitored in blood and skin-test infiltrating-lymphocyte cultures. Almost all patients mounted prophylactic vaccine- or KLH-specific immune responses. Both after intranodal injection and after intradermal/intravenous injection, tumor antigen-specific immune responses were detected, which coincide with longer overall survival in stage IV melanoma patients. VAC-DC induce local and systemic CTC grade 2 and 3 toxicity, which is most likely caused by BCG in the maturation cocktail. The side effects were self-limiting or resolved upon a short period of systemic steroid therapy. We conclude that VAC-DC can induce functional tumor-specific responses. Unfortunately, toxicity observed after vaccination precludes the general application of VAC-DC, since in DC maturated with prophylactic vaccines BCG appears to be essential in the maturation cocktail.

  11. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Daniel L; O'Neil, Richard T; Foster, Aaron E; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M; Wilson, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans.

  12. Icariin and its derivative, ICT, exert anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor effects, and modulate myeloid derived suppressive cells (MDSCs) functions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junmin; Wu, Jinfeng; Chen, Xianghong; Fortenbery, Nicole; Eksioglu, Erika; Kodumudi, Krithika N; Pk, Epling-Burnette; Dong, Jingcheng; Djeu, Julie Y; Wei, Sheng

    2011-07-01

    3, 5,7-trihydroxy-4'-methoxy-8-(3-hydroxy-3-methylbutyl)-flavone (ICT) is a novel derivative of Icariin (ICA), the major active ingredient of Herba Epimedii, a herb used in traditional Chinese and alternative medicine. We previously demonstrated its anti-inflammatory effect in murine innate immune cells and activated human PBMCs. We report herein that ICA or ICT treatment reduces the expression of MRP8/MRP14 and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) on human PBMCs. Administration of ICA or ICT inhibited tumor growth in 4T1-Neu tumor-bearing mice and considerably decreased MDSC numbers in the spleen of these mice. Further, we saw a restoration of IFN-γ production by CD8+ T cells in tumor bearing mice when treated with ICA or ICT. ICA and ICT significantly decreased the amounts of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in MDSC in vivo. When MDSC were treated in vitro with ICT, we saw a significant reduction in the percent of these cells with concomitant differentiation into dendritic cells and macrophages. Concomitant with this cell type conversion was a down-regulation of IL-10, IL-6 and TNF-α production. Decreased expression of S100A8/9 and inhibition of activation of STAT3 and AKT may in part be responsible for the observed results. In conclusion, our results showed that ICA, and more robustly, ICT, directly modulate MDSC signaling and therefore altered the phenotype and function of these cells, in vitro and in vivo.

  13. The effect of polyanhydride chemistry in particle-based cancer vaccines on the magnitude of the anti-tumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Wafa, Emad I; Geary, Sean M; Goodman, Jonathan T; Narasimhan, Balaji; Salem, Aliasger K

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this research was to study the effect of polyanhydride chemistry on the immune response induced by a prophylactic cancer vaccine based on biodegradable polyanhydride particles. To achieve this goal, different compositions of polyanhydride copolymers based on 1,8-bis-(p-carboxyphenoxy)-3,6-dioxaoctane (CPTEG), 1,6-bis-(p-carboxyphenoxy)-hexane (CPH), and sebacic anhydride (SA) were synthesized by melt polycondensation, and polyanhydride copolymer particles encapsulating a model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), were then synthesized using a double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The ability of three different compositions of polyanhydride copolymers (50:50 CPTEG:CPH, 20:80 CPTEG:CPH, and 20:80 CPH:SA) encapsulating OVA to elicit immune responses was investigated. In addition, the impact of unmethylated oligodeoxynucleotides containing deoxycytidyl-deoxyguanosine dinucleotides (CpG ODN), an immunological adjuvant, on the immune response was also studied. The immune response to cancer vaccines was measured after treatment of C57BL/6J mice with two subcutaneous injections, seven days apart, of 50μg OVA encapsulated in particles composed of different polyanhydride copolymers with or without 25μg CpG ODN. In vivo studies showed that 20:80 CPTEG:CPH particles encapsulating OVA significantly stimulated the highest level of CD8(+) T lymphocytes, generated the highest serum titers of OVA-specific IgG antibodies, and provided longer protection against tumor challenge with an OVA-expressing thymoma cell line in comparison to formulations made from other polyanhydride copolymers. The results also revealed that vaccination with CpG ODN along with polyanhydride particles encapsulating OVA did not enhance the immunogenicity of OVA. These results accentuate the crucial role of the copolymer composition of polyanhydrides in stimulating the immune response and provide important insights on rationally designing efficacious cancer vaccines.

  14. Sustained release of PTX-incorporated nanoparticles synergized by burst release of DOX⋅HCl from thermosensitive modified PEG/PCL hydrogel to improve anti-tumor efficiency.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuxin; Wang, Weiwei; Li, Xijing; Liu, Jianping; Dong, Anjie; Deng, Liandong

    2014-10-01

    As drug therapies become increasingly sophisticated, the synergistic benefits of two or more drugs are often required. In this study, we aimed at improving anti-tumor efficiency of paclitaxel (PTX)-incorporated thermo-sensitive injectable hydrogel by the synergy of burst release of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX⋅HCl). Thermosensitive injectable hydrogel composed of nanoparticles assembled from amphiphilic copolymer poly(ε-caprolactone-co-1,4,8-trioxa[4.6]spiro-9-undecanone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolaone-co-1,4,8-trioxa[4.6]spiro-9-undecanone) (PECT) was fabricated. Hydrophobic PTX and hydrophilic DOX⋅HCl were loaded simultaneously in the thermo-sensitive injectable hydrogel by a two-stage entrapment. Thermosensitive gelling behaviors of drug-loading PECT nanoparticle aqueous dispersions were studied. In vitro release profiles of PTX and DOX⋅HCl and in vivo anti-tumor effect by dual drugs from PECT hydrogel were investigated. The results showed that hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs could be successfully entrapped in PECT hydrogel simultaneously without affecting its thermo-sensitive behavior. In vitro release profiles demonstrated the burst release of DOX⋅HCl and the sustained release of PTX. Anti-tumor effect was improved by a fast and tense attack caused by the burst release of hydrophilic DOX⋅HCl from hydrogel, which was continued by the sequent sustained release of PTX-incorporated nanoparticles and remnant DOX⋅HCl. Unintentionally, entrapped in PECT hydrogel, hydrophilic DOX⋅HCl was observed to have a sustained releasing pattern in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Anti-tumor effect of the alphavirus-based virus-like particle vector expressing prostate-specific antigen in a HLA-DR transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Riabov, V; Tretyakova, I; Alexander, R B; Pushko, P; Klyushnenkova, E N

    2015-10-05

    The goal of this study was to determine if an alphavirus-based vaccine encoding human Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) could generate an effective anti-tumor immune response in a stringent mouse model of prostate cancer. DR2bxPSA F1 male mice expressing human PSA and HLA-DRB1(*)1501 transgenes were vaccinated with virus-like particle vector encoding PSA (VLPV-PSA) followed by the challenge with Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate cells engineered to express PSA (TRAMP-PSA). PSA-specific cellular and humoral immune responses were measured before and after tumor challenge. PSA and CD8 reactivity in the tumors was detected by immunohistochemistry. Tumor growth was compared in vaccinated and control groups. We found that VLPV-PSA could infect mouse dendritic cells in vitro and induce a robust PSA-specific immune response in vivo. A substantial proportion of splenic CD8 T cells (19.6 ± 7.4%) produced IFNγ in response to the immunodominant peptide PSA(65-73). In the blood of vaccinated mice, 18.4 ± 4.1% of CD8 T cells were PSA-specific as determined by the staining with H-2D(b)/PSA(65-73) dextramers. VLPV-PSA vaccination also strongly stimulated production of IgG2a/b anti-PSA antibodies. Tumors in vaccinated mice showed low levels of PSA expression and significant CD8+ T cell infiltration. Tumor growth in VLPV-PSA vaccinated mice was significantly delayed at early time points (p=0.002, Gehan-Breslow test). Our data suggest that TC-83-based VLPV-PSA vaccine can efficiently overcome immune tolerance to PSA, mediate rapid clearance of PSA-expressing tumor cells and delay tumor growth. The VLPV-PSA vaccine will undergo further testing for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  16. Enhanced anti-tumor activity by the combination of a conditionally replicating adenovirus mediated interleukin-24 and dacarbazine against melanoma cells via induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guan; Liu, Yan-Qun; Wei, Zhi-Ping; Pei, Dong-Sheng; Mao, Li-Jun; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2010-08-28

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most lethal and aggressive human malignancies. It is notoriously resistant to all of the current therapeutic modalities, including chemotherapy. Suppressed apoptosis and extraordinary invasiveness are the distinctive features that contribute to the malignancy of melanoma. Dacarbazine (DTIC) has been considered as the gold standard for melanoma treatment with a response rate of 15-20%. Unfortunately, the resistance to this chemotherapeutic agent occurs frequently. ZD55-IL-24 is a selective conditionally replicating adenovirus that can mediate the expression of interleukin-24 (IL-24) gene, which has a strong anti-tumor effect. In this study, we hypothesized that a combination of ZD55-IL-24-mediated gene virotherapy and chemotherapy using DTIC would produce an increased cytotoxicity against human melanoma cells in comparison with these agents alone. Our results showed that the combination of ZD55-IL-24 and DTIC significantly enhanced the anti-tumor activity by more effectively inducing apoptosis in melanoma cells than either agent used alone without any overlapping toxicity against normal cells. This additive or synergistic effect of ZD55-IL-24 in combination with DTIC in killing human malignant melanoma cells implies a promising novel approach for melanoma therapy.

  17. Cancer vaccines: harnessing the potential of anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    Although the presence of cancer suggests failure of the immune system to protect against development of tumors, the possibility that immunity can be redirected and focused to generate an anti-tumor response offers great translational possibility. The key to this is identifying antigens likely to be present in any given tumor and functionally critical to tumor survival and growth. Such tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are varied and optimally should be absent from normal tissue. Of particular interest are TAAs associated with the tumor stroma, as immunity directed against the stroma may restrict the ability of the tumor to grow and metastasize. Important to directing the immune system toward an effect anti-tumor response is the understanding of how TAAs are processed and how the tumor is able to evade immune elimination. The process of immunoediting happens in response to the selective pressure that the immune system places upon tumor cell populations and allows for emergence of tumor cells capable of escaping immune destruction. Efforts to harness the immune system for clinical application has been aided by vaccines based on purified recombinant protein or nucleic acid TAAs. For example, a vaccine for canine melanoma has been developed and approved based on immunization with DNA components of tyrosinase, a glycoprotein essential to melanin synthesis. The performance of cancer vaccines has been aided in some cases when supplemented with immunostimulatory molecules such as interleukin 2 or a novel extracellular matrix vaccine adjuvant. Vaccines with the broadest menu of antigenic targets may be those most likely to succeed against cancer. For this reason, tissue vaccines produced from harvested tumor material may offer significant benefit. With several cancer vaccines on the veterinary and human markets, efforts to understand basic tumor immunology are soon to yield great dividends.

  18. Synergistic mechanisms involved in the antidepressant effects of agomelatine.

    PubMed

    Tardito, Daniela; Molteni, Raffaella; Popoli, Maurizio; Racagni, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Agomelatine is a novel and clinically effective antidepressant drug with melatonergic (MT1/MT2) agonist and 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist properties. Both receptorial components are widely expressed in the central nervous system and it seems that this compound could act synergistically on both the melatonergic and the 5-HT(2C) receptors. In this review we will briefly summarize the preclinical evidence suggesting that the molecular-cellular effects of agomelatine and in turn its antidepressant activity are the result of a synergistic action between its agonism at MT1/MT2 and antagonism at 5-HT(2C) receptors. The antidepressant properties of agomelatine related to its effect on neurogenesis, cell survival, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), activity-regulated cytoskeleton associated protein (Arc) and stress-induced glutamate release, appear to be due to this synergistic action. Compared with traditional antidepressants which also affect these parameters, agomelatine is the only one able to resynchronize these effectors at distinct levels, circuital and intracellular. This suggests that agomelatine effects in restoring circadian rhythms and relieving depressive symptoms result from a synergistic interaction between melatonergic and serotonergic receptors.

  19. Synergistic growth inhibitory effect of deracoxib with doxorubicin against a canine mammary tumor cell line, CMT-U27

    PubMed Central

    BAKIREL, Tülay; ALKAN, Fulya Üstün; ÜSTÜNER, Oya; ÇINAR, Suzan; YILDIRIM, Funda; ERTEN, Gaye; BAKIREL, Utku

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors have been shown to exert anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities on many types of malignant tumors. These anticancer properties make it worthwhile to examine the possible benefit of combining COX inhibitors with other anti-cancer agents. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of deracoxib (DER) in potentiating antitumor activity of doxorubicin (DOX) in canine mammary carcinoma cells (CMT-U27). DER (50–250 µM) enhanced the antiproliferative activity of DOX by reducing the IC50 (approximately 3- to 3.5 fold). Interaction analysis of the data showed that combinations of DOX at 0.9 µM with DER (100–250 µM) produced synergism in the CMT-U27 cell line, with a ratio index ranging from 1.98 to 2.33. In additional studies identifying the mechanism of observed synergistic effect, we found that DER strongly potentiated DOX-caused G0/G1 arrest in cell cycle progression. Also, DER (100–250 µM) augmented apoptosis induction with approximately 1.35- and 1.37- fold increases in apoptotic response caused by DOX in the cells. DER enhanced the antiproliferative effect of DOX in conjunction with induction of apoptosis by modulation of Bcl-2 expression and changes in the cell cycle of the CMT-U27 cell line. Although the exact molecular mechanism of the alterations in the cell cycle and apoptosis observed with DER and DOX combinations require further investigations, the results suggest that the synergistic effect of DOX and DER combinations in CMT therapy may be achieved at relatively lower doses of DOX with lesser side effects. Therefore, combining DER with DOX may prove beneficial in the clinical treatment of canine mammary cancer. PMID:26822118

  20. The synergistic effect of humanized monoclonal antibodies targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sui, Ping; Cao, Hongxin; Meng, Long; Hu, Pingping; Ma, Honghai; Du, Jiajun

    2014-01-01

    IGF-1R, an important member of the IGF signaling system, is a plasma-membrane-bound receptor composed of two α-subunits and two β-subunits. IGF-1R has been revealed to play a pivotal role in cancer cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and phenotype transformation, resulting uncontrolled tumor-cell growth. During the last decades, IGF-1R monoclonal antibody combined with chemotherapeutic agents as a novel cancer treatment approach has shown synergistic effect in cancer treatment in some preclinical and clinical trials. Prolonged progression-free survival rate, objective response rate and stable disease were shown in some sorts of cancer patients compared to those implemented traditional standard chemotherapy. However, not all related clinical trials demonstrated expected promising outcomes. Most treatment-related adverse events in those studies are mild and manageable. The most frequently happened side effect is hyperglycemia in majorities of combined cancer therapy studies. Herein, we summarized the recent online and published literatures concerning the safety, tolerability, anti-tumor activity and adverse events of this novel strategy. Besides, this work attempts to provide convincible evidence to warrant further investigation to identify prognostic biomarkers on neoplasm.

  1. Homeostatic T Cell Expansion to Induce Anti-Tumor Autoimmunity in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    preferentially expand and activate otherwise tolerant lymphocytes and, hence, elicit effective anti-tumor autoimmunity (2). Our initial experiments with...vaccination and IL-2 treatment (4). Therefore, the use of additional antibodies to deplete other relevant lymphocyte populations may improve the effect... lymphocyte recovery. Nonetheless, the fact that metastases were reduced in LN cell-transfused, as compared to non-transfused, lymphopenic mice, suggests

  2. Anti-tumor mechanism in IL-12 Gene therapy using liposomal bubbles and ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Oda, Yusuke; Koshima, Risa; Hirata, Keiichi; Nomura, Tetsuya; Negishi, Yoichi; Utoguchi, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    Sonoporation combined with nano/microbubbles is an attractive technique for developing non-invasive and non-viral gene delivery systems. Previously, we developed novel ultrasound sensitive liposomes (Bubble liposomes) which contain the ultrasound imaging gas perfluoropropane. IL-12 corded plasmid DNA delivery into tumor tissue by sonoporation combined with Bubble liposomes was found to suppress tumor growth. In this study, we examined the mechanism of the anti-tumor effect in this IL-12 gene delivery. This therapeutic effect was T-cell dependent, requiring mainly CD8+ T lymphocytes in the effector phase, as confirmed by a mouse in vivo depletion assay. In addition, migration of CD8+ T cells was observed in the mice. These results suggest that CD8+ T lymphocytes play an important role in the anti-tumor effects of this IL-12 gene therapy.

  3. Synergistic Effects of Gold Nanocages in Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-wei; Guo, Wei-hua; Qi, Ya-fei; Wang, Jian-zhen; Ma, Xiang-xing; Yu, De-xin

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanocages (GNCs) are a promising material that not only converts near infrared (NIR) light to heat for the ablation of tumors but also acts as a radiosensitizer. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has a synergistic effect that can lead to significant tumor cell necrosis. In the current study, we synthesized GNCs that offered the combined effects of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. This combination strategy resulted in increased tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor tissue necrosis. We propose that GNCs can be used for clinical treatment and to potentially overcome resistance to radiotherapy by clearly increasing the antitumor effect.

  4. Anti-tumor-promoting activity of lignans from the aerial part of Saussurea medusa.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, M; Konoshima, T; Komatsu, K; Tokuda, H; Nishino, H

    2000-09-29

    In the course of our continuing search for novel cancer chemopreventive agents from natural sources, several kinds of Compositae plants were screened. Consequently, the lignans, arctiin (ARC) and arctigenin (ARC-G), were obtained from the aerial part of Saussurea medusaas active constituents. These compounds exhibited the remarkable anti-tumor-promoting effect on two-stage carcinogenesis test of mouse skin tumors induced by 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene as an initiator and 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate as a promoter by both topical application and oral administration. Furthermore, ARC-G exhibited potent anti-tumor-promoting activity on two-stage carcinogenesis test of mouse pulmonary tumors induced by 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide as an initiator and glycerol as a promoter.

  5. Synthesis and anti-tumor activity evaluation of gallic acid-mangiferin hybrid molecule.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang-yu; Deng, Jia-gang; Wang, Lin; Yuan, Ye-fei

    2013-12-01

    To improve the anti-tumor effects of gallic acid and mangiferin, a gallic acid-mangiferin hybrid molecule (GAMA) was synthesized from gallic acid with mangiferin in the presence of ionic liquid ChC1(choline chloride)·2SnC12. Chemical and spectroscopic methods, such as (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, and HR-ESIMS were used for the structure identification of GA-MA. Using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, the in vitro anti-tumor effects were compared between GA-MA, gallic acid and mangiferin on human hepatoma HepG2, human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE, human lung cancer NCI-H460, human ovarian cancer SK-OV-3, and human cervical cancer Hela cells. The results showed that the half inhibitory concentration (IC50) of GA-MA on HepG2, CNE, NCI-H460, SK-OV-3, and Hela cells was significantly lower than that of gallic acid or mangiferin. This showed that GA-MA has a better in vitro anti-tumor effect than gallic acid and mangi-ferin.

  6. Synthesis and anti-tumor activity evaluation of rhein-aloe emodin hybrid molecule.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye-Fei; Hu, Xiang-Yu; He, Ying; Deng, Jia-Gang

    2012-02-01

    To improve the anti-tumor effects of rhein and aloe-emodin, a rhein-aloe-emodin hybrid molecule (RH-AE) was synthesized from rhein and aloe-emodin in the presence of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) and 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP). Chemical and spectroscopic methods, such as 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, and HR-ESIMS were used for the structure identification of RH-AE. Using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, the in vitro anti-tumor effects were compared between RH-AE, rhein and aloe-emodin on human hepatoma HepG2, human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE, human lung cancer NCI-H460, human ovarian cancer SK-OV-3, and human cervical cancer Hela cells. The results showed that the half inhibitory concentration (IC50) of RH-AE on HepG2, CNE, NCI-H460, SK-OV-3, and Hela cells were significantly lower than those of rhein and aloe-emodin. This showed that RH-AE has a better in vitro anti-tumor effect than rhein and aloe-emodin.

  7. Synergistic Effect of Lupenone and Caryophyllene Oxide against Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Polanco-Hernández, Glendy; Escalante-Erosa, Fabiola; García-Sosa, Karlina; Rosado, María E.; Guzmán-Marín, Eugenia; Acosta-Viana, Karla Y.; Giménez-Turba, Alberto; Salamanca, Efraín; Peña-Rodríguez, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro trypanocidal activity of a 1 : 4 mixture of lupenone and caryophyllene oxide confirmed a synergistic effect of the terpenoids against epimastigotes forms of T. cruzi (IC50 = 10.4 μg/mL, FIC = 0.46). In addition, testing of the terpenoid mixture for its capacity to reduce the number of amastigote nests in cardiac tissue and skeletal muscle of infected mice showed a reduction of more than 80% at a dose level of 20.8 mg·kg−1·day−1. PMID:23762135

  8. BPIC: A novel anti-tumor lead capable of inhibiting inflammation and scavenging free radicals.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Wang, Yuji; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Jianhui; Peng, Shiqi

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation has a critical role in the tumor progression, free radical damage can worse the status of patients in cancer condition. The anti-cancer agents capable of inhibiting inflammation and scavenging free radicals attract a lot of our interest. Aimed at the discovery of such anti-tumor agent, a novel intercalator, benzyl 1-[4-hydroxy-3-(methoxycarbonyl)-phenyl-9H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole-3-carboxylate (BPIC) was presented. The docking investigation of BPIC and doxorubicin towards the DNA (PDB ID: 1NAB) gave equal score and similar feature. The anti-proliferation assay of 8 cancer cells identified S180 cells had equal sensitivity to BPIC and doxorubicin. The anti-tumor assay defined the efficacy of BPIC been 2 folds higher than that of doxorubicin. At 1μmol/kg of dose BPIC effectively inhibited xylene-induced ear edema and decreased the plasma TNF-α and IL-8 of the mice. BPIC scavenged ∙OH, ∙O2(-) and NO free radicals in a concentration dependent manner and NO free radicals had the highest sensitivity. BPIC could be a novel anti-tumor lead capable of simultaneously inhibiting inflammation and scavenging free radicals.

  9. A novel anti-alpha-fetoprotein single-chain variable fragment displays anti-tumor effects in HepG2 cells as a single agent or in combination with paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaonan; Shen, Yanli; Sun, Hao; Gao, Xiangdong

    2016-08-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a high rate of tumor recurrence and metastasis, resulting in shortened survival time. The function of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) as a regulatory factor in the growth of HCC cells has been well defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of a novel AFP-specific single-chain variable fragment that blocked AFP and inhibited HCC cell growth. The results indicated that the anti-AFP single-chain variable fragment (scFv) induced growth inhibition of AFP-expressing HCC cell lines in vitro through induction of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The mechanism of apoptosis probably involved with blocking AFP internalization and regulation of the PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling network. Moreover, the anti-AFP-scFv also effectively sensitized the HepG2 cells to paclitaxel (PTX) at a lower concentration. The combination effect of PTX and anti-AFP-scFv displayed a synergistic effect on HepG2 cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrated that targeting AFP by specific antibodies has potential immunotherapeutic efficacy in human HCC.

  10. Synergistic effects of COMT and TPH2 on social cognition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chieh-Hsin; Tseng, Yu-Lun; Huang, Chieh-Liang; Chang, Yue-Cune; Tsai, Guochuan E; Lane, Hsien-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Whether genetic factors affect social cognition, particularly emotion management, requires elucidation. This study investigates whether social cognition varies with genetic variations of COMT and tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2), which modulate dopamine and serotonin neurotransmissions respectively, and thereby emotion regulation. NIMH-recommended "managing emotions branch and 2 subtasks" of MSCEIT and six neurocognition domains, and genotypes of COMT Val158Met and TPH2 G703T were measured in 150 Han-Chinese healthy adults. Subjects carrying the M allele (M group) of COMT exceeded Val/Val homozygotes (V group) in managing emotions branch (p = 0.032) and emotional relation subtask (p = 0.037). TPH2 T/T homozygotes (T group) excelled those with the G allele (G group) in emotional management subtask (p = 0.025). Subjects with M+T variation surpassed the other 3 groups (M+G, V+T and V+G) in managing emotion branch (p = 0.002), emotional relation subtask (p = 0.023), and emotional management subtask (p = 0.002). The findings remained after control for gender, age, education, and neurocognitive functions. Synergistically, the effect size of COMT-TPH2 combination surmounted the sum of separate effect sizes of COMT and TPH2. The findings suggest that genetic variations of COMT and TPH2 have synergistic effects on social cognition in the general population.

  11. Poly (I:C) enhances the anti-tumor activity of canine parvovirus NS1 protein by inducing a potent anti-tumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Tiwari, A K; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P

    2016-09-01

    The canine parvovirus NS1 (CPV2.NS1) protein selectively induces apoptosis in the malignant cells. However, for an effective in vivo tumor treatment strategy, an oncolytic agent also needs to induce a potent anti-tumor immune response. In the present study, we used poly (I:C), a TLR3 ligand, as an adjuvant along with CPV2.NS1 to find out if the combination can enhance the oncolytic activity by inducing a potent anti-tumor immune response. The 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells were used to induce mammary tumor in Balb/c mice. The results suggested that poly (I:C), when given along with CPV2.NS1, not only significantly reduced the tumor growth but also augmented the immune response against tumor antigen(s) as indicated by the increase in blood CD4+ and CD8+ counts and infiltration of immune cells in the tumor tissue. Further, blood serum analysis of the cytokines revealed that Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) were significantly upregulated in the treatment group indicating activation of cell-mediated immune response. The present study reports the efficacy of CPV2.NS1 along with poly (I:C) not only in inhibiting the mammary tumor growth but also in generating an active anti-tumor immune response without any visible toxicity. The results of our study may help in developing CPV2.NS1 and poly (I: C) combination as a cancer therapeutic regime to treat various malignancies.

  12. Synergistic effects of anethole and ibuprofen in acute inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski-Rebecca, Edirlene S; Rocha, Bruno A; Wiirzler, Luiz A M; Cuman, Roberto K N; Velazquez-Martinez, Carlos A; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A

    2015-12-05

    This study assessed the effect of the combination of anethole and ibuprofen in comparison with monotherapy by either drug alone, using two in vivo inflammatory models, namely the pleurisy and paw edema in rats. We also measured the levels of the TNF protein in plasma, and the ability of anethole to inhibit, in vitro, the activity of the cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes. The test drugs (anethole; ibuprofen; anethole + ibuprofen), at different doses, were administered once (p.o.) 60 min before the induction of the inflammatory response. The association of anethole + ibuprofen inhibited the development of the inflammatory response in both models used. This effect can be partially explained by the inhibitory action on the production of TNF and of COX isoforms. The isobologram analysis evidenced a synergistic effect between ibuprofen and anethole, because the combination of drugs showed a higher inhibitory potential than either drug alone.

  13. Development and Characterization of a Humanized Anti-HER2 Antibody HuA21 with Potent Anti-Tumor Properties in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruilin; Hu, Siyi; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Zhihui; Zha, Zhao; Huang, Hui; Shen, Guodong; Liu, Jing; Song, Lihua; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer immunotherapy. An engineered anti-HER-2 chimeric A21 antibody (chA21) is a chimeric antibody targeted to subdomain I of the HER2 extracellular domain. Here, we report the anti-tumor activity of the novel engineered monoclonal antibody humanized chA21 (HuA21) that targets HER2 on the basis of chA21, and we describe the underlying mechanisms. Our results reveal that HuA21 markedly inhibits the proliferation and migration of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and causes enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity potency against HER2-overexpressing tumor cells. In particular, HuA21, but not trastuzumab (Tra), markedly suppresses growth and enhances the internalization of the antibody in Tra-resistant BT-474 breast cancer cells. These characteristics are highly associated with the intrinsic ability of HuA21 to down-regulate HER2 activation and inhibit the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathways. Furthermore, the combination of HuA21 with Tra synergistically enhances the anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo and inhibits HER2 activation and the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways. Altogether, our results suggest that HuA21 may represent a unique anti-HER2 antibody with potential as a therapeutic candidate alone or in combination with other anti-HER2 reagents in cancer therapy. PMID:27092488

  14. Development and Characterization of a Humanized Anti-HER2 Antibody HuA21 with Potent Anti-Tumor Properties in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruilin; Hu, Siyi; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Zhihui; Zha, Zhao; Huang, Hui; Shen, Guodong; Liu, Jing; Song, Lihua; Wei, Wei

    2016-04-15

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer immunotherapy. An engineered anti-HER-2 chimeric A21 antibody (chA21) is a chimeric antibody targeted to subdomain I of the HER2 extracellular domain. Here, we report the anti-tumor activity of the novel engineered monoclonal antibody humanized chA21 (HuA21) that targets HER2 on the basis of chA21, and we describe the underlying mechanisms. Our results reveal that HuA21 markedly inhibits the proliferation and migration of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and causes enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity potency against HER2-overexpressing tumor cells. In particular, HuA21, but not trastuzumab (Tra), markedly suppresses growth and enhances the internalization of the antibody in Tra-resistant BT-474 breast cancer cells. These characteristics are highly associated with the intrinsic ability of HuA21 to down-regulate HER2 activation and inhibit the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathways. Furthermore, the combination of HuA21 with Tra synergistically enhances the anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo and inhibits HER2 activation and the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways. Altogether, our results suggest that HuA21 may represent a unique anti-HER2 antibody with potential as a therapeutic candidate alone or in combination with other anti-HER2 reagents in cancer therapy.

  15. The synergistic effect between vanillin and doxorubicin in ehrlich ascites carcinoma solid tumor and MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Elsherbiny, Nehal M; Younis, Nahla N; Shaheen, Mohamed A; Elseweidy, Mohamed M

    2016-09-01

    Despite the remarkable anti-tumor activity of doxorubicin (DOX), its clinical application is limited due to multiple organ toxicities. Products with less side effects are therefore highly requested. The current study investigated the anti-cancer activities of vanillin against breast cancer and possible synergistic potentiation of DOX chemotherapeutic effects by vanillin. Vanillin (100mg/kg), DOX (2mg/kg) and their combination were administered i.p. to solid Ehrlich tumor-bearing mice for 21days. MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line was treated with vanillin (1 and 2mM), DOX (100μM) or their combination. Protection against DOX-induced nephrotoxicity was studied in rats that received vanillin (100mg/kg, ip) for 10days with a single dose of DOX (15mg/kg) on day 6. Vanillin exerted anticancer effects comparable to DOX and synergesticlly potentiated DOX anticancer effects both in-vivo and in-vitro. The anticancer potency of vanillin in-vivo was mediated via apoptosis and antioxidant capacity. It also offered an in-vitro growth inhibitory effect and cytotoxicity mediated by apoptosis (increased caspase-9 and Bax:Bcl-2 ratio) along with anti-metasasis effect. Vanillin protected against DOX-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. In conclusion, vanillin can be a potential lead molecule for the development of non-toxic agents for the treatment of breast cancer either alone or combined with DOX.

  16. Synergistic Effects of Toxic Elements on Heat Shock Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mahmood, Qaisar; Irshad, Muhammad; Hussain, Jamshaid

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins show remarkable variations in their expression levels under a variety of toxic conditions. A research span expanded over five decades has revealed their molecular characterization, gene regulation, expression patterns, vast similarity in diverse groups, and broad range of functional capabilities. Their functions include protection and tolerance against cytotoxic conditions through their molecular chaperoning activity, maintaining cytoskeleton stability, and assisting in cell signaling. However, their role as biomarkers for monitoring the environmental risk assessment is controversial due to a number of conflicting, validating, and nonvalidating reports. The current knowledge regarding the interpretation of HSPs expression levels has been discussed in the present review. The candidature of heat shock proteins as biomarkers of toxicity is thus far unreliable due to synergistic effects of toxicants and other environmental factors. The adoption of heat shock proteins as “suit of biomarkers in a set of organisms” requires further investigation. PMID:25136596

  17. Synergistic effect of repulsive inhibition in synchronization of excitatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belykh, Igor; Reimbayev, Reimbay; Zhao, Kun

    2015-06-01

    We show that the addition of pairwise repulsive inhibition to excitatory networks of bursting neurons induces synchrony, in contrast to one's expectations. Through stability analysis, we reveal the mechanism underlying this purely synergistic phenomenon and demonstrate that it originates from the transition between different types of bursting, caused by excitatory-inhibitory synaptic coupling. This effect is generic and observed in different models of bursting neurons and fast synaptic interactions. We also find a universal scaling law for the synchronization stability condition for large networks in terms of the number of excitatory and inhibitory inputs each neuron receives, regardless of the network size and topology. This general law is in sharp contrast with linearly coupled networks with positive (attractive) and negative (repulsive) coupling where the placement and structure of negative connections heavily affect synchronization.

  18. Synergistic effects of toxic elements on heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Khalid; Jadoon, Saima; Mahmood, Qaisar; Irshad, Muhammad; Hussain, Jamshaid

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins show remarkable variations in their expression levels under a variety of toxic conditions. A research span expanded over five decades has revealed their molecular characterization, gene regulation, expression patterns, vast similarity in diverse groups, and broad range of functional capabilities. Their functions include protection and tolerance against cytotoxic conditions through their molecular chaperoning activity, maintaining cytoskeleton stability, and assisting in cell signaling. However, their role as biomarkers for monitoring the environmental risk assessment is controversial due to a number of conflicting, validating, and nonvalidating reports. The current knowledge regarding the interpretation of HSPs expression levels has been discussed in the present review. The candidature of heat shock proteins as biomarkers of toxicity is thus far unreliable due to synergistic effects of toxicants and other environmental factors. The adoption of heat shock proteins as "suit of biomarkers in a set of organisms" requires further investigation.

  19. Biodegradable nanoassemblies of piperlongumine display enhanced anti-angiogenesis and anti-tumor activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Chang, Ying; Yang, Chao; Sang, Zitai; Yang, Tao; Ang, Wei; Ye, Weiwei; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang; Luo, Youfu

    2014-03-01

    Piperlongumine (PL) shows an inhibitory effect on tumor growth; however, lipophilicity has restricted its further applications. Nanotechnology provides an effective method to overcome the poor water solubility of lipophilic drugs. Polymeric micelles with small particle size can passively target tumors by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, thus improving their anti-tumor effects. In this study, to improve the water solubility and anti-tumor activity of PL, PL encapsulated polymeric micelles (PL micelles) were prepared by a solid dispersion method. The prepared PL micelles showed a small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency, which could be lyophilized into powder, and the re-dissolved PL micelles are homogenous and stable in water. In addition, a sustained release behavior of PL micelles was observed in vitro. Encapsulation of PL into polymeric micelles could increase the cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and reduce glutathione (GSH) levels in vitro. Encapsulation of PL into polymeric micelles enhanced its inhibitory effect on neovascularization both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with free PL, PL micelles showed a stronger inhibitory effect on the proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Additionally, in a transgenic zebrafish model, embryonic angiogenesis was inhibited by PL micelles. Furthermore, PL micelles were more effective in inhibiting tumor growth and prolonging survival in a subcutaneous CT-26 murine tumor model in vivo. Therefore, our data revealed that the encapsulation of PL into biodegradable polymeric micelles enhanced its anti-angiogenesis and anti-tumor activities both in vitro and in vivo.

  20. 2DG suppresses the in vivo anti-tumor efficacy of erlotinib in HNSCC cells

    PubMed Central

    Sobhakumari, Arya; Orcutt, Kevin; Love-Homan, Laurie; Kowalski, Christopher; Parsons, Arlene; Knudson, C. Michael; Simons, Andrean L.

    2017-01-01

    Poor tumor response to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is a significant challenge for effective treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Therefore, strategies that may increase tumor response to EGFR TKIs are warranted in order to improve HNSCC patient treatment and overall survival. HNSCC tumors are highly glycolytic and increased EGFR signaling has been found to promote glucose metabolism through various mechanisms. We have previously shown that inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) significantly enhanced the antitumor effects of cisplatin and radiation which are commonly used to treat HNSCC. The goal of the current studies is to determine if 2DG will enhance the anti-tumor activity of the EGFR TKI erlotinib in HNSCC. Erlotinib transiently suppressed glucose consumption accompanied by alterations in pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) expression. 2DG enhanced the cytotoxic effect of erlotinib in vitro but reversed the anti-tumor effect of erlotinib in vivo. 2DG altered the N-glycosylation status of EGFR and induced the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers CHOP and BiP in vitro. Additionally, the effects of 2DG+erlotinib on cytotoxicity and ER stress in vitro were reversed by mannose but not glucose or antioxidant enzymes. Lastly, the protective effect of 2DG on erlotinib-induced cytotoxicity in vivo was reversed by chloroquine. Altogether, 2DG suppressed the anti-tumor efficacy of erlotinib in a HNSCC xenograft mouse model which may be due to increased cytoprotective autophagy mediated by ER stress activation. PMID:27178822

  1. Synergistic effects of co-administration of suicide gene expressing mesenchymal stem cells and prodrug-encapsulated liposome on aggressive lung melanoma metastases in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Huang, Bing; Wu, Hai-Bin; Wu, Jia-He; Li, Li-Ming; Li, Yan-Xin; Hu, Yu-Lan; Han, Min; Shen, You-Qing; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2015-07-10

    The success of conventional suicide gene therapy for cancer treatment is still limited because of lack of efficient delivery methods, as well as poor penetration into tumor tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have recently emerged as potential vehicles in improving delivery issues. However, these stem cells are usually genetically modified using viral gene vectors for suicide gene overexpression to induce sufficient therapeutic efficacy. This approach may result in safety risks for clinical translation. Therefore, we designed a novel strategy that uses non-viral gene vector in modifying MSCs with suicide genes to reduce risks. In addition, these cells were co-administrated with prodrug-encapsulated liposomes for synergistic anti-tumor effects. Results demonstrate that this strategy is effective for gene and prodrug delivery, which co-target tumor tissues, to achieve a significant decrease in tumor colonization and a subsequent increase in survival in a murine melanoma lung metastasis model. Moreover, for the first time, we demonstrated the permeability of MSCs within tumor nests by using an in vitro 3D tumor spheroid model. Thus, the present study provides a new strategy to improve the delivery problem in conventional suicide gene therapy and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. Furthermore, this study also presents new findings to improve our understanding of MSCs in tumor-targeted gene delivery.

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Neutrophils with Anti-Tumor Properties.

    PubMed

    Sionov, Ronit Vogt; Assi, Simaan; Gershkovitz, Maya; Sagiv, Jitka Y; Polyansky, Lola; Mishalian, Inbal; Fridlender, Zvi G; Granot, Zvi

    2015-06-19

    Neutrophils, the most abundant of all white blood cells in the human circulation, play an important role in the host defense against invading microorganisms. In addition, neutrophils play a central role in the immune surveillance of tumor cells. They have the ability to recognize tumor cells and induce tumor cell death either through a cell contact-dependent mechanism involving hydrogen peroxide or through antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Neutrophils with anti-tumor activity can be isolated from peripheral blood of cancer patients and of tumor-bearing mice. These neutrophils are termed tumor-entrained neutrophils (TEN) to distinguish them from neutrophils of healthy subjects or naïve mice that show no significant tumor cytotoxic activity. Compared with other white blood cells, neutrophils show different buoyancy making it feasible to obtain a > 98% pure neutrophil population when subjected to a density gradient. However, in addition to the normal high-density neutrophil population (HDN), in cancer patients, in tumor-bearing mice, as well as under chronic inflammatory conditions, distinct low-density neutrophil populations (LDN) appear in the circulation. LDN co-purify with the mononuclear fraction and can be separated from mononuclear cells using either positive or negative selection strategies. Once the purity of the isolated neutrophils is determined by flow cytometry, they can be used for in vitro and in vivo functional assays. We describe techniques for monitoring the anti-tumor activity of neutrophils, their ability to migrate and to produce reactive oxygen species, as well as monitoring their phagocytic capacity ex vivo. We further describe techniques to label the neutrophils for in vivo tracking, and to determine their anti-metastatic capacity in vivo. All these techniques are essential for understanding how to obtain and characterize neutrophils with anti-tumor function.

  3. Synergistic health effects between chemical pollutants and electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ledoigt, Gérard; Sta, Chaima; Goujon, Eric; Souguir, Dalila; El Ferjani, Ezzeddine

    2015-01-01

    Humans and ecosystems are exposed to highly variable and unknown cocktail of chemicals and radiations. Although individual chemicals are typically present at low concentrations, they can interact with each other resulting in additive or potentially synergistic mixture effects. This was also observed with products obtained by radiation actions such as sunlight or electromagnetic fields that can change the effects of chemicals, such as pesticides, and metal trace elements on health. Concomitant presence of various pesticides and their transformation products adds further complexity to chemical risk assessment since chronic inflammation is a key step for cancer promotion. Degradation of a parent molecule can produce several by-products which can trigger various toxic effects with different impacts on health and environment. For instance, the cocktail of sunlight irradiated sulcotrione pesticide has a greater cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than parent molecule, sulcotrione, and questions about the impact of photochemical process on environment. Adjuvants were shown to modify the biological features of pesticides. Addition of other elements, metals or biological products, can differently enhance cell toxicity of pesticides or electromagnetic radiations suggesting a synergy in living organisms. Electromagnetic fields spreading, pesticide by-products and mixtures monitoring become greater for environmental contamination evaluations.

  4. Drug development from natural products: exploiting synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Ulrich-Merzenich, Gudrun; Panek, D; Zeitler, H; Vetter, H; Wagner, H

    2010-03-01

    Drug development in phytomedicine has been focused in the past on the discovery and analysis of new structures from natural products. The search aimed at the determination of the single "active principle" in plants, based on the assumption that a plant has one or a few ingredients which determine its therapeutic effects. But traditional systems of medicines like Ayurveda, traditional Chinese medicine or the European phytotherapy generally assume that a synergy of all ingredients of the plants will bring about the maximum of therapeutic efficacy. This approach has for long been impossible to investigate since adequate methods to standardize complex plant mixtures as well as to rationalize complex mode of actions were lacking. The introduction of high throughput technologies provides the opportunity to determine profiles of plants and to systematically explore the mode of action of combinatory drug regimes. The present review highlights the concept of synergy and gives examples of synergistic effects of plant constituents. It elaborates on how the high throughput technologies can be used in drug development from natural products with the aim of creating evidence-based plant medications in prevention and treatment of different diseases in the form of new single treatments or new combinatory drug regimes while exploiting synergy-effects.

  5. Synergistic effect of fragrant herbs in Japanese scent sachets.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yumi; Ito, Michiho

    2015-02-01

    The sedative activity of eight aromatic natural medicines that are traditionally used in Japanese scent sachets was examined using an open field test with mice. Galangal (Kaempferia galanga), patchouli (Pogostemon cablin), sandalwood (Santalum album), spikenard (Nardostachys chinensis), cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia), clove (Syzygium aromaticum), star anise (Illicium verum), and borneol (Dryobalanops aromatica) distilled oils were used. These natural medicines have various pharmacological effects. For example, galangal has insecticidal activity and clove extracts possess strong total antioxidant activity. Aromatherapy, a well-known complementary medicine system that uses inhalation, has recently attracted much attention. The sedative activity of inhaled aromatic compounds or essential oils has been examined by measuring the spontaneous motor activity of mice in an open field test. The galangal, patchouli, sandalwood, spikenard, and borneol oils showed significant sedative effects. The effect was stronger for a mixture of the five oils than for any of the single oils. This suggests that the oil mixture may have synergistic activity. Sedative activity was not observed when inactive oils (cinnamon, clove, and star anise) were added to the mixture of the five active oils.

  6. Anti-tumor activity of arginine deiminase via arginine deprivation in retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Dong Hun; Min, Bon-Hong; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2007-12-01

    In spite of recent advances in the treatment of retinoblastoma, chemotherapy is still challenging in high-stage intraocular retinoblastoma or metastatic retinoblastoma. Here, we investigated whether arginine deprivation via arginine deiminase (ADI) could be a new anti-tumor therapy in retinoblastoma cells. Expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) was detected in human retinoblastoma tissues. Even with a high expression of ASS, ADI effectively inhibited the proliferation of retinoblastoma cells and induced retinoblastoma cell death in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that arginine deprivation via ADI could be another treatment option for retinoblastoma due to low ASS activity in retinoblastoma cells.

  7. Selected anti-tumor vaccines merit a place in multimodal tumor therapies

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Eva-Maria; Wunderlich, Roland; Ebel, Nina; Rubner, Yvonne; Schlücker, Eberhard; Meyer-Pittroff, Roland; Ott, Oliver J.; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.; Frey, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Multimodal approaches are nowadays successfully applied in cancer therapy. Primary locally acting therapies such as radiotherapy (RT) and surgery are combined with systemic administration of chemotherapeutics. Nevertheless, the therapy of cancer is still a big challenge in medicine. The treatments often fail to induce long-lasting anti-tumor responses. Tumor recurrences and metastases result. Immunotherapies are therefore ideal adjuncts to standard tumor therapies since they aim to activate the patient's immune system against malignant cells even outside the primary treatment areas (abscopal effects). Especially cancer vaccines may have the potential both to train the immune system against cancer cells and to generate an immunological memory, resulting in long-lasting anti-tumor effects. However, despite promising results in phase I and II studies, most of the concepts finally failed. There are some critical aspects in development and application of cancer vaccines that may decide on their efficiency. The time point and frequency of medication, usage of an adequate immune adjuvant, the vaccine's immunogenic potential, and the tumor burden of the patient are crucial. Whole tumor cell vaccines have advantages compared to peptide-based ones since a variety of tumor antigens (TAs) are present. The master requirements of cell-based, therapeutic tumor vaccines are the complete inactivation of the tumor cells and the increase of their immunogenicity. Since the latter is highly connected with the cell death modality, the inactivation procedure of the tumor cell material may significantly influence the vaccine's efficiency. We therefore also introduce high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) as an innovative inactivation technology for tumor cell-based vaccines and outline that HHP efficiently inactivates tumor cells by enhancing their immunogenicity. Finally studies are presented proving that anti-tumor immune responses can be triggered by combining RT with selected immune

  8. Synergistic effect of copper and low temperature over Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Mauricio; Quesille-Villalobos, Ana María; Maza, Felipe; Parra, Angel; Reyes-Jara, Angélica

    2015-12-01

    The capacity to grow at low temperatures has allowed Listeria monocytogenes to become one of the primary food pathogens to date, representing a major public health problem worldwide. Several works have described the homeostatic response of L. monocytogenes under different copper (Cu) treatments growing at mild temperature (30 °C). The aims of this report were to evaluate if changes in the external concentration of Cu affected viability and Cu homeostasis of L. monocytogenes growing at low temperature. Ours results showed that L. monocytogenes growing at 8 °C had a reduced viability relative to 30 °C when exposed to Cu treatments. This decrease was correlated with an increase in the internal concentration of Cu, probably linked to the transcriptional down-regulation of mechanisms involved in Cu homeostasis. This combined effect of Cu and low temperature showed a synergistic impact over the viability and homeostasis of L. monocytogenes, where low temperature exacerbated the toxic effect of Cu. These results can be useful in terms of the use of Cu as an antibacterial agent.

  9. Anti-tumor activity and mechanism of action for a cyanoaziridine-derivative, AMP423

    PubMed Central

    Wisner, Lee; Samulitis, Betty K.; Landowski, Terry H.; Remers, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Preclinical studies evaluated the anti-tumor activity and mechanism of action of AMP423, a naphthyl derivative of 2-cyanoaziridine-1-carboxamide with structural similarity to the pro-oxidant anti-tumor agent imexon. Methods The cytotoxic potency was evaluated in vitro against a variety of human cancer cell lines. Mechanism-of-action studies were performed in the human 8226/S myeloma cell line and its imexon-resistant variant, 8226/IM10. In vivo activity was evaluated against human myeloma and lymphoma xenografts in SCID mice. Pharmacokinetics and toxicology were investigated in non-tumor-bearing mice. Results The 72-h IC50s for all cell types ranged from 2 to 36 μM, across a wide variety of human cancer cell lines. AMP423 was active in SCID mice bearing 8226/S myeloma and SU-DHL-6 B-cell lymphoma tumors, with a median tumor growth delay (T–C) of 21 days (P = 0.0002) and 5 days (P = 0.004), respectively, and a median tumor growth inhibition (T/C) of 33.3% (P = 0.03) and 82% (P = 0.01), respectively. In non-tumor-bearing mice, AMP423 was not myelosuppressive. Mechanistic studies show that AMP423’s mode of cell death is a mixture of necrosis and apoptosis, with generation of reactive oxygen species, inhibition of protein synthesis, and a decrease in reduced sulfhydryl levels, but no alkylation of nucleophiles. Unlike its structural analog imexon, which causes cell cycle arrest in G2/M, AMP423 induces the accumulation of cells in S-phase. Conclusions AMP423 has pro-oxidant effects similar to imexon, has greater cytotoxic potency in vitro, and has anti-tumor activity in hematologic tumors in vivo. PMID:22186884

  10. A New in Vitro Anti-Tumor Polypeptide Isolated from Arca inflata

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Zhiyan; Song, Liyan; Chen, Lili; Zhu, Jianhua; Lv, Shuangshuang; Yu, Rongmin

    2013-01-01

    A new in vitro anti-tumor polypeptide, coded as J2-C3, was isolated from Arca inflata Reeve and purified by diethyl-aminoethanol (DEAE)-sepharose Fast Flow anion exchange and phenyl sepharose CL-4B hydrophobic chromatography. J2-C3 was identified to be a homogeneous compound by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Native-PAGE). The purity of J2-C3 was over 99% in reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The molecular weight was determined as 20,538.0 Da by electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). J2-C3 was rich in Glx (Gln + Glu), Lys, and Asx (Asp + Asn) according to amino acid analysis. Four partial amino acid sequences of this peptide were determined as L/ISMEDVEESR, KNGMHSI/LDVNHDGR, AMKI/LI/LNPKKGI/LVPR and AMGAHKPPKGNEL/IGHR via MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and de novo sequencing. Secondary structural analysis by CD spectroscopy revealed that J2-C3 had the α-helix (45.2%), β-sheet (2.9%), β-turn (26.0%) and random coil (25.9%). The anti-tumor effect of J2-C3 against human tumor cells was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the IC50 values of J2-C3 were 65.57, 93.33 and 122.95 µg/mL against A549, HT-29 and HepG2 cell lines, respectively. Therefore, J2-C3 might be developed as a potential anti-tumor agent. PMID:24317469

  11. Comparative toxicity and efficacy of engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants with broad anti-tumor activities

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Diane E.; Hoover, Benjamin; Cloud, Loretta Grey; Liu, Shihui; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Bugge, Thomas H.

    2014-09-01

    We have previously designed and characterized versions of anthrax lethal toxin that are selectively cytotoxic in the tumor microenvironment and which display broad and potent anti-tumor activities in vivo. Here, we have performed the first direct comparison of the safety and efficacy of three engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants requiring activation by either matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs), urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) or co-localized MMP/uPA activities. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with six doses of engineered toxins via intraperitoneal (I.P.) or intravenous (I.V.) dose routes to determine the maximum tolerated dose for six administrations (MTD6) and dose-limiting toxicities. Efficacy was evaluated using the B16-BL6 syngraft model of melanoma; mice bearing established tumors were treated with six I.P. doses of toxin and tumor measurements and immunohistochemistry, paired with terminal blood work, were used to elaborate upon the anti-tumor mechanism and relative efficacy of each variant. We found that MMP-, uPA- and dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxins exhibited the same dose-limiting toxicity; dose-dependent GI toxicity. In terms of efficacy, all three toxins significantly reduced primary B16-BL6 tumor burden, ranging from 32% to 87% reduction, and they also delayed disease progression as evidenced by dose-dependent normalization of blood work values. While target organ toxicity and effective doses were similar amongst the variants, the dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin exhibited the highest I.P. MTD6 and was 1.5–3-fold better tolerated than the single MMP- and uPA-activated toxins. Overall, we demonstrate that this dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin can be administered safely and is highly effective in a preclinical model of melanoma. This modified bacterial cytotoxin is thus a promising candidate for further clinical development and evaluation for use in treating human cancers. - Highlights: • Toxicity and anti-tumor

  12. Synergistic estrogenic effects of Fusarium and Alternaria mycotoxins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vejdovszky, Katharina; Hahn, Kathrin; Braun, Dominik; Warth, Benedikt; Marko, Doris

    2017-03-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites formed by various fungal species that are found as natural contaminants in food. This very heterogeneous group of compounds triggers multiple toxic mechanisms, including endocrine disruptive potential. Current risk assessment of mycotoxins, as for most chemical substances, is based on the effects of single compounds. However, concern on a potential enhancement of risks by interactions of single substances in naturally occurring mixtures has greatly increased recently. In this study, the combinatory effects of three mycoestrogens were investigated in detail. This includes the endocrine disruptors zearalenone (ZEN) and α-zearalenol (α-ZEL) produced by Fusarium fungi and alternariol (AOH), a cytotoxic and estrogenic mycotoxin formed by Alternaria species. For evaluation of effects, estrogen-dependent activation of alkaline phosphatase (AlP) and cell proliferation were tested in the adenocarcinoma cell line Ishikawa. The estrogenic potential varied among the single substances. Half maximum effect concentrations (EC50) for AlP activation were evaluated for α-ZEL, ZEN and AOH as 37 pM, 562 pM and 995 nM, respectively. All three mycotoxins were found to act as partial agonists. The majority of binary combinations, even at very low concentrations in the case of α-ZEL, showed strong synergism in the AlP assay. These potentiating phenomena of mycotoxin mixtures highlight the urgent need to incorporate combinatory effects into future risk assessment, especially when endocrine disruptors are involved. To the best of our knowledge, this study presents the first investigation on synergistic effects of mycoestrogens.

  13. Immune-associated proteins with potential in vivo anti-tumor activities are upregulated in lung cancer cells treated with umbelliprenin: A proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Khaghanzadeh, Narges; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Ghaderi, Abbas; Mojtahedi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Umbelliprenin (Umb), a natural coumarin, has demonstrated anti-tumor activities, both in vitro and particularly in vivo, in several types of cancer, including lung cancer. The present study aimed to identify molecular targets of Umb using a high-throughput approach. Lung cancer cell lines, QU-DB (large-cell lung carcinoma) and A549 (adenocarcinoma), were treated with Umb. Differentially-expressed proteins were identified using two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. In the QU-DB cells, differential expression of proteins, including downregulation of the tumorigenic protein heat shock protein 90 kDa and upregulation of the potential anti-tumor proteins Nipsnap1 and glycine-tRNA ligase (GRS), suggested that Umb is a strong anti-tumor compound. In the A549 cells, differential expression of proteins indicated possible contradictory effects of Umbregarding tumorigenesis, which included downregulation of the tumorigenic protein cyclophilin and the tumor suppressor MST, and upregulation of stathmin (tumorigenic) and calreticulin. Calreticulun, in addition to GRS in QU-DB cells, stimulates anti-tumor immune responses in vivo. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to use a high-throughput approach to identify targets of Umb in cancer. These molecular targets suggested that Umb may exhibit stronger in vitro anti-tumor activity against the large-cell carcinoma model than the adenocarcinoma model. Furthermore, it has been reported that Umb exhibits higher cytotoxicity against QU-DB cells than A549 cells in vitro, and significant Umb anti-tumor activity against lung cancer in vivo, which is consistent with previously published literature. In each cell type, immune-associated molecules were upregulated, indicating that this naturally occurring compound exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in vivo. However, further studies that investigate the effect of Umb in different in vitro models of cancer are required. PMID:28105238

  14. Synergistic effects of resistance training and protein intake: practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Cholewa, Jason Michael; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Zhi, X I A; Magagnin, Daiane; de Sá, Rafaele Bis Dal Ponte; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Teixeira, Tamiris da Silva; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2014-10-01

    Resistance training is a potent stimulus to increase skeletal muscle mass. The muscle protein accretion process depends on a robust synergistic action between protein intake and overload. The intake of protein after resistance training increases plasma amino acids, which results in the activation of signaling molecules leading to increased muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle hypertrophy. Although both essential and non-essential amino acids are necessary for hypertrophy, the intake of free L-leucine or high-leucine whole proteins has been specifically shown to increase the initiation of translation that is essential for elevated MPS. The literature supports the use of protein intake following resistance-training sessions to enhance MPS; however, less understood are the effects of different protein sources and timing protocols on MPS. The sum of the adaptions from each individual training session is essential to muscle hypertrophy, and thus highlights the importance of an optimal supplementation protocol. The aim of this review is to present recent findings reported in the literature and to discuss the practical application of these results. In that light, new speculations and questions will arise that may direct future investigations. The information and recommendations generated in this review should be of benefit to clinical dietitians as well as those engaged in sports.

  15. Induction of anti-tumor immunity by photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollnick, Sandra O.; Owczarczak, Barbara; Maier, Patricia

    2006-02-01

    Tumor directed PDT has been shown by a number of pre-clinical studies to enhance a specific anti-tumor immune response, which appears to be critical to long-term tumor growth control by PDT. The PDT enhanced immune response is T cell dependent, however the mechanism behind the potentiation of the immune response by PDT is unknown. Induction of T cell dependent immunity depends upon the presence of activated antigen presenting cells. Therefore we have examined the ability of PDT to stimulate maturation and activation of antigen presenting cells in the PDT-treated tumor bed and tumor draining lymph node. Our studies demonstrate and increase in the number of activated antigen presenting cells in the tumor bed 24h following treatment of EMT6 murine tumors with Photofrin-PDT. Tumor draining lymph nodes also showed increased levels of activated antigen presenting cells within 4h of treatment. The levels peaked at 24h and declined by 48h after PDT. These results demonstrate that PDT-enhanced anti-tumor immunity is accompanied by an increase in antigen presenting cell activity. Therefore it is possible that T cell dependent immunity is enhanced following PDT through enhanced antigen presenting cell activity.

  16. Anti-tumor potential and acute toxicity of Jacaranda puberula Cham. (Bignoniacea).

    PubMed

    de-Almeida, Michelle Rodrigues-Ayres; Ramos-Leal, Ivana Correa; Ruela, Halliny Siqueira; Justo-Araujo, Maria da-Graça; Martins, Thiago Martino; Pinto-Coelho, Marsen Garcia; Kuster, Ricardo Machado; Carvalho-Sabino, Kátia Costa

    2013-09-01

    Cancer chemotherapy is an important strategy to treat this leading cause of death worldwide and plants may constitute a source of new antineoplastic agents. This work fractionated the ethanolic extract of Jacaranda puberula leaves and studied the in vitro antitumoral action and some toxicological effects of the most bioactive fraction. Cell lines related to worldwide cancers were used. The Dichloromethane (DCM) and PP fractions were the most bioactive ones. The anti-tumoral action of the DCM fraction was higher than that of the crude EtOH extract while that of PP fraction was higher than the original one (DCM) for both breast (MCF-7), prostate (PC3) and lung (A549) tumor cells, chronic leukemia cells. The K562 cells were the most sensitive cell line. The PP fraction (20 μg/mL) cytotoxicity for these cells was similar to that of the ursolic acid triterpene or the antineoplastic ethoposide. The PP fraction inhibited K562 cell proliferation without cell cycle arrest in a specific phase or apoptosis. PP increased the mitochondrial reduction activity of lymphocytes. After a single dose by oral route, PP fraction did not induce intrinsic acute toxicity or animal death. This work demonstrated that the J. puberula fraction (PP) present high in vitro anti-tumoral effect with no cytotoxicity for immune system cells or oral acute toxicity, improving the Jacaranda puberula ethnopharmacology and reporting new biological effects for the genus Jacaranda.

  17. Preparation, characterization, and anti-tumor property of podophyllotoxin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R. R.; Qin, L. L.; Wang, M.; Wu, S. M.; Wang, S. L.; Zhang, R.; Liu, Z. X.; Sun, X. Y.; Yao, S. D.

    2009-02-01

    In an effort to develop an alternative formulation of podophyllotoxin suitable for drug release and delivery, podophyllotoxin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (PPT-SLNs) were constructed, characterized and examined for in vitro cytotoxicity and tumor inhibition. The SLNs were prepared by using a solvent emulsification-evaporation method, and their size was around 50 nm. TEM detection showed that the SLNs were homogeneous and spherical in shape, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurement revealed a new conformation of PPT-SLNs. An in vitro drug release study showed that PPT was released from the SLNs in a slow but time-dependent manner. Furthermore, the treatment of 293T and HeLa cells with PPT-SLNs demonstrated that PPT-SLNs were less toxic to normal cells and more effective in anti-tumor potency compared with unconjugated PPT. A colony forming efficiency assay showed an effective long-term cancer growth suppression of PPT-SLNs; in addition, they can also enhance the apoptotic and cellular uptake processes on tumor cells compared with PPT. These results collectively demonstrated that this SLN formulation has a potential application as an alternative delivery system for anti-tumor drugs.

  18. Nanosuspension delivery of paclitaxel to xenograft mice can alter drug disposition and anti-tumor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Po-Chang; Gould, Stephen; Nannini, Michelle; Qin, Ann; Deng, Yuzhong; Arrazate, Alfonso; Kam, Kimberly R.; Ran, Yingqing; Wong, Harvey

    2014-04-01

    Paclitaxel is a common chemotherapeutic agent that is effective against various cancers. The poor aqueous solubility of paclitaxel necessitates a large percentage of Cremophor EL:ethanol (USP) in its commercial formulation which leads to hypersensitivity reactions in patients. We evaluate the use of a crystalline nanosuspension versus the USP formulation to deliver paclitaxel to tumor-bearing xenograft mice. Anti-tumor efficacy was assessed following intravenous administration of three 20 mg/kg doses of paclitaxel. Paclitaxel pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution were evaluated, and differences were observed between the two formulations. Plasma clearance and tissue to plasma ratio of mice that were dosed with the nanosuspension are approximately 33- and 11-fold higher compared to those of mice that were given the USP formulation. Despite a higher tumor to plasma ratio for the nanosuspension treatment group, absolute paclitaxel tumor exposure was higher for the USP group. Accordingly, a higher anti-tumor effect was observed in the xenograft mice that were dosed with the USP formulation (90% versus 42% tumor growth inhibition). This reduction in activity of nanoparticle formulation appeared to result from a slower than anticipated dissolution in vivo. This study illustrates a need for careful consideration of both dose and systemic solubility prior utilizing nanosuspension as a mode of intravenous delivery.

  19. Nanosuspension delivery of paclitaxel to xenograft mice can alter drug disposition and anti-tumor activity.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Po-Chang; Gould, Stephen; Nannini, Michelle; Qin, Ann; Deng, Yuzhong; Arrazate, Alfonso; Kam, Kimberly R; Ran, Yingqing; Wong, Harvey

    2014-04-01

    Paclitaxel is a common chemotherapeutic agent that is effective against various cancers. The poor aqueous solubility of paclitaxel necessitates a large percentage of Cremophor EL:ethanol (USP) in its commercial formulation which leads to hypersensitivity reactions in patients. We evaluate the use of a crystalline nanosuspension versus the USP formulation to deliver paclitaxel to tumor-bearing xenograft mice. Anti-tumor efficacy was assessed following intravenous administration of three 20 mg/kg doses of paclitaxel. Paclitaxel pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution were evaluated, and differences were observed between the two formulations. Plasma clearance and tissue to plasma ratio of mice that were dosed with the nanosuspension are approximately 33- and 11-fold higher compared to those of mice that were given the USP formulation. Despite a higher tumor to plasma ratio for the nanosuspension treatment group, absolute paclitaxel tumor exposure was higher for the USP group. Accordingly, a higher anti-tumor effect was observed in the xenograft mice that were dosed with the USP formulation (90% versus 42% tumor growth inhibition). This reduction in activity of nanoparticle formulation appeared to result from a slower than anticipated dissolution in vivo. This study illustrates a need for careful consideration of both dose and systemic solubility prior utilizing nanosuspension as a mode of intravenous delivery.

  20. Anti-tumor activity of phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride on malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian-Bin; Jiang, Lei; Ding, Mao-Hua; Chen, Zhen-Hua; Bao, Yi; Chen, Yi; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Chen-Ran; Hu, Hong-Kang; Cai, Zhen; Lu, Cheng-Yin; Zhou, Jue-Yu; Qian, Jun; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Jin, Wei-Lin; Hu, Guo-Han

    2016-03-01

    Phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride (PHEN) is a selective antagonist of both α-adrenoceptor and calmodulin that exhibits anticancer properties. The aim of this study was to explore the anti-tumor function of PHEN in glioma. Cell proliferation assay was used to assess glioma cell growth. Migration and invasion capacity of glioma cells was monitored by wound-healing and transwell assay, respectively. Neurosphere formation test was adopted for the tumorigenesis of glioma cells, which was also confirmed by soft agar cloning formation test in vitro and a nude mouse model in vivo. Finally, we explored the potential pathway utilized by PHEN using Western blot and immunofluoresce staining. PHEN exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on the proliferation of both U251 and U87MG glioma cell lines in a positive dose-dependent manner. PHEN apparently attenuated the malignancy of glioma in terms of migration and invasion and also suppressed the tumorigenic capacity both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanism study showed that PHEN promoted tumor suppression by inhibiting the TrkB-Akt pathway. The results of the present study demonstrated that PHEN suppressed the proliferation, migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis of glioma cells, induced LINGO-1 expression, and inhibited the TrkB-Akt pathway, which may prove to be the mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor effect of PHEN on glioma cells.

  1. Evaluating strategies to enhance the anti-tumor immune response to a carbohydrate mimetic peptide vaccine.

    PubMed

    Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Jousheghany, Fariba; Artaud, Cecile; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2006-06-01

    Carbohydrate mimetic peptides of tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACA) are T-cell-dependent antigens and, therefore, immunization with these surrogates is predicted to overcome the low immunogenicity of carbohydrate antigens. Consistent with this hypothesis, we show that among the potential immune cells involved, peptide immunization led to an increase in T-cell populations. While peptide mimetics may also function as TLR binding ligands, we did not observe evidence of involvement of NK cells. Examining tumor challenged animals, we observed that peptide immunization and not tumor cells rendered IL-12 responsiveness to T-cells, as T-cells from peptide-immunized mice produced IFN-gamma upon stimulation with IL-12. Cyclophosphamide administration enhanced the anti-tumor efficacy of the vaccine, which was achieved by enhancing T-cell responses with no effect on NK cell population. Prophylactic immunization of mice with a DNA construct encoding carbohydrate mimetic peptides indicated a specific role for the mimotope vaccine in anti-tumor immune responses. These data suggest a role for both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells induced by mimotopes of TACA in protective immunity against tumor cells.

  2. High in Vitro Anti-Tumor Efficacy of Dimeric Rituximab/Saporin-S6 Immunotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotti, Massimo; Bolognesi, Andrea; Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 mAb Rituximab has revolutionized lymphoma therapy, in spite of a number of unresponsive or relapsing patients. Immunotoxins, consisting of toxins coupled to antibodies, are being investigated for their potential ability to augment Rituximab efficacy. Here, we compare the anti-tumor effect of high- and low-molecular-weight Rituximab/saporin-S6 immunotoxins, named HMW-IT and LMW-IT, respectively. Saporin-S6 is a potent and stable plant enzyme belonging to ribosome-inactivating proteins that causes protein synthesis arrest and consequent cell death. Saporin-S6 was conjugated to Rituximab through an artificial disulfide bond. The inhibitory activity of HMW-IT and LMW-IT was evaluated on cell-free protein synthesis and in two CD20+ lymphoma cell lines, Raji and D430B. Two different conjugates were separated on the basis of their molecular weight and further characterized. Both HMW-IT (dimeric) and LMW-IT (monomeric) maintained a high level of enzymatic activity in a cell-free system. HMW-IT, thanks to a higher toxin payload and more efficient antigen capping, showed stronger in vitro anti-tumor efficacy than LMW-IT against lymphoma cells. Dimeric HMW-IT can be used for lymphoma therapy at least for ex vivo treatments. The possibility of using HMW-IT augments the yield in immunotoxin preparation and allows the targeting of antigens with low internalization rates. PMID:27338475

  3. Two photon microscopy intravital study of DC-mediated anti-tumor response of NK cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccia, Michele; Gorletta, Tatiana; Sironi, Laura; Zanoni, Ivan; Salvetti, Cristina; Collini, Maddalena; Granucci, Francesca; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in the activation of Natural Killer cells (NKs) that are responsible for anti-tumor innate immune responses. The focus of this report is on the role of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) activated-DCs in inducing NK cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. Mice transplanted sub-cute (s.c.) with AK7 cells, a mesothelioma cell line sensitive to NK cell responses, are injected with fluorescent NK cells and DC activation is then induced by s.c. injection of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using 4 dimensional tracking we follow the kinetic behavior of NK cells at the Draining Lymph-Node (DLN). As control, noninflammatory conditions are also evaluated. Our data suggest that NK cells are recruited to the DLN where they can interact with activated-DCs with a peculiar kinetic behavior: short lived interactions interleaved by rarer longer ones. We also found that the changes in the NK dynamic behavior in inflammatory conditions clearly affect relevant motility parameters such as the instantaneous and average velocity and the effective diffusion coefficient. This observation suggests that NK cells and activated-DCs might efficiently interact in the DLN, where cells could be activated. Therefore the interaction between activated-DCs and NK cells in DLN is not only a reality but it may be also crucial for the start of the immune response of the NKs.

  4. The preparation of three selenium-containing Cordyceps militaris polysaccharides: Characterization and anti-tumor activities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Zhu, Zhen-Yuan; Sun, Xiaoli; Gao, Hui; Zhang, Yong-Min

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, three fractions of selenized Cordyceps militaris polysaccharides (SeCPS) named SeCPS- I, SeCPS- II and SeCPS- III were isolated and purified by ultra-filtration. Their selenium content were measured as 541.3, 863.7 and 623.3μg/g respectively by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. The monosaccharide comformation analysis showed that they were mainly consisted of D-Mannose, D-Glucose, and D-Galactose in mole ratios of 1:7.63:0.83, 1:1.34:0.31 and 1:3.77:0.41 respectively. Their structure characteristics were compared by IFR and NMR spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Congo red (CR) spectrophotometric method were used to investigate their morphological characteristics and conformational transition. SeCPS-II showed the strongest anti-tumor effects judging from the result of in vitro anti-tumor assays against two tumor cell lines (hepatocellular carcinoma HepG-2 cells and lung adenocarcinom A549 cells).

  5. Epigenetic regulation of cancer biology and anti-tumor immunity by EZH2.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Anthos; Karantanos, Theodoros; Bardhan, Kankana; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A

    2016-12-20

    Polycomb group proteins regulate chromatin structure and have an important regulatory role on gene expression in various cell types. Two polycomb group complexes (Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) and 2 (PRC2)) have been identified in mammalian cells. Both PRC1 and PRC2 compact chromatin, and also catalyze histone modifications. PRC1 mediates monoubiquitination of histone H2A, whereas PRC2 catalyzes methylation of histone H3 on lysine 27. These alterations of histones can lead to altered gene expression patterns by regulating chromatin structure. Numerous studies have highlighted the role of the PRC2 catalytic component enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) in neoplastic development and progression, and EZH2 mutations have been identified in various malignancies. Through modulating the expression of critical genes, EZH2 is actively involved in fundamental cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In addition to cancer cells, EZH2 also has a decisive role in the differentiation and function of T effector and T regulatory cells. In this review we summarize the recent progress regarding the role of EZH2 in human malignancies, highlight the molecular mechanisms by which EZH2 aberrations promote the pathogenesis of cancer, and discuss the anti-tumor effects of EZH2 targeting via activating direct anti-cancer mechanisms and anti-tumor immunity.

  6. Synergistic effect of puerarin and 5-fluorouracil on hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Ping; Yang, Zi-Rong; Guo, Xu-Feng; Jun, Wang; Dong, Wei-Guo

    2014-12-01

    puerarin and 5-FU exhibit a synergistic treatment effect on the HCC SMMC7721 cell line.

  7. Synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptide DP7 combined with antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaozhe; Li, Zhan; Li, Xiaolu; Tian, Yaomei; Fan, Yingzi; Yu, Chaoheng; Zhou, Bailing; Liu, Yi; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria present a great threat to public health. In this study, the synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and antibiotics on several multidrug-resistant bacterial strains were studied, and their synergistic effects on azithromycin (AZT)-resistance genes were analyzed to determine the relationships between antimicrobial resistance and these synergistic effects. A checkerboard method was used to evaluate the synergistic effects of AMPs (DP7 and CLS001) and several antibiotics (gentamicin, vancomycin [VAN], AZT, and amoxicillin) on clinical bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Escherichia coli). The AZT-resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, mefA, and msrA) were identified in the resistant strains using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. For all the clinical isolates tested that were resistant to different antibiotics, DP7 had high antimicrobial activity (≤32 mg/L). When DP7 was combined with VAN or AZT, the effect was most frequently synergistic. When we studied the resistance genes of the AZT-resistant isolates, the synergistic effect of DP7–AZT occurred most frequently in highly resistant strains or strains carrying more than two AZT-resistance genes. A transmission electron microscopic analysis of the S. aureus strain synergistically affected by DP7–AZT showed no noteworthy morphological changes, suggesting that a molecular-level mechanism plays an important role in the synergistic action of DP7–AZT. AMP DP7 plus the antibiotic AZT or VAN is more effective, especially against highly antibiotic-resistant strains. PMID:28356719

  8. Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharide exerts anti-tumor activity via MAPK pathways in HL-60 acute leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guohua; Yang, Lei; Zhuang, Yun; Qian, Xifeng; Shen, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor activity both in vitro and in vivo of a polysaccharide obtained from Ganoderma lucidum on HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia cells, and focused on its targeting effect on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. It was found by the methods such as western blot and flow cytometry (FCM), that G. lucidum polysaccharide (GLP) blocked the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/MAPK signaling pathway, simultaneously activated p38 and JNK MAPK pathways, and therefore regulated their downstream genes and proteins, including p53, c-myc, c-fos, c-jun, Bcl-2, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and cyclin D1. As a result, cycle arrest and apoptosis of HL-60 cells were induced. Therefore, GLP exerted anti-tumor activity via MAPK pathways in HL-60 acute leukemia cells.

  9. Induction of abscopal anti-tumor immunity and immunogenic tumor cell death by ionizing irradiation - implications for cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Frey, B; Rubner, Y; Wunderlich, R; Weiss, E-M; Pockley, A G; Fietkau, R; Gaipl, U S

    2012-01-01

    Although cancer progression is primarily driven by the expansion of tumor cells, the tumor microenvironment and anti-tumor immunity also play important roles. Herein, we consider how tumors can become established by escaping immune surveillance and also how cancer cells can be rendered visible to the immune system by standard therapies such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, either alone or in combination with additional immune stimulators. Although local radiotherapy results in DNA damage (targeted effects), it is also capable of inducing immunogenic forms of tumor cell death which are associated with a release of immune activating danger signals (non-targeted effects), such as necrosis. Necrotic tumor cells may result from continued exposure to death stimuli and/or an impaired phosphatidylserine (PS) dependent clearance of the dying tumor cells. In such circumstances, mature dendritic cells take up tumor antigen and mediate the induction of adaptive and innate anti-tumor immunity. Locally-triggered, systemic immune activation can also lead to a spontaneous regression of tumors or metastases that are outside the radiation field - an effect which is termed abscopal. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that combining radiotherapy with immune stimulation can induce anti-tumor immunity. Given that it takes time for immunity to develop following exposure to immunogenic tumor cells, we propose practical combination therapies that should be considered as a basis for future research and clinical practice. It is essential that radiation oncologists become more aware of the importance of the immune system to the success of cancer therapy.

  10. Towards novel anti-tumor strategies for hepatic cancer: ɛ-viniferin in combination with vincristine displays pharmacodynamic synergy at lower doses in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Filiz; Akalın, Gülşen; Şen, Mesut; Önder, Nur Ipek; Işcan, Arzu; Kutlu, H Mehtap; Incesu, Zerrin

    2014-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the fifth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The efficacy of novel combination treatments are increasingly evaluated with use of integrative biology research and development (R&D) strategies and methodological triangulation. We investigated the anti-tumor effect of ɛ-viniferin alone, and the putative synergy of ɛ-viniferin with vincristine on the growth of HepG2 cells in vitro. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induction were determined by MTT assay and annexin V/propidium iodide (PI), respectively. Morphological changes and DNA fragmentation were investigated under electron microscopy and by agarose gel electrophoresis, respectively. The results collectively showed that treating cells with ɛ-viniferin and vincristine significantly inhibited cell viability at lower doses as compared to each agent applied alone. IC(50) values for ɛ-viniferin and vincristine were determined as 98.3 and 52.5 μM at 24 h, respectively. IC(50) value of ɛ-viniferin in combination with vincristine was 15.8+11.25 μM (mean/SD) at 24 h. The viability of cells treated with 17.9 μM vincristine alone for 24 h was 79.62%; it reduced to 26.53% when 25 μM ɛ-viniferin was added in combination with vincristine (p<0.05). We found that combination of drugs promoted the sensitivity of cells against to vincristine treatment. The effect of combined use was in support of a synergistic pharmacodynamic effect. Moreover, low doses of the combination regimen induced phosphatidyl re-localization, morphological changes, and DNA fragmentation, and therefore caused apoptotic death. This study thus suggests that low concentrations of ɛ-viniferin and vincristine can enhance the anti-tumor effects efficiently by inducing HepG2 cell apoptosis. Further studies in other model systems are warranted with a view to potential future applications in the clinic of such combination regimens and their putative mechanism of action

  11. Compositions and Anti-Tumor Activity of Pyropolyporus fomentarius Petroleum Ether Fraction In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanhua; Xiao, Yaping; Wang, Pan; Liu, Quanhong

    2014-01-01

    The chemical compositions and anti-tumor activities of the petroleum ether fraction (PE), from mushroom Pyropolyporus fomentarius, were studied. Upon gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) analysis, nine major constituents were identified in the fraction. In vitro, the PE showed cytotoxic activity against murine sarcoma S180 (S180) cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and the cytotoxic effects were associated with apoptosis. The mitochondrial membrane potential loss and the intracellular ROS generation were greatly increased in the Pyropolyporus fomentarius PE treated group, suggesting cell apoptosis, induced by the PE in S180 cells, might be mitochondria dependent and ROS mediated. Consistent with in vitro findings, the in vivo study showed that the Pyropolyporus fomentarius PE was also effective in inhibiting the tumor growth induced by S180 cells and had lower immune organ toxicity. We found that the Pyropolyporus fomentarius PE has significant anti-tumor activity and great potential in screening anti-tumor drugs. PMID:25302783

  12. Progress with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Carlos; Allocca, Mariangela; Danese, Silvio; Fiorino, Gionata

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy is a valid, effective and increasingly used option in inflammatory bowel disease management. Nevertheless, further knowledge and therapeutic indications regarding these drugs are still evolving. Anti-TNF therapy may be essential to achieve recently proposed end points, namely mucosal healing, prevention of bowel damage and prevention of patient's disability. Anti-TNF drugs are also suggested to be more effective in early disease, particularly in early Crohn's disease. Moreover, its efficacy for prevention of postoperative recurrence in Crohn's disease is still debated. Costs and adverse effects, the relevance of drug monitoring and the possibility of anti-TNF therapy withdrawal in selected patients are still debated issues. This review aimed to describe and discuss the most relevant data about the progress with anti-TNF therapy for the management of inflammatory bowel disease.

  13. Anti-tumor immunity of BAM-SiPc-mediated vascular photodynamic therapy in a BALB/c mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Hing-Yuen; Lo, Pui-Chi; Ng, Dennis K.P.; Fong, Wing-Ping

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, accumulating evidence from both animal and clinical studies has suggested that a sufficiently activated immune system may strongly augment various types of cancer treatment, including photodynamic therapy (PDT). Through the generation of reactive oxygen species, PDT eradicates tumors by triggering localized tumor damage and inducing anti-tumor immunity. As the major component of anti-tumor immunity, the involvement of a cell-mediated immune response in PDT has been well investigated in the past decade, whereas the role of humoral immunity has remained relatively unexplored. In the present investigation, using the photosensitizer BAM-SiPc and the CT26 tumor-bearing BALB/c mouse model, it was demonstrated that both cell-mediated and humoral adaptive immune components could be involved in PDT. With a vascular PDT (VPDT) regimen, BAM-SiPc could eradicate the tumors of ∼70% of tumor-bearing mice and trigger an anti-tumor immune response that could last for more than 1 year. An elevation of Th2 cytokines was detected ex vivo after VPDT, indicating the potential involvement of a humoral response. An analysis of serum from the VPDT-cured mice also revealed elevated levels of tumor-specific antibodies. Moreover, this serum could effectively hinder tumor growth and protect the mice against further re-challenge in a T-cell-dependent manner. Taken together, these results show that the humoral components induced after BAM-SiPc-VPDT could assist the development of anti-tumor immunity. PMID:26388236

  14. Rational design of a comprehensive cancer therapy platform using temperature-sensitive polymer grafted hollow gold nanospheres: simultaneous chemo/photothermal/photodynamic therapy triggered by a 650 nm laser with enhanced anti-tumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaoran; Chen, Yinyin; Cheng, Ziyong; Deng, Kerong; Ma, Ping'an; Hou, Zhiyao; Liu, Bei; Huang, Shanshan; Jin, Dayong; Lin, Jun

    2016-03-28

    Combining multi-model treatments within one single system has attracted great interest for the purpose of synergistic therapy. In this paper, hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNs) coated with a temperature-sensitive polymer, poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) methacrylate-co-2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)), co-loaded with DOX and a photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6) were successfully synthesized. As high as 58% DOX and 6% Ce6 by weight could be loaded onto the HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA) nanocomposites. The grafting polymer brushes outside the HAuNs play the role of "gate molecules" for controlled drug release by 650 nm laser radiation owing to the temperature-sensitive property of the polymer and the photothermal effect of HAuNs. The HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)-Ce6-DOX nanocomposites with 650 nm laser radiation show effective inhibition of cancer cells in vitro and enhanced anti-tumor efficacy in vivo. In contrast, control groups without laser radiation show little cytotoxicity. The nanocomposite demonstrates a way of "killing three birds with one stone", that is, chemotherapy, photothermal and photodynamic therapy are triggered simultaneously by the 650 nm laser stimulation. Therefore, the nanocomposites show the great advantages of multi-modal synergistic effects for cancer therapy by a remote-controlled laser stimulus.

  15. Recombinant expression and purification of a MAP30-cell penetrating peptide fusion protein with higher anti-tumor bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiang; Yang, Xu-Zhong; Fu, Long-Yun; Lu, Yv-Ting; Lu, Yan-Hua; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun

    2015-07-01

    MAP30 (Momordica Antiviral Protein 30 Kd), a single-stranded type-I ribosome inactivating protein, possesses versatile biological activities including anti-tumor abilities. However, the low efficiency penetrating into tumor cells hampers the tumoricidal effect of MAP30. This paper describes MAP30 fused with a human-derived cell penetrating peptide HBD which overcome the low uptake efficiency by tumor cells and exhibits higher anti-tumor bioactivity. MAP30 gene was cloned from the genomic DNA of Momordica charantia and the recombinant plasmid pET28b-MAP30-HBD was established and transferred into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant MAP30-HBD protein (rMAP30-HBD) was expressed in a soluble form after being induced by 0.5mM IPTG for 14h at 15°C. The recombinant protein was purified to greater than 95% purity with Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The rMAP30-HBD protein not only has topological inactivation and protein translation inhibition activity but also showed significant improvements in cytotoxic activity compared to that of the rMAP30 protein without HBD in the tested tumor cell lines, and induced higher apoptosis rates in HeLa cells analyzed by Annexin V-FITC with FACS. This paper demonstrated a new method for improving MAP30 protein anti-tumor activity and might have potential applications in cancer therapy area.

  16. Listeriolysin O as a strong immunogenic molecule for the development of new anti-tumor vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Rui; Liu, Yuqin

    2013-01-01

    The pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO), which is produced by Listeria monocytogenes, mediates bacterial phagosomal escape and facilitates bacterial multiplication during infection. This toxin has recently gained attention because of its confirmed role in the controlled and specific modulation of the immune response. Currently, cancer immunotherapies are focused on conquering the immune tolerance induced by poorly immunogenic tumor antigens and eliciting strong, lasting immunological memory. An effective way to achieve these goals is the co-administration of potent immunomodulatory adjuvant components with vaccine vectors. LLO, a toxin that belongs to the family of cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), exhibits potent cell type-non-specific toxicity and is a source of dominant CD4+ and CD8+ T cell epitopes. According to recent research, in addition to its effective cytotoxicity as a cancer immunotherapeutic drug, the non-specific adjuvant property of LLO makes it promising for the development of efficacious anti-tumor vaccines. PMID:23399758

  17. Anti-tumor activity of calcitriol: pre-clinical and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Trump, Donald L; Hershberger, Pamela A; Bernardi, Ronald J; Ahmed, Sharmilla; Muindi, Josephia; Fakih, Marwan; Yu, Wei-Dong; Johnson, Candace S

    2004-05-01

    1,25-Dihydroxycholecalciferol (calcitriol) is recognized widely for its effects on bone and mineral metabolism. Epidemiological data suggest that low Vitamin D levels may play a role in the genesis of prostate cancer and perhaps other tumors. Calcitriol is a potent anti-proliferative agent in a wide variety of malignant cell types. In prostate, breast, colorectal, head/neck and lung cancer as well as lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma model systems calcitriol has significant anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Calcitriol effects are associated with an increase in G0/G1 arrest, induction of apoptosis and differentiation, modulation of expression of growth factor receptors. Glucocorticoids potentiate the anti-tumor effect of calcitriol and decrease calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia. Calcitriol potentiates the antitumor effects of many cytotoxic agents and inhibits motility and invasiveness of tumor cells and formation of new blood vessels. Phase I and II trials of calcitriol either alone or in combination with carboplatin, taxanes or dexamethasone have been initiated in patients with androgen dependent and independent prostate cancer and advanced cancer. Data indicate that high-dose calcitriol is feasible on an intermittent schedule, no dose-limiting toxicity has been encountered and optimal dose and schedule are being delineated. Clinical responses have been seen with the combination of high dose calcitriol+dexamethasone in androgen independent prostate cancer (AIPC) and apparent potentiation of the antitumor effects of docetaxel have been seen in AIPC. These results demonstrate that high intermittent doses of calcitriol can be administered to patients without toxicity, that the MTD is yet to be determined and that calcitriol has potential as an anti-cancer agent.

  18. Specific internalization and synergistic anticancer effect of docetaxel-encapsulated chitosan-modified polymeric nanocarriers: a novel approach in cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asthana, Shalini; Gupta, Pramod K.; Konwar, Rituraj; Chourasia, Manish K.

    2013-09-01

    Nanocarriers can be surface engineered to increase endocytosis for applications in delivery of chemotherapeutics. This study investigated the chitosan (CS)-mediated effects on the anticancer efficacy and uptake of docetaxel-loaded nanometric particles (<250 nm) by MCF-7 tumor cells. Herein, negatively charged poly lactic- co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (-18.4 ± 2.57 mV, 162 ± 6.34 nm), poorly endocytosed by the MCF-7 cells, were subjected to surface modification with CS. It demonstrated significant increase (>5-fold) in intracellular uptake as well as antitumor efficacy of modified nanoparticles (NPs) that explicate the possibility of saccharide marker-mediated tumor targeting along with synergism via proapoptotic effect of CS. Additionally, high positivity of optimized tailored nanocarrier (+23.3 ± 2.02 mV, 242.8 ± 9.42 nm) may have accounted for the increased adsorption-mediated endocytosis, preferably toward tumor cells with negative potential. Developed drug carrier system showed high stability in human blood which is in compliance with mucoadhesive property of CS. Transmission electron microscopy technique was applied to observe shape and morphological features of NPs. Furthermore, in vivo tissue toxicity study revealed safe use of drug at 20 mg/kg dose in nanoparticulate form. Moreover, the enhanced in vitro uptake of these NPs and their cytotoxicity against the tumor cells along with synergistic effect of CS clearly suggest that CS-modified carrier system is a promising candidate for preclinical studies to achieve wider anti-tumor therapeutic window and lower side effects.

  19. Synergistic, additive, and antagonistic effects of food mixtures on total antioxidant capacities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sunan; Meckling, Kelly A; Marcone, Massimo F; Kakuda, Yukio; Tsao, Rong

    2011-02-09

    Different foods possess different bioactive compounds with varied antioxidant capacities. When foods are consumed together, the total antioxidant capacity of food mixtures may be modified via synergistic, additive, or antagonistic interactions among these components, which may in turn alter their physiological impacts. The main objective of this study was to investigate these interactions and identify any synergistic combinations. Eleven foods from three categories, including fruits (raspberry, blackberry, and apple), vegetables (broccoli, tomato, mushroom, and purple cauliflower), and legumes (soybean, adzuki bean, red kidney bean, and black bean) were combined in pairs. Four assays (total phenolic content, ferric reducing antioxidant power, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, radical scavenging capacity, and oxygen radical absorbance capacity) were used to evaluate the antioxidant capacities of individual foods and their combinations. The results indicated that within the same food category, 13, 68, and 21% of the combinations produced synergistic, additive, and antagonistic interactions, respectively, while the combinations produced 21, 54, and 25% synergistic, additive, and antagonistic effects, respectively, across food categories. Combining specific foods across categories (e.g., fruit and legume) was more likely to result in synergistic antioxidant capacity than combinations within a food group. Combining raspberry and adzuki bean extracts demonstrated synergistic interactions in all four chemical-based assays. Compositional changes did not seem to have occurred in the mixture. Results in this study suggest the importance of strategically selecting foods or diets to maximum synergisms as well as to minimum antagonisms in antioxidant activity.

  20. Preparation and anti-tumor evaluation of polyactin A microparticles from supercritical CO 2 processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Jianhong; Zhao, Jinglan; Bao, Lang; Liu, Yan; Wu, Caosong

    2008-11-01

    This paper reports the use of a coating process based on supercritical fluid technology to prepare a solvent-free microparticles, loaded with a polymannopeptide (polyactin A, PAA) for enhancing optimal host response in cancer immunotherapy. Microparticles were characterized as regards their morphology, drug content and in vitro release. A prolonged release of the PAA had been achieved over a 24 h period from microparticles coated with the lipidic compound, which produced a more homogeneous, film-forming coating. Furthermore, it was shown that PAA did not undergo any degradation under the supercritical conditions used in the coating process. In vitro immunoactivity and anti-tumor effect analysis results showed that the PAA microparticle could efficiently trigger the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in a sustained manner.

  1. Alopecia secondary to anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Lara Beatriz Prata; Rego, Juliana Carlos Gonçalves; Estrada, Bruna Duque; Bastos, Paula Raso; Piñeiro Maceira, Juan Manuel; Sodré, Celso Tavares

    2015-01-01

    Biologic drugs represent a substantial progress in the treatment of chronic inflammatory immunologic diseases. However, its crescent use has revealed seldom reported or unknown adverse reactions, mainly associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF). Psoriasiform cutaneous reactions and few cases of alopecia can occur in some patients while taking these drugs. Two cases of alopecia were reported after anti-TNF therapy. Both also developed psoriasiform lesions on the body. This is the second report about a new entity described as 'anti-TNF therapy-related alopecia', which combines clinical and histopathological features of both alopecia areata and psoriatic alopecia. The recognition of these effects by specialists is essential for the proper management and guidance of these patients.

  2. Study on the anti-tumor mechanism of Meretrix meretrix glycopeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jielian; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Meixia

    2017-03-01

    Previous in vitro and vivo researches have showed that MGP0501, a natural glycopeptide isolated from Meretrix meretrix, can inhibit proliferation or induce apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma, lung cance (A549). But the precise mechanism by which MGP0501 exerts anticarcinogenic effects is not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigate the anti-tumor mechanism of MGP0501 induced cell apoptosis. Results revealed that the Mitotiefigure analysis showed that the number of positive cells in the MGP0501-treated group was higher than that in the control group. The results indicated that MGP0501 can significantly inhibit the proliferation of the S180. Through the analysis of detection Flow cytometry, the apoptosis rate of S180 tumor cells in MGP0501 group was 10.69%. These results indicated that in vivo antitumor activity is associated with induction of apoptosis by MGP0501.

  3. Synergistic effects of floral phytochemicals against a bumble bee parasite.

    PubMed

    Palmer-Young, Evan C; Sadd, Ben M; Irwin, Rebecca E; Adler, Lynn S

    2017-03-01

    Floral landscapes comprise diverse phytochemical combinations. Individual phytochemicals in floral nectar and pollen can reduce infection in bees and directly inhibit trypanosome parasites. However, gut parasites of generalist pollinators, which consume nectar and pollen from many plant species, are exposed to phytochemical combinations. Interactions between phytochemicals could augment or decrease effects of single compounds on parasites. Using a matrix of 36 phytochemical treatment combinations, we assessed the combined effects of two floral phytochemicals, eugenol and thymol, against four strains of the bumblebee gut trypanosome Crithidia bombi. Eugenol and thymol had synergistic effects against C. bombi growth across seven independent experiments, showing that the phytochemical combination can disproportionately inhibit parasites. The strength of synergistic effects varied across strains and experiments. Thus, the antiparasitic effects of individual compounds will depend on both the presence of other phytochemicals and parasite strain identity. The presence of synergistic phytochemical combinations could augment the antiparasitic activity of individual compounds for pollinators in diverse floral landscapes.

  4. An Investigation on a Novel Anti-tumor Fusion Peptide of FSH33-53-IIKK

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runlin; Liu, Ping; Pan, Donghui; zhang, Pengjun; Bai, Zhicheng; Xu, Yuping; Wang, Lizhen; Yan, Junjie; Yan, Yongjun; Liu, Xingdang; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    A novel fusion peptide FSH33-53-IIKK was designed and expected to combine the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) targeting and tumor toxicity. In vitro and in vivo study showed the anti-tumor activity of FSH33-53-IIKK was enhanced compared to that of IIKK only. FSH33-53-IIKK could inhibit the growth of tumor via apoptosis and autophagy pathways. In summary, combining the tumor marker-target peptide and anti-tumor peptide together may be an efficient way to search for better anti-tumor candidates. PMID:27313792

  5. Plasticity of γδ T Cells: Impact on the Anti-Tumor Response

    PubMed Central

    Lafont, Virginie; Sanchez, Françoise; Laprevotte, Emilie; Michaud, Henri-Alexandre; Gros, Laurent; Eliaou, Jean-François; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    The tumor immune microenvironment contributes to tumor initiation, progression, and response to therapy. Among the immune cell subsets that play a role in the tumor microenvironment, innate-like T cells that express T cell receptors composed of γ and δ chains (γδ T cells) are of particular interest. γδ T cells can contribute to the immune response against many tumor types (lymphoma, myeloma, melanoma, breast, colon, lung, ovary, and prostate cancer) directly through their cytotoxic activity and indirectly by stimulating or regulating the biological functions of other cell types required for the initiation and establishment of the anti-tumor immune response, such as dendritic cells and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. However, the notion that tumor-infiltrating γδ T cells are a good prognostic marker in cancer was recently challenged by studies showing that the presence of these cells in the tumor microenvironment was associated with poor prognosis in both breast and colon cancer. These findings suggest that γδ T cells may also display pro-tumor activities. Indeed, breast tumor-infiltrating γδ T cells could exert an immunosuppressive activity by negatively regulating dendritic cell maturation. Furthermore, recent studies demonstrated that signals from the microenvironment, particularly cytokines, can confer some plasticity to γδ T cells and promote their differentiation into γδ T cells with regulatory functions. This review focuses on the current knowledge on the functional plasticity of γδ T cells and its effect on their anti-tumor activities. It also discusses the putative mechanisms underlying γδ T cell expansion, differentiation, and recruitment in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25538706

  6. Stabilized nanosystem of nanocarriers with an immobilized biological factor for anti-tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Angelika; Grzeczkowicz, Anna; Stachowiak, Radosław; Kamiński, Michał; Grubek, Zuzanna; Bielecki, Jacek; Strawski, Marcin; Szklarczyk, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Objective The inadequate efficiency of existing therapeutic anti-cancer regiments and the increase in the multidrug resistance of cancer cells underscore the need to investigate novel anticancer strategies. The induction of apoptosis in tumors by cytotoxic agents produced by pathogenic microorganisms is an example of such an approach. Nevertheless, even the most effective drug should be delivered directly to targeted sites to reduce any negative impact on other cells. Accordingly, the stabilized nanosystem (SNS) for active agent delivery to cancer cells was designed for further application in local anti-tumor therapy. A product of genetically modified Escherichia coli, listeriolysin O (LLO), was immobilized within the polyelectrolyte membrane (poly(ethylenimine)|hyaluronic acid) shells of ‘LLO nanocarriers’ coupled with the stabilizing element of natural origin. Methods and results The impact of LLO was evaluated in human leukemia cell lines in vitro. Correspondingly, the influence of the SNS and its elements was assessed in vitro. The viability of targeted cells was evaluated by flow cytometry. Visualization of the system structure was performed using confocal microscopy. The membrane shell applied to the nanocarriers was analyzed using atomic force microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Furthermore, the presence of a polyelectrolyte layer on the nanocarrier surface and/or in the cell was confirmed by flow cytometry. Finally, the structural integrity of the SNS and the corresponding release of the fluorescent solute listeriolysin were investigated. Conclusion The construction of a stabilized system offers LLO release with a lethal impact on model eukaryotic cells. The applied platform design may be recommended for local anti-tumor treatment purposes. PMID:28166290

  7. Synergistic Effects of Chinese Herbal Medicine: A Comprehensive Review of Methodology and Current Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xian; Seto, Sai Wang; Chang, Dennis; Kiat, Hosen; Razmovski-Naumovski, Valentina; Chan, Kelvin; Bensoussan, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an important part of primary health care in Asian countries that has utilized complex herbal formulations (consisting 2 or more medicinal herbs) for treating diseases over thousands of years. There seems to be a general assumption that the synergistic therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) derive from the complex interactions between the multiple bioactive components within the herbs and/or herbal formulations. However, evidence to support these synergistic effects remains weak and controversial due to several reasons, including the very complex nature of CHM, misconceptions about synergy and methodological challenges to study design. In this review, we clarify the definition of synergy, identify common errors in synergy research and describe current methodological approaches to test for synergistic interaction. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of these models in the context of CHM and summarize the current status of synergy research in CHM. Despite the availability of some scientific data to support the synergistic effects of multi-herbal and/or herb-drug combinations, the level of evidence remains low, and the clinical relevancy of most of these findings is undetermined. There remain significant challenges in the development of suitable methods for synergistic studies of complex herbal combinations. PMID:27462269

  8. Synergistic Effects of Chinese Herbal Medicine: A Comprehensive Review of Methodology and Current Research.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xian; Seto, Sai Wang; Chang, Dennis; Kiat, Hosen; Razmovski-Naumovski, Valentina; Chan, Kelvin; Bensoussan, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an important part of primary health care in Asian countries that has utilized complex herbal formulations (consisting 2 or more medicinal herbs) for treating diseases over thousands of years. There seems to be a general assumption that the synergistic therapeutic effects of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) derive from the complex interactions between the multiple bioactive components within the herbs and/or herbal formulations. However, evidence to support these synergistic effects remains weak and controversial due to several reasons, including the very complex nature of CHM, misconceptions about synergy and methodological challenges to study design. In this review, we clarify the definition of synergy, identify common errors in synergy research and describe current methodological approaches to test for synergistic interaction. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of these models in the context of CHM and summarize the current status of synergy research in CHM. Despite the availability of some scientific data to support the synergistic effects of multi-herbal and/or herb-drug combinations, the level of evidence remains low, and the clinical relevancy of most of these findings is undetermined. There remain significant challenges in the development of suitable methods for synergistic studies of complex herbal combinations.

  9. Synergistic effect of ionizing radiation on chemical disinfectant treatments for reduction of natural microflora on seafood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunjoo; Ha, Ji-Hyoung; Lee, Ju-Woon; Jo, Cheorun; Ha, Sang-Do

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether combined treatments would produce synergistic disinfection effects on seafood products such as mussel and squid compared with single treatments. We investigated the bactericidal effects of chlorine and ionizing radiation on the natural microflora of mussel and squid. Total aerobic bacteria initially ranged from 102 to 104 Log CFU/g. More than 100 ppm of chlorine and irradiation at 1 kGy were sufficient to reduce the total aerobic bacteria on mussel and squid to a level lower than detection limit (10 CFU/g). Synergistic effects against natural microflora were observed for all combined treatment. These results suggest that a significant synergistic benefit results from combine chlorine-ionizing radiation treatment against natural microflora on mussel and squid.

  10. Synergistic effect of mixed neutron and gamma irradiation in bipolar operational amplifier OP07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liu; Wei, Chen; Shanchao, Yang; Xiaoming, Jin; Chaohui, He

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the synergistic effects in bipolar operational amplifier OP07. The radiation effects are studied by neutron beam, gamma ray, and mixed neutron/gamma ray environments. The characterateristics of the synergistic effects are studied through comparison of different experiment results. The results show that the bipolar operational amplifier OP07 exhibited significant synergistic effects in the mixed neutron and gamma irradiation. The bipolar transistor is identified as the most radiation sensitive unit of the operational amplifier. In this paper, a series of simulations are performed on bipolar transistors in different radiation environments. In the theoretical simulation, the geometric model and calculations based on the Medici toolkit are built to study the radiation effects in bipolar components. The effect of mixed neutron and gamma irradiation is simulated based on the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of radiation effects in bipolar transistors. The simulated results agree well with the experimental data. The results of the experiments and simulation indicate that the radiation effects in the bipolar devices subjected to mixed neutron and gamma environments is not a simple combination of total ionizing dose (TID) effects and displacement damage. The data suggests that the TID effect could enhance the displacement damage. The synergistic effect should not be neglected in complex radiation environments.

  11. Immune-system-dependent anti-tumor activity of a plant-derived polyphenol rich fraction in a melanoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Cadena, A; Urueña, C; Prieto, K; Martinez-Usatorre, A; Donda, A; Barreto, A; Romero, P; Fiorentino, S

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that part of the anti-tumor effects of several chemotherapeutic agents require an intact immune system. This is in part due to the induction of immunogenic cell death. We have identified a gallotannin-rich fraction, obtained from Caesalpinia spinosa (P2Et) as an anti-tumor agent in both breast carcinoma and melanoma. Here, we report that P2Et treatment results in activation of caspase 3 and 9, mobilization of cytochrome c and externalization of annexin V in tumor cells, thus suggesting the induction of apoptosis. This was preceded by the onset of autophagy and the expression of immunogenic cell death markers. We further demonstrate that P2Et-treated tumor cells are highly immunogenic in vaccinated mice and induce immune system activation, clearly shown by the generation of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) producing tyrosine-related protein 2 antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Moreover, the tumor protective effects of P2Et treatment were abolished in immunodeficient mice, and partially lost after CD4 and CD8 depletion, indicating that P2Et's anti-tumor activity is highly dependent on immune system and at least in part of T cells. Altogether, these results support the hypothesis that the gallotannin-rich fraction P2Et's anti-tumor effects are mediated to a great extent by the endogenous immune response following to the exposure to immunogenic dying tumor cells. PMID:27253407

  12. Preclinical evaluation of the anti-tumor effects of the natural isoflavone genistein in two xenograft mouse models monitored by [18F]FDG, [18F]FLT, and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab small animal PET

    PubMed Central

    Honndorf, Valerie S.; Wiehr, Stefan; Rolle, Anna-Maria; Schmitt, Julia; Kreft, Luisa; Quintanilla-Martinez, Letitia; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Reischl, Gerald; Maurer, Andreas; Boldt, Karsten; Schwarz, Michael; Schmidt, Holger; Pichler, Bernd J.

    2016-01-01

    The natural phytoestrogen genistein is known as protein kinase inhibitor and tumor suppressor in various types of cancers. We studied its antitumor effect in two different xenograft models using positron emission tomography (PET) in vivo combined with ex vivo histology and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolic fingerprinting. Procedures A431 and Colo205 tumor-bearing mice were treated with vehicle or genistein (500 mg/kg/d) over a period of 12 days. Imaging was performed with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) and 3′-deoxy-3′-[18F]fluorothymidine ([18F] FLT). In a second study A431 tumor-bearing mice were treated with vehicle, genistein (500 mg/kg/d), cetuximab (1mg/3d) or a combination of the compounds and imaged using [18F]FDG, [18F]FLT and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab. Data were compared to histology and principal components analysis (PCA) of NMR fingerprinting data. Results Genistein reduced tumor growth significantly in both xenografts. [18F] FLT uptake was consistent in both models and corresponded to histological findings and also PCA whereas [18F]FDG and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab were not suitable for therapy monitoring. Conclusions As mono-therapy the natural isoflavone genistein has a powerful therapeutic effect in vivo on A431 and Colo205 tumors. [18F]FLT has superior consistency compared to the other tested tracers in therapy monitoring, while the treatment effect could be shown on the molecular level by histology and metabolic fingerprinting. PMID:27070087

  13. Pyrethroid resistance in Phytoseiulus macropilis (Acari: Phytoseiidae): cross-resistance, stability and effect of synergists.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Maria Cristina Vitelli; Sato, Mario Eidi

    2016-01-01

    Phytoseiulus macropilis Banks (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is an effective predator of Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae). The objectives of this research were to study the stability of fenpropathrin resistance and the cross-resistance relationships with different pyrethroids, and also to evaluate the effect of synergists [piperonyl butoxide (PBO), diethyl maleate (DEM) and S,S,S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate (DEF)] on fenpropathrin resistant and susceptible strains of this predaceous mite. The stability of fenpropathrin resistance was studied under laboratory conditions, using P. macropilis populations with initial frequencies of 75 and 50% of resistant mites. The percentages of fenpropathrin resistant mites were evaluated monthly for a period of up to 12 months. A trend toward decreased resistance frequencies was observed only during the first 3-4 months. After this initial decrease, the fenpropathrin resistance was shown to be stable, maintaining constant resistance frequencies (around 30%) until the end of the evaluation period. Toxicity tests carried out using fenpropathrin resistant and susceptible strains of P. macropilis indicated strong positive cross-resistance between fenpropathrin and the pyrethroids bifenthrin and deltamethrin. Bioassays with the synergists DEM, DEF and PBO were also performed. The maximum synergism ratio (SR = LC50 without synergist/LC50 with synergist) detected for the three evaluated synergists (PBO, DEM, DEF) was 5.86 (for DEF), indicating low influence of enzyme detoxification processes in fenpropathrin resistance.

  14. Synergistic antinociceptive effects of alfentanil and propofol in the formalin test.

    PubMed

    Jia, Na; Zuo, Xiaochun; Guo, Chao; Li, Yuwen; Cui, Jia; Zhao, Chao; Cao, Shanshan; Wang, Chao; Li, Ruili; Wu, Yin; Wen, Aidong

    2017-04-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the combined analgesic effect of alfentanil and propofol in the formalin test. Diluted formalin was injected into the dorsal surface of the right hind paw in rats. Nociceptive behavior was determined by counting the number of flinches of the injected paw for 1 h after injection; a reduction in formalin‑induced flinching was interpreted as an antinociceptive effect. Isobolographic analysis was used to determine the type of antinociceptive interaction (additivity, antagonism or synergism). Extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) and c‑fos protein levels were also detected by western blot analysis to determine the potential mechanisms of the synergistic effect. Alfentanil, propofol or an alfentanil‑propofol combination had an antinociceptive effect in the formalin test. The median effective dose (ED50), value of the individual drug was also obtained. The derived theoretical ED50 for the antinociceptive effect (4.36 mg/kg) was different from the observed experimental ED50 value (2.51 mg/kg). The interaction between alfentanil and propofol that produced the antinociceptive effect was synergistic according to isobolographic analysis. Furthermore, the combination of alfentanil and propofol treatments may produce synergistically antinociceptive effects by inhibiting the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and decreasing the expression of c‑fos in the spinal cord. These results demonstrated that combined treatment, with alfentanil and propofol, produced synergistic antinociceptive effects in the formalin test and may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of acute pain.

  15. Direct transfection of miR-137 mimics is more effective than DNA demethylation of miR-137 promoter to augment anti-tumor mechanisms of delphinidin in human glioblastoma U87MG and LN18 cells.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Ray, Swapan K

    2015-11-15

    Glioblastoma is the deadliest brain tumor in humans. Recent studies suggested that 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine (AzaC) could inhibit cell cycle progression in human glioblastoma stem cells by an indirect increase in expression of the tumor suppressor microRNA-137 (miR-137). Delphinidin (DPN), a new anthocyanidin, inhibits cell growth in different cancers. We investigated inhibition of glioblastoma growth after indirect or direct overexpression of miR-137 and then DPN treatment. The highest inhibition of cell growth occurred due to treatment with combination of 10 μM AzaC and 50 μM DPN in human glioblastoma U87MG and LN18 cells. The methylation sensitive-polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR) results showed that AzaC inhibited methylation of miR-137 promoter region, which was hypermethylated in both glioblastoma cell lines, to cause indirect increase in miR-137 expression. Our results also indicated the highest miR-137 expression after direct transfection of miR-137 mimics and DPN treatment. Combination of miR-137 mimics transfection and DPN treatment caused the highest inhibition of cell invasion and prevented angiogenic network formation due to the least expression of angiogenic factor (VEGF) in human glioblastoma cells in co-culture with human microvascular endothelial cells. This combination strategy most effectively inhibited survival factors (p-Akt and NF-κB), angiogenic factors (VEGF and b-FGF), growth factor receptor (EGFR), and invasive factors (MMP-9 and MMP-2). Direct overexpression of miR-137 most effectively augmented efficacy of DPN to induce apoptosis with activation of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. So, sequential miR-137 overexpression and DPN treatment could be a promising combination treatment to inhibit growth of human glioblastoma cells.

  16. Antitussive arabinogalactan of Andrographis paniculata demonstrates synergistic effect with andrographolide.

    PubMed

    Nosáľová, Gabriela; Majee, Sujay Kumar; Ghosh, Kanika; Raja, Washim; Chatterjee, Udipta Ranjan; Jureček, Ludovít; Ray, Bimalendu

    2014-08-01

    Traditional Indian medicines have been used in humans for thousands of years. While the link to a particular indication has been established in man, the active principle of the formulations often remains unknown. In this study, we aim to investigate the structural features and antitussive activity of fractions from Andrographis paniculata leaves. In vivo investigations of water extract (WE), and both ethanol-soluble (WES) and precipitated (WEP) fractions from WE on the citric-acid induced cough efforts and airways smooth muscle reactivity in guinea pigs were performed. Chemical, chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis revealed the existence of a highly branched pectic arabinogalactan (109kDa) in WEP and andrographolide in WES. WEP showed significant antitussive activity while the potencies of WE and WES are even higher. Neither WE nor WES significantly alter specific airway smooth muscle reactivity. Remarkably, the antitussive activity of arabinogalactan could be increased by synergistic action with andrographolide. Finally, traditional aqueous extraction method provides an arabinogalactan from A. paniculata, which stimulate biological response but without addiction.

  17. Caffeic Acid Expands Anti-Tumor Effect of Metformin in Human Metastatic Cervical Carcinoma HTB-34 Cells: Implications of AMPK Activation and Impairment of Fatty Acids De Novo Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tyszka-Czochara, Malgorzata; Konieczny, Pawel; Majka, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of cancer treatments is often limited and associated with substantial toxicity. Appropriate combination of drug targeting specific mechanisms may regulate metabolism of tumor cells to reduce cancer cell growth and to improve survival. Therefore, we investigated the effects of anti-diabetic drug Metformin (Met) and a natural compound caffeic acid (trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid, CA) alone and in combination to treat an aggressive metastatic human cervical HTB-34 (ATCC CRL­1550) cancer cell line. CA at concentration of 100 µM, unlike Met at 10 mM, activated 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). What is more, CA contributed to the fueling of mitochondrial tricarboxylic acids (TCA) cycle with pyruvate by increasing Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex (PDH) activity, while Met promoted glucose catabolism to lactate. Met downregulated expression of enzymes of fatty acid de novo synthesis, such as ATP Citrate Lyase (ACLY), Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS), Fatty Acyl-CoA Elongase 6 (ELOVL6), and Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase-1 (SCD1) in cancer cells. In conclusion, CA mediated reprogramming of glucose processing through TCA cycle via oxidative decarboxylation. The increased oxidative stress, as a result of CA treatment, sensitized cancer cells and, acting on cell biosynthesis and bioenergetics, made HTB-34 cells more susceptible to Met and successfully inhibited neoplastic cells. The combination of Metformin and caffeic acid to suppress cervical carcinoma cells by two independent mechanisms may provide a promising approach to cancer treatment. PMID:28230778

  18. Synergistic cytotoxic effects of zoledronic acid and radiation in human prostate cancer and myeloma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Algur, Ece; Macklis, Roger M.; Haefeli, Urs O. . E-mail: uhafeli@interchange.ubc.ca

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: The clinical use of the potent bisphosphonate zoledronic acid has increased recently, especially for the treatment of bone metastases. Synergistic effects with chemotherapeutic agents (e.g., doxorubicin, paclitaxel) have been shown. It is not known whether similar synergistic effects exist with radiation. Methods and materials: IM-9 myeloma cells and C4-2 prostate cancer cells were treated with up to 200 {mu}M concentrations of zoledronic acid, irradiated with single doses of up to 1,000 cGy, or exposed to combinations of both treatments. Cell viability was then determined via yellow dye 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay and the affected fractions analyzed using the median effect principal, a method developed and validated by Chou and Talalay. Results: A statistically significant synergistic cytotoxic effect of the combination of zoledronic acid and radiation was documented. The extent of the effect was cell type-dependent, with the C4-2 cells showing a greater synergistic effect than the IM-9 cells. Conclusions: The combined use of zoledronic acid and radiotherapy shows enhanced in vitro cytotoxicity for two human prostate and myeloma cancer cell lines over that expected for a simple additive effect from each treatment alone. A clinical trial is under way to test this combination therapy.

  19. Synergistic Effect of Trabectedin and Olaparib Combination Regimen in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ávila-Arroyo, Sonia; Nuñez, Gema Santamaría; García-Fernández, Luis Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Trabectedin induces synthetic lethality in tumor cells carrying defects in homologous recombinant DNA repair. We evaluated the effect of concomitant inhibition of nucleotide-excision repair and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity with trabectedin and PARP inhibitors, respectively, and whether the synthetic lethality effect had the potential for a synergistic effect in breast cancer cell lines. Additionally, we investigated if this approach remained effective in BRCA1-positive breast tumor cells. Methods We have evaluated the in vitro synergistic effect of combinations of trabectedin and three different PARP inhibitors (veliparib, olaparib, and iniparib) in four breast cancer cell lines, each presenting a different BRCA1 genetic background. Antiproliferative activity, DNA damage, cell cycle perturbations and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation were assessed by MTT assay, comet assay, flow cytometry and western blot, respectively. Results The combination of trabectedin and olaparib was synergistic in all the breast cancer cell lines tested. Our data indicated that the synergy persisted regardless of the BRCA1 status of the tumor cells. Combination treatment was associated with a strong accumulation of double-stranded DNA breaks, G2/M arrest, and apoptotic cell death. Synergistic effects were not observed when trabectedin was combined with veliparib or iniparib. Conclusion Collectively, our results indicate that the combination of trabectedin and olaparib induces an artificial synthetic lethality effect that can be used to kill breast cancer cells, independent of BRCA1 status. PMID:26770239

  20. Synergistic effect of additives including multifunctional acrylates in wood plastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mubarak A.; Idriss Ali, K. M.; Garnett, John L.

    1993-07-01

    Wood Plastic Composite (WPC) was prepared with simul (soft wood, density = 0.4g/cc) and butylmethacrylate (BMA) monomer using 10% methanol as the swelling agent. Effect of additives including (i) multifunctional acrylates such as tripropylene glycol diacrylate (TPGDA), trimethylol propane triacrylate (TMPTA) (ii) oligomer acrylates like the urethane (UA), epoxy (EA) and polyester (PEA) acrylates and (iii) N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP) was investigated using 1 to 3 Mrad dose at 0.8 Mrad/h. Synergistic increases in polymer loading yields was achieved in presence of the additives, particularly with the trifunctional acrylate (TMPTA). In addition, acid as well as urea were also used as co-additives and synergistic enhancement in yields of polymer loading were obtained. The synergistic polymer loading by acid addition causes substantial decrease in tensile strength of the composite; but other additives and co-additives increase both the polymer loading and the tensile strength in these systems.

  1. Social support and positive events as suicide resiliency factors: examination of synergistic buffering effects.

    PubMed

    Kleiman, Evan M; Riskind, John H; Schaefer, Karen E

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the role of social support and positive events as protective factors in suicide. Participants (n = 379) were administered measures of social support, life events, depressive symptoms, and suicide ideation. Results indicated that (1) social support had a direct protective effect on suicide ideation, (2) social support and positive events acted as individual buffers in the relationship between negative events and suicide ideation, and (3) social support and positive events synergistically buffered the relationship between negative events and suicide ideation. Our results provide evidence that positive events and social support act as protective factors against suicide individually and synergistically when they co-occur.

  2. Effects of Androgen Ablation on Anti-Tumor Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    37°C. After incubation, the cells were underlaid with Lympholyte-M (Cedarlane laboratories) and spun at 10 000 x g for 10 min without brakes . The...on top of the 11.5% OptiPrep. The suspension was spun at 600xg, 15min with no brakes . The DCs floating at the interface of the HBSS and 11.5...without brakes . The lymphocytes at the interface were collected and washed twice with 5%FBS-HBSS pH 7.4 before use. Flow cytometry Cells were

  3. Anti-tumor immune response after photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Wu, Mei X.; Kung, Andrew L.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due a number of factors including: the acute inflammatory response caused by PDT, release of antigens from PDT-damaged tumor cells, priming of the adaptive immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA), and induction of heat-shock proteins. The induction of specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy as it would allow the treatment of tumors that may have already metastasized. The PDT killed tumor cells may be phagocytosed by dendritic cells (DC) that then migrate to draining lymph nodes and prime naÃve T-cells that recognize TAA epitopes. We have carried out in vivo PDT with a BPD-mediated vascular regimen using a pair of BALB/c mouse colon carcinomas: CT26 wild type expressing the naturally occurring retroviral antigen gp70 and CT26.CL25 additionally expressing beta-galactosidase (b-gal) as a model tumor rejection antigen. PDT of CT26.CL25 cured 100% of tumors but none of the CT26WT tumors (all recurred). Cured CT26.CL25 mice were resistant to rechallenge. Moreover mice with two bilateral CT26.CL25 tumors that had only one treated with PDT demonstrated spontaneous regression of 70% of untreated contralateral tumors. T-lymphocytes were isolated from lymph nodes of PDT cured mice that recognized a particular peptide specific to b-gal antigen. T-lymphocytes from LN were able to kill CT26.CL25 target cells in vitro but not CT26WT cells as shown by a chromium release assay. CT26.CL25 tumors treated with PDT and removed five days later had higher levels of Th1 cytokines than CT26 WT tumors showing a higher level of immune response. When mice bearing CT26WT tumors were treated with a regimen of low dose cyclophosphamide (CY) 2 days before, PDT led to 100% of cures (versus 0% without CY) and resistance to rechallenge. Low dose CY is thought to deplete regulatory T-cells (Treg, CD4+CD25+foxp

  4. In vitro synergistic cytoreductive effects of zoledronic acid and radiation on breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ural, A Ugur; Avcu, Ferit; Candir, Muhammed; Guden, Metin; Ozcan, M Ali

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Bisphosphonates are mostly used in the treatment of bone metastases. They have been shown to act synergistically with other chemotherapeutic agents. It is not known, however, whether similar synergistic effects exist with radiation on breast cancer cells. Methods Human MCF-7 breast cancer cells were treated with up to 100 μM zoledronic acid, were irradiated with up to 800 cGy or were exposed to combinations of both treatments to determine the antiproliferative effects of zoledronic acid and radiation. Results Zoledronic acid and radiation caused a dose-dependent and time-dependent decrease in cell viability (approximate 50% growth inhibition values were 48 μM and 20 μM for 24 hours and 72 hours, respectively, for zoledronic acid and 500 cGy for radiation). A synergistic cytotoxic effect of the combination of zoledronic acid and radiation was confirmed by isobologram analysis. Conclusion These data constitute the first in vitro evidence for synergistic effects between zoledronic acid and radiation. This combination therapy might thus be expected to be more effective than either treatment alone in patients with metastatic breast carcinoma. PMID:16925824

  5. Improved in vitro anti-tumoral activity, intracellular uptake and apoptotic induction of gemcitabine-loaded pegylated unilamellar liposomes.

    PubMed

    Celia, Christian; Calvagno, Maria Grazia; Paolino, Donatella; Bulotta, Stefania; Ventura, Cinzia Anna; Russo, Diego; Fresta, Massimo

    2008-04-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is one of the most aggressive and lethal solid carcinomas affecting humans. A major limit of the chemotherapeutic agents is represented by their low therapeutic index. In this work, we investigated the possibility of improving the anti-tumoral activity of gemcitabine by using pegylated unilamellar liposomes. Liposomes were made up of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospocholine monohydrate/cholesterol/N-(carbonyl-methoxypolyethylene glycol-2000)-1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (6:3:1 molar ratio) and they were prepared with a pH gradient to improve the gemcitabine loading capacity. The anti-tumoral efficacy of the liposomal formulation was tested in vitro on human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells (ARO) in culture, comparing the effects with those of the free drug. Gemcitabine-loaded unilamellar liposomes had a mean size approximately 200 nm with a zeta potential approximately -2 mV. The liposomal carrier noticeably improved the anti-tumoral activity of gemcitabine against ARO cells in terms of both dose-dependent cytotoxic effect and of drug exposition effect. Namely, gemcitabine-loaded liposomes showed a cytotoxic effect (58.2% increase of cell mortality at 1 microM with respect to free drug) after 12 h incubation, while the free drug showed a significant activity only after 72 h incubation. Moreover, a significant effect on the cell mortality appeared at 0.1 microM and 100% mortality was detected at a concentration of 1 microM of gemcitabine-loaded liposomes, while the free drug elicited the same effect at a concentration of 100 microM. The improved anti-tumoral activity of gemcitabine determined by the liposomal carrier was due to a greater intracellular uptake. The intracellular gemcitabine levels as a function of time showed a sinusoidal profile with peaks after 2 h, 6 h and 11 h, related to the cellular cycle of ARO. PARP cleavage and DNA fragmentation analysis provided clear evidence of the apoptosis induction in

  6. The synergistic effects of slip ring-brush design and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, N. E.; Cole, S. R.; Glossbrenner, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and subsequent testing of four power slip rings for synchronous orbit application are described. The synergistic effects of contact materials and slip ring-brush design are studied by means of frequent and simultaneous recording of friction, wear, and electrical noise. Data generated during the test period are presented along with post test analysis data.

  7. Super absorbent conjugated microporous polymers: a synergistic structural effect on the exceptional uptake of amines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Xu, Yanhong; Guo, Zhaoqi; Nagai, Atsushi; Jiang, Donglin

    2013-04-21

    Conjugated microporous polymers exhibit a synergistic structural effect on the exceptional uptake of amines, whereas the dense porphyrin units facilitate uptake, the high porosity offers a large interface and the swellability boosts capacity. They are efficient in the uptake of both vapor and liquid amines, are applicable to various types of amines, and are excellent for cycle use.

  8. Synergistic effects of ajoene and the microwave power density memories of water on germination inhibition of fungal spores.

    PubMed

    Rai, S; Singh, U P; Mishra, G D; Singh, S P; Samarketu; Wagner, K G

    1995-05-01

    The synergistic effects of ajoene and the microwave power density memories of water on germination inhibition of some fungal spores are examined. The study reveals power memory varying different synergistic effects of different concentrations of ajoene on the inhibition of spore germination.

  9. The Effect of Insecticide Synergists on the Response of Scabies Mites to Pyrethroid Acaricides

    PubMed Central

    Pasay, Cielo; Arlian, Larry; Morgan, Marjorie; Gunning, Robin; Rossiter, Louise; Holt, Deborah; Walton, Shelley; Beckham, Simone; McCarthy, James

    2009-01-01

    Background Permethrin is the active component of topical creams widely used to treat human scabies. Recent evidence has demonstrated that scabies mites are becoming increasingly tolerant to topical permethrin and oral ivermectin. An effective approach to manage pesticide resistance is the addition of synergists to counteract metabolic resistance. Synergists are also useful for laboratory investigation of resistance mechanisms through their ability to inhibit specific metabolic pathways. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the role of metabolic degradation as a mechanism for acaricide resistance in scabies mites, PBO (piperonyl butoxide), DEF (S,S,S-tributyl phosphorotrithioate) and DEM (diethyl maleate) were first tested for synergistic activity with permethrin in a bioassay of mite killing. Then, to investigate the relative role of specific metabolic pathways inhibited by these synergists, enzyme assays were developed to measure esterase, glutathione S-transferase (GST) and cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (cytochrome P450) activity in mite extracts. A statistically significant difference in median survival time of permethrin-resistant Sarcoptes scabiei variety canis was noted when any of the three synergists were used in combination with permethrin compared to median survival time of mites exposed to permethrin alone (p<0.0001). Incubation of mite homogenates with DEF showed inhibition of esterase activity (37%); inhibition of GST activity (73%) with DEM and inhibition of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity (81%) with PBO. A 7-fold increase in esterase activity, a 4-fold increase in GST activity and a 2-fold increase in cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity were observed in resistant mites compared to sensitive mites. Conclusions These findings indicate the potential utility of synergists in reversing resistance to pyrethroid-based acaricides and suggest a significant role of metabolic mechanisms in mediating pyrethroid resistance in scabies mites. PMID

  10. Superior anti-tumor efficacy of diisopropylamine dichloroacetate compared with dichloroacetate in a subcutaneous transplantation breast tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chen; Chen, Aiping; Meng, Gang; Wei, Jiwu; Yu, Decai; Ding, Yitao

    2016-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, has anti-tumor properties in various carcinoma models. Diisopropylamine dichloroacetate (DADA), an over-the-counter drug for chronic liver disease, is a derivative of DCA. To date, few studies have evaluated the anticancer potential of DADA in breast cancer. In this study, MDA-MB-231 cells, a breast adenocarcinoma cell line, were used in in vitro and in vivo experiments to evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of DADA and DCA. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of DADA (7.1 ± 1.1 mmol/L) against MDA-MB-231 cells was significantly lower than that of DCA (15.6 ± 2.0 mmol/L); 100 mg/kg (0.0004 mol/kg) DADA was better than 100 mg/kg (0.0008 mol/kg) DCA at suppressing the growth of subcutaneous transplantation breast tumor at the same dose after 24 days intervention. Histological examination showed that both DCA and DADA interventions led to necrosis, inflammation, and fibrosis of tumor tissue in a mouse subcutaneous transplantation breast tumor model. DADA treatment inhibited Ki67 expression in tumor tissue. In vitro experiments showed that DADA could inhibit lactic acid production and glucose uptake in MDA-MB-231 cells at 10 mmol/L and these effects were stronger than DCA. DADA administration also induced complete autophagy during early treatment stages and incomplete autophagy and cell death at later treatment stages. In conclusion, DADA showed better anti-tumor efficacy than DCA in a breast cancer model. PMID:27582548

  11. MLN4924 Synergistically Enhances Cisplatin-induced Cytotoxicity via JNK and Bcl-xL Pathways in Human Urothelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ho, I-Lin; Kuo, Kuan-Lin; Liu, Shing-Hwa-; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Hsieh, Ju-Ton; Wu, June-Tai; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Lin, Wei-Chou; Tsai, Yu-Chieh; Chou, Chien-Tso; Hsu, Chen-Hsun; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Huang, Kuo-How

    2015-11-23

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is the primary treatment for metastatic bladder urothelial carcinoma. However, the response rate is only 40-65%. This study investigated the anti-tumor effect and underlying mechanisms of the combination of cisplatin and the NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 in human bladder urothelial carcinoma. The combination of cisplatin and MLN4924 exerted synergistic cytotoxicity on two high-grade bladder urothelial carcinoma cell lines, NTUB1 and T24 (combination index <1). MLN4924 also potentiated the cisplatin-induced apoptosis and activation of caspase-3 and -7, phospho-histone H2A.X and PARP. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation and a down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) were also observed during cisplatin and MLN4924 treatment. Inhibition of JNK activation partially restored cell viability and Bcl-xL expression. Bcl-xL overexpression also rescued cell viability. MLN4924 significantly potentiated cisplatin-induced tumor suppression in urothelial carcinoma xenograft mice. In summary, MLN4924 synergistically enhanced the anti-tumor effect of cisplatin via an increase in DNA damage, JNK activation and down-regulation of Bcl-xL in urothelial carcinoma cells. These findings provide a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of bladder cancer.

  12. [The synergistic effect of FGF-21 and insulin on regulating glucose metabolism and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan; Sun, Cui-Yu; Sun, Guo-Peng; Ren, Gui-Ping; Ye, Xian-Long; Zhu, Sheng-Long; Wang, Wen-Fei; Xu, Peng-Fei; Li, Shu-Jie; Wu, Qiang; Niu, Ze-Shan; Sun, Tian; Liu, Ming-Yao; Li, De-Shan

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies proposed that the synergistic effect of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) and insulin may be due to the improvement of insulin sensitivity by FGF-21. However, there is no experimental evidence to support this. This study was designed to elucidate the mechanism of synergistic effect of FGF-21 and insulin in the regulation of glucose metabolism. The synergistic effect of FGF-21 and insulin on regulating glucose metabolism was demonstrated by investigating the glucose absorption rate by insulin resistance HepG2 cell model and the blood glucose chances in type 2 diabetic db/db mice after treatments with different concentrations of FGF-21 or/and insulin; The synergistic metabolism was revealed through detecting GLUT1 and GLUT4 transcription levels in the liver by real-time PCR method. The experimental results showed that FGF-21 and insulin have a synergistic effect on the regulation of glucose metabolism. The results of real-time PCR showed that the effective dose of FGF-21 could up-regulate the transcription level of GLUT1 in a dose-dependent manner, but had no effect on the transcription level of GLUT4. Insulin (4 u) alone could up-regulate the transcription level of GLUT4, yet had no effect on that of GLUT1. Ineffective dose 0.1 mg kg(-1) FGF-21 alone could not change the transcription level of GLUT1 or GLUT4. However, when the ineffective dose 0.1 mg x kg(-1) FGF-21 was used in combination with insulin (4 u) significantly increased the transcription levels of both GLUT1 and GLUT4, the transcription level of GLUT1 was similar to that treated with 5 time concentration of FGF-21 alone; the transcription level of GLUT4 is higher than that treated with insulin (4 u) alone. In summary, in the presence of FGF-21, insulin increases the sensitivity of FGF-21 through enhancing GLUT1 transcription. Vice versa, FGF-21 increases the sensitivity of insulin by stimulating GLUT4 transcription in the presence of insulin. FGF-21 and insulin exert a synergistic

  13. An evaluation of the anti-tumor efficacy of oleanolic acid-loaded PEGylated liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shengnan; Gao, Dawei; Zhao, Tingting; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Xiaoning

    2013-06-01

    The effective delivery of oleanolic acid (OA) to the target site has several benefits in therapy for different pathologies. However, the delivery of OA is challenging due to its poor aqueous solubility. The study aims to evaluate the tumor inhibition effect of the PEGylated OA nanoliposome on the U14 cervical carcinoma cell line. In our previous study, OA was successfully encapsulated into PEGylated liposome with the modified ethanol injection method. Oral administration of PEGylated OA liposome was demonstrated to be more efficient in inhibiting xenograft tumors. The results of organ index indicated that PEG liposome exhibited higher anti-tumor activity and lower cytotoxicity. It was also found that OA and OA liposomes induced tumor cell apoptosis detected by flow cytometry. Furthermore, effects of OA on the morphology of tumor and other tissues were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The histopathology sections did not show pathological changes in kidney or liver in tested mice. In contrast, there was a significant difference in tumor tissues between treatment groups and the negative control group. These observations imply that PEGylated liposomes seem to have advantages for cancer therapy in terms of effective delivery of OA.

  14. Comparative toxicity and efficacy of engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants with broad anti-tumor activities.

    PubMed

    Peters, Diane E; Hoover, Benjamin; Cloud, Loretta Grey; Liu, Shihui; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Leppla, Stephen H; Bugge, Thomas H

    2014-09-01

    We have previously designed and characterized versions of anthrax lethal toxin that are selectively cytotoxic in the tumor microenvironment and which display broad and potent anti-tumor activities in vivo. Here, we have performed the first direct comparison of the safety and efficacy of three engineered anthrax lethal toxin variants requiring activation by either matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs), urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) or co-localized MMP/uPA activities. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with six doses of engineered toxins via intraperitoneal (I.P.) or intravenous (I.V.) dose routes to determine the maximum tolerated dose for six administrations (MTD6) and dose-limiting toxicities. Efficacy was evaluated using the B16-BL6 syngraft model of melanoma; mice bearing established tumors were treated with six I.P. doses of toxin and tumor measurements and immunohistochemistry, paired with terminal blood work, were used to elaborate upon the anti-tumor mechanism and relative efficacy of each variant. We found that MMP-, uPA- and dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxins exhibited the same dose-limiting toxicity; dose-dependent GI toxicity. In terms of efficacy, all three toxins significantly reduced primary B16-BL6 tumor burden, ranging from 32% to 87% reduction, and they also delayed disease progression as evidenced by dose-dependent normalization of blood work values. While target organ toxicity and effective doses were similar amongst the variants, the dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin exhibited the highest I.P. MTD6 and was 1.5-3-fold better tolerated than the single MMP- and uPA-activated toxins. Overall, we demonstrate that this dual MMP/uPA-activated anthrax lethal toxin can be administered safely and is highly effective in a preclinical model of melanoma. This modified bacterial cytotoxin is thus a promising candidate for further clinical development and evaluation for use in treating human cancers.

  15. Synergistic Effect and Molecular Mechanisms of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Regulating Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhuo; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment is like a relationship between the “seeds” and “soil,” which is a hotspot in recent cancer research. Targeting at tumor microenvironment as well as tumor cells has become a new strategy for cancer treatment. Conventional cancer treatments mostly focused on single targets or single mechanism (the seeds or part of the soil); few researches intervened in the whole tumor microenvironment and achieved ideal therapeutic effect as expected. Traditional Chinese medicine displays a broad range of biological effects, and increasing evidence has shown that it may relate with synergistic effect on regulating tumor microenvironment and cancer cells. Based on literature review and our previous studies, we summarize the synergistic effect and the molecular mechanisms of traditional Chinese medicine on regulating tumor microenvironment and cancer cells. PMID:27042656

  16. The study of synergistic effects of alcohols on the catalytic hydrogenation of brown coal

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, P.N.; Kuznetsova, L.I.; Kartseva, N.V.

    1998-12-31

    The hydrogenation of brown coal in methanol, ethanol and isopropanol containing medium in the presence of catalysts was studied. The effects of different catalysts, alcohols, the proportion between the quantity of hydrogen, alcohols and tetralin on the conversion of coal, product yields, composition and molecular weight of solubles were analyzed. The synergistic effects of the mixtures of methanol and ethanol with tetralin and with hydrogen on the conversion of brown coal were observed at 380 C and 430 C in the presence of supported Fe, Fe-Mo, Ni, and Co hydroxide catalysts. Small amounts of methanol and ethanol additives induced the improved coal swelling and conversion into soluble products with diminished molecular weight. Synergistic effect was found to depend on the catalyst concentration, hydrogen pressure and alcohol structure. Coal swelling, hydrogenation and alkylation reactions were evaluated. The nature of the promoting effect of alcohols on coal liquefaction is discussed.

  17. Scaling dynamic response and destructive metabolism in an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system modulated by different external periodic interventions.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yuanzhi; Hu, Wenyong; Zhong, Weirong; Li, Li

    2011-01-14

    On the basis of two universal power-law scaling laws, i.e. the scaling dynamic hysteresis in physics and the allometric scaling metabolism in biosystem, we studied the dynamic response and the evolution of an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system subjected to a periodic external intervention, which is equivalent to the scheme of a radiotherapy or chemotherapy, within the framework of the growth dynamics of tumor. Under the modulation of either an abrupt or a gradual change external intervention, the population density of tumors exhibits a dynamic hysteresis to the intervention. The area of dynamic hysteresis loop characterizes a sort of dissipative-therapeutic relationship of the dynamic responding of treated tumors with the dose consumption of accumulated external intervention per cycle of therapy. Scaling the area of dynamic hysteresis loops against the intensity of an external intervention, we deduced a characteristic quantity which was defined as the theoretical therapeutic effectiveness of treated tumor and related with the destructive metabolism of tumor under treatment. The calculated dose-effectiveness profiles, namely the dose cumulant per cycle of intervention versus the therapeutic effectiveness, could be well scaled into a universal quadratic formula regardless of either an abrupt or a gradual change intervention involved. We present a new concept, i.e., the therapy-effect matrix and the dose cumulant matrix, to expound the new finding observed in the growth and regression dynamics of a modulated anti-tumor system.

  18. Utility of Clostridium difficile toxin B for inducing anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tuxiong; Li, Shan; Li, Guangchao; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Haiying; Shi, Lianfa; Perez-Cordon, Gregorio; Mao, Li; Wang, Xiaoning; Wang, Jufang; Feng, Hanping

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin B (TcdB) is a key virulence factor of bacterium and induces intestinal inflammatory disease. Because of its potent cytotoxic and proinflammatory activities, we investigated the utility of TcdB in developing anti-tumor immunity. TcdB induced cell death in mouse colorectal cancer CT26 cells, and the intoxicated cells stimulated the activation of mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and subsequent T cell activation in vitro. Immunization of BALB/c mice with toxin-treated CT26 cells elicited potent anti-tumor immunity that protected mice from a lethal challenge of the same tumor cells and rejected pre-injected tumors. The anti-tumor immunity generated was cell-mediated, long-term, and tumor-specific. Further experiments demonstrated that the intact cell bodies were important for the immunogenicity since lysing the toxin-treated tumor cells reduced their ability to induce antitumor immunity. Finally, we showed that TcdB is able to induce potent anti-tumor immunity in B16-F10 melanoma model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the utility of C. difficile toxin B for developing anti-tumor immunity.

  19. Oleuropein, a non-toxic olive iridoid, is an anti-tumor agent and cytoskeleton disruptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdi, Hamdi K. . E-mail: hkhamdi@gmail.com; Castellon, Raquel

    2005-09-02

    Oleuropein, a non-toxic secoiridoid derived from the olive tree, is a powerful antioxidant and anti-angiogenic agent. Here, we show it to be a potent anti-cancer compound, directly disrupting actin filaments in cells and in a cell-free assay. Oleuropein inhibited the proliferation and migration of advanced-grade tumor cell lines in a dose-responsive manner. In a novel tube-disruption assay, Oleuropein irreversibly rounded cancer cells, preventing their replication, motility, and invasiveness; these effects were reversible in normal cells. When administered orally to mice that developed spontaneous tumors, Oleuropein completely regressed tumors in 9-12 days. When tumors were resected prior to complete regression, they lacked cohesiveness and had a crumbly consistency. No viable cells could be recovered from these tumors. These observations elevate Oleuropein from a non-toxic antioxidant into a potent anti-tumor agent with direct effects against tumor cells. Our data may also explain the cancer-protective effects of the olive-rich Mediterranean diet.

  20. Molecular mechanism of action of anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies in inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Billmeier, Ulrike; Dieterich, Walburga; Neurath, Markus F; Atreya, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies are successfully used in the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the molecular mechanism of action of these agents is still a matter of debate. Apart from neutralization of TNF, influence on the intestinal barrier function, induction of apoptosis in mucosal immune cells, formation of regulatory macrophages as well as other immune modulating properties have been discussed as central features. Nevertheless, clinically effective anti-TNF antibodies were shown to differ in their mode-of-action in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, the anti-TNF agent etanercept is effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis but failed to induce clinical response in Crohn’s disease patients, suggesting different contributions of TNF in the pathogenesis of these inflammatory diseases. In the following, we will review different aspects regarding the mechanism of action of anti-TNF agents in general and analyze comparatively different effects of each anti-TNF agent such as TNF neutralization, modulation of the immune system, reverse signaling and induction of apoptosis. We discuss the relevance of the membrane-bound form of TNF compared to the soluble form for the immunopathogenesis of IBD. Furthermore, we review reports that could lead to personalized medicine approaches regarding treatment with anti-TNF antibodies in chronic intestinal inflammation, by predicting response to therapy. PMID:27895418

  1. Molecular mechanism of action of anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Billmeier, Ulrike; Dieterich, Walburga; Neurath, Markus F; Atreya, Raja

    2016-11-14

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies are successfully used in the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, the molecular mechanism of action of these agents is still a matter of debate. Apart from neutralization of TNF, influence on the intestinal barrier function, induction of apoptosis in mucosal immune cells, formation of regulatory macrophages as well as other immune modulating properties have been discussed as central features. Nevertheless, clinically effective anti-TNF antibodies were shown to differ in their mode-of-action in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, the anti-TNF agent etanercept is effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis but failed to induce clinical response in Crohn's disease patients, suggesting different contributions of TNF in the pathogenesis of these inflammatory diseases. In the following, we will review different aspects regarding the mechanism of action of anti-TNF agents in general and analyze comparatively different effects of each anti-TNF agent such as TNF neutralization, modulation of the immune system, reverse signaling and induction of apoptosis. We discuss the relevance of the membrane-bound form of TNF compared to the soluble form for the immunopathogenesis of IBD. Furthermore, we review reports that could lead to personalized medicine approaches regarding treatment with anti-TNF antibodies in chronic intestinal inflammation, by predicting response to therapy.

  2. Galactosylated liposome as a dendritic cell-targeted mucosal vaccine for inducing protective anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping-Lun; Lin, Hung-Jun; Wang, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Wen-Yu; Lin, Shen-Fu; Chien, Mei-Yin; Liang, Pi-Hui; Huang, Yi-You; Liu, Der-Zen

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces contain specialized dendritic cells (DCs) that are able to recognize foreign pathogens and mount protective immunity. We previously demonstrated that intranasal administration of targeted galactosylated liposomes can elicit mucosal and systemic antibody responses. In the present study, we assessed whether galactosylated liposomes could act as an effective DC-targeted mucosal vaccine that would be capable of inducing systemic anti-tumor immunity as well as antibody responses. We show that targeted galactosylated liposomes effectively facilitated antigen uptake by DCs beyond that mediated by unmodified liposomes both in vitro and in vivo. Targeted galactosylated liposomes induced higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines than unmodified liposomes in vitro. C57BL/6 mice thrice immunized intranasally with ovalbumin (OVA)-encapsulated galactosylated liposomes produced high levels of OVA-specific IgG antibodies in their serum. Spleen cells from mice receiving galactosylated liposomes were restimulated with OVA and showed significantly augmented levels of IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, intranasal administration of OVA-encapsulated beta-galactosylated liposomes resulted in complete protection against EG7 tumor challenge in C57BL/6 mice. Taken together, these results indicate that nasal administration of a galactosylated liposome vaccine mediates the development of an effective immunity against tumors and might be useful for further clinical anti-tumoral applications.

  3. Anti-tumor response induced by immunologically modified carbon nanotubes and laser irradiation using rat mammary tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Hasanjee, Aamr M.; Bahavar, Cody F.; Zhou, Fefian; Liu, Hong; Howard, Eric W.; Bullen, Liz C.; Silvy, Ricardo P.; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) is being developed as a treatment modality for metastatic cancer which can destroy primary tumors and induce effective systemic anti-tumor responses by using a targeted treatment approach in conjunction with the use of a novel immunoadjuvant, glycated chitosan (GC). In this study, Non-invasive Laser Immunotherapy (NLIT) was used as the primary treatment mode. We incorporated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into the treatment regimen to boost the tumor-killing effect of LIT. SWNTs and GC were conjugated to create a completely novel, immunologically modified carbon nanotube (SWNT-GC). To determine the efficacy of different laser irradiation durations, 5 minutes or 10 minutes, a series of experiments were performed. Rats were inoculated with DMBA-4 cancer cells, a highly aggressive metastatic cancer cell line. Half of the treatment group of rats receiving laser irradiation for 10 minutes survived without primary or metastatic tumors. The treatment group of rats receiving laser irradiation for 5 minutes had no survivors. Thus, Laser+SWNT-GC treatment with 10 minutes of laser irradiation proved to be effective at reducing tumor size and inducing long-term anti-tumor immunity.

  4. Multiple defender effects: synergistic coral defense by mutualist crustaceans.

    PubMed

    McKeon, C Seabird; Stier, Adrian C; McIlroy, Shelby E; Bolker, Benjamin M

    2012-08-01

    The majority of our understanding of mutualisms comes from studies of pairwise interactions. However, many hosts support mutualist guilds, and interactions among mutualists make the prediction of aggregate effects difficult. Here, we apply a factorial experiment to interactions of 'guard' crustaceans that defend their coral host from seastar predators. Predation was reduced by the presence of mutualists (15% reduction in predation frequency and 45% in volume of coral consumed). The frequency of attacks with both mutualists was lower than with a single species, but it did not differ significantly from the expected frequency of independent effects. In contrast, the combined defensive efficacy of both mutualist species reduced the volume of coral tissue lost by 73%, significantly more than the 38% reduction expected from independent defensive efforts, suggesting the existence of a cooperative synergy in defensive behaviors of 'guard' crustaceans. These emergent 'multiple defender effects' are statistically and ecologically analogous to the emergent concept of 'multiple predator effects' known from the predation literature.

  5. Synergistic Effects of Nanochitin on Inhibition of Tobacco Root Rot Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Jiang, Shijun; Jiao, Yongji; Wang, Hezhong

    2017-02-22

    Nanomaterials have great potential for use in various fields, due to their unique properties. In order to explore the bioactivity of nanochitin on tobacco, the effects of nanochitin suspensions on tobacco seed germination, seedling growth, and synergistic effects with fungicides were studied in indoor and field trials. Results showed that 0.004% (w/v) of nanochitin improved tobacco seed germination and shortened mean time to germination significantly; 0.005% (w/v) of nanochitin increased tobacco stem length, stem girth, leaf number and leaf area, and 0.001% (w/v) of nanochitin had synergistic effects on inhibition of tobacco root rot when mixed with metalaxyl mancozeb and thiophanate methyl fungicides. This indicates that nanochitin suspensions have a strong potential to protect tobacco from tobacco root rot diseases and reduce the use of chemical fungicides in tobacco plantations.

  6. Higher Performance of DSSC with Dyes from Cladophora sp. as Mixed Cosensitizer through Synergistic Effect

    PubMed Central

    Haji Manaf, Noramaliyana; Tennakoon, Kushan; Chandrakanthi, R. L. N.; Lim, Linda Biaw Leng; Bandara, J. M. R. Sarath; Ekanayake, Piyasiri

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophyll and xanthophyll dyes extracted from a single source of filamentous freshwater green algae (Cladophora sp.) were used to sensitize dye sensitized solar cells and their performances were investigated. A more positive interaction is expected as the derived dyes come from a single natural source because they work mutually in nature. Cell sensitized with mixed chlorophyll and xanthophyll showed synergistic activity with improved cell performance of 1.5- to 2-fold higher than that sensitized with any individual dye. The effect of temperature and the stability of these dyes were also investigated. Xanthophyll dye was found to be more stable compared to chlorophyll that is attributed in the ability of xanthophyll to dissipate extra energy via reversible structural changes. Mixing the dyes resulted to an increase in effective electron life time and reduced the process of electron recombination during solar cell operation, hence exhibiting a synergistic effect. PMID:25688266

  7. Maspin expression in prostate tumor elicits host anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dzinic, Sijana H.; Chen, Kang; Thakur, Archana; Kaplun, Alexander; Daniel Bonfil, R.; Li, Xiaohua; Liu, Jason; Margarida Bernardo, M.; Saliganan, Allen; Back, Jessica B.; Yano, Hiroshi; Schalk, Dana L.; Tomaszewski, Elyse N.; Beydoun, Ahmed S.; Dyson, Gregory; Mujagic, Adelina; Krass, David; Dean, Ivory; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Heath, Elisabeth; Sakr, Wael; Lum, Lawrence G.; Sheng, Shijie

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the current study is to examine the biological effects of epithelial-specific tumor suppressor maspin on tumor host immune response. Accumulated evidence demonstrates an anti-tumor effect of maspin on tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. The molecular mechanism underlying these biological functions of maspin is thought to be through histone deacetylase inhibition, key to the maintenance of differentiated epithelial phenotype. Since tumor-driven stromal reactivities co-evolve in tumor progression and metastasis, it is not surprising that maspin expression in tumor cells inhibits extracellular matrix degradation, increases fibrosis and blocks hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. Using the athymic nude mouse model capable of supporting the growth and progression of xenogeneic human prostate cancer cells, we further demonstrate that maspin expression in tumor cells elicits neutrophil- and B cells-dependent host tumor immunogenicity. Specifically, mice bearing maspin-expressing tumors exhibited increased systemic and intratumoral neutrophil maturation, activation and antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, and decreased peritumoral lymphangiogenesis. These results reveal a novel biological function of maspin in directing host immunity towards tumor elimination that helps explain the significant reduction of xenograft tumor incidence in vivo and the clinical correlation of maspin with better prognosis of several types of cancer. Taken together, our data raised the possibility for novel maspin-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:25373490

  8. In vivo antioxidant, hypoglycemic, and anti-tumor activities of anthocyanin extracts from purple sweet potato

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jin-Ge; Yan, Qian-Qian; Lu, Li-Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Anthocyanin from purple sweet potato (PSP) extracted by microwave baking (MB) and acidified electrolyzed water (AEW) exhibited antioxidant activity. After further purification by macroporous AB-8 resin, the color value of PSP anthocyanin (PSPA) reached 30.15 with a total flavonoid concentration of 932.5 mg/g. The purified extracts had more potent antioxidant activities than the crude extracts. After continuously administering the PSP extracts to 12-mo-old mice for 1 mo, the anti-aging index of the experimental group was not significantly different from that of 5-mo-old mice. To a certain degree, PSPA was also effective for controlling plasma glucose levels in male Streptozocin (STZ)-treated diabetic mice. In addition, the extracts inhibited Sarcoma S180 cell growth in ICR mice. Mice consuming the PSP extracts formed significantly fewer and smaller sarcomas than mice consuming the control diets. The highest inhibition rate was 69.03%. These results suggest that anthocyanin extracts from PSP not only exert strong antioxidant effects in vitro, but also had anti-aging, anti-hyperglycemic, and anti-tumor activities. PMID:24133614

  9. Pharmacological and anti-tumor activities of ganoderma spores processed by top-down approaches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Jiang-Hai; Yuan, Jian-Ping

    2005-12-01

    Ganoderma was considered to be the most valuable medicine in ancient China, and it is still widely esteemed as a valuable health supplement and herbal medicine for the prevention and treatment of a variety of chronic diseases. However, the efficiency of Ganoderma in therapy has long been hindered by the uncertainty of its effectual constituents and the pharmaceutical mechanisms. Lately, it has been found that a most effective pharmaceutical component is the Ganoderma spore. Nevertheless, efficiency in using the spores requires further improvement in processing since the spores have rigid and tough walls the size on a micron scale which are difficult to take up and absorb by the human body. This review describes the top-down approaches in Ganoderma spore processing in order to release the effective pharmaceutical constituents such as the triterpenoid. The production of raw Ganoderma spores, the processing techniques to produce the sporoderm-broken germinating Ganoderma spores, the significant pharmacological activities of Ganoderma, the anti-tumor mechanisms elucidated by modern pharmacological studies, the outcome of the clinical trials, and a prospective of future preparations of triterpenoid-enriched Ganoderma spores and Ganoderma triterpenoids for immune regulation and cancer therapy will be discussed.

  10. Synergistic antioxidative effect of astaxanthin and tocotrienol by co-encapsulated in liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kamezaki, Chihiro; Nakashima, Ami; Yamada, Asako; Uenishi, Sachiko; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Shibuya, Natsumi; Hama, Susumu; Hosoi, Shinzo; Yamashita, Eiji; Kogure, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Astaxanthin and vitamin E are both effective antioxidants that are frequently used in cosmetics, as food additives, and in to prevent oxidative damage. A combination of astaxanthin and vitamin E would be expected to show an additive anntioxidative effect. In this study, liposomes co-encapsulating astaxanthin and the vitamin E derivatives α-tocopherol (α-T) or tocotrienols (T3) were prepared, and the antioxidative activity of these liposomes toward singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical was evaluated in vitro. Liposomes co-encapsulating astaxanthin and α-T showed no additive anntioxidative effect, while the actual scavenging activity of liposomes co-encapsulating astaxanthin and T3 was higher than the calculated additive activity. To clarify why this synergistic effect occurs, the most stable structure of astaxanthin in the presence of α-T or α-T3 was calculated. Only α-T3 was predicted to form hydrogen bonding with astaxanthin, and the astaxanthin polyene chain would partially interact with the α-T3 triene chain, which could explain why there was a synergistic effect between astaxanthin and T3 but not α-T. In conclusion, co-encapsulation of astaxanthin and T3 induces synergistic scavenging activity by intermolecular interactions between the two antioxidants. PMID:27698536

  11. Simultaneous irradiation with different wavelengths of ultraviolet light has synergistic bactericidal effect on Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Nakahashi, Mutsumi; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Hirata, Akiko; Maetani, Miki; Shimohata, Takaaki; Uebanso, Takashi; Hamada, Yasuhiro; Akutagawa, Masatake; Kinouchi, Yousuke; Takahashi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is an increasingly used method of water disinfection. UV rays can be classified by wavelength into UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (<280 nm). We previously developed UVA sterilization equipment with a UVA light-emitting diode (LED). The aim of this study was to establish a new water disinfection procedure using the combined irradiation of the UVA-LED and another UV wavelength. An oxidative DNA product, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), increased after irradiation by UVA-LED alone, and the level of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) was increased by UVC alone in Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Although sequential irradiation of UVA-LED and UVC-induced additional bactericidal effects, simultaneous irradiation with UVA-LED and UVC-induced bactericidal synergistic effects. The 8-OHdG and CPDs production showed no differences between sequential and simultaneous irradiation. Interestingly, the recovery of CPDs was delayed by simultaneous irradiation. The synergistic effect was absent in SOS response-deficient mutants, such as the recA and lexA strains. Because recA- and lexA-mediated SOS responses have crucial roles in a DNA repair pathway, the synergistic bactericidal effect produced by the simultaneous irradiation could depend on the suppression of the CPDs repair. The simultaneous irradiation of UVA-LED and UVC is a candidate new procedure for effective water disinfection.

  12. Synergistic Effect of SH003 and Doxorubicin in Triple-negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sang-Mi; Kim, Ah Jeong; Choi, Youn Kyung; Shin, Young Cheol; Cho, Sung-Gook; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-11-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is highly aggressive, resulting in poor prognosis. Chemotherapy of TNBC relies on anti-cancer agents with strong cytotoxicity, but it causes several side effects with recurrence. While combinational approaches of chemotherapeutics have been highlighted as a new treatment strategy for TNBC to reduce side effects, combinations of anti-cancer agents with herbal medicines have not been reported. We recently reported that newly modified traditional Chinese medicine named SH003 inhibited TNBC growth. Considering a combinational strategy for TNBC treatment, we further studied synergistic effects of SH003 with various anti-cancer drugs in TNBC treatment. Here, we demonstrate that SH003 shows a synergistic effect with doxorubicin on TNBC treatment. Our in vitro cell viability assays revealed that SH003 and doxorubicin showed a synergistic effect in the well-defined TNBC cell line, MDA-MB-231. Moreover, we found that the combinational treatment caused Caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Our in vivo mouse xenograft tumor growth assays confirmed that combinational treatment of SH003 with doxorubicin repressed MDA-MB-231 tumor growth with no weight loss. Therefore, we conclude that the combinational treatment of SH003 with doxorubicin shows the synergism in TNBC treatment, and suggest that SH003 can be used together with conventional anti-cancer drugs in chemotherapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Cryo-thermal therapy elicits potent anti-tumor immunity by inducing extracellular Hsp70-dependent MDSC differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-06-01

    Achieving control of metastatic disease is a long-sought goal in cancer therapy. Treatments that encourage a patient’s own immune system are bringing new hopes in reaching such a goal. In clinic, local hyperthermia and cryoablation have been explored to induce anti-tumor immune responses against tumors. We have also developed a novel therapeutic modality of cryo-thermal treatment by alternating liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling and radio frequency (RF) heating, and better therapeutic effect was achieved in treating metastatic cancer in animal model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of systemic immune response elicited by cryo-thermal therapy. In the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model, we found that local cryo-thermal therapy resulted in a considerable reduction of distant lung metastases, and improved long-term survival. Moreover, results of tumor re-challenge experiments indicated generation of a strong tumor-specific immune memory after the local treatment of primary tumors. Our further study indicated that cryo-thermal therapy caused an elevated extracellular release of Hsp70. Subsequently, Hsp70 induced differentiation of MDSCs into mature DCs, contributing to the relief of MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression and ultimately the activation of strong anti-tumor immune response. Our findings reveal new insight into the mechanism of robust therapeutic effects of cryo-thermal therapy against metastatic cancers.

  14. Cryo-thermal therapy elicits potent anti-tumor immunity by inducing extracellular Hsp70-dependent MDSC differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-01-01

    Achieving control of metastatic disease is a long-sought goal in cancer therapy. Treatments that encourage a patient’s own immune system are bringing new hopes in reaching such a goal. In clinic, local hyperthermia and cryoablation have been explored to induce anti-tumor immune responses against tumors. We have also developed a novel therapeutic modality of cryo-thermal treatment by alternating liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling and radio frequency (RF) heating, and better therapeutic effect was achieved in treating metastatic cancer in animal model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of systemic immune response elicited by cryo-thermal therapy. In the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model, we found that local cryo-thermal therapy resulted in a considerable reduction of distant lung metastases, and improved long-term survival. Moreover, results of tumor re-challenge experiments indicated generation of a strong tumor-specific immune memory after the local treatment of primary tumors. Our further study indicated that cryo-thermal therapy caused an elevated extracellular release of Hsp70. Subsequently, Hsp70 induced differentiation of MDSCs into mature DCs, contributing to the relief of MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression and ultimately the activation of strong anti-tumor immune response. Our findings reveal new insight into the mechanism of robust therapeutic effects of cryo-thermal therapy against metastatic cancers. PMID:27256519

  15. Synergistic effect of enhancers for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mitragotri, S

    2000-11-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers a non-invasive route of drug administration, although its applications are limited by low skin permeability. Various enhancers including iontophoresis, chemicals, ultrasound, and electroporation have been shown to enhance transdermal drug transport. Although all these methods have been individually shown to enhance transdermal drug transport, their combinations have often been found to enhance transdermal transport more effectively than each of them alone. This paper summarizes literature studies on these combinations with respect to their efficacy and mechanisms.

  16. Synergistic strengthening effect of nanocrystalline copper reinforced with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hu; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Hu, Zheng-Yang; Wang, Fu-Chi; Li, Sheng-Lin; Korznikov, Elena; Zhao, Xiu-Chen; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhen-Feng; Kang, Zhe

    2016-05-17

    In this study, a novel multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced nanocrystalline copper matrix composite with super high strength and moderate plasticity was synthesized. We successfully overcome the agglomeration problem of the carbon nanotubes and the grain growth problem of the nanocrystalline copper matrix by combined use of the electroless deposition and spark plasma sintering methods. The yield strength of the composite reach up to 692 MPa, which is increased by 2 and 5 times comparing with those of the nanocrystalline and coarse copper, respectively. Simultaneously, the plasticity of the composite was also significantly increased in contrast with that of the nanocrystalline copper. The increase of the density of the carbon nanotubes after coating, the isolation effect caused by the copper coating, and the improvement of the compatibility between the reinforcements and matrix as well as the effective control of the grain growth of the copper matrix all contribute to improving the mechanical properties of the composite. In addition, a new strengthening mechanism, i.e., the series-connection effect of the nanocrystalline copper grains introduced by carbon nanotubes, is proposed to further explain the mechanical behavior of the nanocomposite.

  17. Synergistic strengthening effect of nanocrystalline copper reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hu; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Hu, Zheng-Yang; Wang, Fu-Chi; Li, Sheng-Lin; Korznikov, Elena; Zhao, Xiu-Chen; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhen-Feng; Kang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced nanocrystalline copper matrix composite with super high strength and moderate plasticity was synthesized. We successfully overcome the agglomeration problem of the carbon nanotubes and the grain growth problem of the nanocrystalline copper matrix by combined use of the electroless deposition and spark plasma sintering methods. The yield strength of the composite reach up to 692 MPa, which is increased by 2 and 5 times comparing with those of the nanocrystalline and coarse copper, respectively. Simultaneously, the plasticity of the composite was also significantly increased in contrast with that of the nanocrystalline copper. The increase of the density of the carbon nanotubes after coating, the isolation effect caused by the copper coating, and the improvement of the compatibility between the reinforcements and matrix as well as the effective control of the grain growth of the copper matrix all contribute to improving the mechanical properties of the composite. In addition, a new strengthening mechanism, i.e., the series-connection effect of the nanocrystalline copper grains introduced by carbon nanotubes, is proposed to further explain the mechanical behavior of the nanocomposite. PMID:27185503

  18. Synergistic strengthening effect of nanocrystalline copper reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Hu, Zheng-Yang; Wang, Fu-Chi; Li, Sheng-Lin; Korznikov, Elena; Zhao, Xiu-Chen; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhen-Feng; Kang, Zhe

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a novel multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced nanocrystalline copper matrix composite with super high strength and moderate plasticity was synthesized. We successfully overcome the agglomeration problem of the carbon nanotubes and the grain growth problem of the nanocrystalline copper matrix by combined use of the electroless deposition and spark plasma sintering methods. The yield strength of the composite reach up to 692 MPa, which is increased by 2 and 5 times comparing with those of the nanocrystalline and coarse copper, respectively. Simultaneously, the plasticity of the composite was also significantly increased in contrast with that of the nanocrystalline copper. The increase of the density of the carbon nanotubes after coating, the isolation effect caused by the copper coating, and the improvement of the compatibility between the reinforcements and matrix as well as the effective control of the grain growth of the copper matrix all contribute to improving the mechanical properties of the composite. In addition, a new strengthening mechanism, i.e., the series-connection effect of the nanocrystalline copper grains introduced by carbon nanotubes, is proposed to further explain the mechanical behavior of the nanocomposite.

  19. Rational design of a comprehensive cancer therapy platform using temperature-sensitive polymer grafted hollow gold nanospheres: simultaneous chemo/photothermal/photodynamic therapy triggered by a 650 nm laser with enhanced anti-tumor efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaoran; Chen, Yinyin; Cheng, Ziyong; Deng, Kerong; Ma, Ping'an; Hou, Zhiyao; Liu, Bei; Huang, Shanshan; Jin, Dayong; Lin, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Combining multi-model treatments within one single system has attracted great interest for the purpose of synergistic therapy. In this paper, hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNs) coated with a temperature-sensitive polymer, poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) methacrylate-co-2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)), co-loaded with DOX and a photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6) were successfully synthesized. As high as 58% DOX and 6% Ce6 by weight could be loaded onto the HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA) nanocomposites. The grafting polymer brushes outside the HAuNs play the role of ``gate molecules'' for controlled drug release by 650 nm laser radiation owing to the temperature-sensitive property of the polymer and the photothermal effect of HAuNs. The HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)-Ce6-DOX nanocomposites with 650 nm laser radiation show effective inhibition of cancer cells in vitro and enhanced anti-tumor efficacy in vivo. In contrast, control groups without laser radiation show little cytotoxicity. The nanocomposite demonstrates a way of ``killing three birds with one stone'', that is, chemotherapy, photothermal and photodynamic therapy are triggered simultaneously by the 650 nm laser stimulation. Therefore, the nanocomposites show the great advantages of multi-modal synergistic effects for cancer therapy by a remote-controlled laser stimulus.Combining multi-model treatments within one single system has attracted great interest for the purpose of synergistic therapy. In this paper, hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNs) coated with a temperature-sensitive polymer, poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) methacrylate-co-2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)), co-loaded with DOX and a photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6) were successfully synthesized. As high as 58% DOX and 6% Ce6 by weight could be loaded onto the HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA) nanocomposites. The grafting polymer brushes outside the HAuNs play the role of ``gate molecules'' for controlled drug release by 650 nm laser radiation

  20. Synergistic effect of radon and sodium arsenite on DNA damage in HBE cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Sun, Bin; Wang, Xiaojuan; Nie, Jihua; Chen, Zhihai; An, Yan; Tong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Human epidemiological studies showed that radon and arsenic exposures are major risk factors for lung cancer in Yunnan tin miners. However, biological evidence for this phenomenon is absent. In this study, HBE cells were exposed to different concentrations of sodium arsenite, different radon exposure times, or a combination of these two factors. The results showed a synergistic effect of radon and sodium arsenite in cell cytotoxicity as determined by cell viability. Elevated intracellular ROS levels and increased DNA damage indexed by comet assay and γ-H2AX were detected. Moreover, DNA HR repair in terms of Rad51 declined when the cells were exposed to both radon and sodium arsenite. The synergistic effect of radon and sodium arsenite in HBE cells may be attributed to the enhanced DSBs and inhibited HR pathway upon co-exposure.

  1. Synergistic effect of microwave heating and hydrogen peroxide on inactivation of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Kuchma, T

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 isogenous strains and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 102 were used to study the synergistic effects of combined microwave heating at short-time processing with low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. The effect of microwave heating to temperatures of 40, 50 and 60 degrees C, as well as the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (0.05, 0.08 and 0.1%), the sequence of the agents' use, the nature of microorganisms on the survival of cells, DNA damages and interaction factors were studied. A method of anomalous viscosity time dependencies (AVTD) was used for measurement of the changes of genome conformational state (GCS) simultaneously with bacterial survival determination. The synergistic effect of microwave heating and low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide was observed under combined application, and reached a maximum when the cells were exposed to microwave heating to 50 degrees C and 0.08% hydrogen peroxide simultaneously. Both maxima of cell destruction and DNA injuries have been achieved by successive exposure to (MW + 10 min H2O2) to 60 degrees C and 0.08% hydrogen peroxide. The mechanisms of synergistic effects, the role of a disturbance of DNA repair and the interaction of sublethal injuries caused by different agents are discussed.

  2. Synergistic effect of lidocaine with pingyangmycin for treatment of venous malformation using a mouse spleen model

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Nan; Chen, Yuan-Zheng; Mao, Kai-Ping; Fu, Yanjie; Lin, Qiang; Xue, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To explore whether lidocaine has the synergistic effect with pingyangmycin (PYM) in the venous malformations (VMs) treatment. Methods: The mouse spleen was chosen as a VM model and injected with different concentration of lidocaine or PYM or jointly treated with lidocaine and PYM. After 2, 5, 8 or 14 days, the mouse spleen tissues were acquired for hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, TUNEL assay and quantitative RT-PCR analysis to examine the toxicological effects of lidocaine and PYM on splenic vascular endothelial cells. Results: 0.4% of lidocaine mildly promoted the apoptosis of endothelial cells, while 2 mg/ml PYM significantly elevated the apoptotic ratios. However, the combination of 0.2% lidocaine and 0.5 mg/ml PYM notably elevated the apoptotic ratios of splenic cells and severely destroyed the configuration of spleen, compared to those of treatment with 0.5 mg/ml PYM alone. Conclusion: Lidocaine exerts synergistic effects with PYM in promoting the apoptosis of mouse splenic endothelial cells, indicating that lidocaine possibly promotes the therapeutic effects of PYM in VMs treatment via synergistically enhancing the apoptosis of endothelial cells of malformed venous lesions. PMID:24966943

  3. Synergistic effect of low-frequency ultrasound and surfactants on skin permeability.

    PubMed

    Tezel, Ahmet; Sens, Ashley; Tuchscherer, Joe; Mitragotri, Samir

    2002-01-01

    Low-frequency ultrasound (20 kHz) and surfactants have been individually shown to enhance transdermal drug transport. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of ultrasound and surfactants on transdermal drug delivery. Surfactants with different head group chemistries including anionic, cationic, and nonionic with varying tail lengths (8-16-carbon atoms) were studied. We found that surfactants possessing anionic and cationic head groups were more potent than those possessing nonionic head groups in increasing skin conductivity in the presence of ultrasound. Furthermore, for surfactants possessing the same head group, those with a 14-carbon tail length were found to be most effective in enhancing skin permeability. The data presented in this report show that ultrasound and surfactants synergistically enhance skin permeability. Two mechanisms are shown to play a role in this synergistic effect. First, ultrasound enhances surfactant delivery (enhanced delivery) into the skin and, second, ultrasound disperses surfactant (enhanced dispersion) within the skin. In general, surfactants that are potent enhancers by themselves are potent enhancers in the presence of ultrasound as well. We performed imaging experiments to assess the effect of ultrasound on delivery of a model permeant, sulforhodamine B, into the skin. These experiments show that ultrasound enhances surfactant delivery and dispersion in the skin.

  4. Synergistic Effects and Antibiofilm Properties of Chimeric Peptides against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ramamourthy; Kim, Young Gwon; Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Seog Ki; Chae, Jeong Don; Son, Byoung Kwan; Seo, Chang Ho

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of drug-resistant pathogens highlights the need to identify novel antibiotics. Here we investigated the efficacies of four new antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) for potential drug development. The antibacterial activities, synergistic effects, and antibiofilm properties of the four chimeric AMPs were tested against Acinetobacter baumannii, an emerging Gram-negative, nosocomial, drug-resistant pathogen. Nineteen A. baumannii strains resistant to ampicillin, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, and erythromycin were isolated at a hospital from patients with cholelithiasis. All four peptides exhibited significant antibacterial effects (MIC = 3.12 to 12.5 μM) against all 19 strains, whereas five commercial antibiotics showed little or no activity against the same pathogens. An exception was polymyxin, which was effective against all of the strains tested. Each of the peptides showed synergy against one or more strains when administered in combination with cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, or erythromycin. The peptides also exhibited an ability to prevent biofilm formation, which was not seen with cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, or erythromycin, though polymyxin also inhibited biofilm formation. Indeed, when administered in combination with ciprofloxacin, the AMP HPMA exerted a potent synergistic effect against A. baumannii biofilm formation. Collectively, our findings indicate that the AMPs tested have no cytotoxicity but possess potent antibacterial and antibiofilm activities and may act synergistically with commercial antibiotics. PMID:24366740

  5. Achieving large linear elasticity and high strength in bulk nanocompsite via synergistic effect

    DOE PAGES

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Guo, Fangmin; ...

    2015-03-09

    Elastic strain in bulk metallic materials is usually limited to only a fraction of 1%. Developing bulk metallic materials showing large linear elasticity and high strength has proven to be difficult. Here, based on the synergistic effect between nanowires and orientated martensite NiTi shape memory alloy, we developed an in-situ Nb nanowires -orientated martensitic NiTi matrix composite showing an ultra-large linear elastic strain of 4% and an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.8 GPa. This material also has a high mechanical energy storage efficiency of 96% and a high energy storage density of 36 J/cm³ that is almost one order ofmore » larger than that of spring steel. It is demonstrated that the synergistic effect allows the exceptional mechanical properties of nanowires to be harvested at macro scale and the mechanical properties of matrix to be greatly improved, resulting in these superior properties. This study provides new avenues for developing advanced composites with superior properties by using effective synergistic effect between components.« less

  6. Synergistic effect of thymol and carvacrol combined with chelators and organic acids against Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; Ji, Baoping; Zhang, Hong; Jiang, Hui; Yang, Zhiwei; Li, Jingjing; Li, Jihai; Ren, Yali; Yan, Wenjie

    2007-07-01

    To identify synergistic combinations of different food additives, the antimicrobial effects of thymol and carvacrol against Salmonella Typhimurium were assessed alone and in combination with various other preservatives including EDTA, acetic acid, lactic acid, and citric acid. Overall, growth of Salmonella Typhimurium was significantly inhibited in Mueller-Hinton broth containing thymol, carvacrol, EDTA, acetic acid, lactic acid, or citric acid at concentrations of 400 mg/liter, 400 microl/liter, 300 mg/liter, 0.2% (vol/vol), 0.2% (vol/vol), and 0.2% (wt/vol), respectively. The combination of different antimicrobials such as thymol or carvacrol with EDTA, thymol or carvacrol with acetic acid, and thymol or carvacrol with citric acid all resulted in significantly reduced populations of Salmonella Typhimurium. In samples treated with combinations, these antimicrobials had synergistic effects compared with samples treated with thymol, carvacrol, EDTA, acetic acid, or citric acid alone. However, the combined use of lactic acid with thymol or carvacrol did not produce a synergistic effect against Salmonella Typhimurium. Thus, some chelators or organic acids can be used as food preservatives in combination with thymol and carvacrol to reduce the concentrations needed to produce an adequate antimicrobial effect.

  7. Achieving large linear elasticity and high strength in bulk nanocompsite via synergistic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Guo, Fangmin; Liu, Yinong; Shi, Xiaobin; Jiang, Daqiang; Brown, Dennis E.; Ren, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Elastic strain in bulk metallic materials is usually limited to only a fraction of 1%. Developing bulk metallic materials showing large linear elasticity and high strength has proven to be difficult. Here, based on the synergistic effect between nanowires and orientated martensite NiTi shape memory alloy, we developed an in-situ Nb nanowires -orientated martensitic NiTi matrix composite showing an ultra-large linear elastic strain of 4% and an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.8 GPa. This material also has a high mechanical energy storage efficiency of 96% and a high energy storage density of 36 J/cm3 that is almost one order of larger than that of spring steel. It is demonstrated that the synergistic effect allows the exceptional mechanical properties of nanowires to be harvested at macro scale and the mechanical properties of matrix to be greatly improved, resulting in these superior properties. This study provides new avenues for developing advanced composites with superior properties by using effective synergistic effect between components.

  8. Achieving large linear elasticity and high strength in bulk nanocompsite via synergistic effect.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Guo, Fangmin; Liu, Yinong; Shi, Xiaobin; Jiang, Daqiang; Brown, Dennis E; Ren, Yang

    2015-03-09

    Elastic strain in bulk metallic materials is usually limited to only a fraction of 1%. Developing bulk metallic materials showing large linear elasticity and high strength has proven to be difficult. Here, based on the synergistic effect between nanowires and orientated martensite NiTi shape memory alloy, we developed an in-situ Nb nanowires -orientated martensitic NiTi matrix composite showing an ultra-large linear elastic strain of 4% and an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.8 GPa. This material also has a high mechanical energy storage efficiency of 96% and a high energy storage density of 36 J/cm(3) that is almost one order of larger than that of spring steel. It is demonstrated that the synergistic effect allows the exceptional mechanical properties of nanowires to be harvested at macro scale and the mechanical properties of matrix to be greatly improved, resulting in these superior properties. This study provides new avenues for developing advanced composites with superior properties by using effective synergistic effect between components.

  9. Achieving large linear elasticity and high strength in bulk nanocompsite via synergistic effect

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Guo, Fangmin; Liu, Yinong; Shi, Xiaobin; Jiang, Daqiang; Brown, Dennis E.; Ren, Yang

    2015-03-09

    Elastic strain in bulk metallic materials is usually limited to only a fraction of 1%. Developing bulk metallic materials showing large linear elasticity and high strength has proven to be difficult. Here, based on the synergistic effect between nanowires and orientated martensite NiTi shape memory alloy, we developed an in-situ Nb nanowires -orientated martensitic NiTi matrix composite showing an ultra-large linear elastic strain of 4% and an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.8 GPa. This material also has a high mechanical energy storage efficiency of 96% and a high energy storage density of 36 J/cm³ that is almost one order of larger than that of spring steel. It is demonstrated that the synergistic effect allows the exceptional mechanical properties of nanowires to be harvested at macro scale and the mechanical properties of matrix to be greatly improved, resulting in these superior properties. This study provides new avenues for developing advanced composites with superior properties by using effective synergistic effect between components.

  10. Predictive modeling of synergistic effects in nanoscale ion track formation

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Xue, Haizhou; ...

    2015-08-05

    Molecular dynamics techniques and the inelastic thermal spike model are used to study the coupled effects of inelastic energy loss due to 21 MeV Ni ion irradiation and pre-existing defects in SrTiO3. We determine the dependence on pre-existing defect concentration of nanoscale track formation occurring from the synergy between the inelastic energy loss and the pre-existing atomic defects. We show that the nanoscale ion tracks’ size can be controlled by the concentration of pre-existing disorder. This work identifies a major gap in fundamental understanding concerning the role played by defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron–lattice coupling.

  11. Synergistic Effects and Deflagration Analysis in Composite Solid Propellant Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    burn rate at 300 and 2000 psia along with a review of the favor- able catalytic effect of ferrocene when it was restrained to the binder-oxidizer...prepared to complete - the test matrix. This included a smnple with 1% ferrocene added$ three swnules with :.% of ferrocene and • of’ the other three...o Os0 a w cc 040 100 I.7 TABLE II Burn Rates for Cast Composite Propellant (5-8-75) 2000 psi Catalyst Burn Rate (in/sec) r/zyure None .80 1 Ferrocene

  12. Synergistic effects in the processes of crosslinking of elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głuszewski, Wojciech; Zagórski, Zbigniew P.; Rajkiewicz, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Radiation crosslinking of elastomers is an example of the modification of polymers by ionizing radiation. In practice, often parallel both traditional crosslinking (with peroxide) and radiation treatment is applied (Bik et al., 2003, 2004). Elastomers can be irradiated both before and/or after vulcanization products. The aim of this study was to investigate the system of the mixed radiation/peroxide and peroxide/radiation crosslinking of selected elastomers (Engage 8200, HNBR). In particular, attention was directed to the influence of the protective effects of aromatic additives in elastomers (peroxides, thermal- and light stabilizers) on the phenomenon of crosslinking and postradiation oxidation. Aromatic peroxides may undergo modifications during the preirradiation, which affect the subsequent processes of vulcanization. In this way the method of gas chromatography (GC) was applied for determination of hydrogen and oxidation effects, never described before for Engage 8200. Using that approach, radiation efficiency of hydrogen evolution and oxygen absorption efficiency of the polymers has been identified. To describe the phenomena of postradiation oxidation of elastomers, the method of Diffuse Reflection Spectrophotometry (DRS) was also applied.

  13. Aging affect the anti-tumor potential of dendritic cell vaccination, but it can be overcome by co-stimulation with anti-OX40 or anti-4-1BB.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sanjay; Dominguez, Ana Lucia; Lustgarten, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    It has been well established that there is a decline in immune function with age resulting in a diminished capacity to respond to infections or tumors. Although many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of autologous dendritic cells (DC) vaccines in stimulating an anti-tumor immune response in the young, almost none of these reports consider the effect that aging has on the immune system or test whether DC-vaccination is effective in old hosts. In this study we compared the efficacy of DC-vaccination in young and old mice. Our results showed that DC-vaccination in young animals induced an anti-tumor response resulting in approximately 60% tumor growth inhibition, while minimal protection was observed in old animals. DC vaccination plus rIL-2 further enhanced the anti-tumor response in young animals (approximately 70-75% inhibition), while ineffective in old animals. In contrast, co-administration of anti-OX-40 or anti-4-1BB mAbs vigorously enhanced the anti-tumor immune response in both young (approximately 85-90% inhibition) and old mice (approximately 70-75% inhibition). Our data indicate that although old mice have a decline in immune function, they have the capacity to develop strong anti-tumor responses as long as they are provided with efficient co-stimulation.

  14. Synergistic Effects Between Phosphonium-Alkylphosphate Ionic Liquids and Zinc Dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) as Lubricant Additives

    DOE PAGES

    Qu, Jun; Barnhill, William C.; Luo, Huimin; ...

    2015-07-14

    Unique synergistic effects between phosphonium-alkylphosphate ionic liquids and zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) are discovered when used together as lubricant additives, resulting in significant friction and wear reduction along with distinct tribofilm composition and mechanical properties. The synergism is attributed to the 30-70× higher-than-nominal concentrations of hypothetical new compounds (via anion exchange between IL and ZDDP) on the fluid surface/interface.

  15. Tim-3 and its role in regulating anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Das, Madhumita; Zhu, Chen; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2017-03-01

    Immunotherapy is being increasingly recognized as a key therapeutic modality to treat cancer and represents one of the most exciting treatments for the disease. Fighting cancer with immunotherapy has revolutionized treatment for some patients and therapies targeting the immune checkpoint molecules such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 have achieved durable responses in melanoma, renal cancer, Hodgkin's diseases and lung cancer. However, the success rate of these treatments has been low and a large number of cancers, including colorectal cancer remain largely refractory to CTLA-4 and PD-1 blockade. This has provided impetus to identify other co-inhibitory receptors that could be exploited to enhance response rates of current immunotherapeutic agents and achieve responses to the cancers that are refectory to immunotherapy. Tim-3 is a co-inhibitory receptor that is expressed on IFN-g-producing T cells, FoxP3+ Treg cells and innate immune cells (macrophages and dendritic cells) where it has been shown to suppress their responses upon interaction with their ligand(s). Tim-3 has gained prominence as a potential candidate for cancer immunotherapy, where it has been shown that in vivo blockade of Tim-3 with other check-point inhibitors enhances anti-tumor immunity and suppresses tumor growth in several preclinical tumor models. This review discusses the recent findings on Tim-3, the role it plays in regulating immune responses in different cell types and the rationale for targeting Tim-3 for effective cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Safety of anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy during pregnancy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Androulakis, Ioannis; Zavos, Christos; Christopoulos, Panagiotis; Mastorakos, George; Gazouli, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease has significantly improved since the introduction of biological agents, such as infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, and golimumab. The Food and Drug Administration has classified these factors in category B, which means that they do not demonstrate a fetal risk. However, during pregnancy fetuses are exposed to high anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels that are measurable in their plasma after birth. Since antibodies can transfer through the placenta at the end of the second and during the third trimesters, it is important to know the safety profile of these drugs, particularly for the fetus, and whether maintaining relapse of the disease compensates for the potential risks of fetal exposure. The limited data available for the anti-TNF drugs to date have not demonstrated any significant adverse outcomes in the pregnant women who continued their therapy from conception to the first trimester of gestation. However, data suggest that anti-TNFs should be discontinued during the third trimester, as they may affect the immunological system of the newborn baby. Each decision should be individualized, based on the distinct characteristics of the patient and her disease. Considering all the above, there is a need for more clinical studies regarding the effect of anti-TNF therapeutic agents on pregnancy outcomes. PMID:26715803

  17. The anti-tumor drug 2-hydroxyoleic acid (Minerval) stimulates signaling and retrograde transport

    PubMed Central

    Torgersen, Maria L.; Klokk, Tove Irene; Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Klose, Christian; Simons, Kai; Skotland, Tore; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    2-hydroxyoleic acid (OHOA, Minerval®) is an example of a substance used for membrane lipid therapy, where the cellular membranes rather than specific proteins constitute the therapeutical target. OHOA is thought to mediate its anti-tumor effect by affecting the biophysical properties of membranes, which leads to altered recruitment and activation of amphitropic proteins, altered cellular signaling, and eventual cell death. Little is known about the initial signaling events upon treatment with OHOA, and whether the altered membrane properties would have any impact on the dynamic intracellular transport system. In the present study we demonstrate that treatment with OHOA led to a rapid release of intracellular calcium and activation of multiple signaling pathways in HeLa cells, including the PI3K-AKT1-MTOR pathway and several MAP kinases, in a process independent of the EGFR. By lipidomics we confirmed that OHOA was incorporated into several lipid classes. Concomitantly, OHOA potently increased retrograde transport of the plant toxin ricin from endosomes to the Golgi and further to the endoplasmic reticulum. The OHOA-stimulated ricin transport seemed to require several amphitropic proteins, including Src, phospholipase C, protein kinase C, and also Ca2+/calmodulin. Interestingly, OHOA induced a slight increase in endosomal localization of the retromer component VPS35. Thus, our data show that addition of a lipid known to alter membrane properties not only affects signaling, but also intracellular transport. PMID:27894086

  18. B lymphocytes as direct antigen-presenting cells for anti-tumor DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Colluru, Viswa Teja; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of remarkable preclinical efficacy, DNA vaccination has demonstrated low immunogenicity in humans. While efforts have focused on increasing cross-presentation of DNA-encoded antigens, efforts to increase DNA vaccine immunogenicity by targeting direct presentation have remained mostly unexplored. In these studies, we compared the ability of different APCs to present antigen to T cells after simple co-culture with plasmid DNA. We found that human primary peripheral B lymphocytes, and not monocytes or in vitro derived dendritic cells (DCs), were able to efficiently encode antigen mRNA and expand cognate tumor antigen-specific CD8 T cells ex vivo. Similarly, murine B lymphocytes co-cultured with plasmid DNA, and not DCs, were able to prime antigen-specific T cells in vivo. Moreover, B lymphocyte-mediated presentation of plasmid antigen led to greater Th1-biased immunity and was sufficient to elicit an anti-tumor effect in vivo. Surprisingly, increasing plasmid presentation by B cells, and not cross presentation of peptides by DCs, further augmented traditional plasmid vaccination. Together, these data suggest that targeting plasmid DNA to B lymphocytes, for example through transfer of ex vivo plasmidloaded B cells, may be novel means to achieve greater T cell immunity from DNA vaccines. PMID:27661128

  19. Anti-angiogenesis and anti-tumor activity of recombinant anginex

    SciTech Connect

    Brandwijk, Ricardo J.M.G.E.; Dings, Ruud P.M.; Linden, Edith van der; Mayo, Kevin H.; Thijssen, Victor L.J.L.; Griffioen, Arjan W. . E-mail: aw.griffioen@path.unimaas.nl

    2006-10-27

    Anginex, a synthetic 33-mer angiostatic peptide, specifically inhibits vascular endothelial cell proliferation and migration along with induction of apoptosis in endothelial cells. Here we report on the in vivo characterization of recombinant anginex and use of the artificial anginex gene for gene therapy approaches. Tumor growth of human MA148 ovarian carcinoma in athymic mice was inhibited by 80% when treated with recombinant anginex. Histological analysis of the tumors showed an approximate 2.5-fold reduction of microvessel density, suggesting that angiogenesis inhibition is the cause of the anti-tumor effect. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the gene expression patterns of 16 angiogenesis-related factors after treatment with both recombinant and synthetic anginex. To validate the applicability of the anginex gene for gene therapy, stable transfectants of murine B16F10 melanoma cells expressing recombinant anginex were made. Supernatants of these cells inhibited endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, after subcutaneous injection of these cells in C57BL/6 mice, an extensive delay in tumor growth was observed. These data show that the artificial anginex gene can be used to produce a recombinant protein with similar activity as its synthetic counterpart and that the gene can be applied in gene therapy approaches for cancer treatment.

  20. Retrospective cohort study of anti-tumor necrosis factor agent use in a veteran population.

    PubMed

    Bounthavong, Mark; Madkour, Nermeen; Kazerooni, Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are effective for several immunologic conditions (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn's disease (CD), and psoriasis). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents via chart review. Methods. Single-site, retrospective cohort study that evaluated the efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents in veterans initiated between 2010 and 2011. Primary aim evaluated response at 12 months post-index date. Secondary aims evaluated initial response prior to 12 months post-index date and infection events. Results. A majority of patients were prescribed anti-TNF agents for CD (27%) and RA (24%). Patients were initiated on etanercept (41%), adalimumab (40%), and infliximab (18%) between 2010 and 2011. No differences in patient demographics were reported. Response rates were high overall. Sixty-five percent of etanercept patients, 82% of adalimumab patients, and 59% of infliximab patients were either partial or full responders, respectively. Approximately 16%, 11%, and 12% of etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab were non-responders, respectively. Infections between the groups were non-significant. Etanercept and adalimumab patients had higher but non-significant odds of being a responder relative to infliximab. Conclusions. Most patients initiated with anti-TNF agent were responders at 12 months follow-up for all indications in a veteran population.

  1. Retrospective cohort study of anti-tumor necrosis factor agent use in a veteran population

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Nermeen; Kazerooni, Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are effective for several immunologic conditions (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn’s disease (CD), and psoriasis). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents via chart review. Methods. Single-site, retrospective cohort study that evaluated the efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents in veterans initiated between 2010 and 2011. Primary aim evaluated response at 12 months post-index date. Secondary aims evaluated initial response prior to 12 months post-index date and infection events. Results. A majority of patients were prescribed anti-TNF agents for CD (27%) and RA (24%). Patients were initiated on etanercept (41%), adalimumab (40%), and infliximab (18%) between 2010 and 2011. No differences in patient demographics were reported. Response rates were high overall. Sixty-five percent of etanercept patients, 82% of adalimumab patients, and 59% of infliximab patients were either partial or full responders, respectively. Approximately 16%, 11%, and 12% of etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab were non-responders, respectively. Infections between the groups were non-significant. Etanercept and adalimumab patients had higher but non-significant odds of being a responder relative to infliximab. Conclusions. Most patients initiated with anti-TNF agent were responders at 12 months follow-up for all indications in a veteran population. PMID:24883246

  2. Synergistic drug combination effectively blocks Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; He, Shihua; Martínez-Romero, Carles; Kouznetsova, Jennifer; Tawa, Gregory; Xu, Miao; Shinn, Paul; Fisher, Ethan G; Long, Yan; Motabar, Omid; Yang, Shu; Sanderson, Philip E; Williamson, Peter R; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Qiu, Xiangguo; Zheng, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Although a group of FDA-approved drugs were previously identified with activity against Ebola virus (EBOV), most of them are not clinically useful because their human blood concentrations are not high enough to inhibit EBOV infection. We screened 795 unique three-drug combinations in an EBOV entry assay. Two sets of three-drug combinations, toremifene-mefloquine-posaconazole and toremifene-clarithromycin-posaconazole, were identified that effectively blocked EBOV entry and were further validated for inhibition of live EBOV infection. The individual drug concentrations in the combinations were reduced to clinically relevant levels. We identified mechanisms of action of these drugs: functional inhibitions of Niemann-Pick C1, acid sphingomyelinase, and lysosomal calcium release. Our findings identify the drug combinations with potential to treat EBOV infection.

  3. Synergistic Effect of Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene on Diopside Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tingting; Wu, Ping; Gao, Chengde; Feng, Pei; Xiao, Tao; Deng, Youwen; Shuai, Cijun; Peng, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    A synergetic effect between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene on diopside (Di) scaffolds was demonstrated. 3D network architecture in the matrix was formed through the 1D CNTs inlaid among the 2D graphene platelets (GNPs). The mechanical properties of the CNTs/GNPs/Di scaffolds were significantly improved compared with the CNTs/Di scaffolds and GNPs/Di scaffolds. In addition, the scaffolds exhibited excellent apatite-forming ability, a modest degradation rate, and stable mechanical properties in simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, cell culturing tests indicated that the scaffolds supported the cells attachment and proliferation. Taken together, the CNTs/GNPs/Di scaffolds offered great potential for bone tissue engineering. PMID:27144173

  4. Synergistic effect of starch on the antibacterial activity of honey.

    PubMed

    Boukraâ, Laïd; Amara, Karim

    2008-03-01

    The role of amylase present in honey in enhancing its antibacterial activity was evaluated in the presence and absence of starch. Two strains of pathogenic bacteria have been used: Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. For S. aureus, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the three varieties of honey tested without starch was 11%, 24%, and 29% (vol/vol), respectively. When starch was added with honey to the media the MIC obtained was 5%, 19%, and 25% (vol/vol), respectively. For E. coli, the MIC for the three varieties without starch was 23%, 28%, and 25% (vol/vol), respectively. When starch was added with honey to media, the MIC was 19%, 26%, and 23% (vol/vol), respectively. It is speculated that the amylase present in honey hydrolyzed the starch chains to randomly produce dextrin and maltose and that this increased the osmotic effect of the media, which consequently increased the antibacterial activity.

  5. Predictive modeling of synergistic effects in nanoscale ion track formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-08-05

    Molecular dynamics techniques and the inelastic thermal spike model are used to study the coupled effects of inelastic energy loss due to 21 MeV Ni ion irradiation and pre-existing defects in SrTiO3. We determine the dependence on pre-existing defect concentration of nanoscale track formation occurring from the synergy between the inelastic energy loss and the pre-existing atomic defects. We show that the nanoscale ion tracks’ size can be controlled by the concentration of pre-existing disorder. This work identifies a major gap in fundamental understanding concerning the role played by defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron–lattice coupling.

  6. Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7): a novel anti-tumor gene for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Mhashilkar, A. M.; Schrock, R. D.; Hindi, M.; Liao, J.; Sieger, K.; Kourouma, F.; Zou-Yang, X. H.; Onishi, E.; Takh, O.; Vedvick, T. S.; Fanger, G.; Stewart, L.; Watson, G. J.; Snary, D.; Fisher, P. B.; Saeki, T.; Roth, J. A.; Ramesh, R.; Chada, S.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mda-7 gene (melanoma differentiation associated gene-7) is a novel tumor suppressor gene. The anti-proliferative activity of MDA-7 has been previously reported. In this report, we analyze the anti-tumor efficacy of Ad-mda7 in a broad spectrum of cancer lines. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ad-mda7-transduced cancer or normal cell lines were assayed for cell proliferation (tritiated thymidine incorporation assay, Alamar blue assay, and trypan-blue exclusion assay), apoptosis (TUNEL, and Annexin V staining visualized by fluorescent microscopy or FACs analysis), and cell cycle regulation (Propidium Iodide staining and FACs analysis). RESULTS: Ad-mda7 treatment of tumor cells resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a temporal and dose-dependent manner. The anti-tumor effects were independent of the genomic status of p53, RB, p16, ras, bax, and caspase 3 in these cells. In addition, normal cell lines did not show inhibition of proliferation or apoptotic response to Ad-mda7. Moreover, Ad-mda7-transduced cancer cells secreted a soluble form of MDA-7 protein. Thus, Ad-mda7 may represent a novel gene-therapeutic agent for the treatment of a variety of cancers. CONCLUSIONS: The potent and selective killing activity of Ad-mda7 in cancer cells but not in normal cells makes this vector a potential candidate for cancer gene therapy. PMID:11471572

  7. Tivantinib (ARQ-197) exhibits anti-tumor activity with down-regulation of FAK in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Wei-Hong; Yang, Li-Yun; Cao, Zhong-Yi; Qian, Yong

    2015-02-20

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide and the 5 years survival rate of the patients is about 60% in the USA, due to acquired chemotherapeutic resistance and metastasis of the disease. In this study, we found that tivantinib, a selective MET inhibitor, suppresses OCSS cell proliferation and colony formation, however, anti-tumor activities induced by tivantinib are independent of the inhibition of MET signaling pathway. In addition, tivantinib cause G2/M cell cycle arrest and caspases-dependent apoptosis in OSCC cell lines. We also found that tivantinib dose-dependently suppressed the activation and expression of FAK. In all, these data suggested that tivantinib may be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent to effectively treat certain cancers including OSCC. - Highlights: • Tivantinib suppresses OSCC cell growth independent of the inhibition of HGF/MET signaling pathway. • Tivantinib blocks cell cycle and induces caspases-mediated apoptosis. • Tivantinib elicits its anti-tumor activity with the inhibition of FAK signaling pathway.

  8. Seasonal variation of Brazilian red propolis: Antibacterial activity, synergistic effect and phytochemical screening.

    PubMed

    Regueira, M S; Tintino, Saulo Relison; da Silva, Ana Raquel Pereira; Costa, Maria do Socorro; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Matias, Edinardo F F; de Queiroz Balbino, Valdir; Menezes, Irwin R A; Melo Coutinho, Henrique Douglas

    2017-03-27

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the dry and rainy season on the antibacterial activity and chemical composition of the Brazilian red propolis. The samples were collected in rainy (RP-PER) and dry (RP-PED) seasons and analyzed by HPLC-DAD. The extracts were tested alone and in association with antibiotics against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. The HPLC analysis identified luteolin and quercetin as the main compounds. Seasonal variation was observed according to concentrations of the compounds. The MIC values against E. coli ranged from 128 μg/mL to 512 μg/mL (EC 06 and EC ATCC). The red propolis showed MIC values of 512 μg/mL against both strains of P. aeruginosa used in our study (PA03 and PA24) and against strains of Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus the MICs ranged from 64 μg/mL to ≥1024 μg/mL (SA10). A synergistic effect was observed when we combined the RP-PED with gentamicin against all the strains tested. When we combined the RP-PED with Imipenem, we only observed synergistic effect against P. aeruginosa. According to our synergistic activity results, the utilization of red propolis collected in the drier periods can be used as an adjuvant against multiresistant bacterial infections.

  9. Synergistic effects of ethanol and UV radiation to reduce levels of selected foodborne pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ji-Hyoung; Ha, Sang-Do

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether combined treatments would produce synergistic disinfection effects on food products during food processing compared with single treatments. We investigated the bactericidal effects of a commercial chemical disinfectant (ethanol) and of UV radiation on Bacillus cereus F4810/72, Cronobacter sakazakii KCTC 2949, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 35556, Escherichia coli ATCC 10536, and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium NO/NA in vitro. Various concentrations of ethanol (10, 30, 40, and 50%) were tested with various exposure doses of UV radiation (6, 96, 216, 360, and 504 mWs/cm(2)) with a UV lamp. The combined ethanol-UV treatments resulted in greater reductions in bacterial counts than did either treatment alone. The synergistic effect values for B. cereus, C. sakazakii, S. aureus, S. enterica Typhimurium NO/NA, and E. coli were 0.40 to 1.52, 0.52 to 1.74, 0.20 to 2.32, 0.07 to 1.14, and 0.02 to 1.75 log CFU/ml, respectively. The results of this study suggest that a significant synergistic benefit results from combining ethanol and UV treatments against foodborne pathogens in vitro.

  10. Synergistic effect of Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ameliorates drought stress in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Mishra, Sankalp; Dixit, Vijaykant; Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Lalit; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) Pseudomonas putida NBRIRA and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NBRISN13 with ability to tolerate abiotic stress along with multiple PGP traits like ACC deaminase activity, minerals solubilisation, hormones production, biofilm formation, siderophore activity were evaluated for their synergistic effect to ameliorate drought stress in chickpea. Earlier we have reported both the strains individually for their PGP attributes and stress amelioration in host plants. The present study explains in detail the possibilities and benefits of utilizing these 2 PGPR in consortium for improving the chickpea growth under control and drought stressed condition. In vitro results clearly demonstrate that both the PGPR strains are compatible to each other and their synergistic growth enhances the PGP attributes. Greenhouse experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of inoculation of both strains individually and consortia in drought tolerant and sensitive cultivars (BG362 and P1003). The growth parameters were observed significantly higher in consortium as compared to individual PGPR. Colonization of both PGPR in chickpea rhizosphere has been visualized by using gfp labeling. Apart from growth parameters, defense enzymes, soil enzymes and microbial diversity were significantly modulated in individually PGPR and in consortia inoculated plants. Negative effects of drought stress has been ameliorated and apparently seen by higher biomass and reversal of stress indicators in chickpea cultivars treated with PGPR individually or in consortia. Findings from the present study demonstrate that synergistic application has better potential to improve plant growth promotion under drought stress conditions.

  11. Synergistic effect of Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ameliorates drought stress in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Mishra, Sankalp; Dixit, Vijaykant; Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Lalit; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) Pseudomonas putida NBRIRA and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NBRISN13 with ability to tolerate abiotic stress along with multiple PGP traits like ACC deaminase activity, minerals solubilisation, hormones production, biofilm formation, siderophore activity were evaluated for their synergistic effect to ameliorate drought stress in chickpea. Earlier we have reported both the strains individually for their PGP attributes and stress amelioration in host plants. The present study explains in detail the possibilities and benefits of utilizing these 2 PGPR in consortium for improving the chickpea growth under control and drought stressed condition. In vitro results clearly demonstrate that both the PGPR strains are compatible to each other and their synergistic growth enhances the PGP attributes. Greenhouse experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of inoculation of both strains individually and consortia in drought tolerant and sensitive cultivars (BG362 and P1003). The growth parameters were observed significantly higher in consortium as compared to individual PGPR. Colonization of both PGPR in chickpea rhizosphere has been visualized by using gfp labeling. Apart from growth parameters, defense enzymes, soil enzymes and microbial diversity were significantly modulated in individually PGPR and in consortia inoculated plants. Negative effects of drought stress has been ameliorated and apparently seen by higher biomass and reversal of stress indicators in chickpea cultivars treated with PGPR individually or in consortia. Findings from the present study demonstrate that synergistic application has better potential to improve plant growth promotion under drought stress conditions. PMID:26362119

  12. The novel combination of chlorpromazine and pentamidine exerts synergistic antiproliferative effects through dual mitotic action.

    PubMed

    Lee, Margaret S; Johansen, Lisa; Zhang, Yanzhen; Wilson, Amy; Keegan, Mitchell; Avery, William; Elliott, Peter; Borisy, Alexis A; Keith, Curtis T

    2007-12-01

    Combination therapy has proven successful in treating a wide variety of aggressive human cancers. Historically, combination treatments have been discovered through serendipity or lengthy trials using known anticancer agents with similar indications. We have used combination high-throughput screening to discover the unexpected synergistic combination of an antiparasitic agent, pentamidine, and a phenothiazine antipsychotic, chlorpromazine. This combination, CRx-026, inhibits the growth of tumor cell lines in vivo more effectively than either pentamidine or chlorpromazine alone. Here, we report that CRx-026 exerts its antiproliferative effect through synergistic dual mitotic action. Chlorpromazine is a potent and specific inhibitor of the mitotic kinesin KSP/Eg5 and inhibits tumor cell proliferation through mitotic arrest and accumulation of monopolar spindles. Pentamidine treatment results in chromosomal segregation defects and delayed progression through mitosis, consistent with inhibition of the phosphatase of regenerating liver family of phosphatases. We also show that CRx-026 synergizes in vitro and in vivo with the microtubule-binding agents paclitaxel and vinorelbine. These data support a model where dual action of pentamidine and chlorpromazine in mitosis results in synergistic antitumor effects and show the importance of systematic screening for combinations of targeted agents.

  13. Synergistic effects of retinoic acid and tamoxifen on human breast cancer cells: Proteomic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ying; He Qingyu; Chen Hongming; Chiu Jenfu . E-mail: jfchiu@hkucc.hku.hk

    2007-01-15

    The anti-estrogen tamoxifen and vitamin A-related compound, all-trans retinoic acid (RA), in combination act synergistically to inhibit the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. In the present study, we applied two-dimensional gel electrophoresis based proteomic approach to globally analyze this synergistic effect of RA and tamoxifen. Proteomic study revealed that multiple clusters of proteins were involved in RA and tamoxifen-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, including post-transcriptional and splicing factors, proteins related to cellular proliferation or differentiation, and proteins related to energy production and internal degradation systems. The negative growth factor-transforming growth factor {beta} (TGF{beta}) was secreted by RA and/or tamoxifen treatment and was studies as a potential mediator of the synergistic effects of RA and tamoxifen in apoptosis. By comparing protein alterations in treatments of RA and tamoxifen alone or in combination to those of TGF{beta} treatment, or co-treatment with TGF{beta} inhibitor SB 431542, proteomic results showed that a number of proteins were involved in TGF{beta} signaling pathway. These results provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of RA and tamoxifen-induced TGF{beta} signaling pathway in breast cancer cells.

  14. Synergistic effects of in vitro combinations of piplartine, epiisopiloturine and praziquantel against Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Campelo, Yuri Dias Macedo; Mafud, Ana Carolina; Véras, Leiz Maria Costa; Guimarães, Maria Adelaide; Yamaguchi, Lydia F; Lima, David Fernandes; Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; Kato, Massuo J; Mendonça, Ronaldo Z; Pinto, Pedro Luiz Silva; Mascarenhas, Yvonne Primerano; Silva, Marcos P N; de Moraes, Josué; Eaton, Peter; de Souza de Almeida Leite, José Roberto

    2017-04-01

    Schistosomiasis is a world health problem, and praziquantel is the only drug currently used for the treatment. There is some evidence that extensive monotherapy of praziquantel may be leading to drug resistance in the parasite. In order to find alternative treatments, the effects of the combination of epiisopiloturine (EPI), piplartine (PPT) and praziquantel (PZQ) were evaluated. Similarity analysis of these compounds was performed using optimized molecular structures to compare the shape and the charge modeling of combinations between PZQ and EPI or PPT. Supported by this data, in vitro association of PZQ-PPT, PZQ-EPI, and EPI-PPT was carried out, and the activity of these combinations against Schistosoma mansoni was assessed. The results showed synergistic activity with a combination index (CI) of 0.42 for the treatment with PZQ-PPT. Both PZQ-EPI and EPI-PPT combinations also showed synergistic effects, with CI values of 0.86 and 0.61, respectively. Surface alterations in the tegument of adult schistosomes after the treatments were observed using laser confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the association of EPI-PPT decreased the cytotoxicity when compared with both isolated compounds in three different lines of mammalian cells. Thus, synergistic combinations of PZQ-PPT, PZQ-EPI, and EPI-PPT create the possibility of reduced doses to be used against Schistosoma mansoni.

  15. Blockade of cholecystokinin-2 receptor and cyclooxygenase-2 synergistically induces cell apoptosis, and inhibits the proliferation of human gastric cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei-Hao; Zhu, Feng; Chen, Guo-Sheng; Su, Han; Luo, Cheng; Zhao, Qin-Shi; Zhang, Yuan; Shao, Yun; Sun, Jian; Zhou, Su-Ming; Ding, Guo-Xian; Cheng, Yun-Lin

    2008-05-18

    Gastrin and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) play important roles in the carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer. However, it remains unknown whether the combination of cholecystokinin-2 (CCK-2) receptor antagonist plus COX-2 inhibitor exerts synergistic anti-tumor effects on human gastric cancer. Here, we demonstrated that the combination of AG-041R (a CCK-2 receptor antagonist) plus NS-398 (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) treatment had synergistic effects on proliferation inhibition, apoptosis induction, down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax expression in MKN-45 cells. These results indicate that simultaneous targeting of CCK-2 receptor and COX-2 may inhibit gastric cancer development more effectively than targeting either molecule alone.

  16. Blunting the synergistic effect of viral infections and allergies--IgE testing for at-risk asthma patients.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Robert

    2011-10-01

    Results from s-IgE testing can help PCPs implement guideline-based asthma management and reduce the morbidity associated with the synergistic effects of allergen sensitization/exposure and seasonal viral exposure.

  17. Synergistic effect of cellulase and xylanase during hydrolysis of natural lignocellulosic substrates.

    PubMed

    Song, Hui-Ting; Gao, Yuan; Yang, Yi-Min; Xiao, Wen-Jing; Liu, Shi-Hui; Xia, Wu-Cheng; Liu, Zi-Lu; Yi, Li; Jiang, Zheng-Bing

    2016-11-01

    Synergistic combination of cellulase and xylanase has been performed on pre-treated substrates in many previous studies, while few on natural substrates. In this study, three unpretreated lignocellulosic substrates were studied, including corncob, corn stover, and rice straw. The results indicated that when the mixed cellulase and xylanase were applied, reducing sugar concentrations were calculated as 19.53, 15.56, and 17.35mg/ml, respectively, based on the 3,5 dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) method. Compared to the treatment with only cellulose, the hydrolysis yields caused by mixed cellulase and xylanase were improved by 133%, 164%, and 545%, respectively. In addition, the conversion yield of corncob, corn stover, and rice straw by cellulase-xylanase co-treatment reached 43.9%, 48.5%, and 40.2%, respectively, based on HPLC analysis, which confirmed the synergistic effect of cellulase-xylanase that was much higher than either of the single enzyme treatment. The substrate morphology was also evaluated to explore the synergistic mechanism of cellulase-xylanase.

  18. In vitro anti-tumor promoting and anti-parasitic activities of the quassinoids from Eurycoma longifolia, a medicinal plant in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Jiwajinda, Suratwadee; Santisopasri, Vilai; Murakami, Akira; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Gasquet, Monique; Riad, Elias; Balansard, Guy; Ohigashi, Hajime

    2002-09-01

    Some quassinoids (1-6) isolated previously as plant growth inhibitors from the leaves of Eurycoma longifolia Jack. (Simaroubaceae) were subjected to in vitro tests on anti-tumor promoting, antischistosomal and plasmodicidal activities. The most active compound for inhibition of tumor promoter-induced Epstein-Barr virus activation (anti-tumor promotion) was 14,15beta-dihydroxyklaineanone (5, IC(50) = 5 microM). Longilactone (1) gave significant antischistosomal effect at a concentration of 200 microg/ml. 11-Dehydroklaineanone (3) and 15beta-O-acetyl-14-hydroxyklaineanone (6) showed potent plasmodicidal activity (IC(50) = 2 microg/ml). Thus it was suggested that E. longifolia possesses high medicinal values due to the occurrence of a variety of quassinoids.

  19. Optimizing production of asperolide A, a potential anti-tumor tetranorditerpenoid originally produced by the algal-derived endophytic fungus Aspergillus wentii EN-48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Gangming; Wang, Bingui

    2016-07-01

    The marine algal-derived endophytic fungus Aspergillus wentii EN-48 produces the potential anti-tumor agent asperolide A, a tetranorlabdane diterpenoid active against lung cancer. However, the fermentation yield of asperolide A was very low and only produced in static cultures. Static fermentation conditions of A. wentii EN-48 were optimized employing response surface methodology to enhance the production of asperolide A. The optimized conditions resulted in a 13.9-fold yield enhancement, which matched the predicted value, and the optimized conditions were successfully used in scale-up fermentation for the production of asperolide A. Exogenous addition of plant hormones (especially 10 μmol/L methyl jasmonate) stimulated asperolide A production. To our knowledge, this is first optimized production of an asperolide by a marine-derived fungus. The optimization is Effective and valuable to supply material for further anti-tumor mechanism studies and preclinical evaluation of asperolide A and other norditerpenoids.

  20. Co-administration of morphine and gabapentin leads to dose dependent synergistic effects in a rat model of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Papathanasiou, Theodoros; Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Heegaard, Anne-Marie; Kreilgaard, Mads; Lund, Trine Meldgaard

    2016-01-20

    Despite much evidence that combination of morphine and gabapentin can be beneficial for managing postoperative pain, the nature of the pharmacological interaction of the two drugs remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the interaction of morphine and gabapentin in range of different dose combinations and investigate whether co-administration leads to synergistic effects in a preclinical model of postoperative pain. The pharmacodynamic effects of morphine (1, 3 and 7mg/kg), gabapentin (10, 30 and 100mg/kg) or their combination (9 combinations in total) were evaluated in the rat plantar incision model using an electronic von Frey device. The percentage of maximum possible effect (%MPE) and the area under the response curve (AUC) were used for evaluation of the antihyperalgesic effects of the drugs. Identification of synergistic interactions was based on Loewe additivity response surface analyses. The combination of morphine and gabapentin resulted in synergistic antihyperalgesic effects in a preclinical model of postoperative pain. The synergistic interactions were found to be dose dependent and the increase in observed response compared to the theoretical additive response ranged between 26 and 58% for the synergistic doses. The finding of dose-dependent synergistic effects highlights that choosing the right dose-dose combination is of importance in postoperative pain therapy. Our results indicate benefit of high doses of gabapentin as adjuvant to morphine. If these findings translate to humans, they might have important implications for the treatment of pain in postoperative patients.

  1. Synergistic effects of fire and elephants on arboreal animals in an African savanna.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Robert M; Kimuyu, Duncan M; Sensenig, Ryan L; Palmer, Todd M; Riginos, Corinna; Veblen, Kari E; Young, Truman P

    2015-11-01

    Disturbance is a crucial determinant of animal abundance, distribution and community structure in many ecosystems, but the ways in which multiple disturbance types interact remain poorly understood. The effects of multiple-disturbance interactions can be additive, subadditive or super-additive (synergistic). Synergistic effects in particular can accelerate ecological change; thus, characterizing such synergies, the conditions under which they arise, and how long they persist has been identified as a major goal of ecology. We factorially manipulated two principal sources of disturbance in African savannas, fire and elephants, and measured their independent and interactive effects on the numerically dominant vertebrate (the arboreal gekkonid lizard Lygodactylus keniensis) and invertebrate (a guild of symbiotic Acacia ants) animal species in a semi-arid Kenyan savanna. Elephant exclusion alone (minus fire) had negligible effects on gecko density. Fire alone (minus elephants) had negligible effects on gecko density after 4 months, but increased gecko density twofold after 16 months, likely because the decay of fire-damaged woody biomass created refuges and nest sites for geckos. In the presence of elephants, fire increased gecko density nearly threefold within 4 months of the experimental burn; this occurred because fire increased the incidence of elephant damage to trees, which in turn improved microhabitat quality for geckos. However, this synergistic positive effect of fire and elephants attenuated over the ensuing year, such that only the main effect of fire was evident after 16 months. Fire also altered the structure of symbiotic plant-ant assemblages occupying the dominant tree species (Acacia drepanolobium); this influenced gecko habitat selection but did not explain the synergistic effect of fire and elephants. However, fire-driven shifts in plant-ant occupancy may have indirectly mediated this effect by increasing trees' susceptibility to elephant damage. Our

  2. Riluzole mediates anti-tumor properties in breast cancer cells independent of metabotropic glutamate receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Speyer, Cecilia L; Nassar, Mahdy A; Hachem, Ali H; Bukhsh, Miriam A; Jafry, Waris S; Khansa, Rafa M; Gorski, David H

    2016-06-01

    Riluzole, the only drug approved by the FDA for treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, inhibits melanoma proliferation through its inhibitory effect on glutamatergic signaling. We demonstrated that riluzole also inhibits the growth of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and described a role for metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (GRM1) in regulating TNBC cell growth and progression. However, the role of GRM1 in mediating riluzole's effects in breast cancer has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we seek to determine how much of riluzole's action in breast cancer is mediated through GRM1. We investigated anti-tumor properties of riluzole in TNBC and ER+ cells using cell growth, invasion, and soft-agar assays and compared riluzole activity with GRM1 levels. Using Lentiviral vectors expressing GRM1 or shGRM1, these studies were repeated in cells expressing high or low GRM1 levels where the gene was either silenced or overexpressed. Riluzole inhibited proliferation, invasion, and colony formation in both TNBC and ER+ cells. There was a trend between GRM1 expression in TNBC cells and their response to riluzole in both cell proliferation and invasion assays. However, silencing and overexpression studies had no effect on cell sensitivity to riluzole. Our results clearly suggest a GRM1-independent mechanism through which riluzole mediates its effects on breast cancer cells. Understanding the mechanism by which riluzole mediates breast cancer progression will be useful in identifying new therapeutic targets for treating TNBC and in facilitating stratification of patients in clinical trials using riluzole in conjunction with conventional therapy.

  3. Metronomic paclitaxel-loaded mPEG-PLA nanoparticles show enhanced anti-tumor efficacy compared to maximum tolerated dose administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Tan; Yang, Lian-juan; Mo, Xiao-hui; Wang, Xiu-li; Jun, Gu

    2014-11-01

    Low-dose metronomic (LDM) chemotherapy with cytotoxic agents, aimed at disrupting tumor endothelial cells, is an alternative method to maximum tolerated dose chemotherapy targeting proliferating tumor cells in clinical practice. However, even in the LDM schedule, cytotoxic agents still exhibit serious side effects due to non-distribution and high accumulated doses in the body. Nanocarriers can maximize the efficacy of the encapsulated drug by adjusting the pharmacokinetics and bio-distribution pattern, and minimize excessive toxic side effects. In the present study, we prepared polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated stealth nanoparticles containing paclitaxel (PTX-NP) in order to evaluate their accumulation in tumor and their anti-tumor activity following LDM administration. PTX-NPs were prepared by a modified emulsification/solvent diffusion method with methoxy PEG-poly(lactide). The in vitro viability, migration, and tube formation of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells, in addition to thrombospondin-1 positive expression and microvessel density in vivo, confirmed the anti-angiogenic activity of PTX-NP. The cellular uptake and retention study, in addition to pharmacokinetics in Sprague-Dawley rats demonstrated sustained circulation of PTX-NP. The in vivo tumor accumulation of PTX-NP was monitored using the Xenogen IVIS 200 non-invasive optical imaging system. The anti-tumor activity of LDM PTX-NP was studied in B16 melanoma cancer-bearing mice in vivo. In conclusion, PTX-NP improved tumor accumulation and anti-tumor efficacy following LDM administration.

  4. Bias dependence of synergistic radiation effects induced by electrons and protons on silicon bipolar junction transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaoming; Li, Xingji; Yang, Jianqun; Ma, Guoliang; Xiao, Liyi

    2015-06-01

    Bias dependence on synergistic radiation effects caused by 110 keV electrons and 170 keV protons on the current gain of 3DG130 NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) is studied in this paper. Experimental results indicate that the influence induced by 170 keV protons is always enhancement effect during the sequential irradiation. However, the influence induced by 110 keV electrons on the BJT under various bias cases is different during the sequential irradiation. The transition fluence of 110 keV electrons is dependent on the bias case on the emitter-base junction of BJT.

  5. Synergistic effect of phytochemicals in combination with hypoglycemic drugs on glucose uptake in myotubes.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Pranav Kumar; Doble, Mukesh

    2009-12-01

    The present study analyses the effect of two plant phenolic compounds, namely chlorogenic acid and ferulic acid, and a plant alkaloid, berberine, alone and also in combination with two commercial oral hypoglycemic drugs (OHD), namely metformin and 2,4-thiazolodinedione (THZ), on the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) by L6 myotubes. 2-DG uptake is determined using an enzymatic assay. All the three natural products enhance the uptake of 2DG in time- and dose-dependent manner. A combination of different concentrations of chlorogenic acid and metformin or THZ, has a synergistic effect in the uptake of 2DG with a maximum of 5.0- and 5.3-times respectively, with reference to the base value (without the drugs or the natural products). Ferulic acid in combination with metformin or THZ has also shown a synergistic effect and the 2DG uptake increases by 4.98- and 5.11-fold when compared to the control respectively. Whereas, berberine, in combination with either metformin or THZ, has shown an additive effect with maximum 2DG uptake of 4.1- and 4.7-times from the base value, respectively. The synergistic interaction has been explained with the use of combination index and isobologram. Expression of GLUT4 and PPAR-gamma gene were elevated in chlorogenic acid and berberine treated cells, whereas expression of GLUT4 and PI3K transcripts were significantly enhanced in ferulic acid treated cells. The studies indicate that chlorogenic acid enhances glucose uptake by increasing GLUT4 expression via PI3K independent pathway whereas ferulic acid increases glucose uptake by PI3K dependent pathway. The current findings suggest that the phytochemicals can replace the commercial drugs in part, which could lead to a reduction in toxicity and side effects of the later.

  6. Sesamin synergistically potentiates the anticancer effects of γ-tocotrienol in mammary cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Akl, Mohamed R; Ayoub, Nehad M; Abuasal, Bilal S; Kaddoumi, Amal; Sylvester, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    γ-Tocotrienol and sesamin are phytochemicals that display potent anticancer activity. Since sesamin inhibits the metabolic degradation of tocotrienols, studies were conducted to determine if combined treatment with sesamin potentiates the antiproliferative effects of γ-tocotrienol on neoplastic mouse (+SA) and human (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) mammary cancer cells. Results showed that treatment with γ-tocotrienol or sesamin alone induced a significant dose-responsive growth inhibition, whereas combination treatment with these agents synergistically inhibited the growth of +SA, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 mammary cancer cells, while similar treatment doses were found to have little or no effect on normal (mouse CL-S1 and human MCF-10A) mammary epithelial cell growth or viability. However, sesamin synergistic enhancement of γ-tocotrienol-induced anticancer effects was not found to be mediated from a reduction in γ-tocotrienol metabolism. Rather, combined treatment with subeffective doses of γ-tocotrienol and sesamin was found to induce G1 cell cycle arrest, and a corresponding decrease in cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, phospho-Rb, and E2F1 levels, and increase in p27 and p16 levels. Additional studies showed that the antiproliferative effect of combination treatment did not initiate apoptosis or result in a decrease in mammary cancer cell viability. Taken together, these findings indicate that the synergistic antiproliferative action of combined γ-tocotrienol and sesamin treatment in mouse and human mammary cancer cells is cytostatic, not cytotoxic, and results from G1 cell cycle arrest.

  7. Synergistic Effects of Sulfated Polysaccharides from Mexican Seaweeds against Measles Virus

    PubMed Central

    Morán-Santibañez, Karla; Cruz-Suárez, Lucia Elizabeth; Ricque-Marie, Denis; Robledo, Daniel; Freile-Pelegrín, Yolanda; Peña-Hernández, Mario A.; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) extracted from five seaweed samples collected or cultivated in Mexico (Macrocystis pyrifera, Eisenia arborea, Pelvetia compressa, Ulva intestinalis, and Solieria filiformis) were tested in this study in order to evaluate their effect on measles virus in vitro. All polysaccharides showed antiviral activity (as measured by the reduction of syncytia formation) and low cytotoxicity (MTT assay) at inhibitory concentrations. SPs from Eisenia arborea and Solieria filiformis showed the highest antiviral activities (confirmed by qPCR) and were selected to determine their combined effect. Their synergistic effect was observed at low concentrations (0.0274 μg/mL and 0.011 μg/mL of E. arborea and S. filiformis SPs, resp.), which exhibited by far a higher inhibitory effect (96% syncytia reduction) in comparison to the individual SP effects (50% inhibition with 0.275 μg/mL and 0.985 μg/mL of E. arborea and S. filiformis, resp.). Time of addition experiments and viral penetration assays suggest that best activities of these SPs occur at different stages of infection. The synergistic effect would allow reducing the treatment dose and toxicity and minimizing or delaying the induction of antiviral resistance; sulfated polysaccharides of the tested seaweed species thus appear as promising candidates for the development of natural antiviral agents. PMID:27419139

  8. Synergistic and antagonistic effects on genotoxicity of chemicals commonly found in hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T.H.; Sandhu, S.S.; Peng, Y.; Chen, T.D.; Kim, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    Synergistic and antagonistic effects on genotoxicity of mixtures of four chemicals; i.e., lead tetraacetate (LTA), arsenic trioxide (ATO), dieldrin (DED), and tetrachloroethylene (TCE), were evaluated by the Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN) assay. The chemicals were mixed in ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 for mixtures of two chemicals and 1:1:1 each for three chemicals. The concentration of stock solution of these chemicals was around the minimum effective dose (MED) or below the MED for these chemicals as reported by Sandhu et al. (1989). Treatments were applied to plant cuttings by hydroponic uptake of the mixed solutions through the stems of the plant for 30 h followed by fixation of the flower buds in aceto-alcohol (1:3 ratio) without a recovery period. Microslides were prepared for scoring MCN frequencies. Results of two series of repeated experiments indicated that all mixtures of LTA/ATO exhibited antagonistic effects. On the other hand, all mixtures of TCE and DED exhibited synergistic effect. These data indicate that for evaluating biological hazards at chemical waste sites, it is prudent to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex chemical mixtures as these exist in nature because the biological effects based on evaluating individual chemicals may not be true predictors of the interactive effects of the pollutants.

  9. CpG-1826 immunotherapy potentiates chemotherapeutic and anti-tumor immune responses to metronomic cyclophosphamide in a preclinical glioma model.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Marie; Waxman, David J

    2016-04-01

    Cyclophosphamide administered on an intermittent metronomic schedule induces strong immune-dependent regression in several glioma models. Here we investigate whether this immunogenic chemotherapy can be potentiated by combination with the immune stimulatory TLR9 agonist CpG-1826. CpG-1826 treatment of GL261 gliomas implanted in immune competent mice induced tumor growth delay associated with increased tumor recruitment of macrophages and B cells. Anti-tumor responses varied between individuals, with CpG-1826 inducing robust tumor growth delay in ~50% of treated mice. Both high and low CpG-1826-responsive mice showed striking improvements when CpG-1826 was combined with cyclophosphamide treatment. Tumor-associated macrophages, B cells, dendritic cells, and cytotoxic T cells were increased, T regulatory cells were not induced, and long-term GL261 glioma regression with immune memory was achieved when CpG-1826 was combined with either single cyclophosphamide dosing (90 mg/kg) or metronomic cyclophosphamide treatment (two cycles at 45 mg/kg, spaced 12-days apart). B16F10 melanoma, a low immunogenic tumor model, also showed enhanced immune and anti-tumor responses to cyclophosphamide/CpG-1826 chemoimmunotherapy, but unlike GL261 tumors, did not regress. TLR9-based immunotherapy can thus be effectively combined with immunogenic cyclophosphamide treatment to enhance immune-based anti-tumor responses, even in poorly immunogenic cancer models.

  10. The role of CTLA-4 and PD-1 in anti-tumor immune response and their potential efficacy against osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Dong; Li, Heng-Yuan; Li, Bing-Hao; Xie, Tao; Zhu, Ting; Sun, Ling-Ling; Ren, Hai-Yong; Ye, Zhao-Ming

    2016-09-01

    Immunotherapy is proved to be a promising therapeutic strategy against human malignancies. Evasion of immune surveillance is considered to be a major factor of malignant progression. Inhibitory receptors, especially CTLA-4 and PD-1, are found to play critical roles in the mediation of anti-tumor immune efficacy. Thus, antibodies targeting these immune checkpoints have emerged as the attractive treatment approaches to those patients with cancer. Osteosarcoma is highly malignant and current treatment remains a challenge, especially for those patients with metastasis. Despite some achievements, the effect of immunotherapy against osteosarcoma is still unsatisfactory. The present review attempts to show the role and mechanism of CTLA-4 and PD-1 in immune response and summarize the recent findings related to the effect of inhibitory receptor antibodies on the immune response against tumors, especially osteosarcoma, and the correlation between PD-1 or/and CTLA-4 expression and outcome of osteosarcoma patients. We further discuss the utilization of the combination therapy against osteosarcoma.

  11. Enhanced electrochemical supercapacitor properties with synergistic effect of polyaniline, graphene and AgxO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Muhammad; Pan, Lujun; Asif, Muhammad; Mahmood, Zafar; Khan, M. A.; Fu, Xin

    2016-05-01

    The graphene-Ag2O/polyaniline (GAP) composite has been synthesized by in-situ polymerization. It has been observed that Ag2O nanoparticles exist on the porous spongy background of PANI (polyaniline). The optimized composition of the synthesized composite exhibits an extraordinary specific capacitance of 1572 Fg-1 at 0.05 Ag-1 current density and good cyclic stability of 85% over 3000 charge-discharge cycles. The extraordinary electrochemical performance indicates the positive synergistic effect of PANI, graphene and Ag2O. The Ag2O nanoparticles might be responsible for improved electrical conductivity, and graphene might contribute in enhancing the electrochemical stability of the PANI electrode.

  12. The Elastin Receptor Complex: A Unique Matricellular Receptor with High Anti-tumoral Potential

    PubMed Central

    Scandolera, Amandine; Odoul, Ludivine; Salesse, Stéphanie; Guillot, Alexandre; Blaise, Sébastien; Kawecki, Charlotte; Maurice, Pascal; El Btaouri, Hassan; Romier-Crouzet, Béatrice; Martiny, Laurent; Debelle, Laurent; Duca, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Elastin, one of the longest-lived proteins, confers elasticity to tissues with high mechanical constraints. During aging or pathophysiological conditions such as cancer progression, this insoluble polymer of tropoelastin undergoes an important degradation leading to the release of bioactive elastin-derived peptides (EDPs), named elastokines. EDP exhibit several biological functions able to drive tumor development by regulating cell proliferation, invasion, survival, angiogenesis, and matrix metalloproteinase expression in various tumor and stromal cells. Although, several receptors have been suggested to bind elastokines (αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins, galectin-3), their main receptor remains the elastin receptor complex (ERC). This heterotrimer comprises a peripheral subunit, named elastin binding protein (EBP), associated to the protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA). The latter is bound to a membrane-associated protein called Neuraminidase-1 (Neu-1). The pro-tumoral effects of elastokines have been linked to their binding onto EBP. Additionally, Neu-1 sialidase activity is essential for their signal transduction. Consistently, EDP-EBP interaction and Neu-1 activity emerge as original anti-tumoral targets. Interestingly, besides its direct involvement in cancer progression, the ERC also regulates diabetes outcome and thrombosis, an important risk factor for cancer development and a vascular process highly increased in patients suffering from cancer. In this review, we will describe ERC and elastokines involvement in cancer development suggesting that this unique receptor would be a promising therapeutic target. We will also discuss the pharmacological concepts aiming at blocking its pro-tumoral activities. Finally, its emerging role in cancer-associated complications and pathologies such as diabetes and thrombotic events will be also considered. PMID:26973522

  13. Improved Local and Systemic Anti-Tumor Efficacy for Irreversible Electroporation in Immunocompetent versus Immunodeficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Robert E.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Robertson, John L.; Arena, Christopher B.; Davis, Erica M.; Singh, Ravi N.; Stallings, Jonathan; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2013-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a non-thermal focal ablation technique that uses a series of brief but intense electric pulses delivered into a targeted region of tissue, killing the cells by irrecoverably disrupting cellular membrane integrity. This study investigates if there is an improved local anti-tumor response in immunocompetent (IC) BALB/c versus immunodeficient (ID) nude mice, including the potential for a systemic protective effect against rechallenge. Subcutaneous murine renal carcinoma tumors were treated with an IRE pulsing protocol that used 60% of the predicted voltage required to invoke complete regressions in the ID mice. Tumors were followed for 34 days following treatment for 11 treated mice from each strain, and 7 controls from each strain. Mouse survival based on tumor burden and the progression-free disease period was substantially longer in the treated IC mice relative to the treated ID mice and sham controls for both strains. Treated IC mice were rechallenged with the same cell line 18 days after treatment, where growth of the second tumors was shown to be significantly reduced or prevented entirely. There was robust CD3+ cell infiltration in some treated BALB/C mice, with immunocytes focused at the transition between viable and dead tumor. There was no difference in the low immunocyte presence for untreated tumors, nude mice, and matrigel-only injections in both strains. These findings suggest IRE therapy may have greater therapeutic efficacy in immunocompetent patients than what has been suggested by immunodeficient models, and that IRE may invoke a systemic response beyond the targeted ablation region. PMID:23717630

  14. Synergistic effect on co-gasification reactivity of biomass-petroleum coke blended char.

    PubMed

    Wei, Juntao; Guo, Qinghua; Gong, Yan; Ding, Lu; Yu, Guangsuo

    2017-03-03

    In this work, effects of gasification temperature (900°C-1100°C) and blended ratio (3:1, 1:1, 1:3) on reactivity of petroleum coke and biomass co-gasification were studied in TGA. Quantification analysis of active AAEM transformation and in situ investigation of morphological structure variations in gasification were conducted respectively using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer and heating stage microscope to explore synergistic effect on co-gasification reactivity. The results indicated that char gasification reactivity was enhanced with increasing biomass proportion and gasification temperature. Synergistic effect on co-gasification reactivity was presented after complete generation of biomass ash, and gradually weakened with increasing temperature from 1000°C to 1100°C after reaching the most significant value at 1000°C. This phenomenon was well related with the appearance of molten biomass ash rich in glassy state potassium and the weakest inhibition effect on active potassium transformation during co-gasification at the temperature higher than 1000°C.

  15. Synergistic effect of crude oil plus dispersant on bacterial community in a louisiana salt marsh sediment.

    PubMed

    Al-Jawasim, Mohammed; Yu, Kewei; Park, Joong-Wook

    2015-09-01

    A combined effect of crude oil plus dispersant (Corexit 9500A) significantly altered indigenous bacterial communities in a Louisiana salt marsh sediment after 30 days of incubation; the crude oil and/or Corexit 9500A treatments triggered shifts in bacterial communities and the shifted bacterial structure by crude oil plus Corexit 9500A was considerably different from those by either crude oil or Corexit 9500A. However, the synergistic effect of crude oil plus Corexit 9500A was not observed after 7 days of incubation; the bacterial community was slightly shifted by Corexit 9500A and the crude oil did not trigger any bacterial community shift after 7 days of incubation. DNA sequencing data indicated that Chromobacterium species was enriched in the Corexit 9500A microcosms after 7 days of incubation, while Pseudomonas, Advenella, Acidocella and Dyella spp. were enriched after 30 days of incubation. Parvibaculum was a dominant species in the crude oil microcosms after 30 days of incubation. Rhodanobacter, Dyella and Frateuria spp. were dominant in crude oil plus Corexit 9500A microcosms after 30 days of incubation. Our data show that the effect of crude oil plus Corexit 9500A on bacterial community is synergistic, and thus the dispersant effect should be considered with the spilled oil to correctly evaluate the environmental impact.

  16. Synergistic effect of chemical penetration enhancer and iontophoresis on transappendageal transport of oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Keng-Chih; Green, Colin R; Alany, Raid G; Rupenthal, Ilva D

    2013-01-30

    Gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) specific antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AsODN) have been shown to improve a number of inflammatory conditions and may therefore offer a novel strategy for persistent pain management. However, for such molecules to be clinically effective, delivery challenges owing to the molecules' high molecular weight, negative charge and hydrophilicity have to be overcome. In this study, the effect of various chemical penetration enhancers and cathodal iontophoresis on transdermal delivery was evaluated. Initial skin permeation studies revealed only a slight increase in the passive flux of the model anionic drug sodium fluorescein using limonene/ethanol. Applying cathodal iontophoresis, the amount of the model drug permeated through untreated skin was tripled, while a combination of chemical and physical penetration enhancement resulted in a fourfold increase in the fluorescein amount permeated. However, even the synergistic effect of limonene/ethanol and iontophoresis was insufficient to achieve complete permeation of Cy3-labeled Cx43 AsODN across the entire skin thickness. Instead, molecules were trapped in the epidermis or permeated deeply into the hair follicles. These results suggest that the synergistic effect of chemical and physical penetration enhancement increases intradermal delivery of oligonucleotides but is insufficient to deliver such large molecules across intact skin.

  17. Experimental study on synergistic effects of reflectance and transmittance for near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingying; Liu, Jiajia; Ma, Congcong; Li, Lin; Lu, Junsheng; Xu, Kexin

    2016-03-01

    Usually, diffused reflectance or diffused transmittance has been collected respectively when performing the near-infrared spectroscopic measurements. However, glucose-relative spectral signal is quite weak due to the noises from the measuring system and the environment. Previous Monte-Carlo simulation results from our group showed that the spectral magnitude of both diffused reflectance and diffused transmittance can reach the same order. In this talk, it is our aim to further investigate the synergistic effect of diffused reflectance and diffused transmittance for Near Infrared spectral measurements. The diffused reflectance spectra and diffused transmittance spectra of human's earlobe have been obtained simultaneously by home-made optical probes within the wavelength of 1100-1400nm. Two processing methods---Superposition Method and Division Method are introduced to demonstrate the synergistic effect of reflectance and transmittance. Both of the processing methods are performed on diffused reflectance and diffused transmittance in accordance with corresponding wavelengths. The results show that the combination of diffused reflectance and transmittance can effectively enhances the SNR by reducing the interference caused by individual differences and measuring environmental factors. Moreover, comparatively, the Division Method has a more distinguished effect.

  18. Effect of synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO) on the toxicity of some essential oils against mosquito larvae.

    PubMed

    Yadav, S; Mittal, P K; Saxena, P N; Singh, R K

    2008-12-01

    Effect of a known synergist piperonyl butoxide on the toxicity of steam distillate essential oils of Jamarosa (Cymbopogan nardus), Pacholli (Pogostemon pacholli), Basil (Ocimum basilicum), and Peppermint (Mentha pipreta) plant species against Anopheles stephensi larvae were evaluated. The purpose of the present study was to identify the insecticidal potential of these oils against mosquito larvae. The Piperonyl Butoxide (PBO) was used to enhance the activity of these oils with the aim of developing essential oil based formulations. The bioassays of these oils with and without PBO were performed against late 3rd instar larvae of An. stephensi. The LC50 values against An. stephensi were 44.19 ppm for Ocimum basilicum oil, followed by, Mentha pipreta, Cymbopogan nardus, and Pogostemon pacholli oil which gave LC50 values above 250 ppm. Thus in the present study the Ocimum basilicum oil was found to be most effective, whereas Pogostemon pacholli oil was found to least effective against mosquitoes for larvicidal action. The effect of synergist PBO led to the enhancement of toxicity of oils, the LC50 value for Ocimum basilicum were reduced from 44.19 ppm to 23.87 ppm. Similarly the oil of Pogostemon pacholli showed most significant results where the LC50 value was >250 ppm it was reduced to 50 ppm with PBO.

  19. Effect of synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO) on the toxicity of some essential oils against mosquito larvae.

    PubMed

    Yadav, S; Mittal, P K; Saxena, P N; Singh, R K

    2009-03-01

    Effect of a known synergist piperonyl butoxide on the toxicity of steam distillate essential oils of Jamarosa (Cymbopogan nardus), Pacholli (Pogostemon pacholli), Basil (Ocimum basilicum), and Peppermint (Mentha pipreta) plant species against Anopheles stephensi larvae were evaluated. The purpose of the present study was to identify the insecticidal potential of these oils against mosquito larvae. The Piperonyl Butoxide (PBO) was used to enhance the activity of these oils with the aim of developing essential oil based formulations. The bioassays of these oils with and without PBO were performed against late 3rd instar larvae of An. stephensi. The LC50 values against An. stephensi were 44.19 ppm for Ocimum basilicum oil, followed by, Mentha pipreta, Cymbopogan nardus, and Pogostemon pacholli oil which gave LC50 values above 250 ppm. Thus in the present study the Ocimum basilicum oil was found to be most effective, whereas Pogostemon pacholli oil was found to least effective against mosquitoes for larvicidal action. The effect of synergist PBO led to the enhancement of toxicity of oils, the LC50 value for Ocimum basilicum were reduced from 44.19 ppm to 23.87 ppm. Similarly the oil of Pogostemon pacholli showed most significant results where the LC50 value was > 250 ppm it was reduced to 50 ppm with PBO.

  20. In vitro effectiveness of triterpenoids and their synergistic effect with antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus strains

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Muhammad; Nadir, Maha; Mehmood, Nadir; Farooq, Adeel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of four triterpenoids such as oleanolic acid, ursolic acid, cycloastragenol, and beta-boswellic acid alone and in combination with antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus strains. Materials and Methods: Sixteen clinical strains of S. aureus from infected wounds were isolated. Eight were methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), and the other eight were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The activity was also seen in reference S. aureus American Type Culture Collection™ strains. The activity of all the triterpenoids and antibiotics against S. aureus was evaluated by broth microdilution method. The effectiveness was judged by comparing the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the compounds with antibiotics. The combination of antibiotics with compounds was evaluated by their fractional inhibitory concentrations (FIC). Results: Against both clinical and reference MSSA strains, none of the compounds exhibited comparable activity to antibiotics vancomycin or cefradine except for ursolic acid (MIC 7.8 μg/ml). Against MRSA, all compounds (MIC 16–128 μg/ml) showed lesser activity than vancomycin (MIC 5.8 μg/ml). Among triterpenoid-antibiotic combinations, the most effective were ursolic acid and vancomycin against clinical strain MSSA (FICS 0.17). However, overall, different combinations between triterpenoids and antibiotics showed 95%–46% (P < 0.05) reduction in MICs of antibiotics compared to when antibiotics were used alone. Cefradine, a drug not suitable for treating MRSA (MIC = 45 μg/ml), showed a remarkable decrease in its MIC (87% P< 0.01) when it was used in combination with oleanolic acid or ursolic acid in both clinical and reference strains. Conclusion: The tested triterpenoids are relatively weaker than antibiotics. However, when used in combination with antibiotics, they showed remarkable synergistic effect and thus can help in prolonging the viability of these antibiotics

  1. COH-203, a novel microtubule inhibitor, exhibits potent anti-tumor activity via p53-dependent senescence in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Huan; Zuo, Dai-Ying; Bai, Zhao-Shi; Xu, Jing-Wen; Li, Zeng-Qiang; Shen, Qi-Rong; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Wei-Ge; Wu, Ying-Liang

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • COH-203 exhibits anti-hepatoma effects in vitro and in vivo with low toxicity. • COH-203 inhibits tubulin polymerization. • COH-203 induces mitotic arrest followed by mitotic slippage in BEL-7402 cells. • COH-203 induces p53-dependent senescence in BEL-7402 cells. - Abstract: 5-(3-Hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-3H-1, 2-dithiol-3-one (COH-203) is a novel synthesized analogue of combretastatin A-4 that can be classified as a microtubule inhibitor. In this study, we evaluated the anti-hepatoma effect of COH-203 in vitro and in vivo and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. COH-203 was shown to be more effective in inhibiting the proliferation of liver cancer cells compared with normal liver cells. COH-203 also displayed potent anti-tumor activity in a hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft model without significant toxicity. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that treatment with COH-203 induced mitotic arrest by inhibiting tubulin polymerization in BEL-7402 liver cancer cells. Long-term COH-203 treatment in BEL-7402 cells led to mitotic slippage followed by senescence via the p14{sup Arf}–p53–p21 and p16{sup INK4α}–Rb pathways. Furthermore, suppression of p53 via pifithrin-α (p53 inhibitor) and p53-siRNA attenuated COH-203-induced senescence in BEL-7402 cells, suggesting that COH-203 induced senescence p53-dependently. In conclusion, we report for the first time that COH-203, one compound in the combretastatin family, promotes anti-proliferative activity through the induction of p-53 dependent senescence. Our findings will provide a molecular rationale for the development of COH-203 as a promising anti-tumor agent.

  2. Synergistic inhibitory effect of citral with selected phenolics against Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Carriles, Karla; Argaiz, Alvaro; Palou, Enrique; López-Malo, Aurelio

    2005-03-01

    Antifungal susceptibilities of Zygosaccharomyces bailii to individual and binary mixtures of citral with selected phenolics were evaluated to identify synergistic combinations. Individual effects of citral, vanillin, thymol, carvacrol, and eugenol concentrations and combined effects of citral with the other phenolic compounds on the growth of Z. bailii were evaluated in potato dextrose agar, adjusted with sucrose to a water activity of 0.99 or 0.95, and hydrochloric acid to pH 4.5 or 3.5. MICs for individual and binary antimicrobial mixtures were identified and then transformed to fractional inhibitory concentrations. Inhibitory concentrations of citral and vanillin were higher than 650 ppm, whereas for thymol, eugenol, and carvacrol, concentrations were lower than 250 ppm for several of the studied water activity-pH conditions. Combining citral with the other phenolic compounds, fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) and FIC(Index) varied from 0.216 to 0.582. FIC(Index) demonstrated synergistic effects on Z. bailii inhibition when citral was used in combination with vanillin, thymol, carvacrol, or eugenol. Therefore, the relative amount of antimicrobials could be greatly reduced.

  3. Synergistic effects and correlating polarity parameters in binary mixtures of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Beniwal, Vijay; Kumar, Anil

    2015-04-07

    Understanding how a chemical reaction proceeds in solution requires precise knowledge of solute-solvent interactions. Certain issues involved in ionic liquid binary mixtures are still not clearly understood, including: 1) the effects of hydrogen-bond-acceptor basicity (β) of solvents on the "synergistic effects" found in ionic liquid-alcohol mixtures, 2) the interrelation between the polarity parameters in binary mixtures, and 3) the application of a model for the description of normalised electronic transition energy for all the binary mixtures. Here, a detailed analysis of polarity parameters in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic ionic liquids has been carried out. A three-parameter model developed by Roses et al. [J. Chem. Soc. Perkin Trans. 2 1997, 1341-1348] was found to be applicable to all the binary mixtures, and synergistic effects are generated as a result of high β values of alcohols compared with those of the ionic liquids. A strong correlation was observed in the β values and hydrophobicities of pure ionic liquids, suggesting that β values can play a role in describing synergism.

  4. Drug-conjugated polymers as gene carriers for synergistic therapeutic effect.

    PubMed

    Pofali, P A; Singh, B; Dandekar, P; Jain, R D; Maharjan, S; Choi, Y J; Arote, R B; Cho, C S

    2016-05-01

    The ability to safely and effectively transfer gene into cells is the fundamental goal of gene delivery. In spite of the best efforts of researchers around the world, gene therapy has limited success. This may be because of several limitations of delivering gene which is one of the greatest technical challenges in the modern medicine. To address these issues, many efforts have been made to bind drugs and genes together by polymers for co-delivery to achieve synergistic effect. Usually, binding interaction of drugs with polymers is either physical or chemical. In case of drug-polymer physical interaction, the efficiency of drugs generally decreases because of separation of drugs from polymers in vivo whenever it comes in contact with charged biofluid/s or cells. While chemical interaction of drug-polymer overcomes the aforementioned obstacle, several problems such as steric hindrance, solubility, and biodegradability hinder it to develop as gene carrier. Considering these benefits and pitfalls, the objective of this review is to discuss the possible extent of drug-conjugated polymers as safe and efficient gene delivery carriers for achieving synergistic effect to combat various genetic disorders.

  5. Effect of lime pre-treatment on the synergistic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse by hemicellulases.

    PubMed

    Beukes, Natasha; Pletschke, Brett I

    2010-06-01

    Agricultural crop wastes are typically lignocellulosic in composition and thus partially recalcitrant to enzymatic degradation. The recalcitrant nature of plant biomass and the inability to obtain complete enzymatic hydrolysis has led to the establishment of various pre-treatment strategies. Alkaline pre-treatments increase the accessibility of the exposed surface to enzymatic hydrolysis through the removal of acetyl and uronic acid substituents on hemicelluloses. Unlike the use of steam and acid pre-treatments, alkaline pre-treatments (e.g. lime) solubilise lignin and a small percentage of the hemicelluloses. The most common alkaline pre-treatments that are employed make use of sodium hydroxide and lime. This study compared the synergistic degradation of un-treated and lime pre-treated sugarcane bagasse using cellulosomal and non-cellulosomal hemicellulases as free enzymes. The enzyme combination of 37.5% ArfA and 62.5% ManA produced the highest amount of reducing sugar of 91.834 micromol/min for the degradation of un-treated bagasse. This enzyme combination produced a degree of synergy of 1.87. The free enzymes displayed an approximately 6-fold increase in the enzyme activity, i.e. the total amount of reducing sugar released (593.65 micromol/min) with the enzyme combination of 37.5% ArfA, 25% ManA and 37.5% XynA for the lime pre-treated substrate and a degree of synergy of 2.14. To conclude, this study indicated that pre-treating the sugarcane bagasse is essential, in order to increase the efficiency of lignocellulose enzymatic hydrolysis by disruption of the lignin sheath, that the lime pre-treatment did not have any dramatic effect on the synergistic relationship between the free enzymes, and that time may play an important role in the establishment of synergistic relationships between enzymes.

  6. A Novel Immunomodulatory Hemocyanin from the Limpet Fissurella latimarginata Promotes Potent Anti-Tumor Activity in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Arancibia, Sergio; Espinoza, Cecilia; Salazar, Fabián; Del Campo, Miguel; Tampe, Ricardo; Zhong, Ta-Ying; De Ioannes, Pablo; Moltedo, Bruno; Ferreira, Jorge; Lavelle, Ed C.; Manubens, Augusto; De Ioannes, Alfredo E.; Becker, María Inés

    2014-01-01

    Hemocyanins, the huge oxygen-transporting glycoproteins of some mollusks, are used as immunomodulatory proteins with proven anti-cancer properties. The biodiversity of hemocyanins has promoted interest in identifying new anti-cancer candidates with improved immunological properties. Hemocyanins promote Th1 responses without known side effects, which make them ideal for long-term sustained treatment of cancer. In this study, we evaluated a novel hemocyanin from the limpet/gastropod Fissurella latimarginata (FLH). This protein has the typical hollow, cylindrical structure of other known hemocyanins, such as the keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and the Concholepas hemocyanin (CCH). FLH, like the KLH isoforms, is composed of a single type of polypeptide with exposed N- and O-linked oligosaccharides. However, its immunogenicity was significantly greater than that of KLH and CCH, as FLH induced a stronger humoral immune response and had more potent anti-tumor activity, delaying tumor growth and increasing the survival of mice challenged with B16F10 melanoma cells, in prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Additionally, FLH-treated mice demonstrated increased IFN-γ production and higher numbers of tumor-infiltrating CD4+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, in vitro assays demonstrated that FLH, but not CCH or KLH, stimulated the rapid production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-12, IL-23 and TNF-α) by dendritic cells, triggering a pro-inflammatory milieu that may explain its enhanced immunological activity. Moreover, this effect was abolished when deglycosylated FLH was used, suggesting that carbohydrates play a crucial role in the innate immune recognition of this protein. Altogether, our data demonstrate that FLH possesses increased anti-tumor activity in part because it activates a more potent innate immune response in comparison to other known hemocyanins. In conclusion, FLH is a potential new marine adjuvant for immunization and possible cancer immunotherapy. PMID

  7. Amplification of Anti-Tumor Immunity Without Autoimmune Complications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    access in the same animal the effect of tumor regression and mouse thyroglobulin immunization and observed a synergy between anti-neu and anti-mTg...ELISPOT. II. Establish the read-outs for autoimmune response, including antibody and T cell reactivity to mouse thyroglobulin (mTg) and inflammatory...cell reactivity to mouse thyroglobulin and inflammatory infiltration in the thyroid Results from Objectives 1B-I and II have been reported in

  8. Synergistic effect of titanium dioxide nanocrystal/reduced graphene oxide hybrid on enhancement of microbial electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Long; Qiao, Yan; Wu, Xiao-Shuai; Ma, Cai-Xia; Li, Xin; Li, Chang Ming

    2015-02-01

    A small sized TiO2 nanocrystal (˜10 nm)/reduced graphene oxide (TiO2/rGO) hybrid is synthesized through a sol-gel process for hybrid TiO2/GO followed by solvothermal reduction of GO to rGO and is further used as a microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode. The strong synergistic effect from a large surface area produced by uniformly deposited TiO2 nanocrystals, good hydrophilicity of TiO2 nanocrystals and superior conductivity of rGO leads to significantly improved electrocatalysis. In particular, a direct electrochemistry is realized by generating endogenous flavins from a large amount of microbes grown on the highly biocompatible TiO2 nanocrystals to mediate fast electron transfer between microbes and conductive rGO for a high performance anode. The TiO2/rGO hybrid anode delivers a maximum power density of 3169 mW m-2 in Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 MFC, which is much large than that of the conventional carbon cloth anode and reported TiO2/carbon hybrid anode, thus offering great potential for practical applications of MFC. This work is for the first time to report that the synergistic effect from tailoring the physical structure to achieve small sized TiO2 nanocrystals while rationally designing chemistry to introduce highly conductive rGO and superior biocompatible TiO2 is able to significantly boost the MFC performance.

  9. [Synergistic effect and quantification of 5'-ribonucleotides in a chicken soup].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrezy, Carla; Sangronis, Elba

    2006-09-01

    The international and national regulation permits the addition of flavour enhancers such as monosodium glutamate (MSG) and inosinic and guanilic acids and their fosfated salts (IMP or GMP, respectively) alone or combined to dehydrated mixtures of broths and soups in order to obtain a synergistic. The objectives of this study were: (1) to determine, through a sensorial panel, the synergistic effect on the flavour of a dehydrated chicken soup to which flavour enhancers were added and (2) quantify the 5'-ribonucleotides in such matrix. The intensity of the chicken flavour was determined using a previously trained 6-member panel. The 5'-ribonucleotidos were determined using the HPLC technique. The results using the panel demonstrated that the combination of GMS, IMF and GMF used potentiates significantly (p < 0.05) the flavour of the dehydrated chicken soup, which allows the use of less quantity of them to obtain the same effect on the flavour. The chemical analysis of the 5'-ribonucleotidos in the dehydrated chicken soup reflected a percentage of recovery of 93.6% for MSG and 90.5% for IMF.

  10. Secondary brown carbon formation via the dicarbonyl imine pathway: nitrogen heterocycle formation and synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Kampf, C J; Filippi, A; Zuth, C; Hoffmann, T; Opatz, T

    2016-07-21

    Dicarbonyls are known to be important precursors of so-called atmospheric brown carbon, significantly affecting aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing. In this systematic study we report the formation of light-absorbing nitrogen containing compounds from simple 1,2-, 1,3-, 1,4-, and 1,5-dicarbonyl + amine reactions. A combination of spectrophotometric and mass spectrometric techniques was used to characterize reaction products in solutions mimicking atmospheric particulates. Experiments with individual dicarbonyls and dicarbonyl mixtures in ammonium sulfate and glycine solutions demonstrate that nitrogen heterocycles are common structural motifs of brown carbon chromophores formed in such reaction systems. 1,4- and 1,5-dicarbonyl reaction systems, which were used as surrogates for terpene ozonolysis products, showed rapid formation of light-absorbing material and products with absorbance maxima at ∼450 nm. Synergistic effects on absorbance properties were observed in mixed (di-)carbonyl experiments, as indicated by the formation of a strong absorber in ammonium sulfate solutions containing acetaldehyde and acetylacetone. This cross-reaction oligomer shows an absorbance maximum at 385 nm, relevant for the actinic flux region of the atmosphere. This study demonstrates the complexity of secondary brown carbon formation via the imine pathway and highlights that cross-reactions with synergistic effects have to be considered an important pathway for atmospheric BrC formation.

  11. Dacarbazine and the agonistic TRAIL receptor-2 antibody lexatumumab induce synergistic anticancer effects in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Engesæter, Birgit; Engebraaten, Olav; Flørenes, Vivi Ann; Mælandsmo, Gunhild Mari

    2012-01-01

    Mapatumumab and lexatumumab (targeting death receptor 4 (DR4) and 5 (DR5), respectively) are agonistic TRAIL receptor antibodies that induce apoptosis in a wide range of cancer cells. The potency of mapatumumab and lexatumumab was assessed in mono therapy protocols, and the ability to sensitize for dacarbazine (DTIC) treatment was explored in ten different melanoma cell lines. Our data indicated that melanoma cell lines tend to be resistant to mapatumumab, most likely due to low expression of DR4, while a dose dependent response to lexatumumab was observed. Combining DTIC and lexatumumab induced an additive or synergistic effect on cell death in the various melanoma cell lines. The synergistic effect observed in the FEMX-1 cell line was related to enhanced cleavage of Bid in parallel with elevated expression of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bim, Bax and Bak. Furthermore, the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-XL, cIAP-1, XIAP and livin were down regulated. Cleavage of Bid and down regulation of cIAP-2 and livin were observed in vivo. Altogether, these data suggest a change in the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins favoring induction of apoptosis. In the more therapy resistant cell line, HHMS, no changes in the pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins were observed. FEMX-1 xenografts treated with DTIC and lexatumumab showed reduced growth and increased level of apoptosis compared to the control groups, providing arguments for further evaluation of this combination in melanoma patients.

  12. Synergistic anticancer effects of triptolide and celastrol, two main compounds from thunder god vine.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qi-Wei; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Mei, Xiao-Long; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Xue, You-Qiu; Qin, Wu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Wei, Meng-Ning; Zhang, Xu; Lv, Min; Chen, Mei-Wan; Wei, Xing; Shi, Zhi

    2015-10-20

    Triptolide and celastrol are two main active compounds isolated from Thunder God Vine with the potent anticancer activity. However, the anticancer effect of triptolide in combination with celastrol is still unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that the combination of triptolide with celastrol synergistically induced cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and apoptosis with the increased intracellular ROS accumulation in cancer cells. Pretreatment with ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine dramatically blocked the apoptosis induced by co-treatment with triptolide and celastrol. Treatment with celastrol alone led to the decreased expressions of HSP90 client proteins including survivin, AKT, EGFR, which was enhanced by the addition of triptolide. Additionally, the celastrol-induced expression of HSP70 and HSP27 was abrogated by triptolide. In the nude mice with xenograft tumors, the lower-dose combination of triptolide with celastrol significantly inhibited the growth of tumors without obvious toxicity. Overall, triptolide in combination with celastrol showed outstanding synergistic anticancer effect in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that this beneficial combination may offer a promising treatment option for cancer patients.

  13. Synergistic Anticancer Effect of Tocotrienol Combined with Chemotherapeutic Agents or Dietary Components: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Eitsuka, Takahiro; Tatewaki, Naoto; Nishida, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    Tocotrienol (T3), unsaturated vitamin E, is gaining a lot of attention owing to its potent anticancer effect, since its efficacy is much greater than that of tocopherol (Toc). Various factors are known to be involved in such antitumor action, including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction, antiangiogenesis, anti-metastasis, nuclear factor-κB suppression, and telomerase inhibition. Owing to a difference in the affinity of T3 and Toc for the α-tocopherol transfer protein, the bioavailability of orally ingested T3 is lower than that of Toc. Furthermore, cellular uptake of T3 is interrupted by coadministration of α-Toc in vitro and in vivo. Based on this, several studies are in progress to screen for molecules that can synergize with T3 in order to augment its potency. Combinations of T3 with chemotherapeutic drugs (e.g., statins, celecoxib, and gefitinib) or dietary components (e.g., polyphenols, sesamin, and ferulic acid) exhibit synergistic actions on cancer cell growth and signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize the current status of synergistic effects of T3 and an array of agents on cancer cells, and discuss their molecular mechanisms of action. These combination strategies would encourage further investigation and application in cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:27669218

  14. Synergistic Effect of Dazomet Soil Fumigation and Clonostachys rosea Against Cucumber Fusarium Wilt.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Li, Shi-Dong; Sun, Man-Hong

    2014-12-01

    Soil fumigation and biological control are two control measures frequently used against soilborne diseases. In this study, the chemical fumigant dazomet was applied in combination with the biocontrol agent (BCA) Clonostachys rosea 67-1 to combat cucumber wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum KW2-1. When the mycoparasite C. rosea 67-1 was applied after dazomet fumigation, disease control reached 100%, compared with 88.1 and 69.8% for dazomet and 67-1 agent, respectively, applied alone, indicating a synergistic effect of dazomet and C. rosea in combating cucumber Fusarium wilt based on analysis of Bliss Independence. To understand the synergistic mechanism, the effects of chemical fumigation on the colonization potential and activity of F. oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum, and the interaction between the BCA and the pathogen were investigated. The results showed that growth of the pathogen decreased with increasing dazomet concentration subsequent to fumigation. When exposed to dazomet at 100 ppm, the fungal sporulation rate decreased by 94.4%. Severe damage was observed in fumigated isolates using scanning electron microscopy. In the greenhouse, disease incidence of cucumber caused by fumigated F. oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum significantly decreased. Whereas germination of C. rosea 67-1 spores increased by >sixfold in fumigated soil, and its ability to parasitize fumigated F. oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum significantly increased (P = 0.014).

  15. Tribological and Antioxidation Synergistic Effect Study of Sulfonate-Modified Nano Calcium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Zhongyi, He; Liping, Xiong; Sheng, Han; Aixi, Chen; Jianwei, Qiu; Xisheng, Fu

    2013-01-01

    A middle base number sulphonate-modified nano calcium carbonate (SMC) with an average size of 35 nm was synthesized, and its tribological and antioxidation synergistic behaviors with ashless antioxidant N-phenyl-α-naphthylamine (T531) in hydrogenated oil (5Cst) were evaluated. The results demonstrate that adding this synethesized additive even at a low amount (<2.0 wt.%) can evidently improve its load-carrying capacity by 1.5 times and enhance its antiwear performance; in addition, the friction-reducing effect of additive in the high load was better than that in low load. The SMC have a good synergistic antioxidation effect with T531, which verifies the nano calcium carbonate compound was a kind of multifunctional and high-performance additive. The chemical composition of the rubbing surface which formed on the boundary film was analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicating that the excellent antiwear and load-carrying performance could be attributed to the forming of boundary lubrication film which composed of calcium carbonate, oxides, ferrites, sulphide and FeSO4, and so on. Its ability to increase oxidation free energy of base oil is the main reason for increasing its antioxidant collaboration property with ashless antioxidant T531. PMID:23658705

  16. Kinetic model of water disinfection using peracetic acid including synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Flores, Marina J; Brandi, Rodolfo J; Cassano, Alberto E; Labas, Marisol D

    2016-01-01

    The disinfection efficiencies of a commercial mixture of peracetic acid against Escherichia coli were studied in laboratory scale experiments. The joint and separate action of two disinfectant agents, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid, were evaluated in order to observe synergistic effects. A kinetic model for each component of the mixture and for the commercial mixture was proposed. Through simple mathematical equations, the model describes different stages of attack by disinfectants during the inactivation process. Based on the experiments and the kinetic parameters obtained, it could be established that the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide was much lower than that of peracetic acid alone. However, the contribution of hydrogen peroxide was very important in the commercial mixture. It should be noted that this improvement occurred only after peracetic acid had initiated the attack on the cell. This synergistic effect was successfully explained by the proposed scheme and was verified by experimental results. Besides providing a clearer mechanistic understanding of water disinfection, such models may improve our ability to design reactors.

  17. Tumor Mouse Model Confirms MAGE-A3 Cancer Immunotherapeutic As an Efficient Inducer of Long-Lasting Anti-Tumoral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Catherine; Baudson, Nathalie; Ory, Thierry; Louahed, Jamila

    2014-01-01

    Purpose MAGE-A3 is a potential target for immunotherapy due to its tumor-specific nature and expression in several tumor types. Clinical data on MAGE-A3 immunotherapy have raised many questions that can only be addressed by using animal models. In the present study, different aspects of the murine anti-tumor immune responses induced by a recombinant MAGE-A3 protein (recMAGE-A3) in combination with different immunostimulants (AS01, AS02, CpG7909 or AS15) were investigated. Experimental Design and Results Based on cytokine profile analyses and protection against challenge with MAGE-A3-expressing tumor, the combination recMAGE-A3+AS15 was selected for further experimental work, in particular to study the mechanisms of anti-tumor responses. By using MHC class I-, MHC class II-, perforin-, B-cell- and IFN-γ- knock-out mice and CD4+ T cell-, CD8+ T cell- and NK cell- depleted mice, we demonstrated that CD4+ T cells and NK cells are the main anti-tumor effectors, and that IFN-γ is a major effector molecule. This mouse tumor model also established the need to repeat recMAGE-A3+AS15 injections to sustain efficient anti-tumor responses. Furthermore, our results indicated that the efficacy of tumor rejection by the elicited anti-MAGE-A3 responses depends on the proportion of tumor cells expressing MAGE-A3. Conclusions The recMAGE-A3+AS15 cancer immunotherapy efficiently induced an antigen-specific, functional and long-lasting immune response able to recognize and eliminate MAGE-A3-expressing tumor cells up to several months after the last immunization in mice. The data highlighted the importance of the immunostimulant to induce a Th1-type immune response, as well as the key role played by IFN-γ, CD4+ T cells and NK cells in the anti-tumoral effect. PMID:24830315

  18. Synergistic antibacterial effects of β-lactam antibiotic combined with silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Li, Juan; Wu, Changzhu; Wu, Qingsheng; Li, Jian

    2005-09-01

    The bactericidal action of silver (0) nanoparticles and amoxicillin on Escherichia coli is studied, respectively. Increasing concentration of both amoxicillin (0-0.525 mg ml-1) and silver nanoparticles (0-40 µg ml-1) showed a higher antibacterial effect in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium. Escherichia coli cells have different bactericidal sensitivity to them. When amoxicillin and silver nanoparticles are combined, it results in greater bactericidal efficiency on Escherichia coli cells than when they were applied separately. Dynamic tests on bacterial growth indicated that exponential and stationary phases are greatly decreased and delayed in the synergistic effect of amoxicillin and silver nanoparticles. In addition, the effect induced by a preincubation with silver nanoparticles is examined. The results show that solutions with more silver nanoparticles have better antimicrobial effects. One hypothesized mechanism is proposed to explain this phenomenon.

  19. Green synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles using extract of anti-tumor potent Crocus sativus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, R.; Devi, V.; Adavallan, K.; Saranya, D.

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, we have explored anti-tumor potent Crocus sativus (saffron) as a reducing agent for one pot size controlled green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNps) at ambient conditions. The nanoparticles were characterized using UV-vis, scanning electron microscope (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR analysis. The prepared AuNPs showed surface Plasmon resonance centered at 549 nm with average particle size of 15±5 nm. Stable, spherical and triangular crystalline AuNPs with well-defined dimensions were synthesized using anti-tumor potent Crocus sativus (saffron). Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles is confirmed from the HR-TEM, SAED and SEM images, and XRD patterns. From the FTIR spectra it is found that the biomolecules are responsible for capping in gold nanoparticles.

  20. The dual role of complement in cancer and its implication in anti-tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been linked to the initiation of carcinogenesis, as well as the advancement of established tumors. The polarization of the tumor inflammatory microenvironment can contribute to either the control, or the progression of the disease. The emerging participation of members of the complement cascade in several hallmarks of cancer, renders it a potential target for anti-tumor treatment. Moreover, the presence of complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) in most types of tumor cells is known to impede anti-tumor therapies. This review focuses on our current knowledge of complement’s potential involvement in shaping the inflammatory tumor microenvironment and its role on the regulation of angiogenesis and hypoxia. Furthermore, we discuss approaches using complement-based therapies as an adjuvant in tumor immunotherapy. PMID:27563652

  1. Synergistic androgenic effect of a petroleum product caused by the joint action of at least three different types of compounds.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Michiel T O; Candido, Angelica; Vrabie, Cozmina M; Scarlett, Alan G; Rowland, Steven J

    2016-02-01

    In a previous study, we found a dose-dependent synergistic effect in recombinant yeast stably transfected with the human androgen receptor (AR), in response to co-exposure to testosterone and a commercially-available lubricant (engine) oil for cars. As there is relatively little knowledge on synergistic toxic effects and causative compounds, particularly for the androgenic system, the objective of the present study was to investigate this oil in more detail. The oil was fractionated into SARA fractions (so-called 'saturates', 'aromatics', 'resins', and 'asphaltenes') by open column chromatography. Surprisingly, when exposing the recombinant AR yeast to testosterone in combination with the separate SARA fractions, the synergistic effect could not be reproduced fully. After pooling the fractions again however, the full synergism returned. From subsequent exposures to combinations of two or three SARA fractions, it appeared that both the 'saturates' and the 'resins' fraction were required for obtaining the synergistic response with testosterone. This clearly demonstrates a synergistic effect related to the androgenic system caused by the joint action of at least three chemically-distinct compounds, or groups of compounds (i.e. testosterone, 'resins' and 'saturates'). Although detailed chemical analyses could not reveal the identity of the causative compounds and the in vivo relevance of the present results remains unclear, the results do add to the growing body of evidence on the potentially extremely complex character of mixture effects.

  2. Whole blood cells loaded with messenger RNA as an anti-tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Phua, Kyle K L; Boczkowski, David; Dannull, Jens; Pruitt, Scott; Leong, Kam W; Nair, Smita K

    2014-06-01

    The use of a cell-based vaccine composed of autologous whole blood cells loaded with mRNA is described. Mice immunized with whole blood cells loaded with mRNA encoding antigen develop anti-tumor immunity comparable to DC-RNA immunization. This approach offers a simple and affordable alternative to RNA-based cellular therapy by circumventing complex, laborious and expensive ex vivo manipulations required for DC-based immunizations.

  3. The microtubule-depolymerizing agent ansamitocin P3 programs dendritic cells toward enhanced anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kea; Müller, Philipp; Schreiner, Jens; Prince, Spasenija Savic; Lardinois, Didier; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola A; Thommen, Daniela S; Zippelius, Alfred

    2014-09-01

    In addition to direct tumor cell cytotoxicity, chemotherapy can mediate tumor reduction through immune modulation of the tumor microenvironment to promote anti-tumor immunity. Mature dendritic cells (DCs) play key roles in priming robust immune responses in tumor-bearing hosts. Here, we screened a panel of 21 anticancer agents with defined molecular targets for their ability to induce direct maturation of DCs. We identified ansamitocin P3, a microtubule-depolymerizing agent, as a potent inducer of phenotypic and functional maturation of DCs. Exposure of both murine spleen-derived and human monocyte-derived DCs to ansamitocin P3 triggered up-regulation of maturation markers and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, resulting in an enhanced T cell stimulatory capacity. Local administration of ansamitocin P3 induced maturation of skin Langerhans cells in vivo and promoted antigen uptake and extensive homing of tumor-resident DCs to tumor-draining lymph nodes. When used as an adjuvant in a specific vaccination approach, ansamitocin P3 dramatically increased activation of antigen-specific T cells. Finally, we demonstrate that ansamitocin P3, due to its immunomodulatory properties, acts in synergy with antibody-mediated blockade of the T cell inhibitory receptors PD-1 and CTLA-4. The combination treatment was most effective and induced durable growth inhibition of established tumors. Mechanistically, we observed a reduced regulatory T cell frequency and improved T cell effector function at the tumor site. Taken together, our study unravels an immune-based anti-tumor mechanism exploited by microtubule-depolymerizing agents, including ansamitocin P3, and paves the way for future clinical trials combining this class of agents with immunotherapy.

  4. Rottlerin exerts its anti-tumor activity through inhibition of Skp2 in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yingying; Wang, Lixia; Ye, Xiantao; Zhao, Zhe; Zhou, Xiuxia; Li, Yali; Wang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Studies have investigated the tumor suppressive role of rottlerin in carcinogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms of rottlerin-induced anti-tumor activity are largely unclear. Skp2 (S-phase kinase associated protein 2) has been validated to play an oncogenic role in a variety of human malignancies. Therefore, inactivation of Skp2 could be helpful for the treatment of human cancers. In the current study, we explore whether rottlerin could inhibit Skp2 expression, leading to inhibition of cell growth, migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. We found that rottlerin treatment inhibited cell growth, induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. We also revealed that rottlerin suppressed cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. Mechanically, we observed that rottlerin significantly down-regulated the expression of Skp2 in breast cancer cells. Importantly, overexpression of Skp2 abrogated rottlerin-mediated tumor suppressive activity, whereas down-regulation of Skp2 enhanced rottlerin-triggered anti-tumor function. Strikingly, we identified that rottlerin exhibited its anti-tumor potential partly through inactivation of Skp2 in breast cancer. Our findings indicate that rottlerin could be a potential safe agent for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:27582552

  5. Nanovectorized radiotherapy: a new strategy to induce anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Vanpouille-Box, Claire; Hindré, François

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental findings show that activation of the host immune system is required for the success of chemo- and radiotherapy. However, clinically apparent tumors have already developed multiple mechanisms to escape anti-tumor immunity. The fact that tumors are able to induce a state of tolerance and immunosuppression is a major obstacle in immunotherapy. Hence, there is an overwhelming need to develop new strategies that overcome this state of immune tolerance and induce an anti-tumor immune response both at primary and metastatic sites. Nanovectorized radiotherapy that combines ionizing radiation and nanodevices, is one strategy that could boost the quality and magnitude of an immune response in a predictable and designable fashion. The potential benefits of this emerging treatment may be based on the unique combination of immunostimulatory properties of nanoparticles with the ability of ionizing radiation to induce immunogenic tumor cell death. In this review, we will discuss available data and propose that the nanovectorized radiotherapy could be a powerful new strategy to induce anti-tumor immunity required for positive patient outcome. PMID:23087900

  6. Optimized selection of anti-tumor recombinant antibodies from phage libraries on intact cells.

    PubMed

    Pavoni, Emiliano; Vaccaro, Paola; Anastasi, Anna Maria; Minenkova, Olga

    2014-02-01

    Generation of human recombinant antibody libraries displayed on the surface of the filamentous phage and selection of specific antibodies against desirable targets allows production of fully human antibodies usable for repeated administration in humans. Various lymphoid tissues from immunized donors, such as lymph nodes or peripheral blood lymphocytes from individuals with tumor or lymphocytes infiltrating tumor masses may serve as a source of specific anti-tumor antibody repertoire for generation of tumor-focused phage display libraries. In the case of lack of tumor-associated antigens in the purified form, high affinity anti-tumor antibodies can be isolated through library panning on whole cells expressing these antigens. However, affinity selection against cell surface specific antigens within highly heterogeneous population of molecules is not a very efficient process that often results in the selection of unspecific antibodies or antibodies against intracellular antigens that are generally useless for targeted immunotherapy. In this work, we developed a new cell-based antibody selection protocol that, by eliminating the contamination of dead cells from the cell suspension, dramatically improves the selection frequency of anti-tumor antibodies recognizing cell surface antigens.

  7. A novel approach to the discovery of anti-tumor pharmaceuticals: searching for activators of liponecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Arlia-Ciommo, Anthony; Svistkova, Veronika; Mohtashami, Sadaf; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2016-01-01

    A recently conducted chemical genetic screen for pharmaceuticals that can extend longevity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has identified lithocholic acid as a potent anti-aging molecule. It was found that this hydrophobic bile acid is also a selective anti-tumor chemical compound; it kills different types of cultured cancer cells if used at concentrations that do not compromise the viability of non-cancerous cells. These studies have revealed that yeast can be successfully used as a model organism for high-throughput screens aimed at the discovery of selectively acting anti-tumor small molecules. Two metabolic traits of rapidly proliferating fermenting yeast, namely aerobic glycolysis and lipogenesis, are known to be similar to those of cancer cells. The mechanisms underlying these key metabolic features of cancer cells and fermenting yeast have been established; such mechanisms are discussed in this review. We also suggest how a yeast-based chemical genetic screen can be used for the high-throughput development of selective anti-tumor pharmaceuticals that kill only cancer cells. This screen consists of searching for chemical compounds capable of increasing the abundance of membrane lipids enriched in unsaturated fatty acids that would therefore be toxic only to rapidly proliferating cells, such as cancer cells and fermenting yeast. PMID:26636650

  8. Nanovectorized radiotherapy: a new strategy to induce anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Vanpouille-Box, Claire; Hindré, François

    2012-01-01

    Recent experimental findings show that activation of the host immune system is required for the success of chemo- and radiotherapy. However, clinically apparent tumors have already developed multiple mechanisms to escape anti-tumor immunity. The fact that tumors are able to induce a state of tolerance and immunosuppression is a major obstacle in immunotherapy. Hence, there is an overwhelming need to develop new strategies that overcome this state of immune tolerance and induce an anti-tumor immune response both at primary and metastatic sites. Nanovectorized radiotherapy that combines ionizing radiation and nanodevices, is one strategy that could boost the quality and magnitude of an immune response in a predictable and designable fashion. The potential benefits of this emerging treatment may be based on the unique combination of immunostimulatory properties of nanoparticles with the ability of ionizing radiation to induce immunogenic tumor cell death. In this review, we will discuss available data and propose that the nanovectorized radiotherapy could be a powerful new strategy to induce anti-tumor immunity required for positive patient outcome.

  9. Phenotypically distinct helper NK cells are required for gp96-mediated anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sedlacek, Abigail L.; Kinner-Bibeau, Lauren B.; Binder, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    A number of Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs), in the extracellular environment, are immunogenic. Following cross-presentation of HSP-chaperoned peptides by CD91+ antigen presenting cells (APCs), T cells are primed with specificity for the derivative antigen-bearing cell. Accordingly, tumor-derived HSPs are in clinical trials for cancer immunotherapy. We investigate the role of NK cells in gp96-mediated anti-tumor immune responses given their propensity to lyse tumor cells. We show that gp96-mediated rejection of tumors requires a unique and necessary helper role in NK cells. This helper role occurs during the effector phase of the anti-tumor immune response and is required for T cell and APC function. Gp96 activates NK cells indirectly via APCs to a phenotype distinct from NK cells activated by other mechanisms such as IL-2. While NK cells have both lytic and cytokine producing properties, we show that gp96 selectively activates cytokine production in NK cells, which is important in the HSP anti-tumor immune response, and leaves their cytotoxic capacity unchanged. PMID:27431727

  10. Synergistic Effects of Linderanolide B Combined with Arbutin, PTU or Kojic Acid on Tyrosinase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Lin, Yi-Chieh; Chen, Chung-Yi; Chou, Hsin-Yu; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Hui-Min D

    2015-01-01

    Melanin uncontrollable accumulation is a serious social problem to not only women, but also men, and causes pigment over-expression disorders such as freckles, melasma or pigmented acne scars. The synergism is used widely in medication, and the effectiveness makes the drug applications more valuable. Within this experiment, three well-known compounds were chosen: kojic acid, 1-phenyl-2-thiourea (PTU) and arbutin, and they were combined individually with our substance linderanolide B, which is purified from Cinnamomum subavenium. Hence, deciphering the synergistic action of possible whitening agents was the goal of this study. The tyrosinase activity, melanin content, and the combination index (CI) values were observed in B16F10 cells, in addition, the consequences were detected by isobologram analysis. We discovered that certain melanin inhibitors showed synergistic properties when they were combined together to suppress tyrosinase activities. As a result, linderanolide B has a potential synergy on tyrosinase inhibition, and it can be used widely in cosmetic and medication industries.

  11. Synergistic and diminutive effects between halogen bond and lithium bond in complexes involving aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxiu; Cai, Mengyang; Li, Qingzhong; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo

    2015-10-01

    Quantum chemical calculations have been performed to study the interplay between halogen bond and lithium bond in the ternary systems FX-C6H5CN-LiF, FLi-C6H5CN-XF, and FLi-C6H5X-NH3 (X = Cl, Br, and I) involving aromatic compounds. This effect was studied in terms of interaction energy, electron density, charge transfer, and orbital interaction. The results showed that both FX-C6H5CN-LiF and FLi-C6H5CN-XF exhibit diminutive effects with the weakening of halogen bond and lithium bond, while FLi-C6H5X-NH3 displays synergistic effects with the strengthening of halogen bond and lithium bond. The nature of halogen bond and lithium bond in the corresponding binary complexes has been unveiled by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules methodology and energy decomposition analysis.

  12. Synergistic and Antagonistic Effects of Combined Subzero Temperature and High Pressure on Inactivation of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Marwen; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Gervais, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The combined effects of subzero temperature and high pressure on the inactivation of Escherichia coli K12TG1 were investigated. Cells of this bacterial strain were exposed to high pressure (50 to 450 MPa, 10-min holding time) at two temperatures (−20°C without freezing and 25°C) and three water activity levels (aw) (0.850, 0.992, and ca. 1.000) achieved with the addition of glycerol. There was a synergistic interaction between subzero temperature and high pressure in their effects on microbial inactivation. Indeed, to achieve the same inactivation rate, the pressures required at −20°C (in the liquid state) were more than 100 MPa less than those required at 25°C, at pressures in the range of 100 to 300 MPa with an aw of 0.992. However, at pressures greater than 300 MPa, this trend was reversed, and subzero temperature counteracted the inactivation effect of pressure. When the amount of water in the bacterial suspension was increased, the synergistic effect was enhanced. Conversely, when the aw was decreased by the addition of solute to the bacterial suspension, the baroprotective effect of subzero temperature increased sharply. These results support the argument that water compression is involved in the antimicrobial effect of high pressure. From a thermodynamic point of view, the mechanical energy transferred to the cell during the pressure treatment can be characterized by the change in volume of the system. The amount of mechanical energy transferred to the cell system is strongly related to cell compressibility, which depends on the water quantity in the cytoplasm. PMID:16391037

  13. Magnesium sulfate and nimesulide have synergistic effects on rescuing brain damage after transient focal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang-Chao; Huang, Chih-Yuan; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Wu, Ming-Hsiu; Tsai, Kuen-Jer

    2012-05-01

    Magnesium sulfate and nimesulide are commonly used drugs with reported neuroprotective effects. Their combination as stroke treatment has the potential benefits of decreasing individual drug dosage and fewer adverse effects. This study evaluated their synergistic effects and compared a low-dose combination with individual drug alone and placebo. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 90 min of focal ischemia with intraluminal suture occlusion of the middle cerebral artery followed by reperfusion. The rats were randomly assigned to receive one of the following treatments: placebo, magnesium sulfate (MgSO₄; 45 mg/kg) intravenously immediately after the induction of middle cerebral artery occlusion, nimesulide (6 mg/kg) intraperitoneally before reperfusion, and combined therapy. Three days after the ischemia-reperfusion insult, therapeutic outcome was assessed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and a 28-point neurological severity scoring system. Cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E₂, myeloperoxidase, and caspase-3 expression after treatment were evaluated using Western blot analyses and immunohistochemical staining, followed by immunoreactive cell analysis using tissue cytometry. Only the combination treatment group showed a significant decrease in infarction volume (10.93±6.54% versus 26.43±7.08%, p<0.01), and neurological severity score (p<0.05). Low-dose MgSO₄ or nimesulide showed no significant neuroprotection. There was also significant suppression of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E₂, myeloperoxidase, and caspase-3 expression in the combination treatment group, suggesting that the combination of the two drugs improved the neuroprotective effects of each individual drug. MgSO₄ and nimesulide have synergistic effects on ischemia-reperfusion insults. Their combination helps decrease drug dosage and adverse effects. Combined treatment strategies may help to combat stroke-induced brain damage in the future.

  14. Synergistic Antibacterial Effects of Nanoparticles Encapsulated with Scutellaria baicalensis and Pure Chlorhexidine on Oral Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ken Cham-Fai; Seneviratne, Chaminda Jayampath; Li, Xuan; Leung, Ping Chung; Lau, Clara Bik San; Wong, Chi-Hin; Pang, Ka Yan; Wong, Chun Wai; Wat, Elaine; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Scutellaria baicalensis (SB) is a traditional Chinese medicine for treating infectious and inflammatory diseases. Our recent study shows potent antibacterial effects of nanoparticle-encapsulated chlorhexidine (Nano-CHX). Herein, we explored the synergistic effects of the nanoparticle-encapsulated SB (Nano-SB) and Nano-CHX on oral bacterial biofilms. Loading efficiency of Nano-SB was determined by thermogravimetric analysis, and its releasing profile was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatographyusing baicalin (a flavonoid compound of SB) as the marker. The mucosal diffusion assay on Nano-SB was undertaken in a porcine model. The antibacterial effects of the mixed nanoparticles (Nano-MIX) of Nano-SB and Nano-CHX at 9:1 (w/w) ratio were analyzed in both planktonic and biofilm modes of representative oral bacteria. The Nano-MIX was effective on the mono-species biofilms of Streptococcus (S.) mutans, S. sobrinus, Fusobacterium (F.) nucleatum, and Aggregatibacter (A.) actinomycetemcomitans (MIC 50 μg/mL) at 24 h, and exhibited an enhanced effect against the multi-species biofilms such as S. mutans, F. nucleatum, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and Porphyromonas (P.) gingivalis (MIC 12.5 μg/mL) at 24 h that was supported by the findings of both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CLSM). This study shows enhanced synergistic antibacterial effects of the Nano-MIX on common oral bacterial biofilms, which could be potentially developed as a novel antimicrobial agent for clinical oral/periodontal care. PMID:28335189

  15. Isolated and synergistic effects of PM10 and average temperature on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Samya de Lara Lins de Araujo; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Schwartz, Joel; Zanobetti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the effect of air pollution and temperature on mortality due to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. METHODS We evaluated the isolated and synergistic effects of temperature and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 10 µm (PM10) on the mortality of individuals > 40 years old due to cardiovascular disease and that of individuals > 60 years old due to respiratory diseases in Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil, between 1998 and 2008. Three methodologies were used to evaluate the isolated association: time-series analysis using Poisson regression model, bidirectional case-crossover analysis matched by period, and case-crossover analysis matched by the confounding factor, i.e., average temperature or pollutant concentration. The graphical representation of the response surface, generated by the interaction term between these factors added to the Poisson regression model, was interpreted to evaluate the synergistic effect of the risk factors. RESULTS No differences were observed between the results of the case-crossover and time-series analyses. The percentage change in the relative risk of cardiovascular and respiratory mortality was 0.85% (0.45;1.25) and 1.60% (0.74;2.46), respectively, due to an increase of 10 μg/m3 in the PM10 concentration. The pattern of correlation of the temperature with cardiovascular mortality was U-shaped and that with respiratory mortality was J-shaped, indicating an increased relative risk at high temperatures. The values for the interaction term indicated a higher relative risk for cardiovascular and respiratory mortalities at low temperatures and high temperatures, respectively, when the pollution levels reached approximately 60 μg/m3. CONCLUSIONS The positive association standardized in the Poisson regression model for pollutant concentration is not confounded by temperature, and the effect of temperature is not confounded by the pollutant levels in the time-series analysis. The simultaneous exposure

  16. Synergistic effect on thermal behavior during co-pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass model components blend with bituminous coal.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Shuzhong; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Lin; Meng, Haiyu

    2014-10-01

    Co-thermochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass and coal has been investigated as an effective way to reduce the carbon footprint. Successful evaluating on thermal behavior of the co-pyrolysis is prerequisite for predicting performance and optimizing efficiency of this process. In this paper, pyrolysis and kinetics characteristics of three kinds of lignocellulosic biomass model components (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin) blended with a kind of Chinese bituminous coal were explored by thermogravimetric analyzer and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose method. The results indicated that the addition of model compounds had different synergistic effects on thermal behavior of the bituminous coal. The cellulose showed positive synergistic effects on the thermal decomposition of the coal bituminous coal with lower char yield than calculated value. For hemicellulose and lignin, whether positive or negative synergistic was related to the mixed ratio and temperature range. The distribution of the average activation energy values for the mixtures showed nonadditivity performance.

  17. Synergistic Effects of Clostridium perfringens Enterotoxin and Beta Toxin in Rabbit Small Intestinal Loops

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Menglin; Gurjar, Abhijit; Theoret, James R.; Garcia, Jorge P.; Beingesser, Juliann; Freedman, John C.; Fisher, Derek J.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of Clostridium perfringens type C to cause human enteritis necroticans (EN) is attributed to beta toxin (CPB). However, many EN strains also express C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), suggesting that CPE could be another contributor to EN. Supporting this possibility, lysate supernatants from modified Duncan-Strong sporulation (MDS) medium cultures of three CPE-positive type C EN strains caused enteropathogenic effects in rabbit small intestinal loops, which is significant since CPE is produced only during sporulation and since C. perfringens can sporulate in the intestines. Consequently, CPE and CPB contributions to the enteropathogenic effects of MDS lysate supernatants of CPE-positive type C EN strain CN3758 were evaluated using isogenic cpb and cpe null mutants. While supernatants of wild-type CN3758 MDS lysates induced significant hemorrhagic lesions and luminal fluid accumulation, MDS lysate supernatants of the cpb and cpe mutants caused neither significant damage nor fluid accumulation. This attenuation was attributable to inactivating these toxin genes since complementing the cpe mutant or reversing the cpb mutation restored the enteropathogenic effects of MDS lysate supernatants. Confirming that both CPB and CPE are needed for the enteropathogenic effects of CN3758 MDS lysate supernatants, purified CPB and CPE at the same concentrations found in CN3758 MDS lysates also acted together synergistically in rabbit small intestinal loops; however, only higher doses of either purified toxin independently caused enteropathogenic effects. These findings provide the first evidence for potential synergistic toxin interactions during C. perfringens intestinal infections and support a possible role for CPE, as well as CPB, in some EN cases. PMID:24778117

  18. Synergistic effect of cisplatin and synchrotron irradiation on F98 gliomas growing in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Clement; Fernandez, Manuel; Requardt, Herwig; Wion, Didier; Vial, Jean Claude; Segebarth, Christoph; van der Sanden, Boudewijn

    2013-09-01

    Among brain tumors, glioblastoma multiforme appears as one of the most aggressive forms of cancer with poor prognosis and no curative treatment available. Recently, a new kind of radio-chemotherapy has been developed using synchrotron irradiation for the photoactivation of molecules with high-Z elements such as cisplatin (PAT-Plat). This protocol showed a cure of 33% of rats bearing the F98 glioma but the efficiency of the treatment was only measured in terms of overall survival. Here, characterization of the effects of the PAT-Plat on tumor volume and tumor blood perfusion are proposed. Changes in these parameters may predict the overall survival. Firstly, changes in tumor growth of the F98 glioma implanted in the hindlimb of nude mice after the PAT-Plat treatment and its different modalities have been characterized. Secondly, the effects of the treatment on tumor blood perfusion have been observed by intravital two-photon microscopy. Cisplatin alone had no detectable effect on the tumor volume. A reduction of tumor growth was measured after a 15 Gy synchrotron irradiation, but the whole therapy (15 Gy irradiation + cisplatin) showed the largest decrease in tumor growth, indicating a synergistic effect of both synchrotron irradiation and cisplatin treatment. A high number of unperfused vessels (52%) were observed in the peritumoral area in comparison with untreated controls. In the PAT-Plat protocol the transient tumor growth reduction may be due to synergistic interactions of tumor-cell-killing effects and reduction of the tumor blood perfusion.

  19. Synergistic interactions between edge and area effects in a heavily fragmented landscape.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Robert M; Thorpe, Stephen; Didham, Raphael K

    2007-01-01

    Both area and edge effects have a strong influence on ecological processes in fragmented landscapes, but there is little understanding of how these two factors might interact to exacerbate local species declines. To test for synergistic interactions between area and edge effects, we sampled a diverse beetle community in a heavily fragmented landscape in New Zealand. More than 35,000 beetles of approximately 900 species were sampled over large gradients in habitat area (10(-2) 10(6) ha) and distance from patch edge (2(0)-2(10) m from the forest edge into both the forest and adjacent matrix). Using a new approach to partition variance following an ordination analysis, we found that a synergistic interaction between habitat area and distance to edge was a more important determinant of patterns in beetle community composition than direct edge or area effects alone. The strength of edge effects in beetle-species composition increased nonlinearly with increasing fragment area. One important consequence of the synergy is that the slopes of species area (SA) curves constructed from habitat islands depend sensitively on the distance from edge at which sampling is conducted. Surprisingly, we found negative SA curves for communities sampled at intermediate distances from habitat edges, caused by differential edge responses of matrix- vs. forest-specialist species in fragments of increasing area. Our data indicate that distance to habitat edge has a consistently greater impact on beetle community composition than habitat area and that variation in the strength of edge effects may underlie many patterns that are superficially related to habitat area.

  20. Isolated and synergistic effects of chemical and structural defenses of two species of Tethya (Porifera: Demospongiae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Suzi Meneses; Cassiano, Keila Mara; Cavalcanti, Diana Negrão; Teixeira, Valéria Laneuville; Pereira, Renato Crespo

    2012-02-01

    Sponges are an important source of many interesting secondary metabolites with multiple ecological roles. Sponges can also use their spicules as a means of deterring consumers. The present study investigated the importance of chemicals and spicules as defensive strategies against predation for two congeneric sponge species from the Brazilian coast, Tethya rubra and Tethya maza. Crude extract and spicules differed somewhat in their effectiveness between these sponge species, with T. maza better defended than T. rubra against predation by the hermit crab Calcinus tibicen and synergistic effects stronger in T. rubra. These results show that defensive strategies may be similar between sponge species possessing monophyletic origin, and reveal the importance of research on congeneric species to understand the ecology and evolution of defensive strategies.

  1. Synergistic effects of atmospheric pressure plasma-emitted components on DNA oligomers: a Raman spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Edengeiser, Eugen; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Bründermann, Erik; Schneider, Simon; Benedikt, Jan; Bandow, Julia E; Havenith, Martina

    2015-11-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas have become of increasing importance in sterilization processes especially with the growing prevalence of multi-resistant bacteria. Albeit the potential for technological application is obvious, much less is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial inactivation. X-jet technology separates plasma-generated reactive particles and photons, thus allowing the investigation of their individual and joint effects on DNA. Raman spectroscopy shows that particles and photons cause different modifications in DNA single and double strands. The treatment with the combination of particles and photons does not only result in cumulative, but in synergistic effects. Profilometry confirms that etching is a minor contributor to the observed DNA damage in vitro. Schematics of DNA oligomer treatment with cold atmospheric-pressure plasma.

  2. The synergistic effects of traditional Chinese herbs and radiotherapy for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    JIA, LILI; MA, SHUMEI; HOU, XUE; WANG, XIN; QASED, ABU BAKER LAYTH; SUN, XUEFEI; LIANG, NAN; LI, HUICHENG; YI, HEQING; KONG, DEJUAN; LIU, XIAODONG; FAN, FEIYUE

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been demonstrated to have potent cytotoxic activity against certain malignant tumors. Ionizing radiation (IR) is one of the most effective methods used in the clinical treatment of cancer. The drawback of a single formula is that it limits the treatment efficacy for cancer, while comprehensive strategies require additional theoretical support. However, a combination of different antitumor treatment modalities is advantageous in restricting the non-specific toxicity often observed with an extremely high dose of a single regimen. The induction of apoptotic cell death is a significant process in tumor cells following radiotherapy or chemotherapy, and resistance to these treatments has been linked to a low propensity for apoptosis. Autophagy is a response of cancer cells to IR or chemotherapy, and involves the prominent formation of autophagic vacuoles in the cytoplasm. In this review, the synergistic effects of TCM and radiotherapy are summarized and the underlying mechanisms are illustrated, providing new therapeutic strategies for cancer. PMID:23760551

  3. Synergistic effect of Brønsted acid and platinum on purification of automobile exhaust gases

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wei; Li, Xin-Hao; Bao, Hong-Liang; Wang, Kai-Xue; Wei, Xiao; Cai, Yi-Yu; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic purification of automobile exhaust gases (CO, NOx and hydrocarbons) is one of the most practiced conversion processes used to lower the emissions and to reduce the air pollution. Nevertheless, the good performance of exhaust gas purification catalysts often requires the high consumption of noble metals such as platinum. Here we report that the Brønsted acid sites on the external surface of a microporous silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) act as a promoter for exhaust gas purification, effectively cutting the loading amount of platinum in the catalyst without sacrifice of performance. It is revealed that in the Pt-loaded SAPO-CHA catalyst, there exists a remarkable synergistic effect between the Brønsted acid sites and the Pt nanoparticles, the former helping to adsorb and activate the hydrocarbon molecules for NO reduction during the catalytic process. The thermal stability of SAPO-CHA also makes the composite catalyst stable and reusable without activity decay. PMID:23907148

  4. Synergistic effect of fungicides on resistant strains of Penicillium italicum and Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Díaz Borrás, A; Vila Aguilar, R; Hernández Giménez, E

    1988-08-01

    In vitro and in vivo tests were carried out to study the inhibitory effect of mixtures of sodium orthophenylphenate, methyl-1-(butyl-carbamoyl)-2-benzimidazole ('Benomyl') and sodium orthophenylphenate, 2-(4-thiazolil)-benzimidazole ('Thiabendazole') on growth of strains of Penicillium italicum and P. digitatum resistant to sodium orthophenylphenate, 'Benomyl' and 'Thiabendazole'. 'In vitro' tests showed a synergistic effect of the mixtures; 10 ppm of sodium orthophenylphenate and 10 ppm of the benzimidazolic compound in most cases resulted in complete growth inhibition. Navel oranges inoculated with P. italicum spores showed no damage after 7 days of incubation at 25 degrees C and 80-90% relative humidity when treated with a mixture of 100 ppm of sodium orthophenylphenate and 100 ppm of Thiabendazole.

  5. Pattern dependence in synergistic effects of total dose on single-event upset hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongxia; Ding, Lili; Xiao, Yao; Zhang, Fengqi; Luo, Yinhong; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Yuanming

    2016-09-01

    The pattern dependence in synergistic effects was studied in a 0.18 μm static random access memory (SRAM) circuit. Experiments were performed under two SEU test environments: 3 MeV protons and heavy ions. Measured results show different trends. In heavy ion SEU test, the degradation in the peripheral circuitry also existed because the measured SEU cross section decreased regardless of the patterns written to the SRAM array. TCAD simulation was performed. TID-induced degradation in nMOSFETs mainly induced the imprint effect in the SRAM cell, which is consistent with the measured results under the proton environment, but cannot explain the phenomena observed under heavy ion environment. A possible explanation could be the contribution from the radiation-induced GIDL in pMOSFETs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. U1532261).

  6. Synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups on the hydrolysis of cellulose over activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    The chemical oxidation of activated carbon by H2 O2 and H2 SO4 is investigated, structural and chemical modifications are characterized, and the materials are used as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Treatment with H2 O2 enlarges the pore size and imparts functional groups such as phenols, lactones, and carboxylic acids. H2 SO4 treatment targets the edges of carbon sheets primarily, and this effect is more pronounced with a higher temperature. Adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the adsorption of oligomers on functionalized carbon is dominated by van der Waals forces. The materials treated chemically are active for the hydrolysis of cellulose despite the relative weakness of most of their acid sites. It is proposed that a synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups enhances the activity by inducing a conformational change in the glucan chains if they are adsorbed at defect sites. This activates the glycosidic bonds for hydrolysis by in-plane functional groups.

  7. Synergistic effect of Brønsted acid and platinum on purification of automobile exhaust gases.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei; Li, Xin-Hao; Bao, Hong-Liang; Wang, Kai-Xue; Wei, Xiao; Cai, Yi-Yu; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic purification of automobile exhaust gases (CO, NOx and hydrocarbons) is one of the most practiced conversion processes used to lower the emissions and to reduce the air pollution. Nevertheless, the good performance of exhaust gas purification catalysts often requires the high consumption of noble metals such as platinum. Here we report that the Brønsted acid sites on the external surface of a microporous silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) act as a promoter for exhaust gas purification, effectively cutting the loading amount of platinum in the catalyst without sacrifice of performance. It is revealed that in the Pt-loaded SAPO-CHA catalyst, there exists a remarkable synergistic effect between the Brønsted acid sites and the Pt nanoparticles, the former helping to adsorb and activate the hydrocarbon molecules for NO reduction during the catalytic process. The thermal stability of SAPO-CHA also makes the composite catalyst stable and reusable without activity decay.

  8. Synergistic effect of Brønsted acid and platinum on purification of automobile exhaust gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei; Li, Xin-Hao; Bao, Hong-Liang; Wang, Kai-Xue; Wei, Xiao; Cai, Yi-Yu; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2013-08-01

    The catalytic purification of automobile exhaust gases (CO, NOx and hydrocarbons) is one of the most practiced conversion processes used to lower the emissions and to reduce the air pollution. Nevertheless, the good performance of exhaust gas purification catalysts often requires the high consumption of noble metals such as platinum. Here we report that the Brønsted acid sites on the external surface of a microporous silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) act as a promoter for exhaust gas purification, effectively cutting the loading amount of platinum in the catalyst without sacrifice of performance. It is revealed that in the Pt-loaded SAPO-CHA catalyst, there exists a remarkable synergistic effect between the Brønsted acid sites and the Pt nanoparticles, the former helping to adsorb and activate the hydrocarbon molecules for NO reduction during the catalytic process. The thermal stability of SAPO-CHA also makes the composite catalyst stable and reusable without activity decay.

  9. A multi-functional nanoplatform for tumor synergistic phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Jiao, Xiaojing; Chen, Qianqian; Ji, Yandan; Zhang, Xiaoge; Zhu, Xing; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2016-02-01

    Phototherapy, which mainly includes photothermal treatment (PTT) and photodynamic treatment (PDT), is a photo-initiated, noninvasive and effective approach for cancer treatment. The high accumulation of photosensitizers (PSs) in a targeted tumor is still a major challenge for efficient light conversion, to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and local hyperthermia. In this study, a simple and efficient hyaluronic acid (HA)-modified nanoplatform (HA-TiO2@MWCNTs) with high tumor-targeting ability, excellent phototherapy efficiency, low light-associated side effects and good water solubility was developed. It could be an effective carrier to load hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME), owing to the tubular conjugate structure. Apart from this, the as-prepared TiO2@MWCNTs nanocomposites could also be used as PSs for tumor PTT and PDT. Those results in vitro and in vivo showed that the anti-tumor effect of this system-mediated PTT/PDT were significantly better than those of single treatment manner. In addition, this drug delivery system could realize high ratio of drug loading, sustained drug release, prolonged circulation in vivo and active targeted accumulation in tumor. These results suggest that HA-TiO2@MWCNTs/HMME has high potential for tumor synergistic phototherapy as a smart theranostic nanoplatform.

  10. Levelling the playing field: screening for synergistic effects in coalesced bimetallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Rachel Lee Siew; Song, Xiaohui; Chen, Bo; Chong, Wen Han; Fang, Yin; Zhang, Hua; Wei, Jun; Chen, Hongyu

    2016-02-01

    Depending on the synthetic methods, bimetallic nanoparticles can have either core-shell, phase segregated, alloy, or partially coalesced structures, presenting different degrees of atomic mixing on their surface. Along with the variations of size and morphology, the structural differences make it difficult to compare the catalytic activity of bimetallic nanoparticles. In this article, we developed a facile screening method that can focus on the synergistic effects rather than structural differences. Prefabricated nanoparticles are mixed together to form linear aggregates and coalesced to form bimetallic junctions. Their hollow silica shells allow materials transport but prevent further aggregation. With a level playing field, this screening platform can identify the best bimetallic combination for a catalytic reaction, before optimizing the synthesis. This approach is more advantageous than the conventional approaches where structural difference may have dominant effects on the catalytic performance.Depending on the synthetic methods, bimetallic nanoparticles can have either core-shell, phase segregated, alloy, or partially coalesced structures, presenting different degrees of atomic mixing on their surface. Along with the variations of size and morphology, the structural differences make it difficult to compare the catalytic activity of bimetallic nanoparticles. In this article, we developed a facile screening method that can focus on the synergistic effects rather than structural differences. Prefabricated nanoparticles are mixed together to form linear aggregates and coalesced to form bimetallic junctions. Their hollow silica shells allow materials transport but prevent further aggregation. With a level playing field, this screening platform can identify the best bimetallic combination for a catalytic reaction, before optimizing the synthesis. This approach is more advantageous than the conventional approaches where structural difference may have dominant

  11. Synergistic effects in semidilute mixed solutions of alginate and lactose-modified chitosan (chitlac).

    PubMed

    Donati, Ivan; Haug, Ingvild J; Scarpa, Tommaso; Borgogna, Massimiliano; Draget, Kurt I; Skjåk-Braek, Gudmund; Paoletti, Sergio

    2007-03-01

    The present study specifically aimed at preparing and characterizing semidilute binary polymer mixtures of alginate and chitlac which might find an application in the field of cell encapsulation. A polyanion, alginate, and a polycation, a lactose-modified chitosan, were mixed under physiological conditions (pH 7.4 and NaCl 0.15) and at a semidilute concentration avoiding associative phase separation. The mutual solubility was found to be dependent on the charge screening effect of the added NaCl salt, being prevented below 0.05 M NaCl. A comparison with the behavior of the polyanion (alginate) under the same experimental conditions revealed that both the viscosity and the relaxation times of the binary polymer solutions are strongly affected by the presence of the polycation. In particular, the occurrence of electrostatic interactions between the two oppositely charged polysaccharides led to a synergistic effect on the zero-shear viscosity of the solution, which showed a 4.2-fold increase with respect to that of the main component of the solution, i.e., alginate. Moreover, the relaxation time, calculated as the reciprocal of the critical share rate, markedly increased upon reducing the alginate fraction in the binary polysaccharide solution. However, the formation of the soluble complexes and the synergistic effect are reduced upon increasing the concentration of the 1:1 electrolyte. By containing a gel-forming polyanion (alginate, e.g., with Ca(2+) ions) and a bioactive polycation (chitlac, bearing a beta-linked D-galactose), the present system can be regarded as a first step toward the development of biologically active scaffold from polysaccharide mixtures.

  12. Synergistic effects of the anti-cholinergic R,R-glycopyrrolate with anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Andreas; Bauhofer, Artur; Petzold, Ursula; Cnota, Peter J; Maus, Joachim; Brune, Kay; Szelenyi, Stefan

    2006-12-15

    Currently, much effort is geared towards developing therapies that impact on the inflammation in respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD, assuming that this will improve disease pathology. R,R-Glycopyrrolate, a quaternary ammonium compound, is a muscarinic receptor antagonist with the potential to be used as a long-acting bronchodilator in patients with asthma and COPD. In this study we evaluated whether the combination of R,R-glycopyrrolate with known anti-inflammatory drugs results in synergistic effects. Human primary monocytes were used as an in vitro model system. M3, M4, M1 and M2 receptors were expressed in these cells in descending order. The combinatory effects of the drugs on the release of TNF-alpha after lipopolysaccharide stimulation were analyzed. R,R-Glycopyrrolate alone did not affect LPS induced TNF-alpha release. The PDE4 inhibitor rolipram dose dependently inhibited the TNF-alpha release. Maximum inhibition was around 70%. The IC(35) for rolipram was 68.9+/-15.2 nM. The simultaneous administration of 10 microM R,R-glycopyrrolate reduced the IC(35) to 1.70+/-1.18 nM. The anti-histamine azelastine inhibited TNF-alpha release dose dependently. The simultaneous administration of R,R-glycopyrrolate did not influence the action of azelastine. The corticosteroid budesonide inhibited the TNF-alpha release dose dependently with an IC(50) of 0.55+/-0.13 nM. The simultaneous administration of 10 microM R,R-glycopyrrolate reduced the IC(50) to 0.13+/-0.03 nM. Finally, R,R-glycopyrrolate was most effective in the triple combination with budesonide and rolipram in the reduction of TNF-alpha release. In conclusion, R,R-glycopyrrolate acts synergistically with the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram and the steroid budesonide in inhibiting inflammatory mediators.

  13. HSP70 inhibition synergistically enhances the effects of magnetic fluid hyperthermia in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Court, Karem A; Hatakeyama, Hiroto; Wu, Sherry Y; Lingegowda, Mangala S; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Ju-Seog, Lee; Rinaldi, Carlos; Juan, Eduardo J; Sood, Anil K; Torres-Lugo, Madeline

    2017-02-21

    Hyperthermia has been investigated as a potential treatment for cancer. However, specificity in hyperthermia application remains a significant challenge. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) may be an alternative to surpass such a challenge, but implications of MFH at the cellular level are not well understood. Therefore, the present work focused on the examination of gene expression after MFH treatment and using such information to identify target genes that when inhibited could produce an enhanced therapeutic outcome after MFH. Genomic analyzes were performed using ovarian cancer cells exposed to MFH for 30 min at 43°C, which revealed that heat shock protein genes, including HSPA6, were upregulated. HSPA6 encodes the heat shock protein Hsp70, and its expression was confirmed by PCR in HeyA8 and A2780cp20 ovarian cancer cells. Two strategies were investigated to inhibit Hsp70 related genes, siRNA and Hsp70 protein function inhibition by 2-phenylethyenesulfonamide (PES). Both strategies resulted in decreased cell viability following exposure to MFH. Combination index was calculated for PES treatment reporting a synergistic effect. In vivo efficacy experiments with HSPA6 siRNA and MFH were performed using the A2780cp20 and HeyA8 ovarian cancer mouse models. A significantly reduction in tumor growth rate was observed with combination therapy. PES and MFH efficacy were also evaluated in the HeyA8 intraperitoneal tumor model, and resulted in robust antitumor effects. This work demonstrated that HSP70 inhibition combination with MFH generate a synergistic effect and could be a promising target to enhance MFH therapeutic outcomes in ovarian cancer.

  14. Synergistic effects of combined phytochemicals and skin cancer prevention in SENCAR mice.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Magdalena C; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Tolstykh, Olga; Hanausek, Margaret; Walaszek, Zbigniew; Slaga, Thomas J

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the inhibitory effect of combined phytochemicals on chemically induced murine skin tumorigenesis. Our hypothesis was that concurrent topical and dietary treatment with selected compounds would lead to more efficient prevention of skin cancer. We tested ellagic acid and calcium D-glucarate as components of diets, while resveratrol was applied topically; grape seed extract was applied topically or in the diet. The 4-week inflammatory-hyperplasia assay based on the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced skin carcinogenesis model in SENCAR mice was used. We have found that all the selected combinations caused a marked decrease of epidermal thickness compared with the DMBA-treated group and also with groups treated with a single compound and DMBA. All combinations of resveratrol with other compounds showed a synergistic effect on hyperplasia and Ha-ras mutations. Skin tissue of mice receiving the combinations showed decreased cell proliferation and Bcl2 expression; decreased p21, a regulator of cell cycle; and decreased marker of inflammation cyclooxygenase-2. All the selected combinations diminished the DMBA-induced mRNA expression of the CYP1B1 level, and also caused a marked decrease of proto-oncogenes c-jun and c-fos, components of transcription factor activator protein. In conclusion, all combinations showed either additive or synergistic effects and their joint actions allowed for decreasing the doses of the compounds. Especially, resveratrol combinations with ellagic acid, grape seed extract, and other phytochemicals are very potent inhibitors of skin tumorgenesis, based on the suppression of epidermal hyperplasia as well as on the modulation of intermediate biomarkers of cell proliferation, cell survival, inflammation, oncogene mutation, and apoptosis.

  15. Robust cycling of Li-O2 batteries through the synergistic effect of blended electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Gon; Lee, Je-Nam; Lee, Dong Jin; Park, Jung-Ki; Choi, Jang Wook

    2013-03-01

    Despite their exceptionally large specific capacities, the use of Li-O2 batteries has been limited because of their poor cycle lives, which originates from irreversible reaction processes during each cycle. Recent investigations have found that electrolyte decomposition is one of the most critical reasons for capacity decay. Herein, we report that a blended electrolyte, consisting of a carbonate solvent and an ionic liquid, improves the cycle lives of Li-O2 batteries remarkably through a synergistic effect from both components. Both electrolyte components perform complementary functions to each other: The ionic liquid suppresses the decomposition of the carbonate solvent, and the carbonate solvent resolves the poor ionic conductivity of the ionic liquid. This study confirms the importance and opportunities for the use of electrolytes in Li-O2 batteries.

  16. Why Do Lithium–Oxygen Batteries Fail: Parasitic Chemical Reactions and Their Synergistic Effect

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiahui; Dong, Qi; Cheng, Qingmei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As an electrochemical energy‐storage technology with the highest theoretical capacity, lithium–oxygen batteries face critical challenges in terms of poor stabilities and low charge/discharge round‐trip efficiencies. It is generally recognized that these issues are connected to the parasitic chemical reactions at the anode, electrolyte, and cathode. While the detailed mechanisms of these reactions have been studied separately, the possible synergistic effects between these reactions remain poorly understood. To fill in the knowledge gap, this Minireview examines literature reports on the parasitic chemical reactions and finds the reactive oxygen species a key chemical mediator that participates in or facilitates nearly all parasitic chemical reactions. Given the ubiquitous presence of oxygen in all test cells, this finding is important. It offers new insights into how to stabilize various components of lithium–oxygen batteries for high‐performance operations and how to eventually materialize the full potentials of this promising technology. PMID:27381169

  17. Synergistic deleterious effect of chronic stress and sodium azide in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Cortés, María José; Espinosa-Oliva, Ana M; Sarmiento, Manuel; Argüelles, Sandro; Herrera, Antonio J; Mauriño, Raquel; Villarán, Ruth F; Venero, José L; Machado, Alberto; de Pablos, Rocío M

    2015-04-20

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Although the primary cause of the disease is presently unknown, to date several risk factors have been described. Evidence suggests that one of these risk factors could be chronic stress. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that chronic stress is able to induce Alzheimer's disease features after the administration of nontoxic doses of sodium azide. We found that chronic stress increases the levels of several proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, such as presenilin 1, presenilin 2, and S100β, besides inducing the aggregation of Tau, ubiquitin, and β-amyloid proteins in the hippocampus. More important, our work shows a synergistic effect of stress and sodium azide treatment leading to significant neuronal death in the mouse hippocampus. Our results point out that chronic stress is a risk factor contributing to amplify and accelerate Alzheimer's disease features in the hippocampus.

  18. Flexible, Luminescent Metal-Organic Frameworks Showing Synergistic Solid-Solution Effects on Porosity and Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Si-Yang; Zhou, Dong-Dong; He, Chun-Ting; Liao, Pei-Qin; Cheng, Xiao-Ning; Xu, Yan-Tong; Ye, Jia-Wen; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming

    2016-12-23

    Mixing molecular building blocks in the solid solution manner is a valuable strategy to obtain structures and properties in between the isostructural parent metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). We report nonlinear/synergistic solid-solution effects using highly related yet non-isostructural, phosphorescent Cu(I) triazolate frameworks as parent phases. Near the phase boundaries associated with conformational diversity and ligand heterogeneity, the porosity (+150 %) and optical O2 sensitivity (410 times, limit of detection 0.07 ppm) can be drastically improved from the best-performing parent MOFs and even exceeds the records hold by precious-metal complexes (3 ppm) and C70 (0.2 ppm).

  19. Why Do Lithium-Oxygen Batteries Fail: Parasitic Chemical Reactions and Their Synergistic Effect.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiahui; Dong, Qi; Cheng, Qingmei; Wang, Dunwei

    2016-09-12

    As an electrochemical energy-storage technology with the highest theoretical capacity, lithium-oxygen batteries face critical challenges in terms of poor stabilities and low charge/discharge round-trip efficiencies. It is generally recognized that these issues are connected to the parasitic chemical reactions at the anode, electrolyte, and cathode. While the detailed mechanisms of these reactions have been studied separately, the possible synergistic effects between these reactions remain poorly understood. To fill in the knowledge gap, this Minireview examines literature reports on the parasitic chemical reactions and finds the reactive oxygen species a key chemical mediator that participates in or facilitates nearly all parasitic chemical reactions. Given the ubiquitous presence of oxygen in all test cells, this finding is important. It offers new insights into how to stabilize various components of lithium-oxygen batteries for high-performance operations and how to eventually materialize the full potentials of this promising technology.

  20. Synergistic effect in treatment of C.I. Acid Red 2 by electrocoagulation and electrooxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X D; Hao, J D; Li, W S; Jin, H J; Yang, J; Huang, Q M; Lu, D S; Xu, H K

    2009-10-30

    An aqueous C.I. Acid Red 2 solution was decolorized by electrolysis using iron as anode. The decolorization mechanism was investigated through experimental observations on the electrochemical behavior of C.I. Acid Red 2 on Pt rotating disk electrode, UV-visible spectra of the solution and IR spectra of the coagulated mixtures. It is found that the decolorization efficiency is high, over 98.0% after 40 min, and this high decolorization efficiency can be ascribed to the synergistic effect of electrocoagulation and electrooxidation. The electrocoagulation results from the electrogenerated iron hydroxide and the electrooxidation results from electrogenerated ferric ions. The results obtained from IR spectra shows that the decolorization of C.I. Acid Red 2 by electrooxidation is due to the partial or complete cleavage of C-N bonds in C.I. Acid Red 2.

  1. Synergistic effect of piperonyl butoxide on acute toxicity of pyrethrins to Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Jeffrey; Gagne, James; Sharp, Janice

    2016-08-01

    A series of acute toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca was performed to quantify the synergistic effect of piperonyl butoxide (PBO) on pyrethrin toxicity. Concentrations of PBO <4 µg/L caused no toxicity enhancement, whereas toxicity increased with PBO concentrations between 4 µg/L and 15 µg/L. Additive toxicity calculations showed that true synergism accounted for an increase in pyrethrin toxicity (decrease in median lethal concentration) of 1.4-fold to 1.6-fold and varied only slightly between 4 µg/L and 15 µg/L PBO, whereas direct toxicity of PBO accounted for an additional increase in mixture toxicity (up to 3.2-fold) that was proportional to PBO concentration. The results can be used to assess the risk of measured or predicted co-occurring concentrations of PBO and pyrethrins in surface waters. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2111-2116. © 2016 SETAC.

  2. Synergistic effects between Lewis and Brønsted acids: application to the Prins cyclization.

    PubMed

    Breugst, Martin; Grée, René; Houk, K N

    2013-10-04

    Brønsted and Lewis acids can catalyze the Prins cyclization, an efficient method for the synthesis of tetrahydropyrans from homoallylic alcohols and carbonyl compounds. Synergistic effects between weak Brønsted and Lewis acids in these reactions have been analyzed by density functional theory [M06-L/def2-QZVP/IEFPCM(CH2Cl2)//M06-L/6-311+G(2df,2p)]. In order to characterize the reactivities of the employed Lewis acids, methyl anion and hydroxide affinities were determined. On the basis of our calculations, we found that the coordination of Lewis acids to carboxylic and sulfonic acids results in a significant increase in the Brønsted acidities of the latter.

  3. Dysregulation of innate immunity in ulcerative colitis patients who fail anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Angela C; Mallon, Dominic; Radford-Smith, Graham; Boyer, Julien; Piche, Thierry; Prescott, Susan L; Lawrance, Ian C; Tulic, Meri K

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study the innate immune function in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients who fail to respond to anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. METHODS Effects of anti-TNF therapy, inflammation and medications on innate immune function were assessed by measuring peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine expression from 18 inflammatory bowel disease patients pre- and 3 mo post-anti-TNF therapy. Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression and cytokine production post TLR stimulation was assessed in UC “responders” (n = 12) and “non-responders” (n = 12) and compared to healthy controls (n = 12). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured in blood to assess disease severity/activity and inflammation. Pro-inflammatory (TNF, IL-1β, IL-6), immuno-regulatory (IL-10), Th1 (IL-12, IFNγ) and Th2 (IL-9, IL-13, IL-17A) cytokine expression was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay while TLR cellular composition and intracellular signalling was assessed with FACS. RESULTS Prior to anti-TNF therapy, responders and non-responders had similar level of disease severity and activity. PBMC’s ability to respond to TLR stimulation was not affected by TNF therapy, patient’s severity of the disease and inflammation or their medication use. At baseline, non-responders had elevated innate but not adaptive immune responses compared to responders (P < 0.05). Following TLR stimulation, non-responders had consistently reduced innate cytokine responses to all TLRs compared to healthy controls (P < 0.01) and diminished TNF (P < 0.001) and IL-1β (P < 0.01) production compared to responders. This innate immune dysfunction was associated with reduced number of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) (P < 0.01) but increased number of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) (P = 0.03) as well as intracellular accumulation of IRAK4 in non-responders following TLR-2, -4 and -7 activation (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Reduced innate immunity in

  4. Synergistic Effect of Combined Hollow Viscus Injuries on Intra-Abdominal Abscess Formation.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Elena M; Croce, Martin A; Shahan, Charles P; Zarzaur, Ben L; Sharpe, John P; Dileepan, Amirtha; Boyd, Brandon S; Fabian, Timothy C

    2015-07-01

    The strong association between penetrating colon injuries and intra-abdominal abscess (IAA) formation is well established and attributed to high colon bacterial counts. Since trauma patients are rarely fasting at injury, stomach and small bowel colony counts are also elevated. We hypothesized that there is a synergistic effect of increased IAA formation with concomitant stomach and/or colon injuries when compared to small bowel injuries alone. Consecutive patients at a level one trauma center with penetrating small bowel (SB), stomach (S), and/or colon (C) injuries from 1996 to 2012 were reviewed. Logistic regression determined associations with IAA, adjusting for age, gender, Injury Severity Score (ISS), admission Glasgow Coma Score, transfusions, and concurrent pancreas or liver injury. A total of 1518 patients (91% male, ISS = 15.9 ± 8.4) were identified: 496 (33%) SB, 231 (15%) S, 288 (19%) C, 40 (3%) S + SB, 69 (5%) S + C, 338 (22%) C + SB, and 56 (4%) S + C + SB. 148 (10%) patients developed IAA: 4 per cent SB, 9 per cent S, 10 per cent C, 5 per cent S + SB, 22 per cent S + C, 13 per cent C + SB, and 25 per cent S + C + SB. Multiple logistic regression demonstrated that ISS, 24 hour blood transfusions, and concomitant pancreatic or liver injuries were associated with IAA. Compared with reference SB, S or S + SB injuries were no more likely to develop IAA. However, S + C, SB + C, and S + C + SB injuries were significantly more likely to have IAA. In conclusion, combined stomach + colon, small bowel + colon, and stomach, colon, + small bowel injuries have a synergistic effect leading to increased IAA formation after penetrating injuries. Heightened clinical suspicion for IAA formation is necessary in these combined hollow viscus injury patients.

  5. Polycatechol nanosheet: a superior nanocarrier for highly effective chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J.; Jia, X. D.; Ma, Z. F.; Jiang, X. E.; Sun, X. P.

    2016-02-01

    The integration of phototherapy and chemotherapy in a single system holds great promise to improve the therapeutic efficacy of tumor treatment, but it remains a key challenge. In this study, we describe our recent finding that polycatechol nanosheet (PCCNS) can be facilely prepared on a large scale via chemical polymerization at 4 °C, as an effective nanocarrier for loading high-density CuS nanocrystals as a photothermal agent. The resulting CuS/PCCNS nanocomposites exhibit good biocompatibility, strong stability, and a high photothermal conversion efficiency of ~45.7%. The subsequent loading of anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox) creates a superior theranostic agent with pH- and heat-responsive drug release, leading to almost complete destruction of mouse cervical tumor under NIR laser irradiation. This development offers an attractive theranostic agent for in vivo chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy toward biomedical applications.The integration of phototherapy and chemotherapy in a single system holds great promise to improve the therapeutic efficacy of tumor treatment, but it remains a key challenge. In this study, we describe our recent finding that polycatechol nanosheet (PCCNS) can be facilely prepared on a large scale via chemical polymerization at 4 °C, as an effective nanocarrier for loading high-density CuS nanocrystals as a photothermal agent. The resulting CuS/PCCNS nanocomposites exhibit good biocompatibility, strong stability, and a high photothermal conversion efficiency of ~45.7%. The subsequent loading of anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox) creates a superior theranostic agent with pH- and heat-responsive drug release, leading to almost complete destruction of mouse cervical tumor under NIR laser irradiation. This development offers an attractive theranostic agent for in vivo chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy toward biomedical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The calculation of the photothermal conversion

  6. Synergistic hepatoprotective effect of Schisandrae lignans with Astragalus polysaccharides on chronic liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fei; Zhang, Qiao-Yan; Jiao, Lei; Han, Ting; Zhang, Hong; Qin, Lu-Ping; Khalid, Rahman

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the synergistic hepatoprotective effect of lignans from Fructus Schisandrae chinensis (LFS) with Astragalus polysaccharides (APS) on chronic liver injury in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Subcutaneous injection of 10% CCl(4) twice a week for 3 months resulted in significantly (p<0.001) elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), asparate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities compared to controls. In the liver, significantly elevated levels (p<0.001) of malondialdehyde (MDA), lowered levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) (p<0.05) and catalase (CAT) (p<0.001), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (p<0.01)were observed following CCl(4) administration. 'LFS+ASP' treatment of rats at doses of 'LFS (45mg/kg)+APS (150mg/kg)' and 'LFS (135mg/kg)+APS (450mg/kg)' displayed hepatoprotective and antioxidative effects than the administration of either LFS or APS, as evident by lower (p<0.005 or 0.001) levels of serum ALT, AST, ALP and hepatic MDA (p<0.001) concentration, as well as higher SOD (p<0.05 or 0.005), CAT activities(p<0.01 or 0.005), GSH concentration (p<0.05 or 0.005) compared to the toxin treated group. Histopathological examinations revealed severe fatty degeneration in the toxin group, and mild damage in groups treated with 'LFS+APS' were observed. The coefficients drug interaction (CDI) between each individual drug and their combination (at the same dose of their single treatment) of these foregoing parameters were all less than 1, indicating that LFS and APS display hepatoprotective and antioxidant properties and act in a synergistic manner in CCl(4) induced liver injury in rats.

  7. Interleukin 17 induces cartilage collagen breakdown: novel synergistic effects in combination with proinflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, P; Henderson, N; Logan, C; Life, P; Cawston, T; Rowan, A

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether interleukin 17 (IL17), derived specifically from T cells, can promote type II collagen release from cartilage. The ability of IL17 to synergise with other proinflammatory mediators to induce collagen release from cartilage, and what effect anti-inflammatory agents had on this process, was also assessed. Methods: IL17 alone, or in combination with IL1, IL6, oncostatin M (OSM), or tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), was added to bovine nasal cartilage explant cultures. Proteoglycan and collagen release were determined. Collagenolytic activity was determined by bioassay. Chondroprotective effects of IL4, IL13, transforming growth factor ß1 (TGFß1) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) were assessed by inclusion in the explant cultures. Results: IL17 alone stimulated a dose dependent release of proteoglycan and type II collagen from bovine nasal cartilage explants. Suboptimal doses of IL17 synergised potently with TNFα, IL1, OSM, and IL6 to promote collagen degradation. This collagen release was completely inhibited by tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and BB-94 (a synthetic metalloproteinase inhibitor), and was significantly reduced by IL4, IL13, TGFß1, and IGF1. In IL17 treated chondrocytes, mRNA expression for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 was detected. Moreover, a synergistic induction of these MMPs was seen when IL17 was combined with other proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusions: IL17 can, alone and synergistically in combination with other proinflammatory cytokines, promote chondrocyte mediated MMP dependent type II collagen release from cartilage. Because levels of all these proinflammatory cytokines are raised in rheumatoid synovial fluids, this study suggests that IL17 may act as a potent upstream mediator of cartilage collagen breakdown in inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:12117676

  8. Synergistic Effects of Crizotinib and Temozolomide in Experimental FIG-ROS1 Fusion-Positive Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Das, Arabinda; Cheng, Ron Ron; Hilbert, Megan L.T.; Dixon-Moh, Yaenette N.; Decandio, Michele; Vandergrift, William Alex; Banik, Naren L.; Lindhorst, Scott M.; Cachia, David; Varma, Abhay K.; Patel, Sunil J.; Giglio, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GB) is the most common malignant brain tumor. Drug resistance frequently develops in these tumors during chemotherapy. Therefore, predicting drug response in these patients remains a major challenge in the clinic. Thus, to improve the clinical outcome, more effective and tolerable combination treatment strategies are needed. Robust experimental evidence has shown that the main reason for failure of treatments is signal redundancy due to coactivation of several functionally linked receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), including anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), c-Met (hepatocyte growth factor receptor), and oncogenic c-ros oncogene1 (ROS1: RTK class orphan) fusion kinase FIG (fused in GB)-ROS1. As such, these could be attractive targets for GB therapy. The study subjects consisted of 19 patients who underwent neurosurgical resection of GB tissues. Our in vitro and ex vivo models promisingly demonstrated that treatments with crizotinib (PF-02341066: dual ALK/c-Met inhibitor) and temozolomide in combination induced synergistic antitumor activity on FIG-ROS1-positive GB cells. Our results also showed that ex vivo FIG-ROS1+ slices (obtained from GB patients) when cultured were able to preserve tissue architecture, cell viability, and global gene-expression profiles for up to 14 days. Both in vitro and ex vivo studies indicated that combination blockade of FIG, p-ROS1, p-ALK, and p-Met augmented apoptosis, which mechanistically involves activation of Bim and inhibition of survivin, p-Akt, and Mcl-1 expression. However, it is important to note that we did not see any significant synergistic effect of crizotinib and temozolomide on FIG-ROS1-negative GB cells. Thus, these ex vivo culture results will have a significant impact on patient selection for clinical trials and in predicting response to crizotinib and temozolomide therapy. Further studies in different animal models of FIG-ROS1-positive GB cells are warranted to determine useful therapies for the

  9. Radioactive EGFR Antibody Cetuximab in Multimodal Cancer Treatment: Stability and Synergistic Effects With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Wolff, Christian; Nadrowitz, Roger; Breunig, Christian; Schild, Steven E.; Baehre, Manfred; Meller, Birgit

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Systemic therapies when added to whole brain radiotherapy have failed to improve the survival of patients with multiple brain metastases. The epidermal growth factor receptor antibody cetuximab is an attractive option, if it is able to cross the blood-brain barrier. This might be proven with molecular imaging if the radiolabeled antibody is stable long enough to be effective. This study investigated the stability of radiolabeled cetuximab (Erbitux) ({sup 131}I-Erbi) and potential synergistic effects with radiotherapy in vitro. Methods and Materials: Two cell lines were investigated, A431 with numerous epidermal growth factor receptors, and JIMT without epidermal growth factor receptors. We labeled 0.4 mg cetuximab with 50 MBq of [{sup 131}I] iodide. Stability was determined for 72 h. The cell cultures were incubated with {sup 131}I-Erbi or cold cetuximab for 72 h. Uptake and cell proliferation were measured every 24 h after no radiotherapy or irradiation with 2, 4, or 10 Gy. Results: The radiolabeling yield of {sup 131}I-Erbi was always >80%. The radiochemical purity was still 93.6% after 72 h. A431 cells showed a {sup 131}I-Erbi uptake about 100-fold greater than the JIMT controls. After 48 h, the A431 cultures showed significantly decreased proliferation. At 72 h after irradiation, {sup 131}I-Erbi resulted in more pronounced inhibition of cell proliferation than the cold antibody in all radiation dose groups. Conclusion: {sup 131}I-Erbi was stable for <=72 h. Radiotherapy led to increased tumor cell uptake of {sup 131}I-Erbi. Radiotherapy and {sup 131}I-Erbi synergistically inhibited tumor cell proliferation. These results provide the prerequisite data for a planned in vivo study of whole brain radiotherapy plus cetuximab for brain metastases.

  10. Synergistic Effect of Honey and Propolis on Cutaneous Wound Healing in Rats.

    PubMed

    Takzaree, Nasrin; Hadjiakhondi, Abbas; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Rouini, Mohammad Reza; Manayi, Azadeh

    2016-04-01

    Accelerating wound healing is now considered as a principle clinical treatment and increasing the quality and speed of healing which has always been emphasized by the scientists. Propolis and honey are natural bee products with wide range of biological and medicinal properties. This study was aimed to determine the synergistic effect of honey and propolis in wound healing of rat skin. A total of 75 Wistar rats weighing 200-250 gr were placed under general anesthesia and sterile conditions. Then a square shape wound with 1.5*1.5 mm dimension was made on the back of the neck. Animals were randomly divided into control, honey, propolis, combined honey propolis and phenytoin 1% groups, respectively. Rats were randomly divided into the following groups: 4th, 7th and, 14th days of treatment in each period of study. Wound area in the experimental group was covered once daily with a fixed amount of thyme honey, propolis, propolis and honey and phenytoin cream (1%), the control group did not receive any treatment. For histological studies, during the fourth, seventh and fourteenth day's rats were sacrificed and samples were taken from the wound and adjacent skin. After histological staining fibroblast, neutrophils, macrophages and vascular sections were counted in the wound bed. The macroscopic and microscopic evaluations showed that the percentage of wound healing on different days in the experimental and control groups were significant (P<0.05). The macroscopic and microscopic evaluation showed that the percentage of wound healing on different days in combined propolis and honey experimental group was significantly different from the control group (Multivariate ANOVA test) (P<0.05). Combined application of propolis and honey on the open wound healing in rats has a synergistic effect.

  11. Synergistic Effects Between Thioxanthones and Oxacillin Against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Bessa, Lucinda J; Palmeira, Andreia; Gomes, Ana S; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Sousa, Emília; Pinto, Madalena; Martins da Costa, Paulo

    2015-08-01

    The extensive use of antimicrobials is leaving medicine with few effective therapeutic options to treat many infections due to the fact that many organisms developed resistance to commonly used drugs. It is therefore pertinent to search not only for new antimicrobials but also for compounds able to restore or potentiate the activity of existing antibiotics. We have screened a library consisting of 40 (thio)xanthone derivatives for antibacterial activity and possible synergistic effects when used in combination with antibiotics. Nine out of the 40 compounds exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. Two xanthone derivatives, 1-formyl-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy (7), 2-formyl-3-hydroxy-4-methoxyxanthone (8) and the thioxanthone derivative 1-((2-(diethylamino)ethyl)amino)-4-propoxythioxanthone (10) and its hydrochloride form 13, showed activity against a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolate with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values lower than 256 μg/ml. Thioxanthone 10 demonstrated antibacterial activity and also synergy when combined with ampicillin and oxacillin against MRSA. Additionally, thioxanthone 1-(piperidin-1-yl)-4-propoxythioxanthone (9), despite not having antibacterial activity presented remarkable synergy with oxacillin against MRSA; the MIC of tioxanthone 9 and oxacillin when both were in combination were 128 and 8 μg/ml, respectively. Thioxanthones 9 and 10 were also found to be synergistic when both were combined. Subsequently, docking simulations between thioxanthones 9 and 10 and the allosteric domain of penicillin-binding protein 2A (PBP2A) were undertaken in AutoDock Vina. Both compounds had the ability to bind with an allosteric domain of PBP2A, which may explain their synergy with oxacillin. These two thioxanthone derivatives with different profiles may be promising tools for restoring the activity of oxacillin against MRSA.

  12. Synergistic Effects of Crizotinib and Temozolomide in Experimental FIG-ROS1 Fusion-Positive Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Das, Arabinda; Cheng, Ron Ron; Hilbert, Megan L T; Dixon-Moh, Yaenette N; Decandio, Michele; Vandergrift, William Alex; Banik, Naren L; Lindhorst, Scott M; Cachia, David; Varma, Abhay K; Patel, Sunil J; Giglio, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GB) is the most common malignant brain tumor. Drug resistance frequently develops in these tumors during chemotherapy. Therefore, predicting drug response in these patients remains a major challenge in the clinic. Thus, to improve the clinical outcome, more effective and tolerable combination treatment strategies are needed. Robust experimental evidence has shown that the main reason for failure of treatments is signal redundancy due to coactivation of several functionally linked receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), including anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), c-Met (hepatocyte growth factor receptor), and oncogenic c-ros oncogene1 (ROS1: RTK class orphan) fusion kinase FIG (fused in GB)-ROS1. As such, these could be attractive targets for GB therapy. The study subjects consisted of 19 patients who underwent neurosurgical resection of GB tissues. Our in vitro and ex vivo models promisingly demonstrated that treatments with crizotinib (PF-02341066: dual ALK/c-Met inhibitor) and temozolomide in combination induced synergistic antitumor activity on FIG-ROS1-positive GB cells. Our results also showed that ex vivo FIG-ROS1+ slices (obtained from GB patients) when cultured were able to preserve tissue architecture, cell viability, and global gene-expression profiles for up to 14 days. Both in vitro and ex vivo studies indicated that combination blockade of FIG, p-ROS1, p-ALK, and p-Met augmented apoptosis, which mechanistically involves activation of Bim and inhibition of survivin, p-Akt, and Mcl-1 expression. However, it is important to note that we did not see any significant synergistic effect of crizotinib and temozolomide on FIG-ROS1-negative GB cells. Thus, these ex vivo culture results will have a significant impact on patient selection for clinical trials and in predicting response to crizotinib and temozolomide therapy. Further studies in different animal models of FIG-ROS1-positive GB cells are warranted to determine useful therapies for the

  13. Evaluating the Synergistic Neutralizing Effect of Anti-Botulinum Oligoclonal Antibody Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Eran; Lachmi, Bat-El; Keren, Adi; Barnea, Ada; Marcus, Hadar; Cohen, Shoshana; David, Alon Ben; Zichel, Ran

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are considered some of the most lethal known substances. There are seven botulinum serotypes, of which types A, B and E cause most human botulism cases. Anti-botulinum polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) are currently used for both detection and treatment of the disease. However, significant improvements in immunoassay specificity and treatment safety may be made using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). In this study, we present an approach for the simultaneous generation of highly specific and neutralizing MAbs against botulinum serotypes A, B, and E in a single process. The approach relies on immunization of mice with a trivalent mixture of recombinant C-terminal fragment (Hc) of each of the three neurotoxins, followed by a parallel differential robotic hybridoma screening. This strategy enabled the cloning of seven to nine MAbs against each serotype. The majority of the MAbs possessed higher anti-botulinum ELISA titers than anti-botulinum PAbs and had up to five orders of magnitude greater specificity. When tested for their potency in mice, neutralizing MAbs were obtained for all three serotypes and protected against toxin doses of 10 MsLD50–500 MsLD50. A strong synergistic effect of up to 400-fold enhancement in the neutralizing activity was observed when serotype-specific MAbs were combined. Furthermore, the highly protective oligoclonal combinations were as potent as a horse-derived PAb pharmaceutical preparation. Interestingly, MAbs that failed to demonstrate individual neutralizing activity were observed to make a significant contribution to the synergistic effect in the oligoclonal preparation. Together, the trivalent immunization strategy and differential screening approach enabled us to generate highly specific MAbs against each of the A, B, and E BoNTs. These new MAbs may possess diagnostic and therapeutic potential. PMID:24475231

  14. Strong and Nonspecific Synergistic Antibacterial Efficiency of Antibiotics Combined with Silver Nanoparticles at Very Low Concentrations Showing No Cytotoxic Effect.

    PubMed

    Panáček, Aleš; Smékalová, Monika; Kilianová, Martina; Prucek, Robert; Bogdanová, Kateřina; Večeřová, Renata; Kolář, Milan; Havrdová, Markéta; Płaza, Grażyna Anna; Chojniak, Joanna; Zbořil, Radek; Kvítek, Libor

    2015-12-28

    The resistance of bacteria towards traditional antibiotics currently constitutes one of the most important health care issues with serious negative impacts in practice. Overcoming this issue can be achieved by using antibacterial agents with multimode antibacterial action. Silver nano-particles (AgNPs) are one of the well-known antibacterial substances showing such multimode antibacterial action. Therefore, AgNPs are suitable candidates for use in combinations with traditional antibiotics in order to improve their antibacterial action. In this work, a systematic study quantifying the synergistic effects of antibiotics with different modes of action and different chemical structures in combination with AgNPs against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus was performed. Employing the microdilution method as more suitable and reliable than the disc diffusion method, strong synergistic effects were shown for all tested antibiotics combined with AgNPs at very low concentrations of both antibiotics and AgNPs. No trends were observed for synergistic effects of antibiotics with different modes of action and different chemical structures in combination with AgNPs, indicating non-specific synergistic effects. Moreover, a very low amount of silver is needed for effective antibacterial action of the antibiotics, which represents an important finding for potential medical applications due to the negligible cytotoxic effect of AgNPs towards human cells at these concentration levels.

  15. Synergistic effect between amoxicillin and TLR ligands on dendritic cells from amoxicillin-delayed allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Quintero, Maria J; Torres, Maria J; Blazquez, Ana B; Gómez, Enrique; Fernandez, Tahia D; Doña, Inmaculada; Ariza, Adriana; Andreu, Inmaculada; Melendez, Lidia; Blanca, Miguel; Mayorga, Cristobalina

    2013-01-01

    Amoxicillin, a low-molecular-weight compound, is able to interact with dendritic cells inducing semi-maturation in vitro. Specific antigens and TLR ligands can synergistically interact with dendritic cells (DC), leading to complete maturation and more efficient T-cell stimulation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the synergistic effect of amoxicillin and the TLR2, 4 and 7/8 agonists (PAM, LPS and R848, respectively) in TLR expression, DC maturation and specific T-cell response in patients with delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions to amoxicillin. Monocyte-derived DC from 15 patients with DTH to amoxicillin and 15 controls were cultured with amoxicillin in the presence or absence of TLR2, 4 and 7/8 agonists (PAM, LPS and R848, respectively). We studied TLR1-9 gene expression by RT-qPCR, and DC maturation, lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production by flow cytometry. DC from both patients and controls expressed all TLRs except TLR9. The amoxicillin plus TLR2/4 or TLR7/8 ligands showed significant differences, mainly in patients: AX+PAM+LPS induced a decrease in TLR2 and AX+R848 in TLR2, 4, 7 and 8 mRNA levels. AX+PAM+LPS significantly increased the percentage of maturation in patients (75%) vs. controls (40%) (p=0.036) and T-cell proliferation (80.7% vs. 27.3% of cases; p=0.001). Moreover, the combinations AX+PAM+LPS and AX+R848 produced a significant increase in IL-12p70 during both DC maturation and T-cell proliferation. These results indicate that in amoxicillin-induced maculopapular exanthema, the presence of different TLR agonists could be critical for the induction of the innate and adaptive immune responses and this should be taken into account when evaluating allergic reactions to these drugs.

  16. Mechanisms mediating the synergistic anticancer effects of combined γ-tocotrienol and sesamin treatment.

    PubMed

    Akl, Mohamed R; Ayoub, Nehad M; Sylvester, Paul W

    2012-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have highlighted the ability of phytochemicals to reduce the risk of breast cancer by attenuating specific intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cell proliferation and survival. γ-Tocotrienol is a natural form of vitamin E that displays potent anticancer activity at doses that have no discernible toxicity toward normal cells. Sesamin is an abundant phytochemical found in sesame seed oil that also shows antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activity against human breast cancer cells. In this study, the combined treatment of subeffective doses of γ-tocotrienol and sesamin caused a synergistic inhibition of murine +SA mammary epithelial cell growth, as determined by the MTT assay and immunofluorescent Ki-67 staining. Western blot studies revealed that combined low-dose treatment of γ-tocotrienol and sesamin caused a marked reduction in EGF-induced ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors phosphorylation (activation) and a relatively large decrease in intracellular levels of total and/or phosphorylated c-Raf, MEK1/2, ERK1/2, PI3K, PDK1, Akt, p-NFκB, Jak1, Jak2, and Stat1, as compared to cells treated with only one compound or in the vehicle-treated control group. These findings demonstrate that the synergistic growth inhibitory effects of γ-tocotrienol and sesamin treatment are associated with suppression of EGF-dependent mitogenic signaling in mammary tumor cells and suggest that dietary supplementation with these phytochemicals may provide some benefits in the prevention and/or treatment of breast cancer.

  17. Synergistic effects of nicotine on arecoline-induced cytotoxicity in human buccal mucosal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y C; Hu, C C; Tseng, T H; Tai, K W; Lii, C K; Chou, M Y

    2001-09-01

    Areca quid chewing has been linked to oral submucous fibrosis and oral cancer. Arecoline, a major areca nut alkaloid, is considered to be the most important etiologic factor in the areca nut. In order to elucidate the pathobiological effects of arecoline, cytotoxicity assays, cellular glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and lipid peroxidation assay were employed to investigate cultured human buccal mucosal fibroblasts. To date, there is a large proportion of areca quid chewers who are also smokers. Furthermore, nicotine, the major product of cigarette smoking, was added to test how it modulated the cytotoxicity of arecoline. At a concentration higher than 50 microg/ml, arecoline was shown to be cytotoxic to human buccal fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner by the alamar blue dye colorimetric assay (P<0.05). In addition, arecoline significantly decreased GST activity in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). At concentrations of 100 microg/ml and 400 microg/ml, arecoline reduced GST activity about 21% and 46%, respectively, during a 24 h incubation period. However, arecoline at any test dose did not increase lipid peroxidation in the present human buccal fibroblast test system. The addition of extracellular nicotine acted synergistically on the arecoline-induced cytotoxicity. Arecoline at a concentration of 50 microg/ml caused about 30% of cell death over the 24 h incubation period. However, 2.5 mM nicotine enhanced the cytotoxic response and caused about 50% of cell death on 50 microg/ml arecoline-induced cytotoxicity. Taken together, arecoline may render human buccal mucosal fibroblasts more vulnerable to other reactive agents in cigarettes via GST reduction. The compounds of tobacco products may act synergistically in the pathogenesis of oral mucosal lesions in areca quid chewers. The data presented here may partly explain why patients who combined the habits of areca quid chewing and cigarette smoking are at greater risk of contracting oral cancer.

  18. Synergistic effects of F and Fe in co-doped TiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufei; Shen, Huiyuan; Liu, Yanhua

    2016-03-01

    TiO2 photocatalysts co-doped with F and Fe were synthesized by a sol-gel method. Synergistic effects of F and Fe in the co-doped TiO2 were verified by NH3 decomposition, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectroscopy, and was analyzed by the simulation based on the density functional theory (DFT). The results from NH3 decomposition confirmed that the cooperation of F and Fe broadened the optical response of TiO2 to visible light region and also enhanced the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 under ultraviolet light. XRD patterns, SEM and HRTEM images showed that the co-doped samples were nanometric anatase with an average particle size of 25 nm. Co-doping with F and Fe inhibited the grain growth of TiO2 from anatase to rutile and resulted in a larger lattice defect. XPS analysis exhibited that the doped F and Fe atoms were into the TiO2 lattice. UV-Vis absorption spectra showed that its optical absorption edge was moved up to approximately 617 nm and its ultraviolet absorption was also enhanced. The DFT results indicated that the cooperation of Fe 3d and O 2p orbits narrowed the band gap of TiO2 and F 2p orbit widened the upper valence bands. The synergistic electron density around F and Fe in co-doped TiO2 was capable to enhance the photo-chemical stability of TiO2.

  19. Synergistic effects of multiple treatments, and both DNA and RNA direct bindings on, green tea catechins.

    PubMed

    Kuzuhara, Takashi; Tanabe, Akitoshi; Sei, Yoshihisa; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Suganuma, Masami; Fujiki, Hirota

    2007-08-01

    This article reviews two main topics: (1) the synergistic effects of multiple treatments with green tea catechin and (2) the direct binding of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to both DNA and RNA molecules. Japanese drink green tea throughout the day, so we studied whether multiple treatments of cells with EGCG would enhance the expression of apoptosis-related genes, such as growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene (GADD153) and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor gene (p21(waf1)): The results suggest that the synergistic enhancement of both GADD153 and p21(waf1) gene expressions by multiple treatments plays a significant role in human cancer prevention with green tea beverage. Our previous observation-that nucleic acids extracted from catechin-treated cells are colored-allowed us to speculate that catechins directly interact with nucleic acids. Surface plasmon resonance assay (Biacore) indicated that four catechins, EGCG, (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), (+)-gallocatechin gallate (GCG), and (+)-catechin gallate (CG), bound to DNA oligomers. Cold spray ionization mass spectrometry (CSI-MS) analysis showed that one to three EGCG molecules bound to single-stranded 18 mers of DNA and RNA. Moreover, one or two molecules of EGCG bound to double-stranded AG:CT oligomers of various nucleotide lengths. Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) oligomers were detected only as EGCG-bound forms at high temperature, whereas at low temperature both the free and bound forms were detected, suggesting that EGCG protects double-stranded DNA oligomers from double-stranded melting into single-stranded DNA. We assume that catechins accumulate in both double-stranded DNA and RNA molecules through multiple administrations of green tea beverage in in vivo, and that the accumulated green tea catechins play a significant role for human cancer prevention.

  20. Predicting synergistic effects of resources and predators on foraging decisions by juvenile Steller sea lions.

    PubMed

    Frid, Alejandro; Burns, Jennifer; Baker, Gregory G; Thorne, Richard E

    2009-01-01

    Many theoretical and experimental studies suggest that synergistic interactions between resources and predators influence foraging decisions and their fitness consequences. This framework, however, has been ignored almost completely by hypotheses on causes of the population decline of Steller sea lions (SSLs) (Eumetopias jubatus) in western Alaska. By comparing predictions from a dynamic state variable model to empirical data on the behaviour of individuals instrumented with satellite-linked time-at-depth recorders, we develop and find preliminary support for the hypothesis that, during winter in Prince William Sound, juvenile SSLs (a) underutilise walleye pollock, a predictable resource in deep strata, due to predation risk from Pacific sleeper sharks, and (b) underutilise the potential energy bonanza of inshore aggregations of Pacific herring due to risk from either killer whales, larger conspecifics, or both. Further, under conditions of resource scarcity-induced by overfishing, long-term oceanographic cycles, or their combination-trade-offs between mortality risk and energy gain may influence demographic parameters. Accordingly, computer simulations illustrated the theoretical plausibility that a decline of Pacific herring in shallow strata would greatly increase the number of deep foraging dives, thereby increasing exposure to sleeper sharks and mortality rates. These results suggest that hypotheses on the decline of SSLs should consider synergistic effects of predators and resources on behaviour and mortality rates. Empirical support for our model, however, is limited and we outline tasks for empirical research that emerge from these limitations. More generally, in the context of today's conservation crises, our work illustrates that the greater the dearth of system-specific data, the greater the need to apply principles of behavioural ecology toward the understanding and management of large-scale marine systems.

  1. Synergistic Effect between Amoxicillin and TLR Ligands on Dendritic Cells from Amoxicillin-Delayed Allergic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Quintero, Maria J.; Torres, Maria J.; Blazquez, Ana B.; Gómez, Enrique; Fernandez, Tahia D.; Doña, Inmaculada; Ariza, Adriana; Andreu, Inmaculada; Melendez, Lidia; Blanca, Miguel; Mayorga, Cristobalina

    2013-01-01

    Amoxicillin, a low-molecular-weight compound, is able to interact with dendritic cells inducing semi-maturation in vitro. Specific antigens and TLR ligands can synergistically interact with dendritic cells (DC), leading to complete maturation and more efficient T-cell stimulation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the synergistic effect of amoxicillin and the TLR2, 4 and 7/8 agonists (PAM, LPS and R848, respectively) in TLR expression, DC maturation and specific T-cell response in patients with delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions to amoxicillin. Monocyte-derived DC from 15 patients with DTH to amoxicillin and 15 controls were cultured with amoxicillin in the presence or absence of TLR2, 4 and 7/8 agonists (PAM, LPS and R848, respectively). We studied TLR1-9 gene expression by RT-qPCR, and DC maturation, lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production by flow cytometry. DC from both patients and controls expressed all TLRs except TLR9. The amoxicillin plus TLR2/4 or TLR7/8 ligands showed significant differences, mainly in patients: AX+PAM+LPS induced a decrease in TLR2 and AX+R848 in TLR2, 4, 7 and 8 mRNA levels. AX+PAM+LPS significantly increased the percentage of maturation in patients (75%) vs. controls (40%) (p=0.036) and T-cell proliferation (80.7% vs. 27.3% of cases; p=0.001). Moreover, the combinations AX+PAM+LPS and AX+R848 produced a significant increase in IL-12p70 during both DC maturation and T-cell proliferation. These results indicate that in amoxicillin-induced maculopapular exanthema, the presence of different TLR agonists could be critical for the induction of the innate and adaptive immune responses and this should be taken into account when evaluating allergic reactions to these drugs. PMID:24066120

  2. Akbu-LAAO exhibits potent anti-tumor activity to HepG2 cells partially through produced H2O2 via TGF-β signal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chunmei; Liu, Shuqing; Dong, Panpan; Zhao, Dongting; Wang, Chengyi; Tao, Zhiwei; Sun, Ming-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we characterized the biological properties of Akbu-LAAO, a novel L-amino acid oxidase from Agkistrodon blomhoffii ussurensis snake venom (SV). Current work investigated its in vitro anti-tumor activity and underlying mechanism on HepG2 cells. Akbu-LAAO inhibited HepG2 growth time and dose-dependently with an IC50 of ~38.82 μg/mL. It could induce the apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Akbu-LAAO exhibited cytotoxicity by inhibiting growth and inducing apoptosis of HepG2 as it showed no effect on its cell cycle. The inhibition of Akbu-LAAO to HepG2 growth partially relied on enzymatic-released H2O2 as catalase only partially antagonized this effect. cDNA microarray results indicated TGF-β signaling pathway was linked to the cytotoxicity of Akbu-LAAO on HepG2. TGF-β pathway related molecules CYR61, p53, GDF15, TOB1, BTG2, BMP2, BMP6, SMAD9, JUN, JUNB, LOX, CCND1, CDK6, GADD45A, CDKN1A were deregulated in HepG2 following Akbu-LAAO stimulation. The presence of catalase only slightly restored the mRNA changes induced by Akbu-LAAO for differentially expressed genes. Meanwhile, LDN-193189, a TGF-β pathway inhibitor reduced Akbu-LAAO cytotoxicity on HepG2. Collectively, we reported, for the first time, SV-LAAO showed anti-tumor cell activity via TGF-β pathway. It provides new insight of SV-LAAO exhibiting anti-tumor effect via a novel signaling pathway. PMID:26655928

  3. Oxidation and biodegradation of polyethylene films containing pro-oxidantadditives: Synergistic effects of sunlight exposure, thermal aging and fungal biodegradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synergistic effects of sunlight exposure, thermal aging and fungal biodegradation on the oxidation and biodegradation of linear low density poly (ethylene) PE-LLD films containing pro-oxidant were examined. To achieve oxidation and degradation, films were first exposed to the sunlight for 93 days du...

  4. The Synergistic Effect of Teaching a Combined Explicit Movement and Phonological Awareness Program to Preschool Aged Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callcott, Deborah; Hammond, Lorraine; Hill, Susan

    2015-01-01

    While movement is critical to young children's development, there is an ongoing debate about the time devoted to teaching movement in early childhood classrooms. Nevertheless, research has established a link between specific precursor motor skills and early literacy development. This study investigated the synergistic effect of practising specific…

  5. Bovine lactoferrin binds oleic acid to form an anti-tumor complex similar to HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bing; Zhang, Ming; Tian, Mai; Jiang, Lu; Guo, Hui Yuan; Ren, Fa Zheng

    2014-04-04

    α-Lactalbumin (α-LA) can bind oleic acid (OA) to form HAMLET-like complexes, which exhibited highly selective anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Considering the structural similarity to α-LA, we conjectured that lactoferrin (LF) could also bind OA to obtain a complex with anti-tumor activity. In this study, LF-OA was prepared and its activity and structural changes were compared with α-LA-OA. The anti-tumor activity was evaluated by methylene blue assay, while the apoptosis mechanism was analyzed using flow cytometry and Western blot. Structural changes of LF-OA were measured by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism. The interactions of OA with LF and α-LA were evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). LF-OA was obtained by heat-treatment at pH8.0 with LD50 of 4.88, 4.95 and 4.62μM for HepG2, HT29, and MCF-7 cells, respectively, all of which were 10 times higher than those of α-LA-OA. Similar to HAMLET, LF-OA induced apoptosis in tumor cells through both death receptor- and mitochondrial-mediated pathways. Exposure of tryptophan residues and the hydrophobic regions as well as the loss of tertiary structure were observed in LF-OA. Besides these similarities, LF showed different secondary structure changes when compared with α-LA, with a decrease of α-helix and β-turn and an increase of β-sheet and random coil. ITC results showed that there was a higher binding number of OA to LF than to α-LA, while both of the proteins interacted with OA through van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds. This study provides a theoretical basis for further exploration of protein-OA complexes.

  6. Assessment of the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo anti-tumor activity of the alcoholic stem bark extract/fractions of Mimusops elengi Linn.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Harish; Savaliya, Mihir; Biswas, Subhankar; Nayak, Pawan G; Maliyakkal, Naseer; Manjunath Setty, M; Gourishetti, Karthik; Pai, K Sreedhara Ranganath

    2016-08-01

    Various parts of Mimusops elengi Linn. (Sapotaceae) have been used widely in traditional Indian medicine for the treatment of pain, inflammation and wounds. The study was conducted to explore the use of stem bark of M. elengi on pharmacological grounds and to evaluate the scientific basis of cytotoxic and anti-tumor activity. Extract/fractions were prepared and in vitro cytotoxicity was assessed using SRB assay. Most effective fractions were subjected to fluorescence microscopy based acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) and Hoechst 33342 staining to determine apoptosis induction and DNA fragmentation assay. Comet and micronuclei assay were performed to assess genotoxicity. Cell cycle analysis was also performed. In vivo anti-tumor potential was evaluated by Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) model in mice. The alcoholic stem bark extract of M. elengi along with four fractions showed potential in vitro cytotoxicity in SRB assay. Of these, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions were selected for further studies. The fractions revealed apoptosis inducing potential in AO/EB and Hoechst 33342 staining, which was further confirmed by DNA fragmentation assay. Genotoxic potential was revealed by comet and micronuclei assay. Fractions also exhibited specific cell cycle inhibition in G0/G1 phase. In EAC model, ethyl acetate fraction along with the standard (cisplatin) effectively reduced the increase in body weight compared to control and improved mean survival time. Both fractions were able to restore the altered hematological and biochemical parameters. Hence, M. elengi stem bark may be a possible therapeutic candidate having cytotoxic and anti-tumor potential.

  7. Synergistic effect of febantel and pyrantel embonate in elimination of Giardia in a gerbil model.

    PubMed

    Olson, Merle E; Heine, Josef

    2009-08-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine the optimal dose of febantel, pyrantel embonate and a combination of febantel/pyrantel embonate required to effectively treat Giardia in a gerbil model and to determine if there is a synergistic effect with the two drugs. SPF gerbils were infected by oral inoculation with 105 Giardia duodenalis trophozoites (day 0). On days 5 to 7, animals (n = 6) were treated once daily via oral gavage with febantel, pyrantel embonate, febantel and pyrantel embonate, metronidazole or placebo. Gerbils were euthanised 24 hours after last treatment and duodenal trophozoites were enumerated on a haemocytometer to obtain a concentration of trophozoites/ cm of gut. Febantel alone, effectively eliminated Giardia trophozoites at 160 and 80 mg/kg. Pyrantel embonate did not eliminate Giardia from the animals but significantly reduced parasite counts at all dosages. Febantel combined with pyrantel embonate effectively eliminated Giardia trophozoites at 160, 80 and 40 mg/kg. Metronidazole did not eliminate Giardia trophozoites from the gut. All placebo-treated animals were heavily infected with Giardia trophozoites. It can be concluded that febantel is more effective in elimination of Giardia infections when combined with pyrantel embonate compared to the agents used alone.

  8. The synergistic effect of ultrasound and chemical penetration enhancers on chorioamnion mass transport.

    PubMed

    Azagury, Aharon; Khoury, Luai; Adato, Yair; Wolloch, Lior; Ariel, Ilana; Hallak, Mordechai; Kost, Joseph

    2015-02-28

    In our previous study we proposed the use of chemical penetration enhancers for noninvasive detection of fetus abnormalities that can also be utilized for direct fetal drug delivery. In an attempt to further increase the mass transport rate across the amniotic membrane, thus shortening the procedure and improving the applicability of the proposed procedure, the effect and mechanism of combining ultrasound exposure with chemical penetration enhancers' application were assessed. The combined effect was evaluated in vitro on post-delivery human amniotic membrane and ex vivo on rat's whole amniotic sac. Ultrasound effect has been assessed by dye experiments using a customized image analysis program. Additional insights of ultrasound effect's mechanism on biological membranes are presented. Previously we have determined that chemical penetration enhancers affect the fetal membranes via two mechanisms termed as 'extractors' and 'fluidizers'. In this study, we found that combining ultrasound with a 'fluidizer' CPE (e.g. bupivacaine) results in a synergistic enhancement (90-fold) of fetal membrane's mass transport, while combining ultrasound with 'extractors' (e.g. ethanol and NMP) results in an antagonistic effect. The combined procedure is faster and gain greater accuracy than the applications of sole chemical penetration enhancers.

  9. Anti-tumor activity of lipophilic imidazolium salts on select NSCLC cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wright, Brian D; Deblock, Michael C; Wagers, Patrick O; Duah, Ernest; Robishaw, Nikki K; Shelton, Kerri L; Southerland, Marie R; DeBord, Michael A; Kersten, Kortney M; McDonald, Lucas J; Stiel, Jason A; Panzner, Matthew J; Tessier, Claire A; Paruchuri, Sailaja; Youngs, Wiley J

    2015-07-01

    The anti-tumor activity of imidazolium salts is highly dependent upon the substituents on the nitrogen atoms of the imidazolium cation. We have synthesized and characterized a series of naphthalene-substituted imidazolium salts and tested them against a variety of non-smallcell lung cancer cell lines. Several of these complexes displayed anticancer activity comparable to cisplatin. These compounds induced apoptosis in the NCI-H460 cell line as determined by Annexin V staining, caspase-3, and PARP cleavage. These results strongly suggest that this class of compounds can serve as potent chemotherapeutic agents.

  10. Necroptosis in tumorigenesis, activation of anti-tumor immunity, and cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhi-Qiang; Shi, Yang-Yang; Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Deng, Lei; Yuan, Zhi-Yong; Lu, You; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    While the mechanisms underlying apoptosis and autophagy have been well characterized over recent decades, another regulated cell death event, necroptosis, remains poorly understood. Elucidating the signaling networks involved in the regulation of necroptosis may allow this form of regulated cell death to be exploited for diagnosis and treatment of cancer, and will contribute to the understanding of the complex tumor microenvironment. In this review, we have summarized the mechanisms and regulation of necroptosis, the converging and diverging features of necroptosis in tumorigenesis, activation of anti-tumor immunity, and cancer therapy, as well as attempts to exploit this newly gained knowledge to provide therapeutics for cancer. PMID:27429198

  11. Synergistic Effect and Mechanism of Cineole and Terpineol on In-vitro Transdermal Delivery of Huperzine A from Microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jun; Cong, Wen-Juan; Wang, Yi-Ming; Liu, Qing-Fei; Luo, Guo-An

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence and the mechanisms of cineole and terpineol on the in-vitro transdermal delivery of huperzine A from microemulsions, and their potential synergistic effect on the permeation enhancement. The transdermal delivery of huperzine A from microemulsions with different concentrations of cineole and terpineol through the rat abdominal skin was determined by Franz-type diffusion cells. The partition coefficient of huperzine A between the full thickness skin and microemulsion was determined. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was carried out to analyze the effects of cineole and terpineol on the biophysical properties of the stratum corneum (SC) and the mechanisms of permeation enhancement. These results indicated that cineole and terpineol could synergistically increase the transdermal delivery of huperzine A from microemulsions through increasing the partition and diffusion coefficients of huperzine A. ATR-FTIR studies further validated the synergistic effect and revealed that the enhancing mechanisms were due to increasing the disorderliness and fluidity of SC lipid alkyl chains, disrupting the structure of keratin in SC, and extracting SC lipids. In conclusion, cineole and terpineol, acting synergistically to enhance the transdermal delivery of huperzine A from microemulsions, might provide an alternative permeation enhancer combination for the transdermal delivery of huperzine A.

  12. Synergistic protective effect of N-acetylcysteine and taurine against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Wahab, Wessam M; Moussa, Farouzia I; Saad, Najwa A

    2017-01-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diaminedichloroplatinum II; CDDP) is an effective anticancer drug, but it has limitations because of its nephrotoxicity. This study investigates the protective effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and taurine (TAU), both individually and in combination, against CDDP nephrotoxicity in rats. For this purpose, 48 male rats were assigned into eight groups (n=6) as follows: 1) control group, 2) NAC group, 3) TAU group, 4) NAC–TAU group, 5) CDDP group, 6) CDDP–NAC group, 7) CDDP–TAU group, and 8) CDDP–NAC–TAU group. Cisplatin was administered as a single intraperitoneal injection at a concentration of 6 mg/kg. Three days after CDDP administration, NAC (50 mg/kg) and/or TAU (50 mg/kg) were administered three times weekly for four consecutive weeks. Kidney function markers in serum, urinary glucose and protein, as well as oxidant and antioxidant parameters in renal tissue were assessed. Administration of CDDP significantly elevated urinary glucose and protein, as well as serum creatinine, urea, and uric acid. Moreover, CDDP enhanced lipid peroxidation and suppressed the major enzymatic antioxidants in the kidney tissue. Treatment with NAC or TAU protected against the alterations in the serum, urine, and renal tissue when used individually along with CDDP. Furthermore, a combined therapy of both was more effective in ameliorating CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity, which points out to their synergistic effect. PMID:28356716

  13. Synergistic effects of non-Apis bees and honey bees for pollination services.

    PubMed

    Brittain, Claire; Williams, Neal; Kremen, Claire; Klein, Alexandra-Maria

    2013-03-07

    In diverse pollinator communities, interspecific interactions may modify the behaviour and increase the pollination effectiveness of individual species. Because agricultural production reliant on pollination is growing, improving pollination effectiveness could increase crop yield without any increase in agricultural intensity or area. In California almond, a crop highly dependent on honey bee pollination, we explored the foraging behaviour and pollination effectiveness of honey bees in orchards with simple (honey bee only) and diverse (non-Apis bees present) bee communities. In orchards with non-Apis bees, the foraging behaviour of honey bees changed and the pollination effectiveness of a single honey bee visit was greater than in orchards where non-Apis bees were absent. This change translated to a greater proportion of fruit set in these orchards. Our field experiments show that increased pollinator diversity can synergistically increase pollination service, through species interactions that alter the behaviour and resulting functional quality of a dominant pollinator species. These results of functional synergy between species were supported by an additional controlled cage experiment with Osmia lignaria and Apis mellifera. Our findings highlight a largely unexplored facilitative component of the benefit of biodiversity to ecosystem services, and represent a way to improve pollinator-dependent crop yields in a sustainable manner.

  14. ADRB2 and LEPR gene polymorphisms: synergistic effects on the risk of obesity in Japanese.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tiago V; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C; Yamada, Yoshiji

    2011-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to validate a recently reported synergistic effect between variants located in the leptin receptor (LEPR) gene and in the β-2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) gene on the risk of overweight/obesity. We studied a middle-aged/elderly sample of 4,193 nondiabetic Japanese subjects stratified according gender (1,911 women and 2,282 men). The LEPR Gln223Arg (rs1137101) variant as well as both ADRB2 Arg16Gly (rs1042713) and Gln27Glu (rs1042714) polymorphisms were analyzed. The primary outcome was the risk of overweight/obesity defined as BMI ≥25 kg/m(2), whereas secondary outcomes included the risk of a BMI ≥27 kg/m(2) and BMI as a continuous variable. None of the studied polymorphisms showed statistically significant individual effects, regardless of the group or phenotype studied. Haplotype analysis also did not disclose any associations of ADRB2 polymorphisms with BMI. However, dimensionality reduction-based models confirmed significant interactions among the investigated variants for BMI as a continuous variable as well as for the risk of obesity defined as BMI ≥27 kg/m(2). All disclosed interactions were found in men only. Our results provide external validation for a male specific ADRB2-LEPR interaction effect on the risk of overweight/obesity, but indicate that effect sizes associated with these interactions may be smaller in the population studied.

  15. Interleukin-6 Induced “Acute” Phenotypic Microenvironment Promotes Th1 Anti-Tumor Immunity in Cryo-Thermal Therapy Revealed By Shotgun and Parallel Reaction Monitoring Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ting; Liu, Ping; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Kun; Yang, Li; Moritz, Robert L.; Yan, Wei; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-thermal therapy has been emerged as a promising novel therapeutic strategy for advanced breast cancer, triggering higher incidence of tumor regression and enhanced remission of metastasis than routine treatments. To better understand its anti-tumor mechanism, we utilized a spontaneous metastatic mouse model and quantitative proteomics to compare N-glycoproteome changes in 94 serum samples with and without treatment. We quantified 231 highly confident N-glycosylated proteins using iTRAQ shotgun proteomics. Among them, 53 showed significantly discriminated regulatory patterns over the time course, in which the acute phase response emerged as the most enhanced pathway. The anti-tumor feature of the acute response was further investigated using parallel reaction monitoring target proteomics and flow cytometry on 23 of the 53 significant proteins. We found that cryo-thermal therapy reset the tumor chronic inflammation to an “acute” phenotype, with up-regulation of acute phase proteins including IL-6 as a key regulator. The IL-6 mediated “acute” phenotype transformed IL-4 and Treg-promoting ICOSL expression to Th1-promoting IFN-γ and IL-12 production, augmented complement system activation and CD86+MHCII+ dendritic cells maturation and enhanced the proliferation of Th1 memory cells. In addition, we found an increased production of tumor progression and metastatic inhibitory proteins under such “acute” environment, favoring the anti-metastatic effect. Moreover, cryo-thermal on tumors induced the strongest “acute” response compared to cryo/hyperthermia alone or cryo-thermal on healthy tissues, accompanying by the most pronounced anti-tumor immunological effect. In summary, we demonstrated that cryo-thermal therapy induced, IL-6 mediated “acute” microenvironment shifted the tumor chronic microenvironment from Th2 immunosuppressive and pro-tumorigenic to Th1 immunostimulatory and tumoricidal state. Moreover, the magnitude of “acute” and

  16. Synergistic effects of the combination of oxalate and ascorbate on arsenic extraction from contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Cheol; Kim, Eun Jung; Baek, Kitae

    2017-02-01

    Arsenic is often associated with iron oxides in soils due to its high affinity with iron oxides and the abundance of iron oxides in the environment. Dissolution of iron oxides can subsequently release arsenic associated with them into the environment, which results in the increase of arsenic mobility in the soil environment. In this study, arsenic extraction from soils via the dissolution of iron oxides was investigated using oxalate, ascorbate, and their combination in order to effectively remediate arsenic-contaminated soils. Oxalate mainly extracted iron from soils via a ligand-promoted reaction, while ascorbate extracted iron mainly via a reductive reaction. Arsenic extractions from soils by oxalate and ascorbate were shown to behave similarly to iron extractions, indicating the concurrent release of arsenic adsorbed on iron oxides upon the dissolution of iron oxides. The combination of oxalate and ascorbate greatly increased arsenic extraction, indicating the synergistic effects of the combination of oxalate and ascorbate on iron and arsenic extraction from soils. Oxalate and ascorbate are naturally-occurring organic reagents that have chelating and reducing capacity. Therefore, the use of oxalate and ascorbate is environmentally friendly and effective for the remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils.

  17. Synergistic effect of microwave irradiation and CaF2 on vanadium leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-peng; Zhang, Yi-min; Huang, Jing; Liu, Tao

    2017-02-01

    The effect and mechanism of microwave irradiation on vanadium leaching were studied via a comparison between microwave heating and conventional heating. The results show a synergistic effect of microwave irradiation and calcium fluoride (CaF2) on the vanadium leaching efficiency. It is confirmed that the vanadium leaching process can be improved by microwave irradiation when CaF2 is present. The leaching rate of vanadium under microwave irradiation is increased by 8%-15% when 5wt% CaF2 is added; by contrast, in the absence of CaF2, the leaching rate is almost unaffected compared to that by conventional heating. Morphological analysis reveals that the particles are gradually eroded by acid under microwave irradiation, whereas some of the fine particles in samples subjected to conventional heating are tightly covered by a flocculent silicate product. Moreover, a large amount of Al and V and a small amount of Si are dissolved from samples under microwave heating, as revealed by the elemental analysis of leachates. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis also indicates a higher mass transfer coefficient in the diffusion layer of the raw material by microwave irradiation. When CaF2 is present, the reaction energy barrier is lowered and the leaching process is controlled by the tightly covered product layer, resulting in a prominent effect of microwave irradiation.

  18. Surface oxygen vacancies on WO3 contributed to enhanced photothermo-synergistic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingying; Wang, Changhua; Zheng, Han; Wan, Fangxu; Yu, Fei; Zhang, Xintong; Liu, Yichun

    2017-01-01

    Photothermooxidation has demonstrated a high efficiency in the removal of volatile organic compounds in air. Among photothermocatalysts, attention is presently focused on composites of noble metal/metal oxide or metal oxide/metal oxide. Instead, in this work, we present a case of single oxide WO3 subjected to hydrogen treatment as photothermocatalyst. With the increase of hydrogen treatment temperature, the color of WO3 changes from yellow to blue to dark blue and a phase transition from WO3 to WO2.72 to WO2 is accompanied, suggesting an increase of concentration of oxygen vacancy. Photothermocatalytic test against degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde at 60 °C under UV light shows that WO3-x sample with low concentration of oxygen vacancy displays the most significant synergetic effect between photocatalysis and thermocatalysis. Its photothermocatalytic activity in terms of CO2 evolution rate is 5.2 times higher than that of photocatalytic activity. However, WO3-WO2.72 and WO2 with high degree of oxygen deficiency show insignificant synergetic effect between photocatalysis and thermocatalysis. The reason for the different synergistic effect over above samples is believed to lie in balance between decreased activation energy of lattice oxygen and recombination of photogenerated electrons and holes induced by oxygen deficiency.

  19. A pharmacoproteomic study confirms the synergistic effect of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine.

    PubMed

    Calamia, Valentina; Mateos, Jesús; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Lourido, Lucía; Rocha, Beatriz; Fernández-Costa, Carolina; Montell, Eulalia; Vergés, Josep; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; Blanco, Francisco J

    2014-06-10

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common age-related rheumatic disease. Chondrocytes play a primary role in mediating cartilage destruction and extracellular matrix (ECM) breakdown, which are main features of the OA joint. Quantitative proteomics technologies are demonstrating a very interesting power for studying the molecular effects of some drugs currently used to treat OA patients, such as chondroitin sulfate (CS) and glucosamine (GlcN). In this work, we employed the iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) technique to assess the effect of CS and GlcN, both alone and in combination, in modifying cartilage ECM metabolism by the analysis of OA chondrocytes secretome. 186 different proteins secreted by the treated OA chondrocytes were identified. 36 of them presented statistically significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between untreated and treated samples: 32 were increased and 4 decreased. The synergistic chondroprotective effect of CS and GlcN, firstly reported by our group at the intracellular level, is now demonstrated also at the extracellular level.

  20. Effect of Eugenol against Streptococcus agalactiae and Synergistic Interaction with Biologically Produced Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Perugini Biasi-Garbin, Renata; Saori Otaguiri, Eliane; Morey, Alexandre Tadachi; Fernandes da Silva, Mayara; Belotto Morguette, Ana Elisa; Armando Contreras Lancheros, César; Kian, Danielle; Perugini, Márcia Regina Eches; Nakazato, Gerson; Durán, Nelson; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococci (GBS)) is an important infections agent in newborns associated with maternal vaginal colonization. Intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis in GBS-colonized pregnant women has led to a significant reduction in the incidence of early neonatal infection in various geographic regions. However, this strategy may lead to resistance selecting among GBS, indicating the need for new alternatives to prevent bacterial transmission and even to treat GBS infections. This study reported for the first time the effect of eugenol on GBS isolated from colonized women, alone and in combination with silver nanoparticles produced by Fusarium oxysporum (AgNPbio). Eugenol showed a bactericidal effect against planktonic cells of all GBS strains, and this effect appeared to be time-dependent as judged by the time-kill curves and viability analysis. Combination of eugenol with AgNPbio resulted in a strong synergistic activity, significantly reducing the minimum inhibitory concentration values of both compounds. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed fragmented cells and changes in bacterial morphology after incubation with eugenol. In addition, eugenol inhibited the viability of sessile cells during biofilm formation and in mature biofilms. These results indicate the potential of eugenol as an alternative for controlling GBS infections.

  1. A pharmacoproteomic study confirms the synergistic effect of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine

    PubMed Central

    Calamia, Valentina; Mateos, Jesús; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Lourido, Lucía; Rocha, Beatriz; Fernández-Costa, Carolina; Montell, Eulalia; Vergés, Josep; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common age-related rheumatic disease. Chondrocytes play a primary role in mediating cartilage destruction and extracellular matrix (ECM) breakdown, which are main features of the OA joint. Quantitative proteomics technologies are demonstrating a very interesting power for studying the molecular effects of some drugs currently used to treat OA patients, such as chondroitin sulfate (CS) and glucosamine (GlcN). In this work, we employed the iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) technique to assess the effect of CS and GlcN, both alone and in combination, in modifying cartilage ECM metabolism by the analysis of OA chondrocytes secretome. 186 different proteins secreted by the treated OA chondrocytes were identified. 36 of them presented statistically significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between untreated and treated samples: 32 were increased and 4 decreased. The synergistic chondroprotective effect of CS and GlcN, firstly reported by our group at the intracellular level, is now demonstrated also at the extracellular level. PMID:24912619

  2. Synergistic Effects of Nonthermal Plasma and Disinfecting Agents against Dental Biofilms In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Koban, Ina; Geisel, Marie Henrike; Holtfreter, Birte; Jablonowski, Lukasz; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Matthes, Rutger; Masur, Kai; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Kramer, Axel; Kocher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Aim. Dental biofilms play a major role in the pathogenesis of many dental diseases. In this study, we evaluated the synergistic effect of atmospheric pressure plasma and different agents in dentistry on the reduction of biofilms. Methods and Results. We used monospecies (S. mutans) and multispecies dental biofilm models grown on titanium discs in vitro. After treatment with one of the agents, the biofilms were treated with plasma. Efficacy of treatment was determined by the number of colony forming units (CFU) and by live-dead staining. For S. mutans biofilms no colonies could be detected after treatment with NaOCl or H2O2. For multispecies biofilms the combination with plasma achieved a higher CFU reduction than each agent alone. We found an additive antimicrobial effect between argon plasma and agents irrespective of the treatment order with cultivation technique. For EDTA and octenidine, antimicrobial efficacy assessed by live-dead staining differed significantly between the two treatment orders (P < 0.05). Conclusions. The effective treatment of dental biofilms on titanium discs with atmospheric pressure plasma could be increased by adding agents in vitro. PMID:24159388

  3. Understanding the synergistic effect of arginine and glutamic acid mixtures on protein solubility.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Diwakar; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2011-10-20

    Understanding protein solubility is a key part of physical chemistry. In particular, solution conditions can have a major effect, and the effect of multiple cosolutes is little understood. It has been shown that the simultaneous addition of L-arginine hydrochloride and L-glutamic acid enhances the maximum achievable solubility of several poorly soluble proteins up to 4-8 times (Golovanov et. al, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2004, 126, 8933-8939) and reduces the intermolecular interactions between proteins. The observed solubility enhancement is negligible for arginine and glutamic acid solutions as compared to the equimolar mixtures. In this study, we have established the molecular mechanism behind this observed synergistic effect of arginine and glutamic acid mixtures using preferential interaction theory and molecular dynamics simulations of Drosophilia Su(dx) protein (ww34). It was found that the protein solubility enhancement is related to the relative increase in the number of arginine and glutamic acid molecules around the protein in the equimolar mixtures due to additional hydrogen bonding interactions between the excipients on the surface of the protein when both excipients are present. The presence of these additional molecules around the protein leads to enhanced crowding, which suppresses the protein association. These results highlight the role of additive-additive interaction in tuning the protein-protein interactions. Furthermore, this study reports a unique behavior of additive solutions, where the presence of one additive in solution affects the concentration of another on the protein surface.

  4. A natural diterpenoid kamebacetal A with anti-tumor activity: Theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Tang, Fu-ming; Zhang, Yi-Heng; Chen, Zhong

    2010-06-01

    Kamebacetal A ( 1) is an ent-kaurane diterpenoid isolated from Isodon racemosa (Hemsl) Hara. This natural product exhibits significant cytotoxicity against human Bel-7402 and HO-8910 tumor cells. The geometrical conformation of 1 has been optimized at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d) level of theory. The results indicated that the calculated geometric parameters are close to the X-ray crystal structure. The theoretical 13C NMR chemical shifts of 1 were also calculated at the GIAO-B3LYP level of theory with different basis sets. The calculated NMR chemical shifts are in closer agreement with the experimental results. A molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) map was used in an attempt to identify key features of the kamebacetal A to account for its anti-tumor activity. MEP investigations reveal that compound 1, which shows anti-tumor activity, possesses electron-rich regions that extend over the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups of compound 1. The data generated in this study is valuable as it provides an insight into kamebacetal A molecular and structure-activity relationships.

  5. Microencapsulation of anti-tumor, antibiotic and thrombolytic drugs in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Mosier, Benjamin; Cassanto, John

    1994-01-01

    Encapsulation of cytotoxic or labile drugs enables targeted delivery and sustained release kinetics that are not available with intravenous injection. A new liquid-liquid diffusion process has been developed for forming unique microcapsules that contain both aqueous and hydrocarbon soluble drugs. Microgravity experiments, on sounding rockets (1989-92) and Shuttle missions STS-52 (1992) and STS-56 (1993) using an automated Materials Dispersion Apparatus, produced multi-lamellar microcapsules containing both Cis-platinum (anti-tumor drug) and iodinated poppy seed oil (a radiocontrast medium), surrounded by a polyglyceride skin. Microcapsules formed with amoxicillin (antibiotic) or urokinase (a clot dissolving enzyme), co-encapsulated with IPO, are still intact after two years. Microcapsules were formed with the drug so concentrated that crystals formed inside. Multi-layered microspheres, with both hydrophobic drug compartments, can enable diffusion of complementary drugs from the same microcapsule, e.g. antibiotics and immuno-stimulants to treat resistant infections or multiple fibrinolytic drugs to dissolve emboli. Co-encapsulation of enough radio-contrast medium enables oncologists to monitor the delivery of anti-tumor microcapsules to target tumors using computerized tomography and radiography that would track the distribution of microcapsules after release from the intra-arterial catheter. These microcapsules could have important applications in chemotheraphy of certain liver, kidney, brain and other tumors.

  6. In vivo anti-tumor efficacy of docetaxel-loaded thermally responsive nanohydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2009-08-01

    Thermally responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) (P(NIPA-co-AAm)) nanohydrogel (NHG) with a diameter of about 50 nm and a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of about 40 °C was synthesized by a previously reported precipitation polymerization method. The physical properties including LCST, diameter and morphology were characterized. Four hydrophobic model drugs (5-fluorouracil (5-FU), fluorescein, docetaxel (DTX) and near-infrared dye-12 (NIRD-12)) with different hydrophilicities were respectively entrapped into the nanoparticles and their in vitro release kinetics from NHG was investigated. DTX was ultimately chosen as the goal anti-tumor drug and optimally entrapped into NHG with a drug loading content (DLC) of 7.38% and encapsulation efficiency (EE) of 73.8%. An in vitro drug release test indicated that DTX-loaded NHG had zero-order release kinetics at 43 °C. The respective anti-tumor efficacy of DTX-loaded NHG with or without hyperthermia on tumor tissue was evaluated in Kunming mice-bearing S180 sarcoma. The inhibition rates of DTX-loaded NHG with or without hyperthermia were 78.15% and 48.78%, respectively. DTX-loaded NHG also showed much lower toxicity during the therapeutic procedure. Results indicated that this kind of thermally responsive, drug-loaded NHG could be used as a promising strategy for tumor therapy with the help of local hyperthermia treatment.

  7. CD4⁺ T cells play a crucial role for lenalidomide in vivo anti-tumor activity in murine multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Bi, Enguang; Hong, Sungyoul; Qian, Jianfei; Zheng, Chengyun; Wang, Michael; Yi, Qing

    2015-11-03

    Lenalidomide modulates the host immune response against myeloma via multiple actions. Although these effects have been elucidated in vitro, the central action of lenalidomide-mediated anti-myeloma immune response in vivo is not clear. To investigate its immune action in vivo, we selected the murine myeloma cell line 5TGM1, which is resistant to direct tumoricidal effects of lenalidomide in vitro and in immunodeficient mice, but sensitive to lenalidomide treatment in 5TGM1-bearing immunocompetent mice. Depletion of CD4+ T cells, but not NK cells, B cells, or CD8+ T cells, deprived lenalidomide of its therapeutic effects on 5TGM1-bearing immunocompetent mice. Lenalidomide significantly increased the numbers of IFN-γ-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells but had no effects on NK cells and B cells in this mouse model. Lenalidomide slightly decreased the number of CD25+Foxp3+ T cells but increased perforin expression in CD8+ T cells in vivo. Using this mouse model for investigation of anti-tumor immune action of lenalidomide, we demonstrated that lenalidomide facilitated a type-1 anti-tumor immune response in vivo. The CD4+ T cell subset may play a critical role in the lenalidomide-mediated anti-myeloma immune response in vivo.

  8. Synergistic Apoptosis-Inducing Effects on A375 Human Melanoma Cells of Natural Borneol and Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianping; Li, Lin; Su, Jianyu; Li, Bing; Chen, Tianfeng; Wong, Yum-Shing

    2014-01-01

    This study was to investigate the synergistic effect of NB/Cur on growth and apoptosis in A375 human melanoma cell line by MTT assay, flow cytometry and Western blotting. Our results demonstrated that NB effectively synergized with Cur to enhance its antiproliferative activity on A375 human melanoma cells by induction of apoptosis, as evidenced by an increase in sub-G1 cell population, DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage and caspase activation. Further mechanistic studies by Western blotting showed that after treatment of the cells with NB/Cur, up-regulation of the expression level of phosphorylated JNK and down-regulation of the expression level of phosphorylated ERK and Akt contributed to A375 cells apoptosis. Moreover, NB also potentiated Cur to trigger intracellular ROS overproduction and the DNA damage with up-regulation of the expression level of phosphorylated ATM, phosphorylated Brca1 and phosphorylated p53. The results indicate the combinational application potential of NB and Cur in treatments of cancers. PMID:24971451

  9. Ultrasound-targeted HSVtk and Timp3 gene delivery for synergistically enhanced antitumor effects in hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, B-F; Wu, J; Zhang, Y; Sung, H-W; Xie, J; Li, R-K

    2013-05-01

    Cancer gene therapy has great potential for decreasing tumor-induced mortality but has been clinically limited by non-targeted and insufficient gene transfer. We evaluated gene therapy targeting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSVtk/GCV) suicide gene system and the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (Timp3) gene. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) targeted gene delivery to the tumor tissue, and the α-fetoprotein promoter targeted HSVtk expression to the HCC cells. Human HepG2 cells transfected with the HSVtk or Timp3 gene demonstrated a reduction in cell viability by >40% compared with the vector control. Cell viability was further inhibited by over 50% with co-transfection of the genes. HepG2 cells were inoculated subcutaneously into athymic mice to induce tumors. UTMD-mediated delivery of HSVtk or Timp3 suppressed tumor growth by >45% and increased survival of tumor-bearing animals (P<0.01 vs vector control). Co-delivery of the genes resulted in a further 30% improvement in tumor suppression and significant extension of animal survival (P<0.01 vs vector control). Targeted gene delivery increased the number of apoptotic cells and decreased the vascular density of the tumors. Targeted co-delivery of the genes synergistically improved the antitumor effects and may provide an effective therapy for HCC.

  10. Gelatin blending and sonication of chitosan nanofiber mats produce synergistic effects on hemostatic functions.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bon Kang; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Min Sup; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Jong-Il; Kim, Chun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    To improve the hemostatic function of chitosan nanofiber mats, we studied the synergetic effects of gelatin blending and porosity control. Gelatin-blended-chitosan (Chi-Gel) nanofiber mats were evaluated with respect to surface morphology, mechanical properties and wettability, and functionally tested in a blood clotting study. The blood clotting efficiency of Chi-Gel nanofiber mats using rabbit whole blood in vitro was superior to that of chitosan nanofibers. Moreover, Chi-Gel nanofiber mats with enlarged porosity, produced by ultra-sonication, showed improved blood clotting efficiency, cell viability and cell infiltration compared with non-sonicated Chi-Gel nanofiber mats. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy revealed a richer density of platelets on sonicated nanofiber mats than on non-sonicated nanofiber mats after 3 min of blood clotting. The proliferation of human dermal fibroblast cells on sonicated Chi-Gel nanofiber mats using the DNA assay was higher than that on non-sonicated chitosan nanofiber mats after 7 days of culture. Confocal z-stack images showed that sonicated Chi-Gel nanofiber mats with high porosity supported active cell migration and infiltration into the 3-dimensional nanofiber mats. These results suggest that hydrophilic gelatin blending and sonication of chitosan nanofiber mats yields synergistic effects that not only improve hemostatic function but also promote wound repair.

  11. Synergistic Effect of Hybrid Multilayer In2Se3 and Nanodiamonds for Highly Sensitive Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaoqiang; Yao, Jiandong; Xiao, Jun; Yang, Guowei

    2016-08-10

    Layered materials have rapidly established themselves as intriguing building blocks for next-generation photodetection platforms in view of their exotic electronic and optical attributes. However, both relatively low mobility and heavier electron effective mass limit layered materials for high-performance applications. Herein, we employed nanodiamonds (NDs) to promote the performance of multilayer In2Se3 photodetectors for the first time. This hybrid NDs-In2Se3 photodetector showed a tremendous promotion of photodetection performance in comparison to pristine In2Se3 ones. This hybrid devices exhibited remarkable detectivity (5.12 × 10(12) jones), fast response speed (less than 16.6 ms), and decent current on/off ratio (∼2285) simultaneously. These parameters are superior to most reported layered materials based photodetectors and even comparable to the state-of-the-art commercial photodetectors. Meanwhile, we attributed this excellent performance to the synergistic effect between NDs and the In2Se3. They can greatly enhance the broad spectrum absorption and promote the injection of photoexcited carrier in NDs to In2Se3. These results actually open up a new scenario for designing and fabricating innovative optoelectronic systems.

  12. Maximizing the relaxivity of Gd-complex by synergistic effect of HSA and carboxylfullerene.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Mingming; Zheng, Junpeng; Ye, Lei; Li, Shumu; Jin, Chan; Li, Kai; Qiu, Dong; Han, Hongbin; Shu, Chunying; Yang, Yongji; Wang, Chunru

    2012-07-25

    Macromolecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent Gd-DTPA-HSA (DTPA, diethylene triamine pentacetate acid; HSA, human serum albumin) as a model has been successfully conjugated with trimalonic acid modified C60 for contrast enhancement at clinically used magnetic field strength. The Gd-DTPA-HSA-C60 conjugate exhibit maximal relaxivity (r1 = 86 mM(-1) s(-1) at 0.5 T, 300 K) reported so far, which is much superior to that of the control Gd-DTPA-HSA (r1 = 38 mM(-1 )s(-1)) under the same condition and comparable to the theoretical maximum (r1 = 80-120 mM(-1) s(-1), at 20 MHz and 298 K), indicating the synergistic effect of HSA and carboxylfullerene on the increased contrast enhancement. TEM characterization reveals that both Gd-DTPA-HSA-C60 and Gd-DTPA-HSA can penetrate the cells via endocytosis and trans-membrane, respectively, suggesting the potential to sensitively image the events at the cellular and subcellular levels. In addition, the fusion of fullerene with Gd-DTPA-HSA will further endow the resulting complex with photodynamic therapy (PDT) property and thus combine the modalities of therapy (PDT) and diagnostic imaging (MRI) into one entity. More importantly, the payloaded Gd-DTPA may substitute for other more stable Gd-DOTA and HSA as a theranostic package can further work as a drug delivery carrier and effectively control drug release through proteolysis.

  13. Inoculum and zeolite synergistic effect on anaerobic digestion of poultry manure.

    PubMed

    Fotidis, Ioannis A; Kougias, Panagiotis G; Zaganas, Ioannis D; Kotsopoulos, Thomas A; Martzopoulos, Gerasimos G

    2014-01-01

    Poultry manure is an ammonia-rich substrate due to its high content of proteins and amino acids. Ammonia is the major inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process, affecting biogas production and causing great economic losses to the biogas plants. In this study, the effect of different natural zeolite dosages on the mesophilic AD of poultry manure inoculated with a non-acclimatized to ammonia inoculum (dairy manure) was investigated. Additionally, a comparative analysis was performed between the data extracted from this study and the results of a previous study, which has been conducted under the same experimental conditions but with the use of ammonia acclimatized inoculum (swine manure). At 5 and 10 g zeolite L(-1), the methane yield of poultry manure was 43.4% and 80.3% higher compared with the experimental set without zeolite addition. However, the ammonia non-acclimatized inoculum was not efficient in digesting poultry manure even in the presence of 10 g zeolite L(-1), due to low methane production (only 39%) compared with the maximum theoretical yield. Finally, ammonia acclimatized inoculum and zeolite have demonstrated a possible 'synergistic effect', which led to a more efficient AD of poultry manure. The results of this study could potentially been used by the biogas plant operators to efficiently digest poultry manure.

  14. Synergistic effects of the combination of galangin with gentamicin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Seob; Kang, Ok-Hwa; Choi, Jang-Gi; Oh, You-Chang; Chae, Hee-Sung; Kim, Jong Hak; Park, Hyun; Sohn, Dong Hwan; Wang, Zheng-Tao; Kwon, Dong-Yeul

    2008-06-01

    The antimicrobial killing activity toward methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been a serious emerging global issue. New effective antimicrobials and/or new approaches to settle this issue are urgently needed. The oriental herb, Alpinia officinarum, has been used in Korea for several hundreds of years to treat various infectious diseases. As it is well known, one of the active constituents of Alpinia officinarum is galangin. Against the 17 strains, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of galangin (GAL) were in the range of 62.5 ~ 125 microg/ml, and the MICs of gentamicin (GEN) ranged from 1.9 microg/ml to 2,000 microg/ml. The fractional inhibitory concentrations (FICs) of GAL, in combination with GEN, against 3 test strains were 0.4, 3.9, and 250 microg/ml, and were all 15.62 microg/ml in GEN. The FIC index showed marked synergism in the value range of 0.19 to 0.25. By determining time-kill curves, also confirmed the low synergism of the GAL and GEN combination against 4 h, 8 h, 12 h, and 24 h cultured MRSA. The time-kill study results indicated a low synergistic effect against 3 test strains. Thus, the mixture of GAL and GEN could lead to the development of new combination antibiotics against MRSA infection.

  15. Synergistic effect of proanthocyanidin on the bactericidal action of the photolysis of H2O2.

    PubMed

    Ikai, Hiroyo; Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Shirato, Midori; Meirelles, Luiz; Sasaki, Keiichi; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activity of the hydroxyl radical generation system by the photolysis of H2O2 in combination with proanthocyanidin, which refers to a group of polyphenolic compounds, was examined. Bactericidal activity of photo-irradiated H2O2 at 405 nm against Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen of dental caries, was augmented in the presence of proanthocyanidin, whose bactericidal effect by itself was very poor, in a concentration-dependent manner. This combination was also proven effective against Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major pathogen of periodontitis. It is speculated that H2O2, generated from photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin around the bacterial cells, is photolyzed to the hydroxyl radical, which would in turn affect the membrane structure and function of the bacterial cells, resulting in augmented sensitivity of bacterial cells to the disinfection system utilizing the photolysis of H2O2. The present study suggests that the combination of H2O2 and proanthocyanidin works synergistically to kill bacteria when photo-irradiated.

  16. Antibacterial effects of Brazilian and Bulgarian propolis and synergistic effects with antibiotics acting on the bacterial DNA and folic acid.

    PubMed

    Orsi, R O; Fernandes, A; Bankova, V; Sforcin, J M

    2012-01-01

    Propolis is a honeybee product that has been used since ancient times because of its therapeutic effects. It can be used in the development of alternative therapies for the treatment of many diseases, and because propolis shows antibacterial action, this work was carried out in order to investigate a possible synergism between propolis and antibiotics acting on DNA (ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin) and on the metabolism (cotrimoxazole) against Salmonella typhi. Propolis samples collected in Brazil and Bulgaria were compared in these assays, and the synergism was investigated by using ½ and ¼ of the minimal inhibitory concentration for propolis and antibiotics, evaluating the number of viable cells according to the incubation time. Brazilian and Bulgarian propolis showed antibacterial activity, but no synergistic effects with the three tested antibiotics were seen. Previous works by our laboratory have revealed that propolis has synergistic effects with antibiotics, acting on the bacterial wall and ribosome, but it does not seem to interact with antibiotics acting on DNA or folic acid, and only a bacteriostatic action was seen in these assay conditions.

  17. Biological effect of an alternating electric field on cell proliferation and synergistic antimitotic effect in combination with ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Ye Jin; Song, Hyo Sook; Jeong, Youn Kyoung; Lee, Ji Young; Sung, Jiwon; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-01-01

    Alternating electric fields at an intermediate frequency (100~300 kHz), referred to as tumour-treating fields (TTF), are believed to interrupt the process of mitosis via apoptosis and to act as an inhibitor of cell proliferation. Although the existence of an antimitotic effect of TTF is widely known, the proposed apoptotic mechanism of TTF on cell function and the efficacy of TTF are controversial issues among medical experts. To resolve these controversial issues, a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of TTF on cell function and the differences between the effects of TTF alone and in combination with other treatment techniques is essential. Here, we report experimental evidence of TTF-induced apoptosis and the synergistic antimitotic effect of TTF in combination with ionizing radiation (IR). For these experiments, two human Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells (U373 and U87) were treated either with TTF alone or with TTF followed by ionizing radiation (IR). Cell apoptosis, DNA damage, and mitotic abnormalities were quantified after the application of TTF, and their percentages were markedly increased when TTF was combined with IR. Our experimental results also suggested that TTF combined with IR synergistically suppressed both cell migration and invasion, based on the inhibition of MMP-9 and vimentin. PMID:27556699

  18. Ancient Chinese Formula Qiong-Yu-Gao Protects Against Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity Without Reducing Anti-tumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Teng, Zhi-Ying; Cheng, Xiao-Lan; Cai, Xue-Ting; Yang, Yang; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Jin-Di; Lu, Wu-Guang; Chen, Jiao; Hu, Chun-Ping; Zhou, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Li, Song-Lin; Cao, Peng

    2015-10-29

    Cisplatin is a highly effective anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent; however, its clinical use is severely limited by serious side effects, of which nephrotoxicity is the most important. In this study, we investigated whether Qiong-Yu-Gao (QYG), a popular traditional Chinese medicinal formula described 840 years ago, exhibits protective effects against cisplatin-induced renal toxicity. Using a mouse model of cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction, we observed that pretreatment with QYG attenuated cisplatin-induced elevations in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels, ameliorated renal tubular lesions, reduced apoptosis, and accelerated tubular cell regeneration. Cisplatin-mediated elevations in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNA, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) mRNA, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein in the kidney were also significantly suppressed by QYG treatment. Furthermore, QYG reduced platinum accumulation in the kidney by decreasing the expression of copper transporter 1 and organic cation transporter 2. An in vivo study using implanted Lewis lung cancer cells revealed that concurrent administration of QYG and cisplatin did not alter the anti-tumor activity of cisplatin. Our findings suggest that the traditional Chinese medicinal formula QYG inhibits cisplatin toxicity by several mechanisms that act simultaneously, without compromising its therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, QYG may be useful in the clinic as a protective agent to prevent cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

  19. Synergistic antidyskinetic effects of topiramate and amantadine in animal models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kobylecki, Christopher; Hill, Michael P; Crossman, Alan R; Ravenscroft, Paula

    2011-11-01

    L-Dopa-induced dyskinesia in patients with Parkinson's disease can be alleviated by amantadine, an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors. The antiepileptic drug topiramate, which blocks α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors, has also been shown to reduce dyskinesia. The purpose of this study was to examine the behavioral pharmacology of topiramate alone and in combination with amantadine in animal models of PD and L-dopa-induced dyskinesia. The effects of topiramate (5-20 mg/kg) and amantadine (5-20 mg/kg) on abnormal involuntary movements (the rat homologue of dyskinesia) and Rotarod performance were assessed alone and in combination in the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat following chronic L-dopa treatment. Dyskinesia, parkinsonian disability, and "on-time" were assessed in the MPTP-lesioned nonhuman primate following administration of topiramate (5-20 mg/kg) and amantadine (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) alone and in combination. Topiramate and amantadine dose-dependently reduced dyskinesia in the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat, whereas topiramate reduced Rotarod performance; there was no effect on parkinsonian disability in the MPTP-lesioned nonhuman primate, in which both drugs reduced dyskinesia. Topiramate and amantadine exhibited differential antidyskinetic effects on dyskinesia elicited by the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF 38393 (2 mg/kg). Subthreshold doses of both drugs in combination had a synergistic effect on dyskinesia in the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat, with no worsening of motor performance; this effect was confirmed in the MPTP-lesioned nonhuman primate, with a selective reduction in "bad on-time." These data confirm the antidyskinetic potential of topiramate and suggest that combination with low-dose amantadine may allow better reduction of dyskinesia with no adverse motor effects.

  20. VEGFR2 targeted antibody fused with MICA stimulates NKG2D mediated immunosurveillance and exhibits potent anti-tumor activity against breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Youfu; Ren, Xueyan; Wang, Tong; Chen, Zhiguo; Tang, Mingying; Sun, Fumou; Li, Zhaoting; Wang, Min; Zhang, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Binding of MHC class I-related chain molecules A and B (MICA/B) to the natural killer (NK) cell receptor NK group 2, member D (NKG2D) is thought critical for activating NK-mediated immunosurveillance. Angiogenesis is important for tumor growth and interfering with angiogenesis using the fully human IgG1 anti-VEGFR2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2) antibody (mAb04) can be effective in treating malignancy. In an effort to make mAb04 more effective we have generated a novel antibody fusion protein (mAb04-MICA) consisting of mAb04 and MICA. We found that mAb04-MICA maintained the anti-angiogenic and antineoplastic activities of mAb04, and also enhanced immunosurveillance activated by the NKG2D pathway. Moreover, in human breast tumor-bearing nude mice, mAb04-MICA demonstrated superior anti-tumor efficacy compared to combination therapy of mAb04 + Docetaxel or Avastin + Docetaxel, highlighting the immunostimulatory effect of MICA. In conclusion, mAb04-MICA provided new inspiration for anti-tumor treatment and had prospects for clinical application. PMID:26909862

  1. Interaction and its induced inhibiting or synergistic effects during co-gasification of coal char and biomass char.

    PubMed

    Ding, Liang; Zhang, Yongqi; Wang, Zhiqing; Huang, Jiejie; Fang, Yitian

    2014-12-01

    Co-gasification of coal char and biomass char was conducted to investigate the interactions between them. And random pore model (RPM) and modified random pore model (MRPM) were applied to describe the gasification behaviors of the samples. The results show that inhibiting effect was observed during co-gasification of corn stalk char with Hulunbeier lignite coal char, while synergistic effects were observed during co-gasification of corn stalk char with Shenmu bituminous coal char and Jincheng anthracite coal char. The inhibiting effect was attributed to the intimate contact and comparable gasification rate between biomass char and coal char, and the loss of the active form of potassium caused by the formation of KAlSiO4, which was proved to be inactive during gasification. While the synergistic effect was caused by the high potassium content of biomass char and the significant difference of reaction rate between coal char and biomass char during gasification.

  2. Laser-induced synergistic effects around absorbing nanoclusters in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Letfullin, Renat R.; Galitovskay, Elena

    2005-04-01

    Background and Objective: The application of nanotechnology for laser thermal-based killing of abnormal cells (e.g. cancer cells) targeted with absorbing nanoparticles (e.g. gold solid nanospheres, nanoshells, or rod) is becoming an extensive area of research. We develop an approach to enhance the efficiency of selective nanophotothermolysis of cancer cells through laser-induced synergistic effects around gold nanoparticles aggregated in nanoclusters on cell membrane. Study Design/Materials and Methods: A concept of selective target damages by laser-induced synergistic interaction of optical, thermal, and acoustic fields around clustered nanoparticles is presented with focus on overlapping bubbles from nanoparticles aggregated on cell's membrane. The experimental verification of this concept in vitro was performed by the use a tunable laser pulses (420-570 nm, 8-12 ns, 0.1-300 μJ, laser flux of 0.1-10 J/cm2) for irradiation of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells targeted with primary antibodies to which selecttively 40-nm gold nanoparticles were attached by the means of secondary antibodies. The photothermal, electron and atomic force microscopes in combination with viability test (annexin -V-Propidium iodide) were employed to study the nanoparticle's spatial organization, the dynamics of microbubble formations around the particle's clusters, and cells damage. Results: An aggregation of nanoparticles on cell membrane was observed with simultaneous increase bubble formation phenomena, and red-shifted absorption due to plasmon-plasmon resonances into nanoclusters. It led to a significant enhancement, at least two orders of magnitude, of the efficiency of selectively killing cancer cells with nanosecond laser pulses. Conclusion: Described approach allows using relatively small nanoparticles which would be easier delivery to target site with further creation of nanoclusters with larger sizes which provide more profound thermal and related phenomena leading to more

  3. Synergistic Neuroprotective Effects of Two Herbal Ingredients via CREB-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Wang, Dongxiao; Zhao, Runqing; Dong, Xianzhe; Hu, Yuan; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    As two natural oligosaccharide esters, 3,6’-Disinapoyl sucrose (DISS) and tenuifolisideA (TFSA) are originating from the root of Polygala tenuifolia Willd, a traditional Chinese medicine used in treatment of mental disorders. Previous reports have shown that both of them possess in vitro neuroprotective effects by stimulating different upstream pathways related with cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). In the present study, we investigated the additive neuroprotective effects of DISS and TFSA on Glu-induced damage of SY5Y cells and purposed the possible underlying mechanism. The interaction between DISS and TFSA showed a clear-cut synergistic effect as evidenced by combination index (CI). Additional evidence from biochemical (NOS activity) assays confirmed their additive inhibition on the Glu-induced NOS hyperactivation. Moreover, we showed that co-treatment of DISS and TFSA resulted in an additively up-regulated phosphorylation of CREB as well as increased expressions of CRTC1 and BDNF. Neuroprotective effects of DISS and TFSA on Glu-induced decrease in cell viability were blocked by MAPK/ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) and PI3-K inhibitor (LY290042). Nevertheless, the CRTC1 or BDNF expression induced by these two compounds was significantly reduced in the presence of either ERK or PI3-K inhibitor, indicating that the two oligosaccharide esters shared some common pathways in the regulation of CREB-BDNF pathway. Taken together, we, for the first time, showed that DISS and TFSA exerted the additive neuroprotective effects on CREB-BDNF signaling pathway through complementary mechanisms. PMID:27729863

  4. Synergistic effect of intrathecal fentanyl and bupivacaine in spinal anesthesia for cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Bogra, Jaishri; Arora, Namita; Srivastava, Pratima

    2005-05-17

    BACKGROUND: Potentiating the effect of intrathecal local anesthetics by addition of intrathecal opiods for intra-abdominal surgeries is known. In this study by addition of fentanyl we tried to minimize the dose of bupivacaine, thereby reducing the side effects caused by higher doses of intrathecal bupivacaine in cesarean section. METHODS: Study was performed on 120 cesarean section parturients divided into six groups, identified as B8, B10 and B 12.5 8.10 and 12.5 mg of bupivacaine mg and FB8, FB10 and FB 12.5 received a combination of 12.5 mug intrathecal fentanyl respectively. The parameters taken into consideration were visceral pain, hemodynamic stability, intraoperative sedation, intraoperative and postoperative shivering, and postoperative pain. RESULTS: Onset of sensory block to T6 occurred faster with increasing bupivacaine doses in bupivacaine only groups and bupivacaine -fentanyl combination groups. Alone lower concentrations of bupivacaine could not complete removed the visceral pain. Blood pressure declined with the increasing concentration of Bupivacaine and Fentanyl. Incidence of nausea and shivering reduces significantly whereas, the postoperative pain relief and hemodynamics increased by adding fentanyl. Pruritis, maternal respiratory depression and changes in Apgar score of babies do not occur with fentanyl. CONCLUSION: Spinal anesthesia among the neuraxial blocks in obstetric patients needs strict dose calculations because minimal dose changes, complications and side effects arise, providing impetus for this study. Here the synergistic, potentiating effect of fentanyl (an opiod) on bupivacaine (a local anesthetic) in spinal anesthesia for cesarian section is presented, fentanyl is able to reduce the dose of bupivacaine and therefore its harmful effects.

  5. Synergistic effect of the sequential use of UV irradiation and chlorine to disinfect reclaimed water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiujuan; Hu, Xuexiang; Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun

    2012-03-15

    The effectiveness of UV and chlorination, used individually and sequentially, was investigated in killing pathogenic microorganisms and inhibiting the formation of disinfection by-products in two different municipal wastewaters for the source water of reclaimed water, which were from a microfilter (W1) and membrane bioreactor (W2) respectively. Heterotrophic plate count (HPC), total bacteria count (TBC), and total coliform (TC) were selected to evaluate the efficiency of different disinfection processes. UV inactivation of the three bacteria followed first-order kinetics in W1 wastewater, but in W2 wastewater, the UV dose-response curve trailed beyond approximately 10 mJ/cm2 UV. The higher number of particles in the W2 might have protected the bacteria against UV damage, as UV light alone was not effective in killing HPC in W2 wastewater with higher turbidity. However, chlorine was more effective in W2 than in W1 for the three bacteria inactivation owing to the greater formation of inorganic and organic chloramines in W1 wastewater. Complete inactivation of HPC in W1 wastewater required a chlorine dose higher than 5.5 mg/L, whereas 4.5 mg/L chlorine gave the equivalent result in W2 wastewater. In contrast, sequential UV and chlorine treatment produced a synergistic effect in both wastewater systems and was the most effective option for complete removal of all three bacteria. UV disinfection lowered the required chlorine dose in W1, but not in W2, because of the higher chlorine consumption in W2 wastewater. However, UV irradiation decreased total trihalomethane formation during chlorination in both wastewaters.

  6. Synergistic effect of the interaction between curcumin and diclofenac on the formalin test in rats.

    PubMed

    De Paz-Campos, Marco A; Ortiz, Mario I; Chávez Piña, Aracely E; Zazueta-Beltrán, Liliana; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto

    2014-10-15

    The association of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with certain plant extracts can increase antinociceptive activity, permitting the use of lower doses and thus limiting side effects. Therefore, the aim objective of the current study was to examine the effects of curcumin on the nociception and pharmacokinetics of diclofenac in rats. Antinociception was assessed using the formalin test. Diluted formalin was injected subcutaneously into the dorsal surface of the right hind paw. Nociceptive behavior was quantified as the number of flinches of the injected paw during 60 min after injection, and a reduction in formalin-induced flinching was interpreted as an antinociceptive response. Rats were treated with oral diclofenac (1-31 mg/kg), curcumin (3.1-100 mg/kg) or the diclofenac-curcumin combination (2.4-38.4 mg/kg). To determine the possibility of a pharmacokinetic interaction, the oral bioavailability of diclofenac (10 mg/kg) was studied in presence and the absence of curcumin (31 mg/kg). Diclofenac, curcumin, or diclofenac-curcumin combination produced an antinociceptive effect on the formalin test. ED30 values were estimated for the individual drugs, and an isobologram was const