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Sample records for antibiotic antitumour agent

  1. Structural effects of nogalamycin, an antibiotic antitumour agent, on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, T.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2008-09-19

    The structural changes of DNA, induced by the antitumour antibiotic nogalamycin, have been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The transformation in the tertiary structure of 4361 bp long plasmid pBR322 DNA, after incubation with nogalamycin at 37 deg. C, has been monitored at the single molecule level. The AFM topographs of free DNA and the DNA-nogalamycin complex, incubated for 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h, reveal a gradual change from the circular supercoiled form having strand crossovers to the more compact plectonemic superhelix. With increasing incubation time, the extent of plectonemic coiling increases, indicating increasing level of drug binding via intercalative mode. Supportive evidences are obtained from the CD and UV-vis spectroscopic studies. To our knowledge, this is the first report on an AFM imaging study of the effects of nogalamycin, an anthracyclin intercalator, on DNA.

  2. Spergualin: a new antitumour antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, K; Takeuchi, T

    1987-01-01

    Spergualin was isolated from the culture filtrate of Bacillus laterosporus as an antitumour substance. It had a unique structure and was shown to have chemotherapeutic effects on mouse transplantable leukaemias such as L-1210, P-388, P-815, C-1489, EL-4 and RL male 1. It was especially effective to L-1210 leukaemia and the leukaemia-bearing mice were even curable by the optimal dose of this drug. When the spergualin-treated cured mice were inoculated again by L-1210 cells, those leukaemic cells did not grow in the animals suggesting that specific immunity to L-1210 had been induced. In this induction of immunity cytotoxic T lymphocytes were suggested to be involved. Cytostatic effect of spergualin in cell culture was dependent on the content of amine oxidase in serum. In the study of structure-activity relationship, the 15-hydroxy group was found to be not necessary, while the spermidine moiety was essential for antitumour activity. 15-Deoxy derivative of spergualin was found to be more potent in antitumour activity.

  3. Progresses in TCM metal-based antitumour agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Feng; Liang, Hong

    2010-06-01

    Traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) have recently been recognized as a new source of anticancer drugs and new chemotherapy adjuvant to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy and to diminish side effects and resistance of cancer chemotherapies. At the same time, cisplatin, one of the most widely used anticancer drugs, is effective in treating a variety of cancers, especially testicular cancer for which it has a greater than 90% cure rate, but its clinical efficacy is limited by significant side effects and acquired or intrinsic resistance. Therefore, many efforts have been devoted to designing new platinum compounds with improved pharmacological properties and a broader range of antitumour activity. New strategies have been applied in the designs of antitumour coordination compounds as drugs, such as synthesizing new ligands or metal complexes with different reaction mechanisms. Among them, new coordination compounds based on traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) provide a novel approach to potential (pro-)drugs. This review mainly focuses on the synthesis, structure, antitumour activity and interactions with molecular targets of TCM based metal complexes. TCM alkaloids, flavonoids, cantharidin, coumarins, plumbagin, curcumin and camphoric acid metal-based antitumour agents are covered. The future development of hybrid TCM-metal complexes as antitumour drugs is discussed. The pursuit of new TCM metal-based anticancer drugs and enhancement of modern TCM holds promise for overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR).

  4. Antibiotic Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work Contact Us ABOUT THE ISSUE What is Antibiotic Resistance? General Background Science of Resistance Glossary References POLICY ... for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance Reservoirs of Antibiotic Resistance Project (ROAR) INTERNATIONAL CHAPTERS APUA Chapter Network Africa ...

  5. Antitumour agents as inhibitors of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Pantouris, Georgios; Mowat, Christopher G.

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •∼2800 National Cancer Institute USA compounds have been screened as potential inhibitors of TDO and/or IDO. •Seven compounds with anti-tumour properties have been identified as potent inhibitors. •NSC 36398 (taxifolin, dihydroquercetin) is selective for TDO with a K{sub i} of 16 M. •This may help further our understanding of the role of TDO in cancer. -- Abstract: The involvement of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) in cancer biology has recently been described, with the enzyme playing an immunomodulatory role, suppressing antitumour immune responses and promoting tumour cell survival and proliferation. This finding reinforces the need for specific inhibitors of TDO that may potentially be developed for therapeutic use. In this work we have screened ∼2800 compounds from the library of the National Cancer Institute USA and identified seven potent inhibitors of TDO with inhibition constants in the nanomolar or low micromolar range. All seven have antitumour properties, killing various cancer cell lines. For comparison, the inhibition potencies of these compounds were tested against IDO and their inhibition constants are reported. Interestingly, this work reveals that NSC 36398 (dihydroquercetin, taxifolin), with an in vitro inhibition constant of ∼16 μM, is the first TDO-selective inhibitor reported.

  6. Nucleotide carriers for anti-tumour actinomycin antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Vekshin, N L; Kovalev, V I

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated a number of complexes of 7-aminoactinomycin D (7AAMD), with its potential carriers: caffeine, folic acid (FA), purine bases-guanine and adenine, pyrimidine base-thymine and with fragmented DNA to determine more stable and suitable complex. The process of binding of the fluorescent antibiotic with clusters of caffeine, guanine, adenine, thymine and with fragmented DNA was accompanied by a considerable long-wavelength shift in excitation spectrum. The energy of interaction between phenoxazine hetero-cycle of 7AAMD and chromophores of the carriers studied has been found. In the case of 7AAMD with guanine, adenine, thymine and caffeine, the energy is about of 7 kcal/mol, which is a little lower than in the case with DNA (7.7 kcal/mol). On the basis of emission spectra, in all examined compounds, with the exception DNA, the 7AAMD molecule emits photons from water phase, not from a cluster, since photo-excitation leads to desorption of the antibiotic from a cluster surface. We observed also the mutual fluorescence quenching of 7AAMD and FA in their complex. It may well be that this complex forms due to interaction of peptide-lactone rings of 7AAMD with system of FA. In the case of DNA, the complex with 7AAMD has very high stability that is determined not only by interaction between phenoxazine of 7AAMD and the DNA bases, but it is largely owing to the interaction between two peptide-lactone rings of 7AAMD and the DNA deoxyribose-phosphate chains.

  7. Phase I trials of antitumour agents: fundamental concepts

    PubMed Central

    Toloi, Diego de Araujo; Jardim, Denis Leonardo Fontes; Hoff, Paulo Marcelo Gehm; Riechelmann, Rachel Simões Pimenta

    2015-01-01

    Phase I trials are an important step in the development of new drugs. Because of the advancing knowledge of cancer’s molecular biology, these trials offer an important platform for the development of new agents and also for patient treatment. Therefore, comprehension of their peculiar terminology and methodology are increasingly important. Our objectives were to review the fundamental concepts of phase I designs and to critically contextualise this type of study as a therapeutic option for patients with refractory cancer. PMID:25729414

  8. Organometallic Antitumour Agents with Alternative Modes of Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casini, Angela; Hartinger, Christian G.; Nazarov, Alexey A.; Dyson, Paul J.

    The therapeutic index of drugs that target DNA, a ubiquitous target present in nearly all cells, is low. Nevertheless, DNA has remained the primary target for medicinal chemists developing metal-based anticancer drugs, although DNA has been essentially abandoned in favour of non-genomic targets by medicinal chemists developing organic drugs. A number of organometallic drugs that target proteins/enzymes have been developed and these compounds, based on ruthenium, osmium and gold, are described in this chapter. Targets include cathepsin B, thioredoxin reductases, multidrug resistance protein (Pgp), glutathione S-transferases and kinases. It is found that compounds that inhibit these various targets are active against metastatic tumours, or tumours that are resistant to classical DNA damaging agents such as cisplatin, and therefore offer considerable potential in clinical applications.

  9. An integrative biological approach to the analysis of tissue culture data: application to the antitumour agent RHPS4.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lucy A; Byrne, Helen M; Willis, Anne E; Laughton, Charles A

    2011-08-01

    We describe a mathematical model of cell growth and death and explain how it can be used to integrate data from classic tissue culture experiments on antitumour agents and thus aid the identification of their mechanism of action. Experimental data relating to time- and dose-dependent changes in growth rate, cell cycle distribution, plus apoptotic and senescent fractions, are reinterpreted in terms of modulations to kinetic parameters that describe the rates at which cells transit between phenotypic compartments. The mathematical model is analytical, in the sense that the kinetic parameters are calculated from the experimental data directly, without any fitting process. Since the kinetic parameters are much more directly related to potential molecular targets than are the experimentally measured quantities, this approach can provide a more informative picture of the mechanism of action of the antitumour agent under investigation. We demonstrate the potential value of our model by applying it to data from RHPS4 (3,11-difluoro-6,8,13-trimethyl-8H-quino [4,3,2-kl] acridinium methosulfate). This agent is a DNA-interactive pentacyclic acridine for which at least three potential mechanisms of antitumour activity have been identified. Firstly RHPS4 is a telomerase inhibitor, secondly it is a telomerase-independent destabiliser of telomeres, and thirdly it is a telomere-independent binder to genomic DNA. Each mechanism can induce a separate, but overlapping, pattern of cellular responses, making the interpretation of tissue culture data very complex. Here we study the time- and dose-dependent effects of RHPS4 on the HCT116 cell line, and develop a five-compartment mathematical model to interpret the data. Application of the model to the data suggests that RHPS4 increases the rate at which cells became senescent state but, rather surprisingly, actually inhibits the rate of cell death. As a control, we also apply the model to data describing the time- and dose

  10. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel benzimidazole-2-substituted phenyl or pyridine propyl ketene derivatives as antitumour agents.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lin-tao; Jiang, Zhi; Shen, Jia-jia; Yi, Hong; Zhan, Yue-chen; Sha, Ming-quan; Wang, Zhen; Xue, Si-tu; Li, Zhuo-rong

    2016-05-23

    A series of novel benzimidazole-2-subsituted phenyl or pyridine propyl ketene derivatives were designed and synthesized. The biological activities of these derivatives were then evaluated as potential antitumour agents. These compounds were assayed for growth-inhibitory activity against HCT116, MCF-7 and HepG2 cell lines in vitro. The IC50 values of compounds A1 and A7 against the cancer cells were 0.06-3.64 μM and 0.04-9.80 μM, respectively. Their antiproliferative activities were significantly better than that of 5-Fluorouracil (IC50: 56.96-174.50 μM) and were close to that of Paclitaxel (IC50: 0.026-1.53 μM). The activity of these derivatives was over 100 times more effective than other reported structures of chalcone analogues (licochalcone A). A preliminary mechanistic study suggested that these compounds inhibit p53-MDM2 binding. Compounds A1, A7 and A9 effectively inhibited tumour growth in BALB/c mice with colon carcinoma HCT116 cells. The group administered 200 mg/kg of compound A7 showed a 74.6% tumour growth inhibition with no signs of toxicity at high doses that was similar to the inhibition achieved with the 12.5 mg/kg irinotecan positive control (70.2%). Therefore, this class of benzimidazole-2-subsituted phenyl or pyridine propyl ketene derivatives represents a promising lead structure for the development of possible p53-MDM2 inhibitors as new antitumour agents.

  11. Preclinical investigation of tolerance and antitumour activity of new fluorodeoxyglucose-coupled chlorambucil alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Reux, Bastien; Debiton, Eric; Madelmont, Jean-Claude; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Coudert, Pascal; Weber, Valérie

    2011-06-01

    Our strategy is to increase drug accumulation in target tumour cells using specific "vectors" tailored to neoplastic tissue characteristics, which ideally are not found in healthy tissues. The aim of this work was to use 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) as a drug carrier, in view of its well-known accumulation by most primary and disseminated human tumours. We had previously selected two FDG-cytotoxic conjugates of chlorambucil (CLB), i.e. compounds 21a and 40a, on the basis of their in vitro profiles. Here we investigated the antitumour profile and tolerance of these compounds in vitro and in vivo in two murine cell lines of solid tumours. In vitro, we found that micromolar concentrations of compounds 21a and 40a inhibited proliferation of B16F0 and CT-26 cell lines. Interestingly, compounds 21a and 40a were found to act at different levels in the cell cycle: S and subG1 accumulation for 21a and G2 accumulation for 40a. In vivo, a single-dose-finding study to select the Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) by the intraperitoneal route (IP) showed that the two peracetylated glucoconjugates of CLB were less toxic than CLB itself. When given to tumour-bearing mice (melanoma and colon carcinoma models), according to a "q4d × 3" schedule (i.e., three doses at 4-day intervals) both compounds demonstrated a promising antitumour activity, with Log Cell Kill (LCK) values higher than 1.3 in both B16F0 and CT-26 models. Hence compounds 21a and 40a are good candidates for further works to develop new highly active antineoplastic compounds.

  12. Cis- and trans-platinum and palladium complexes: a comparative study review as antitumour agents.

    PubMed

    al-Allaf, T A; Rashan, L J

    2001-01-01

    A large body of novel platinum and palladium complexes, in both the cis- and trans-forms, with various donor ligands, e.g. beta-carboline alkaloids, pyrazoles, DMSO, ferrocenylphosphines,...... have been tested for their antitumour activity against number of fluid suspension (P388, L1210, K562, and Raji) and solid tumour (KB, T47D, SW948, HeLa, A549, L929, Hep-2, RD,...) cell lines. Remarkable cytotoxic effects against these cell lines were observed by some of these complexes. The preliminary results indicated that most of the trans-palladium complexes showed a better activity than the cis-platinum isomers and superior activity than that of the cis-palladium isomers. More importantly they showed activities equal to (or superior than) those of cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin (the anti-cancer drugs) in vitro. Although these results are preliminary, however, encouraging since they are in a disagreement with the previous studies that cis-isomers are more active than trans-ones; the complexes which have not received the required attention from the vast number of researchers in this field.

  13. 2-(4-Aminophenyl)benzothiazoles: novel agents with selective profiles of in vitro anti-tumour activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, T. D.; Wrigley, S.; Shi, D. F.; Schultz, R. J.; Paull, K. D.; Stevens, M. F.

    1998-01-01

    2-(4-Aminophenyl)benzothiazole (CJM 126) elicits biphasic growth-inhibitory effects against a panel of oestrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and oestrogen receptor-negative (ER-) human mammary carcinoma cell lines in vitro, yielding IC50 values in the nM range. Substitutions adjacent to the amino group in the 2-phenyl ring with a halogen atom or methyl group enhance potency in sensitive breast lines (pM IC50 values). Transient biphasic dose responses were induced but rapidly eradicated after specific drug exposure periods. Two human prostate carcinoma cell lines were refractory to the growth-inhibitory properties of 2-(4-aminophenyl)benzothiazoles; IC50 values > 30 microM were obtained. Potency and selectivity were confirmed when compounds were examined in the National Cancer Institute's Developmental Therapeutics screen; the spectrum of activity included specific ovarian, renal, colon as well as breast carcinoma cell lines. Moreover, comparing 6-day and 48-h incubations, the exposure time-dependent nature of the biphasic response was corroborated. Differential perturbation of cell cycle distribution followed treatment of MCF-7 and MDA 468 cells with substituted 2-(4-aminophenyl)benzothiazoles. In MDA 468 populations only, accumulation of events in G2/M phase was observed. Two MCF-7 cell lines were established with acquired resistance to CJM 126 (IC50 values > 20 microM), which exhibit cross-resistance to substituted benzothiazoles, but equal sensitivity to tamoxifen and doxorubicin. Compared with standard anti-tumour agents evaluated in the National Cancer Institute in vitro cell panel, benzothiazoles revealed unique profiles of growth inhibition, suggesting a mode(s) of action shared with no known clinically active class of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:9514053

  14. Target/signalling pathways of natural plant-derived radioprotective agents from treatment to potential candidates: A reverse thought on anti-tumour drugs.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ke-Li; Wang, Zhen Yu

    2017-07-01

    Radiation damage can occur in nuclear power plant workers when physical protections fail, which results in nuclear leakage through the protective layers. Alternatively, workers may be unable to use physical protection in time (in the case of a sudden nuclear weapons attack). In addition, patients who receive local radiotherapy and are not allowed to adopt local physical protection may experience radiation damage. Thus, protection against chemical radiation has become indispensable. In view of the side effects caused by synthetic radioprotective agents (such as amisfostine), searching for radioprotective agents from plant sources is an alternative strategy. Radiation damage can cause multiple signalling pathway disturbances, leading to multiple organ injuries. Changes in these signalling pathways can lead to apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy, as well as organ fibrosis, atrophy, and inflammation. Through literature searches, we determined that most targets for treating radiation injury are mechanistically opposite those of anti-tumour agents. This is likely attributable to the idea that anti-tumour agents promote cell necrosis or apoptosis, whereas the goal of anti-radiation agents is to promote cell survival or autophagy. This observation has important theoretical and practical significance when searching and developing new radioprotective agents derived from plant extracts. Further, it has important guiding value for meeting military needs and serving the public. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA stretching in the nucleosome facilitates alkylation by an intercalating antitumour agent.

    PubMed

    Davey, Gabriela E; Wu, Bin; Dong, Yuancai; Surana, Uttam; Davey, Curt A

    2010-04-01

    DNA stretching in the nucleosome core can cause dramatic structural distortions, which may influence compaction and factor recognition in chromatin. We find that the base pair unstacking arising from stretching-induced extreme minor groove kinking near the nucleosome centre creates a hot spot for intercalation and alkylation by a novel anticancer compound. This may have far reaching implications for how chromatin structure can influence binding of intercalator species and indicates potential for the development of site selective DNA-binding agents that target unique conformational features of the nucleosome.

  16. DNA stretching in the nucleosome facilitates alkylation by an intercalating antitumour agent

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuancai; Surana, Uttam; Davey, Curt A.

    2010-01-01

    DNA stretching in the nucleosome core can cause dramatic structural distortions, which may influence compaction and factor recognition in chromatin. We find that the base pair unstacking arising from stretching-induced extreme minor groove kinking near the nucleosome centre creates a hot spot for intercalation and alkylation by a novel anticancer compound. This may have far reaching implications for how chromatin structure can influence binding of intercalator species and indicates potential for the development of site selective DNA-binding agents that target unique conformational features of the nucleosome. PMID:20026584

  17. Antitumour activity of novel taxanes that act at the same time as cytotoxic agents and P-glycoprotein inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ferlini, C; Distefano, M; Pignatelli, F; Lin, S; Riva, A; Bombardelli, E; Mancuso, S; Ojima, I; Scambia, G

    2000-01-01

    Taxanes antitumour agents such as paclitaxel and docetaxel represent a successful family of chemotherapeutic drugs. Unfortunately, acquired and innate resistance represents a clinical problem for these drugs. We investigated, on a panel of 7 human cancer cell lines, the growth inhibition effect of 3 newly developed taxanes (SB-T-1213, SB-T-1250 and SB-T-101187) with modification at the C10 and C3′ positions of the taxane framework. These positions have been previously characterized as critical to make taxanes highly active against cells overexpressing the efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Paclitaxel and docetaxel were used as reference compounds. Results unambiguously indicate the exceptional activity of the novel taxanes toward P-gp positive cells (up to >400 fold higher potency than that of paclitaxel). SB-T-1213 and SB-T-1250 are also substantially more active than the reference compounds against P-gp negative cells. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the enhanced activity of the newly developed taxanes, we performed cell cycle and apoptosis analysis. This study demonstrates that the striking growth inhibition effect exhibited by the novel taxanes is ascribed to their increased ability in inducing apoptosis and G 2/M cell cycle block. SB-T-1213 and SB-T-1250 are also more active than reference compounds in inducing intracellular accumulation of the beta-tubulin subunits. Finally, it is revealed that these novel taxanes have ability to inhibit the function of the P-gp efflux pump on the basis of the Rhodamine 123 assay. These findings strongly suggest that SB-T-1213, SB-T-1250 and SB-T-101187 represent a new tool to overcome innate or acquired P-gp mediated taxane-resistance. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11104578

  18. Antibiotics as immunomodulant agents in COPD.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Francesco; Mantero, Marco; Aliberti, Stefano

    2012-06-01

    It is widely accepted that some antibiotics have activities beyond their direct antibacterial effects. Macrolide is the antibiotic class with more convincing studies and evidence on its immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities. Different clinical studies have shown that macrolide prophylaxis in patients with moderate-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can have a significant impact on the exacerbation rate reducing morbidity and, potentially, mortality of the disease. Other antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones, demonstrate a variety of immunomodulatory effects but only few clinical data are available in COPD. New macrolide derivatives devoid of antibacterial activity have been synthetized. This review analyses the relevance of immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of antibiotics in the management of COPD.

  19. The anti-tumour agent lonidamine is a potent inhibitor of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier and plasma membrane monocarboxylate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Nancolas, Bethany; Guo, Lili; Zhou, Rong; Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Blair, Ian A.; Glickson, Jerry D.; Halestrap, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Lonidamine (LND) is an anti-tumour drug particularly effective at selectively sensitising tumours to chemotherapy, hyperthermia and radiotherapy, although its precise mode of action remains unclear. It has been reported to perturb the bioenergetics of cells by inhibiting glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration, while indirect evidence suggests it may also inhibit L-lactic acid efflux from cells mediated by members of the proton-linked monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) family and also pyruvate uptake into the mitochondria by the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC). Here we test these possibilities directly. We demonstrate that LND potently inhibits MPC activity in isolated rat liver mitochondria (Ki 2.5 μM) and cooperatively inhibits L-lactate transport by MCT1, MCT2 and MCT4 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes with K0.5 and Hill Coefficient values of 36–40 μM and 1.65–1.85. In rat heart mitochondria LND inhibited the MPC with similar potency and uncoupled oxidation of pyruvate was inhibited more effectively (IC50 ~7 μM) than other substrates including glutamate (IC50 ~20 μM). In isolated DB-1 melanoma cells 1–10 μM LND increased L-lactate output, consistent with MPC inhibition, but higher concentrations (150 μM) decreased L-lactate output while increasing intracellular [L-lactate] > five-fold, consistent with MCT inhibition. We conclude that MPC inhibition is the most sensitive anti-tumour target for LND, with additional inhibitory effects on MCT-mediated L-lactic acid efflux and glutamine/glutamate oxidation. Together these actions can account for published data on the selective tumour effects of LND on L-lactate, intracellular pH (pHi) and ATP levels that can be partially mimicked by the established MPC and MCT inhibitor α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate. PMID:26831515

  20. Children as agents of change in combatting antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Andreea

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide problem and changes are needed in the way antibiotics are used. The value of engaging children as key contributors in health care campaigns to increase the appropriate use of antibiotics has not been fully recognized. Little is known about how to design educational materials for children in order to enable them to be agents of change in their communities. Science education needs to improve the way it engages children so as to give them the tools needed to make responsible decisions on antibiotic use.

  1. Interactions of beta-lactam antibiotics and antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Y; Saito, A; Fukuoka, Y; Yamashiro, Y; Ikeda, Y; Taki, H; Yasuda, T; Saikawa, I

    1983-01-01

    The in vitro interactions of four beta-lactam antibiotics and five antineoplastic agents were examined with 100 clinically isolated strains of four species of gram-negative bacilli. Generally, by the checkerboard dilution method, beta-lactam antibiotics, when tested in combination with mitomycin C, bleomycin, or 5-fluorouracil, showed synergistic action, whereas when tested in combination with carboquone, they showed antagonistic action. Almost no combinations of adriamycin showed the interactions. Among beta-lactam antibiotics, piperacillin was more frequently synergistic than cefoperazone, cefazolin, or carbenicillin when tested in combination with each antineoplastic agent against various species. PMID:6405686

  2. Coping with antibiotic resistance: combining nanoparticles with antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Kon, Kateryna Volodymyrivna; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Bagirova, Malahat; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2011-11-01

    The worldwide escalation of bacterial resistance to conventional medical antibiotics is a serious concern for modern medicine. High prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria among bacteria-based infections decreases effectiveness of current treatments and causes thousands of deaths. New improvements in present methods and novel strategies are urgently needed to cope with this problem. Owing to their antibacterial activities, metallic nanoparticles represent an effective solution for overcoming bacterial resistance. However, metallic nanoparticles are toxic, which causes restrictions in their use. Recent studies have shown that combining nanoparticles with antibiotics not only reduces the toxicity of both agents towards human cells by decreasing the requirement for high dosages but also enhances their bactericidal properties. Combining antibiotics with nanoparticles also restores their ability to destroy bacteria that have acquired resistance to them. Furthermore, nanoparticles tagged with antibiotics have been shown to increase the concentration of antibiotics at the site of bacterium-antibiotic interaction, and to facilitate binding of antibiotics to bacteria. Likewise, combining nanoparticles with antimicrobial peptides and essential oils generates genuine synergy against bacterial resistance. In this article, we aim to summarize recent studies on interactions between nanoparticles and antibiotics, as well as other antibacterial agents to formulate new prospects for future studies. Based on the promising data that demonstrated the synergistic effects of antimicrobial agents with nanoparticles, we believe that this combination is a potential candidate for more research into treatments for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  3. Ecology of Anti-Biofilm Agents I: Antibiotics versus Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Abedon, Stephen T

    2015-09-09

    Bacteriophages, the viruses that infect bacteria, have for decades been successfully used to combat antibiotic-resistant, chronic bacterial infections, many of which are likely biofilm associated. Antibiotics as anti-biofilm agents can, by contrast, be inefficacious against even genetically sensitive targets. Such deficiencies in usefulness may result from antibiotics, as naturally occurring compounds, not serving their producers, in nature, as stand-alone disruptors of mature biofilms. Anti-biofilm effectiveness by phages, by contrast, may result from a combination of inherent abilities to concentrate lytic antibacterial activity intracellularly via bacterial infection and extracellularly via localized population growth. Considered here is the anti-biofilm activity of microorganisms, with a case presented for why, ecologically, bacteriophages can be more efficacious than traditional antibiotics as medically or environmentally applied biofilm-disrupting agents. Four criteria, it can be argued, generally must be met, in combination, for microorganisms to eradicate biofilms: (1) Furnishing of sufficiently effective antibacterial factors, (2) intimate interaction with biofilm bacteria over extended periods, (3) associated ability to concentrate antibacterial factors in or around targets, and, ultimately, (4) a means of physically disrupting or displacing target bacteria. In nature, lytic predators of bacteria likely can meet these criteria whereas antibiotic production, in and of itself, largely may not.

  4. Ecology of Anti-Biofilm Agents I: Antibiotics versus Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Abedon, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages, the viruses that infect bacteria, have for decades been successfully used to combat antibiotic-resistant, chronic bacterial infections, many of which are likely biofilm associated. Antibiotics as anti-biofilm agents can, by contrast, be inefficacious against even genetically sensitive targets. Such deficiencies in usefulness may result from antibiotics, as naturally occurring compounds, not serving their producers, in nature, as stand-alone disruptors of mature biofilms. Anti-biofilm effectiveness by phages, by contrast, may result from a combination of inherent abilities to concentrate lytic antibacterial activity intracellularly via bacterial infection and extracellularly via localized population growth. Considered here is the anti-biofilm activity of microorganisms, with a case presented for why, ecologically, bacteriophages can be more efficacious than traditional antibiotics as medically or environmentally applied biofilm-disrupting agents. Four criteria, it can be argued, generally must be met, in combination, for microorganisms to eradicate biofilms: (1) Furnishing of sufficiently effective antibacterial factors, (2) intimate interaction with biofilm bacteria over extended periods, (3) associated ability to concentrate antibacterial factors in or around targets, and, ultimately, (4) a means of physically disrupting or displacing target bacteria. In nature, lytic predators of bacteria likely can meet these criteria whereas antibiotic production, in and of itself, largely may not. PMID:26371010

  5. Overview on the current antibiotic containing agents used in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya

    2014-08-01

    Antibiotics are systemically and locally used extensively in endodontics. However, local antibiotic application mode is considered more effective than systemic administration. The local mode enables the dentist to target bacteria in every nook and corner of root canal system, which is otherwise beyond reach if targeted by instrumentation or conventional root canal treatment protocols. Therefore, they are an important adjunct to conventional treatment of root canal. The present study reviews the various antibiotic containing dental agents used in endodontics. A web-based research on MedLine was performed with terms Review Articles published in the last 10 year's dental journals in English for literature researching, extracting, and synthesizing data. Relevant articles were shortlisted. Important cross-reference articles were also reviewed.

  6. Overview on the Current Antibiotic Containing Agents Used in Endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics are systemically and locally used extensively in endodontics. However, local antibiotic application mode is considered more effective than systemic administration. The local mode enables the dentist to target bacteria in every nook and corner of root canal system, which is otherwise beyond reach if targeted by instrumentation or conventional root canal treatment protocols. Therefore, they are an important adjunct to conventional treatment of root canal. The present study reviews the various antibiotic containing dental agents used in endodontics. A web-based research on MedLine was performed with terms Review Articles published in the last 10 year's dental journals in English for literature researching, extracting, and synthesizing data. Relevant articles were shortlisted. Important cross-reference articles were also reviewed. PMID:25210667

  7. [Sensitivity of nosocomial purulent-septic infection causative agents to disinfection agents and antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Sergevnin, V I; Kliukina, T V; Kliuchareva, N M; Volkova, E O; Kudriavtseva, L G

    2014-01-01

    Study the sensitivity of nosocomial purulent-septic infection (PSI) causative agents to disinfectants (DA) and antibiotics (AB). Sensitivity to DA and AB of 209 PSI causative agent strains isolated from patients and the environment of 2 obstetric and 3 surgical hospitals was studied in 2009-2011. Sensitivity to DA of 94 strains and to AB of 189 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients with signs of PSI of reanimation and intensive therapy and surgical departments of a multi-field hospital was studied in 2012. Sensitivity to DA was determined on test-surfaces and in solution according to guidelines by V.V. Shkarin et al., 2010; sensitivity to AB - by disc-diffusion method. Among PSI causative agents resistant to DA the portion of poly-antibiotic resistant strains is higher than among microorganisms sensitive to DA, and among antibiotic resistant bacteria the number of strains resistant to DA is higher than among sensitive to antibiotics. The increase of resistance to DA and AB of P. aeruginosa strains is observed in parallel to the increase of volume of the antibacterial preparations used. The results obtained give evidence of the possibility of formation of combined (associated) resistance to DA and AB by nosocomial PSI causative agents against the background of increase of their consumption.

  8. A multi-agent system approach for monitoring the prescription of restricted use antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Godo, L; Puyol-Gruart, J; Sabater, J; Torra, V; Barrufet, P; Fàbregas, X

    2003-03-01

    Hospitals have a specified set of antibiotics for restricted use (ARU), very expensive, which are only recommended for special pathologies. The pharmacy department daily checks the prescription of this kind of antibiotics since it is often the case that, after a careful analysis, one can get the same therapeutic effects by using normal antibiotics which are much cheaper and usually less aggressive. In this paper, we describe a multi-agent system to help in the revision of medical prescriptions containing antibiotics of restricted use. The proposed approach attaches an agent to each patient which is responsible of checking different medical aspects related to his/her prescribed therapy. A pharmacy agent is responsible for analyzing it and suggesting alternative antibiotic treatments. All these agents are integrated in a hospital distributed scenario composed by many different kinds of software and human agents. This patient-centered multi-agent scenario is specified using the design methodology of Electronic Institutions.

  9. Structural variations on antitumour agents derived from bisacylimidoselenocarbamate. A proposal for structure-activity relationships based on the analysis of conformational behaviour.

    PubMed

    Font, María; Lizarraga, Elena; Ibáñez, Elena; Plano, Daniel; Sanmartín, Carmen; Palop, Juan A

    2013-08-01

    A molecular modelling study has been carried out on a previously reported series of symmetrically substituted bisacylimidoselenocarbamate (BSeC) derivatives that show remarkable antitumour activity in vitro against a panel of human tumour cell lines. These derivatives can be considered as a central scaffold constructed around a methyl carbamimidoselenoate nucleus in which two heteroarylacyl fragments are located on the scaffold nitrogen atoms, thus forming the different BSeCs. The results reveal that the nature of the selected heteroaryl ring has a marked influence on the antiproliferative activity of the compounds and this can be related, as a first approximation, to the ability to release methylselenol (MeSeH), a compound that, according to our initial hypothesis, is ultimately responsible for the antitumour activity of the compounds under investigation. The release of MeSeH from the active BSeCs has been confirmed by means of Head Space Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry techniques. The data that support this connection include the topography of the molecules, the conformational behaviour of the compounds, which influences the accessibility of the hydrolysis point, the interaction map obtained for an O2H type probe, and the location and energy of the HOMO/LUMO orbitals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. The antitumour agent 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno) imidazole-4-carboxamide (DTIC) inhibits rat liver cAMP phosphodiesterase and amplifies hormone effects in hepatocytes and hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, P. G.; Haffner, F.; Brłnstad, G. O.; Christoffersen, T.

    1979-01-01

    The antitumour agent 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (DTIC) was found to inhibit competitively the low-Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity in an ammonium-sulphate-precipitable fraction of the 2,000g supernatant of rat liver. With substrate concentration at 0.25 microM, I50 was 790 microM for DTIC and 350 microM for theophylline. DTIC at 2 mM more than doubled the cAMP response to glucagon in hepatocytes and to adrenaline in MH1C1 hepatoma cells, indicating that it also exerts its inhibitory effect on the phosphodiesterase in intact cells. The possible contribution of the phosphodiesterase inhibition to the growth-inhibitory and cytotoxic effects of DTIC is discussed. PMID:228692

  11. On the local applications of antibiotics and antibiotic-based agents in endodontics and dental traumatology.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Z; Abbott, P V

    2009-07-01

    Antibiotics are a valuable adjunctive to the armamentarium available to health professionals for the management of bacterial infections. During endodontic treatment and when managing trauma to the teeth, antibiotics may be applied systemically (orally and/or parenterally) or locally (i.e. intra-dentally via irrigants and medicaments). Due to the potential risk of adverse effects following systemic application, and the ineffectiveness of systemic antibiotics in necrotic pulpless teeth and the periradicular tissues, the local application of antibiotics may be a more effective mode for delivery in endodontics. The aim of this article was to review the history, rationale and applications of antibiotic-containing irrigants and medicaments in endodontics and dental traumatology. The search was performed from 1981 to 2008 and was limited to English-language papers. The keywords searched on Medline were 'Antibiotics AND endodontics', 'Antibiotics AND root canal irrigation', 'Antibiotics AND intra-canal medicament', 'Antibiotics AND Dental trauma' and 'Antibiotics AND root resorption'. The reference section of each article was manually searched to find other suitable sources of information. It seems that local routes of antibiotic administration are a more effective mode than systemic applications. Various antibiotics have been tested in numerous studies and each has some advantages. Tetracyclines are a group of bacteriostatic antibiotics with antibacterial substantivity for up to 12 weeks. They are typically used in conjunction with corticosteroids and these combinations have anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-resorptive properties, all of which help to reduce the periapical inflammatory reaction including clastic-cell mediated resorption. Tetracyclines have also been used as part of irrigating solutions but the substantivity is only for 4 weeks. Clindamycin and a combination of three antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and minocycline) have also been

  12. Antibiotics as intermicrobial signaling agents instead of weapons

    PubMed Central

    Linares, J. F.; Gustafsson, I.; Baquero, F.; Martinez, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    It has been widely assumed that the ecological function of antibiotics in nature is fighting against competitors. This made them a good example of the Darwinian struggle-for-life in the microbial world. Based on this idea, it also has been believed that antibiotics, even at subinhibitory concentrations, reduce virulence of bacterial pathogens. Herein, using a combination of genomic and functional assays, we demonstrate that specific antibiotics (namely tobramycin, tetracycline, and norfloxacin) at subinhibitory concentrations trigger expression of determinants influencing the virulence of the major opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All three antibiotics induce biofilm formation; tobramycin increases bacterial motility, and tetracycline triggers expression of P. aeruginosa type III secretion system and consequently bacterial cytotoxicity. Besides their relevance in the infection process, those determinants are relevant for the ecological behavior of this bacterial species in natural, nonclinical environments, either by favoring colonization of surfaces (biofilm, motility) or for fighting against eukaryotic predators (cytotoxicity). Our results support the notion that antibiotics are not only bacterial weapons for fighting competitors but also signaling molecules that may regulate the homeostasis of microbial communities. At low concentrations, they can even be beneficial for the behavior of susceptible bacteria in natural environments. This is a complete change on our vision on the ecological function of antibiotics with clear implications both for the treatment of infectious diseases and for the understanding of the microbial relationships in the biosphere. PMID:17148599

  13. Abatacept (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4-immunoglobulin) improves B cell function and regulatory T cell inhibitory capacity in rheumatoid arthritis patients non-responding to anti-tumour necrosis factor-α agents.

    PubMed

    Picchianti Diamanti, A; Rosado, M M; Scarsella, M; Germano, V; Giorda, E; Cascioli, S; Laganà, B; D'Amelio, R; Carsetti, R

    2014-09-01

    The use of biological agents combined with methotrexate (MTX) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients has strongly improved disease outcome. In this study, the effects of abatacept on the size and function of circulating B and T cells in RA patients not responding to anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α have been analysed, with the aim of identifying immunological parameters helpful to choosing suitable tailored therapies. We analysed the frequency of peripheral B and T cell subsets, B cell function and T regulatory cell (Treg ) inhibitory function in 20 moderate/severe RA patients, according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR)/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, primary non-responders to one TNF-α blocking agent, who received abatacept + MTX. Patients were studied before and 6 months after therapy. We found that abatacept therapy significantly reduced disease activity score on 44 joints (DAS)/erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) values without causing severe side effects. The size of the circulating B and T cell compartments in RA patients was not significantly different from healthy donors, but B cell proliferation and plasma cell differentiation was impaired before therapy and restored by abatacept. While Treg cell frequency was normal, its inhibitory function was absent before therapy and was partially recovered 6 months after abatacept. B and Treg cell function is impaired in RA patients not responding to the first anti-TNF-α agent. Abatacept therapy was able to rescue immune function and led to an effective and safe clinical outcome, suggesting that RA patients, in whom anti-TNF-α failed, are immunologically prone to benefit from an agent targeting a different pathway.

  14. Antibiotics in the intensive care unit: focus on agents for resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Volles, David F; Branan, Trisha N

    2008-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is increasing faster than the drug industry can develop and market new antibiotics. Medical personnel commonly must deal with the resistant gram-positive pathogens including MRSA and VRE, in addition to the problem gram-negative bacteria, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and ESBL producing strains of Klebsiella and E. coli. Clinicians should be familiar with treatment strategies for these resistant pathogens. Because of the lack of novel agents to treat resistant infections, clinicians must use antibiotics judiciously and appropriately to limit further development of resistance. Early, appropriate cultures of the blood, urine, sputum and suspected source, ideally obtained before antibiotic initiation, allow for future de-escalation of antibiotics, or the decision to discontinue antibiotics.

  15. Apoptosis induction via microtubule disassembly by an antitumour compound, pironetin.

    PubMed Central

    Kondoh, M; Usui, T; Nishikiori, T; Mayumi, T; Osada, H

    1999-01-01

    We reported previously that pironetin and its derivatives were potent inhibitors of cell cycle progression at the M-phase and showed antitumour activity against a murine tumour cell line, P388 leukaemia, transplanted in mice. In this paper, we investigated the mechanism of action of pironetins in antitumour activity and cell cycle arrest at the M-phase. As reported previously for murine leukaemia P388 cells, pironetin showed antitumour activity in a dose-dependent manner in the human leukaemia cell line HL-60. Since DNA fragmentation was observed in both P388 and HL-60 cells, the antitumour activity of pironetin is thought to be due to the induction of apoptosis. Pironetin also induced the rapid phosphorylation of Bcl-2 before formation of the DNA ladder in HL-60 cells, as seen with several tubulin binders. These results suggest that the antitumour activity of pironetin is due to apoptosis caused by the phosphorylation of Bcl-2, and that pironetin targets the microtubules. Pironetin and demethylpironetin exhibited reversible disruption of the cellular microtubule network in normal rat fibroblast 3Y1 cells. However, epoxypironetin, which contains epoxide instead of the double bond of pironetin, showed only weak activity. Since the concentrations that inhibit cell cycle progression at the M-phase were the same as those for disruption of the microtubule network, it was suggested that the mitotic arrest induced by pironetin was the result of the loss of the mitotic spindle. These compounds also inhibited the microtubule-associated protein-induced and glutamate-induced tubulin assembly in vitro. Pironetin inhibited the binding of [3H]vinblastine, but not that of [3H]colchicine, to tubulin, and the Kd values revealed that the affinity of pironetin for tubulin is stronger than that of vinblastine. These results suggest that pironetins are novel antitumour agents which inhibit microtubule assembly. PMID:10333483

  16. Marine Pharmacology in 2005-6: Antitumour and Cytotoxic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alejandro M.S.; Gustafson, Kirk R.

    2009-01-01

    During 2005 and 2006, marine pharmacology research directed towards the discovery and development of novel antitumour agents was reported in 171 peer-reviewed articles. The purpose of this article is to present a structured review of the antitumour and cytotoxic properties of 136 marine natural products, many of which are novel compounds that belong to diverse structural classes, including polyketides, terpenes, steroids, and peptides. The organisms yielding these bioactive marine compounds included invertebrate animals, algae, fungi and bacteria. Antitumour pharmacological studies were conducted with 42 structurally defined marine natural products in a number of experimental and clinical models which further defined their mechanisms of action. Particularly potent in vitro cytotoxicity data generated with murine and human tumour cell lines was reported for 94 novel marine chemicals with as yet undetermined mechanisms of action. Noteworthy is the fact that marine anticancer research was sustained by a global collaborative effort, involving researchers from Australia, Belgium, Benin, Brazil, Canada, China, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Panama, the Philippines, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, United Kingdom, and the United States. Finally, this 2005-6 overview of the marine pharmacology literature highlights the fact that the discovery of novel marine antitumour agents continued at the same active pace as during 1998-2004. PMID:18701274

  17. Marine pharmacology in 2005-2006: antitumour and cytotoxic compounds.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Alejandro M S; Gustafson, Kirk R

    2008-11-01

    During 2005 and 2006, marine pharmacology research directed towards the discovery and development of novel antitumour agents was reported in 171 peer-reviewed articles. The purpose of this article is to present a structured review of the antitumour and cytotoxic properties of 136 marine natural products, many of which are novel compounds that belong to diverse structural classes, including polyketides, terpenes, steroids and peptides. The organisms yielding these bioactive marine compounds included invertebrate animals, algae, fungi and bacteria. Antitumour pharmacological studies were conducted with 42 structurally defined marine natural products in a number of experimental and clinical models which further defined their mechanisms of action. Particularly potent in vitro cytotoxicity data generated with murine and human tumour cell lines were reported for 94 novel marine chemicals with as yet undetermined mechanisms of action. Noteworthy is the fact that marine anticancer research was sustained by a global collaborative effort, involving researchers from Australia, Belgium, Benin, Brazil, Canada, China, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Panama, the Philippines, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, United Kingdom (UK) and the United States of America (USA). Finally, this 2005-2006 overview of the marine pharmacology literature highlights the fact that the discovery of novel marine antitumour agents continued at the same active pace as during 1998-2004.

  18. G9a inhibition potentiates the anti-tumour activity of DNA double-strand break inducing agents by impairing DNA repair independent of p53 status.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Jackson, Stephen P

    2016-10-01

    Cancer cells often exhibit altered epigenetic signatures that can misregulate genes involved in processes such as transcription, proliferation, apoptosis and DNA repair. As regulation of chromatin structure is crucial for DNA repair processes, and both DNA repair and epigenetic controls are deregulated in many cancers, we speculated that simultaneously targeting both might provide new opportunities for cancer therapy. Here, we describe a focused screen that profiled small-molecule inhibitors targeting epigenetic regulators in combination with DNA double-strand break (DSB) inducing agents. We identify UNC0638, a catalytic inhibitor of histone lysine N-methyl-transferase G9a, as hypersensitising tumour cells to low doses of DSB-inducing agents without affecting the growth of the non-tumorigenic cells tested. Similar effects are also observed with another, structurally distinct, G9a inhibitor A-366. We also show that small-molecule inhibition of G9a or siRNA-mediated G9a depletion induces tumour cell death under low DNA damage conditions by impairing DSB repair in a p53 independent manner. Furthermore, we establish that G9a promotes DNA non-homologous end-joining in response to DSB-inducing genotoxic stress. This study thus highlights the potential for using G9a inhibitors as anti-cancer therapeutic agents in combination with DSB-inducing chemotherapeutic drugs such as etoposide.

  19. Clinically Relevant Growth Conditions Alter Acinetobacter baumannii Antibiotic Susceptibility and Promote Identification of Novel Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, Jennifer M.; Wozniak, Rachel A. F.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Biological processes that govern bacterial proliferation and survival in the host-environment(s) are likely to be vastly different from those that are required for viability in nutrient-rich laboratory media. Consequently, growth-based antimicrobial screens performed in conditions modeling aspects of bacterial disease states have the potential to identify new classes of antimicrobials that would be missed by screens performed in conventional laboratory media. Accordingly, we performed screens of the Selleck library of 853 FDA approved drugs for agents that exhibit antimicrobial activity toward the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii during growth in human serum, lung surfactant, and/or the organism in the biofilm state and compared those results to that of conventional laboratory medium. Results revealed that a total of 90 compounds representing 73 antibiotics and 17 agents that were developed for alternative therapeutic indications displayed antimicrobial properties toward the test strain in at least one screening condition. Of the active library antibiotics only four agents, rifampin, rifaximin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline, exhibited antimicrobial activity toward the organism during all screening conditions, whereas the remainder were inactive in ≥ 1 condition; 56 antibiotics were inactive during serum growth, 25 and 38 were inactive toward lung surfactant grown and biofilm-associated cells, respectively, suggesting that subsets of antibiotics may outperform others in differing infection settings. Moreover, 9 antibiotics that are predominantly used for the treatment Gram-positive pathogens and 10 non-antibiotics lacked detectable antimicrobial activity toward A. baumannii grown in conventional medium but were active during ≥ 1 alternative growth condition(s). Such agents may represent promising anti-Acinetobacter agents that would have likely been overlooked by antimicrobial whole cell screening assays performed in traditional

  20. Synergy between antibiotics and natural agents results in increased antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Abidi, Syed Hani; Ahmed, Khalid; Sherwani, Sikander Khan; Kazmi, Shahana Urooj

    2015-09-27

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is one of the most frequent causes of biofilm-associated infections on indwelling medical devices. With the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE), there is an urgent need to discover novel active agents against a range of Gram-positive pathogens. We screened the clinical isolates of S. epidermidis for susceptibility/resistance against commonly prescribed antibiotics. Furthermore, we tested some natural agents alone and in combination with antibiotics to find possible synergistic antimicrobial effects. S. epidermidis clinical isolates were screened for susceptibility/resistance against vancomycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, ofloxacin, cephalexin, and gentamicin using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The antimicrobial potential of Camellia sinensis, Juglans regia, and Hippophae rhamnoides alone and in combination with antibiotics were examined using the disk diffusion method, where the antimicrobial potential activity was measured in terms of formation of zones of inhibition. Most S. epidermidis isolates were found to be resistant to one or more antibiotics. Gentamycin and ofloxacin were found to be the most effective antibiotics against S. epidermidis isolates. Extracts of Hippophae rhamnoides, Juglans regia, and Camellia sinensis were found to be equally effective against S. epidermidis isolates. In combination with antibiotics, these extracts exhibited appreciable synergistic activity; the highest synergistic activity was observed with erythromycin and cephalexin. In the case of cephalexin, a reversion in resistance was observed. The plant extracts used in the study exhibited additive and synergistic antibacterial activity against S. epidermidis, hence providing an effective alternative to deal with the problem of multidrug resistance.

  1. Modeling the Population Dynamics of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria:. AN Agent-Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, James T.; Walshe, Ray; Devocelle, Marc

    The response of bacterial populations to antibiotic treatment is often a function of a diverse range of interacting factors. In order to develop strategies to minimize the spread of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria, a sound theoretical understanding of the systems of interactions taking place within a colony must be developed. The agent-based approach to modeling bacterial populations is a useful tool for relating data obtained at the molecular and cellular level with the overall population dynamics. Here we demonstrate an agent-based model, called Micro-Gen, which has been developed to simulate the growth and development of bacterial colonies in culture. The model also incorporates biochemical rules and parameters describing the kinetic interactions of bacterial cells with antibiotic molecules. Simulations were carried out to replicate the development of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) colonies growing in the presence of antibiotics. The model was explored to see how the properties of the system emerge from the interactions of the individual bacterial agents in order to achieve a better mechanistic understanding of the population dynamics taking place. Micro-Gen provides a good theoretical framework for investigating the effects of local environmental conditions and cellular properties on the response of bacterial populations to antibiotic exposure in the context of a simulated environment.

  2. Carbon-11 labelling of the antitumour agent N-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]acridine-4-carboxamide (DACA) and determination of plasma metabolites in man.

    PubMed

    Brady, F; Luthra, S K; Brown, G; Osman, S; Harte, R J; Denny, W A; Baguley, B C; Jones, T; Price, P M

    1997-04-01

    The potential anti-cancer agent N-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl] acridine-4-carboxamide, DACA has been labelled with carbon-11. N-[2-11C-methyl]DACA was produced in 73% radiochemical yield from [11C]iodomethane in 40 min from EOB. The average radiochemical yield was 3.2 GBq with specific radioactivity of 41.5 GBq mumol-1 at EOS, corresponding to 24 micrograms of stable DACA. The position of labelling was confirmed by co-labelling with [11/13C]iodomethane. PET studies in patients have been performed prior to Phase I trial of DACA and during Phase I trial of DACA. Analysis of serial plasma samples showed that the metabolism of N-[2-11C-methyl]DACA is rapid and extensive in patient plasma.

  3. In Vitro Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Burkholderia mallei (Causative Agent of Glanders) Determined by Broth Microdilution and E-Test

    PubMed Central

    Heine, Henry S.; England, Marilyn J.; Waag, David M.; Byrne, W. Russell

    2001-01-01

    In vitro susceptibilities to 28 antibiotics were determined for 11 strains of Burkholderia mallei by the broth microdilution method. The B. mallei strains demonstrated susceptibility to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones, doxycycline, piperacillin, ceftazidime, and imipenem. For comparison and evaluation, 17 antibiotic susceptibilities were also determined by the E-test. E-test values were always lower than the broth dilution values. Establishing and comparing antibiotic susceptibilities of specific B. mallei strains will provide reference information for assessing new antibiotic agents. PMID:11408233

  4. The effectiveness and medication costs of three anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha agents in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis from prospective clinical practice data.

    PubMed

    Kievit, W; Adang, E M; Fransen, J; Kuper, H H; van de Laar, M A F J; Jansen, T L; De Gendt, C M A; De Rooij, D-J R A M; Brus, H L M; Van Oijen, P C M; Van Riel, P C L M

    2008-09-01

    to evaluate the effects of adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab on disease activity, functional ability and quality of life and the medication costs in a naturalistic design. All patients from the Dutch Rheumatoid Arthritis Monitoring (DREAM) register starting on tumour necrosis factor (TNF)alpha-blocking agents for the first time were monitored and assessed by trained research nurses every 3 months. The primary outcome was the Disease Activity Score (DAS28) course over the 12 months follow-up, analysed by linear mixed models. Secondary outcomes were the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), EuroQol five dimensions (EQ-5D) and the Short-Form 36 items (SF36) scores, and medication-related total costs. The DAS28 and SF-36 physical component scale decreased in all three medication groups over 12 months, but the decrease was larger for adalimumab and etanercept in comparison to infliximab (p<0.001). The analyses of the HAQ and the EQ-5D scores showed the same (non-significant) trend, namely that at 12 months, the functionality and quality of life was better for adalimumab and etanercept patients. With regard to the medication costs, infliximab treatment resulted in significantly higher costs over the follow-up period than treatments with either adalimumab or etanercept. The comparison between adalimumab and etanercept showed a significant difference in the 12-month DAS28 course (p = 0.031). There were no additional indications for differences in effectiveness or costs between adalimumab and etanercept. The evaluation of the effectiveness and costs showed that adalimumab and etanercept are more or less equal and favourable compared to infliximab in the first year of treatment.

  5. Selective advantage of resistant strains at trace levels of antibiotics: a simple and ultrasensitive color test for detection of antibiotics and genotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anne; Fong, Amie; Becket, Elinne; Yuan, Jessica; Tamae, Cindy; Medrano, Leah; Maiz, Maria; Wahba, Christine; Lee, Catherine; Lee, Kim; Tran, Katherine P; Yang, Hanjing; Hoffman, Robert M; Salih, Anya; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2011-03-01

    Many studies have examined the evolution of bacterial mutants that are resistant to specific antibiotics, and many of these focus on concentrations at and above the MIC. Here we ask for the minimum concentration at which existing resistant mutants can outgrow sensitive wild-type strains in competition experiments at antibiotic levels significantly below the MIC, and we define a minimum selective concentration (MSC) in Escherichia coli for two antibiotics, which is near 1/5 of the MIC for ciprofloxacin and 1/20 of the MIC for tetracycline. Because of the prevalence of resistant mutants already in the human microbiome, allowable levels of antibiotics to which we are exposed should be below the MSC. Since this concentration often corresponds to low or trace levels of antibiotics, it is helpful to have simple tests to detect such trace levels. We describe a simple ultrasensitive test for detecting the presence of antibiotics and genotoxic agents. The test is based on the use of chromogenic proteins as color markers and the use of single and multiple mutants of Escherichia coli that have greatly increased sensitivity to either a wide range of antibiotics or specific antibiotics, antibiotic families, and genotoxic agents. This test can detect ciprofloxacin at 1/75 of the MIC.

  6. Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such as Colds Flu Most coughs and bronchitis Sore throats, unless caused by strep If a virus is making you sick, taking antibiotics may do ...

  7. Formation of complexes of antimicrobial agent norfloxacin with antitumor antibiotics of anthracycline series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstigneev, M. P.; Rybakova, K. A.; Davies, D. B.

    2007-05-01

    The formation of complexes in solutions of the norfloxacin antimicrobial agent (NOR) with daunomycin (DAU) and nogalamycin (NOG), antitumor anthracycline antibiotics, was studied using 1H NMR spectroscopy. Based on the concentration and temperature dependences of the chemical shifts of the protons of interacting molecules, the equilibrium constants and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy and entropy) of heteroassociation of the antibiotics were calculated. It was shown that NOR interacts with DAU (NOG) in aqueous solutions forming stacked heterocomplexes with parallel orientation of the molecular chromophores. The conclusion was drawn that such interactions should be taken into account when anthracyclines and quinolones are jointly administered during combined chemotherapy, since they can contribute to the medico-biological synergistic effect of these antibiotics.

  8. Functional gold nanoclusters as antimicrobial agents for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Lin, Ju-Yu; Chen, Wei-Jen; Luo, Liyang; Wei-Guang Diau, Eric; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2010-07-01

    Our aim was to demonstrate that lysozyme-directed generation of gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) are potential antimicrobial agents for antibiotic-resistant bacteria and broad labeling agents for pathogenic bacteria. Lysozyme is an enzyme that is capable of hydrolyzing the cell walls of bacteria. In this study, we demonstrated the generation of functional Au NCs by using lysozyme as the sequester and the reducing agent for Au precursors at 40 degrees C. In addition, to shorten the reaction time, the reaction was conducted under microwave irradiation within a short period of time for the first time. The bioactivity of the lysozyme on the Au NCs was retained. Therefore, the as-prepared lysozyme-Au NCs with desirable fluorescence feature were successfully employed to be broad-band labeling agents for pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that the lysozyme-Au NCs can be used to effectively inhibit the cell growth of notorious antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including pan-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis. The potential of employing the lysozyme-Au NCs for bacterial labeling and as antimicrobial agents is expected.

  9. Phenazine antibiotic inspired discovery of potent bromophenazine antibacterial agents against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Borrero, Nicholas V; Bai, Fang; Perez, Cristian; Duong, Benjamin Q; Rocca, James R; Jin, Shouguang; Huigens, Robert W

    2014-02-14

    Nearly all clinically used antibiotics have been (1) discovered from microorganisms (2) using phenotype screens to identify inhibitors of bacterial growth. The effectiveness of these antibiotics is attributed to their endogenous roles as bacterial warfare agents against competing microorganisms. Unfortunately, every class of clinically used antibiotic has been met with drug resistant bacteria. In fact, the emergence of resistant bacterial infections coupled to the dismal pipeline of new antibacterial agents has resulted in a global health care crisis. There is an urgent need for innovative antibacterial strategies and treatment options to effectively combat drug resistant bacterial pathogens. Here, we describe the implementation of a Pseudomonas competition strategy, using redox-active phenazines, to identify novel antibacterial leads against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. In this report, we describe the chemical synthesis and evaluation of a diverse 27-membered phenazine library. Using this microbial warfare inspired approach, we have identified several bromophenazines with potent antibacterial activities against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. The most potent bromophenazine analogue from this focused library demonstrated a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.78-1.56 μM, or 0.31-0.62 μg mL(-1), against S. aureus and S. epidermidis and proved to be 32- to 64-fold more potent than the phenazine antibiotic pyocyanin in head-to-head MIC experiments. In addition to the discovery of potent antibacterial agents against S. aureus and S. epidermidis, we also report a detailed structure-activity relationship for this class of bromophenazine small molecules.

  10. Evaluation of combinations of putative anti-biofilm agents and antibiotics to eradicate biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Belfield, Katherine; Bayston, Roger; Hajduk, Nadzieja; Levell, Georgia; Birchall, John P; Daniel, Matija

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate potential anti-biofilm agents for their ability to enhance the activity of antibiotics for local treatment of localized biofilm infections. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro biofilm models were developed. The putative antibiotic enhancers N-acetylcysteine, acetylsalicylic acid, sodium salicylate, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease I, dispersin B, hydrogen peroxide and Johnson's Baby Shampoo (JBS) were tested for their anti-biofilm activity alone and their ability to enhance the activity of antibiotics for 7 or 14 days, against 5 day old biofilms. The antibiotic enhancers were paired with rifampicin and clindamycin against S. aureus and gentamicin and ciprofloxacin against P. aeruginosa. Isolates from biofilms that were not eradicated were tested for antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic levels 10× MIC and 100× MIC significantly reduced biofilm, but did not consistently eradicate it. Antibiotics at 100× MIC with 10% JBS for 14 days was the only treatment to eradicate both staphylococcal and pseudomonal biofilms. Recombinant human deoxyribonuclease I significantly reduced staphylococcal biofilm. Emergence of resistance of surviving isolates was minimal and was often associated with the small colony variant phenotype. JBS enhanced the activity of antibiotics and several other promising anti-biofilm agents were identified. Antibiotics with 10% JBS eradicated biofilms produced by both organisms. Such combinations might be useful in local treatment of localized biofilm infections.

  11. CO-releasing Metal Carbonyl Compounds as Antimicrobial Agents in the Post-antibiotic Era*

    PubMed Central

    Wareham, Lauren K.; Poole, Robert K.; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of a “post-antibiotic era” in the 21st century, in which common infections may kill, has prompted research into radically new antimicrobials. CO-releasing molecules (CORMs), mostly metal carbonyl compounds, originally developed for therapeutic CO delivery in animals, are potent antimicrobial agents. Certain CORMs inhibit growth and respiration, reduce viability, and release CO to intracellular hemes, as predicted, but their actions are more complex, as revealed by transcriptomic datasets and modeling. Progress is hindered by difficulties in detecting CO release intracellularly, limited understanding of the biological chemistry of CO reactions with non-heme targets, and the cytotoxicity of some CORMs to mammalian cells. PMID:26055702

  12. Effects of nandrolone decanoate on the toxicity and anti-tumour action of CCNU and FU in murine tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Bibby, M. C.; Double, J. A.; Mughal, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Pre-treatment with the anabolic steroid nandrolone decanoate (ND) increases the LD50 of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) and 5-Fluorouracil (FU) in NMRI mice. Administration of ND did not affect the anti-tumour action of CCNU against a transplantable mouse adenocarcinoma of the colon (MAC 13) or the anti-tumour action of FU against MAC 26. In both tumour lines ND had no significant effect on tumour growth. These data suggest that an increase in the anti-tumour selectivity of these agents may be produced by pre-treatment with ND. PMID:7295514

  13. Non-antibiotic selection systems for soybean somatic embryos: the lysine analog aminoethyl-cysteine as a selection agent

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In soybean somatic embryo transformation, the standard selection agent currently used is hygromycin. However, hygromycin being an antibiotic is not ideal in the final product. When tested against different alternate selection agents our studies show that 0.16 µg/ mL glufosinate, 40 mg/L isopropylam...

  14. Functional gold nanoparticle-based antibacterial agents for nosocomial and antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yen-Ling; Wang, Sin-Ge; Wu, Ching-Yi; Lee, Kai-Chieh; Jao, Chan-Jung; Chou, Shiu-Huey; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-10-01

    Medical treatments for bacterial-infections have become challenging because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. Thus, new therapeutics and antibiotics must be developed. Arginine and tryptophan can target negatively-charged bacteria and penetrate bacterial cell membrane, respectively. Synthetic-peptides containing arginine, tryptophan and cysteine termini, in other words, (DVFLG)2REEW4C and (DVFLG)2REEW2C, as starting materials were mixed with aqueous tetrachloroauric acid to generate peptide-immobilized gold nanoparticles (i.e., [DVFLG]2REEW4C-AuNPs and [DVFLG]2REEW2C-AuNPs) through one-pot reactions. The peptide immobilized AuNPs exhibit targeting capacity and antibacterial activity. Furthermore, (DVFLG)2REEW4C-AuNPs immobilized with a higher number of tryptophan molecules possess more effective antibacterial capacity than (DVFLG)2REEW2C-AuNPs. Nevertheless, they are not harmful for animal cells. The feasibility of using the peptide-AuNPs to inhibit the cell growth of bacterium-infected macrophages was demonstrated. These results suggested that the proposed antibacterial AuNPs are effective antibacterial agents for Staphylococci, Enterococci and antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. [Formula: see text].

  15. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility of the newly recognized agent of ehrlichiosis in humans, Ehrlichia chaffeensis.

    PubMed Central

    Brouqui, P; Raoult, D

    1992-01-01

    Ehrlichiosis in humans, a rickettsial disease recently discovered in the United States, is generally treated successfully with tetracyclines; however treatment with these agents is usually avoided with children and pregnant women. The in vitro susceptibility of Ehrlichia chaffeensis, the agent of human ehrlichiosis in the United States, was assessed by a quantitative evaluation of infected DH82 cells cultivated in 96-well microtiter plates in the presence of different concentrations of selected antibiotics. Extracellular MICs and MBCs were evaluated after 72 h of exposure to the antibiotics. Doxycycline and rifampin were found to exert rapidly bactericidal effects, with MBCs in the extracellular culture medium of less than 0.5 and 0.125 microgram/ml, respectively. E. chaffeensis was resistant to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, co-trimoxazole, penicillin, and gentamicin, which had MICs greater than 16, 4, 8, 4, 40, and 32 micrograms/ml, respectively. These observations are consistent with the finding that human ehrlichiosis appears to respond to tetracycline therapy, which has been the therapy of first choice. Further clinical investigations are necessary to evaluate the role of rifampin in the treatment of human ehrlichiosis, especially in children. PMID:1482148

  16. Susceptibility of clinical Moraxella catarrhalis isolates in British Columbia to six empirically prescribed antibiotic agents

    PubMed Central

    Bandet, Tamara; Whitehead, Sue; Blondel-Hill, Edith; Wagner, Ken; Cheeptham, Naowarat

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Moraxella catarrhalis is a commensal organism of the respiratory tract that has emerged as an important pathogen for a variety of upper and lower respiratory tract infections including otitis media and acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. Susceptibility testing of M catarrhalis is not routinely performed in most diagnostic laboratories; rather, a comment predicting susceptibility based on the literature is attached to the report. The most recent Canadian report on M catarrhalis antimicrobial susceptibility was published in 2003; therefore, a new study at this time was of interest and importance. OBJECTIVE: To determine the susceptibility of M catarrhalis isolates from British Columbia to amoxicillin-clavulanate, doxycycline, clarithromycin, cefuroxime, levofloxacin and trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole. METHODS: A total of 117 clinical M catarrhalis isolates were isolated and tested from five Interior hospitals and two private laboratory centres in British Columbia between January and December 2012. Antibiotic susceptibility of M catarrhalis isolates was characterized using the Etest (E-strip; bioMérieux, USA) according to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. RESULTS: All isolates were sensitive to amoxicillin-clavulanate, doxycycline, clarithromycin, levofloxacin and trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole. One isolate was intermediately resistant to cefuroxime, representing a 99.15% sensitivity rate to the cephem agent. Cefuroxime minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) inhibiting 50% and 90% of organisms (MIC50 and MIC90) were highest among the antibiotics tested, and the MIC90 (3 μg/mL) of cefuroxime reached the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoint of susceptibility. DISCUSSION: The antibiotic susceptibility of M catarrhalis isolates evaluated in the present study largely confirms the findings of previous surveillance studies performed in Canada. Cefuroxime MICs are in the high end of the sensitive range and the MIC50 and MIC90

  17. Synthesis and antitumour activity of 4-aminoquinazoline derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipunova, G. N.; Nosova, E. V.; Charushin, V. N.; Chupakhin, O. N.

    2016-07-01

    Pieces of data on the synthesis and antitumour activity of 4-aminoquinazolines are summarized and analyzed. Key methods for the synthesis of these compounds are considered, primarily cyclocondensation of carboxylic acid derivatives, as well as the oxidation of quinazolines and the cyclization of disubstituted thioureas. Improvements of synthetic schemes for erlotinib, gefitinib and lapatinib, which are the best-known pharmaceuticals based on compounds of the title class, are also considered. Synthetic strategies and biological activities for new 4-aminoquinazoline derivatives that are EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors, multiactive compounds, and labelled compounds for use as positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents are discussed. The bibliography includes 263 references.

  18. Influence of Mycotoxins and a Mycotoxin Adsorbing Agent on the Oral Bioavailability of Commonly Used Antibiotics in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Joline; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Pasmans, Frank; De Baere, Siegrid; Devreese, Mathias; Osselaere, Ann; Verbrugghe, Elin; Haesebrouck, Freddy; De Saeger, Sarah; Eeckhout, Mia; Audenaert, Kris; Haesaert, Geert; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2012-01-01

    It is recognized that mycotoxins can cause a variety of adverse health effects in animals, including altered gastrointestinal barrier function. It is the aim of the present study to determine whether mycotoxin-contaminated diets can alter the oral bioavailability of the antibiotics doxycycline and paromomycin in pigs, and whether a mycotoxin adsorbing agent included into diets interacts with those antibiotics. Experiments were conducted with pigs utilizing diets that contained blank feed, mycotoxin-contaminated feed (T-2 toxin or deoxynivalenol), mycotoxin-contaminated feed supplemented with a glucomannan mycotoxin binder, or blank feed supplemented with mycotoxin binder. Diets with T-2 toxin and binder or deoxynivalenol and binder induced increased plasma concentrations of doxycycline administered as single bolus in pigs compared to diets containing blank feed. These results suggest that complex interactions may occur between mycotoxins, mycotoxin binders, and antibiotics which could alter antibiotic bioavailability. This could have consequences for animal toxicity, withdrawal time for oral antibiotics, or public health. PMID:22606377

  19. Influence of mycotoxins and a mycotoxin adsorbing agent on the oral bioavailability of commonly used antibiotics in pigs.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Joline; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Pasmans, Frank; De Baere, Siegrid; Devreese, Mathias; Osselaere, Ann; Verbrugghe, Elin; Haesebrouck, Freddy; De Saeger, Sarah; Eeckhout, Mia; Audenaert, Kris; Haesaert, Geert; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2012-04-01

    It is recognized that mycotoxins can cause a variety of adverse health effects in animals, including altered gastrointestinal barrier function. It is the aim of the present study to determine whether mycotoxin-contaminated diets can alter the oral bioavailability of the antibiotics doxycycline and paromomycin in pigs, and whether a mycotoxin adsorbing agent included into diets interacts with those antibiotics. Experiments were conducted with pigs utilizing diets that contained blank feed, mycotoxin-contaminated feed (T-2 toxin or deoxynivalenol), mycotoxin-contaminated feed supplemented with a glucomannan mycotoxin binder, or blank feed supplemented with mycotoxin binder. Diets with T-2 toxin and binder or deoxynivalenol and binder induced increased plasma concentrations of doxycycline administered as single bolus in pigs compared to diets containing blank feed. These results suggest that complex interactions may occur between mycotoxins, mycotoxin binders, and antibiotics which could alter antibiotic bioavailability. This could have consequences for animal toxicity, withdrawal time for oral antibiotics, or public health.

  20. Impact of Delftia tsuruhatensis and Achromobacter xylosoxidans on Escherichia coli dual-species biofilms treated with antibiotic agents.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Andreia S; Almeida, Carina; Pereira, Bruno; Melo, Luís F; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that for urinary tract infections species with a lower or unproven pathogenic potential, such as Delftia tsuruhatensis and Achromobacter xylosoxidans, might interact with conventional pathogenic agents such as Escherichia coli. Here, single- and dual-species biofilms of these microorganisms were characterized in terms of microbial composition over time, the average fitness of E. coli, the spatial organization and the biofilm antimicrobial profile. The results revealed a positive impact of these species on the fitness of E. coli and a greater tolerance to the antibiotic agents. In dual-species biofilms exposed to antibiotics, E. coli was able to dominate the microbial consortia in spite of being the most sensitive strain. This is the first study demonstrating the protective effect of less common species over E. coli under adverse conditions imposed by the use of antibiotic agents.

  1. Antibiotic resistance and hypermutability of Escherichia coli O157 from feedlot cattle treated with growth-promoting agents.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Brigitte; Diarra, Moussa S; Giguère, Karine; Roy, Gabriel; Michaud, Sophie; Malouin, François

    2005-11-01

    In a longitudinal study (165 days), we investigated the effect of growth-promoting agents (monensin and trenbolone acetate-estradiol) and an antibiotic (oxytetracycline) on the incidence in feedlot steers of Escherichia coli O157, including antibiotic-resistant and hypermutable isolates. Eighty steers in 16 pens were treated with eight combinations of promoters, and each treatment was duplicated. Fecal samples were collected at nine different sampling times for detection of E. coli O157. Overall, 50 E. coli O157 isolates were detected in treated animals, and none were found in untreated animals. Compared with untreated controls, there was a significant association between the utilization of growth-promoting agents or antibiotics and the shedding of E. coli O157 at day 137 (P = 0.03), when a prevalence peak was observed and 50% of the isolates were detected. Multiplex PCR assays were conducted for some virulence genes. PCR results indicated that all except one isolate possessed at least the Shiga toxin gene stx2. MICs for 12 antibiotics were determined, and eight oxytetracycline-resistant E. coli O157 strains were identified. Antibiotic-resistant strains were considered a distinct subpopulation of E. coli O157 by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing. Seven of these antibiotic-resistant strains were isolated early in the study (on or before day 25), and among them two were also hypermutable as determined by rifampin mutation frequencies. The proportion of hypermutable strains among E. coli O157 isolates remained relatively constant throughout the study period. These results indicate that the use of growth-promoting agents and antibiotics in beef production may increase the risk of environmental contamination by E. coli O157.

  2. Effect of Antibiotics and Antibiofilm Agents in the Ultrastructure and Development of Biofilms Developed by Nonpigmented Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Egea, María-Carmen; García-Pedrazuela, María; Mahillo-Fernandez, Ignacio; Esteban, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the effect of amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and clarithromycin, alone and associated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and Tween 80, at different times and concentrations in nonpigmented rapidly growing mycobacteria (NPRGM) biofilms. For this purpose, confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis were used to study the development and behavior of intrinsic autofluorescence, covered area, thickness, and cell viability in NPRGM biofilms after adding antibiotics alone and associated with antibiofilm agents. In this study, ciprofloxacin is the most active antibiotic against this type of biofilm and thickness is the most affected parameter. NAC and Tween 80 combined with antibiotics exert a synergistic effect in increasing the percentage of dead bacteria and also reducing the percentage of covered surface and thickness of NPRGM biofilms. Tween 80 seems to be an antibiofilm agent more effective than NAC due to its higher reduction in the percentage of cover surface and thickness. In conclusion, the results obtained in this work show that phenotypic parameters (thickness, percentage of covered surface, autofluorescence, percentage of live/dead bacteria) are affected by combining antibiotics and antibiofilm agents, ciprofloxacin and Tween 80 being the most active agents against NPRGM biofilms.

  3. Immune stimulatory and anti-tumour properties of haemin.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, A; Wang, J; Stenzel, K H; Novogrodsky, A

    1993-01-01

    IL-2 induces tumour regression in some patients with metastatic disease, but the dose of IL-2 is limited by severe toxicity. Agents that increase the expression of IL-2 receptors in the effector cells could be used to improve the effectiveness of IL-2 in mediating its anti-tumour effect. We have reported that haemin increased the expression of IL-2 receptors in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and synergized with IL-2 in the induction of mitogenicity, cytotoxicity and cytokine production. We now report on haemin-induced immune stimulation and tumour regression in mice. Haemin-induced mitogenicity in mouse splenocytes was potentiated up to two-fold by IL-2. The combination of haemin and IL-2 was also effective in inducing cytotoxicity for natural killer (NK)-resistant target cells. Maximal induction of cytotoxicity was attained at an optimal concentration of haemin of 10 microM. Higher concentrations were less effective. Splenocytes isolated from mice that had been treated in vivo with haemin and IL-2 incorporated twice the amount of 3H-thymidine compared with splenocytes from mice treated with either haemin or IL-2 alone. Cytotoxicity of splenocytes for NK-resistant target cells was not increased following in vivo administration of haemin and IL-2 when fresh splenocytes were tested. Cytotoxicity was enhanced, however, up to five-fold following 48 h in vitro incubation with IL-2. Administration of haemin and IL-2 resulted in a significant decrease (40%) of established hepatic metastases in mice. Either IL-2 or haemin alone at the dose used were ineffective. The anti-tumour effect of haemin and IL-2 was enhanced (63% decrease in metastases) by administration of the thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine. Since haemin can safely be administered to patients, it may represent a new class of biologic response modifiers that could enhance IL-2-mediated anti-tumour effects. PMID:8370158

  4. Mycothiol-deficient Mycobacterium smegmatis mutants are hypersensitive to alkylating agents, free radicals, and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Mamta; Newton, Gerald L; Ko, Mary; Martinez, Gladys J; Fahey, Robert C; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2002-11-01

    Mycothiol (MSH; 1D-myo-inosityl 2-[N-acetyl-L-cysteinyl]amido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranoside) is the major low-molecular-weight thiol produced by mycobacteria. Mutants of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155 deficient in MSH production were produced by chemical mutagenesis as well as by transposon mutagenesis. One chemical mutant (mutant I64) and two transposon mutants (mutants Tn1 and Tn2) stably deficient in MSH production were isolated by screening for reduced levels of MSH content. The MSH contents of transposon mutants Tn1 and Tn2 were found to be less than 0.1% that of the parent strain, and the MSH content of I64 was found to be 1 to 5% that of the parent strain. All three strains accumulated 1D-myo-inosityl 2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranoside to levels 20- to 25-fold the level found in the parent strain. The cysteine:1D-myo-inosityl 2-amino-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranoside ligase (MshC) activities of the three mutant strains were < or =2% that of the parent strain. Phenotypic analysis revealed that these MSH-deficient mutants possess increased susceptibilities to free radicals and alkylating agents and to a wide range of antibiotics including erythromycin, azithromycin, vancomycin, penicillin G, rifamycin, and rifampin. Conversely, the mutants possess at least 200-fold higher levels of resistance to isoniazid than the wild type. We mapped the mutation in the chemical mutant by sequencing the mshC gene and showed that a single amino acid substitution (L205P) is responsible for reduced MSH production and its associated phenotype. Our results demonstrate that there is a direct correlation between MSH depletion and enhanced sensitivity to toxins and antibiotics.

  5. [Causative agents of intravenous catheter-related infections and their antibiotic susceptibilities].

    PubMed

    Aktaş, Elif; Sarı, Emre Nur; Seremet Keskin, Ayşegül; Pişkin, Nihal; Külah, Canan; Cömert, Füsun

    2011-01-01

    Intravenous catheterization can lead to colonization as well as a broad spectrum of infections ranging from catheter site infections to catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSIs). The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution of causative agents and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns in CRBSIs and catheter site infections along with the colonization rates and colonizing microorganisms in Zonguldak Karaelmas University Hospital, Turkey. The results of cultures from catheter tips and/or intracatheter blood cultures and simultaneously taken peripheral blood cultures were sent to medical microbiology laboratory and were retrospectively investigated for 201 patients hospitalized between September 2007 and September 2009. The catheter tips were cultured by semi-quantitative and quantitative culture methods. Blood cultures from the catheters and peripheral veins were performed in BACTEC 9120 (Becton Dickinson, USA) blood culture systems. The antibiotic susceptibility tests were done by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method according to the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Out of 201 patients included, 28 (13.9%) had CRBSIs and 13 (6.4%) had catheter site infections while colonization was defined for 55 (27.3%) patients. Of 28 patients with CRBSIs, Acinetobacter spp. were isolated from 11 including five carbapenem-resistant strains, methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCNS) from eight, methicillin-susceptible coagulase-negative staphylococci (MSCNS) from two, Klebsiella pneumoniae from two patients and one of each patient's cultures yielded methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli and MRCNS + Enterococcus faecium. Of 13 patients with catheter site infections, five MSCNS, two methicillin-susceptible S.aureus (MSSA), two E.coli, and one of each K.pneumoniae, MRCNS, Enterococcus spp., K.pneumoniae + P

  6. Indications and Types of Antibiotic Agents Used in 6 Acute Care Hospitals, 2009-2010: A Pragmatic Retrospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Braykov, Nikolay; Uslan, Daniel Z; Morgan, Daniel J; Gandra, Sumanth; Johannsson, Birgir; Schweizer, Marin L; Weisenberg, Scott A; Young, Heather; Cantey, Joseph; Perencevich, Eli; Septimus, Edward; Srinivasan, Arjun; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To design better antimicrobial stewardship programs, detailed data on the primary drivers and patterns of antibiotic use are needed. OBJECTIVE To characterize the indications for antibiotic therapy, agents used, duration, combinations, and microbiological justification in 6 acute-care US facilities with varied location, size, and type of antimicrobial stewardship programs. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS, AND SETTING Retrospective medical chart review was performed on a random cross-sectional sample of 1,200 adult inpatients, hospitalized (>24 hrs) in 6 hospitals, and receiving at least 1 antibiotic dose on 4 index dates chosen at equal intervals through a 1-year study period (October 1, 2009-September 30, 2010). METHODS Infectious disease specialists recorded patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, microbiological and radiological testing, and agents used, dose, duration, and indication for antibiotic prescriptions. RESULTS On the index dates 4,119 (60.5%) of 6,812 inpatients were receiving antibiotics. The random sample of 1,200 case patients was receiving 2,527 antibiotics (average: 2.1 per patient); 540 (21.4%) were prophylactic and 1,987 (78.6%) were therapeutic, of which 372 (18.7%) were pathogen-directed at start. Of the 1,615 empirical starts, 382 (23.7%) were subsequently pathogen-directed and 1,231 (76.2%) remained empirical. Use was primarily for respiratory (27.6% of prescriptions) followed by gastrointestinal (13.1%) infections. Fluoroquinolones, vancomycin, and antipseudomonal penicillins together accounted for 47.1% of therapy-days. CONCLUSIONS Use of broad-spectrum empirical therapy was prevalent in 6 US acute care facilities and in most instances was not subsequently pathogen directed. Fluoroquinolones, vancomycin, and antipseudomonal penicillins were the most frequently used antibiotics, particularly for respiratory indications. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;37(1):70-79.

  7. [Comparative analysis of the antibiotic sensitivity determination methods of conventionally pathogenic bacteria--agents of human opportunistic infections].

    PubMed

    Kulia, A F; Sabo, Iu; Koval', H M; Boĭko, N V

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of biological properties of pathogenic bacteria and, first of all, their sensitivity to antibiotics is the key to successful treatment of human opportunistic infections and to selection of appropriate tactics of their prevention. This paper is devoted to the comparative characteristic of modem and classical approaches to determination of sensitivities to antibiotics of conventionally pathogenic bacteria: methods applied in Ukraine and recommendations proposed by European Committee aimed to unify all the methods of testing sensitivity to antimicrobial agents (EUCAST). The major differences of the above-mentioned methods of testing sensitivity of clinical and non-clinical isolates of potentially pathogenic bacteria to antibiotics have been examined in order to confirm the feasibility of usage and permanent updating the EUCAST database and to promote creation of the appropriate unifield national electronic resource.

  8. Comparison of bleaching efficacy of two bleaching agents on teeth discoloured by different antibiotic combinations used in revascularization.

    PubMed

    Yasa, Bilal; Arslan, Hakan; Akcay, Merve; Kavrik, Fevzi; Hatirli, Huseyin; Ozkan, Bulent

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the whitening effects of different bleaching agents on teeth discoloured by different antibiotic combinations of ciprofloxacin and metronidazole with minocycline, doxycycline, amoxicillin or cefaclor. Forty extracted bovine incisors were collected and discoloured with triple antibiotic pastes (TAP) with minocycline, doxycycline, amoxicillin and cefaclor throughout 30 days. The specimens were then randomly divided into two subgroups and each group received different bleaching materials: 35% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate. Spectrophotometric measurements were obtained on the buccal surfaces of the crown, firstly in the beginning, then on the 4th, 8th and 12th days after the placement of the bleaching materials. The acceptability threshold was set to 3.5. The ∆E values were calculated and the data was analysed using the repeated measures analysis of variance (P = .05). All the test groups induced colour changes exceeding the acceptability threshold 30 days after the antibiotic pastes were placed. The 35% hydrogen peroxide was more effective than sodium perborate in the whitening of discoloured teeth by antibiotic pastes (P = .001). The whitening effect after the 8th and 12th days was significantly more than after 4 days of treatment (P <.001). The discolouration caused by the TAP with minocycline and cefaclor showed greater whitening compared to the TAP with doxycycline and amoxicillin groups (P <.05). The whitening treatment effect of 35% hydrogen peroxide on teeth discoloured by antibiotic pastes seems to have significantly outperformed the sodium perborate treatment. Both bleaching agents were allowed to bleach the teeth gradually each day and the effects on the 8th and 12th days were superior to the one on the 4th day. The use of 35% hydrogen peroxide could be advantageous to bleach the teeth discoloured with antibiotic pastes compared to sodium perborate.

  9. Cutting the limits of aminobisphosphonates: new strategies for the potentiation of their anti-tumour effects.

    PubMed

    Marra, M; Abbruzzese, A; Addeo, R; Del Prete, S; Tassone, P; Tonini, G; Tagliaferri, P; Santini, D; Caraglia, M

    2009-11-01

    Therapy with aminobisphosphonate (N-BPs), and zoledronic acid (ZOL) especially, has become a standard of care for patients with malignant bone disease. In addition, preclinical and preliminary clinical data suggest that N-BPs exert their direct or indirect anti-tumour effects on cancer growth factor release, cancer cell adhesion, invasion and viability, cancer angiogenesis and cancer cell apoptosis. Here, we will discuss the molecular mechanisms of the antitumour effects induced by ZOL. Despite their well-established in vitro anti-tumour effects N-BPs have not clear in vivo anti-tumour activity in humans. The bases of these discrepancies will be discussed in the text with a special focus on the pharmacokinetic limits of N-BPs. Moreover, the following molecular and pharmacological strategies in order to overcome N-BPs limitations will be described: i) development of pharmacological combinations with other biological agents; ii) finding of new molecular targets of N-BPs; iii) development of new pharmacological formulations of N-BPs. Finally, a new scenario of integrated bio-medicine and pharmacology will be depicted in order to drive the optimization of anti-cancer activity of N-BPs.

  10. [Systemic therapy with anti-infective agents. Principles of rational use of systemic antibiotics in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Sunderkötter, C; Brehler, R; Becker, K

    2014-02-01

    Antibiotics are frequently prescribed and extremely valuable drugs, because they are curative. However, their often incorrect use is the main reason for the increase of multiresistant pathogens. Inappropriate prescription of broad spectrum antibiotics for skin and soft tissue infections favors the selection and spread of multiresistant bacteria not only in the skin, but also in remote visceral organs (e.g. in the intestines), due to their systemic distribution and effects in the body (so-called collateral damage). For this reason basic knowledge and special prudence when using antibiotics are just as desirable as an awareness of responsibility for the public welfare. This article intends to convey basic knowledge on the indications and selection of suitable antibiotics as well as on the development of bacterial resistance and it gives recommendations for allergological procedures when patients report alleged drug reactions to antibiotics. Systemic antibiotics for soft tissue infections are indicated when the infection spreads within the tissue so that it is no longer accessible for local antiseptics. In addition to the clinical symptoms, important parameters are high blood sedimentation rates (BSR) and high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), leukocytosis with neutrophilia and fever (not always present in elderly or immunosuppressed patients). Certain constellations, such as the presence of severe underlying diseases, perfusion disorders or a particular localization (e.g. infection of the face) may necessitate early or parenteral administration. There is no need for systemic administration of antibiotics for uncomplicated wounds without soft tissue infections. Due to their curative effects, the decisive criterion for the use of antibiotics is their sufficient antimicrobial efficacy at the site of infection. An inappropriate administration increases both the selection pressure and costs of treatment and can have fatal consequences in serious situations. In

  11. Cyclic lipopeptides as antibacterial agents - potent antibiotic activity mediated by intriguing mode of actions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Tanja; Müller, Anna; Miess, Henrike; Gross, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are a promising class of natural products with antibiotic properties. CLPs are amphiphilic molecules, composed of a fatty acid tail linked to a short oligopeptide which form a macrocylic ring structure. This review presents an overview of this class of antibiotics, focusing on the current and potential therapeutic applications and placing particular emphasis on the molecular modes of action of these compounds.

  12. Non-antibiotic selection systems for soybean somatic embryos: the lysine analog aminoethyl-cysteine as a selection agent

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In soybean somatic embryo transformation, the standard selection agent currently used is hygromycin. It may be preferable to avoid use of antibiotic resistance genes in foods. The objective of these experiments was to develop a selection system for producing transgenic soybean somatic embryos without the use of antibiotics such as hygromycin. Results When tested against different alternate selection agents our studies show that 0.16 μg/mL glufosinate, 40 mg/L isopropylamine-glyphosate, 0.5 mg/mL (S-(2 aminoethyl)-L-cysteine) (AEC) and the acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors Exceed® and Synchrony® both at 150 μg/mL inhibited soybean somatic embryo growth. Even at the concentration of 2 mg/mL, lysine+threonine (LT) were poor selection agents. The use of AEC may be preferable since it is a natural compound. Unlike the plant enzyme, dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHPS) from E. coli is not feed-back inhibited by physiological concentrations of lysine. The dapA gene which codes for E. coli DHPS was expressed in soybean somatic embryos under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter. Following introduction of the construct into embryogenic tissue of soybean, transgenic events were recovered by incubating the tissue in liquid medium containing AEC at a concentration of 5 mM. Only transgenic soybeans were able to grow at this concentration of AEC; no escapes were observed. Conclusion Genetically engineered soybeans expressing a lysine insensitive DHPS gene can be selected with the non-antibiotic selection agent AEC. We also report here the inhibitory effects of glufosinate, (isopropylamine-glyphosate) (Roundup®), AEC and the ALS inhibitors Exceed® and Synchrony® against different tissues of soybean PMID:19922622

  13. Administration of antibiotic agents before intraoperative sampling in orthopedic infections alters culture results.

    PubMed

    Al-Mayahi, Mohamed; Cian, Anais; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Suvà, Domizio; Müller, Camillo; Landelle, Caroline; Miozzari, Hermès H; Uçkay, Ilker

    2015-11-01

    Many physicians and surgeons think that prescribing antibiotics before intraoperative sampling does not alter the microbiological results. Case-control study of adult patients hospitalized with orthopedic infections. Among 2740 episodes of orthopedic infections, 1167 (43%) had received antibiotic therapy before surgical sampling. Among these, 220 (19%) grew no pathogens while the proportion of culture-negative results in the 2573 who had no preoperative antibiotic therapy was only 6%. By multivariate analyses, pre-operative antibiotic exposure was associated with significantly more culture-negative results (odds ratio 2.8, 95% confidence interval 2.1-3.7), more non-fermenting rods and skin commensals (odds ratio 2.8 and 3.0, respectively). Even a single pre-operative dose of antibiotic was significantly associated with subsequent culture-negative results (19/93 vs. 297/2350; χ²-test, p = 0.01) and skin commensals (17/74 vs. 274/2350; p = 0.01) compared to episodes without preceding prophylaxis. Prior antibiotic use, including single-dose prophylactic administrations, is three-fold associated with culture-negative results, non-fermenting rods and resistant skin commensals. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural characterization of antibiotic self-immunity tRNA synthetase in plant tumour biocontrol agent

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Shaileja; Palencia, Andrés; Virus, Cornelia; Schulwitz, Sarah; Temple, Brenda R.; Cusack, Stephen; Reader, John

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic-producing microbes evolved self-resistance mechanisms to avoid suicide. The biocontrol Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 secretes the Trojan Horse antibiotic agrocin 84 that is selectively transported into the plant pathogen A. tumefaciens and processed into the toxin TM84. We previously showed that TM84 employs a unique tRNA-dependent mechanism to inhibit leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), while the TM84-producer prevents self-poisoning by expressing a resistant LeuRS AgnB2. We now identify a mechanism by which the antibiotic-producing microbe resists its own toxin. Using a combination of structural, biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that AgnB2 evolved structural changes so as to resist the antibiotic by eliminating the tRNA-dependence of TM84 binding. Mutagenesis of key resistance determinants results in mutants adopting an antibiotic-sensitive phenotype. This study illuminates the evolution of resistance in self-immunity genes and provides mechanistic insights into a fascinating tRNA-dependent antibiotic with applications for the development of anti-infectives and the prevention of biocontrol emasculation. PMID:27713402

  15. Antibiotic-induced immediate type hypersensitivity is a risk factor for positive allergy skin tests for neuromuscular blocking agents.

    PubMed

    Hagau, Natalia; Gherman, Nadia; Cocis, Mihaela; Petrisor, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Skin tests for neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) are not currently recommended for the general population undergoing general anaesthesia. In a previous study we have reported a high incidence of positive allergy tests for NMBAs in patients with a positive history of non-anaesthetic drug allergy, a larger prospective study being needed to confirm those preliminary results. The objective of this study was to compare the skin tests results for patients with a positive history of antibiotic-induced immediate type hypersensitivity reactions to those of controls without drug allergies. Ninety eight patients with previous antibiotic hypersensitivity and 72 controls were prospectively included. Skin tests were performed for atracurium, pancuronium, rocuronium, and suxamethonium. We found 65 positive skin tests from the 392 tests performed in patients with a positive history of antibiotic hypersensitivity (1 6.58%) and 23 positive skin tests from the 288 performed in controls (7.98%), the two incidences showing significant statistical difference (p = 0.0011). The relative risk for having a positive skin test for NMBAs for patients versus controls was 1.77 (1.15-2.76). For atracurium, skin tests were more often positive in patients with a positive history of antibiotic hypersensitivity versus controls (p = 0.02). For pancuronium, rocuronium and suxamethonium the statistical difference was not attained (p-values 0.08 for pancuronium, 0.23 for rocuronium, and 0.26 for suxamethonium). Patients with a positive history of antibiotic hypersensitivity seem to have a higher incidence of positive skin tests for NMBAs. They might represent a group at higher risk for developing intraoperative anaphylaxis compared to the general population. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antitumour principles from Peganum harmala seeds.

    PubMed

    Lamchouri, F; Settaf, A; Cherrah, Y; Zemzami, M; Lyoussi, B; Zaid, A; Atif, N; Hassar, M

    1999-01-01

    From ancient times, Peganum harmala was claimed to be an important medicinal plant. Its seeds were known to possess hypothermic, and essentially hallucinogenic properties. Various authors have undertaken studies on the antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral effects of Peganum harmala seeds, but studies on the antitumour activity are not to be found in the literature. In Moroccan traditional medicine, seed powder is sometimes used on skin and subcutaneous tumours. This work was designed to investigate some aspects of the antineoplastic properties of the plant Peganum. Varying concentrations (10 to 120 micrograms/ml) of total alkaloid extracts of Peganum harmala seeds (collected in Morocco) were tested in vitro on four tumoural cell-lines: Med-mek and UCP-Med carcinoma, UCP-Med sarcoma and Sp2/O-Ag14. In vivo experiments were performed with the Sp2/O cell-line grafted subcutaneously in syngenic BALB/c mice. In vitro, proliferation of tumoural cell lines was significantly reduced by all tested concentrations of the Peganum alkaloid extracts during the first 24 h of contact. A cell lysis effect occurred after 24 h and progressed to complete cell death within 48 to 72 h depending on the alkaloid concentration. Results obtained indicate that alkaloids of Peganum have a high cell toxicity in vitro. The active principle at a dose of 50 mg/kg given orally to mice for 40 days was found to have significant antitumoural activity. Peganum harmala alkaloids thus possess significant antitumour potential, which could prove useful as a novel anticancer therapy.

  17. Use of Preservative Agents and Antibiotics for Increased Poliovirus Survival on Positively Charged Filters.

    PubMed

    Fagnant, Christine Susan; Kossik, Alexandra Lynn; Zhou, Nicolette Angela; Sánchez-Gonzalez, Liliana; Falman, Jill Christin; Keim, Erika Karen; Linden, Yarrow; Scheibe, Alana; Barnes, Kilala Sayisha; Beck, Nicola Koren; Boyle, David S; Meschke, John Scott

    2017-06-14

    Environmental surveillance of poliovirus (PV) and other non-enveloped viruses can help identify silent circulation and is necessary to certify eradication. The bag-mediated filtration system is an efficient method to filter large volumes of environmental waters at field sites for monitoring the presence of viruses. As filters may require long transit times to off-site laboratories for processing, viral inactivation or overgrowth of bacteria and fungi can interfere with virus detection and quantification (Miki and Jacquet in Aquatic Microb Ecol 51(2):195-208, 2008). To evaluate virus survival over time on ViroCap(™) filters, the filters were seeded with PV type 1 (PV1) and/or MS2 and then dosed with preservatives or antibiotics prior to storage and elution. These filters were stored at various temperatures and time periods, and then eluted for PV1 and MS2 recovery quantification. Filters dosed with the preservative combination of 2% sodium benzoate and 0.2% calcium propionate had increased virus survival over time when stored at 25 °C, compared to samples stored at 25 °C with no preservatives. While elution within 24 h of filtration is recommended, if storage or shipping is required then this preservative mixture can help preserve sample integrity. Addition of an antibiotic cocktail containing cephapirin, gentamicin, and Proclin(™) 300 increased recovery after storage at 4 and 25 °C, when compared to storage with no antibiotics. The antibiotic cocktail can aid sample preservation if access to appropriate antibiotics storage is available and sample cold chain is unreliable. This study demonstrated that the use of preservatives or antibiotics is a simple, cost-effective method to improve virus detection from ViroCap cartridge filters over time.

  18. New antibiotic agents in the pipeline and how they can help overcome microbial resistance.

    PubMed

    Gould, Ian M; Bal, Abhijit M

    2013-02-15

    Bacterial resistance is a growing threat and yet few new antibiotics active against multi-resistant bacteria are being explored. A combination of falling profits, regulatory mechanisms and irrational and injudicious use of antibiotics has led to an alarming situation where some infections have no cure. In this article, we summarize the new developments that have been suggested to incentivize the pharmaceutical industries toward the field of infections. We also briefly mention the new compounds on the horizon and some newly approved compounds that might help us tide over this crisis.

  19. Motuporamine Derivatives as Antimicrobial Agents and Antibiotic Enhancers against Resistant Gram‐Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Borselli, Diane; Blanchet, Marine; Bolla, Jean‐Michel; Muth, Aaron; Skruber, Kristen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Dihydromotuporamine C and its derivatives were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activities and antibiotic enhancement properties against Gram‐negative bacteria and clinical isolates. The mechanism of action of one of these derivatives, MOTU‐N44, was investigated against Enterobacter aerogenes by using fluorescent dyes to evaluate outer‐membrane depolarization and permeabilization. Its efficiency correlated with inhibition of dye transport, thus suggesting that these molecules inhibit drug transporters by de‐energization of the efflux pump rather than by direct interaction of the molecule with the pump. This suggests that depowering the efflux pump provides another strategy to address antibiotic resistance. PMID:28098416

  20. New antibiotic agents in the pipeline and how they can help overcome microbial resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Ian M.; Bal, Abhijit M.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance is a growing threat and yet few new antibiotics active against multi-resistant bacteria are being explored. A combination of falling profits, regulatory mechanisms and irrational and injudicious use of antibiotics has led to an alarming situation where some infections have no cure. In this article, we summarize the new developments that have been suggested to incentivize the pharmaceutical industries toward the field of infections. We also briefly mention the new compounds on the horizon and some newly approved compounds that might help us tide over this crisis. PMID:23302792

  1. Antibodies as an unlimited source of anti-infective, anti-tumour and immunomodulatory peptides.

    PubMed

    Ciociola, Tecla; Magliani, Walter; Giovati, Laura; Sperindé, Martina; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Giorgio; Conti, Stefania; Polonella, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies (Abs) are emerging as an important class of therapeutic agents for the treatment of various human diseases, often conjugated to drugs or toxic substances. In recent years, the incidence of cancer and infectious diseases has increased dramatically making it imperative to discover new effective therapeutic molecules. Among these, small peptides are arousing great interest. Synthetic peptides, representative of variable and constant region fragments of Abs, were proved to exert in vitro, ex vivo and/or in vivo anti-microbial, anti-viral, anti-tumour and/or immunomodulatory activities, mediated by different mechanisms of action and regardless of the specificity and isotype of the Ab. Some of these synthetic peptides possess the ability to spontaneously and reversibly self-assemble in an organised network of fibril-like structure. Ab fragments may represent a novel model of targeted anti-infective and anti-tumour auto-delivering drugs.

  2. Antibiotic-Conjugated Polyacrylate Nanoparticles: New Opportunities for Development of Anti-MRSA Agents

    PubMed Central

    Turos, Edward; Shim, Jeung-Yeop; Wang, Yang; Greenhalgh, Kerriann; Reddy, G. Suresh Kumar; Dickey, Sonja; Lim, Daniel V.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the preparation of polyacrylate nanoparticles in which an N-thiolated β-lactam antibiotic is covalently conjugated onto the polymer framework. These nanoparticles are formed in water by emulsion polymerization of an acrylated antibiotic pre-dissolved in a liquid acrylate monomer (or mixture of co-monomers) in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate as a surfactant and potassium persulfate as a radical initiator. Dynamic light scattering analysis and electron microscopy images of these emulsions show that the nanoparticles are approximately 40 nm in diameter. The emulsions have potent in vitro antibacterial properties against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and have improved bioactivity relative to the non-polymerized form of the antibiotic. A unique feature of this methodology is the ability to incorporate water-insoluble drugs directly into the nanoparticle framework without the need for post-synthetic modification. Additionally, the antibiotic properties of the nanoparticles can be modulated by changing the length or location of the acrylate linker on the drug monomer. PMID:17049850

  3. Antibiotic-conjugated polyacrylate nanoparticles: new opportunities for development of anti-MRSA agents.

    PubMed

    Turos, Edward; Shim, Jeung-Yeop; Wang, Yang; Greenhalgh, Kerriann; Reddy, G Suresh Kumar; Dickey, Sonja; Lim, Daniel V

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the preparation of polyacrylate nanoparticles in which an N-thiolated beta-lactam antibiotic is covalently conjugated onto the polymer framework. These nanoparticles are formed in water by emulsion polymerization of an acrylated antibiotic pre-dissolved in a liquid acrylate monomer (or mixture of co-monomers) in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate as a surfactant and potassium persulfate as a radical initiator. Dynamic light scattering analysis and electron microscopy images of these emulsions show that the nanoparticles are approximately 40 nm in diameter. The emulsions have potent in vitro antibacterial properties against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and have improved bioactivity relative to the non-polymerized form of the antibiotic. A unique feature of this methodology is the ability to incorporate water-insoluble drugs directly into the nanoparticle framework without the need for post-synthetic modification. Additionally, the antibiotic properties of the nanoparticles can be modulated by changing the length or location of the acrylate linker on the drug monomer.

  4. Novel quorum-quenching agents promote methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) wound healing and sensitize MRSA to β-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kuo, David; Yu, Guanping; Hoch, Wyatt; Gabay, Dean; Long, Lisa; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Nagy, Nancy; Harding, Clifford V; Viswanathan, Rajesh; Shoham, Menachem

    2015-03-01

    The dwindling repertoire of antibiotics to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) calls for novel treatment options. Quorum-quenching agents offer an alternative or an adjuvant to antibiotic therapy. Three biaryl hydroxyketone compounds discovered previously (F1, F12, and F19; G. Yu, D. Kuo, M. Shoham, and R. Viswanathan, ACS Comb Sci 16:85-91, 2014) were tested for efficacy in MRSA-infected animal models. Topical therapy of compounds F1 and F12 in a MRSA murine wound infection model promotes wound healing compared to the untreated control. Compounds F1, F12, and F19 afford significant survival benefits in a MRSA insect larva model. Combination therapy of these quorum-quenching agents with cephalothin or nafcillin, antibiotics to which MRSA is resistant in monotherapy, revealed additional survival benefits. The quorum-quenching agents sensitize MRSA to the antibiotic by a synergistic mode of action that also is observed in vitro. An adjuvant of 1 μg/ml F1, F12, or F19 reduces the MIC of nafcillin and cephalothin about 50-fold to values comparable to those for vancomycin, the antibiotic often prescribed for MRSA infections. These findings suggest that it is possible to resurrect obsolete antibiotic therapies in combination with these novel quorum-quenching agents.

  5. Novel Quorum-Quenching Agents Promote Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Wound Healing and Sensitize MRSA to β-Lactam Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, David; Yu, Guanping; Hoch, Wyatt; Gabay, Dean; Long, Lisa; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Nagy, Nancy; Harding, Clifford V.; Viswanathan, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    The dwindling repertoire of antibiotics to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) calls for novel treatment options. Quorum-quenching agents offer an alternative or an adjuvant to antibiotic therapy. Three biaryl hydroxyketone compounds discovered previously (F1, F12, and F19; G. Yu, D. Kuo, M. Shoham, and R. Viswanathan, ACS Comb Sci 16:85–91, 2014) were tested for efficacy in MRSA-infected animal models. Topical therapy of compounds F1 and F12 in a MRSA murine wound infection model promotes wound healing compared to the untreated control. Compounds F1, F12, and F19 afford significant survival benefits in a MRSA insect larva model. Combination therapy of these quorum-quenching agents with cephalothin or nafcillin, antibiotics to which MRSA is resistant in monotherapy, revealed additional survival benefits. The quorum-quenching agents sensitize MRSA to the antibiotic by a synergistic mode of action that also is observed in vitro. An adjuvant of 1 μg/ml F1, F12, or F19 reduces the MIC of nafcillin and cephalothin about 50-fold to values comparable to those for vancomycin, the antibiotic often prescribed for MRSA infections. These findings suggest that it is possible to resurrect obsolete antibiotic therapies in combination with these novel quorum-quenching agents. PMID:25534736

  6. Motuporamine Derivatives as Antimicrobial Agents and Antibiotic Enhancers against Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Borselli, Diane; Blanchet, Marine; Bolla, Jean-Michel; Muth, Aaron; Skruber, Kristen; Phanstiel, Otto; Brunel, Jean Michel

    2017-02-01

    Dihydromotuporamine C and its derivatives were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activities and antibiotic enhancement properties against Gram-negative bacteria and clinical isolates. The mechanism of action of one of these derivatives, MOTU-N44, was investigated against Enterobacter aerogenes by using fluorescent dyes to evaluate outer-membrane depolarization and permeabilization. Its efficiency correlated with inhibition of dye transport, thus suggesting that these molecules inhibit drug transporters by de-energization of the efflux pump rather than by direct interaction of the molecule with the pump. This suggests that depowering the efflux pump provides another strategy to address antibiotic resistance. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  7. Detection of antibiotic-related genes from bacterial biocontrol agents with polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Fernando, W G D; de Kievit, T R; Berry, C; Daayf, F; Paulitz, T C

    2006-05-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis PA23, Pseudomonas spp. strain DF41, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BS6 consistently inhibit infection of canola petals by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in both greenhouse and field experiments. Bacillus thuringiensis BS8, Bacillus cereus L, and Bacillus mycoides S have shown significant inhibition against S. sclerotiorum on plate assays. The presence of antibiotic biosynthetic or self-resistance genes in these strains was investigated with polymerase chain reaction and, in one case, Southern blotting. Thirty primers were used to amplify (i) antibiotic biosythetic genes encoding phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyoluteorin, and pyrrolnitrin, and (ii) the zwittermicin A self-resistance gene. Our findings revealed that the fungal antagonist P. chlororaphis PA23 contains biosynthetic genes for phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyrrolnitrin. Moreover, production of these compounds was confirmed by high performance liquid chromatography. Pseudomonas spp. DF41 and B. amyloliquefaciens BS6 do not appear to harbour genes for any of the antibiotics tested. Bacillus thuringiensis BS8, B. cereus L, and B. mycoides S contain the zwittermicin A self-resistance gene. This is the first report of zmaR in B. mycoides.

  8. Hyperosmotic Agents and Antibiotics Affect Dissolved Oxygen and pH Concentration Gradients in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kiamco, Mia Mae; Atci, Erhan; Mohamed, Abdelrhman; Call, Douglas R; Beyenal, Haluk

    2017-03-15

    Biofilms on wound surfaces are treated topically with hyperosmotic agents, such as medical-grade honey and cadexomer iodine; in some cases, these treatments are combined with antibiotics. Tissue repair requires oxygen, and a low pH is conducive to oxygen release from red blood cells and epithelialization. We investigated the variation of dissolved oxygen concentration and pH with biofilm depth and the variation in oxygen consumption rates when biofilms are challenged with medical-grade honey or cadexomer iodine combined with vancomycin or ciprofloxacin. Dissolved oxygen and pH depth profiles in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms were measured using microelectrodes. The presence of cadexomer iodine with vancomycin or ciprofloxacin on the surface of the biofilm permitted a measurable concentration of oxygen at greater biofilm depths (101.6 ± 27.3 μm, P = 0.02; and 155.5 ± 27.9 μm, P = 0.016, respectively) than in untreated controls (30.1 μm). Decreases in pH of ∼0.6 and ∼0.4 units were observed in biofilms challenged with medical-grade honey alone and combined with ciprofloxacin, respectively (P < 0.001 and 0.01, respectively); the number of bacteria recovered from biofilms was significantly reduced (1.26 log) by treatment with cadexomer iodine and ciprofloxacin (P = 0.002) compared to the untreated control. Combining cadexomer iodine and ciprofloxacin improved dissolved oxygen concentration and penetration depth into the biofilm, while medical-grade honey was associated with a lower pH; not all treatments established a bactericidal effect in the time frame used in the experiments.IMPORTANCE Reports about using hyperosmotic agents and antibiotics against wound biofilms focus mostly on killing bacteria, but the results of these treatments should additionally be considered in the context of how they affect physiologically important parameters, such as oxygen concentration and pH. We confirmed that the combination of a hyperosmotic agent and an antibiotic results

  9. Membrane-active Antimicrobial Peptides as Template Structures for Novel Antibiotic Agents.

    PubMed

    Lohner, Karl

    2017-01-01

    The increase of pathogens being resistant to antibiotics represents a global health problem and therefore it is a pressing need to develop antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action. Host defense peptides, which have direct antimicrobial activity (also termed antimicrobial peptides) or immune modulating activity, are valuable template structures for the development of such compounds. Antimicrobial peptides exhibit remarkably different structures as well as biological activity profiles with multiple targets. A large fraction of these peptides interfere physically with the cell membrane of bacteria (focus of this review), but can also translocate into the cytosol, where they interact with nucleic acids, ribosomes and proteins. Several potential interaction sites have to be considered on the route of the peptides from the environment to the cytoplasmic membrane. Translocation of peptides through the cell wall may not be impaired by the thick but relatively porous peptidoglycan layer. However, interaction with lipopolysaccharides of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and (lipo)teichoic acids of Gram-positive bacteria may reduce the effective concentration at the cytoplasmic membrane, where supposedly the killing event takes place. On a molecular level several mechanisms are discussed, which are important for the rational design of improved antimicrobial compounds: toroidal pore formation, carpet model (coverage of membrane surface by peptides), interfacial activity, void formation, clustering of lipids and effects of membrane curvature. In summary, many of these models just represent special cases that can be interrelated to each other and depend on both the nature of lipids and peptides.

  10. Functional Silver Nanoparticle as a Benign Antimicrobial Agent That Eradicates Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria and Promotes Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaomei; Guo, Qianqian; Zhao, Yu; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Tianqi; Zhang, Xinge; Li, Chaoxing

    2016-10-05

    With the increased prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria infections, there is a pressed need for innovative antimicrobial agent. Here, we report a benign ε-polylysine/silver nanoparticle nanocomposite (EPL-g-butyl@AgNPs) with polyvalent and synergistic antibacterial effects. EPL-g-butyl@AgNPs exhibited good stability in aqueous solution and effective antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative (P. aeruginosa) and Gram-positive (S. aureus) bacteria without emergence of bacterial resistance. Importantly, the nanocomposites eradicated the antibiotic-resistant bacteria without toxicity to mammalian cells. Analysis of the antibacterial mechanism confirmed that the nanocomposites adhered to the bacterial surface, irreversibly disrupted the membrane structure of the bacteria, subsequently penetrated cells, and effectively inhibited protein activity, which ultimately led to bacteria apoptosis. Notably, the nanocomposites modulated the relative level of CD3(+) T cells and CD68(+) macrophages and effectively promoted infected wound healing in diabetic rats. This work improves our understanding of the antibacterial mechanism of AgNPs-based nanocomposites and offers guidance to activity prediction and rational design of effective antimicrobial nanoparticles.

  11. Novel anti-tumour barringenol-like triterpenoids from the husks of Xanthoceras sorbifolia Bunge and their three dimensional quantitative structure activity relationships analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da; Su, Dan; Yu, Bin; Chen, Chuming; Cheng, Li; Li, Xianzhe; Xi, Ronggang; Gao, Huiyuan; Wang, Xiaobo

    2017-01-01

    The high edible oil content of Xanthoceras sorbifolia Bunge seeds contributes to its economic value. In this study, we analysed the barrigenol-like triterpenoids derived from X. sorbifolia husks. We also identified anti-tumour agents that could enhance the health benefits and medicinal value of X. sorbifolia. We isolated 10 barrigenol triterpenoids, including six new compounds (1-6) and four known compounds (7-10). New compounds 3 and 5 showed significant inhibitory activity against the proliferation of three human tumour cell lines, namely, HepG2, HCT-116 and U87-MG. We determined the relationship between the structures and inhibitory activity of 25 barrigenol triterpenoids and 15 penta-cyclic triterpenoids through analysis of three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationships (3D-QSAR). The isolation of novel barrigenol derivatives with anti-tumour activity from X. sorbifolia implied that husks of this plant may be a good source of anti-tumour agents.

  12. New Approaches to Antibiotic Use and Review of Recently Approved Antimicrobial Agents.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Andrew W; Jain, Rupali; Spach, David H

    2016-07-01

    Antimicrobial drug-resistance continues to force adaptation in our clinical practice. We explore new evidence regarding adjunctive antibiotic therapy for skin and soft tissue abscesses as well as duration of therapy for intra-abdominal abscesses. As new evidence refines optimal practice, it is essential to support clinicians in adopting practice patterns concordant with evidence-based guidelines. We review a simple approach that can 'nudge' clinicians towards concordant practices. Finally, the use of novel antimicrobials will play an increasingly important role in contemporary therapy. We review five new antimicrobials recently FDA-approved for use in drug-resistant infections: dalbavancin, oritavancin, ceftaroline, ceftolozane-tazobactam, and ceftazidime-avibactam. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Marinopyrrole derivatives as potential antibiotic agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (III).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Haste, Nina M; Thienphrapa, Wdee; Li, Jerry; Nizet, Victor; Hensler, Mary; Li, Rongshi

    2014-04-30

    The marine natural product, marinopyrrole A (1), was previously shown to have significant antibiotic activity against Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Although compound (1) exhibits a significant reduction in MRSA activity in the presence of human serum, we have identified key modifications that partially restore activity. We previously reported our discovery of a chloro-derivative of marinopyrrole A (1a) featuring a 2-4 fold improved minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against MRSA, significantly less susceptibility to serum inhibition and rapid and concentration-dependent killing of MRSA. Here, we report a novel fluoro-derivative of marinopyrrole A (1e) showing an improved profile of potency, less susceptibility to serum inhibition, as well as rapid and concentration-dependent killing of MRSA.

  14. Platinum(II)-Acyclovir Complexes: Synthesis, Antiviral and Antitumour Activity

    PubMed Central

    Coluccia, M.; Boccarelli, A.; Cermelli, C.; Portolani, M.; Natile, G.

    1995-01-01

    A platinum(II) complex with the antiviral drug acyclovir was synthesized and its antiviral and anticancer properties were investigated in comparison to those of acyclovir and cisplatin. The platinum-acyclovir complex maintained the antiviral activity of the parent drug acyclovir, though showing a minor efficacy on a molar basis (ID50  =   7.85 and 1.02 μΜ for platinum-acyclovir and cisplatin, respectively). As anticancer agent, the platinum-acyclovir complex was markedly less potent than cisplatin on a mole-equivalent basis, but it was as effective as cisplatin when equitoxic dosages were administered in vivo to P388 leukaemia-bearing mice (%T/C = 209 and 211 for platinum-acyclovir and cisplatin, respectively). The platinum-acyclovir complex was also active against a cisplatin-resistant subline of the P388 leukaemia (%T/C = 140), thus suggesting a different mechanism of action. The DNA interaction properties (sequence specificity and interstrand cross-linking ability) of platinum-acyclovir were also investigated in comparison to those of cisplatin and [Pt(dien)Cl]+, an antitumour-inactive platinum-triamine compound. The results of this study point to a potential new drug endowed, at the same time, with antiviral and anticancer activity and characterized by DNA interaction properties different from those of cisplatin. PMID:18472776

  15. [Studies on the antitumour effect of Alocasia macrorrhiza].

    PubMed

    Ke, Y; Zhou, X; Bai, Q

    1999-05-01

    Models of transplanted tumour in mice and human cancer enograft in nude mice were used to evaluate the antitumour effect of water extract of Alocasia macrorrhiza. Results showed that the inhibitory rate against S180 in mice was 29.38%, and the inhibitory rate against transplantable humman gastroadenitis in nude mice was 51.72%. No antitumour effect was shown against ECA in mice.

  16. Pharmacologically prospective antibiotic agents and their sources: a marine microbial perspective.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Ira; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2012-11-01

    Marine microbes have been a storehouse of bioactive metabolites with tremendous potential as drug candidates. Marine microorganism derived secondary metabolites (chemical compounds/peptides) are considered to be a burning area of research since recent past. Many of such compounds have been proven to be anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-algal, anti-HIV, anti-helminthic, anti-protozoan, anti-tumor and anti-allergic agents. Marine bacteria and fungi have been reported to be the producers of such compounds owing to their defense mechanisms and metabolic by products. Although the number of natural products isolated from these classes of marine microbial flora is large, a limited number of such compounds reach the clinical trial and even less number of them get approved as a drug. Here we discuss the recent studies on the isolation, characterization and the pharmacological significances of anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-infective agents of marine microbial origin. Further, the clinical status of such compounds has also been discussed in comparison with those derived from their terrestrial counterparts.

  17. Strategies for decreasing multidrug antibiotic resistance: role of ototopical agents for treatment of middle ear infections.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jerome O

    2002-10-01

    Change in the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antimicrobial agents is constant. The efficacy of a new drug may change as it is used in clinical settings, and resistant bacterial clones result from the encounter of drug and organism. Soon after the introduction of the sulfonamides in the mid-1930s, the first effective agents of the antimicrobial era, resistance of pneumococci and group A streptococci was evident. In each of the following decades, a different problem in multidrug resistance occurred among common bacterial pathogens: beta-lactamase-producing staphylococci in the 1950s; highly resistant gram-negative enteric bacteria in the 1960s; beta-lactamase-producing Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis in the 1970s; and multidrug-resistant pneumococci in the 1980s. Antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens is now a common clinical problem throughout the world, and its management is a part of routine office practice. Currently in the United States, about 25% of pneumococci are resistant to penicillin, and 25% of H influenzae and 90% of M catarrhalis produce beta-lactamase and would be inactivated by organisms producing the enzyme. The emergence of penicillin and multidrug-resistant pneumococci and beta-lactamase-producing strains of H influenzae and M catarrhalis have special importance for the management of infections of the middle ear. The widespread use of oral and parenteral antimicrobial drugs for appropriate and inappropriate uses has driven the emergence and spread of resistant organisms. This article discusses current susceptibility patterns of organisms involved in middle ear infections, risk factors associated with development of resistant strains, strategies for limiting the incidence and spread of resistant organisms and, as part of the strategy, use of ototopical rather than systemic antimicrobial drugs for chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) and acute otitis media (AOM) in children with tympanostomy tubes. Although

  18. Utilization of microbial iron assimilation processes for the development of new antibiotics and inspiration for the design of new anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Helen; Xu, Yanping; Wu, Chunrui; Walz, Andrew J.; Vergne, Anne; Roosenberg, John M.; Moraski, Garrett; Minnick, Albert A.; McKee-Dolence, Julia; Hu, Jingdan; Fennell, Kelley; Dolence, E. Kurt; Dong, Li; Franzblau, Scott; Malouin, Francois; Möllmann, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes rapidly develop resistance to antibiotics. To keep ahead in the “microbial war”, extensive interdisciplinary research is needed. A primary cause of drug resistance is the overuse of antibiotics that can result in alteration of microbial permeability, alteration of drug target binding sites, induction of enzymes that destroy antibiotics (ie., beta-lactamase) and even induction of efflux mechanisms. A combination of chemical syntheses, microbiological and biochemical studies demonstrate that the known critical dependence of iron assimilation by microbes for growth and virulence can be exploited for the development of new approaches to antibiotic therapy. Iron recognition and active transport relies on the biosyntheses and use of microbe-selective iron-chelating compounds called siderophores. Our studies, and those of others, demonstrate that siderophores and analogs can be used for iron transport-mediated drug delivery (“Trojan Horse” antibiotics) and induction of iron limitation/starvation (Development of new agents to block iron assimilation). Recent extensions of the use of siderophores for the development of novel potent and selective anticancer agents are also described. PMID:19130268

  19. Utilization of microbial iron assimilation processes for the development of new antibiotics and inspiration for the design of new anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marvin J; Zhu, Helen; Xu, Yanping; Wu, Chunrui; Walz, Andrew J; Vergne, Anne; Roosenberg, John M; Moraski, Garrett; Minnick, Albert A; McKee-Dolence, Julia; Hu, Jingdan; Fennell, Kelley; Kurt Dolence, E; Dong, Li; Franzblau, Scott; Malouin, Francois; Möllmann, Ute

    2009-02-01

    Pathogenic microbes rapidly develop resistance to antibiotics. To keep ahead in the "microbial war", extensive interdisciplinary research is needed. A primary cause of drug resistance is the overuse of antibiotics that can result in alteration of microbial permeability, alteration of drug target binding sites, induction of enzymes that destroy antibiotics (ie., beta-lactamase) and even induction of efflux mechanisms. A combination of chemical syntheses, microbiological and biochemical studies demonstrate that the known critical dependence of iron assimilation by microbes for growth and virulence can be exploited for the development of new approaches to antibiotic therapy. Iron recognition and active transport relies on the biosyntheses and use of microbe-selective iron-chelating compounds called siderophores. Our studies, and those of others, demonstrate that siderophores and analogs can be used for iron transport-mediated drug delivery ("Trojan Horse" antibiotics) and induction of iron limitation/starvation (Development of new agents to block iron assimilation). Recent extensions of the use of siderophores for the development of novel potent and selective anticancer agents are also described.

  20. Antitumour and antioxidant potential of some selected Pakistani honeys.

    PubMed

    Noor, Nadia; Sarfraz, Raja Adil; Ali, Shaukat; Shahid, Muhammad

    2014-01-15

    Antitumour potential of honey is attributed to its excellent antioxidant activity which in turn depends on the geographical origin. The present study focuses on exploration of antioxidant and antitumour potential as well as total phenolic contents (TPC) of 58 Pakistani honeys involving spectrochemical techniques and potato disk assay. Agrobacterium tumefaciens was used to induce tumours in potato disks. All analysed honey samples exhibited 1.33±0.00-155.16±0.98mg/100g of TPC, 50% 2,2-diphenyl picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) inhibition, ⩾7.36±0.43-39.86±2.34mg/100g qurecitin equivalent antioxidant contents, ⩾13.69±0.91-65.50±1.37mg/100g ascorbic acid equivalent antioxidant contents, 64.65±0.43-1780.74±11.79mM ferric reducing antioxidant power and 60% peroxide inhibition. Antitumour activity observed for 43 natural and 10 commercial samples was ⩾20%. Two samples from Faisalabad region showed 87.50±5.50% and 79.00±5.56% antitumour activity which were reference standard. It was concluded that Pakistani honeys possessed excellent antioxidant and antitumour potential overall. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular insights on the biosynthesis of antitumour compounds by actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Olano, Carlos; Méndez, Carmen; Salas, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Natural products are traditionally the main source of drug leads. In particular, many antitumour compounds are either natural products or derived from them. However, the search for novel antitumour drugs active against untreatable tumours, with fewer side‐effects or with enhanced therapeutic efficiency, is a priority goal in cancer chemotherapy. Microorganisms, particularly actinomycetes, are prolific producers of bioactive compounds, including antitumour drugs, produced as secondary metabolites. Structural genes involved in the biosynthesis of such compounds are normally clustered together with resistance and regulatory genes, which facilitates the isolation of the gene cluster. The characterization of these clusters has represented, during the last 25 years, a great source of genes for the generation of novel derivatives by using combinatorial biosynthesis approaches: gene inactivation, gene expression, heterologous expression of the clusters or mutasynthesis. In addition, these techniques have been also applied to improve the production yields of natural and novel antitumour compounds. In this review we focus on some representative antitumour compounds produced by actinomycetes covering the genetic approaches used to isolate and validate their biosynthesis gene clusters, which finally led to generating novel derivatives and to improving the production yields. PMID:21342461

  2. Molecular insights on the biosynthesis of antitumour compounds by actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Olano, Carlos; Méndez, Carmen; Salas, José A

    2011-03-01

    Natural products are traditionally the main source of drug leads. In particular, many antitumour compounds are either natural products or derived from them. However, the search for novel antitumour drugs active against untreatable tumours, with fewer side-effects or with enhanced therapeutic efficiency, is a priority goal in cancer chemotherapy. Microorganisms, particularly actinomycetes, are prolific producers of bioactive compounds, including antitumour drugs, produced as secondary metabolites. Structural genes involved in the biosynthesis of such compounds are normally clustered together with resistance and regulatory genes, which facilitates the isolation of the gene cluster. The characterization of these clusters has represented, during the last 25 years, a great source of genes for the generation of novel derivatives by using combinatorial biosynthesis approaches: gene inactivation, gene expression, heterologous expression of the clusters or mutasynthesis. In addition, these techniques have been also applied to improve the production yields of natural and novel antitumour compounds. In this review we focus on some representative antitumour compounds produced by actinomycetes covering the genetic approaches used to isolate and validate their biosynthesis gene clusters, which finally led to generating novel derivatives and to improving the production yields.

  3. POOLED ESTIMATES OF INCIDENCE OF ENDOPHTHALMITIS AFTER INTRAVITREAL INJECTION OF ANTI-VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR AGENTS WITH AND WITHOUT TOPICAL ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS.

    PubMed

    Reibaldi, Michele; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Avitabile, Teresio; Bonfiglio, Vincenza; Russo, Andrea; Mariotti, Cesare; Bucolo, Claudio; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Parisi, Guglielmo; Longo, Antonio

    2017-03-06

    To assess the effect of topical antibiotic prophylaxis on postoperative endophthalmitis after intravitreal injection of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents. A systematic literature search was performed from inception to March 2016 using PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, Embase, and the Cochrane Library, to identify articles that reported cases of endophthalmitis after intravitreal injection of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents. We used a pooled analysis to estimate the incidence of cases of endophthalmitis who developed after injections performed with and without topical antibiotic prophylaxis. We used regression analysis to explore the effects of study characteristics on heterogeneity. From our search of electronic databases, we identified and screened 4,561 unique records. We judged 60 articles to have reported findings for cohorts of patients who met our inclusion criteria, (12 arms of randomized clinical trials, 11 prospective cohort studies, and 37 retrospective cohort studies), which included 244 cases of endophthalmitis and 639,391 intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents. The final pooled estimate endophthalmitis proportions were 9/10,000 (95% confidence interval, 7/10,000-12/10,000) in the antibiotic-treated group and 3/10,000 (95% confidence interval, 2/10,000-5/10,000) in the untreated group. The estimated incidence of endophthalmitis with topical antibiotic prophylaxis was approximated three times the incidence without prophylaxis. Random effects regression showed that none of the study characteristics significantly affected the effect size in either group. Topical antibiotic after intravitreal injection of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents is associated with a higher risk of endophthalmitis.

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of isatin-β-thiosemicarbazones as novel agents against antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Meng; Guo, Hui; Li, Zai-Shun; Song, Fu-Hang; Wang, Wei-Min; Dai, Huan-Qin; Zhang, Li-Xin; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2015-08-28

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) have caused an increasing mortality rate, which means that antibiotic resistance is becoming an important health issue. In the course to screen new agents for resistant bacteria, we identified that a series of isatin-β-thiosemicarbazones (IBTs) could inhibit the growth of MRSA and VRE. This was the first time that the "familiar" IBT compounds exhibited significant anti Gram-positive pathogen activity. Against a clinical isolated MRSA strain, 20 of the 51 synthesized compounds showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) data of 0.78 mg/L and another 12 novel compounds had MICs of 0.39 mg/L. Moreover, these compounds also inhibited Enterococcus faecalis and VRE at similar levels, indicating that IBTs might have different mode of action compared with vancomycin. For these IBTs, comparative field analysis (CoMFA) models were further established to understand the structure-activity relationships in order to design new compounds from steric and electrostatic contributions. This work has suggested that IBTs can be considered as potential lead compounds to discover antibacterial inhibitors to combat drug resistance.

  5. Antitumour activity of the novel flavonoid Oncamex in preclinical breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pérez, Carlos; Ward, Carol; Turnbull, Arran K; Mullen, Peter; Cook, Graeme; Meehan, James; Jarman, Edward J; Thomson, Patrick IT; Campbell, Colin J; McPhail, Donald; Harrison, David J; Langdon, Simon P

    2016-01-01

    Background: The natural polyphenol myricetin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in preclinical cancer models. We hypothesised that myricetin-derived flavonoids with enhanced redox properties, improved cell uptake and mitochondrial targeting might have increased potential as antitumour agents. Methods: We studied the effect of a second-generation flavonoid analogue Oncamex in a panel of seven breast cancer cell lines, applying western blotting, gene expression analysis, fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of xenograft tissue to investigate its mechanism of action. Results: Proliferation assays showed that Oncamex treatment for 8 h reduced cell viability and induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis, concomitant with increased caspase activation. Microarray analysis showed that Oncamex was associated with changes in the expression of genes controlling cell cycle and apoptosis. Fluorescence microscopy showed the compound's mitochondrial targeting and reactive oxygen species-modulating properties, inducing superoxide production at concentrations associated with antiproliferative effects. A preliminary in vivo study in mice implanted with the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft showed that Oncamex inhibited tumour growth, reducing tissue viability and Ki-67 proliferation, with no signs of untoward effects on the animals. Conclusions: Oncamex is a novel flavonoid capable of specific mitochondrial delivery and redox modulation. It has shown antitumour activity in preclinical models of breast cancer, supporting the potential of this prototypic candidate for its continued development as an anticancer agent. PMID:27031849

  6. UV-C-irradiation sublethal stress does not alter antibiotic susceptibility of the viridans group streptococci to β-lactam, macrolide, and fluoroquinolone antibiotic agents.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yasunori; Coulter, Wilson A; Goldsmith, Colin E; Cherie Millar, B; Moore, John E

    2012-08-01

    Previous work has indicated that environmental stresses on bacteria might lead to an upregulation of stress response. LED curing lights (315-400 nm) and other UV lights used in tooth whitening cosmetic procedures might act as stresses. We examined the effect of UV-C light, as a high-energy surrogate to the lower-energy UV-A light used in such instruments, to examine its effect on the antibiotic susceptibility of viridans group streptococci. Twelve species of viridans group streptococci were examined in this study: Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus australis, Streptococcus cristatus, Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus infantis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus parasanguinis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus salivarius, and Streptococcus sanguinis. These organisms were exposed to varying degrees of sublethal UV-C radiation, and their minimum inhibitory concentration susceptibility was determined by broth dilution assay against three classes of commonly-used antibiotics: β-lactams (penicillin), macrolides (erythromycin), and fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin). There was no significant difference between antibiotic susceptibility before UV-C exposure and following maximum sublethal stress, prior to cell death due to fatal UV-C exposure. Exposure to UV-C light will not result in altered antibiotic susceptibility patterns on viridans group streptococci. Given that UV-C is more toxic and mutagenic than UV-A light, it is unlikely than UV-A light would yield any difference in response to such exposure. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. UVc-irradiation sublethal stress does not alter antibiotic susceptibility of staphylococci (MRSA, MSSA, and coagulase-negative staphylococci) to β-lactam, macrolide, and fluoroquinolone antibiotic agents.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yasunori; Goldsmith, Colin E; Coulter, Wilson A; Millar, B Cherie; Dooley, James S G; Lowery, Colm J; Loughrey, Anne; Rooney, Paul J; McDowell, David A; Matsuda, Motoo; Moore, John E

    2012-01-01

    Skin tanning, either by exposure to natural sunlight or through use of UV sunbeds, has become a popular practice in the US, where it is estimated that approximately 1 million times per day someone in the US uses UV radiation for skin tanning, equating to 30 million Americans (circa 10% of the US population) who use a tanning bed. As well as exposing the host to periods of UV radiation, such practices also expose commensal skin bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, to such UV radiation. Previous work has indicated that environmental stresses on bacteria may lead to an upregulation of stress responses, in an attempt for the organism to combat the applied stress and remain viable. UV light may act as an environmental stress on bacteria, and so it was the aim of this study to examine the effect of UVc light on the antibiotic susceptibility of commensal skin bacteria, to determine if UV radiation would increase the antibiotic resistance of such skin flora and thus lead to a potential skin flora with increased antibiotic resistance. Previously, it has been shown that UVc light has a greater mutational effect on bacteria compared to lower-energy UV forms, including UVa and UVb light. Therefore, we decided to employ UVc light in our study to amplify the potential for mutational events occurring in skin staphylococci organisms (n=8) including methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (n=2), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (n=4), and coagulase-negative staphylococci (Staphylococcus haemolyticus) (n=2) were exposed to varying degrees of sublethal radiation via UVc light, and their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) susceptibility was determined by broth dilution assay against three classes of commonly used antibiotics, namely β-lactams (penicillin), macrolides (erythromycin), and fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin). There was no significant difference between antibiotic susceptibility before UVc exposure and until maximum sublethal stress, prior to cell

  8. [Antibiotic stewardship].

    PubMed

    Kerwat, Klaus; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2014-09-01

    Resistance against antibiotics is continuously increasing throughout the world and has become a very serious problem. For just this reason "Antibiotic Stewardship Programs" have been developed. These programs are intended to lead to a sustained improvement in the situation and to assure a rational practice for the prescription of anti-infective agents in medical facilities. The aim is to prescribe the correct antibiotic therapy to the right patient at the most appropriate point in time. An AWMF S3 guideline on this topic published by the German Society for Infectiology (S3-Leitlinie StrategienzurSicherungrationalerAntibiotika-AnwendungimKrankenhaus.AWMF-Registernummer 092/001 - S3 Guideline on Strategies for the Rational Use of Antibiotics in Hospitals. AWMF - Registry Number 092/001) has been available since the end of 2013. An essential aspect therein is the expert interdisciplinary cooperation of a team comprising a clinically experienced infectiologist, a hospital pharmacist and a consultant for microbiology.

  9. Low-density polypropylene meshes coated with resorbable and biocompatible hydrophilic polymers as controlled release agents of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gutierrez, Mar; Olivares, Enrique; Pascual, Gemma; Bellon, Juan M; San Román, Julio

    2013-04-01

    The application of bioactive meshes in abdominal surgery for the repair of hernias is an increasing clinical activity in a wide sector of the population. The main secondary effect is the appearance of infections from bacteria, specifically Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis. This paper describes the development and application of low-density polypropylene meshes coated with a biocompatible and resorbable polymer as a controlled release system of the antibiotic vancomycin. The polymeric coating (a non-cross-linked copolymer of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) has a thickness of 14-15μm and contains 0.32mgcm(-2) of the antibiotic vancomycin. The in vitro experiments demonstrate the excellent inhibitory character of the coated meshes loaded with the antibiotic, following the standard protocol of inhibition of halo in agar diffusion test. This inhibitory effect is maintained for a relatively long period (at least 14days) with a low concentration of antibiotic. The acrylic polymer system regulates the release of the antibiotic with a rate of 24μgh(-1), due to its slow dissolution in the medium. Experiments in vivo, based on the implantation of coated meshes, demonstrate that the system controls the infection in the animal (rabbits) for at least 30days. The concentration of antibiotic in the blood stream of the rabbits was below the detection limit of the analytical technique (<1-2μgml(-1)), which demonstrates that the antibiotic is released in the local area of the implant and remains concentrated at the implantation site, without diffusion to the blood stream. The systems can be applied to other medical devices and implants for the application of new-generation antibiotics in a controlled release and targeted applications.

  10. Antibiotic resistant in microorganisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antimicrobial agents are necessary for use in veterinary medicine including the production of food producing animals. Antibiotic use is indicated for the treatment of bacterial target organisms and/or disease for which the antibiotic was developed. However, an unintended consequence of antibiotic ...

  11. Insight into the mechanism of chemical modification of antibacterial agents by antibiotic resistance enzyme O-phosphotransferase-IIIA.

    PubMed

    Power, Blake Hollett; Smith, Nathan; Downer, Brandon; Alisaraie, Laleh

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, the mechanism of resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics was investigated. We examined the conformational changes of the O-phosphotransferase-IIIa enzyme, complexed with the antibiotics using MD simulations. The inhibitory effects of a group of antibacterial peptides against the enzyme were also examined, among which CP10A showed the highest affinity and the results correlated with the measured IC50 values. The regioselectivity of the phosphorylation reaction was shown to be in favor of the OH at the 5″ position versus the 3' of the antibiotic. The binding mode of CP10A was evaluated by means of MD simulation that resulted in recognizing its Trp8 and Arg13 residues binding near to where residues at the 3' and 5″ positions of the antibiotic would bind; thus, they are essential for the peptide inhibitory effect. The major open, semi-open, and closed conformations of the binding sites were identified throughout the MD trajectory, which enable the enzyme to regulate the influx of molecules into these sites. Based on the enzyme crystal structure, it was assumed that the 'antibiotic loop' of the enzyme is stable in its liganded mode; however, MD results revealed that the loop is highly flexible in both liganded and ligand-free modes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Selected Essential Oils as Antifungal Agents Against Antibiotic-Resistant Candida spp.: In Vitro Study on Clinical and Food-Borne Isolates.

    PubMed

    Rajkowska, Katarzyna; Kunicka-Styczyńska, Alina; Maroszyńska, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Candida spp. cause significant health problems, inducing various types of superficial and deep-seated mycoses in humans. As a result of the increasing antibiotic resistance among pathogenic yeasts, the interest in alternative agents of antifungal activity is growing. This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of selected essential oils (EOs) against Candida clinical and food-borne strains, including antibiotic-resistant isolates, in relation to yeast cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH). Candida strains showed different range of susceptibility to tea tree, thyme, peppermint, and clove oils, and peppermint oil demonstrated the lowest anticandidal activity with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 0.03-8.0% v/v. MIC values for thyme and clove oils ranged from 0.03% to 0.25% v/v, and for tea tree oil-from 0.12% to 2.0% v/v. The exception was Candida tropicalis food-borne strain, the growth of which was inhibited after application of EOs at concentration of 8% v/v. Due to diverse yeast susceptibility to EOs, isolates were divided into five clusters in a principal component analysis model, each containing both clinical and food-borne strains. Hydrophobic properties of yeast were also diversified, and 37% of clinical and 50% of food-borne strains exhibited high hydrophobicity. The study indicates high homology of clinical and food-borne Candida isolates in relation to their susceptibility to anticandidal agents and hydrophobic properties. The susceptibility of yeasts to EOs could be partially related to their CSH. High antifungal activity of examined EOs, also against antibiotic-resistant isolates, indicates their usefulness as agents preventing the development of Candida strains of different origin.

  13. Antitumour activity of Bauhinia variegata on Dalton's ascitic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rajkapoor, B; Jayakar, B; Murugesh, N

    2003-11-01

    The antitumour activity of the ethanol extract of Bauhinia variegata (EBV) has been evaluated against Dalton's ascitic lymphoma (DAL) in Swiss albino mice. A significant enhancement of mean survival time of EBV-treated tumour bearing mice was found with respect to control group. EBV treatment was found to enhance peritoneal cell counts. After 14 days of inoculation, EBV is able to reverse the changes in the haemotological parameters, protein and PCV consequent to tumour inoculation.

  14. Molecular investigation of the direct anti-tumour effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in a panel of canine cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, R; Saeki, K; Watanabe, M; Nakaoka, N; Ong, S M; Hanafusa, M; Choisunirachon, N; Fujita, N; Nishimura, R; Nakagawa, T

    2017-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been suggested as effective adjunctive anti-tumour agents in human and veterinary medicine. However, the molecular mechanisms associated with their anti-tumour effects and correlations with the expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) and related molecules in tumours remain controversial. The objective of this study was to compare the expression profiles of COX and related molecules with NSAID sensitivity and to explore the molecular mechanisms of anti-tumour effects. The expression profiles of COXs, prostaglandins (PGs), PGD2 synthases, and PGE2 synthases were obtained, and their correlations with in vitro sensitivity to the NSAIDs piroxicam, carprofen, and robenacoxib were examined, using 26 canine cancer cell lines. Subsequently, microarray analysis was performed using one melanoma cell line to gain insight into mechanisms by which NSAIDs could exert cytotoxic effects. No strong correlation was observed between the cellular expression of COX and related molecules and sensitivity to NSAID treatment. Additionally, NSAIDs inhibited cell growth only at considerably higher concentrations than those required for functional COX inhibition. Microarray data demonstrated that five genes (SLC16A6, PER2, SLC9A8, HTR2B, and BRAF) were significantly upregulated and that four genes (LOC488305, H2AFJ, LOC476445, and ANKRD43) were significantly downregulated by NSAID exposure to the melanoma cell line. These results suggest that the direct in vitro anti-tumour effects of NSAIDs might be mediated by COX/PG-independent pathways. Novel candidate genes that could potentially be involved in the anti-tumour effects of NSAIDs were identified. Further validation and elucidation of their associated mechanisms will contribute to patient selection in clinical settings and the development of effective combination therapies.

  15. Multifunctional Fe₃O₄/alumina core/shell MNPs as photothermal agents for targeted hyperthermia of nosocomial and antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tsai-Jung; Li, Po-Han; Tseng, Te-Wei; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2011-10-01

    The appearance of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains is a serious problem in medical treatment. Thus, it is imperative to explore new therapeutic approaches and antibiotics with which to treat patients suffering from bacterial infections. In this work, we propose a targeted hyperthermia therapeutic approach using alumina-coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4)/alumina core/shell MNPs) as photothermal agents to selectively kill bacteria. Fe(3)O(4) MNPs possess photothermal capabilities under near-infrared (NIR) light illumination. The temperature of the MNP suspension (1.33 µg/µl, 60 µl) under illumination with NIR light increased 20°C over 5 min. Functionalization of the surface of the MNPs with an alumina coating allows them to have targeting capability toward bacteria. The prepared Fe(3)O(4)/alumina core/shell MNPs possess several desirable features, including magnetic properties, absorption capability in the NIR region and the ability to target bacteria. The magnetic properties of the Fe(3)O(4)/alumina MNPs allow conjugated target species to aggregate at a specific location under a magnetic field. A NIR laser can then be used to specifically irradiate the aggregated spot to photokill target bacteria. The cell growth of nosocomial bacteria, including Gram-positive, Gram-negative and antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, can be effectively inhibited by over 95% within 10 min of light irradiation when targeted by Fe(3)O(4)/alumina MNPs. This approach provides a potential therapeutic approach for treating patients suffering from nosocomial and antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

  16. The phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli populations isolated from farm animals with different exposure to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Justyna; Pusz, Paweł; Bok, Ewa; Stosik, Michał; Baldy-Chudzik, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of the presence or the absence of antibiotic input on the emergence and maintenance of resistance in commensal bacteria from food producing animals. The research material constituted E. coli isolates from two animal species: swine at different age from one conventional pig farm with antibiotic input in young pigs and from beef and dairy cattle originated from organic breeding farm. The sensitivity to 16 antimicrobial agents was tested, and the presence of 15 resistance genes was examined. In E. coli from swine, the most prevalent resistance was resistance to streptomycin (88.3%), co-trimoxazole (78.8%), tetracycline (57.3%) ampicillin (49.3%) and doxycycline (44.9%) with multiple resistance in the majority. The most commonly observed resistance genes were: bla(TEM) (45.2%), tetA (35.8%), aadA1 (35.0%), sul3 (29.5%), dfrA1 (20.4%). Differences in phenotypes and genotypes of E. coli between young swine undergoing prevention program and the older ones without the antibiotic pressure occurred. A disparate resistance was found in E. coli from cattle: cephalothin (36.9%), cefuroxime (18.9%), doxycycline (8.2%), nitrofurantoin (7.7%), and concerned mainly dairy cows. Among isolates from cattle, multidrug resistance was outnumbered by resistance to one or two antibiotics and the only found gene markers were: bla(SHV), (3.4%), tetA (1.29%), bla(TEM) (0.43%) and tetC (0.43%). The presented outcomes provide evidence that antimicrobial pressure contributes to resistance development, and enteric microflora constitutes an essential reservoir of resistance genes.

  17. In vitro susceptibility of e.faecalis and c.albicans isolates from apical periodontitis to common antimicrobial agents, antibiotics and antifungal medicaments

    PubMed Central

    Yoldas, Oguz; Yilmaz, Sehnaz; Akcimen, Beril; Seydaoglu, Gulsah; Kipalev, Arzu; Koksal, Fatih

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro antimicrobial activity of 4 antibiotic agents (for E.faecalis) and 4 antifungal agents (for C.albicans) by agar dilution method. Additionally, modified strip diffusion method was used for detection of in vitro antimicrobial activities of 5% NaOCl, 2.5% NaOCl, 17% EDTA and 2% CHX and agar diffusion method for detection of in vitro susceptibilities of three intracanal medicaments for 18 E.faecalis and 18 C.albicans isolates from primary and secondary root canal infection. Isolates were recovered from 231 endodontic samples of patients, with the need of root canal treatment and retreatment. All tested E.faecalis isolates showed resistance to antibiotics. For irrigation solutions, 2% CHX was more effective in eliminating E.faecalis but 5% NaOCl showed larger inhibition zone than 2.5% NaOCl, 17% EDTA and 2% CHX. For intracanal medication, Ca(OH)2-CHX worked efficiently in killing E.faecalis isolates compared to Ca(OH)2-Steril saline solution, Ca(OH)2-Glycerin. For C.albicans, 18 isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, nistatin, fluconazole but showed resistance to ketoconazole. 5% NaOCl was more effective in eliminating and produced larger inhibition zone compared to 2.5% NaOCl, 17% EDTA and 2% CHX. Ca(OH)2-Glycerin intracanal medication was better in eliminating C.albicans isolates and produced larger inhibition zone compared to other Ca(OH)2 medicaments. Key words:E.faecalis, C.albicans, antimicrobial, antibiotic, antifungal. PMID:24558517

  18. The membrane protein PrsS mimics σS in protecting Staphylococcus aureus against cell wall-targeting antibiotics and DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Krute, Christina N; Bell-Temin, Harris; Miller, Halie K; Rivera, Frances E; Weiss, Andy; Stevens, Stanley M; Shaw, Lindsey N

    2015-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus possesses a lone extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor, σ(S). In Bacillus subtilis, the ECF sigma factor, σ(W), is activated through a proteolytic cascade that begins with cleavage of the RsiW anti-sigma factor by a site-1 protease (S1P), PrsW. We have identified a PrsW homologue in S. aureus (termed PrsS) and explored its role in σ(S) regulation. Herein, we demonstrate that although a cognate σ(S) anti-sigma factor currently remains elusive, prsS phenocopies sigS in a wealth of regards. Specifically, prsS expression mimics the upregulation observed for sigS in response to DNA-damaging agents, cell wall-targeting antibiotics and during ex vivo growth in human serum and murine macrophages. prsS mutants also display the same sensitivities of sigS mutants to the DNA-damaging agents methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) and hydrogen peroxide, and the cell wall-targeting antibiotics ampicillin, bacitracin and penicillin-G. These phenotypes appear to be explained by alterations in abundance of proteins involved in drug resistance (Pbp2a, FemB, HmrA) and the response to DNA damage (BmrA, Hpt, Tag). Our findings seem to be mediated by putative proteolytic activity of PrsS, as site-directed mutagenesis of predicted catalytic residues fails to rescue the sensitivity of the mutant to H2O2 and MMS. Finally, a role for PrsS in S. aureus virulence was identified using human and murine models of infection. Collectively, our data indicate that PrsS and σ(S) function in a similar manner, and perhaps mediate virulence and resistance to DNA damage and cell wall-targeting antibiotics, via a common pathway.

  19. Tensions in Antibiotic Prescribing

    PubMed Central

    Metlay, Joshua P; Shea, Judy A; Crossette, Linda B; Asch, David A

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND To reduce the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the community, physicians must optimize their use of antibiotics. However, optimal use from the perspective of the community (reserving newer agents for future use) is not always consistent with optimal use from the perspective of the individual patient (prescribing newer, broader agents). OBJECTIVES To identify preferred patterns of antibiotic prescribing for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), measure explicit attitudes toward antibiotics and antibiotic resistance, and determine the relationship between these prescribing patterns and attitudes. DESIGN Cross-sectional anonymous mail survey. PARTICIPANTS National random sample of 400 generalist physicians (general internal medicine and family practice) and 429 infectious diseases specialists. MEASUREMENTS Rank ordering of antibiotic preferences for a hypothetical outpatient with CAP and reasons for antibiotic selection. Endorsement of attitudes regarding antibiotic prescribing decisions and resistance. RESULTS Both generalists and infectious diseases specialists were more likely to prefer newer, broader drugs for the treatment of CAP compared to older agents still recommended by national guidelines. Physicians rated the issue of contributing to antibiotic resistance lowest among 7 determinants of their choices. CONCLUSIONS Despite national guidelines and increasing public awareness, the public health concern of contributing to the problem of antibiotic resistance does not exert a strong impact on physician prescribing decisions for CAP. Future efforts to optimize antibiotic prescribing decisions will need to consider options for increasing the impact of public health issues on the patient-oriented decisions of individual physicians. PMID:11841523

  20. Anti-tumour efficacy of etoposide alone and in combination with piroxicam against canine osteosarcoma in a xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ong, S M; Saeki, K; Kok, M K; Tanaka, Y; Choisunirachon, N; Yoshitake, R; Nishimura, R; Nakagawa, T

    2017-08-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) in dogs is locally invasive and highly malignant. Distant metastasis is the most common cause of death. To date, the survival rate in dogs with OSA remains poor. The cytotoxic effects of etoposide against canine OSA cell lines, either alone or in combination with piroxicam, have been previously demonstrated in vitro. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumour effect of etoposide alone and in combination with piroxicam on canine OSA using murine models. Etoposide single agent treatment significantly delayed tumour progression with a marked reduction in Ki-67 immunoreactivity in tumour tissue. Concomitant treatment with piroxicam did not enhance the anti-tumour efficacy of etoposide. Etoposide single agent treatment and combination treatment with piroxicam down-regulated survivin expression, but was not followed by increased apoptotic activity. These findings indicate that etoposide might be a promising novel therapeutic for canine OSA. Further investigations into its potential for clinical application in veterinary oncology are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Muraymycin nucleoside-peptide antibiotics: uridine-derived natural products as lead structures for the development of novel antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Wiegmann, Daniel; Koppermann, Stefan; Wirth, Marius; Niro, Giuliana; Leyerer, Kristin; Ducho, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Muraymycins are a promising class of antimicrobial natural products. These uridine-derived nucleoside-peptide antibiotics inhibit the bacterial membrane protein translocase I (MraY), a key enzyme in the intracellular part of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. This review describes the structures of naturally occurring muraymycins, their mode of action, synthetic access to muraymycins and their analogues, some structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies and first insights into muraymycin biosynthesis. It therefore provides an overview on the current state of research, as well as an outlook on possible future developments in this field.

  2. Muraymycin nucleoside-peptide antibiotics: uridine-derived natural products as lead structures for the development of novel antibacterial agents

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Marius; Niro, Giuliana; Leyerer, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Muraymycins are a promising class of antimicrobial natural products. These uridine-derived nucleoside-peptide antibiotics inhibit the bacterial membrane protein translocase I (MraY), a key enzyme in the intracellular part of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. This review describes the structures of naturally occurring muraymycins, their mode of action, synthetic access to muraymycins and their analogues, some structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies and first insights into muraymycin biosynthesis. It therefore provides an overview on the current state of research, as well as an outlook on possible future developments in this field. PMID:27340469

  3. Potential of a novel antibiotic, 2-methylheptyl isonicotinate, as a biocontrol agent against fusarial wilt of crucifers.

    PubMed

    Bordoloi, Gojen N; Kumari, Babita; Guha, Arijit; Thakur, Debajit; Bordoloi, Manabjyoti; Roy, Monoj K; Bora, Tarun C

    2002-03-01

    Screening for newer bioactive compounds from microbial metabolites resulted in the isolation of a novel antibiotic from the culture filtrate, Streptomyces sp 201, of a soil. The bioactive compound, with antifungal and antibacterial activity, was identified as 2-methylheptyl isonicotinate. The antifungal activity of live culture, culture broth and the isolated bioactive compound showed marked inhibition against dominant soil-borne phytopathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum Schlect, F moniliforme Sheldon, F semitectum Berkeley & Ravenel, F solani (Martius) Sacc and Rhizoctonia solani Kuehn. The compound had no effect on seed germination and seedling development as displayed by root and stem growth of the test plant species. In pot experiments with seedlings of cruciferous plants such as Raphanus sativus L (radish), Brassica campestris L (yellow mustard), Brassica oleracea var botrytis L (cauliflower), the antibiotic compound showed promising protective activity of 92% when seeds of the test plants were treated at a dose of 50 micrograms ml-1 prior to sowing. Seed treatment with a spore suspension (3 x 10(8) spores ml-1) of the Streptomyces sp 201 displayed protective activity in the range of 56-60%. Seeds coated with 2.5% methyl cellulose-amended spores of the antagonist showed protective activity in the range of 64-72%. Further, seed treatment with the culture filtrate of the antagonist also showed promising protective activity in the range of 64-84%.

  4. Presence of Cx43 in extracellular vesicles reduces the cardiotoxicity of the anti-tumour therapeutic approach with doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Marques, Tania; Pinho, Maria Joao; Zuzarte, Monica; Oliveira, Carla; Pereira, Paulo; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Gomes, Celia; Girao, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are major conveyors of biological information, mediating local and systemic cell-to-cell communication under physiological and pathological conditions. These endogenous vesicles have been recognized as prominent drug delivery vehicles of several therapeutic cargoes, including doxorubicin (dox), presenting major advantages over the classical approaches. Although dox is one of the most effective anti-tumour agents in the clinical practice, its use is very often hindered by its consequent dramatic cardiotoxicity. Despite significant advances witnessed in the past few years, more comprehensive studies, supporting the therapeutic efficacy of EVs, with decreased side effects, are still scarce. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the role of the gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) in mediating the release of EV content into tumour cells. Moreover, we investigated whether Cx43 improves the efficiency of dox-based anti-tumour treatment, with a concomitant decrease of cardiotoxicity. In the present report, we demonstrate that the presence of Cx43 in EVs increases the release of luciferin from EVs into tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, using cell-based approaches and a subcutaneous mouse tumour model, we show that the anti-tumour effect of dox incorporated into EVs is similar to the administration of the free drug, regardless the presence of Cx43. Strikingly, we demonstrate that the presence of Cx43 in dox-loaded EVs reduces the cardiotoxicity of the drug. Altogether, these results bring new insights into the concrete potential of EVs as therapeutic vehicles and open new avenues toward the development of strategies that help to reduce unwanted side effects. PMID:27702427

  5. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  6. In vitro study of the post-antibiotic effect and the bactericidal activity of Cefditoren and ten other oral antimicrobial agents against upper and lower respiratory tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Dubois, J; St-Pierre, C

    2000-07-01

    The in vitro post-antibiotic effect (PAE) and batericidal activity of cefditoren was compared to that of cefixime, cefuroxime, loracarbef, cefaclor, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, clarithromycin, azithromycin, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin against ATCC culture strains and clinical respiratory isolates. A PAE > 1 h was observed for cefditoren and generally for the macrolides against Streptococcus pneumoniae, beta-lactamase-negative Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pyogenes, whereas the other beta-lactams showed mixed results. Cefditoren was the only beta-lactam showing significant bactericidal activity (>3 log reduction of viable cells) within 4 h against penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae. Only cefditoren and ciprofloxacin showed significant bactericidal activity against beta-lactamase-negative (after 24 h) and beta-lactamase-positive strains of H. influenzae (after 12 h). Against beta-lactamase-positive strains of M. catarrhalis, cefditoren was the only agent to show significant bactericidal activity at 6 h (versus cefuroxime and ciprofloxacin at 12 h).

  7. Agents.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2002-01-01

    Although health care is inherently an economic activity, it is inadequately described as a market process. An alternative, grounded in organizational economic theory, is to view professionals and many others as agents, contracted to advance the best interests of their principals (patients). This view untangles some of the ethical conflicts in dentistry. It also helps identify major controllable costs in dentistry and suggests that dentists can act as a group to increase or decrease agency costs, primarily by controlling the bad actors who damage the value of all dentists.

  8. Efficacy of ultra-short single agent regimen antibiotic chemo-prophylaxis in reducing the risk of meningitis in patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery.

    PubMed

    Somma, Teresa; Maraolo, Alberto Enrico; Esposito, Felice; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; Tosone, Grazia; Orlando, Raffaele; Cappabianca, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    The study aims to evaluate the incidence of infectious complications (namely meningitis) within 30 days after endoscopic endonasal transspheinodal neurosurgery (EETS) in patients receiving an ultra-short peri-operative chemo-prophylaxis regimen with 2 doses of 1st generation cephalosporin or macrolide. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical records of 145 patients who received an ultra-short chemoprophylaxis with two doses of an antibiotic, given 30 min before and 8h after EETS, over a 30-month time-frame. Ninety-seven patients (66.89%) received endovenous cefazolin, a 1st generation cephalosporin, administered at a dosage of 1000 mg, and 48 patients (33.10%) with an history of allergy to various agents, received endovenous clarithromycin at a dosage of 500 mg. No case of peri- and post-operative meningitis occurred in patients receiving the 2 doses of antibiotic. Only one patient (0.68%) developed cerebral fluid leakage on the 7th postoperative day, which required the switching to a broad-spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis for one week; this patient received the ultrashort prophylaxis with a macrolide. In addition, 7 patients (4.82%) developed minor infectious complications such as low-grade fever (3 cases, all of them receiving cefazolin), enlarged submandibular and cervical lymphnodes (3 cases, all of them receiving cefazolin), and upper and lower respiratory tract infection (1 case receiving clarithromycin). The cost of this prophylaxis regimen ranged from 7.76 Euro (cefazolin) to 39.54 Euro (clarithromycin). This study suggested that an ultra-short single-antibiotic prophylaxis is a safe, cheap and effective regimen to prevent post-operative meningitis in patients undergoing EETS and who do not require lumbar drainage after surgery. In these patients also the rate of minor infective complications was acceptable when compared with the previous more expensive regimen based on 3rd generation cephalosporin plus aminoglycoside or alone, that could be suitable only

  9. Intra-Operative Surgical Irrigation of the Surgical Incision: What Does the Future Hold-Saline, Antibiotic Agents, or Antiseptic Agents?

    PubMed

    Edmiston, Charles E; Leaper, David J

    2016-12-01

    Intra-operative surgical site irrigation (lavage) is common practice in surgical procedures in general, with all disciplines advocating some form of irrigation before incision closure. This practice, however, has been neither standardized nor is there compelling evidence that it effectively reduces the risk of surgical site infection (SSI). This narrative review addresses the laboratory and clinical evidence that is available to support the practice of irrigation of the abdominal cavity and superficial/deep incisional tissues, using specific irrigation solutions at the end of an operative procedure to reduce the microbial burden at wound closure. Review of PubMed and OVID for pertinent, scientific, and clinical publications in the English language was performed. Incision irrigation was found to afford a three-fold benefit: First, to hydrate the bed; second, to assist in allowing better examination of the area immediately before closure; and finally, by removing superficial and deep incisional contamination and lowering the bioburden, expedite the healing process. The clinical practice of intra-operative peritoneal lavage is highly variable and is dependent solely on surgeon preference. By contrast, intra-operative irrigation after device-related procedures has become a standard of care for the prophylaxis of acute peri-prosthetic infection. The clinical evidence that supports the use of antibiotic irrigation is limited and based on retrospective analysis and few acceptable randomized controlled trials. The results of laboratory and animal studies using aqueous 0.05% chlorhexidine gluconate are favorable, suggesting that further studies are justified to determine its clinical efficacy. The adoption of appropriate and standardized intra-operative irrigation practices into peri-operative care bundles, which include other evidence-based strategies (weight-based antimicrobial prophylaxis, antimicrobial sutures, maintenance of normothermia, and glycemic control), offers

  10. Antibiotic Conjugated Fluorescent Carbon Dots as a Theranostic Agent for Controlled Drug Release, Bioimaging, and Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vaibhav; Khade, Monika; Goshi, Ekta; Sharon, Madhuri

    2014-01-01

    A novel report on microwave assisted synthesis of bright carbon dots (C-dots) using gum arabic (GA) and its use as molecular vehicle to ferry ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, a broad spectrum antibiotic, is reported in the present work. Density gradient centrifugation (DGC) was used to separate different types of C-dots. After careful analysis of the fractions obtained after centrifugation, ciprofloxacin was attached to synthesize ciprofloxacin conjugated with C-dots (Cipro@C-dots conjugate). Release of ciprofloxacin was found to be extremely regulated under physiological conditions. Cipro@C-dots were found to be biocompatible on Vero cells as compared to free ciprofloxacin (1.2 mM) even at very high concentrations. Bare C-dots (∼13 mg mL−1) were used for microbial imaging of the simplest eukaryotic model—Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). Bright green fluorescent was obtained when live imaging was performed to view yeast cells under fluorescent microscope suggesting C-dots incorporation inside the cells. Cipro@C-dots conjugate also showed enhanced antimicrobial activity against both model gram positive and gram negative microorganisms. Thus, the Cipro@C-dots conjugate paves not only a way for bioimaging but also an efficient new nanocarrier for controlled drug release with high antimicrobial activity, thereby serving potential tool for theranostics. PMID:24744921

  11. Antibiotics Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Everyone Should Know What You Can Do Antibiotic Resistance Q&As Fast Facts Antibiotics Quiz Glossary For ... Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Core Elements of Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship ...

  12. What is left when anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases fails?

    PubMed Central

    Lawrance, Ian C

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic incurable conditions that primarily present in young patients. Being incurable, the IBDs may be part of the patient’s life for many years and these conditions require therapies that will be effective over the long-term. Surgery in Crohn’s disease does not cure the disease with endoscopic recurrent in up to 70% of patients 1 year post resection. This means that, the patient will require many years of medications and the goal of the treating physician is to induce and maintain long-term remission without side effects. The development of the anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) agents has been a magnificent clinical advance in IBD, but they are not always effective, with loss of response overtime and, at times, discontinuation is required secondary to side effects. So what options are available if of the anti-TNFα agents can no longer be used? This review aims to provide other options for the physician, to remind them of the older established medications like azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate, the less established medications like mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus as well as newer therapeutic options like the anti-integins, which block the trafficking of leukocytes into the intestinal mucosa. The location of the intestinal inflammation must also be considered, as topical therapeutic agents may also be worthwhile to consider in the long-term management of the more challenging IBD patient. The more options that are available the more likely the patient will be able to have tailored therapy to treat their disease and a better long-term outcome. PMID:24574799

  13. What is left when anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases fails?

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Ian C

    2014-02-07

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic incurable conditions that primarily present in young patients. Being incurable, the IBDs may be part of the patient's life for many years and these conditions require therapies that will be effective over the long-term. Surgery in Crohn's disease does not cure the disease with endoscopic recurrent in up to 70% of patients 1 year post resection. This means that, the patient will require many years of medications and the goal of the treating physician is to induce and maintain long-term remission without side effects. The development of the anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) agents has been a magnificent clinical advance in IBD, but they are not always effective, with loss of response overtime and, at times, discontinuation is required secondary to side effects. So what options are available if of the anti-TNFα agents can no longer be used? This review aims to provide other options for the physician, to remind them of the older established medications like azathioprine/6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate, the less established medications like mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus as well as newer therapeutic options like the anti-integins, which block the trafficking of leukocytes into the intestinal mucosa. The location of the intestinal inflammation must also be considered, as topical therapeutic agents may also be worthwhile to consider in the long-term management of the more challenging IBD patient. The more options that are available the more likely the patient will be able to have tailored therapy to treat their disease and a better long-term outcome.

  14. Conversion of abiraterone to D4A drives anti-tumour activity in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenfei; Bishop, Andrew C; Alyamani, Mohammad; Garcia, Jorge A; Dreicer, Robert; Bunch, Dustin; Liu, Jiayan; Upadhyay, Sunil K; Auchus, Richard J; Sharifi, Nima

    2015-07-16

    Prostate cancer resistance to castration occurs because tumours acquire the metabolic capability of converting precursor steroids to 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), promoting signalling by the androgen receptor and the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Essential for resistance, DHT synthesis from adrenal precursor steroids or possibly from de novo synthesis from cholesterol commonly requires enzymatic reactions by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3βHSD), steroid-5α-reductase (SRD5A) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17βHSD) isoenzymes. Abiraterone, a steroidal 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1) inhibitor, blocks this synthetic process and prolongs survival. We hypothesized that abiraterone is converted by an enzyme to the more active Δ(4)-abiraterone (D4A), which blocks multiple steroidogenic enzymes and antagonizes the androgen receptor, providing an additional explanation for abiraterone's clinical activity. Here we show that abiraterone is converted to D4A in mice and patients with prostate cancer. D4A inhibits CYP17A1, 3βHSD and SRD5A, which are required for DHT synthesis. Furthermore, competitive androgen receptor antagonism by D4A is comparable to the potent antagonist enzalutamide. D4A also has more potent anti-tumour activity against xenograft tumours than abiraterone. Our findings suggest an additional explanation-conversion to a more active agent-for abiraterone's survival extension. We propose that direct treatment with D4A would be more clinically effective than abiraterone treatment.

  15. Bismuth(III) β-thioxoketonates as antibiotics against Helicobacter pylori and as anti-leishmanial agents.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Philip C; Blair, Victoria L; Ferrero, Richard L; Junk, Peter C; Kedzierski, Lukasz; Peiris, Roshani M

    2014-01-21

    Nine different β-thioxoketones of general formula R(1)C(=O)CH2C(=S)R(2) (R(1) = C6H5, R(2) = C6H5L1; R(1) = C6H5, R(2) = p-CF3C6H4L2; R(1) = p-MeOC6H4, R(2) = C6H5L3; R(1) = p-MeOC6H4, R(2) = p-CF3C6H4L4; R(1) = C5H4N, R(2) = C6H5L5; R(1) = p-IC6H4, R(2) = C6H5L6; R(1) = C6H5, R(2) = p-IC6H4L7; R(1) = C6H5, R(2) = C10H7L8 and R(1) = CH3, R(2) = C6H5L9) and their tris-substituted bismuth(III) complexes having the general formula [Bi{R(1)C(=O)CHC(=S)R(2)}3] were synthesised and fully characterised. The solid state structure of [Bi{C5H4NC(=O)CHC(=S)C6H5}3] B5 was determined by crystallography and revealed that the three β-thioxoketonato ligands are bound to bismuth(III) centre in a bidentate fashion through O and S atoms. The bismuth(III) complexes and the corresponding thioxoketones were assessed for their activity against H. pylori. All of the bismuth(III) complexes were highly active against H. pylori having a MIC of greater than or equal to 3.125 μg mL(-1), while the free acids were essentially not toxic to the bacteria. The anti-leishmanial activity of all the bismuth(III) β-thioxoketonates and the corresponding free acids were assessed against L. major promastigotes. The toxicity towards human fibroblast cells was also assessed. All of the free β-thioxoketones were selectively toxic to the L. major promastigotes displaying some potential as anti-leishmanial agents. Among these [C6H5C(=O)CH2C(=S)C6H5] L1 and [C5H4NC(=O)CH2C(=S)C6H5] L5 showed comparable activity to that of Amphotericin B, killing about 80% of the L. major promastigotes at a concentration of 25 μM (6.0 μg mL(-1)). The bismuth(III) β-thioxoketonate complexes were toxic to both the L. major promastigotes and fibroblast cells at high concentrations, but gave no improvement in anti-leishmanial activity over the free β-thioxoketones.

  16. Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Cows with Mastitis in Eastern Poland and Analysis of Susceptibility of Resistant Strains to Alternative Nonantibiotic Agents: Lysostaphin, Nisin and Polymyxin B

    PubMed Central

    SZWEDA, Piotr; SCHIELMANN, Marta; FRANKOWSKA, Aneta; KOT, Barbara; ZALEWSKA, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to analyze the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis in the eastern part of Poland to a set of 20 antibiotics and three alternative agents: lysostaphin, nisin and polymyxin B. Eighty-six out of 123 examined isolates were susceptible to all 20 tested antibiotics (70%). The highest percentage of resistance was observed in the case of β-lactam antibiotics: amoxicillin (n=22, 17.9%), ampicillin (n=28, 22.8%), penicillin (n=29, 23.6%) and streptomycin (n=13; 10.6%). Twenty-five of the penicillin-resistant strains were found to carry the blaZ gene coding for β-lactamases. Two strains were found to be mecA positive and a few strains were classified as multidrug resistant (MDR), one of them was simultaneously resistant to six antibiotics. All strains, resistant to at least one antibiotic (n=37) and two control strains, were susceptible to lysostaphin with MIC values of 0.008–0.5 µg/ml (susceptibility breakpoint 32 µg/ml). Twenty-one (54%) isolates were susceptible to nisin. The MIC value of this agent for 17 (44%) strains was 51.2 µg/ml and was not much higher than the susceptibility breakpoint value (32 µg/ml). Polymyxin B was able to inhibit the growth of the strains only at a high concentration (32–128 µg/ml). The presented results confirmed the observed worldwide problem of spreading antibiotic resistance among staphylococci isolated from bovine mastitis; on the other hand, we have indicated a high level of bactericidal activity of nisin and especially lysostaphin. PMID:24212507

  17. Possible role of macrophage-like suppressor cells in the anti-tumour activity of BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Castés, M.; Lynch, N. R.; Lespinats, G.; Orbach-Arbouys, S.

    1981-01-01

    The i.v. injection of high doses (3 mg) of BCG into C3H mice bearing a transplantable 3-methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma caused the regression of a significant proportion. This effect was most evident when the BCG was injected on the day of the graft, or 7 days later. The injection of this agent either 14 days before the graft, or in low doses (0.1 or 0.5 mg), or directly into the tumour (i.t.) only prolonged the survival of the animals. Spleen cells from systemic high-dose BCG-treated mice were found to exert a strong nonspecific cytostatic effect in vitro that was not an artefact of the test conditions, and was not expressed by cells from low-dose animals. The cytostatic effect was shown to be caused by cells with the characteristics of macrophages, i.e. they were strongly adherent, unaffected by treatment with anti-Thy 1.2 + C', radioresistant but heat-sensitive, and were detected in BCG-treated "B" mice. The spleens of high-dose BCG-treated mice also contained suppressor cells that were capable of inhibiting the in vitro reactivity of normal T cells to PHA. Like the cytostatic effect, this suppressor activity was not detected in low-dose mice, and the cells responsible had the properties of macrophages; the effect was lost after the removal of adherent cells by sequential exposure to plastic and colloidal iron, but was conserved after treatment with anti-Thy 1.2 + C'. T-cell-deprived animals, such as "B" or nude mice, also developed suppressor-cell activity when treated with systemic high-dose BCG. Close parallels became evident between the in vivo anti-tumour activity of BCG, the in vitro cytostatic effect, and the suppressor-cell activity. We here discuss the possible role of suppressor cells in the mechanism of action of this agent. PMID:6459797

  18. Antitumour Activity of the Microencapsulation of Annona vepretorum Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Bomfim, Larissa M; Menezes, Leociley R A; Rodrigues, Ana Carolina B C; Dias, Rosane B; Rocha, Clarissa A Gurgel; Soares, Milena B P; Neto, Albertino F S; Nascimento, Magaly P; Campos, Adriana F; Silva, Lidércia C R C E; Costa, Emmanoel V; Bezerra, Daniel P

    2016-03-01

    Annona vepretorum Mart. (Annonaceae), popularly known as 'bruteira', has nutritional and medicinal uses. This study investigated the chemical composition and antitumour potential of the essential oil of A. vepretorum leaf alone and complexed with β-cyclodextrin in a microencapsulation. The essential oil was obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus and analysed using GC-MS and GC-FID. In vitro cytotoxicity of the essential oil and some of its major constituents in tumour cell lines from different histotypes was evaluated using the alamar blue assay. Furthermore, the in vivo efficacy of essential oil was demonstrated in mice inoculated with B16-F10 mouse melanoma. The essential oil included bicyclogermacrene (35.71%), spathulenol (18.89%), (E)-β-ocimene (12.46%), α-phellandrene (8.08%), o-cymene (6.24%), germacrene D (3.27%) and α-pinene (2.18%) as major constituents. The essential oil and spathulenol exhibited promising cytotoxicity. In vivo tumour growth was inhibited by the treatment with the essential oil (inhibition of 34.46%). Importantly, microencapsulation of the essential oil increased in vivo tumour growth inhibition (inhibition of 62.66%).

  19. The novel proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib (CFZ) induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and potentiates the anti-tumour activity of chemotherapy in rituximab-resistant lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Juan J.; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J.; Kaufman, Gregory P.; Czuczman, Natalie M.; Mavis, Cory; Skitzki, Joseph J.; Czuczman, Myron S.

    2013-01-01

    Targeting the proteasome system with bortezomib (BTZ) results in anti-tumour activity and potentiates the effects of chemotherapy/biological agents in multiple myeloma and B-cell lymphoma. Carfilzomib (CFZ) is a more selective proteasome inhibitor that is structurally distinct from BTZ. In an attempt to characterize its biological activity, we evaluated CFZ in several lymphoma pre-clinical models. Rituximab-sensitive cell lines (RSCL), rituximab-resistant cell lines (RRCL), and primary tumour cells derived from B-cell lymphoma patients were exposed to CFZ or BTZ. Cell viability and changes in cell cycle were determined. Western blots were performed to detect PARP-cleavage and/or changes in Bcl-2 (BCL2) family members. CFZ was 10 times more active than BTZ and exhibited dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity. CFZ exposure induced apoptosis by upregulation of Bak (BAK1) and subsequent PARP cleavage in RSCL and RRCL; it was also partially caspase-dependent. CFZ induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in RSCL. CFZ demonstrated the ability to overcome resistance to chemotherapy in RRCL and potentiated the anti-tumour activity of chemotherapy agents. Our data suggest that CFZ is able to overcome resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, upregulate pro-apoptotic proteins to promote apoptosis, and induce G2/M cell cycle arrest in lymphoma cells. Our pre-clinical data supports future clinical evaluation of CFZ in B-cell lymphoma. PMID:23826755

  20. PM01183, a new DNA minor groove covalent binder with potent in vitro and in vivo anti-tumour activity

    PubMed Central

    Leal, JFM; Martínez-Díez, M; García-Hernández, V; Moneo, V; Domingo, A; Bueren-Calabuig, JA; Negri, A; Gago, F; Guillén-Navarro, MJ; Avilés, P; Cuevas, C; García-Fernández, LF; Galmarini, CM

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE PM01183 is a new synthetic tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid that is currently in phase I clinical development for the treatment of solid tumours. In this study we have characterized the interactions of PM01183 with selected DNA molecules of defined sequence and its in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH DNA binding characteristics of PM01183 were studied using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, fluorescence-based melting kinetic experiments and computational modelling methods. Its mechanism of action was investigated using flow cytometry, Western blot analysis and fluorescent microscopy. In vitro anti-tumour activity was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and the in vivo activity utilized several human cancer models. KEY RESULTS Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that PM01183 bound to DNA. Fluorescence-based thermal denaturation experiments showed that the most favourable DNA triplets providing a central guanine for covalent adduct formation are AGC, CGG, AGG and TGG. These binding preferences could be rationalized using molecular modelling. PM01183–DNA adducts in living cells give rise to double-strand breaks, triggering S-phase accumulation and apoptosis. The potent cytotoxic activity of PM01183 was ascertained in a 23-cell line panel with a mean GI50 value of 2.7 nM. In four murine xenograft models of human cancer, PM01183 inhibited tumour growth significantly with no weight loss of treated animals. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS PM01183 is shown to bind to selected DNA sequences and promoted apoptosis by inducing double-strand breaks at nanomolar concentrations. The potent anti-tumour activity of PM01183 in several murine models of human cancer supports its development as a novel anti-neoplastic agent. PMID:20977459

  1. New classes of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Moir, Donald T; Opperman, Timothy J; Butler, Michelle M; Bowlin, Terry L

    2012-10-01

    Several novel chemical classes of antibiotics are currently in human clinical studies. While most are narrow spectrum agents that inhibit unexploited targets, the susceptible pathogens are clinically important, including staphylococci, pseudomonads, and mycobacteria. Given the paucity of antibacterial agents consisting of novel chemical scaffolds that act on established targets, these new antibacterial scaffolds, which are active against new targets, represent an important advance in the battle against antibiotic resistance. Indeed, most of these compounds are unlikely to be subject to existing compound-based or target-based resistance mechanisms.

  2. An immunomodulatory polysaccharide-rich substance from the fruit juice of Morinda citrifolia (noni) with antitumour activity.

    PubMed

    Hirazumi, A; Furusawa, E

    1999-08-01

    The fruit juice of Morinda citrifolia (noni) contains a polysaccharide-rich substance (noni-ppt) with antitumour activity in the Lewis lung (LLC) peritoneal carcinomatosis model. Therapeutic administration of noni-ppt significantly enhanced the duration of survival of inbred syngeneic LLC tumour bearing mice. It did not exert significant cytotoxic effects in an adapted culture of LLC cells, LLC1, but could activate peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) to impart profound toxicity when co-cultured with the tumour cells. This suggested the possibility that noni-ppt may suppress tumour growth through activation of the host immune system. Concomitant treatment with the immunosuppressive agent, 2-chloroadenosine (C1-Ade) or cyclosporin (cys-A) diminished its activity, thereby substantiating an immunomodulatory mechanism. Noni-ppt was also capable of stimulating the release of several mediators from murine effector cells, including tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-10, IL-12 p70, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and nitric oxide (NO), but had no effect on IL-2 and suppressed IL-4 release. Improved survival time and curative effects occurred when noni-ppt was combined with sub-optimal doses of the standard chemotherapeutic agents, adriamycin (Adria), cisplatin (CDDP), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and vincristine (VCR), suggesting important clinical applications of noni-ppt as a supplemental agent in cancer treatment. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Methylseleninic acid promotes antitumour effects via nuclear FOXO3a translocation through Akt inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Tarrado-Castellarnau, Míriam; Cortés, Roldán; Zanuy, Miriam; Tarragó-Celada, Josep; Polat, Ibrahim H.; Hill, Richard; Fan, Teresa W.; Link, Wolfgang; Cascante, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Selenium supplement has been shown in clinical trials to reduce the risk of different cancers including lung carcinoma. Previous studies reported that the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic activities of methylseleninic acid (MSA) in cancer cells could be mediated by inhibition of the PI3K pathway. A better understanding of the downstream cellular targets of MSA will provide information on its mechanism of action and will help to optimise its use in combination therapies with PI3K inhibitors. For this study, the effects of MSA on viability, cell cycle, metabolism, apoptosis, protein and mRNA expression, and Reactive Oxygen Species production were analysed in A549 cells. FOXO3a subcellular localisation was examined in A549 cells and in stably transfected human osteosarcoma U2foxRELOC cells. Our results demonstrate that MSA induces FOXO3a nuclear translocation in A549 cells and in U2OS cells that stably express GFP-FOXO3a. Interestingly, sodium selenite, another selenium compound, did not induce any significant effects on FOXO3a translocation despite inducing apoptosis. Single strand break of DNA, disruption of tumour cell metabolic adaptations, decrease in ROS production, and cell cycle arrest in G1 accompanied by induction of apoptosis are late events occurring after 24 h of MSA treatment in A549 cells. Our findings suggest that FOXO3a is a relevant mediator of the antiproliferative effects of MSA. This new evidence on the mechanistic action of MSA can open new avenues in exploiting its antitumour properties and in the optimal design of novel combination therapies. We present MSA as a promising chemotherapeutic agent with synergistic antiproliferative effects with cisplatin. PMID:26375988

  4. SPARC independent drug delivery and antitumour effects of nab-paclitaxel in genetically engineered mice

    PubMed Central

    Neesse, Albrecht; Frese, Kristopher K; Chan, Derek S; Bapiro, Tashinga E; Howat, William J; Richards, Frances M; Ellenrieder, Volker; Jodrell, Duncan I; Tuveson, David A

    2014-01-01

    Design Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of cremophor-paclitaxel, nab-paclitaxel (human-albumin-bound paclitaxel, Abraxane) and a novel mouse-albumin-bound paclitaxel (m-nab-paclitaxel) were evaluated in genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), histological and biochemical analysis. Preclinical evaluation of m-nab-paclitaxel included assessment by three-dimensional high-resolution ultrasound and molecular analysis in a novel secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC)-deficient GEMM of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Results nab-Paclitaxel exerted its antitumoural effects in a dose-dependent manner and was associated with less toxicity compared with cremophor-paclitaxel. SPARC nullizygosity in a GEMM of PDA, KrasG12D;p53flox/−;p48Cre (KPfC), resulted in desmoplastic ductal pancreas tumours with impaired collagen maturation. Paclitaxel concentrations were significantly decreased in SPARC null plasma samples and tissues when administered as low-dose m-nab-paclitaxel. At the maximally tolerated dose, SPARC deficiency did not affect the intratumoural paclitaxel concentration, stromal deposition and the immediate therapeutic response. Conclusions nab-Paclitaxel accumulates and acts in a dose-dependent manner. The interaction of plasma SPARC and albumin-bound drugs is observed at low doses of nab-paclitaxel but is saturated at therapeutic doses in murine tumours. Thus, this study provides important information for future preclinical and clinical trials in PDA using nab-paclitaxel in combination with novel experimental and targeted agents. PMID:24067278

  5. Inhibition of bone resorption, rather than direct cytotoxicity, mediates the anti-tumour actions of ibandronate and osteoprotegerin in a murine model of breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Brennan, Karen; Blair, Julie M; Modzelewski, James R K; Seibel, Markus J; Dunstan, Colin R

    2007-02-01

    than either agent alone; and that (ii) inhibition of bone resorption, rather than direct anti-tumour action, mediates the effects of these agents on tumour growth in this in vivo model.

  6. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saswati; Chattopadhyay, Madhab K.; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in sub-inhibitory concentrations acting as signaling molecules supporting the process of quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host–parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell, and so on). The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behavior of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and the genes that confer resistance to antibiotics

  7. Effect of thalidomide on tumour necrosis factor production and anti-tumour activity induced by 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Ching, L. M.; Xu, Z. F.; Gummer, B. H.; Palmer, B. D.; Joseph, W. R.; Baguley, B. C.

    1995-01-01

    The investigational anti-tumour agent, 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (5,6-MeXAA), an analogue of flavone acetic acid (FAA), has been scheduled for clinical evaluation. Like FAA, 5,6-MeXAA exhibits excellent experimental anti-tumour activity and is an efficient inducer of cytokines in mice. We have examined the effect of pharmacological suppression of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) production on the anti-tumour activity of 5,6-MeXAA, taking advantage of previous observations that TNF production in response to endotoxin in vitro is inhibited by thalidomide. Thalidomide at doses of between 8 and 250 mg kg-1 efficiently suppressed serum TNF activity in response to 5,6-MeXAA at its optimal TNF inducing dose of 55 mg kg-1. Suppression was achieved when thalidomide was administered at the same time as, or up to 4 h before, 5,6-MeXAA. Under conditions in which TNF activity was suppressed, the degree of tumour haemorrhagic necrosis and the proportion of cures in the subcutaneous Colon 38 tumour were increased. In mice administered thalidomide (100 mg kg-1) together with 5,6-MeXAA (30 mg kg-1), complete tumour regression was obtained in 100% of mice, as compared with 67% in mice receiving 5,6-MeXAA alone. The results suggest a possible new application for thalidomide and pose new questions about the action of 5,6-MeXAA and related compounds. PMID:7640215

  8. Enhanced inhibition of tumour growth and metastasis, and induction of antitumour immunity by IL-2-IgG2b fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Budagian, V; Nanni, P; Lollini, P L; Musiani, P; Di Carlo, E; Bulanova, E; Paus, R; Bulfone-Paus, S

    2002-05-01

    Cytokine-immunoglobulin (Ig)-fusion proteins have attracted increasing interest as antitumour agents. Here, we have investigated the antimetastatic and antitumour responses elicited in vivo by mammary adenocarcinoma cells (TS/A) engineered to secrete interleukin (IL)-2-IgG fusion proteins. TS/A cells were transfected with DNA coding for IL-2-IgG2b, IgG2b or IL-2, and injected subcutaneously into syngeneic mice. Animals injected with TS/A-IL-2 or TS/A-IL-2-IgG2b both efficiently rejected tumours, whereas treatment with parental cells or TS/A-IgG2b was lethal. Interestingly, only mice vaccinated with IL-2-IgG2b fusion protein-secreting cells showed a long-lasting protective immunity against a later challenge with parental tumour cells. Moreover, the metastatic potential of TS/A-IL-2-IgG2b-transfected cells was dramatically decreased compared with TS/A-IL-2-cells, with a virtual absence of lung metastases after intravenous injection. Adenocarcinomas secreting IL-2-IgG2b exhibited a more prominent, early and persistent infiltration of CD4+, CD8+ and natural killer (NK) cells than TS/A-IL-2 cells. Therefore, upon transfection into adenocarcinoma cells, the IgG2b part of IL-2 fusion protein exerts intriguing added antitumour properties over IL-2 alone, thus contributing to a long-lasting tumour immunity, probably by the recruitment of specific immune effector cells. These findings suggest a promising new oncotherapeutic strategy for poorly immunogenic tumours: vaccination with tumour cells engineered to secrete IL-2-IgG2b fusion protein.

  9. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Orbital Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Benjamin; Rajjoub, Lamise; Mansour, Tamer; Chen, Tony; Mumtaz, Aisha

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether prophylactic antibiotic use in patients with orbital fracture prevent orbital infection. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Participants: All patients diagnosed with orbital fracture between January 1, 2008 and March 1, 2014 at The George Washington University Hospital and Clinics. Main Outcome Measures: Development of orbital infection. Results: One hundred seventy-two patients with orbital fracture met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. No orbital infections were documented. Twenty subjects (12%) received no prophylactic antibiotic, and two (1%) received only one dose of antibiotics pre-operatively for surgery. For primary antibiotic, 136 subjects (79%) received oral antibiotics, and 14 (8%) received intravenous (IV) antibiotics (excluding cefazolin). Cephalexin and amoxicillin-clavulanate were the most prescribed oral antibiotics that are equally effective. Five-to-seven day courses of antibiotics had no increased infections compared to ten-to-fourteen day courses. Calculated boundaries for effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotics ranged from a Number Needed to Treat (NNT) of 75 to a Number Needed to Harm (NNH) of 198. Conclusion: Antibiotics for prevention of orbital infection in patients with orbital fractures have become widely used. Coordination between trauma teams and specialists is needed to prevent patient overmedication and antibiotic resistance. Should antibiotics be used, shorter courses and avoidance of broad spectrum agents are recommended. Additional studies are needed. PMID:28400887

  10. History of Antibiotics Research.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Kathrin I

    2016-01-01

    For thousands of years people were delivered helplessly to various kinds of infections, which often reached epidemic proportions and have cost the lives of millions of people. This is precisely the age since mankind has been thinking of infectious diseases and the question of their causes. However, due to a lack of knowledge, the search for strategies to fight, heal, and prevent the spread of communicable diseases was unsuccessful for a long time. It was not until the discovery of the healing effects of (antibiotic producing) molds, the first microscopic observations of microorganisms in the seventeenth century, the refutation of the abiogenesis theory, and the dissolution of the question "What is the nature of infectious diseases?" that the first milestones within the history of antibiotics research were set. Then new discoveries accelerated rapidly: Bacteria could be isolated and cultured and were identified as possible agents of diseases as well as producers of bioactive metabolites. At the same time the first synthetic antibiotics were developed and shortly thereafter, thousands of synthetic substances as well as millions of soil borne bacteria and fungi were screened for bioactivity within numerous microbial laboratories of pharmaceutical companies. New antibiotic classes with different targets were discovered as on assembly line production. With the beginning of the twentieth century, many of the diseases which reached epidemic proportions at the time-e.g., cholera, syphilis, plague, tuberculosis, or typhoid fever, just to name a few, could be combatted with new discovered antibiotics. It should be considered that hundred years ago the market launch of new antibiotics was significantly faster and less complicated than today (where it takes 10-12 years in average between the discovery of a new antibiotic until the launch). After the first euphoria it was quickly realized that bacteria are able to develop, acquire, and spread numerous resistance mechanisms

  11. Potent anti-tumour activity of a novel conditionally replicating adenovirus for melanoma via inhibition of migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, G; Yang, C-S; Xu, D; Sun, C; Zheng, J-N; Lei, T-C; Liu, Y-Q

    2014-01-01

    Background: Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) represent a novel class of oncological therapeutic agents. One strategy to ensure tumour targeting is to place the essential viral genes under the control of tumour-specific promoters. Ki67 has been selected as a cancer gene therapy target, as it is expressed in most malignant cells but is barely detectable in most normal cells. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a Ki67 promoter-controlled CRAd (Ki67-ZD55-IL-24) on the proliferation and apoptosis of melanoma cells. Methods: Melanoma cells were independently treated with Ki67-ZD55-IL-24, ZD55-IL-24, Ki67-ZD55, and ZD55-EGFP. The cytotoxic potential of each treatment was assessed using cell viability measurements. Cell migration and invasion were assayed using cell migration and invasion assays. Apoptosis was assayed using the annexin V-FITC assay, western blotting, reverse transcriptase PCR (RT–PCR), haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, and the TUNEL assay. Results: Our results showed that Ki67-ZD55-IL-24 had significantly enhanced anti-tumour activity as it more effectively induced apoptosis in melanoma cells than the other agents. Ki67-ZD55-IL-24 also caused the most significant inhibition of cell migration and invasion of melanoma cells. Furthermore, apoptosis was induced more effectively in melanoma xenografts in nude mice. Conclusions: This strategy holds promising potential for the further development of an effective approach to treat malignant melanoma. PMID:24714752

  12. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really replace antibiotics remains a controversial issue. This review summarizes recent development and perspectives of alternatives to antibiotics. The mechanism of actions, applications, and prospectives of the alternatives such as immunity modulating agents, bacteriophages and their lysins, antimicrobial peptides, pro-, pre-, and synbiotics, plant extracts, inhibitors targeting pathogenicity (bacterial quorum sensing, biofilm, and virulence), and feeding enzymes are thoroughly discussed. Lastly, the feasibility of alternatives to antibiotics is deeply analyzed. It is hard to conclude that the alternatives might substitute antibiotics in veterinary medicine in the foreseeable future. At the present time, prudent use of antibiotics and the establishment of scientific monitoring systems are the best and fastest way to limit the adverse effects of the abuse of antibiotics and to ensure the safety of animal-derived food and environment.

  13. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really replace antibiotics remains a controversial issue. This review summarizes recent development and perspectives of alternatives to antibiotics. The mechanism of actions, applications, and prospectives of the alternatives such as immunity modulating agents, bacteriophages and their lysins, antimicrobial peptides, pro-, pre-, and synbiotics, plant extracts, inhibitors targeting pathogenicity (bacterial quorum sensing, biofilm, and virulence), and feeding enzymes are thoroughly discussed. Lastly, the feasibility of alternatives to antibiotics is deeply analyzed. It is hard to conclude that the alternatives might substitute antibiotics in veterinary medicine in the foreseeable future. At the present time, prudent use of antibiotics and the establishment of scientific monitoring systems are the best and fastest way to limit the adverse effects of the abuse of antibiotics and to ensure the safety of animal-derived food and environment. PMID:24860564

  14. Adaptation of mycoplasmas to antimicrobial agents: Acholeplasma laidlawii extracellular vesicles mediate the export of ciprofloxacin and a mutant gene related to the antibiotic target.

    PubMed

    Medvedeva, Elena S; Baranova, Natalia B; Mouzykantov, Alexey A; Grigorieva, Tatiana Yu; Davydova, Marina N; Trushin, Maxim V; Chernova, Olga A; Chernov, Vladislav M

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrated that extracellular membrane vesicles are involved with the development of resistance to fluoroquinolones by mycoplasmas (class Mollicutes). This study assessed the differences in susceptibility to ciprofloxacin among strains of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8. The mechanisms of mycoplasma resistance to antibiotics may be associated with a mutation in a gene related to the target of quinolones, which could modulate the vesiculation level. A. laidlawii extracellular vesicles mediated the export of the nucleotide sequences of the antibiotic target gene as well as the traffic of ciprofloxacin. These results may facilitate the development of effective approaches to control mycoplasma infections, as well as the contamination of cell cultures and vaccine preparations.

  15. [Antibiotic Stewardship].

    PubMed

    Lanckohr, Christian; Ellger, Björn

    2016-02-01

    The adequate management of infections is an important task in critical care medicine which has an effect on patient outcome. As a result, the prevalence of antiinfective therapy is high in intensive care units. In the face of an unsettling development of worldwide microbial resistance, an optimization and reduction of antiinfective therapy is necessary. Antibiotic stewardship tries to improve antiinfective therapy with an interdisciplinary approach. One overall objective of antibiotic stewardship is the reduction of resistance induction in order to preserve the therapeutic efficiency of antibiotics. Intensive care units are important fields of action for antibiotic stewardship interventions. This article reviews available evidence and some practical aspects for antibiotic stewardship.

  16. Goshajinkigan reduces oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy without affecting anti-tumour efficacy in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ushio, Soichiro; Egashira, Nobuaki; Sada, Hikaru; Kawashiri, Takehiro; Shirahama, Masafumi; Masuguchi, Ken; Oishi, Ryozo

    2012-06-01

    Oxaliplatin is a key drug in the treatment of colorectal cancer, but it causes acute and chronic neuropathies in patients. Goshajinkigan (GJG) is a Kampo medicine that is used for the treatments of several neurological symptoms including pain and numbness. More recently, GJG has been reported to prevent the oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in clinical studies. No experimental study, however, has been conducted to date to determine the effect of GJG on pain behaviour in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. Moreover, the impact on the anti-tumour effect of oxaliplatin remains unknown. In the present study, we examined the effects of GJG on the peripheral neuropathy and anti-tumour activity of oxaliplatin in rodents. Repeated administration of oxaliplatin caused cold hyperalgesia from days 3 to 37 and mechanical allodynia from days 21 to 28. Repeated administration of GJG prevented the oxaliplatin-induced cold hyperalgesia but not mechanical allodynia and axonal degeneration in rat sciatic nerve. Single administration of GJG reduced both cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia after the development of neuropathy. In addition, GJG did not affect the anti-tumour effect of oxaliplatin in the tumour cells or tumour cells-implanted mice. These results suggest that GJG relieves the oxaliplatin-induced cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia without affecting anti-tumour activity of oxaliplatin, and, therefore, may be useful for the oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in clinical practice.

  17. Novel and highly potent antitumour natural products from cnidarians of marine origin.

    PubMed

    Pejin, Boris; Mojovic, Milos; Savic, Aleksandar G

    2014-01-01

    This article covers the 2003-2012 literature published for marine natural products from the phylum Cnidaria. The focus is on new and highly potent antitumour substances, together with details related to the organism sourced. It describes 12 promising bioactives isolated from 7 species.

  18. New antitumour natural products from marine red algae: covering the period from 2003 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Pejin, Boris; Jovanovic, Katarina K; Savic, Aleksandar G

    2015-01-01

    This review covers the 2003-2012 literature data published for natural products originating from marine red algae. The focus is on new antitumour substances, together with details related to the organism sourced. It emphasises 14 promising compounds (isolated from 13 species) whose chemical structures are briefly discussed.

  19. Metabonomics applied in exploring the antitumour mechanism of physapubenolide on hepatocellular carcinoma cells by targeting glycolysis through the Akt-p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ting; Fan, Bo-Yi; Zhang, Chao; Zhao, Hui-Jun; Han, Chao; Gao, Cai-Yun; Luo, Jian-Guang; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics can be used to identify potential markers and discover new targets for future therapeutic interventions. Here, we developed a novel application of the metabonomics method based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) for rapidly exploring the anticancer mechanism of physapubenolide (PB), a cytotoxic withanolide isolated from Physalis species. PB inhibited the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by apoptosis-related biochemical events, including the cleavage of caspase-3/7/9 and PARP. Metabolic profiling analysis revealed that PB disturbed the metabolic pattern and significantly decreased lactate production. This suggests that the suppression of glycolysis plays an important role in the anti-tumour effects induced by PB, which is further supported by the decreased expression of glycolysis-related genes and proteins. Furthermore, the increased level of p53 and decreased expression of p-Akt were observed, and the attenuated glycolysis and enhanced apoptosis were reversed in the presence of Akt cDNA or p53 siRNA. These results confirm that PB exhibits anti-cancer activities through the Akt-p53 pathway. Our study not only reports for the first time the anti-tumour mechanism of PB, but also suggests that PB is a promising therapeutic agent for use in cancer treatments and that metabolomic approaches provide a new strategy to effectively explore the molecular mechanisms of promising anticancer compounds. PMID:27416811

  20. Smac is another pathway in the anti-tumour activity of Trichosanthin and reverses Trichosanthin resistance in CaSki cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lei; Song, Jian; Wu, Liting; Huang, Liming; Wang, Yanlin; Huang, Yingdi; Yu, Han; Huang, Yiling; You, C C; Ye, Jiayou

    2015-02-01

    Trichosanthin (TCS), or Tin Hua Fen, is a renowned traditional Chinese medicine and is still used in Chinese clinics for midterm abortion and the treatment of choriocarcinoma. Many studies have demonstrated that TCS has anti-tumour action as a type I ribosome-inactivating protein. We hypothesized that there is another pathway of the anti-tumour activity of TCS. cDNA array analysis was applied to profile changes in gene expression of human CaSki in response to TCS stimulation. Smac, a mitochondrial protein, was identified as the highly upregulated protein in response to TCS treatment. The mRNA and protein levels of Smac were determined by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting respectively. We analysed the methylation status of Smac using methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and indicates that TCS promotes Smac demethylation and increases its expression in cervical CaSki cells. Tumour cells develop resistance to TCS during prolonged treatment, as with other classic chemotherapeutic agents. Smac expression was downregulated and Twist was upregulated in TCS-resistant cells. These results indicate that TCS has demethylating activity and that Smac is involved in both TCS response and TCS resistance.

  1. Potential antitumour and pro-oxidative effects of (E)-methyl 2-(7-chloroquinolin-4-ylthio)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) acrylate (QNACR).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Juan R; Ferrer, Rosa; Gamboa, Neira; Charris, Jaime; Antunes, Fernando

    2013-12-01

    Characterization of the pro-oxidant activity of QNACR. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induce cellular damage and represent unique opportunities to kill malignant cells. In this study, we synthesized and evaluated the new compound, (E)-methyl 2-(7-chloroquinolin-4-ylthio)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) acrylate (QNACR) as potential pro-oxidative agent against breast cancer. Oxidative stress biomarkers such as ROS, thiobarbuturic acid reactive species (TBARs) and different antioxidant enzyme activities were determined in cell lysates. QNACR showed cytotoxic and more selective effects to tumour MCF7 cells (IC50 < 25 µM) compared to antitumour controls, inducing ROS and TBARs parallel to inhibitions of catalase (CAT), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH). Longer exposures to QNACR triggered adaptive effects increasing the overall activities of CAT, glutathione reductase, G6PDH and 6PGDH, but eventually the adaptation changes faded and cells died. QNACR led to remarkable modifications in the oxidative status of tumour cells, proposing this compound as potential alternative for antitumour therapy.

  2. Antibiotic use and microbiome function.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Manuel; Méndez-García, Celia; Rojo, David; Barbas, Coral; Moya, Andrés

    2017-06-15

    Our microbiome should be understood as one of the most complex components of the human body. The use of β-lactam antibiotics is one of the microbiome covariates that influence its composition. The extent to which our microbiota changes after an antibiotic intervention depends not only on the chemical nature of the antibiotic or cocktail of antibiotics used to treat specific infections, but also on the type of administration, duration and dose, as well as the level of resistance that each microbiota develops. We have begun to appreciate that not all bacteria within our microbiota are vulnerable or reactive to different antibiotic interventions, and that their influence on both microbial composition and metabolism may differ. Antibiotics are being used worldwide on a huge scale and the prescription of antibiotics is continuing to rise; however, their effects on our microbiota have been reported for only a limited number of them. This article presents a critical review of the antibiotics or antibiotic cocktails whose use in humans has been linked to changes in the composition of our microbial communities, with a particular focus on the gut, oral, respiratory, skin and vaginal microbiota, and on their molecular agents (genes, proteins and metabolites). We review the state of the art as of June 2016, and cover a total of circa 68 different antibiotics. The data herein are the first to compile information about the bacteria, fungi, archaea and viruses most influenced by the main antibiotic treatments prescribed nowadays. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clostridium sporogenes delivers interleukin-12 to hypoxic tumours, producing antitumour activity without significant toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-L; Lü, R; Chang, Z-S; Zhang, W-Q; Wang, Q-B; Ding, S-Y; Zhao, W

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium sporogenes ATCC 3584 is an obligate anaerobe that has been reported to possess excellent tumour-targeting capacity. Here, we use Cl. sporogenes as a vector to deliver IL-12, a potent antitumour cytokine that bears numerous antitumour properties but that has limited clinical applications due to its strong toxicity when delivered systemically. In this study, Cl. sporogenes was genetically engineered to secrete murine IL-12, and its antitumour efficacy and toxicity were investigated in a murine EMT6 mammary carcinoma model. After intravenous injection, Cl. sporogenes was able to selectively settle and reproduce in the tumours without encroaching on normal tissues, resulting in a clear delay of tumour growth and a 14·3% cure rate. Importantly, the mice showed no obvious toxicity-associated side effects, such as diarrhoea and weight loss, during the treatment process. The significant antitumour efficacy and low toxicity of this treatment may be explained by the selective tumour-targeting properties of Cl. sporogenes and by the sustained release of IL-12 accompanying bacterial proliferation. This moderate local IL-12 concentration would not induce the severe response in the entire body, that is inevitable when IL-12 is administered directly. Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a potent antitumour cytokine, but it is toxic when administrated systemically. This study demonstrates that murine IL-12 can be systemically delivered to hypoxic sites in solid tumours by Clostridium sporogenes, producing a clear delay in tumour growth and a 14·3% cure rate in a mouse tumour model. Importantly, there is no obvious toxicity associated with IL-12 during the treatment process. This result may be accounted for by the excellent tumour-targeting capacity of Cl. sporogenes, targeting IL-12 directly to the tumour site instead of to the entire body. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. [Antibiotics in primary care].

    PubMed

    Steciwko, Andrzej; Lubieniecka, Małgorzata; Muszyńska, Agnieszka

    2011-05-01

    Discovered in the forties of the twentieth century antimicrobial agents have changed the world. Currently, due to their overuse, we are threatened by the increasing resistance of bacteria to antibiotics, and soon we may face a threat of inability to fight these pathogens. For that reason, the world, European and national organizations introduce antibiotics protection programs. In Poland since 2004, the National Program of Protection of Antibiotics is being held. The concept of rational antibiotic therapy is associated not only with the appropriate choice of therapy or antimicrobial dosage but also with a reduction in costs associated with a refund of medicines. Antibiotics are prescribed mostly by primary care physicians (GP), and about one fifth of visits to family doctor's office ends with prescribing antimicrobial drug. These trends are probably related to both the difficulty in applying the differential diagnosis of viral and bacterial infection in a primary care doctor's office, as well as patient's conviction about the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in viral infections. However, although patients often want to influence the therapeutic decisions and ask their doctor for prescribing antimicrobial drug, the right conversation with a doctor alone is the critical component in satisfaction with medical care. Many countries have established standards to clarify the indications for use of antibiotics and thereby reduce their consumption. The next step is to monitor the prescribing and use of these drugs and to assess the rise of drug resistance in the area. In Poland, the recommendations regarding outpatient respiratory tract infections treatment were published and usage of antimicrobial agents monitoring has begun. However, lack of publications covering a broad analysis of antibiotic therapy and drug resistance on Polish territory is still a problem. Modem medicine has yet another tool in the fight against bacteria--they are bacteriophages. Phage therapy is

  5. Chiral copper(II) complex based on natural product rosin derivative as promising antitumour agent.

    PubMed

    Fei, Bao-Li; Huang, Zhi-Xiang; Xu, Wu-Shuang; Li, Dong-Dong; Lu, Yang; Gao, Wei-Lin; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qing-Bo

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the biological preference of chiral drug candidates for molecular target DNA, the synthesis and characterization of a chiral copper(II) complex (2) of a chiral ligand N,N'-(pyridin-2-ylmethylene) dehydroabietylamine (1) was carried out. The interactions of 1 and 2 with salmon sperm DNA were investigated by viscosity measurements, UV, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques. Absorption spectral, emission spectral and viscosity analysis reveal that 1 and 2 interacted with DNA through intercalation and 2 exhibited a higher DNA binding ability. In the absence/presence of ascorbic acid, 1 and 2 cleaved supercoiled pBR322 DNA by single-strand and 2 displayed stronger DNA cleavage ability. In addition, in vitro cytotoxicity of 1 and 2 against HeLa, SiHa, HepG-2 and A431 cancer cell lines study show that they exhibited effective cytotoxicity against the tested cell lines, notably, 2 showed a superior cytotoxicity than the widely used drug cisplatin under identical conditions, indicating it has the potential to act as effective anticancer drug. Flow cytometry analysis indicates 2 produced death of HeLa cancer cells through an apoptotic pathway. Cell cycle analysis demonstrates that 2 mainly arrested HeLa cells at the S phase. The study represents the first step towards understanding the mode of the promising chiral rosin-derivative based copper complexes as chemotherapeutics.

  6. Predicting antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José L; Baquero, Fernando; Andersson, Dan I

    2007-12-01

    The treatment of bacterial infections is increasingly complicated because microorganisms can develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. This article discusses the information that is required to predict when antibiotic resistance is likely to emerge in a bacterial population. Indeed, the development of the conceptual and methodological tools required for this type of prediction represents an important goal for microbiological research. To this end, we propose the establishment of methodological guidelines that will allow researchers to predict the emergence of resistance to a new antibiotic before its clinical introduction.

  7. Raloxifene Inhibits NF-kB Pathway and Potentiates Anti-Tumour Activity of Cisplatin with Simultaneous Reduction in its Nephrotoxictiy.

    PubMed

    Jamdade, Vinayak Sudhir; Mundhe, Nitin A; Kumar, Parveen; Tadla, Venkatesh; Lahkar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity is the chief obstacle in the use of cisplatin as chemotherapeutic agent. However, it remains as most widely employed anticancer agent to treat various solid tumours like head-neck, testicular, ovarian and mammary gland cancer. Raloxifene is claimed to be potent anti-inflammatory as well as anti-cancer agent. The present study was carried out to explore the effect of pre-treatment of raloxifene on cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity and its anti-tumour activity in 7, 12 dimethyl benz [a] anthracene induced mammary tumour in animal model. Renal damage was accessed by measuring serum level of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and albumin whereas systemic inflammation was accessed by measuring level of pro-inflammatory cytokines like tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). Moreover, assessment of tumour reduction was done by measuring tumour volume and percentage tumour reduction. A single dose of cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg) resulted in significant increase in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, NF-kB, TNF-α and IL-6 levels along with decrease in albumin and IL-10 levels. However, there were no significant changes in raloxifene (8 mg/kg) treated group. Pre-treatment of raloxifene (8 mg/kg) caused marked decrease in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, TNF-α and IL-6 levels whereas increase in albumin and IL-10 levels. However, pre-treatment of raloxifene showed maximum tumour reduction as compared to cisplatin and raloxifene treated groups. The present study demonstrates that raloxifene potentiates anti-tumour activity of cisplatin with simultaneous reduction in its nephrotoxicity, and this effect is attributed to its direct anti-inflammatory activity.

  8. Anti-tumour efficacy on glioma models of PHA-848125, a multi-kinase inhibitor able to cross the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Albanese, C; Alzani, R; Amboldi, N; Degrassi, A; Festuccia, C; Fiorentini, F; Gravina, Gl; Mercurio, C; Pastori, W; Brasca, Mg; Pesenti, E; Galvani, A; Ciomei, M

    2013-05-01

    Malignant gliomas, the most common primary brain tumours, are highly invasive and neurologically destructive neoplasms with a very bad prognosis due to the difficulty in removing the mass completely by surgery and the limited activity of current therapeutic agents. PHA-848125 is a multi-kinase inhibitor with broad anti-tumour activity in pre-clinical studies and good tolerability in phase 1 studies, which could affect two main pathways involved in glioma pathogenesis, the G1-S phase progression control pathway through the inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases and the signalling pathways mediated by tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors, such as tropomyosin receptors. For this reason, we tested PHA-848125 in glioma models. PHA-848125 was tested on a panel of glioma cell lines in vitro to evaluate inhibition of proliferation and mechanism of action. In vivo efficacy was evaluated on two glioma models both as single agent and in combination with standard therapy. When tested on a subset of representative glioma cell lines, PHA-848125 blocked cell proliferation, DNA synthesis and inhibited both cell cycle and signal transduction markers. Relevantly, PHA-848125 was also able to induce cell death through autophagy in all cell lines. Good anti-tumour efficacy was observed by oral route in different glioma models both with s.c. and intracranial implantation. Indeed, we demonstrate that the drug is able to cross the blood-brain barrier. Moreover, the combination of PHA-848125 with temozolomide resulted in a synergistic effect, and a clear therapeutic gain was also observed with a triple treatment adding PHA-848125 to radiotherapy and temozolomide. All the pre-clinical data obtained so far suggest that PHA-848125 may become a useful agent in chemotherapy regimens for glioma patients and support its evaluation in phase 2 trials for this indication. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Toxicity Profiles In Vivo in Mice and Antitumour Activity in Tumour-Bearing Mice of Di- and Triorganotin Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Willem, R.; Dalil, H.; de Vos, D.; Kuiper, C. M.; Peters, G. J.

    1998-01-01

    The in vivo toxicity profiles in mice and the antitumour activity in tumour bearing mice were screened for four di-n-butyltin and five triorganotin carboxylates, di-n-butyltin diterebate (5), bis(phenylacetate) (6), bis(deoxycholate) (7), bis(lithocholate) (8), tri-n-butyltin terebate (9), cinnamate (10), and triphenyltin terebate (11). At their maximum tolerated dosis (MTD), no antitumour effect (T/C ~1) was observed for the compounds 5, 7, 9, 10 and 11. The compounds 6 (T/C = 0.51) and 8 (T/C = 0.42) showed clear antitumour activity after single dose administration and might therefore be of interest for further antitumour activity studies. PMID:18475827

  10. Antitumoural activity of a cytotoxic peptide of Lactobacillus casei peptidoglycan and its interaction with mitochondrial-bound hexokinase

    PubMed Central

    Fichera, Giuseppe A.; Milone, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported the cytotoxic activity against various tumour cells of the peptidoglycan of Lactobacillus casei. To isolate the most active components, we performed column-chromatography separation of the peptidoglycan complex and tested the related fractions for their cytotoxic activity. The most active fractions were then lyophilized and the residue was analysed by gas chromatography for its amino acid content and composition. On the basis of the known chemical formula of the basic peptidic component of the peptidoglycan complex of L. casei, a peptide was then synthesized [Europ. (CH-DE-FR-GB) Patent number 1217005; IT number 01320177] and its cytotoxicity was tested against tumoural and normal cells. The synthetic peptide was found to impair the entire metabolism of cultured tumour cells and to restore the apoptotic process. By contrast, normal cells appeared to be stimulated rather than inhibited by the peptide, whereas primary mouse embryo fibroblasts behaved similarly to tumour cells. On the basis of these results, L. casei peptidoglycan fragments and their constituent basic peptide might be applicable as potent antitumour agents. PMID:27101258

  11. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... are even stronger. Bacteria and Viruses Questions about Antibiotic Resistance Bacteria and Viruses Bacteria and viruses are the two ... even help us to digest food. But other bacteria cause bad diseases like TB and lyme disease. Questions about Antibiotic Resistance Does this affect me? If you have a ...

  12. Antibiotic Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... very important to know that antibiotics cannot kill virus germs but can kill bacteria germs. Viral infections should not be treated with antibiotics. Some examples of viral illnesses include: • Common cold—stuffy nose, sore throat, sneezing, cough, headache • Influenza ( ...

  13. Isolation, Characterization and Antitumour Propirties of the 1,2-Popylenediaminetetraacetate trans-Diaqua-Copper (II)

    PubMed Central

    Kamah, S.; Vilaplana, R.; Moreno, J.; Akdi, K.; García-Herdugo, G.

    2000-01-01

    A trans-diaquacomplex formed by copper(II) sulphate and the sequestering polyamminopolycarboxylic ligand 1,2-propylenediaminetetraacetic acid (PDTA) has been isolated and characterized by chemical analysis, titrimetry, FT-IR and electronic spectroscopy, Potentiometric and electronic measurements identified the ligand as tetradentate, two nitrogen and two oxygen atoms being bonded to the Cu(II) in planar positions. This octahedral monomeric soluble compound, is an unusual example of a copper (II) substance showing significant in vitro antitumour activity against the human ovarian tumour cells TG (ID50 = 2.29 μM at 48 h) and important in vivo antitumour activity against solid Sarcoma 180 with complete regression of the tumour at a dose of 12.5 mg/Kg body weight. PMID:18475948

  14. Purification and antitumour activity of a lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus natto TK-1.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiao-Hong; Liao, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Chun-Ling; Cai, Ping; Yang, Wen-Yan; Lu, Mei-Fang; Huang, Guo-Wei

    2009-02-01

    An antitumour lipopeptide biosurfactant purified from Bacillus natto TK-1 was able to inhibit the proliferation of MCF-7 human breast-cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase release showed no significant difference between MCF-7 cells treated with lipopeptide and untreated controls. The antitumour activity of the lipopeptide in MCF-7 cells was associated with cell apoptosis determined by typical morphological changes and sub-G(1) peak in cell growth-phase distribution. The cell cycle was arrested at G(2)/M phase. In addition, the caspase activity assay revealed that lipopeptide-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells was associated with caspase 3.

  15. Isolation, Characterization and Antitumour Propirties of the 1,2-Popylenediaminetetraacetate trans-Diaqua-Copper (II).

    PubMed

    Kamah, S; Vilaplana, R; Moreno, J; Akdi, K; García-Herdugo, G; González-Vílchez, F

    2000-01-01

    A trans-diaquacomplex formed by copper(II) sulphate and the sequestering polyamminopolycarboxylic ligand 1,2-propylenediaminetetraacetic acid (PDTA) has been isolated and characterized by chemical analysis, titrimetry, FT-IR and electronic spectroscopy, Potentiometric and electronic measurements identified the ligand as tetradentate, two nitrogen and two oxygen atoms being bonded to the Cu(II) in planar positions. This octahedral monomeric soluble compound, is an unusual example of a copper (II) substance showing significant in vitro antitumour activity against the human ovarian tumour cells TG (ID(50) = 2.29 muM at 48 h) and important in vivo antitumour activity against solid Sarcoma 180 with complete regression of the tumour at a dose of 12.5 mg/Kg body weight.

  16. Enhanced immunogenicity of multivalent MUC1 glycopeptide antitumour vaccines based on hyperbranched polymers.

    PubMed

    Glaffig, M; Palitzsch, B; Stergiou, N; Schüll, C; Strassburger, D; Schmitt, E; Frey, H; Kunz, H

    2015-10-28

    Enhancing the immunogenicity of an antitumour vaccine still poses a major challenge. It depends upon the selected antigen and the mode of its presentation. We here describe a fully synthetic antitumour vaccine, which addresses both aspects. For the antigen, a tumour-associated MUC1 glycopeptide as B-cell epitope was synthesised and linked to the immunostimulating T-cell epitope P2 derived from tetanus toxoid. The MUC1-P2 conjugate is presented multivalently on a hyperbranched polyglycerol to the immune system. In comparison to a related vaccine of lower multivalency, this vaccine exposing more antigen structures on the hyperbranched polymer induced significantly stronger immune responses in mice and elicited IgG antibodies of distinctly higher affinity to epithelial tumour cells.

  17. Quinolone resistance genes (qnrA and qnrS) in bacteriophage particles from wastewater samples and the effect of inducing agents on packaged antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Colomer-Lluch, Marta; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2014-05-01

    This study quantifies quinolone antibiotic resistance genes (qnrA and qnrS) in DNA of phage particles isolated from faecally polluted waters and evaluates the influence of phage inducers on the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in packaged DNA. qnrA and qnrS were quantified by qPCR in DNA of phage particles isolated from 18 raw urban wastewater samples, 18 river samples and 28 archived samples of animal wastewater. The bacterial fraction of the samples was treated with mitomycin C, ciprofloxacin, EDTA or sodium citrate under different conditions, and the number of resistance genes in DNA of phage particles was compared with the non-induced samples. qnrA was more prevalent than qnrS, with 100% of positive samples in urban wastewater and river and 71.4% of positive samples in animal wastewater. Densities of qnrA ranged from 2.3 × 10(2) gene copies (GC)/mL in urban wastewater to 7.4 × 10(1) GC/mL in animal wastewater. qnrS was detected in 38.9% of urban wastewater samples, in 22.2% of river samples and only in one animal wastewater sample (3.6%). Despite the lower prevalence, qnrS densities reached values of 10(3) GC/mL. Both qnr genes and other resistance genes assayed (blaTEM and blaCTX-M) showed a significant increase in DNA of phage particles when treated with EDTA or sodium citrate, while mitomycin C and ciprofloxacin showed no effect under the different conditions assayed. This study confirms the contribution of phages to the mobilization of resistance genes and the role of the environment and certain inducers in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes by means of phages.

  18. Enhanced anti-tumour effects of Vinca alkaloids given separately from cytostatic therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, H; Pannert, L; Pfeiffer, S; Wachter, F; Amtmann, E; Jeremias, I

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose In polychemotherapy protocols, that is for treatment of neuroblastoma and Ewing sarcoma, Vinca alkaloids and cell cycle-arresting drugs are usually administered on the same day. Here we studied whether this combination enables the optimal antitumour effects of Vinca alkaloids to be manifested. Experimental Approach Vinca alkaloids were tested in a preclinical mouse model in vivo and in vitro in combination with cell cycle-arresting drugs. Signalling pathways were characterized using RNA interference. Key Results In vitro, knockdown of cyclins significantly inhibited vincristine-induced cell death indicating, in accordance with previous findings, Vinca alkaloids require active cell cycling and M-phase transition for induction of cell death. In contrast, anthracyclines, irradiation and dexamethasone arrested the cell cycle and acted like cytostatic drugs. The combination of Vinca alkaloids with cytostatic therapeutics resulted in diminished cell death in 31 of 36 (86%) tumour cell lines. In a preclinical tumour model, anthracyclines significantly inhibited the antitumour effect of Vinca alkaloids in vivo. Antitumour effects of Vinca alkaloids in the presence of cytostatic drugs were restored by caffeine, which maintained active cell cycling, or by knockdown of p53, which prevented drug-induced cell cycle arrest. Therapeutically most important, optimal antitumour effects were obtained in vivo upon separating the application of Vinca alkaloids from cytostatic therapeutics. Conclusion and Implications Clinical trials are required to prove whether Vinca alkaloids act more efficiently in cancer patients if they are applied uncoupled from cytostatic therapies. On a conceptual level, our data suggest the implementation of polychemotherapy protocols based on molecular mechanisms of drug–drug interactions. Linked Article This article is commented on by Solary, pp 1555–1557 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph

  19. Synthesis, Structure and Antitumour Properties of a New 1,2-Propylenediaminetetraacetate-Ruthenium(III) Compound.

    PubMed

    Vilaplana, R; Romero, M A; Quirós, M; Salas, J M; González-Vílchez, F

    1995-01-01

    A novel complex formed by ruthenium (III) and the sequestering ligand 1,2-propylenediaminetetraacetic acid (PDTA) has been synthetized and characterized. The structure of the monomeric compound, studied by X-ray diffraction , shows an almost symmetric octahedral geometry around the metal ion, with two chlorine atoms in a cis conformation. The antitumour activity against a variety of murine and human cancers is reported.

  20. Synthesis, Structure and Antitumour Properties of a New 1,2-Propylenediaminetetraacetate-Ruthenium(III) Compound

    PubMed Central

    Vilaplana, R.; Romero, M. A.; Quirós, M.; Salas, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    A novel complex formed by ruthenium (III) and the sequestering ligand 1,2-propylenediaminetetraacetic acid (PDTA) has been synthetized and characterized. The structure of the monomeric compound, studied by X-ray diffraction , shows an almost symmetric octahedral geometry around the metal ion, with two chlorine atoms in a cis conformation. The antitumour activity against a variety of murine and human cancers is reported. PMID:18472768

  1. In vitro antitumour and antibacterial studies of some Pt(IV) dithiocarbamate complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manav, N.; Mishra, A. K.; Kaushik, N. K.

    2006-09-01

    A few Pt(IV) complexes of the type [Pt(L) 2Cl 2] [where L = morpholine dithiocarbamate (L 1), aniline dithiocarbamate (L 2), N-(methyl, cyclohexyl) dithiocarbamate (L 3) and N-(ethyl, cyclohexyl) dithiocarbamate (L 4)] were synthesized. The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, IR, electronic, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic studies. The ligands found to act in monobasic bidentate fashion. Cyclicvoltammetric studies, antibacterial and in vitro antitumour studies were also carried out.

  2. Which alkylglycerols from shark liver oil have anti-tumour activities?

    PubMed

    Deniau, Anne-Laure; Mosset, Paul; Le Bot, Damien; Legrand, Alain B

    2011-01-01

    Alkylglycerols (alkyl-Gro) are ether lipids abundant in shark liver oil (SLO), and oral SLO or alkyl-Gro mix from this source have several in vivo biological activities including stimulation of haematopoiesis an immunological defences, or anti-tumour and anti-metastasis activities in vivo. Composition of natural alkyl-Gro mix contains several alkyl-Gro varying by chain length and unsaturation, and individual anti-tumour activity of each molecule present in natural mix remained unknown. We synthesized six prominent constituents of natural alkyl-Gro mix, namely 12:0, 14:0 16:0, 18:0, 16:1 n-7, and 18:1 n-9 alkyl-Gro. Using an in vivo model of grafted tumour in mice (3LL cells), we studied and compared the oral anti-tumour and anti-metastasis activities of each of these 6 alkyl-Gro. 16:1 and 18:1 alkyl-Gro showed strong activity in reducing lung metastasis number, while saturated alkyl-Gro had weaker (16:0) or no (12:0, 14:0, 18:0) effect. Spleen weights at day 20 after graft were also measured and showed tremendous variations depending on the treatment. Tumour graft resulted in a raise in spleen weight in control group, this raise was nearly abolished in 16:1 and 18:1 alkyl-Gro-treated mice, and was reduced in 14:0 and 16:0 alkyl-Gro-treated mice. Conversely, 18:0 alkyl-Gro-treated mice showed spleen weigh raise as compared with untreated grafted mice. These new data demonstrate a prominent role of unsaturation in the anti-tumour activities of alkyl-Gro.

  3. Reviving old antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Theuretzbacher, Ursula; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Cantón, Rafael; Giske, Christian G; Mouton, Johan W; Nation, Roger L; Paul, Mical; Turnidge, John D; Kahlmeter, Gunnar

    2015-08-01

    In the face of increasing antimicrobial resistance and the paucity of new antimicrobial agents it has become clear that new antimicrobial strategies are urgently needed. One of these is to revisit old antibiotics to ensure that they are used correctly and to their full potential, as well as to determine whether one or several of them can help alleviate the pressure on more recent agents. Strategies are urgently needed to 're-develop' these drugs using modern standards, integrating new knowledge into regulatory frameworks and communicating the knowledge from the research bench to the bedside. Without a systematic approach to re-developing these old drugs and rigorously testing them according to today's standards, there is a significant risk of doing harm to patients and further increasing multidrug resistance. This paper describes factors to be considered and outlines steps and actions needed to re-develop old antibiotics so that they can be used effectively for the treatment of infections.

  4. Nanoemulsion formulation of fisetin improves bioavailability and antitumour activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ragelle, Héloïse; Crauste-Manciet, Sylvie; Seguin, Johanne; Brossard, Denis; Scherman, Daniel; Arnaud, Philippe; Chabot, Guy G

    2012-05-10

    The natural flavonoid fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone) has shown antitumour activity but its administration is complicated by its low water solubility. Our aim was to incorporate fisetin into a nanoemulsion to improve its pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficacy. Solubility and emulsification tests allowed to develop an optimal nanoemulsion composed of Miglyol 812N/Labrasol/Tween 80/Lipoid E80/water (10%/10%/2.5%/1.2%/76.3%). The nanoemulsion had an oil droplet diameter of 153 ± 2 nm, a negative zeta potential (-28.4 ± 0.6 mV) and a polydispersity index of 0.129. The nanoemulsion was stable at 4 °C for 30 days, but phase separation occurred at 20 °C. Pharmacokinetic studies in mice revealed that the fisetin nanoemulsion injected intravenously (13 mg/kg) showed no significant difference in systemic exposure compared to free fisetin. However, when the fisetin nanoemulsion was administered intraperitoneally, a 24-fold increase in fisetin relative bioavailability was noted, compared to free fisetin. Additionally, the antitumour activity of the fisetin nanoemulsion in Lewis lung carcinoma bearing mice occurred at lower doses (36.6 mg/kg) compared to free fisetin (223 mg/kg). In conclusion, we have developed a stable nanoemulsion of fisetin and have shown that it could improve its relative bioavailability and antitumour activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Systemic interleukin 12 displays anti-tumour activity in the mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Kishima, H.; Shimizu, K.; Miyao, Y.; Mabuchi, E.; Tamura, K.; Tamura, M.; Sasaki, M.; Hakakawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    In various systemic cancers, interleukin 12 (IL-12) induces anti-tumour immunity mediated by T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. To determine whether IL-12 has anti-tumour activity against malignant gliomas in the central nervous system (CNS), which is considered to be an immunologically privileged site, we treated mice with meningeal gliomatosis by intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intrathecal (i.t.) administration of recombinant murine IL-12. Although untreated mice revealed symptoms, such as body weight loss or paraplegia as a result of the meningeal gliomatosis within 8 days after tumour inoculation, 80% of the mice treated with IL-12 at 0.5 microg i.p. were cured. Many lymphocytes, mostly CD4+ and CD8+ cells, infiltrated to the tumours of IL-12-treated mice. The numbers of these cells increased in the cervical lymph nodes, into which the cerebrospinal fluid drains, and there they secreted a considerable amount of interferon-gamma. Mice cured by IL-12 rejected subcutaneous or i.t. rechallenge with their original glioma cells, but the same mice were not able to reject other syngeneic tumour cells. These results indicate that the immune system recognizes malignant glioma cells in the subarachnoid space of the CNS and that systemic IL-12 may produce effective anti-tumour activity and long-lasting tumour-specific immunity. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:9716025

  6. Potentiating the antitumour response of CD8+ T cells by modulating cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Bai, Yibing; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Shuokai; Zheng, Xiaojun; Meng, Xiangbo; Li, Lunyi; Wang, Jing; Xu, Chenguang; Yan, Chengsong; Wang, Lijuan; Chang, Catharine C. Y.; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Zhang, Ti; Zhou, Penghui; Song, Bao-Liang; Liu, Wanli; Sun, Shao-cong; Liu, Xiaolong; Li, Bo-liang; Xu, Chenqi

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ T cells have a central role in antitumour immunity, but their activity is suppressed in the tumour microenvironment1–4. Reactivating the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells is of great clinical interest in cancer immunotherapy. Here we report a new mechanism by which the antitumour response of mouse CD8+ T cells can be potentiated by modulating cholesterol metabolism. Inhibiting cholesterol esterification in T cells by genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of ACAT1, a key cholesterol esterification enzyme5, led to potentiated effector function and enhanced proliferation of CD8+ but not CD4+ T cells. This is due to the increase in the plasma membrane cholesterol level of CD8+ T cells, which causes enhanced T-cell receptor clustering and signalling as well as more efficient formation of the immunological synapse. ACAT1-deficient CD8+ T cells were better than wild-type CD8+ T cells at controlling melanoma growth and metastasis in mice. We used the ACAT inhibitor avasimibe, which was previously tested in clinical trials for treating atherosclerosis and showed a good human safety profile6,7, to treat melanoma in mice and observed a good antitumour effect. A combined therapy of avasimibe plus an anti-PD-1 antibody showed better efficacy than monotherapies in controlling tumour progression. ACAT1, an established target for atherosclerosis, is therefore also a potential target for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26982734

  7. Impact of feed supplementation with antimicrobial agents on growth performance of broiler chickens, Clostridium perfringens and enterococcus counts, and antibiotic resistance phenotypes and distribution of antimicrobial resistance determinants in Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Diarra, Moussa S; Silversides, Fred G; Diarrassouba, Fatoumata; Pritchard, Jane; Masson, Luke; Brousseau, Roland; Bonnet, Claudie; Delaquis, Pascal; Bach, Susan; Skura, Brent J; Topp, Edward

    2007-10-01

    The effects of feed supplementation with the approved antimicrobial agents bambermycin, penicillin, salinomycin, and bacitracin or a combination of salinomycin plus bacitracin were evaluated for the incidence and distribution of antibiotic resistance in 197 commensal Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chickens over 35 days. All isolates showed some degree of multiple antibiotic resistance. Resistance to tetracycline (68.5%), amoxicillin (61.4%), ceftiofur (51.3%), spectinomycin (47.2%), and sulfonamides (42%) was most frequent. The levels of resistance to streptomycin, chloramphenicol, and gentamicin were 33.5, 35.5, and 25.3%, respectively. The overall resistance levels decreased from day 7 to day 35 (P < 0.001). Comparing treatments, the levels of resistance to ceftiofur, spectinomycin, and gentamicin (except for resistance to bacitracin treatment) were significantly higher in isolates from chickens receiving feed supplemented with salinomycin than from the other feeds (P < 0.001). Using a DNA microarray analysis capable of detecting commonly found antimicrobial resistance genes, we characterized 104 tetracycline-resistant E. coli isolates from 7- to 28-day-old chickens fed different growth promoters. Results showed a decrease in the incidence of isolates harboring tet(B), bla(TEM), sulI, and aadA and class 1 integron from days 7 to 35 (P < 0.01). Of the 84 tetracycline-ceftiofur-resistant E. coli isolates, 76 (90.5%) were positive for bla(CMY-2). The proportions of isolates positive for sulI, aadA, and integron class 1 were significantly higher in salinomycin-treated chickens than in the control or other treatment groups (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that multiantibiotic-resistant E. coli isolates can be found in broiler chickens regardless of the antimicrobial growth promoters used. However, the phenotype and the distribution of resistance determinants in E. coli can be modulated by feed supplementation with some of the antimicrobial agents used in

  8. Development of a web application for recording bacterial etiologic agents and their antimicrobial susceptibility to improve the treatment of urinary tract infections and monitor resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Palomo, Francisco; Sorlózano-Puerto, Antonio; Miranda-Casas, Consuelo; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José María; Navarro-Marí, José María; Gutiérrez-Fernández, José

    2016-04-01

    We describe the development of a web platform that provides an updated record of the etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of the different microorganisms responsible for urinary tract infections. The MicrobDinamyc system (Francisco Soria Melguizo, SA, Madrid, Spain) is employed for the management of information derived from the urine culture results. The web application database automatically gathers the results of urine cultures conducted in the laboratory. Results. The user can consult the distribution of bacterial etiologies and antimicrobial susceptibilities in the different clinical settings during a specific time window. Using susceptibility data obtained in previous studies and stored on the web platform, it is possible to deduce the clinical activity of a given antibiotic in a specific setting.

  9. Antibiotics that target protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Lisa S; Xie, Yun; Tor, Yitzhak

    2011-01-01

    The key role of the bacterial ribosome makes it an important target for antibacterial agents. Indeed, a large number of clinically useful antibiotics target this complex translational ribonucleoprotein machinery. The majority of these compounds, mostly of natural origin, bind to one of the three key ribosomal sites: the decoding (or A-site) on the 30S, the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) on the 50S, and the peptide exit tunnel on the 50S. Antibiotics that bind the A-site, such as the aminoglycosides, interfere with codon recognition and translocation. Peptide bond formation is inhibited when small molecules like oxazolidinones bind at the PTC. Finally, macrolides tend to block the growth of the amino acid chain at the peptide exit tunnel. In this article, the major classes of antibiotics that target the bacterial ribosome are discussed and classified according to their respective target. Notably, most antibiotics solely interact with the RNA components of the bacterial ribosome. The surge seen in the appearance of resistant bacteria has not been met by a parallel development of effective and broad-spectrum new antibiotics, as evident by the introduction of only two novel classes of antibiotics, the oxazolidinones and lipopeptides, in the past decades. Nevertheless, this significant health threat has revitalized the search for new antibacterial agents and novel targets. High resolution structural data of many ribosome-bound antibiotics provide unprecedented insight into their molecular contacts and mode of action and inspire the design and synthesis of new candidate drugs that target this fascinating molecular machine.

  10. Antibiotic control in a municipal hospital.

    PubMed

    Recco, R A; Gladstone, J L; Friedman, S A; Gerken, E H

    1979-05-25

    The choice of an antibiotic for a patient is often a difficult decision. The clinician must contend with a bewildering variety of bacteria and use a number of expensive and toxic antimicrobial agents judiciously. To deal with the problems of excessive and inappropriate use, the medical staff of Coney Island Hospital established compulsory, prospective antibiotic control. Two years after initiation of this program, we analyzed changes in sensitivity patterns of hospital flora, physicians' prescribing habits and antibiotic use. A trend toward increasing resistance on the part of some Gram-negative isolates to certain beta-lactam antibiotics was noted. Antibiotic costs decreased an average of 38%, while prescribing skills improved.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition: a review of anti-tumour activity.

    PubMed

    Brown, P D; Giavazzi, R

    1995-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are a homologous family of proteolytic enzymes. Collectively, these proteinases are capable of degrading all components of the extracellular matrix, including proteolytically resistant fibrillar collagens. Extracellular matrices constitute the principal barrier to tumour growth and spread, and there is now experimental evidence that malignant tumours utilise matrix metalloproteinases to overcome this barrier. Inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases may therefore be of therapeutic value in the treatment of metastatic disease. This review describes the activity of matrix metalloproteinases inhibitors (MMPIs), in experimental tumour models and in phase I/II clinical studies. Studies with MMPIs in vitro have shown that these agents are not cytotoxic but can inhibit the degradation of extracellular matrix by tumour cells. In experimental tumour models in vivo, MMPI treatment caused inhibition of tumour growth and metastatic spread in both rodent syngeneic and human xenograft models. MMPIs have also been shown to inhibit angiogenesis, a process essential for the rapid growth of most malignancies. MMPI therapy has the potential to arrest tumour growth and spread. As a non-cytotoxic 'tumourostatic' approach it may offer an ideal complement to surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the successful long-term treatment of metastatic disease.

  12. Bacterial agents and antibiotic resistance profiles of infections from different sites that occurred among patients at Debre Markos Referral Hospital, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mulu, Wondemagegn; Abera, Bayeh; Yimer, Mulat; Hailu, Tadesse; Ayele, Haimanot; Abate, Dereje

    2017-07-06

    In developing countries like Ethiopia, infections with antibiotic resistant bacteria become a real threat. Hence, monitoring of local level antimicrobial resistance profile is indispensable to contain the spread of drug resistant bacteria and intervene poor awareness on antimicrobial resistance. Therefore, this study aimed at determining bacterial and antibiotic resistance profiles of infections from different sites that occurred among patients. Retrospective data recorded were analyzed on culture and drug susceptibility test results at Debre Markos Referral Hospital which were performed from 2011 to 2014. Drug susceptibility tests were performed using disk-diffusion technique. Chi square test was computed to compare the proportion of bacterial isolates with patients' age and sex. Out of 575 clinical samples processed, 280 (48.7%) were culture positive for aerobic bacteria pathogens. Wound 238 (41.4%) and urine 108 (18.8%) were the most frequent samples processed. Overall, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was the predominant isolate 100 (31.5%) followed by Escherichia coli (E. coli) 39 (13.8%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) 30 (10.3%) and Salmonella spp. 25 (8.9%). P. aeruginosa was the most frequent isolate followed by S. aureus from ear infection. E. coli was the leading isolate followed by Klebsiella spp. from urinary tract infection. Salmonella and Shigella spp. were the most frequent isolates in stool in children below 5 years of age. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (N. gonorrhoeae) 16 (76.2%) was the most common isolate from urethral discharge. The overall multidrug-resistant Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria isolates were 113 (84.6%) and 96 (72.2%), respectively. Gram positive bacteria revealed resistance to cotrimoxazole (80%), gentamicin (83.1%), amoxicillin (85.1%), ampicillin (85.8%), penicillin (89.7%), clindamycin (93.2%) and erythromycin (90.9%). Gram negative bacteria showed resistance to cotrimoxazole (53.1%), amoxicillin (58.8%), ampicillin

  13. Enhanced anti-tumour immunity requires the interplay between resident and circulating memory CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Enamorado, Michel; Iborra, Salvador; Priego, Elena; Cueto, Francisco J.; Quintana, Juan A.; Martínez-Cano, Sarai; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; Esteban, Mariano; Melero, Ignacio; Hidalgo, Andrés; Sancho, David

    2017-01-01

    The goal of successful anti-tumoural immunity is the development of long-term protective immunity to prevent relapse. Infiltration of tumours with CD8+ T cells with a resident memory (Trm) phenotype correlates with improved survival. However, the interplay of circulating CD8+ T cells and Trm cells remains poorly explored in tumour immunity. Using different vaccination strategies that fine-tune the generation of Trm cells or circulating memory T cells, here we show that, while both subsets are sufficient for anti-tumour immunity, the presence of Trm cells improves anti-tumour efficacy. Transferred central memory T cells (Tcm) generate Trm cells following viral infection or tumour challenge. Anti-PD-1 treatment promotes infiltration of transferred Tcm cells within tumours, improving anti-tumour immunity. Moreover, Batf3-dependent dendritic cells are essential for reactivation of circulating memory anti-tumour response. Our findings show the plasticity, collaboration and requirements for reactivation of memory CD8+ T cells subsets needed for optimal tumour vaccination and immunotherapy. PMID:28714465

  14. Fractionated Radiotherapy with 3 x 8 Gy Induces Systemic Anti-Tumour Responses and Abscopal Tumour Inhibition without Modulating the Humoral Anti-Tumour Response

    PubMed Central

    Habets, Thomas H. P. M.; Oth, Tammy; Houben, Ans W.; Huijskens, Mirelle J. A. J.; Senden-Gijsbers, Birgit L. M. G.; Schnijderberg, Melanie C. A.; Brans, Boudewijn; Dubois, Ludwig J.; Lambin, Philippe; De Saint-Hubert, Marijke; Germeraad, Wilfred T. V.; Tilanus, Marcel G. J.; Mottaghy, Felix M.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that fractionated radiotherapy (RT) can result in distant non-irradiated (abscopal) tumour regression. Although preclinical studies indicate the importance of T cells in this infrequent phenomenon, these studies do not preclude that other immune mechanisms exhibit an addition role in the abscopal effect. We therefore addressed the question whether in addition to T cell mediated responses also humoral anti-tumour responses are modulated after fractionated RT and whether systemic dendritic cell (DC) stimulation can enhance tumour-specific antibody production. We selected the 67NR mammary carcinoma model since this tumour showed spontaneous antibody production in all tumour-bearing mice. Fractionated RT to the primary tumour was associated with a survival benefit and a delayed growth of a non-irradiated (contralateral) secondary tumour. Notably, fractionated RT did not affect anti-tumour antibody titers and the composition of the immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes. Likewise, we demonstrated that treatment of tumour-bearing Balb/C mice with DC stimulating growth factor Flt3-L did neither modulate the magnitude nor the composition of the humoral immune response. Finally, we evaluated the immune infiltrate and Ig isotype content of the tumour tissue using flow cytometry and found no differences between treatment groups that were indicative for local antibody production. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the 67NR mammary carcinoma in Balb/C mice is associated with a pre-existing antibody response. And, we show that in tumour-bearing Balb/C mice with abscopal tumour regression such pre-existing antibody responses are not altered upon fractionated RT and/or DC stimulation with Flt3-L. Our research indicates that evaluating the humoral immune response in the setting of abscopal tumour regression is not invariably associated with therapeutic effects. PMID:27427766

  15. Improved antiangiogenic and antitumour activity of the combination of the natural flavonoid fisetin and cyclophosphamide in Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    Touil, Yasmine S.; Seguin, Johanne; Scherman, Daniel; Chabot, Guy G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The natural flavonoid fisetin was recently identified as a lead compound that stabilizes endothelial cell microtubules. In this study we investigated the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties of fisetin in vitro and in vivo. Methods Fisetin cytotoxicity was evaluated using Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LLC), endothelial cells and NIH 3T3 cells. Endothelial cell (EC) migration and capillary-like structure formation were evaluated using EAhy 926 cells. In vivo tumour growth inhibition studies were performed using LLC bearing mice treated with fisetin and/or cyclophosphamide (CPA). Results The fisetin IC50 was 59 μM for LLC and 77 μM for EC cells, compared to 210 μM for normal NIH 3T3 cells (24 h). Fisetin inhibited EC migration and capillary-like structure formation at non-cytotoxic concentrations (22–44 μM). In mice, fisetin inhibited angiogenesis assessed using the Matrigel plug assay. In LLC bearing mice, fisetin produced a 67% tumour growth inhibition (223 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), similar to the 66% produced by low dose CPA (30 mg/kg, subcutaneous). When fisetin and CPA were combined, however, a marked improvement in antitumour activity was observed (92% tumour growth inhibition), with low systemic toxicity. Tumour histology showed decreased microvessel density with either fisetin or CPA alone, and a dramatic decrease after the fisetin/CPA combination. Conclusions We have shown that fisetin not only displays in vitro and in vivo antiangiogenic properties, but that it can also markedly improve the in vivo antitumour effect of CPA. We propose that this drug combination associating a non-toxic dietary flavonoid with a cytotoxic agent could advantageously be used in the treatment of solid tumours. PMID:21069336

  16. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological characterisation of the antitumour properties of pyrido[1',2':1,2]imidazo[4,5-h]quinazoline.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Marianne; Blache, Yves; Bailly, Christian; Poujol, Sylvain; Chapat, Jean-Pierre; Pinguet, Frédéric

    2002-01-01

    The anti-tumour activity of pyrido[1',2':1,2]imidazo[4,5-h]quinazoline (PIQ) was investigated in vitro and in vivo with a human tumour model. In vitro PIQ cytotoxicity was evaluated on two different human parental-sensitive cancer cell lines (HL60S and A2780S) and their multidrug-resistant variant sublines (HL60R and A2780R). Proliferation was assessed using the MTT assay and PIQ showed activity, particularly with resistant cell lines. Drug activity was not affected by MDR resistance. After LD50 determination using Swiss mice, in vivo activity with A2780 ovarian carcinoma was carried out using xenografted Swiss nude mice. We performed either a weekly intra-peritoneal injection of 64 mg.kg-1 PIQ or an intra-venous injection of 10 mg.kg-1 PIQ during 2 months. After 60 days of treatment, no toxicologically meaningful differences were observed in macroscopic and microscopic parameters compared to controls. Both regimens demonstrated efficacy against xenografted tumours. However, the decrease in tumoural volume of the xenografted mice was significant only in the PIC i.v. injection group. Pharmacokinetics and the accumulation of PIQ in normal and tumour tissues were also assessed using a chromatographic method. The lack of activity using the i.p. route was explained by the four-fold reduction of its AUC in comparison to the i.v. route. After an i.v. injection, the highest concentrations of PIQ were accumulated in the tumour and spleen. Drug analysis has shown that PIQ intercalates into DNA. PIQ derivatives are effective new antitumour agents in cancer chemotherapy.

  17. Pneumococcal resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Klugman, K P

    1990-01-01

    The geographic distribution of pneumococci resistant to one or more of the antibiotics penicillin, erythromycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline appears to be expanding, and there exist foci of resistance to chloramphenicol and rifampin. Multiply resistant pneumococci are being encountered more commonly and are more often community acquired. Factors associated with infection caused by resistant pneumococci include young age, duration of hospitalization, infection with a pneumococcus of serogroup 6, 19, or 23 or serotype 14, and exposure to antibiotics to which the strain is resistant. At present, the most useful drugs for the management of resistant pneumococcal infections are cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, and rifampin. If the strains are susceptible, chloramphenicol may be useful as an alternative, less expensive agent. Appropriate interventions for the control of resistant pneumococcal outbreaks include investigation of the prevalence of resistant strains, isolation of patients, possible treatment of carriers, and reduction of usage of antibiotics to which the strain is resistant. The molecular mechanisms of penicillin resistance are related to the structure and function of penicillin-binding proteins, and the mechanisms of resistance to other agents involved in multiple resistance are being elucidated. Recognition is increasing of the standard screening procedure for penicillin resistance, using a 1-microgram oxacillin disk. PMID:2187594

  18. In vitro cytotoxicity and antitumour properties of Hypericum mysorense and Hypericum patulum.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, P; Vinod Kumar, S; Dhanaraj, S A; Mukherjee, P K; Suresh, B

    2003-09-01

    The methanol extracts of the aerial parts of Hypericum mysorense and Hypericum patulum were tested for in vitro cytotoxicity on HEp-2, RD and Vero cell lines and antitumour activity using DLA and HEp-2 cell lines. The cell viability and morphological changes were assessed. Of these extracts, Hypericum patulum (stem) extract showed strong cytotoxicity against all the cell lines used. The CTC50 of the Hypericum patulum (stem) extract was 1.71 microg/mL for HEp-2, 1.53 microg/mL for RD and 2.23 microg/mL for Vero cell lines. The Hypericum patulum (leaves) and Hypericum mysorense (aerial parts) extracts showed moderate cytotoxicity and Hypericum patulum (aerial parts) extract did not show any cytotoxicity up to 1,000 microg/mL concentration. In the clonogenic assay, no colony formation was observed at a concentration of 300 micro g/mL and above for Hypericum mysorense (aerial parts), 400 microg/mL and above for Hypericum patulum (leaves) and 500 microg/mL and above for Hypericum patulum (stem) extracts. In the short term antitumour studies using DLA cells, 50% viability was observed in the concentration range 100-200 microg/mL for Hypericum patulum (leaves and stem) and 200-400 microg/mL for Hypericum mysorense (aerial) extract. In the long term antitumour activity using the HEp-2 cell line, no colony formation was observed over a concentration of 1.6 microg/mL for the Hypericum patulum (stem) extract. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Coagulase-negative staphylococci: pathogenesis, occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes and in vitro effects of antimicrobial agents on biofilm-growing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Szczuka, Ewa; Jabłońska, Lucyna; Kaznowski, Adam

    2016-12-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are opportunistic pathogens that particularly cause infections in patients with implanted medical devices. The present research was performed to study the virulence potential of 53 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus capitis, Staphylococcus auricularis, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, Staphylococcus simulans, Staphylococcus cohnii and Staphylococcus caprae. All clinical strains were clonally unrelated. Isolates carried genes encoding resistance to β-lactam (mecA) (15 %), aminoglycoside [aac(6')/aph(2″)(11 %), aph (3')-IIIa (15 %), ant(4')-Ia (19 %)] and macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLSB) [erm(A) (4 %), erm(B) (13 %), erm(C) (41 %), msr(A) (11 %)] antibiotics. CoNS isolates (64 %) were able to form biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that these biofilms formed a three-dimensional structure composed mainly of living cells. All biofilm-positive strains carried the ica operon. In vitro studies demonstrated that a combination treatment with tigecycline and rifampicin was more effective against biofilms than one with ciprofloxacin and rifampicin. The minimum biofilm eradication concentration values were 0.062-0.5 µg ml-1 for tigecycline/rifampicin and 0.250-2 µg ml-1 for ciprofloxacin/rifampicin. All CoNS strains adhered to the human epithelial cell line HeLa, and more than half of the isolates were able to invade the HeLa cells, although most invaded relatively poorly. The virulence of CoNS is also attributed to their cytotoxic effects on HeLa cells. Incubation of HeLa cells with culture supernatant of the CoNS isolates resulted in cell death. The results indicate that the pathogenicity of S. capitis, S. auricularis, S. lugdunensis, S. cohnii and S. caprae is multi-factorial, involving the ability of these bacteria to adhere to human epithelial cells, form biofilms and invade and destroy human cells.

  20. Natural products from aquatic eukaryotic microorganisms for cancer therapy: Perspectives on anti-tumour properties of ciliate bioactive molecules.

    PubMed

    Catalani, Elisabetta; Proietti Serafini, Francesca; Zecchini, Silvia; Picchietti, Simona; Fausto, Anna Maria; Marcantoni, Enrico; Buonanno, Federico; Ortenzi, Claudio; Perrotta, Cristiana; Cervia, Davide

    2016-11-01

    Several modern drugs, including those for cancer therapy, have been isolated from natural sources, are based on natural products and its derivatives, or mime natural products. Some of them are in clinical use, others in clinical trials. The success of natural products in drug discovery is related to their biochemical characteristics and to the technologic methods used to study their feature. Natural compounds may acts as chemo-preventive agents and as factors that increase therapeutic efficacy of existing drugs, thus overcoming cancer cell drug resistance that is the main factor determining the failure in conventional chemotherapy. Water environment, because of its physical and chemical conditions, shows an extraordinary collection of natural biological substances with an extensive structural and functional diversity. The isolation of bioactive molecules has been reported from a great variety of aquatic organisms; however, the therapeutic application of molecules from eukaryotic microorganisms remains inadequately investigated and underexploited on a systematic basis. Herein we describe the biological activities in mammalian cells of selected substances isolated from ciliates, free-living protozoa common almost everywhere there is water, focusing on their anti-tumour actions and their possible therapeutic activity. In particular, we unveil the cellular and molecular machine mediating the effects of cell type-specific signalling protein pheromone Er-1 and secondary metabolites, i.e. euplotin C and climacostol, in cancer cells. To support the feasibility of climacostol-based approaches, we also present novel findings and report additional mechanisms of action using both in vitro and in vivo models of mouse melanomas, with the scope of highlighting new frontiers that can be explored also in a therapeutic perspective. The high skeletal chemical difference of ciliate compounds, their sustainability and availability, also through the use of new organic synthesis

  1. Inhibitory effects of marine-derived DNA-binding anti-tumour tetrahydroisoquinolines on the Fanconi anaemia pathway

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Sandra; Pérez, Laura; Galmarini, Carlos M; Aracil, Miguel; Tercero, Juan C; Gago, Federico; Albella, Beatriz; Bueren, Juan A

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We have previously shown that cells with a defective Fanconi anaemia (FA) pathway are hypersensitive to trabectedin, a DNA-binding anti-cancer tetrahydroisoquinoline (DBAT) whose adducts functionally mimic a DNA inter-strand cross link (ICL). Here we expand these observations to new DBATs and investigate whether our findings in primary untransformed cells can be reproduced in human cancer cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Initially, the sensitivity of transformed and untransformed cells, deficient or not in one component of the FA pathway, to mitomycin C (MMC) and three DBATs, trabectedin, Zalypsis and PM01183, was assessed. Then, the functional interaction of these drugs with the FA pathway was comparatively investigated. KEY RESULTS While untransformed FA-deficient haematopoietic cells were hypersensitive to both MMC and DBATs, the response of FA-deficient squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells to DBATs was similar to that of their respective FA-competent counterparts, even though these FA-deficient SCC cells were hypersensitive to MMC. Furthermore, while MMC always activated the FA pathway, the DBATs inhibited the FA pathway in the cancer cell lines tested and this enhanced their response to MMC. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our data show that although DBATs functionally interact with DNA as do agents that generate classical ICL, these drugs should be considered as FA pathway inhibitors rather than activators. Moreover, this effect was most significant in a variety of cancer cells. These inhibitory effects of DBATs on the FA pathway could be exploited clinically with the aim of ‘fanconizing’ cancer cells in order to make them more sensitive to other anti-tumour drugs. PMID:23937566

  2. Antitumour activity of Prosopis cineraria (L.) Druce against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Stellaa; Narayanan, N; Raj Kapoor, B

    2011-04-01

    The antitumour activity of the hydroalcoholic extract of the leaf (PCL) and stem bark (PCB) of Prosopis cineraria (L.) in Swiss albino mice was evaluated against an Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) tumour model. The activity was assessed using survival time, peritoneal cells, haematological studies, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, solid tumour mass and in vitro cytotoxicity. PCL and PCB were found to be potent and possessed significant cytotoxicity towards EAC tumour cells.

  3. Antibiotic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Mast, Yvonne; Stegmann, Evi; Ziemert, Nadine

    2016-09-01

    Due to the threat posed by the increase of highly resistant pathogenic bacteria, there is an urgent need for new antibiotics; all the more so since in the last 20 years, the approval for new antibacterial agents had decreased. The field of natural product discovery has undergone a tremendous development over the past few years. This has been the consequence of several new and revolutionizing drug discovery and development techniques, which is initiating a 'New Age of Antibiotic Discovery'. In this review, we concentrate on the most significant discovery approaches during the last and present years and comment on the challenges facing the community in the coming years. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. [Certain results of the investigations into the anti-tumour action of the magnetic field under experimental conditions].

    PubMed

    Ulashchik, V S

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the application of thr magnetic fields for the treatment of experimental tumours, such as sarcoma M-1, alveolar liver cancer PC-1, and Erlich's carcinoma. The evidence of the anti-tumour action of both strong (1200 mTI) and weak (5 to 100 mTI) magnetic fields has been obtained. The author describes the modulating effect of the magnetic fields on the anti-tumour potency of photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy. The data concerning the impact of ferromagnetic hyperthermal therapy on the tumour growth and the survival rate among the tumour-bearing animals are presented.

  5. Generic antibiotics in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Shigeru; Watanabe, Akira

    2012-08-01

    Generic drugs have been used extensively in many developed countries, although their use in Japan has been limited. Generic drugs reduce drug expenses and thereby national medical expenditure. Because generic drugs provide advantages for both public administration and consumers, it is expected that they will be more widely used in the future. However, the diffusion rate of generic drugs in Japan is quite low compared with that of other developed countries. An investigation on generic drugs conducted by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan revealed that 17.2 % of doctors and 37.2 % of patients had not used generic drugs. The major reasons for this low use rate included distrust of off-patent products and lower drug price margin compared with the brand name drug. The generic drugs available in the market include external drugs such as wet packs, antihypertensive agents, analgesics, anticancer drugs, and antibiotics. Among them, antibiotics are frequently used in cases of acute infectious diseases. When the treatment of these infections is delayed, the infection might be aggravated rapidly. The pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics (PK-PD) theory has been adopted in recent chemotherapy, and in many cases, the most appropriate dosage and administration of antibiotics are determined for individual patients considering renal function; high-dosage antibiotics are used preferably for a short duration. Therefore, a highly detailed antimicrobial agent is necessary. However, some of the generic antibiotics have less antibacterial potency or solubility than the brand name products. We showed that the potency of the generic products of vancomycin and teicoplanin is lower than that of the branded drugs by 14.6 % and 17.3 %, respectively. Furthermore, we confirmed that a generic meropenem drug for injection required about 82 s to solubilize in saline, whereas the brand product required only about 21 s. It was thought that the cause may be the difference in size of bulk

  6. Antitumour and antiangiogenic effects of Aplidin in the 5TMM syngeneic models of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Caers, J; Menu, E; De Raeve, H; Lepage, D; Van Valckenborgh, E; Van Camp, B; Alvarez, E; Vanderkerken, K

    2008-06-17

    Aplidin is an antitumour drug, currently undergoing phase II evaluation in different haematological and solid tumours. In this study, we analysed the antimyeloma effects of Aplidin in the syngeneic 5T33MM model, which is representable for the human disease. In vitro, Aplidin inhibited 5T33MMvv DNA synthesis with an IC(50) of 3.87 nM. On cell-cycle progression, the drug induced an arrest in transition from G0/G1 to S phase, while Western blot showed a decreased cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression. Furthermore, Aplidin induced apoptosis by lowering the mitochondrial membrane potential, by inducing cytochrome c release and by activating caspase-9 and caspase-3. For the in vivo experiment, 5T33MM-injected C57Bl/KaLwRij mice were intraperitoneally treated with vehicle or Aplidin (90 microg kg(-1) daily). Chronic treatment with Aplidin was well tolerated and reduced serum paraprotein concentration by 42% (P<0.001), while BM invasion with myeloma cells was decreased by 35% (P<0.001). Aplidin also reduced the myeloma-associated angiogenesis to basal values. This antiangiogenic effect was confirmed in vitro and explained by inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and vessel formation. These data indicate that Aplidin is well tolerated in vivo and its antitumour and antiangiogenic effects support the use of the drug in multiple myeloma.

  7. Cytotoxicity and antitumour activity of 5-fluorouracil-loaded polyhydroxybutyrate and cellulose acetate phthalate blend microspheres.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Kiran; Tripathi, Santosh Kumar; Kulkarni, Anandrao R; Aminabhavi, Tejraj M

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and antitumour activity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-loaded polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP) blend microspheres were investigated in chemically induced colorectal cancer in albino male Wistar rats and compared with pristine 5-FU given as a suspension. The microspheres were characterised for particle size, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro release and in vitro cytotoxicity on human HT-29 colon cancer cell line. Spherical particles with a mean size of 44 ± 11 µm were obtained that showed sustained release of 5-FU. A high concentration of 5-FU was achieved in colonic tissues and significant reduction in tumour volume and multiplicity were observed in animals treated with 5-FU-loaded microspheres. The decreased levels of plasma albumin, creatinine, leucocytopenia and thrombocytopenia were observed in animals for 5-FU microspheres compared to the standard 5-FU formulation. The results suggest the extended release of 5-FU from the PHB-CAP blend microspheres in colonic region to enhance the antitumour efficacy.

  8. Enzastaurin has anti-tumour effects in lung cancers with overexpressed JAK pathway molecules

    PubMed Central

    Shimokawa, T; Seike, M; Soeno, C; Uesaka, H; Miyanaga, A; Mizutani, H; Kitamura, K; Minegishi, Y; Noro, R; Okano, T; Yoshimura, A; Gemma, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Enzastaurin, an oral serine–threonine kinase inhibitor, was initially developed as an ATP-competitive selective inhibitor against protein kinase Cβ. However, the mechanism by which enzastaurin contributes to tumourigenesis remains unclear. Methods: We analysed the anti-tumour effects of enzastaurin in 22 lung cancer cell lines to ascertain the potential for enzastaurin-based treatment of lung cancer. To identify molecules or signalling pathways associated with this sensitivity, we conducted a gene, receptor tyrosine kinases phosphorylation and microRNA expression profiling study on the same set of cell lines. Results: We identified eight genes by pathway analysis of molecules having gene-drug sensitivity correlation, and used them to build a support vector machine algorithm model by which sensitive cell lines were distinguished from resistant cell lines. Pathway analysis revealed that the JAK/STAT signalling pathway was one of the main ones involved in sensitivity to enzastaurin. Overexpression of JAK1 was observed in the sensitive cells by western blotting. Simultaneous administration of enzastaurin and JAK inhibitor inhibited enzastaurin-induced cell growth-inhibitory effect. Furthermore, lentiviral-mediated JAK1-overexpressing cells were more sensitive to enzastaurin than control cells. Conclusion: Our results suggested that the JAK1 pathway may be used as a single predictive biomarker for enzastaurin treatment. The anti-tumour effect of enzastaurin should be evaluated in lung cancer with overexpressed JAK pathway molecules. PMID:22333600

  9. Immunomodulatory and antitumour effects of abnormal Savda Munziq on S180 tumour-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Abnormal Savda Munziq (ASMq), a traditional uyghur medicine, has shown anti-tumour properties in vitro. This study attempts to confirm these effects in vivo and measure effects on the immune system. Methods Kunming mice transplanted with Sarcoma 180 cells were treated with ASMq (2–8 g/kg/day) by intra-gastric administration compared to model and cyclophosphamide (20 mg/kg/day). After the 14th day post tumour implant, thymus, liver, spleen and tumours were removed, weighed, and processed for histopathological analysis. Blood samples were also taken for haematological and biochemical analyses including TNF-α , IL-1 β and IL-2. Splenic lymphocyte function was measured with MTT; lymphocyte subpopulations were measured by flow cytometry. Results ASMq treated animals had reduced tumour volume compared to model and increased concentrations of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-2 compared to untreated and to cyclophosphamide-treated animals. No histopathological alterations were observed. The absence of viable S180 cells and the presence of necrotic cells and granulation tissue were observed in tumour tissue of treated animals. The effect on T lymphocytes was unclear. Conclusions ASMq confirmed in vivo anti-tumour effects observed in vitro, which may be at least in part mediated by increased immune activity. PMID:22978453

  10. Class IIa HDAC inhibition reduces breast tumours and metastases through anti-tumour macrophages.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Jennifer L; Sotayo, Alaba; Ponichtera, Holly E; Castrillon, Jessica A; Pourzia, Alexandra L; Schad, Sara; Johnson, Shawn F; Carrasco, Ruben D; Lazo, Suzan; Bronson, Roderick T; Davis, Scott P; Lobera, Mercedes; Nolan, Michael A; Letai, Anthony

    2017-03-16

    Although the main focus of immuno-oncology has been manipulating the adaptive immune system, harnessing both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system might produce superior tumour reduction and elimination. Tumour-associated macrophages often have net pro-tumour effects, but their embedded location and their untapped potential provide impetus to discover strategies to turn them against tumours. Strategies that deplete (anti-CSF-1 antibodies and CSF-1R inhibition) or stimulate (agonistic anti-CD40 or inhibitory anti-CD47 antibodies) tumour-associated macrophages have had some success. We hypothesized that pharmacologic modulation of macrophage phenotype could produce an anti-tumour effect. We previously reported that a first-in-class selective class IIa histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, TMP195, influenced human monocyte responses to the colony-stimulating factors CSF-1 and CSF-2 in vitro. Here, we utilize a macrophage-dependent autochthonous mouse model of breast cancer to demonstrate that in vivo TMP195 treatment alters the tumour microenvironment and reduces tumour burden and pulmonary metastases by modulating macrophage phenotypes. TMP195 induces the recruitment and differentiation of highly phagocytic and stimulatory macrophages within tumours. Furthermore, combining TMP195 with chemotherapy regimens or T-cell checkpoint blockade in this model significantly enhances the durability of tumour reduction. These data introduce class IIa HDAC inhibition as a means to harness the anti-tumour potential of macrophages to enhance cancer therapy.

  11. Mechanism of the anti-tumour effect of glucans and fructosans: a comparison with C. parvum.

    PubMed

    Bomford, R; Moreno, C

    1977-07-01

    The anti-tumour activity induced by glucans (lentinan, yeast cell walls, pseudonigeran, dextran, DEAE-dextran and dextran sulphate) and fructosans (levan and carboxymethyl-levan) was compared with the activity of C. parvum. The following effects on tumour systems in CBA mice were assayed: (a) adjuvant activity on the immune response against tumour-specific transplantation antigens (TSTA) with a methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma; (b) cytostatic activity of peritoneal macrophages against radiation-induced leukaemia cells; and (c) inhibition of tumour nodule formation in the lungs following i.v. injection of fibrosarcoma cells. All the polysaccharides induced cytostatic macrophages, but the dextrans and levans did so only after i.p. and not i.v. injection. Only lentinan, yeast cell walls and pseudonigeran were active in the lung-nodule inhibition test; and only lentinan and dextran sulphate showed slight adjuvant activity for TSTA. It is concluded that the anti-tumour activity induced by these polysaccharides is predominantly non-specific macrophage-mediated and much weaker than that found with C. parvum.

  12. Is Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes Latency Influenced by Single Versus Multiple Agent Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Group B Streptococcus Positive Women Delivering Preterm?

    PubMed

    Smith, Anita; Allen, Victoria M; Walsh, Jennifer; Jangaard, Krista; O'Connell, Colleen M

    2015-09-01

    Objectif : Évaluer l’influence d’un schéma antibiotique sur la durée de la latence (période séparant la rupture prématurée des membranes préterme [RPMP] et l’accouchement) et la présence d’une morbidité infectieuse néonatale considérable, entre la rupture des membranes et l’accouchement à < 37 semaines d’âge gestationnel, chez des femmes ayant obtenu des résultats positifs au dépistage des streptocoques du groupe B (SGB). Méthodes : Nous avons tiré des données de la Nova Scotia Atlee Perinatal Database. Dans le cadre d’une étude populationnelle de cohorte rétrospective, nous avons inclus les grossesses compliquées par la RPMP, mais nous avons exclu les grossesses de ce groupe qui nécessitaient un accouchement immédiat. La cohorte a été catégorisée en fonction du schéma antibiotique (un seul agent vs de multiples agents) et nous avons comparé la latence et les issues néonatales indésirables en fonction du schéma antibiotique utilisé. Les caractéristiques sommaires ont été comparées au moyen d’une analyse du chi carré (signification < 0,05). Une régression logistique a été utilisée pour estimer les rapports de cotes corrigés, les intervalles de confiance à 95 % et les différences moyennes pour toutes les issues et pour tenir compte des variables parasites. Résultats : Entre 1988 et 2011, la population d’étude potentielle s’élevait à 119 158 grossesses. Au total, 3 435 accouchements ont été identifiés comme présentant une RPMP (3 %). La présence de SGB avait été déterminée par uroculture ou par mise en culture d’écouvillonnages chez 303 paires mère-enfant (9 %) de ce groupe. Les comparaisons corrigées de la latence et de la septicémie néonatale n’ont indiqué aucune différence en fonction du schéma antibiotique (P > 0,05). Conclusion : La directive de 2013 de la SOGC sur la prophylaxie anti-SGB recommande la mise en œuvre d’une antibiothérapie chez les femmes

  13. Impact of thiopurines and anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy on hospitalisation and long-term surgical outcomes in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Alexakis, Christopher; Pollok, Richard CG

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the large bowel and is associated with a significant risk of both requirement for surgery and the need for hospitalisation. Thiopurines, and more recently, anti-tumour necrosis factor (aTNF) therapy have been used successfully to induce clinical remission. However, there is less data available on whether these agents prevent long-term colectomy rates or the need for hospitalisation. The focus of this article is to review the recent and pertinent literature on the long-term impact of thiopurines and aTNF on long-term surgical and hospitalisation rates in UC. Data from population based longitudinal research indicates that thiopurine therapy probably has a protective role against colectomy, if used in appropriate patients for a sufficient duration. aTNF agents appear to have a short term protective effect against colectomy, but data is limited for longer periods. Whereas there is insufficient evidence that thiopurines affect hospitalisation, evidence favours that aTNF therapy probably reduces the risk of hospitalisation within the first year of use, but it is less clear on whether this effect continues beyond this period. More structured research needs to be conducted to answer these clinically important questions. PMID:26730281

  14. [Selection and spreading of antibiotic resistance in bacteria].

    PubMed

    Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2011-11-07

    Use of an antibiotic may not only select for resistance against the agent itself, but may at the same time co-select for resistance against other antibiotics if resistance genes are linked on e.g. a plasmid. Resistance plasmids may also carry genes mediating resistance against metals and disinfectants. Therefore, abundant use of metals, e.g. copper and zinc for growth promotion in animals used for food, may also co-select for antibiotic resistance. The same applies to disinfectants, e.g. silver and chlorhexidine. Prudent use of antibiotics and these other agents is essential to control antibiotic resistance.

  15. In-vitro and in-vivo antitumour activity of physalins B and D from Physalis angulata.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Hemerson Iury Ferreira; Veras, Maria Leopoldina; Torres, Márcia Rocha; Alves, Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes; Pessoa, Otília Deusdênia Loiola; Silveira, Edilberto Rocha; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia Veras; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico; Pessoa, Cláudia

    2006-02-01

    We have evaluated the in-vitro and in-vivo antitumour activity of physalin B and physalin D isolated from the aerial parts of Physalis angulata. In-vitro, both compounds displayed considerable cytotoxicity against several cancer cell lines, showing IC50 values in the range of 0.58 to 15.18 microg mL(-1) for physalin B, and 0.28 to 2.43 microg mL(-1) for physalin D. The antitumour activity of both compounds was confirmed in-vivo using mice bearing sarcoma 180 tumour cells. The in-vivo antitumour activity was related to the inhibition of tumour proliferation, as observed by the reduction of Ki67 staining in tumours of treated animals. Histopathological examination of the kidney and liver showed that both organs were affected by physalin treatment, but in a reversible manner. These compounds were probably responsible for the previously described antitumour activity of ethanol extracts of P. angulata, and their identification and characterization presented here could explain the ethnopharmacological use of this species in the treatment of cancer.

  16. Macrophages and Fc-receptor interactions contribute to the antitumour activities of the anti-CD40 antibody SGN-40.

    PubMed

    Oflazoglu, E; Stone, I J; Brown, L; Gordon, K A; van Rooijen, N; Jonas, M; Law, C-L; Grewal, I S; Gerber, H-P

    2009-01-13

    SGN-40 is a therapeutic antibody targeting CD40, which induces potent anti-lymphoma activities via direct apoptotic signalling cells and by cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Here we show antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) by macrophages to contribute significantly to the therapeutic activities and that the antitumour effects of SGN-40 depend on Fc interactions.

  17. Synthesis of platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes with 9,9-dihexyl-4,5-diazafluorene and their in vivo antitumour activity against Hep3B xenografted mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q-W; Lam, P-L; Wong, R S-M; Cheng, G Y-M; Lam, K-H; Bian, Z-X; Ho, C-L; Feng, Y-H; Gambari, R; Lo, Y-H; Wong, W-Y; Chui, C-H

    2016-11-29

    Two complexes dichloro(9,9-dihexyl-4,5-diazafluorene)platinum(II) (Pt-DHF) and dichloro(9,9-dihexyl-4,5-diazafluorene)palladium(II) (Pd-DHF) were synthesized and their in vivo antitumour activity was investigated using an athymic nude mice model xenografted with human Hep3B carcinoma cells. Pt-DHF- and Pd-DHF-treated groups showed significant tumour growth inhibition (with about 9-fold and 3-fold tumour growth retardation) when compared with the vehicle control group. The liver toxicology effects on the animals of the two compounds were investigated. Pt-DHF and Pd-DHF-treated groups had a lower alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase values than those of the vehicle treated group as the animals from the vehicle control group had very heavy hepatoma burden. We assume that both complexes could be further investigated as effective antitumour agents and it is worthwhile to study their underlying working mechanism.

  18. The chronic administration of drugs that inhibit the regulation of intracellular pH: in vitro and anti-tumour effects.

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, M.; Tannock, I. F.

    1996-01-01

    Mean values of extracellular pH (pHe) in tumours tend to be about 0.5 pH units lower than in normal tissues, whereas values of intracellular pH (pHi) in tumours and normal tissues are similar. Previous studies have shown that drugs that acidify cells at lower pHe such as nigericin, used alone or with agents that inhibit the regulation of pHi, have toxicity to cultured cells at pHe < 6.5 in short-term exposure; these agents also lead to modest anti-tumour effects in mice when given acutely. To evaluate the long-term effects of these drugs at levels of pHe that might occur commonly in tumours, we exposed cells for up to 72h at pHe 6.8 or 7.2 in vitro. Nigericin (0.033 microM) caused time-dependent cell killing of murine KHT and EMT-6 cells at pHe 6.8 (but not at pHe 7.2) with a surviving fraction approximately 5 x 10(-3) after 72 h exposure. Cell killing was increased in the presence of 4,4-diisothiocyanstilbene 2,2-disulphonic acid (DIDS), an inhibitor of Na+-dependent HCO3-/CI- exchange, and to a lesser extent in the presence of 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA), an inhibitor of Na+/H+ exchange. Cell killing was exquisitely sensitive to the level of pHe. Osmotic pumps were used to obtain a 72 h continuous infusion of nigericin in mice; this led to dose-dependent killing of cells in KHT tumours with surviving fraction of approximately 0.1 at maximum tolerated doses. Hydralazine, which may cause tumour hypoxia and lower pHi as well as pHe, caused cytotoxity when given alone by chronic infusion, and enhanced the cytotoxicity due to nigericin. The addition of DIDS and/or EIPA (using two pumps) further enhanced anti-tumour toxicity, with a surviving fraction of approximately 0.002 at tolerated doses of the four drugs used to treat KHT tumours. The experiments demonstrate the activity of drugs that inhibit the regulation of pHi against murine tumours when delivered by chronic infusion. PMID:8645575

  19. Physicochemical characterization and antitumour activity of exopolysaccharides produced by Lactobacillus casei SB27 from yak milk.

    PubMed

    Di, Wei; Zhang, Lanwei; Wang, Shumei; Yi, Huaxi; Han, Xue; Fan, Rongbo; Zhang, Yingchun

    2017-09-01

    Two high molecular weight fractions (LW1 and LW2) of exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by Lactobacillus casei SB27 were isolated from yak milk obtained from the Gansu Tibetan area of China. GC-MS, FTIR spectroscopy, methylation analysis and FE-SEM analysis were performed to elucidate the physicochemical characterization of these two fractions, and their in vitro antitumour activities were also evaluated. The molecular weights (Mws) of LW1 and LW2 as determined by HPGPC were 25.10 and 12.34kDa, respectively. Monosaccharide composition analysis revealed that LW1 and LW2 were mainly composed of galactose (52.4% and 57.4%, mol%) and glucose (29.1% and 22.2%, mol%), respectively. Methylation results showed that the main chain of LW1 likely involves (1→4)-linked Galp and (1→4)-linked Glcp with its side chains being (1→4,6)-linked Galp through the O-6 position connected to the backbone, whereas the main chain of LW2 likely involves (1→4)-linked Galp and (1→4)-linked Glcp with its side chains being (1→3)-Galp through the O-6 position of (1→3,6)-Galp linked to the main chain. Evaluation of the microcosmic morphology, as revealed by FE-SEM analysis of the two EPS fractions, showed a sheet-like appearance with a folded surface and a compact structure. The results from in vitro antitumour tests indicated that both LW1 and LW2 could significantly inhibit the proliferation of HT-29 colorectal cancer cells and up-regulated the expressions of Bad, Bax, Caspase-3 and -8 genes. Finally, TEM images revealed the apoptotic morphological changes of HT-29 cells induced by LW1 and LW2. Our results suggested that LW1 and LW2 possess potential not only for use in functional food products but also as a source of natural antitumour drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Synthetic membrane-targeted antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Vooturi, S K; Firestine, S M

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance continues to evolve and presents serious challenges in the therapy of both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. The rise of resistant strains like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) suggests that antimicrobial resistance is an inevitable evolutionary response to antimicrobial use. This highlights the tremendous need for antibiotics against new bacterial targets. Agents that target the integrity of bacterial membrane are relatively novel in the clinical armamentarium. Daptomycin, a lipopeptide is a classical example of membrane-bound antibiotic. Nature has also utilized this tactic. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are found in all kingdoms, function primarily by permeabilizing the bacterial membrane. AMPs have several advantages over existing antibiotics including a broad spectrum of activity, rapid bactericidal activity, no cross-resistance with the existing antibiotics and a low probability for developing resistance. Currently, a small number of peptides have been developed for clinical use but therapeutic applications are limited because of poor bioavailability and high manufacturing cost. However, their broad specificity, potent activity and lower probability for resistance have spurred the search for synthetic mimetics of antimicrobial peptides as membrane-active antibiotics. In this review, we will discuss the different classes of synthetic membrane-bound antibiotics published since 2004.

  1. Non-antibiotic treatment for infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J; Castro, I; Calabuig, E; Salavert, M

    2017-09-01

    The abuse and uncontrolled use of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria. The utility of conventional antibiotics for the treatment of bacterial infections has become increasingly strained due to increased rates of resistance coupled with reduced rates of development of new agents. As a result, multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant, and pan-drug-resistant bacterial strains are now frequently encountered. This has led to fears of a "post-antibiotic era" in which many bacterial infections could be untreatable. Alternative non-antibiotic treatment strategies need to be explored to ensure that a robust pipeline of effective therapies is available to clinicians. The new therapeutic approaches for bacterial infections (beyond antibiotics) may provide a way to extend the usefulness of current antibiotics in an era of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infections.

  2. Control of Biofilm Formation: Antibiotics and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Algburi, Ammar; Comito, Nicole; Kashtanov, Dimitri; Dicks, Leon M T; Chikindas, Michael L

    2017-02-01

    Biofilm-associated bacteria are less sensitive to antibiotics than free-living (planktonic) cells. Furthermore, with variations in the concentration of antibiotics throughout a biofilm, microbial cells are often exposed to levels below inhibitory concentrations and may develop resistance. This, as well as the irresponsible use of antibiotics, leads to the selection of pathogens that are difficult to eradicate. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention use the terms "antibiotic" and "antimicrobial agent" interchangeably. However, a clear distinction between these two terms is required for the purpose of this assessment. Therefore, we define "antibiotics" as pharmaceutically formulated and medically administered substances and "antimicrobials" as a broad category of substances which are not regulated as drugs. This comprehensive minireview evaluates the effect of natural antimicrobials on pathogens in biofilms when used instead of, or in combination with, commonly prescribed antibiotics.

  3. New antibiotic therapies for acne and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Mays, Rana Majd; Gordon, Rachel A; Wilson, Janice M; Silapunt, Sirunya

    2012-01-01

    Acne and rosacea compromise a substantial portion of the dermatology clinical practice. Over the past century, many treatment modalities have been introduced with antibiotics playing a major role. Today, both oral and topical antibiotics are used in the management of acne and rosacea, with several novel formulations and/or combination regimens recently introduced. The latest studies suggest anti-inflammatory actions to be the most likely mechanism of antibiotics in acne and rosacea, shifting the focus to subantimicrobial-dose oral antibiotics and/or topical antibiotic regimens as the preferred first-line agents. Here we will discuss the most recent oral and topical antibiotic therapies available for treatment of acne and rosacea, with special focus on efficacy data, indication, dosing, and mechanism of action.

  4. Evolutionary Rationale for Phages as Complements of Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Torres-Barceló, Clara; Hochberg, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections are a major concern to public health. Phage therapy has been proposed as a promising alternative to antibiotics, but an increasing number of studies suggest that both of these antimicrobial agents in combination are more effective in controlling pathogenic bacteria than either alone. We advocate the use of phages in combination with antibiotics and present the evolutionary basis for our claim. In addition, we identify compelling challenges for the realistic application of phage-antibiotic combined therapy.

  5. Chetomin, targeting HIF-1α/p300 complex, exhibits antitumour activity in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Viziteu, Elena; Grandmougin, Camille; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Seckinger, Anja; Hose, Dirk; Klein, Bernard; Moreaux, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable clonal plasma cell malignancy. The constitutive expression of HIF-1α in MM suggests that inhibition of HIF-1α-mediated transcription represents an interesting target in MM. Methods: As p300 is a crucial co-activator of hypoxia-inducible transcription, disrupting the complex HIF-1α/p300 to target HIF activity appears to be an attractive strategy. Results: We reported that chetomin, an inhibitor of HIF-1α/p300 interaction, exhibits antitumour activity in human myeloma cell lines and primary MM cells from patients. Conclusions: Our data suggest that chetomin may be of clinical value in MM and especially for patients characterised by a high EP300/HIF-1α expression and a poor prognosis. PMID:26867162

  6. Could plant lectins become promising anti-tumour drugs for causing autophagic cell death?

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Luo, Y; Zhou, T-T; Zhang, W-Z

    2013-10-01

    Plant lectins, a group of highly diverse carbohydrate-binding proteins of non-immune origin, are ubiquitously distributed through a variety of plant species, and have recently drawn rising attention due to their remarkable ability to kill tumour cells using mechanisms implicated in autophagy. In this review, we provide a brief outline of structures of some representative plant lectins such as concanavalin A, Polygonatum cyrtonema lectin and mistletoe lectins. These can target autophagy by modulating BNIP-3, ROS-p38-p53, Ras-Raf and PI3KCI-Akt pathways, as well as Beclin-1, in many types of cancer cells. In addition, we further discuss how plant lectins are able to kill cancer cells by modulating autophagic death, for therapeutic purposes. Together, these findings provide a comprehensive perspective concerning plant lectins as promising new anti-tumour drugs, with respect to autophagic cell death in future cancer therapeutics.

  7. The Steroidal Glycoalkaloids from Solanaceae: Toxic Effect, Antitumour Activity and Mechanism of Action.

    PubMed

    Sucha, Lenka; Tomsik, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids present in Solanaceae are toxic compounds biosynthesised for the protection of the plants. However, many health benefits of these compounds have been reported so far. One of their promising targets might be cancer, as demonstrated in a large number of studies. However, the main mechanism of action seems to be unclear. It could include the induction of apoptosis or trigger a necrosis with a subsequent inflammatory response. The relatively high systemic toxicity of steroidal compounds is another effect that must be taken into account in anticancer research. The main aim of this work was to summarise the recent progress in the investigation of the mechanisms of their antitumour action and to discuss their potential.

  8. Synthesis and antitumour activity of arctigenin amino acid ester derivatives against H22 hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cai, Enbo; Guo, Shijie; Yang, Limin; Han, Mei; Xia, Jing; Zhao, Yan; Gao, Xiaorui; Wang, Yu

    2017-04-18

    Arctigenin (ARG) is famous in its abundant pharmacological activity. However, many researches in it entered the bottleneck period because of its poor water solubility. The derivatives of ARG have been synthesised with five amino acids which have t-Butyloxy carbonyl (BOC) as a protective group. We examined the effects of removing BOC. The results showed that the amino acid derivatives without protective group have better water solubility and nitrite-clearing ability than ARG. Based on these results, ARG6' and ARG9' were selected at a dosage of 40 mg/kg to evaluate their antitumour activity. The percentage inhibition rate of ARG6' and ARG9' were 55.87 and 51.40, respectively, which was twice as much as ARG. Furthermore, they could increase liver and kidney indexes and produce less damage in these organs. In brief, this study provides a basis for new drug development.

  9. Effect of solcoseryl on antitumour action and acute toxicity of some antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Danysz, A; Sołtysiak-Pawluczuk, D; Czyzewska-Szafran, H; Jedrych, A; Jastrzebski, Z

    1991-01-01

    The in vivo effect of Solcoseryl on the antitumour activity and acute toxicity of some antineoplastic drugs was examined. It was found that Solcoseryl does not inhibit the antineoplastic effectiveness of the drugs against transplantable P 388 leukaemia in mice. Studies of the effect of Solcoseryl on acute toxicity of selected antineoplastic drugs in mice revealed that the biostimulator could exert a modifying influence. The prior administration of Solcoseryl significantly decreases the acute toxicity of methotrexate but has no effect on acute toxicity of 5-fluorouracil, increases the acute toxicity of bleomycin and vinblastine and has no effect on acute toxicity of methotrexate and mitoxantron. On the other hand, Solcoseryl administered simultaneously with the antineoplastic drugs increases acute toxicity of 5-fluorouracil, bleomycin and mitoxantron. The protective effect of the biostimulator noted exclusively against acute toxicity of 5-fluorouracil was also observed after multiple administration of this anticancer drug.

  10. Preclinical antitumour activity of F 11782, a novel dual catalytic inhibitor of topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Kruczynski, A; Etiévant, C; Perrin, D; Imbert, T; Colpaert, F; Hill, B T

    2000-01-01

    F 11782 is a novel inhibitor of topoisomerases I and II, with an original mechanism of action (Perrin et al, 2000). This study, aimed to define its anticancer efficacy against a series of murine and human tumour models, has provided evidence of major antitumour activity for F 11782. This was demonstrated as a high level of activity against the P388 leukaemia, as reflected by increased survival of 143–457%, when administered i.p., p.o. or i.v. as single or multiple doses, and proved consistently superior to etoposide or camptothecin tested concurrently. Single or multiple i.p. doses of F 11782 also proved highly active against the s.c. grafted B16 melanoma, significantly increasing survival (P < 0.001) and inhibiting tumour growth (T/C of 0.3%), again superior to etoposide tested concurrently. Furthermore, F 11782 inhibited the number of pulmonary metastatic foci of the B16F10 melanoma by 99%. In human tumour xenograft studies, multiple i.p. doses of F 11782 resulted in major inhibitory activity against MX-1 (breast) tumours (T/C of 0.1%), as well as causing definite tumour regressions, whereas none resulted from similar experimental treatments with etoposide. Significant activity was also recorded with F 11782 against the relatively refractory LX-1 (lung) xenografts, with an optimal T/C value of 19%. It was notable that the antitumour activity of F 11782 was consistently demonstrated over a wide range of 2–6 dose levels, providing evidence of its good overall tolerance. In conclusion, these results emphasize the preclinical interest of this novel molecule and support its further preclinical development. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11076662

  11. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and anti-tumour efficacy of paclitaxel delivered by polyvinylpyrrolidone solid dispersion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangrui; Sun, Jiabei; Chen, Xiaomei; Wang, Shanshan; Scott, Hannah; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2012-06-01

    Paclitaxel is a potent anti-cancer drug that has exhibited clinical activity against several tumours. Unfortunately, serious side effects are associated with Taxol, the commercial formulation of paclitaxel, which contains Cremophor EL (CrEL). Currently, the main focus of developing paclitaxel formulations is on improving efficacy and reducing toxicity. A novel, Cremophor-free, paclitaxel solid dispersion (PSD) was prepared in our laboratory previously. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, acute toxicity and anti-tumour efficacy of the PSD compared with Taxol. SD rats were used to examine the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of PSD. The acute toxicity of PSD was evaluated in ICR mouse. The anti-tumor activity of PSD was assessed in an in vivo anti-tumor nude mice model inoculated with human SKOV-3 cancer cells. The two formulations presented different pharmacokinetic behaviour. The plasma AUC of paclitaxel in the PSD was 5.84-fold lower than that of Taxol, and the mean residence time, total body clearance and apparent volume of distribution of paclitaxel in the PSD were increased by 1.73, 4.67 and 8.57 fold, respectively. However, the two formulations showed similar tissue distribution properties. CrEL, the vehicle in Taxol, decreased the clearance of paclitaxel from plasma. The LD50 (median lethal dose) was 34.8 mg/kg for Taxol, whereas no death was observed at 160 mg/kg for the PSD. The anti-tumour activity of PSD was similar to that of Taxol at a dose of 15 mg/kg. Most importantly, the improved tolerance of PSD enabled a higher administrable dose of paclitaxel, which resulted in improved efficacy compared with Taxol administered at its maximum tolerated dose. These results suggest that the PSD, a CrEL-free formulation, is a promising approach to increase the safety and efficacy of paclitaxel. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  12. Antitumour and anti-inflammatory effects of palladium(II) complexes on Ehrlich tumour.

    PubMed

    Quilles, Marcela B; Carli, Camila B A; Ananias, Sandra R; Ferreira, Lucas S; Ribeiro, Livia C A; Maia, Danielle C G; Resende, Flávia A; Moro, Antônio C; Varanda, Eliana A; Placeres, Marisa Campos Polesi; Mauro, Antonio E; Carlos, Iracilda Z

    2013-01-01

    Palladium(II) complexes are an important class of cyclopalladated compounds that play a pivotal role in various pharmaceutical applications. Here, we investigated the antitumour, anti-inflammatory, and mutagenic effects of two complexes: [Pd(dmba)(Cl)tu] (1) and [Pd(dmba)(N3)tu] (2) (dmba = N,N-dimethylbenzylamine and tu = thiourea), on Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells and peritoneal exudate cells (PECs) from mice bearing solid Ehrlich tumour. The cytotoxic effects of the complexes on EAT cells and PECs were assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-3-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The effects of the complexes on the immune system were assessed based on the production of nitric oxide (NO) (Griess assay) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-12 (IL-12), and interleukin-10 (IL-10) (ELISA). Finally the mutagenic activity was assessed by the Ames test using the Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 98. Cisplatin was used as a standard. The IC50 ranges for the growth inhibition of EAT cells and PECs were found to be (72.8 +/- 3.23) microM and (137.65 +/- 0.22) microM for 1 and (39.7 +/- 0.30) microM and (146.51 +/- 2.67) microM for 2, respectively. The production of NO, IL-12, and TNF-alpha, but not IL-10, was induced by both complexes and cisplatin. The complexes showed no mutagenicity in vitro, unlike cisplatin, which was mutagenic in the strain. These results indicate that the complexes are not mutagenic and have potential immunological and antitumour activities. These properties make them promising alternatives to cisplatin.

  13. Modulation of actin dynamics as potential macrophage subtype-targeting anti-tumour strategy

    PubMed Central

    Pergola, Carlo; Schubert, Katrin; Pace, Simona; Ziereisen, Jana; Nikels, Felix; Scherer, Olga; Hüttel, Stephan; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M.; Weinigel, Christina; Rummler, Silke; Müller, Rolf; Raasch, Martin; Mosig, Alexander; Koeberle, Andreas; Werz, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages mainly comprise immunosuppressive M2 phenotypes that promote tumour progression besides anti-tumoural M1 subsets. Selective depletion or reprogramming of M2 may represent an innovative anti-cancer strategy. The actin cytoskeleton is central for cellular homeostasis and is targeted for anti-cancer chemotherapy. Here, we show that targeting G-actin nucleation using chondramide A (ChA) predominantly depletes human M2 while promoting the tumour-suppressive M1 phenotype. ChA reduced the viability of M2, with minor effects on M1, but increased tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α release from M1. Interestingly, ChA caused rapid disruption of dynamic F-actin filaments and polymerization of G-actin, followed by reduction of cell size, binucleation and cell division, without cellular collapse. In M1, but not in M2, ChA caused marked activation of SAPK/JNK and NFκB, with slight or no effects on Akt, STAT-1/-3, ERK-1/2, and p38 MAPK, seemingly accounting for the better survival of M1 and TNFα secretion. In a microfluidically-supported human tumour biochip model, circulating ChA-treated M1 markedly reduced tumour cell viability through enhanced release of TNFα. Together, ChA may cause an anti-tumoural microenvironment by depletion of M2 and activation of M1, suggesting induction of G-actin nucleation as potential strategy to target tumour-associated macrophages in addition to neoplastic cells. PMID:28134280

  14. Hybrid antibiotics - clinical progress and novel designs.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Alastair L; Yule, Ian A

    2016-07-01

    There is a growing need for new antibacterial agents, but success in development of antibiotics in recent years has been limited. This has led researchers to investigate novel approaches to finding compounds that are effective against multi-drug resistant bacteria, and that delay onset of resistance. One such strategy has been to link antibiotics to produce hybrids designed to overcome resistance mechanisms. The concept of dual-acting hybrid antibiotics was introduced and reviewed in this journal in 2010. In the present review the authors sought to discover how clinical candidates described had progressed, and to examine how the field has developed. In three sections the authors cover the clinical progress of hybrid antibiotics, novel agents produced from hybridisation of two or more small-molecule antibiotics, and novel agents produced from hybridisation of antibiotics with small-molecules that have complementary activity. Many key questions regarding dual-acting hybrid antibiotics remain to be answered, and the proposed benefits of this approach are yet to be demonstrated. While Cadazolid in particular continues to progress in the clinic, suggesting that there is promise in hybridisation through covalent linkage, it may be that properties other than antibacterial activity are key when choosing a partner molecule.

  15. A review of global initiatives to fight antibiotic resistance and recent antibiotics׳ discovery.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Arpana Sagwal

    2016-11-01

    Data from across the world have shown an overall decline in the antibiotic pipeline and continually rising resistance to all first-line and last-resort antibiotics. The gaps in our knowledge of existing prevalence and mechanisms of antibiotic resistance (ABR) are all too well known. Several decades of antibiotic abuse in humans, animals, and agricultural practices have created health emergency situations and huge socio-economic impact. This paper discusses key findings of the studies conducted by several national and international collaborative organizations on the current state of affairs in ABR. Alongside, a brief overview of the antibacterial agents׳ discovery in recent years approved by the US FDA is discussed.

  16. Antitumour activity of the recombination polypeptide GST-NT21MP is mediated by inhibition of CXCR4 pathway in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Q; Zhang, F; Ding, Y; Huang, J; Chen, S; Wu, Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z; Chen, C

    2014-03-04

    CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α, also known as CXCL12) have important roles in promoting tumour growth and metastasis. Therefore, targeting CXCR4 could be a promising strategy for treatment of human cancer. To achieve this goal, we developed a highly purified recombination polypeptide (GST-NT21MP), which is a synthetic 21-mer peptide antagonist of CXCR4 (NT21MP) derived from the viral macrophage inflammatory protein II by fermentation technology, affinity chromatography and fast protein liquid chromatography. In this study, we used multiple methods such as MTT assay, FACS, invasion assay, RT-PCR and western blot to explore the efficacy and mechanism by which GST-NT21MP inhibits cell growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. We found that blockade of CXCR4 pathway by GST-NT21MP decreased SDF-1-induced cell growth, adhesion and migration capacities in breast cancer cells. Moreover, GST-NT21MP significantly retarded pulmonary metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, GST-NT21MP-mediated antitumour activity was found to be associated with reduced phosphorylated Src, Akt, FAK and ERK1/2 as well as decreased Bcl-2. Our results suggest that GST-NT21MP could be a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  17. Antitumour activity of the recombination polypeptide GST-NT21MP is mediated by inhibition of CXCR4 pathway in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Q; Zhang, F; Ding, Y; Huang, J; Chen, S; Wu, Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z; Chen, C

    2014-01-01

    Background: CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α, also known as CXCL12) have important roles in promoting tumour growth and metastasis. Therefore, targeting CXCR4 could be a promising strategy for treatment of human cancer. Methods: To achieve this goal, we developed a highly purified recombination polypeptide (GST-NT21MP), which is a synthetic 21-mer peptide antagonist of CXCR4 (NT21MP) derived from the viral macrophage inflammatory protein II by fermentation technology, affinity chromatography and fast protein liquid chromatography. In this study, we used multiple methods such as MTT assay, FACS, invasion assay, RT–PCR and western blot to explore the efficacy and mechanism by which GST-NT21MP inhibits cell growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. Results: We found that blockade of CXCR4 pathway by GST-NT21MP decreased SDF-1-induced cell growth, adhesion and migration capacities in breast cancer cells. Moreover, GST-NT21MP significantly retarded pulmonary metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, GST-NT21MP-mediated antitumour activity was found to be associated with reduced phosphorylated Src, Akt, FAK and ERK1/2 as well as decreased Bcl-2. Conclusions: Our results suggest that GST-NT21MP could be a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:24448360

  18. The novel atypical retinoid ST5589 down-regulates Aurora Kinase A and has anti-tumour activity in lymphoma pre-clinical models.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Elena; Gaudio, Eugenio; Kwee, Ivo; Rinaldi, Andrea; Cascione, Luciano; Tarantelli, Chiara; Mensah, Afua Adjeiwaa; Stathis, Anastasios; Zucca, Emanuele; Vesci, Loredana; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bertoni, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    Despite the marked improvements in the treatment of lymphomas, there is still a need for new therapeutic agents. Synthetic retinoids represent a class of compounds with anti-cancer activity. Here, we report the preclinical activity of a new member of this class, the ST1926-derivative ST5589, in lymphomas. ST5589 presented a dose-dependent anti-proliferative activity in almost all of the 25 lymphoma cell lines analysed, with a median 50% inhibitory concentration of 433 nM. Apoptosis was observed in 8/11 cell lines. ST5589 induced changes in the gene expression profiles of the cell lines, including the down-regulation of Aurora Kinase A (AURKA). Specific gene expression signatures were associated with a higher sensitivity to the compound and combination of ST5589 with carfilzomib revealed the importance of proteasome activity in mediating the anti-tumour activity of ST5589. In conclusion, we have identified a new mechanism of action of atypical retinoids as anti-cancer compounds, and the encouraging results obtained with the new ST1926-derivative ST5589 provide the basis for further developments of the compound.

  19. Antibiotic research and development: business as usual?

    PubMed

    Harbarth, S; Theuretzbacher, U; Hackett, J

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of antibiotic resistance is tremendous and, without new anti-infective strategies, will continue to increase in the coming decades. Despite the growing need for new antibiotics, few pharmaceutical companies today retain active antibacterial drug discovery programmes. One reason is that it is scientifically challenging to discover new antibiotics that are active against the antibiotic-resistant bacteria of current clinical concern. However, the main hurdle is diminishing economic incentives. Increased global calls to minimize the overuse of antibiotics, the cost of meeting regulatory requirements and the low prices of currently marketed antibiotics are strong deterrents to antibacterial drug development programmes. New economic models that create incentives for the discovery of new antibiotics and yet reconcile these incentives with responsible antibiotic use are long overdue. DRIVE-AB is a €9.4 million public-private consortium, funded by the EU Innovative Medicines Initiative, that aims to define a standard for the responsible use of antibiotics and to develop, test and recommend new economic models to incentivize investment in producing new anti-infective agents. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Addressing antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kalpana

    2002-07-08

    Management of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) has traditionally been based on 2 important principles: the spectrum of organisms causing acute UTI is highly predictable (Escherichia coli accounts for 75% to 90% and Staphylococcus saprophyticus accounts for 5% to 15% of isolates), and the susceptibility patterns of these organisms have also been relatively predictable. As a result, empiric therapy with short-course trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been a standard management approach for uncomplicated cystitis.However, antibiotic resistance is now becoming a major factor not only in nosocomial complicated UTIs, but also in uncomplicated community-acquired UTIs. Resistance to TMP-SMX now approaches 18% to 22% in some regions of the United States, and nearly 1 in 3 bacterial strains causing cystitis or pyelonephritis demonstrate resistance to amoxicillin. Fortunately, resistance to other agents, such as nitrofurantoin and the fluoroquinolones, has remained low, at approximately 2%. Preliminary data suggest that the increase in TMP-SMX resistance is associated with poorer bacteriologic and clinical outcomes when TMP-SMX is used for therapy. As a result, these trends have necessitated a change in the management approach to community-acquired UTI. The use of TMP-SMX as a first-line agent for empiric therapy of uncomplicated cystitis is only appropriate in areas where TMP-SMX resistance prevalence is <10% to 20%. In areas where resistance to TMP-SMX exceeds this rate, alternative agents need to be considered.

  1. Addressing antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kalpana

    2003-02-01

    Management of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) has traditionally been based on 2 important principles: the spectrum of organisms causing acute UTI is highly predictable (Escherichia coli accounts for 75% to 90% and Staphylococcus saprophyticus accounts for 5% to 15% of isolates), and the susceptibility patterns of these organisms have also been relatively predictable. As a result, empiric therapy with short-course trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been a standard management approach for uncomplicated cystitis.However, antibiotic resistance is now becoming a major factor not only in nosocomial complicated UTIs, but also in uncomplicated community-acquired UTIs. Resistance to TMP-SMX now approaches 18% to 22% in some regions of the United States, and nearly 1 in 3 bacterial strains causing cystitis or pyelonephritis demonstrate resistance to amoxicillin. Fortunately, resistance to other agents, such as nitrofurantoin and the fluoroquinolones, has remained low, at approximately 2%. Preliminary data suggest that the increase in TMP-SMX resistance is associated with poorer bacteriologic and clinical outcomes when TMP-SMX is used for therapy. As a result, these trends have necessitated a change in the management approach to community-acquired UTI. The use of TMP-SMX as a first-line agent for empiric therapy of uncomplicated cystitis is only appropriate in areas where TMP-SMX resistance prevalence is <10% to 20%. In areas where resistance to TMP-SMX exceeds this rate, alternative agents need to be considered.

  2. Evolution of antibiotic resistance without antibiotic exposure.

    PubMed

    Knöppel, Anna; Näsvall, Joakim; Andersson, Dan I

    2017-09-11

    Antibiotic use is the main driver in the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Another unexplored possibility is that resistance evolves coincidentally in response to other selective pressures. We show that selection in the absence of antibiotics can co-select for decreased susceptibility to several antibiotics. Thus, genetic adaptation of bacteria to natural environments may drive resistance evolution by generating a pool of resistance mutations that selection could act on to enrich resistant mutants when antibiotic exposure occurs. Copyright © 2017 Knöppel et al.

  3. Targeting multiple cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways with a resorcinol derivative leads to inhibition of advanced stages of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murase, Ryuichi; Kawamura, Rumi; Singer, Eric; Pakdel, Arash; Sarma, Pranamee; Judkins, Jonathon; Elwakeel, Eiman; Dayal, Sonali; Martinez-Martinez, Esther; Amere, Mukkanti; Gujjar, Ramesh; Mahadevan, Anu; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; McAllister, Sean D

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The psychoactive cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) can both reduce cancer progression, each through distinct anti-tumour pathways. Our goal was to discover a compound that could efficiently target both cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways. Experimental Approach To measure breast cancer cell proliferation/viability and invasion, MTT and Boyden chamber assays were used. Modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis was measured using dichlorodihydrofluorescein and annexin/propidium iodide, respectively, in combination with cell flow cytometry. Changes in protein levels were evaluated using Western analysis. Orthotopic and i.v. mouse models of breast cancer metastasis were used to test the activity of cannabinoids in vivo. Key Results CBD reduced breast cancer metastasis in advanced stages of the disease as the direct result of down-regulating the transcriptional regulator Id1. However, this was associated with moderate increases in survival. We therefore screened for analogues that could co-target cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways (CBD- and THC-associated) and discovered the compound O-1663. This analogue inhibited Id1, produced a marked stimulation of ROS, up-regulated autophagy and induced apoptosis. Of all the compounds tested, it was the most potent at inhibiting breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in culture and metastasis in vivo. Conclusions and Implications O-1663 prolonged survival in advanced stages of breast cancer metastasis. Developing compounds that can simultaneously target multiple cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways efficiently may provide a novel approach for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer. PMID:24910342

  4. Targeting multiple cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways with a resorcinol derivative leads to inhibition of advanced stages of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Murase, Ryuichi; Kawamura, Rumi; Singer, Eric; Pakdel, Arash; Sarma, Pranamee; Judkins, Jonathon; Elwakeel, Eiman; Dayal, Sonali; Martinez-Martinez, Esther; Amere, Mukkanti; Gujjar, Ramesh; Mahadevan, Anu; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; McAllister, Sean D

    2014-10-01

    The psychoactive cannabinoid Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) can both reduce cancer progression, each through distinct anti-tumour pathways. Our goal was to discover a compound that could efficiently target both cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways. To measure breast cancer cell proliferation/viability and invasion, MTT and Boyden chamber assays were used. Modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis was measured using dichlorodihydrofluorescein and annexin/propidium iodide, respectively, in combination with cell flow cytometry. Changes in protein levels were evaluated using Western analysis. Orthotopic and i.v. mouse models of breast cancer metastasis were used to test the activity of cannabinoids in vivo. CBD reduced breast cancer metastasis in advanced stages of the disease as the direct result of down-regulating the transcriptional regulator Id1. However, this was associated with moderate increases in survival. We therefore screened for analogues that could co-target cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways (CBD- and THC-associated) and discovered the compound O-1663. This analogue inhibited Id1, produced a marked stimulation of ROS, up-regulated autophagy and induced apoptosis. Of all the compounds tested, it was the most potent at inhibiting breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in culture and metastasis in vivo. O-1663 prolonged survival in advanced stages of breast cancer metastasis. Developing compounds that can simultaneously target multiple cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways efficiently may provide a novel approach for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Antibiotic Resistance in Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Stultz, Jeremy S; Doern, Christopher D; Godbout, Emily

    2016-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem in pediatric patients. Resistance to common antibiotic agents appears to be increasing over time, although resistance rates may vary based on geographic region or country. Prior antibiotic exposure is a pertinent risk factor for acquiring resistant organisms during a first UTI and recurrent UTI. Judicious prescribing of antibiotics for common pediatric conditions is needed to prevent additional resistance from occurring. Complex pediatric patients with histories of hospitalizations, prior antibiotic exposure, and recurrent UTIs are also at high risk for acquiring UTIs due to extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing organisms. Data regarding the impact of in vitro antibiotic susceptibility testing interpretation on UTI treatment outcomes is lacking.

  6. Impact of antibiotic restrictions: the pharmaceutical perspective.

    PubMed

    Power, E

    2006-08-01

    The development of new antibiotics is dependent on their performance in economic models that favour products with large markets, high levels of potential sales and low development risks. There is a trend toward more severe and more widespread market restrictions for the use of antibiotics, ostensibly to control resistance, though they may be enacted through the control of drug budgets. The restrictions reduce the potential earnings of new antibiotics. In addition, more stringent regulatory procedures increase development costs and risk. As a consequence, compared with drugs for other diseases, particularly chronic diseases, antibiotics perform poorly in economic decision models and are therefore less likely to be selected by pharmaceutical companies for continued development. Overall, this creates a conflict between the twin objectives of controlling resistance through antibiotic restriction and addressing resistance clinically through the introduction of new agents. Ultimately, this may lead to the accelerated loss of efficacy for currently available agents, as we become more dependent on them. Moreover, the new agents that we need to maintain our current levels of health will be lacking in pharmaceutical pipelines. Antibiotic resistance is inevitable; the development of new antibiotics is, however, under threat. Unless the market conditions can be economically rebalanced to encourage innovation and investment, or new models of pharmaceutical development can be applied to this area, the number of companies with active antibiotic research programmes will continue to fall. Just as we should not be complacent regarding the development of resistance, we should not be complacent in assuming that the antibiotics of tomorrow will be there when we need them.

  7. Antitumour activity of 2-dihydroailanthone from the bark of Ailanthus altissima against U251.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruxing; Xu, Qian; Liu, Lei; Liang, Xiujun; Cheng, Luyang; Zhang, Manli; Shi, Qingwen

    2016-09-01

    Context The bark of Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle (Simaroubaceae) is traditionally used to treat ascariasis, diarrhoea, spermatorrhoea, bleeding and gastrointestinal diseases. Objective The objective of this study is to investigate the antitumour activity and mechanism of 2-dihydroailanthone isolated from A. altissima. Materials and methods The U251 cells were treated with 1.00, 4.00 and 8.00 μg/mL of 2-dihydroailanthone for 48 h and the normal cells treated with 20.00 μg/mL of 2-dihydroailanthone were tested as well. Proliferation inhibition of 2-dihydroailanthone on the cells was tested by MTT. Apoptosis and cell-cycle distribution in U251 cells with 1.00, 3.00 and 5.80 μg/mL of 2-dihydroailanthone for 48 h were determined by flow cytometry, respectively. The expression of the apoptosis-related genes and proteins was analysed by RT-PCR and Western blot method, respectively. Results MTT assay revealed that 2-dihydroailanthone inhibited U251 cells proliferation. The cell viability of U251 cells was 62.82, 31.34 and 25.58%, and that of three normal cells was 72.75, 82.74 and 44.92%, respectively. Flow cytometry assay showed that 2-dihydroailanthone induced apoptosis and G0/G1 phase cycle arrest towards U251 cells. The late apoptotic cells were 11.37, 21.73 and 33.83%, and the cells cycle distributed in the G0/G1 accounted for 48.85, 62.77 and 64.40%, respectively. The Western blot and RT-PCR assay showed that up-regulation of pro-apoptotic bax protein and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic bcl-2 protein as well as their mRNA on U251 cells might be related to the apoptosis induction and proliferation inhibition. Conclusion An important bioactive component, 2-dihydroailanthone, has antitumour effects, enlightening a novel source of phytomedicines in tumour therapy.

  8. In vitro and in vivo investigations on the antitumour activity of Chelidonium majus.

    PubMed

    Capistrano I, Rica; Wouters, An; Lardon, Filip; Gravekamp, Claudia; Apers, Sandra; Pieters, Luc

    2015-12-15

    Chelidonium majus L. (Papaveraceae) (greater celandine) is a medicinal herb that is widely spread in Europe. Antitumoural activity has been reported for C. majus extracts. To investigate the antitumour activity of a C. majus extract in vitro and in vivo. Cytotoxic effects of C. majus extracts were evaluated on human cancer cell lines, i.e. PANC-1 (pancreas cancer), HT-29 (colon cancer), MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer), PC-EM005 and PC-EM002 (primary endometrium cancer cells), and PANC02 (murine pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells). A preliminary in vivo study was performed to evaluate the effect of a defatted C. majus extract and Ukrain(TM) in a highly metastatic murine pancreatic model. Chelidonium majus L. herb containing 1.26% (dry weight) of total alkaloids expressed as chelidonine was used to prepare an 80% ethanolic extract (CM2). This crude extract was then defatted with n-hexane, resulting in a defatted C. majus extract (CM2B). Cytotoxic effects of the two extracts (CM2 and CM2B) were evaluated on human and murine cell lines in vitro. CM2B and Ukrain(TM) were evaluated in a highly metastatic murine pancreatic model. Four main benzylisoquinoline alkaloids were identified in CM2B, i.e. chelidonine, sanguinarine, chelerythrine and protopine, using HPLC-UV. CM2 showed a high cytotoxic activity against PANC-1 (IC50, 20.7 µg/ml) and HT-29 (IC50, 20.6 µg/ml), and a moderate cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-231 (IC50, 73.9 µg/ml). CM2 as well as CM2B showed a moderate to high cytotoxic activity against the PANC02 cell line (IC50, 34.4 and 36.0 µg/ml). Low to almost no cytotoxic effect was observed on primary endometrium cancer cells PC-EM005, PC-EM002 and on normal fibroblast cells 3T3, when treated with CM2B. Significantly less metastases were counted in mice treated with 1.2 mg/kg CM2B, but not with 3.6 mg/kg Ukrain(TM), compared to the control group. The extract, however, did not affect the weight of the primary tumours. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights

  9. Molecular design of hybrid tumour necrosis factor alpha with polyethylene glycol increases its anti-tumour potency.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Y.; Kihira, T.; Tsunoda, S.; Kanamori, T.; Nakagawa, S.; Mayumi, T.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to increase the anti-tumour potency and reduce the toxic side-effects of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Natural human TNF-alpha was chemically conjugated with monomethoxy polyethylene glycol (PEG) using succinimidyl coupling of lysine amino groups of TNF-alpha. The number-average molecular weight of PEG-modified TNF-alpha (PEG-TNF-alpha) increased with an increase in the reaction time and the initial molar ratio of PEG relative to TNF-alpha. The resulting modified TNF-alpha was separated into fractions of various molecular weights. The specific activity of separated PEG-TNF-alpha s relative to that of native TNF-alpha gradually decreased with an increase in the degree of PEG modification, but the plasma half-life was drastically increased with the increase in molecular weight of modified TNF-alpha. PEG-TNF-alpha s, in which 29% and 56% of lysine residues were coupled to PEG, had anti-tumour activity approximately 4 and 100 times greater than unmodified TNF-alpha in the murine Meth-A fibrosarcoma model. Extensive PEG modification did not increase its in vivo activity. A high dose of unmodified TNF-alpha induced toxic side-effects, but these were not observed with the modified TNF-alpha s. Optimal PEG modification of TNF-alpha markedly increased its bioavailability and may facilitate its potential anti-tumour therapeutic use. PMID:7734321

  10. Antitumour and apoptotic effects of a novel Tris-peptide complex obtained after isolation of Raoultella ornithinolytica extracellular metabolites.

    PubMed

    Fiołka, M J; Grzywnowicz, K; Rzymowska, J; Lewtak, K; Szewczyk, R; Mendyk, E; Keller, R

    2015-06-01

    The characterization of the antitumour activity and chemical identification of the compounds obtained after the isolation of extracellular metabolites of bacteria Raoultella ornithinolytica. The fraction with anticancer activity against the HeLa cell line, T47D and TOV-112D was obtained from the supernatants of R. ornithinolytica culture using ion-exchange chromatography, and separated by Sephadex G-50 medium gel filtration into two subfractions. The obtained compounds were analysed using Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization MS/MS spectrometry. The antitumour activity of the two subfractions was analysed using 5-bromo-2-deoxy-uridine kit. The subfraction with the highest activity against HeLa cells was identified as Tris-peptide complex. The amino acid sequence of the peptide from the complex was found to be TDAPSFSDIPN and molecular weight was estimated at 1430·6576 Da. Cytotoxic, cytopathic and apoptotic effects in HeLa cells treated with the active complex were observed; however, the cytotoxic effect against normal human skin fibroblasts was minimal. The Tris-peptide complex from R. ornithinolytica showed selective antitumour activity against the HeLa cell line. The Tris-peptide complex due to the high selectivity can be used in biomedicine, and its derivatives may contribute to the development of new anticancer compounds. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Evaluation of the cytotoxic and antitumour effects of the essential oil from Mentha x villosa and its main compound, rotundifolone.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Ricardo G; Fonseca, Cecília S; Silva, Tayane Kayne M; Andrade, Luciana N; França, Maria E; Barbosa-Filho, José M; de Sousa, Damião P; Moraes, Manoel O; Pessoa, Cláudia Ó; Carvalho, Adriana A; Thomazzi, Sara Maria

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic and antitumour effects of the essential oil from the leaves of Mentha x villosa (EOMV) and its main component (rotundifolone). In-vitro cytotoxic activity of the EOMV and rotundifolone was determined on cultured tumour cells. In-vivo antitumour activity of the EOMV was assessed in sarcoma 180-bearing mice. The EOMV displayed cytotoxicity against human tumour cell lines, showing IC50 values in the range of 0.57-1.02 μg/ml in the HCT-116 and SF-295 cell lines, respectively. Rotundifolone showed weak cytotoxicity against HCT-116, SF-295 and OVCAR-8 cell lines (IC50 > 25.00 μg/ml). Tumour growth inhibition rates were 29.4-40.5% and 25.0-45.2% for the EOMV treatment by intraperitoneal (50-100 mg/kg/day) and oral (100-200 mg/kg/day) administration, respectively. The EOMV did not significantly affect body mass and macroscopy of the organs. The EOMV possesses significant antitumour activity with low systemic toxicity, possibly due to the synergistic action of its minor constituents. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  12. Antibiotic resistance: from Darwin to Lederberg to Keynes.

    PubMed

    Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos F

    2013-04-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria reflects both, a gradual, completely Darwinian evolution, which mostly yields slight decreases in antibiotic susceptibility, along with phenotypes that are not precisely characterized as "resistance"; and sudden changes, from full susceptibility to full resistance, which are driven by a vast array of horizontal gene transfer mechanisms. Antibiotics select for more than just antibiotic resistance (i.e., increased virulence and enhanced gene exchange abilities); and many non-antibiotic agents or conditions select for or maintain antibiotic resistance traits as a result of a complex network of underlying and often overlapping mechanisms. Thus, the development of new antibiotics and thoughtful, integrated anti-infective strategies is needed to address the immediate and long-term threat of antibiotic resistance. Since the biology of resistance is complex, these new drugs and strategies will not come from free-market forces, or from "incentives" for pharmaceutical companies.

  13. Bacteriocins – Exploring Alternatives to Antibiotics in Mastitis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pieterse, Reneé; Todorov, Svetoslav D.

    2010-01-01

    Mastitis is considered to be the most costly disease affecting the dairy industry. Management strategies involve the extensive use of antibiotics to treat and prevent this disease. Prophylactic dosages of antibiotics used in mastitis control programmes could select for strains with resistance to antibiotics. In addition, a strong drive towards reducing antibiotic residues in animal food products has lead to research in finding alternative antimicrobial agents. In this review we have focus on the pathogenesis of the mastitis in dairy cows, existing antibiotic treatments and possible alternative for application of bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of this disease. PMID:24031528

  14. A new boron compound (guanidine biboric acid adduct) as an antitumour agent against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, P; Sur, B; Bag, S P; Sur, P

    1999-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of a new boron compound of guanidine biboric acid adduct (GB) and guanidium chloride (L1) on the growth of ascites tumour in female Swiss mice were studied by monitoring the survival, tumour weight, tumour cell count, transplantability of Ehrlich ascites cells, precursor incorporation and the haematological parameters of the treated mice. 5-Fluorouracil, a known anticancer drug, was used as a positive control. The most important parameter was the survival time, which increased significantly when tumour-bearing mice were treated with the boron compound. Haematological parameters of the treated animals showed minimum toxic effects when boron was coupled with guanidine.

  15. NIR-driven Smart Theranostic Nanomedicine for On-demand Drug Release and Synergistic Antitumour Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengfei; Zheng, Mingbin; Luo, Zhenyu; Gong, Ping; Gao, Guanhui; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2015-09-24

    Smart nanoparticles (NPs) that respond to external and internal stimulations have been developing to achieve optimal drug release in tumour. However, applying these smart NPs to attain high antitumour performance is hampered by limited drug carriers and inefficient spatiotemporal control. Here we report a noninvasive NIR-driven, temperature-sensitive DI-TSL (DOX/ICG-loaded temperature sensitive liposomes) co-encapsulating doxorubicin (DOX) and indocyanine green (ICG). This theranostic system applies thermo-responsive lipid to controllably release drug, utilizes the fluorescence (FL) of DOX/ICG to real-time trace the distribution of NPs, and employs DOX/ICG to treat cancer by chemo/photothermal therapy. DI-TSL exhibits uniform size distribution, excellent FL/size stability, enhanced response to NIR-laser, and 3 times increased drug release through laser irradiation. After endocytosis by MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells, DI-TSL in cellular endosomes can cause hyperthermia through laser irradiation, then endosomes are disrupted and DI-TSL 'opens' to release DOX simultaneously for increased cytotoxicity. Furthermore, DI-TSL shows laser-controlled release of DOX in tumour, enhanced ICG and DOX retention by 7 times and 4 times compared with free drugs. Thermo-sensitive DI-TSL manifests high efficiency to promote cell apoptosis, and completely eradicate tumour without side-effect. DI-TSL may provide a smart strategy to release drugs on demand for combinatorial cancer therapy.

  16. Anti-tumour promoter activity in Malaysian ginger rhizobia used in traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Vimala, S; Norhanom, A W; Yadav, M

    1999-04-01

    Zingiberaceae rhizomes commonly used in the Malaysian traditional medicine were screened for anti-tumour promoter activity using the short-term assay of inhibition of 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) in Raji cells. The inhibition of TPA-induced EBV-EA was detected using the indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blot technique. The indirect IFA detected the expression/inhibition of EBV-EA-D (diffused EA antigen), whereas the Western blot technique detected the expression/inhibition of both EBV-EA-D and EA-R (restricted EA antigen). Seven rhizomes were found to possess inhibitory activity towards EBV activation, induced by TPA; they are: Curcuma domestica, C. xanthorrhiza, Kaempferia galanga, Zingiber cassumunar, Z. officinale, Z. officinale (red variety), and Z. zerumbet. A cytotoxicity assay was carried out to determine the toxicity of the Zingiberaceae rhizome extracts. The rhizome extracts that exhibited EBV activation inhibitory activity had no cytotoxicity effect in Raji cells. Therefore, the present study shows that several Zingiberaceae species used in Malaysian traditional medicine contain naturally occurring non-toxic compounds that inhibit the EBV activation, which, if further investigated, could contribute in the development of cancer prevention methods at the tumour-promoting stage.

  17. Anti-tumour promoter activity in Malaysian ginger rhizobia used in traditional medicine

    PubMed Central

    Vimala, S; Norhanom, A W; Yadav, M

    1999-01-01

    Zingiberaceae rhizomes commonly used in the Malaysian traditional medicine were screened for anti-tumour promoter activity using the short-term assay of inhibition of 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) in Raji cells. The inhibition of TPA-induced EBV-EA was detected using the indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blot technique. The indirect IFA detected the expression/inhibition of EBV-EA-D (diffused EA antigen), whereas the Western blot technique detected the expression/inhibition of both EBV-EA-D and EA-R (restricted EA antigen). Seven rhizomes were found to possess inhibitory activity towards EBV activation, induced by TPA; they are: Curcuma domestica, C. xanthorrhiza, Kaempferia galanga, Zingiber cassumunar, Z. officinale, Z. officinale (red variety), and Z. zerumbet. A cytotoxicity assay was carried out to determine the toxicity of the Zingiberaceae rhizome extracts. The rhizome extracts that exhibited EBV activation inhibitory activity had no cytotoxicity effect in Raji cells. Therefore, the present study shows that several Zingiberaceae species used in Malaysian traditional medicine contain naturally occurring non-toxic compounds that inhibit the EBV activation, which, if further investigated, could contribute in the development of cancer prevention methods at the tumour-promoting stage. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10389986

  18. Evidence for anti-tumour effect of allogeneic haematopoietic SCT in cases without sustained donor engraftment.

    PubMed

    Daguindau, E; Lioure, B; Buzyn, A; Robin, M; Faucher, C; Kuentz, M; Tiberghien, P; Deconinck, E

    2010-01-01

    Remissions of haematological malignancies have been reported after allo-SCT, despite donor cell rejection, suggesting that sustained allogeneic engraftment is not mandatory to obtain a lasting anti-tumour effect. To evaluate the potential benefit from transient post-allo-SCT alloreactivity, we took advantage of the Société Française de Greffe de Moëlle et Thérapie Cellulaire (SFGM-TC) registry to colligate 14 patients with an efficient and long-lasting allogeneic (GVL) effect after allo-SCT for haematological malignancies, despite transient or absent engraftment. None received a second allogeneic graft after autologous recovery. The median duration of remission after autologous reconstitution was 118 (12-252) months. Although we cannot exclude the possibility that some patients were cured before allo-SCT, this retrospective analysis does strongly suggest that an efficient GVL effect can be observed without sustained donor engraftment, and that the transient presence of donor T cells might be sufficient to induce a powerful GVL effect.

  19. Fusion of phospholipid vesicles produced by the anti-tumour protein alpha-sarcin.

    PubMed Central

    Gasset, M; Oñaderra, M; Thomas, P G; Gavilanes, J G

    1990-01-01

    The anti-tumour protein alpha-sarcin causes fusion of bilayers of phospholipid vesicles at neutral pH. This is demonstrated by measuring the decrease in the efficiency of the fluorescence energy transfer between N-(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)-dimyristoylphosphatidylethano lamine (NDB-PE) (donor) and N-(lissamine rhodamine B sulphonyl)-diacylphosphatidylethanolamine (Rh-PE) (acceptor) incorporated in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPG) vesicles. The effect of alpha-sarcin is a maximum at 0.15 M ionic strength and is abolished at basic pH. alpha-Sarcin promotes fusion between 1,6-diphenylhexa-1,3,5-triene (DPH)-labelled DMPG and dipalmitoyl-PG (DPPG) vesicles, resulting in a single thermotropic transition for the population of fused phospholipid vesicles. Bilayers composed of DMPC and DMPG, at different molar ratios in the range 1:1 to 1:10 PC/PG, are also fused by alpha-sarcin. Freeze-fracture electron micrographs corroborate the occurrence of fusion induced by the protein. alpha-Sarcin also modifies the permeability of the bilayers, causing the leakage of calcein in dye-trapped PG vesicles. All of the observed effects reach saturation at a 50:1 phospholipid/protein molar ratio, which is coincident with the binding stoichiometry previously described. Images Fig. 8. PMID:2306215

  20. Binding and hydrolysis studies of antitumoural titanocene dichloride and Titanocene Y with phosphate diesters.

    PubMed

    Erxleben, Andrea; Claffey, James; Tacke, Matthias

    2010-04-01

    The interaction of the antitumoural metallocene dihalides, titanocene dichloride (Cp(2)TiCl(2)) and Titanocene Y (bis-[(p-methoxybenzyl)cyclopentadienyl]titanium(IV) chloride), with bis(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP), which is a widely used model for the phosphate diester linkages in DNA, has been studied. Cp(2)TiCl(2) has been shown to promote the cleavage of the phosphate diester in weakly acidic solution. At pH 4, 37 degrees C, a 10(6)-fold rate acceleration over the uncatalysed reaction was observed under pseudo-first-order conditions, when freshly prepared solutions of Cp(2)TiCl(2) were applied. The activity of aged solutions dropped significantly due to the formation of insoluble precipitates of hydrolysed Ti species. The precipitates isolated from aged solutions were shown to act as moderately active, heterogeneous catalysts for BNPP cleavage. By contrast, no hydrolysis of the phosphate diester could be observed in the presence of Titanocene Y. Implications for the mode of action of the apoptosis-inducing metallocene dihalides are discussed.

  1. NIR-driven Smart Theranostic Nanomedicine for On-demand Drug Release and Synergistic Antitumour Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pengfei; Zheng, Mingbin; Luo, Zhenyu; Gong, Ping; Gao, Guanhui; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2015-01-01

    Smart nanoparticles (NPs) that respond to external and internal stimulations have been developing to achieve optimal drug release in tumour. However, applying these smart NPs to attain high antitumour performance is hampered by limited drug carriers and inefficient spatiotemporal control. Here we report a noninvasive NIR-driven, temperature-sensitive DI-TSL (DOX/ICG-loaded temperature sensitive liposomes) co-encapsulating doxorubicin (DOX) and indocyanine green (ICG). This theranostic system applies thermo-responsive lipid to controllably release drug, utilizes the fluorescence (FL) of DOX/ICG to real-time trace the distribution of NPs, and employs DOX/ICG to treat cancer by chemo/photothermal therapy. DI-TSL exhibits uniform size distribution, excellent FL/size stability, enhanced response to NIR-laser, and 3 times increased drug release through laser irradiation. After endocytosis by MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells, DI-TSL in cellular endosomes can cause hyperthermia through laser irradiation, then endosomes are disrupted and DI-TSL ‘opens’ to release DOX simultaneously for increased cytotoxicity. Furthermore, DI-TSL shows laser-controlled release of DOX in tumour, enhanced ICG and DOX retention by 7 times and 4 times compared with free drugs. Thermo-sensitive DI-TSL manifests high efficiency to promote cell apoptosis, and completely eradicate tumour without side-effect. DI-TSL may provide a smart strategy to release drugs on demand for combinatorial cancer therapy. PMID:26400780

  2. Antitumour Effects of Isocurcumenol Isolated from Curcuma zedoaria Rhizomes on Human and Murine Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, S.; Padmaja, G.; Remani, P.

    2011-01-01

    Curcuma zedoaria belonging to the family Zingiberaceae has been used in the traditional system of medicine in India and Southwest Asia in treating many human ailments and is found to possess many biological activities. The rationale of the present study was to isolate, identify, and characterize antitumour principles from the rhizomes of Curcuma zedoaria, to assess its cytotoxic effects on human and murine cancer cells, to determine its apoptosis inducing capacity in cancer cells, and to evaluate its tumour reducing properties in in vivo mice models. Isocurcumenol was characterized as the active compound by spectroscopy and was found to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells without inducing significant toxicity to the normal cells. Fluorescent staining exhibited the morphological features of apoptosis in the compound-treated cancer cells. In vivo tumour reduction studies revealed that a dose of 35.7 mg/kg body weight significantly reduced the ascitic tumour in DLA-challenged mice and increased the lifespan with respect to untreated control mice. PMID:27429805

  3. Polyphyllin D exerts potent anti-tumour effects on Lewis cancer cells under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ma, D-D; Lu, H-X; Xu, L-S; Xiao, W

    2009-01-01

    Paris polyphylla has been used to treat cancer in China for many years and components of the plant, such as polyphyllin D, may have potent antiproliferative effects in vitro. To investigate the potential antitumour effects of polyphyllin D on cancer cells under hypoxia, Lewis lung cancer cells and mouse tracheal epithelial cells were cultured with or without polyphyllin D under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Proliferation and apoptosis of cells were assayed. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1alpha) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA. Polyphyllin D decreased cell proliferation, increased apoptosis and inhibited expression of HIF-1alpha and VEGF mRNAs in Lewis cells. These effects were greater under hypoxic than normoxic conditions. Polyphyllin D did not show a cytotoxic effect in non-tumour cells (mouse skin fibroblasts and tracheal epithelial cells). These results suggest that polyphyllin D potentially has anticancer effects in vitro under hypoxia.

  4. Antiangiogenesis response of endothelial cells to the antitumour drug 10-methoxy-9-nitrocamptothecin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaochun; Luo, Peihua; Yang, Bo; He, Qiaojun

    2006-11-01

    10-Methoxy-9-nitrocamptothecin (MONCPT), a topoisomerase I inhibitor, exhibited high anticancer activity in solid tumour xenograft animal models in our previous study. We hypothesized that this phenomenon was associated with antiangiogenesis response. In the present study, we found that MONCPT exhibited high antiproliferation action in human EA.hy926 endothelial cells and the IC(50) value was 0.13+/-0.04microM (MTT assay). With AO/EB stain, MONCPT (50-5000nM)-mediated apoptosis was observed in EA.hy926 cells, and the similar results were shown in flow cytometry assay, the percentage of apoptotic cells induced by MONCPT (50-5000nM) was 9.2-58.5%. In Chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay, MONCPT (1-5microg) resulted in a dose-dependent angiogenic inhibition. In addition, MONCPT significantly inhibited chemotactic-migration invasion on gelatin and tube formation on Matrigel of HUVECs. These results suggest that MONCPT has potential property for inhibiting angiogenesis which is involved in its antitumour activity.

  5. NIR-driven Smart Theranostic Nanomedicine for On-demand Drug Release and Synergistic Antitumour Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pengfei; Zheng, Mingbin; Luo, Zhenyu; Gong, Ping; Gao, Guanhui; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2015-09-01

    Smart nanoparticles (NPs) that respond to external and internal stimulations have been developing to achieve optimal drug release in tumour. However, applying these smart NPs to attain high antitumour performance is hampered by limited drug carriers and inefficient spatiotemporal control. Here we report a noninvasive NIR-driven, temperature-sensitive DI-TSL (DOX/ICG-loaded temperature sensitive liposomes) co-encapsulating doxorubicin (DOX) and indocyanine green (ICG). This theranostic system applies thermo-responsive lipid to controllably release drug, utilizes the fluorescence (FL) of DOX/ICG to real-time trace the distribution of NPs, and employs DOX/ICG to treat cancer by chemo/photothermal therapy. DI-TSL exhibits uniform size distribution, excellent FL/size stability, enhanced response to NIR-laser, and 3 times increased drug release through laser irradiation. After endocytosis by MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells, DI-TSL in cellular endosomes can cause hyperthermia through laser irradiation, then endosomes are disrupted and DI-TSL ‘opens’ to release DOX simultaneously for increased cytotoxicity. Furthermore, DI-TSL shows laser-controlled release of DOX in tumour, enhanced ICG and DOX retention by 7 times and 4 times compared with free drugs. Thermo-sensitive DI-TSL manifests high efficiency to promote cell apoptosis, and completely eradicate tumour without side-effect. DI-TSL may provide a smart strategy to release drugs on demand for combinatorial cancer therapy.

  6. Anti-tumour strategies aiming to target tumour-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoqiang; Mo, Chunfen; Wang, Yongsheng; Wei, Dandan; Xiao, Hengyi

    2013-01-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent a predominant population of inflammatory cells that present in solid tumours. TAMs are mostly characterized as alternatively activated M2-like macrophages and are known to orchestrate nearly all stages of tumour progression. Experimental investigations indicate that TAMs contribute to drug-resistance and radio-protective effects, and clinical evidence shows that an elevated number of TAMs and their M2 profile are correlated with therapy failure and poor prognosis in cancer patients. Recently, many studies on TAM-targeted strategies have made significant progress and some pilot works have achieved encouraging results. Among these, connections between some anti-tumour drugs and their influence on TAMs have been suggested. In this review, we will summarize recent advances in TAM-targeted strategies for tumour therapy. Based on the proposed mechanisms, those strategies are grouped into four categories: (i) inhibiting macrophage recruitment; (ii) suppressing TAM survival; (iii) enhancing M1-like tumoricidal activity of TAMs; (iv) blocking M2-like tumour-promoting activity of TAMs. It is desired that further attention be drawn to this research field and more effort be made to promote TAM-targeted tumour therapy. PMID:23113570

  7. Antitumoural activity of viniferin-enriched extracts from Vitis vinifera L. cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, L; Innocenti, M; Santamaria, A R; Bigagli, E; Pasqua, G; Mulinacci, N

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of stilbenes from different cultivars of Vitis vinifera on tumour proliferation. Extracts were obtained from elicited V. vinifera cell cultures and characterised by HPLC/DAD/MS. Cell growth was evaluated in four human cancer cell lines and in normal human fibroblasts. The cells were exposed to the extracts or to trans-resveratrol, used as reference molecule, for 48 h, at 1-10 μM concentrations of total stilbenoids. All the extracts exhibited antiproliferative activity, mediated by modulation of the cell cycle and induction of cytotoxicity in cancer but not in normal cell lines, and positively correlated with the content in dimeric stilbenoids. The Alphonse Lavallée extract was the most active, and the obtained stilbenoid fraction resulted 8-10 times more active than trans-resveratrol. Extracts from V. vinifera cell cultures could represent new sources of active stilbenoid compounds to be further assayed in in vivo studies for their antitumoural properties.

  8. Mariculture and natural production of the antitumoural (+)-discodermolide by the Caribbean marine sponge Discodermia dissoluta.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Cesar; Valderrama, Katherine; Zea, Sven; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2013-10-01

    Biotechnological research on marine organisms, such as ex situ or in situ aquaculture and in vitro cell culture, is being conducted to produce bioactive metabolites for biomedical and industrial uses. The Caribbean marine sponge Discodermia dissoluta is the source of (+)-discodermolide, a potent antitumoural polyketide that has reached clinical trials. This sponge usually lives at depths greater than 30 m, but at Santa Marta (Colombia) there is a shallower population, which has made it logistically possible to investigate for the first time, on ways to supply discodermolide. We thus performed in situ, 6-month fragment culture trials to assess the performance of this sponge in terms of growth and additional discodermolide production and studied possible factors that influence the variability of discodermolide concentrations in the wild. Sponge fragments cultured in soft mesh bags suspended from horizontal lines showed high survivorship (93 %), moderate growth (28 % increase in volume) and an overall rise (33 %) in the discodermolide concentration, equivalent to average additional production of 8 μg of compound per millilitre of sponge. The concentration of discodermolide in wild sponges ranged from 8 to 40 μg mL(-1). Locality was the only factor related to discodermolide variation in the wild, and there were greater concentrations in peripheral vs. basal portions of the sponge, and in clean vs. fouled individuals. As natural growth and regeneration rates can be higher than culture growth rates, there is room for improving techniques to sustainably produce discodermolide.

  9. Antibiotic Application and Emergence of Multiple Antibiotic Resistance (MAR) in Global Catfish Aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Li-Oon; Effarizah, M E; Goni, Abatcha Mustapha; Rusul, Gulam

    2016-06-01

    Catfish is one of the most cultivated species worldwide. Antibiotics are usually used in catfish farming as therapeutic and prophylactic agents. In the USA, only oxytetracycline, a combination of sulfadimethoxine and ormetoprim, and florfenicol are approved by the Food Drug Administration for specific fish species (e.g., catfish and salmonids) and their specific diseases. Misuse of antibiotics as prophylactic agents in disease prevention, however, is common and contributes in the development of antibiotic resistance. Various studies had reported on antibiotic residues and/or resistance in farmed species, feral fish, water column, sediments, and, in a lesser content, among farm workers. Ninety percent of the world aquaculture production is carried out in developing countries, which lack regulations and enforcement on the use of antibiotics. Hence, efforts are needed to promote the development and enforcement of such a regulatory structure. Alternatives to antibiotics such as antibacterial vaccines, bacteriophages and their lysins, and probiotics have been applied to curtail the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the imprudent application of antibiotics in aquaculture.

  10. Exploring antibiotic use and practices in a Malaysian community.

    PubMed

    Fatokun, Omotayo

    2014-06-01

    In Malaysia, antibacterial agents are among the most utilized drugs. There has been an increase in their use in recent years, contributing to an increase of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). This study explores the pattern of antibiotic use and practices in a Malaysian community and identifies the variables associated with a likelihood of non-compliance with a course of antibiotic treatment. The study was conducted in Cheras, a community located to the south-east of Kuala Lumpur, the capital city of Malaysia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 250 individuals, using an interviewer-administered questionnaire in Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Frequency of antibiotic use, sources of antibiotics, use of antibiotics without prescription, discontinuation of antibiotic treatment, antibiotic resistance awareness, handling of unused antibiotics, and association between respondents characteristics and compliance with a course of antibiotic treatment. Approximately 36 % of the participants (n = 91) had taken antibiotics in the year of the study. The majority (66.8 %) obtained antibiotics from clinics. Almost 80 % of the participants had never obtained antibiotics without a doctor's prescription. Nearly 55 % discontinued the course of antibiotics once symptoms disappeared. The most common method of disposing leftover antibiotics was throwing them into the household rubbish bin (78.8 %). Only 6.4 % of participants returned leftover antibiotics to the pharmacist or doctor. Univariate analysis revealed that male gender (p = 0.04), lack of knowledge of antibiotic functions (p < 0.0001), and lack of awareness of antibiotic resistance (p < 0.0001) were all significantly associated with a greater likelihood of non-compliance with a full course of prescribed antibiotic treatment. Most individuals in the Malaysian community obtained antibiotics through prescription. Non-completion of a course of antibiotic treatment and improper disposal of unused antibiotics need to be

  11. Field Wound Care: Prophylactic Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Murray, Clinton K

    2017-06-01

    Adequate management of wounds requires numerous interventions, one of which is the appropriate use of antimicrobials to attempt to minimize the risk of excess morbidity or mortality without increasing toxicity or multidrug resistant bacterial acquisition. There are numerous recommendations and opinions for not only the use of systemic prophylactic antimicrobials, but also the agent, dose, route, and duration. To best address the implementation of systemic antimicrobials in a field scenario, one must weigh the factors that go into that decision and then determine the best agents possible. The epidemiologic triangle (ie, the host, the agent, and the environment) forms the basis for selecting the correct prophylactic antibiotic for field wound care. Extreme conditions can be encountered in both military and nonmilitary systems, requiring a unique selection process to make the right antibiotic choice. A modifiable weighted matrix, recommended previously for point of injury combat casualty care, assists in selecting the best oral and intravenous/intramuscular agent based on the epidemiologic risk determination. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Antibiotic use in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yurdakök, M

    1998-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a life-threatening emergency and any delay in treatment may cause death. Initial signs of neonatal sepsis are slight and nonspecific. Therefore, in suspected sepsis, two or three days empirical antibiotic therapy should begin immediately after cultures have been obtained without awaiting the results. Antibiotics should be reevaluated when the results of the cultures and susceptibility tests are available. If the cultures are negative and the clinical findings are well, antibiotics should be stopped. Because of the nonspecific nature of neonatal sepsis, especially in small preterm infants, physicians continue antibiotics once started. If a baby has pneumonia or what appears to be sepsis, antibiotics should not be stopped, although cultures are negative. The duration of therapy depends on the initial response to the appropriate antibiotics but should be 10 to 14 days in most infants with sepsis and minimal or absent focal infection. In infants who developed sepsis during the first week of life, empirical therapy must cover group B streptococci, Enterobacteriaceae (especially E. coli) and Listeria monocytogenes. Penicillin or ampicillin plus an aminoglycoside is usually effective against all these organisms. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infants who developed sepsis beyond the first days of life must cover the organisms associated with early-onset sepsis as well as hospital-acquired pathogens such as staphylococci, enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Penicillin or ampicillin and an aminoglycoside combination may also be used in the initial therapy of late-onset sepsis as in cases with early-onset sepsis. In nosocomial infections, netilmicin or amikacin should be preferred. In cases showing increased risk of staphylococcal infection (e.g. presence of vascular catheter) or Pseudomonas infection (e.g. presence of typical skin lesions), antistaphylococcal or anti-Pseudomonas agents may be preferred in the initial empirical therapy. In

  13. Antibiotic resistance in hospitals: a ward-specific random effect model in a low antibiotic consumption environment.

    PubMed

    Aldrin, Magne; Raastad, Ragnhild; Tvete, Ingunn Fride; Berild, Dag; Frigessi, Arnoldo; Leegaard, Truls; Monnet, Dominique L; Walberg, Mette; Müller, Fredrik

    2013-04-15

    Association between previous antibiotic use and emergence of antibiotic resistance has been reported for several microorganisms. The relationship has been extensively studied, and although the causes of antibiotic resistance are multi-factorial, clear evidence of antibiotic use as a major risk factor exists. Most studies are carried out in countries with high consumption of antibiotics and corresponding high levels of antibiotic resistance, and currently, little is known whether and at what level the associations are detectable in a low antibiotic consumption environment. We conduct an ecological, retrospective study aimed at determining the impact of antibiotic consumption on antibiotic-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in three hospitals in Norway, a country with low levels of antibiotic use. We construct a sophisticated statistical model to capture such low signals. To reduce noise, we conduct our study at hospital ward level. We propose a random effect Poisson or binomial regression model, with a reparametrisation that allows us to reduce the number of parameters. Inference is likelihood based. Through scenario simulation, we study the potential effects of reduced or increased antibiotic use. Results clearly indicate that the effects of consumption on resistance are present under conditions with relatively low use of antibiotic agents. This strengthens the recommendation on prudent use of antibiotics, even when consumption is relatively low. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The Ecology of Antibiotic Use in the ICU: Homogeneous Prescribing of Cefepime but Not Tazocin Selects for Antibiotic Resistant Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ginn, Andrew N.; Wiklendt, Agnieszka M.; Gidding, Heather F.; George, Narelle; O’Driscoll, James S.; Partridge, Sally R.; O’Toole, Brian I.; Perri, Rita A.; Faoagali, Joan; Gallagher, John E.; Lipman, Jeffrey; Iredell, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Antibiotic homogeneity is thought to drive resistance but in vivo data are lacking. In this study, we determined the impact of antibiotic homogeneity per se, and of cefepime versus antipseudomonal penicillin/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations (APP-β), on the likelihood of infection or colonisation with antibiotic resistant bacteria and/or two commonly resistant nosocomial pathogens (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). A secondary question was whether antibiotic cycling was associated with adverse outcomes including mortality, length of stay, and antibiotic resistance. Methods We evaluated clinical and microbiological outcomes in two similar metropolitan ICUs, which both alternated cefepime with APP-β in four-month cycles. All microbiological isolates and commensal samples were analysed for the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria including MRSA and P. aeruginosa. Results Length of stay, mortality and overall antibiotic resistance were unchanged after sixteen months. However, increased colonisation and infection by antibiotic-resistant bacteria were observed in cefepime cycles, returning to baseline in APP-β cycles. Cefepime was the strongest risk factor for acquisition of antibiotic-resistant infection. Conclusions Ecological effects of different β-lactam antibiotics may be more important than specific activity against the causative agents or the effect of antibiotic homogeneity in selection for antibiotic resistance. This has important implications for antibiotic policy. PMID:22761698

  15. [Probiotics for the prevention of antibiotic-induced diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Eser, A; Thalhammer, F; Burghuber, F; Högenauer, C; Stockenhuber, F; Wenisch, C; Widhalm, K; Reinisch, W

    2012-10-01

    Between 5 and 49% of patients treated with antibiotics suffer from diarrhoea. Principally all microbial agents can cause diarrhoea, especially oral agents like cephalosporines, clindamycin, broad-spectrum penicillins, and quinolones of the 3  rd and 4th generation. Manifestations of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea range from mild self-limiting forms to severe life-threatening courses. The potentially most severe form of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea is caused by Clostridium diffcile accounting for approx. 25  % of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. In the past two decades a broad spectrum of different probiotic strains has been evaluated for the primary prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea in children and adults. Based on their efficacy and clinical data, different levels of evidence and recommendations are emerging on the preventive use of probiotics in antibiotic-associated diarrhoea.

  16. Optimizing antibiotic therapy in the intensive care unit setting

    PubMed Central

    Kollef, Marin H

    2001-01-01

    Antibiotics are one of the most common therapies administered in the intensive care unit setting. In addition to treating infections, antibiotic use contributes to the emergence of resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. Therefore, avoiding unnecessary antibiotic use and optimizing the administration of antimicrobial agents will help to improve patient outcomes while minimizing further pressures for resistance. This review will present several strategies aimed at achieving optimal use of antimicrobial agents. It is important to note that each intensive care unit should have a program in place which monitors antibiotic utilization and its effectiveness. Only in this way can the impact of interventions aimed at improving antibiotic use (e.g. antibiotic rotation, de-escalation therapy) be evaluated at the local level. PMID:11511331

  17. Antibodies: an alternative for antibiotics?

    PubMed

    Berghman, L R; Abi-Ghanem, D; Waghela, S D; Ricke, S C

    2005-04-01

    In 1967, the success of vaccination programs, combined with the seemingly unstoppable triumph of antibiotics, prompted the US Surgeon General to declare that "it was time to close the books on infectious diseases." We now know that the prediction was overly optimistic and that the fight against infectious diseases is here to stay. During the last 20 yr, infectious diseases have indeed made a staggering comeback for a variety of reasons, including resistance against existing antibiotics. As a consequence, several alternatives to antibiotics are currently being considered or reconsidered. Passive immunization (i.e., the administration of more or less pathogen-specific antibodies to the patient) prior to or after exposure to the disease-causing agent is one of those alternative strategies that was almost entirely abandoned with the introduction of chemical antibiotics but that is now gaining interest again. This review will discuss the early successes and limitations of passive immunization, formerly referred to as "serum therapy," the current use of antibody administration for prophylaxis or treatment of infectious diseases in agriculture, and, finally, recent developments in the field of antibody engineering and "molecular farming" of antibodies in various expression systems. Especially the potential of producing therapeutic antibodies in crops that are routine dietary components of farm animals, such as corn and soy beans, seems to hold promise for future application in the fight against infectious diseases.

  18. Sweet antibiotics - the role of glycosidic residues in antibiotic and antitumor activity and their randomization.

    PubMed

    Kren, Vladimír; Rezanka, Tomás

    2008-08-01

    A large number of antibiotics are glycosides. In numerous cases the glycosidic residues are crucial to their activity; sometimes, glycosylation only improves their pharmacokinetic parameters. Recent developments in molecular glycobiology have improved our understanding of aglycone vs. glycoside activities and made it possible to develop new, more active or more effective glycodrugs based on these findings - a very illustrative recent example is vancomycin. The majority of attention has been devoted to glycosidic antibiotics including their past, present, and probably future position in antimicrobial therapy. The role of the glycosidic residue in the biological activity of glycosidic antibiotics, and the attendant targeting and antibiotic selectivity mediated by glycone and aglycone in antibiotics some antitumor agents is discussed here in detail. Chemical and enzymatic modifications of aglycones in antibiotics, including their synthesis, are demonstrated on various examples, with particular emphasis on the role of specific and mutant glycosyltransferases and glycorandomization in the preparation of these compounds. The last section of this review describes and explains the interactions of the glycone moiety of the antibiotics with DNA and especially the design and structure-activity relationship of glycosidic antibiotics, including their classification based on their aglycone and glycosidic moiety. The new enzymatic methodology 'glycorandomization' enabled the preparation of glycoside libraries and opened up new ways to prepare optimized or entirely novel glycoside antibiotics.

  19. Generic antibiotic drugs: is effectiveness guaranteed?

    PubMed

    Gauzit, R; Lakdhari, M

    2012-04-01

    There are recently published arguments suggesting all generic antibiotic drugs do not present the full reliability needed to claim therapeutic equivalence with branded drugs. The problem is especially crucial for generic intravenous drugs, which do not need any bioequivalence study before they can be marketed. The evaluation of generic antibiotic drug effectiveness yields an important dispersion of results according to antibiotic agents and for the same antibiotic agent all generic drugs are not equivalent. There are differences at all levels: drug components, levels of impurity, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship, in vitro effectiveness, therapeutic effectiveness in experimental models, etc. So that finally, the specifications approved in the initial submission file of a brand name drugs are not always respected by a generic drug. There is also a specific problem of taste and treatment acceptability for pediatric oral antibiotic drugs. Available data on clinical effectiveness is excessively rare. The marketing of a great number of generic drugs of the same specialty is followed by a sometimes very important increase of their use, even in countries where consumption is low. The corollary of this increase in consumption is an increase of resistance, and this is especially true for oral fluoroquinolones. Even if most of this information needs to be verified, it seems necessary to review regulations for marketing authorization of generic antibiotic drugs.

  20. Inhibition of all-TRANS-retinoic acid metabolism by R116010 induces antitumour activity

    PubMed Central

    Van heusden, J; Van Ginckel, R; Bruwiere, H; Moelans, P; Janssen, B; Floren, W; van der Leede, B J; van Dun, J; Sanz, G; Venet, M; Dillen, L; Van Hove, C; Willemsens, G; Janicot, M; Wouters, W

    2002-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid is a potent inhibitor of cell proliferation and inducer of differentiation. However, the clinical use of all-trans-retinoic acid in the treatment of cancer is significantly hampered by its toxicity and the prompt emergence of resistance, believed to be caused by increased all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism. Inhibitors of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism may therefore prove valuable in the treatment of cancer. In this study, we characterize R116010 as a new anticancer drug that is a potent inhibitor of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism. In vitro, R116010 potently inhibits all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism in intact T47D cells with an IC50-value of 8.7 nM. In addition, R116010 is a selective inhibitor as indicated by its inhibition profile for several other cytochrome P450-mediated reactions. In T47D cell proliferation assays, R116010 by itself has no effect on cell proliferation. However, in combination with all-trans-retinoic acid, R116010 enhances the all-trans-retinoic acid-mediated antiproliferative activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In vivo, the growth of murine oestrogen-independent TA3-Ha mammary tumours is significantly inhibited by R116010 at doses as low as 0.16 mg kg−1. In conclusion, R116010 is a highly potent and selective inhibitor of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism, which is able to enhance the biological activity of all-trans-retinoic acid, thereby exhibiting antitumour activity. R116010 represents a novel and promising anticancer drug with an unique mechanism of action. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 605–611. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600056 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11870544

  1. Inhibition of all-TRANS-retinoic acid metabolism by R116010 induces antitumour activity.

    PubMed

    Van Heusden, J; Van Ginckel, R; Bruwiere, H; Moelans, P; Janssen, B; Floren, W; van der Leede, B J; van Dun, J; Sanz, G; Venet, M; Dillen, L; Van Hove, C; Willemsens, G; Janicot, M; Wouters, W

    2002-02-12

    All-trans-retinoic acid is a potent inhibitor of cell proliferation and inducer of differentiation. However, the clinical use of all-trans-retinoic acid in the treatment of cancer is significantly hampered by its toxicity and the prompt emergence of resistance, believed to be caused by increased all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism. Inhibitors of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism may therefore prove valuable in the treatment of cancer. In this study, we characterize R116010 as a new anticancer drug that is a potent inhibitor of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism. In vitro, R116010 potently inhibits all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism in intact T47D cells with an IC(50)-value of 8.7 nM. In addition, R116010 is a selective inhibitor as indicated by its inhibition profile for several other cytochrome P450-mediated reactions. In T47D cell proliferation assays, R116010 by itself has no effect on cell proliferation. However, in combination with all-trans-retinoic acid, R116010 enhances the all-trans-retinoic acid-mediated antiproliferative activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In vivo, the growth of murine oestrogen-independent TA3-Ha mammary tumours is significantly inhibited by R116010 at doses as low as 0.16 mg kg(-1). In conclusion, R116010 is a highly potent and selective inhibitor of all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism, which is able to enhance the biological activity of all-trans-retinoic acid, thereby exhibiting antitumour activity. R116010 represents a novel and promising anticancer drug with an unique mechanism of action.

  2. [Glucuronidation of antitumour therapeutics--detoxification, mechanism of resistance or prodrug formation?].

    PubMed

    Mróz, Anna; Mazerska, Zofia

    2015-12-31

    The physiological role of phase I and II of xenobiotic biotransformations is their detoxification and better excretion outside the organism. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) being the enzymes of phase II metabolism catalyse the conjugation of glucuronic acid to the lipophilic substrate by its specific nucleophilic group. UGT isoenzymes of various substrate specificities and different expression profiles in selected tissues belong to the large UGT superfamily. Usually, glucuronidation is the detoxification process, but sometimes (morphine, tamoxifen) glucuronides express biological activity higher than or comparable to the native compound. The level of UGT gene expression is individual for patients, because of their genetic status as well as epigenetic conditions. Also, xenobiotics are able to modulate UGT level and gene expression by the interaction with nuclear receptors. Moreover, one can find a lower level of UGT in the tumour compared to normal tissue, which results in the protection against deactivation of the drug and in the promotion of its selective activity in tumor tissue. On the other hand, UGT activity is considered as the possible cause of resistance to chemotherapy. Metabolism by hepatic and intestinal UGT isoenzymes is responsible for the "first-pass effect", whereas acquired resistance consists in the induction of UGT gene expression by the chemotherapeutic or its metabolite. Moreover, UGT induction can be associated with the induction of membrane transporters, particularly proteins of the ABC family, responsible for drug excretion outside the cell. The above resistance effects can be fortified by the overexpression of selected UGT isoenzymes sometimes observed in specific types of tumours. It is also considered that many advanced tumours are characterized by a higher level of β-glucuronidase. This enzyme has a chance to be the molecular target of directed antitumour therapy, as it catalyses β-glucuronide hydrolysis, leading to active aglycones.

  3. Systemic anti-tumour effects of local thermally sensitive liposome therapy.

    PubMed

    Viglianti, Benjamin L; Dewhirst, Mark W; Boruta, R J; Park, Ji-Young; Landon, Chelsea; Fontanella, Andrew N; Guo, Jing; Manzoor, Ashley; Hofmann, Christina L; Palmer, Gregory M

    2014-09-01

    There were two primary objectives of this study: (1) to determine whether treatment of a tumour site with systemically administered thermally sensitive liposomes and local hyperthermia (HT) for triggered release would have dual anti-tumour effect on the primary heated tumour as well as an unheated secondary tumour in a distant site, and (2) to determine the ability of non-invasive optical spectroscopy to predict treatment outcome. The optical end points studied included drug levels, metabolic markers flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H), and physiological markers (total haemoglobin (Hb) and Hb oxygen saturation) before and after treatment. Mice were inoculated with SKOV3 human ovarian carcinoma in both hind legs. One tumour was selected for local hyperthermia and subsequent systemic treatment. There were four treatment groups: control, DOXIL (non-thermally sensitive liposomes containing doxorubicin), and two different thermally sensitive liposome formulations containing doxorubicin. Optical spectroscopy was performed prior to therapy, immediately after treatment, and 6, 12, and 24 h post therapy. Tumour growth delay was seen with DOXIL and the thermally sensitive liposomes in the tumours that were heated, similar to previous studies. Tumour growth delay was also seen in the opposing tumour in the thermally sensitive liposome-treated groups. Optical spectroscopy demonstrated correlation between growth delay, doxorubicin (DOX) levels, and changes of NAD(P)H from baseline levels. Hb and Hb saturation were not correlated with growth delay. The study demonstrated that thermally sensitive liposomes affect the primary heated tumour as well as systemic efficacy. Non-invasive optical spectroscopy methods were shown to be useful in predicting efficacy at early time points post-treatment.

  4. Nonmedical Uses of Antibiotics: Time to Restrict Their Use?

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Richard William; Vyas, Hrushi; Piddock, Laura Jane Violet

    2015-01-01

    The global crisis of antibiotic resistance has reached a point where, if action is not taken, human medicine will enter a postantibiotic world and simple injuries could once again be life threatening. New antibiotics are needed urgently, but better use of existing agents is just as important. More appropriate use of antibiotics in medicine is vital, but the extensive use of antibiotics outside medical settings is often overlooked. Antibiotics are commonly used in animal husbandry, bee-keeping, fish farming and other forms of aquaculture, ethanol production, horticulture, antifouling paints, food preservation, and domestically. This provides multiple opportunities for the selection and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Given the current crisis, it is vital that the nonmedical use of antibiotics is critically examined and that any nonessential use halted. PMID:26444324

  5. Antibiotics, Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes: Aerial Transport from Cattle Feed Yards via Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    McEachran, Andrew D.; Blackwell, Brett R.; Hanson, J. Delton; Wooten, Kimberly J.; Mayer, Gregory D.; Cox, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance has become a global health threat and is often linked with overuse and misuse of clinical and veterinary chemotherapeutic agents. Modern industrial-scale animal feeding operations rely extensively on veterinary pharmaceuticals, including antibiotics, to augment animal growth. Following excretion, antibiotics are transported through the environment via runoff, leaching, and land application of manure; however, airborne transport from feed yards has not been characterized. Objectives: The goal of this study was to determine the extent to which antibiotics, antibiotic resistance genes (ARG), and ruminant-associated microbes are aerially dispersed via particulate matter (PM) derived from large-scale beef cattle feed yards. Methods: PM was collected downwind and upwind of 10 beef cattle feed yards. After extraction from PM, five veterinary antibiotics were quantified via high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, ARG were quantified via targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and microbial community diversity was analyzed via 16S rRNA amplification and sequencing. Results: Airborne PM derived from feed yards facilitated dispersal of several veterinary antibiotics, as well as microbial communities containing ARG. Concentrations of several antibiotics in airborne PM immediately downwind of feed yards ranged from 0.5 to 4.6 μg/g of PM. Microbial communities of PM collected downwind of feed yards were enriched with ruminant-associated taxa and were distinct when compared to upwind PM assemblages. Furthermore, genes encoding resistance to tetracycline antibiotics were significantly more abundant in PM collected downwind of feed yards as compared to upwind. Conclusions: Wind-dispersed PM from feed yards harbors antibiotics, bacteria, and ARGs. Citation: McEachran AD, Blackwell BR, Hanson JD, Wooten KJ, Mayer GD, Cox SB, Smith PN. 2015. Antibiotics, bacteria, and antibiotic

  6. Combating Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Combating Antibiotic Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... however, have contributed to a phenomenon known as antibiotic resistance. This resistance develops when potentially harmful bacteria change ...

  7. Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment. C. difficile infection C. difficile is a toxin-producing bacteria that causes antibiotic-associated colitis, which ... doctor feels they're necessary. Antibiotics can treat bacterial infections, but they won't help viral infections, ...

  8. Carcinogenicity of antineoplastic agents in man.

    PubMed

    Rieche, K

    1984-03-01

    Review of the literature shows that: Anticancer drugs are in all probability mostly also carcinogenic. Alkylating agents such as melphalan, chlorambucil and cyclophosphamide seem to lead to the highest rate of second malignancies. Second malignancies after antitumour drugs are mostly acute leukaemias. Conditions which could influence the carcinogenicity of an antitumour drug are (a) its carcinogenic potency; (b) long-term administration; (c) the total dose used and (d) long-term survival of the patient. Irradiation and chemotherapy seem to have the greatest carcinogenic potential, e.g. in malignant lymphomas. The role of immunosuppression as a co-carcinogenic factor is difficult to estimate. Although transplant patients on anticancer drugs for immunosuppression have a higher risk of reticulosarcomas, but not of solid tumours, there is no evidence to suppose that in general immunosuppression and carcinogenicity are directly related. There is no reason to abandon intensive chemotherapy regimes if they lead to significant therapeutic results on the grounds of possible carcinogenicity of these drugs.

  9. What is an "ideal" antibiotic? Discovery challenges and path forward.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheo B; Young, Katherine; Silver, Lynn L

    2017-06-01

    An ideal antibiotic is an antibacterial agent that kills or inhibits the growth of all harmful bacteria in a host, regardless of site of infection without affecting beneficial gut microbes (gut flora) or causing undue toxicity to the host. Sadly, no such antibiotics exist. What exist are many effective Gram-positive antibacterial agents as well as broad-spectrum agents that provide treatment of certain Gram-negative bacteria but not holistic treatment of all bacteria. However effectiveness of all antibacterial agents is being rapidly eroded due to resistance. This viewpoint provides an overview of today's antibiotics, challenges and potential path forward of discovery and development of new (ideal) antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ciprofloxacin prophylaxis delays initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and reduces the overall use of antimicrobial agents during induction therapy for acute leukaemia: A single-centre study.

    PubMed

    Hallböök, Helene; Lidström, Anna-Karin; Pauksens, Karlis

    2016-01-01

    Due to an outbreak of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, the routine use of fluoroquinolone prophylaxis was questioned. As a result, this study was conducted with the aim to evaluate the impact of ciprofloxacin-prophylaxis on the use of broad-spectrum antibioctics and anti-mycotics. A cohort of 139 consecutive patients with acute leukaemia treated with remission-inducing induction chemotherapy between 2004-2012 at the Department of Haematology in Uppsala University Hospital was analysed. Fifty-three patients (38%) received broad-spectrum antibiotics at the initiation of chemotherapy and were not eligible for prophylaxis. Of the remaining patients, the initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotics was delayed by 3 days in those receiving ciprofloxacin prophylaxis (n = 47) compared with those receiving no prophylaxis (n = 39). The median duration of systemic antibiotic treatment was 6 days shorter in patients receiving ciprofloxacin prophylaxis (12 vs 18 days; p = 0.0005) and the cumulative (total) median days on systemic antibiotic treatment was shortened by 8 days (15 vs 23 days, p = 0.0008). Piperacillin/tazobactam (p = 0.02), carbapenems (p = 0.05) and empiric broad-spectrum antifungals (p < 0.01) were used significantly less often when ciprofloxacin prophylaxis was given. Ciprofloxacin prophylaxis delayed empiric therapy by 3 days and reduced overall antibiotic use in this study. These benefits must be evaluated vs the risks of development of resistant bacterial strains, making fluoroquinolone prophylaxis an open question for debate.

  11. Specific antitumour immunity of HIFU-activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes after adoptive transfusion in tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Ran, Li-Feng; Xie, Xun-Peng; Xia, Ji-Zhu; Xie, Fang-Lin; Fan, Yan-Min; Wu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the specific anti-tumour immunity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) activated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) after adoptive transfer in a murine tumour model. H22 tumour-bearing mice were treated by either HIFU or sham-HIFU, while naïve syngeneic mice were used as controls. They were sacrificed and the spleens were harvested 14 days after HIFU. T lymphocytes were obtained from the spleens, and then adoptively transferred into 40 mice each bearing a 3-day implanted H22 tumour. On day 14 after adoptive transfer, 10 mice were sacrificed in each group for assessment of the number of tumour-infiltrating T lymphocytes and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) secreting cells. The remaining 30 mice were continuously observed for 60 days, and tumour growth, progression and survival were recorded. HIFU significantly increased peripheral blood CD3(+), CD4(+) levels and CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio (P < 0.05), CTL cytotoxicity (P < 0.01) and IFN-γ and TNF-α secretion (P < 0.01) in H22 tumour-bearing mice. Adoptive transfer of HIFU-activated T lymphocytes into the autologous tumour-bearing mice induced a significant increase of tumour-infiltrating T lymphocytes and IFN-γ-secreting cells (P < 0.001). Compared to the control and sham-HIFU groups, HIFU-activated lymphocytes elicited significant inhibition of in vivo tumour growth (P < 0.01) and progression (P < 0.0001), and longer survival time in the tumour-bearing mice (P < 0.001). HIFU could enhance CTL's specific antitumour immunity. Adoptive transfer of HIFU-activated T lymphocytes could increase local antitumour immunity, and elicit stronger inhibition on tumour growth and progression, with more survival benefit in the autologous tumour-bearing mice.

  12. Potentiation of antitumour activity of docetaxel by combination with trastuzumab in a human prostate cancer xenograft model and underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Legrier, M-E; Oudard, S; Judde, J-G; Guyader, C; de Pinieux, G; Boyé, K; de Cremoux, P; Dutrillaux, B; Poupon, M-F

    2007-01-01

    Antitumour activity of docetaxel (Taxotere®) in hormone-dependent (HD) and hormone-independent (HID) prostate cancer PAC120 xenograft model was previously reported, and its level was associated with HER2 protein expression. In the present study, we evaluate the antitumour effects of docetaxel combined with trastuzumab (Herceptin®), an anti-HER2 antibody. Although trastuzumab alone had no effect on tumour growth, it potentiated the antitumour activity of docetaxel in HD tumours and more strongly in HID variants. Using the HID28 variant, we show that docetaxel treatment of tumour-bearing mice induces an increased HER2 mRNA expression of the tyrosine kinase receptor of 25-fold 24 h after docetaxel treatment, while HER2 protein and p-AKT decreased. This was followed by an increase of HER2 protein 3 days (two-fold) after docetaxel treatment and by a strong HER2 release in the serum of treated mice; expression of phospho-ERK, p27, BCL2 and HSP70 concomitantly increased. Similar molecular alterations were induced by docetaxel plus trastuzumab combination, except for that there was a transient and complete disappearance of AR and HSP90 proteins 24 h after treatment. We show that in addition to its known effects on tubulin and mitotic spindles, docetaxel induces complex signalisation pathway mechanisms in surviving cells, including HER2, which can be pharmacologically targeted. This study suggests that the docetaxel/trastuzumab combination may prove an effective therapeutic approach for HER2-expressing hormone-refractory prostate cancer. PMID:17211467

  13. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William R; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) enterococci are important nosocomial pathogens and a growing clinical challenge. These organisms have developed resistance to virtually all antimicrobials currently used in clinical practice using a diverse number of genetic strategies. Due to this ability to recruit antibiotic resistance determinants, MDR enterococci display a wide repertoire of antibiotic resistance mechanisms including modification of drug targets, inactivation of therapeutic agents, overexpression of efflux pumps and a sophisticated cell envelope adaptive response that promotes survival in the human host and the nosocomial environment. MDR enterococci are well adapted to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and can become the dominant flora under antibiotic pressure, predisposing the severely ill and immunocompromised patient to invasive infections. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci is the first step for devising strategies to control the spread of these organisms and potentially establish novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25199988

  14. Empiric Antibiotic Therapy of Nosocomial Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotics are commonly used by physicians to treat various infections. The source of infection and causative organisms are not always apparent during the initial evaluation of the patient, and antibiotics are often given empirically to patients with suspected sepsis. Fear of attempting cephalosporins and carbapenems in penicillin-allergic septic patients may result in significant decrease in the spectrum of antimicrobial coverage. Empiric antibiotic therapy should sufficiently cover all the suspected pathogens, guided by the bacteriologic susceptibilities of the medical center. It is important to understand the major pharmacokinetic properties of antibacterial agents for proper use and to minimize the development of resistance. In several septic patients, negative cultures do not exclude active infection and positive cultures may not represent the actual infection. This article will review the important differences in the spectrum of commonly used antibiotics for nosocomial bacterial infections with a particular emphasis on culture-negative sepsis and colonization.

  15. Gold(I) chloride adducts of 1,3-bis(di-2-pyridylphosphino)propane: synthesis, structural studies and antitumour activity

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, Anthony S.; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Berners-Price, Susan J.; Koutsantonis, George A.; Skelton, Brian W.; White, Allan H.

    2008-06-30

    The novel water soluble bidentate phosphine ligand 1,3-bis(di-2-pyridylphosphino)propane (d2pypp) has been synthesized by a convenient route involving treatment of 2-pyridyllithium with Cl{sub 2}P(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}PCl{sub 2} and isolation in crystalline form as the hydrochloride salt. The synthesis of the precursor Cl{sub 2}P(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}PCl{sub 2} has been optimized by the use of triphosgene as the chlorinating agent. The 2:1 and 1:2 AuCl:d2pypp adducts have been synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray studies, and shown to be of the form (AuCl){sub 2}({mu}-d2pypp-P,P{prime}) and Au(d2pypp-P,P{prime}){sub 2}Cl(-3.75H{sub 2}O), respectively. The latter is more lipophilic than analogous 1:2 adducts of gold(I) chloride with the diphosphine ligands 1,2-bis(di-n-pyridylphosphino)ethane (dnpype) for n = 2, 3 and 4, based on measurement of the n-octanol-water partition coefficient (log P = -0.46). A single crystal structure determination of the 1:2 Au(I) complex of the 3-pyridyl ethane ligand shows it to be of the form [Au(d3pype-P,P{prime}){sub 2}]Cl {center_dot} 5H{sub 2}O. The in vitro cytotoxic activity of [Au(d2pypp){sub 2}]Cl was assessed in human normal and cancer breast cells and selective toxicity to the cancer cells found. The significance of these results to the antitumour properties of chelated 1:2 Au(I) diphosphine complexes is discussed.

  16. Dinuclear ruthenium complexes display loop isomer selectivity to c-MYC DNA G-quadriplex and exhibit anti-tumour activity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chuping; Liu, Yanan; Liu, Ying; Qin, Xiuying; Zhou, Yanhui; Liu, Jie

    2016-03-01

    G-quadruplex DNA, especially the cellular-myelocytomatosis viral oncogene (c-MYC) is closely associated with cell-cycle regulation, proliferation of tumour cells. In this work, the interaction between the c-MYC and two dinuclear Ru(II) complexes [(bpy)2Ru(bpibp)Ru(bpy)2](ClO4)4 (compound 1) and [(phen)2Ru(bpibp)Ru(phen)2](ClO4)4 (compound 2) have been studied. The data from UV-Visible, PCR-stop and Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) showed that two complexes can stabilize the structure of G-quadruplex in the c-MYC promoter and targeting the G-quadruplex loop isomers. Interestingly, the complex 2 has a greater effect on the 1:2:1 and 2:1:1 loop isomers while the 1 prefers to the 1:2:1 isomers. The mechanism studies revealed that complexes can induce apoptosis in HepG2 cells by generating ROS metabolites, triggering mitochondrial membrane potential loss and down-regulation of P-Akt (Akt also known as protein kinase B), P-p44/42 MAP kinase protein (P-p44/42), and c-MYC. Taken together, these results suggested that the two dinuclear complexes may both be candidates as anti-tumour agents as they may reduce the c-MYC gene expression. {bpibp: 4, 4'-bis (1, 10-phenanthroline-[5, 6-d] imidazole-2-yl)-biphenyl, bpy: 2,2-bipyridine, phen: 1,10-phenanthroline}. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Antibiotic resistance in ocular bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial infections of the eye are common and ophthalmologists are spoilt for choice with a variety of antibiotics available in the market. Antibiotics can be administered in the eye by a number of routes; topical, subconjunctival, subtenon and intraocular. Apart from a gamut of eye drops available, ophthalmologists also have the option of preparing fortified eye drops from parenteral formulations, thereby, achieving high concentrations; often much above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), of antibiotics in ocular tissues during therapy. Antibiotic resistance among ocular pathogens is increasing in parallel with the increase seen over the years in bacteria associated with systemic infections. Although it is believed that the rise in resistant ocular bacterial isolates is linked to the rise in resistant systemic pathogens, recent evidence has correlated the emergence of resistant bacteria in the eye to prior topical antibiotic therapy. One would like to believe that either of these contributes to the emergence of resistance to antibiotics among ocular pathogens. Until recently, ocular pathogens resistant to fluoroquinolones have been minimal but the pattern is currently alarming. The new 8-fluoroquinolone on the scene-besifloxacin, is developed exclusively for ophthalmic use and it is hoped that it will escape the selective pressure for resistance because of lack of systemic use. In addition to development of new antibacterial agents, the strategies to halt or control further development of resistant ocular pathogens should always include judicious use of antibiotics in the treatment of human, animal or plant diseases.

  18. Finding alternatives to antibiotics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens requires new treatments. The availability of new antibiotics has severely declined, and so alternatives to antibiotics need to be considered in both animal agriculture and human medicine. Products for disease prevention are different than products for d...

  19. Systemic antibiotics in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Slots, Jørgen

    2004-11-01

    This position paper addresses the role of systemic antibiotics in the treatment of periodontal disease. Topical antibiotic therapy is not discussed here. The paper was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. The document consists of three sections: 1) concept of antibiotic periodontal therapy; 2) efficacy of antibiotic periodontal therapy; and 3) practical aspects of antibiotic periodontal therapy. The conclusions drawn in this paper represent the position of the American Academy of Periodontology and are intended for the information of the dental profession.

  20. Antibiotic resistance in Chlamydiae.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Rockey, Daniel D

    2010-09-01

    There are few documented reports of antibiotic resistance in Chlamydia and no examples of natural and stable antibiotic resistance in strains collected from humans. While there are several reports of clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to antibiotics, these strains either lost their resistance phenotype in vitro, or lost viability altogether. Differences in procedures for chlamydial culture in the laboratory, low recovery rates of clinical isolates and the unknown significance of heterotypic resistance observed in culture may interfere with the recognition and interpretation of antibiotic resistance. Although antibiotic resistance has not emerged in chlamydiae pathogenic to humans, several lines of evidence suggest they are capable of expressing significant resistant phenotypes. The adept ability of chlamydiae to evolve to antibiotic resistance in vitro is demonstrated by contemporary examples of mutagenesis, recombination and genetic transformation. The isolation of tetracycline-resistant Chlamydia suis strains from pigs also emphasizes their adaptive ability to acquire antibiotic resistance genes when exposed to significant selective pressure.

  1. New antimicrobial molecules and new antibiotic strategies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Castro, Felipe; Naranjo, Olga Rajas; Marco, Javier Aspa; Violán, Jordi Solé

    2009-04-01

    Drug options for treatment of infections are increasingly limited. The pharmaceutical industry has found it difficult to discover new antimicrobial agents, and only two novel classes of antibiotics, the oxazolidinones and the cyclic lipopeptides, have entered the market since the late 1960s. Few new agents have reached the market in the last decade with potential interest for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) treatment, including linezolid (the first oxazolidinone in clinical use), new fluoroquinolones, cefditoren, ertapenem, and telithromycin. Agents currently in clinical development include other novel quinolones and ketolides, broad-spectrum cephalosporin derivatives, faropenem, several glycopeptides, and iclaprim. Other molecules are considered to be promising candidates for the future. In addition to the foregoing agents, alternative treatment approaches have also been introduced into clinical practice, which include the administration of the appropriate antimicrobials in a timely manner and the consideration of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic properties of the agent(s).

  2. Antitumour activity of somatostatin analogues in sporadic, progressive, metastatic pulmonary carcinoids.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Ivana; Le Teuff, Gwénaël; Guigay, Joël; Caramella, Caroline; Berdelou, Amandine; Leboulleux, Sophie; Déandréis, Désirée; Hadoux, Julien; Ducreux, Michel; Duvillard, Pierre; Adam, Julien; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Baudin, Eric; Planchard, David

    2017-04-01

    Antiproliferative activity of somatostatin analogues (SSAs) has been demonstrated in digestive neuroendocrine tumours but few data have been published on pulmonary carcinoids (PC). The aim of this retrospective study was to report the antitumour activity of SSAs in patients with progressive, metastatic PC. Patients with PC and treated with SSA monotherapy were reviewed. Disease was classified according to the tumour slope prior to SSA initiation as rapidly progressive (at least 20% increase in the sum of the longest diameter of target lesions or the appearance of one or more new lesions within 6 months) or slowly progressive (if progression occurred over 6 months). Survival outcomes were progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). We additionally examined the overall response rate and safety. Prognostic factors associated with PFS and OS were sought. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using the Cox model. Among 67 patients reviewed, 61 were included in the study. Forty-one (67%) of them exhibited slowly progressive disease prior to SSAs, 41 (67%) had atypical carcinoids and 29 (48%) had functioning tumours. Forty-six (76%) patients had received SSAs as first-line therapy. The best overall response was stable disease in 47 (77%) patients. The median duration of SSAs was 13.7 months. With a median follow-up of 5.8 years, median PFS and OS were 17.4 (95% CI: 8.7-26.0) and 58.4 (95% CI: 44.2-102.7) months, respectively. Functioning tumours and slowly progressive disease were significantly associated with longer PFS: HR = 0.48 ([95% CI: 0.24-0.95], p = 0.03) and HR = 7.43 ([95% CI: 3.02-18.25], p < 0.0001), respectively. Only functioning tumours remained significantly associated with OS: HR = 0.33 ([95% CI: 0.14-0.79], p = 0.01). Treatment had been discontinued in two patients due to side-effects. Median PFS observed in our study is encouraging for PC patients. Patients with functioning tumours and slowly

  3. Systemic lupus erythematosus induced by anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha therapy: a French national survey.

    PubMed

    De Bandt, Michel; Sibilia, Jean; Le Loët, Xavier; Prouzeau, Sebastian; Fautrel, Bruno; Marcelli, Christian; Boucquillard, Eric; Siame, Jean Louis; Mariette, Xavier

    2005-01-01

    The development of drug-induced lupus remains a matter of concern in patients treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha. The incidence of such adverse effects is unknown. We undertook a retrospective national study to analyse such patients. Between June and October 2003, 866 rheumatology and internal medicine practitioners from all French hospital centres prescribing anti-TNF in rheumatic diseases registered on the website of the 'Club Rhumatismes et Inflammation' were contacted by email to obtain the files of patients with TNF-induced systemic lupus erythematosus. Twenty-two cases were collected, revealing two aspects of these manifestations. Ten patients (six patients receiving infliximab, four patients receiving etanercept) only had anti-DNA antibodies and skin manifestations one could classify as 'limited skin lupus' or 'toxidermia' in a context of autoimmunity, whereas 12 patients (nine patients receiving infliximab, three patients receiving etanercept) had more complete drug-induced lupus with systemic manifestations and at least four American Congress of Rheumatology criteria. One patient had central nervous system manifestations. No patients had lupus nephritis. The signs of lupus occurred within a mean of 9 months (range 3-16 months) in patients treated with infliximab and within a mean of 4 months (range 2-5 months) in patients treated with etanercept. In all cases after diagnosis was determined, anti-TNF was stopped and specific treatment introduced in eight patients: two patients received intravenous methylprednisolone, four patients received oral steroids (15-35 mg/day), and two patients received topical steroids. Lupus manifestations abated within a few weeks (median 8 weeks, standard deviation 3-16) in all patients except one with longer-lasting evolution (6 months). At that time, cautious estimations (unpublished data from Schering Plough Inc. and Wyeth Inc.) indicated that about 7700 patients had been exposed to infliximab and 3000 to

  4. Fruit peel polyphenols demonstrate substantial anti-tumour effects in the model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kubatka, Peter; Kapinová, Andrea; Kello, Martin; Kruzliak, Peter; Kajo, Karol; Výbohová, Desanka; Mahmood, Silvia; Murin, Radovan; Viera, Tischlerová; Mojžiš, Ján; Zulli, Anthony; Péč, Martin; Adamkov, Marián; Kassayová, Monika; Bojková, Bianka; Stollárová, Nadežda; Dobrota, Dušan

    2016-04-01

    Fruit and vegetable intake is inversely correlated with cancer; thus, it is proposed that an extract of phytochemicals as present in whole fruits, vegetables, or grains may have anti-carcinogenic properties. Thus, the anti-tumour effects of fruit peel polyphenols (Flavin7) in the chemoprevention of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mammary carcinogenesis in female rats were evaluated. Lyophilized substance of Flavin7 (F7) was administered at two concentrations of 0.3 and 3 % through diet. The experiment was terminated 14 weeks after carcinogen administration, and mammary tumours were removed and prepared for histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis. In addition, using an in vitro cytotoxicity assay, apoptosis and proliferation after F7 treatment in human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells were performed. High-dose F7 suppressed tumour frequency by 58 % (P < 0.001), tumour incidence by 24 % (P < 0.05), and lengthened latency by 8 days (P > 0.05) in comparison with the control rats, whereas lower dose of F7 was less effective. Histopathological analysis of tumours showed significant decrease in the ratio of high-/low-grade carcinomas after high-dose F7 treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis of rat carcinoma cells in vivo found a significant increase in caspase-3 expression and significant decrease in Bcl-2, Ki67, and VEGFR-2 expression in the high-dose group. Both doses demonstrated significant positive effects on plasma lipid metabolism in rats. F7 significantly decreased survival of MCF-7 cells in vitro in MTT assay by dose- and time-dependent manner compared to control. F7 prevented cell cycle progression by significant enrichment in G1 cell populations. Incubation with F7 showed significant increase in the percentage of annexin V-/PI-positive MCF-7 cells and DNA fragmentation. Our results reveal a substantial tumour-suppressive effect of F7 in the breast cancer model. We propose that the effects of phytochemicals present in this fruit extract are

  5. Design, synthesis and DNA-binding capacity of a new peptidic bifunctional intercalating agent.

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, J L; Henichart, J P; Catteau, J P

    1981-01-01

    A lysyl-lysine bifunctional derivative of 9-aminoacridine has been synthesized and its DNA-binding capacity established by electron-paramagnetic-resonance study. For this purpose the binding parameters of a spin-labelled aminoacridine probe were estimated and the affinities of the lysylacridinyl-lysyldiamino-octane dimer and of 9-amino-acridine could be evaluated by competitive assays. The competition study provided quantitative results concerning the dissociation constant (KD) of the dimer. The obtained value was closely similar to the KD of 9-aminoacridine determined by the same method and to the KD previously reported for the anti-tumour and antibiotic bifunctional intercalator quinomycins. PMID:6280671

  6. Antitumour and antiangiogenic effects of Aplidin® in the 5TMM syngeneic models of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Caers, J; Menu, E; De Raeve, H; Lepage, D; Van Valckenborgh, E; Van Camp, B; Alvarez, E; Vanderkerken, K

    2008-01-01

    Aplidin® is an antitumour drug, currently undergoing phase II evaluation in different haematological and solid tumours. In this study, we analysed the antimyeloma effects of Aplidin in the syngeneic 5T33MM model, which is representable for the human disease. In vitro, Aplidin inhibited 5T33MMvv DNA synthesis with an IC50 of 3.87 nM. On cell-cycle progression, the drug induced an arrest in transition from G0/G1 to S phase, while Western blot showed a decreased cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression. Furthermore, Aplidin induced apoptosis by lowering the mitochondrial membrane potential, by inducing cytochrome c release and by activating caspase-9 and caspase-3. For the in vivo experiment, 5T33MM-injected C57Bl/KaLwRij mice were intraperitoneally treated with vehicle or Aplidin (90 μg kg−1 daily). Chronic treatment with Aplidin was well tolerated and reduced serum paraprotein concentration by 42% (P<0.001), while BM invasion with myeloma cells was decreased by 35% (P<0.001). Aplidin also reduced the myeloma-associated angiogenesis to basal values. This antiangiogenic effect was confirmed in vitro and explained by inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and vessel formation. These data indicate that Aplidin is well tolerated in vivo and its antitumour and antiangiogenic effects support the use of the drug in multiple myeloma. PMID:18521088

  7. Anti-tumour activity of tivozanib, a pan-inhibitor of VEGF receptors, in therapy-resistant ovarian carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Momeny, Majid; Sabourinejad, Zahra; Zarrinrad, Ghazaleh; Moghaddaskho, Farima; Eyvani, Haniyeh; Yousefi, Hassan; Mirshahvaladi, Shahab; Poursani, Ensieh M.; Barghi, Farinaz; Poursheikhani, Arash; Dardaei, Leila; Bashash, Davood; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Tavangar, Seyyed M.; Dehpour, Ahmad R.; Yaghmaie, Marjan; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Ghaffari, Seyed H.

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most fatal gynaecological malignancy. Despite initial therapeutic response, the majority of advanced-stage patients relapse and succumb to chemoresistant disease. Overcoming drug resistance is the key to successful treatment of EOC. Members of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family are overexpressed in EOC and play key roles in its malignant progression though their contribution in development of the chemoresistant disease remains elusive. Here we show that expression of the VEGF family is higher in therapy-resistant EOC cells compared to sensitive ones. Overexpression of VEGFR2 correlated with resistance to cisplatin and combination with VEGFR2-inhibitor apatinib synergistically increased cisplatin sensitivity. Tivozanib, a pan-inhibitor of VEGF receptors, reduced proliferation of the chemoresistant EOC cells through induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death. Tivozanib decreased invasive potential of these cells, concomitant with reduction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and diminishing the enzymatic activity of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Moreover, tivozanib synergistically enhanced anti-tumour effects of EGFR-directed therapies including erlotinib. These findings suggest that the VEGF pathway has potential as a therapeutic target in therapy-resistant EOC and VEGFR blockade by tivozanib may yield stronger anti-tumour efficacy and circumvent resistance to EGFR-directed therapies. PMID:28383032

  8. Design, characterization and anti-tumour cytotoxicity of a panel of recombinant, mammalian ribonuclease-based immunotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Deonarain, M. P.; Epenetos, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    Bovine seminal ribonuclease (BSRNase) is an unusual member of the ribonuclease superfamily, because of its remarkable anti-tumour and immunosuppressive properties. We describe here the construction, expression, purification and characterization of a panel of six immunotoxins based upon this enzyme and show that we can increase its anti-tumour activity by over 2 x 10(4)-fold. This is achieved by improving tumour cell targeting using a single-chain Fv (scFv) directed against the oncofetal antigen placental alkaline phosphatase. As well as the simple scFv-BSRNase fusion protein, we have constructed five other derivatives with additional peptides designed to improve folding and intracellular trafficking and delivery. We find that the molecule most cytotoxic to antigen (PLAP)-positive cells in vitro is one that contains a C-terminal 'KDEL' endoplasmic reticulum retention signal and a peptide sequence derived from diphtheria toxin. All these molecules are produced in Escherichia coli (E. coli) as insoluble inclusion bodies and require extensive in vitro processing to recover antigen binding and ribonuclease activity. Despite incomplete ribonuclease activity and quaternary assembly, these molecules are promising reagents for specific chemotherapy of cancer and are potentially less harmful and immunogenic than current immunotoxins. Images Figure 2 PMID:9484808

  9. A pharmacological approach for the selection of potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Double, John A

    2004-09-01

    Historically, the process of developing new anticancer agents was largely empirical. Today, because of improvements in our knowledge of the molecular processes involved in the development of cancer, the process of developing new agents is becoming more rational. Researchers from Cancer Research UK, the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the National Cancer Institute have shown that, by undertaking a pharmacological approach to the selection of potential anticancer agents, both meaningful antitumour data and an 80% reduction in animal usage can be obtained. It has also been demonstrated that a new pharmacological tool, the "hollow fibre system", in which tumour cells are grown in biocompatible fibres which are implanted into mice, can be used to produce meaningful antitumour data with pharmacodynamic endpoints. By increasing the amount of data that can be obtained from a single animal and opening up the possibility of eliminating the need for untreated control animals, the hollow fibre system has the potential to make a significant contribution to both reduction and refinement.

  10. Selectively guanidinylated aminoglycosides as antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Fair, Richard J; Hensler, Mary E; Thienphrapa, Wdee; Dam, Quang N; Nizet, Victor; Tor, Yitzhak

    2012-07-01

    The emergence of virulent, drug-resistant bacterial strains coupled with a minimal output of new pharmaceutical agents to combat them makes this a critical time for antibacterial research. Aminoglycosides are a well-studied, highly potent class of naturally occurring antibiotics with scaffolds amenable to modification, and therefore, they provide an excellent starting point for the development of semisynthetic, next-generation compounds. To explore the potential of this approach, we synthesized a small library of aminoglycoside derivatives selectively and minimally modified at one or two positions with a guanidine group replacing the corresponding amine or hydroxy functionality. Most guanidino-aminoglycosides showed increased affinity for the ribosomal decoding rRNA site, the cognate biological target of the natural products, when compared with their parent antibiotics, as measured by an in vitro fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) A-site binding assay. Additionally, certain analogues showed improved minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values against resistant bacterial strains, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). An amikacin derivative holds particular promise with activity greater than or equal to the parent antibiotic in the majority of bacterial strains tested.

  11. Drug Hepatotoxicity: Newer Agents.

    PubMed

    Bunchorntavakul, Chalermrat; Reddy, K Rajender

    2017-02-01

    Idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity is one of the most common reasons for an approved drug being restricted. This article focuses on hepatotoxicity of selected and recently introduced agents, such as, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, novel oral anticoagulants, newer antiplatelets, antibiotics, anti-diabetics, anti-epileptics, anti-depressants, anti-psychotics and anti-retrovirals. Overall, the incidence of clinically relevant hepatotoxicity from newer agents seems to be lower than that of the older agents. Nevertheless, cases of severe hepatotoxicity have been reported due to some of these newer agents, including, trastuzumab, ipilimumab, infliximab, imatinib, bosutinib, dasatinib, gefitinib, erlotinib, sunitinib, ponatinib, lapatinib, vemurafenib, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, felbamate, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, venlafaxine, duloxetine, darunavir, and maraviroc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Antibiotics in the environment.

    PubMed

    Larsson, D G Joakim

    2014-05-01

    Molecules with antibiotic properties, produced by various microbes, have been around long before mankind recognized their usefulness in preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteria have therefore been exposed to selection pressures from antibiotics for very long times, however, generally only on a micro-scale within the immediate vicinity of the antibiotic-producing organisms. In the twentieth century we began mass-producing antibiotics, mainly synthetic derivatives of naturally produced antibiotic molecules, but also a few entirely synthetic compounds. As a consequence, entire bacterial communities became exposed to unprecedented antibiotic selection pressures, which in turn led to the rapid resistance development we are facing today among many pathogens. We are, rightly, concerned about the direct selection pressures of antibiotics on the microbial communities that reside in or on our bodies. However, other environments, outside of our bodies, may also be exposed to antibiotics through different routes, most often unintentionally. There are concerns that increased selection pressures from antibiotics in the environment can contribute to the recruitment of resistance factors from the environmental resistome to human pathogens. This paper attempts to 1) provide a brief overview of environmental exposure routes of antibiotics, 2) provide some thoughts about our current knowledge of the associated risks for humans as well as ecosystems, and 3) indicate management options to reduce risks.

  13. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Baram, David; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Breiner, Elinor; Davidovich, Chen; Cimicata, Giuseppe; Eyal, Zohar; Halfon, Yehuda; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Metz, Markus; Rufayda, Mruwat; Peretz, Moshe; Pick, Ophir; Pyetan, Erez; Rozenberg, Haim; Shalev-Benami, Moran; Wekselman, Itai; Zarivach, Raz; Zimmerman, Ella; Assis, Nofar; Bloch, Joel; Israeli, Hadar; Kalaora, Rinat; Lim, Lisha; Sade-Falk, Ofir; Shapira, Tal; Taha-Salaime, Leena; Tang, Hua; Yonath, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of “pathogen-specific antibiotics,” in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification. PMID:27367739

  14. Antibiotic update for the surgeon.

    PubMed

    Bennion, R S

    1994-01-01

    All too often, it seems that the utilization of antibiotics by surgeons for either prophylaxis or the treatment of established infections is shrouded in a combination of mysticism and marketing. What should be straight forward, frequently becomes confused by factors such as superstition, habit, recent interaction with an industry representative, and faulty information. The rational use of antibiotics is surprising simply, and is based on the fact that these agents are, quite simply, systemic chemotherapy against bacteria. Once delivered to the patient these agents act not only locally, but, more importantly, sistemically against susceptible microorganisms. This demands that the practitioner make an educated guess as to which bacteria are likely to be present, as well as use an agent that both safe and effective in that specific patient. The types and variety of bacteria present in a surgical infection, or likely to be present, can usually be deduced by the location and / or organ system involved. The safest and most effective agent to be used against those organisms is primarily a function of the specific hospital that the patient in, and whether the infection is hospital-acquired (nosocomial) or community-acquired. The susceptibility patterns for bacteria vary from community to community (as noted by local hospitals), as well as from hospital to hospital dependent on whether it is a community hospital or a tertiary referral center. It is illogical to assume that the same drug or drugs will be just as effective in one setting as in another, regardless of whether they are used for prophylaxis or an established infection.

  15. Update on antibiotics in ocular infections.

    PubMed

    Leopold, I H

    1985-07-15

    Each year, new antimicrobials are found or synthesized in an effort to improve the chance of overcoming infections. In the early 1950s, the only antibiotic available for ocular use was penicillin. Today, ophthalmologists can make a choice from a large selection of antibiotics for ocular infections. The majority of antibiotics have been literally unearthed, since worldwide soil surveys may have been the means of their discovery. In addition, synthetic derivatives of penicillin, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, and tetracyclines, as well as drugs against tuberculosis and fungi, have become available, and new names have been added to the already bewildering list of less frequently used sulfonamides. However, it takes several years to appreciate the impact of new agents and the continued contribution of older ones. Constant reevaluation is mandatory. The real benefits as well as the untoward effects of a new antimicrobial agent may not be known until several years after the clinical introduction. In addition to approaching infection from the viewpoint of the offending organism and a specific antibiotic to address this organism, one may also approach this problem from the host's immunity. Until now, we have relied largely on the corticosteroids, but one must also consider various nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and, even more importantly, the development of drugs to enhance the host's natural immunity.

  16. Malabsorption due to selected oral antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Mero, K N; Rollin, R E; Phillips, R W

    1985-11-01

    This article represents an overview of recent research conducted on antibiotic-induced malabsorption in calves. The authors feel strongly that this work identifies a serious and ill-defined problem in the management of neonatal calves. Too often the solution utilized by veterinarian and stockmen for controlling neonatal diarrhea has been to administer oral antibiotics. In many cases, this has been done on the basis of antibiotic sensitivity testing, an approach that seems appropriate. Unfortunately, little consideration has been given to the relative sensitivity of the neonatal intestinal mucosa, with its very rapid turnover, to the potentially detrimental effects of oral antimicrobial therapy. The data that we have collected over the past 3 years conclusively demonstrate that high levels of four commonly used oral antibiotics, especially neomycin and chloramphenicol but also tetracycline and ampicillin, can cause a malabsorption diarrhea in normal calves. This action is not due to viral agents or overgrowth of resistant microbes but is the result of direct modification of the intestinal mucosa. Extrapolation of these data to different dose levels may not be accurate. Oral antibiotics may be of value in treating neonatal enteritis. Conversely, there can be too much of a good thing, and many cases of chronic diarrhea following use of oral antibiotics may be the result of an overenthusiastic and prolonged dosage regimen. Be cautious!

  17. Active controlled studies in antibiotic drug development.

    PubMed

    Dane, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The increasing concern of antibacterial resistance has been well documented, as has the relative lack of antibiotic development. This paradox is in part due to challenges with clinical development of antibiotics. Because of their rapid progression, untreated bacterial infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. As a consequence, placebo-controlled studies of new agents are unethical. Rather, pivotal development studies are mostly conducted using non-inferiority designs versus an active comparator. Further, infections because of comparator-resistant isolates must usually be excluded from the trial programme. Unfortunately, the placebo-controlled data classically used in support of non-inferiority designs are largely unavailable for antibiotics. The only available data are from the 1930s and 1940s and their use is associated with significant concerns regarding constancy and assay sensitivity. Extended public debate on this challenge has led to proposed solutions by some in which these concerns are addressed by using very conservative approaches to trial design, endpoints and non-inferiority margins, in some cases leading to potentially impractical studies. To compound this challenge, different Regulatory Authorities seem to be taking different approaches to these key issues. If harmonisation does not occur, antibiotic development will become increasingly challenging, with the risk of further decreases in the amount of antibiotic drug development. However with clarity on Regulatory requirements and an ability to feasibly conduct global development programmes, it should be possible to bring much needed additional antibiotics to patients. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. From antiseptics to antibiotics – and back?

    PubMed Central

    Assadian, Ojan

    2007-01-01

    There is no straight line to trace the trajectory of antiseptics; rather, this has been manifested more as a fluctuating line, a backwards and forwards movement, seen in the wake of major discoveries but of colossal mistakes too. While today no one would allow their prophylactic policies to be guided by miasma or contagia, there continues to be some uncertainly about how to manage anti-infectives effectively even today. When in 1941 the first human being was successfully treated with penicillin, interest in antiseptics gradually waned. From that time onwards, everything was treated with antibiotics, unleashing a race for the discovery of novel antibiotics, as witnessed decades earlier in the case of antiseptics. The significance of antiseptics declined to such an extent that among physicians they were associated merely with cleaning agents or sanitary disinfection. Today, at the beginning of the 21st century we know that the euphoria generated by antibiotics was just another station along the pathway of discoveries. Bacterial infections and new, hitherto unknown infectious diseases continue to play a major role. Several viral infections continue to be refractory to successful treatment and bacterial antibiotic resistance has become a problem worldwide. The most effective countermeasures no longer entail only the development of new antibiotics but above all responsible management of antibiotics and strict observance of infection control measures in the hospital setting. Set against that background, interest in antiseptics has been rekindled. In that spirit we can look eagerly forward over the coming years to further developments in antisepsis. PMID:20200687

  19. Antibiotic resistance: a primer and call to action.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel A; M'ikanatha, Nkuchia M; Read, Andrew F

    2015-01-01

    During the past century, discoveries of microorganisms as causes of infections and antibiotics as effective therapeutic agents have contributed to significant gains in public health in many parts of the world. Health agencies worldwide are galvanizing attention toward antibiotic resistance, which is a major threat to public health (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2013; World Health Organization, 2014). Some life scientists believe that we are approaching the post-antibiotic age (Davies & Davies, 2010). The growing threat of antimicrobial resistance is fueled by complex factors with biological, behavioral, and societal aspects. This primer provides an overview of antibiotic resistance and its growing burden on public health, the biological and behavioral mechanisms that increase antibiotic resistance, and examples of where health communication scholars can contribute to efforts to make our current antibiotic drugs last as long as possible. In addition, we identify compelling challenges for current communication theories and practices.

  20. Antibiotic Resistance: A Primer and Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel A.; M’ikanatha, Nkuchia M.; Read, Andrew F.

    2014-01-01

    During the past century, discoveries of microorganisms as causes of infections and antibiotics as effective therapeutic agents have contributed to significant gains in public health in many parts of the world. Health agencies worldwide are galvanizing attention toward antibiotic resistance, which is a major threat to public health (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2013; World Health Organization [WHO], 2014). Some life scientists believe that we are approaching the post-antibiotic age (Davies & Davies, 2010). The growing threat of antimicrobial resistance is fueled by complex factors with biological, behavioral and societal aspects. This primer provides an overview of antibiotic resistance and its growing burden on public health, the biological and behavioral mechanisms that increase antibiotic resistance, and examples of where health communication scholars can contribute to efforts to make our current antibiotic drugs last as long as possible. In addition, we identify compelling challenges for current communication theories and practices. PMID:25121990

  1. On the specificity of antibiotics targeting the large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Daniel N

    2011-12-01

    The peptidyltransferase center of the large ribosomal subunit is responsible for catalyzing peptide bonds. This active site is the target of a variety of diverse antibiotics, many of which are used clinically. The past decade has seen a plethora of structures of antibiotics in complex with the large ribosomal subunit, providing unprecedented insight into the mechanism of action of these inhibitors. Ten distinct antibiotics (chloramphenicol, clindamycin, linezolid, tiamulin, sparsomycin, and five macrolides) have been crystallized in complex with four distinct ribosomal species, three bacterial, and one archaeal. This review aims to compare these structures in order to provide insight into the conserved and species-specific modes of interaction for particular members of each class of antibiotics. Coupled with the wealth of biochemical data, a picture is emerging defining the specific functional states of the ribosome that antibiotics preferentially target. Such mechanistic insight into antibiotic inhibition will be important for the development of the next generation of antimicrobial agents.

  2. [Rational use of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Walger, P

    2016-06-01

    International and national campaigns draw attention worldwide to the rational use of the available antibiotics. This has been stimulated by the high prevalence rates of drug-resistant pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), a threatening spread of development of resistance in Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria and the selection of Clostridium difficile with a simultaneous clear reduction in the development of new antibiotics. The implementation of antibiotic stewardship programs aims to maintain their effectiveness by a rational use of the available antibiotics. The essential target of therapy with antibiotics is successful treatment of individual patients with bacterial infections. The optimal clinical treatment results can only be achieved when the toxicity, selection of pathogens and development of resistance are minimized. This article presents the principles of a rational antibiotic therapy.

  3. Antibiotics and Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    de Sá Del Fiol, Fernando; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; de Cássia Bergamaschi, Cristiane; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Gauthier, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    During the breastfeeding period, bacterial infections can occur in the nursing mother, requiring the use of antibiotics. A lack of accurate information may lead health care professionals and mothers to suspend breastfeeding, which may be unnecessary. This article provides information on the main antibiotics that are appropriate for clinical use and the interference of these antibiotics with the infant to support medical decisions regarding the discontinuation of breastfeeding. We aim to provide information on the pharmacokinetic factors that interfere with the passage of antibiotics into breast milk and the toxicological implications of absorption by the infant. Publications related to the 20 most frequently employed antibiotics and their transfer into breast milk were evaluated. The results demonstrate that most antibiotics in clinical use are considered suitable during breastfeeding; however, the pharmacokinetic profile of each drug must be observed to ensure the resolution of the maternal infection and the safety of the infant.

  4. Platforms for antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kim

    2013-05-01

    The spread of resistant bacteria, leading to untreatable infections, is a major public health threat but the pace of antibiotic discovery to combat these pathogens has slowed down. Most antibiotics were originally isolated by screening soil-derived actinomycetes during the golden era of antibiotic discovery in the 1940s to 1960s. However, diminishing returns from this discovery platform led to its collapse, and efforts to create a new platform based on target-focused screening of large libraries of synthetic compounds failed, in part owing to the lack of penetration of such compounds through the bacterial envelope. This article considers strategies to re-establish viable platforms for antibiotic discovery. These include investigating untapped natural product sources such as uncultured bacteria, establishing rules of compound penetration to enable the development of synthetic antibiotics, developing species-specific antibiotics and identifying prodrugs that have the potential to eradicate dormant persisters, which are often responsible for hard-to-treat infections.

  5. Biotic acts of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Aminov, Rustam I.

    2013-01-01

    Biological functions of antibiotics are not limited to killing. The most likely function of antibiotics in natural microbial ecosystems is signaling. Does this signaling function of antibiotics also extend to the eukaryotic – in particular mammalian – cells? In this review, the host modulating properties of three classes of antibiotics (macrolides, tetracyclines, and β-lactams) will be briefly discussed. Antibiotics can be effective in treatment of a broad spectrum of diseases and pathological conditions other than those of infectious etiology and, in this capacity, may find widespread applications beyond the intended antimicrobial use. This use, however, should not compromise the primary function antibiotics are used for. The biological background for this inter-kingdom signaling is also discussed. PMID:23966991

  6. New synthetic antibiotics for the treatment of Enterococcus and Campylobacter infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hai-Wei; Qin, Shang-Shang; Liu, Hong-Min

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics, particularly to multiple drug resistant antibiotics, is becoming cause for significant concern. The only really viable course of action is to discover new antibiotics with novel mode of actions. This review focuses on antibiotic resistance mechanisms of Enterococcus and Campylobacter, and new antibacterial agents against Enterococcus and Campylobacter through de novo or semi- synthesis in the period from 2003 until mid- 2013.

  7. Choice of intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis for colorectal surgery does matter.

    PubMed

    Deierhoi, Rhiannon J; Dawes, Lillian G; Vick, Catherine; Itani, Kamal M F; Hawn, Mary T

    2013-11-01

    The Surgical Care Improvement Program endorses mandatory compliance with approved intravenous prophylactic antibiotics; however, oral antibiotics are optional. We hypothesized that surgical site infection (SSI) rates may vary depending on the choice of antibiotic prophylaxis. A retrospective cohort study of elective colorectal procedures using Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) and SSI outcomes data was linked to the Office of Informatics and Analytics (OIA) and Pharmacy Benefits Management (PBM) antibiotic data from 2005 to 2009. Surgical site infection rates by type of IV antibiotic agent alone (IV) or in combination with oral antibiotic (IV + OA) were determined. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the association between type of antibiotic prophylaxis and SSI for the entire cohort and stratified by use of oral antibiotics. After 5,750 elective colorectal procedures, 709 SSIs (12.3%) developed within 30 days. Oral antibiotic + IV (n = 2,426) had a lower SSI rate than IV alone (n = 3,324) (6.3% vs 16.7%, p < 0.0001). There was a significant difference in the SSI rate based on type of preoperative IV antibiotic given (p ≤ 0.0001). Generalized estimating equations adjusting for significant covariates of age, body mass index, procedure work relative value units, and operation duration demonstrated an independent protective effect of oral antibiotics (odds ratio [OR] 0.37, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.46), as well as increased rates of SSI associated with ampicillin/sulbactam (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.37 to 3.56) and second generation cephalosporins (cefoxitin, OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.83 to 3.42; cefotetan, OR 2.70, 95% CI 1.72 to 4.22) when compared with first generation cephalosporin/metronidazole. The choice of IV antibiotic was related to the SSI rate; however, oral antibiotics were associated with reduced SSI rate for every antibiotic class. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Antibiotics, bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes: aerial transport from cattle feed yards via particulate matter.

    PubMed

    McEachran, Andrew D; Blackwell, Brett R; Hanson, J Delton; Wooten, Kimberly J; Mayer, Gregory D; Cox, Stephen B; Smith, Philip N

    2015-04-01

    Emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance has become a global health threat and is often linked with overuse and misuse of clinical and veterinary chemotherapeutic agents. Modern industrial-scale animal feeding operations rely extensively on veterinary pharmaceuticals, including antibiotics, to augment animal growth. Following excretion, antibiotics are transported through the environment via runoff, leaching, and land application of manure; however, airborne transport from feed yards has not been characterized. The goal of this study was to determine the extent to which antibiotics, antibiotic resistance genes (ARG), and ruminant-associated microbes are aerially dispersed via particulate matter (PM) derived from large-scale beef cattle feed yards. PM was collected downwind and upwind of 10 beef cattle feed yards. After extraction from PM, five veterinary antibiotics were quantified via high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, ARG were quantified via targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and microbial community diversity was analyzed via 16S rRNA amplification and sequencing. Airborne PM derived from feed yards facilitated dispersal of several veterinary antibiotics, as well as microbial communities containing ARG. Concentrations of several antibiotics in airborne PM immediately downwind of feed yards ranged from 0.5 to 4.6 μg/g of PM. Microbial communities of PM collected downwind of feed yards were enriched with ruminant-associated taxa and were distinct when compared to upwind PM assemblages. Furthermore, genes encoding resistance to tetracycline antibiotics were significantly more abundant in PM collected downwind of feed yards as compared to upwind. Wind-dispersed PM from feed yards harbors antibiotics, bacteria, and ARGs.

  9. Synthesis, Characterization and In vitro Antitumour Activity of Novel Organotin Derivatives of 1,2- and 1,7-Dicarba-Closo-dodecaboranes

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, François; Zhidkova, Olga B.; Kampel, Vladimir Ts.; Bregadze, Vladimir l.; de Vos, Dick; Biesemans, Monique; Mahieu, Bernard; Willem, Rudolph

    1995-01-01

    Several organotin derivatives of 1,2- and 1,7-dicarba-closo-dodecaboranes were synthesized and characterized by 119Sn Mössbauer, 1H, 13C and 119Sn NMR spectroscopy. Their antitumour activities in vitro against cancerous cell lines of human origin are reported. PMID:18472744

  10. Enhanced oral bioavailability and anti-tumour effect of paclitaxel by 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei-Qiong; Wang, Bin; Gan, Hui; Fu, Shou-Ting; Zhu, Xiao-Xia; Wu, Zhuo-Na; Zhan, Da-Wei; Gu, Ruo-Lan; Dou, Gui-Fang; Meng, Zhi-Yun

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of paclitaxel in combination with 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 on its anti-tumour effect in nude mice. In the Caco-2 transport assay, the apparent permeability from the apical side to the basal side (P(app)) (A-B) and P(app) (B-A) of paclitaxel were measured when co-incubated with different concentrations of 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3. The results indicated that the penetration of paclitaxel through the Caco-2 monolayer from the apical side to the basal side was facilitated by 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 in a concentration-dependent manner. Meanwhile, 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 inhibited P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and the maximum inhibition was achieved at 80 µM (p < 0.05). The pharmacokinetic parameters of paclitaxel after oral co-administration of paclitaxel (40 mg/kg) with various doses of 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 in rats were investigated by an in vivo pharmacokinetic experiment. The results showed that the AUC of paclitaxel co-administered with 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 was significantly higher (p < 0.001 at 10 mg/kg) compared with the control. The relative bioavailability (RB) % of paclitaxel with 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 was 3.4-fold (10 mg/kg) higher than that of the control. The effect of paclitaxel orally co-administered with 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 against human tumour MCF-7 xenografts in nude mice was also evaluated. Paclitaxel (20 mg/kg) co-administered with 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 (10 mg/kg) exhibited an effective anti-tumour activity with the relative tumor growth rate (T/C) values of 39.36% (p <0.05). The results showed that 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 enhanced the oral bioavailability of paclitaxel in rats and improved the anti-tumour activity in nude mice, indicating that oral co-administration of paclitaxel with 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 could provide an effective strategy in addition to the established i.v. route.

  11. Exploring Synergy between Classic Mutagens and Antibiotics To Examine Mechanisms of Synergy and Antibiotic Action

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lisa Yun; D'Souza, Sara; Lam, Karen; Kang, Tina Manzhu

    2015-01-01

    We used classical mutagens in Gram-negative Escherichia coli to study synergies with different classes of antibiotics, test models of antibiotic mechanisms of action, and examine the basis of synergy. We used 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO), zebularine (ZEB), 5-azacytidine (5AZ), 2-aminopurine (2AP), and 5-bromodeoxyuridine (5BrdU) as mutagens (with bactericidal potency of 4NQO > ZEB > 5AZ > 2AP > 5BrdU) and vancomycin (VAN), ciprofloxacin (CPR), trimethoprim (TMP), gentamicin (GEN), tetracycline (TET), erythromycin (ERY), and chloramphenicol (CHL) as antibiotics. We detected the strongest synergies with 4NQO, an agent that oxidizes guanines and ultimately results in double-strand breaks when paired with the bactericidal antibiotics VAN, TMP, CPR, and GEN, but no synergies with the bacteriostatic antibiotics TET, ERY, and CHL. Each of the other mutagens displays synergies with the bactericidal antibiotics to various degrees that reflect their potencies, as well as with some of the other mutagens. The results support recent models showing that bactericidal antibiotics kill bacteria principally by ultimately generating more double-strand breaks than can be repaired. We discuss the synergies seen here and elsewhere as representing dose effects of not the proximal target damage but rather the ultimate resulting double-strand breaks. We also used the results of pairwise tests to place the classic mutagens into functional antibacterial categories within a previously defined drug interaction network. PMID:26711761

  12. Exploring Synergy between Classic Mutagens and Antibiotics To Examine Mechanisms of Synergy and Antibiotic Action.

    PubMed

    Song, Lisa Yun; D'Souza, Sara; Lam, Karen; Kang, Tina Manzhu; Yeh, Pamela; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2015-12-28

    We used classical mutagens in Gram-negative Escherichia coli to study synergies with different classes of antibiotics, test models of antibiotic mechanisms of action, and examine the basis of synergy. We used 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO), zebularine (ZEB), 5-azacytidine (5AZ), 2-aminopurine (2AP), and 5-bromodeoxyuridine (5BrdU) as mutagens (with bactericidal potency of 4NQO > ZEB > 5AZ > 2AP > 5BrdU) and vancomycin (VAN), ciprofloxacin (CPR), trimethoprim (TMP), gentamicin (GEN), tetracycline (TET), erythromycin (ERY), and chloramphenicol (CHL) as antibiotics. We detected the strongest synergies with 4NQO, an agent that oxidizes guanines and ultimately results in double-strand breaks when paired with the bactericidal antibiotics VAN, TMP, CPR, and GEN, but no synergies with the bacteriostatic antibiotics TET, ERY, and CHL. Each of the other mutagens displays synergies with the bactericidal antibiotics to various degrees that reflect their potencies, as well as with some of the other mutagens. The results support recent models showing that bactericidal antibiotics kill bacteria principally by ultimately generating more double-strand breaks than can be repaired. We discuss the synergies seen here and elsewhere as representing dose effects of not the proximal target damage but rather the ultimate resulting double-strand breaks. We also used the results of pairwise tests to place the classic mutagens into functional antibacterial categories within a previously defined drug interaction network.

  13. Thalidomide increases both intra-tumoural tumour necrosis factor-α production and anti-tumour activity in response to 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Z; Joseph, W R; Browne, W L; Mountjoy, K G; Palmer, B D; Baguley, B C; Ching, L-M

    1999-01-01

    5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA), synthesized in this laboratory and currently in phase I clinical trial, is a low molecular weight inducer of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Administration of DMXAA to mice with established transplantable tumours elicits rapid vascular collapse selectively in the tumour, followed by extensive haemorrhagic necrosis mediated primarily through the production of TNF-α. In this report we have investigated the synthesis of TNF-α mRNA in hepatic, splenic and tumour tissue. Co-administration of thalidomide with DMXAA increased anti-tumour activity and increased intra-tumoural TNF-α production approximately tenfold over that obtained with DMXAA alone. Thalidomide increased splenic TNF-α production slightly but significantly decreased serum and hepatic levels of TNF-α induced with DMXAA. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced 300-fold higher serum TNF-α than did DMXAA at the maximum tolerated dose, but induced similar amounts of TNF-α in spleen, liver and tumour. Splenic TNF-α activity induced with LPS was slightly increased with thalidomide, but serum and liver TNF-α levels were suppressed. Thalidomide did not increase intra-tumoural TNF-α production induced with LPS, in sharp contrast to that obtained with DMXAA. While thalidomide improved the anti-tumour response to DMXAA, it had no effect on the anti-tumour action of LPS that did not induce a significant growth delay or cures against the Colon 38 tumour. The increase in the anti-tumour action by thalidomide in combination with DMXAA corresponded to an increase in intra-tumoural TNF-α production. Co-administration of thalidomide may represent a novel approach to improving selective intra-tumoural TNF-α production and anti-tumour efficacy of DMXAA. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10360649

  14. Bacteriophage therapy: a potential solution for the antibiotic resistance crisis.

    PubMed

    Golkar, Zhabiz; Bagasra, Omar; Pace, Donald Gene

    2014-02-13

    The emergence of multiple drug-resistant bacteria has prompted interest in alternatives to conventional antimicrobials. One of the possible replacement options for antibiotics is the use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents. Phage therapy is an important alternative to antibiotics in the current era of drug-resistant pathogens. Bacteriophages have played an important role in the expansion of molecular biology and have been used as antibacterial agents since 1966. In this review, we describe a brief history of bacteriophages and clinical studies on their use in bacterial disease prophylaxis and therapy. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of bacteriophages as therapeutic agents in this regard.

  15. Can antibiotic use be both just and sustainable... or only more or less so?

    PubMed

    Millar, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Antibiotic resistance threatens the capacity to treat life-threatening infections. If it is accepted that it will be many years (if not decades) until the production of new antibiotics overcomes current concerns with antibiotic resistance then ways to conserve the effectiveness of current antibiotics will have to be found. For many bacterial agents of infection levels of antibiotic resistance are directly dependent on the quantity of antibiotic prescribed. Antibiotics are currently underutilised in many parts of the world. If a just distribution of access to antibiotics requires equal access for individuals with equal need irrespective of wealth then responding to this requirement of justice has the potential to shorten the effective life of currently available antibiotics. Increasing the range and numbers of individuals treated with antibiotics would seem to threaten sustainability and also potentially undermine the access of future generations to cost-effective treatments for bacterial infection. The control of antibiotic resistance requires that the determinants of infectious disease transmission are addressed, such as poor housing, education and nutrition as well as the provision of antibiotics. The apparent tension between intragenerational justice and sustainability diminishes when the account of distributive justice extends beyond access to antibiotics and includes plural entitlements. Controlling antibiotic resistance requires more than the redistribution or reduction (in the overall use) of antibiotics.

  16. The future of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Spellberg, Brad

    2014-06-27

    Antibiotic resistance continues to spread even as society is experiencing a market failure of new antibiotic research and development (R&D). Scientific, economic, and regulatory barriers all contribute to the antibiotic market failure. Scientific solutions to rekindle R&D include finding new screening strategies to identify novel antibiotic scaffolds and transforming the way we think about treating infections, such that the goal is to disarm the pathogen without killing it or modulate the host response to the organism without targeting the organism for destruction. Future economic strategies are likely to focus on 'push' incentives offered by public-private partnerships as well as increasing pricing by focusing development on areas of high unmet need. Such strategies can also help protect new antibiotics from overuse after marketing. Regulatory reform is needed to re-establish feasible and meaningful traditional antibiotic pathways, to create novel limited-use pathways that focus on highly resistant infections, and to harmonize regulatory standards across nations. We need new antibiotics with which to treat our patients. But we also need to protect those new antibiotics from misuse when they become available. If we want to break the cycle of resistance and change the current landscape, disruptive approaches that challenge long-standing dogma will be needed.

  17. Replacement for antibiotics: Lysozyme

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotics have been fed at subtherapeutic levels to swine as growth promoters for more than 60 years, and the majority of swine produced in the U.S. receive antibiotics in their feed at some point in their production cycle. These compounds benefit the producers by minimizing production losses by ...

  18. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  19. [Antibiotics: present and future].

    PubMed

    Bérdy, János

    2013-04-14

    The author discuss the up to date interpretation of the concept of antibiotics and antibiotic research, as well as the present role of various natural, semisynthetic and synthetic antibiotic compounds in various areas of the human therapy. The origin and the total number of all antibiotics and applied antibiotics in the practice, as well as the bioactive microbial metabolites (antibiotics) in other therapeutical, non-antibiotic fields (including agriculture) are also reviewed. The author discusses main problems, such as increasing (poly)resistance, virulence of pathogens and the non-scientific factors (such as a decline of research efforts and their sociological, economic, financial and regulatory reasons). A short summary of the history of Hungarian antibiotic research is also provided. The author briefly discusses the prospects in the future and the general advantages of the natural products over synthetic compounds. It is concluded that new approaches for the investigation of the unlimited possibilities of the living world are necessary. The discovery of new types or simply neglected (micro)organisms and their biosynthetic capabilities, the introduction of new biotechnological and genetic methods (genomics, metagenom, genome mining) are absolutely required in the future.

  20. The future of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to spread even as society is experiencing a market failure of new antibiotic research and development (R&D). Scientific, economic, and regulatory barriers all contribute to the antibiotic market failure. Scientific solutions to rekindle R&D include finding new screening strategies to identify novel antibiotic scaffolds and transforming the way we think about treating infections, such that the goal is to disarm the pathogen without killing it or modulate the host response to the organism without targeting the organism for destruction. Future economic strategies are likely to focus on ‘push’ incentives offered by public-private partnerships as well as increasing pricing by focusing development on areas of high unmet need. Such strategies can also help protect new antibiotics from overuse after marketing. Regulatory reform is needed to re-establish feasible and meaningful traditional antibiotic pathways, to create novel limited-use pathways that focus on highly resistant infections, and to harmonize regulatory standards across nations. We need new antibiotics with which to treat our patients. But we also need to protect those new antibiotics from misuse when they become available. If we want to break the cycle of resistance and change the current landscape, disruptive approaches that challenge long-standing dogma will be needed. PMID:25043962

  1. Economics of antibiotic administration.

    PubMed

    Sommers, Ben D

    2003-03-01

    This article examines several elements of antibiotic administration that make it worthy of policy analysis, including microbial resistance, contagion, competing brand and generic drugs, and formulary restrictions by insurers and hospitals. These topics are explored using two concepts from health economics, cost-effectiveness and externalities, revealing theoretical and empirical evidence that society may not be using antibiotics as efficiently as it could.

  2. Setamycin, a new antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Otoguro, K; Nishikiori, T; Oiwa, R; Iwai, Y

    1981-10-01

    A new antibiotic, setamycin, was extracted from the mycelia of a rare actinomycete strain KM-6054. The antibiotic, the molecular formula of which was found to be C42H61NO12 (tentative), is a yellow powder showing activity against some fungi, trichomonads and weakly against Gram-positive bacteria.

  3. [Side effects of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Hoigné, R

    1975-03-01

    The clinically severe and newer forms of antibiotic side effects are reviewed. The study covers the following antibiotics: penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and polymyxins, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol and thiamphenicol, macrolides and lincomycin, rifamycins and sulfonamides. Special reference is made to (1) hematologic side effects, and (2) general evaluation of drug reactions. The relationship between reaction time and clinical symptoms is of particular practical significance.

  4. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  5. Evaluation of new antimicrobials for the hospital formulary. Policies restricting antibiotic use in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Miquel; Delgado, Olga; Puigventós, Francesc; Corzo, Juan E; Cercenado, Emilia; Martínez, José Antonio

    2013-09-01

    In Spain, the inclusion of new antibiotics in hospital formularies is performed by the Infection Policy Committee or the Pharmacy and Therapeutic Committee, although now the decision is moving to a regional level. Criteria for the evaluation of new drugs include efficacy, safety and cost. For antimicrobial drugs evaluation it is necessary to consider local sensibility and impact in bacterial resistance to determinate the therapeutic positioning. There is compelling evidence that the use of antibiotics is associated with increasing bacterial resistance, and a great number of antibiotics are used incorrectly. In order to decrease the inappropriate use of antibiotics, several approaches have been proposed. Limiting the use of antimicrobials through formulary restrictions, often aimed at drugs with a specific resistance profile, shows benefits in improving antimicrobial susceptibilities and decreasing colonization by drug-resistant organisms. However, the restriction of one agent may result in the increased utilization of other agents. By using antibiotic cycling, the amount of antibiotics is maintained below the threshold where bacterial resistance develops, thus preserving highly efficient antibiotics. Unfortunately, cumulative evidence to date suggests that antibiotic cycling has limited efficacy in preventing antibiotic resistance. Finally, although there is still little clinical evidence available on antibiotic heterogeneity, the use of most of the existing antimicrobial classes could limit the emergence of resistance. This review summarizes information regarding antibiotic evaluation and available restrictive strategies to limit the use of antibiotics at hospitals with the aim of curtailing increasing antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment increases circulating T helper type 17 cells similarly in different types of inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hull, D N; Williams, R O; Pathan, E; Alzabin, S; Abraham, S; Taylor, P C

    2015-09-01

    We investigated changes in circulating T helper type 17 (Th17) cells following anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from 25 RA, 15 AS and eight PsA patients at baseline 4 and 12 weeks after treatment, and Th17 cell frequencies were analysed using interleukin (IL)-17 enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) and flow cytometry. A significant increase in IL-17-producing cells was observed by ELISPOT in RA and AS patients at 12 weeks. Flow cytometry confirmed significant increases in CD4(+) IL-17(+) cells at 12 weeks in RA and AS and 4 weeks in PsA patients. Anti-TNF treatment increases circulating Th17 cells in three different diseases. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  7. Attempts at the production of more selective antitumourals. Part II. The antineoplastic activity of cyclophosphazenes linked to spermine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sournies, François; Labarre, Jean-François; Spreafico, Federico; Filippeschi, Stefania; Quan Jin, Xing

    1986-09-01

    In an attempt to design antitumour cyclophosphazenes of improved specificity by linking them to some natural tumour finders, we studied the binding of gem-N 3P 3Az 4Cl 2 to spermine. Synthesis, NMR and mass spectra of the vectorized drug (in which two N 3P 3Az 4 active principles are linked to spermine in a DISPIROBINO configuration) are described. Results obtained with this compound in 6 murine tumour systems (L1210 and P388 leukaemias, 3LL carcinoma, M5076 reticulum cell sarcoma, B16 melanoma and line 16 mammary carcinoma), are also described and compared with results previously obtained about the targeting of gem-N 3P 3Az 4Cl 2 through 1,3-diaminopropane and 1,4-diaminobutane (putrescine).

  8. A case of severe psoriasis with an apparent incomplete response to anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha treatment.

    PubMed

    Agnusdei, Concetto P; Mastronardi, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    This report covers a case of severe psoriasis that appeared to respond well to treatment with subcutaneous etanercept, with good recovery of the arthropathic component. However, there were distinct areas at the patient's hands and wrists that failed to respond to such treatment. A standard series of patch tests yielded strong positive responses to the vaseline ointment and mercaptobenzothiazole mix, substances that the patient had constantly applied, twice daily, before and during the anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha therapy course, as an emollient, rubber-gloved topical treatment. This case is reported to provide further evidence of the efficacy of etanercept treatment, and to confirm that the immunopathological pathway leading to psoriasis and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) sometimes goes into 'overdrive' in ACD, giving a mixed pattern, involving each of the branches of the immune system.

  9. Heat shock protein derived from a non-autologous tumour can be used as an anti-tumour vaccine.

    PubMed

    Casey, David G; Lysaght, Joanne; James, Tharappel; Bateman, Andrew; Melcher, Alan A; Todryk, Stephen M

    2003-09-01

    Antigenic cross-reactivity between certain tumours has allowed the development of more widely applicable, major histocompatibility complex-disparate (allogeneic) whole-cell vaccines. This principle should also allow heat shock proteins (hsp) derived from certain tumours (and carrying cross-reactive antigens) to be used as vaccines to generate anti-tumour immunity in a range of cancer patients. Here, hsp70 derived from gp70-antigen+ B16 melanoma generated cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-mediated immune protection in BALB/c mice against challenge with gp70-antigen+ CT26 colorectal tumour cells. Using ovalbumin as a model tumour antigen, it is shown that hsp70 enhances peptide re-presentation by dendritic cells via class I over equimolar whole ovalbumin antigen. However, while transfection of tumour cells with inducible hsp70 increases hsp yield from tumours, it does not enhance antigen recognition via purified hsp70 nor via whole cells or their lysate.

  10. Heat shock protein derived from a non-autologous tumour can be used as an anti-tumour vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Casey, David G; Lysaght, Joanne; James, Tharappel; Bateman, Andrew; Melcher, Alan A; Todryk, Stephen M

    2003-01-01

    Antigenic cross-reactivity between certain tumours has allowed the development of more widely applicable, major histocompatibility complex-disparate (allogeneic) whole-cell vaccines. This principle should also allow heat shock proteins (hsp) derived from certain tumours (and carrying cross-reactive antigens) to be used as vaccines to generate anti-tumour immunity in a range of cancer patients. Here, hsp70 derived from gp70-antigen+ B16 melanoma generated cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-mediated immune protection in BALB/c mice against challenge with gp70-antigen+ CT26 colorectal tumour cells. Using ovalbumin as a model tumour antigen, it is shown that hsp70 enhances peptide re-presentation by dendritic cells via class I over equimolar whole ovalbumin antigen. However, while transfection of tumour cells with inducible hsp70 increases hsp yield from tumours, it does not enhance antigen recognition via purified hsp70 nor via whole cells or their lysate. PMID:12941147

  11. Antibiotics: a new hope.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gerard D

    2012-01-27

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the most significant challenges to the health care sector in the 21st century. A myriad of resistance mechanisms have emerged over the past decades and are widely disseminated worldwide through bacterial populations. At the same time there have been ever fewer new antibiotics brought to market, and the pharmaceutical industry increasingly sees antibiotics as a poor investment. Paradoxically, we are in a Golden Age of understanding how antibiotics work and where resistance comes from. This knowledge is fueling a renaissance of interest and innovation in antibiotic discovery, synthesis, and mechanism that is poised to inform drug discovery to address pressing clinical needs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance].

    PubMed

    Mühlemann, K

    2002-01-01

    Antibiotics interfere with structural and regulatory elements of bacterial cells leading to growth arrest or cell death. Bacteria have evolved a variety of strategies to overcome the effects of antibiotics. Examples are enzymatic destruction, alteration of the target, efflux and permeability changes. Resistance towards the same substance can be mediated by several mechanisms. Efflux pumps can probably act as mediators of higher resistance development. Alteration of common targets can lead to cross-resistance against several classes of antibiotics. Genetic events, such as point mutations, transfer of plasmids and gen regulation, can mediate a rapid emergence of resistance. Therefore, substances like rifampicin should be only used in combination with other drugs. Accumulation of resistance genes under common regulatory control in integrons induces co-resistance against substances of different specificity. Detailed knowledge of resistance mechanisms, their evolution and dynamics is important for a rational use of antibiotics and other strategies against antibiotic resistance.

  13. [Antibiotics and gait disorders].

    PubMed

    Gomez-Porro, P; Vinagre-Aragon, A; Zabala-Goiburu, J A

    2016-12-01

    The neurological toxicity of many antibiotics has been reported in a number of articles and clinical notes. In this review antibiotics are classified according to the physiopathogenic mechanism that can give rise to a gait disorder, taking both clinical and experimental data into account. An exhaustive search was conducted in Google Scholar and PubMed with the aim of finding reviews, articles and clinical cases dealing with gait disorders secondary to different antibiotics. The different antibiotics were separated according to the physiopathogenic mechanism that could cause them to trigger a gait disorder. They were classified into antibiotics capable of producing cerebellar ataxia, vestibular ataxia, sensitive ataxia or an extrapyramidal gait disorder. The main aim was to group all the drugs that can give rise to a gait disorder, in order to facilitate the clinical suspicion and, consequently, the management of patients.

  14. Zoledronic acid has differential anti-tumour activity in the pre-and post-menopausal bone microenvironment in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ottewell, Penelope D; Wang, Ning; Brown, Hannah K; Reeves, Kimberly J; Fowles, C Anne; Croucher, Peter I; Eaton, Colby L; Holen, Ingunn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Clinical trials in early breast cancer have suggested that benefits of adjuvant bone targeted treatments are restricted to women with established menopause. We developed models that mimic pre- and post-menopausal status to investigate effects of altered bone turnover on growth of disseminated breast tumour cells. Here we report a differential anti-tumour effect of zoledronic acid (ZOL) in these two settings. Experimental design 12-week old female Balb/c-nude mice with disseminated MDA-MB-231 breast tumour cells in bone underwent sham operation or ovariectomy (OVX), mimicking the pre- and post-menopausal bone microenvironment, respectively. To determine the effects of bone-targeted therapy, sham/OVX animals received saline or 100ug/kg ZOL weekly. Tumour growth was assessed by in vivo imaging and effects on bone by RT-PCR, microCT, histomorphometry and measurements of bone markers. Disseminated tumour cells were detected by two-photon microscopy. Results OVX increased bone resorption and induced growth of disseminated tumour cells in bone. Tumours were detected in 83% of animals following OVX (post-menopausal model) compared to 17% following sham operation (pre-menopausal model). OVX had no effect on tumours outside of bone. OVX-induced tumour growth was completely prevented by ZOL, despite the presence of disseminated tumour cells. ZOL did not affect tumour growth in bone in the sham-operated animals. ZOL increased bone volume in both groups. Conclusions This is the first demonstration that tumour growth is driven by osteoclast-mediated mechanisms in models that mimic post-but not pre-menopausal bone, providing a biological rationale for the differential anti-tumour effects of ZOL reported in these settings. PMID:24687923

  15. [Bacteriophages as antibacterial agents].

    PubMed

    Shasha, Shaul M; Sharon, Nehama; Inbar, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacteria. They have played an important role in the development of molecular biology and have been used as anti-bacterial agents. Since their independent discovery by Twort and d'Herelle, they have been extensively used to prevent and treat bacterial infections, mainly in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. In western countries this method has been sporadically employed on humans and domesticated animals. However, the discovery and widespread use of antibiotics, coupled with doubts about the efficacy of phage therapy, led to an eclipse in the use of phage in medicine. The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, especially strains that are multiply resistant, has resulted in a renewed interest in alternatives to conventional drugs. One of the possible replacements for antibiotics is the use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents. This brief review aims to describe the history of bacteriophage and early clinical studies on their use in bacterial disease prophylaxis and therapy, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of bacteriophage in this regard.

  16. Polyphenols as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Daglia, Maria

    2012-04-01

    Polyphenols are secondary metabolites produced by higher plants, which play multiple essential roles in plant physiology and have potential healthy properties on human organism, mainly as antioxidants, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antihypertensive, and antimicrobial agents. In the present review the antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal activities of the most active polyphenol classes are reported, highlighting, where investigated, the mechanisms of action and the structure-activity relationship. Moreover, considering that the microbial resistance has become an increasing global problem, and there is a compulsory need to find out new potent antimicrobial agents as accessories to antibiotic therapy, the synergistic effect of polyphenols in combination with conventional antimicrobial agents against clinical multidrug-resistant microorganisms is discussed.

  17. Inhaled Antibiotic Therapy in Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Maselli, Diego J.; Keyt, Holly; Restrepo, Marcos I.

    2017-01-01

    The management of patients with chronic respiratory diseases affected by difficult to treat infections has become a challenge in clinical practice. Conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis require extensive treatment strategies to deal with multidrug resistant pathogens that include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia species and non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM). These challenges prompted scientists to deliver antimicrobial agents through the pulmonary system by using inhaled, aerosolized or nebulized antibiotics. Subsequent research advances focused on the development of antibiotic agents able to achieve high tissue concentrations capable of reducing the bacterial load of difficult-to-treat organisms in hosts with chronic respiratory conditions. In this review, we focus on the evidence regarding the use of antibiotic therapies administered through the respiratory system via inhalation, nebulization or aerosolization, specifically in patients with chronic respiratory diseases that include CF, non-CF bronchiectasis and NTM. However, further research is required to address the potential benefits, mechanisms of action and applications of inhaled antibiotics for the management of difficult-to-treat infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. PMID:28509852

  18. Antitumour Activity and Safety of Enzalutamide in Patients with Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Previously Treated with Abiraterone Acetate Plus Prednisone for ≥24 weeks in Europe.

    PubMed

    de Bono, Johann S; Chowdhury, Simon; Feyerabend, Susan; Elliott, Tony; Grande, Enrique; Melhem-Bertrandt, Amal; Baron, Benoit; Hirmand, Mohammad; Werbrouck, Patrick; Fizazi, Karim

    2017-08-22

    Enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate plus prednisone, which target the androgen receptor axis, have expanded the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Retrospective analyses suggest some cross-resistance between these two drugs when used sequentially, but robust, prospective studies have not yet been reported. To fulfil a regulatory postregistration commitment by evaluating the efficacy and safety of enzalutamide in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who progressed following abiraterone acetate plus prednisone treatment. Multicentre, single-arm, open-label study, enrolled patients with progressing mCRPC after ≥24 wk of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone treatment. All patients maintained castration therapy during the trial. Prior chemotherapy was allowed but not required. Patients received enzalutamide 160mg/d orally. The primary endpoint was radiographic progression-free survival. Secondary endpoints were overall survival, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response, and time-to-PSA progression. Safety data were also assessed. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to descriptively analyse time-to-event endpoints. Overall, 214 patients received enzalutamide treatment, 145 of whom were chemotherapy-naïve. Median radiographic progression-free survival was 8.1 mo (95% confidence interval: 6.1-8.3); median overall survival had not been reached. Unconfirmed PSA response rate was 27% (48 of 181). Median time-to-PSA progression was 5.7 mo (95% confidence interval: 5.6-5.8). The most common treatment-emergent adverse events were fatigue (32%), decreased appetite (25%), asthenia (18%), back pain (17%), and arthralgia (16%). No seizures were reported. Enzalutamide showed antitumour activity in some patients with mCRPC who had previously progressed following ≥24 wk of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone treatment. Patients with mCRPC who progressed on previous abiraterone acetate plus prednisone treatment, with or without prior chemotherapy

  19. Examination of a synthetic benzophenone membrane-targeted antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Vooturi, Sunil K; Dewal, Mahender B; Firestine, Steven M

    2011-09-21

    The enormous success of antibiotics is seriously threatened by the development of resistance to most of the drugs available on the market. Thus, novel antibiotics are needed that are less prone to bacterial resistance and are directed toward novel biological targets. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have attracted considerable attention due to their unique mode of action and broad spectrum activity. However, these agents suffer from liability to proteases and the high cost of manufacturing has impeded their development. Previously, we have reported on a novel class of benzophenone-based antibiotics and early studies suggested that these agents might target the bacterial membrane. In this study, we present our work on the mechanism of action of these novel membrane targeted antibiotics. These compounds have good affinities to polyanionic components of the cell wall such as lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that these agents release potassium ions from treated bacteria; thus, resulting in disruption of the bacterial membrane potential. Benzophenone-based membrane targeted antibiotics (BPMTAs) cause membrane disruption in synthetic lipid vesicles that mimic Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria. The compounds display no hemolytic activity up to a concentration that is 100 times the MIC values and they are capable of curing mice of a lethal MRSA infection. Repeated attempts to develop a mutant resistant to these agents has failed. Taken together, BPMTAs represent a promising new class of membrane-targeted antibacterial agents.

  20. Biosensors, antibiotics and food.

    PubMed

    Virolainen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics are medicine's leading asset for fighting microbial infection, which is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. However, the misuse of antibiotics has led to the rapid spread of antibiotic resistance among bacteria and the development of multiple resistant pathogens. Therefore, antibiotics are rapidly losing their antimicrobial value. The use of antibiotics in food production animals is strictly controlled by the European Union (EU). Veterinary use is regulated to prevent the spread of resistance. EU legislation establishes maximum residue limits for veterinary medicinal products in foodstuffs of animal origin and enforces the establishment and execution of national monitoring plans. Among samples selected for monitoring, suspected noncompliant samples are screened and then subjected to confirmatory analysis to establish the identity and concentration of the contaminant. Screening methods for antibiotic residues are typically based on microbiological growth inhibition, whereas physico-chemical methods are used for confirmatory analysis. This chapter discusses biosensors, especially whole-cell based biosensors, as emerging screening methods for antibiotic residues. Whole-cell biosensors can offer highly sensitive and specific detection of residues. Applications demonstrating quantitative analysis and specific analyte identification further improve their potential as screening methods.

  1. Solving the Antibiotic Crisis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gerard D

    2015-02-13

    Antibiotics are essential for both treating and preventing infectious diseases. Paradoxically, despite their importance as pillars of modern medicine, we are in danger of losing antibiotics because of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms throughout all pathogenic microbes. This fact, coupled with an inability to bring new drugs to market at a pace that matches resistance, has resulted in a crisis of global proportion. Solving this crisis requires the actions of many stakeholders, but chemists, chemical biologists, and microbiologists must drive the scientific innovation that is required to maintain our antibiotic arsenal. This innovation requires (1) a deep understanding of the evolution and reservoirs of resistance; (2) full knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic action and resistance; (3) the discovery of chemical and genetic probes of antibiotic action and resistance; (4) the integration of systems biology into antibiotic discovery; and (5) the discovery of new antimicrobial chemical matter. Addressing these pressing scientific gaps will ensure that we can meet the antibiotic crisis with creativity and purpose.

  2. Glyphosate Resistance as a Novel Select-Agent-Compliant, Non-Antibiotic-Selectable Marker in Chromosomal Mutagenesis of the Essential Genes asd and dapB of Burkholderia pseudomallei▿

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Michael H.; Kang, Yun; Lu, Diana; Wilcox, Bruce A.; Hoang, Tung T.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic manipulation of the category B select agents Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei has been stifled due to the lack of compliant selectable markers. Hence, there is a need for additional select-agent-compliant selectable markers. We engineered a selectable marker based on the gat gene (encoding glyphosate acetyltransferase), which confers resistance to the common herbicide glyphosate (GS). To show the ability of GS to inhibit bacterial growth, we determined the effective concentrations of GS against Escherichia coli and several Burkholderia species. Plasmids based on gat, flanked by unique flip recombination target (FRT) sequences, were constructed for allelic-replacement. Both allelic-replacement approaches, one using the counterselectable marker pheS and the gat-FRT cassette and one using the DNA incubation method with the gat-FRT cassette, were successfully utilized to create deletions in the asd and dapB genes of wild-type B. pseudomallei strains. The asd and dapB genes encode an aspartate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (BPSS1704, chromosome 2) and dihydrodipicolinate reductase (BPSL2941, chromosome 1), respectively. Mutants unable to grow on media without diaminopimelate (DAP) and other amino acids of this pathway were PCR verified. These mutants displayed cellular morphologies consistent with the inability to cross-link peptidoglycan in the absence of DAP. The B. pseudomallei 1026b Δasd::gat-FRT mutant was complemented with the B. pseudomallei asd gene on a site-specific transposon, mini-Tn7-bar, by selecting for the bar gene (encoding bialaphos/PPT resistance) with PPT. We conclude that the gat gene is one of very few appropriate, effective, and beneficial compliant markers available for Burkholderia select-agent species. Together with the bar gene, the gat cassette will facilitate various genetic manipulations of Burkholderia select-agent species. PMID:19648360

  3. Isolation and characterization of lipopeptide antibiotics produced by Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Wang, L; Su, C X; Gong, G H; Wang, P; Yu, Z L

    2008-09-01

    Antibiotics from Bacillus subtilis JA show strong pathogen inhibition ability, which has potential market application; yet, the composition of these antibiotics has not been elucidated. The aim of this paper is to isolate and identify these antibiotics. The antagonistic activity of JA was tested in vitro; it exhibited strong inhibition against some important phytopathogens and postharvest pathogens. Crude antibiotic production was extracted with methanol from the precipitate by adding 6 mol l(-1) HCl to the bacillus-free culture broth. The crude extract was run on Diamonsil C18 column (5 microm, 250 x 4.6 mm) in HPLC system to separate the antibiotics. Major antibiotics were classified into three lipopeptide families according to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry analysis. Subsequently, the classification of antibiotics was confirmed with typical collision-induced dissociation fragments. Three kinds of antibiotics were isolated from B. subtilis JA and were identified to the lipopeptide families, surfactin, iturin and fengycin. These compounds could function as biocontrol agents against a large spectrum of pathogens. This study provided a reliable and rapid method for isolation and structural characterization of lipopeptide antibiotics from B. subtilis.

  4. The role of healthcare strategies in controlling antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Ann-Marie

    In an interview in March 2013, the Chief Medical Officer described antibiotic resistance as a 'ticking time bomb' and ranked it along with terrorism on a list of threats to the nation. Her report Infections and the Rise of Antimicrobial Resistance (Department of Health, 2011) highlighted that, while a new infectious disease has been discovered nearly every year over the past three decades, there have been very few new antibiotics developed, leaving our armoury nearly empty. Antibiotic resistance is a universal problem that needs to be tackled by a wide variety of strategies and players. Our approach to tackling resistance to antibiotic agents must therefore also be dynamic. As well as reducing environmental use, we also need to lower antibiotic use in the healthcare setting. Healthcare workers have a huge role to play in combating antibiotic resistance. This article focuses on several issues related to antibiotic resistance, including antibiotic modes of action and the properties that confer resistance on bacteria. It includes information on antibiotic usage and describes current healthcare strategies we can adopt to help reduce the development of resistance.

  5. Toyota production system quality improvement initiative improves perioperative antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Burkitt, Kelly H; Mor, Maria K; Jain, Rajiv; Kruszewski, Matthew S; McCray, Ellesha E; Moreland, Michael E; Muder, Robert R; Obrosky, David Scott; Sevick, Mary Ann; Wilson, Mark A; Fine, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    To assess the role of a Toyota production system (TPS) quality improvement (QI) intervention on appropriateness of perioperative antibiotic therapy and in length of hospital stay (LOS) among surgical patients. Pre-post quasi-experimental study using local and national retrospective cohorts. We used TPS methods to implement a multifaceted intervention to reduce nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections on a Veterans Affairs surgical unit, which led to a QI intervention targeting appropriate perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Appropriate perioperative antibiotic therapy was defined as selection of the recommended antibiotic agents for a duration not exceeding 24 hours from the time of the operation. The local computerized medical record system was used to identify patients undergoing the 25 most common surgical procedures and to examine changes in appropriate antibiotic therapy and LOS over time. Overall, 2550 surgical admissions were identified from the local computerized medical records. The proportion of surgical admissions receiving appropriate perioperative antibiotics was significantly higher (P <.01) in 2004 after initiation of the TPS intervention (44.0%) compared with the previous 4 years (range, 23.4%-29.8%) primarily because of improvements in compliance with antibiotic therapy duration rather than appropriate antibiotic selection. There was no statistically significant decrease in LOS over time. The use of TPS methods resulted in a QI intervention that was associated with an increase in appropriate perioperative antibiotic therapy among surgical patients, without affecting LOS.

  6. Sampling the antibiotic resistome.

    PubMed

    D'Costa, Vanessa M; McGrann, Katherine M; Hughes, Donald W; Wright, Gerard D

    2006-01-20

    Microbial resistance to antibiotics currently spans all known classes of natural and synthetic compounds. It has not only hindered our treatment of infections but also dramatically reshaped drug discovery, yet its origins have not been systematically studied. Soil-dwelling bacteria produce and encounter a myriad of antibiotics, evolving corresponding sensing and evading strategies. They are a reservoir of resistance determinants that can be mobilized into the microbial community. Study of this reservoir could provide an early warning system for future clinically relevant antibiotic resistance mechanisms.

  7. The role of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature.

    PubMed

    Aminov, Rustam I

    2009-12-01

    Investigations of antibiotic resistance from an environmental prospective shed new light on a problem that was traditionally confined to a subset of clinically relevant antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens. It is clear that the environmental microbiota, even in apparently antibiotic-free environments, possess an enormous number and diversity of antibiotic resistance genes, some of which are very similar to the genes circulating in pathogenic microbiota. It is difficult to explain the role of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in natural environments from an anthropocentric point of view, which is focused on clinical aspects such as the efficiency of antibiotics in clearing infections and pathogens that are resistant to antibiotic treatment. A broader overview of the role of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature from the evolutionary and ecological prospective suggests that antibiotics have evolved as another way of intra- and inter-domain communication in various ecosystems. This signalling by non-clinical concentrations of antibiotics in the environment results in adaptive phenotypic and genotypic responses of microbiota and other members of the community. Understanding the complex picture of evolution and ecology of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance may help to understand the processes leading to the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance and also help to control it, at least in relation to the newer antibiotics now entering clinical practice.

  8. N-O Chemistry for Antibiotics: Discovery of N-Alkyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine Scaffolds as Selective Antibacterial Agents Using Nitroso Diels-Alder and Ene Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Wencewicz, Timothy A.; Yang, Baiyuan; Rudloff, James R.; Oliver, Allen G.; Miller, Marvin J.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery, syntheses, and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of a new family of heterocyclic antibacterial compounds based on N-alkyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine scaffolds are described. A structurally diverse library of ~100 heterocyclic molecules generated from Lewis acid-mediated nucleophilic ring opening reactions with nitroso Diels-Alder cycloadducts and nitroso ene reactions with substituted alkenes was evaluated in whole cell antibacterial assays. Compounds containing the N-alkyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine structure demonstrated selective and potent antibacterial activity against the Gram-positive bacterium Micrococcus luteus ATCC 10240 (MIC90 = 2.0 μM or 0.41 μg/mL) and moderate activity against other Gram-positive strains including antibiotic resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Enterococcus faecalis (VRE). A new synthetic route to the active core was developed using palladium-catalyzed Buchwald-Hartwig amination reactions of N-alkyl-O-(4-methoxybenzyl)hydroxylamines with 2-halo-pyridines that facilitated SAR studies and revealed the simplest active structural fragment. This work shows the value of using a combination of diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) and parallel synthesis for identifying new antibacterial scaffolds. PMID:21859126

  9. N-O chemistry for antibiotics: discovery of N-alkyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine scaffolds as selective antibacterial agents using nitroso Diels-Alder and ene chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wencewicz, Timothy A; Yang, Baiyuan; Rudloff, James R; Oliver, Allen G; Miller, Marvin J

    2011-10-13

    The discovery, syntheses, and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of a new family of heterocyclic antibacterial compounds based on N-alkyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine scaffolds are described. A structurally diverse library of ∼100 heterocyclic molecules generated from Lewis acid-mediated nucleophilic ring-opening reactions with nitroso Diels-Alder cycloadducts and nitroso ene reactions with substituted alkenes was evaluated in whole cell antibacterial assays. Compounds containing the N-alkyl-N-(pyridin-2-yl)hydroxylamine structure demonstrated selective and potent antibacterial activity against the Gram-positive bacterium Micrococcus luteus ATCC 10240 (MIC(90) = 2.0 μM or 0.41 μg/mL) and moderate activity against other Gram-positive strains including antibiotic resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Enterococcus faecalis (VRE). A new synthetic route to the active core was developed using palladium-catalyzed Buchwald-Hartwig amination reactions of N-alkyl-O-(4-methoxybenzyl)hydroxylamines with 2-halo-pyridines that facilitated SAR studies and revealed the simplest active structural fragment. This work shows the value of using a combination of diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) and parallel synthesis for identifying new antibacterial scaffolds.

  10. [Antibiotic prophylaxis in colorectal surgery].

    PubMed

    Dellamonica, P; Bernard, E

    1994-01-01

    In elective colorectal surgery, the benefit of preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis is well established, with a reduction in wound infection rate to less than 10%. The antimicrobial agent used has to be active against aerobic and anaerobic pathogens such as Escheria coli and Bacteriodes fragilis. The efficacy of three schemes of administration: oral and/or parenteral prophylaxis associated with a mechanical preparation, has been demonstrated. Oral antibiotic administration is current practice in USA; the most widely used oral regimen is the combination of erythromycin and neomycin given the day before surgery. Parenteral prophylaxis with a cephalosporin active against Bacteriodes fragilis such as cefoxitin and cefotetan, is preferred in Europe. The issue of whether a systemic prophylaxis should be added to the oral regimen or not has not yet been resolved. However it seems that the association should be proposed in various situations: patients with a high risk factors score (rectal resection and operations lasting more than three hours), patients with incomplete mechanical preparation, delay of the onset of surgery after the last oral dose.

  11. Antibiotic use and overuse for appendicectomy in Antigua and Barbuda.

    PubMed

    Martin, T C; Anthony, F

    2006-01-01

    The use of antibiotics for appendicectomy in Antigua and Barbuda, from January 1998 to December 1999, was examined with respect to current Surgical Infection Society guidelines from developed countries. There were 143 cases of appendicectomy performed at Holberton Hospital. The mean patient age and standard deviation (SD) was 28.1 +/- 15.8 years, 57% female. Pathology showed inflammed appendix only in 56%, peri-appendiceal abscess/perforation in 17%, "fibrosed" appendix in 10% and normal appendix in 17%. Postoperative infection (wound infection, fever > three days) was seen in 7/24 (29%) of cases with peri-appendiceal abscess/perforation and 2/119 (1.7%) of the other cases. A subset of 88 cases had antibiotic use reviewed: 3/88 (3.4%) were given no antibiotics, 7/88 (8%) were given one antibiotic, 5/88 (5.7%) were given two antibiotics, 72/88 (81.8%) were given three antibiotics and 1/88 (1.1%) was given four antibiotics. Parenteral antibiotics were given a mean and SD of 5.39 +/- 1.94 days followed by oral antibiotics in 18/88 (20.5%) cases. Those with appendiceal abscess/perforation were treated parenterally for mean and SD of 6.56 +/- 2.35 days, not significantly different from others. Most frequent antibiotics used were gentamicin, metronidazole and ampicillin/penicillin/cloxacillin/cephradine (81.8%). The Surgical Infection Society recommends starting prophylactic antibiotics before surgery, using appropriate spectrum agents for less than 24 hours if not contaminated and less than five days if infected. It may be possible to safely reduce antibiotic use for appendicectomy in Antigua and Barbuda.

  12. Childhood infections, antibiotics, and resistance: what are parents saying now?

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Jonathan A.; Dutta-Linn, Maya; Meyer, Robert; Goldman, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Parental misconceptions and even “demand” for unnecessary antibiotics were previously viewed as contributors to overuse of these agents. We conducted focus groups to explore the knowledge and attitudes surrounding common infections and antibiotic use in the current era of more judicious prescribing. Among diverse groups of parents, we found widespread use of home remedies and considerable concern regarding antibiotic resistance. Parents generally expressed the desire to use antibiotics only when necessary. There was appreciation of inherent error in the diagnosis of common infections, with most trust placed in providers with whom parents had longstanding relationships. While some parents had experience with “watchful waiting” for otitis media, there was little enthusiasm for this approach. While there may still be room for further education, it appears that parents have become more informed and sophisticated regarding appropriate uses of antibiotics. This has likely contributed to the declines seen in their use nationally. PMID:24137024

  13. Marine bacteria: potential sources for compounds to overcome antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Eom, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Young-Mog; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most problematic Gram-positive bacterium in the context of public health due to its resistance against almost all available antibiotics except vancomycin and teicoplanin. Moreover, glycopeptide-resistant S. aureus have been emerging with the increasing use of glycopeptides. Recently, resistant strains against linezolid and daptomycin, which are alternative drugs to treat MRSA infection, have also been reported. Thus, the development of new drugs or alternative therapies is clearly a matter of urgency. In response to the antibiotic resistance, many researchers have studied for alternative antibiotics and therapies. In this review, anti-MRSA substances isolated from marine bacteria, with their potential antibacterial effect against MRSA as potential anti-MRSA agents, are discussed and several strategies for overcoming the antibiotic resistance are also introduced. Our objective was to highlight marine bacteria that have potential to lead in developing novel antibiotics or clinically useful alternative therapeutic treatments.

  14. Chloroquinolines block antibiotic efflux pumps in antibiotic-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes isolates.

    PubMed

    Ghisalberti, Didier; Mahamoud, Abdallah; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Baitiche, Milad; Martino, Michèle; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Barbe, Jacques

    2006-06-01

    Efflux mechanisms protect bacterial cells by pumping out toxic compounds and actively contribute to bacterial multidrug resistance. Agents inhibiting efflux pumps are of interest for the control of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Herein we report the effects of new chloroquinoline derivatives that render resistant Enterobacter aerogenes isolates noticeably more susceptible to structurally unrelated antibiotics. In addition, some of these chloroquinolines increase the intracellular concentration of chloramphenicol. Some of the molecules tested in this work are able to inhibit the main efflux pump (AcrAB-TolC), which is involved in E. aerogenes antibiotic resistance.

  15. Glycopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yim, Grace; Thaker, Maulik N; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Glycopeptides such as vancomycin, teicoplanin and telavancin are essential for treating infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Unfortunately, the dwindled pipeline of new antibiotics into the market and the emergence of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci and other resistant bacteria are increasingly making effective antibiotic treatment difficult. We have now learned a great deal about how bacteria produce antibiotics. This information can be exploited to develop the next generation of antimicrobials. The biosynthesis of glycopeptides via nonribosomal peptide assembly and unusual amino acid synthesis, crosslinking and tailoring enzymes gives rise to intricate chemical structures that target the bacterial cell wall. This review seeks to describe recent advances in our understanding of both biosynthesis and resistance of these important antibiotics.

  16. Targeting Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chellat, Mathieu F.; Raguž, Luka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Finding strategies against the development of antibiotic resistance is a major global challenge for the life sciences community and for public health. The past decades have seen a dramatic worldwide increase in human‐pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to one or multiple antibiotics. More and more infections caused by resistant microorganisms fail to respond to conventional treatment, and in some cases, even last‐resort antibiotics have lost their power. In addition, industry pipelines for the development of novel antibiotics have run dry over the past decades. A recent world health day by the World Health Organization titled “Combat drug resistance: no action today means no cure tomorrow” triggered an increase in research activity, and several promising strategies have been developed to restore treatment options against infections by resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27000559

  17. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms.

  18. The use of oral antibiotics in treating acne vulgaris: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Farrah, Georgia; Tan, Ernest

    2016-09-01

    Although acne is not an infectious disease, oral antibiotics have remained a mainstay of treatment over the last 40 years. The anti-inflammatory properties of oral antibiotics, particularly the tetracyclines, are efficacious in treating inflammatory acne lesions. Common prescribing practices in Dermatology exert significant selection pressure on bacteria, contributing to the development of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic use for acne not only promotes resistance in Propionibacterium acnes, but also affects other host bacteria with pathogenic potential. This review will summarize the commonly used treatments for acne vulgaris, and how they should be combined as rational treatment. The indications for using oral antibiotics in acne will be highlighted. Strategies described in the literature to conserve the utility of oral antibiotics will be summarized. These include limiting the duration of antibiotic therapy, concomitant use of a topical non-antibiotic agent, use of subantimicrobial dose doxycycline, and the introduction of topical dapsone.

  19. Antibiotic Resistance in Acne Treatment.

    PubMed

    Adler, Brandon L; Kornmehl, Heather; Armstrong, April W

    2017-08-01

    What is the evidence for antibiotic resistance in acne, and how does resistance affect treatment? Use of topical and systemic antibiotics for acne is associated with formation of resistance in Propionibacterium acnes and other bacteria, with clinical consequences. Guidelines recommend resistance reduction strategies including avoidance of antibiotic monotherapy, combination treatment with topical modalities, and limiting the duration of oral antibiotic use.

  20. What ever happened to the common cold? Improving antibiotic utilization.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Mark K; VanKeulen, Scott; Hoffman, Wendell W

    2013-04-01

    Unnecessary antibiotic prescribing has tremendous cost to both the individual and to society in terms of drug resistance, adverse drug reactions and economic expense. There is overwhelming evidence in the medical literature that the majority of outpatient cases for which antibiotics are prescribed may be effectively and safely treated without the use of these agents. We present algorithms for upper respiratory tract infections to aid physicians and advanced practice clinicians in distinguishing those patients who may benefit from antibiotics from the greater majority who are more likely to be harmed by them.

  1. Natural Product-Based Antibiotics: Synthesis and SAR-Studies.

    PubMed

    Prusov, Evgeny V

    2016-01-01

    Efficient control of the infectious diseases in the era of the emerging bacterial resistance demands consistent development of new antibiotic agents with novel modes of action. With some notable exceptions, the majority of the currently used antibiotics are natural product-derived compounds which were elaborated upon lead structures discovered by screening of various isolates. In this review, we summarized some selected examples of recent advances in the area of natural product based antibiotic development with particular emphasis on the synthetic and SAR-elucidation aspects.

  2. [The history of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Yazdankhah, Siamak; Lassen, Jørgen; Midtvedt, Tore; Solberg, Claus Ola

    2013-12-10

    The development of chemical compounds for the treatment of infectious diseases may be divided into three phases: a) the discovery in the 1600s in South America of alkaloid extracts from the bark of the cinchona tree and from the dried root of the ipecacuanha bush, which proved effective against, respectively, malaria (quinine) and amoebic dysentery (emetine); b) the development of synthetic drugs, which mostly took place in Germany, starting with Paul Ehrlich's (1854-1915) discovery of salvarsan (1909), and crowned with Gerhard Domagk's (1895-1964) discovery of the sulfonamides (1930s); and c) the discovery of antibiotics. The prime example of the latter is the development of penicillin in the late 1920s following a discovery by a solitary research scientist who never worked in a team and never as part of a research programme. It took another ten years or so before drug-quality penicillin was produced, with research now dependent on being conducted in large collaborative teams, frequently between universities and wealthy industrial companies. The search for new antibiotics began in earnest in the latter half of the 1940s and was mostly based on soil microorganisms. Many new antibiotics were discovered in this period, which may be termed «the golden age of antibiotics». Over the past three decades, the development of new antibiotics has largely stalled, while antibiotic resistance has increased. This situation may require new strategies for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  3. Antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R T

    1981-11-01

    This review examines the principles and practice of antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery. Such prophylaxis is required to decrease the frequency of postoperative infection in most patients with clean-contaminated and contaminated wounds, to prevent infrequent but devastating infection of prostheses in cardiovascular and orthopedic surgery and to prevent endocarditis in noncardiac surgery in patients who have valvular heart disease. Prophylaxis should begin before operation; it is usually unnecessary afterwards. The antibiotic may be given topically or parenterally. The latter is more certain, but oral prophylaxis in bowel surgery may offer additional protection by reducing colonic flora, and topical wound and peritoneal antibiotics may be augment protective antibiotic levels at those sites. Antibiotics, such as the cephalosporin cefazolin (but not cephalothin), which penetrate blood and tissues rapidly and for prolonged periods, afford excellent prophylaxis at most sites. But for prophylaxis in colonic surgery, antibiotics directed against Bacteroides fragilis may be superior, and to prevent endocarditis in noncardiac surgery, vancomycin or a combination of penicillin and an aminoglycoside is best.

  4. Strategies for appropriate antibiotic use in intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Camila Delfino Ribeiro; Silva, Moacyr

    2015-01-01

    The comsumption of antibiotics is high, mainly in intensive care units. Unfortunately, most are inappropriately used leading to increased multi-resistant bacteria. It is well known that initial empirical therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce mortality rates. However the prolonged and irrational use of antimicrobials may also increase the risk of toxicity, drug interactions and diarrhea due to Clostridium difficile. Some strategies to rational use of antimicrobial agents include avoiding colonization treatment, de-escalation, monitoring serum levels of the agents, appropriate duration of therapy and use of biological markers. This review discusses the effectiveness of these strategies, the importance of microbiology knowledge, considering there are agents resistant to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae, and reducing antibiotic use and bacterial resistance, with no impact on mortality. PMID:26132360

  5. Therapeutic effects of date fruits (Phoenix dactylifera) in the prevention of diseases via modulation of anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-tumour activity

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Arshad H; Aly, Salah M; Ali, Habeeb; Babiker, Ali Y; Srikar, Sauda; khan, Amjad A

    2014-01-01

    The current mode of treatment of various diseases based on synthetic drugs is expensive, alters genetic and metabolic pathways and also shows adverse side effects. Thus, safe and effective approach is needed to prevent the diseases development and progression. In this vista, Natural products are good remedy in the treatment/management of diseases and they are affordable and effective without any adverse effects. Dates are main fruit in the Arabian Peninsula and are considered to be one of the most significant commercial crops and also have been documented in Holy Quran and modern scientific literatures. Earlier studies have shown that constituents of dates act as potent antioxidant, anti-tumour as well as anti-inflammatory, provide a suitable alternative therapy in various diseases cure. In this review, dates fruits has medicinal value are summarized in terms of therapeutic implications in the diseases control through anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumour and ant-diabetic effect. PMID:24753740

  6. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Cho, Ill Hwan; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care), the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students) regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing). The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics. PMID:24036486

  7. Strategies to minimize antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Cho, Ill Hwan; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2013-09-12

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care), the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students) regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing). The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.

  8. The Clinical Relevance of Antibiotic Resistance: Thirteen Principles That Every Dermatologist Needs to Consider When Prescribing Antibiotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Zeichner, Joshua A

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics are commonly used by dermatologists in clinical practice, primarily because of the overall track record of favorable efficacy and safety with the most commonly used agents. During the past decade, increased attention has been given to the problems associated with antibiotic resistance. This article summarizes important principles gleaned from the continued efforts of the Scientific Panel on Antibiotic Use in Dermatology; other groups working diligently in this area, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Canadian Antimicrobial Resistance Alliance; and from the published literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Contribution of H-Bonding to the Preference of Platinum Anti-Tumour Drugs for Particular Bases and Particular Cross-Links

    PubMed Central

    Natile, Giovanni

    1994-01-01

    The stereochemical factors that influence the tendencies for sequence specific binding of platinum antitumour drugs to DNA are examined. The NHs of the platinum-amine moiety can form hydrogen bonds to the O6 of guanine or to a phosphate oxygen of DNA. Modelling the stereochemistry of the NH atoms can lead to compounds with a strong preference for forming one type of adduct with DNA. PMID:18476245

  10. Rediscovering the antibiotics of the hive.

    PubMed

    Boukraâ, Laïd; Sulaiman, Siti A

    2009-11-01

    Honey and other bee products were subjected to laboratory and clinical investigations during the past few decades and the most remarkable discovery was their antibacterial activity. Honey has been used since ancient times for the treatment of some diseases and for the healing of wounds but its use as an anti-infective agent was superseded by modern dressings and antibiotic therapy. However, the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria has confounded the current use of antibiotic therapy leading to the re-examination of former remedies. Honey, propolis, royal jelly and bee venom have a strong antibacterial activity. Even antibiotic-resistant strains such as epidemic strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycine resistant Enterococcus (VRE) have been found to be as sensitive to honey as the antibiotic-sensitive strains of the same species. Sensitivity of bacteria to bee products varies considerably within the product and the varieties of the same product. Botanical origin plays a major role in its antibacterial activity. Propolis has been found to have the strongest action against bacteria. This is probably due to its richness in flavonoids. The most challenging problems of using hive products for medical purposes are dosage and safety. Honey and royal jelly produced as a food often are not well filtered, and may contain various particles. Processed for use in wound care, they are passed through fine filters which remove most of the pollen and other impurities to prevent allergies. Also, although honey does not allow vegetative bacteria to survive, it does contain viable spores, including clostridia. With the increased availability of licensed medical stuffs containing bee products, clinical use is expected to increase and further evidence will become available. Their use in professional care centres should be limited to those which are safe and with certified antibacterial activities. The present article is a short review

  11. Antibiotics in dental practice: how justified are we.

    PubMed

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder S; Dhingra, Chandan; Sharma, Gaurav; Sardana, Divesh

    2015-02-01

    Antibiotics are prescribed by dentists in dental practice, during dental treatment as well as for prevention of infection. Indications for the use of systemic antibiotics in dentistry are limited because most dental and periodontal diseases are best managed by operative intervention and oral hygiene measures. The use of antibiotics in dental practice is characterised by empirical prescription based on clinical and bacteriological epidemiological factors, resulting in the use of a very narrow range of broad-spectrum antibiotics for short periods of time. This has led to the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in a wide range of microbes and to the consequent inefficacy of commonly used antibiotics. Dentists can make a difference by the judicious use of antimicrobials--prescribing the correct drug, at the standard dosage and appropriate regimen--only when systemic spread of infection is evident. The increasing resistance problems of recent years are probably related to the over- or misuse of broad-spectrum agents. There is a clear need for the development of prescribing guidelines and educational initiatives to encourage the rational and appropriate use of drugs in dentistry. This paper highlights the need for dentists to improve antibiotic prescribing practices in an attempt to curb the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance and other side effects of antibiotic abuse. The literature provides evidence of inadequate prescribing practices by dentists for a number of factors, ranging from inadequate knowledge to social factors. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  12. [Update on antibiotic resistance in Gram-positive bacteria].

    PubMed

    Lozano, Carmen; Torres, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance among Gram-positive bacteria, especially in Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, is a serious threat to public health. These microorganisms have multiple resistance mechanisms to agents currently used in clinical practice. Many of these resistance mechanisms are common to all 4 of these bacterial species, but other mechanisms seem to be more specific. The prevalence and dissemination of these mechanisms varies considerably, depending on the microorganism. This review discusses the resistance mechanisms to the most clinically relevant antibiotics, with particular emphasis on the new mechanisms described for widely used antibiotics and for newer agents such as lipopeptides, lipoglycopeptides, glycylcyclines and oxazolidinones.

  13. Evaluation of empiric antibiotic de-escalation in febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Amanda L; Corrigan, Patricia A; Patel, Shejal; Hawks, Kelly G

    2016-10-01

    Up until 2010, the recommended duration of empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics for febrile neutropenia was until absolute neutrophil count (ANC) recovery. An updated guideline on the use of antimicrobial agents in neutropenic patients with cancer indicates that patients who have completed an appropriate treatment course of broad-spectrum antibiotics, with resolution of signs and symptoms of infection but persistent neutropenia, can be de-escalated to oral fluoroquinolone prophylaxis until ANC recovery. The primary objective of this retrospective investigation was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of de-escalating broad-spectrum antibiotics in patients remaining neutropenic after at least 14 days of empiric broadspectrum antibiotics for febrile neutropenia compared to patients continuing broad-spectrum antibiotics until ANC recovery. There were 16 patients (61.5%) in the comparator group who met the primary endpoint of remaining afebrile and without escalation of antibiotics for at least 72 hours after 14 days of broad-spectrum antibiotics and 21 patients (80.7%) in the de-escalation group who met the primary endpoint of remaining afebrile and without reinitiation of broad-spectrum antibiotics for at least 72 hours after de-escalation to levofloxacin therapy (p = 0.11). Mean total duration of broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy was 23.5 ± 1.5 days in the comparator group versus 22.2 ± 1.43 days in the de-escalation group (p = 0.39). Results of this investigation indicate that broad-spectrum antibiotics can be safely de-escalated to levofloxacin prophylaxis prior to ANC recovery in select patients. This practice may decrease the duration of broad-spectrum antibiotic exposure and associated complications. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Antibiotics for acute bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom; Smucny, John; Becker, Lorne A

    2017-06-19

    The benefits and risks of antibiotics for acute bronchitis remain unclear despite it being one of the most common illnesses seen in primary care. To assess the effects of antibiotics in improving outcomes and to assess adverse effects of antibiotic therapy for people with a clinical diagnosis of acute bronchitis. We searched CENTRAL 2016, Issue 11 (accessed 13 January 2017), MEDLINE (1966 to January week 1, 2017), Embase (1974 to 13 January 2017), and LILACS (1982 to 13 January 2017). We searched the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov on 5 April 2017. Randomised controlled trials comparing any antibiotic therapy with placebo or no treatment in acute bronchitis or acute productive cough, in people without underlying pulmonary disease. At least two review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality. We did not identify any new trials for inclusion in this 2017 update. We included 17 trials with 5099 participants in the primary analysis. The quality of trials was generally good. At follow-up there was no difference in participants described as being clinically improved between the antibiotic and placebo groups (11 studies with 3841 participants, risk ratio (RR) 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99 to 1.15). Participants given antibiotics were less likely to have a cough (4 studies with 275 participants, RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.85; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 6) and a night cough (4 studies with 538 participants, RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.83; NNTB 7). Participants given antibiotics had a shorter mean cough duration (7 studies with 2776 participants, mean difference (MD) -0.46 days, 95% CI -0.87 to -0.04). The differences in presence of a productive cough at follow-up and MD of productive cough did not reach statistical significance.Antibiotic-treated participants were more likely to be improved according to clinician's global assessment (6 studies

  15. Surveillance of life-long antibiotics: a review of antibiotic prescribing practices in an Australian Healthcare Network.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jillian S Y; Kiss, Christopher; Roberts, Erika; Horne, Kylie; Korman, Tony M; Woolley, Ian

    2017-01-18

    The rise of antimicrobial use in the twentieth century has significantly reduced morbidity due to infection, however it has also brought with it the rise of increasing resistance. Some patients are on prolonged, if not "life-long" course of antibiotics. The reasons for this are varied, and include non-infectious indications. We aimed to study the characteristics of this potential source of antibiotic resistance, by exploring the antibiotic dispensing practices and describing the population of patients on long-term antibiotic therapy. A retrospective cross-sectional study of antibiotic dispensing records was performed at a large university hospital-based healthcare network in Melbourne, Australia. Outpatient prescriptions were extracted from the hospital pharmacy database over a 6 month period in 2014. Medical records of these patients were reviewed to determine the indication for prescription, including microbiology, the intended duration, and the prescribing unit. A descriptive analysis was performed on this data. 66,127 dispensing episodes were reviewed. 202 patients were found to have been prescribed 1 or more antibiotics with an intended duration of 1 year or longer. 69/202 (34%) of these patients were prescribed prolonged antibiotics for primary prophylaxis in the setting of immunosuppression. 43/202 (21%) patients were prescribed long-term suppressive antibiotics for infections of thought incurable (e.g. vascular graft infections), and 34/43 (79%) were prescribed by Infectious Diseases doctors. 66/202 (33%) patients with cystic fibrosis were prescribed prolonged courses of macrolides or fluoroquinolones, by respiratory physicians. There was great heterogeneity noted in indications for prolonged antibiotic courses, as well as antibiotic agents utilised. Our study found that that continuous antibiotic therapy represented only a small proportion of overall antibiotic prescribing at our health network. Prolonged courses of antibiotics were used mainly to

  16. Status Report from the Scientific Panel on Antibiotic Use in Dermatology of the American Acne and Rosacea Society

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Richard L.; Thiboutot, Diane; Webster, Guy F.; Rosen, Ted; Leyden, James J.; Walker, Clay; Zhanel, George; Eichenfield, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    In this second part of a three-part series addressing several issues related to antibiotic use in dermatology, potential effects of antibiotic use on the human microbiota and microbiome are reviewed. Data from available literature on the microbiologic effects of specific therapeutic agents commonly used in dermatology, including oral isotretinoin, tetracycline agents, and sub-antimicrobial (sub-antibiotic) dose doxycycline, are also discussed.

  17. Antibiotics after rattlesnake envenomation.

    PubMed

    LoVecchio, Frank; Klemens, Jane; Welch, Sharon; Rodriguez, Ron

    2002-11-01

    To record the outcome, with regard to infection rate, of patients with rattlesnake bites (RSBs) who do not receive prophylactic antibiotics, a prospective observational study was performed of patients with RSBs treated at our institution during a consecutive 18-month period. The inclusion criteria were RSBs <24 h old and completion of follow-up (telephone call, mail reply, medical toxicologist, or private physician examination) 7-10 days following envenomation. Fifty-six consecutive patients (Median age: 32.8 years [range 4-67 years]) were enrolled. One patient was excluded because of presentation 38 h after envenomation and two patients failed to complete the required follow-up. One patient received a dose of antibiotics before transfer. Antibiotics were discontinued upon arrival. Of the total 56 RSB patients, 34 (61%) RSBs involved the upper extremity and 22 (39%) involved the lower extremity. Six patients (11%) applied ice and two (4%) used a tourniquet before evaluation. The mean arrival time was 2.7 h (Range <1-24 h). Forty-three patients (81%) received antivenin. Fifty-three patients (100%) had extremity swelling and 38 patients (72%) had tender proximal lymph nodes. Of the 53 patients who completed the study, 3 (6%) received antibiotics from their primary care physicians at 7-10 day follow-up, with no cases (0%) of documented infection. Prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated in patients with rattlesnake bites.

  18. Laryngectomy Complications Are Associated with Perioperative Antibiotic Choice.

    PubMed

    Langerman, Alexander; Ham, Sandra A; Pisano, Jennifer; Pariser, Joseph; Hohmann, Samuel F; Meltzer, David O

    2015-07-01

    To assess hospital- and physician-level variation in pattern of perioperative antibiotic use for laryngectomy and the relationship between pattern of antibiotic use and surgical site infection (SSI), wound dehiscence, and antibiotic-induced complications. Retrospective analysis of University HealthSystem Consortium data. Academic medical centers and affiliated hospitals. Elective admissions for laryngectomy from 2008 to 2011 and associated 30-day readmissions were analyzed with multivariate logistic regression models. There were 439 unique antibiotic regimens (agents and duration) identified over the first 4 days of the 1865 admissions included in this study. Ampicillin/sulbactam, cefazolin + metronidazole, and clindamycin were the most common agents given on the day of surgery. Clindamycin was independently associated with higher odds of SSI (odds ratio [OR] = 3.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.31-6.49]), wound dehiscence (OR = 3.42, 95% CI = 2.07-5.64), and antibiotic-induced complications (OR = 3.01, 95% CI = 1.59-5.67) when given alone; it was also associated with higher odds of SSI (OR = 2.69, 95% CI = 1.43-5.05) and antibiotic-induced complications (OR = 2.20, 95% CI = 1.04-4.64) when given with other agents. These effects were stronger in a subsample of high-volume physicians and hospitals. There is substantial variability in perioperative antibiotic strategies for laryngectomy. Clindamycin was associated with much higher odds of short-term complications as compared to other common regimens. Based on these data, clinical trials should be planned to firmly establish the most effective and cost-effective antibiotic management for laryngectomy and determine potential alternatives to clindamycin for penicillin-allergic patients. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  19. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... Orange Parkinson’s Awareness Month Were you exposed to herbicides during service and have Parkinson’s disease? You may ...

  20. Indirect resistance to several classes of antibiotics in cocultures with resistant bacteria expressing antibiotic-modifying or -degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nicoloff, Hervé; Andersson, Dan I

    2016-01-01

    Indirect resistance (IR), the ability of an antibiotic-resistant population of bacteria to protect a susceptible population, has been previously observed for β-lactamase-producing bacteria and associated with antimicrobial treatment failures. Here, we determined whether other resistance determinants could cause IR in the presence of five other classes of antibiotics. A test was designed to detect IR and 14 antibiotic resistance genes were tested in the presence of 13 antibiotics from six classes. A bioassay was used to measure the ability of resistance-causing enzymes to decrease the concentration of active antibiotics in the medium. We confirmed IR in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics (ampicillin and mecillinam) when TEM-1A was expressed. We found that bacteria expressing antibiotic-modifying or -degrading enzymes Ere(A), Tet(X2) or CatA1 caused IR in the presence of macrolides (erythromycin and clarithromycin), tetracyclines (tetracycline and tigecycline) and chloramphenicol, respectively. IR was not observed with resistance determinants that did not modify or destroy antibiotics or with enzymes modifying aminoglycosides or degrading fosfomycin. IR was dependent on the resistance enzymes decreasing the concentration of active antibiotics in the medium, hence allowing nearby susceptible bacteria to resume growth once the antibiotic concentration fell below their MIC. IR was not limited to β-lactamase-producing bacteria, but was also caused by resistant bacteria carrying cytoplasmic antibiotic-modifying or -degrading enzymes that catalyse energy-consuming reactions requiring complex cellular cofactors. Our results suggest that IR is common and further emphasizes that coinfecting agents and the human microflora can have a negative impact during antimicrobial therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Preparation, characterisation and antitumour activity of β-, γ- and HP-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes of oxaliplatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da; Zhang, Jianqiang; Jiang, Kunming; Li, Ke; Cong, Yangwei; Pu, Shaoping; Jin, Yi; Lin, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Three water-soluble oxaliplatin complexes were prepared by inclusion complexation with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), γ-CD and HP-β-CD. The structures of oxaliplatin/CDs were confirmed by NMR, FTIR, TGA, XRD as well as SEM analysis. The results show that the water solubility of oxaliplatin was increased in the complex with CDs in 1:1 stoichiometry inclusion modes, and the cyclohexane ring of oxaliplatin molecule was deeply inserted into the cavity of CDs. Moreover, the stoichiometry was established by a Job plot and the water stability constant (Kc) of oxaliplatin/CDs was calculated by phase solubility studies, all results show that the oxaliplatin/β-CD complex is more stable than free oxaliplatin, oxaliplatin/HP-β-CD and oxaliplatin/γ-CD. Meanwhile, the inclusion complexes displayed almost twice as high cytotoxicity compared to free oxaliplatin against HCT116 and MCF-7 cells. This satisfactory water solubility and higher cytotoxic activity of the oxaliplatin/CD complexes will potentially be useful for their application in anti-tumour therapy.

  2. Structure-activity relationship and role of oxygen in the potential antitumour activity of fluoroquinolones in human epithelial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Perucca, Paola; Savio, Monica; Cazzalini, Ornella; Mocchi, Roberto; Maccario, Cristina; Sommatis, Sabrina; Ferraro, Daniela; Pizzala, Roberto; Pretali, Luca; Fasani, Elisa; Albini, Angelo; Stivala, Lucia Anna

    2014-11-01

    The photobehavior of ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin and ofloxacin fluoroquinolones was investigated using several in vitro methods to assess their cytotoxic, antiproliferative, and genotoxic potential against two human cancer cell lines. We focused our attention on the possible relationship between their chemical structure, O₂ partial pressure and photobiological activity on cancer cells. The three molecules share the main features of most fluoroquinolones, a fluorine in 6 and a piperazino group in 7, but differ at the key position 8, unsubstituted in ciprofloxacin, a fluorine in lomefloxacin and an alkoxy group in ofloxacin. Studies in solution show that ofloxacin has a low photoreactivity; lomefloxacin reacts via aryl cation, ciprofloxacin reacts but not via the cation. In our experiments, ciprofloxacin and lomefloxacin showed a high and comparable potential for photodamaging cells and DNA. Lomefloxacin appeared the most efficient molecule in hypoxia, acting mainly against tumour cell proliferation and generating DNA plasmid photocleavage. Although our results do not directly provide evidence that a carbocation is involved in photodamage induced by lomefloxacin, our data strongly support this hypothesis. This may lead to new and more efficient anti-tumour drugs involving a cation in their mechanism of action. This latter acting independently of oxygen, can target hypoxic tumour tissue.

  3. Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Enhance the Anti-tumour Effects of the mTOR Inhibitor Everolimus against Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jie; Wu, Shan; Kong, Yan; Chi, Zhihong; Si, Lu; Sheng, Xinan; Cui, Chuanliang; Fang, Jing; Zhang, Jue; Guo, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The PI3K/mTOR/AKT pathway is activated in most melanomas, but mTOR inhibitors used singly have limited activity against advanced melanomas. The application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) is a promising cancer therapy approach. In this study, we evaluated the synergistic anti-tumour efficacy of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in conjunction with nsPEFs against melanoma. The combined treatment of nsPEFs and everolimus gradually decreased cell growth concurrent with nsPEF intensity. nsPEFs alone or combined with everolimus could promote melanoma cell apoptosis, accompanied with a loss in cellular mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in Ca2+ levels. In vivo experiments showed that a combination of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and nsPEFs improved the inhibitory effect, and all skin lesions caused by nsPEFs healed in 1 week without any observed adverse effect. Combination treatment induced caspase-dependent apoptosis through the upregulation of the pro-apoptotic factor Bax and downregulation of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2. Everolimus and nsPEFs synergistically inhibited angiogenesis by decreasing the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor (VEGFR), and CD34. Our findings indicate that nsPEFs in combination with an mTOR inhibitor can be used as a potential treatment approach for advanced melanoma.

  4. IL-21-mediated reversal of NK cell exhaustion facilitates anti-tumour immunity in MHC class I-deficient tumours

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyungseok; Jeon, Insu; Kim, Byung-Seok; Park, Myunghwan; Bae, Eun-Ah; Song, Boyeong; Koh, Choong-Hyun; Shin, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Il-Kyu; Choi, Kiyoung; Oh, Taegwon; Min, Jiyoun; Min, Byung Soh; Han, Yoon Dae; Kang, Suk-Jo; Shin, Sang Joon; Chung, Yeonseok; Kang, Chang-Yuil

    2017-01-01

    During cancer immunoediting, loss of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) in neoplasm contributes to the evasion of tumours from host immune system. Recent studies have demonstrated that most natural killer (NK) cells that are found in advanced cancers are defective, releasing the malignant MHC-I-deficient tumours from NK-cell-dependent immune control. Here, we show that a natural killer T (NKT)-cell-ligand-loaded tumour-antigen expressing antigen-presenting cell (APC)-based vaccine effectively eradicates these advanced tumours. During this process, we find that the co-expression of Tim-3 and PD-1 marks functionally exhausted NK cells in advanced tumours and that MHC-I downregulation in tumours is closely associated with the induction of NK-cell exhaustion in both tumour-bearing mice and cancer patients. Furthermore, the recovery of NK-cell function by IL-21 is critical for the anti-tumour effects of the vaccine against advanced tumours. These results reveal the process involved in the induction of NK-cell dysfunction in advanced cancers and provide a guidance for the development of strategies for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:28585539

  5. A newly synthesized molecule derived from ruthenium cation, with antitumour activity, activates NADPH oxidase in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Carballo, M; Vilaplana, R; Márquez, G; Conde, M; Bedoya, F J; González-Vílchez, F; Sobrino, F

    1997-12-01

    To determine the nature of the mechanism by which certain derived ruthenium (Ru) complexes induce regression in tumour growth, we have investigated the possibility that this mechanism was associated with an increase of superoxide anion (O2-. production by phagocytic cells, which are usually found in tumour nodes. Here we present evidence that a newly synthesized complex, Ru3+-propylene-1, 2-diaminotetra-acetic acid (Ru-PDTA), derived from Ru and the sequestering ligand (PDTA), specifically stimulates O2-. production. This increase was associated with the translocation of cytosolic factors p47(phox) and p67(phox) of NADPH oxidase to the plasma membrane. The Ru-PDTA-complex-dependent O2-. production was abrogated by staurosporine, partially inhibited by diphenylene iodonium, and it was insensitive to pertussis toxin or dibutyryl cyclic AMP pretreatment. An increase of cytosolic Ca2+ levels were also detected in neutrophils treated with the Ru-PDTA complex. Also, Ru-PDTA complex induced the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues of several proteins as assessed by Western blotting. Present data are consistent with the possibility that Ru-PDTA-dependent antitumour effects are due in part to the complex's ability to stimulate the release of toxic oxygen metabolites from phagocytic cells infiltrating tumour masses.

  6. A newly synthesized molecule derived from ruthenium cation, with antitumour activity, activates NADPH oxidase in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Carballo, M; Vilaplana, R; Márquez, G; Conde, M; Bedoya, F J; González-Vílchez, F; Sobrino, F

    1997-01-01

    To determine the nature of the mechanism by which certain derived ruthenium (Ru) complexes induce regression in tumour growth, we have investigated the possibility that this mechanism was associated with an increase of superoxide anion (O2-. production by phagocytic cells, which are usually found in tumour nodes. Here we present evidence that a newly synthesized complex, Ru3+-propylene-1, 2-diaminotetra-acetic acid (Ru-PDTA), derived from Ru and the sequestering ligand (PDTA), specifically stimulates O2-. production. This increase was associated with the translocation of cytosolic factors p47(phox) and p67(phox) of NADPH oxidase to the plasma membrane. The Ru-PDTA-complex-dependent O2-. production was abrogated by staurosporine, partially inhibited by diphenylene iodonium, and it was insensitive to pertussis toxin or dibutyryl cyclic AMP pretreatment. An increase of cytosolic Ca2+ levels were also detected in neutrophils treated with the Ru-PDTA complex. Also, Ru-PDTA complex induced the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues of several proteins as assessed by Western blotting. Present data are consistent with the possibility that Ru-PDTA-dependent antitumour effects are due in part to the complex's ability to stimulate the release of toxic oxygen metabolites from phagocytic cells infiltrating tumour masses. PMID:9371715

  7. Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Enhance the Anti-tumour Effects of the mTOR Inhibitor Everolimus against Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jie; Wu, Shan; Kong, Yan; Chi, Zhihong; Si, Lu; Sheng, Xinan; Cui, Chuanliang; Fang, Jing; Zhang, Jue; Guo, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The PI3K/mTOR/AKT pathway is activated in most melanomas, but mTOR inhibitors used singly have limited activity against advanced melanomas. The application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) is a promising cancer therapy approach. In this study, we evaluated the synergistic anti-tumour efficacy of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in conjunction with nsPEFs against melanoma. The combined treatment of nsPEFs and everolimus gradually decreased cell growth concurrent with nsPEF intensity. nsPEFs alone or combined with everolimus could promote melanoma cell apoptosis, accompanied with a loss in cellular mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in Ca2+ levels. In vivo experiments showed that a combination of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and nsPEFs improved the inhibitory effect, and all skin lesions caused by nsPEFs healed in 1 week without any observed adverse effect. Combination treatment induced caspase-dependent apoptosis through the upregulation of the pro-apoptotic factor Bax and downregulation of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2. Everolimus and nsPEFs synergistically inhibited angiogenesis by decreasing the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor (VEGFR), and CD34. Our findings indicate that nsPEFs in combination with an mTOR inhibitor can be used as a potential treatment approach for advanced melanoma. PMID:28054548

  8. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy induces transient clinical response in advanced rat fibrosarcoma - comparison with preventive anti-tumour vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kucera, A; Pýcha, K; Pajer, P; Spísek, R; Skába, R

    2009-01-01

    In this study we present the models of preventive and therapeutic vaccination of sarcoma-bearing rats with dendritic cells that present tumour antigens from killed tumour cells. We present the characteristics of dendritic cell-based vaccine and its capacity to induce anti-tumour immune response both in vitro and in vivo. We show that preventive vaccination efficiently prevents tumour growth. On the other hand, vaccination of rats with established tumours did not lead to eradication of the tumours. Despite the induction of a vigorous immune response after administration of dendritic cell-based vaccine and transient decrease in tumour progression, tumours eventually resumed their growth and animals vaccinated with dendritic cells succumbed to cancer. In both settings, preventive and therapeutic, dendritic cell-based vaccination induced a vigorous tumour-specific T-cell response. These results argue for the timing of cancer immunotherapy to the stages of low tumour load. Immunotherapy initiated at the stage of minimal residual disease, after reduction of tumour load by other modalities, will have much better chance to offer a clinical benefit to cancer patients than the immunotherapy at the stage of metastatic disease.

  9. Anti-tumour activity of photodynamic therapy in combination with mitomycin C in nude mice with human colon adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, L. W.; Moan, J.; Steen, H. B.; Iani, V.

    1995-01-01

    The interaction of photodynamic therapy (PDT) and a chemotherapeutic drug, mitomycin C (MMC), was investigated using WiDr human colon adenocarcinoma tumours implanted on Balb/c athymic nude mice. The WiDr tumours were treated with PDT alone, MMC alone or with both. It was found that the combined treatment produced a greater retardation in the growth of the WiDr tumour than monotherapy with MMC or PDT. The synergistic effect was especially prominent when PDT was used in combination with a low dose of MMC (1 mg kg-1), since treatment of 1 mg kg-1 MMC alone had no effect on the tumour. The anti-tumour activity of PDT was found to be increased with MMC of 5 mg kg-1. The response of normal skin on mice feet to PDT slightly greater when PDT was combined with 5 mg kg-1 MMC than when PDT was applied alone, while no detectable additional effect on skin photosensitivity was observed when PDT was combined with 1 mg kg-1 MMC. An enhanced uptake of Photofrin in tumours was found 12 h and 24 h after administration of MMC. The effect of MMC on the cell cycle distribution of cell dissociated directly from the tumours was studied. The results suggest that the increased susceptibility to photoinactivation of Photofrin-sensitised tumours may be due to MMC-induced accumulation of the tumour cells in S-phase. PMID:7734319

  10. miR-22 has a potent anti-tumour role with therapeutic potential in acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xi; Hu, Chao; Arnovitz, Stephen; Bugno, Jason; Yu, Miao; Zuo, Zhixiang; Chen, Ping; Huang, Hao; Ulrich, Bryan; Gurbuxani, Sandeep; Weng, Hengyou; Strong, Jennifer; Wang, Yungui; Li, Yuanyuan; Salat, Justin; Li, Shenglai; Elkahloun, Abdel G.; Yang, Yang; Neilly, Mary Beth; Larson, Richard A.; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Herold, Tobias; Bohlander, Stefan K.; Liu, Paul P.; Zhang, Jiwang; Li, Zejuan; He, Chuan; Jin, Jie; Hong, Seungpyo; Chen, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are subject to precise regulation and have key roles in tumorigenesis. In contrast to the oncogenic role of miR-22 reported in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and breast cancer, here we show that miR-22 is an essential anti-tumour gatekeeper in de novo acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) where it is significantly downregulated. Forced expression of miR-22 significantly suppresses leukaemic cell viability and growth in vitro, and substantially inhibits leukaemia development and maintenance in vivo. Mechanistically, miR-22 targets multiple oncogenes, including CRTC1, FLT3 and MYCBP, and thus represses the CREB and MYC pathways. The downregulation of miR-22 in AML is caused by TET1/GFI1/EZH2/SIN3A-mediated epigenetic repression and/or DNA copy-number loss. Furthermore, nanoparticles carrying miR-22 oligos significantly inhibit leukaemia progression in vivo. Together, our study uncovers a TET1/GFI1/EZH2/SIN3A/miR-22/CREB-MYC signalling circuit and thereby provides insights into epigenetic/genetic mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of AML, and also highlights the clinical potential of miR-22-based AML therapy. PMID:27116251

  11. Synthesis, In vitro Antifungal and Antitumour Activity of Some Triorganotin(IV) N,C,N-Chelates

    PubMed Central

    Růžička, Aleš; Jambor, Roman; Buchta, Vladimír; Kubanová, Petra; Holoček, Jaroslav

    2002-01-01

    The in vitro antifungal activity of compounds 1-3 ( { [ ( CH 3 ) 2 NCH 2 ] 2 C 6 H 3 } R 2 SnX ; (where X=Cl, R=n-Bu for 1, X=Br, R=n-Bu for 2 and x= PF 6 , R=n=Bu for 3)) was estimated with the help of a modified microdilution format of the M27-A guidelines and was compared with in vitro activity of their diphenyltin(IV) analogues 4 and 5 (where X=Br, R=Ph for 4 and X= PF 6 , R=Ph for 5), and of drugs currently in clinical use (ketoconazole, fluconazole and amphotericin B). It was found that in coordinating solvents the more soluble derivative 2 is less active than the phenyl one (4), and compounds 1 and 3 are even inactive. In this paper, the in vitro antitumour activity of ionic diphenyltin(IV) complexes 4 and 5 against seven tumoural cell lines of human origin is also reported. The preparation and characterization ( H 1 , C 13 and Sn 119 NMR spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry) of the novel compound 3 is mentioned too. PMID:18475429

  12. Targeted α-therapy using 227Th-APOMAB and cross-fire antitumour effects: preliminary in-vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Staudacher, Alexander H; Bezak, Eva; Borysenko, Artem; Brown, Michael P

    2014-12-01

    Resistance to conventional cancer treatments is a major problem associated with solid tumours. Tumour hypoxia is associated with a poor prognosis and with poor treatment outcomes; therefore, there is a need for treatments that can kill hypoxic tumour cells. One potential option is targeted α-radioimmunotherapy, as α-particles can directly kill hypoxic tumour cells. The murine monoclonal antibody DAB4 (APOMAB), which binds dead tumour cells after DNA-damaging treatment, was conjugated and radiolabelled with the α-particle-emitting radionuclide thorium-227 (Th). Mice bearing Lewis lung tumours were administered Th-DAB4 alone or after chemotherapy and the tissue biodistribution of the radioimmunoconjugate was examined, as was the effect of these treatments on tumour growth and survival. Th-DAB4 accumulated in the tumour particularly after chemotherapy, whereas the distribution in healthy tissues did not change. Th-DAB4 as a monotherapy increased survival, with more pronounced responses observed when given after chemotherapy. We have shown that targeted α-therapy of necrotic tumour cells with Th-DAB4 had significant and surprising antitumour activity as it would occur only through a cross-fire effect.

  13. Blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors by tivozanib has potential anti-tumour effects on human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Momeny, Majid; Moghaddaskho, Farima; Gortany, Narges K.; Yousefi, Hassan; Sabourinejad, Zahra; Zarrinrad, Ghazaleh; Mirshahvaladi, Shahab; Eyvani, Haniyeh; Barghi, Farinaz; Ahmadinia, Leila; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Dehpour, Ahmad R.; Amanpour, Saeid; Tavangar, Seyyed M.; Dardaei, Leila; Emami, Amir H.; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Ghaffari, Seyed H.

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) remains one of the most fatal human malignancies due to its high angiogenic and infiltrative capacities. Even with optimal therapy including surgery, radiotherapy and temozolomide, it is essentially incurable. GBM is among the most neovascularised neoplasms and its malignant progression associates with striking neovascularisation, evidenced by vasoproliferation and endothelial cell hyperplasia. Targeting the pro-angiogenic pathways is therefore a promising anti-glioma strategy. Here we show that tivozanib, a pan-inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors, inhibited proliferation of GBM cells through a G2/M cell cycle arrest via inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) signalling pathway and down-modulation of Aurora kinases A and B, cyclin B1 and CDC25C. Moreover, tivozanib decreased adhesive potential of these cells through reduction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Tivozanib diminished GBM cell invasion through impairing the proteolytic cascade of cathepsin B/urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)/matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Combination of tivozanib with EGFR small molecule inhibitor gefitinib synergistically increased sensitivity to gefitinib. Altogether, these findings suggest that VEGFR blockade by tivozanib has potential anti-glioma effects in vitro. Further in vivo studies are warranted to explore the anti-tumour activity of tivozanib in combinatorial approaches in GBM. PMID:28287096

  14. Intratumoral modulation of the inducible co-stimulator ICOS by recombinant oncolytic virus promotes systemic anti-tumour immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zamarin, Dmitriy; Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Ricca, Jacob; Plitt, Tamar; Palese, Peter; Sharma, Padmanee; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Allison, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Emerging data suggest that locoregional cancer therapeutic approaches with oncolytic viruses can lead to systemic anti-tumour immunity, although the appropriate targets for intratumoral immunomodulation using this strategy are not known. Here we find that intratumoral therapy with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), in addition to the activation of innate immunity, upregulates the expression of T-cell co-stimulatory receptors, with the inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) being most notable. To explore ICOS as a direct target in the tumour, we engineered a recombinant NDV-expressing ICOS ligand (NDV-ICOSL). In the bilateral flank tumour models, intratumoral administration of NDV-ICOSL results in enhanced infiltration with activated T cells in both virus-injected and distant tumours, and leads to effective rejection of both tumours when used in combination with systemic CTLA-4 blockade. These findings highlight that intratumoral immunomodulation with an oncolytic virus expressing a rationally selected ligand can be an effective strategy to drive systemic efficacy of immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:28194010

  15. Choice of antibiotic in nonelective cesarean section.

    PubMed Central

    Hager, W D; Rapp, R P; Billeter, M; Bradley, B B

    1991-01-01

    The use of antibiotics for prophylaxis against infection among women undergoing nonelective cesarean section has become the standard of care in the United States. Many different antibiotics have been used successfully. Single-dose regimens administered after the cord is clamped have proven just as effective as multiple-dose regimens. Although the most frequently used class of antibiotics is the cephalosporin family, the single best agent has not been determined. This study was a double-blind, randomized trial in which we compared a narrow-spectrum cephalosporin (cefazolin; n = 63) with an expanded-spectrum cephamycin (cefoxitin; n = 66) and with a broad-spectrum cephalosporin (cefotaxime; n = 60) used as a single-dose prophylaxis in patients undergoing a nonelective cesarean section. Of the 194 patients enrolled in the study, 189 were evaluable. There was no significant difference between the groups in mean age, gravidity, parity, duration of labor, duration of ruptured membranes, number of vaginal examinations, or socioeconomic status (socioeconomic status was defined by third-party coverage). There was no significant difference among the antibiotics in the incidence of immediate or delayed postoperative infections. These data indicate that a less expensive, narrow-spectrum cephalosporin is as effective as more expensive, broader-spectrum cephamycins and cephalosporins as prophylaxis for patients undergoing nonelective cesarean section. PMID:1952848

  16. Polyene antibiotic that inhibits membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed

    te Welscher, Yvonne Maria; van Leeuwen, Martin Richard; de Kruijff, Ben; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Breukink, Eefjan

    2012-07-10

    The limited therapeutic arsenal and the increase in reports of fungal resistance to multiple antifungal agents have made fungal infections a major therapeutic challenge. The polyene antibiotics are the only group of antifungal antibiotics that directly target the plasma membrane via a specific interaction with the main fungal sterol, ergosterol, often resulting in membrane permeabilization. In contrast to other polyene antibiotics that form pores in the membrane, the mode of action of natamycin has remained obscure but is not related to membrane permeabilization. Here, we demonstrate that natamycin inhibits growth of yeasts and fungi via the immediate inhibition of amino acid and glucose transport across the plasma membrane. This is attributable to ergosterol-specific and reversible inhibition of membrane transport proteins. It is proposed that ergosterol-dependent inhibition of membrane proteins is a general mode of action of all the polyene antibiotics, of which some have been shown additionally to permeabilize the plasma membrane. Our results imply that sterol-protein interactions are fundamentally important for protein function even for those proteins that are not known to reside in sterol-rich domains.

  17. Antibiotics for acute bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom; Smucny, John; Becker, Lorne A

    2014-03-01

    The benefits and risks of antibiotics for acute bronchitis remain unclear despite it being one of the most common illnesses seen in primary care. To assess the effects of antibiotics in improving outcomes and assess adverse effects of antibiotic therapy for patients with a clinical diagnosis of acute bronchitis. We searched CENTRAL 2013, Issue 12, MEDLINE (1966 to January week 1, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to January 2014) and LILACS (1982 to January 2014). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing any antibiotic therapy with placebo or no treatment in acute bronchitis or acute productive cough, in patients without underlying pulmonary disease. At least two review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality. Seventeen trials with 3936 participants were included in the primary analysis. The quality of trials was generally good. There was limited evidence to support the use of antibiotics in acute bronchitis. At follow-up, there was no difference in participants described as being clinically improved between antibiotic and placebo groups (11 studies with 3841 participants, risk ratio (RR) 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99 to 1.15; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 22. Participants given antibiotics were less likely to have a cough (four studies with 275 participants, RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.85; NNTB 6); have a night cough (four studies with 538 participants, RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.83; NNTB 7) and a shorter mean cough duration (seven studies with 2776 participants, mean difference (MD) -0.46 days, 95% CI -0.87 to -0.04). The differences in presence of a productive cough at follow-up and MD of productive cough did not reach statistical significance.Antibiotic-treated patients were more likely to be unimproved according to clinician's global assessment (six studies with 891 participants, RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.79; NNTB 25); have an abnormal lung exam (five studies with 613 participants, RR 0.54, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.70; NNTB

  18. Tetracycline Antibiotics and Resistance.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Trudy H

    2016-04-01

    Tetracyclines possess many properties considered ideal for antibiotic drugs, including activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens, proven clinical safety, acceptable tolerability, and the availability of intravenous (IV) and oral formulations for most members of the class. As with all antibiotic classes, the antimicrobial activities of tetracyclines are subject to both class-specific and intrinsic antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Since the discovery of the first tetracyclines more than 60 years ago, ongoing optimization of the core scaffold has produced tetracyclines in clinical use and development that are capable of thwarting many of these resistance mechanisms. New chemistry approaches have enabled the creation of synthetic derivatives with improved in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy, ensuring that the full potential of the class can be explored for use against current and emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  19. Antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ottoline, Ana Carolina Xavier; Tomita, Shiro; Marques, Marise da Penha Costa; Felix, Felippe; Ferraiolo, Priscila Novaes; Laurindo, Roberta Silveira Santos

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim: Antibiotic prophylaxis aims to prevent infection of surgical sites before contamination or infection occurs. Prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis does not enhance the prevention of surgical infection and is associated with higher rates of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. This review of the literature concerning antibiotic prophylaxis, with an emphasis on otolaryngologic surgery, aims to develop a guide for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery in order to reduce the numbers of complications stemming from the indiscriminate use of antibiotics. PMID:25991999

  20. Combined blockade of signalling pathways shows marked anti-tumour potential in phaeochromocytoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Nölting, Svenja; Garcia, Edwin; Alusi, Ghassan; Giubellino, Alessio; Pacak, Karel; Korbonits, Márta; Grossman, Ashley B

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no completely effective therapy available for metastatic phaeochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas. In this study, we explore new molecular targeted therapies for these tumours, using one more benign (mouse phaeochromocytoma cell (MPC)) and one more malignant (mouse tumour tissue (MTT)) mouse PCC cell line –both generated from heterozygous neurofibromin 1 knockout mice. Several PCC-promoting gene mutations have been associated with aberrant activation of PI3K/AKT, mTORC1 and RAS/RAF/ERK signalling. We therefore investigated different agents that interfere specifically with these pathways, including antagonism of the IGF1 receptor by NVP-AEW541. We found that NVP-AEW541 significantly reduced MPC and MTT cell viability at relatively high doses but led to a compensatory up-regulation of ERK and mTORC1 signalling at suboptimal doses while PI3K/AKT inhibition remained stable. We subsequently investigated the effect of the dual PI3K/mTORC1/2 inhibitor NVP-BEZ235, which led to a significant decrease of MPC and MTT cell viability at doses down to 50 nM but again increased ERK signalling. Accordingly, we next examined the combination of NVP-BEZ235 with the established agent lovastatin, as this has been described to inhibit ERK signalling. Lovastatin alone significantly reduced MPC and MTT cell viability at therapeutically relevant doses and inhibited both ERK and AKT signalling, but increased mTORC1/p70S6K signalling. Combination treatment with NVP-BEZ235 and lovastatin showed a significant additive effect in MPC and MTT cells and resulted in inhibition of both AKT and mTORC1/p70S6K signalling without ERK up-regulation. Simultaneous inhibition of PI3K/AKT, mTORC1/2 and ERK signalling suggests a novel therapeutic approach for malignant PCCs. PMID:22715163

  1. Tackling antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Karen; Courvalin, Patrice; Dantas, Gautam; Davies, Julian; Eisenstein, Barry; Huovinen, Pentti; Jacoby, George A.; Kishony, Roy; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Kutter, Elizabeth; Lerner, Stephen A.; Levy, Stuart; Lewis, Kim; Lomovskaya, Olga; Miller, Jeffrey H.; Mobashery, Shahriar; Piddock, Laura J. V.; Projan, Steven; Thomas, Christopher M.; Tomasz, Alexander; Tulkens, Paul M.; Walsh, Timothy R.; Watson, James D.; Witkowski, Jan; Witte, Wolfgang; Wright, Gerry; Yeh, Pamela; Zgurskaya, Helen I.

    2014-01-01

    The development and spread of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a universal threat to both humans and animals that is generally not preventable, but can nevertheless be controlled and must be tackled in the most effective ways possible. To explore how the problem of antibiotic resistance might best be addressed, a group of thirty scientists from academia and industry gathered at the Banbury Conference Centre in Cold Spring Harbor, New York, May 16-18, 2011. From these discussions emerged a priority list of steps that need to be taken to resolve this global crisis. PMID:22048738

  2. Antibiotics in Animal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, Amílcar C.

    The administration of antibiotics to animals to prevent or treat diseases led us to be concerned about the impact of these antibiotics on human health. In fact, animal products could be a potential vehicle to transfer drugs to humans. Using appropri ated mathematical and statistical models, one can predict the kinetic profile of drugs and their metabolites and, consequently, develop preventive procedures regarding drug transmission (i.e., determination of appropriate withdrawal periods). Nevertheless, in the present chapter the mathematical and statistical concepts for data interpretation are strictly given to allow understanding of some basic pharma-cokinetic principles and to illustrate the determination of withdrawal periods

  3. Antibiotics and preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Mertz, H L; Ernest, J M

    2001-08-01

    Prematurity is a profound obstetric problem and to date no effective treatment or prevention strategies have been found. Many animal and clinical data exist to link infection and preterm labor, yet clinical trials examining the effect of antibiotic treatment in patients with patterns labor and intact membranes have been conflicting and disappointing. Beyond treatment to reduce neonatal group B streptococcal infection, sexually transmitted infections, symptomatic bacterial vaginosis, and bacteriuria, no clinical data exist at this time to support the routine use of antibiotics in patients with preterm labor and intact membranes.

  4. Synthesis of Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kalesse, Markus; Böhm, Andreas; Kipper, Andi; Wandelt, Vanessa

    The synthesis of β-lactams, tetracyclines, and erythromycins as three of the major families of antibiotics will be described herein. We will describe why these antibiotics were the ultimate synthetic targets in the past and how modern synthetic organic chemistry has evolved to address these challenges with new, improved strategies and methods. An additional aspect we would like to highlight here is the fact that these first syntheses had to be particularly creative as most of the modern synthetic methods were not available at that time, or were developed in the course of these syntheses.

  5. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems: State of the science

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We propose a simple causal model depicting relationships involved in dissemination of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems and potential effects on human health, functioning of natural ecosystems, and agricultural productivity. Available evidence for each causal link is briefly su...

  6. Comparison of antibiotic susceptibility in viridans group streptococci in low and high antibiotic-prescribing General Practices.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, C E; Hara, Y; Sato, T; Nakajima, T; Nakanishi, S; Mason, C; Moore, J E; Matsuda, M; Coulter, W A

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become a global public health issue. Most antibiotics are prescribed in the community, although there is less stewardship of such agents in the community compared to secondary and tertiary care. Few studies have attempted to examine the prescribing practices in General Practice and its impact on antibiotic resistance and, therefore, a study was performed in order to compare antibiotic susceptibilities of commensal viridans group streptococci (VGS) obtained from patient cohorts in General Practices (GP), who were high and low prescribers of oral antibiotics. Sixty-five patients (<1 month-81 years; 77% female: 23% male) were enrolled onto the study, and viridans group streptococci (n = 5/patient) were collected from each patient's nasal passages and oropharynx region and tested for antibiotic susceptibility against (i) tetracyclines (doxycycline); (ii) macrolides (erythromycin); (iii) β-lactams (penicillin G); and (iv) fluoroquinolones (ofloxacin & levofloxacin). There were no significant differences in MICs between high and low GP prescribers with doxycycline (P = 0·094), erythromycin (P = 0·122), ofloxacin (P = 0·193) and levofloxacin (P = 0·058). However, there was a significant difference between high and low GP practices with regard to penicillin G (P = 0·031). This finding is important as the β-lactams are the most commonly prescribed oral antibiotic in the community. This study demonstrates that high prescribing practices may lead to an altered (higher) level of resistance to these agents in the commensal VGS population, which may be important as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance determinants in subsequent horizontal gene transfer events, particularly with newly colonizing pathogens, including pneumococci. Primary care physicians should be aware that increased prescribing of antibiotics may led to increased level of penicillin resistance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Antibiotics, probiotics and prebiotics in IBD.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Charles N

    2014-01-01

    The dysbiosis theory of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) posits that there is an alteration in the gut microbiome as an important underpinning of disease etiology. It stands to reason then, that administering agents that could impact on the balance of microbes on the gut could be impactful on the course of IBD. Herein is a review of the controlled trials undertaken to assess the use of antibiotics that would kill or suppress potentially injurious microbes, probiotics that would overpopulate the gut with potentially beneficial microbes or prebiotics that provide a metabolic substrate that enhances the growth of potentially beneficial microbes. With regard to antibiotics, the best data are for the use of nitroimadoles postoperatively in Crohn's disease (CD) to prevent disease recurrence. Otherwise, the data are limited with the regard to any lasting benefit of antibiotics sustaining remission in either CD or ulcerative colitis (UC). A recent meta-analysis concluded that antibiotics are superior to placebo at inducing remission in CD or UC, although the meta-analysis grouped a variety of antibiotics with different spectra of activity. Despite the absence of robust clinical trial data, antibiotics are widely used to treat perineal fistulizing CD and acute and chronic pouchitis. Probiotics have not been shown to have a beneficial role in CD. However, Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 has comparable effects to low doses of mesalamine in maintaining remission in UC. VSL#3, a combination of 8 microbes, has been shown to have an effect in inducing remission in UC and preventing pouchitis. Prebiotics have yet to be shown to have an effect in any form of IBD, but to date controlled trials have been small. The use of antibiotics should be balanced against the risks they pose. Even probiotics may pose some risk and should not be assumed to be innocuous especially when ingested by persons with a compromised epithelial barrier. Prebiotics may not be harmful but may cause

  8. MraY-antibiotic complex reveals details of tunicamycin mode of action.

    PubMed

    Hakulinen, Jonna K; Hering, Jenny; Brändén, Gisela; Chen, Hongming; Snijder, Arjan; Ek, Margareta; Johansson, Patrik

    2017-03-01

    The rapid increase of antibiotic resistance has created an urgent need to develop novel antimicrobial agents. Here we describe the crystal structure of the promising bacterial target phospho-N-acetylmuramoyl-pentapeptide translocase (MraY) in complex with the nucleoside antibiotic tunicamycin. The structure not only reveals the mode of action of several related natural-product antibiotics but also gives an indication on the binding mode of the MraY UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide and undecaprenyl-phosphate substrates.

  9. Nosocomial infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci at a university hospital in Taiwan from 1991 to 2003: resistance trends, antibiotic usage and in vitro activities of newer antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Chen, Wen-Huei; Teng, Lee-Jene; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2005-07-01

    A rapid increase of nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection (from 39% in 1991 to 75% in 2003) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) (from 1.2% in 1996 to 6.1% in 2003) at a university hospital in Taiwan was found. The noticeable rise of MRSA and VRE was significantly correlated with the increased consumption of glycopeptides, beta-lactam-beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations, extended-spectrum cephalosporins, carbapenems and fluoroquinolones (Pearson's correlation coefficient, P < 0.05). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 100 non-duplicate blood isolates of MRSA (in 2003) and of 25 non-duplicate isolates of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and 172 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (in 1996-2003) causing nosocomial infection recovered from various clinical specimens of patients treated at the hospital to nine antimicrobial agents were determined by the agar dilution method. All of these isolates were susceptible to linezolid and were inhibited by 0.5mg/L of tigecycline, and all MRSA isolates were inhibited by daptomycin 1mg/L, including two isolates of MRSA with heteroresistance to vancomycin. Daptomycin had two-fold better activity against vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis (MIC90, 2 mg/L) than against vancomycin-resistant E. faecium (MIC90, 4 mg/L). Decreased susceptibilities of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium and MRSA to quinupristin/dalfopristin (non-susceptibility 25% and 8%, respectively) were found. Telithromycin had poor activity against the isolates tested (MIC90, 8 mg/L). Linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline may represent therapeutic options for infections caused by these resistant Gram-positive organisms.

  10. The mechanism of ROS regulation of antibiotic resistance and antimicrobial lethality.

    PubMed

    Lina, Ma; Hongfei, Mi; Yunxin, Xue; Dai, Wang; Xilin, Zhao

    2016-10-20

    Misuse and overuse of antibiotics have led to serious resistance problems that pose a grave threat to human health. How to solve the increasing antibiotic resistance problem is a huge challenge. Besides the traditional strategy of developing novel antimicrobial agents, exploring ways to enhance the lethal activity of antibiotics currently available is another feasible approach to fight against resistance. Recent studies showed that ROS plays an important role in regulating both antibiotic resistance and antimicrobial lethality. ROS produced by sublethal levels of antibiotic induces antibiotic resistance through activating drug efflux pumps via MarR(Multiple antibiotic resistance repressor)-MarA(Multiple antibiotic resistance activator), triggers the protective function against stress via SoxR (Superoxide response transcriptional regulator)-SoxS (Superoxide response transcription factor), and promotes mutagenesis by induction of SOS system. On the contrary, ROS triggered by lethal levels of antibiotic promotes bacterial killing and suppresses resistance. In addition to the concentration of antibiotic, the role of ROS in mediating antimicrobial resistance and bacterial killing is also regulated by a series of genetic regulators (e.g. MazEF, Cpx, SoxR, MarRAB). Thus, how ROS contribute to antimicrobial resistance and bacterial killing is complex. In this review, we summarized the mechanism of ROS in regulating antibiotic resistance and antimicrobial lethality, which may provide references and guidance for finding new ways to enhance antimicrobial lethality of currently available antimicrobials and battling antibiotic resistance.

  11. [Colistin in the post-antibiotic era].

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Alejandro; Mella, Sergio; Riedel, Gisela; Bello, Helia; Domínguez, Mariana; González-Rocha, Gerardo

    2016-04-01

    One of the most important features of the post-antibiotic era in the late 20th century is the resurgence of colistin for the treatment of extensively drug resistant gram-negative bacteria (XDR). Colistin is a narrow spectrum anti-biotic, active against microorganisms with clinical significance such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Nowadays its toxicity is lower, partly explained by better pharmaceuticals and management of the critically ill patients. However, there has been much confusion regarding the dosage of the drug, its name and labeling, therefore, experts have recommended using a common language about this polymyxin. The lack of PK/PD studies for colistin is perhaps the main weakness of this area of knowledge, even though the before mentioned approach has contributed with new ways to manage and calculate the dose of this antimicrobial. Indeed, the efficiency of colistin in association with a second agent in reducing mortality has not been demonstrated.

  12. Effects of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Primary Care Providers on Antibiotic Selection, United States

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rebecca M.; Albert, Alison P.; Johnson, Darcia D.; Hicks, Lauri A.

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate selection of antibiotic drugs is critical to optimize treatment of infections and limit the spread of antibiotic resistance. To better inform public health efforts to improve prescribing of antibiotic drugs, we conducted in-depth interviews with 36 primary care providers in the United States (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) to explore knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported practices regarding antibiotic drug resistance and antibiotic drug selection for common infections. Participants were generally familiar with guideline recommendations for antibiotic drug selection for common infections, but did not always comply with them. Reasons for nonadherence included the belief that nonrecommended agents are more likely to cure an infection, concern for patient or parent satisfaction, and fear of infectious complications. Providers inconsistently defined broad- and narrow-spectrum antibiotic agents. There was widespread concern for antibiotic resistance; however, it was not commonly considered when selecting therapy. Strategies to encourage use of first-line agents are needed in addition to limiting unnecessary prescribing of antibiotic drugs. PMID:25418868

  13. Effects of knowledge, attitudes, and practices of primary care providers on antibiotic selection, United States.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Guillermo V; Roberts, Rebecca M; Albert, Alison P; Johnson, Darcia D; Hicks, Lauri A

    2014-12-01

    Appropriate selection of antibiotic drugs is critical to optimize treatment of infections and limit the spread of antibiotic resistance. To better inform public health efforts to improve prescribing of antibiotic drugs, we conducted in-depth interviews with 36 primary care providers in the United States (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) to explore knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported practices regarding antibiotic drug resistance and antibiotic drug selection for common infections. Participants were generally familiar with guideline recommendations for antibiotic drug selection for common infections, but did not always comply with them. Reasons for nonadherence included the belief that nonrecommended agents are more likely to cure an infection, concern for patient or parent satisfaction, and fear of infectious complications. Providers inconsistently defined broad- and narrow-spectrum antibiotic agents. There was widespread concern for antibiotic resistance; however, it was not commonly considered when selecting therapy. Strategies to encourage use of first-line agents are needed in addition to limiting unnecessary prescribing of antibiotic drugs.

  14. Recycling antibiotics into GUMBOS: A new combination strategy to combat multi-drug resistant bacteria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria, coupled with the lack of new antibiotics in development, is fast evolving into a global crisis. New strategies utilizing existing antibacterial agents are urgently needed. We propose one such strategy in which four outmoded ß-lactam antibiotics (amp...

  15. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacteria are stained dark purple. Cell walls of gram-negative bacteria are more permeable - they do not retain much of the dye, and so their cell walls do not show much stain. Growth promoters A class of substances, usually antibiotics, ...

  16. Resistance-Resistant Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    New antibiotics are needed because as drug resistance is increasing, the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. Here, we discuss six possible approaches to develop ‘resistance-resistant’ antibiotics. First, multi-target inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy due to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, re-purposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multi-target therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and in some cases suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored, in otherwise drug resistant organisms. PMID:25458541

  17. Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of resistance among the most important bacterial pathogens is recognized as a major public health threat affecting humans worldwide. Multidrug-resistant organisms have emerged not only in the hospital environment but are now often identified in community settings, suggesting that reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present outside the hospital. The bacterial response to the antibiotic “attack” is the prime example of bacterial adaptation and the pinnacle of evolution. “Survival of the fittest” is a consequence of an immense genetic plasticity of bacterial pathogens that trigger specific responses that result in mutational adaptations, acquisition of genetic material or alteration of gene expression producing resistance to virtually all antibiotics currently available in clinical practice. Therefore, understanding the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance is of paramount importance to design strategies to curtail the emergence and spread of resistance and devise innovative therapeutic approaches against multidrug-resistant organisms. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the major mechanisms of antibiotic resistance encountered in clinical practice providing specific examples in relevant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27227291

  18. Ruling out antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Matt

    2017-06-14

    Most upper respiratory tract infections are viral. As antibiotics are only effective if the infection is caused by bacteria, they are not recommended in most cases. However, prescribing for respiratory tract infections in primary care is not an exact science, and deciding whether an infection is viral or bacterial is often down to individual clinicians.

  19. Antibiotics, Pediatric Dysbiosis, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vangay, Pajau; Ward, Tonya; Gerber, Jeffrey S.; Knights, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotics are by far the most common medications prescribed for children. Recent epidemiological data suggests an association between early antibiotic use and disease phenotypes in adulthood. Antibiotic use during infancy induces imbalances in gut microbiota, called dysbiosis. The gut microbiome’s responses to antibiotics and its potential link to disease development are especially complex to study in the changing infant gut. Here, we synthesize current knowledge linking antibiotics, dysbiosis, and disease and propose a framework for studying antibiotic-related dysbiosis in children. We recommend future studies into the microbiome-mediated effects of antibiotics focused on four types of dysbiosis: loss of keystone taxa, loss of diversity, shifts in metabolic capacity, and blooms of pathogens. Establishment of a large and diverse baseline cohort to define healthy infant microbiome development is essential to advancing diagnosis, interpretation, and eventual treatment of pediatric dysbiosis. This approach will also help provide evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic usage in infancy. PMID:25974298

  20. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea (ARG)

    MedlinePlus

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Gonorrhea Antibiotic Resistance Basic Information Laboratory Information Resources & References Combating the ... Page Surveillance Trends and Treatment Challenges Laboratory Issues Antibiotic resistance (AR) is the ability of bacteria to resist ...

  1. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  2. Antibiotics, pediatric dysbiosis, and disease.

    PubMed

    Vangay, Pajau; Ward, Tonya; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Knights, Dan

    2015-05-13

    Antibiotics are by far the most common medications prescribed for children. Recent epidemiological data suggests an association between early antibiotic use and disease phenotypes in adulthood. Antibiotic use during infancy induces imbalances in gut microbiota, called dysbiosis. The gut microbiome's responses to antibiotics and its potential link to disease development are especially complex to study in the changing infant gut. Here, we synthesize current knowledge linking antibiotics, dysbiosis, and disease and propose a framework for studying antibiotic-related dysbiosis in children. We recommend future studies into the microbiome-mediated effects of antibiotics focused on four types of dysbiosis: loss of keystone taxa, loss of diversity, shifts in metabolic capacity, and blooms of pathogens. Establishment of a large and diverse baseline cohort to define healthy infant microbiome development is essential to advancing diagnosis, interpretation, and eventual treatment of pediatric dysbiosis. This approach will also help provide evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic usage in infancy.

  3. Antibiotics and Pregnancy: What's Safe?

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Pregnancy week by week Is it safe to take antibiotics during pregnancy? Answers from Roger W. Harms, M. ... 2014 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/expert-answers/antibiotics-and-pregnancy/ ...

  4. Selection of antimicrobial agents in periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Slots, Jørgen

    2002-10-01

    The recognition over the past 3 decades of microbial specificity in periodontitis has afforded dental practitioners the ability to prevent and treat the disease with a variety of antimicrobial drugs. These include systemic antibiotics, topical antibiotics and topical antiseptics. Systemic antibiotic therapy can be essential in eliminating pathogenic bacteria that invade gingival tissue and in helping control periodontal pathogens residing in various domains of the mouth from where they may translocate to periodontal sites. Frequently used periodontal combination antibiotic therapies are metronidazole-amoxicillin (250-375 mg of each 3 x daily for 8 days) and metronidazole-ciprofloxacin (500 mg of each 2 x daily for 8 days). Microbiological analysis helps determine the optimal antibiotic therapy and effectiveness of treatment. Topical antibiotics that are commercially available as controlled release devices suffer from several potential problems, including insufficient spectrum of antimicrobial activity in some periodontal polymicrobial infections, risks of producing an antibiotic resistant microbiota, and high acquisition costs. Topical antiseptics of relevance in periodontal treatment include 10% povidone-iodine placed subgingivally by a syringe for 5 min, and 0.1% sodium hypochlorite solution applied subgingivally by patients using an irrigation device. The present paper recommends periodontal treatment that includes a battery of professionally and patient-administered antimicrobial agents (properly prescribed systemic antibiotics, povidone-iodine and sodium hypochlorite subgingival irrigants, and chlorhexidine mouthrinse). Available chemotherapeutics can provide effective, safe, practical and affordable means of controlling subgingival colonization of periodontal pathogens and various types of periodontal disease.

  5. Selective Advantage of Resistant Strains at Trace Levels of Antibiotics: a Simple and Ultrasensitive Color Test for Detection of Antibiotics and Genotoxic Agents▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Anne; Fong, Amie; Becket, Elinne; Yuan, Jessica; Tamae, Cindy; Medrano, Leah; Maiz, Maria; Wahba, Christine; Lee, Catherine; Lee, Kim; Tran, Katherine P.; Yang, Hanjing; Hoffman, Robert M.; Salih, Anya; Miller, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have examined the evolution of bacterial mutants that are resistant to specific antibiotics, and many of these focus on concentrations at and above the MIC. Here we ask for the minimum concentration at which existing resistant mutants can outgrow sensitive wild-type strains in competition experiments at antibiotic levels significantly below the MIC, and we define a minimum selective concentration (MSC) in Escherichia coli for two antibiotics, which is near 1/5 of the MIC for ciprofloxacin and 1/20 of the MIC for tetracycline. Because of the prevalence of resistant mutants already in the human microbiome, allowable levels of antibiotics to which we are exposed should be below the MSC. Since this concentration often corresponds to low or trace levels of antibiotics, it is helpful to have simple tests to detect such trace levels. We describe a simple ultrasensitive test for detecting the presence of antibiotics and genotoxic agents. The test is based on the use of chromogenic proteins as color markers and the use of single and multiple mutants of Escherichia coli that have greatly increased sensitivity to either a wide range of antibiotics or specific antibiotics, antibiotic families, and genotoxic agents. This test can detect ciprofloxacin at 1/75 of the MIC. PMID:21199928

  6. Mode of action of thiocoraline, a natural marine compound with anti-tumour activity

    PubMed Central

    Erba, E; Bergamaschi, D; Ronzoni, S; Faretta, M; Taverna, S; Bonfanti, M; Catapano, C V; Faircloth, G; Jimeno, J; D'Incalci, M

    1999-01-01

    Thiocoraline, a new anticancer agent derived from the marine actinomycete Micromonospora marina, was found to induce profound perturbations of the cell cycle. On both LoVo and SW620 human colon cancer cell lines, thiocoraline caused an arrest in G1 phase of the cell cycle and a decrease in the rate of S phase progression towards G2/M phases, as assessed by using bromodeoxyuridine/DNA biparametric flow cytometric analysis. Thiocoraline does not inhibit DNA-topoisomerase II enzymes in vitro, nor does it induce DNA breakage in cells exposed to effective drug concentrations. The cell cycle effects observed after exposure to thiocoraline appear related to the inhibition of DNA replication. By using a primer extension assay it was found that thiocoraline inhibited DNA elongation by DNA polymerase α at concentrations that inhibited cell cycle progression and clonogenicity. These studies indicate that the new anticancer drug thiocoraline probably acts by inhibiting DNA polymerase α activity. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10362104

  7. The double life of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Yap, Mee-Ngan F

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a persistent health care problem worldwide. Evidence for the negative consequences of subtherapeutic feeding in livestock production has been mounting while the antibiotic pipeline is drying up. In recent years, there has been a paradigm shift in our perception of antibiotics. Apart from its roles in self-defense, antibiotics also serve as inter-microbial signaling molecules, regulators of gene expression, microbial food sources, and as mediators of host immune response.

  8. A mathematical model to guide antibiotic treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Sotto, Albert; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe

    2012-08-13

    Over the past few decades, the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR) to antibiotics in bacteria has led to major difficulties in the management of infected patients. At present, there is a serious lack of development of new antibacterial agents. Mathematical models are one approach to understand how antibiotic usage patterns may be optimized. However, the classical approach to modeling the emergence of MDR relies on the simplifying assumption that resistance is acquired at a constant rate. In their model, Obolski and Hadany introduce the notion of horizontal gene transfer and stress-induced mutation, with antibiotics constituting an environmental stressor of particular relevance. Finally, from this complex mathematical model, the authors propose predictions for minimizing MDR in bacteria depending on strategies of antibiotic treatment. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/89.

  9. Chitosan Coupling Makes Microbial Biofilms Susceptible to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Amin; Mu, Haibo; Zhang, Wuxia; Cui, Guoting; Zhu, Jie; Duan, Jinyou

    2013-01-01

    Microbial biofilms, prevalent in nature and inherently resistant to both antimicrobial agents and host defenses, can cause serious problems in the chemical, medical and pharmaceutical industries. Herein we demonstrated that conjugation of an aminoglycoside antibiotic (streptomycin) to chitosan could efficiently damage established biofilms and inhibit biofilm formation. This method was suitable to eradiate biofilms formed by Gram-positive organisms, and it appeared that antibiotic contents, molecular size and positive charges of the conjugate were the key to retain this anti-biofilm activity. Mechanistic insight demonstrated chitosan conjugation rendered streptomycin more accessible into biofilms, thereby available to interact with biofilm bacteria. Thus, this work represent an innovative strategy that antibiotic covalently linked to carbohydrate carriers can overcome antibiotic resistance of microbial biofilms, and might provide a comprehensive solution to combat biofilms in industrial and medical settings. PMID:24284335

  10. Essential Oils, A New Horizon in Combating Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Polly Soo Xi; Yiap, Beow Chin; Ping, Hu Cai; Lim, Swee Hua Erin

    2014-01-01

    For many years, the battle between humans and the multitudes of infection and disease causing pathogens continues. Emerging at the battlefield as some of the most significant challenges to human health are bacterial resistance and its rapid rise. These have become a major concern in global public health invigorating the need for new antimicrobial compounds. A rational approach to deal with antibiotic resistance problems requires detailed knowledge of the different biological and non-biological factors that affect the rate and extent of resistance development. Combination therapy combining conventional antibiotics and essential oils is currently blooming and represents a potential area for future investigations. This new generation of phytopharmaceuticals may shed light on the development of new pharmacological regimes in combating antibiotic resistance. This review consolidated and described the observed synergistic outcome between essential oils and antibiotics, and highlighted the possibilities of essential oils as the potential resistance modifying agent. PMID:24627729

  11. Microscale insights into pneumococcal antibiotic mutant selection windows

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Robin A.; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae shows alarming rates of antibiotic resistance emergence. The basic requirements for de novo resistance emergence are poorly understood in the pneumococcus. Here we systematically analyse the impact of antibiotics on S. pneumoniae at concentrations that inhibit wild type cells, that is, within the mutant selection window. We identify discrete growth-inhibition profiles for bacteriostatic and bactericidal compounds, providing a predictive framework for distinction between the two classifications. Cells treated with bacteriostatic agents show continued gene expression activity, and real-time mutation assays link this activity to the development of genotypic resistance. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that antibiotic-susceptible pneumococci display remarkable growth and death bistability patterns in response to many antibiotics. We furthermore capture the rise of subpopulations with decreased susceptibility towards cell wall synthesis inhibitors (heteroresisters). We show that this phenomenon is epigenetically inherited, and that heteroresistance potentiates the accumulation of genotypic resistance. PMID:26514094

  12. Development of new antibiotics: taking off finally?

    PubMed

    Bettiol, Esther; Harbarth, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Since 2010, awareness of the global threat caused by antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has risen considerably and multiple policy and research initiatives have been implemented. Research and development (R&D) of much-needed new antibiotics active against multiresistant pathogens is a key component of all programmes aiming at fighting AMR, but it has been lagging behind owing to scientific, regulatory and economic challenges. Although a few new antibiotics might be available in Switzerland in the next 5 years, these new agents are not based on new mechanisms of action and are not necessarily active against resistant pathogens for which there is the highest unmet medical need, i.e. multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria. Of the three new antibiotics with pending authorisation in Switzerland for systemic treatment of severe infections, oritavancin and tedizolid target Gram-positive pathogens, while only ceftolozane+tazobactam partially covers multiresistant Gram-negative pathogens. Among six antibiotics currently in phase III of clinical development, delafloxacin and solithromycin will also be useful mostly for Gram-positive infections. Importantly, the four other compounds are active against multiresistant Gram-negative pathogens: ceftazidime+avibactam, meropenem+RPX7009, eravacycline and plazomicin. The three last compounds are also active against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). A few compounds active against such pathogens are currently in earlier clinical development, but their number may decrease, considering the risk of failure over the course of clinical development. At last, through public and political awareness of pathogens with high public health impact and unmet medical need, development of innovative economic incentives and updated regulatory guidance, R&D of new antibiotics is slowly taking off again.

  13. Mode of Action of Antibiotic U-24,544

    PubMed Central

    Reusser, Fritz

    1967-01-01

    Antibiotic U-24,544, a new antibacterial agent, was found to be an effective uncoupler of phosphorylation associated with the oxidation of glutamate and succinate in rat liver mitochondria. Respiration was inhibited during glutamate oxidation but not during succinate oxidation. In a medium deficient in inorganic phosphate, the agent showed slight stimulation of mitochondrial glutamate oxidation. Mitochondrial swelling induced by inorganic phosphate was suppressed. The antibiotic inhibited protein, nucleic acid, and cell wall synthesis in Mycobacterium avium cells nearly equally without a predominant inhibition of any one of these macromolecular biosynthetic processes. Nucleic acid and polypeptide synthesis remained unaffected, but respiration was inhibited in cell-free bacterial systems. It was thus concluded that the antibiotic interfered primarily with the cellular energy-generating processes. PMID:6069281

  14. Assessing antibiotic resistance of microorganisms in sanitary sewage.

    PubMed

    Kaeseberg, Thomas; Blumensaat, Frank; Zhang, Jin; Krebs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The release of antimicrobial substances into surface waters is of growing concern due to direct toxic effects on all trophic levels and the promotion of antibiotic resistance through sub-inhibitory concentration levels. This study showcases (1) the variation of antibiotics in sanitary sewage depending on different timescales and (2) a method to assess the antibiotic resistance based on an inhibition test. The test is based on the measurement of the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) in wastewater samples with increasing concentrations of the selected antibiotic agents. The following antibiotics were analysed in the present study: clarithromycin (CLA) was selected due to its high toxicity to many microorganisms (low EC50), ciprofloxacin (CIP) which is used to generally fight all bacteria concerning interstitial infections and doxycyclin (DOX) having a broad spectrum efficacy. Results show that CLA inhibited the OUR by approximately 50% at a concentration of about 10 mg L⁻¹, because Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli are resistant, whereas CIP inhibited about 90% of the OUR at a concentration equal to or greater than 10 mg L⁻¹. In the case of DOX, a moderate inhibition of about 38% at a concentration of 10 mg L⁻¹ was identified, indicating a significant antibiotic resistance. The results are consistent with the corresponding findings from the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Thus, the presented inhibition test provides a simple but robust alternative method to assess antibiotic resistance in biofilms instead of more complex clinical tests.

  15. Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli Serotypes from Cochin Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Divya P.; Durairaj, Srinivasan; Abdulla, Mohamed Hatha

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at detecting the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant serotypes of Escherichia coli in Cochin estuary, India. E. coli strains were isolated during the period January 2010–December 2011 from five different stations set at Cochin estuary. Water samples from five different stations in Cochin estuary were collected on a monthly basis for a period of two years. Isolates were serotyped, antibiogram-phenotyped for twelve antimicrobial agents, and genotyped by polymerase chain reaction for uid gene that codes for β-D-glucuronidase. These E. coli strains from Cochin estuary were tested against twelve antibiotics to determine the prevalence of multiple antibiotic resistance among them. The results revealed that more than 53.33% of the isolates were multiple antibiotic resistant. Thirteen isolates showed resistance to sulphonamides and two of them contained the sul 1 gene. Class 1 integrons were detected in two E. coli strains which were resistant to more than seven antibiotics. In the present study, O serotyping, antibiotic sensitivity, and polymerase chain reaction were employed with the purpose of establishing the present distribution of multiple antibiotic-resistant serotypes, associated with E. coli isolated from different parts of Cochin estuary. PMID:23008708

  16. Alternatives to antibiotics-a pipeline portfolio review.

    PubMed

    Czaplewski, Lloyd; Bax, Richard; Clokie, Martha; Dawson, Mike; Fairhead, Heather; Fischetti, Vincent A; Foster, Simon; Gilmore, Brendan F; Hancock, Robert E W; Harper, David; Henderson, Ian R; Hilpert, Kai; Jones, Brian V; Kadioglu, Aras; Knowles, David; Ólafsdóttir, Sigríður; Payne, David; Projan, Steve; Shaunak, Sunil; Silverman, Jared; Thomas, Christopher M; Trust, Trevor J; Warn, Peter; Rex, John H

    2016-02-01

    Antibiotics have saved countless lives and enabled the development of modern medicine over the past 70 years. However, it is clear that the success of antibiotics might only have been temporary and we now expect a long-term and perhaps never-ending challenge to find new therapies to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A broader approach to address bacterial infection is needed. In this Review, we discuss alternatives to antibiotics, which we defined as non-compound approaches (products other than classic antibacterial agents) that target bacteria or any approaches that target the host. The most advanced approaches are antibodies, probiotics, and vaccines in phase 2 and phase 3 trials. This first wave of alternatives to antibiotics will probably best serve as adjunctive or preventive therapies, which suggests that conventional antibiotics are still needed. Funding of more than £1·5 billion is needed over 10 years to test and develop these alternatives to antibiotics. Investment needs to be partnered with translational expertise and targeted to support the validation of these approaches in phase 2 trials, which would be a catalyst for active engagement and investment by the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry. Only a sustained, concerted, and coordinated international effort will provide the solutions needed for the future.

  17. Plasmid mediated antibiotic resistance in isolated bacteria from burned patients.

    PubMed

    Beige, Fahimeh; Baseri Salehi, Majid; Bahador, Nima; Mobasherzadeh, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, the treatment of burned patients is difficult because of the high frequency of infection with antibiotic resistance bacteria. This study was conducted to evaluate the level of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria and its relation with the existence of plasmid. The samples were collected from two hundred twenty hospitalized burned patients in Isfahan burn hospital during a three-month period (March 2012 to June 2012). The samples were isolated and the Gram-negative bacteria were identified using phenotypic method and API 20E System. Antibiotic susceptibility and plasmid profile were determined by standard Agar disc diffusion and plasmid spin column extraction methods. Totally 117 Gram-negative bacteria were isolated, the most common were Pseudomonas aerugionsa (37.6%), P. fluorescens (25.6%), Acinetobacter baumanii (20/5%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (7.6%), respectively. The isolates showed high frequency of antibiotic resistance against ceftazidime and co-amoxiclave (100%) and low frequency of antibiotic resistance against amikacin with (70%).The results indicated that 60% of the isolates harboured plasmid. On the other hand, the patients infected with A. baumanii and P. aeruginosa were cured (with 60% frequency) whereas, those infected with P. fluorescens were not cured. Hence, probably antibiotic resistance markers of A. baumanii and P. aeruginosa are plasmid mediated; however, P. fluorescens is chromosomally mediated. Based on our findings, P. aerugionsa is a major causative agent of wound infections and amikacin could be considered as a more effective antibiotic for treatment of the burned patients.

  18. Investigating the Antibiotic Resistance Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Michael; Lawson, Amy L.

    1998-01-01

    Seeks to give teachers useful information on the extent of the problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, mechanisms bacteria use to resist antibiotics, the causes of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms, and practices that can prevent or reverse this trend. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  19. Investigating the Antibiotic Resistance Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Michael; Lawson, Amy L.

    1998-01-01

    Seeks to give teachers useful information on the extent of the problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, mechanisms bacteria use to resist antibiotics, the causes of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms, and practices that can prevent or reverse this trend. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  20. Danger of Antibiotic Overuse (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old The Danger of Antibiotic Overuse KidsHealth > For Parents > The Danger of Antibiotic ... by not reaching for the prescription pad. How Antibiotics Work Antibiotics, first used in the 1940s, are ...

  1. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and antitumour effects of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin in mice.

    PubMed

    Anupama, S; Laha, Preeti; Sharma, Mamta; Pathak, Kamal; Bane, Sanjay; Ingle, Arvind D; Gota, Vikram; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Yu, Lu-Gang; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R

    2017-04-03

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) is a lectin isolated from the fungus Sclerotium rolfsii and has exquisite binding specificity towards the oncofetal Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF-Ag; Galβ1-3GalNAcα-O-Ser/Thr) and its derivatives. Previous studies have shown that SRL inhibits the proliferation of human colon, breast and ovarian cancer cells in vitro and suppresses tumour growth in mice when introduced intratumourally. The present study assessed the effect of SRL on tumour growth when introduced intraperitoneally in BALB/c nude mice and investigated the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of SRL in Swiss albino mice. When 9 doses of SRL (30 mg/kg body weight/mice) was administered to BALB/c nude mice bearing human colon cancer HT-29 xenografts, a substantial reduction in tumour size was observed. A 35.8% reduction in tumour size was noted in the treated animals after 17 days. SRL treatment also inhibited angiogenesis, and the tumours from the treated animals were observed to carry fewer blood vessels and express less angiogenesis marker protein CD31, than that from the control animals. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution analysis revealed that SRL was detected in the serum after 1 h and its level peaked after 24 h. SRL was not detected in any of the organs apart from the kidney where a trace amount was detected after 24 h of SRL injection. No significant changes were observed in any of the biochemical parameters tested including SGOT, SGPT, LDH, CREAT and BUN in the SRL-treated mice compared to these levels in the controls. This suggests that SRL has good potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for cancer treatment and warrant further investigations in vivo and subsequent clinical trials.

  2. Antibiotics as part of the management of severe acute malnutrition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Severe acute malnutrition contributes to 1 million deaths among children annually. Adding routine antibiotic agents to nutritional therapy may increase recovery rates and decrease mortality among children with severe acute malnutrition treated in the community. In this randomized, double-blind, plac...

  3. Selection of antibiotic resistance at very low antibiotic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Human use of antibiotics has driven the selective enrichment of pathogenic bacteria resistant to clinically used drugs. Traditionally, the selection of resistance has been considered to occur mainly at high, therapeutic levels of antibiotics, but we are now beginning to understand better the importance of selection of resistance at low levels of antibiotics. The concentration of an antibiotic varies in different body compartments during treatment, and low concentrations of antibiotics are found in sewage water, soils, and many water environments due to natural production and contamination from human activities. Selection of resistance at non-lethal antibiotic concentrations (below the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration) occurs due to differences in growth rate at the particular antibiotic concentration between cells with different tolerance levels to the antibiotic. The minimum selective concentration for a particular antibiotic is reached when its reducing effect on growth of the susceptible strain balances the reducing effect (fitness cost) of the resistance determinant in the resistant strain. Recent studies have shown that resistant bacteria can be selected at concentrations several hundred-fold below the lethal concentrations for susceptible cells. Resistant mutants selected at low antibiotic concentrations are generally more fit than those selected at high concentrations but can still be highly resistant. The characteristics of selection at low antibiotic concentrations, the potential clinical problems of this mode of selection, and potential solutions will be discussed. PMID:24694026

  4. Selection of antibiotic resistance at very low antibiotic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sandegren, Linus

    2014-05-01

    Human use of antibiotics has driven the selective enrichment of pathogenic bacteria resistant to clinically used drugs. Traditionally, the selection of resistance has been considered to occur mainly at high, therapeutic levels of antibiotics, but we are now beginning to understand better the importance of selection of resistance at low levels of antibiotics. The concentration of an antibiotic varies in different body compartments during treatment, and low concentrations of antibiotics are found in sewage water, soils, and many water environments due to natural production and contamination from human activities. Selection of resistance at non-lethal antibiotic concentrations (below the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration) occurs due to differences in growth rate at the particular antibiotic concentration between cells with different tolerance levels to the antibiotic. The minimum selective concentration for a particular antibiotic is reached when its reducing effect on growth of the susceptible strain balances the reducing effect (fitness cost) of the resistance determinant in the resistant strain. Recent studies have shown that resistant bacteria can be selected at concentrations several hundred-fold below the lethal concentrations for susceptible cells. Resistant mutants selected at low antibiotic concentrations are generally more fit than those selected at high concentrations but can still be highly resistant. The characteristics of selection at low antibiotic concentrations, the potential clinical problems of this mode of selection, and potential solutions will be discussed.

  5. Efficient loading of dendritic cells following cryo and radiofrequency ablation in combination with immune modulation induces anti-tumour immunity

    PubMed Central

    den Brok, M H M G M; Sutmuller, R P M; Nierkens, S; Bennink, E J; Frielink, C; Toonen, L W J; Boerman, O C; Figdor, C G; Ruers, T J M; Adema, G J

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells that play a pivotal role in the induction of immunity. Ex vivo-generated, tumour antigen-loaded mature DC are currently exploited as cancer vaccines in clinical studies. However, antigen loading and maturation of DC directly in vivo would greatly facilitate the application of DC-based vaccines. We formerly showed in murine models that radiofrequency-mediated tumour destruction can provide an antigen source for the in vivo induction of anti-tumour immunity, and we explored the role of DC herein. In this paper we evaluate radiofrequency and cryo ablation for their ability to provide an antigen source for DC and compare this with an ex vivo-loaded DC vaccine. The data obtained with model antigens demonstrate that upon tumour destruction by radiofrequency ablation, up to 7% of the total draining lymph node (LN) DC contained antigen, whereas only few DC from the conventional vaccine reached the LN. Interestingly, following cryo ablation the amount of antigen-loaded DC is almost doubled. Analysis of surface markers revealed that both destruction methods were able to induce DC maturation. Finally, we show that in situ tumour ablation can be efficiently combined with immune modulation by anti-CTLA-4 antibodies or regulatory T-cell depletion. These combination treatments protected mice from the outgrowth of tumour challenges, and led to in vivo enhancement of tumour-specific T-cell numbers, which produced more IFN-γ upon activation. Therefore, in situ tumour destruction in combination with immune modulation creates a unique, ‘in situ DC-vaccine' that is readily applicable in the clinic without prior knowledge of tumour antigens. PMID:16953240

  6. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and colorectal cancer: a troublesome twosome for the anti-tumour immune response?

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, Grace; Heijltjes, Madelon; Houston, Aileen M.; Rani, Sweta; Ritter, Thomas; Egan, Laurence J.; Ryan, Aideen E.

    2016-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment (TME) is an important factor in determining the growth and metastasis of colorectal cancer, and can aid tumours by both establishing an immunosuppressive milieu, allowing the tumour avoid immune clearance, and by hampering the efficacy of various therapeutic regimens. The tumour microenvironment is composed of many cell types including tumour, stromal, endothelial and immune cell populations. It is widely accepted that cells present in the TME acquire distinct functional phenotypes that promote tumorigenesis. One such cell type is the mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC). Evidence suggests that MSCs exert effects in the colorectal tumour microenvironment including the promotion of angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. MSCs immunomodulatory capacity may represent another largely unexplored central feature of MSCs tumour promoting capacity. There is considerable evidence to suggest that MSCs and their secreted factors can influence the innate and adaptive immune responses. MSC-immune cell interactions can skew the proliferation and functional activity of T-cells, dendritic cells, natural killer cells and macrophages, which could favour tumour growth and enable tumours to evade immune cell clearance. A better understanding of the interactions between the malignant cancer cell and stromal components of the TME is key to the development of more specific and efficacious therapies for colorectal cancer. Here, we review and explore MSC- mediated mechanisms of suppressing anti-tumour immune responses in the colon tumour microenvironment. Elucidation of the precise mechanism of immunomodulation exerted by tumour-educated MSCs is critical to inhibiting immunosuppression and immune evasion established by the TME, thus providing an opportunity for targeted and efficacious immunotherapy for colorectal cancer growth and metastasis. PMID:27542276

  7. P16 reactivation induces anoikis and exhibits antitumour potency by downregulating Akt/survivin signalling in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huanzhang; Li, Zhigang; Chen, Jie; Wang, Duanming; Ma, Juming; Wang, Weiguo; Li, Jiang; Wu, Hongping; Li, Linfang; Wu, Mengchao; Qian, Qijun; Chen, Jingbo; Su, Changqing

    2011-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most malignant tumours with high rate of recurrence and metastasis. In HCC, deficiency of the P16/CDK4/Rb pathway is a frequent molecular event, and transferring the P16 gene into cancer cells can induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting that the P16 gene is a good target in cancer gene therapy. The previous study demonstrated that P16 re-expression mediated by adenovirus within cancer cells can induce cell apoptosis and exert potent antitumour efficacy in cancer xenografts in nude mice. However, the molecular mechanism of P16-induced apoptosis in cancer cells is not clear yet. In this resulting study, we found that P16 re-expression can downregulate survivin expression in HCC cells. As a member of the inhibitors of the apoptotic gene family, survivin has been reported to be overexpressed in most common human cancers and present multiple physiological and pathological functions including cell cycle control, inhibition of cell apoptosis, regulation of cell division and induction of angiogenesis, etc. Further investigation found that P16 reactivation led to a decrease of phosphorylated Akt on Thr308 and phosphorylated survivin on Thr34, then downregulated survivin expression. The P16-mediated decrease of nuclear survivin in cancer cells limited CDK4 import into nuclei, which restrained CDK4 functions of promoting cell proliferation, then exhibited the effect of cell cycle arrest and induction of detachment-induced apoptosis (anoikis). The antitumor potency of P16 by downregulating the Akt/survivin signalling was also demonstrated in HCC xenograft models in nude mice. This new insight into P16 function would help in designing better strategies for cancer gene therapy.

  8. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and colorectal cancer: a troublesome twosome for the anti-tumour immune response?

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Grace; Heijltjes, Madelon; Houston, Aileen M; Rani, Sweta; Ritter, Thomas; Egan, Laurence J; Ryan, Aideen E

    2016-09-13

    The tumour microenvironment (TME) is an important factor in determining the growth and metastasis of colorectal cancer, and can aid tumours by both establishing an immunosuppressive milieu, allowing the tumour avoid immune clearance, and by hampering the efficacy of various therapeutic regimens. The tumour microenvironment is composed of many cell types including tumour, stromal, endothelial and immune cell populations. It is widely accepted that cells present in the TME acquire distinct functional phenotypes that promote tumorigenesis. One such cell type is the mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC). Evidence suggests that MSCs exert effects in the colorectal tumour microenvironment including the promotion of angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. MSCs immunomodulatory capacity may represent another largely unexplored central feature of MSCs tumour promoting capacity. There is considerable evidence to suggest that MSCs and their secreted factors can influence the innate and adaptive immune responses. MSC-immune cell interactions can skew the proliferation and functional activity of T-cells, dendritic cells, natural killer cells and macrophages, which could favour tumour growth and enable tumours to evade immune cell clearance. A better understanding of the interactions between the malignant cancer cell and stromal components of the TME is key to the development of more specific and efficacious therapies for colorectal cancer. Here, we review and explore MSC- mediated mechanisms of suppressing anti-tumour immune responses in the colon tumour microenvironment. Elucidation of the precise mechanism of immunomodulation exerted by tumour-educated MSCs is critical to inhibiting immunosuppression and immune evasion established by the TME, thus providing an opportunity for targeted and efficacious immunotherapy for colorectal cancer growth and metastasis.

  9. The antitumour drug 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin monohydrate and its solid-state hydrolysis mechanism on heating.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Ashraf; Noguchi, Shuji; Watanabe, Miteki; Iwao, Yasunori; Itai, Shigeru

    2016-10-01

    7-Ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin [systematic name: (4S)-4,11-diethyl-4,9-dihydroxy-1H-pyrano[3',4':6,7]indolizino[1,2-b]quinoline-3,14(4H,12H)-dione, SN-38] is an antitumour drug which exerts activity through the inhibition of topoisomerase I. The crystal structure of SN-38 as the monohydrate, C22H20N2O5·H2O, reveals that it is a monoclinic crystal, with one SN-38 molecule and one water molecule in the asymmetric unit. When the crystal is heated to 473 K, approximately 30% of SN-38 is hydrolyzed at its lactone ring, resulting in the formation of the inactive carboxylate form. The molecular arrangement around the water molecule and the lactone ring of SN-38 in the crystal structure suggests that SN-38 is hydrolyzed by the water molecule at (x, y, z) nucleophilically attacking the carbonyl C atom of the lactone ring at (x - 1, y, z - 1). Hydrogen bonding around the water molecules and the lactone ring appears to promote this hydrolysis reaction: two carbonyl O atoms, which are hydrogen bonded as hydrogen-bond acceptors to the water molecule at (x, y, z), might enhance the nucleophilicity of this water molecule, while the water molecule at (-x, y + 1/2, -z), which is hydrogen bonded as a hydrogen-bond donor to the carbonyl O atom at (x - 1, y, z - 1), might enhance the electrophilicity of the carbonyl C atom.

  10. Anti-tumour effects of lanreotide for pancreatic and intestinal neuroendocrine tumours: the CLARINET open-label extension study.

    PubMed

    Caplin, Martyn E; Pavel, Marianne; Ćwikła, Jarosław B; Phan, Alexandria T; Raderer, Markus; Sedláčková, Eva; Cadiot, Guillaume; Wolin, Edward M; Capdevila, Jaume; Wall, Lucy; Rindi, Guido; Langley, Alison; Martinez, Séverine; Gomez-Panzani, Edda; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    In the CLARINET study, lanreotide Autogel (depot in USA) significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic pancreatic/intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). We report long-term safety and additional efficacy data from the open-label extension (OLE). Patients with metastatic grade 1/2 (Ki-67 ≤ 10%) non-functioning NET and documented baseline tumour-progression status received lanreotide Autogel 120 mg (n = 101) or placebo (n = 103) for 96 weeks or until death/progressive disease (PD) in CLARINET study. Patients with stable disease (SD) at core study end (lanreotide/placebo) or PD (placebo only) continued or switched to lanreotide in the OLE. In total, 88 patients (previously: lanreotide, n = 41; placebo, n = 47) participated: 38% had pancreatic, 39% midgut and 23% other/unknown primary tumours. Patients continuing lanreotide reported fewer adverse events (AEs) (all and treatment-related) during OLE than core study. Placebo-to-lanreotide switch patients reported similar AE rates in OLE and core studies, except more diarrhoea was considered treatment-related in OLE (overall diarrhoea unchanged). Median lanreotide PFS (core study randomisation to PD in core/OLE; n=101) was 32.8 months (95% CI: 30.9, 68.0). A sensitivity analysis, addressing potential selection bias by assuming that patients with SD on lanreotide in the core study and not entering the OLE (n=13) had PD 24 weeks after last core assessment, found median PFS remaining consistent: 30.8 months (95% CI: 30.0, 31.3). Median time to further PD after placebo-to-lanreotide switch (n=32) was 14.0 months (10.1; not reached). This OLE study suggests long-term treatment with lanreotide Autogel 120 mg maintained favourable safety/tolerability. CLARINET OLE data also provide new evidence of lanreotide anti-tumour benefits in indolent and progressive pancreatic/intestinal NETs. © 2016 The authors.

  11. Synthesis, cytotoxicity and antitumour mechanism investigations of polyoxometalate doped silica nanospheres on breast cancer MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongqian; Li, Chunyan; Qi, Wen; Meng, Xiangjun; Tian, Rui; Qi, Yanfei; Yang, Wei; Li, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) have shown the potential anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-tumor activities. In order to improve their physiological stability and antitumour activity for medical application, K2Na[AsIIIMo6O21(O2CCH2NH3)3]·6H2O doped silica nanospheres (POM@SiO2) with diameters of ~40 nm have been synthesized by the water-in-oil microemulsion method in this study. The obtained spheres were morphologically uniform nanosized and nearly monodispersed in solution. The nanoparticles had high entrapment efficiency, which was upto 46.2% by the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis and POMs slowly released from the nanospheres both in the PH 7.4 and 5.5 phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solutions in 60 h. The in vitro MTT assays of particles on MCF-7 cell line (a human breast adenocarcinoma cell line) exhibited enhanced antitumor activity compared to that of plain polyoxometalate. The IC50 value of the POM@SiO2 nanoparticles was 40.0 μg/mL at 24 h calculated by the encapsulated POM concentration, which was much lower comparing to that of 2.0 × 104 μg/mL according to the pure POM. And the SiO2 shells showed low inhibitory effect at the corresponding concentration. Confocal images further indicated the cell morphology changes and necrosis. Flow cytometric analysis showed nanoparticles induced the apoptosis by arresting the cells in S phase and western blot analysis indicated they promoted apoptosis by inhibiting the Bcl-2 protein. Moreover, the study of interactions between human serum albumin (HSA) and the nanoparticles indicated the fluorescence quenching was static, and the nanoparticles were likely to bind to HSA and changed its conformation.

  12. Synthesis, cytotoxicity and antitumour mechanism investigations of polyoxometalate doped silica nanospheres on breast cancer MCF-7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyan; Qi, Wen; Meng, Xiangjun; Tian, Rui; Qi, Yanfei; Yang, Wei; Li, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) have shown the potential anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-tumor activities. In order to improve their physiological stability and antitumour activity for medical application, K2Na[AsIIIMo6O21(O2CCH2NH3)3]·6H2O doped silica nanospheres (POM@SiO2) with diameters of ~40 nm have been synthesized by the water-in-oil microemulsion method in this study. The obtained spheres were morphologically uniform nanosized and nearly monodispersed in solution. The nanoparticles had high entrapment efficiency, which was upto 46.2% by the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis and POMs slowly released from the nanospheres both in the PH 7.4 and 5.5 phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solutions in 60 h. The in vitro MTT assays of particles on MCF-7 cell line (a human breast adenocarcinoma cell line) exhibited enhanced antitumor activity compared to that of plain polyoxometalate. The IC50 value of the POM@SiO2 nanoparticles was 40.0 μg/mL at 24 h calculated by the encapsulated POM concentration, which was much lower comparing to that of 2.0 × 104 μg/mL according to the pure POM. And the SiO2 shells showed low inhibitory effect at the corresponding concentration. Confocal images further indicated the cell morphology changes and necrosis. Flow cytometric analysis showed nanoparticles induced the apoptosis by arresting the cells in S phase and western blot analysis indicated they promoted apoptosis by inhibiting the Bcl-2 protein. Moreover, the study of interactions between human serum albumin (HSA) and the nanoparticles indicated the fluorescence quenching was static, and the nanoparticles were likely to bind to HSA and changed its conformation. PMID:28704559

  13. Curcumin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles have prolonged in vitro antitumour activity, cellular uptake and improved in vivo bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiabei; Bi, Chao; Chan, Hok Man; Sun, Shaoping; Zhang, Qingwen; Zheng, Ying

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to blend liquid lipids with solid lipids to encapsulate curcumin in solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), thereby improving the dispersibility and chemical stability of curcumin, prolonging its antitumour activity and cellular uptake and enhancing its bioavailability. Curcumin-loaded SLNs (C-SLNs) were prepared by high-pressure homogenisation with liquid lipid Sefsol-218(®). The morphology, stability and release of curcumin in the optimised formulation were investigated. The anti-cancer activity of the formulation was evaluated in MCF-7 cells. Fluorescence spectrophotometry was used to quantify cellular uptake of the drug. The pharmacokinetic profiles of curcumin in SLNs after intravenous administration were studied in rats. Blending Sefsol-218(®) into a lipid matrix reduced the particle size without improving drug loading. An optimised formulation consisting of Dynasan 114(®), Sefsol-218(®), and Pluronic F68(®) (630:70:300, w/w) loaded with 0.8% drug was prepared. This formulation could be dispersed in water with a mean particle size of 152.8 ± 4.7 nm and a 90% entrapment efficiency. Curcumin displayed a two-phase sustained release profile from C-SLNs with improved chemical stability. Compared to the solubilised solution, C-SLNs exhibited prolonged inhibitory activity in cancer cells, as well as time-dependent increases in intracellular uptake. After intravenous administration to rats, the bioavailability of curcumin was increased by 1.25-fold. C-SLNs with improved dispersibility and chemical stability in an aqueous system have been successfully developed. C-SLNs may represent a potentially useful cancer therapeutic curcumin delivery system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Anti-tumour effects of lanreotide for pancreatic and intestinal neuroendocrine tumours: the CLARINET open-label extension study

    PubMed Central

    Caplin, Martyn E; Pavel, Marianne; Ćwikła, Jarosław B; Phan, Alexandria T; Raderer, Markus; Sedláčková, Eva; Cadiot, Guillaume; Wolin, Edward M; Capdevila, Jaume; Wall, Lucy; Rindi, Guido; Langley, Alison; Martinez, Séverine; Gomez-Panzani, Edda; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In the CLARINET study, lanreotide Autogel (depot in USA) significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic pancreatic/intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). We report long-term safety and additional efficacy data from the open-label extension (OLE). Patients with metastatic grade 1/2 (Ki-67 ≤10%) non-functioning NET and documented baseline tumour-progression status received lanreotide Autogel 120 mg (n=101) or placebo (n=103) for 96 weeks or until death/progressive disease (PD) in CLARINET study. Patients with stable disease (SD) at core study end (lanreotide/placebo) or PD (placebo only) continued or switched to lanreotide in the OLE. In total, 88 patients (previously: lanreotide, n=41; placebo, n=47) participated: 38% had pancreatic, 39% midgut and 23% other/unknown primary tumours. Patients continuing lanreotide reported fewer adverse events (AEs) (all and treatment-related) during OLE than core study. Placebo-to-lanreotide switch patients reported similar AE rates in OLE and core studies, except more diarrhoea was considered treatment-related in OLE (overall diarrhoea unchanged). Median lanreotide PFS (core study randomisation to PD in core/OLE; n=101) was 32.8 months (95% CI: 30.9, 68.0). A sensitivity analysis, addressing potential selection bias by assuming that patients with SD on lanreotide in the core study and not entering the OLE (n=13) had PD 24 weeks after last core assessment, found median PFS remaining consistent: 30.8 months (95% CI: 30.0, 31.3). Median time to further PD after placebo-to-lanreotide switch (n=32) was 14.0 months (10.1; not reached). This OLE study suggests long-term treatment with lanreotide Autogel 120 mg maintained favourable safety/tolerability. CLARINET OLE data also provide new evidence of lanreotide anti-tumour benefits in indolent and progressive pancreatic/intestinal NETs. PMID:26743120

  15. Molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jessica M A; Webber, Mark A; Baylay, Alison J; Ogbolu, David O; Piddock, Laura J V

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria that are difficult or impossible to treat are becoming increasingly common and are causing a global health crisis. Antibiotic resistance is encoded by several genes, many of which can transfer between bacteria. New resistance mechanisms are constantly being described, and new genes and vectors of transmission are identified on a regular basis. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which bacteria are either intrinsically resistant or acquire resistance to antibiotics, including the prevention of access to drug targets, changes in the structure and protection of antibiotic targets and the direct modification or inactivation of antibiotics.

  16. Chemical modification of antifungal polyene macrolide antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovieva, S. E.; Olsufyeva, E. N.; Preobrazhenskaya, M. N.

    2011-02-01

    The review summarizes advances in the methods for the synthesis of polyene antibiotics (amphotericin B, partricin A, etc.) and investigations of the structure-activity relationship made in the last 15 years. State-of-the-art approaches based on the combination of the chemical synthesis and genetic engineering are considered. Emphasis is given to the design of semisynthetic antifungal agents against chemotherapy-resistant pathogens having the highest therapeutic indices. Recent results of research on the mechanisms of action of polyenes are outlined.

  17. A novel protein from the serum of Python sebae, structurally homologous with type-γ phospholipase A(2) inhibitor, displays antitumour activity.

    PubMed

    Donnini, Sandra; Finetti, Federica; Francese, Simona; Boscaro, Francesca; Dani, Francesca R; Maset, Fabio; Frasson, Roberta; Palmieri, Michele; Pazzagli, Mario; De Filippis, Vincenzo; Garaci, Enrico; Ziche, Marina

    2011-12-01

    Cytotoxic and antitumour factors have been documented in the venom of snakes, although little information is available on the identification of cytotoxic products in snake serum. In the present study, we purified and characterized a new cytotoxic factor from serum of the non-venomous African rock python (Python sebae), endowed with antitumour activity. PSS (P. sebae serum) exerted a cytotoxic activity and reduced dose-dependently the viability of several different tumour cell lines. In a model of human squamous cell carcinoma xenograft (A431), subcutaneous injection of PSS in proximity of the tumour mass reduced the tumour volume by 20%. Fractionation of PSS by ion-exchange chromatography yielded an active protein fraction, F5, which significantly reduced tumour cell viability in vitro and, strikingly, tumour growth in vivo. F5 is composed of P1 (peak 1) and P2 subunits interacting in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio to form a heterotetramer in equilibrium with a hexameric form, which retained biological activity only when assembled. The two peptides share sequence similarity with PIP {PLI-γ [type-γ PLA(2) (phospholipase A(2)) inhibitor] from Python reticulatus}, existing as a homohexamer. More importantly, although PIP inhibits the hydrolytic activity of PLA(2), the anti-PLA(2) function of F5 is negligible. Using high-resolution MS, we covered 87 and 97% of the sequences of P1 and P2 respectively. In conclusion, in the present study we have identified and thoroughly characterized a novel protein displaying high sequence similarity to PLI-γ and possessing remarkable cytotoxic and antitumour effects that can be exploited for potential pharmacological applications.

  18. Targeting colon cancer cell NF-κB promotes an anti-tumour M1-like macrophage phenotype and inhibits peritoneal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, A E; Colleran, A; O'Gorman, A; O'Flynn, L; Pindjacova, J; Lohan, P; O'Malley, G; Nosov, M; Mureau, C; Egan, L J

    2015-03-19

    In a model of peritoneal metastasis in immune-competent mice, we show that nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibition in CT26 colon cancer cells prevents metastasis. NF-κB inhibition, by stable overexpression of IκB-α super-repressor, induced differential polarization of co-cultured macrophages to an M1-like anti-tumour phenotype in vitro. NF-κB-deficient cancer cell-conditioned media (CT26/IκB-α SR) induced interleukin (IL)-12 and nitric oxide (NO) synthase (inducible NO synthase (iNOS)) expression in macrophages. Control cell (CT26/EV) conditioned media induced high levels of IL-10 and arginase in macrophages. In vivo, this effect translated to reduction in metastasis in mice injected with CT26/ IκB-α SR cells and was positively associated with increased CD8(+)CD44(+)CD62L(-) and CD4(+)CD44(+)CD62L(-) effector T cells. Furthermore, inhibition of NF-κB activity induced high levels of NO in infiltrating immune cells and decreases in matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression, simultaneous with increases in tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 and 2 within tumours. CT26/IκB-α SR tumours displayed increased pro-inflammatory gene expression, low levels of angiogenesis and extensive intratumoral apoptosis, consistent with the presence of an anti-tumour macrophage phenotype. Macrophage depletion reduced tumour size in CT26/EV-injected animals and increased tumour size in CT26/IκB-α SR cells compared with untreated tumours. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that an important implication of targeting tumour cell NF-κB is skewing of macrophage polarization to an anti-tumour phenotype. This knowledge offers novel therapeutic opportunities for anticancer treatment.

  19. Therapeutic effect of interleukin 12 on mouse haemangiosarcomas is not associated with an increased anti-tumour cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity.

    PubMed Central

    Vizler, C.; Rosato, A.; Calderazzo, F.; Quintieri, L.; Fruscella, P.; Wainstok de Calmanovici, R.; Mantovani, A.; Vecchi, A.; Zanovello, P.; Collavo, D.

    1998-01-01

    In syngeneic mice, the H5V polyoma middle-T oncogene-transformed endothelioma cell line induces Kaposi's sarcoma-like cavernous haemangiomas that regress transiently, probably because of an anti-tumour immune response, but eventually grow progressively and kill the host. To evaluate the generation of tumour-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), spleen cells of tumour-bearing mice were restimulated with irradiated H5V cells in mixed leucocyte-tumour cell cultures. Tumour-specific CTLs were demonstrable only when low numbers of H5V stimulator cells were used (<1 H5V cell per 50 splenocytes). We found that H5V cells secrete immunosuppressive mediators because CTL generation was blocked when H5V cells culture supernatants were added to allogeneic mixed leucocyte cultures. As numerous tumour-derived immunosuppressive mediators may interfere with interleukin 12 (IL-12) production, we tested whether IL-12 treatment of the tumour-bearing mice would augment their immune response and thus suppress tumour growth. Indeed, IL-12 inhibited tumour growth and prevented mortality, but did not increase anti-H5V CTL generation either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, the anti-tumour activity in IL-12-treated mice was abrogated by anti-interferon (IFN)-gamma monoclonal antibody (MAb) co-administration. These results strongly suggest that the anti-tumour effect of IL-12 is principally mediated by IFN-gamma release that in turn blocks H5V cell proliferation and induces the release of factors that suppress angiogenesis. PMID:9484826

  20. Antibiotic Rotation for Febrile Neutropenic Patients with Hematological Malignancies: Clinical Significance of Antibiotic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Yong; Shimoda, Shinji; Yakushiji, Hiroko; Ito, Yoshikiyo; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Kamimura, Tomohiko; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Akashi, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Background Our unit adopted the single administration of cefepime as the initial treatment for febrile episodes in neutropenic patients with hematological malignancies. However, recently, cefepime-resistant gram-negative bacteremia, including those with extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producers, was frequently observed in these patients. Therefore, we instituted a rotation of primary antibiotics for febrile neutropenic patients in an attempt to control antibiotic resistance. Methods This prospective trial was performed from August 2008 through March 2011 at our unit. After a pre-intervention period, in which cefepime was used as the initial agent for febrile neutropenia, 4 primary antibiotics, namely, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, meropenem, and cefepime, were rotated at 1-month intervals over 20 months. Blood and surveillance cultures were conducted for febrile episodes, in order to assess the etiology, the resistance pattern (particularly to cefepime), and the prognosis. Results In this trial, 219 patients were registered. A 65.9% reduction in the use of cefepime occurred after the antibiotic rotation. In the surveillance stool cultures, the detection rate of cefepime-resistant gram-negative isolates, of which ESBL-producers were predominant, declined significantly after the intervention (8.5 vs 0.9 episodes per 1000 patient days before and after intervention respectively, P<0.01). Interestingly, ESBL-related bacteremia was not detected after the initiation of the trial (1.7 vs 0.0 episodes per 1000 patient days before and after intervention respectively, P<0.01). Infection-related mortality was comparable between the 2 periods. Conclusions We implemented a monthly rotation of primary antibiotics for febrile neutropenic patients. An antibiotic heterogeneity strategy, mainly performed as a cycling regimen, would be useful for controlling antimicrobial resistance among patients treated for febrile neutropenia. PMID:23372683

  1. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    DeRossi, Scott S; Hersh, Elliot V

    2002-10-01

    With the exception of rifampin-like drugs, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the ability of commonly prescribed antibiotics, including all those routinely employed in outpatient dentistry, to either reduce blood levels and/or the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. To date, all clinical trials studying the effects of concomitant antibiotic therapy (with the exception of rifampin and rifabutin) have failed to demonstrate an interaction. Like all drugs, oral contraceptives are not 100% effective with the failure rate in the typical United States population reported to be as high as 3%. It is thus possible that the case reports of unintended pregnancies during antibiotic therapy may simply represent the normal failure rate of these drugs. Considering that both drug classes are prescribed frequently to women of childbearing potential, one would expect a much higher rate of oral contraceptive failure in this group of patients if a true drug:drug interaction existed. On the other hand, if the interaction does exist but is a relatively rare event, occurring in, say, 1 in 5000 women, clinical studies such as those described in this article would not detect the interaction. The pharmacokinetic studies of simultaneous antibiotic and oral contraceptive ingestion, and the retrospective studies of pregnancy rates among oral contraceptive users exposed to antibiotics, all suffer from one potential common weakness, i.e., their relatively small sample size. Sample sizes in the pharmacokinetic trials ranged from 7 to 24 participants, whereas the largest retrospective study of pregnancy rates still evaluated less than 800 total contraceptive users. Still, the incidence of such a rare interaction would not differ from the accepted normal failure rate of oral contraceptive therapy. The medico-legal ramifications of what looks like at best a rare interaction remains somewhat "murky." On one hand, we have medico-legal experts advising the profession to exercise caution

  2. Antibiotics in microbial coculture.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kenji; Beppu, Teruhiko

    2017-04-01

    Today, the frequency of discovery of new antibiotics in microbial culture is significantly decreasing. The evidence from whole-genome surveys suggests that many genes involved in the synthesis of unknown metabolites do exist but are not expressed under conventional cultivation conditions. Therefore, it is urgently necessary to study the conditions that make otherwise silent genes active in microbes. Here we overview the knowledge on the antibiotic production promoted by cocultivation of multiple microbial strains. Accumulating evidence indicates that cocultivation can be an effective way to stimulate the production of substances that are not formed during pure cultivation. Characterization of the promotive factors produced by stimulator strains is expected to give clues to the development of effective cultivation conditions for drug discovery.

  3. [Resistance to antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jesús Silva

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major public health problem around the world causing high rates of morbi-mortality and economic problems in hospital settings. Major bacterial causing nosocomial infections are: extended-spectrum beta-lactameses (ESBL) producing enterobacteria, methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, metallo fl-lactamases (MBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus spp, Acinetobacter baumani. This last bacteria is not very often isolated in hospital settings yet, but it is multi-resistance pathogen causing high mortality. Helicobacter pylori, which is not a nosocomial pathogen but is associated to gastric di