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Sample records for antibiotic molecules bypassing

  1. Bypass of genetic constraints during mutator evolution to antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Couce, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2015-04-07

    Genetic constraints can block many mutational pathways to optimal genotypes in real fitness landscapes, yet the extent to which this can limit evolution remains to be determined. Interestingly, mutator bacteria elevate only specific types of mutations, and therefore could be very sensitive to genetic constraints. Testing this possibility is not only clinically relevant, but can also inform about the general impact of genetic constraints in adaptation. Here, we evolved 576 populations of two mutator and one wild-type Escherichia coli to doubling concentrations of the antibiotic cefotaxime. All strains carried TEM-1, a β-lactamase enzyme well known by its low availability of mutational pathways. Crucially, one of the mutators does not elevate any of the relevant first-step mutations known to improve cefatoximase activity. Despite this, both mutators displayed a similar ability to evolve more than 1000-fold resistance. Initial adaptation proceeded in parallel through general multi-drug resistance mechanisms. High-level resistance, in contrast, was achieved through divergent paths; with the a priori inferior mutator exploiting alternative mutational pathways in PBP3, the target of the antibiotic. These results have implications for mutator management in clinical infections and, more generally, illustrate that limits to natural selection in real organisms are alleviated by the existence of multiple loci contributing to fitness.

  2. Neutrophil adhesion molecule expression during cardiopulmonary bypass: a comparative study of roller and centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Macey, M G; McCarthy, D A; Trivedi, U R; Venn, G E; Chambers, D J; Brown, K A

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether adhesion molecules and markers of cell activation were preferentially increased on blood neutrophils during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and whether such effects were influenced by the use of a roller pump or a centrifugal pump. Forty-six patients undergoing open heart surgery were randomly allocated into either the roller or centrifugal groups. Blood (1 ml volumes) was removed from arterial and venous lines immediately before and 1 h after the start of bypass. Whole blood samples were immunolabelled and flow cytometry used to measure the distribution and expression of the adhesion molecules CD11b, CD18, CD62L on neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes, in addition to CD64 on neutrophils and monocytes, and CD14 on monocytes. The expression of CD11b was significantly enhanced on neutrophils in arterial and venous samples from both the roller pump (mean 84% and 100% increase, respectively; p < 0.001) and centrifugal pump (mean 74% and 73% increase, respectively; p < 0.001) groups. Neutrophil L-selectin expression increased to a small but significant extent in arterial and venous samples from the centrifugal pump group (mean 16% increase; p < 0.001) and in venous samples from the roller pump group (mean 10% increase; p < 0.01). Neither the percentage of neutrophils bearing CD11b/CD18, CD62L and CD64, nor the expression of adhesion molecules on lymphocytes and monocytes were modified by 1 h of bypass. These results suggest that patients subjected to CPB with roller or centrifugal pumps are equally at risk to neutrophil activation that could lead to increased interaction of these cells with blood vessel walls.

  3. Identification of a small molecule that simultaneously suppresses virulence and antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiaoyun; Wei, Yu; Xia, Bin; Jin, Yongxin; Liu, Chang; Pan, Xiaolei; Shi, Jing; Zhu, Feng; Li, Jinlong; Qian, Lei; Liu, Xinqi; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Lin, Jianping; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-01

    The rising antibiotic resistance of bacteria imposes a severe threat on human health. Inhibition of bacterial virulence is an alternative approach to develop new antimicrobials. Molecules targeting antibiotic resistant enzymes have been used in combination with cognate antibiotics. It might be ideal that a molecule can simultaneously suppress virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here we combined genetic and computer-aided inhibitor screening to search for such molecules against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To identify target proteins that control both virulence and antibiotic resistance, we screened for mutants with defective cytotoxicity and biofilm formation from 93 transposon insertion mutants previously reported with increased antibiotic susceptibility. A pyrD mutant displayed defects in cytotoxicity, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and virulence in an acute mouse pneumonia model. Next, we employed a computer-aided screening to identify potential inhibitors of the PyrD protein, a dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODase) involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. One of the predicted inhibitors was able to suppress the enzymatic activity of PyrD as well as bacterial cytotoxicity, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. A single administration of the compound reduced the bacterial colonization in the acute mouse pneumonia model. Therefore, we have developed a strategy to identify novel treatment targets and antimicrobial molecules. PMID:26751736

  4. Identification of a small molecule that simultaneously suppresses virulence and antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiaoyun; Wei, Yu; Xia, Bin; Jin, Yongxin; Liu, Chang; Pan, Xiaolei; Shi, Jing; Zhu, Feng; Li, Jinlong; Qian, Lei; Liu, Xinqi; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Lin, Jianping; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-11

    The rising antibiotic resistance of bacteria imposes a severe threat on human health. Inhibition of bacterial virulence is an alternative approach to develop new antimicrobials. Molecules targeting antibiotic resistant enzymes have been used in combination with cognate antibiotics. It might be ideal that a molecule can simultaneously suppress virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here we combined genetic and computer-aided inhibitor screening to search for such molecules against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To identify target proteins that control both virulence and antibiotic resistance, we screened for mutants with defective cytotoxicity and biofilm formation from 93 transposon insertion mutants previously reported with increased antibiotic susceptibility. A pyrD mutant displayed defects in cytotoxicity, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and virulence in an acute mouse pneumonia model. Next, we employed a computer-aided screening to identify potential inhibitors of the PyrD protein, a dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODase) involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. One of the predicted inhibitors was able to suppress the enzymatic activity of PyrD as well as bacterial cytotoxicity, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. A single administration of the compound reduced the bacterial colonization in the acute mouse pneumonia model. Therefore, we have developed a strategy to identify novel treatment targets and antimicrobial molecules.

  5. Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or ... natural defenses can usually take it from there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such ...

  6. Synergy among antibacterial peptides and between peptides and small-molecule antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Cassone, Marco; Otvos, Laszlo

    2010-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are key components of native immunity. Unlike most common small-molecule antibiotics, antimicrobial peptides have been refined by evolution to work synergistically within the host environment. The mechanisms of synergy are complex and specific, and it is only now that they are beginning to be understood. Thus, antimicrobial peptides are top candidates to broaden our limited therapeutic arsenal, and are very well suited to be used in synergic combinations with currently available antibiotics. In order for this promising strategy to become a reality, however, some key steps in basic and translational research need to be improved. These include the standardization and critical evaluation of testing and quantification methods, the characterization of the molecular mechanism of action, the study of indirect antibacterial activity such as immune-response modulation, and several other aspects that will be presented and discussed, with a focus primarily on antibacterial therapy. There will be a special focus on advances and innovations that might significantly improve the future perspectives of antimicrobial peptides from a therapeutic point-of-view.

  7. Physical methods to quantify small antibiotic molecules uptake into Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Winterhalter, Mathias; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2015-09-01

    The development of antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria is a challenge: any active compound must cross the outer cell envelope composed of a hydrophilic highly charged lipopolysaccharide layer followed by a tight hydrophobic layer containing water filled gates called porins to reach the hydrophilic periplasmic space and depending on the target with the further need to cross the hydrophobic inner membrane. In addition to a possible rapid enzymatic deactivation efflux pumps shuffle compounds back outside. The resulting low permeability of cell envelope requires high dose and leads therefore to toxicity problems. Despite its relevance the permeability barrier in Gram-negative bacteria is not well understood partially caused by the lack of appropriate direct assays. Here we give a brief introduction on current available techniques to quantify passive diffusion of small hydrophilic molecules into Gram-negative bacteria.

  8. Towards Development of Small Molecule Lipid II Inhibitors as Novel Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Jamal; Cardinale, Steven; Fang, Lei; Huang, Jing; Kwasny, Steven M.; Pennington, M. Ross; Basi, Kelly; diTargiani, Robert; Capacio, Benedict R.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Opperman, Timothy J.; Fletcher, Steven; de Leeuw, Erik P. H.

    2016-01-01

    Recently we described a novel di-benzene-pyrylium-indolene (BAS00127538) inhibitor of Lipid II. BAS00127538 (1-Methyl-2,4-diphenyl-6-((1E,3E)-3-(1,3,3-trimethylindolin-2-ylidene)prop-1-en-1-yl)pyryl-1-ium) tetrafluoroborate is the first small molecule Lipid II inhibitor and is structurally distinct from natural agents that bind Lipid II, such as vancomycin. Here, we describe the synthesis and biological evaluation of 50 new analogs of BAS00127538 designed to explore the structure-activity relationships of the scaffold. The results of this study indicate an activity map of the scaffold, identifying regions that are critical to cytotoxicity, Lipid II binding and range of anti-bacterial action. One compound, 6jc48-1, showed significantly enhanced drug-like properties compared to BAS00127538. 6jc48-1 has reduced cytotoxicity, while retaining specific Lipid II binding and activity against Enterococcus spp. in vitro and in vivo. Further, this compound showed a markedly improved pharmacokinetic profile with a half-life of over 13 hours upon intravenous and oral administration and was stable in plasma. These results suggest that scaffolds like that of 6jc48-1 can be developed into small molecule antibiotic drugs that target Lipid II. PMID:27776124

  9. N-Heterocyclic molecule-capped gold nanoparticles as effective antibiotics against multi-drug resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan; Chen, Wenwen; Jia, Yuexiao; Tian, Yue; Zhao, Yuyun; Long, Fei; Rui, Yukui; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that N-heterocyclic molecule-capped gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Optimized antibacterial activity can be achieved by using different initial molar ratios (1 : 1 and 10 : 1) of N-heterocyclic prodrugs and the precursor of Au NPs (HAuCl4). This work opens up new avenues for antibiotics based on Au NPs.We demonstrate that N-heterocyclic molecule-capped gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Optimized antibacterial activity can be achieved by using different initial molar ratios (1 : 1 and 10 : 1) of N-heterocyclic prodrugs and the precursor of Au NPs (HAuCl4). This work opens up new avenues for antibiotics based on Au NPs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03317b

  10. Heparin-coated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits selectively deplete the pattern recognition molecule ficolin-2 of the lectin complement pathway in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hein, E; Munthe-Fog, L; Thiara, A S; Fiane, A E; Mollnes, T E; Garred, P

    2015-02-01

    The complement system can be activated via the lectin pathway by the recognition molecules mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and the ficolins. Ficolin-2 exhibits binding against a broad range of ligands, including biomaterials in vitro, and low ficolin-2 levels are associated with increased risk of infections. Thus, we investigated the biocompatibility of the recognition molecules of the lectin pathway in two different types of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits. Bloods were drawn at five time-points before, during and postoperatively from 30 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Patients were randomized into two groups using different coatings of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits, Phisio® (phosphorylcholine polymer coating) and Bioline® (albumin-heparin coating). Concentrations of MBL, ficolin-1, -2 and -3 and soluble C3a and terminal complement complex (TCC) in plasma samples were measured. Ficolin-3-mediated complement activation potential was evaluated with C4, C3 and TCC as output. There was no significant difference between the two circuit materials regarding MBL, ficolin-1 and -3. In the Bioline® group the ficolin-2 levels decreased significantly after initiation of surgery (P < 0.0001) and remained reduced throughout the sampling period. This was not seen for Phisio®-coated circuits. Ficolin-3-mediated complement activation potential was reduced significantly in both groups after start of operation (P < 0.0001), whereas soluble C3a and TCC in the samples were increased (P < 0.0001). Ficolin-2 was depleted from plasma during cardiac surgery when using heparin-coated bypass circuits and did not reach baseline level 24 h postoperation. These findings may have implications for the postoperative susceptibility to infections in patients undergoing extracorporeal circulation procedures.

  11. A novel antibiotic-delivery system by using ovotransferrin as targeting molecule.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hisham R; Tatsumoto, Sayuri; Ono, Hajime; Van Immerseel, Filip; Raspoet, Ruth; Miyata, Takeshi

    2015-01-23

    Synthetic antibiotics and antimicrobial agents, such as sulfonamide and triclosan (TCS), have provided new avenues in the treatment of bacterial infections, as they target lethal intracellular pathways. Sulfonamide antibiotics block synthesis of folic acid by inhibiting dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) while TCS block fatty acid synthesis through inhibition of enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI). They are water-insoluble agents and high doses are toxic, limiting their therapeutic efficiency. In this study, an antibiotic drug-targeting strategy based on utilizing ovotransferrin (OTf) as a carrier to allow specific targeting of the drug to microbial or mammalian cells via the transferrin receptor (TfR) is explored, with potential to alleviate insolubility and toxicity problems. Complexation, through non-covalent interaction, with OTf turned sulfa antibiotics or TCS into completely soluble in aqueous solution. OTf complexes showed superior bactericidal activity against several bacterial strains compared to the activity of free agents. Strikingly, a multi-drug resistant Salmonella strain become susceptible to antibiotics-OTf complexes while a tolC-knockout mutant strain become susceptible to OTf and more sensitive to the complexes. The antibiotic bound to OTf was, thus exported through the multi-drug efflux pump TolC in Salmonella wild-type strain. Further, antibiotics-OTf complexes were able to efficiently kill intracellular pathogens after infecting human colon carcinoma cells (HCT-116). The results demonstrate, for the first time, that the TfR mediated endocytosis of OTf can be utilized to specifically target drugs directly to pathogens or intracellularly infected cells and highlights the potency of the antibiotic-OTf complex for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  12. Antibiotic Resistance and Regulation of the Gram-Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane Barrier by Host Innate Immune Molecules

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gram-negative outer membrane is an important barrier that provides protection against toxic compounds, which include antibiotics and host innate immune molecules such as cationic antimicrobial peptides. Recently, significant research progress has been made in understanding the biogenesis, regulation, and functioning of the outer membrane, including a recent paper from the laboratory of Dr. Brett Finlay at the University of British Columbia (J. van der Heijden et al., mBio 7:e01238-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01541-16). These investigators demonstrate that toxic oxygen radicals, such as those found in host tissues, regulate outer membrane permeability by altering the outer membrane porin protein channels to regulate the influx of oxygen radicals as well as β-lactam antibiotics. This commentary provides context about this interesting paper and discusses the prospects of utilizing increased knowledge of outer membrane biology to develop new antibiotics for antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:27677793

  13. Assessing specific oligonucleotides and small molecule antibiotics for the ability to inhibit the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction.

    PubMed

    King, Dustin T; Barnes, Mark; Thomsen, Dana; Lee, Chow H

    2014-01-01

    Studies on Coding Region Determinant-Binding Protein (CRD-BP) and its orthologs have confirmed their functional role in mRNA stability and localization. CRD-BP is present in extremely low levels in normal adult tissues, but it is over-expressed in many types of aggressive human cancers and in neonatal tissues. Although the exact role of CRD-BP in tumour progression is unclear, cumulative evidence suggests that its ability to physically associate with target mRNAs is an important criterion for its oncogenic role. CRD-BP has high affinity for the 3'UTR of the oncogenic CD44 mRNA and depletion of CRD-BP in cells led to destabilization of CD44 mRNA, decreased CD44 expression, reduced adhesion and disruption of invadopodia formation. Here, we further characterize the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction and assess specific antisense oligonucleotides and small molecule antibiotics for their ability to inhibit the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction. CRD-BP has a high affinity for binding to CD44 RNA nts 2862-3055 with a Kd of 645 nM. Out of ten antisense oligonucleotides spanning nts 2862-3055, only three antisense oligonucleotides (DD4, DD7 and DD10) were effective in competing with CRD-BP for binding to 32P-labeled CD44 RNA. The potency of DD4, DD7 and DD10 in inhibiting the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction in vitro correlated with their ability to specifically reduce the steady-state level of CD44 mRNA in cells. The aminoglycoside antibiotics neomycin, paramomycin, kanamycin and streptomycin effectively inhibited the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction in vitro. Assessing the potential inhibitory effect of aminoglycoside antibiotics including neomycin on the CRD-BP-CD44 mRNA interaction in cells proved difficult, likely due to their propensity to non-specifically bind nucleic acids. Our results have important implications for future studies in finding small molecules and nucleic acid-based inhibitors that interfere with protein-RNA interactions.

  14. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass; OPCAB; Beating heart surgery; Bypass surgery - heart; CABG; Coronary artery bypass graft; Coronary artery bypass surgery; Coronary bypass surgery; Coronary artery disease - CABG; CAD - CABG; Angina - ...

  15. [1H NMR analysis of the complex formation of aromatic molecules of antibiotic and vitamin in aqueous solution: heteroassociation of actinomycin D and flavin mononucleotide].

    PubMed

    Veselkov, A N; Evstigneev, M P; Rozvadovskaia, A O; Mukhina, Iu V; Rybakova, K A

    2005-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the combined action of antibiotic and vitamin was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The heteroassociation of the antitumor antibiotic actinomycin D and flavin mononucleotide was investigated as a function of concentration and temperature by 500 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. The equilibrium association constant, the thermodynamic parameters (deltaH, deltaS) of heteroassociation of actinomycin D with flavin mononucleotide, and the limiting values of proton chemical shifts in the heterocomplex were determined from the concentration and temperature dependences of proton chemical shifts of molecules. The most favorable structure of the 1:1 actinomycin D-flavin mononucleotide heteroassociation complex was determined using both the molecular mechanics methods (X-PLOR software) and the limiting values of proton chemical shifts of the molecules. In the calculated structure, the planes of the chromophores of actinomycin D and flavin mononucleotide molecules in the 1:1 heterocomplex are parallel and separated from each other by a distance of about 0.34 nm. At the same time, there is a probability of formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in the calculated structure of 1:1 actinomycin D-flavin mononucleotide complex. The analysis of the results obtained suggests that aromatic molecules of vitamins, e.g., flavin mononucleotide, can form energetically favorable heterocomplexes with aromatic antitumor antibiotics in aqueous solution, modulating thereby the efficacy of their medical and biological action.

  16. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting? Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is ... bypass multiple coronary arteries during one surgery. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Figure A shows the location of ...

  17. Novel anti-infective molecule from innate immune cells as an antibiotic-alternative to control infections caused by Apicomplexa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With increasing needs for the global animal industry to address the regulatory restrictions on the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in animal production, there is much interest to find alternatives to AGPs. To develop alternatives to antibiotics against the major poultry parasitic disease, ...

  18. Gastric bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Bariatric surgery - gastric bypass - discharge; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass - discharge; Gastric bypass - Roux-en-Y - discharge; Obesity ... Gloy VL, Briel M, Bhatt DL, et al. Bariatric surgery versus non-surgical treatment for obesity: a systematic ...

  19. [THE ROLE OF (p)ppGpp MOLECULES IN FORMATION OF "STRICT RESPONSE" IN BACTERIA AND BIOSYNTHESIS OF ANTIBIOTICS AND MORPHOLOGICAL DIFFERENTIATION IN ACTINOMYCETES].

    PubMed

    Klymyshin, D; Stephanyshyn, O; Fedorenko, V

    2016-01-01

    Strict response is a pleiotropic physiological response of cells caused by lack of aminoacetylated tRNAs. Experimentally, this response occurs due to the lack of amino acids in the environment and the limitation of tRNA aminoacylation even in the presence of the corresponding amino acids in the cell. Many features of this response indicate its dependence on the accumulation of ppGpp molecules. There is a correlation between the growth rate of actinomycetes and biosynthesis of their secondary metabolites. Introduction of additional relA gene copies of ppGpp synthetase can affect the production of antibiotics in streptomycetes. The article presents the authors' own experimental data, dedicated to the influence of heterologous relA gene expression in Streptomyces nogalater cells.

  20. Peripheral artery bypass - leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007394.htm Peripheral artery bypass - leg To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Peripheral artery bypass is surgery to reroute the blood supply ...

  1. Change in gut microbiota is correlated with alterations in the surface molecule expression of monocytes after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery in obese type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Qian, Lei; Lv, Qiangsheng; Yu, Jianxiu; Wu, Wei; Qian, Haixin

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Persistent low-grade chronic inflammation is common in type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity. To date, the underlying molecular mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate gut microbiota and the expression of monocyte surface molecules in obese T2D subjects who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. Methods: Twenty-four T2D patients were enrolled. Gut microbiota was assessed by measuring bacterial DNA. The phenotypes and biological functions of monocytes, and the expression of monocyte surface molecules were examined by flow cytometry. Results: RYGB led to significant alterations in the phenotypes of monocytes. Moreover, the ability of monocyte migration was significantly decreased after RYGB (P<0.05), which was consistent with reduced Chemokine-receptors CCR2 expression of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes (P<0.05) and CX3CR1 expression of the three monocytes subsets (P<0.05). RYGB also resulted in a shift of gut microbiota in the obese T2D patients. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient showed a link between gut microbiota and monocyte subsets where the increased Bacteroidetes was negatively correlated with the variation of CD14(dim)CD16(+) monocyte percentage (r=-0.477, P<0.05). Furthermore, the decreased counts of Escherichia were positively correlated with the variation of TNF-α secretion (r=0.442, P<0.05) and TLR4 (r=0.425, P<0.05) expression onCD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes. Conclusions: This study, for the first time, demonstrated a link between the changes in gut microbiota and alterations in both phenotypes and functions of monocytes after RYGB, which may contribute significantly to the low-grade chronic inflammation in obese T2D patients.

  2. Change in gut microbiota is correlated with alterations in the surface molecule expression of monocytes after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery in obese type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Qian, Lei; Lv, Qiangsheng; Yu, Jianxiu; Wu, Wei; Qian, Haixin

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Persistent low-grade chronic inflammation is common in type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity. To date, the underlying molecular mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate gut microbiota and the expression of monocyte surface molecules in obese T2D subjects who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. Methods: Twenty-four T2D patients were enrolled. Gut microbiota was assessed by measuring bacterial DNA. The phenotypes and biological functions of monocytes, and the expression of monocyte surface molecules were examined by flow cytometry. Results: RYGB led to significant alterations in the phenotypes of monocytes. Moreover, the ability of monocyte migration was significantly decreased after RYGB (P<0.05), which was consistent with reduced Chemokine-receptors CCR2 expression of CD14+CD16+ monocytes (P<0.05) and CX3CR1 expression of the three monocytes subsets (P<0.05). RYGB also resulted in a shift of gut microbiota in the obese T2D patients. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient showed a link between gut microbiota and monocyte subsets where the increased Bacteroidetes was negatively correlated with the variation of CD14dimCD16+ monocyte percentage (r=-0.477, P<0.05). Furthermore, the decreased counts of Escherichia were positively correlated with the variation of TNF-α secretion (r=0.442, P<0.05) and TLR4 (r=0.425, P<0.05) expression onCD14+CD16+ monocytes. Conclusions: This study, for the first time, demonstrated a link between the changes in gut microbiota and alterations in both phenotypes and functions of monocytes after RYGB, which may contribute significantly to the low-grade chronic inflammation in obese T2D patients. PMID:28386350

  3. Antibiotics Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  4. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... resistant to several common antibiotics. To help prevent antibiotic resistance Don't use antibiotics for viruses like colds ...

  5. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Heart bypass surgery begins with an incision made in the chest, with the breastbone cut exposing the heart. Next, a portion of the saphenous vein is ... used to bypass the blocked arteries in the heart. The venous graft is sewn to the aorta ...

  6. The double life of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Yap, Mee-Ngan F

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a persistent health care problem worldwide. Evidence for the negative consequences of subtherapeutic feeding in livestock production has been mounting while the antibiotic pipeline is drying up. In recent years, there has been a paradigm shift in our perception of antibiotics. Apart from its roles in self-defense, antibiotics also serve as inter-microbial signaling molecules, regulators of gene expression, microbial food sources, and as mediators of host immune response.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gerard D

    2011-04-14

    Over the past decade, resistance to antibiotics has emerged as a crisis of global proportion. Microbes resistant to many and even all clinically approved antibiotics are increasingly common and easily spread across continents. At the same time there are fewer new antibiotic drugs coming to market. We are reaching a point where we are no longer able to confidently treat a growing number of bacterial infections. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance provide the essential knowledge on new drug development and clinical use. These mechanisms include enzyme catalyzed antibiotic modifications, bypass of antibiotic targets and active efflux of drugs from the cell. Understanding the chemical rationale and underpinnings of resistance is an essential component of our response to this clinical challenge.

  8. Evolving medicinal chemistry strategies in antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Andrew C; Johnson, Jarrod W; Wright, Gerard D

    2016-12-01

    Chemical modification of synthetic or natural product antibiotic scaffolds to expand potency and spectrum and to bypass mechanisms of resistance has dominated antibiotic drug discovery and proven immensely successful. However, the inexorable evolution of drug resistance coupled with a drought in innovation in antibiotic discovery contribute to a dearth of new drugs entering to market. Better understanding of the physicochemical properties of antibiotic chemical space is required to inform new antibiotic discovery. Innovations such as the development of antibiotic adjuvants to preserve efficacy of existing drugs together with expanding antibiotic chemical diversity through synthetic biology or new techniques to mine antibiotic producing organisms, are required to bridge the growing gap between the need for new drugs and their discovery.

  9. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Antibiotic Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... these products really help. To Learn More about Antibiotic Resistance Get Smart About Antibiotics (Video) Fact Sheets ...

  10. Gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... your legs to help prevent blood clots from forming. You will receive shots of medicine to prevent ... diversion with duodenal switch Dumping syndrome References Buchwald H. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. In: Buchwald ...

  11. Seizures Following Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Monique E.; McMeniman, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Seizures following cardiopulmonary bypass are an immediate and alarming indication that a neurologic event has occurred. A case report of a 67-year-old man undergoing aortic valve surgery who unexpectedly experiences seizures following cardiopulmonary bypass is outlined. Possible contributing factors including atheromatous disease in the aorta, low cerebral perfusion pressures, an open-chamber procedure, and the use of tranexamic acid are identified. PMID:27729707

  12. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saswati; Chattopadhyay, Madhab K.; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in sub-inhibitory concentrations acting as signaling molecules supporting the process of quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host–parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell, and so on). The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behavior of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and the genes that confer resistance to antibiotics

  13. QSAR-assisted virtual screening of lead-like molecules from marine and microbial natural sources for antitumor and antibiotic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Florbela; Latino, Diogo A R S; Gaudêncio, Susana P

    2015-03-17

    A Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) approach for classification was used for the prediction of compounds as active/inactive relatively to overall biological activity, antitumor and antibiotic activities using a data set of 1746 compounds from PubChem with empirical CDK descriptors and semi-empirical quantum-chemical descriptors. A data set of 183 active pharmaceutical ingredients was additionally used for the external validation of the best models. The best classification models for antibiotic and antitumor activities were used to screen a data set of marine and microbial natural products from the AntiMarin database-25 and four lead compounds for antibiotic and antitumor drug design were proposed, respectively. The present work enables the presentation of a new set of possible lead like bioactive compounds and corroborates the results of our previous investigations. By other side it is shown the usefulness of quantum-chemical descriptors in the discrimination of biologically active and inactive compounds. None of the compounds suggested by our approach have assigned non-antibiotic and non-antitumor activities in the AntiMarin database and almost all were lately reported as being active in the literature.

  14. Bypass Flow Study

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments in the MIR (Matched Index of-Refraction) flow system at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing, and turbulence models for the flow ratios between coolant channels and bypass gaps in the interstitial regions of typical prismatic standard fuel element (SFE) or upper reflector block geometries of typical Modular High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (MHTGR) in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. The experiments use Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to measure the velocity fields that will populate the bypass flow study database.

  15. Peripheral artery bypass - leg - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000239.htm Peripheral artery bypass - leg - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. You had peripheral artery bypass surgery to re-route the blood supply ...

  16. Antibiotic Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... resistance develops, the antibiotic is not able to kill the germs causing the infection. Your infection may ... to vaginal yeast infections. This happens because antibiotics kill the normal bacteria in the vagina and this ...

  17. History of Antibiotics Research.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Kathrin I

    2016-01-01

    . Whenever a new antibiotic reached the market it did not take long until scientists observed the first resistant germs. Since the marketing of the first antibiotic there is a neck-on-neck race between scientists who discover natural or develop semisynthetic and synthetic bioactive molecules and bacteria, which have developed resistance mechanisms. The emphasis of this chapter is to give an overview of the history of antibiotics research. The situation within the pre-antibiotic era as well as in the early antibiotic era will be described until the Golden Age of Antibiotics will conclude this time travel. The most important antibiotic classes, information about their discovery, activity spectrum, mode of action, resistance mechanisms, and current application will be presented.

  18. Superior Vena Cava Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Trainini, Jorge Carlos; Auricchio, Renato; Del Bagno, Horacio Augusto; Federico, Vicente; Acrich, Mario Willie; Osorio, Julio Nestor

    1983-01-01

    A case of superior vena cava obstruction due to carcinoma of unknown origin is reported. A superior vena cava bypass with polytetrafluoroethylene was performed by suturing the prosthesis to the left innominate vein and the right atrium, respectively. Long-term satisfactory results were achieved. Images PMID:15227139

  19. [Antibiotic Stewardship].

    PubMed

    Lanckohr, Christian; Ellger, Björn

    2016-02-01

    The adequate management of infections is an important task in critical care medicine which has an effect on patient outcome. As a result, the prevalence of antiinfective therapy is high in intensive care units. In the face of an unsettling development of worldwide microbial resistance, an optimization and reduction of antiinfective therapy is necessary. Antibiotic stewardship tries to improve antiinfective therapy with an interdisciplinary approach. One overall objective of antibiotic stewardship is the reduction of resistance induction in order to preserve the therapeutic efficiency of antibiotics. Intensive care units are important fields of action for antibiotic stewardship interventions. This article reviews available evidence and some practical aspects for antibiotic stewardship.

  20. Antibiotics from microbes: converging to kill.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, Michael A

    2009-10-01

    As genetically encoded small molecules, antibiotics are phenotypes that have resulted from mutation and natural selection. Advances in genetics, biochemistry, and bioinformatics have connected hundreds of antibiotics to the gene clusters that encode them, allowing these molecules to be analyzed using the tools of evolutionary biology. This review surveys examples of convergent evolution from microbially produced antibiotics, including the convergence of distinct gene clusters on similar phenotypes and the merger of distinct gene clusters into a single functional unit. Examining antibiotics through an evolutionary lens highlights the versatility of biosynthetic pathways, reveals lessons for combating antibiotic resistance, and provides an entry point for studying the natural roles of these natural products.

  1. Access to the bypassed stomach after gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Fobi, M A; Chicola, K; Lee, H

    1998-06-01

    The gastric bypass (GBP) Operation is progressively being widely used to treat severe obesity. One problem with this operation is that it leaves the bypassed segment of the gastrointestinal tract not readily available for either mechanical, radiological or endoscopic evaluation. We have addressed this problem by putting a gastrostomy tube in the bypassed stomach at the time of the GBP. A radio-opaque marker placed around the gastrostomy site enables easy radiological localization of and thus easy percutaneous access to the bypassed stomach. The surgical technique is presented.

  2. Direct identification of antibiotic resistance genes on single plasmid molecules using CRISPR/Cas9 in combination with optical DNA mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Vilhelm; Rajer, Fredrika; Frykholm, Karolin; Nyberg, Lena K.; Quaderi, Saair; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Sandegren, Linus; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial plasmids are extensively involved in the rapid global spread of antibiotic resistance. We here present an assay, based on optical DNA mapping of single plasmids in nanofluidic channels, which provides detailed information about the plasmids present in a bacterial isolate. In a single experiment, we obtain the number of different plasmids in the sample, the size of each plasmid, an optical barcode that can be used to identify and trace the plasmid of interest and information about which plasmid that carries a specific resistance gene. Gene identification is done using CRISPR/Cas9 loaded with a guide-RNA (gRNA) complementary to the gene of interest that linearizes the circular plasmids at a specific location that is identified using the optical DNA maps. We demonstrate the principle on clinically relevant extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing isolates. We discuss how the gRNA sequence can be varied to obtain the desired information. The gRNA can either be very specific to identify a homogeneous group of genes or general to detect several groups of genes at the same time. Finally, we demonstrate an example where we use a combination of two gRNA sequences to identify carbapenemase-encoding genes in two previously not characterized clinical bacterial samples.

  3. Direct identification of antibiotic resistance genes on single plasmid molecules using CRISPR/Cas9 in combination with optical DNA mapping

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Vilhelm; Rajer, Fredrika; Frykholm, Karolin; Nyberg, Lena K.; Quaderi, Saair; Fritzsche, Joachim; Kristiansson, Erik; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Sandegren, Linus; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids are extensively involved in the rapid global spread of antibiotic resistance. We here present an assay, based on optical DNA mapping of single plasmids in nanofluidic channels, which provides detailed information about the plasmids present in a bacterial isolate. In a single experiment, we obtain the number of different plasmids in the sample, the size of each plasmid, an optical barcode that can be used to identify and trace the plasmid of interest and information about which plasmid that carries a specific resistance gene. Gene identification is done using CRISPR/Cas9 loaded with a guide-RNA (gRNA) complementary to the gene of interest that linearizes the circular plasmids at a specific location that is identified using the optical DNA maps. We demonstrate the principle on clinically relevant extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing isolates. We discuss how the gRNA sequence can be varied to obtain the desired information. The gRNA can either be very specific to identify a homogeneous group of genes or general to detect several groups of genes at the same time. Finally, we demonstrate an example where we use a combination of two gRNA sequences to identify carbapenemase-encoding genes in two previously not characterized clinical bacterial samples. PMID:27905467

  4. Multiple strategies to activate gold nanoparticles as antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuyun; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-08-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance calls for new strategies. Nanotechnology provides a chance to overcome antibiotic resistance by multiple antibiotic mechanisms. This paper reviews the progress in activating gold nanoparticles with nonantibiotic or antibiotic molecules to combat bacterial resistance, analyzes the gap between experimental achievements and real clinical application, and suggests some potential directions in developing antibacterial nanodrugs.

  5. Bypass surgery for lower extremity limb salvage: vein bypass.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Hosam F

    2012-01-01

    Bypass surgery for limb salvage in cases of chronic limb ischemia is a well-established treatment modality. Use of an autogenous vein provides the best conduit for infrainguinal arterial bypass procedures, particularly for bypass to the infrapopliteal arteries. In this article, we discuss infrainguinal vein bypass surgery including indications, perioperative care, and long-term follow up. We also discuss the outcomes of the procedure with regard to patient survival and limb salvage. The autogenous vein continues to be the best available conduit with the highest patency rate and the best treatment option. Compared to all other revascularization options for infrainguinal disease, the vein bypass has the best limb salvage and long-term survival in patients appropriately selected for the procedure.

  6. Natural Product Screening Reveals Naphthoquinone Complex I Bypass Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mevers, Emily; Higgins, Kathleen W.; Fomina, Yevgenia; Zhang, Jianming; Mandinova, Anna; Newman, David; Shaw, Stanley Y.; Clardy, Jon; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of mitochondrial complex I is encountered in both rare and common diseases, but we have limited therapeutic options to treat this lesion to the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Idebenone and menadione are redox-active molecules capable of rescuing OXPHOS activity by engaging complex I-independent pathways of entry, often referred to as “complex I bypass.” In the present study, we created a cellular model of complex I deficiency by using CRISPR genome editing to knock out Ndufa9 in mouse myoblasts, and utilized this cell line to develop a high-throughput screening platform for novel complex I bypass factors. We screened a library of ~40,000 natural product extracts and performed bioassay-guided fractionation on a subset of the top scoring hits. We isolated four plant-derived 1,4-naphthoquinone complex I bypass factors with structural similarity to menadione: chimaphilin and 3-chloro-chimaphilin from Chimaphila umbellata and dehydro-α-lapachone and dehydroiso-α-lapachone from Stereospermum euphoroides. We also tested a small number of structurally related naphthoquinones from commercial sources and identified two additional compounds with complex I bypass activity: 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and 2-methoxy-3-methyl-1,4,-naphthoquinone. The six novel complex I bypass factors reported here expand this class of molecules and will be useful as tool compounds for investigating complex I disease biology. PMID:27622560

  7. Natural Product Screening Reveals Naphthoquinone Complex I Bypass Factors.

    PubMed

    Vafai, Scott B; Mevers, Emily; Higgins, Kathleen W; Fomina, Yevgenia; Zhang, Jianming; Mandinova, Anna; Newman, David; Shaw, Stanley Y; Clardy, Jon; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of mitochondrial complex I is encountered in both rare and common diseases, but we have limited therapeutic options to treat this lesion to the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Idebenone and menadione are redox-active molecules capable of rescuing OXPHOS activity by engaging complex I-independent pathways of entry, often referred to as "complex I bypass." In the present study, we created a cellular model of complex I deficiency by using CRISPR genome editing to knock out Ndufa9 in mouse myoblasts, and utilized this cell line to develop a high-throughput screening platform for novel complex I bypass factors. We screened a library of ~40,000 natural product extracts and performed bioassay-guided fractionation on a subset of the top scoring hits. We isolated four plant-derived 1,4-naphthoquinone complex I bypass factors with structural similarity to menadione: chimaphilin and 3-chloro-chimaphilin from Chimaphila umbellata and dehydro-α-lapachone and dehydroiso-α-lapachone from Stereospermum euphoroides. We also tested a small number of structurally related naphthoquinones from commercial sources and identified two additional compounds with complex I bypass activity: 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and 2-methoxy-3-methyl-1,4,-naphthoquinone. The six novel complex I bypass factors reported here expand this class of molecules and will be useful as tool compounds for investigating complex I disease biology.

  8. Spiritual Bypass: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Glosoff, Harriet L.; Hammond, Cheree

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of spiritual bypass has received limited attention in the transpersonal psychology and counseling literature and has not been subjected to empirical inquiry. This study examines the phenomenon of spiritual bypass by considering how spirituality, mindfulness, alexithymia (emotional restrictiveness), and narcissism work together to…

  9. New approaches to antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Kealey, C; Creaven, C A; Murphy, C D; Brady, C B

    2017-03-08

    New antibiotics are urgently required by human medicine as pathogens emerge with developed resistance to almost all antibiotic classes. Pioneering approaches, methodologies and technologies have facilitated a new era in antimicrobial discovery. Innovative culturing techniques such as iChip and co-culturing methods which use 'helper' strains to produce bioactive molecules have had notable success. Exploiting antibiotic resistance to identify antibacterial producers performed in tandem with diagnostic PCR based identification approaches has identified novel candidates. Employing powerful metagenomic mining and metabolomic tools has identified the antibiotic'ome, highlighting new antibiotics from underexplored environments and silent gene clusters enabling researchers to mine for scaffolds with both a novel mechanism of action and also few clinically established resistance determinants. Modern biotechnological approaches are delivering but will require support from government initiatives together with changes in regulation to pave the way for valuable, efficacious, highly targeted, pathogen specific antimicrobial therapies.

  10. [Antibiotic stewardship].

    PubMed

    Kerwat, Klaus; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2014-09-01

    Resistance against antibiotics is continuously increasing throughout the world and has become a very serious problem. For just this reason "Antibiotic Stewardship Programs" have been developed. These programs are intended to lead to a sustained improvement in the situation and to assure a rational practice for the prescription of anti-infective agents in medical facilities. The aim is to prescribe the correct antibiotic therapy to the right patient at the most appropriate point in time. An AWMF S3 guideline on this topic published by the German Society for Infectiology (S3-Leitlinie StrategienzurSicherungrationalerAntibiotika-AnwendungimKrankenhaus.AWMF-Registernummer 092/001 - S3 Guideline on Strategies for the Rational Use of Antibiotics in Hospitals. AWMF - Registry Number 092/001) has been available since the end of 2013. An essential aspect therein is the expert interdisciplinary cooperation of a team comprising a clinically experienced infectiologist, a hospital pharmacist and a consultant for microbiology.

  11. Bypass diode integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Protective bypass diodes and mounting configurations which are applicable for use with photovoltaic modules having power dissipation requirements in the 5 to 50 watt range were investigated. Using PN silicon and Schottky diode characterization data on packaged diodes and diode chips, typical diodes were selected as representative for each range of current carrying capacity, an appropriate heat dissipating mounting concept along with its environmental enclosure was defined, and a thermal analysis relating junction temperature as a function of power dissipation was performed. In addition, the heat dissipating mounting device dimensions were varied to determine the effect on junction temperature. The results of the analysis are presented as a set of curves indicating junction temperature as a function of power dissipation for each diode package.

  12. Cardiopulmonary Bypass Without Heparin.

    PubMed

    Rehfeldt, Kent H; Barbara, David W

    2016-03-01

    Due to familiarity, short half-life, ease of monitoring, and the availability of a reversal agent, heparin remains the anticoagulant of choice for cardiac operations requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, occasionally patients require CPB but should not receive heparin, most often because of acute or subacute heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). In these cases, if it is not feasible to wait for the disappearance of HIT antibodies, an alternative anticoagulant must be selected. A number of non-heparin anticoagulant options have been explored. However, current recommendations suggest the use of a direct thrombin inhibitor such as bivalirudin. This review describes the use of heparin alternatives for the conduct of CPB with a focus on the direct thrombin inhibitors.

  13. Photovoltaic module bypass diode encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The design and processing techniques necessary to incorporate bypass diodes within the module encapsulant are presented. The Semicon PN junction diode cells were selected. Diode junction to heat spreader thermal resistance measurements, performed on a variety of mounted diode chip types and sizes, have yielded values which are consistently below 1 deg C per watt, but show some instability when thermally cycled over the temperature range from -40 to 150 deg C. Three representative experimental modules, each incorporating integral bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies of various sizes, were designed. Thermal testing of these modules enabled the formulation of a recommended heat spreader plate sizing relationship. The production cost of three encapsulated bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies were compared with similarly rated externally mounted packaged diodes. It is concluded that, when proper designed and installed, these bypass diode devices will improve the overall reliability of a terrestrial array over a 20 year design lifetime.

  14. Antibiotic / Antimicrobial Resistance Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  15. Facts about Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  16. Designing Safer and Greener Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Andrew; Gathergood, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Since the production of the first pharmaceutically active molecules at the beginning of the 1900s, drug molecules and their metabolites have been observed in the environment in significant concentrations. In this review, the persistence of antibiotics in the environment and their associated effects on ecosystems, bacterial resistance and health effects will be examined. Solutions to these problems will also be discussed, including the pharmaceutical industries input, green chemistry, computer modeling and representative ionic liquid research. PMID:27029311

  17. The Double Life of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Mee-Ngan F.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a persistent health care problem worldwide. Evidence for the negative consequences of subtherapeutic feeding in livestock production has been mounting while the antibiotic pipeline is drying up. In recent years, there has been a paradigm shift in our perception of antibiotics. Apart from its roles in self-defense, antibiotics also serve as inter-microbial signaling molecules, regulators of gene expression, microbial food sources, and as mediators of host immune response. “The time may come when penicillin can be bought by anyone in the shops. Then there is the danger that the ignorant man may easily under-dose himself and by exposing his microbes to nonlethal quantities of the drug make them resistant.”~Alexander Fleming PMID:24003650

  18. Multiscale Models of Antibiotic Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of antibiotics is one of the most important advances in the history of humankind. For eighty years human life expectancy and standards of living improved greatly thanks to antibiotics. But bacteria have been fighting back, developing resistance to our most potent molecules. New, alternative strategies must be explored as antibiotic therapies become obsolete because of bacterial resistance. Mathematical models and simulations guide the development of complex technologies, such as aircrafts, bridges, communication systems and transportation systems. Herein, models are discussed that guide the development of new antibiotic technologies. These models span multiple molecular and cellular scales, and facilitate the development of a technology that addresses a significant societal challenge. We argue that simulations can be a creative source of knowledge. PMID:25313349

  19. Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Antibiotic-associated diarrhea refers to passing loose, watery stools ... after taking medications used to treat bacterial infections (antibiotics). Most often, antibiotic-associated diarrhea is mild and ...

  20. Antibiotics that target protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Lisa S; Xie, Yun; Tor, Yitzhak

    2011-01-01

    The key role of the bacterial ribosome makes it an important target for antibacterial agents. Indeed, a large number of clinically useful antibiotics target this complex translational ribonucleoprotein machinery. The majority of these compounds, mostly of natural origin, bind to one of the three key ribosomal sites: the decoding (or A-site) on the 30S, the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) on the 50S, and the peptide exit tunnel on the 50S. Antibiotics that bind the A-site, such as the aminoglycosides, interfere with codon recognition and translocation. Peptide bond formation is inhibited when small molecules like oxazolidinones bind at the PTC. Finally, macrolides tend to block the growth of the amino acid chain at the peptide exit tunnel. In this article, the major classes of antibiotics that target the bacterial ribosome are discussed and classified according to their respective target. Notably, most antibiotics solely interact with the RNA components of the bacterial ribosome. The surge seen in the appearance of resistant bacteria has not been met by a parallel development of effective and broad-spectrum new antibiotics, as evident by the introduction of only two novel classes of antibiotics, the oxazolidinones and lipopeptides, in the past decades. Nevertheless, this significant health threat has revitalized the search for new antibacterial agents and novel targets. High resolution structural data of many ribosome-bound antibiotics provide unprecedented insight into their molecular contacts and mode of action and inspire the design and synthesis of new candidate drugs that target this fascinating molecular machine.

  1. Bypass rewiring and robustness of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junsang; Hahn, Sang Geun

    2016-08-01

    A concept of bypass rewiring is introduced, and random bypass rewiring is analytically and numerically investigated with simulations. Our results show that bypass rewiring makes networks robust against removal of nodes including random failures and attacks. In particular, random bypass rewiring connects all nodes except the removed nodes on an even degree infinite network and makes the percolation threshold 0 for arbitrary occupation probabilities. In our example, the even degree network is more robust than the original network with random bypass rewiring, while the original network is more robust than the even degree networks without random bypass. We propose a greedy bypass rewiring algorithm which guarantees the maximum size of the largest component at each step, assuming which node will be removed next is unknown. The simulation result shows that the greedy bypass rewiring algorithm improves the robustness of the autonomous system of the Internet under attacks more than random bypass rewiring.

  2. Carotid bypass for carotid occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hage, Ziad A; Behbahani, Mandana; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Charbel, Fady T

    2015-07-01

    The 2-year risk of ipsilateral ischemic stroke following internal carotid artery occlusion (ICAO) in a patient undergoing maximal medical therapy is 5-8% per year. While medical therapy may reduce the risk of stroke, it does not completely eliminate it. Since the 1985 extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass study, additional trials have been conducted to further investigate the usefulness of EC-IC bypass surgery in more selected patients with cerebral ischemia and impaired hemodynamic reserve. These important studies will be briefly reviewed in this article, as well as a discussion regarding the utility of bypass surgery for ICAO in current clinical practice. In addition, a short discussion regarding the pathophysiology of carotid occlusion will be presented. We will also highlight our own institutional patient selection criteria based on the latest methods for hemodynamic assessment, as well as our intraoperative flow assisted surgical techniques (FAST), and post-operative patient follow-up.

  3. Antibiotics From Microbes: Converging To Kill

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As genetically encoded small molecules, antibiotics are phenotypes that have resulted from mutation and natural selection. Advances in genetics, biochemistry, and bioinformatics have connected hundreds of antibiotics to the gene clusters that encode them, allowing these molecules to be analyzed using the tools of evolutionary biology. This review surveys examples of convergent evolution from microbially produced antibiotics, including the convergence of distinct gene clusters on similar phenotypes and the merger of distinct gene clusters into a single functional unit. Examining antibiotics through an evolutionary lens highlights the versatility of biosynthetic pathways, reveals lessons for combating antibiotic resistance, and provides an entry point for studying the natural roles of these natural products. PMID:19695947

  4. Secondary and College LD Bypass Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosby, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    The author describes the Developmental By-Pass (DBP) Instructional technology for teaching secondary and college learning disabled (LD) students by allowing students to bypass ordering and organizational deficits. (SB)

  5. 40 CFR 403.17 - Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... loss of natural resources which can reasonably be expected to occur in the absence of a bypass. Severe... essential maintenance to assure efficient operation. These bypasses are not subject to the provision...

  6. Types of Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting There are several types of coronary ... for you based on your needs. Traditional Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Traditional CABG is used when at ...

  7. Who Needs Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Needs Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting? Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is used to treat people ... or after a heart attack to treat blocked arteries. Your doctor may recommend CABG if other treatments, ...

  8. Coronary Artery Disease: Angioplasty or Bypass Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease: Angioplasty or bypass surgery? I'm getting a cardiac catheterization. If blockages are found, ... angioplasty or bypass surgery? Answers from Rekha Mankad, M.D. During cardiac catheterization, your doctor will examine ...

  9. Psychological Effects of Intestinal Bypass Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampler, Richard S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Preoperative and postoperative intestinal bypass patients were evaluated. Results suggest that postoperative bypass patients have improved psychological health and an increased sense of freedom and well-being but may need assistance in improving self-concepts. (Author)

  10. Therapeutic strategies to combat antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Benjamin D; Brooks, Amanda E

    2014-11-30

    With multidrug resistant bacteria on the rise, new antibiotic approaches are required. Although a number of new small molecule antibiotics are currently in the development pipeline with many more in preclinical development, the clinical options and practices for infection control must be expanded. Biologics and non-antibiotic adjuvants offer this opportunity for expansion. Nevertheless, to avoid known mechanisms of resistance, intelligent combination approaches for multiple simultaneous and complimentary therapies must be designed. Combination approaches should extend beyond biologically active molecules to include smart controlled delivery strategies. Infection control must integrate antimicrobial stewardship, new antibiotic molecules, biologics, and delivery strategies into effective combination therapies designed to 1) fight the infection, 2) avoid resistance, and 3) protect the natural microbiome. This review explores these developing strategies in the context of circumventing current mechanisms of resistance.

  11. Microbiological effects of sublethal levels of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Dan I; Hughes, Diarmaid

    2014-07-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics results in the generation of antibiotic concentration gradients in humans, livestock and the environment. Thus, bacteria are frequently exposed to non-lethal (that is, subinhibitory) concentrations of drugs, and recent evidence suggests that this is likely to have an important role in the evolution of antibiotic resistance. In this Review, we discuss the ecology of antibiotics and the ability of subinhibitory concentrations to select for bacterial resistance. We also consider the effects of low-level drug exposure on bacterial physiology, including the generation of genetic and phenotypic variability, as well as the ability of antibiotics to function as signalling molecules. Together, these effects accelerate the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria among humans and animals.

  12. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... MIDCAB; Robot-assisted coronary artery bypass; RACAB; Keyhole heart surgery; CAD - MIDCAB; Coronary artery disease - MIDCAB ... To perform this surgery: The heart surgeon will make a 3- to 5-inch (8 to 13 centimeters) surgical cut in the left part of your chest ...

  13. Interventions in Infrainguinal Bypass Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Huelsbeck, S. Order, B.-M.; Jahnke, T.

    2006-02-15

    The interventional radiologist plays an important role in the detection and prevention of infrainguinal bypass failure. Early detection and evaluation of flow-limiting lesions effectively preserve graft (venous bypass and polyester or expanded polytetrafluoroethylene bypass) patency by identifying stenoses before occlusion occurs. Delay in treatment of the at-risk graft may result in graft failure and a reduced chance of successful revascularization. For this reason, surveillance protocols form an important part of follow-up after infrainguinal bypass surgery. As well as having an understanding of the application of imaging techniques including ultrasound, MR angiography, CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography, the interventional radiologist should have detailed knowledge of the minimally invasive therapeutic options. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), or alternatively cutting balloon angioplasty, is the interventional treatment of choice in prevention of graft failure and occlusion. Further alternatives include metallic stent placement, fibrinolysis, and mechanical thrombectomy. Primary assisted patency rates following PTA can be up to 65% at 5 years. When the endovascular approach is unsuccessful, these therapeutic options are complemented by surgical procedures including vein patch revision, jump grafting, or placement of a new graft.

  14. Antibiotic Capture by Bacterial Lipocalins Uncovers an Extracellular Mechanism of Intrinsic Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    El-Halfawy, Omar M; Klett, Javier; Ingram, Rebecca J; Loutet, Slade A; Murphy, Michael E P; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Valvano, Miguel A

    2017-03-14

    The potential for microbes to overcome antibiotics of different classes before they reach bacterial cells is largely unexplored. Here we show that a soluble bacterial lipocalin produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia upon exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations increases resistance to diverse antibiotics in vitro and in vivo These phenotypes were recapitulated by heterologous expression in B. cenocepacia of lipocalin genes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Purified lipocalin bound different classes of bactericidal antibiotics and contributed to bacterial survival in vivo Experimental and X-ray crystal structure-guided computational studies revealed that lipocalins counteract antibiotic action by capturing antibiotics in the extracellular space. We also demonstrated that fat-soluble vitamins prevent antibiotic capture by binding bacterial lipocalin with higher affinity than antibiotics. Therefore, bacterial lipocalins contribute to antimicrobial resistance by capturing diverse antibiotics in the extracellular space at the site of infection, which can be counteracted by known vitamins.IMPORTANCE Current research on antibiotic action and resistance focuses on targeting essential functions within bacterial cells. We discovered a previously unrecognized mode of general bacterial antibiotic resistance operating in the extracellular space, which depends on bacterial protein molecules called lipocalins. These molecules are highly conserved in most bacteria and have the ability to capture different classes of antibiotics outside bacterial cells. We also discovered that liposoluble vitamins, such as vitamin E, overcome in vitro and in vivo antibiotic resistance mediated by bacterial lipocalins, providing an unexpected new alternative to combat resistance by using this vitamin or its derivatives as antibiotic adjuvants.

  15. Hybrid Endovascular Solutions for Supra-Aortic Vessels Extra-Anatomic Bypass Infection.

    PubMed

    Fadda, Gian Franco; Marino, Mario; Kasemi, Holta; Di Angelo, Costantino Luca; Ronchey, Sonia; Serrao, Eugenia; Orrico, Matteo; Mangialardi, Nicola

    2015-11-01

    The use of extra-anatomic bypasses for the hybrid repair of thoracic aortic pathologies should consider the risk of vascular graft infection. Graft infections at cervical level are extremely rare and are associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. We report 2 cases of infected extra-anatomic bypasses for supra-aortic vessels debranching treated with a hybrid approach: re-extra-anatomical bypass with the Viabahn Open Revascularization Technique (VORTEC) in the first patient and the EndoVAC approach in the second case. Endovascular techniques may offer bail-out solutions in a hybrid fashion to treat vascular graft infection in patients considered unfeasible for the conventional surgical repair, associated with appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  16. Direction of aminoacylated transfer RNAs into antibiotic synthesis and peptidoglycan-mediated antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Jennifer; Ibba, Michael

    2013-09-17

    Prokaryotic aminoacylated-transfer RNAs often need to be efficiently segregated between translation and other cellular biosynthetic pathways. Many clinically relevant bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa direct some aminoacylated-tRNA species into peptidoglycan biosynthesis and/or membrane phospholipid modification. Subsequent indirect peptidoglycan cross-linkage or change in membrane permeability is often a prerequisite for high-level antibiotic resistance. In Streptomycetes, aminoacylated-tRNA species are used for antibiotic synthesis as well as antibiotic resistance. The direction of coding aminoacylated-tRNA molecules away from translation and into antibiotic resistance and synthesis pathways are discussed in this review.

  17. Mini cardiopulmonary bypass: Anesthetic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Alsatli, Raed A.

    2012-01-01

    This review article is going to elaborate on the description, components, and advantages of mini-cardiopulmonary bypass (mini-CPB), with special reference to the anesthetic management and fast track anesthesia with mini-CPB. There are several clinical advantages of mini-CPB like, reduced inflammatory reaction to the pump, reduced need for allogenic blood transfusion and lower incidence of postoperative neurological complications. There are certainly important points that have to be considered by anesthesiologists to avoid sever perturbation in the cardiac output and blood pressure during mini-CPB. Fast-track anesthesia provides advantages regarding fast postoperative recovery from anesthesia, and reduction of postoperative ventilation time. Mini bypass offers a sound alternative to conventional CPB, and has definite advantages. It has its limitations, but even with that it has a definite place in the current practice of cardiac surgery. PMID:25885494

  18. Antibiotic-bonded PTFE vascular grafts: the effect of silver antibiotic on bioactivity following implantation.

    PubMed

    Kinney, E V; Bandyk, D F; Seabrook, G A; Kelly, H M; Towne, J B

    1991-05-01

    Use of an infection-resistant vascular prosthesis has appeal for grafting in sites of potential contamination or to replace graft segments involved in low-grade infections caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). In this study, antibiotic retention on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts prepared using three antibiotic-bonding methods was compared following implantation into the arterial circulation. Ciprofloxacin or silver-ciprofloxacin was bonded to PTFE surfaces by surfactant-mediated or direct bonding methods. Antibiotic-bonded grafts of each type (n = 8) or control grafts (n = 2) were used to replace the carotid or femoral arteries of 10 dogs. Duplicate grafts segments (0.5 x 0.5 cm) were explanted at various time intervals ranging from 1 hr to 14 days later and imprinted onto culture plates of Klebsiella pneumonia. Antibiotic retention (micrograms/ml) was determined by measuring zones of inhibition and correlated with known disc concentrations of ciprofloxacin. Antibacterial bioactivity of grafts bonded with silver-antibiotic complexes was superior (P less than 0.02) to bonding of antibiotic alone at 3 and 24 hr following implantation. Ciprofloxacin retention in excess of the minimum bactericidal concentration (0.5 microgram/ml) of Staphylococcus epidermidis was demonstrated on all silver-antibiotic-bonded grafts after 14 days of implantation. At 7 and 14 days following implantation, the bioactivity of all antibiotic-bonded grafts exceeded 0.125 micrograms/ml of ciprofloxacin, the minimum inhibitory concentration of S. epidermidis. Bonding of silver-ciprofloxacin on PTFE grafts provided an effective source of local antibiotic release at levels which may be useful for bypass grafting in contaminated wounds or for in situ replacement of grafts infected by CNS.

  19. Bacteriocins - a viable alternative to antibiotics?

    PubMed

    Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2013-02-01

    Solutions are urgently required for the growing number of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Bacteriocins, which are antimicrobial peptides produced by certain bacteria, might warrant serious consideration as alternatives to traditional antibiotics. These molecules exhibit significant potency against other bacteria (including antibiotic-resistant strains), are stable and can have narrow or broad activity spectra. Bacteriocins can even be produced in situ in the gut by probiotic bacteria to combat intestinal infections. Although the application of specific bacteriocins might be curtailed by the development of resistance, an understanding of the mechanisms by which such resistance could emerge will enable researchers to develop strategies to minimize this potential problem.

  20. Ramjet bypass duct and preburner configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlando, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A combined turbofan and ramjet aircraft engine includes a forward bypass duct which allows the engine to operate more efficiently during the turbofan mode of operation. By mounting a ramjet preburner in the forward duct and isolating this duct from the turbofan bypass air, a transition from turbofan operation to ramjet operation can take place at lower flight Mach numbers without incurring pressure losses or blockage in the turbofan bypass air.

  1. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy studies on magnetite/Ag/antibiotic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, Olena; Jurga-Stopa, Justyna; Coy, Emerson; Peplinska, Barbara; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Jurga, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    This article presents a study on the detection of antibiotics in magnetite/Ag/antibiotic nanocomposites using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Antibiotics with different spectra of antimicrobial activities, including rifampicin, doxycycline, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone, were studied. Mechanical mixtures of antibiotics and magnetite/Ag nanocomposites, as well as antibiotics and magnetite nanopowder, were investigated in order to identify the origin of FTIR bands. FTIR spectroscopy was found to be an appropriate technique for this task. The spectra of the magnetite/Ag/antibiotic nanocomposites exhibited very weak (for doxycycline, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone) or even no (for rifampicin) antibiotic bands. This FTIR "invisibility" of antibiotics is ascribed to their adsorbed state. FTIR and Raman measurements show altered Csbnd O, Cdbnd O, and Csbnd S bonds, indicating adsorption of the antibiotic molecules on the magnetite/Ag nanocomposite structure. In addition, a potential mechanism through which antibiotic molecules interact with magnetite/Ag nanoparticle surfaces is proposed.

  2. Antibiotic therapy of aortic graft infection: treatment and prevention recommendations.

    PubMed

    Hodgkiss-Harlow, Kelley D; Bandyk, Dennis F

    2011-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after aortic intervention, an uncommon but serious vascular condition, requires patient-specific antibiotic therapy. Effective treatment and prevention requires the vascular surgeon to be cognizant of changing SSI microbiology, advances in antibiotic delivery, and patient characteristics. The majority of aortic graft infections are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus now the prevalent pathogen. Nasal carriage of methicillin-sensitive or methicillin-resistant S aureus strains, diabetes mellitus, recent hospitalization, a failed arterial reconstruction, and the presence of a groin incision are important SSI risk factors. Overall, the aortic SSI rate is higher than predicted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance risk category system; ranging from 5% after open or endovascular aortic interventions to as high as 10% to 15% after aortofemoral bypass or uni-aortoiliac grafting with femorofemoral bypass. Perioperative measures to reduce S aureus nares and skin colonization, administration of antibiotic prophylaxis, meticulous wound closure/care, and therapy directed to optimize patient host defense regulation mechanisms (eg, temperature, oxygenation, blood sugar) can minimize SSI occurrence. Antibiotic therapy for aortic graft infection should utilize bactericidal drugs that penetrate bacteria biofilms and can be delivered to the surgical site both parenterally and locally in the form of antibiotic-impregnated beads or prosthetic grafts.

  3. History of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB).

    PubMed

    Hessel, Eugene A

    2015-06-01

    The development of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), thereby permitting open-heart surgery, is one of the most important advances in medicine in the 20th century. Many currently practicing cardiac anesthesiologists, cardiac surgeons, and perfusionists are unaware of how recently it came into use (60 years) and how much the practice of CPB has changed during its short existence. In this paper, the development of CPB and the many changes and progress that has taken place over this brief period of time, making it a remarkably safe endeavor, are reviewed. The many as yet unresolved questions are also identified, which sets the stage for the other papers in this issue of this journal.

  4. What to Expect during Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. What To Expect During Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) requires ... surgery to newer, less-invasive methods. Traditional Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting This type of surgery usually lasts ...

  5. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... arteries from becoming clogged again. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Start Here Coronary Artery Bypass (Texas Heart ... in Spanish Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) What Is Coronary Bypass Surgery? (American Heart ...

  6. Proteome studies of bacterial antibiotic resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vranakis, Iosif; Goniotakis, Ioannis; Psaroulaki, Anna; Sandalakis, Vassilios; Tselentis, Yannis; Gevaert, Kris; Tsiotis, Georgios

    2014-01-31

    Ever since antibiotics were used to help humanity battle infectious diseases, microorganisms straight away fought back. Antibiotic resistance mechanisms indeed provide microbes with possibilities to by-pass and survive the action of antibiotic drugs. Several methods have been employed to identify these microbial resistance mechanisms in an ongoing effort to reduce the steadily increasing number of treatment failures due to multi-drug-resistant microbes. Proteomics has evolved to an important tool for this area of research. Following rapid advances in whole genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have been widely used to investigate microbial gene expression. This review highlights the contribution of proteomics in identifying microbial drug resistance mechanisms. It summarizes different proteomic studies on bacteria resistant to different antibiotic drugs. The review further includes an overview of the methodologies used, as well as lists key proteins identified, thus providing the reader not only a summary of research already done, but also directions for future research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Trends in Microbial Proteomics.

  7. Antibiotics and the burn patient.

    PubMed

    Ravat, François; Le-Floch, Ronan; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Ainaud, Pierre; Bertin-Maghit, Marc; Carsin, Hervé; Perro, Gérard

    2011-02-01

    Infection is a major problem in burn care and especially when it is due to bacteria with hospital-acquired multi-resistance to antibiotics. Moreover, when these bacteria are Gram-negative organisms, the most effective molecules are 20 years old and there is little hope of any new product available even in the distant future. Therefore, it is obvious that currently available antibiotics should not be misused. With this aim in mind, the following review was conducted by a group of experts from the French Society for Burn Injuries (SFETB). It examined key points addressing the management of antibiotics for burn patients: when to use or not, time of onset, bactericidia, combination, adaptation, de-escalation, treatment duration and regimen based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of these compounds. The authors also considered antibioprophylaxis and some other key points such as: infection diagnosis criteria, bacterial inoculae and local treatment. French guidelines for the use of antibiotics in burn patients have been designed up from this work.

  8. 40 CFR 403.17 - Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Bypass. 403.17 Section 403.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PRE-TREAT-MENT REGULATIONS FOR EXIST-ING AND NEW SOURCES OF POLLUTION § 403.17 Bypass....

  9. 40 CFR 403.17 - Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Bypass. 403.17 Section 403.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PRE-TREAT-MENT REGULATIONS FOR EXIST-ING AND NEW SOURCES OF POLLUTION § 403.17 Bypass....

  10. 40 CFR 403.17 - Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., damage to the treatment facilities which causes them to become inoperable, or substantial and permanent... does not cause Pretreatment Standards or Requirements to be violated, but only if it also is for... a description of the bypass and its cause; the duration of the bypass, including exact dates...

  11. 40 CFR 403.17 - Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Definitions. (1) Bypass means the intentional diversion of wastestreams from any portion of an Industrial User... applicable Pretreatment Standards or Requirements. An Industrial User may allow any bypass to occur which... paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section. (c) Notice. (1) If an Industrial User knows in advance of the...

  12. Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  13. Biotechnology of polyketides: new breath of life for the novel antibiotic genetic pathways discovery through metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Elisângela Soares; Schuch, Viviane; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms (e.g., penicillin in 1928) and the beginning of their industrial application (1940) opened new doors to what has been the main medication source for the treatment of infectious diseases and tumors. In fact, approximately 80 years after the discovery of the first antibiotic compound, and despite all of the warnings about the failure of the "goose that laid the golden egg," the potential of this wealth is still inexorable: simply adjust the focus from "micro" to "nano", that means changing the look from microorganisms to nanograms of DNA. Then, the search for new drugs, driven by genetic engineering combined with metagenomic strategies, shows us a way to bypass the barriers imposed by methodologies limited to isolation and culturing. However, we are far from solving the problem of supplying new molecules that are effective against the plasticity of multi- or pan-drug-resistant pathogens. Although the first advances in genetic engineering date back to 1990, there is still a lack of high-throughput methods to speed up the screening of new genes and design new molecules by recombination of pathways. In addition, it is necessary an increase in the variety of heterologous hosts and improvements throughout the full drug discovery pipeline. Among numerous studies focused on this subject, those on polyketide antibiotics stand out for the large technical-scientific efforts that established novel solutions for the transfer/engineering of major metabolic pathways using transposons and other episomes, overcoming one of the main methodological constraints for the heterologous expression of major pathways. In silico prediction analysis of three-dimensional enzymatic structures and advances in sequencing technologies have expanded access to the metabolic potential of microorganisms.

  14. Biotechnology of polyketides: New breath of life for the novel antibiotic genetic pathways discovery through metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Elisângela Soares; Schuch, Viviane; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms (e.g., penicillin in 1928) and the beginning of their industrial application (1940) opened new doors to what has been the main medication source for the treatment of infectious diseases and tumors. In fact, approximately 80 years after the discovery of the first antibiotic compound, and despite all of the warnings about the failure of the “goose that laid the golden egg,” the potential of this wealth is still inexorable: simply adjust the focus from “micro” to “nano”, that means changing the look from microorganisms to nanograms of DNA. Then, the search for new drugs, driven by genetic engineering combined with metagenomic strategies, shows us a way to bypass the barriers imposed by methodologies limited to isolation and culturing. However, we are far from solving the problem of supplying new molecules that are effective against the plasticity of multi- or pan-drug-resistant pathogens. Although the first advances in genetic engineering date back to 1990, there is still a lack of high-throughput methods to speed up the screening of new genes and design new molecules by recombination of pathways. In addition, it is necessary an increase in the variety of heterologous hosts and improvements throughout the full drug discovery pipeline. Among numerous studies focused on this subject, those on polyketide antibiotics stand out for the large technical-scientific efforts that established novel solutions for the transfer/engineering of major metabolic pathways using transposons and other episomes, overcoming one of the main methodological constraints for the heterologous expression of major pathways. In silico prediction analysis of three-dimensional enzymatic structures and advances in sequencing technologies have expanded access to the metabolic potential of microorganisms. PMID:24688489

  15. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... induced by natural or human activity on the ecology and living organisms. Ecology The study of the relationships and interactions between ... antibiotics The Cost of Resistance Science of Resistance Ecology Antibiotics in Agriculture Antibacterial Agents Glossary References Web ...

  16. Engineering persister-specific antibiotics with synergistic antimicrobial functions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Nathan W; Deshayes, Stephanie; Hawker, Sinead; Blacker, Alyssa; Kasko, Andrea M; Wong, Gerard C L

    2014-09-23

    Most antibiotics target growth processes and are ineffective against persister bacterial cells, which tolerate antibiotics due to their reduced metabolic activity. These persisters act as a genetic reservoir for resistant mutants and constitute a root cause of antibiotic resistance, a worldwide problem in human health. We re-engineer antibiotics specifically for persisters using tobramycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic that targets bacterial ribosomes but is ineffective against persisters with low metabolic and cellular transport activity. By giving tobramycin the ability to induce nanoscopic negative Gaussian membrane curvature via addition of 12 amino acids, we transform tobramycin itself into a transporter sequence. The resulting molecule spontaneously permeates membranes, retains the high antibiotic activity of aminoglycosides, kills E. coli and S. aureus persisters 4-6 logs better than tobramycin, but remains noncytotoxic to eukaryotes. These results suggest a promising paradigm to renovate traditional antibiotics.

  17. The antibiotics in the chemical space.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Maxime; Banéres-Roquet, Françoise; Villain-Guillot, Philippe; Pugnière, Martine; Leonetti, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    Ensuring the availability of new antibiotics to eradicate resistant pathogens is a critical issue, but very few new antibacterials have been recently commercialized. In an effort to rationalize their discovery process, the industry has utilized chemical library and high-throughput approaches already applied in other therapeutical areas to generate new antibiotics. This strategy has turned out to be poorly adapted to the reality of antibacterial discovery. Commercial chemical libraries contain molecules with specific molecular properties, and unfortunately systemic antibacterials are more hydrophilic and have more complex structures. These factors are critical, since hydrophobic antibiotics are generally inactive in the presence of serum. Here, we review how the skewed distribution of systemic antibiotics in chemical space influences the discovery process.

  18. Finding alternatives to antibiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens requires new treatments. The availability of new antibiotics has severely declined, and so alternatives to antibiotics need to be considered in both animal agriculture and human medicine. Products for disease prevention are different than products for d...

  19. Antibiotic resistant in microorganisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial agents are necessary for use in veterinary medicine including the production of food producing animals. Antibiotic use is indicated for the treatment of bacterial target organisms and/or disease for which the antibiotic was developed. However, an unintended consequence of antibiotic ...

  20. Molecular Regulation of Antibiotic Biosynthesis in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Chandra, Govind; Niu, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptomycetes are the most abundant source of antibiotics. Typically, each species produces several antibiotics, with the profile being species specific. Streptomyces coelicolor, the model species, produces at least five different antibiotics. We review the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in S. coelicolor and other, nonmodel streptomycetes in the light of recent studies. The biosynthesis of each antibiotic is specified by a large gene cluster, usually including regulatory genes (cluster-situated regulators [CSRs]). These are the main point of connection with a plethora of generally conserved regulatory systems that monitor the organism's physiology, developmental state, population density, and environment to determine the onset and level of production of each antibiotic. Some CSRs may also be sensitive to the levels of different kinds of ligands, including products of the pathway itself, products of other antibiotic pathways in the same organism, and specialized regulatory small molecules such as gamma-butyrolactones. These interactions can result in self-reinforcing feed-forward circuitry and complex cross talk between pathways. The physiological signals and regulatory mechanisms may be of practical importance for the activation of the many cryptic secondary metabolic gene cluster pathways revealed by recent sequencing of numerous Streptomyces genomes. PMID:23471619

  1. Molecular regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Chater, Keith F; Chandra, Govind; Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2013-03-01

    Streptomycetes are the most abundant source of antibiotics. Typically, each species produces several antibiotics, with the profile being species specific. Streptomyces coelicolor, the model species, produces at least five different antibiotics. We review the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in S. coelicolor and other, nonmodel streptomycetes in the light of recent studies. The biosynthesis of each antibiotic is specified by a large gene cluster, usually including regulatory genes (cluster-situated regulators [CSRs]). These are the main point of connection with a plethora of generally conserved regulatory systems that monitor the organism's physiology, developmental state, population density, and environment to determine the onset and level of production of each antibiotic. Some CSRs may also be sensitive to the levels of different kinds of ligands, including products of the pathway itself, products of other antibiotic pathways in the same organism, and specialized regulatory small molecules such as gamma-butyrolactones. These interactions can result in self-reinforcing feed-forward circuitry and complex cross talk between pathways. The physiological signals and regulatory mechanisms may be of practical importance for the activation of the many cryptic secondary metabolic gene cluster pathways revealed by recent sequencing of numerous Streptomyces genomes.

  2. Antibiotics: a new hope.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gerard D

    2012-01-27

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the most significant challenges to the health care sector in the 21st century. A myriad of resistance mechanisms have emerged over the past decades and are widely disseminated worldwide through bacterial populations. At the same time there have been ever fewer new antibiotics brought to market, and the pharmaceutical industry increasingly sees antibiotics as a poor investment. Paradoxically, we are in a Golden Age of understanding how antibiotics work and where resistance comes from. This knowledge is fueling a renaissance of interest and innovation in antibiotic discovery, synthesis, and mechanism that is poised to inform drug discovery to address pressing clinical needs.

  3. Systemic antibiotics in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Slots, Jørgen

    2004-11-01

    This position paper addresses the role of systemic antibiotics in the treatment of periodontal disease. Topical antibiotic therapy is not discussed here. The paper was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. The document consists of three sections: 1) concept of antibiotic periodontal therapy; 2) efficacy of antibiotic periodontal therapy; and 3) practical aspects of antibiotic periodontal therapy. The conclusions drawn in this paper represent the position of the American Academy of Periodontology and are intended for the information of the dental profession.

  4. Appropriate Antibiotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Allison, Michael G; Heil, Emily L; Hayes, Bryan D

    2017-02-01

    Prescribing antibiotics is an essential component of initial therapy in sepsis. Early antibiotics are an important component of therapy, but speed of administration should not overshadow the patient-specific characteristics that determine the optimal breadth of antimicrobial therapy. Cultures should be drawn before antibiotic therapy if it does not significantly delay administration. Combination antibiotic therapy against gram-negative infections is not routinely required, and combination therapy involving vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam is associated with an increase in acute kidney injury. Emergency practitioners should be aware of special considerations in the administration and dosing of antibiotics in order to deliver optimal care to septic patients.

  5. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood...

  10. 30 CFR 56.19018 - Overtravel by-pass switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overtravel by-pass switches. 56.19018 Section... Hoisting Hoists § 56.19018 Overtravel by-pass switches. When an overtravel by-pass switch is installed, the... switch is held in the closed position by the hoistman. The overtravel by-pass switch shall...

  11. 30 CFR 57.19018 - Overtravel by-pass switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overtravel by-pass switches. 57.19018 Section... Hoisting Hoists § 57.19018 Overtravel by-pass switches. When an overtravel by-pass switch is installed, the... switch is held in the closed position by the hoistman. The overtravel by-pass switch shall...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  13. Antibiotic resistance in Chlamydiae.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Rockey, Daniel D

    2010-09-01

    There are few documented reports of antibiotic resistance in Chlamydia and no examples of natural and stable antibiotic resistance in strains collected from humans. While there are several reports of clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to antibiotics, these strains either lost their resistance phenotype in vitro, or lost viability altogether. Differences in procedures for chlamydial culture in the laboratory, low recovery rates of clinical isolates and the unknown significance of heterotypic resistance observed in culture may interfere with the recognition and interpretation of antibiotic resistance. Although antibiotic resistance has not emerged in chlamydiae pathogenic to humans, several lines of evidence suggest they are capable of expressing significant resistant phenotypes. The adept ability of chlamydiae to evolve to antibiotic resistance in vitro is demonstrated by contemporary examples of mutagenesis, recombination and genetic transformation. The isolation of tetracycline-resistant Chlamydia suis strains from pigs also emphasizes their adaptive ability to acquire antibiotic resistance genes when exposed to significant selective pressure.

  14. Frataxin-bypassing Isu1: characterization of the bypass activity in cells and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Heeyong; Knight, Simon A B; Pandey, Alok; Pain, Jayashree; Zhang, Yan; Pain, Debkumar; Dancis, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    Frataxin is a conserved mitochondrial protein, and deficiency underlies the neurodegenerative disease Friedreich's ataxia. Frataxin interacts with the core machinery for Fe-S cluster assembly in mitochondria. Recently we reported that in frataxin-deleted yeast strains, a spontaneously occurring mutation in one of two genes encoding redundant Isu scaffold proteins, bypassed the mutant phenotypes. In the present study we created strains expressing a single scaffold protein, either Isu1 or the bypass mutant M107I Isu1. Our results show that in the frataxin-deletion strain expressing the bypass mutant Isu1, cell growth, Fe-S cluster protein activities, haem proteins and iron homoeostasis were restored to normal or close to normal. The bypass effects were not mediated by changes in Isu1 expression level. The persulfide-forming activity of the cysteine desulfurase was diminished in the frataxin deletion (∆yfh1 ISU1) and was improved by expression of the bypass Isu1 (∆yfh1 M107I ISU1). The addition of purified bypass M107I Isu1 protein to a ∆yfh1 lysate conferred similar enhancement of cysteine desulfurase as did frataxin, suggesting that this effect contributed to the bypass mechanism. Fe-S cluster-forming activity in isolated mitochondria was stimulated by the bypass Isu1, albeit at a lower rate. The rescuing effects of the bypass Isu1 point to ways that the core defects in Friedreich's ataxia mitochondria can be restored.

  15. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives.

    PubMed

    Diarra, Moussa S; Malouin, François

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics (growth promoters) in feed need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily be spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2600 regulated chicken producers who have access to several antibiotics approved as feed additives for poultry. Feed recipes and mixtures vary greatly geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While some reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens) have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno-stimulatory activities.

  16. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Diarra, Moussa S.; Malouin, François

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics (growth promoters) in feed need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily be spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2600 regulated chicken producers who have access to several antibiotics approved as feed additives for poultry. Feed recipes and mixtures vary greatly geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While some reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens) have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno-stimulatory activities. PMID:24987390

  17. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. Chest . 2012;141(2 ... bypass surgery - minimally invasive Heart failure - overview High blood cholesterol ...

  18. Exhaust gas bypass valve control for thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Michael G; Yang, Jihui; Meisner, Greogry P.; Stabler, Francis R.; De Bock, Hendrik Pieter Jacobus; Anderson, Todd Alan

    2012-09-04

    A method of controlling engine exhaust flow through at least one of an exhaust bypass and a thermoelectric device via a bypass valve is provided. The method includes: determining a mass flow of exhaust exiting an engine; determining a desired exhaust pressure based on the mass flow of exhaust; comparing the desired exhaust pressure to a determined exhaust pressure; and determining a bypass valve control value based on the comparing, wherein the bypass valve control value is used to control the bypass valve.

  19. MHD Energy Bypass Scramjet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.; Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Revolutionary rather than evolutionary changes in propulsion systems are most likely to decrease cost of space transportation and to provide a global range capability. Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion is a revolutionary propulsion system. The performance of scramjet engines can be improved by the AJAX energy management concept. A magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) generator controls the flow and extracts flow energy in the engine inlet and a MHD accelerator downstream of the combustor accelerates the nozzle flow. A progress report toward developing the MHD technology is presented herein. Recent theoretical efforts are reviewed and ongoing experimental efforts are discussed. The latter efforts also include an ongoing collaboration between NASA, the US Air Force Research Laboratory, US industry, and Russian scientific organizations. Two of the critical technologies, the ionization of the air and the MHD accelerator, are briefly discussed. Examples of limiting the combustor entrance Mach number to a low supersonic value with a MHD energy bypass scheme are presented, demonstrating an improvement in scramjet performance. The results for a simplified design of an aerospace plane show that the specific impulse of the MHD-bypass system is better than the non-MHD system and typical rocket over a narrow region of flight speeds and design parameters. Equilibrium ionization and non-equilibrium ionization are discussed. The thermodynamic condition of air at the entrance of the engine inlet determines the method of ionization. The required external power for non-equilibrium ionization is computed. There have been many experiments in which electrical power generation has successfully been achieved by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) means. However, relatively few experiments have been made to date for the reverse case of achieving gas acceleration by the MHD means. An experiment in a shock tunnel is described in which MHD acceleration is investigated experimentally. MHD has several

  20. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Rim, Seung Bum [Palo Alto, CA; Kim, Taeseok [San Jose, CA; Smith, David D [Campbell, CA; Cousins, Peter J [Menlo Park, CA

    2012-03-13

    Bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a bypass diode for a solar cell includes a substrate of the solar cell. A first conductive region is disposed above the substrate, the first conductive region of a first conductivity type. A second conductive region is disposed on the first conductive region, the second conductive region of a second conductivity type opposite the first conductivity type.

  1. Monsanto may bypass NIH in microbe test.

    PubMed

    Sun, Marjorie

    1985-01-11

    The Monsanto Company is planning to ask the Environmental Protection Agency for clearance to field test a genetically engineered microbial pesticide, bypassing the traditional approval process of the National Institutes of Health. Although only federally funded institutions are required to obtain NIH approval for genetic engineering tests, Monsanto is the first company to bypass the NIH regulatory process, which has become mired in a lawsuit brought by Jeremy Rifkin.

  2. Prophylactic digitalization for coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L W; Dickstein, R A; Fruehan, C T; Kane, P; Potts, J L; Smulyan, H; Webb, W R; Eich, R H

    1976-05-01

    One hundred and twenty patients undergoing aortocoronary bypass procedures were randomly placed into control and digitalized groups. All were initially in normal sinus rhythm and without evidence of congestive heart failure. Supraventricular arrhythmias occurred in 17 of 66 controls and in only three of 54 digitalized patients (P less than 0.01). There was no evidence of digitals toxicity. Based on this evidence we recommend prophylactic digitalization for patients having aortocoronary bypass operations.

  3. The Dalles Dam juvenile bypass electrical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bannister, B.D.; Luck, B.

    1995-12-31

    The Corps of Engineers is in the process of providing a juvenile fish bypass system at The Dalles Lock and Dam project on the lower Columbia River. This system is intended to preserve and enhance the dwindling stocks of wild anadromous fish. The impact of the proposed facilities on the electrical systems and on plant operations are developed along with descriptions of the special bypass features including the incorporation of provisions for a future small hydropower generator.

  4. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  5. Antibiotics and Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    de Sá Del Fiol, Fernando; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; de Cássia Bergamaschi, Cristiane; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Gauthier, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    During the breastfeeding period, bacterial infections can occur in the nursing mother, requiring the use of antibiotics. A lack of accurate information may lead health care professionals and mothers to suspend breastfeeding, which may be unnecessary. This article provides information on the main antibiotics that are appropriate for clinical use and the interference of these antibiotics with the infant to support medical decisions regarding the discontinuation of breastfeeding. We aim to provide information on the pharmacokinetic factors that interfere with the passage of antibiotics into breast milk and the toxicological implications of absorption by the infant. Publications related to the 20 most frequently employed antibiotics and their transfer into breast milk were evaluated. The results demonstrate that most antibiotics in clinical use are considered suitable during breastfeeding; however, the pharmacokinetic profile of each drug must be observed to ensure the resolution of the maternal infection and the safety of the infant.

  6. Biotic acts of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Aminov, Rustam I.

    2013-01-01

    Biological functions of antibiotics are not limited to killing. The most likely function of antibiotics in natural microbial ecosystems is signaling. Does this signaling function of antibiotics also extend to the eukaryotic – in particular mammalian – cells? In this review, the host modulating properties of three classes of antibiotics (macrolides, tetracyclines, and β-lactams) will be briefly discussed. Antibiotics can be effective in treatment of a broad spectrum of diseases and pathological conditions other than those of infectious etiology and, in this capacity, may find widespread applications beyond the intended antimicrobial use. This use, however, should not compromise the primary function antibiotics are used for. The biological background for this inter-kingdom signaling is also discussed. PMID:23966991

  7. Platforms for antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kim

    2013-05-01

    The spread of resistant bacteria, leading to untreatable infections, is a major public health threat but the pace of antibiotic discovery to combat these pathogens has slowed down. Most antibiotics were originally isolated by screening soil-derived actinomycetes during the golden era of antibiotic discovery in the 1940s to 1960s. However, diminishing returns from this discovery platform led to its collapse, and efforts to create a new platform based on target-focused screening of large libraries of synthetic compounds failed, in part owing to the lack of penetration of such compounds through the bacterial envelope. This article considers strategies to re-establish viable platforms for antibiotic discovery. These include investigating untapped natural product sources such as uncultured bacteria, establishing rules of compound penetration to enable the development of synthetic antibiotics, developing species-specific antibiotics and identifying prodrugs that have the potential to eradicate dormant persisters, which are often responsible for hard-to-treat infections.

  8. Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, H.R.; Husum, B.; Waaben, J.; Andersen, K.; Andersen, L.I.; Gefke, K.; Kaarsen, A.L.; Gjedde, A.

    1987-11-01

    Emboli in the brain microvasculature may inhibit brain activity during cardiopulmonary bypass. Such hypothetical blockade, if confirmed, may be responsible for the reduction of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose observed in animals subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass. In previous studies of cerebral blood flow during bypass, brain microcirculation was not evaluated. In the present study in animals (pigs), reduction of the number of perfused capillaries was estimated by measurements of the capillary diffusion capacity for hydrophilic tracers of low permeability. Capillary diffusion capacity, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose were measured simultaneously by the integral method, different tracers being used with different circulation times. In eight animals subjected to normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and seven subjected to hypothermic bypass, cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, and capillary diffusion capacity decreased significantly: cerebral blood flow from 63 to 43 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 34 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose from 43.0 to 23.0 mumol/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 14.1 mumol/100 gm/min in hypothermia. The capillary diffusion capacity declined markedly from 0.15 to 0.03 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia but only to 0.08 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia. We conclude that the decrease of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass is caused by interruption of blood flow through a part of the capillary bed, possibly by microemboli, and that cerebral blood flow is an inadequate indicator of capillary blood flow. Further studies must clarify why normal microvascular function appears to be preserved during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass.

  9. Replacement for antibiotics: Lysozyme

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics have been fed at subtherapeutic levels to swine as growth promoters for more than 60 years, and the majority of swine produced in the U.S. receive antibiotics in their feed at some point in their production cycle. These compounds benefit the producers by minimizing production losses by ...

  10. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  11. Setamycin, a new antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Otoguro, K; Nishikiori, T; Oiwa, R; Iwai, Y

    1981-10-01

    A new antibiotic, setamycin, was extracted from the mycelia of a rare actinomycete strain KM-6054. The antibiotic, the molecular formula of which was found to be C42H61NO12 (tentative), is a yellow powder showing activity against some fungi, trichomonads and weakly against Gram-positive bacteria.

  12. [Side effects of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Hoigné, R

    1975-03-01

    The clinically severe and newer forms of antibiotic side effects are reviewed. The study covers the following antibiotics: penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and polymyxins, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol and thiamphenicol, macrolides and lincomycin, rifamycins and sulfonamides. Special reference is made to (1) hematologic side effects, and (2) general evaluation of drug reactions. The relationship between reaction time and clinical symptoms is of particular practical significance.

  13. [Antibiotics and gait disorders].

    PubMed

    Gomez-Porro, P; Vinagre-Aragon, A; Zabala-Goiburu, J A

    2016-12-01

    The neurological toxicity of many antibiotics has been reported in a number of articles and clinical notes. In this review antibiotics are classified according to the physiopathogenic mechanism that can give rise to a gait disorder, taking both clinical and experimental data into account. An exhaustive search was conducted in Google Scholar and PubMed with the aim of finding reviews, articles and clinical cases dealing with gait disorders secondary to different antibiotics. The different antibiotics were separated according to the physiopathogenic mechanism that could cause them to trigger a gait disorder. They were classified into antibiotics capable of producing cerebellar ataxia, vestibular ataxia, sensitive ataxia or an extrapyramidal gait disorder. The main aim was to group all the drugs that can give rise to a gait disorder, in order to facilitate the clinical suspicion and, consequently, the management of patients.

  14. Experimental Investigation of By-pass Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Tapan; Lim, T. T.; Chattopadhyay, Manojit

    2000-11-01

    By-pass transition, a phenomenon often encountered in nature and engineering devices, is a complex flow instability caused by moving disturbances over bodies. To date this phenomenon is not fully explained. In the present research a controlled experiment is performed to show that the violent breakdown during by-pass transition is dominated by a two-dimensional mechanism and the resultant broadband energy spectrum of the corresponding turbulent flow is excited at the receptivity stage itself by the primary instability. The experiment is conducted in a water tunnel using dye visualisation technique, and the by-pass transition is created by controlled motion of captive vortices. In the presentation, apart from showing video images of the phenomenon, the similarity of the observed events with secondary instability and fully developed turbulent flows will be discussed.

  15. Battery Cell By-Pass Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evers, Jeffrey (Inventor); Gelger, Ronald V. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The invention is a circuit and method of limiting the charging current voltage from a power supply net work applied to an individual cell of a plurality of cells making up a battery being charged in series. It is particularly designed for use with batteries that can be damaged by overcharging, such as Lithium-ion type batteries. In detail. the method includes the following steps: 1) sensing the actual voltage level of the individual cell; 2) comparing the actual voltage level of the individual cell with a reference value and providing an error signal representative thereof; and 3) by-passing the charging current around individual cell necessary to keep the individual cell voltage level generally equal a specific voltage level while continuing to charge the remaining cells. Preferably this is accomplished by by-passing the charging current around the individual cell if said actual voltage level is above the specific voltage level and allowing the charging current to the individual cell if the actual voltage level is equal or less than the specific voltage level. In the step of bypassing the charging current, the by-passed current is transferred at a proper voltage level to the power supply. The by-pass circuit a voltage comparison circuit is used to compare the actual voltage level of the individual cell with a reference value and to provide an error signal representative thereof. A third circuit, designed to be responsive to the error signal, is provided for maintaining the individual cell voltage level generally equal to the specific voltage level. Circuitry is provided in the third circuit for bypassing charging current around the individual cell if the actual voltage level is above the specific voltage level and transfers the excess charging current to the power supply net work. The circuitry also allows charging of the individual cell if the actual voltage level is equal or less than the specific voltage level.

  16. [Simplified laparoscopic gastric bypass. Initial experience].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Miguelena, Luis; Maldonado-Vázquez, Angélica; Cortes-Romano, Pablo; Ríos-Cruz, Daniel; Marín-Domínguez, Raúl; Castillo-González, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: la cirugía de la obesidad comprende diversos procedimientos gastrointestinales. El bypass gástrico en Y de Roux es el prototipo de los procedimientos mixtos y el más practicado en el mundo en sus diversas variedades. Una técnica similar y novedosa es la adoptada por Cardoso-Ramos y Galvao denominada "bypass simplificado" que rápidamente se aceptó por la mayor facilidad y resultados muy parecidos a la técnica convencional. Objetivo: describir los resultados a un año del bypass gástrico simplificado para el tratamiento de la obesidad mórbida. Material y métodos: estudio retrospectivo y descriptivo de todos los pacientes a quienes se realizó bypass gástrico de enero de 2008 a julio de 2012, en la clínica de obesidad de un hospital privado de la Ciudad de México. Resultados: se estudiaron 90 pacientes con diagnóstico de obesidad mórbida, con límites de edad de 18 y 65 años, operados para bypass gástrico simplificado. En 10% de los pacientes hubo complicaciones, las más frecuentes fueron: hemorragia y hernia interna. Durante el periodo de estudio la mortalidad fue de 0%. La pérdida de peso promedio a los 12 meses fue de 72.7%. Conclusión: el bypass gástrico simplificado laparoscópico es una cirugía segura, con buenos resultados a mediano plazo, y con una pérdida del exceso de peso adecuada en 71% de los casos.

  17. Polymorphous ventricular tachycardia following cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, L. D.; Cohen, A. J.; Bellasis, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    A 62-year-old African-American man who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery was found to have repetitive ventricular tachycardia of the "Torsade des pointes" type. The arrhythmia was resistant to bretylium, lidocaine, and pacing, but was controlled by intravenous magnesium sulfate. The recurrent attacks were abolished by a bolus of 1 g magnesium sulfate and controlled using a 1 mg/minute drip for 12 hours. This case shows the effectiveness of intravenous magnesium in controlling Torsade des pointes in postoperative coronary bypass patients. PMID:8583493

  18. Biosensors, antibiotics and food.

    PubMed

    Virolainen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics are medicine's leading asset for fighting microbial infection, which is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. However, the misuse of antibiotics has led to the rapid spread of antibiotic resistance among bacteria and the development of multiple resistant pathogens. Therefore, antibiotics are rapidly losing their antimicrobial value. The use of antibiotics in food production animals is strictly controlled by the European Union (EU). Veterinary use is regulated to prevent the spread of resistance. EU legislation establishes maximum residue limits for veterinary medicinal products in foodstuffs of animal origin and enforces the establishment and execution of national monitoring plans. Among samples selected for monitoring, suspected noncompliant samples are screened and then subjected to confirmatory analysis to establish the identity and concentration of the contaminant. Screening methods for antibiotic residues are typically based on microbiological growth inhibition, whereas physico-chemical methods are used for confirmatory analysis. This chapter discusses biosensors, especially whole-cell based biosensors, as emerging screening methods for antibiotic residues. Whole-cell biosensors can offer highly sensitive and specific detection of residues. Applications demonstrating quantitative analysis and specific analyte identification further improve their potential as screening methods.

  19. Antibiotic bonding to polytetrafluoroethylene with tridodecylmethylammonium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.A.; Alcid, D.V.; Greco, R.S.

    1982-09-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) treated with the cationic surfactant, triodecylmethylammonium chloride (TDMAC), binds /sup 14/C-penicillin (1.5 to 2 mg antibiotic/cm graft), whereas untreated PTFE or PTFE treated with anionic detergents shows little binding of antibiotic. TDMAC-treated PTFE concomitantly binds penicillin and heparin, generating a surface that potentially can resist both infection and thrombosis. The retention of these biologically active molecules is not due to passive entrapment in the PTFE but reflects an ionic interaction between the anionic ligands and surface-bound TDMAC. Penicillin bound to PTFE is not removed by exhaustive washing in aqueous buffers but is slowly released in the presence of plasma or when the PTFE is placed in a muscle pouch in the rat. Muscle tissue adjacent to the treated PTFE shows elevated levels of antibiotic following implantation. PTFE treated with TDMAC and placed in a muscle pouch binds /sup 14/C-penicillin when it is locally irrigated with antibiotic or when penicillin is administered intravenously. Thus, the TDMAC surface treated either in vitro or in vivo with penicillin provides an effective in situ source for the timed release of antibiotic.

  20. [The threat of antibiotic resistance: origin, impact and public health perspectives].

    PubMed

    Struelens, M J; Denis, O; Rodriguez-Villalobos, H; Hallin, M

    2007-09-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is as old as the living planet, i.e. over 3 billion years ago when bacterial life emerged together with its biological warfare weapons, the antibiotics. Bacteria can readily develop a diverse array of antibiotic resistance mechanisms, including selection of mutants which produce modified low-affinity drug targets, exhibit reduced drug permeability or increased drug efflux. Another pathway is through acquisition of mobile genetic determinants of drug inactivating enzymes, target protection or bypass mechanisms. Antibiotic resistance has accelerated and spread across the community of human and animal bacteria following massive use of antibiotics for over half-a century in human and veterinary medicine and agriculture. Today, the increasing prevalence of resistance among many bacterial pathogens is no longer counter-balanced by the launching of innovative and active antibiotics. This imbalanced "arms race" undermines the escalating use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and increases the risk of therapeutic failure, drug side effets and excess costs of care. The accumulation of antibiotic resistance genes and their epidemic dissemination is fuelled by the selective pressure associated with excess and inappropriate use of antibiotics combined with insufficient infection prevention and control measures. Confronting this threat effectively requires new strategies to be implemented globally, nationally, and locally across all healthcare and agricultural sectors.

  1. Variable volume combustor with an air bypass system

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Ostebee, Heath Michael; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-02-07

    The present application provides a combustor for use with flow of fuel and a flow of air in a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within a liner and an air bypass system position about the liner. The air bypass system variably allows a bypass portion of the flow of air to bypass the micro-mixer fuel nozzles.

  2. Sampling the antibiotic resistome.

    PubMed

    D'Costa, Vanessa M; McGrann, Katherine M; Hughes, Donald W; Wright, Gerard D

    2006-01-20

    Microbial resistance to antibiotics currently spans all known classes of natural and synthetic compounds. It has not only hindered our treatment of infections but also dramatically reshaped drug discovery, yet its origins have not been systematically studied. Soil-dwelling bacteria produce and encounter a myriad of antibiotics, evolving corresponding sensing and evading strategies. They are a reservoir of resistance determinants that can be mobilized into the microbial community. Study of this reservoir could provide an early warning system for future clinically relevant antibiotic resistance mechanisms.

  3. Metagenomic small molecule discovery methods

    PubMed Central

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Milshteyn, Aleksandr; Brady, Sean F.

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches to natural product discovery provide the means of harvesting bioactive small molecules synthesized by environmental bacteria without the requirement of first culturing these organisms. Advances in sequencing technologies and general metagenomic methods are beginning to provide the tools necessary to unlock the unexplored biosynthetic potential encoded by the genomes of uncultured environmental bacteria. Here, we highlight recent advances in sequence- and functional- based metagenomic approaches that promise to facilitate antibiotic discovery from diverse environmental microbiomes. PMID:25000402

  4. Snake Venom: Any Clue for Antibiotics and CAM?

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Lately several naturally occurring peptides presenting antimicrobial activity have been described in the literature. However, snake venoms, which are an enormous source of peptides, have not been fully explored for searching such molecules. The aim of this work is to review the basis of antimicrobial mechanisms revealing snake venom as a feasible source for searching an antibiotic prototype. Therefore, it includes (i) a description of the constituents of the snake venoms involved in their main biological effects during the envenomation process; (ii) examples of snake venom molecules of commercial use; (iii) mechanisms of action of known antibiotics; and (iv) how the microorganisms can be resistant to antibiotics. This review also shows that snake venoms are not totally unexplored sources for antibiotics and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). PMID:15841277

  5. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  9. Bypass apparatus and method for series connected energy storage devices

    DOEpatents

    Rouillard, Jean; Comte, Christophe; Daigle, Dominik

    2000-01-01

    A bypass apparatus and method for series connected energy storage devices. Each of the energy storage devices coupled to a common series connection has an associated bypass unit connected thereto in parallel. A current bypass unit includes a sensor which is coupled in parallel with an associated energy storage device or cell and senses an energy parameter indicative of an energy state of the cell, such as cell voltage. A bypass switch is coupled in parallel with the energy storage cell and operable between a non-activated state and an activated state. The bypass switch, when in the non-activated state, is substantially non-conductive with respect to current passing through the energy storage cell and, when in the activated state, provides a bypass current path for passing current to the series connection so as to bypass the associated cell. A controller controls activation of the bypass switch in response to the voltage of the cell deviating from a pre-established voltage setpoint. The controller may be included within the bypass unit or be disposed on a control platform external to the bypass unit. The bypass switch may, when activated, establish a permanent or a temporary bypass current path.

  10. 30 CFR 57.19018 - Overtravel by-pass switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Overtravel by-pass switches. 57.19018 Section... Hoisting Hoists § 57.19018 Overtravel by-pass switches. When an overtravel by-pass switch is installed, the switch shall function so as to allow the conveyance to be moved through the overtravel position when...

  11. 30 CFR 56.19018 - Overtravel by-pass switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Overtravel by-pass switches. 56.19018 Section... Hoisting Hoists § 56.19018 Overtravel by-pass switches. When an overtravel by-pass switch is installed, the switch shall function so as to allow the conveyance to be moved through the overtravel position when...

  12. 30 CFR 56.19018 - Overtravel by-pass switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Overtravel by-pass switches. 56.19018 Section... Hoisting Hoists § 56.19018 Overtravel by-pass switches. When an overtravel by-pass switch is installed, the switch shall function so as to allow the conveyance to be moved through the overtravel position when...

  13. 30 CFR 57.19018 - Overtravel by-pass switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Overtravel by-pass switches. 57.19018 Section... Hoisting Hoists § 57.19018 Overtravel by-pass switches. When an overtravel by-pass switch is installed, the switch shall function so as to allow the conveyance to be moved through the overtravel position when...

  14. 30 CFR 56.19018 - Overtravel by-pass switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Overtravel by-pass switches. 56.19018 Section... Hoisting Hoists § 56.19018 Overtravel by-pass switches. When an overtravel by-pass switch is installed, the switch shall function so as to allow the conveyance to be moved through the overtravel position when...

  15. 30 CFR 57.19018 - Overtravel by-pass switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Overtravel by-pass switches. 57.19018 Section... Hoisting Hoists § 57.19018 Overtravel by-pass switches. When an overtravel by-pass switch is installed, the switch shall function so as to allow the conveyance to be moved through the overtravel position when...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  17. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  18. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  19. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  20. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  1. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger. 870.4240... bypass heat exchanger. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger is a device, consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  4. 20 CFR 631.18 - Federal by-pass authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Federal by-pass authority. 631.18 Section 631... Procedures § 631.18 Federal by-pass authority. (a) In the event that a State fails to submit a biennial State... Secretary's intent to exercise by-pass authority and an opportunity to request and to receive a...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in... circulation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards), except that a reservoir that contains...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in... circulation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards), except that a reservoir that contains...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in... circulation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards), except that a reservoir that contains...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in... circulation. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards), except that a reservoir that contains...

  9. 30 CFR 56.19018 - Overtravel by-pass switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Overtravel by-pass switches. 56.19018 Section... Hoisting Hoists § 56.19018 Overtravel by-pass switches. When an overtravel by-pass switch is installed, the switch shall function so as to allow the conveyance to be moved through the overtravel position when...

  10. 30 CFR 57.19018 - Overtravel by-pass switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Overtravel by-pass switches. 57.19018 Section... Hoisting Hoists § 57.19018 Overtravel by-pass switches. When an overtravel by-pass switch is installed, the switch shall function so as to allow the conveyance to be moved through the overtravel position when...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which is used in the blood pump head and which is cyclically compressed by the pump to cause the blood to...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  13. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  14. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  15. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  16. Opportunities for synthetic biology in antibiotics: expanding glycopeptide chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Maulik N; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-03-20

    Synthetic biology offers a new path for the exploitation and improvement of natural products to address the growing crisis in antibiotic resistance. All antibiotics in clinical use are facing eventual obsolesce as a result of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms, yet there are few new drug leads forthcoming from the pharmaceutical sector. Natural products of microbial origin have proven over the past 70 years to be the wellspring of antimicrobial drugs. Harnessing synthetic biology thinking and strategies can provide new molecules and expand chemical diversity of known antibiotic scaffolds to provide much needed new drug leads. The glycopeptide antibiotics offer paradigmatic scaffolds suitable for such an approach. We review these strategies here using the glycopeptides as an example and demonstrate how synthetic biology can expand antibiotic chemical diversity to help address the growing resistance crisis.

  17. Targeting Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chellat, Mathieu F.; Raguž, Luka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Finding strategies against the development of antibiotic resistance is a major global challenge for the life sciences community and for public health. The past decades have seen a dramatic worldwide increase in human‐pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to one or multiple antibiotics. More and more infections caused by resistant microorganisms fail to respond to conventional treatment, and in some cases, even last‐resort antibiotics have lost their power. In addition, industry pipelines for the development of novel antibiotics have run dry over the past decades. A recent world health day by the World Health Organization titled “Combat drug resistance: no action today means no cure tomorrow” triggered an increase in research activity, and several promising strategies have been developed to restore treatment options against infections by resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27000559

  18. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms.

  19. Educational Programs for By-Passed Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Don A., Ed.

    The objective of the symposium from which this document resulted was to give visibility to some worthwhile programs for mobile and "by-passed" populations, in order to allow those in attendance at the symposium and those exposed to the published proceedings to capitalize on what has been learned through these programs. The conference report points…

  20. Chloroquinolines block antibiotic efflux pumps in antibiotic-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes isolates.

    PubMed

    Ghisalberti, Didier; Mahamoud, Abdallah; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Baitiche, Milad; Martino, Michèle; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Barbe, Jacques

    2006-06-01

    Efflux mechanisms protect bacterial cells by pumping out toxic compounds and actively contribute to bacterial multidrug resistance. Agents inhibiting efflux pumps are of interest for the control of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Herein we report the effects of new chloroquinoline derivatives that render resistant Enterobacter aerogenes isolates noticeably more susceptible to structurally unrelated antibiotics. In addition, some of these chloroquinolines increase the intracellular concentration of chloramphenicol. Some of the molecules tested in this work are able to inhibit the main efflux pump (AcrAB-TolC), which is involved in E. aerogenes antibiotic resistance.

  1. [Antibiotics in primary care].

    PubMed

    Steciwko, Andrzej; Lubieniecka, Małgorzata; Muszyńska, Agnieszka

    2011-05-01

    Discovered in the forties of the twentieth century antimicrobial agents have changed the world. Currently, due to their overuse, we are threatened by the increasing resistance of bacteria to antibiotics, and soon we may face a threat of inability to fight these pathogens. For that reason, the world, European and national organizations introduce antibiotics protection programs. In Poland since 2004, the National Program of Protection of Antibiotics is being held. The concept of rational antibiotic therapy is associated not only with the appropriate choice of therapy or antimicrobial dosage but also with a reduction in costs associated with a refund of medicines. Antibiotics are prescribed mostly by primary care physicians (GP), and about one fifth of visits to family doctor's office ends with prescribing antimicrobial drug. These trends are probably related to both the difficulty in applying the differential diagnosis of viral and bacterial infection in a primary care doctor's office, as well as patient's conviction about the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in viral infections. However, although patients often want to influence the therapeutic decisions and ask their doctor for prescribing antimicrobial drug, the right conversation with a doctor alone is the critical component in satisfaction with medical care. Many countries have established standards to clarify the indications for use of antibiotics and thereby reduce their consumption. The next step is to monitor the prescribing and use of these drugs and to assess the rise of drug resistance in the area. In Poland, the recommendations regarding outpatient respiratory tract infections treatment were published and usage of antimicrobial agents monitoring has begun. However, lack of publications covering a broad analysis of antibiotic therapy and drug resistance on Polish territory is still a problem. Modem medicine has yet another tool in the fight against bacteria--they are bacteriophages. Phage therapy is

  2. Clinical experimentation with aerosol antibiotics: current and future methods of administration

    PubMed Central

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Kioumis, Ioannis; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Spyratos, Dionysios; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Turner, J Francis; Browning, Robert; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Currently almost all antibiotics are administered by the intravenous route. Since several systems and situations require more efficient methods of administration, investigation and experimentation in drug design has produced local treatment modalities. Administration of antibiotics in aerosol form is one of the treatment methods of increasing interest. As the field of drug nanotechnology grows, new molecules have been produced and combined with aerosol production systems. In the current review, we discuss the efficiency of aerosol antibiotic studies along with aerosol production systems. The different parts of the aerosol antibiotic methodology are presented. Additionally, information regarding the drug molecules used is presented and future applications of this method are discussed. PMID:24115836

  3. [The history of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Yazdankhah, Siamak; Lassen, Jørgen; Midtvedt, Tore; Solberg, Claus Ola

    2013-12-10

    The development of chemical compounds for the treatment of infectious diseases may be divided into three phases: a) the discovery in the 1600s in South America of alkaloid extracts from the bark of the cinchona tree and from the dried root of the ipecacuanha bush, which proved effective against, respectively, malaria (quinine) and amoebic dysentery (emetine); b) the development of synthetic drugs, which mostly took place in Germany, starting with Paul Ehrlich's (1854-1915) discovery of salvarsan (1909), and crowned with Gerhard Domagk's (1895-1964) discovery of the sulfonamides (1930s); and c) the discovery of antibiotics. The prime example of the latter is the development of penicillin in the late 1920s following a discovery by a solitary research scientist who never worked in a team and never as part of a research programme. It took another ten years or so before drug-quality penicillin was produced, with research now dependent on being conducted in large collaborative teams, frequently between universities and wealthy industrial companies. The search for new antibiotics began in earnest in the latter half of the 1940s and was mostly based on soil microorganisms. Many new antibiotics were discovered in this period, which may be termed «the golden age of antibiotics». Over the past three decades, the development of new antibiotics has largely stalled, while antibiotic resistance has increased. This situation may require new strategies for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  4. Charge-transfer chromatographic study of the interaction of antibiotics with sodium dodecylsulfate.

    PubMed

    Forgács, E; Csethati, T

    1997-06-01

    The interaction of 29 antibiotics with the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) was studied by charge-transfer reversed-phase chromatography carried out on impregnated silica layers using water-methanol mixtures as eluents. The hydrophobicity of antibiotics and the relative strength of SDS-antibiotic interaction was calculated separately for each antibiotic-SDS pair. SDS interacted with 17 antibiotics where the antibiotic-SDS complex was either more hydrophilic or more hydrophobic than the uncomplexed molecule. The relative strength of interaction depended considerably on the molecular structure of the antibiotics. No significant linear correlation was found between the hydrophobicity parameters of antibiotics and their capacity to interact with SDS. Stepwise regression analysis proved that the inductive effect of substituents, their electron-withdrawing power and proton-acceptor capacity exert a significance influence on the strength of interaction.

  5. Interstellar Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  6. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  7. Mobius Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses formation of chemical molecules via Mobius strip intermediates, and concludes that many special physics-chemical properties of the fully closed circular form (1) of polyoma DNA are explainable by this topological feature. (CC)

  8. Natural and engineered biosynthesis of nucleoside antibiotics in Actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenqing; Qi, Jianzhao; Wu, Pan; Wan, Dan; Liu, Jin; Feng, Xuan; Deng, Zixin

    2016-03-01

    Nucleoside antibiotics constitute an important family of microbial natural products bearing diverse bioactivities and unusual structural features. Their biosynthetic logics are unique with involvement of complex multi-enzymatic reactions leading to the intricate molecules from simple building blocks. Understanding how nature builds this family of antibiotics in post-genomic era sets the stage for rational enhancement of their production, and also paves the way for targeted persuasion of the cell factories to make artificial designer nucleoside drugs and leads via synthetic biology approaches. In this review, we discuss the recent progress and perspectives on the natural and engineered biosynthesis of nucleoside antibiotics.

  9. Antibiotic production by actinomycetes: the Janus faces of regulation.

    PubMed

    Cundliffe, Eric

    2006-07-01

    This manuscript reviews some of the common regulatory mechanisms that control antibiotic production in actinomycetes. These ubiquitous bacteria, collectively responsible for the earthy smell of soil, are prolific producers of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites. The content of this review is biased towards the author's current research interests, concerning the action of regulatory gene products that control transcription of antibiotic-biosynthetic genes and the associated involvement of low molecular weight signalling molecules of the gamma-butyrolactone family. As a result, much fertile ground remains unturned particularly in the area of environmental monitoring and responses of actinomycetes to stimuli so perceived. Reviews casting a broader net are cited in the text.

  10. Enumerating molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  11. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Cho, Ill Hwan; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care), the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students) regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing). The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics. PMID:24036486

  12. Strategies to minimize antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Cho, Ill Hwan; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2013-09-12

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care), the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students) regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing). The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.

  13. Global transcriptome and physiological responses of Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 exposed to distinct classes of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Heo, Aram; Jang, Hyun-Jin; Sung, Jung-Suk; Park, Woojun

    2014-01-01

    The effects of antibiotics on environment-originated nonpathogenic Acinetobacter species have been poorly explored. To understand the antibiotic-resistance mechanisms that function in nonpathogenic Acinetobacter species, we used an RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) technique to perform global gene-expression profiling of soil-borne Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 after exposing the bacteria to 4 classes of antibiotics (ampicillin, Amp; kanamycin, Km; tetracycline, Tc; norfloxacin, Nor). Interestingly, the well-known two global regulators, the soxR and the rpoE genes are present among 41 commonly upregulated genes under all 4 antibiotic-treatment conditions. We speculate that these common genes are essential for antibiotic resistance in DR1. Treatment with the 4 antibiotics produced diverse physiological and phenotypic changes. Km treatment induced the most dramatic phenotypic changes. Examination of mutation frequency and DNA-repair capability demonstrated the induction of the SOS response in Acinetobacter especially under Nor treatment. Based on the RNA-seq analysis, the glyoxylate-bypass genes of the citrate cycle were specifically upregulated under Amp treatment. We also identified newly recognized non-coding small RNAs of the DR1 strain, which were also confirmed by Northern blot analysis. These results reveal that treatment with antibiotics of distinct classes differentially affected the gene expression and physiology of DR1 cells. This study expands our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic-stress response of environment-originated bacteria and provides a basis for future investigations.

  14. Adjuvant strategies for potentiation of antibiotics to overcome antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Pieren, Michel; Tigges, Marcel

    2012-10-01

    Alarming facts about the occurrence and spreading of multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria have caught the attention of global surveillance authorities and public media. The demand for novel effective antimicrobial drugs is high and on the rise while, at the same time, the supply of fresh 'magic bullets' is drying up. This review summarizes examples of recent strategies for development of adjunctive antibiotic therapies that overcome microbial resistance and thus rejuvenate the existing arsenal of drugs. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of compounds that inhibit the action of the repressor protein implicated in ethionamide resistance, thus stimulating activation of the drug and thereby restoring the activity of the antibiotic for treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Such specific interference with regulators or signal transduction mechanisms involved in antibiotic resistance or virulence provides a new toolbox for novel combinations of antimicrobial drugs with adjuvant molecules lacking intrinsic antibiotic activity. In addition to the development of new antibiotics and vaccination initiatives this strategy of restoring or potentiating the activity of existing antibiotics may help to postpone the day when antibiotics are no longer generally efficacious.

  15. Antibiotics after rattlesnake envenomation.

    PubMed

    LoVecchio, Frank; Klemens, Jane; Welch, Sharon; Rodriguez, Ron

    2002-11-01

    To record the outcome, with regard to infection rate, of patients with rattlesnake bites (RSBs) who do not receive prophylactic antibiotics, a prospective observational study was performed of patients with RSBs treated at our institution during a consecutive 18-month period. The inclusion criteria were RSBs <24 h old and completion of follow-up (telephone call, mail reply, medical toxicologist, or private physician examination) 7-10 days following envenomation. Fifty-six consecutive patients (Median age: 32.8 years [range 4-67 years]) were enrolled. One patient was excluded because of presentation 38 h after envenomation and two patients failed to complete the required follow-up. One patient received a dose of antibiotics before transfer. Antibiotics were discontinued upon arrival. Of the total 56 RSB patients, 34 (61%) RSBs involved the upper extremity and 22 (39%) involved the lower extremity. Six patients (11%) applied ice and two (4%) used a tourniquet before evaluation. The mean arrival time was 2.7 h (Range <1-24 h). Forty-three patients (81%) received antivenin. Fifty-three patients (100%) had extremity swelling and 38 patients (72%) had tender proximal lymph nodes. Of the 53 patients who completed the study, 3 (6%) received antibiotics from their primary care physicians at 7-10 day follow-up, with no cases (0%) of documented infection. Prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated in patients with rattlesnake bites.

  16. Quinolones: from antibiotics to autoinducers

    PubMed Central

    Heeb, Stephan; Fletcher, Matthew P; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Diggle, Stephen P; Williams, Paul; Cámara, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Since quinine was first isolated, animals, plants and microorganisms producing a wide variety of quinolone compounds have been discovered, several of which possess medicinally interesting properties ranging from antiallergenic and anticancer to antimicrobial activities. Over the years, these have served in the development of many synthetic drugs, including the successful fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and related bacteria produce a number of 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones, some of which exhibit antimicrobial activity. However, quinolones such as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline act as quorum-sensing signal molecules, controlling the expression of many virulence genes as a function of cell population density. Here, we review selectively this extensive family of bicyclic compounds, from natural and synthetic antimicrobials to signalling molecules, with a special emphasis on the biology of P. aeruginosa. In particular, we review their nomenclature and biochemistry, their multiple properties as membrane-interacting compounds, inhibitors of the cytochrome bc1 complex and iron chelators, as well as the regulation of their biosynthesis and their integration into the intricate quorum-sensing regulatory networks governing virulence and secondary metabolite gene expression. PMID:20738404

  17. Quinolones: from antibiotics to autoinducers.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Stephan; Fletcher, Matthew P; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Diggle, Stephen P; Williams, Paul; Cámara, Miguel

    2011-03-01

    Since quinine was first isolated, animals, plants and microorganisms producing a wide variety of quinolone compounds have been discovered, several of which possess medicinally interesting properties ranging from antiallergenic and anticancer to antimicrobial activities. Over the years, these have served in the development of many synthetic drugs, including the successful fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and related bacteria produce a number of 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones, some of which exhibit antimicrobial activity. However, quinolones such as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline act as quorum-sensing signal molecules, controlling the expression of many virulence genes as a function of cell population density. Here, we review selectively this extensive family of bicyclic compounds, from natural and synthetic antimicrobials to signalling molecules, with a special emphasis on the biology of P. aeruginosa. In particular, we review their nomenclature and biochemistry, their multiple properties as membrane-interacting compounds, inhibitors of the cytochrome bc(1) complex and iron chelators, as well as the regulation of their biosynthesis and their integration into the intricate quorum-sensing regulatory networks governing virulence and secondary metabolite gene expression.

  18. Bypass surgery in limb salvage: inflow procedures.

    PubMed

    Bismuth, Jean; Duran, Cassidy

    2013-04-01

    Proper management of lower-extremity inflow vessel disease is critical to the success of distal interventions. Aortobifemoral bypass is the most effective means of treating aortoiliac disease, but this invasive procedure is not always ideal for a patient population that often has diffuse vascular disease and multiple comorbidities. Technologic advances and increasing experience have fundamentally altered the management algorithm for lower-extremity vascular lesions, and endovascular options have become the first-line therapy for Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Guidelines (TASC) class A and B lesions. In fact, an endovascular first approach is being endorsed even for highly complex TASC C and even TASC D lesions. Other alternatives include minimally invasive (laparoscopic or robotic) options or extra-anatomic bypass procedures. Inadequate outflow can compromise any inflow procedure, but inflow treatment failures are the crux of all limb salvage in patients with lower-extremity vascular disease.

  19. Coronary artery bypass surgery in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Arun; Samadian, Samad; Clark, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    An increasing number of elderly individuals are now undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. Elderly patients, compared with patients of a younger age group, present for surgery with a greater burden of risk factors and reduced functional levels. Short‐term outcomes are hence poorer in them. But symptom relief occurs in most survivors and is accompanied by excellent rates of long‐term survival and a good quality of life. Therefore, an individualised risk–benefit profile must be carefully constructed by clinicians, taking into account several different factors and not just age alone. This review summarises the current concepts of coronary artery bypass surgery from the perspective of the very old. PMID:17344568

  20. The Golden bypass landslide, Golden, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Highland, L.M.; Brown, W. M.

    1993-01-01

    Slope instability along a new highway bypass in Golden, Colorado, became a major concern in 1993. Rains and snowmelt accelerated movement of a landslide that had begun to develop before the bypass was opened to traffic in July of 1991. The downslope movement of earth materials increased significantly in 1993. During the first few months of the year, the landslide pushed onto the west shoulder of the road and crumpled the pavement beneath the south-bound lane. As we prepare this article (September, 1993), the slide continues to encroach onto the highway, posing a persistent problem despite repeated efforts to slow or stop its movement. As this article will show, permanent solutions to landslide problems of this kind are difficult to obtain. 

  1. Tetracycline Antibiotics and Resistance.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Trudy H

    2016-04-01

    Tetracyclines possess many properties considered ideal for antibiotic drugs, including activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens, proven clinical safety, acceptable tolerability, and the availability of intravenous (IV) and oral formulations for most members of the class. As with all antibiotic classes, the antimicrobial activities of tetracyclines are subject to both class-specific and intrinsic antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Since the discovery of the first tetracyclines more than 60 years ago, ongoing optimization of the core scaffold has produced tetracyclines in clinical use and development that are capable of thwarting many of these resistance mechanisms. New chemistry approaches have enabled the creation of synthetic derivatives with improved in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy, ensuring that the full potential of the class can be explored for use against current and emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  2. Altered coronary microvascular serotonin receptor expression after coronary artery bypass grafting utilizing cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Robich, Michael P.; Araujo, Eugenio G.; Feng, Jun; Osipov, Robert M.; Clements, Richard T.; Bianchi, Cesario; Sellke, Frank W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate the role of serotonin receptors 1B and 2A, thromboxane synthase and receptor and phospholipases A2 and C in response to cardiopulmonary bypass in patients. Methods Atrial tissue was harvested from patients before and after cardiopulmonary bypass with cardioplegia (n=13). Coronary microvessels were assessed for vasoactive response to serotonin with and without inhibitors of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A receceptors, phospholipase A2 and C. Expression of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A mRNA was determined by RT-PCR. Expression of 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, Thromboxane A2 receptor and synthase protein was determined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Results Exposure of microvessels to serotonin elicited a 7.3 ± 2% relaxation response pre-bypass, changing to a strong contraction response of -19.2 ± 2% after bypass (p<0.001). Addition of either a specific 5-HT1B antagonist or inhibitor of PLA2 resulted in a significant decrease in the contractile response to -8.6 ±1% (p<0.001) and 2.8 ± 3% (p= 0.001), respectively. 5-HT1B receptor mRNA expression increased 1.82 ± 0.34 fold after bypass (p=0.044), while 5-HT2A mRNA expression did not change. 5-HT1B receptor, but not 5-HT2A, protein expression increased after bypass by 1.35 ± 0.7 fold (p=0.0413). Neither thromboxane synthase nor thromboxane receptor expression changed after bypass. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated 5-HT1B receptor increased mainly in the arterial smooth muscle. There was no appreciable difference in arterial expression of either thromboxane synthase or receptor. Conclusion These data indicate that 5-HT-induced vascular dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass with cardioplegia may be mediated by increased expression of 5-HT1B receptor and subsequent PLA2 activation in myocardial coronary smooth muscle. Mini Abstract The expression of 5-HT1B receptor protein and mRNA were increased in the atrial myocardium after cardioplegia and cardiopulmonary bypass (CP-CPB). Serotonin elicited a strong contraction

  3. Effects of Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Hemostasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    agents as possible alternatives to heparin anticoagulation during CPB. Some of the agents mat have been found to be promising in these studies...67-76. 22Q. Terrell MR, Walenga JM, Koza MJ, et al. Efficacy of aprotinin with various anticoagulant agents in cardiopulmonary bypass. AnnThorac Surg...procedures, systemic anticoagulation with 3mg/kg of heparin prior to the institution of CPB elicits a modest but significant prolongation of the

  4. Control of Bypass Transition for Textile Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Satoshi; Shimoji, Masayuki; Watanabe, Hideo; Kohama, Yasuaki

    The present research deals with turbulent friction reduction for bypass transition on a flat plate with a textile surface. Unique boundary layers such as those found in swimsuits, sail wings, or skiwear, where certain boundary layer trip structure-like folded edges or masts of a sailboat exist, contain limited turbulence level in the boundary layer even under laminar conditions. A turbulent transition delay in such boundary layers is observed for textile surfaces.

  5. Histoplasma infection of aortofemoral bypass graft.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nishit; Bronze, Michael S

    2014-05-01

    Histoplasma infection of vascular grafts is extremely rare. To our knowledge, there are only 4 cases reported with Histoplasma capsulatum infection of the aortic graft. All had previous disseminated histoplasmosis and atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease. They were treated surgically with explantation of the infected graft and reimplantation of new graft in extra-anatomic uninfected site. The authors present a new case of H capsulatum infection of aortofemoral bypass graft, but unlike the other cases, this case was managed without surgical intervention.

  6. The surgical technique of the Fobi-Pouch operation for obesity (the transected silastic vertical gastric bypass).

    PubMed

    Fobi, M A; Lee, H

    1998-06-01

    The Fobi-Pouch operation (FPO) for obesity is the product of clinical trials, more than 15 years of personal clinical experience and information gathered from publications, scientific meetings, and personal communications with other bariatric surgeons. The essence of the operation is the small vertical pouch (< 25 ml), an externally supported stoma, the interposed Roux-en-Y limb, the gastrostomy and the bypassed stomach marker to facilitate percutaneous transabdominal access to the bypassed segment. Patients undergoing this operation are usually given bowel prep the day before the operation, admitted the morning of the operation and started on subcutaneous heparin, prophylactic antibiotic and hydration. Antithrombotic sequential compression devices are regularly used. The hospital stay is usually 4 days. Our results and those of other surgeons who have used this modification substantiate the rationale for the modifications entailed in the FPO. Our longer-term experience and results are being compiled for publication.

  7. Synthetic biology era: Improving antibiotic's world.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Trampe, Silvia; Ceapa, Corina D; Manzo-Ruiz, Monserrat; Sánchez, Sergio

    2017-01-31

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogen microorganisms is problematic in the context of the current spectrum of available medication. The poor specificity and the high toxicity of some available molecules have made imperative the search for new strategies to improve the specificity and to pursue the discovery of novel compounds with increased bioactivity. Using living cells as platforms, synthetic biology has counteracted this problem by offering novel pathways to create synthetic systems with improved and desired functions. Among many other biotechnological approaches, the advances in synthetic biology have made it possible to design and construct novel biological systems in order to look for new drugs with increased bioactivity. Advancements have also been made in the redesigning of RNA and DNA molecules in order to engineer antibiotic clusters for antibiotic overexpression. As for the production of these antibacterial compounds, yeasts and filamentous fungi as well as gene therapy are utilized to enhance protein solubility. Specific delivery is achieved by creating chimeras using plant genes into bacterial hosts. Some of these synthetic systems are currently in clinical trials, proving the proficiency of synthetic biology in terms of both pharmacological activities as well as an increase in the biosafety of treatments. It is possible that we may just be seeing the tip of the iceberg, and synthetic biology applications will overpass expectations beyond our present knowledge.

  8. Antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ottoline, Ana Carolina Xavier; Tomita, Shiro; Marques, Marise da Penha Costa; Felix, Felippe; Ferraiolo, Priscila Novaes; Laurindo, Roberta Silveira Santos

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim: Antibiotic prophylaxis aims to prevent infection of surgical sites before contamination or infection occurs. Prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis does not enhance the prevention of surgical infection and is associated with higher rates of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. This review of the literature concerning antibiotic prophylaxis, with an emphasis on otolaryngologic surgery, aims to develop a guide for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery in order to reduce the numbers of complications stemming from the indiscriminate use of antibiotics. PMID:25991999

  9. New classes of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Moir, Donald T; Opperman, Timothy J; Butler, Michelle M; Bowlin, Terry L

    2012-10-01

    Several novel chemical classes of antibiotics are currently in human clinical studies. While most are narrow spectrum agents that inhibit unexploited targets, the susceptible pathogens are clinically important, including staphylococci, pseudomonads, and mycobacteria. Given the paucity of antibacterial agents consisting of novel chemical scaffolds that act on established targets, these new antibacterial scaffolds, which are active against new targets, represent an important advance in the battle against antibiotic resistance. Indeed, most of these compounds are unlikely to be subject to existing compound-based or target-based resistance mechanisms.

  10. Antibiotics in Animal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, Amílcar C.

    The administration of antibiotics to animals to prevent or treat diseases led us to be concerned about the impact of these antibiotics on human health. In fact, animal products could be a potential vehicle to transfer drugs to humans. Using appropri ated mathematical and statistical models, one can predict the kinetic profile of drugs and their metabolites and, consequently, develop preventive procedures regarding drug transmission (i.e., determination of appropriate withdrawal periods). Nevertheless, in the present chapter the mathematical and statistical concepts for data interpretation are strictly given to allow understanding of some basic pharma-cokinetic principles and to illustrate the determination of withdrawal periods

  11. Predicting antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José L; Baquero, Fernando; Andersson, Dan I

    2007-12-01

    The treatment of bacterial infections is increasingly complicated because microorganisms can develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. This article discusses the information that is required to predict when antibiotic resistance is likely to emerge in a bacterial population. Indeed, the development of the conceptual and methodological tools required for this type of prediction represents an important goal for microbiological research. To this end, we propose the establishment of methodological guidelines that will allow researchers to predict the emergence of resistance to a new antibiotic before its clinical introduction.

  12. Percutaneous venovenous bypass in orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Washburn, W K; Lewis, W D; Jenkins, R L

    1995-11-01

    Since January 1994, we have used percutaneous placement of both the subclavian and femoral cannulae to establish access for venovenous bypass during orthotopic liver transplantation. Percutaneous subclavian and femoral cannulae were used in 36 patients of which 5 had portal decompression by placement of a cannula in inferior mesenteric vein percutaneously through the abdominal wall. Intraoperative placement of the subclavian cannula is facilitated by placing a subclavian central venous line before the abdominal incision. One patient underwent exploration for femoral vein bleeding early in our experience. Another patient sustained hypotension as a result of a kinked subclavian cannula. In 4 patients, early in this experience, we had difficulty placing the subclavian cannula and resorted to axillary vein cut-down. There were no episodes of deep venous thrombosis detected by routine postoperative duplex ultrasonography. Minimum and maximum flow rates were significantly better (P < .01), with percutaneously placed cannulae in comparison to a control group of patients who underwent transplantation in whom we used the standard venous cut-down approach with a #7 Gott shunt (2.14 and 3.17 L/min v 1.65 and 2.41 L/min, respectively). Percutaneous placement of cannulae for venovenous bypass during liver transplantation is quick, safe, and effective. We would advocate this technique as an alternative approach for patients in whom bypass is deemed necessary.

  13. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems: State of the science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We propose a simple causal model depicting relationships involved in dissemination of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems and potential effects on human health, functioning of natural ecosystems, and agricultural productivity. Available evidence for each causal link is briefly su...

  14. Resistance-Resistant Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    New antibiotics are needed because as drug resistance is increasing, the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. Here, we discuss six possible approaches to develop ‘resistance-resistant’ antibiotics. First, multi-target inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy due to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, re-purposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multi-target therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and in some cases suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored, in otherwise drug resistant organisms. PMID:25458541

  15. Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of resistance among the most important bacterial pathogens is recognized as a major public health threat affecting humans worldwide. Multidrug-resistant organisms have emerged not only in the hospital environment but are now often identified in community settings, suggesting that reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present outside the hospital. The bacterial response to the antibiotic “attack” is the prime example of bacterial adaptation and the pinnacle of evolution. “Survival of the fittest” is a consequence of an immense genetic plasticity of bacterial pathogens that trigger specific responses that result in mutational adaptations, acquisition of genetic material or alteration of gene expression producing resistance to virtually all antibiotics currently available in clinical practice. Therefore, understanding the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance is of paramount importance to design strategies to curtail the emergence and spread of resistance and devise innovative therapeutic approaches against multidrug-resistant organisms. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the major mechanisms of antibiotic resistance encountered in clinical practice providing specific examples in relevant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27227291

  16. Hypopotassemia following open heart surgery by cardio-pulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Abe, T; Nagata, Y; Yoshioka, K; Iyomasa, Y

    1977-01-01

    1. In this study where potassium concentration of perfusate of heart-lung machine was made high and no potassium was given until two hours after by-pass, the fall of plasma potassium level due to heart-lung bypass occurred in two stages, namely one hour of complete bypass and two hours after the end of bypass. 2. Regarding to the decrease of these plasma potassium level, increase of potassium excretion into urine and the movement of potassium from extracellular fluid into cells are presumed to be causes. Their genesis was discussed. 3. To prevent hypopotassemia following bypass, it is recommended to add KCl in the perfusate of heart-lung machine and to give intravenous drip of KCl immediately after bypass.

  17. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  18. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea (ARG)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Basic Information Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Page Surveillance Trends and Treatment Challenges Laboratory Issues Antibiotic resistance (AR) is the ability of bacteria to ...

  19. Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Button Past Emails CDC Features Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Can ... spp. So, what can we do to prevent antibiotic resistance in healthcare settings? Patients, healthcare providers, healthcare ...

  20. Antibiotics, pediatric dysbiosis, and disease.

    PubMed

    Vangay, Pajau; Ward, Tonya; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Knights, Dan

    2015-05-13

    Antibiotics are by far the most common medications prescribed for children. Recent epidemiological data suggests an association between early antibiotic use and disease phenotypes in adulthood. Antibiotic use during infancy induces imbalances in gut microbiota, called dysbiosis. The gut microbiome's responses to antibiotics and its potential link to disease development are especially complex to study in the changing infant gut. Here, we synthesize current knowledge linking antibiotics, dysbiosis, and disease and propose a framework for studying antibiotic-related dysbiosis in children. We recommend future studies into the microbiome-mediated effects of antibiotics focused on four types of dysbiosis: loss of keystone taxa, loss of diversity, shifts in metabolic capacity, and blooms of pathogens. Establishment of a large and diverse baseline cohort to define healthy infant microbiome development is essential to advancing diagnosis, interpretation, and eventual treatment of pediatric dysbiosis. This approach will also help provide evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic usage in infancy.

  1. Antibiotics and Pregnancy: What's Safe?

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Pregnancy week by week Is it safe to take antibiotics during pregnancy? Answers from Roger W. Harms, M. ... 2014 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/expert-answers/antibiotics-and-pregnancy/ ...

  2. A new strategy to fight antimicrobial resistance: the revival of old antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Cassir, Nadim; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Brouqui, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of hospital and community-acquired infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens is limiting the options for effective antibiotic therapy. Moreover, this alarming spread of antimicrobial resistance has not been paralleled by the development of novel antimicrobials. Resistance to the scarce new antibiotics is also emerging. In this context, the rational use of older antibiotics could represent an alternative to the treatment of MDR bacterial pathogens. It would help to optimize the armamentarium of antibiotics in the way to preserve new antibiotics and avoid the prescription of molecules known to favor the spread of resistance (i.e., quinolones). Furthermore, in a global economical perspective, this could represent a useful public health orientation knowing that several of these cheapest “forgotten” antibiotics are not available in many countries. We will review here the successful treatment of MDR bacterial infections with the use of old antibiotics and discuss their place in current practice. PMID:25368610

  3. The MAR1 transporter is an opportunistic entry point for antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Conte, Sarah S; Lloyd, Alan M

    2010-01-01

    The vast quantities of antibiotics used in modern agriculture contaminate the environment and threaten human health. Recent studies have shown that crop plants grown in soil fertilized with manure from antibiotic-treated animals can accumulate antibiotic within the plant body, thus making them an additional antibiotic exposure route for consumers. Until recently, mechanisms of antibiotic entry and subcellular partitioning within plant cells were virtually unknown. We have uncovered and characterized a transporter gene in Arabidopsis thaliana, MAR1, which appears to control antibiotic entry into the chloroplast. Antibiotic resistance via MAR1 is specific to the aminoglycoside class, and is conferred by loss-of-function mutations, which is rather unusual, since most transporter-based antibiotic resistance is conferred by overexpression or gain-of-function mutations in efflux pumps with poor substrate specificity. Since MAR1 overexpression lines exhibit various iron starvation phenotypes, we propose that MAR1 transports an iron chelation molecule that is mimicked specifically by aminoglycoside antibiotics, and this facilitates their entry into the chloroplast. Knowledge about MAR1 enhances our understanding of how antibiotics might enter the plant cell, which may aid in the production of crop plants that are incapable of antibiotic accumulation, as well as further the development of new plant-based antibiotic resistance markers.

  4. Investigating the Antibiotic Resistance Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Michael; Lawson, Amy L.

    1998-01-01

    Seeks to give teachers useful information on the extent of the problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, mechanisms bacteria use to resist antibiotics, the causes of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms, and practices that can prevent or reverse this trend. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  5. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Orbital Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Benjamin; Rajjoub, Lamise; Mansour, Tamer; Chen, Tony; Mumtaz, Aisha

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether prophylactic antibiotic use in patients with orbital fracture prevent orbital infection. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Participants: All patients diagnosed with orbital fracture between January 1, 2008 and March 1, 2014 at The George Washington University Hospital and Clinics. Main Outcome Measures: Development of orbital infection. Results: One hundred seventy-two patients with orbital fracture met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. No orbital infections were documented. Twenty subjects (12%) received no prophylactic antibiotic, and two (1%) received only one dose of antibiotics pre-operatively for surgery. For primary antibiotic, 136 subjects (79%) received oral antibiotics, and 14 (8%) received intravenous (IV) antibiotics (excluding cefazolin). Cephalexin and amoxicillin-clavulanate were the most prescribed oral antibiotics that are equally effective. Five-to-seven day courses of antibiotics had no increased infections compared to ten-to-fourteen day courses. Calculated boundaries for effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotics ranged from a Number Needed to Treat (NNT) of 75 to a Number Needed to Harm (NNH) of 198. Conclusion: Antibiotics for prevention of orbital infection in patients with orbital fractures have become widely used. Coordination between trauma teams and specialists is needed to prevent patient overmedication and antibiotic resistance. Should antibiotics be used, shorter courses and avoidance of broad spectrum agents are recommended. Additional studies are needed.

  6. Structure aided design of chimeric antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Karoli, Tomislav; Mamidyala, Sreeman K; Zuegg, Johannes; Fry, Scott R; Tee, Ernest H L; Bradford, Tanya A; Madala, Praveen K; Huang, Johnny X; Ramu, Soumya; Butler, Mark S; Cooper, Matthew A

    2012-04-01

    The rise of antibiotic resistance is of great clinical concern. One approach to reducing the development of resistance is to co-administer two or more antibiotics with different modes of action. However, it can be difficult to control the distribution and pharmacokinetics of two drugs to ensure both concentrations remain within the range of therapeutic efficacy whilst avoiding adverse effects. Hybrid drugs, where two drugs are linked together with a flexible linker, have been explored, but the resultant large, flexible molecules can have poor bioavailability. We have developed a chimeric approach using click chemistry where the pharmacophores of two drugs are overlapped into a single smaller, more drug-like molecule. Design and selection of compounds were assisted by in silico structural docking. We prepared a series of compounds that include candidates showing activity against the targets of both trimethoprim; dihydrofolate reductase, and ciprofloxacin; DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. The resultant triazole containing molecules show modest, but broad spectrum activities against drug sensitive and resistant Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, with no observable cytotoxicity.

  7. Heat exchanger bypass system for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    A heat exchanger bypass system for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The bypass system operates to pass strong solution from the generator around the heat exchanger to the absorber of the absorption refrigeration system when strong solution builds up in the generator above a selected level indicative of solidification of strong solution in the heat exchanger or other such blockage. The bypass system includes a bypass line with a gooseneck located in the generator for controlling flow of strong solution into the bypass line and for preventing refrigerant vapor in the generator from entering the bypass line during normal operation of the refrigeration system. Also, the bypass line includes a trap section filled with liquid for providing a barrier to maintain the normal pressure difference between the generator and the absorber even when the gooseneck of the bypass line is exposed to refrigerant vapor in the generator. Strong solution, which may accumulate in the trap section of the bypass line, is diluted, to prevent solidification, by supplying weak solution to the trap section from a purge system for the absorption refrigeration system.

  8. Danger of Antibiotic Overuse (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old The Danger of Antibiotic Overuse KidsHealth > For Parents > The Danger of Antibiotic ... by not reaching for the prescription pad. How Antibiotics Work Antibiotics, first used in the 1940s, are ...

  9. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really replace antibiotics remains a controversial issue. This review summarizes recent development and perspectives of alternatives to antibiotics. The mechanism of actions, applications, and prospectives of the alternatives such as immunity modulating agents, bacteriophages and their lysins, antimicrobial peptides, pro-, pre-, and synbiotics, plant extracts, inhibitors targeting pathogenicity (bacterial quorum sensing, biofilm, and virulence), and feeding enzymes are thoroughly discussed. Lastly, the feasibility of alternatives to antibiotics is deeply analyzed. It is hard to conclude that the alternatives might substitute antibiotics in veterinary medicine in the foreseeable future. At the present time, prudent use of antibiotics and the establishment of scientific monitoring systems are the best and fastest way to limit the adverse effects of the abuse of antibiotics and to ensure the safety of animal-derived food and environment. PMID:24860564

  10. Selection of antibiotic resistance at very low antibiotic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sandegren, Linus

    2014-05-01

    Human use of antibiotics has driven the selective enrichment of pathogenic bacteria resistant to clinically used drugs. Traditionally, the selection of resistance has been considered to occur mainly at high, therapeutic levels of antibiotics, but we are now beginning to understand better the importance of selection of resistance at low levels of antibiotics. The concentration of an antibiotic varies in different body compartments during treatment, and low concentrations of antibiotics are found in sewage water, soils, and many water environments due to natural production and contamination from human activities. Selection of resistance at non-lethal antibiotic concentrations (below the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration) occurs due to differences in growth rate at the particular antibiotic concentration between cells with different tolerance levels to the antibiotic. The minimum selective concentration for a particular antibiotic is reached when its reducing effect on growth of the susceptible strain balances the reducing effect (fitness cost) of the resistance determinant in the resistant strain. Recent studies have shown that resistant bacteria can be selected at concentrations several hundred-fold below the lethal concentrations for susceptible cells. Resistant mutants selected at low antibiotic concentrations are generally more fit than those selected at high concentrations but can still be highly resistant. The characteristics of selection at low antibiotic concentrations, the potential clinical problems of this mode of selection, and potential solutions will be discussed.

  11. Supercomputer Simulations Help Develop New Approach to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

    ScienceCinema

    Zgurskaya, Helen; Smith, Jeremy

    2016-11-23

    ORNL leveraged powerful supercomputing to support research led by University of Oklahoma scientists to identify chemicals that seek out and disrupt bacterial proteins called efflux pumps, known to be a major cause of antibiotic resistance. By running simulations on Titan, the team selected molecules most likely to target and potentially disable the assembly of efflux pumps found in E. coli bacteria cells.

  12. Supercomputer Simulations Help Develop New Approach to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Zgurskaya, Helen; Smith, Jeremy

    2016-11-17

    ORNL leveraged powerful supercomputing to support research led by University of Oklahoma scientists to identify chemicals that seek out and disrupt bacterial proteins called efflux pumps, known to be a major cause of antibiotic resistance. By running simulations on Titan, the team selected molecules most likely to target and potentially disable the assembly of efflux pumps found in E. coli bacteria cells.

  13. Embolic Activity During In Vivo Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    DeFoe, Gordon R.; Dame, Norman A.; Farrell, Mark S.; Ross, Cathy S.; Langner, Craig W.; Likosky, Donald S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Neurologic injury after cardiac surgery is principally associated with emboli. Although much work has focused on surgical sources of emboli, less attention has been focused on emboli associated with the heart–lung machine. We tested whether emboli are associated with discrete processes during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). One hundred patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery were enrolled between April 2008 and May 2011 at a single medical center. During each surgical procedure, emboli were counted in three CPB locations: the venous side (Channel 1), before the arterial line filter (Channel 2), and after the arterial line filter (Channel 3). We used prespecified event markers to identify perfusionist interventions. Identical circuits were used on all patients. Of the 100 patients enrolled, 62 underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), 17 underwent isolated valve operations, and 21 underwent CABG plus valve. Median counts across Channels 1, 2, and 3 were 69,853, 3,017, and 1,251, respectively. The greatest contributor to emboli in Channels 1, 2, and 3, respectively, were achieving the calculated CPB flow, opening of the electronic arterial line clamp, and introducing a hemofilter. The circuit technology was efficient in reducing total emboli counts from Channels 1–2 irrespective of the size of the emboli. Nearly 71% of all emboli 30–100 mm in size were removed from the circuit between Channels 2 and 3. No significant association was found between emboli counts and S100B release. Emboli occur frequently during CPB and are predominantly associated with the initiation of bypass, operation of the electronic arterial line clamp, and the initiation of a hemofilter. Continued work to reduce the occurrence of emboli is warranted. PMID:25208432

  14. Preoperative graft assessment in aortocoronary bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tinica, Grigore; Vartic, Cristina Luca; Mocanu, Veronica; Baran, Dana; Butcovan, Doina

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) is a surgical procedure able to improve the blood supply to the myocardium. In the present study, the distal segments of grafts taken from the internal thoracic artery (ITA), radial artery (RA) and saphenous vein (SV) for use in aortocoronary bypass surgery were examined. The morphologies of the grafts were investigated in order to draw conclusions concerning their patency and viability. In addition, clinical and laboratory risk factors considered to be significant predictors of lesion severity in graft vessels used in CABGs were investigated. In total, 54 distal graft segments of ITAs, RAs and SVs from 20 men and 6 women aged between 42 and 78 years, were evaluated. Histological analyses were used to visualize graft lesions. Morphometrically, the intimal thickness index (ITI) and luminal narrowing were assessed as an indication of graft patency. The histological changes observed in the graft vessel walls included the presence of distinct atheromatous plaques (fatty streaks in 2 cases) or thickening of the intima (20 cases) and media (17 cases). Morphometric analysis showed that the mean ITI of the vessel conduits was 0.37 in the SVs, 0.95 in the RAs, and 1.66 in the ITAs. No patient had >50% conduit stenosis. By assessing the association between risk factors and graft lesions, it was found that all the patients showed risk factors for atherosclerosis, such as age (61.54%), arterial hypertension (65.38%), hyperlipidemia (65.38%), smoking (34.61%), diabetes mellitus (38.46%) and obesity (15.38%). The presence of pre-existing lesions in bypass grafts may contribute to a reduction in their viability, particularly in the case of venous grafts. Further long-term follow-ups are mandatory to evaluate the consequences of such lesions upon the patency of the grafts. PMID:27446279

  15. [Repeat bypass surgery for intracranial hemorrhage 30 years after indirect bypass for moyamoya disease].

    PubMed

    Hori, Satoshi; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Akioka, Naoki; Hamada, Hideo; Kuwayama, Naoya; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2014-04-01

    A 39-year-old man had been diagnosed with moyamoya disease and underwent a bilateral encephalo-duro-arterio-synangiosis(EDAS)intervention at the age of 9 years. During the 30 years after his bilateral EDAS, he experienced no cerebrovascular events. However, at age 39, he suddenly presented with mild consciousness disturbance and vomiting and was transferred to a local hospital. Brain CT showed an intracerebral hemorrhage associated with ventricular hematoma. He was referred to our hospital for further investigation and treatment. Cerebral angiography showed faint collaterals through the site of the bilateral EDAS and development of basal moyamoya vessels. SPECT showed decreased cerebral blood flow(CBF)and cerebrovascular reactivity(CVR)in the right frontal lobe. We diagnosed him with delayed cerebral hemorrhage due to delayed rupturing of fragile moyamoya vessels after indirect bypass. The patient underwent a repeat bypass surgery(STA-MCA anastomosis and encephalo-duro-myo-arterio-pericranial synangiosis;EDMAPS)on the right side. He showed improvement in cerebral hemodynamics after surgery, and has since remained free from cerebrovascular events. Hemorrhagic events occurring a very long time after indirect bypass surgery in pediatric-onset moyamoya disease are rare. In such cases, a lifelong follow-up strategy may be necessary. Repeat bypass surgery may be a powerful tool to prevent such hemorrhagic events.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jessica M A; Webber, Mark A; Baylay, Alison J; Ogbolu, David O; Piddock, Laura J V

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria that are difficult or impossible to treat are becoming increasingly common and are causing a global health crisis. Antibiotic resistance is encoded by several genes, many of which can transfer between bacteria. New resistance mechanisms are constantly being described, and new genes and vectors of transmission are identified on a regular basis. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which bacteria are either intrinsically resistant or acquire resistance to antibiotics, including the prevention of access to drug targets, changes in the structure and protection of antibiotic targets and the direct modification or inactivation of antibiotics.

  17. Conduits for Coronary Bypass: Vein Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Emily A

    2012-01-01

    The saphenous vein has been the principal conduit for coronary bypass grafting from the beginning, circa 1970. This report briefly traces this history and concomitantly presents one surgeons experience and personal views on use of the vein graft. As such it is not exhaustive but meant to be practical with a modest number of references. The focus is that of providing guidance and perspective which may be at variance with that of others and recognizing that there may be many ways to accomplish the task at hand. Hopefully the surgeon in training/early career may find this instructive on the journey to surgical maturity. PMID:23130300

  18. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Rim, Seung Bum; Kim, Taeseok; Smith, David D; Cousins, Peter J

    2013-11-12

    Methods of fabricating bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In once embodiment, a method includes forming a first conductive region of a first conductivity type above a substrate of a solar cell. A second conductive region of a second conductivity type is formed on the first conductive region. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a first conductive region of a first conductivity type above a substrate of a solar cell. A second conductive region of a second conductivity type is formed within, and surrounded by, an uppermost portion of the first conductive region but is not formed in a lowermost portion of the first conductive region.

  19. Flow characteristics in narrowed coronary bypass graft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, S. I.; Bosioc, A.; Bernad, E. S.; Petre, I.; Totorean, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    Tortuous saphenous vein graft (SVG) hemodynamics was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. Computed tomography (CT) technology is used for non-invasive bypass graft assessment 7 days after surgery. CT investigation shown two regions with severe shape remodelling first is an elbow type contortion and second is a severe curvature with tortuous area reduction. In conclusion, the helical flow induced by vessel torsion may stabilize the blood flow in the distal part of the SVG, reducing the flow disturbance and suppressing the flow separation, but in the distal end of the graft, promote the inflammatory processes in the vessels.

  20. Bacterial gasotransmitters: an innate defense against antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Luhachack, Lyly; Nudler, Evgeny

    2014-10-01

    In recent decades, there has been growing interest in the field of gasotransmitters, endogenous gaseous signaling molecules (NO, H2S, and CO), as regulators of a multitude of biochemical pathways and physiological processes. Most of the concerted effort has been on eukaryotic gasotransmitters until the subsequent discovery of bacterial counterparts. While the fundamental aspects of bacterial gasotransmitters remain undefined and necessitate further research, we will discuss a known specific role they play in defense against antibiotics. Considering the current dilemma of multidrug-resistant bacteria we consider it particularly prudent to exploring novel targets and approaches, of which the bacterial gasotransmitters, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide represent.

  1. Reviving old antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Theuretzbacher, Ursula; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Cantón, Rafael; Giske, Christian G; Mouton, Johan W; Nation, Roger L; Paul, Mical; Turnidge, John D; Kahlmeter, Gunnar

    2015-08-01

    In the face of increasing antimicrobial resistance and the paucity of new antimicrobial agents it has become clear that new antimicrobial strategies are urgently needed. One of these is to revisit old antibiotics to ensure that they are used correctly and to their full potential, as well as to determine whether one or several of them can help alleviate the pressure on more recent agents. Strategies are urgently needed to 're-develop' these drugs using modern standards, integrating new knowledge into regulatory frameworks and communicating the knowledge from the research bench to the bedside. Without a systematic approach to re-developing these old drugs and rigorously testing them according to today's standards, there is a significant risk of doing harm to patients and further increasing multidrug resistance. This paper describes factors to be considered and outlines steps and actions needed to re-develop old antibiotics so that they can be used effectively for the treatment of infections.

  2. Antibiotics in microbial coculture.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kenji; Beppu, Teruhiko

    2017-04-01

    Today, the frequency of discovery of new antibiotics in microbial culture is significantly decreasing. The evidence from whole-genome surveys suggests that many genes involved in the synthesis of unknown metabolites do exist but are not expressed under conventional cultivation conditions. Therefore, it is urgently necessary to study the conditions that make otherwise silent genes active in microbes. Here we overview the knowledge on the antibiotic production promoted by cocultivation of multiple microbial strains. Accumulating evidence indicates that cocultivation can be an effective way to stimulate the production of substances that are not formed during pure cultivation. Characterization of the promotive factors produced by stimulator strains is expected to give clues to the development of effective cultivation conditions for drug discovery.

  3. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    DeRossi, Scott S; Hersh, Elliot V

    2002-10-01

    With the exception of rifampin-like drugs, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the ability of commonly prescribed antibiotics, including all those routinely employed in outpatient dentistry, to either reduce blood levels and/or the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. To date, all clinical trials studying the effects of concomitant antibiotic therapy (with the exception of rifampin and rifabutin) have failed to demonstrate an interaction. Like all drugs, oral contraceptives are not 100% effective with the failure rate in the typical United States population reported to be as high as 3%. It is thus possible that the case reports of unintended pregnancies during antibiotic therapy may simply represent the normal failure rate of these drugs. Considering that both drug classes are prescribed frequently to women of childbearing potential, one would expect a much higher rate of oral contraceptive failure in this group of patients if a true drug:drug interaction existed. On the other hand, if the interaction does exist but is a relatively rare event, occurring in, say, 1 in 5000 women, clinical studies such as those described in this article would not detect the interaction. The pharmacokinetic studies of simultaneous antibiotic and oral contraceptive ingestion, and the retrospective studies of pregnancy rates among oral contraceptive users exposed to antibiotics, all suffer from one potential common weakness, i.e., their relatively small sample size. Sample sizes in the pharmacokinetic trials ranged from 7 to 24 participants, whereas the largest retrospective study of pregnancy rates still evaluated less than 800 total contraceptive users. Still, the incidence of such a rare interaction would not differ from the accepted normal failure rate of oral contraceptive therapy. The medico-legal ramifications of what looks like at best a rare interaction remains somewhat "murky." On one hand, we have medico-legal experts advising the profession to exercise caution

  4. [Resistance to antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jesús Silva

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major public health problem around the world causing high rates of morbi-mortality and economic problems in hospital settings. Major bacterial causing nosocomial infections are: extended-spectrum beta-lactameses (ESBL) producing enterobacteria, methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, metallo fl-lactamases (MBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus spp, Acinetobacter baumani. This last bacteria is not very often isolated in hospital settings yet, but it is multi-resistance pathogen causing high mortality. Helicobacter pylori, which is not a nosocomial pathogen but is associated to gastric diseases (from gastritis to gastric cancer). Infections prevention, to obtain an accuracy diagnostic and effective treatment, use antibiotic wisely and pathogen dissemination prevention (hand washing), are important steps to control the bacterial resistance.

  5. Pneumococcal resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Klugman, K P

    1990-01-01

    The geographic distribution of pneumococci resistant to one or more of the antibiotics penicillin, erythromycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline appears to be expanding, and there exist foci of resistance to chloramphenicol and rifampin. Multiply resistant pneumococci are being encountered more commonly and are more often community acquired. Factors associated with infection caused by resistant pneumococci include young age, duration of hospitalization, infection with a pneumococcus of serogroup 6, 19, or 23 or serotype 14, and exposure to antibiotics to which the strain is resistant. At present, the most useful drugs for the management of resistant pneumococcal infections are cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, and rifampin. If the strains are susceptible, chloramphenicol may be useful as an alternative, less expensive agent. Appropriate interventions for the control of resistant pneumococcal outbreaks include investigation of the prevalence of resistant strains, isolation of patients, possible treatment of carriers, and reduction of usage of antibiotics to which the strain is resistant. The molecular mechanisms of penicillin resistance are related to the structure and function of penicillin-binding proteins, and the mechanisms of resistance to other agents involved in multiple resistance are being elucidated. Recognition is increasing of the standard screening procedure for penicillin resistance, using a 1-microgram oxacillin disk. PMID:2187594

  6. Biosynthetic Genes for the Tetrodecamycin Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Gverzdys, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently described 13-deoxytetrodecamycin, a new member of the tetrodecamycin family of antibiotics. A defining feature of these molecules is the presence of a five-membered lactone called a tetronate ring. By sequencing the genome of a producer strain, Streptomyces sp. strain WAC04657, and searching for a gene previously implicated in tetronate ring formation, we identified the biosynthetic genes responsible for producing 13-deoxytetrodecamycin (the ted genes). Using the ted cluster in WAC04657 as a reference, we found related clusters in three other organisms: Streptomyces atroolivaceus ATCC 19725, Streptomyces globisporus NRRL B-2293, and Streptomyces sp. strain LaPpAH-202. Comparing the four clusters allowed us to identify the cluster boundaries. Genetic manipulation of the cluster confirmed the involvement of the ted genes in 13-deoxytetrodecamycin biosynthesis and revealed several additional molecules produced through the ted biosynthetic pathway, including tetrodecamycin, dihydrotetrodecamycin, and another, W5.9, a novel molecule. Comparison of the bioactivities of these four molecules suggests that they may act through the covalent modification of their target(s). IMPORTANCE The tetrodecamycins are a distinct subgroup of the tetronate family of secondary metabolites. Little is known about their biosynthesis or mechanisms of action, making them an attractive subject for investigation. In this paper we present the biosynthetic gene cluster for 13-deoxytetrodecamycin in Streptomyces sp. strain WAC04657. We identify related clusters in several other organisms and show that they produce related molecules. PMID:27137499

  7. Clinical evolution of mediastinitis in patients undergoing adjuvant hyperbaric oxygen therapy after coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    do Egito, Julyana Galvão Tabosa; Abboud, Cely Saad; de Oliveira, Aline Pâmela Vieira; Máximo, Carlos Alberto Gonçalves; Montenegro, Carolina Moreira; Amato, Vivian Lerner; Bammann, Roberto; Farsky, Pedro Silvio

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy as an adjunctive treatment in mediastinitis after coronary artery bypass surgery. Methods: This is a retrospective descriptive study, performed between October 2010 and February 2012. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was indicated in difficult clinical management cases despite antibiotic therapy. Results: We identified 18 patients with mediastinitis during the study period. Thirty three microorganisms were isolated, and polymicrobial infection was present in 11 cases. Enterobacteriaceae were the most prevalent pathogens and six were multi-resistant agents. There was only 1 hospital death, 7 months after the oxygen therapy caused by sepsis, unrelated to hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This treatment was well-tolerated. Conclusion: The initial data showed favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:24136762

  8. Multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria and their role in antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jessica M A; Richmond, Grace E; Piddock, Laura J V

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria express a plethora of efflux pumps that are capable of transporting structurally varied molecules, including antibiotics, out of the bacterial cell. This efflux lowers the intracellular antibiotic concentration, allowing bacteria to survive at higher antibiotic concentrations. Overexpression of some efflux pumps can cause clinically relevant levels of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative pathogens. This review discusses the role of efflux in resistance of clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacteria, the regulatory mechanisms that control efflux pump expression, the recent advances in our understanding of efflux pump structure and how inhibition of efflux is a promising future strategy for tackling multidrug resistance in Gram-negative pathogens.

  9. Conduit options in coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Canver, C C

    1995-10-01

    The choice of graft conduit is crucial to the success of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) because the patency of a coronary conduit is closely associated with an uneventful postoperative course and a better long-term patient survival. The standard conduits used for CABG are the greater saphenous vein (GSV) and the internal thoracic artery (ITA). An excellent substitute conduit for coronary bypass operations that can be taken "off the shelf" is certainly the dream of every practicing cardiac surgeon. However, virtually every synthetic and biologic alternative to arterial conduits or autologous fresh saphenous vein has proved disappointing. Fortunately, patients with absolutely no autologous conduit alternatives are uncommon. Circumstances exist, however, that often necessitate the use of alternative conduits such as young hyperlipemic patients, absent or unsuitable autologous ITAs and GSV as a result of previous myocardial revascularization, peripheral arterial reconstruction, and varicose vein ligation procedures. This review provides an update on the clinical work done with all coronary conduits available for myocardial surgical revascularization.

  10. Jet noise from ultrahigh bypass turbofan engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posey, Joe W.; Norum, Thomas D.; Brown, Martha C.; Bhat, Thonse R. S.

    2002-05-01

    Modern commercial jet transport aircraft are powered by turbofan engines. Thrust from a turbofan engine is derived in part from the exhaust of a ducted fan, which may or may not be mixed with the core exhaust before exiting the nacelle. The historical trend has been toward ever higher bypass ratios (BPRs). The BPR is the ratio of air mass passing through the fan to that going through the core. The higher BPR engines can be more efficient and quieter. In general, a higher BPR results in lower average exhaust velocities and less jet noise. In order to address a scarcity of noise data for BPRs greater than 6, an extensive database collection effort was undertaken using the Jet Engine Simulator in NASA Langley's Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel. Forward flight simulations of Mach 0.1, 0.2, and 0.28 were used with BPRs of 5, 8, 11, and 14. Data was taken over the entire operating line of the simulated engines along with parametric deviations to provide a complete set of sensitivity measurements. The results will be used to develop an empirical jet noise prediction capability for ultrahigh bypass engines.

  11. Previous gastric bypass surgery complicating total thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Bianca; Jacobson, Adam S; Alon, Eran E; Via, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Hypocalcemia is a well-known complication of total thyroidectomy. Patients who have previously undergone gastric bypass surgery may be at increased risk of hypocalcemia due to gastrointestinal malabsorption, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and an underlying vitamin D deficiency. We present the case of a 58-year-old woman who underwent a total thyroidectomy for the follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Her history included Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Following the thyroid surgery, she developed postoperative hypocalcemia that required large doses of oral calcium carbonate (7.5 g/day), oral calcitriol (up to 4 μg/day), intravenous calcium gluconate (2.0 g/day), calcium citrate (2.0 g/day), and ergocalciferol (50,000 IU/day). Her serum calcium levels remained normal on this regimen after hospital discharge despite persistent hypoparathyroidism. Bariatric surgery patients who undergo thyroid surgery require aggressive supplementation to maintain normal serum calcium levels. Preoperative supplementation with calcium and vitamin D is strongly recommended.

  12. At 1050 Gallery, Block 65, view of coaster gate bypass ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    At 1050 Gallery, Block 65, view of coaster gate bypass valve (for turbine-generator unit G-10, this bypass-valve unit manufactured by Western Koppers Co., Fort Wayne, Ind., 1938), looking southeast. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  13. Bearing-Bypass Loading On Bolted Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, John H.; Naik, Rajiv-Vikas A.

    1989-01-01

    Unexpected interaction between effects of bypass and bearing loads reported. Combined experimental and analytical study described in NASA technical memorandum conducted to investigate effects of simultaneous bearing and bypass loading on graphite/epoxy laminate. Results important in emerging technology of composites for use in wide range of applications. Includes applications in aircraft, boats, and automobiles, in which bolted connections to composites increasingly important.

  14. 20 CFR 631.38 - State by-pass authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false State by-pass authority. 631.38 Section 631.38 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE III OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT State Administration § 631.38 State by-pass authority....

  15. The in situ saphenous vein bypass graft: radiologic aspects.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, W; Nozick, J; Richmand, D; Rodgers, B; Simpson, A; Argila, C; Honickman, S

    1986-03-01

    The use of the in situ saphenous vein for bypassing arterial occlusions in the lower extremities appears to have a higher patency rate than other bypass procedures but presents unique technical problems, such as lysing valves and occluding venous tributaries. Forty-four patients undergoing in situ bypasses had preoperative arteriograms. Special attention was paid to the small runoff vessels around the ankle, which are not suitable for reversed bypass procedures but may be adequate for in situ bypasses. Eight patients also had preoperative saphenous venograms, which revealed surgically important abnormalities in six cases. Postoperative arteriograms obtained within 2 weeks in 10 patients and within 2-12 months in 15 patients revealed persistent arteriovenous fistulas in four patients, stenoses in nine, occlusions in five, and progressive disease in the nonbypassed arteries in five patients. Early recognition of these problems led to 11 surgical repairs; nine repairs used the interventional radiologic procedures of balloon angioplasty, transcatheter embolization, and catheter thrombolysis. In this group of 44 patients, five patients died with patent bypasses and three patients required amputation despite functioning bypasses. Only four amputations were attributed to bypass failure. This low figure may be due to the close cooperation of the vascular surgeons and the vascular radiologists in dealing with these complicated cases.

  16. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... from the chest or heart during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  20. Reverse bias protected solar array with integrated bypass battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for protecting the photovoltaic cells in a photovoltaic (PV) array from reverse bias damage by utilizing a rechargeable battery for bypassing current from a shaded photovoltaic cell or group of cells, avoiding the need for a bypass diode. Further, the method mitigates the voltage degradation of a PV array caused by shaded cells.

  1. 46 CFR 154.550 - Excess flow valve: Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Bypass. 154.550 Section 154.550 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... and Process Piping Systems § 154.550 Excess flow valve: Bypass. If the excess flow valve allowed...

  2. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions.

    PubMed

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This omission creates a skewed view, which emphasizes short-term efficacy and ignores the long-term consequences to the patient and other people. We offer a framework for addressing antibiotic resistance in systematic reviews. We suggest that the data on background resistance in the original trials should be reported and taken into account when interpreting results. Data on emergence of resistance (whether in the body reservoirs or in the bacteria causing infection) are important outcomes. Emergence of resistance should be taken into account when interpreting the evidence on antibiotic treatment in randomized controlled trials or systematic reviews.

  3. Putrescine reduces antibiotic-induced oxidative stress as a mechanism of modulation of antibiotic resistance in Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    PubMed

    El-Halfawy, Omar M; Valvano, Miguel A

    2014-07-01

    Communication of antibiotic resistance among bacteria via small molecules is implicated in transient reduction of bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics, which could lead to therapeutic failures aggravating the problem of antibiotic resistance. Released putrescine from the extremely antibiotic-resistant bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia protects less-resistant cells from different species against the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B (PmB). Exposure of B. cenocepacia to sublethal concentrations of PmB and other bactericidal antibiotics induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and expression of the oxidative stress response regulator OxyR. We evaluated whether putrescine alleviates antibiotic-induced oxidative stress. The accumulation of intracellular ROS, such as superoxide ion and hydrogen peroxide, was assessed fluorometrically with dichlorofluorescein diacetate, while the expression of OxyR and putrescine synthesis enzymes was determined in luciferase assays using chromosomal promoter-lux reporter system fusions. We evaluated wild-type and isogenic deletion mutant strains with defects in putrescine biosynthesis after exposure to sublethal concentrations of PmB and other bactericidal antibiotics. Exogenous putrescine protected against oxidative stress induced by PmB and other antibiotics, whereas reduced putrescine synthesis resulted in increased ROS generation and a parallel increased sensitivity to PmB. Of the 3 B. cenocepacia putrescine-synthesizing enzymes, PmB induced only BCAL2641, an ornithine decarboxylase. This study reveals BCAL2641 as a critical component of the putrescine-mediated communication of antibiotic resistance and as a plausible target for designing inhibitors that would block the communication of such resistance among different bacteria, ultimately reducing the window of therapeutic failure in treating bacterial infections.

  4. Cardiopulmonary bypass: development of John Gibbon's heart-lung machine

    PubMed Central

    Passaroni, Andréia Cristina; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide a brief review of the development of cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods A review of the literature on the development of extracorporeal circulation techniques, their essential role in cardiovascular surgery, and the complications associated with their use, including hemolysis and inflammation. Results The advancement of extracorporeal circulation techniques has played an essential role in minimizing the complications of cardiopulmonary bypass, which can range from various degrees of tissue injury to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Investigators have long researched the ways in which cardiopulmonary bypass may insult the human body. Potential solutions arose and laid the groundwork for development of safer postoperative care strategies. Conclusion Steady progress has been made in cardiopulmonary bypass in the decades since it was first conceived of by Gibbon. Despite the constant evolution of cardiopulmonary bypass techniques and attempts to minimize their complications, it is still essential that clinicians respect the particularities of each patient's physiological function. PMID:26107456

  5. 75 FR 71145 - San Joaquin River Restoration Program: Reach 4B, Eastside Bypass, and Mariposa Bypass Channel and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... bypasses and maintain the current flood operations and conveyance capacity of the system. Additionally, the Proposed Action may result in an opportunity for improvements to the existing flood system. These..., and the Mariposa Bypass. The planning and environmental review for the Proposed Action is...

  6. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and thiamine deficiency after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Lakhani, Shilen V; Shah, Hiral N; Alexander, Kenneth; Finelli, Frederick C; Kirkpatrick, John R; Koch, Timothy R

    2008-05-01

    It has been proposed that thiamine deficiency after gastric bypass surgery in obese patients results from prolonged nausea and emesis. We hypothesized that thiamine deficiency is induced by altered gut ecology. This report includes 2 retrospective studies of obese patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery at our institution from 1999 to 2005. In the first study, 80 patients (52 women and 28 men) had measurement of whole-blood thiamine diphosphate level and serum folate level. In these 80 patients, 39 (49%) had thiamine diphosphate levels less than the lower limit of the reference range, and 28 (72%) of the 39 had folate levels higher than the upper limit of the reference range, an indicator of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. In 41 patients with normal thiamine levels, only 14 (34%) had folate levels higher than the upper limit of the reference range (chi(2) test, P < .01). In the second study, 21 patients (17 women and 4 men) had thiamine diphosphate levels less than the lower limit of the reference range and abnormal glucose-hydrogen breath tests, consistent with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Fifteen patients received oral thiamine supplements, but repeated thiamine levels remained low in all 15. Nine of these patients then received oral antibiotic therapy; repeated thiamine levels were found to be normal in all 9 patients. These results support the hypothesis that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth results from altered gut ecology and induces thiamine deficiency after gastric bypass surgery in obese patients.

  7. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Korp, Juliane; Vela Gurovic, María S

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism. PMID:27340451

  8. [Enteropathogens and antibiotics].

    PubMed

    González-Torralba, Ana; García-Esteban, Coral; Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2015-08-12

    Infectious gastroenteritis remains a public health problem. The most severe cases are of bacterial origin. In Spain, Campylobacter and Salmonella are the most prevalent bacterial genus, while Yersinia and Shigella are much less frequent. Most cases are usually self-limiting and antibiotic therapy is not generally indicated, unless patients have risk factors for severe infection and shigellosis. Ciprofloxacin, third generation cephalosporins, azithromycin, ampicillin, cotrimoxazole and doxycycline are the most recommended drugs. The susceptibility pattern of the different bacteria determines the choice of the most appropriate treatment. The aim of this review is to analyse the current situation, developments, and evolution of resistance and multidrug resistance in these 4 enteric pathogens.

  9. Endless Resistance. Endless Antibiotics?

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jed F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2016-01-01

    The practice of medicine was profoundly transformed by the introduction of the antibiotics (compounds isolated from Nature) and the antibacterials (compounds prepared by synthesis) for the control of bacterial infection. As a result of the extraordinary success of these compounds over decades of time, a timeless biological activity for these compounds has been presumed. This presumption is no longer. The inexorable acquisition of resistance mechanisms by bacteria is retransforming medical practice. Credible answers to this dilemma are far better recognized than they are being implemented. In this perspective we examine (and in key respects, reiterate) the chemical and biological strategies being used to address the challenge of bacterial resistance. PMID:27746889

  10. Antibiotics as intermicrobial signaling agents instead of weapons

    PubMed Central

    Linares, J. F.; Gustafsson, I.; Baquero, F.; Martinez, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    It has been widely assumed that the ecological function of antibiotics in nature is fighting against competitors. This made them a good example of the Darwinian struggle-for-life in the microbial world. Based on this idea, it also has been believed that antibiotics, even at subinhibitory concentrations, reduce virulence of bacterial pathogens. Herein, using a combination of genomic and functional assays, we demonstrate that specific antibiotics (namely tobramycin, tetracycline, and norfloxacin) at subinhibitory concentrations trigger expression of determinants influencing the virulence of the major opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All three antibiotics induce biofilm formation; tobramycin increases bacterial motility, and tetracycline triggers expression of P. aeruginosa type III secretion system and consequently bacterial cytotoxicity. Besides their relevance in the infection process, those determinants are relevant for the ecological behavior of this bacterial species in natural, nonclinical environments, either by favoring colonization of surfaces (biofilm, motility) or for fighting against eukaryotic predators (cytotoxicity). Our results support the notion that antibiotics are not only bacterial weapons for fighting competitors but also signaling molecules that may regulate the homeostasis of microbial communities. At low concentrations, they can even be beneficial for the behavior of susceptible bacteria in natural environments. This is a complete change on our vision on the ecological function of antibiotics with clear implications both for the treatment of infectious diseases and for the understanding of the microbial relationships in the biosphere. PMID:17148599

  11. Mind Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Solomon H.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific styles vary tremendously. For me, research is largely about the unfettered pursuit of novel ideas and experiments that can test multiple ideas in a day, not a year, an approach that I learned from my mentor Julius “Julie” Axelrod. This focus on creative conceptualizations has been my métier since working in the summers during medical school at the National Institutes of Health, during my two years in the Axelrod laboratory, and throughout my forty-five years at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Equally important has been the “high” that emerges from brainstorming with my students. Nothing can compare with the eureka moments when, together, we sense new insights and, better yet, when high-risk, high-payoff experiments succeed. Although I have studied many different questions over the years, a common theme emerges: simple biochemical approaches to understanding molecular messengers, usually small molecules. Equally important has been identifying, purifying, and cloning the messengers' relevant biosynthetic, degradative, or target proteins, at all times seeking potential therapeutic relevance in the form of drugs. In the interests of brevity, this Reflections article is highly selective, and, with a few exceptions, literature citations are only of findings of our laboratory that illustrate notable themes. PMID:21543333

  12. Comparison of inflammatory response following coronary revascularization with or without cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Gasz, Balázs; Benkö, László; Jancsó, Gábor; Lantos, János; Szántó, Zalán; Alotti, Nasri; Röth, Erzsébet

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well known that conventional coronary revascularization is associated with a pronounced systemic inflammatory response due to the application of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with (on-pump) or without (off-pump) extra-corporeal circulation observing certain inflammatory response parameters. METHODS: Twenty patients undergoing CABG with (CPB group: 10 patients) or without (off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting [OPCAB] group: 10 patients) CPB were enrolled in this prospective, randomized study. Blood samples were collected three times during the operation and on postoperative days 1, 2, 3 and 7. The plasma level of proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method following stimulation, and the expression of adhesion molecules (CD11, CD18) of leukocytes were determined by flow cytometry. Furthermore, white blood cell (WBC) and neutrophil count were carried out. RESULTS: The WBC and neutrophil counts rose markedly in both groups following the operation and remained at this increased level during the observation period. There was a significant difference in WBC and neutrophil counts between the two groups of patients on postoperative day 7. A significant difference in the level of TNF-alpha was found between the two groups on postoperative day 2 (P<0.05). An intense increase was observed with CPB, which significantly exceeded the values of the OPCAB group without extracorporeal circulation in the early postoperative period. The CD11a and CD18 expression of leukocytes decreased during the operation and on postoperative day 1; thereafter, it increased markedly. There was a significant difference in adhesion molecule expression between the two groups on postoperative day 2. CONCLUSION: The investigation revealed that inflammatory response reactions following extracorporeal circulation could be reduced

  13. [Antibiotics: drug and food interactions].

    PubMed

    Hodel, M; Genné, D

    2009-10-07

    Antibiotics are widely prescribed in medical practice. Many of them induce or are subject to interactions that may diminish their anti-infectious efficiency or elicit toxic effects. Food intake can influence the effectiveness of an antibiotic. Certain antibiotics can lower the effectiveness of oral contraception. Oral anticoagulation can be influenced to a great extent by antibiotics and controls are necessary. Interactions are also possible via enzymatic induction or inhibition of cytochromes. The use of an interaction list with substrates of cytochromes enables to anticipate. Every new prescription should consider a possible drug or food interaction.

  14. [Nutritional follow-up after gastric bypass].

    PubMed

    Gasteyger, C; Giusti, V

    2006-03-29

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass has become one of the main bariatric procedures. This surgical operation shows excellent results in weight evolution and quality of life and allows a decrease of mortality. However, it leads, relatively often, to nutritional deficiencies which need an effective post-operative follow-up. This follow-up includes not only medical and dietetic encounters but also regular blood analyses made every 3 months during the first post-operative year, every 6 months the second year, then each year. The most frequent deficiencies are those in vitamin B12, iron and folic acid. The secondary hyperparathyroidism characterized by an increase of PTH associated to a low vitamin D and a normal calcium, is quite frequent.

  15. Outcomes of coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Anna Louise; Nowak, Madeleine; Bidstrup, Benjamin; Speare, Richard

    2006-01-01

    This review article summarizes the major studies that have investigated the outcomes of coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). The article includes a review of the literature in the areas of: history of CABG; indications for CABG; and measurement of quality of life following CABG, including prolongation of life, physical functioning (ie, relief from angina and dyspnea, physical activity, as well as complications of surgery and re-hospitalization), psychological functioning, and social functioning. Overall, the literature demonstrates that the outcomes of CABG have historically been measured in terms of mortality and morbidity; however, it has now been well recognized that adjustment to CABG is a multidimensional phenomenon that is not fully explained by medical factors. Therefore, in addition to studying mortality and morbidity outcomes following CABG, many recent studies have identified that it is important to investigate various physical, psychological, and social variables that have a significant impact on post-operative adjustment to CABG. PMID:17323602

  16. Transient Diabetes Insipidus Following Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Ekim, Meral; Ekim, Hasan; Yilmaz, Yunus Keser; Bolat, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) results from inadequate output of Antidiuretic Hormone (ADH) from the pituitary gland (central DI) or the inability of the kidney tubules to respond to ADH (nephrogenic DI). ADH is an octapeptide produced in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus and stored in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland. Cardiopulmonary Bypass (CPB) has been shown to cause a six-fold increased circulating ADH levels 12 hours after surgery. However, in some cases, ADH release may be transiently suppressed due to cardioplegia (cardiac standstill) or CPB leading to DI. We present the postoperative course of a 60-year-old man who developed transient DI after CPB. He was successfully treated by applying nasal desmopressin therapy. Relevant biochemical parameters should be monitored closely in patients who produce excessive urine after open heart surgery.

  17. Comparison of neutrophil:lymphocyte ratios following coronary artery bypass surgery with or without cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Aldemir, Mustafa; Adalı, Fahri; Çarşanba, Görkem; Tecer, Evren; Bakı, Elif Doğan; Taş, Hanife Uzel

    2015-01-01

    Objective Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery may induce postoperative systemic changes in leukocyte counts, including leukocytosis, neutrophilia or lymphopenia. This retrospective clinical study investigated whether offpump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery working on the beating heart without extracorporeal circulation could favourably affect leukocyte counts, including neutrophil-tolymphocyte (N:L) ratio, after CABG. Methods In this study, 30 patients who underwent isolated CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and another 30 patients who underwent the same operation without CPB between May 2010 and May 2013, were screened from the computerised database of our hospital. Pre-operative, and first and fifth postoperative day differential counts of leukocytes with the N:L ratio of peripheral blood were obtained. Results A significant increase in total leukocyte and neutrophil counts and N:L ratio, and a decrease in lymphocyte counts were observed at all time points after surgery in both groups. N:L ratio was significantly higher in the CPB group compared with the OPCAB group on the first postoperative day (20.73 ± 13.85 vs 10.19 ± 4.55, p < 0.001), but this difference disappeared on the fifth postoperative day. Conclusion CPB results in transient but significant changes in leukocyte counts in the peripheral blood stream in terms of N:L ratio compared with the off-pump technique of CABG. PMID:25903477

  18. Miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass: the Hammersmith technique

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Conventional Cardiopulmonary Bypass (cCPB) is a trigger of systemic inflammatory reactions, hemodilution, coagulopathy, and organ failure. Miniaturised Cardiopulmonary Bypass (mCPB) has the potential to reduce these deleterious effects. Here, we describe our standardised ‘Hammersmith’ mCPB technique, used in all types of adult cardiac operations including major aortic surgery. Methods The use of mCPB remains limited by the diversity of technologies which range from extremely complex, micro systems to ones very similar to cCPB. Our approach is designed around the principle of balancing the benefits of miniaturisation; reducing foreign surface area while maintaining patient safety. Results From January 2010 to March 2011, a single surgeon performed 184 consecutive operations (Euro score Logistic 8.4+/-9.9): 61 aortic valve replacements, 78 CABGs, 25 aortic valve replacement and CABG and 17 other procedures (major aortic surgery, re-do operations or double/triple valve replacements). Our clinical experience suggests that: i. Venous drainage is optimally maintained using kinetic energy. ii. Venous collapse pressure depends on the patient’s anatomy and cannula size, but most importantly on the negative pressure generated by venous drainage. iii. The patient-prime interaction is optimised with antegrade and retrograde autologous priming, which mixes the blood and prime away from the tissues and results in a reduced oncotic destabilization. iv. mCPB is a safe and reproducible technique Conclusion The Hammersmith mCPB is a “next generation” system which uses standard commercially available components. It aims to maintain safety margin and the benefit of miniaturised system whilst reducing the human factor demands. PMID:23731623

  19. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2010-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the sector grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  20. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the one-twelfth grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  1. The reliability of bypass diodes in PV modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Shiradkar, Narendra; Schneller, Eric; Gade, Vivek

    2013-09-01

    The operating conditions of bypass diodes in PV modules deployed in the field are considerably harsher than the conditions at which the diode manufacturers test the diodes. This has a potential to significantly reduce the operating life of bypass diodes and has raised concerns about the safety and reliability of PV modules as a whole. The study of modes and mechanisms of the failures encountered in bypass diodes used in PV modules can provide important information which would be useful to predict the module lifetime. This paper presents the review of the failure modes and mechanisms observed in bypass diodes and current work related to reliability testing of bypass diodes. The International PV Module Quality Assurance Task Force has recommended following four potential areas of research to understand the reliability issues of bypass diodes: Electrostatic Discharge, reverse bias thermal runaway testing, forward bias overheating and transition testing of forward bias to reverse bias. As a joint collaborative effort between Florida Solar Energy Center and Solar and Environmental Test Laboratory at Jabil Inc., laboratory testing of bypass diodes on the guidelines provided by the International PV Module Quality Assurance Task Force has been initiated. Preliminary results from this work are presented in this paper.

  2. Alongshore sediment bypassing as a control on river mouth morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, Jaap H.; Ashton, Andrew D.; Nardin, William; Fagherazzi, Sergio; Giosan, Liviu

    2016-04-01

    River mouths, shoreline locations where fluvial and coastal sediments are partitioned via erosion, trapping, and redistribution, are responsible for the ultimate sedimentary architecture of deltas and, because of their dynamic nature, also pose great management and engineering challenges. To investigate the interaction between fluvial and littoral processes at wave-dominated river mouths, we modeled their morphologic evolution using the coupled hydrodynamic and morphodynamic model Delft3D-SWAN. Model experiments replicate alongshore migration of river mouths, river mouth spit development, and eventual spit breaching, suggesting that these are emergent phenomena that can develop even under constant fluvial and wave conditions. Furthermore, we find that sediment bypassing of a river mouth develops though feedbacks between waves and river mouth morphology, resulting in either continuous bypassing pathways or episodic bar bypassing pathways. Model results demonstrate that waves refracting into the river mouth bar create a zone of low alongshore sediment transport updrift of the river mouth, which reduces sediment bypassing. Sediment bypassing, in turn, controls the river mouth migration rate and the size of the river mouth spit. As a result, an intermediate amount of river discharge maximizes river mouth migration. The fraction of alongshore sediment bypassing can be predicted from the balance between the jet and the wave momentum flux. Quantitative comparisons show a match between our modeled predictions of river mouth bypassing and migration rates observed in natural settings.

  3. Antibiotic drug advertising in medical journals.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Jacob; Moran, Lia; Schlaeffer, Francisc; Borer, Abraham

    2005-01-01

    Advertising is a leading strategy for drug promotion. We analysed 779 advertisements in 24 medical journals, 25% of which featured antibiotics. Antibiotic advertisements showed differences compared to those of other drugs. None addressed the issue of antibiotic resistance. Efforts to prevent antibiotic resistance should take antibiotic advertising into consideration.

  4. Coronary artery bypass grafting in an achondroplastic dwarf.

    PubMed

    Balaguer, J M; Perry, D; Crowley, J; Moran, J M

    1995-01-01

    To our knowledge, coronary bypass for complications of coronary artery disease in achondroplasia has not previously been described. Achondroplasia, in and of itself, is not a contraindication to coronary bypass. Although the anatomic reserve of saphenous vein is less in achondroplastic dwarfs than in people of normal stature, that vessel and the internal mammary artery can be harvested in routine fashion. A 60-year-old woman with several risk factors for coronary artery disease underwent successful bypass surgery, which included the use of both a saphenous vein and the left internal mammary artery.

  5. [Bypass spanning the knee joint with synthetic prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Müller-Wiefel, H

    1989-01-01

    Synthetic tubes are the second choice for below-knee bypass materials. The ring-reinforced thin-walled Goretex-PTFE graft is an approved material which was tested in a multicenter study. The primary 3 years patency for below-knee femoral-popliteal bypass was 64%, for crural bypass 39%. A total of 195 grafts have been implanted. Long-term patency depends very much on the run-off conditions (81% in good and 43% in bad cases). The over-all limb salvage rate was 80% after 3 years.

  6. Beating heart versus conventional cardiopulmonary bypass: the octopus experience: a randomized comparison of 281 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery with or without cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Diederik; Diephuis, Jan C; Nierich, Arno P; Keizer, Annemieke M A; Kalkman, Cor J

    2006-06-01

    In the Octopus Study, 281 coronary artery bypass surgery patients were randomized to surgery with or without cardiopulmonary bypass. The primary objective was to compare cognitive outcome between off-pump and on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery. Before and after surgery, psychologists administered a battery of 10 neuropsychological tests to the patients. Cognitive decline was defined as a decrease in an individual's performance of at least 20% from baseline, in at least 20% of the main variables. According to this definition, cognitive decline was present in 21% in the off-pump group and 29% in the on-pump group, 3 months after the procedure (P = .15). At 12 months, cognitive decline was present in 31% in the off-pump group and 34% in the on-pump group (P = .69). These results indicated that patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery without cardiopulmonary bypass had improved cognitive outcomes 3 months after the procedure, but the effects were limited and became negligible at 12 months. The same definition of cognitive decline was also applied to 112 volunteers not undergoing surgery. The definition labeled 28% of the control subjects as suffering from cognitive decline, 3 months after their first assessment. This suggests that the natural fluctuations in performance during repeated neuropsychological testing should be included in the statistical analysis of cognitive decline. Using an alternative definition of cognitive decline that takes these natural fluctuations in performance into account, the proportions of coronary artery bypass surgery patients displaying cognitive decline were substantially lower. This indicates that the incidence of cognitive decline after coronary artery bypass surgery has been overestimated.

  7. 34 CFR 300.191 - Provisions for services under a by-pass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Provisions for services under a by-pass. 300.191... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility By-Pass for Children in Private Schools § 300.191 Provisions for services under a by-pass. (a) Before implementing a by-pass, the Secretary consults...

  8. 34 CFR 300.198 - Continuation of a by-pass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuation of a by-pass. 300.198 Section 300.198... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility By-Pass for Children in Private Schools § 300.198 Continuation of a by-pass. The Secretary continues a by-pass until the Secretary determines that the SEA, LEA...

  9. 34 CFR 300.192 - Notice of intent to implement a by-pass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Notice of intent to implement a by-pass. 300.192... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility By-Pass for Children in Private Schools § 300.192 Notice of intent to implement a by-pass. (a) Before taking any final action to implement a by-pass,...

  10. Effects of coronary artery bypass grafting on cellular immunity with or without cardiopulmonary bypass: changes in lymphocytes subsets.

    PubMed

    Akbas, Haluk; Erdal, A Cenk; Demiralp, Emel; Alp, Mete

    2002-12-01

    Cell-mediated immunity responses decrease after all kinds of surgical procedures. Either anesthesia or surgical trauma plays an important role in this effect. Identification of functional lymphocyte subsets, by using appropriate monoclonal antibodies and analysis of flow cytometry data, appears to provide an accurate measurement of cellular immune competence. We found a significant decrease in the total number of T helper/inducer cells (p<0.035), B cells (p<0.043) and natural killer cells (NK) (p<0.018) but in contrast, increase in NK cell activity (p<0.012) in the peripheral arterial blood of ten patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass (group 1) immediately after surgery and postoperative day 1 (POD1). On the other hand, there was no significant change of these parameters occurred in the peripheral arterial blood of ten patients (group 2) who were undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass. Therefore, we conclude that coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with cardiopulmonary bypass induce a greater decrease in immunologic response than CABG without cardiopulmonary bypass (off pump) operations. Nevertheless, off pump CABG operations do not induce a greater decrease in immunologic response than other surgical operations.

  11. Linitis Plastica of the bypassed stomach 7 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Haenen, Filip Wn; Gys, Ben; Moreels, Tom; Michielsen, Maartje; Gys, Tobie; Lafullarde, Thierry

    2016-06-03

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is currently the preferred surgical procedure to treat morbid obesity. It has proven its effects on excess weight loss and its positive effect on comorbidities. One of the main issues, however, is the postoperative evaluation of the bypassed gastric remnant. In literature, cancer of the excluded stomach after RYGB is rare. We describe the case of a 52-year-old woman with gastric linitis plastica in the bypassed stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, diagnosed by means of laparoscopy and Single-Balloon enteroscopy, and it's clinical importance. Linitis plastica of the excluded stomach after RYGB is a very rare entity. This case report shows the importance of long-term postoperative follow-up, and the importance of Single-Balloon enteroscopy for visualization of the bypassed stomach remnant, when other investigations remain without results. This case report is only the second report of a linitis plastica in the bypassed stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

  12. The Antibiotic Resistance Problem Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The term "antibiotic" was first proposed by Vuillemin in 1889 but was first used in the current sense by Walksman in 1941. An antibiotic is defined as a "derivative produced by the metabolism of microorganisms that possess antibacterial activity at low concentrations and is not toxic to the host." In this article, the author describes how…

  13. Antibiotic use in livestock production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotic usage is a useful and commonly implemented practice in livestock and production agriculture that has progressively gained attention in recent years from consumers of animal products due to concerns about human and environmental health. Sub-therapeutic usage of antibiotics has led to a con...

  14. Antibiotics and Bacterial Resistance in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Fair, Richard J; Tor, Yitzhak

    2014-01-01

    Dangerous, antibiotic resistant bacteria have been observed with increasing frequency over the past several decades. In this review the factors that have been linked to this phenomenon are addressed. Profiles of bacterial species that are deemed to be particularly concerning at the present time are illustrated. Factors including economic impact, intrinsic and acquired drug resistance, morbidity and mortality rates, and means of infection are taken into account. Synchronously with the waxing of bacterial resistance there has been waning antibiotic development. The approaches that scientists are employing in the pursuit of new antibacterial agents are briefly described. The standings of established antibiotic classes as well as potentially emerging classes are assessed with an emphasis on molecules that have been clinically approved or are in advanced stages of development. Historical perspectives, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum of activity, and preeminent members of each class are discussed. PMID:25232278

  15. Nanoformulated antibiotics: the next step for pathogenic bacteria control.

    PubMed

    Saúde, Amanda Caroline Marques; Cherobim, Mariana Dornelles; Amaral, André Corrêa; Dias, Simoní Campos; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2013-01-01

    The resistance of infectious bacteria to current antibiotics is a worldwide problem. Previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of nanostructured molecules against pathogens as an innovative methodology for the development of novel drugs. Currently, 95% of properties limited pharmacies applicability such as low solubility, short half-life in the circulatory system, toxicity associated to controlled release and immunogenicity. Furthermore, nanobiotechnology provides a different perspective for modifying these properties and allows innovative drug development. In this context, this review aims to describe different methods, polymers, and drugs used to obtain and analyze nanostructures associated with antibiotics as an unconventional and innovative tool for bacterial control. Biotechnology provides a different perspective for modifying drug properties and allows innovative drug development. This review describes nanostructures in association with antibiotics as an unconventional and innovative tool for bacterial control.

  16. [Antibiotic resistance: A global crisis].

    PubMed

    Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2015-12-01

    The introduction of antibiotics into clinical practice represented one of the most important interventions for the control of infectious diseases. Antibiotics have saved millions of lives and have also brought a revolution in medicine. However, an increasing threat has deteriorated the effectiveness of these drugs, that of bacterial resistance to antibiotics, which is defined here as the ability of bacteria to survive in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit/kill others of the same species. In this review some recent and important examples of resistance in pathogens of concern for mankind are mentioned. It is explained, according to present knowledge, the process that led to the current situation in a short time, evolutionarily speaking. It begins with the resistance genes, continues with clones and genetic elements involved in the maintenance and dissemination, and ends with other factors that contribute to its spread. Possible responses to the problem are also reviewed, with special reference to the development of new antibiotics.

  17. Antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Obeso, Sergio; Rodrigo, Juan P; Sánchez, Rafael; López, Fernando; Díaz, Juan P; Suárez, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 80s, numerous clinical trials have shown a significant reduction in the incidence of infections in clean-contaminated upper respiratory tract surgery, due to perioperative use of antibiotics; however, there is no consensus about the best antibiotic protocol. Moreover, there are no universally accepted guidelines about flap reconstructive procedures. In otological and rhinological surgery, tonsillectomy, cochlear implant and laryngo-pharyngeal laser surgery, the use of antibiotics frequently depends on institutional or personal preferences rather than the evidence available. We reviewed clinical trials on different otorhinolaryngological procedures, assessing choice of antibiotic, length of treatment and administration route. There are no clinical trials for laryngo-pharyngeal laser surgery. Nor are there clinical trials on implant cochlear surgery or neurosurgical clean-contaminated procedures, but in these circumstances, antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended.

  18. 14. DRAGLINE BEGINNING CONSTRUCTION OF THE BYPASS CHANNEL CONNECTING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DRAGLINE BEGINNING CONSTRUCTION OF THE BY-PASS CHANNEL CONNECTING THE DIVERSION GATE ALONG THE OUTLET CHANNEL WITH THE ORIGINAL CHANNEL OF THE SOURIS RIVER - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  19. What to Expect After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    MedlinePlus

    ... What To Expect After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Recovery in the Hospital After surgery, you'll typically ... for 3 to 5 days before going home. Recovery at Home Your doctor will give you specific ...

  20. Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation - January 2003 Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence R. Zirker; James E. Francfort

    2003-01-01

    This report details the initial activities to evaluate the performance of the oil bypass filter technology being tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight full-size, four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass systems from the puraDYN Corporation. Each bus averages about 60,000 miles a year. The evaluation includes an oil analysis regime to monitor the presence of necessary additives in the oil and to detect undesirable contaminants. Very preliminary economic analysis suggests that the oil bypass system can reduce life-cycle costs. As the evaluation continues and oil avoidance costs are quantified, it is estimated that the bypass system economics may prove increasingly favorable, given the anticipated savings in operational costs and in reduced use of oil and waste oil avoidance.

  1. Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation - First Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zirker, L.R.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-31

    This report details the initial activities to evaluate the performance of the oil bypass filter technology being tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight full-size, four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass systems from the puraDYN Corporation. Each bus averages about 60,000 miles a year. The evaluation includes an oil analysis regime to monitor the presence of necessary additives in the oil and to detect undesirable contaminants. Very preliminary economic analysis suggests that the oil bypass system can reduce life-cycle costs. As the evaluation continues and oil avoidance costs are quantified, it is estimated that the bypass system economics may prove increasingly favorable, given the anticipated savings in operational costs and in reduced use of oil and waste oil avoidance.

  2. Spasm in Arterial Grafts in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Surgery.

    PubMed

    He, Guo-Wei; Taggart, David P

    2016-03-01

    Spasm of arterial grafts in coronary artery bypass grafting surgery is still a clinical problem, and refractory spasm can occasionally be lethal. Perioperative spasm in bypass grafts and coronary arteries has been reported in 0.43% of all coronary artery bypass grafting surgery, but this may be an underestimate. Spasm can develop not only in the internal mammary artery but more frequently in the right gastroepiploic and radial artery. The mechanism of spasm can involve many pathways, particularly those involving regulation of the intracellular calcium concentration. Endothelial dysfunction also plays a role in spasm. Depending on the clinical scenario, the possibility of spasm during and after coronary artery bypass grafting should be confirmed by angiography. If present, immediate intraluminal injection of vasodilators is often effective, although other procedures such as an intraaortic balloon pump or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation may also become necessary to salvage the patient. Prevention of spasm involves many considerations, and the principles are discussed in this review article.

  3. Protection of semiconductor converters for controlled bypass reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgopolov, A. G.; Akhmetzhanov, N. G.; Karmanov, V. F.

    2010-05-15

    Possible ways of protecting thyristor converters in systems for magnetizing 110 - 500 kV controlled bypass reactors during switching and automatic reclosing are examined based on experience with the development of equipment, line tests, and mathematical modelling.

  4. Subarachnoid-subarachnoid bypass for spinal adhesive arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Toshiya; Moriyama, Tokuhide; Maruo, Keishi; Inoue, Shinichi; Arizumi, Fumihiro; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2014-11-01

    The authors report a case of adhesive arachnoiditis (AA) and arachnoid cyst successfully treated by subarachnoid to subarachnoid bypass (S-S bypass). Arachnoid cysts or syringes sometimes compress the spinal cord and cause compressive myelopathy that requires surgical treatment. However, surgical treatment for AA is challenging. A 57-year-old woman developed leg pain and gait disturbance. A dorsal arachnoid cyst compressed the spinal cord at T7-9, the spinal cord was swollen, and a small syrinx was present at T9-10. An S-S bypass was performed from T6-7 to T11-12. The patient's gait disturbance resolved immediately after surgery. Two years later, a small arachnoid cyst developed. However, there was no neurological deterioration. The myelopathy associated with thoracic spinal AA, subarachnoid cyst, and syrinx improved after S-S bypass.

  5. [Psychoprophylaxis in patients after coronary artery bypass graft operations].

    PubMed

    Rymaszewska, Joanna; Chładzińska-Kiejna, Sylwia; Górna, Renata; Kustrzycki, Wojciech

    2004-05-01

    The paper presented problems of quality of life and psychosocial functioning of patients following coronary artery bypass grafting operations. Possibilities of psychoprophylactic effects towards these patients and its efficacy were described.

  6. 1. PLENUM INTERIOR, SHOWING HEATING COILS AND BYPASS Hot ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PLENUM INTERIOR, SHOWING HEATING COILS AND BY-PASS - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Fordyce Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  7. [Preliminary study of colloid osmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Xiang, L; Luo, J

    1996-12-01

    The ideal colloid osmotic pressure is beneficial to decrease the fluid accumulated in the pulmonary and other tissue during cardiopulmonary bypass. Schupbach reported the proper colloidosmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass was 2.1 kPa (16 mmHg). Colloid osmotic pressures of blood and priming fluid during cardiopulmonary bypass were measured in 28 patients with heart disease by using colloid osmotic pressure detection apparatus. The value of colloid osmotic pressure suitable for the designed standard was apparently different among the Gelofusine group and other groups. P value was 0.005. Priming fluid for cardiopulmonary bypass needs to satisfy the quality and the quantity of colloid osmotic pressure. Using Albumin isn't economical. Whole blood and plazma are not suitable for increasing colloid osmotic pressure. Hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine is best choice in priming to get designed standard of colloid osmotic pressure. The ratio of hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine in priming fluid should beyond 1/2.

  8. Off-pump coronary artery bypass: techniques, pitfalls, and results.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to advance the surgical treatment of coronary artery disease, surgeons sought a way to offer the proven benefits of coronary revascularization and avoid the side effects of cardiopulmonary bypass by performing revascularization in the beating heart (off-pump coronary artery bypass). This review will describe the development and refinement of the technique, pitfalls to its widespread adoption, and an up-to-date assessment of current results.

  9. Curing bacteria of antibiotic resistance: reverse antibiotics, a novel class of antibiotics in nature.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Morimoto, Yuh; Baba, Tadashi; Umekita, Maya; Akamatsu, Yuzuru

    2012-06-01

    By screening cultures of soil bacteria, we re-discovered an old antibiotic (nybomycin) as an antibiotic with a novel feature. Nybomycin is active against quinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains with mutated gyrA genes but not against those with intact gyrA genes against which quinolone antibiotics are effective. Nybomycin-resistant mutant strains were generated from a quinolone-resistant, nybomycin-susceptible, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strain Mu 50. The mutants, occurring at an extremely low rate (<1 × 10(-11)/generation), were found to have their gyrA genes back-mutated and to have lost quinolone resistance. Here we describe nybomycin as the first member of a novel class of antibiotics designated 'reverse antibiotics'.

  10. Progress on Complications of Direct Bypass for Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinlu; Shi, Lei; Guo, Yunbao; Xu, Baofeng; Xu, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) involves progressive occlusion of the intracranial internal carotid artery resulting in formation of moyamoya-like vessels at the base of the brain. It can be characterized by hemorrhage or ischemia. Direct vascular bypass is the main and most effective treatment of MMD. However, patients with MMD differ from those with normal cerebral vessels. MMD patients have unstable intracranial artery hemodynamics and a poor blood flow reserve; therefore, during the direct bypass of superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis, perioperative risk factors and anesthesia can affect the hemodynamics of these patients. When brain tissue cannot tolerate a high blood flow rate, it becomes prone to hyperperfusion syndrome, which leads to neurological function defects and can even cause intracranial hemorrhage in severe cases. The brain tissue is prone to infarction when hemodynamic equilibrium is affected. In addition, bypass vessels become susceptible to occlusion or atrophy when blood resistance increases. Even compression of the temporalis affects bypass vessels. Because the STA is used in MMD surgery, the scalp becomes ischemic and is likely to develop necrosis and infection. These complications of MMD surgery are difficult to manage and are not well understood. To date, no systematic studies of the complications that occur after direct bypass in MMD have been performed, and reported complications are hidden among various case studies; therefore, this paper presents a review and summary of the literature in PubMed on the complications of direct bypass in MMD. PMID:27499690

  11. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Al-Jassim, Nada; Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2013-01-01

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water. PMID:27029309

  12. [Epidemiological overview of antibiotic resistance in France and worldwide].

    PubMed

    Arlet, Guillaume

    2012-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance appeared early after the introduction of these molecules in therapeutic. But, this resistance has long been confined to care facilities. Twenty years ago, resistance emerged in community with the methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus and also with the reduced susceptibility to penicillin in pneumococci, which are good examples. Fortunately, for these two species, in France, the situation appears to be controlled. The most worrying now is the emergence of resistance to major antimicrobial agents in Escherichia coli both in community and in hospitals. The third-generation cephalosporins and the fluoroquinolones are concerned. This situation is currently not well controlled here and worldwide. The only recourse remaining carbapenems, antibiotics reserved for hospital use. Unfortunately, new mechanisms of resistance to these molecules are emerging.

  13. Urinary tract infection diagnosis and response to antibiotics using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastanos, Evdokia; Kyriakides, Alexandros; Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Pitris, Constantinos

    2009-02-01

    Urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram require a 48 hour waiting period using conventional methods. This results in ineffective treatments, increased costs and most importantly in increased resistance to antibiotics. In this work, a novel method for classifying bacteria and determining their sensitivity to an antibiotic using Raman spectroscopy is described. Raman spectra of three species of gram negative Enterobacteria, most commonly responsible for urinary tract infections, were collected. The study included 25 samples each of E.coli, Klebsiella p. and Proteus spp. A novel algorithm based on spectral ratios followed by discriminant analysis resulted in classification with over 94% accuracy. Sensitivity and specificity for the three types of bacteria ranged from 88-100%. For the development of an antibiogram, bacterial samples were treated with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin to which they were all sensitive. Sensitivity to the antibiotic was evident after analysis of the Raman signatures of bacteria treated or not treated with this antibiotic as early as two hours after exposure. This technique can lead to the development of new technology for urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram with same day results, bypassing urine cultures and avoiding all undesirable consequences of current practice.

  14. Current status of mini-gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Mahawar, Kamal K.; Kumar, Parveen; Carr, William RJ; Jennings, Neil; Schroeder, Norbert; Balupuri, Shlok; Small, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    Mini-gastric bypass (MGP) is a promising bariatric procedure. Tens of thousands of this procedure have been performed throughout the world since Rutledge performed the first procedure in the United States of America in 1997. Several thousands of these have even been documented in the published scientific literature. Despite a proven track record over nearly two decades, this operation continues to polarise the bariatric community. A large number of surgeons across the world have strong objections to this procedure and do not perform it. The risk of symptomatic (bile) reflux, marginal ulceration, severe malnutrition, and long-term risk of gastric and oesophageal cancers are some of the commonly voiced concerns. Despite these expressed fears, several advantages such as technical simplicity, shorter learning curve, ease of revision and reversal, non-inferior weight loss and comorbidity resolution outcomes have prompted some surgeons to advocate a wider adoption of this procedure. This review examines the current status of these controversial aspects in the light of the published academic literature in English. PMID:27251826

  15. Leading-edge effects in bypass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, S.; Lele, S. K.; Ferziger, J. H.

    The effect of a blunt leading edge on bypass transition is studied by numerical simulation. A mixed direct and large-eddy simulation of a flat plate with a super-ellipse leading edge is carried out at various conditions. Onset and completion of transition is seen to move upstream with increasing bluntness. For sharper leading edges, at lower levels of turbulence, transition usually occurs through instabilities on low-speed streaks as observed by Jacobs & Durbin (2001) and Brandt et al. (2004) whereas increasing either the turbulence intensity or the leading-edge bluntness brings into play another mechanism. Free-stream vortices are amplified at the leading edge because of stretching. In the case of particularly strong vortices, this interaction induces a localized streamwise vortical disturbance in the boundary layer which then grows as it convects downstream and eventually breaks down to form a turbulent spot. These disturbances, which are localized and hence wavepacket-like, move at speeds in the range 0.55 U_{infty} 0.65 U_{infty} and occur in the lower portion of the boundary layer. Simulations conducted with isolated vortices confirm such a response of the boundary layer.

  16. The general mode of translation inhibition by macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Krishna; Kanabar, Pinal; Schryer, David; Florin, Tanja; Oh, Eugene; Bahroos, Neil; Tenson, Tanel; Weissman, Jonathan S; Mankin, Alexander S

    2014-11-11

    Macrolides are clinically important antibiotics thought to inhibit bacterial growth by impeding the passage of newly synthesized polypeptides through the nascent peptide exit tunnel of the bacterial ribosome. Recent data challenged this view by showing that macrolide antibiotics can differentially affect synthesis of individual proteins. To understand the general mechanism of macrolide action, we used genome-wide ribosome profiling and analyzed the redistribution of ribosomes translating highly expressed genes in bacterial cells treated with high concentrations of macrolide antibiotics. The metagene analysis indicated that inhibition of early rounds of translation, which would be characteristic of the conventional view of macrolide action, occurs only at a limited number of genes. Translation of most genes proceeds past the 5'-proximal codons and can be arrested at more distal codons when the ribosome encounters specific short sequence motifs. The problematic sequence motifs are confined to the nascent peptide residues in the peptidyl transferase center but not to the peptide segment that contacts the antibiotic molecule in the exit tunnel. Therefore, it appears that the general mode of macrolide action involves selective inhibition of peptide bond formation between specific combinations of donor and acceptor substrates. Additional factors operating in the living cell but not functioning during in vitro protein synthesis may modulate site-specific action of macrolide antibiotics.

  17. Salmonella typhimurium intercepts Escherichia coli signaling to enhance antibiotic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Nicole M.; Allison, Kyle R.; Samuels, Amanda N.; Klempner, Mark S.; Collins, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial communication plays an important role in many population-based phenotypes and interspecies interactions, including those in host environments. These interspecies interactions may prove critical to some infectious diseases, and it follows that communication between pathogenic bacteria and commensal bacteria is a subject of growing interest. Recent studies have shown that Escherichia coli uses the signaling molecule indole to increase antibiotic tolerance throughout its population. Here, we show that the intestinal pathogen Salmonella typhimurium increases its antibiotic tolerance in response to indole, even though S. typhimurium does not natively produce indole. Increased antibiotic tolerance can be induced in S. typhimurium by both exogenous indole added to clonal S. typhimurium populations and indole produced by E. coli in mixed-microbial communities. Our data show that indole-induced tolerance in S. typhimurium is mediated primarily by the oxidative stress response and, to a lesser extent, by the phage shock response, which were previously shown to mediate indole-induced tolerance in E. coli. Further, we find that indole signaling by E. coli induces S. typhimurium antibiotic tolerance in a Caenorhabditis elegans model for gastrointestinal infection. These results suggest that the intestinal pathogen S. typhimurium can intercept indole signaling from the commensal bacterium E. coli to enhance its antibiotic tolerance in the host intestine. PMID:23946425

  18. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Anoop; Malhotra, Ranjan; Grover, Vishakha; Grover, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP), can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy. PMID:23559912

  19. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Anoop; Malhotra, Ranjan; Grover, Vishakha; Grover, Deepak

    2012-09-01

    Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP), can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy.

  20. [Strategies to avoid antibiotic resistance].

    PubMed

    Kees, M G

    2013-03-01

    Antibiotics are used very frequently in critically ill patients as a causal and often life-saving treatment; however, the high density of use of broad spectrum antibiotics contributes to a further deterioration in resistance trends, which makes a rational prescription behavior mandatory. This particularly includes measures which lead to the reduction of antibiotic use, i.e. rigorous indications, targeted de-escalation and limited duration. For optimal efficacy of a necessary treatment the integration of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles can be helpful.

  1. Antibiotic Cycling and Antibiotic Mixing: Which One Best Mitigates Antibiotic Resistance?

    PubMed

    Beardmore, Robert Eric; Peña-Miller, Rafael; Gori, Fabio; Iredell, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Can we exploit our burgeoning understanding of molecular evolution to slow the progress of drug resistance? One role of an infection clinician is exactly that: to foresee trajectories to resistance during antibiotic treatment and to hinder that evolutionary course. But can this be done at a hospital-wide scale? Clinicians and theoreticians tried to when they proposed two conflicting behavioral strategies that are expected to curb resistance evolution in the clinic, these are known as "antibiotic cycling" and "antibiotic mixing." However, the accumulated data from clinical trials, now approaching 4 million patient days of treatment, is too variable for cycling or mixing to be deemed successful. The former implements the restriction and prioritization of different antibiotics at different times in hospitals in a manner said to "cycle" between them. In antibiotic mixing, appropriate antibiotics are allocated to patients but randomly. Mixing results in no correlation, in time or across patients, in the drugs used for treatment which is why theorists saw this as an optimal behavioral strategy. So while cycling and mixing were proposed as ways of controlling evolution, we show there is good reason why clinical datasets cannot choose between them: by re-examining the theoretical literature we show prior support for the theoretical optimality of mixing was misplaced. Our analysis is consistent with a pattern emerging in data: neither cycling or mixing is a priori better than the other at mitigating selection for antibiotic resistance in the clinic.

  2. Antibiotic resistance: An ethical challenge.

    PubMed

    Littmann, Jasper; Buyx, Alena; Cars, Otto

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we argue that antibiotic resistance (ABR) raises a number of ethical problems that have not yet been sufficiently addressed. We outline four areas in which ethical issues that arise in relation to ABR are particularly pressing. First, the emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant infections exacerbates traditional ethical challenges of infectious disease control, such as the restriction of individual liberty for the protection of the public's health. Second, ABR raises issues of global distributive justice, both with regard to the overuse and lack of access to antibiotics. Third, the use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine raises serious concerns for animal welfare and sustainable farming practices. Finally, the diminishing effectiveness of antibiotics leads to questions about intergenerational justice and our responsibility for the wellbeing of future generations. We suggest that current policy discussions should take ethical conflicts into account and engage openly with the challenges that we outline in this paper.

  3. β-Lactam Antibiotics Renaissance

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wenling; Panunzio, Mauro; Biondi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1940s β-lactam antibiotics have been used to treat bacterial infections. However, emergence and dissemination of β-lactam resistance has reached the point where many marketed β-lactams no longer are clinically effective. The increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria and the progressive withdrawal of pharmaceutical companies from antibiotic research have evoked a strong reaction from health authorities, who have implemented initiatives to encourage the discovery of new antibacterials. Despite this gloomy scenario, several novel β-lactam antibiotics and β-lactamase inhibitors have recently progressed into clinical trials, and many more such compounds are being investigated. Here we seek to provide highlights of recent developments relating to the discovery of novel β-lactam antibiotics and β-lactamase inhibitors. PMID:27025744

  4. Cognitive Impairment by Antibiotic-Induced Gut Dysbiosis: Analysis of Gut Microbiota-Brain Communication

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Esther E.; Farzi, Aitak; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Reichmann, Florian; Jačan, Angela; Wagner, Bernhard; Zinser, Erwin; Bordag, Natalie; Magnes, Christoph; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kashofer, Karl; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Holzer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that disruption of the gut microbial community (dysbiosis) impairs mental health. Germ-free mice and antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis are two approaches to establish causality in gut microbiota-brain relationships. However, both models have limitations, as germ-free mice display alterations in blood-brain barrier and brain ultrastructure and antibiotics may act directly on the brain. We hypothesized that the concerns related to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis can only adequately be addressed if the effect of intragastric treatment of adult mice with multiple antibiotics on (i) gut microbial community, (ii) metabolite profile in the colon, (iii) circulating metabolites, (iv) expression of neuronal signaling molecules in distinct brain areas and (v) cognitive behavior is systematically investigated. Of the antibiotics used (ampicillin, bacitracin, meropenem, neomycin, vancomycin), ampicillin had some oral bioavailability but did not enter the brain. 16S rDNA sequencing confirmed antibiotic-induced microbial community disruption, and metabolomics revealed that gut dysbiosis was associated with depletion of bacteria-derived metabolites in the colon and alterations of lipid species and converted microbe-derived molecules in the plasma. Importantly, novel object recognition, but not spatial, memory was impaired in antibiotic-treated mice. This cognitive deficit was associated with brain region-specific changes in the expression of cognition-relevant signaling molecules, notably brain-derived neurotrophic factor, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B, serotonin transporter and neuropeptide Y system. We conclude that circulating metabolites and the cerebral neuropeptide Y system play an important role in the cognitive impairment and dysregulation of cerebral signaling molecules due to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis. PMID:26923630

  5. Cognitive impairment by antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis: Analysis of gut microbiota-brain communication.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Esther E; Farzi, Aitak; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Reichmann, Florian; Jačan, Angela; Wagner, Bernhard; Zinser, Erwin; Bordag, Natalie; Magnes, Christoph; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kashofer, Karl; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Holzer, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that disruption of the gut microbial community (dysbiosis) impairs mental health. Germ-free mice and antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis are two approaches to establish causality in gut microbiota-brain relationships. However, both models have limitations, as germ-free mice display alterations in blood-brain barrier and brain ultrastructure and antibiotics may act directly on the brain. We hypothesized that the concerns related to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis can only adequately be addressed if the effect of intragastric treatment of adult mice with multiple antibiotics on (i) gut microbial community, (ii) metabolite profile in the colon, (iii) circulating metabolites, (iv) expression of neuronal signaling molecules in distinct brain areas and (v) cognitive behavior is systematically investigated. Of the antibiotics used (ampicillin, bacitracin, meropenem, neomycin, vancomycin), ampicillin had some oral bioavailability but did not enter the brain. 16S rDNA sequencing confirmed antibiotic-induced microbial community disruption, and metabolomics revealed that gut dysbiosis was associated with depletion of bacteria-derived metabolites in the colon and alterations of lipid species and converted microbe-derived molecules in the plasma. Importantly, novel object recognition, but not spatial, memory was impaired in antibiotic-treated mice. This cognitive deficit was associated with brain region-specific changes in the expression of cognition-relevant signaling molecules, notably brain-derived neurotrophic factor, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2B, serotonin transporter and neuropeptide Y system. We conclude that circulating metabolites and the cerebral neuropeptide Y system play an important role in the cognitive impairment and dysregulation of cerebral signaling molecules due to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis.

  6. Cyclic lipopeptides as antibacterial agents - potent antibiotic activity mediated by intriguing mode of actions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Tanja; Müller, Anna; Miess, Henrike; Gross, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are a promising class of natural products with antibiotic properties. CLPs are amphiphilic molecules, composed of a fatty acid tail linked to a short oligopeptide which form a macrocylic ring structure. This review presents an overview of this class of antibiotics, focusing on the current and potential therapeutic applications and placing particular emphasis on the molecular modes of action of these compounds.

  7. Annular MHD Physics for Turbojet Energy Bypass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The use of annular Hall type MHD generator/accelerator ducts for turbojet energy bypass is evaluated assuming weakly ionized flows obtained from pulsed nanosecond discharges. The equations for a 1-D, axisymmetric MHD generator/accelerator are derived and numerically integrated to determine the generator/accelerator performance characteristics. The concept offers a shockless means of interacting with high speed inlet flows and potentially offers variable inlet geometry performance without the complexity of moving parts simply by varying the generator loading parameter. The cycle analysis conducted iteratively with a spike inlet and turbojet flying at M = 7 at 30 km altitude is estimated to have a positive thrust per unit mass flow of 185 N-s/kg. The turbojet allowable combustor temperature is set at an aggressive 2200 deg K. The annular MHD Hall generator/accelerator is L = 3 m in length with a B(sub r) = 5 Tesla magnetic field and a conductivity of sigma = 5 mho/m for the generator and sigma= 1.0 mho/m for the accelerator. The calculated isentropic efficiency for the generator is eta(sub sg) = 84 percent at an enthalpy extraction ratio, eta(sub Ng) = 0.63. The calculated isentropic efficiency for the accelerator is eta(sub sa) = 81 percent at an enthalpy addition ratio, eta(sub Na) = 0.62. An assessment of the ionization fraction necessary to achieve a conductivity of sigma = 1.0 mho/m is n(sub e)/n = 1.90 X 10(exp -6), and for sigma = 5.0 mho/m is n(sub e)/n = 9.52 X 10(exp -6).

  8. Expedient antibiotics production: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bienkowski, P.R.; Byers, C.H.; Lee, D.D.

    1988-05-01

    The literature on the manufacture, separation and purification, and clinical uses of antibiotics was reviewed, and a bibliography of the pertinent material was completed. Five antimicrobial drugs, penicillin V and G, (and amoxicillin with clavulanic acid), Cephalexin (a cephalosporin), tetracycline and oxytetracycline, Bacitracin (topical), and sulfonamide (chemically produced) were identified for emergency production. Plants that manufacture antibiotics in the continental United States, Mexico, and Puerto Rico have been identified along with potential alternate sites such as those where SCP, enzyme, and fermentation ethanol are produced. Detailed process flow sheets and process descriptions have been derived from the literature and documented. This investigation revealed that a typical antibiotic-manufacturing facility is composed of two main sections: (1) a highly specialized, but generic, fermentation unit and (2) a multistep, complex separation and purification unit which is specific to a particular antibiotic product. The fermentation section requires specialized equipment for operation in a sterile environment which is not usually available in other industries. The emergency production of antibiotics under austere conditions will be feasible only if a substantial reduction in the complexity and degree of separation and purity normally required can be realized. Detailed instructions were developed to assist state and federal officials who would be directing the resumption of antibiotic production after a nuclear attack. 182 refs., 54 figs., 26 tabs.

  9. Antimicrobial Peptides as Potential Alternatives to Antibiotics in Food Animal Industry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Zeng, Xiangfang; Yang, Qing; Qiao, Shiyan

    2016-05-03

    Over the last decade, the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens has become a global concern, which has prompted the search for alternative antibacterial agents for use in food animals. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), produced by bacteria, insects, amphibians and mammals, as well as by chemical synthesis, are possible candidates for the design of new antimicrobial agents because of their natural antimicrobial properties and a low propensity for development of resistance by microorganisms. This manuscript reviews the current knowledge of the basic biology of AMPs and their applications in non-ruminant nutrition. Antimicrobial peptides not only have broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, fungi, and viruses but also have the ability to bypass the common resistance mechanisms that are placing standard antibiotics in jeopardy. In addition, AMPs have beneficial effects on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, intestinal morphology and gut microbiota in pigs and broilers. Therefore, AMPs have good potential as suitable alternatives to conventional antibiotics used in swine and poultry industries.

  10. Antibiotics at subinhibitory concentrations improve the quorum sensing behavior of Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanjun; Wang, Weishan; Zhu, Ying; Gong, Qianhong; Yu, Wengong; Lu, Xinzhi

    2013-04-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that antibiotics function as intermicrobial signaling molecules instead of killing weapons. However, mechanisms and key factors that are involved in such functions remain poorly understood. Earlier findings have associated antibiotic signaling with quorum sensing (QS); however, results varied among experiments, antibiotics, and bacterial strains. In this study, we found that antibiotics at subinhibitory concentrations improved the violacein-producing ability of Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction of QS-associated gene transcripts and bioassay of violacein production in a QS mutant strain demonstrated that antibiotics enhanced the production of N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs; QS signaling molecules) and increased AHL-inducing QS-mediated virulence, including chitinase production and biofilm formation. Moreover, a positive flagellar activity and an increased bacterial clustering ability were found, which are related to the antibiotic-induced biofilm formation. Our findings suggested that antibiotic-mediated interspecific signaling also occurs in C. violaceum, thereby expanding the knowledge and language of cell-to-cell communication.

  11. Bearing-Bypass Loading on Bolted Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.; Naik, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical study has been conducted to investigate the effects of simultaneous bearing and bypass loading on a graphite/epoxy (T300/5208) laminate. Tests were conducted with a test machine that allows the bearing-bypass load ratio to be controlled while a single-fastener coupon is loaded to failure in either tension or compression. Test coupons consisted of 16-ply quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy laminates with a centrally-located 6.35 mm bolt having a clearance fit. Onset-damage and ultimate strengths were determined for each test case. Next, a finite element stress analysis was conducted for each test case. The computed local stresses were used with appropriate failure criteria to analyze the observed failure modes and strengths. An unexpected interaction of the effect of the bypass and bearing loads was found for the onset of compression-reacted bearing damage. This interaction was caused by a decrease in the bolt-hole contact arc and a corresponding increase in the severity of the bearing loads. The amount of bolt-hole contact had a significant effect on local stresses and, thus, on the calculated damage-onset and ultimate strengths. An offset-compressible failure mode was identified for laminate failure under compression bearing-bypass loading. This failure mode appears to be unique to compression bearing-bypass loading and, therefore, cannot be predicted from simple tests.

  12. Evidence for iC3 generation during cardiopulmonary bypass as the result of blood-gas interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Pekna, M; Nilsson, L; Nilsson-Ekdahl, K; Nilsson, U R; Nilsson, B

    1993-01-01

    Earlier we have shown that iC3 is generated at the blood-gas interface in vitro and that the generation of this molecule is independent of complement activation and the composition of the gas. In order to investigate whether iC3 is also generated during cardiopulmonary bypass where blood comes into contact with oxygen bubbles, two bubble oxygenators were incubated at 37 degrees C with human heparinized blood. A continuous increase in the level of iC3 was shown in the oxygen-perfused bubble oxygenator (up to 100 nmol/l after 180 min) in contrast to the unbubbled control. Similarly, in plasma drawn from patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass using either bubble or membrane oxygenators, the levels of iC3 were shown to increase continuously during the operation. Furthermore, this form of C3 was found to be susceptible to cleavage by factor I. The formation of iC3 at the blood-gas interface in vivo could be a mechanism by which gas bubbles induce clinical manifestations associated with complement activation, e.g. during cardiopulmonary bypass, adult respiratory distress syndrome and decompression sickness. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8443963

  13. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Beatriz Espinosa; Altagracia Martínez, Marina; Sánchez Rodríguez, Martha A; Wertheimer, Albert I

    2009-01-01

    Background: The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community. Objectives: To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem. Methods: We conducted a MedLine search using the key words “determinants”, “antibiotic”, and “antibiotic resistance” to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded. Results: The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance. Conclusions: Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals. PMID:21694883

  14. Cytoprotection by inhaled carbon monoxide before cardiopulmonary bypass in preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Loop, Torsten; Schlensak, Christian; Goebel, Ulrich

    2012-05-01

    Although a potentially toxic gaseous molecule, carbon monoxide recently gains rising scientifically and clinical interest as its beneficial effects and mechanisms of action are defined substantially in various in vitro and in vivo experiments. Its anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative properties but its increasing impact concerning numerous disease models in means of protection, well describe this gas as a new and challenging therapeutic alternative. In this review, we focus on the extensively analyzed advantageous value of pre- and postconditioning with inhaled carbon monoxide in the context of lung and kidney injury, induced by the low perfusion during and after cardiopulmonary bypass. Mechanisms like the heat shock response as well as an expanded view regarding toxicity and side effects are described broadly.

  15. The use of platensimycin and platencin to fight antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Bagirova, Melahat; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Ates, Sezen Canim; Koc, Rabia Cakir; Miraloglu, Meral; Elcicek, Serhat; Yaman, Serkan; Unal, Gokce

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases are known as one of the most life-threatening disabilities worldwide. Approximately 13 million deaths related to infectious diseases are reported each year. The only way to combat infectious diseases is by chemotherapy using antimicrobial agents and antibiotics. However, due to uncontrolled and unnecessary use of antibiotics in particular, surviving bacteria have evolved resistance against several antibiotics. Emergence of multidrug resistance in bacteria over the past several decades has resulted in one of the most important clinical health problems in modern medicine. For instance, approximately 440,000 new cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis are reported every year leading to the deaths of 150,000 people worldwide. Management of multidrug resistance requires understanding its molecular basis and the evolution and dissemination of resistance; development of new antibiotic compounds in place of traditional antibiotics; and innovative strategies for extending the life of antibiotic molecules. Researchers have begun to develop new antimicrobials for overcoming this important problem. Recently, platensimycin – isolated from extracts of Streptomyces platensis – and its analog platencin have been defined as promising agents for fighting multidrug resistance. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that these new antimicrobials have great potential to inhibit methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae by targeting type II fatty acid synthesis in bacteria. Showing strong efficacy without any observed in vivo toxicity increases the significance of these antimicrobial agents for their use in humans. However, at the present time, clinical trials are insufficient and require more research. The strong antibacterial efficacies of platensimycin and platencin may be established in clinical trials and their use in humans for coping with multidrug resistance may be

  16. WAAR (World Alliance against Antibiotic Resistance): Safeguarding antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Resistance to antibiotics has increased recently to a dramatic extend, and the pipeline of new antibiotics is almost dry for the five next years. Failures happen already for trivial community acquired infections, like pyelonephritis, or peritonitis, and this is likely to increase. Difficult surgical procedures, transplants, and other immunosuppressive therapies will become far more risky. Resistance is mainly due to an excessive usage of antibiotics, in all sectors, including the animal one. Action is urgently needed. Therefore, an alliance against MDRO has been recently created, which includes health care professionals, consumers, health managers, and politicians. The document highlights the different proposed measures, and represents a strong consensus between the different professionals, including general practicionners, and veterinarians. PMID:22958542

  17. Physics of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Many varieties of molecule have been detected in the Milky Way and in other galaxies. The processes by which these molecules are formed and destroyed are now broadly understood (see INTERSTELLAR CHEMISTRY). These molecules are important components of galaxies in two ways. Firstly, radiation emitted by molecules enables us to trace the presence of diffuse gas, to infer its physical properties and ...

  18. Neuroprotective Strategies during Cardiac Surgery with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Aida; Dhein, Stefan; Dähnert, Ingo; Klein, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Aortocoronary bypass or valve surgery usually require cardiac arrest using cardioplegic solutions. Although, in principle, in a number of cases beating heart surgery (so-called off-pump technique) is possible, aortic or valve surgery or correction of congenital heart diseases mostly require cardiopulmonary arrest. During this condition, the heart-lung machine also named cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has to take over the circulation. It is noteworthy that the invention of a machine bypassing the heart and lungs enabled complex cardiac operations, but possible negative effects of the CPB on other organs, especially the brain, cannot be neglected. Thus, neuroprotection during CPB is still a matter of great interest. In this review, we will describe the impact of CPB on the brain and focus on pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies to protect the brain. PMID:27879647

  19. Rankine cycle load limiting through use of a recuperator bypass

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Timothy C.

    2011-08-16

    A system for converting heat from an engine into work includes a boiler coupled to a heat source for transferring heat to a working fluid, a turbine that transforms the heat into work, a condenser that transforms the working fluid into liquid, a recuperator with one flow path that routes working fluid from the turbine to the condenser, and another flow path that routes liquid working fluid from the condenser to the boiler, the recuperator being configured to transfer heat to the liquid working fluid, and a bypass valve in parallel with the second flow path. The bypass valve is movable between a closed position, permitting flow through the second flow path and an opened position, under high engine load conditions, bypassing the second flow path.

  20. Bearing-bypass loading on bolted composite joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H., Jr.; Naik, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of simultaneous bearing and bypass loading on a graphite-epoxy (T300/5208) laminate were investigated. Onset damage and ultimate strengths were determined for each test case. A finite element stress analysis was conducted for each test case. The computed local stresses were used with appropriate failure criteria to analyze the observed failure modes and strengths. An unexpected interaction of the effect of the bypass and bearing loads was found for the onset of compression reacted bearing damage. The interaction was caused by a decrease in the bolt-hole contact arc and a corresponding increase in the severity of the bearing loads. The amount of bolt-hole contact had a significant effect on local stresses and, thus, on the calculated damage-onset and ultimate strengths. An offset-compression failure mode was identified for laminate failure under compression bearing-bypass loading.

  1. Vitamin deficiency after gastric bypass surgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Matrana, Marc R; Davis, William E

    2009-10-01

    More than 60% of the adult US population now meets the criteria for being overweight or obese. Gastric bypass surgery has become a popular and effective way to combat this medical problem. Despite the success of these procedures, they are associated with many complications, including malnutrition, neurological compromise, and vitamin deficiency. Research has determined that even with multivitamin supplementation for life, a large percentage of bypass patients develop vitamin deficiencies. We present a case of beriberi after Roux-en-Y bypass that illustrates the importance of close follow up. A thorough review of vitamin deficiencies in this unique patient population is explored. Vitamin supplementation and treatment recommendations are compiled from the most up-to-date sources. Even patients on regular supplements should be closely monitored for vitamin deficiencies. Patient education regarding vitamin supplementation is vital; it should begin prior to surgery and continue throughout the postoperative period and beyond.

  2. Highly Reproducible Ag NPs/CNT-Intercalated GO Membranes for Enrichment and SERS Detection of Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Qu, Lu Lu; Liu, Ying-Ya; Liu, Ming-Kai; Yang, Guo-Hai; Li, Da-Wei; Li, Hai-Tao

    2016-10-05

    The increasing pollution of aquatic environments by antibiotics makes it necessary to develop efficient enrichment and sensitive detection methods for environmental antibiotics monitoring. In this work, silver nanoparticles and carbon nanotube-intercalated graphene oxide laminar membranes (Ag NPs/CNT-GO membranes) were successfully prepared for enrichment and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of antibiotics. The prepared Ag NPs/CNT-GO membranes exhibited a high enrichment ability because of the π-π stacking and electrostatic interactions of GO toward antibiotic molecules, which enhanced the sensitivity of SERS measurements and enabled the antibiotics to be determined at sub-nM concentrations. In addition, the nanochannels created by the intercalation of CNTs into GO layers resulted in an 8-fold enhancement in the water permeance of Ag NPs/CNT-GO membranes compared to that of pure GO membranes. More importantly, the Ag NPs/CNT-GO membranes exhibited high reproducibility and long-term stability. The spot-to-spot variation in SERS intensity was less than 15%, and the SERS performance was maintained for at least 70 days. The Ag NPs/CNT-GO membranes were also used for SERS detection of antibiotics in real samples; the results showed that the characteristic peaks of antibiotics were obviously recognizable. Thus, the sensitive SERS detection of antibiotics based on Ag NPs/CNT-GO offers great potential for practical applications in environmental analysis.

  3. Motuporamine Derivatives as Antimicrobial Agents and Antibiotic Enhancers against Resistant Gram‐Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Borselli, Diane; Blanchet, Marine; Bolla, Jean‐Michel; Muth, Aaron; Skruber, Kristen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Dihydromotuporamine C and its derivatives were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activities and antibiotic enhancement properties against Gram‐negative bacteria and clinical isolates. The mechanism of action of one of these derivatives, MOTU‐N44, was investigated against Enterobacter aerogenes by using fluorescent dyes to evaluate outer‐membrane depolarization and permeabilization. Its efficiency correlated with inhibition of dye transport, thus suggesting that these molecules inhibit drug transporters by de‐energization of the efflux pump rather than by direct interaction of the molecule with the pump. This suggests that depowering the efflux pump provides another strategy to address antibiotic resistance. PMID:28098416

  4. Background antibiotic resistance patterns in antibiotic-free pastured poultry production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a significant public health issue, and agroecosystems are often viewed as major environmental sources of antibiotic resistant foodborne pathogens. While the use of antibiotics in agroecosystems can potentially increase AR, appropriate background resistance levels in th...

  5. Management Options For Reducing The Release Of Antibiotics And Antibiotic Resistance Genes To The Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: There is growing concern worldwide about the role of polluted soil and water - 77 environments in the development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. 78 Objective: To identify management options for reducing the spread of antibiotics and 79 antibiotic resist...

  6. [New antibiotics - standstill or progress].

    PubMed

    Rademacher, J; Welte, T

    2017-04-01

    The development of resistance to antibiotics has been ignored for a long time. But nowadays, increasing resistance is an important topic. For a decade no new antibiotics had been developed and it is not possible to quickly close this gap of new resistance and no new drugs. This work presents six new antibiotics (ceftaroline, ceftobiprole, solithromycin, tedizolid, ceftolozane/tazobactam, ceftazidime/avibactam). In part, only expert opinions are given due to lack of study results.The two 5th generation cephalosporins ceftaroline and ceftobiprole have beside their equivalent efficacy to ceftriaxone (ceftaroline) and cefipim (ceftobiprole) high activity against MRSA. The fluoroketolide solithromycin should help against macrolide-resistant pathogens and has been shown to be noninferior to the fluorochinolones. The oxazolidinone tedizolid is effective against linezolid-resistant MRSA. The two cephalosporins ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam are not only effective against gram-negative pathogens, but they have a very broad spectrum. Due to the efficacy against extended-spectrum β‑lactamases, they can relieve the selection pressure of the carbapenems. We benefit from all new antibiotics which can take the selection pressure from other often used antibiotics. The increasing number of resistant gram-negative pathogens worldwide is alarming. Thus, focusing on the development of new drugs is extremely important.

  7. Nucleotide Selectivity of Antibiotic Kinases▿

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Tushar; Wright, Gerard D.

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotic kinases, which include aminoglycoside and macrolide phosphotransferases (APHs and MPHs), pose a serious threat to currently used antimicrobial therapies. These enzymes show structural and functional homology with Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases, which is suggestive of a common ancestor. Surprisingly, recent in vitro studies using purified antibiotic kinase enzymes have revealed that a number are able to utilize GTP as the antibiotic phospho donor, either preferentially or exclusively compared to ATP, the canonical phosphate donor in most biochemical reactions. To further explore this phenomenon, we examined three enzymes, APH(3′)-IIIa, APH(2″)-Ib, and MPH(2′)-I, using a competitive assay that mimics in vivo nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) concentrations and usage by each enzyme. Downstream analysis of reaction products by high-performance liquid chromatography enabled the determination of partitioning of phosphate flux from NTP donors to antibiotics. Using this ratio along with support from kinetic analysis and inhibitor studies, we find that under physiologic concentrations of NTPs, APH(3′)-IIIa exclusively uses ATP, MPH(2′)-I exclusively uses GTP, and APH(2″)-Ib is able to use both species with a preference for GTP. These differences reveal likely different pathways in antibiotic resistance enzyme evolution and can be exploited in selective inhibitor design to counteract resistance. PMID:20231391

  8. Nucleotide selectivity of antibiotic kinases.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Tushar; Wright, Gerard D

    2010-05-01

    Antibiotic kinases, which include aminoglycoside and macrolide phosphotransferases (APHs and MPHs), pose a serious threat to currently used antimicrobial therapies. These enzymes show structural and functional homology with Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases, which is suggestive of a common ancestor. Surprisingly, recent in vitro studies using purified antibiotic kinase enzymes have revealed that a number are able to utilize GTP as the antibiotic phospho donor, either preferentially or exclusively compared to ATP, the canonical phosphate donor in most biochemical reactions. To further explore this phenomenon, we examined three enzymes, APH(3')-IIIa, APH(2'')-Ib, and MPH(2')-I, using a competitive assay that mimics in vivo nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) concentrations and usage by each enzyme. Downstream analysis of reaction products by high-performance liquid chromatography enabled the determination of partitioning of phosphate flux from NTP donors to antibiotics. Using this ratio along with support from kinetic analysis and inhibitor studies, we find that under physiologic concentrations of NTPs, APH(3')-IIIa exclusively uses ATP, MPH(2')-I exclusively uses GTP, and APH(2'')-Ib is able to use both species with a preference for GTP. These differences reveal likely different pathways in antibiotic resistance enzyme evolution and can be exploited in selective inhibitor design to counteract resistance.

  9. Clinical consequences and cost of limiting use of vancomycin for perioperative prophylaxis: example of coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, G.; Goldie, S. J.; Platt, R.

    2001-01-01

    Routine us of vancomycin for perioperative prophylaxis is discouraged, principally to minimize microbial resistance to it. However, outcomes and costs of this recommendation have not been assessed. We used decision-analytic models to compare clinical results and cost-effectiveness of no prophylaxis, cefazolin, and vancomycin, in coronary artery bypass graft surgery. In the base case, vancomycin resulted in 7% fewer surgical site infections and 1% lower all-cause mortality and saved $117 per procedure, compared with cefazolin. Cefazolin, in turn, resulted in substantially fewer infections and deaths and lower costs than no prophylaxis. We conclude that perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis with vancomycin is usually more effective and less expensive than cefazolin. Data on vancomycin's impact on resistance are needed to quantify the trade-off between individual patients' improved clinical outcomes and lower costs and the future long-term consequences to society. PMID:11747694

  10. By-pass hydrocarbon absorber system for ULEV

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.L.; Patil, M.D.; Hertl, W.

    1996-09-01

    A by-pass zeolite adsorber system consisting of a first catalyst, a by-pass loop containing the zeolite adsorbers followed by a downstream second catalyst was FTP tested using a US vehicle equipped with a 3.8 L, V6 engine. The system exhibited ULEV emissions performance with hydrocarbon adsorption and regeneration (desorption and oxidation) within the FTP cycle and required only a single diversion valve within the exhaust line. Adsorption takes place during the initial 70 seconds of the FTP cycle. The adsorbers were regenerated with the exhaust gas plus injected air.

  11. Management of a malignant hyperthermia patient during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Byrick, R J; Rose, D K; Ranganathan, N

    1982-01-01

    The anaesthetic management of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for a patient with biopsy-proven malignant hyperthermia is reported. Specific changes in the technique used, such as venting the oxygenator before use, monitoring mixed venous PO2 and PCO2, as well as the safety of cold hyperkalaemic cardioplegia are described. Controversial aspects of malignant hyperthermia management such as the safety of calcium and catechol inotropes are discussed in relationship to the successful use of cardio-pulmonary bypass in our patient. We chose to treat left ventricular dysfunction by aggressive vasodilator (nitroglycerine) therapy. We detected no myocardial or respiratory depression secondary to dantrolene therapy either before or after operation.

  12. Lattice and bypass design for a coherent xuv facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A.; Garren, A.A.; Vignola, G.

    1985-05-01

    The design of a magnet lattice and bypass for a coherent radiation facility is discussed. The lattice is the missing magnet FODO structure first proposed by Vignola for a 6 GeV light source. This has been adapted for a 750-1300 MeV electron storage ring for use with both conventional insertion devices and a high gain FEL optimized for output at 400 A. The latter device requires that the electron bunch be deflected into a small aperture bypass, then reinjected into the ring where the perturbing effects of the FEL are damped out. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Fibrin Adhesive: Clinical Application in Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fundaró, Pino; Velardi, Antonio R.; Santoli, Carmine

    1985-01-01

    Fibrin adhesive was used 72 times in a group of 67 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery. The indications were prophylactic sealing of potential sources of bleeding, topical hemostasis (control of bleeding sites dangerous or difficult to suture), and fixation of the graft in the optimal position. The method of glue application under varying circumstances is described and the results are reported. This experience suggests that in some cases the glue expedites the operation and makes it safer. We conclude that the fibrin sealing represents a valid aid in coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:15227018

  14. [Prevalence of early and late dumping after gastric bypass].

    PubMed

    Héraïef, R; Giusti, V

    2014-03-26

    Gastric bypass surgery is an effective treatment of obesity, bringing a significant weight loss and a major improvement of carbohydrate profile. However, in some patients, a deregulation in carbohydrate metabolism between insulin secretion and sensitivity is observed, whereupon early and late dumping happen. Their prevalence isn't well studied, although it seems that 10 to 20% of patients are affected. We've studied a cohort of 70 patients who undergone gastric bypass surgery at the CHUV. 18 (25.7%) patients have a positive anamnesis for early dumping and 10 (14.3%) for late dumping, being it superior as what is described in the literature.

  15. CT scan diagnosis of bleeding peptic ulcer after gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Husain, Syed; Ahmed, Ahmed R; Johnson, Joseph; Boss, Thad; O'Malley, William

    2007-11-01

    Investigation of the bypassed stomach in patients with suspected peptic ulcer disease presents a major challenge to bariatric surgeons. Various methods have been suggested for visualization of the duodenum and bypassed stomach. These include endoscopy via percutaneous gastrostomy access, retrograde endoscopy and virtual gastroscopy using CT scan. We present a case of peptic ulcer bleeding diagnosed with the help of conventional CT scan. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second such case reported in the literature and the first in the bariatric population.

  16. Detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

    PubMed

    Sajid, Abdul; Kashif, Natasha; Kifayat, Nasira; Ahmad, Shabeer

    2016-09-01

    The antibiotic residues in poultry meat can pose certain hazards to human health among them are sensitivity to antibiotics, allergic reactions, mutation in cells, imbalance of intestinal micro biota and bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The purpose of the present paper was to detect antibiotic residue in poultry meat. During the present study a total of 80 poultry kidney and liver samples were collected and tested for detection of different antibiotic residues at different pH levels Eschericha coli at pH 6, 7 and Staphyloccocus aureus at pH 8 & 9. Out of 80 samples only 4 samples were positive for antibiotic residues. The highest concentrations of antibiotic residue found in these tissues were tetracycline (8%) followed by ampicilin (4%), streptomycine (2%) and aminoglycosides (1%) as compared to other antibiotics like sulfonamides, neomycine and gentamycine. It was concluded that these microorganism at these pH levels could be effectively used for detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

  17. A Bypass Program of Supportive Instruction for Secondary Students with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosby, Robert J.

    1979-01-01

    The developmental bypass teaching technique (which provides students an opportunity to bypass their learning deficits) was studied with regard to social studies achievement and classroom behaviors in 50 learning disabled junior high school students. (Author/PHR)

  18. Source Control and Graft Preservation Using Negative Pressure Wound Therapy with Antibiotic Instillation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Timothy; Grossi, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely used to treat many types of complex wounds, and the advent of the instillation and dwell time (NPWTi-d) technique has enhanced this system with the addition of automated treatment with topical solutions. In the field of vascular surgery, NPWT is utilized to help close wounds over underlying grafts; however keeping these wounds free of infection and avoiding large reoperation when infection occurs remains a challenge. In this case report we present a patient who required acute intervention for limb ischemia, with a large wound created in the groin for anastomosis of a prosthetic graft bypass. Postoperatively, the wound became infected, and the challenge became balancing infection control and graft preservation with the patient’s multiple comorbidities including postoperative non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). To avoid a large reoperation, we chose NPWTi-d with automated instillation of an antibiotic solution. There was no reinfection or return to the operating room (OR), the patient was discharged after four weeks and the wound closed on its own shortly thereafter. This case demonstrates that for high-risk surgical patients with known wound infections in the proximity of a bypass graft, NPWTi-d with antibiotic instillation may be an effective augmentation to current treatment strategies and may be considered as a stand-alone technique for wound closure in select cases. PMID:27909643

  19. The challenge of efflux-mediated antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Zhi; Plésiat, Patrick; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    The global emergence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a growing threat to antibiotic therapy. The chromosomally encoded drug efflux mechanisms that are ubiquitous in these bacteria greatly contribute to antibiotic resistance and present a major challenge for antibiotic development. Multidrug pumps, particularly those represented by the clinically relevant AcrAB-TolC and Mex pumps of the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) superfamily, not only mediate intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) but also are involved in other functions, including the bacterial stress response and pathogenicity. Additionally, efflux pumps interact synergistically with other resistance mechanisms (e.g., with the outer membrane permeability barrier) to increase resistance levels. Since the discovery of RND pumps in the early 1990s, remarkable scientific and technological advances have allowed for an in-depth understanding of the structural and biochemical basis, substrate profiles, molecular regulation, and inhibition of MDR pumps. However, the development of clinically useful efflux pump inhibitors and/or new antibiotics that can bypass pump effects continues to be a challenge. Plasmid-borne efflux pump genes (including those for RND pumps) have increasingly been identified. This article highlights the recent progress obtained for organisms of clinical significance, together with methodological considerations for the characterization of MDR pumps.

  20. The Challenge of Efflux-Mediated Antibiotic Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Plésiat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The global emergence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a growing threat to antibiotic therapy. The chromosomally encoded drug efflux mechanisms that are ubiquitous in these bacteria greatly contribute to antibiotic resistance and present a major challenge for antibiotic development. Multidrug pumps, particularly those represented by the clinically relevant AcrAB-TolC and Mex pumps of the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) superfamily, not only mediate intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) but also are involved in other functions, including the bacterial stress response and pathogenicity. Additionally, efflux pumps interact synergistically with other resistance mechanisms (e.g., with the outer membrane permeability barrier) to increase resistance levels. Since the discovery of RND pumps in the early 1990s, remarkable scientific and technological advances have allowed for an in-depth understanding of the structural and biochemical basis, substrate profiles, molecular regulation, and inhibition of MDR pumps. However, the development of clinically useful efflux pump inhibitors and/or new antibiotics that can bypass pump effects continues to be a challenge. Plasmid-borne efflux pump genes (including those for RND pumps) have increasingly been identified. This article highlights the recent progress obtained for organisms of clinical significance, together with methodological considerations for the characterization of MDR pumps. PMID:25788514

  1. Tailored silica-antibiotic nanoparticles: overcoming bacterial resistance with low cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Capeletti, Larissa Brentano; de Oliveira, Luciane França; Gonçalves, Kaliandra de Almeida; de Oliveira, Jessica Fernanda Affonso; Saito, Ângela; Kobarg, Jörg; dos Santos, João Henrique Zimnoch; Cardoso, Mateus Borba

    2014-07-01

    New and more aggressive antibiotic resistant bacteria arise at an alarming rate and represent an ever-growing challenge to global health care systems. Consequently, the development of new antimicrobial agents is required to overcome the inefficiency of conventional antibiotics and bypass treatment limitations related to these pathologies. In this study, we present a synthesis protocol, which was able to entrap tetracycline antibiotic into silica nanospheres. Bactericidal efficacy of these structures was tested against bacteria that were susceptible and resistant to antibiotics. For nonresistant bacteria, our composite had bactericidal efficiency comparable to that of free-tetracycline. On the other hand, the synthesized composites were able to avoid bacterial growth of resistant bacteria while free-tetracycline has shown no significant bactericidal effect. Finally, we have investigated the cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles against mammalian cells to check any possible poisoning effect. It was found that these nanospheres are not apoptosis-inducers and only a reduction on the cell replication rate was seen when compared to the control without nanoparticles.

  2. Hereditary spherocytosis in a patient undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass--a case report.

    PubMed

    Spegar, J; Riha, H; Kotulak, T; Vanek, T

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is a genetically determined abnormality of red blood cells. It is the most common cause of inherited haemolysis in Europe and North America within the Caucasian population. We document a patient who underwent an aortocoronary bypass procedure on cardiopulmonary bypass. In view of the uncertain tolerance of the abnormal red cells in hereditary spherocytosis to cardiopulmonary bypass, we reviewed the patient's chart and analyzed recorded values of these parameters: free plasma haemoglobin, renal parameters, cystatin C, bilirubin, liver tests, urine samples. From the results, we can see that slight haemolysis-elevated bilirubin in the blood sample and elevated bilirubin and urobilinogen in the urine sample occurred on the first postoperative day. The levels of these parameters slowly decreased during the next postoperative days. There was no real clinical effect of this haemolysis on renal functions.

  3. On Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery Versus Off Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Yousuf-ul; Ahmed, Muhammad Umer; Khan, Muhammad Shahzeb; Bawany, Faizan Imran; Khan, Asadullah; Arshad, Mohammad Hussham

    2014-01-01

    There are two basic ways of performing coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG): on pump CABG and off pump CABG. Off pump CABG is relatively a newer procedure to on-pump CABG and does not require the use of the cardiopulmonary bypass machine. On pump CABG is the more traditional method of performing bypass surgery. However its resultant inflammatory effects cause renal dysfunction, gastrointestinal distress and cardiac abnormalities which have forced the surgeons to look for alternatives to the procedure. An extensive literature search revealed that on pump CABG causes better revascularization as compared to off pump CABG while off pump CABG has a much lower post operative morbidity and mortality especially in high risk patients. We suggest that the technique used should depend on the ease of the surgeon doing the operation as both the methods seem almost equally efficient according to the review. PMID:24762361

  4. [Alliance against MDRO: safeguarding antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Carlet, J; Rambaud, C; Pulcini, C

    2012-09-01

    Resistance to antibiotics has increased recently to a dramatic extend, and the pipeline of new antibiotics is almost dry for the 5 next years. Failures happen already for trivial community acquired infections, like pyelonephritis, or peritonitis, and this is likely to increase. Difficult surgical procedures, transplants, and other immunosuppressive therapies will become far more risky. Resistance is mainly due to an excessive usage of antibiotics, in all sectors, including the animal one. Action is urgently needed. Therefore, an alliance against MDRO has been recently created, which includes health care professionals, consumers, health managers, and politicians. The document highlights the different proposed measures, and represents a strong consensus between the different professionals, including general practitioners, and veterinarians.

  5. [Sinusitis--judicious antibiotic treatment].

    PubMed

    Niedzielska, Grazyna

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents different forms of sinusitis in children and adults as well as the patomechanism of sinusitis of infective and non-infective origin. The role of bacterial infection has been discussed. Participation of major pathogens of URTI such as S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis has been highlighted and the factors influencing growth of their antibiotic-resistant stains. Guidelines concerning antibiotic therapy in children and adults, depending on disease course, age and factors influencing growth of resistant stains have been presented. Causes of failure in treatment of sinusitis have been analysed eg. in case of bacterial biofilm growth or non-neutrophilic inflammation forms. Antimicrobial treatment concerns mainly acute and aggravated infections. In case of chronic sinusitis, antibiotic therapy is complementary to surgical treatment.

  6. Cairomycin B, a New Antibiotic

    PubMed Central

    Shimi, Ibrahim R.; Abedallah, Nadia; Fathy, Shadia

    1977-01-01

    Cairomycin B is a new cyclic peptide antibiotic that was isolated from Streptomyces As-C-19 obtained from the soil of Cairo. The antibiotic had the following empirical formula: C10H15N3O3; on acid hydrolysis, it yielded aspartic acid and lysine. Spectral analysis and its chemical characteristics indicated that it was a cyclic peptide. The antibiotic melted at 120 to 121°C and was freely soluble in chloroform, ethyl acetate, and acetone, slightly soluble in alcohols, and rather insoluble in water and petroleum ether. Cairomycin B was mainly active against gram-positive bacteria, with high toxicity to experimental animals and weak serum-binding properties. PMID:855995

  7. Polar bears, antibiotics, and the evolving ribosome (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Yonath, Ada

    2010-06-14

    High-resolution structures of ribosomes, the cellular machines that translate the genetic code into proteins, revealed the decoding mechanism, detected the mRNA path, identified the sites of the tRNA molecules in the ribosome, elucidated the position and the nature of the nascent proteins exit tunnel, illuminated the interactions of the ribosome with non-ribosomal factors, such as the initiation, release and recycling factors, and provided valuable information on ribosomal antibiotics, their binding sites, modes of action, principles of selectivity and the mechanisms leading to their resistance. Notably, these structures proved that the ribosome is a ribozyme whose active site, namely where the peptide bonds are being formed, is situated within a universal symmetrical region that is embedded in the otherwise asymmetric ribosome structure. As this symmetrical region is highly conserved and provides the machinery required for peptide bond formation and for ribosome polymerase activity, it may be the remnant of the proto-ribosome, a dimeric prebiotic machine that formed peptide bonds and non-coded polypeptide chains. Structures of complexes of ribosomes with antibiotics targeting them revealed the principles allowing for their clinical use, identified resistance mechanisms and showed the structural bases for discriminating pathogenic bacteria from hosts, hence providing valuable structural information for antibiotics improvement and for the design of novel compounds that can serve as antibiotics.

  8. Thiopeptide antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Rachel; Watrous, Jeramie D; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Bowers, Albert A; Shank, Elizabeth A

    2015-03-10

    Bacteria have evolved the ability to produce a wide range of structurally complex natural products historically called "secondary" metabolites. Although some of these compounds have been identified as bacterial communication cues, more frequently natural products are scrutinized for antibiotic activities that are relevant to human health. However, there has been little regard for how these compounds might otherwise impact the physiology of neighboring microbes present in complex communities. Bacillus cereus secretes molecules that activate expression of biofilm genes in Bacillus subtilis. Here, we use imaging mass spectrometry to identify the thiocillins, a group of thiazolyl peptide antibiotics, as biofilm matrix-inducing compounds produced by B. cereus. We found that thiocillin increased the population of matrix-producing B. subtilis cells and that this activity could be abolished by multiple structural alterations. Importantly, a mutation that eliminated thiocillin's antibiotic activity did not affect its ability to induce biofilm gene expression in B. subtilis. We go on to show that biofilm induction appears to be a general phenomenon of multiple structurally diverse thiazolyl peptides and use this activity to confirm the presence of thiazolyl peptide gene clusters in other bacterial species. Our results indicate that the roles of secondary metabolites initially identified as antibiotics may have more complex effects--acting not only as killing agents, but also as specific modulators of microbial cellular phenotypes.

  9. Antibiotic treatment for Helicobacter pylori: Is the end coming?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Young; Choi, Duck Joo; Chung, Jun-Won

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been associated with gastro-duodenal disease and the importance of H. pylori eradication is underscored by its designation as a group I carcinogen. The standard triple therapy consists of a proton pump inhibitor, amoxicillin and clarithromycin, although many other regimens are used, including quadruple, sequential and concomitant therapy regimens supplemented with metronidazole, clarithromycin and levofloxacin. Despite these efforts, current therapeutic regimens lack efficacy in eradication due to antibiotic resistance, drug compliance and antibiotic degradation by the acidic stomach environment. Antibiotic resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole is particularly problematic and several approaches have been proposed to overcome this issue, such as complementary probiotic therapy with Lactobacillus. Other studies have identified novel molecules with an anti-H. pylori effect, as well as tailored therapy and nanotechnology as viable alternative eradication strategies. This review discusses current antibiotic therapy for H. pylori infections, limitations of this type of therapy and predicts the availability of newly developed therapies for H. pylori eradication. PMID:26558152

  10. Antibiotic Sensitivity of Bacillus clausii Strains in Commercial Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Abbrescia, A.; Palese, L.L.; Papa, S.; Gaballo, A.; Alifano, P.; Sardanelli, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    Recently has been acknowledged the healthy use of Bacillus and related bacteria as probiotics. A mixture reported to contain four probiotic strains of Bacillus clausii is marketed as an OTC (Over The Counter) medicinal supplement for human use. Their poliantibiotic resistant property, useful for restoring the gut microbiota during antibiotic treatment, raises the question about the risk of resistance transfer. In order to better assess the risk-benefit ratio it is important to always monitoring the pattern and stability of resistance spectra in these bacteria. In this work, we have extensively redefined the antibiotic susceptibility profile of these four probiotic strains. Resistance phenotype has been determined by screening a large number of antibiotics, including natural products (such as penicillin, vancomycin and erythromycin), and completely synthetic molecules (such as fluoroquinolones). Extensive comparison with a wild type strain belonging to the normal intestinal microbiome was carried out. The molecular basis of some resistances was determined. Observed antibiotic resistances were correlated with previous and new data in safety evaluations of these strains for human use.

  11. 5-Alkyloxytryptamines are membrane-targeting, broad-spectrum antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Katherine C; Hurley, Katherine A; Weibel, Douglas B

    2016-11-15

    Antibiotic adjuvant therapy represents an exciting opportunity to enhance the activity of clinical antibiotics by co-dosing with a secondary small molecule. Successful adjuvants decrease the concentration of antibiotics used to defeat bacteria, increase activity (in some cases introducing activity against organisms that are drug resistant), and reduce the frequency at which drug-resistant bacteria emerge. We report that 5-alkyloxytryptamines are a new class of broad-spectrum antibacterial agents with exciting activity as antibiotic adjuvants. We synthesized 5-alkyloxytryptamine analogs and found that an alkyl chain length of 6-12 carbons and a primary ammonium group are necessary for the antibacterial activity of the compounds, and an alkyl chain length of 6-10 carbons increased the membrane permeability of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Although several of the most potent analogs also have activity against the membranes of human embryonic kidney cells, we demonstrate that below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)-where mammalian cell toxicity is low-these compounds may be successfully used as adjuvants for chloramphenicol, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, and rifampicin against clinical strains of Salmonella typhimurium, Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus, reducing MIC values by as much as several logs.

  12. Thiopeptide antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Bleich, Rachel; Watrous, Jeramie D.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Bowers, Albert A.; Shank, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved the ability to produce a wide range of structurally complex natural products historically called “secondary” metabolites. Although some of these compounds have been identified as bacterial communication cues, more frequently natural products are scrutinized for antibiotic activities that are relevant to human health. However, there has been little regard for how these compounds might otherwise impact the physiology of neighboring microbes present in complex communities. Bacillus cereus secretes molecules that activate expression of biofilm genes in Bacillus subtilis. Here, we use imaging mass spectrometry to identify the thiocillins, a group of thiazolyl peptide antibiotics, as biofilm matrix-inducing compounds produced by B. cereus. We found that thiocillin increased the population of matrix-producing B. subtilis cells and that this activity could be abolished by multiple structural alterations. Importantly, a mutation that eliminated thiocillin’s antibiotic activity did not affect its ability to induce biofilm gene expression in B. subtilis. We go on to show that biofilm induction appears to be a general phenomenon of multiple structurally diverse thiazolyl peptides and use this activity to confirm the presence of thiazolyl peptide gene clusters in other bacterial species. Our results indicate that the roles of secondary metabolites initially identified as antibiotics may have more complex effects—acting not only as killing agents, but also as specific modulators of microbial cellular phenotypes. PMID:25713360

  13. Percutaneous gastric drainage as a treatment for small bowel obstruction after gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Hamoui, Nahid; Crookes, Peter F; Kaufman, Howard S

    2007-10-01

    The authors report the case of a patient who developed small bowel obstruction after laparoscopic gastric bypass. Imaging revealed an obstruction at the enteroenterostomy resulting in dilation of the bypassed stomach and proximal small bowel. The bypassed stomach was percutaneously drained using CT guidance, leading to resolution of the small bowel obstruction. Biliopancreatic limb obstructions can be successfully treated non-operatively after gastric bypass.

  14. Outcomes of lower extremity bypass performed for acute limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Baril, Donald T.; Patel, Virendra I.; Judelson, Dejah R.; Goodney, Philip P.; McPhee, James T.; Hevelone, Nathanael D.; Cronenwett, Jack L.; Schanzer, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acute limb ischemia remains one of the most challenging emergencies in vascular surgery. Historically, outcomes following interventions for acute limb ischemia have been associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to determine contemporary outcomes following lower extremity bypass performed for acute limb ischemia. Methods All patients undergoing infrainguinal lower extremity bypass between 2003 and 2011 within hospitals comprising the Vascular Study Group of New England were identified. Patients were stratified according to whether or not the indication for lower extremity bypass was acute limb ischemia. Primary end points included bypass graft occlusion, major amputation, and mortality at 1 year postoperatively as determined by Kaplan-Meier life table analysis. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to evaluate independent predictors of mortality and major amputation at 1 year. Results Of 5712 lower extremity bypass procedures, 323 (5.7%) were performed for acute limb ischemia. Patients undergoing lower extremity bypass for acute limb ischemia were similar in age (66 vs 67; P = .084) and sex (68% male vs 69% male; P = .617) compared with chronic ischemia patients, but were less likely to be on aspirin (63% vs 75%; P < .0001) or a statin (55% vs 68%; P < .0001). Patients with acute limb ischemia were more likely to be current smokers (49% vs 39%; P < .0001), to have had a prior ipsilateral bypass (33% vs 24%; P = .004) or a prior ipsilateral percutaneous intervention (41% vs 29%; P = .001). Bypasses performed for acute limb ischemia were longer in duration (270 vs 244 minutes; P = .007), had greater blood loss (363 vs 272 mL; P < .0001), and more commonly utilized prosthetic conduits (41% vs 33%; P = .003). Acute limb ischemia patients experienced increased in-hospital major adverse events (20% vs 12%; P < .0001) including myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure exacerbation

  15. The binding of antibiotics in OmpF porin.

    PubMed

    Ziervogel, Brigitte K; Roux, Benoît

    2013-01-08

    The structure of OmpF porin in complex with three common antibiotics (zwitterionic ampicillin, anionic ertapenem, and di-anionic carbenicillin) was determined using X-ray crystallography. The three antibiotics are found to bind within the extracellular and periplasmic pore vestibules, away from the narrow OmpF constriction zone. Using the X-ray structures as a starting point, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations with an applied membrane voltage show that ionic current through the OmpF channel is blocked with bound ampicillin, but not with bound carbenicillin. The susceptibility of Escherichia coli expressing OmpF mutants to ampicillin and carbenicillin was also experimentally characterized using microbiologic assays. These results show that general diffusion by OmpF porins allows for transfer of molecules with varied charged states and give insights into the design of more efficient antibiotics. A better understanding of this mechanism will shed light on nature's way of devising channels able to enhance the transport of molecules through membranes.

  16. Nucleoside antibiotics: biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2015-02-01

    The alarming rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens has coincided with a decline in the supply of new antibiotics. It is therefore of great importance to find and create new antibiotics. Nucleoside antibiotics are a large family of natural products with diverse biological functions. Their biosynthesis is a complex process through multistep enzymatic reactions and is subject to hierarchical regulation. Genetic and biochemical studies of the biosynthetic machinery have provided the basis for pathway engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis to create new or hybrid nucleoside antibiotics. Dissection of regulatory mechanisms is leading to strategies to increase the titer of bioactive nucleoside antibiotics.

  17. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  6. Routine preoperative insertion of IABP in high-risk off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Hunaid A; Briffa, Norman P

    2005-01-01

    The beneficial effects of intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) in coronary artery bypass graft surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass have been reported. However, whether preoperative insertion of IABP in high-risk off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) has any beneficial effects remains to be established. We report our experience of preoperative insertion of IABP in OPCAB.

  7. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  8. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Symptom Relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  9. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  10. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - What You Can Do

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  11. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - What Everyone Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  12. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  13. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Influenza (Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  14. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Bronchitis (Chest Cold)

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  15. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Sinus Infection (Sinusitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  16. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Sore Throat

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  17. Probiotic approach to prevent antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Ouwehand, Arthur C; Forssten, Sofia; Hibberd, Ashley A; Lyra, Anna; Stahl, Buffy

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, mainly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although also strain of other species are commercialized, that have a beneficial effect on the host. From the perspective of antibiotic use, probiotics have been observed to reduce the risk of certain infectious disease such as certain types of diarrhea and respiratory tract infection. This may be accompanied with a reduced need of antibiotics for secondary infections. Antibiotics tend to be effective against most common diseases, but increasingly resistance is being observed among pathogens. Probiotics are specifically selected to not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and not carry transferable antibiotic resistance. Concomitant use of probiotics with antibiotics has been observed to reduce the incidence, duration and/or severity of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. This contributes to better adherence to the antibiotic prescription and thereby reduces the evolution of resistance. To what extent probiotics directly reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance is still much under investigation; but maintaining a balanced microbiota during antibiotic use may certainly provide opportunities for reducing the spread of resistances. Key messages Probiotics may reduce the risk for certain infectious diseases and thereby reduce the need for antibiotics. Probiotics may reduce the risk for antibiotic-associated diarrhea Probiotics do not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and may even reduce it.

  18. Emergency EC-IC bypass for symptomatic atherosclerotic ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Nitta, Junpei; Ishizaka, Shigetoshi; Kanaya, Kohei; Yanagawa, Takao; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass surgery has no preventive effect on subsequent ipsilateral ischemic stroke in patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic internal carotid occlusion and hemodynamic cerebral ischemia. A few studies have assessed whether an urgent EC-IC bypass surgery is an effective treatment for main trunk stenosis or occlusion in acute stage. The authors retrospectively reviewed 58 consecutive patients who underwent urgent EC-IC bypass for symptomatic internal carotid artery or the middle cerebral artery stenosis or occlusion between January 2003 and December 2011. Clinical characteristics and neuroimagings were evaluated and analyzed. Based on preoperative angiogram, responsible lesions were the internal carotid artery in 19 (32.8%) patients and the middle cerebral artery in 39 (67.2%). No hemorrhagic complication occurred. Sixty-nine percent of patients showed improvement of neurological function after surgery, and 74.1% of patients had favorable outcome. Unfavorable outcome was associated with insufficient collateral flow and new infarction after bypass surgery.

  19. 21 CFR 870.4430 - Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. 870.4430 Section 870.4430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... intracardiac suction control is a device which provides the vacuum and control for a cardiotomy return...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4430 - Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. 870.4430 Section 870.4430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... intracardiac suction control is a device which provides the vacuum and control for a cardiotomy return...

  1. Plutonium Finishing Plant assessment of confinement system bypass leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, J.D.

    1996-09-30

    The purpose of this report is to document walk-through`s of the safety class confinement systems at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). In addition this document outlines the actions taken to assess the confinement system for bypass leakage as well as establishing disposition for discovered deficiencies at the PFP.

  2. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device. 870.3545 Section 870.3545 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... partially implanted in the body. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or...

  3. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device. 870.3545 Section 870.3545 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... partially implanted in the body. (b) Classification. Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or...

  4. Step by Step: Avoiding Spiritual Bypass in 12-Step Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Clarke, Philip B.; Graves, Elizabeth G.

    2009-01-01

    With spirituality as a cornerstone, 12-step groups serve a vital role in the recovery community. It is important for counselors to be mindful, however, of the potential for clients to be in spiritual bypass, which likely will undermine the recovery process.

  5. Thermal Reliability Study of Bypass Diodes in Photovoltaic Modules (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the result of high-temperature durability and thermal cycling testing and analysis for the selected diodes to study the detail of the thermal design and relative long-term reliability of the bypass diodes used to limit the detrimental effects of module hot-spot susceptibility.

  6. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device. 870.3545 Section 870.3545 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3545...

  7. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device. 870.3545 Section 870.3545 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3545...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device. 870.3545 Section 870.3545 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3545...

  9. Integral bypass diodes in an amorphous silicon alloy photovoltaic module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, J. J.; Flaisher, H.

    1991-01-01

    Thin-film, tandem-junction, amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic modules were constructed in which a part of the a-Si alloy cell material is used to form bypass protection diodes. This integral design circumvents the need for incorporating external, conventional diodes, thus simplifying the manufacturing process and reducing module weight.

  10. Bypassing the Local Rural Hospital for Outpatient Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Charles; Bellamy, Gail R.; Menachemi, Nir; Chukmaitov, Askar S.; Brooks, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the amount of local rural hospital outpatient department (HOPD) bypass for outpatient procedures. Methods: We analyzed data on colonoscopies and upper gastrointestinal endoscopies performed in the state of Florida over the period 1997-2004. Findings: Approximately, 53% of colonoscopy and 45% of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy…

  11. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. 870.4320 Section 870.4320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food and Drug Administration on or...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. 870.4320 Section 870.4320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... of completion of a PDP is required to be filed with the Food and Drug Administration on or...

  13. Successful kinase bypass with new acyclovir phosphoramidate prodrugs.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Christopher; Derudas, Marco; Bugert, Joachim J; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert; Balzarini, Jan

    2008-08-01

    Novel phosphoramidates of acyclovir have been prepared and evaluated in vitro against acyclovir-sensitive and -resistant herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 and varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Unlike the parent nucleoside these novel phosphate prodrugs retain antiviral potency versus the ACV-resistant virus strain, suggesting an efficient bypass of the viral thymidine kinase.

  14. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator. 870.4350 Section 870.4350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-heart surgery. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator. 870.4350 Section 870.4350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-heart surgery. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator. 870.4350 Section 870.4350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-heart surgery. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator. 870.4350 Section 870.4350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-heart surgery. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control for this device...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4200 - Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment. 870.4200 Section 870.4200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., and (ii) The guidance document entitled “Guidance on the Performance Standard for Electrode Lead...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4200 - Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass accessory equipment. 870.4200 Section 870.4200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., and (ii) The guidance document entitled “Guidance on the Performance Standard for Electrode Lead...

  20. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Bypass Surgery Операция шунтирования коронарной ... displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  1. 46 CFR 56.20-20 - Valve bypasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Valve bypasses. 56.20-20 Section 56.20-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES..., and of a material of the same nominal chemical composition and physical properties as that used...

  2. Cycling firing method for bypass operation of bridge converters

    DOEpatents

    Zabar, Zivan

    1982-01-01

    The bridge converter comprises a number of switching elements and an electronic logic system which regulated the electric power levels by controlling the firing, i.e., the initiation of the conduction period of the switching elements. Cyclic firing of said elements allows the direct current to bypass the alternating current system with high power factor and negligible losses.

  3. Locked-in Syndrome and Blue Toe Syndrome Caused by Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Moloudi, Abdolrasoul

    2010-01-01

    Severe inflammation after cardiopulmonary bypass with the vasculitis of the acral extremity and vertebro-basilar arterial system leads to the locked-in syndrome and blue toe syndrome. In broad terms, systemic, idiopathic, and environmental factors provoke syndromes that present with digital discoloration or the blue toe syndrome. Painful digital discoloration, accompanied by ulceration, suggests vasculitis, involving small blood vessels. Definitive diagnosis usually requires histological documentation because vasculitic syndromes have no pathognomonic clinical features or laboratory test results.The case introduced herein is that of a woman who developed the locked-in syndrome in conjunction with quadriplegia, loss of facial movement, speech loss, and loss of horizontal eye movements. She had initially presented with severe mitral stenosis and left atrial clot and undergone mitral valve replacement and clot extraction. The patient expired from multiple organ failure despite prolonged ventilatory support, including tracheotomy, and meticulous nursing care and antibiotic prophylaxis. Given the previously reported partial recovery from this syndrome with the use of steroids, we would advocate the use of such pharmacological agents.

  4. Successful salvage of kidney allografts threatened by ureteral stricture using pyelovesical bypass.

    PubMed

    Azhar, R A; Hassanain, M; Aljiffry, M; Aldousari, S; Cabrera, T; Andonian, S; Metrakos, P; Anidjar, M; Paraskevas, S

    2010-06-01

    Ureteral stricture is the most common urologic complication after renal transplantation. When endourologic management fails, open ureteral reconstruction remains the standard treatment. The complexity of some of these procedures makes it necessary to explore other means of repair. This study evaluated the intermediate-term outcome of subcutaneous pyelovesical bypass graft (SPBG) on renal transplant recipients. We reviewed 8 patients (6 male and 2 female; mean age 52 years) with refractory ureteral strictures postrenal transplantation, who received SPBG as salvage therapy. All patients failed endourologic management and half failed open management of their strictures. After a mean follow-up of 19.4 months, 7 out of 8 renal grafts have good function with mean GFR of 58.5 mL/min/1.73 m(2), without evidence of obstruction or infection. One patient lost his graft due to persistent infection of the SPBG and one patient developed a recurrent urinary tract infection managed with long-term antibiotics. SPBG offers a last resort in the treatment of ureteral stricture after renal transplantation refractory to conventional therapy.

  5. Antibiotic resistance-mediated isolation of scaffold-specific natural product producers.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Maulik N; Waglechner, Nicholas; Wright, Gerry D

    2014-01-01

    For over half a century, actinomycetes have served as the most promising source of novel antibacterial scaffolds. However, over the years, there has been a decline in the discovery of new antibiotics from actinomycetes. This is partly due to the use of standard screening methods and platforms that result in the re-discovery of the same molecules. Thus, according to current estimates, the discovery of a new antibacterial requires screening of tens to hundreds of thousands of bacterial strains. We have devised a resistance-based antibacterial discovery platform by harnessing the innate self-protection mechanism of antibiotic producers. This protocol provides a detailed method for isolation of scaffold-specific antibacterial producers by isolating strains in the presence of a selective antibiotic. As a specific example, we describe isolation of glycopeptide antibiotic (GPA) producers from soil actinomycetes, using vancomycin as the antibiotic resistance filter. However, the protocol can be adapted to isolate diverse producers from various sources producing different scaffolds, by selecting an appropriate antibiotic as a screening filter. The protocol provides a solution for two major bottlenecks that impede the new drug discovery pipeline: low hit frequency and re-discovery of known molecules. The entire protocol, from soil collection to identification of putative antibacterial producers, takes about 6 weeks to complete.

  6. Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity Of Antibiotics Mixed With Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Neeraj; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Thakur, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    Current producers of antimicrobial technology have a long lasting, environmentally safe, non-leaching, water soluble solution that will eventually replace all poisons and heavy metals. The transition metal ions inevitably exist as metal complexes in biological systems by interaction with the numerous molecules possessing groupings capable of complexation or chelation. Nanoparticles of metal oxides offer a wide variety of potential applications in medicine due to the unprecedented advances in nanobiotechnology research. the bacterial action of antibiotics like penicillin, erythryomycin, ampicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin etc. and that of a mixture of antibiotics and metal and metal oxide nanoparticles like zinc oxide, zirconium, silver and gold on microbes was examined by the agar-well-diffusion method, enumeration of colony-forming units (CFU) and turbidimetry.

  7. Mechanisms of Resistance to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: Overview and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotics are used to treat many Gram-negative and some Gram-positive infections and, importantly, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Among various bacterial species, resistance to AGs arises through a variety of intrinsic and acquired mechanisms. The bacterial cell wall serves as a natural barrier for small molecules such as AGs and may be further fortified via acquired mutations. Efflux pumps work to expel AGs from bacterial cells, and modifications here too may cause further resistance to AGs. Mutations in the ribosomal target of AGs, while rare, also contribute to resistance. Of growing clinical prominence is resistance caused by ribosome methyltransferases. By far the most widespread mechanism of resistance to AGs is the inactivation of these antibiotics by AG-modifying enzymes. We provide here an overview of these mechanisms by which bacteria become resistant to AGs and discuss their prevalence and potential for clinical relevance. PMID:26877861

  8. Spatial mapping of antibiotic resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A serious concern for modern animal production is the fear that feed antimicrobials, such as monensin, increase the potential for high levels of antibiotic resistant (AR) gene prevalence in the manure, which may subsequently be shared with soil communities and eventually be taken up by human pathoge...

  9. [Antibiotic prophylaxis before kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Robles, N R; Gallego, E; Anaya, F; Franco, A; Valderrábano, F

    1990-02-01

    The effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis was evaluated in the immediate postoperative period of renal transplantation (RT). Before RT, the patients were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: 1) cefotaxime (intravenous infusion of 1 g one hour before the operation). 2) Ceftriaxone (1 g i.v. given in a similar way). 3) Control (without antibiotics). Patients who required antibiotic therapy during the first 3 postoperative weeks were excluded. 20 recipients of cadaveric renal grafts were included in each group. There were 39 males and 21 females with a mean age of 39.9 years. One patient from the cefotaxime group (5%), 2 from the ceftriaxone group (10%) and 2 from the control group (10%) developed infection of the surgical wound, all due to grampositive organisms. 19 patients had urinary tract infections: 7 from the control group (35%), 7 from the cefotaxime group (35%), and 5 from the ceftriaxone group (25%). The development of wound infection was not correlated with urea, creatinine, hemoglobin or total protein levels, or with urinary tract infection or fistula, diabetes or fever. The mean packed red cell volume of the patients who developed wound infection was 24.7 +/- 1.2 vs 28.6 +/- 6.6 in those who did not (p less than 0.01). All patients with visible hematoma and 3 of 10 with perirenal blood collection had wound infection. It was concluded that antibiotic prophylaxis for renal transplantation was useless in our patients.

  10. Antibiotic resistance: a geopolitical issue.

    PubMed

    Carlet, J; Pulcini, C; Piddock, L J V

    2014-10-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR), associated with a lack of new antibiotics, is a major threat. Some countries have been able to contain resistance, but in most countries the numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria continue to increase, along with antibiotic consumption by humans and animals. AMR is a global issue, and concerns all decision-makers worldwide. Some initiatives have been undertaken in the last 15 years, in particular by the WHO, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, and the CDC, but those initiatives were partial and poorly implemented, without coordination. Very recently, some important initiatives have been implemented by the WHO. Since 2009, a US and European joint task force, the Trans-Atlantic Task Force on Antibiotic Resistance, has been working on common recommendations. At a national level, some important initiatives have been implemented, in particular in European countries and in the USA. The Chennai declaration, in India, is also a good example of a multidisciplinary and national initiative that was highly political. Finally, several non-governmental non-profit organizations are also very active, and have helped to raise awareness about the problem of AMR. In the future, this global issue will need political involvement and strong cooperation between countries and between international agencies.

  11. Antibiotic Therapy of Staphylococcal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hawks, Gordon H.

    1965-01-01

    The antibiotic treatment of staphylococcal infections remains a problem. Isolation of the organism and sensitivity testing are necessary in the choice of antibiotic. Penicillin G is the most effective penicillin against non-penicillinase-producing staphy-lococci; for the penicillinase producers there is very little to choose between the semisynthetic penicillins, methicillin, cloxacillin, nafcillin and oxacillin. For patients who are hypersensitive to penicillin, the bacteriostatic drugs (erythromycin, novobiocin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, oleandomycin) are useful for mild infections, while for more severe illness the bactericidal drugs (vancomycin, ristocetin, kanamycin, bacitracin, neomycin) have been used successfully. Acute staphylococcal enterocolitis is probably best treated by a semisynthetic penicillin. Other antibiotics which have been found useful, with clinical trials, for staphylococcal infections are cephalosporin, fucidin, cephaloridine and lincomycin. The latter drug has been reported of value in the treatment of osteomyelitis. There is little justification for the prophylactic use of antibiotics to prevent staphylococcal infection. Surgical drainage is still an important adjunct in the treatment of many staphylococcal infections. PMID:5318575

  12. Antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Sánchez, Borja; G. de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara; Margolles, Abelardo

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The main probiotic bacteria are strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although other representatives, such as Bacillus or Escherichia coli strains, have also been used. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are two common inhabitants of the human intestinal microbiota. Also, some species are used in food fermentation processes as starters, or as adjunct cultures in the food industry. With some exceptions, antibiotic resistance in these beneficial microbes does not constitute a safety concern in itself, when mutations or intrinsic resistance mechanisms are responsible for the resistance phenotype. In fact, some probiotic strains with intrinsic antibiotic resistance could be useful for restoring the gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment. However, specific antibiotic resistance determinants carried on mobile genetic elements, such as tetracycline resistance genes, are often detected in the typical probiotic genera, and constitute a reservoir of resistance for potential food or gut pathogens, thus representing a serious safety issue. PMID:23882264

  13. What Can Be Done about Antibiotic Resistance?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us General Background: What can be done about Antibiotic Resistance? What can I do? Are antibacterial agents, such as antibacterial soaps, a solution? Are antibiotics regulated? Is there any international action on the ...

  14. Collective antibiotic tolerance: Mechanisms, dynamics, and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Hannah R.; Srimani, Jaydeep K.; Lee, Anna J.; Lopatkin, Allison J.; You, Lingchong

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have developed resistance against every antibiotic at an alarming rate, considering the timescale at which new antibiotics are developed. Thus, there is a critical need to use antibiotics more effectively, extend the shelf life of existing antibiotics, and minimize their side effects. This requires understanding the mechanisms underlying bacterial drug responses. Past studies have focused on survival in the presence of antibiotics by individual cells, as genetic mutants or persisters. In contrast, a population of bacterial cells can collectively survive antibiotic treatments lethal to individual cells. This tolerance can arise by diverse mechanisms, including resistance-conferring enzyme production, titration-mediated bistable growth inhibition, swarming, and inter-population interactions. These strategies can enable rapid population recovery after antibiotic treatment, and provide a time window for otherwise susceptible bacteria to acquire inheritable genetic resistance. Here, we emphasize the potential for targeting collective antibiotic tolerance behaviors as an antibacterial treatment strategy. PMID:25689336

  15. Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Competencies Current Projects Completed Projects The Center for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance Reservoirs of Antibiotic Resistance ... visit our partner lab at the Center for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance . Antibiotic Resistance in the ...

  16. When and How to Take Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... complete dose, and they will not work to kill all your disease causing bacteria. Taking partial doses ... dose of the appropriate antibiotic is needed to kill all the harmful bacteria. How safe are antibiotics? ...

  17. Origins and evolution of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Davies, Julian; Davies, Dorothy

    2010-09-01

    Antibiotics have always been considered one of the wonder discoveries of the 20th century. This is true, but the real wonder is the rise of antibiotic resistance in hospitals, communities, and the environment concomitant with their use. The extraordinary genetic capacities of microbes have benefitted from man's overuse of antibiotics to exploit every source of resistance genes and every means of horizontal gene transmission to develop multiple mechanisms of resistance for each and every antibiotic introduced into practice clinically, agriculturally, or otherwise. This review presents the salient aspects of antibiotic resistance development over the past half-century, with the oft-restated conclusion that it is time to act. To achieve complete restitution of therapeutic applications of antibiotics, there is a need for more information on the role of environmental microbiomes in the rise of antibiotic resistance. In particular, creative approaches to the discovery of novel antibiotics and their expedited and controlled introduction to therapy are obligatory.

  18. Antibiotic stewardship programmes and the surgeon's role.

    PubMed

    Çakmakçi, M

    2015-04-01

    Inappropriate antibiotic use is a frequent occurrence, especially in surgical units. Among the unnecessary costs of such usage are unfavourable outcomes for patients and the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria. Antibiotic stewardship programmes aim to limit the spread of antibiotic resistance by promoting thoughtful prescribing of antibiotics. Such programmes usually try to control inappropriate use of antibiotics; to optimize the choice of drug, dosing, route, and duration of therapy; to maximize clinical cure or prevention of infection; and to limit unwanted effects and excess cost. In this paper, I discuss the impact of improper use of antibiotics and outline why I believe that antibiotic stewardship is likely to be the best way of dealing with it. Engagement of surgeons in antibiotic stewardship programmes is crucial to their success.

  19. Origins and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Julian; Davies, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Antibiotics have always been considered one of the wonder discoveries of the 20th century. This is true, but the real wonder is the rise of antibiotic resistance in hospitals, communities, and the environment concomitant with their use. The extraordinary genetic capacities of microbes have benefitted from man's overuse of antibiotics to exploit every source of resistance genes and every means of horizontal gene transmission to develop multiple mechanisms of resistance for each and every antibiotic introduced into practice clinically, agriculturally, or otherwise. This review presents the salient aspects of antibiotic resistance development over the past half-century, with the oft-restated conclusion that it is time to act. To achieve complete restitution of therapeutic applications of antibiotics, there is a need for more information on the role of environmental microbiomes in the rise of antibiotic resistance. In particular, creative approaches to the discovery of novel antibiotics and their expedited and controlled introduction to therapy are obligatory. PMID:20805405

  20. Antibiotic use in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yurdakök, M

    1998-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a life-threatening emergency and any delay in treatment may cause death. Initial signs of neonatal sepsis are slight and nonspecific. Therefore, in suspected sepsis, two or three days empirical antibiotic therapy should begin immediately after cultures have been obtained without awaiting the results. Antibiotics should be reevaluated when the results of the cultures and susceptibility tests are available. If the cultures are negative and the clinical findings are well, antibiotics should be stopped. Because of the nonspecific nature of neonatal sepsis, especially in small preterm infants, physicians continue antibiotics once started. If a baby has pneumonia or what appears to be sepsis, antibiotics should not be stopped, although cultures are negative. The duration of therapy depends on the initial response to the appropriate antibiotics but should be 10 to 14 days in most infants with sepsis and minimal or absent focal infection. In infants who developed sepsis during the first week of life, empirical therapy must cover group B streptococci, Enterobacteriaceae (especially E. coli) and Listeria monocytogenes. Penicillin or ampicillin plus an aminoglycoside is usually effective against all these organisms. Initial empirical antibiotic therapy for infants who developed sepsis beyond the first days of life must cover the organisms associated with early-onset sepsis as well as hospital-acquired pathogens such as staphylococci, enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Penicillin or ampicillin and an aminoglycoside combination may also be used in the initial therapy of late-onset sepsis as in cases with early-onset sepsis. In nosocomial infections, netilmicin or amikacin should be preferred. In cases showing increased risk of staphylococcal infection (e.g. presence of vascular catheter) or Pseudomonas infection (e.g. presence of typical skin lesions), antistaphylococcal or anti-Pseudomonas agents may be preferred in the initial empirical therapy. In

  1. Computer-assisted LAD bypass grafting at the open heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, Christine; Gnahm, Claudia; Friedl, Reinhard; Hoffmann, Martin; Dietmayer, Klaus

    2009-02-01

    Open heart bypass surgery is the standard treatment in advanced coronary heart diseases. For an effective revascularization procedure, optimal placement of the bypass is very important. To accelerate the intraoperative localization of the anastomosis site and to increase the precision of the procedure, a concept for computer assistance in open heart bypass surgery has been developed comprising the following steps: 1. Preprocedural planning: A patient-specific coronary map with information on vessel paths and wall plaque formations is extracted from a multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT). On this basis, the heart surgeon and the cardiac radiologist define the optimal anastomosis site prior to surgery. 2. Intraoperative navigation: During surgery, data are recorded at the beating heart using a stereo camera system. After registering the pre- and intraoperative data sets, preprocedural information can be transferred to the surgical site by overlaying the coronary map and the planned anastomosis site on the live video stream. With this visual guidance system, the surgeon can navigate to the planned anastomosis site. In this work, the proposed surgical assistance system has been validated for the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). The accuracy of the registration mechanism has been evaluated in retrospective on patient data sets and the effects of breathing motion were quantified. The promising results of the retrospective evaluation led to the in-vivo application of the computer assistance system during several bypass grafting procedures. Intraoperative navigation has been performed successfully and postoperative evaluation confirms that the bypass grafts were accurately positioned to the preoperatively planned anastomosis sites.

  2. Atrial Fibrillation, Neurocognitive Decline and Gene Expression After Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Rahul S.; Sabe, Ashraf A.; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y.; Ramlawi, Basel; Sellke, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline are common complications after cardiopulmonary bypass. By utilizing genomic microarrays we investigate whether gene expression is associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline. METHODS Twenty one cardiac surgery patients were prospectively matched and underwent neurocognitive assessments pre-operatively and four days postoperatively. The whole blood collected in the pre-cardiopulmonary bypass, 6 hours after-cardiopulmonary bypass, and on the 4th postoperative day was hybridized to Affymetrix Gene Chip U133 Plus 2.0 Microarrays. Gene expression in patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline (n=6; POAF+NCD) was compared with gene expression in patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation and normal cognitive function (n=5; POAF+NORM) and patients with sinus rhythm and normal cognitive function (n=10; SR+NORM). Regulated genes were identified using JMP Genomics 4.0 with a false discovery rate of 0.05 and fold change of >1.5 or <-1.5. RESULTS Eleven patients developed postoperative atrial fibrillation. Six of these also developed neurocognitive decline. Of the 12 patients with sinus rhythm, only 2 developed neurocognitive decline. POAF+NCD patients had unique regulation of 17 named genes preoperatively, 60 named genes six hours after cardiopulmonary bypass, and 34 named genes four days postoperatively (P<0.05) compared with normal patients. Pathway analysis demonstrated that these genes are involved in cell death, inflammation, cardiac remodeling and nervous system function. CONCLUSION Patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline after cardiopulmonary bypass may have differential genomic responses compared to normal patients and patients with only postoperative atrial fibrillation, suggesting common pathophysiology for these conditions. Further exploration of these genes may provide insight into the

  3. Mass transfer from bypassed zones during gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.E.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    Gasflooding in oil reservoirs leads to bypassing of the oil due to gravitational, viscous and/or heterogeneity effects. The bypassed oil can be recovered by the flowing solvent by pressure-driven, gravity-driven, dispersion/diffusion-driven and capillarity-driven crossflow/mass transfer. It is difficult to represent all of these mechanisms explicitly in large-scale simulations. In this work, we have studied the effect of the orientation of the bypassed region and the enrichment of the solvent on the mass transfer. Laboratory-scale mass transfer and coreflood experiments were conducted. Numerical simulation was used to identify the role of the different mechanisms. Results indicate that the mass transfer is the least for the vertical orientation, intermediate for the inverted orientation and the highest for the horizontal orientation. The mass transfer increases with enrichment for all orientations. Liquid phase diffusion controls vertical orientation mass transfer for the fluids studied. Phase behavior determines the liquid phase saturation. Capillary pumping does not contribute to the mass transfer of oil because the interfacial tension decreases towards the flowing region. Gravity-driven flow contributes the most to the mass transfer in the horizontal and the inverted orientations. The gravity-driven flow, however, is impeded by the capillarity whose magnitude decreases with solvent enrichment. Oil recovery in the horizontal gasfloods is nonmonotonic with enrichment for this fluid system in an almost homogeneous Berea core. Multiphase flow in the near-miscible floods leads to less gravity override compared to the FCM floods. In the heterogeneous core studied, the heterogeneity is very strong and the capillary forces do not prevent bypassing. The capillary forces, in fact, reduce oil recovery by diminishing mass transfer from the bypassed regions.

  4. Tympanoplasty surgery and prophylactic antibiotics: surgical results.

    PubMed

    John, D G; Carlin, W V; Lesser, T H; Carrick, D G; Fielder, C

    1988-06-01

    This paper reports a multicentre, controlled, blind, prospective, randomized study into the use of prophylactic systemic antibiotics in myringoplasty surgery. A total of 130 individuals were randomly allocated to either an antibiotic or a non-antibiotic group. Each individual was clinically and audiometrically assessed preoperatively, and 8 weeks postoperatively. It was found that systemic prophylactic antibiotics did not influence either the success rate of myringoplasty surgery or the audiometric result.

  5. Design of dual action antibiotics as an approach to search for new promising drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tevyashova, A. N.; Olsufyeva, E. N.; Preobrazhenskaya, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    The review is devoted to the latest achievements in the design of dual action antibiotics — heterodimeric (chimeric) structures based on antibacterial agents of different classes (fluoroquinolones, anthracyclines, oxazolidines, macrolides and so on). Covalent binding can make the pharmacokinetic characteristics of these molecules more predictable and improve the penetration of each component into the cell. Consequently, not only does the drug efficacy increase owing to inhibition of two targets but also the resistance to one or both antibiotics can be overcome. The theoretical grounds of elaboration, design principles and methods for the synthesis of dual action antibiotics are considered. The structures are classified according to the type of covalent spacer (cleavable or not) connecting the moieties of two agents. Dual action antibiotics with a spacer that can be cleaved in a living cell are considered as dual action prodrugs. Data on the biological action of heterodimeric compounds are presented and structure-activity relationships are analyzed. The bibliography includes 225 references.

  6. Insights into novel antimicrobial compounds and antibiotic resistance genes from soil metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Alinne P.; Fernandes, Gabriel da R.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years a major worldwide problem has arisen with regard to infectious diseases caused by resistant bacteria. Resistant pathogens are related to high mortality and also to enormous healthcare costs. In this field, cultured microorganisms have been commonly focused in attempts to isolate antibiotic resistance genes or to identify antimicrobial compounds. Although this strategy has been successful in many cases, most of the microbial diversity and related antimicrobial molecules have been completely lost. As an alternative, metagenomics has been used as a reliable approach to reveal the prospective reservoir of antimicrobial compounds and antibiotic resistance genes in the uncultured microbial community that inhabits a number of environments. In this context, this review will focus on resistance genes as well as on novel antibiotics revealed by a metagenomics approach from the soil environment. Biotechnology prospects are also discussed, opening new frontiers for antibiotic development. PMID:25278933

  7. Synthesis and antibiotic activity of oxazolidinone-catechol conjugates against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Paulen, Aurélie; Gasser, Véronique; Hoegy, Françoise; Perraud, Quentin; Pesset, Bénédicte; Schalk, Isabelle J; Mislin, Gaëtan L A

    2015-12-21

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium responsible for severe infections in which resistance to most of the approved families of antibiotics is increasing. Oxazolidinone antibiotics are active against many Gram-positive bacteria, but are only weakly active against Gram-negative pathogens. We describe the synthesis of conjugates between a catechol moiety and oxazolidinone antibiotics. These conjugates were significantly more active against P. aeruginosa (218-1024 μM) than linezolid (MIC > 1024 μM), the reference molecule from the oxazolidinone family. Antibiotic activity was slightly higher in medium depleted of iron, suggesting the involvement of a bacterial iron uptake system in this biological activity. The bacterial iron uptake pathway involved in the transport is still to be addressed, but the present data excluded a contribution of the enterobactin transporter PfeA.

  8. Delivery of antibiotics with polymeric particles.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Meng-Hua; Bao, Yan; Yang, Xian-Zhu; Zhu, Yan-Hua; Wang, Jun

    2014-11-30

    Despite the wide use of antibiotics, bacterial infection is still one of the leading causes of hospitalization and mortality. The clinical failure of antibiotic therapy is linked with low bioavailability, poor penetration to bacterial infection sites, and the side effects of antibiotics, as well as the antibiotic resistance properties of bacteria. Antibiotics encapsulated in nanoparticles or microparticles made up of a biodegradable polymer have shown great potential in replacing the administration of antibiotics in their "free" form. Polymeric particles provide protection to antibiotics against environmental deactivation and alter antibiotic pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Polymeric particles can overcome tissue and cellular barriers and deliver antibiotics into very dense tissues and inaccessible target cells. Polymeric particles can be modified to target or respond to particular tissues, cells, and even bacteria, and thereby facilitate the selective concentration or release of the antibiotic at infection sites, respectively. Thus, the delivery of antibiotics with polymeric particles augments the level of the bioactive drug at the site of infection while reducing the dosage and the dosing frequency. The end results are improved therapeutic effects as well as decreased "pill burden" and drug side effects in patients. The main objective of this review is to analyze recent advances and current perspectives in the use of polymeric antibiotic delivery systems in the treatment of bacterial infection.

  9. New business models for antibiotic innovation.

    PubMed

    So, Anthony D; Shah, Tejen A

    2014-05-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistance and the dearth of novel antibiotics have become a growing concern among policy-makers. A combination of financial, scientific, and regulatory challenges poses barriers to antibiotic innovation. However, each of these three challenges provides an opportunity to develop pathways for new business models to bring novel antibiotics to market. Pull-incentives that pay for the outputs of research and development (R&D) and push-incentives that pay for the inputs of R&D can be used to increase innovation for antibiotics. Financial incentives might be structured to promote delinkage of a company's return on investment from revenues of antibiotics. This delinkage strategy might not only increase innovation, but also reinforce rational use of antibiotics. Regulatory approval, however, should not and need not compromise safety and efficacy standards to bring antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action to market. Instead regulatory agencies could encourage development of companion diagnostics, test antibiotic combinations in parallel, and pool and make transparent clinical trial data to lower R&D costs. A tax on non-human use of antibiotics might also create a disincentive for non-therapeutic use of these drugs. Finally, the new business model for antibiotic innovation should apply the 3Rs strategy for encouraging collaborative approaches to R&D in innovating novel antibiotics: sharing resources, risks, and rewards.

  10. Overcoming the current deadlock in antibiotic research.

    PubMed

    Schäberle, Till F; Hack, Ingrid M

    2014-04-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are on the rise, making it harder to treat bacterial infections. The situation is aggravated by the shrinking of the antibiotic development pipeline. To finance urgently needed incentives for antibiotic research, creative financing solutions are needed. Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are a successful model for moving forward.

  11. Pipeline of Known Chemical Classes of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    d’Urso de Souza Mendes, Cristina; de Souza Antunes, Adelaide Maria

    2013-01-01

    Many approaches are used to discover new antibiotic compounds, one of the most widespread being the chemical modification of known antibiotics. This type of discovery has been so important in the development of new antibiotics that most antibiotics used today belong to the same chemical classes as antibiotics discovered in the 1950s and 1960s. Even though the discovery of new classes of antibiotics is urgently needed, the chemical modification of antibiotics in known classes is still widely used to discover new antibiotics, resulting in a great number of compounds in the discovery and clinical pipeline that belong to existing classes. In this scenario, the present article presents an overview of the R&D pipeline of new antibiotics in known classes of antibiotics, from discovery to clinical trial, in order to map out the technological trends in this type of antibiotic R&D, aiming to identify the chemical classes attracting most interest, their spectrum of activity, and the new subclasses under development. The result of the study shows that the new antibiotics in the pipeline belong to the following chemical classes: quinolones, aminoglycosides, macrolides, oxazolidinones, tetracyclines, pleuromutilins, beta-lactams, lipoglycopeptides, polymyxins and cyclic lipopeptides. PMID:27029317

  12. Do topical antibiotics help corneal epithelial trauma?

    PubMed Central

    King, J. W.; Brison, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Topical antibiotics are routinely used in emergency rooms to treat corneal trauma, although no published evidence supports this treatment. In a noncomparative clinical trial, 351 patients with corneal epithelial injuries were treated without antibiotics. The infection rate was 0.7%, suggesting that such injuries can be safely and effectively managed without antibiotics. A comparative clinical trial is neither warranted nor feasible. PMID:8268742

  13. Bio-inspired synthetic receptor molecules towards mimicry of vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Monnee, M C; Brouwer, A J; Verbeek, L M; van Wageningen, A M; Liskamp, R M

    2001-06-18

    A 512-member library of bio-inspired synthetic receptor molecules was prepared featuring a triazacyclophane scaffold. The purpose of this scaffold was to orient three (identical) peptide 'binding arms' in order to mimic an antibiotic binding cavity as is present in the vancomycin antibiotics. The library was screened with D-Ala-D-Ala and D-Ala-D-Lac containing ligands, which are present in the cell wall precursors of pathogenic bacteria. Screening and validation led to identification of a synthetic receptor capable of binding these ligands.

  14. Structures of the orthosomycin antibiotics avilamycin and evernimicin in complex with the bacterial 70S ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Arenz, Stefan; Graf, Michael; Nguyen, Fabian; Huter, Paul; Polikanov, Yury S.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is one of the major targets for therapeutic antibiotics; however, the rise in multidrug resistance is a growing threat to the utility of our current arsenal. The orthosomycin antibiotics evernimicin (EVN) and avilamycin (AVI) target the ribosome and do not display cross-resistance with any other classes of antibiotics, suggesting that they bind to a unique site on the ribosome and may therefore represent an avenue for development of new antimicrobial agents. Here we present cryo-EM structures of EVN and AVI in complex with the Escherichia coli ribosome at 3.6- to 3.9-Å resolution. The structures reveal that EVN and AVI bind to a single site on the large subunit that is distinct from other known antibiotic binding sites on the ribosome. Both antibiotics adopt an extended conformation spanning the minor grooves of helices 89 and 91 of the 23S rRNA and interacting with arginine residues of ribosomal protein L16. This binding site overlaps with the elbow region of A-site bound tRNA. Consistent with this finding, single-molecule FRET (smFRET) experiments show that both antibiotics interfere with late steps in the accommodation process, wherein aminoacyl-tRNA enters the peptidyltransferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. These data provide a structural and mechanistic rationale for how these antibiotics inhibit the elongation phase of protein synthesis. PMID:27330110

  15. A role for the bacterial GATC methylome in antibiotic stress survival

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Nadia R.; Ross, Christian A.; Jain, Saloni; Shapiro, Rebecca S.; Gutierrez, Arnaud; Belenky, Peter; Li, Hu; Collins, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasingly serious public health threat1. Understanding pathways allowing bacteria to survive antibiotic stress may unveil new therapeutic targets2–8. We explore the role of the bacterial epigenome in antibiotic stress survival using classical genetic tools and single-molecule real-time sequencing to characterize genomic methylation kinetics. We find that Escherichia coli survival under antibiotic pressure is severely compromised without adenine methylation at GATC sites. While the adenine methylome remains stable during drug stress, without GATC methylation, methyl-dependent mismatch repair (MMR) is deleterious, and fueled by the drug-induced error-prone polymerase PolIV, overwhelms cells with toxic DNA breaks. In multiple E. coli strains, including pathogenic and drug-resistant clinical isolates, DNA adenine methyltransferase deficiency potentiates antibiotics from the β-lactam and quinolone classes. This work indicates that the GATC methylome provides structural support for bacterial survival during antibiotics stress and suggests targeting bacterial DNA methylation as a viable approach to enhancing antibiotic activity. PMID:26998690

  16. Structures of the orthosomycin antibiotics avilamycin and evernimicin in complex with the bacterial 70S ribosome.

    PubMed

    Arenz, Stefan; Juette, Manuel F; Graf, Michael; Nguyen, Fabian; Huter, Paul; Polikanov, Yury S; Blanchard, Scott C; Wilson, Daniel N

    2016-07-05

    The ribosome is one of the major targets for therapeutic antibiotics; however, the rise in multidrug resistance is a growing threat to the utility of our current arsenal. The orthosomycin antibiotics evernimicin (EVN) and avilamycin (AVI) target the ribosome and do not display cross-resistance with any other classes of antibiotics, suggesting that they bind to a unique site on the ribosome and may therefore represent an avenue for development of new antimicrobial agents. Here we present cryo-EM structures of EVN and AVI in complex with the Escherichia coli ribosome at 3.6- to 3.9-Å resolution. The structures reveal that EVN and AVI bind to a single site on the large subunit that is distinct from other known antibiotic binding sites on the ribosome. Both antibiotics adopt an extended conformation spanning the minor grooves of helices 89 and 91 of the 23S rRNA and interacting with arginine residues of ribosomal protein L16. This binding site overlaps with the elbow region of A-site bound tRNA. Consistent with this finding, single-molecule FRET (smFRET) experiments show that both antibiotics interfere with late steps in the accommodation process, wherein aminoacyl-tRNA enters the peptidyltransferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. These data provide a structural and mechanistic rationale for how these antibiotics inhibit the elongation phase of protein synthesis.

  17. [Increased fibrinolytic activity during cardiopulmonary bypass is caused by activated protein C system].

    PubMed

    Gando, S; Tedo, I; Masio, H; Goda, Y; Kawahigashi, H

    1994-06-01

    To examine the hypothesis that activated protein C system during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery may increase fibrinolytic activity during cardiopulmonary bypass, protein C activity, protein C antigen and thrombomodulin of sixteen patients undergoing elective cardiopulmonary bypass surgery were investigated after induction of anesthesia, before and after cardiopulmonary bypass, and at the end of operation. Protein C activity decreased and thrombomodulin increased significantly after the cardiopulmonary bypass. There were no significant correlations of thrombomodulin with protein C activity and protein C antigen. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that protein C system is activated and circulating thrombomodulin appears in the systemic circulation during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery and this enhanced activation of protein C system is possibly related to the reported increase of fibrinolytic activity during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  18. Development of antibiotic activity profile screening for the classification and discovery of natural product antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Wong, Weng Ruh; Oliver, Allen G; Linington, Roger G

    2012-11-21

    Despite recognition of the looming antibiotic crisis by healthcare professionals, the number of new antibiotics reaching the clinic continues to decline sharply. This study aimed to establish an antibiotic profiling strategy using a panel of clinically relevant bacterial strains to create unique biological fingerprints for all major classes of antibiotics. Antibiotic mode of action profile (BioMAP) screening has been shown to effectively cluster antibiotics by structural class based on these fingerprints. Using this approach, we have accurately predicted the presence of known antibiotics in natural product extracts and have discovered a naphthoquinone-based antibiotic from our marine natural product library that possesses a unique carbon skeleton. We have demonstrated that bioactivity fingerprinting is a successful strategy for profiling antibiotic lead compounds and that BioMAP can be applied to the discovery of new natural product antibiotics leads.

  19. Antibiotic resistance breakers: can repurposed drugs fill the antibiotic discovery void?

    PubMed

    Brown, David

    2015-12-01

    Concern over antibiotic resistance is growing, and new classes of antibiotics, particularly against Gram-negative bacteria, are needed. However, even if the scientific hurdles can be overcome, it could take decades for sufficient numbers of such antibiotics to become available. As an interim solution, antibiotic resistance could be 'broken' by co-administering appropriate non-antibiotic drugs with failing antibiotics. Several marketed drugs that do not currently have antibacterial indications can either directly kill bacteria, reduce the antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration when used in combination with existing antibiotics and/or modulate host defence through effects on host innate immunity, in particular by altering inflammation and autophagy. This article discusses how such 'antibiotic resistance breakers' could contribute to reducing the antibiotic resistance problem, and analyses a priority list of candidates for further investigation.

  20. Surface modeling of soil antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen-jiao; Yue, Tian-xiang; Du, Zheng-ping; Wang, Zong; Li, Xue-wen

    2016-02-01

    Large numbers of livestock and poultry feces are continuously applied into soils in intensive vegetable cultivation areas, and then some veterinary antibiotics are persistent existed in soils and cause health risk. For the spatial heterogeneity of antibiotic residues, developing a suitable technique to interpolate soil antibiotic residues is still a challenge. In this study, we developed an effective interpolator, high accuracy surface modeling (HASM) combined vegetable types, to predict the spatial patterns of soil antibiotics, using 100 surface soil samples collected from an intensive vegetable cultivation area located in east of China, and the fluoroquinolones (FQs), including ciprofloxacin (CFX), enrofloxacin (EFX) and norfloxacin (NFX), were analyzed as the target antibiotics. The results show that vegetable type is an effective factor to be combined to improve the interpolator performance. HASM achieves less mean absolute errors (MAEs) and root mean square errors (RMSEs) for total FQs (NFX+CFX+EFX), NFX, CFX and EFX than kriging with external drift (KED), stratified kriging (StK), ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW). The MAE of HASM for FQs is 55.1 μg/kg, and the MAEs of KED, StK, OK and IDW are 99.0 μg/kg, 102.8 μg/kg, 106.3 μg/kg and 108.7 μg/kg, respectively. Further, RMSE simulated by HASM for FQs (CFX, EFX and NFX) are 106.2 μg/kg (88.6 μg/kg, 20.4 μg/kg and 39.2 μg/kg), and less 30% (27%, 22% and 36%), 33% (27%, 27% and 43%), 38% (34%, 23% and 41%) and 42% (32%, 35% and 51%) than the ones by KED, StK, OK and IDW, respectively. HASM also provides better maps with more details and more consistent maximum and minimum values of soil antibiotics compared with the measured data. The better performance can be concluded that HASM takes the vegetable type information as global approximate information, and takes local sampling data as its optimum control constraints.

  1. PhotoGate microscopy to track single molecules in crowded environments

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Vladislav; Shih, Sheng-Min; Bandaria, Jigar; Huang, Yongjian; Lawrence, Rosalie E.; Zoncu, Roberto; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Tracking single molecules inside cells reveals the dynamics of biological processes, including receptor trafficking, signalling and cargo transport. However, individual molecules often cannot be resolved inside cells due to their high density. Here we develop the PhotoGate technique that controls the number of fluorescent particles in a region of interest by repeatedly photobleaching its boundary. PhotoGate bypasses the requirement of photoactivation to track single particles at surface densities two orders of magnitude greater than the single-molecule detection limit. Using this method, we observe ligand-induced dimerization of a receptor tyrosine kinase at the cell surface and directly measure binding and dissociation of signalling molecules from early endosomes in a dense cytoplasm with single-molecule resolution. We additionally develop a numerical simulation suite for rapid quantitative optimization of Photogate experimental conditions. PhotoGate yields longer tracking times and more accurate measurements of complex stoichiometry than existing single-molecule imaging methods. PMID:28071667

  2. Monitoring the conjunctiva for carbon dioxide and oxygen tensions and pH during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Irwin K; Isenberg, Sherwin J; McArthur, David L; Del Signore, Madeline; McDonald, John S

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure, for the first time, multiple physiologic parameters of perfusion (pH, PCO2, PO2, and temperature) from the conjunctiva of adult patients during cardiopulmonary bypass while undergoing cardiothoracic surgery. Ten patients who underwent either intracardiac valve repair, atrial septal defect repair, or coronary artery bypass graft surgery had placement of a sensor which directly measured pH, PCO2, PO2, and temperature from the conjunctiva. Data were stratified into seven phases (0-5 minutes prior to bypass; 0-5, 6-10, and 11-15 minutes after initiation of bypass; 0-5 minutes prior to conclusion of bypass; and 0-5 and 6-10 minutes after bypass) and analyzed using a mixed model analysis.The change in conjunctival pH over the course of measurement was not statistically significant (p = .56). The PCO2 level followed a quadratic pattern, decreasing from a mean pre-bypass level of 37.7 mmHg at baseline prior to the initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass to a nadir of 33.2 mmHg, then increasing to a high of 39.4 mmHg at 6-10 minutes post bypass (p < .01). The PO2 declined from a mean pre-bypass level of 79.5 mmHg to 31.3 mmHg by 6-10 minutes post bypass and even post-bypass, it never returned to baseline values (p < .01). Temperature followed a pattern similar to PCO2 by returning to baseline levels as the patient was re-warmed following bypass (p < .01). There was no evidence of any eye injury or inflammation following the removal of the sensor. In the subjects studied, the conjunctival sensor yielded reproducible measurements during the various phases of cardiopulmonary bypass without ocular injury. Further study is necessary to determine the role of conjunctival measurements in critical settings.

  3. Probing translation using small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Scott C.; Cooperman, Barry S.; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The translational apparatus of the bacterial cell remains one of the principal targets of antibiotics for the clinical treatment of infection worldwide. Since the introduction of specific translation inhibitors into clinical practise in the late 1940’s, intense efforts have been made to understand their precise mechanisms of action. Such research has often revealed significant and sometimes unexpected insights into many fundamental aspects of the translation mechanism. Central to progress in this area, high-resolution crystal structures of the bacterial ribosome identifying the sites of antibiotic binding are now available, which, together with recent developments in single-molecule and fast-kinetic approaches, provide an integrated view of the dynamic translation process. Assays employing these approaches and focusing on specific steps of the overall translation process are amenable for drug-screening. Such assays, coupled with structural studies, have the potential not only to accelerate the discovery of novel and effective antimicrobial agents, but also to refine our understanding of the translation mechanism, since antibiotics often stabilize specific functional states of the ribosome and allow distinct translation steps to be dissected in molecular detail. PMID:20609413

  4. Anesthetic implications of subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Murali; Veerappa, Muralimanohar; Jawali, Vivek; Pandya, Nischal; Krishnamoorthy, Jayaprakash; Muniraju, Geetha; George, Antony; Baishya, Jitumoni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Minimal invasive surgeries are carried out to benefit the patient with less pain, blood loss, mechanical ventilation and hospital stay; a smaller scar is not the aim. Minimal invasive cardiac surgeries are carried out via small sternotomy, small thoracotomy and via robotic arms. Subxiphoid route is a novel method and avoids sternotomy. Aim: This case series is an attempt to understand the anesthetic modifications required. Secondly, whether it is feasible to carry out subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery. Methods: Elective patients scheduled to undergo subxiphoid coronary artery bypass surgery were chosen. The surgeries were conducted under general anesthesia with left lung isolation via either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker. Results: We conducted ten (seven males and 3 females) coronary artery bypass graft surgeries via subxiphoid technique. The mean EuroSCORE was 1.7 and the mean ejection fraction was 53.6. Eight patients underwent surgery via endobronchial tube, while, in the remaining two lung isolation was obtained using bronchial blocker. Mean blood loss intraoperatively was 300 ± 42 ml and postoperatively 2000 ± 95 ml. The pain score on the postoperative day ‘0’ was 4.3 ± 0.6 and 2.3 ± 0.7 on the day of discharge. Length of stay in the hospital was 4.8 ± 0.9 days. There were no complications, blood transfusions, conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. The modifications in the anesthetic and surgical techniques are, use of left lung isolation using either endobronchial tube or bronchial blocker, increased duration for conduit harvesting, grafting, requirement of transesophageal echocardiography monitoring in addition to hemodynamic monitoring. Other minor requirements are transcutaneous pacing and defibrillator pads, a wedge under the chest to ‘lift’ up the chest, sparing right femoral artery and vein (to serve as vascular access) for an unlikely event of conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. Any anesthesiologist wishing

  5. Antibiotic control in a municipal hospital.

    PubMed

    Recco, R A; Gladstone, J L; Friedman, S A; Gerken, E H

    1979-05-25

    The choice of an antibiotic for a patient is often a difficult decision. The clinician must contend with a bewildering variety of bacteria and use a number of expensive and toxic antimicrobial agents judiciously. To deal with the problems of excessive and inappropriate use, the medical staff of Coney Island Hospital established compulsory, prospective antibiotic control. Two years after initiation of this program, we analyzed changes in sensitivity patterns of hospital flora, physicians' prescribing habits and antibiotic use. A trend toward increasing resistance on the part of some Gram-negative isolates to certain beta-lactam antibiotics was noted. Antibiotic costs decreased an average of 38%, while prescribing skills improved.

  6. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruscito, Annamaria; DeRosa, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then applied in aptamer-based biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is ultimately needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, issues such as the drastic difference in size of the aptamer and small molecule make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for the detection of small molecules. Thus, recent (since 2012) notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed

  7. Antibiotic resistance in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gudiol, Carlota; Carratalà, Jordi

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infection is one of the most frequent complications in cancer patients and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. In recent years, the emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a significant problem worldwide, and cancer patients are among those affected. Treatment of infections due to multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria represents a clinical challenge, especially in the case of Gram-negative bacilli, since the therapeutic options are often very limited. As the antibiotics active against MDR bacteria present several disadvantages (limited clinical experience, higher incidence of adverse effects, and less knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of the drug), a thorough acquaintance with the main characteristics of these drugs is mandatory in order to provide safe treatment to cancer patients with MDR bacterial infections. Nevertheless, the implementation of antibiotic stewardship programs and infection control measures is the cornerstone for controlling the development and spread of these MDR pathogens.

  8. Resistance to Antibiotics Mediated by Target Alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, Brian G.

    1994-04-01

    The development of resistance to antibiotics by reductions in the affinities of their enzymatic targets occurs most rapidly for antibiotics that inactivate a single target and that are not analogs of substrate. In these cases of resistance (for example, resistance to rifampicin), numerous single amino acid substitutions may provide large decreases in the affinity of the target for the antibiotic, leading to clinically significant levels of resistance. Resistance due to target alterations should occur much more slowly for those antibiotics (penicillin, for example) that inactivate multiple targets irreversibly by acting as close analogs of substrate. Resistance to penicillin because of target changes has emerged, by unexpected mechanisms, only in a limited number of species. However, inactivating enzymes commonly provide resistance to antibiotics that, like penicillin, are derived from natural products, although such enzymes have not been found for synthetic antibiotics. Thus, the ideal antibiotic would be produced by rational design, rather than by the modification of a natural product.

  9. Use of antibiotics in plant agriculture.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, V O; Duffy, B

    2012-04-01

    Antibiotics are essential for control of bacterial diseases of plants, especially fire blight of pear and apple and bacterial spot of peach. Streptomycin is used in several countries; the use of oxytetracycline, oxolinic acid and gentamicin is limited to only a few countries. Springtime antibiotic sprays suppress pathogen growth on flowers and leaf surfaces before infection; after infection, antibiotics are ineffective. Antibiotics are applied when disease risk is high, and consequently the majority of orchards are not treated annually. In 2009 in the United States, 16,465 kg (active ingredient) was applied to orchards, which is 0.12% of the total antibiotics used in animal agriculture. Antibiotics are active on plants for less than a week, and significant residues have not been found on harvested fruit. Antibiotics have been indispensable for crop protection in the United States for more than 50 years without reports of adverse effects on human health or persistent impacts on the environment.

  10. Antibiotic prescribing practices by dentists: a review

    PubMed Central

    Dar-Odeh, Najla Saeed; Abu-Hammad, Osama Abdalla; Al-Omiri, Mahmoud Khaled; Khraisat, Ameen Sameh; Shehabi, Asem Ata

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotics are prescribed by dentists for treatment as well as prevention of infection. Indications for the use of systemic antibiotics in dentistry are limited, since most dental and periodontal diseases are best managed by operative intervention and oral hygiene measures. However, the literature provides evidence of inadequate prescribing practices by dentists, due to a number of factors ranging from inadequate knowledge to social factors. Here we review studies that investigated the pattern of antibiotic use by dentists worldwide. The main defects in the knowledge of antibiotic prescribing are outlined. The main conclusion is that, unfortunately, the prescribing practices of dentists are inadequate and this is manifested by over-prescribing. Recommendations to improve antibiotic prescribing practices are presented in an attempt to curb the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance and other side effects of antibiotic abuse. PMID:20668712

  11. Local antibiotic delivery with demineralized bone matrix.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christine S; Supronowicz, Peter R; Zhukauskas, Rasa M; Gill, Elise; Cobb, Ronald R

    2012-03-01

    A method of care for these infected nonunions is prolonged intravenous systemic antibiotic treatment and implantation of methyl methacrylate antibiotic carrier beads to delivery high local doses of antibiotics. This method requires a second surgery to remove the beads once the infection has cleared. Recent studies have investigated the use of biodegradable materials that have been impregnated with antibiotics as tools to treat bone infections. In the present study, human demineralized bone matrix (DBM) was investigated for its ability to be loaded with an antibiotic. The data presented herein demonstrates that this osteoinductive and biodegradable material can be loaded with gentamicin and release clinically relevant levels of the drug for at least 13 days in vitro. This study also demonstrates that the antibiotic loaded onto the graft has no adverse effects on the osteoinductive nature of the DBM as measured in vitro and in vivo. This bone void filler may represent a promising option for local antibiotic delivery in orthopedic applications.

  12. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, Robin

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  13. Antibiotics and the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Modi, Sheetal R; Collins, James J; Relman, David A

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotics have been a cornerstone of innovation in the fields of public health, agriculture, and medicine. However, recent studies have shed new light on the collateral damage they impart on the indigenous host-associated communities. These drugs have been found to alter the taxonomic, genomic, and functional capacity of the human gut microbiota, with effects that are rapid and sometimes persistent. Broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce bacterial diversity while expanding and collapsing membership of specific indigenous taxa. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment selects for resistant bacteria, increases opportunities for horizontal gene transfer, and enables intrusion of pathogenic organisms through depletion of occupied natural niches, with profound implications for the emergence of resistance. Because these pervasive alterations can be viewed as an uncoupling of mutualistic host-microbe relationships, it is valuable to reconsider antimicrobial therapies in the context of an ecological framework. Understanding the biology of competitive exclusion, interspecies protection, and gene flow of adaptive functions in the gut environment may inform the design of new strategies that treat infections while preserving the ecology of our beneficial constituents.

  14. Desensitization to antibiotics in children.

    PubMed

    Cernadas, Josefina R

    2013-02-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions can occur to almost all drugs and antibiotics are among the most common cause for this kind of reactions. Drug hypersensitivity may affect any organ or system, and manifestations range widely in clinical severity from mild pruritus to anaphylaxis. In most cases, the suspected drug is avoided in the future. In case of infection, there is usually a safe antibiotic alternative. Nonetheless, in some cases, no alternative treatment exists for optimal therapy. Under these circumstances, desensitization may be performed. Drug desensitization is defined as the induction of a temporary state of tolerance to a drug which can only be maintained by continuous administration of the medication responsible for the hypersensitivity reaction. Desensitization is mainly performed in IgE-mediated reactions. Increasing doses of the implicated drug are administered over a short period of time, until the therapeutic dose is achieved and tolerated. Very few studies confined to children are found in literature. Most of them are case reports. In general, the proposed desensitization schemes are similar to those used in adults differing only in the final dose administered. The purpose of this study is to review desensitization to antibiotics in children presenting and discussing three clinical practical cases of desensitization in this age group.

  15. Selectively guanidinylated aminoglycosides as antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Fair, Richard J; Hensler, Mary E; Thienphrapa, Wdee; Dam, Quang N; Nizet, Victor; Tor, Yitzhak

    2012-07-01

    The emergence of virulent, drug-resistant bacterial strains coupled with a minimal output of new pharmaceutical agents to combat them makes this a critical time for antibacterial research. Aminoglycosides are a well-studied, highly potent class of naturally occurring antibiotics with scaffolds amenable to modification, and therefore, they provide an excellent starting point for the development of semisynthetic, next-generation compounds. To explore the potential of this approach, we synthesized a small library of aminoglycoside derivatives selectively and minimally modified at one or two positions with a guanidine group replacing the corresponding amine or hydroxy functionality. Most guanidino-aminoglycosides showed increased affinity for the ribosomal decoding rRNA site, the cognate biological target of the natural products, when compared with their parent antibiotics, as measured by an in vitro fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) A-site binding assay. Additionally, certain analogues showed improved minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values against resistant bacterial strains, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). An amikacin derivative holds particular promise with activity greater than or equal to the parent antibiotic in the majority of bacterial strains tested.

  16. Sources of antibiotics: Hot springs.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Girish B; Balachandran, Lakshmi

    2016-11-24

    The discovery of antibiotics heralded an era of improved health care. However, the over-prescription and misuse of antibiotics resulted in the development of resistant strains of various pathogens. Since then, there has been an incessant search for discovering novel compounds from bacteria at various locations with extreme conditions. The soil is one of the most explored locations for bioprospecting. In recent times, hypersaline environments and symbiotic associations have been investigated for novel antimicrobial compounds. Among the extreme environments, hot springs are comparatively less explored. Many researchers have reported the presence of microbial life and secretion of antimicrobial compounds by microorganisms in hot springs. A pioneering research in the corresponding author's laboratory resulted in the identification of the antibiotic Fusaricidin B isolated from a hot spring derived eubacteria, Paenibacillus polymyxa, which has been assigned a new application for its anti-tubercular properties. The corresponding author has also reported anti-MRSA and anti-VRE activity of 73 bacterial isolates from hot springs in India.

  17. Antibiotic resistance in Burkholderia species.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Katherine A; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2016-09-01

    The genus Burkholderia comprises metabolically diverse and adaptable Gram-negative bacteria, which thrive in often adversarial environments. A few members of the genus are prominent opportunistic pathogens. These include Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei of the B. pseudomallei complex, which cause glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Burkholderia cenocepacia, Burkholderia multivorans, and Burkholderia vietnamiensis belong to the Burkholderia cepacia complex and affect mostly cystic fibrosis patients. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. The first line of defense against antimicrobials in Burkholderia species is the outer membrane penetration barrier. Most Burkholderia contain a modified lipopolysaccharide that causes intrinsic polymyxin resistance. Contributing to reduced drug penetration are restrictive porin proteins. Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division family are major players in Burkholderia multidrug resistance. Third and fourth generation β-lactam antibiotics are seminal for treatment of Burkholderia infections, but therapeutic efficacy is compromised by expression of several β-lactamases and ceftazidime target mutations. Altered DNA gyrase and dihydrofolate reductase targets cause fluoroquinolone and trimethoprim resistance, respectively. Although antibiotic resistance hampers therapy of Burkholderia infections, the characterization of resistance mechanisms lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens, especially ESKAPE bacteria such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  18. Beta- Lactam Antibiotics Stimulate Biofilm Formation in Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae by Up-Regulating Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Siva; Li, Xiaojin; Gunawardana, Manjula; Maguire, Kathleen; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Schaudinn, Christoph; Wang, Charles; Baum, Marc M.; Webster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common acute otitis media pathogen, with an incidence that is increased by previous antibiotic treatment. NTHi is also an emerging causative agent of other chronic infections in humans, some linked to morbidity, and all of which impose substantial treatment costs. In this study we explore the possibility that antibiotic exposure may stimulate biofilm formation by NTHi bacteria. We discovered that sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotic (i.e., amounts that partially inhibit bacterial growth) stimulated the biofilm-forming ability of NTHi strains, an effect that was strain and antibiotic dependent. When exposed to sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics NTHi strains produced tightly packed biofilms with decreased numbers of culturable bacteria but increased biomass. The ratio of protein per unit weight of biofilm decreased as a result of antibiotic exposure. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilms had altered ultrastructure, and genes involved in glycogen production and transporter function were up regulated in response to antibiotic exposure. Down-regulated genes were linked to multiple metabolic processes but not those involved in stress response. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilm bacteria were more resistant to a lethal dose (10 µg/mL) of cefuroxime. Our results suggest that beta-lactam antibiotic exposure may act as a signaling molecule that promotes transformation into the biofilm phenotype. Loss of viable bacteria, increase in biofilm biomass and decreased protein production coupled with a concomitant up-regulation of genes involved with glycogen production might result in a biofilm of sessile, metabolically inactive bacteria sustained by stored glycogen. These biofilms may protect surviving bacteria from subsequent antibiotic challenges, and act as a reservoir of viable bacteria once antibiotic exposure has ended. PMID:25007395

  19. Carbon Monoxide: An Essential Signalling Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Brian E.

    Carbon monoxide (CO), like nitric oxide (NO), is an essential signalling molecule in humans. It is active in the cardiovascular system as a vasodilator. In addition, CO possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative properties and protects tissues from hypoxia and reperfusion injury. Some of its applications in animal models include suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. CO also suppresses arteriosclerotic lesions following angioplasty, reverses established pulmonary hypertension and mitigates the development of post-operative ileus in the murine small intestine and the development of cerebral malaria in mice as well as graft-induced intimal hyperplasia in pigs. There have been several clinical trials using air-CO mixtures for the treatment of lung-, heart-, kidney- and abdominal-related diseases. This review examines the research involving the development of classes of compounds (with particular emphasis on metal carbonyls) that release CO, which could be used in clinically relevant conditions. The review is drawn not only from published papers in the chemical literature but also from the extensive biological literature and patents on CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs).

  20. Distinctive striatal dopamine signaling after dieting and gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Hankir, Mohammed K; Ashrafian, Hutan; Hesse, Swen; Horstmann, Annette; Fenske, Wiebke K

    2015-05-01

    Highly palatable and/or calorically dense foods, such as those rich in fat, engage the striatum to govern and set complex behaviors. Striatal dopamine signaling has been implicated in hedonic feeding and the development of obesity. Dieting and bariatric surgery have markedly different outcomes on weight loss, yet how these interventions affect central homeostatic and food reward processing remains poorly understood. Here, we propose that dieting and gastric bypass produce distinct changes in peripheral factors with known roles in regulating energy homeostasis, resulting in differential modulation of nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopaminergic reward circuits. Enhancement of intestinal fat metabolism after gastric bypass may also modify striatal dopamine signaling contributing to its unique long-term effects on feeding behavior and body weight in obese individuals.