Science.gov

Sample records for antibodies reveals potential

  1. Harnessing the protective potential of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S Abigail; Derdeyn, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    Recent biological, structural, and technical advances are converging within the HIV-1 vaccine field to harness the power of antibodies for prevention and therapy. Numerous monoclonal antibodies with broad neutralizing activity against diverse HIV-1 isolates have now been identified, revealing at least five sites of vulnerability on the envelope (Env) glycoproteins. While there are practical and technological barriers blocking a clear path from broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAb) to a protective vaccine, this is not a dead end. Scientists are revisiting old approaches with new technology, cutting new trails through unexplored territory, and paving new roads in the hopes of preventing HIV-1 infection. Other promising avenues to capitalize on the power of bNAbs are also being pursued, such as passive antibody immunotherapy and gene therapy approaches. Moreover, non-neutralizing antibodies have inhibitory activities that could have protective potential, alone or in combination with bNAbs. With a new generation of bNAbs, and a clinical trial that associated antibodies with reduced acquisition, the field is closer than ever to developing strategies to use antibodies against HIV-1. PMID:26918160

  2. Antibody protection reveals extended epitopes on the human TSH receptor.

    PubMed

    Latif, Rauf; Teixeira, Avelino; Michalek, Krzysztof; Ali, M Rejwan; Schlesinger, Max; Baliram, Ramkumarie; Morshed, Syed A; Davies, Terry F

    2012-01-01

    Stimulating, and some blocking, antibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR) have conformation-dependent epitopes reported to involve primarily the leucine rich repeat region of the ectodomain (LRD). However, successful crystallization of TSHR residues 22-260 has omitted important extracellular non-LRD residues including the hinge region which connects the TSHR ectodomain to the transmembrane domain and which is involved in ligand induced signal transduction. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to determine if TSHR antibodies (TSHR-Abs) have non-LRD binding sites outside the LRD. To obtain this information we employed the method of epitope protection in which we first protected TSHR residues 1-412 with intact TSHR antibodies and then enzymatically digested the unprotected residues. Those peptides remaining were subsequently delineated by mass spectrometry. Fourteen out of 23 of the reported stimulating monoclonal TSHR-Ab crystal contact residues were protected by this technique which may reflect the higher binding energies of certain residues detected in this approach. Comparing the protected epitopes of two stimulating TSHR-Abs we found both similarities and differences but both antibodies also contacted the hinge region and the amino terminus of the TSHR following the signal peptide and encompassing cysteine box 1 which has previously been shown to be important for TSH binding and activation. A monoclonal blocking TSHR antibody revealed a similar pattern of binding regions but the residues that it contacted on the LRD were again distinct. These data demonstrated that conformationally dependent TSHR-Abs had epitopes not confined to the LRDs but also incorporated epitopes not revealed in the available crystal structure. Furthermore, the data also indicated that in addition to overlapping contact regions within the LRD, there are unique epitope patterns for each of the antibodies which may contribute to their functional heterogeneity. PMID:22957097

  3. New Insights into the Functional Behavior of Antibodies as Revealed by Binding Studies on an Anti-Uranium Monoclonal Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Diane A.; Xia Li; Haini Yu; Blake, Robert C.

    2004-03-17

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop immunoassays for chelated uranium(VI) on a hand-held flow fluorimeter, an anti-uranium monoclonal antibody designated as 8A11 was fluorescently labeled using two different strategies. When 8A11 was coupled via reactive lysines to either ALEXATM 488 or Cy5TM, the resulting fluorescent antibody conjugate exhibited positive cooperativity in the presence of its antigen, U(VI) chelated with 2,9-dicarboxy-1,10-phenanthroline (U(VI)-DCP). That is, when one of the two binding sites on the covalently modified 8A11 was occupied with bound antigen, the affinity of the remaining site on the antibody for U(VI)-DCP appeared to increase. Unmodified 8A11 bound U(VI)-DCP with the expected hyperbolic dependence on the concentration of antigen, consistent with independent and equal binding of ligand at both sites. Proteolytic cleavage of the fluorescently conjugated 8A11 to produce the fluorescent monovalent Fab fragment yielded an active preparation that now bound U(VI)-DCP with no evidence of positive cooperativity. Although, in principle, any divalent antibody has the potential to exhibit positive cooperativity in its binding interactions with its antigen, very little literature precedent for this type of behavior exists. Native 8A11 was also noncovalently labeled with highly fluorescent ZENONTM reagents. These reagents are fluorescently-labeled Fab fragments of goat anti-mouse antibodies that bind to the Fc portion of 8A11. These high-affinity, monovalent fluorescent reagents permitted the intact 8A11 mouse antibody to be labeled in situ with no covalent modifications. Incubation of the 8A11 with ZENON 647 produced a fluorescent protein complex that showed an 8-fold higher affinity for U(VI)-DCP than did the free 8A11 alone. Again, very few literature precedents exist for this phenomenon, where agents that bind to the Fc portion of an intact antibody change the affinity of the antibody for the antigen at the structurally distant Fab portion

  4. Non-genetic inheritable potential of maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Hilmar; Hansen, Hinrich; Lange, Hans

    2003-07-28

    Maternal antibodies (IgG and IgA) not only provide passive protection against microbial infections, but also exert a variety of equally important active, idiotypically-mediated immunoregulatory functions. Since the generation of maternal antibodies depends entirely on the stimulation of the mother's immune system by external mainly thymus-dependent antigens, with long-lived antigen independent plasma cells in the bone marrow, maternal antibodies represent the mother's collective ontogenetic immunological experience. Although their stimulatory potential in mice is restricted to the neonatal imprinting period, maternal antibodies exert a life-long determinative influence which is even dominant over seemingly genetic predispositions. Therefore, the functional impact of maternal IgG antibodies appears phenotypically as a non-genetic inheritance.

  5. Focused Evolution of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Revealed by Structures and Deep Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xueling; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Baoshan; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wang, Charlene; Chen, Xuejun; Longo, Nancy S.; Louder, Mark; McKee, Krisha; O’Dell, Sijy; Perfetto, Stephen; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Shi, Wei; Wu, Lan; Yang, Yongping; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Zhongjia; Zhang, Zhenhai; Bonsignori, Mattia; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Simek, Melissa; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Connors, Mark; Mullikin, James C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Roederer, Mario; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.

    2013-03-04

    Antibody VRC01 is a human immunoglobulin that neutralizes about 90% of HIV-1 isolates. To understand how such broadly neutralizing antibodies develop, we used x-ray crystallography and 454 pyrosequencing to characterize additional VRC01-like antibodies from HIV-1-infected individuals. Crystal structures revealed a convergent mode of binding for diverse antibodies to the same CD4-binding-site epitope. A functional genomics analysis of expressed heavy and light chains revealed common pathways of antibody-heavy chain maturation, confined to the IGHV1-2*02 lineage, involving dozens of somatic changes, and capable of pairing with different light chains. Broadly neutralizing HIV-1 immunity associated with VRC01-like antibodies thus involves the evolution of antibodies to a highly affinity-matured state required to recognize an invariant viral structure, with lineages defined from thousands of sequences providing a genetic roadmap of their development.

  6. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity.

  7. Antibody microarray profiling of human prostate cancer sera: antibody screening and identification of potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeremy C; Zhou, Heping; Kwekel, Joshua; Cavallo, Robert; Burke, Jocelyn; Butler, E Brian; Teh, Bin S; Haab, Brian B

    2003-01-01

    We developed a practical strategy for serum protein profiling using antibody microarrays and applied the method to the identification of potential biomarkers in prostate cancer serum. Protein abundances from 33 prostate cancer and 20 control serum samples were compared to abundances from a common reference pool using a two-color fluorescence assay. Robotically spotted microarrays containing 184 unique antibodies were prepared on two different substrates: polyacrylamide based hydrogels on glass and poly-1-lysine coated glass with a photoreactive cross-linking layer. The hydrogel substrate yielded an average six-fold higher signal-to-noise ratio than the other substrate, and detection of protein binding was possible from a greater number of antibodies using the hydrogels. A statistical filter based on the correlation of data from "reverse-labeled" experiment sets accurately predicted the agreement between the microarray measurements and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay measurements, showing that this parameter can serve to screen for antibodies that are functional on microarrays. Having defined a set of reliable microarray measurements, we identified five proteins (von Willebrand Factor, immunoglobulinM, Alpha1-antichymotrypsin, Villin and immunoglobulinG) that had significantly different levels between the prostate cancer samples and the controls. These developments enable the immediate use of high-density antibody and protein microarrays in biomarker discovery studies. PMID:12548634

  8. Ubiquitin Chain Editing Revealed By Polyubiquitin Linkage-Specific Antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, K.; Matsumoto, M.L.; Wertz, I.E.; Kirkpatrick, D.S.; Lill, J.R.; Tan, J.; Dugger, D.; Gordon, N.; Sidhu, S.S.; Fellouse, F.A.; Komuves, L.; French, D.M.; Ferrando, R.E.; Lam, C.; Compaan, D.; Yu, C.; Bosanac, I.; Hymowitz, S.G.; Kelley, R.F.; Dixit, V.M.

    2009-05-22

    Posttranslational modification of proteins with polyubiquitin occurs in diverse signaling pathways and is tightly regulated to ensure cellular homeostasis. Studies employing ubiquitin mutants suggest that the fate of polyubiquitinated proteins is determined by which lysine within ubiquitin is linked to the C terminus of an adjacent ubiquitin. We have developed linkage-specific antibodies that recognize polyubiquitin chains joined through lysine 63 (K63) or 48 (K48). A cocrystal structure of an anti-K63 linkage Fab bound to K63-linked diubiquitin provides insight into the molecular basis for specificity. We use these antibodies to demonstrate that RIP1, which is essential for tumor necrosis factor-induced NF-{kappa}B activation, and IRAK1, which participates in signaling by interleukin-1{beta} and Toll-like receptors, both undergo polyubiquitin editing in stimulated cells. Both kinase adaptors initially acquire K63-linked polyubiquitin, while at later times K48-linked polyubiquitin targets them for proteasomal degradation. Polyubiquitin editing may therefore be a general mechanism for attenuating innate immune signaling.

  9. Ubiquitin chain editing revealed by polyubiquitin linkage-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Newton, Kim; Matsumoto, Marissa L; Wertz, Ingrid E; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Lill, Jennie R; Tan, Jenille; Dugger, Debra; Gordon, Nathaniel; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Fellouse, Frederic A; Komuves, Laszlo; French, Dorothy M; Ferrando, Ronald E; Lam, Cynthia; Compaan, Deanne; Yu, Christine; Bosanac, Ivan; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Kelley, Robert F; Dixit, Vishva M

    2008-08-22

    Posttranslational modification of proteins with polyubiquitin occurs in diverse signaling pathways and is tightly regulated to ensure cellular homeostasis. Studies employing ubiquitin mutants suggest that the fate of polyubiquitinated proteins is determined by which lysine within ubiquitin is linked to the C terminus of an adjacent ubiquitin. We have developed linkage-specific antibodies that recognize polyubiquitin chains joined through lysine 63 (K63) or 48 (K48). A cocrystal structure of an anti-K63 linkage Fab bound to K63-linked diubiquitin provides insight into the molecular basis for specificity. We use these antibodies to demonstrate that RIP1, which is essential for tumor necrosis factor-induced NF-kappaB activation, and IRAK1, which participates in signaling by interleukin-1beta and Toll-like receptors, both undergo polyubiquitin editing in stimulated cells. Both kinase adaptors initially acquire K63-linked polyubiquitin, while at later times K48-linked polyubiquitin targets them for proteasomal degradation. Polyubiquitin editing may therefore be a general mechanism for attenuating innate immune signaling.

  10. Putative Bioactive Motif of Tritrpticin Revealed by an Antibody with Biological Receptor-Like Properties

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Raghava; Lomash, Suvendu; Salunke, Dinakar M.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides represent one of the most promising future strategies for combating infections and microbial drug resistance. Tritrpticin is a 13mer tryptophan-rich cationic antimicrobial peptide with a broad spectrum of activity whose application in antimicrobial therapy has been hampered by ambiguity about its biological target and consequently the molecular interactions necessary for its antimicrobial activity. The present study provides clues about the mechanism of action of tritripticin by using a unique monoclonal antibody (mAb) as a ‘physiological’ structural scaffold. A pool of mAbs were generated against tritrpticin and based on its high affinity and ability to bind tritrpticin analogs, mAb 6C6D7 was selected and characterized further. In a screening of phage displayed random peptides, this antibody was able to identify a novel antimicrobial peptide with low sequence homology to tritrpticin, suggesting that the mAb possessed the physico-chemical characteristics mimicking the natural receptor. Subsequently, thermodynamics and molecular modeling identified a core group of hydrophobic residues in tritrpticin arranged in a distorted’s’ shaped conformation as critical for antibody binding. Comparison of the mAb induced conformation with the micelle bound structure of tritrpticin reveals how a common motif may be able to interact with multiple classes of biomolecules thus extending the target range of this innate immune peptide. Based on the concurrence between thermodynamic and structural data our results reveal a template that can be used to design novel antimicrobial pharmacophores while simultaneously demonstrating at a more fundamental level the potential of mAbs to act as receptor surrogates. PMID:24086578

  11. Development of new versions of anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies with potentially reduced immunogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Weizhu; Wang Ling; Li Bohua; Wang Hao; Hou Sheng; Hong Xueyu; Zhang Dapeng; Guo Yajun

    2008-03-07

    Despite the widespread clinical use of CD34 antibodies for the purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, all the current anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are murine, which have the potential to elicit human antimouse antibody (HAMA) immune response. In the present study, we developed three new mouse anti-human CD34 mAbs which, respectively, belonged to class I, class II and class III CD34 epitope antibodies. In an attempt to reduce the immunogenicity of these three murine mAbs, their chimeric antibodies, which consisted of mouse antibody variable regions fused genetically to human antibody constant regions, were constructed and characterized. The anti-CD34 chimeric antibodies were shown to possess affinity and specificity similar to that of their respective parental murine antibodies. Due to the potentially better safety profiles, these chimeric antibodies might become alternatives to mouse anti-CD34 antibodies routinely used for clinical application.

  12. Monoclonal Antibody Shows Promise as Potential Therapeutic for MERS | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A monoclonal antibody has proven effective in preventing Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in lab animals, suggesting further development as a potential intervention for the deadly disease in humans, according to new research. MERS is a newly emerged coronavirus first detected in humans in 2012. Most cases have occurred in the Middle East, but the disease has appeared elsewhere. In all, MERS has infected more than 1,700 individuals and killed more than 600, according to the World Health Organization. No vaccines or antiviral therapies currently exist. Several candidate vaccines are being developed, and some have been tested in animal models, a prerequisite to human clinical trials.

  13. Bead arrays for antibody and complement profiling reveal joint contribution of antibody isotypes to C3 deposition.

    PubMed

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Szarka, Eszter; Huber, Krisztina; Orosz, Anita; Babos, Fruzsina; Magyar, Anna; Hudecz, Ferenc; Rojkovich, Bernadette; Gáti, Tamás; Nagy, György; Schwenk, Jochen M; Sármay, Gabriella; Prechl, József; Nilsson, Peter; Papp, Krisztián

    2014-01-01

    The development of antigen arrays has provided researchers with great tools to identify reactivities against self or foreign antigens from body fluids. Yet, these approaches mostly do not address antibody isotypes and their effector functions even though these are key points for a more detailed understanding of disease processes. Here, we present a bead array-based assay for a multiplexed determination of antigen-specific antibody levels in parallel with their properties for complement activation. We measured the deposition of C3 fragments from serum samples to reflect the degree of complement activation via all three complement activation pathways. We utilized the assay on a bead array containing native and citrullinated peptide antigens to investigate the levels of IgG, IgM and IgA autoantibodies along with their complement activating properties in serum samples of 41 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 40 controls. Our analysis revealed significantly higher IgG reactivity against the citrullinated fibrinogen β and filaggrin peptides as well as an IgA reactivity that was exclusive for citrullinated fibrinogen β peptide and C3 deposition in rheumatoid arthritis patients. In addition, we characterized the humoral immune response against the viral EBNA-1 antigen to demonstrate the applicability of this assay beyond autoimmune conditions. We observed that particular buffer compositions were demanded for separate measurement of antibody reactivity and complement activation, as detection of antigen-antibody complexes appeared to be masked due to C3 deposition. We also found that rheumatoid factors of IgM isotype altered C3 deposition and introduced false-positive reactivities against EBNA-1 antigen. In conclusion, the presented bead-based assay setup can be utilized to profile antibody reactivities and immune-complex induced complement activation in a high-throughput manner and could facilitate the understanding and diagnosis of several diseases where complement

  14. Bead Arrays for Antibody and Complement Profiling Reveal Joint Contribution of Antibody Isotypes to C3 Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Szarka, Eszter; Huber, Krisztina; Orosz, Anita; Babos, Fruzsina; Magyar, Anna; Hudecz, Ferenc; Rojkovich, Bernadette; Gáti, Tamás; Nagy, György; Schwenk, Jochen M.; Sármay, Gabriella; Prechl, József

    2014-01-01

    The development of antigen arrays has provided researchers with great tools to identify reactivities against self or foreign antigens from body fluids. Yet, these approaches mostly do not address antibody isotypes and their effector functions even though these are key points for a more detailed understanding of disease processes. Here, we present a bead array-based assay for a multiplexed determination of antigen-specific antibody levels in parallel with their properties for complement activation. We measured the deposition of C3 fragments from serum samples to reflect the degree of complement activation via all three complement activation pathways. We utilized the assay on a bead array containing native and citrullinated peptide antigens to investigate the levels of IgG, IgM and IgA autoantibodies along with their complement activating properties in serum samples of 41 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 40 controls. Our analysis revealed significantly higher IgG reactivity against the citrullinated fibrinogen β and filaggrin peptides as well as an IgA reactivity that was exclusive for citrullinated fibrinogen β peptide and C3 deposition in rheumatoid arthritis patients. In addition, we characterized the humoral immune response against the viral EBNA-1 antigen to demonstrate the applicability of this assay beyond autoimmune conditions. We observed that particular buffer compositions were demanded for separate measurement of antibody reactivity and complement activation, as detection of antigen-antibody complexes appeared to be masked due to C3 deposition. We also found that rheumatoid factors of IgM isotype altered C3 deposition and introduced false-positive reactivities against EBNA-1 antigen. In conclusion, the presented bead-based assay setup can be utilized to profile antibody reactivities and immune-complex induced complement activation in a high-throughput manner and could facilitate the understanding and diagnosis of several diseases where complement

  15. Defensins Potentiate a Neutralizing Antibody Response to Enteric Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Gounder, Anshu P; Myers, Nicolle D; Treuting, Piper M; Bromme, Beth A; Wilson, Sarah S; Wiens, Mayim E; Lu, Wuyuan; Ouellette, André J; Spindler, Katherine R; Parks, William C; Smith, Jason G

    2016-03-01

    α-defensins are abundant antimicrobial peptides with broad, potent antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activities in vitro. Although their contribution to host defense against bacteria in vivo has been demonstrated, comparable studies of their antiviral activity in vivo are lacking. Using a mouse model deficient in activated α-defensins in the small intestine, we show that Paneth cell α-defensins protect mice from oral infection by a pathogenic virus, mouse adenovirus 1 (MAdV-1). Survival differences between mouse genotypes are lost upon parenteral MAdV-1 infection, strongly implicating a role for intestinal defenses in attenuating pathogenesis. Although differences in α-defensin expression impact the composition of the ileal commensal bacterial population, depletion studies using broad-spectrum antibiotics revealed no effect of the microbiota on α-defensin-dependent viral pathogenesis. Moreover, despite the sensitivity of MAdV-1 infection to α-defensin neutralization in cell culture, we observed no barrier effect due to Paneth cell α-defensin activation on the kinetics and magnitude of MAdV-1 dissemination to the brain. Rather, a protective neutralizing antibody response was delayed in the absence of α-defensins. This effect was specific to oral viral infection, because antibody responses to parenteral or mucosal ovalbumin exposure were not affected by α-defensin deficiency. Thus, α-defensins play an important role as adjuvants in antiviral immunity in vivo that is distinct from their direct antiviral activity observed in cell culture. PMID:26933888

  16. Defensins Potentiate a Neutralizing Antibody Response to Enteric Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Treuting, Piper M.; Bromme, Beth A.; Wilson, Sarah S.; Wiens, Mayim E.; Lu, Wuyuan; Ouellette, André J.; Spindler, Katherine R.; Parks, William C.; Smith, Jason G.

    2016-01-01

    α-defensins are abundant antimicrobial peptides with broad, potent antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activities in vitro. Although their contribution to host defense against bacteria in vivo has been demonstrated, comparable studies of their antiviral activity in vivo are lacking. Using a mouse model deficient in activated α-defensins in the small intestine, we show that Paneth cell α-defensins protect mice from oral infection by a pathogenic virus, mouse adenovirus 1 (MAdV-1). Survival differences between mouse genotypes are lost upon parenteral MAdV-1 infection, strongly implicating a role for intestinal defenses in attenuating pathogenesis. Although differences in α-defensin expression impact the composition of the ileal commensal bacterial population, depletion studies using broad-spectrum antibiotics revealed no effect of the microbiota on α-defensin-dependent viral pathogenesis. Moreover, despite the sensitivity of MAdV-1 infection to α-defensin neutralization in cell culture, we observed no barrier effect due to Paneth cell α-defensin activation on the kinetics and magnitude of MAdV-1 dissemination to the brain. Rather, a protective neutralizing antibody response was delayed in the absence of α-defensins. This effect was specific to oral viral infection, because antibody responses to parenteral or mucosal ovalbumin exposure were not affected by α-defensin deficiency. Thus, α-defensins play an important role as adjuvants in antiviral immunity in vivo that is distinct from their direct antiviral activity observed in cell culture. PMID:26933888

  17. New Phosphospecific Antibody Reveals Isoform-Specific Phosphorylation of CPEB3 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Kapil; Sylvester, Marc; Skubal, Magdalena; Josten, Michele; Steinhäuser, Christian; De Koninck, Paul; Theis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding proteins (CPEBs) are a family of polyadenylation factors interacting with 3’UTRs of mRNA and thereby regulating gene expression. Various functions of CPEBs in development, synaptic plasticity, and cellular senescence have been reported. Four CPEB family members of partially overlapping functions have been described to date, each containing a distinct alternatively spliced region. This region is highly conserved between CPEBs-2-4 and contains a putative phosphorylation consensus, overlapping with the exon seven of CPEB3. We previously found CPEBs-2-4 splice isoforms containing exon seven to be predominantly present in neurons, and the isoform expression pattern to be cell type-specific. Here, focusing on the alternatively spliced region of CPEB3, we determined that putative neuronal isoforms of CPEB3 are phosphorylated. Using a new phosphospecific antibody directed to the phosphorylation consensus we found Protein Kinase A and Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II to robustly phosphorylate CPEB3 in vitro and in primary hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, status epilepticus induced by systemic kainate injection in mice led to specific upregulation of the CPEB3 isoforms containing exon seven. Extensive analysis of CPEB3 phosphorylation in vitro revealed two other phosphorylation sites. In addition, we found plethora of potential kinases that might be targeting the alternatively spliced kinase consensus site of CPEB3. As this site is highly conserved between the CPEB family members, we suggest the existence of a splicing-based regulatory mechanism of CPEB function, and describe a robust phosphospecific antibody to study it in future. PMID:26915047

  18. New Phosphospecific Antibody Reveals Isoform-Specific Phosphorylation of CPEB3 Protein.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Labrie-Dion, Étienne; Sehgal, Kapil; Sylvester, Marc; Skubal, Magdalena; Josten, Michele; Steinhäuser, Christian; De Koninck, Paul; Theis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding proteins (CPEBs) are a family of polyadenylation factors interacting with 3'UTRs of mRNA and thereby regulating gene expression. Various functions of CPEBs in development, synaptic plasticity, and cellular senescence have been reported. Four CPEB family members of partially overlapping functions have been described to date, each containing a distinct alternatively spliced region. This region is highly conserved between CPEBs-2-4 and contains a putative phosphorylation consensus, overlapping with the exon seven of CPEB3. We previously found CPEBs-2-4 splice isoforms containing exon seven to be predominantly present in neurons, and the isoform expression pattern to be cell type-specific. Here, focusing on the alternatively spliced region of CPEB3, we determined that putative neuronal isoforms of CPEB3 are phosphorylated. Using a new phosphospecific antibody directed to the phosphorylation consensus we found Protein Kinase A and Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II to robustly phosphorylate CPEB3 in vitro and in primary hippocampal neurons. Interestingly, status epilepticus induced by systemic kainate injection in mice led to specific upregulation of the CPEB3 isoforms containing exon seven. Extensive analysis of CPEB3 phosphorylation in vitro revealed two other phosphorylation sites. In addition, we found plethora of potential kinases that might be targeting the alternatively spliced kinase consensus site of CPEB3. As this site is highly conserved between the CPEB family members, we suggest the existence of a splicing-based regulatory mechanism of CPEB function, and describe a robust phosphospecific antibody to study it in future. PMID:26915047

  19. Different molecular weight forms of opioid receptors revealed by polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Roy, S; Zhu, Y X; Lee, N M; Loh, H H

    1988-01-15

    Polyclonal antibodies were raised against a purified opioid receptor from bovine brain (Cho, et. al., 1986), and shown to inhibit 3H-diprenorphine binding to this receptor in a dose-dependent fashion. These antibodies were then used to characterize opioid-binding material present in rat brain and in NG108-15 neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells. Western blot analysis revealed that the antibodies reacted with a single species of 58,000 molecular weight in rat brain membranes; this closely corresponds in size to the bovine opioid receptor used to raise the antibodies. In contrast, the polyclonal antibodies reacted with a 45,000 molecular weight species in NG108-15 neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells; moreover, this band was specifically reduced in NG108-15 cells in which opioid receptors had been down-regulated by incubation with D-ala2-D-leu5-enkephalin for 24 hours. Thus at least two distinct opioid receptor molecules have been identified, which have antigenic similarities.

  20. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  1. Structures of protective antibodies reveal sites of vulnerability on Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Murin, Charles D; Fusco, Marnie L; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Qiu, Xiangguo; Olinger, Gene G; Zeitlin, Larry; Kobinger, Gary P; Ward, Andrew B; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2014-12-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) and related filoviruses cause severe hemorrhagic fever, with up to 90% lethality, and no treatments are approved for human use. Multiple recent outbreaks of EBOV and the likelihood of future human exposure highlight the need for pre- and postexposure treatments. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) cocktails are particularly attractive candidates due to their proven postexposure efficacy in nonhuman primate models of EBOV infection. Two candidate cocktails, MB-003 and ZMAb, have been extensively evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Recently, these two therapeutics have been combined into a new cocktail named ZMapp, which showed increased efficacy and has been given compassionately to some human patients. Epitope information and mechanism of action are currently unknown for most of the component mAbs. Here we provide single-particle EM reconstructions of every mAb in the ZMapp cocktail, as well as additional antibodies from MB-003 and ZMAb. Our results illuminate key and recurring sites of vulnerability on the EBOV glycoprotein and provide a structural rationale for the efficacy of ZMapp. Interestingly, two of its components recognize overlapping epitopes and compete with each other for binding. Going forward, this work now provides a basis for strategic selection of next-generation antibody cocktails against Ebola and related viruses and a model for predicting the impact of ZMapp on potential escape mutations in ongoing or future Ebola outbreaks.

  2. Potential of palladium-109-labeled antimelanoma monoclonal antibody for tumor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fawwaz, R.A.; Wang, T.S.T.; Srivastava, S.C.; Rosen, J.M.; Ferrone, S.; Hardy, M.A.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-07-01

    Palladium-109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, was chelated to the monoclonal antibody 225.28S to the high molecular weight antigen associated with human melanoma. Injection of the radiolabeled monoclonal antibody into nude mice bearing human melanoma resulted in significant accumulation of the radiolabel in the tumors: 19% injected dose/g; 38:1 and 61:1 tumor-to-blood ratios at 24 and 48 hr, respectively. The localization of the radiolabeled antibody in liver and kidney also was high, but appreciably lower than that achieved in tumor. These results suggest Pd-109-labeled monoclonal antibody to tumor-associated antigens may have potential applications in tumor immunotherapy.

  3. Potential of mean force for human lysozyme camelid vhh hl6 antibody interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Liao, Jun-Min; Chen, Cheng-Lung; Su, Zhi-Yuan; Chen, Chang-Hung; Hu, Jeu-Jiun

    2008-04-01

    Calculating antigen-antibody interaction energies is crucial for understanding antigen-antibody associations in immunology. To shed further light into this equation, we study a separation of human lysozyme-camelid vhh hl6 antibody (cAb-HuL6) complex. The c-terminal end-to-end stretching of the lysozyme-antibody complex structures have been studied using potential of mean force (PMF) calculations based on molecular dynamics (MD) and explicit water model. For the lysozyme-antibody complex, there are six important intermediates in the c-terminal extensions process. Inclusion of our simulations may help to understand the binding mechanics of lysozyme-cAb-HuL6 antibody complex.

  4. Antibodies and Their Receptors: Different Potential Roles in Mucosal Defense

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Rachel E.; Vidarsson, Gestur

    2013-01-01

    Over recent years it has become increasingly apparent that mucosal antibodies are not only restricted to the IgM and IgA isotypes, but that also other isotypes and particularly IgG can be found in significant quantities at some mucosal surfaces, such as in the genital tract. Their role is more complex than traditionally believed with, among other things, the discovery of novel function of mucosal immunoglobulin receptors. A thorough knowledge in the source and function and mucosal immunoglobulins is particularly important in development of vaccines providing mucosal immunity, and also in the current climate of microbicide development, to combat major world health issues such as HIV. We present here a comprehensive review of human antibody mediated mucosal immunity. PMID:23882268

  5. Immunoactive two-dimensional self-assembly of monoclonal antibodies in aqueous solution revealed by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, Shinichiro; Kimiya, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Kei; Kominami, Hiroaki; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2014-03-01

    The conformational flexibility of antibodies in solution directly affects their immune function. Namely, the flexible hinge regions of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies are essential in epitope-specific antigen recognition and biological effector function. The antibody structure, which is strongly related to its functions, has been partially revealed by electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, but only under non-physiological conditions. Here we observed monoclonal IgG antibodies in aqueous solution by high-resolution frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM). We found that monoclonal antibodies self-assemble into hexamers, which form two-dimensional crystals in aqueous solution. Furthermore, by directly observing antibody-antigen interactions using FM-AFM, we revealed that IgG molecules in the crystal retain immunoactivity. As the self-assembled monolayer crystal of antibodies retains immunoactivity at a neutral pH and is functionally stable at a wide range of pH and temperature, the antibody crystal is applicable to new biotechnological platforms for biosensors or bioassays.

  6. Immunoactive two-dimensional self-assembly of monoclonal antibodies in aqueous solution revealed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ido, Shinichiro; Kimiya, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Kei; Kominami, Hiroaki; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2014-03-01

    The conformational flexibility of antibodies in solution directly affects their immune function. Namely, the flexible hinge regions of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies are essential in epitope-specific antigen recognition and biological effector function. The antibody structure, which is strongly related to its functions, has been partially revealed by electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, but only under non-physiological conditions. Here we observed monoclonal IgG antibodies in aqueous solution by high-resolution frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM). We found that monoclonal antibodies self-assemble into hexamers, which form two-dimensional crystals in aqueous solution. Furthermore, by directly observing antibody-antigen interactions using FM-AFM, we revealed that IgG molecules in the crystal retain immunoactivity. As the self-assembled monolayer crystal of antibodies retains immunoactivity at a neutral pH and is functionally stable at a wide range of pH and temperature, the antibody crystal is applicable to new biotechnological platforms for biosensors or bioassays. PMID:24441879

  7. Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation Is Associated with Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and the Complement-Independent Alloreactive Potential of Donor-Specific Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Legris, Tristan; Picard, Christophe; Todorova, Dilyana; Lyonnet, Luc; Laporte, Cathy; Dumoulin, Chloé; Nicolino-Brunet, Corinne; Daniel, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Bataille, Stanislas; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valérie; Berland, Yvon; Dignat-George, Francoise; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT) was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1(+) cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years). Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83). In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration of

  8. Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation Is Associated with Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and the Complement-Independent Alloreactive Potential of Donor-Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Legris, Tristan; Picard, Christophe; Todorova, Dilyana; Lyonnet, Luc; Laporte, Cathy; Dumoulin, Chloé; Nicolino-Brunet, Corinne; Daniel, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Bataille, Stanislas; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valérie; Berland, Yvon; Dignat-George, Francoise; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT) was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1+ cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years). Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83). In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration of

  9. Restricted diversity of antigen binding residues of antibodies revealed by computational alanine scanning of 227 antibody-antigen complexes.

    PubMed

    Robin, Gautier; Sato, Yoshiteru; Desplancq, Dominique; Rochel, Natacha; Weiss, Etienne; Martineau, Pierre

    2014-11-11

    Antibody molecules are able to recognize any antigen with high affinity and specificity. To get insight into the molecular diversity at the source of this functional diversity, we compiled and analyzed a non-redundant aligned collection of 227 structures of antibody-antigen complexes. Free energy of binding of all the residue side chains was quantified by computational alanine scanning, allowing the first large-scale quantitative description of antibody paratopes. This demonstrated that as few as 8 residues among 30 key positions are sufficient to explain 80% of the binding free energy in most complexes. At these positions, the residue distribution is not only different from that of other surface residues but also dependent on the role played by the side chain in the interaction, residues participating in the binding energy being mainly aromatic residues, and Gly or Ser otherwise. To question the generality of these binding characteristics, we isolated an antibody fragment by phage display using a biased synthetic repertoire with only two diversified complementarity-determining regions and solved its structure in complex with its antigen. Despite this restricted diversity, the structure demonstrated that all complementarity-determining regions were involved in the interaction with the antigen and that the rules derived from the natural antibody repertoire apply to this synthetic binder, thus demonstrating the robustness and universality of our results.

  10. Potential therapeutic use of antibodies directed towards HuIFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Froyen, G; Billiau, A

    1997-01-01

    IFN-gamma is an important regulator of immune responses and inflammation. Studies in animal models of inflammation, autoimmunity, cancer, transplant rejection and delayed-type hypersensitivity have indicated that administration of antibodies against IFN-gamma can prevent the occurrence of diseases or alleviate disease manifestations. Therefore, it is speculated that such antibodies may have therapeutical efficacy in human diseases. Since animal-derived antibodies are immunogenic in patients several strategies are being developed in order to reduce or abolish this human anti-mouse antibody (HAMA) response. In our laboratory, we have constructed a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) derived from a mouse antibody with neutralizing potential for human IFN-gamma. A scFv consists of only variable domains tethered together by a flexible linker. The scFv was demonstrated to neutralize the antiviral activity of HuIFN-gamma in vitro and therefore might be considered as a candidate for human therapy.

  11. Boronated antibodies and promazine derivatives for potential neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, F.; Soloway, A.H.; Barth, R.F.; Adams, D.M.; Mafune, N.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical basis for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) derives from the irradiation of /sup 10/B with thermal neutrons, resulting in a fission reaction yielding /sup 7/Li and alpha particles. The fission products have short path lengths and high linear energy transfer (LET). Each component of this binary system, thermal neutrons and /sup 10/B, independently are nontumoricidal, but together they can be highly lethal. Success depends on localizing enough of the /sup 10/B (approx.20 ..mu..g/g of tumor) and delivering a requisite fluence of thermal neutrons (approx.10/sup 13/ n/cm/sup 9/) at the site of the tumor. This report describes the boronation of antibodies and the development of boron-containing promazine derivatives to selectively deliver /sup 10/B to tumor cells for BNCT.

  12. A novel method for measuring cellular antibody uptake using imaging flow cytometry reveals distinct uptake rates for two different monoclonal antibodies targeting L1.

    PubMed

    Hazin, John; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Altevogt, Peter; Brady, Nathan R

    2015-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have emerged as a promising tool for cancer therapy. Differing approaches utilize mAbs to either deliver a drug to the tumor cells or to modulate the host's immune system to mediate tumor kill. The rate by which a therapeutic antibody is being internalized by tumor cells is a decisive feature for choosing the appropriate treatment strategy. We herein present a novel method to effectively quantitate antibody uptake of tumor cells by using image-based flow cytometry, which combines image analysis with high throughput of sample numbers and sample size. The use of this method is established by determining uptake rate of an anti-EpCAM antibody (HEA125), from single cell measurements of plasma membrane versus internalized antibody, in conjunction with inhibitors of endocytosis. The method is then applied to two mAbs (L1-9.3, L1-OV52.24) targeting the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 (L1CAM) at two different epitopes. Based on median cell population responses, we find that mAb L1-OV52.24 is rapidly internalized by the ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3ip while L1 mAb 9.3 is mainly retained at the cell surface. These findings suggest the L1 mAb OV52.24 as a candidate to be further developed for drug-delivery to cancer cells, while L1-9.3 may be optimized to tag the tumor cells and stimulate immunogenic cancer cell killing. Furthermore, when analyzing cell-to-cell variability, we observed L1 mAb OV52.24 rapidly transition into a subpopulation with high-internalization capacity. In summary, this novel high-content method for measuring antibody internalization rate provides a high level of accuracy and sensitivity for cell population measurements and reveals further biologically relevant information when taking into account cellular heterogeneity.

  13. A novel method for measuring cellular antibody uptake using imaging flow cytometry reveals distinct uptake rates for two different monoclonal antibodies targeting L1.

    PubMed

    Hazin, John; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Altevogt, Peter; Brady, Nathan R

    2015-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have emerged as a promising tool for cancer therapy. Differing approaches utilize mAbs to either deliver a drug to the tumor cells or to modulate the host's immune system to mediate tumor kill. The rate by which a therapeutic antibody is being internalized by tumor cells is a decisive feature for choosing the appropriate treatment strategy. We herein present a novel method to effectively quantitate antibody uptake of tumor cells by using image-based flow cytometry, which combines image analysis with high throughput of sample numbers and sample size. The use of this method is established by determining uptake rate of an anti-EpCAM antibody (HEA125), from single cell measurements of plasma membrane versus internalized antibody, in conjunction with inhibitors of endocytosis. The method is then applied to two mAbs (L1-9.3, L1-OV52.24) targeting the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 (L1CAM) at two different epitopes. Based on median cell population responses, we find that mAb L1-OV52.24 is rapidly internalized by the ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3ip while L1 mAb 9.3 is mainly retained at the cell surface. These findings suggest the L1 mAb OV52.24 as a candidate to be further developed for drug-delivery to cancer cells, while L1-9.3 may be optimized to tag the tumor cells and stimulate immunogenic cancer cell killing. Furthermore, when analyzing cell-to-cell variability, we observed L1 mAb OV52.24 rapidly transition into a subpopulation with high-internalization capacity. In summary, this novel high-content method for measuring antibody internalization rate provides a high level of accuracy and sensitivity for cell population measurements and reveals further biologically relevant information when taking into account cellular heterogeneity. PMID:25967950

  14. Lineage tracing of human B cells reveals the in vivo landscape of human antibody class switching.

    PubMed

    Horns, Felix; Vollmers, Christopher; Croote, Derek; Mackey, Sally F; Swan, Gary E; Dekker, Cornelia L; Davis, Mark M; Quake, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Antibody class switching is a feature of the adaptive immune system which enables diversification of the effector properties of antibodies. Even though class switching is essential for mounting a protective response to pathogens, the in vivo patterns and lineage characteristics of antibody class switching have remained uncharacterized in living humans. Here we comprehensively measured the landscape of antibody class switching in human adult twins using antibody repertoire sequencing. The map identifies how antibodies of every class are created and delineates a two-tiered hierarchy of class switch pathways. Using somatic hypermutations as a molecular clock, we discovered that closely related B cells often switch to the same class, but lose coherence as somatic mutations accumulate. Such correlations between closely related cells exist when purified B cells class switch in vitro, suggesting that class switch recombination is directed toward specific isotypes by a cell-autonomous imprinted state. PMID:27481325

  15. Inhibition of HIV-1 entry by antibodies: potential viral and cellular targets

    PubMed Central

    Phogat, S.; Wyatt, R. T.; Hedestam, G. B. Karlsson

    2008-01-01

    Phogat S, Wyatt RT, Karlsson Hedestam GB (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; Department of Microbiology Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; and the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Solna, Sweden). Inhibition of HIV-1 entry by antibodies: potential viral and cellular targets (Review). Vaccine-induced antibodies that interfere with viral entry are the protective correlate of most existing prophylactic vaccines. However, for highly variable viruses such as HIV-1, the ability to elicit broadly neutralizing antibody responses through vaccination has proven to be extremely difficult. The major targets for HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies are the viral envelope glycoprotein trimers on the surface of the virus that mediate receptor binding and entry. HIV-1 has evolved many mechanisms on the surface of envelope glyco-proteins to evade antibody-mediated neutralization, including the masking of conserved regions by glycan, quaternary protein interactions and the presence of immunodominant variable elements. The primary challenge in the development of an HIV-1 vaccine that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies therefore lies in the design of suitable envelope glycoprotein immunogens that circumvent these barriers. Here, we describe neutralizing determinants on the viral envelope glyco-proteins that are defined by their function in receptor binding or by rare neutralizing antibodies isolated from HIV-infected individuals. We also describe the nonvariable cellular receptors involved in the HIV-1 entry process, or other cellular proteins, and ongoing studies to determine if antibodies against these proteins have efficacy as therapeutic reagents or, in some cases, as vaccine targets to interfere with HIV-1 entry. PMID:17598813

  16. Validation of Endothelin B Receptor Antibodies Reveals Two Distinct Receptor-related Bands on Western Blot

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Travis P.; Kornberg, Daniel; Montmayeur, Jean-Pierre; Long, Melinda; Reichheld, Stephen; Strichartz, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are important tools for the study of protein expression, but are often used without full validation. In this study, we use Western blots to characterize antibodies targeted to the N- (NT) or C-termini (CT) and the second (IL2) or third intracellular (IL3) loops of the endothelin B receptor (ETB). The IL2-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB expression in rat brain and cultured rat astrocytes by labeling a 50kD band, the expected weight of full-length ETB. However, this antibody failed to detect transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures. In contrast, the NT-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB in rat astrocyte cultures and transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures by labeling a 37 kD band, but failed to detect endogenous ETB in rat brain. Bands detected by the CT-targeted or IL3-targeted antibodies were found to be unrelated to ETB. Our findings show that functional ETB receptors can be detected at 50 kD or 37 kD on Western blot, with drastic differences in antibody affinity for these bands. The 37 kD band likely reflects ETB receptor processing, which appears to be dependent on cell type and/or culture condition. PMID:25232999

  17. Validation of endothelin B receptor antibodies reveals two distinct receptor-related bands on Western blot.

    PubMed

    Barr, Travis P; Kornberg, Daniel; Montmayeur, Jean-Pierre; Long, Melinda; Reichheld, Stephen; Strichartz, Gary R

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are important tools for the study of protein expression but are often used without full validation. In this study, we used Western blots to characterize antibodies targeted to the N or C terminal (NT or CT, respectively) and the second or third intracellular loop (IL2 or IL3, respectively) of the endothelin B receptor (ETB). The IL2-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB expression in rat brain and cultured rat astrocytes by labeling a 50-kDa band, the expected weight of full-length ETB. However, this antibody failed to detect transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures. In contrast, the NT-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB in rat astrocyte cultures and transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures by labeling a 37-kDa band but failed to detect endogenous ETB in rat brain. Bands detected by the CT- or IL3-targeted antibody were found to be unrelated to ETB. Our findings show that functional ETB can be detected at 50 or 37kDa on Western blot, with drastic differences in antibody affinity for these bands. The 37-kDa band likely reflects ETB processing, which appears to be dependent on cell type and/or culture condition.

  18. Antibody response to BK polyomavirus as a prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Xavier Etienne; Kardas, Piotr; Acevedo, Claudio; Sais, Giovanni; Poyet, Cédric; Banzola, Irina; Mortezavi, Ashkan; Seifert, Burkhardt; Sulser, Tullio

    2015-01-01

    Infectious agents, including the BK polyomavirus (BKPyV), have been proposed as important inflammatory pathogens in prostate cancer. Here, we evaluated whether the preoperative antibody response to BKPyV large T antigen (LTag) and viral capsid protein 1 (VP1) was associated with the risk of biochemical recurrence in 226 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for primary prostate cancer. Essentially, the multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that preoperative seropositivity to BKPyV LTag significantly reduced the risk of biochemical recurrence, independently of established predictors of biochemical recurrence such as tumor stage, Gleason score and surgical margin status. The predictive accuracy of the regression model was denotatively increased by the inclusion of the BKPyV LTag serostatus. In contrast, the VP1 serostatus was of no prognostic value. Finally, the BKPyV LTag serostatus was associated with a peculiar cytokine gene expression profile upon assessment of the cellular immune response elicited by LTag. Taken together, our findings suggest that the BKPyV LTag serology may serve as a prognostic factor in prostate cancer. If validated in additional studies, this biomarker may allow for better treatment decisions after radical prostatectomy. Finally, the favorable outcome of LTag seropositive patients may provide a potential opportunity for novel therapeutic approaches targeting a viral antigen. PMID:25749042

  19. Monoclonal antibodies reveal multiple forms of expression of human microsomal epoxide hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hongying; Takagi, Akira; Kayano, Hidekazu; Koyama, Isamu; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2012-04-01

    In a previous study, we developed five kinds of monoclonal antibodies against different portions of human mEH: three, anti-N-terminal; one, anti-C-terminal; one, anti-conformational epitope. Using them, we stained the intact and the permeabilized human cells of various kinds and performed flow cytometric analysis. Primary hepatocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) showed remarkable differences. On the surface, hepatocytes exhibited 4 out of 5 epitopes whereas PBMC did not show any of the epitopes. mEH was detected inside both cell types, but the most prominent expression was observed for the conformational epitope in the hepatocytes and the two N-terminal epitopes in PBMC. These differences were also observed between hepatocyte-derived cell lines and mononuclear cell-derived cell lines. In addition, among each group, there were several differences which may be related to the cultivation, the degree of differentiation, or the original cell subsets. We also noted that two glioblastoma cell lines reveal marked expression of the conformational epitope on the surface which seemed to correlate with the brain tumor-associated antigen reported elsewhere. Several cell lines also underwent selective permeabilization before flow cytometric analysis, and we noticed that the topological orientation of mEH on the ER membrane in those cells was in accordance with the previous report. However, the orientation on the cell surface was inconsistent with the report and had a great variation between the cells. These findings show the multiple mode of expression of mEH which may be possibly related to the multiple roles that mEH plays in different cells. -- Highlights: ► We examine expression of five mEH epitopes in human cells. ► Remarkable differences exist between hepatocytes and PBMC. ► mEH expression in cell lines differs depending on several factors. ► Some glioblastoma cell lines reveal marked surface expression of mEH. ► Topology of mEH on the cell

  20. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, wemore » derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.« less

  1. Lineage tracing of human B cells reveals the in vivo landscape of human antibody class switching

    PubMed Central

    Horns, Felix; Vollmers, Christopher; Croote, Derek; Mackey, Sally F; Swan, Gary E; Dekker, Cornelia L; Davis, Mark M; Quake, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Antibody class switching is a feature of the adaptive immune system which enables diversification of the effector properties of antibodies. Even though class switching is essential for mounting a protective response to pathogens, the in vivo patterns and lineage characteristics of antibody class switching have remained uncharacterized in living humans. Here we comprehensively measured the landscape of antibody class switching in human adult twins using antibody repertoire sequencing. The map identifies how antibodies of every class are created and delineates a two-tiered hierarchy of class switch pathways. Using somatic hypermutations as a molecular clock, we discovered that closely related B cells often switch to the same class, but lose coherence as somatic mutations accumulate. Such correlations between closely related cells exist when purified B cells class switch in vitro, suggesting that class switch recombination is directed toward specific isotypes by a cell-autonomous imprinted state. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16578.001 PMID:27481325

  2. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, we derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.

  3. The structural analysis of shark IgNAR antibodies reveals evolutionary principles of immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Feige, Matthias J; Gräwert, Melissa A; Marcinowski, Moritz; Hennig, Janosch; Behnke, Julia; Ausländer, David; Herold, Eva M; Peschek, Jirka; Castro, Caitlin D; Flajnik, Martin; Hendershot, Linda M; Sattler, Michael; Groll, Michael; Buchner, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Sharks and other cartilaginous fish are the phylogenetically oldest living organisms that rely on antibodies as part of their adaptive immune system. They produce the immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR), a homodimeric heavy chain-only antibody, as a major part of their humoral adaptive immune response. Here, we report the atomic resolution structure of the IgNAR constant domains and a structural model of this heavy chain-only antibody. We find that despite low sequence conservation, the basic Ig fold of modern antibodies is already present in the evolutionary ancient shark IgNAR domains, highlighting key structural determinants of the ubiquitous Ig fold. In contrast, structural differences between human and shark antibody domains explain the high stability of several IgNAR domains and allowed us to engineer human antibodies for increased stability and secretion efficiency. We identified two constant domains, C1 and C3, that act as dimerization modules within IgNAR. Together with the individual domain structures and small-angle X-ray scattering, this allowed us to develop a structural model of the complete IgNAR molecule. Its constant region exhibits an elongated shape with flexibility and a characteristic kink in the middle. Despite the lack of a canonical hinge region, the variable domains are spaced appropriately wide for binding to multiple antigens. Thus, the shark IgNAR domains already display the well-known Ig fold, but apart from that, this heavy chain-only antibody employs unique ways for dimerization and positioning of functional modules.

  4. A Diverse Panel of Hepatitis C Virus Glycoproteins for Use in Vaccine Research Reveals Extremes of Monoclonal Antibody Neutralization Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Urbanowicz, Richard A.; McClure, C. Patrick; Brown, Richard J. P.; Tsoleridis, Theocharis; Persson, Mats A. A.; Krey, Thomas; Irving, William L.; Tarr, Alexander W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite significant advances in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, the need to develop preventative vaccines remains. Identification of the best vaccine candidates and evaluation of their performance in preclinical and clinical development will require appropriate neutralization assays utilizing diverse HCV isolates. We aimed to generate and characterize a panel of HCV E1E2 glycoproteins suitable for subsequent use in vaccine and therapeutic antibody testing. Full-length E1E2 clones were PCR amplified from patient-derived serum samples, cloned into an expression vector, and used to generate viral pseudoparticles (HCVpp). In addition, some of these clones were used to generate cell culture infectious (HCVcc) clones. The infectivity and neutralization sensitivity of these viruses were then determined. Bioinformatic and HCVpp infectivity screening of approximately 900 E1E2 clones resulted in the assembly of a panel of 78 functional E1E2 proteins representing distinct HCV genotypes and different stages of infection. These HCV glycoproteins differed markedly in their sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies. We used this panel to predict antibody efficacy against circulating HCV strains, highlighting the likely reason why some monoclonal antibodies failed in previous clinical trials. This study provides the first objective categorization of cross-genotype patient-derived HCV E1E2 clones according to their sensitivity to antibody neutralization. It has shown that HCV isolates have clearly distinguishable neutralization-sensitive, -resistant, or -intermediate phenotypes, which are independent of genotype. The panel provides a systematic means for characterization of the neutralizing response elicited by candidate vaccines and for defining the therapeutic potential of monoclonal antibodies. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has a global burden of more than 170 million people, many of whom cannot attain the new, expensive, direct-acting antiviral

  5. DIFFERENTIATION AND FUNCTIONAL EXPRESSION OF POTENTIAL ANTIBODY-PRODUCING CELLS IN THE PRESENCE OF CHLORAMPHENICOL

    PubMed Central

    Schoenberg, Melvin D.; Moore, Richard D.; Weisberger, Austin S.

    1967-01-01

    Rabbits were immunized with diphtheria toxoid combined with complete Freund's adjuvant. Half of the animals were started on intramuscular injections of chloramphenicol 24 hr before the injection of the antigens. There was a general depression of protein synthesis in the immune system in the presence of chloramphenicol, but a greater effect on the synthesis of antibody than on the synthesis of proteins necessary for reproduction and maturation. In contrast to the finding of antibody in cells of the spleen and in the circulation of the control animals, those animals receiving chloramphenicol did not have measurable circulating antibody, and their spleens contained only a few cells with intracytoplasmic antibody late in the course of the experiment. Cytologically there was maturation of potential antibody-producing cells in the red pulp and nonfollicular white pulp of the spleen while the animals were receiving chloramphenicol. These cells developed more slowly, and were fewer and smaller than those of the control animals. They had numerous small, electron-opaque particles in their cytoplasm early in development. Ribosomes were synthesized, though fewer in number. The endoplasmic reticulum formed more slowly. PMID:10976231

  6. Antibodies to avian influenza viruses in Canada geese (Branta canadensis): a potential surveillance tool?

    PubMed

    Kistler, Whitney M; Stallknecht, David E; Deliberto, Thomas J; Swafford, Seth; Pedersen, Kerri; Van Why, Kyle; Wolf, Paul C; Hill, Jerry A; Bruning, Darren L; Cumbee, James C; Mickley, Randall M; Betsill, Carl W; Randall, Adam R; Berghaus, Roy D; Yabsley, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    Traditionally, the epidemiology of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in wild birds has been defined by detection of virus or viral RNA through virus isolation or reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Our goals were to estimate AIV antibody prevalence in Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and measure effects of age and location on these estimates. We collected 3,205 samples from nine states during June and July 2008 and 2009: Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Washington, and West Virginia. Serum samples were tested for AIV antibodies with the use of a commercial blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Overall, 483 (15%) Canada geese had detectable antibodies to AIV. Significantly higher prevalences were detected in geese collected from northeastern and upper midwestern states compared with southeastern states. This trend is consistent with results from virus isolation studies reporting AIV prevalence in North American dabbling ducks. Within Pennsylvania, significantly higher antibody prevalences were detected in goose flocks sampled in urban locations compared to flocks sampled in rural areas. Antibody prevalence was significantly higher in after-hatch-year geese compared to hatch-year geese. No significant differences in prevalence were detected from 10 locations sampled during both years. Results indicate that Canada geese are frequently exposed to AIVs and, with resident populations, may potentially be useful as sentinels to confirm regional AIV transmission within wild bird populations.

  7. Physical Activity and Natural Anti-VIP Antibodies: Potential Role in Breast and Prostate Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Veljkovic, Milena; Dopsaj, Violeta; Dopsaj, Milivoj; Branch, Donald R.; Veljkovic, Nevena; Sakarellos-Daitsiotis, Maria M.; Veljkovic, Veljko; Glisic, Sanja; Colombatti, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Background There is convincing evidence from numerous clinical and epidemiological studies that physical activity can reduce the risk for breast and prostate cancer. The biological mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain elusive. Herein we suggest a role for naturally produced antibodies reactive with the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the suppression of breast and prostate cancer, which we believe could offer a possible molecular mechanism underlying control of these cancers by physical exercise. Methodology and Results We found that sera from individuals having breast and prostate cancers have decreased titers of VIP natural antibodies as demonstrated by a lower reactivity against peptide NTM1, having similar informational and structural properties as VIP. In contrast, sera collected from elite athletes, exhibited titers of natural NTM1-reactive antibodies that are significantly increased, suggesting that physical activity boosts production of these antibodies. Significance Presented results suggest that physical exercise stimulates production of natural anti-VIP antibodies and likely results in suppression of VIP. This, in turn, may play a protective role against breast and prostate cancers. Physical exercise should be further investigated as a potential tool in the treatment of these diseases. PMID:22140573

  8. Development of specific scFv antibodies to detect neurocysticercosis antigens and potential applications in immunodiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Vanessa da Silva; Araújo, Thaise Gonçalves; Gonzaga, Henrique Tomaz; Nascimento, Rafael; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2013-01-01

    We have shown previously that detection of circulating antibodies against mimotopes selected by phage display were useful in neurocysticercosis diagnosis. However, circulating antigens may also be useful in patients' clinical follow-up. Therefore, we aimed to select novel combinatorial antibodies, single-chain variable fragment (scFv), which can be used for specific antigens with pre-defined affinity and specificity without prior immunization. A phage scFv antibody library was selected against Taenia solium mimotopes displayed on phages coupled in beads and total saline extract of T. solium metacestodes (S) immobilized on microtiter plate wells. After two rounds of selection, 96 phage clones were evolved and validated against each target by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and dot-blot, and three specific antibodies (B6, G10 and A4) were further characterized by sequencing and indirect immunofluorescence (IFI) assays. IFI revealed tegument staining for the B6, while the others showed a non-uniform staining in the whole parasite. The selected scFvs were used to capture their antigen targets that were elucidated through mass spectrometry, and used for antibody detection in NC patients' sera by ELISA, which achieved sensitivities greater than 97% and specificities above 95%. We have successfully developed scFv antibodies against important mimotopes used in NC diagnosis, and can be further explored to detect circulating antigens for clinical follow-up of patients with NC. Our strategy also highlighted the possibility of using this combinatorial approach to select, capture and characterize specific antigens to better understand this intriguing parasite infection and disease evolution.

  9. Imaging of primary and metastatic colorectal carcinoma with monoclonal antibody 791T/36 and the therapeutic potential of antibody-drug conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Pimm, M.V.; Armitage, N.C.; Ballantyne, K.; Baldwin, R.W.; Perkins, A.C.; Durrant, L.G.; Garnett, M.C.; Hardcastle, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 791T/36, prepared against a tumor-associated 72,000 dalton glycoprotein, reacted with cells from primary and metastatic colorectal carcinomas. I-131 or In-111-labelled antibody localized in xenografts of colorectal carcinomas established from in vitro clonogenic populations. Clinically, with I-131-labelled antibody, 8/11 colonic tumors imaged positively. Imaging was negative in four patients with benign colon disease. 5/11 rectal tumors were positively imaged, but excreted I-131 in the bladder obscured tumors in several studies. In-111-labelled antibody gave superior images and positively imaged primary and metastatic sites in 13/14 patients. Prospectively in the detection of recurrent disease, I-131 or In-111-antibody detected 29/33 separate sites in 24 patients. Seven negative patients remain disease free. There were 3 false positives; overall sensitivity was 88%, with 70% specificity. Specific localization of radiolabel was confirmed immunochemically and by counting radioactivity in resected specimens. Antibody conjugates with methotrexate, vindesine and daunomycin retained drug activity and antibody function, including xenograft localization and conjugates were therapeutically effective against xenografts. 791T/36 antibody has potential for immunodetection of primary and recurrent colorectal carcinoma and for targeting of therapeutic agents.

  10. Terminal differentiation of osteogenic cells in the embryonic chick tibia is revealed by a monoclonal antibody against osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Bruder, S P; Caplan, A I

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against the surface of embryonic osteogenic cells have been used to characterize the sequence of transitions involved in the osteoblastic cell lineage. These previous data identified distinct cell stages within the osteogenic lineage, but were incomplete. To further refine and extend these observations, additional monoclonal antibodies were generated against the surface of osteogenic cells by immunizing mice with a heterogeneous population of chick embryonic bone cells. Supernatants from growing hybridoma colonies were immunohistochemically screened against frozen sections of stage 35 (day 9.5) chick tibiae. One cell line, SB-5, which secretes an antibody against the surface of osteogenic cells was successfully cloned, stabilized, and immortalized. Studies on the developmental progression of osteogenesis in the embryonic chick tibia reveal that cells within the lineage stages from Pre-Osteoblast to Secretory Osteoblast were never observed to react with antibody SB-5 at any time. By contrast, strong cell surface immunoreactivity was present on mature osteoblastic cells as they became Osteocytes. Furthermore, in cultures of osteogenic cells derived from embryonic calvaria or tibiae, cells possessing the SB-5 antigen on their surface displayed a morphology remarkably similar to that of Osteocytes found in situ. Double immunofluorescent staining of developing chick tibiae with SB-5 and SB-2, a monoclonal antibody directed against the surface of Secretory Osteoblasts, indicates that these cells proceed through an intermediate lineage step before becoming terminally differentiated Osteocytes. This transitory cell state is characterized by the simultaneous cell surface binding of antibodies SB-2 and SB-5, and is referred to as the Osteocytic Osteoblast stage.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Potentiation of NK cytotoxicity by antibody-C3b/iC3b heteroconjugates.

    PubMed

    Yefenof, E; Benizri, R; Reiter, Y; Klein, E; Fishelson, Z

    1990-02-15

    The interaction of two Burkitt lymphoma lines, Raji and Rael, with human C and NK cells was analyzed. Raji cells activate the alternative C pathway (ACP) and then bind C3 fragments. Consequently, the cells become more sensitive to lysis by CR3-bearing NK cells but not to C lysis. In contrast, Rael cells are poor ACP activators, do not bind C3 fragments, and are therefore resistant to C-dependent NK lysis. As suggested earlier, the difference between Raji and Rael could be attributed to the presence or absence of CR2, respectively, on their surface. To potentiate C- and NK-dependent lysis of target cells, we generated heteroconjugates composed of a murine antitransferrin receptor mAb and of human C C3b or iC3b. Antibody-C3b conjugates induced C3 deposition on Rael cells and elevated C3 deposition on Raji cells in human serum. Both Raji and Rael cells coated with antibody-C3b conjugates were efficiently lyzed by the cytolytic ACP in human serum. This conjugate had a small enhancing effect on target cell lysis by NK cells which could be markedly increased by combined treatment of the target cell with antibody-C3b conjugate and C5-depleted human serum. On the other hand, antibody-iC3b conjugates efficiently potentiated lysis of target cells by NK cells in the absence of serum. The iC3b-directed cytotoxicity was mediated by CR3-bearing NK effector cells. Anti-C3 but not anti-mouse Ig antibodies abrogated the activity of the antibody-iC3b conjugate. These results further demonstrate that NK cytotoxicity may be potentiated by opsonizing the target cells with C3 fragments and suggest that antibody-C3b/iC3b conjugates could be potent tools for targeting and potentiation of the lytic action of both C and NK cells against tumor cells.

  12. Potentiation of NK cytotoxicity by antibody-C3b/iC3b heteroconjugates.

    PubMed

    Yefenof, E; Benizri, R; Reiter, Y; Klein, E; Fishelson, Z

    1990-02-15

    The interaction of two Burkitt lymphoma lines, Raji and Rael, with human C and NK cells was analyzed. Raji cells activate the alternative C pathway (ACP) and then bind C3 fragments. Consequently, the cells become more sensitive to lysis by CR3-bearing NK cells but not to C lysis. In contrast, Rael cells are poor ACP activators, do not bind C3 fragments, and are therefore resistant to C-dependent NK lysis. As suggested earlier, the difference between Raji and Rael could be attributed to the presence or absence of CR2, respectively, on their surface. To potentiate C- and NK-dependent lysis of target cells, we generated heteroconjugates composed of a murine antitransferrin receptor mAb and of human C C3b or iC3b. Antibody-C3b conjugates induced C3 deposition on Rael cells and elevated C3 deposition on Raji cells in human serum. Both Raji and Rael cells coated with antibody-C3b conjugates were efficiently lyzed by the cytolytic ACP in human serum. This conjugate had a small enhancing effect on target cell lysis by NK cells which could be markedly increased by combined treatment of the target cell with antibody-C3b conjugate and C5-depleted human serum. On the other hand, antibody-iC3b conjugates efficiently potentiated lysis of target cells by NK cells in the absence of serum. The iC3b-directed cytotoxicity was mediated by CR3-bearing NK effector cells. Anti-C3 but not anti-mouse Ig antibodies abrogated the activity of the antibody-iC3b conjugate. These results further demonstrate that NK cytotoxicity may be potentiated by opsonizing the target cells with C3 fragments and suggest that antibody-C3b/iC3b conjugates could be potent tools for targeting and potentiation of the lytic action of both C and NK cells against tumor cells. PMID:2303717

  13. Human Monoclonal Islet Cell Antibodies From a Patient with Insulin- Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Reveal Glutamate Decarboxylase as the Target Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Wiltrud; Endl, Josef; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Brandt, Michael; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Thivolet, Charles; Jungfer, Herbert; Scherbaum, Werner A.

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune phenomena associated with destruction of the β cell in pancreatic islets and development of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) include circulating islet cell antibodies. We have immortalized peripheral blood lymphocytes from prediabetic individuals and patients with newly diagnosed IDDM by Epstein-Barr virus transformation. IgG-positive cells were selected by anti-human IgG-coupled magnetic beads and expanded in cell culture. Supernatants were screened for cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies using the conventional indirect immunofluorescence test on cryostat sections of human pancreas. Six islet cell-specific B-cell lines, originating from a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM, could be stabilized on a monoclonal level. All six monoclonal islet cell antibodies (MICA 1-6) were of the IgG class. None of the MICA reacted with human thyroid, adrenal gland, anterior pituitary, liver, lung, stomach, and intestine tissues but all six reacted with pancreatic islets of different mammalian species and, in addition, with neurons of rat cerebellar cortex. MICA 1-6 were shown to recognize four distinct antigenic epitopes in islets. Islet cell antibody-positive diabetic sera but not normal human sera blocked the binding of the monoclonal antibodies to their target epitopes. Immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled human islet cell extracts revealed that a protein of identical size to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was a target of all MICA. Furthermore, antigen immunotrapped by the MICA from brain homogenates showed glutamate decarboxylase enzyme activity. MICA 1-6 therefore reveal glutamate decarboxylase as the predominant target antigen of cytoplasmic islet cell autoantibodies in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM.

  14. [Salmonella typhi vaccination response study reveals defective antibody production selective IgA deficiency patient].

    PubMed

    Pleguezuelo, Daniel E; Gianelli, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD) is the most prevalent immunodeficiency worldwide, progressing to common variable immunodeficiency only in few reported cases. We report the case of a Spanish female aged 22 and diagnosed of selective IgA deficiency, a long history of bronchitis, several episodes of pneumonia, bilateral bronchiectasis, normal IgG, IgM, IgG subclasses, and detectable pre-vaccination IgG antibodies against tetanus toxoid and Streptococcus pneumoniae. She was evaluated in our clinic in order to rule out common variable immunodeficiency. We observed good antibody response to tetanus toxoid, absence of circulating switched memory B cells, decreased response to pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens and a lack of response to Salmonella typhi vaccine. Most SIgAD patients presents with upper respiratory tract infections or mild diarrhea. Those with lower tract infections, pneumonia or untreatable diarrhea should follow B-cell subpopulations' study and antibody response to vaccines. Absence of response to Salmonella typhi vaccine allowed us to expose the defective antibody production.

  15. The Intrinsic Dynamics and Unfolding Process of an Antibody Fab Fragment Revealed by Elastic Network Model.

    PubMed

    Su, Ji-Guo; Zhang, Xiao; Han, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Li, Chun-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies have been increasingly used as pharmaceuticals in clinical treatment. Thermal stability and unfolding process are important properties that must be considered in antibody design. In this paper, the structure-encoded dynamical properties and the unfolding process of the Fab fragment of the phosphocholine-binding antibody McPC603 are investigated by use of the normal mode analysis of Gaussian network model (GNM). Firstly, the temperature factors for the residues of the protein were calculated with GNM and then compared with the experimental measurements. A good result was obtained, which provides the validity for the use of GNM to study the dynamical properties of the protein. Then, with this approach, the mean-square fluctuation (MSF) of the residues, as well as the MSF in the internal distance (MSFID) between all pairwise residues, was calculated to investigate the mobility and flexibility of the protein, respectively. It is found that the mobility and flexibility of the constant regions are higher than those of the variable regions, and the six complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) in the variable regions also exhibit relative large mobility and flexibility. The large amplitude motions of the CDRs are considered to be associated with the immune function of the antibody. In addition, the unfolding process of the protein was simulated by iterative use of the GNM. In our method, only the topology of protein native structure is taken into account, and the protein unfolding process is simulated through breaking the native contacts one by one according to the MSFID values between the residues. It is found that the flexible regions tend to unfold earlier. The sequence of the unfolding events obtained by our method is consistent with the hydrogen-deuterium exchange experimental results. Our studies imply that the unfolding behavior of the Fab fragment of antibody McPc603 is largely determined by the intrinsic dynamics of the protein.

  16. Antibody-Based Sensors: Principles, Problems and Potential for Detection of Pathogens and Associated Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Barry; Stack, Edwina; Gilmartin, Niamh; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Antibody-based sensors permit the rapid and sensitive analysis of a range of pathogens and associated toxins. A critical assessment of the implementation of such formats is provided, with reference to their principles, problems and potential for ‘on-site’ analysis. Particular emphasis is placed on the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens, such as Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes, and additional examples relating to the monitoring of fungal pathogens, viruses, mycotoxins, marine toxins and parasites are also provided. PMID:22408533

  17. Increasing the Chemical Potential of the Germ-Line Antibody Repertoire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvetnick, Nora; Gurushanthaiah, Deepak; Han, Nianhe; Prudent, James; Schultz, Peter; Lerner, Richard

    1993-05-01

    To augment the chemical potential of the immunological repertoire, a metal ion-binding light chain has been introduced into the murine genome. Mice containing the transgene were subsequently immunized with a fluorescein conjugate. The transgenic light chain was found at a high frequency in the anti-fluorescein memory B-cell compartment. This general method should be applicable to other cofactors and small molecules and should lead to generation of antibodies with unique catalytic activities.

  18. Structures of a pan-specific antagonist antibody complexed to different isoforms of TGFβ reveal structural plasticity of antibody-antigen interactions.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Aaron; Mathieu, Magali; Lawrence, Catherine; Bigelow, Russell; Levine, Mark; Hamel, Christine; Marquette, Jean-Piere; Le Parc, Josiane; Loux, Christophe; Ferrari, Paul; Capdevila, Cecile; Dumas, Jacques; Dumas, Bruno; Rak, Alexey; Bird, Julie; Qiu, Huawei; Pan, Clark Q; Edmunds, Tim; Wei, Ronnie R

    2014-12-01

    Various important biological pathways are modulated by TGFβ isoforms; as such they are potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Fresolimumab, also known as GC1008, is a pan-TGFβ neutralizing antibody that has been tested clinically for several indications including an ongoing trial for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. The structure of the antigen-binding fragment of fresolimumab (GC1008 Fab) in complex with TGFβ3 has been reported previously, but the structural capacity of fresolimumab to accommodate tight interactions with TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 was insufficiently understood. We report the crystal structure of the single-chain variable fragment of fresolimumab (GC1008 scFv) in complex with target TGFβ1 to a resolution of 3.00 Å and the crystal structure of GC1008 Fab in complex with TGFβ2 to 2.83 Å. The structures provide further insight into the details of TGFβ recognition by fresolimumab, give a clear indication of the determinants of fresolimumab pan-specificity and provide potential starting points for the development of isoform-specific antibodies using a fresolimumab scaffold.

  19. Accurate and High-Coverage Immune Repertoire Sequencing Reveals Characteristics of Antibody Repertoire Diversification in Young Children with Malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ning

    Accurately measuring the immune repertoire sequence composition, diversity, and abundance is important in studying repertoire response in infections, vaccinations, and cancer immunology. Using molecular identifiers (MIDs) to tag mRNA molecules is an effective method in improving the accuracy of immune repertoire sequencing (IR-seq). However, it is still difficult to use IR-seq on small amount of clinical samples to achieve a high coverage of the repertoire diversities. This is especially challenging in studying infections and vaccinations where B cell subpopulations with fewer cells, such as memory B cells or plasmablasts, are often of great interest to study somatic mutation patterns and diversity changes. Here, we describe an approach of IR-seq based on the use of MIDs in combination with a clustering method that can reveal more than 80% of the antibody diversity in a sample and can be applied to as few as 1,000 B cells. We applied this to study the antibody repertoires of young children before and during an acute malaria infection. We discovered unexpectedly high levels of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in infants and revealed characteristics of antibody repertoire development in young children that would have a profound impact on immunization in children.

  20. Novel monoclonal antibodies against Pdx1 reveal feedback regulation of Pdx1 protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Galbo, T.; Pedersen, I.L.; Fløyel, T.; Bang-Berthelsen, C.H.; Serup, P.; Madsen, O.D.; Hald, J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize two monoclonal antibodies (F6A11 and F109-D12) generated against Pdx1 (pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1), a homeodomain transcription factor, which is critical for pancreas formation as well as for normal pancreatic beta cell function. For production of monoclonal antibodies, we immunized Robertsonian POSF (RBF)mice with a GST-Pdx1 fusion protein containing a 68-amino acid C-terminal fragment of rat Pdx1. These monoclonal antibodies detect Pdx1 by western blotting and allow immunohistochemical detection of Pdx1 in both mouse and rat tissue. F6A11 and F109-D12 produce IHC staining patterns indistinguishable from that obtained with highly specific polyclonal Pdx1 antisera raised in rabbits and goats, when applied to embryonic or adult mouse pancreatic tissue. In contrast to previously generated polyclonal anti-Pdx1 antisera, we also demonstrate that F6A11 works for intracellular fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) staining of Pdx1. By using F6A11, we characterize the induction of Pdx1 in the Doxycycline (DOX) inducible insulinoma cell line INSrαβ-Pdx1 and follow the reduction of Pdx1 after removing Dox. Finally, we show that induction of exogenous Pdx1 leads to a reduction in endogenous Pdx1 levels, which suggests that a negative feedback loop is involved in maintaining correct levels of Pdx1 in the cell. PMID:20558340

  1. Antibody Responses to Mycobacterial Antigens in Children with Tuberculosis: Challenges and Potential Diagnostic Value

    PubMed Central

    Ziegenbalg, Anke

    2012-01-01

    The identification of easily detectable biomarkers for active tuberculosis (TB) is a global health priority. Such biomarkers would be of particular value in childhood TB, which poses greater diagnostic challenges than adult TB. Serum antibodies can be detected by simple formats that provide extremely rapid results. However, attempts to develop accurate serodiagnostic tests for TB have been unsuccessful. Whereas antibody responses to mycobacterial antigens in adult TB have been studied extensively and reviewed, the same cannot be said for serologic data in pediatric populations. Here we appraise studies on serological responses in childhood TB and discuss findings and limitations in the context of the developing immune system, the age range, and the spectrum of TB manifestations. We found that the antibody responses to mycobacterial antigens in childhood TB can vary widely, with sensitivities and specificities ranging from 14% to 85% and from 86% to 100%, respectively. We conclude that the limitations in serodiagnostic studies of childhood TB are manifold, thereby restricting the interpretation of currently available data. Concerns about the methodology used in published studies suggest that conclusions about the eventual value of serodiagnosis cannot be made at this time. However, the available data suggest a potential adjunctive value for serology in the diagnosis of childhood TB. Despite the difficulties noted in this field, there is optimism that the application of novel antigens and the integration of those factors which contribute to the serological responses in childhood TB can lead to useful future diagnostics. PMID:23100476

  2. The natural antibody repertoire of sharks and humans recognizes the potential universe of antigens.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Miranda K; Schluter, Samuel F; Marchalonis, John J

    2004-02-01

    In ancestral sharks, a rapid emergence in the evolution of the immune system occurred, giving jawed-vertebrates the necessary components for the combinatorial immune response (CIR). To compare the natural antibody (NAb) repertoires of the most divergent vertebrates with the capacity to produce antibodies, we isolated NAbs to the same set of antigens by affinity chromatography from two species of Carcharhine sharks and from human polyclonal IgG and IgM antibody preparations. The activities of the affinity-purified anti-T-cell receptor (anti-TCR) NAbs were compared with those of monoclonal anti-TCR NAbs that were generated from a systemic lupus erythematosus patient. We report that sharks and humans, representing the evolutionary extremes of vertebrate species sharing the CIR, have NAbs to human TCRs, Igs, the human senescent cell antigen, and to numerous retroviral antigens, indicating that essential features of the combinatorial repertoire and the capacity to recognize the potential universe of antigens is shared among all jawed-vertebrates.

  3. Polyclonal hyper-IgE mouse model reveals mechanistic insights into antibody class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Misaghi, Shahram; Senger, Kate; Sai, Tao; Qu, Yan; Sun, Yonglian; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Nguyen, Allen; Jin, Zhaoyu; Zhou, Meijuan; Yan, Donghong; Lin, Wei Yu; Lin, Zhonghua; Lorenzo, Maria N.; Sebrell, Andrew; Ding, Jiabing; Xu, Min; Caplazi, Patrick; Austin, Cary D.; Balazs, Mercedesz; Roose-Girma, Merone; DeForge, Laura; Warming, Søren; Lee, Wyne P.; Dixit, Vishva M.; Zarrin, Ali A.

    2013-01-01

    Preceding antibody constant regions are switch (S) regions varying in length and repeat density that are targets of activation-induced cytidine deaminase. We asked how participating S regions influence each other to orchestrate rearrangements at the IgH locus by engineering mice in which the weakest S region, Sε, is replaced with prominent recombination hotspot Sμ. These mice produce copious polyclonal IgE upon challenge, providing a platform to study IgE biology and therapeutic interventions. The insertion enhances ε germ-line transcript levels, shows a preference for direct vs. sequential switching, and reduces intraswitch recombination events at native Sμ. These results suggest that the sufficiency of Sμ to mediate IgH rearrangements may be influenced by context-dependent cues. PMID:24019479

  4. Polyclonal hyper-IgE mouse model reveals mechanistic insights into antibody class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Misaghi, Shahram; Senger, Kate; Sai, Tao; Qu, Yan; Sun, Yonglian; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Nguyen, Allen; Jin, Zhaoyu; Zhou, Meijuan; Yan, Donghong; Lin, Wei Yu; Lin, Zhonghua; Lorenzo, Maria N; Sebrell, Andrew; Ding, Jiabing; Xu, Min; Caplazi, Patrick; Austin, Cary D; Balazs, Mercedesz; Roose-Girma, Merone; DeForge, Laura; Warming, Søren; Lee, Wyne P; Dixit, Vishva M; Zarrin, Ali A

    2013-09-24

    Preceding antibody constant regions are switch (S) regions varying in length and repeat density that are targets of activation-induced cytidine deaminase. We asked how participating S regions influence each other to orchestrate rearrangements at the IgH locus by engineering mice in which the weakest S region, Sε, is replaced with prominent recombination hotspot Sμ. These mice produce copious polyclonal IgE upon challenge, providing a platform to study IgE biology and therapeutic interventions. The insertion enhances ε germ-line transcript levels, shows a preference for direct vs. sequential switching, and reduces intraswitch recombination events at native Sμ. These results suggest that the sufficiency of Sμ to mediate IgH rearrangements may be influenced by context-dependent cues. PMID:24019479

  5. Autologous red blood cells potentiate antibody synthesis by unfractionated human mononuclear cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Rugeles, M T; La Via, M; Goust, J M; Kilpatrick, J M; Hyman, B; Virella, G

    1987-08-01

    We have tried to determine the most favourable conditions for the in vitro induction of specific antibody (Ab) responses to tetanus toxoid (TT) and keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) were obtained from normal volunteers and stimulated with PWM, TT, KLH, and mixtures of PWM and antigens in the presence or absence of autologous red blood cells (RBC) (1:50 ratio of PBMNC/RBC). The cultures were harvested on day 11; immunoglobulins were determined immunonephelometrically and Ab levels by ELISA with human antibodies used for calibration. While anti-TT responses were easy to induce with PBMNC from recently boosted individuals, the production of anti-TT from PBMNC obtained from non-recently boosted individuals was only possible when PBMNC were stimulated with TT and PWM in the presence of autologous RBC. Similarly, anti-KLH responses were easier to induce with PBMNC from an immune donor; maximal response was observed after stimulation with PWM + KLH in the presence of autologous RBC. Stimulation of primary anti-KLH responses with PBMNC from non-immune donors was only successful when the cells were stimulated with KLH + PWM in the presence of autologous RBC. The potentiation of human B-cell responses with autologous RBC can be abrogated by pretreatment of PBMNC with anti-CD2 antibodies and is associated with increased expression of IL-2 receptors and increased production of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). However, addition of IFN-gamma in different doses and at different times to PWM-stimulated PBMNC cultures was not as effective as addition of RBC in enhancing the production of immunoglobulin and antibody. PMID:3114872

  6. Immunoproteomic Analysis of Antibody Responses to Extracellular Proteins of Candida albicans Revealing the Importance of Glycosylation for Antigen Recognition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Krüger, Thomas; Knüpfer, Uwe; Kasper, Lydia; Wielsch, Natalie; Hube, Bernhard; Kortgen, Andreas; Bauer, Michael; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Dimopoulos, George; Brakhage, Axel A; Kniemeyer, Olaf

    2016-08-01

    During infection, the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans undergoes a yeast-to-hypha transition, secretes numerous proteins for invasion of host tissues, and modulates the host's immune response. Little is known about the interplay of C. albicans secreted proteins and the host adaptive immune system. Here, we applied a combined 2D gel- and LC-MS/MS-based approach for the characterization of C. albicans extracellular proteins during the yeast-to-hypha transition, which led to a comprehensive C. albicans secretome map. The serological responses to C. albicans extracellular proteins were investigated by a 2D-immunoblotting approach combined with MS for protein identification. On the basis of the screening of sera from candidemia and three groups of noncandidemia patients, a core set of 19 immunodominant antibodies against secreted proteins of C. albicans was identified, seven of which represent potential diagnostic markers for candidemia (Xog1, Lip4, Asc1, Met6, Tsa1, Tpi1, and Prx1). Intriguingly, some secreted, strongly glycosylated protein antigens showed high cross-reactivity with sera from noncandidemia control groups. Enzymatic deglycosylation of proteins secreted from hyphae significantly impaired sera antibody recognition. Furthermore, deglycosylation of the recombinantly produced, secreted aspartyl protease Sap6 confirmed a significant contribution of glycan epitopes to the recognition of Sap6 by antibodies in patient's sera. PMID:27386892

  7. Burkholderia pseudomallei Capsular Polysaccharide Recognition by a Monoclonal Antibody Reveals Key Details toward a Biodefense Vaccine and Diagnostics against Melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Roberta; Dillon, Michael J; Burtnick, Mary N; Hubbard, Mark A; Kenfack, Marielle Tamigney; Blériot, Yves; Gauthier, Charles; Brett, Paul J; AuCoin, David P; Lanzetta, Rosa; Silipo, Alba; Molinaro, Antonio

    2015-10-16

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the bacterium responsible for melioidosis, an infectious disease with high mortality rates. Since melioidosis is a significant public health concern in endemic regions and the organism is currently classified as a potential biothreat agent, the development of effective vaccines and rapid diagnostics is a priority. The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) expressed by B. pseudomallei is a highly conserved virulence factor and a protective antigen. Because of this, CPS is considered an attractive antigen for use in the development of both vaccines and diagnostics. In the present study, we describe the interactions of CPS with the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4C4 using a multidisciplinary approach including organic synthesis, molecular biology techniques, surface plasmon resonance, and nuclear magnetic spectroscopy. Using these methods, we determined the mode of binding between mAb 4C4 and native CPS or ad hoc synthesized capsular polysaccharide fragments. Interestingly, we demonstrated that the O-acetyl moiety of CPS is essential for the interaction of the CPS epitope with mAb 4C4. Collectively, our results provide important insights into the structural features of B. pseudomallei CPS that enable antibody recognition that may help the rational design of CPS-based vaccine candidates. In addition, our findings confirm that the mAb 4C4 is suitable for use in an antibody-based detection assay for diagnosis of B. pseudomallei infections. PMID:26198038

  8. Cell Damage at the Origin of Antiphospholipid Antibodies and Their Pathogenic Potential in Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Piroux, Véronique; Eschwège, Valérie

    1997-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) are associated with thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and fetal loss but they occur in a variety of diseases. Despite many efforts, a correlation between the specificity of particular subgroups of APA and particular clinical situations remains to be established. The antigens at the origin of APA remain to be identified. We discuss here the possible links between cell apoptosis or necrosis, leading to plasma membrane alterations, and the occurrence of APA in response to sustained stimulation. The pathogenic potential of APA is also considered with respect to recurrent pregnancy loss. PMID:18476171

  9. TCGA Bladder Cancer Study Reveals Potential Drug Targets - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with the TCGA Research Network have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease.

  10. TCGA bladder cancer study reveals potential drug targets

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with TCGA have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease. They also discovered that, at the molecular level, some subtypes of bla

  11. HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody precursor B cells revealed by germline-targeting immunogen

    PubMed Central

    Jardine, Joseph G.; Kulp, Daniel W.; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Sarkar, Anita; Briney, Bryan; Sok, Devin; Sesterhenn, Fabian; Ereño-Orbea, June; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Deresa, Isaiah; Hu, Xiaozhen; Spencer, Skye; Jones, Meaghan; Georgeson, Erik; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; deCamp, Allan C.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Wilson, Ian A.; Burton, Dennis R.; Crotty, Shane; Schief, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a major HIV vaccine goal. Germline-targeting immunogens aim to initiate bnAb induction by activating bnAb germline precursor B cells. Critical unmet challenges are to determine whether bnAb precursor naïve B cells bind germline-targeting immunogens and occur at sufficient frequency in humans for reliable vaccine responses. We employed deep mutational scanning and multi-target optimization to develop a germline-targeting immunogen (eOD-GT8) for diverse VRC01-class bnAbs. We then used the immunogen to isolate VRC01-class precursor naïve B cells from HIV-uninfected donors. Frequencies of true VRC01-class precursors, their structures, and their eOD-GT8 affinities support this immunogen as a candidate human vaccine prime. These methods could be applied to germline targeting for other classes of HIV bnAbs and for Abs to other pathogens. PMID:27013733

  12. HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody precursor B cells revealed by germline-targeting immunogen.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Joseph G; Kulp, Daniel W; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Sarkar, Anita; Briney, Bryan; Sok, Devin; Sesterhenn, Fabian; Ereño-Orbea, June; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Deresa, Isaiah; Hu, Xiaozhen; Spencer, Skye; Jones, Meaghan; Georgeson, Erik; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; deCamp, Allan C; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Wilson, Ian A; Burton, Dennis R; Crotty, Shane; Schief, William R

    2016-03-25

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a major HIV vaccine goal. Germline-targeting immunogens aim to initiate bnAb induction by activating bnAb germline precursor B cells. Critical unmet challenges are to determine whether bnAb precursor naïve B cells bind germline-targeting immunogens and occur at sufficient frequency in humans for reliable vaccine responses. Using deep mutational scanning and multitarget optimization, we developed a germline-targeting immunogen (eOD-GT8) for diverse VRC01-class bnAbs. We then used the immunogen to isolate VRC01-class precursor naïve B cells from HIV-uninfected donors. Frequencies of true VRC01-class precursors, their structures, and their eOD-GT8 affinities support this immunogen as a candidate human vaccine prime. These methods could be applied to germline targeting for other classes of HIV bnAbs and for Abs to other pathogens.

  13. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides potentiate the antitumor activity of anti-BST2 antibody.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Kosuke; Serada, Satoshi; Kobiyama, Kouji; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Morimoto, Akiko; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Ueda, Yutaka; Fujimoto, Minoru; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Ishii, Ken J; Enomoto, Takayuki; Kimura, Tadashi; Naka, Tetsuji

    2015-10-01

    Numerous monoclonal antibodies (mAb) targeting tumor antigens have recently been developed. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) via effector cells such as tumor-infiltrating natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages are often involved in mediating the antitumor activity of mAb. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) have a potent antitumor activity and are considered to increase tumor infiltration of NK cells and macrophages. Our group previously reported significant antitumor activity of anti-bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST2) mAb against BST2-positive endometrial cancer cells through ADCC. In this study, we evaluated the synergistic antitumor activity of combination therapy with anti-BST-2 mAb and CpG ODN using SCID mice and elucidated the mechanisms underlying this activity. Anti-BST2 mAb and CpG ODN monotherapy had a significant dose-dependent antitumor activity (P = 0.0135 and P = 0.0196, respectively). Combination therapy with anti-BST2 mAb and CpG ODN had a significant antitumor activity in SCID mice (P < 0.01), but not in NOG mice. FACS analysis revealed significantly increased numbers of NK cells and macrophages in tumors treated with a combination of anti-BST2 mAb and CpG ODN and with CpG ODN alone in SCID mice (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). These results suggested that the combination therapy with anti-BST2 mAb and CpG ODN has a significant antitumor activity and induces tumor infiltration of NK cells and macrophages. Combination therapy with CpG ODN and anti-BST2 mAb or other antitumor mAb depending on ADCC may represent a new treatment option for cancer. PMID:26498112

  14. An anti-hapten camelid antibody reveals a cryptic binding site with significant energetic contributions from a nonhypervariable loop

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, Sean W.; Horn, James R.

    2014-03-05

    Conventional anti-hapten antibodies typically bind low-molecular weight compounds (haptens) in the crevice between the variable heavy and light chains. Conversely, heavy chain-only camelid antibodies, which lack a light chain, must rely entirely on a single variable domain to recognize haptens. While several anti-hapten VHHs have been generated, little is known regarding the underlying structural and thermodynamic basis for hapten recognition. Here, an anti-methotrexate VHH (anti-MTX VHH) was generated using grafting methods whereby the three complementarity determining regions (CDRs) were inserted onto an existing VHH framework. Thermodynamic analysis of the anti-MTX VHH CDR1-3 Graft revealed a micromolar binding affinity, while the crystal structure of the complex revealed a somewhat surprising noncanonical binding site which involved MTX tunneling under the CDR1 loop. Due to the close proximity of MTX to CDR4, a nonhypervariable loop, the CDR4 loop sequence was subsequently introduced into the CDR1-3 graft, which resulted in a dramatic 1000-fold increase in the binding affinity. Crystal structure analysis of both the free and complex anti-MTX CDR1-4 graft revealed CDR4 plays a significant role in both intermolecular contacts and binding site conformation that appear to contribute toward high affinity binding. Additionally, the anti-MTX VHH possessed relatively high specificity for MTX over closely related compounds aminopterin and folate, demonstrating that VHH domains are capable of binding low-molecular weight ligands with high affinity and specificity, despite their reduced interface.

  15. Antinucleosome antibodies as a potential biomarker for the evaluation of renal pathological activity in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Hung, W T; Chen, Y M; Lan, J L; Chen, H H; Chen, Y H; Chen, D Y; Hsieh, C W; Wen, M C

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the correlation between antinucleosome antibodies and renal pathological activity in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN). We evaluated 36 patients with proliferative LN, 14 non-renal lupus patients and 10 healthy volunteers. Lupus activity was assessed using the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group 2004 (BILAG 2004) index, serum anti-double stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) levels, serum complement levels and daily urinary protein levels. All 36 lupus nephritis patients received renal biopsy. Antinucleosome antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results showed that levels of serum antinucleosome antibodies were significantly higher in LN patients (median 90.35 units/ml, interquartile range [IQR] 37.38-135.23) than in non-renal SLE patients (median 5.45 units/ml, IQR 2.6-28.93, p <0.05) and in healthy volunteers (median 3.35 units/ml, IQR 2.95-5.23, p <0.001). Serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies were positively correlated with BILAG index (Spearman's r = 0.645, p <0.001) and serum anti-dsDNA antibody levels (r(s) = 0.644, p <0.01), while serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies were negatively correlated with serum levels of C3 (r(s) = -0.400, p <0.01) and C4 (r(s) = -0.300, p <0.05). Serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies were positively correlated with the histological activity index of LN (r(s) = 0.368, p <0.05). However, there was no significant correlation between serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies and the histological chronicity index. In conclusion, the serum level of antinucleosome antibodies is a potential biomarker for early recognition of renal involvement and evaluation of disease activity in SLE. Our preliminary results suggested that serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies might be a potential biomarker in evaluating pathological activity of LN.

  16. Cell Surface Glycoprotein of Reactive Stromal Fibroblasts as a Potential Antibody Target in Human Epithelial Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Old, Lloyd J.; Rettig, Wolfgang J.

    1990-09-01

    The F19 antigen is a cell surface glycoprotein (M_r, 95,000) of human sarcomas and proliferating, cultured fibroblasts that is absent from resting fibroblasts in normal adult tissues. Normal and malignant epithelial cells are also F19^-. The present immunohistochemical study describes induction of F19 in the reactive mesenchyme of epithelial tumors. F19^+ fibroblasts were found in primary and metastatic carcinomas, including colorectal (18 of 18 cases studied), breast (14/14), ovarian (21/21), bladder (9/10), and lung carcinomas (13/13). In contrast, the stroma of benign colorectal adenomas, fibrocystic disease and fibroadenomas of breast, benign prostate hyperplasia, in situ bladder carcinomas, and benign ovarian tumors showed no or only moderate numbers of F19^+ fibroblasts. Analysis of dermal incision wounds revealed that F19 is strongly induced during scar formation. Comparison of F19 with the extracellular matrix protein tenascin, a putative marker of tumor mesenchyme, showed a cellular staining pattern for F19 vs. the extracellular matrix pattern for tenascin and widespread expression of tenascin in F19^- normal tissues and benign tumors. Our results suggest that the F19^+ phenotype correlates with specialized fibroblast functions in wound healing and malignant tumor growth. Because of its abundance in tumor mesenchyme, F19 may serve as a target for antibodies labeled with radioisotopes or toxic agents, or inflammatogenic antibodies, in carcinoma patients.

  17. A Remote Arene-Binding Site on Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen Revealed by Antibody-Recruiting Small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Andrew X.; Murelli, Ryan P.; Barinka, Cyril; Michel, Julien; Cocleaza, Alexandra; Jorgensen, William L.; Lubkowski, Jacek; Spiegel, David A.

    2010-09-27

    Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a membrane-bound glutamate carboxypeptidase overexpressed in many forms of prostate cancer. Our laboratory has recently disclosed a class of small molecules, called ARM-Ps (antibody-recruiting molecule targeting prostate cancer) that are capable of enhancing antibody-mediated immune recognition of prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, during the course of these studies, we found ARM-Ps to exhibit extraordinarily high potencies toward PSMA, compared to previously reported inhibitors. Here, we report in-depth biochemical, crystallographic, and computational investigations which elucidate the origin of the observed affinity enhancement. These studies reveal a previously unreported arene-binding site on PSMA, which we believe participates in an aromatic stacking interaction with ARMs. Although this site is composed of only a few amino acid residues, it drastically enhances small molecule binding affinity. These results provide critical insights into the design of PSMA-targeted small molecules for prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment; more broadly, the presence of similar arene-binding sites throughout the proteome could prove widely enabling in the optimization of small molecule-protein interactions.

  18. Mechanism of Action and Epitopes of Clostridium difficile Toxin B-neutralizing Antibody Bezlotoxumab Revealed by X-ray Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Peter; Xiao, Li; Hernandez, Lorraine D.; Reichert, Paul; Sheth, Payal R.; Beaumont, Maribel; Yang, Xiaoyu; Murgolo, Nicholas; Ermakov, Grigori; DiNunzio, Edward; Racine, Fred; Karczewski, Jerzy; Secore, Susan; Ingram, Richard N.; Mayhood, Todd; Strickland, Corey; Therien, Alex G.

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of Clostridium difficile infections are caused by two exotoxins, TcdA and TcdB, which target host colonocytes by binding to unknown cell surface receptors, at least in part via their combined repetitive oligopeptide (CROP) domains. A combination of the anti-TcdA antibody actoxumab and the anti-TcdB antibody bezlotoxumab is currently under development for the prevention of recurrent C. difficile infections. We demonstrate here through various biophysical approaches that bezlotoxumab binds to specific regions within the N-terminal half of the TcdB CROP domain. Based on this information, we solved the x-ray structure of the N-terminal half of the TcdB CROP domain bound to Fab fragments of bezlotoxumab. The structure reveals that the TcdB CROP domain adopts a β-solenoid fold consisting of long and short repeats and that bezlotoxumab binds to two homologous sites within the CROP domain, partially occluding two of the four putative carbohydrate binding pockets located in TcdB. We also show that bezlotoxumab neutralizes TcdB by blocking binding of TcdB to mammalian cells. Overall, our data are consistent with a model wherein a single molecule of bezlotoxumab neutralizes TcdB by binding via its two Fab regions to two epitopes within the N-terminal half of the TcdB CROP domain, partially blocking the carbohydrate binding pockets of the toxin and preventing toxin binding to host cells. PMID:24821719

  19. Crystal Structure of the HSV-1 Fc Receptor Bound to Fc Reveals a Mechanism for Antibody Bipolar Bridging

    SciTech Connect

    Sprague, E.R.; Wang, C.; Baker, D.; Bjorkman, P.J.; /Caltech /Howard Hughes Med. Inst.

    2007-08-08

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 expresses a heterodimeric Fc receptor, gE-gI, on the surfaces of virions and infected cells that binds the Fc region of host immunoglobulin G and is implicated in the cell-to-cell spread of virus. gE-gI binds immunoglobulin G at the basic pH of the cell surface and releases it at the acidic pH of lysosomes, consistent with a role in facilitating the degradation of antiviral antibodies. Here we identify the C-terminal domain of the gE ectodomain (CgE) as the minimal Fc-binding domain and present a 1.78-{angstrom} CgE structure. A 5-{angstrom} gE-gI/Fc crystal structure, which was independently verified by a theoretical prediction method, reveals that CgE binds Fc at the C{sub H}2-C{sub H}3 interface, the binding site for several mammalian and bacterial Fc-binding proteins. The structure identifies interface histidines that may confer pH-dependent binding and regions of CgE implicated in cell-to-cell spread of virus. The ternary organization of the gE-gI/Fc complex is compatible with antibody bipolar bridging, which can interfere with the antiviral immune response.

  20. Potential cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies against clinically relevant mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Flores-Moreno, K; Celis-Meneses, J S; Meneses-Ruiz, D M; Castillo-Rodal, A I; Orduña, P; Montiel, B A; López-Vidal, Y

    2014-08-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTb). In 2011, global mortality due to tuberculosis was 1·4 million individuals. The only available vaccine is the attenuated M. bovis [bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)] strain, which confers variable protection against pulmonary tuberculosis. Some widely distributed non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), such as M. avium and M. arupense, are also potential pathogens for humans. This work aimed to produce and characterize monoclonal antibodies against the M. bovis BCG Mexico strain of the MTb, M. avium subs. hominissuis and the M. arupense strain from NTM. Hybridomas were produced from splenocytes of BALB/c female mice immunized with radiation-inactivated mycobacteria, and the immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a antibody-producing clones with the highest antigenic recognition were selected. The selected clones, Mbv 2A10 for M. bovis BCG Mexico, Mav 3H1 for M. avium and Mar 2D10 for M. arupense, were used in further studies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immune proteomics analyses characterized the clones as having the highest cross-reactivity with mycobacteria. Using mass spectrometry, a number of proteins recognized by the monoclonal antibody (mAb) clones were identified. These proteins had roles in metabolic processes, hypoxia, cell cycle and dormancy. In addition, a Clustal W and Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) in-silico analysis was performed in protein sequences that result in the conserved regions within probability epitopes that could be recognized for Mbv2A10 and Mav3H1 clones.

  1. Potential cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies against clinically relevant mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Moreno, K; Celis-Meneses, J S; Meneses-Ruiz, D M; Castillo-Rodal, A I; Orduña, P; Montiel, B A; López-Vidal, Y

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTb). In 2011, global mortality due to tuberculosis was 1·4 million individuals. The only available vaccine is the attenuated M. bovis [bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG)] strain, which confers variable protection against pulmonary tuberculosis. Some widely distributed non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), such as M. avium and M. arupense, are also potential pathogens for humans. This work aimed to produce and characterize monoclonal antibodies against the M. bovis BCG Mexico strain of the MTb, M. avium subs. hominissuis and the M. arupense strain from NTM. Hybridomas were produced from splenocytes of BALB/c female mice immunized with radiation-inactivated mycobacteria, and the immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a antibody-producing clones with the highest antigenic recognition were selected. The selected clones, Mbv 2A10 for M. bovis BCG Mexico, Mav 3H1 for M. avium and Mar 2D10 for M. arupense, were used in further studies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immune proteomics analyses characterized the clones as having the highest cross-reactivity with mycobacteria. Using mass spectrometry, a number of proteins recognized by the monoclonal antibody (mAb) clones were identified. These proteins had roles in metabolic processes, hypoxia, cell cycle and dormancy. In addition, a Clustal W and Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) in-silico analysis was performed in protein sequences that result in the conserved regions within probability epitopes that could be recognized for Mbv2A10 and Mav3H1 clones. PMID:24580144

  2. Brain potentials reveal unconscious translation during foreign-language comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Thierry, Guillaume; Wu, Yan Jing

    2007-01-01

    Whether the native language of bilingual individuals is active during second-language comprehension is the subject of lively debate. Studies of bilingualism have often used a mix of first- and second-language words, thereby creating an artificial “dual-language” context. Here, using event-related brain potentials, we demonstrate implicit access to the first language when bilinguals read words exclusively in their second language. Chinese–English bilinguals were required to decide whether English words presented in pairs were related in meaning or not; they were unaware of the fact that half of the words concealed a character repetition when translated into Chinese. Whereas the hidden factor failed to affect behavioral performance, it significantly modulated brain potentials in the expected direction, establishing that English words were automatically and unconsciously translated into Chinese. Critically, the same modulation was found in Chinese monolinguals reading the same words in Chinese, i.e., when Chinese character repetition was evident. Finally, we replicated this pattern of results in the auditory modality by using a listening comprehension task. These findings demonstrate that native-language activation is an unconscious correlate of second-language comprehension. PMID:17630288

  3. Network analysis reveals potential markers for pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Anurag; Suman, Shikha; Ranjan, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy with a poor outcome. Molecular mechanisms of pediatric ACC oncogenesis and advancement are not well understood. Accurate and timely diagnosis of the disease requires identification of new markers for pediatric ACC. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified from the gene expression profile of pediatric ACC and obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. Gene Ontology functional and pathway enrichment analysis was implemented to recognize the functions of DEGs. A protein–protein interaction (PPI) and gene–gene functional interaction (GGI) network of DEGs was constructed. Hub gene detection and enrichment analysis of functional modules were performed. Furthermore, a gene regulatory network incorporating DEGs–microRNAs–transcription factors was constructed and analyzed. A total of 431 DEGs including 228 upregulated and 203 downregulated DEGs were screened. These genes were largely involved in cell cycle, steroid biosynthesis, and p53 signaling pathways. Upregulated genes, CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B, were identified as the common hubs of PPI and GGI networks. All the four common hub genes were also part of modules of the PPI network. Moreover, all the four genes were also present in the largest module of GGI network. A gene regulatory network consisting of 82 microRNAs and 100 transcription factors was also constructed. CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B may serve as potential biomarker of pediatric ACC and as potential targets for therapeutic approach, although experimental studies are required to authenticate our findings. PMID:27555782

  4. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  5. Proteomics reveals potential biomarkers of seed vigor in sugarbeet.

    PubMed

    Catusse, Julie; Meinhard, Juliane; Job, Claudette; Strub, Jean-Marc; Fischer, Uwe; Pestsova, Elena; Westhoff, Peter; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Job, Dominique

    2011-05-01

    To unravel biomarkers of seed vigor, an important trait conditioning crop yield, a comparative proteomic study was conducted with sugarbeet seed samples of varying vigor as generated by an invigoration treatment called hydropriming and an aging treatment called controlled deterioration. Comparative proteomics revealed proteins exhibiting contrasting behavior between seed samples. Thus, 18 proteins were up-regulated during priming and down-regulated during aging and further displayed an up-regulation upon priming of the aged seeds, meaning that down-regulation of these spot volumes during aging was reversible upon subsequent priming. Also, 11 proteins exhibited the converse behavior characterized by a decrease and an increase of the spot volumes during priming and aging of the control seeds, respectively, and a decrease in the spot volumes upon priming of the aged seeds. The results underpinned the role in seed vigor of several metabolic pathways involved in lipid and starch mobilization, protein synthesis or the methyl cycle. They also corroborate previous studies suggesting that the glyoxylate enzyme isocitrate lyase, the capacity of protein synthesis and components of abscisic acid signaling pathways are likely contributors of seed vigor.

  6. Differential phosphorylation of perilipin 1A at the initiation of lipolysis revealed by novel monoclonal antibodies and high content analysis.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Patrick M; Maciejewski-Lenoir, Dominique; Hartig, Sean M; Hanna, Rita A; Whittaker, Ross; Heisel, Andrew; Nicoll, James B; Buehrer, Benjamin M; Christensen, Kurt; Mancini, Maureen G; Mancini, Michael A; Edwards, Dean P; Price, Jeffrey H

    2013-01-01

    Lipolysis in adipocytes is regulated by phosphorylation of lipid droplet-associated proteins, including perilipin 1A and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). Perilipin 1A is potentially phosphorylated by cAMP(adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) on several sites, including conserved C-terminal residues, serine 497 (PKA-site 5) and serine 522 (PKA-site 6). To characterize perilipin 1A phosphorylation, novel monoclonal antibodies were developed, which selectively recognize perilipin 1A phosphorylation at PKA-site 5 and PKA-site 6. Utilizing these novel antibodies, as well as antibodies selectively recognizing HSL phosphorylation at serine 563 or serine 660, we used high content analysis to examine the phosphorylation of perilipin 1A and HSL in adipocytes exposed to lipolytic agents. We found that perilipin PKA-site 5 and HSL-serine 660 were phosphorylated to a similar extent in response to forskolin (FSK) and L-γ-melanocyte stimulating hormone (L-γ-MSH). In contrast, perilipin PKA-site 6 and HSL-serine 563 were phosphorylated more slowly and L-γ-MSH was a stronger agonist for these sites compared to FSK. When a panel of lipolytic agents was tested, including multiple concentrations of isoproterenol, FSK, and L-γ-MSH, the pattern of results was virtually identical for perilipin PKA-site 5 and HSL-serine 660, whereas a distinct pattern was observed for perilipin PKA-site 6 and HSL-serine 563. Notably, perilipin PKA-site 5 and HSL-serine 660 feature two arginine residues upstream from the phospho-acceptor site, which confers high affinity for PKA, whereas perilipin PKA-site 6 and HSL-serine 563 feature only a single arginine. Thus, we suggest perilipin 1A and HSL are differentially phosphorylated in a similar manner at the initiation of lipolysis and arginine residues near the target serines may influence this process.

  7. Historical forest baselines reveal potential for continued carbon sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Rhemtulla, Jeanine M.; Mladenoff, David J.; Clayton, Murray K.

    2009-01-01

    One-third of net CO2 emissions to the atmosphere since 1850 are the result of land-use change, primarily from the clearing of forests for timber and agriculture, but quantifying these changes is complicated by the lack of historical data on both former ecosystem conditions and the extent and spatial configuration of subsequent land use. Using fine-resolution historical survey records, we reconstruct pre-EuroAmerican settlement (1850s) forest carbon in the state of Wisconsin, examine changes in carbon after logging and agricultural conversion, and assess the potential for future sequestration through forest recovery. Results suggest that total above-ground live forest carbon (AGC) fell from 434 TgC before settlement to 120 TgC at the peak of agricultural clearing in the 1930s and has since recovered to approximately 276 TgC. The spatial distribution of AGC, however, has shifted significantly. Former savanna ecosystems in the south now store more AGC because of fire suppression and forest ingrowth, despite the fact that most of the region remains in agriculture, whereas northern forests still store much less carbon than before settlement. Across the state, continued sequestration in existing forests has the potential to contribute an additional 69 TgC. Reforestation of agricultural lands, in particular, the formerly high C-density forests in the north-central region that are now agricultural lands less optimal than those in the south, could contribute 150 TgC. Restoring historical carbon stocks across the landscape will therefore require reassessing overall land-use choices, but a range of options can be ranked and considered under changing needs for ecosystem services. PMID:19369213

  8. Elucidation of the potential disease-promoting influence of IgM apoptotic cell-reactive antibodies in lupus.

    PubMed

    Malik, M; Arora, P; Sachdeva, R; Sharma, L; Ramachandran, V G; Pal, R

    2016-06-01

    The undigested remnants of apoptosis are believed to stimulate the generation of autoantibodies in lupus. The biological properties of initiator, disease-specific IgM antibodies that specifically recognize apoptotic cells, readily detected in the sera of lupus patients, remain unclear. Apoptotic cell-reactive IgM monoclonal antibodies (generated from lupus-prone mice), as opposed to control IgM, preferentially stimulated maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) derived from such mice, relative to BMDCs derived from healthy mice. An influence of both antibody specificity and cell genotype was also apparent in the secretion of signature inflammatory cytokines. Immunization of such antibodies in lupus-prone animals induced increases in total serum IgG levels, with the elicited antibodies also preferentially recognizing moieties on dying cells. An expanded specificity was apparent both upon Western blot on cellular lysate and from the enhanced recognition of dsDNA, Ro60, RNP68 and Sm; the antibody most efficient in mediating autoreactive diversity, while being germline encoded, also induced the highest degree of phenotypic changes on BMDCs. Apoptotic cell-reactive IgM antibodies may therefore be potentially capable of influencing the course of systemic autoimmune disease by affecting both innate and adaptive immunity.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Bujak, Emil; Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  10. VLA Reveals a Close Pair of Potential Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-09-01

    Planets apparently can form in many more binary-star systems than previously thought, according to astronomers who used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope to image protoplanetary disks around a close pair of stars. "Most stars in the universe are not alone, like our Sun, but are part of double or triple systems, so this means that the number of potential planets is greater than we realized," said Luis Rodriguez, of the National Autonomous University in Mexico City, who led an international observing team that made the discovery. The astronomers announced their results in the Sept. 24 issue of the scientific journal Nature. The researchers used the VLA to study a stellar nursery - a giant cloud of gas and dust - some 450 light-years distant in the constellation Taurus, where stars the size of the Sun or smaller are being formed. They aimed at one particular object, that, based on previous infrared and radio observations, was believed to be a very young star. The VLA observations showed that the object was not a single young star but a pair of young stars, separated only slightly more than the Sun and Pluto. The VLA images show that each star in the pair is surrounded by an orbiting disk of dust, extending out about as far as the orbit of Saturn. Such dusty disks are believed to be the material from which planets form. Similar disks are seen around single stars, but the newly-discovered disks around the stars in the binary system are about ten times smaller, their size limited by the gravitational effect of the other, nearby star. Their existence indicates, however, that such protoplanetary disks, though truncated in size, still can survive in such a close double-star system. "It was surprising to see these disks in a binary system with the stars so close together," said Rodriguez. "Each of these disks contains enough mass to form a solar system like our own," said David Wilner, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

  11. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and therapy: Potential, problems, and prospects: Scientific highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    This meeting focused on areas of research on radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Topics covered included the production, purification, and fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies and immunochemistry of hybridomas; the production and the chemistry of radionuclides; the radiohalogenation and radiometal labeling techniques; the in-vivo pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies; the considerations of immunoreactivity of radiolabeled preparations; the instrumentation and imaging techniques as applied to radioimmunodetection; the radiation dosimetry in diagnostic and therapeutic use of labeled antibodies; the radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy studies; and perspectives and directions for future research. Tutorial as well as scientific lectures describing the latest research data on the above topics were presented. Three workshop panels were convened on ''Methods for Determining Immunoreactivity of Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies - Problems and Pitfalls,'' Radiobiological and Dosimetric Considerations for Immunotherapy with Labeled Antibodies,'' and ''The Human Anti-Mouse Antibody Response in Patients.''

  12. Intermittent chemotherapy can retain the therapeutic potential of anti-CD137 antibody during the late tumor-bearing state

    PubMed Central

    Tongu, Miki; Harashima, Nanae; Tamada, Koji; Chen, Lieping; Harada, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    Immunomodulating monoclonal antibodies (mAb) can evoke antitumor T-cell responses, which are attenuated by regulatory T cells (Treg) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). Treatment with cyclophosphamide (CP) and gemcitabine (GEM) can mitigate the immunosuppression by Treg and MDSC, respectively. In the current study, we examined the antitumor effects of a combination of local injection with anti-CD137 mAb and intermittent low-dose chemotherapy using CP and GEM in subcutaneously established CT26 colon carcinoma. Although a significant antitumor effect was observed when local anti-CD137 mAb therapy (5 μg) was started early in the tumor-bearing stage (day 10), no therapeutic efficacy was observed when the mAb therapy was started at a later tumor-bearing stage (day 17). Analyses of the tumor-infiltrating immune cells revealed that the number of Gr-1high/low CD11b+ MDSC started to increase 13 days after tumor inoculation, whereas injection with low-dose (50 mg/kg) CP and GEM mitigated this increase. In addition, although intermittent injections with low-dose CP and GEM on days 10 and 18 suppressed tumor growth significantly, additional local injections of anti-CD137 mAb on days 19, 21, and 23 further augmented the therapeutic efficacy. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes reactive to CT26 and a tumor antigen peptide were induced successfully from the spleen cells of tumor-cured or tumor-stable mice. In a bilateral tumor inoculation model, this combination therapy achieved systemic therapeutic effects and suppressed the growth of mAb-untreated tumors. These results suggest that intermittent immunochemotherapy using CP and GEM could retain the therapeutic potential of anti-CD137 mAb that is normally impaired during the late tumor-bearing stage. Intermittent chemotherapy and anti-CD137 antibody therapy. PMID:25363339

  13. Impaired Haemophilus influenzae Type b Transplacental Antibody Transmission and Declining Antibody Avidity through the First Year of Life Represent Potential Vulnerabilities for HIV-Exposed but -Uninfected Infants

    PubMed Central

    Rakhola, Jeremy T.; Onyango-Makumbi, Carolyne; Mubiru, Michael; Westcott, Jamie E.; Krebs, Nancy F.; Asturias, Edwin J.; Fowler, Mary Glenn; McFarland, Elizabeth; Janoff, Edward N.

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether immune function is impaired among HIV-exposed but -uninfected (HEU) infants born to HIV-infected mothers and to identify potential vulnerabilities to vaccine-preventable infection, we characterized the mother-to-infant placental transfer of Haemophilus influenzae type b-specific IgG (Hib-IgG) and its levels and avidity after vaccination in Ugandan HEU infants and in HIV-unexposed U.S. infants. Hib-IgG was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 57 Ugandan HIV-infected mothers prenatally and in their vaccinated HEU infants and 14 HIV-unexposed U.S. infants at birth and 12, 24, and 48 weeks of age. Antibody avidity at birth and 48 weeks of age was determined with 1 M ammonium thiocyanate. A median of 43% of maternal Hib-IgG was transferred to HEU infants. Although its level was lower in HEU infants than in U.S. infants at birth (P < 0.001), Hib-IgG was present at protective levels (>1.0 μg/ml) at birth in 90% of HEU infants and all U.S. infants. HEU infants had robust Hib-IgG responses to a primary vaccination. Although Hib-IgG levels declined from 24 to 48 weeks of age in HEU infants, they were higher than those in U.S. infants (P = 0.002). Antibody avidity, comparable at birth, declined by 48 weeks of age in both populations. Early vaccination of HEU infants may limit an initial vulnerability to Hib disease resulting from impaired transplacental antibody transfer. While initial Hib vaccine responses appeared adequate, the confluence of lower antibody avidity and declining Hib-IgG levels in HEU infants by 12 months support Hib booster vaccination at 1 year. Potential immunologic impairments of HEU infants should be considered in the development of vaccine platforms for populations with high maternal HIV prevalence. PMID:25298109

  14. A broadly neutralizing anti-influenza antibody reveals ongoing capacity of haemagglutinin-specific memory B cells to evolve.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Zhang, Zhen; Sheehan, Jared; Avnir, Yuval; Ridenour, Callie; Sachnik, Thomas; Sun, Jiusong; Hossain, M Jaber; Chen, Li-Mei; Zhu, Quan; Donis, Ruben O; Marasco, Wayne A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the natural evolution and structural changes involved in broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) development holds great promise for improving the design of prophylactic influenza vaccines. Here we report an haemagglutinin (HA) stem-directed bnAb, 3I14, isolated from human memory B cells, that utilizes a heavy chain encoded by the IGHV3-30 germline gene. MAb 3I14 binds and neutralizes groups 1 and 2 influenza A viruses and protects mice from lethal challenge. Analysis of VH and VL germline back-mutants reveals binding to H3 and H1 but not H5, which supports the critical role of somatic hypermutation in broadening the bnAb response. Moreover, a single VLD94N mutation improves the affinity of 3I14 to H5 by nearly 10-fold. These data provide evidence that memory B cell evolution can expand the HA subtype specificity. Our results further suggest that establishing an optimized memory B cell pool should be an aim of 'universal' influenza vaccine strategies.

  15. A broadly neutralizing anti-influenza antibody reveals ongoing capacity of haemagglutinin-specific memory B cells to evolve

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ying; Zhang, Zhen; Sheehan, Jared; Avnir, Yuval; Ridenour, Callie; Sachnik, Thomas; Sun, Jiusong; Hossain, M. Jaber; Chen, Li-Mei; Zhu, Quan; Donis, Ruben O.; Marasco, Wayne A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the natural evolution and structural changes involved in broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) development holds great promise for improving the design of prophylactic influenza vaccines. Here we report an haemagglutinin (HA) stem-directed bnAb, 3I14, isolated from human memory B cells, that utilizes a heavy chain encoded by the IGHV3-30 germline gene. MAb 3I14 binds and neutralizes groups 1 and 2 influenza A viruses and protects mice from lethal challenge. Analysis of VH and VL germline back-mutants reveals binding to H3 and H1 but not H5, which supports the critical role of somatic hypermutation in broadening the bnAb response. Moreover, a single VLD94N mutation improves the affinity of 3I14 to H5 by nearly 10-fold. These data provide evidence that memory B cell evolution can expand the HA subtype specificity. Our results further suggest that establishing an optimized memory B cell pool should be an aim of ‘universal' influenza vaccine strategies. PMID:27619409

  16. A broadly neutralizing anti-influenza antibody reveals ongoing capacity of haemagglutinin-specific memory B cells to evolve.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Zhang, Zhen; Sheehan, Jared; Avnir, Yuval; Ridenour, Callie; Sachnik, Thomas; Sun, Jiusong; Hossain, M Jaber; Chen, Li-Mei; Zhu, Quan; Donis, Ruben O; Marasco, Wayne A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the natural evolution and structural changes involved in broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) development holds great promise for improving the design of prophylactic influenza vaccines. Here we report an haemagglutinin (HA) stem-directed bnAb, 3I14, isolated from human memory B cells, that utilizes a heavy chain encoded by the IGHV3-30 germline gene. MAb 3I14 binds and neutralizes groups 1 and 2 influenza A viruses and protects mice from lethal challenge. Analysis of VH and VL germline back-mutants reveals binding to H3 and H1 but not H5, which supports the critical role of somatic hypermutation in broadening the bnAb response. Moreover, a single VLD94N mutation improves the affinity of 3I14 to H5 by nearly 10-fold. These data provide evidence that memory B cell evolution can expand the HA subtype specificity. Our results further suggest that establishing an optimized memory B cell pool should be an aim of 'universal' influenza vaccine strategies. PMID:27619409

  17. A potential trigger of nephritogenic anti-DNA antibodies in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Y; Oka, Y; Tada, M; Takahashi, R; Ishii, T

    2007-06-01

    Anti-DNA antibodies play an essential role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. Mammalian DNA alone, however, is poorly immunogenic. We speculated that the antigenic trigger for the production of human nephritogenic anti-DNA antibodies is a non-DNA substance. The cDNA library from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) of a patient with active lupus nephritis was screened using the single-chain Fv of a human monoclonal nephritogenic O-81 anti-DNA antibody in a two-hybrid system. A clone containing the gene of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducible protein, Herp, was obtained: The O-81 antibody bound to recombinant Herp protein synthesized by Escherichia coli. Immunization with Herp elicited both anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) and anti-single-stranded (anti-ssDNA) antibodies in BALB/c mice and formed deposits of IgG in renal glomeruli. Anti-DNA antibodies purified from SLE sera bound to Herp. Moreover, anti-Herp antibodies showed specific binding to DNA. Herp was spontaneously expressed in PBLs of patients with active SLE, but not in PBLs of healthy subjects. These results imply that an inducible intracellular self-protein represents a candidate trigger for human nephritogenic anti-DNA autoantibodies. Any cell stress causing ER stress, such as viral infection, ultraviolet radiation, and chemicals, might be responsible for anti-DNA antibody production via Herp.

  18. Antigenic Characterization of the HCMV gH/gL/gO and Pentamer Cell Entry Complexes Reveals Binding Sites for Potently Neutralizing Human Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ciferri, Claudio; Chandramouli, Sumana; Leitner, Alexander; Donnarumma, Danilo; Cianfrocco, Michael A.; Gerrein, Rachel; Friedrich, Kristian; Aggarwal, Yukti; Palladino, Giuseppe; Aebersold, Ruedi; Norais, Nathalie; Settembre, Ethan C.; Carfi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in transplant patients and in fetuses following congenital infection. The glycoprotein complexes gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/UL128/UL130/UL131A (Pentamer) are required for HCMV entry in fibroblasts and endothelial/epithelial cells, respectively, and are targeted by potently neutralizing antibodies in the infected host. Using purified soluble forms of gH/gL/gO and Pentamer as well as a panel of naturally elicited human monoclonal antibodies, we determined the location of key neutralizing epitopes on the gH/gL/gO and Pentamer surfaces. Mass Spectrometry (MS) coupled to Chemical Crosslinking or to Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange was used to define residues that are either in proximity or part of neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein complexes. We also determined the molecular architecture of the gH/gL/gO- and Pentamer-antibody complexes by Electron Microscopy (EM) and 3D reconstructions. The EM analysis revealed that the Pentamer specific neutralizing antibodies bind to two opposite surfaces of the complex, suggesting that they may neutralize infection by different mechanisms. Together, our data identify the location of neutralizing antibodies binding sites on the gH/gL/gO and Pentamer complexes and provide a framework for the development of antibodies and vaccines against HCMV. PMID:26485028

  19. Antigenic Characterization of the HCMV gH/gL/gO and Pentamer Cell Entry Complexes Reveals Binding Sites for Potently Neutralizing Human Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ciferri, Claudio; Chandramouli, Sumana; Leitner, Alexander; Donnarumma, Danilo; Cianfrocco, Michael A; Gerrein, Rachel; Friedrich, Kristian; Aggarwal, Yukti; Palladino, Giuseppe; Aebersold, Ruedi; Norais, Nathalie; Settembre, Ethan C; Carfi, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in transplant patients and in fetuses following congenital infection. The glycoprotein complexes gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/UL128/UL130/UL131A (Pentamer) are required for HCMV entry in fibroblasts and endothelial/epithelial cells, respectively, and are targeted by potently neutralizing antibodies in the infected host. Using purified soluble forms of gH/gL/gO and Pentamer as well as a panel of naturally elicited human monoclonal antibodies, we determined the location of key neutralizing epitopes on the gH/gL/gO and Pentamer surfaces. Mass Spectrometry (MS) coupled to Chemical Crosslinking or to Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange was used to define residues that are either in proximity or part of neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein complexes. We also determined the molecular architecture of the gH/gL/gO- and Pentamer-antibody complexes by Electron Microscopy (EM) and 3D reconstructions. The EM analysis revealed that the Pentamer specific neutralizing antibodies bind to two opposite surfaces of the complex, suggesting that they may neutralize infection by different mechanisms. Together, our data identify the location of neutralizing antibodies binding sites on the gH/gL/gO and Pentamer complexes and provide a framework for the development of antibodies and vaccines against HCMV. PMID:26485028

  20. PDL241, a novel humanized monoclonal antibody, reveals CD319 as a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Targeting the CD20 antigen has been a successful therapeutic intervention in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, in some patients with an inadequate response to anti-CD20 therapy, a persistence of CD20- plasmablasts is noted. The strong expression of CD319 on CD20- plasmablast and plasma cell populations in RA synovium led to the investigation of the potential of CD319 as a therapeutic target. Methods PDL241, a novel humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CD319, was generated and examined for its ability to inhibit immunoglobulin production from plasmablasts and plasma cells generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the presence and absence of RA synovial fibroblasts (RA-SF). The in vivo activity of PDL241 was determined in a human PBMC transfer into NOD scid IL-2 gamma chain knockout (NSG) mouse model. Finally, the ability of PDL241 to ameliorate experimental arthritis was evaluated in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model in rhesus monkeys. Results PDL241 bound to plasmablasts and plasma cells but not naïve B cells. Consistent with the binding profile, PDL241 inhibited the production of IgM from in vitro PBMC cultures by the depletion of CD319+ plasmablasts and plasma cells but not B cells. The activity of PDL241 was dependent on an intact Fc portion of the IgG1 and mediated predominantly by natural killer cells. Inhibition of IgM production was also observed in the human PBMC transfer to NSG mouse model. Treatment of rhesus monkeys in a CIA model with PDL241 led to a significant inhibition of anti-collagen IgG and IgM antibodies. A beneficial effect on joint related parameters, including bone remodeling, histopathology, and joint swelling was also observed. Conclusions The activity of PDL241 in both in vitro and in vivo models highlights the potential of CD319 as a therapeutic target in RA. PMID:24299175

  1. A comparison of antibody responses to veterinary vaccine antigens potentiated by different adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Usinger, W R

    1997-12-01

    Six adjuvant formulations were compared for their ability to potentiate the primary and memory antibody responses in mice to three companion animal vaccine immunogens--feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and a recombinantly-derived heartworm antigen. The combination of a novel bacterial immunostimulator, gliding bacterial adjuvant (GBA), either adsorbed onto an aluminum hydroxide gel (Rehydragel HPA), or emulsified with a vehicle of polyalcohol and detergent, elicited the strongest memory responses to both virus preparations. Both forms of aluminum hydroxide gels administered without GBA gave similar levels of adjuvant effects, on par with or greater than those generated by incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). The Acemannan immunostimulant was not effective in increasing the responses to the virus antigens, but increased the primary response to the heart-worm antigen over tenfold from control levels. All preparations appeared to be well tolerated, with no detectable adverse reactions observed in any of the 250 mice used. The proven safety of aluminum hydroxide adjuvants and the apparent absence of adverse reactions seen with GBA make this vehicle/adjuvant formulation worthy of additional study. PMID:9413100

  2. Potential Sources of Inter-Subject Variability in Monoclonal Antibody Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Gill, Katherine L; Machavaram, Krishna K; Rose, Rachel H; Chetty, Manoranjenni

    2016-07-01

    Understanding inter-subject variability in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is important to ensure that all patients attain suitable drug exposure to achieve efficacy and avoid toxicity. Inter-subject variability in the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is generally moderate to high; however, the factors responsible for the high inter-subject variability have not been comprehensively reviewed. In this review, the extent of inter-subject variability for mAb pharmacokinetics is presented and potential factors contributing to this variability are explored and summarised. Disease status, age, sex, ethnicity, body size, genetic polymorphisms, concomitant medication, co-morbidities, immune status and multiple other patient-specific details have been considered. The inter-subject variability for mAb pharmacokinetics most likely depends on the complex interplay of multiple factors. However, studies aimed at investigating the reasons for the inter-subject variability are sparse. Population pharmacokinetic models and physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are useful tools to identify important covariates, aiding in the understanding of factors contributing to inter-subject variability. Further understanding of inter-subject variability in pharmacokinetics should aid in development of dosing regimens that are more appropriate.

  3. A comparative antibody analysis of pannexin1 expression in four rat brain regions reveals varying subcellular localizations.

    PubMed

    Cone, Angela C; Ambrosi, Cinzia; Scemes, Eliana; Martone, Maryann E; Sosinsky, Gina E

    2013-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels release cytosolic ATP in response to signaling pathways. Panx1 is highly expressed in the central nervous system. We used four antibodies with different Panx1 anti-peptide epitopes to analyze four regions of rat brain. These antibodies labeled the same bands in Western blots and had highly similar patterns of immunofluorescence in tissue culture cells expressing Panx1, but Western blots of brain lysates from Panx1 knockout and control mice showed different banding patterns. Localizations of Panx1 in brain slices were generated using automated wide field mosaic confocal microscopy for imaging large regions of interest while retaining maximum resolution for examining cell populations and compartments. We compared Panx1 expression over the cerebellum, hippocampus with adjacent cortex, thalamus, and olfactory bulb. While Panx1 localizes to the same neuronal cell types, subcellular localizations differ. Two antibodies with epitopes against the intracellular loop and one against the carboxy terminus preferentially labeled cell bodies, while an antibody raised against an N-terminal peptide highlighted neuronal processes more than cell bodies. These labeling patterns may be a reflection of different cellular and subcellular localizations of full-length and/or modified Panx1 channels where each antibody is highlighting unique or differentially accessible Panx1 populations. However, we cannot rule out that one or more of these antibodies have specificity issues. All data associated with experiments from these four antibodies are presented in a manner that allows them to be compared and our claims thoroughly evaluated, rather than eliminating results that were questionable. Each antibody is given a unique identifier through the NIF Antibody Registry that can be used to track usage of individual antibodies across papers and all image and metadata are made available in the public repository, the Cell Centered Database, for on-line viewing, and

  4. A Comparative Antibody Analysis of Pannexin1 Expression in Four Rat Brain Regions Reveals Varying Subcellular Localizations

    PubMed Central

    Cone, Angela C.; Ambrosi, Cinzia; Scemes, Eliana; Martone, Maryann E.; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2012-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels release cytosolic ATP in response to signaling pathways. Panx1 is highly expressed in the central nervous system. We used four antibodies with different Panx1 anti-peptide epitopes to analyze four regions of rat brain. These antibodies labeled the same bands in Western blots and had highly similar patterns of immunofluorescence in tissue culture cells expressing Panx1, but Western blots of brain lysates from Panx1 knockout and control mice showed different banding patterns. Localizations of Panx1 in brain slices were generated using automated wide field mosaic confocal microscopy for imaging large regions of interest while retaining maximum resolution for examining cell populations and compartments. We compared Panx1 expression over the cerebellum, hippocampus with adjacent cortex, thalamus, and olfactory bulb. While Panx1 localizes to the same neuronal cell types, subcellular localizations differ. Two antibodies with epitopes against the intracellular loop and one against the carboxy terminus preferentially labeled cell bodies, while an antibody raised against an N-terminal peptide highlighted neuronal processes more than cell bodies. These labeling patterns may be a reflection of different cellular and subcellular localizations of full-length and/or modified Panx1 channels where each antibody is highlighting unique or differentially accessible Panx1 populations. However, we cannot rule out that one or more of these antibodies have specificity issues. All data associated with experiments from these four antibodies are presented in a manner that allows them to be compared and our claims thoroughly evaluated, rather than eliminating results that were questionable. Each antibody is given a unique identifier through the NIF Antibody Registry that can be used to track usage of individual antibodies across papers and all image and metadata are made available in the public repository, the Cell Centered Database, for on-line viewing, and

  5. Anti-cysticercus antibody detection in saliva as a potential diagnostic tool for neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Rumpa; Roy, Priyamvada; Das, Shukla; Shah, Dheeraj; Agarwal, Sunil; Kaur, Iqbal Rajinder

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was planned to determine the usefulness of anti-cysticercus IgG antibody detection in saliva for neurocysticercosis (NCC) diagnosis, along with serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level to serve as a surrogate marker. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study of 14 months duration, blood and saliva samples were collected from 40 patients suspected to be suffering from NCC and were subjected to anti-cysticercus IgG antibody detection by ELISA. Serum CRP levels were estimated as acute-phase reactant by high sensitivity CRP ELISA. Results: Anti-cysticercus IgG was detected in serum and saliva of 34 and 30 patients, respectively. Cases positive for salivary antibody were positive for serum antibody and their serum CRP level was higher than normal. Cases negative for salivary antibody had low serum CRP levels. Anti-cysticercus IgG detection in saliva was 88.24% sensitive, 100% specific, and had a positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 60%. Positive salivary anti-cysticercus IgG and high serum CRP level showed a significant association. Difference between CRP levels of patients positive for anti-cysticercus antibody in both serum and saliva, and patients positive for antibody in serum but not saliva was highly significant. Conclusions: Saliva, being painless and noninvasive, can be used as alternative to serum for NCC diagnosis. PMID:27570404

  6. Revealing a quantum feature of dimensionless uncertainty in linear and quadratic potentials by changing potential intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheiri, R.

    2016-09-01

    As an undergraduate exercise, in an article (2012 Am. J. Phys. 80 780–14), quantum and classical uncertainties for dimensionless variables of position and momentum were evaluated in three potentials: infinite well, bouncing ball, and harmonic oscillator. While original quantum uncertainty products depend on {{\\hslash }} and the number of states (n), a dimensionless approach makes the comparison between quantum uncertainty and classical dispersion possible by excluding {{\\hslash }}. But the question is whether the uncertainty still remains dependent on quantum number n. In the above-mentioned article, there lies this contrast; on the one hand, the dimensionless quantum uncertainty of the potential box approaches classical dispersion only in the limit of large quantum numbers (n\\to ∞ )—consistent with the correspondence principle. On the other hand, similar evaluations for bouncing ball and harmonic oscillator potentials are equal to their classical counterparts independent of n. This equality may hide the quantum feature of low energy levels. In the current study, we change the potential intervals in order to make them symmetric for the linear potential and non-symmetric for the quadratic potential. As a result, it is shown in this paper that the dimensionless quantum uncertainty of these potentials in the new potential intervals is expressed in terms of quantum number n. In other words, the uncertainty requires the correspondence principle in order to approach the classical limit. Therefore, it can be concluded that the dimensionless analysis, as a useful pedagogical method, does not take away the quantum feature of the n-dependence of quantum uncertainty in general. Moreover, our numerical calculations include the higher powers of the position for the potentials.

  7. Revealing a quantum feature of dimensionless uncertainty in linear and quadratic potentials by changing potential intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheiri, R.

    2016-09-01

    As an undergraduate exercise, in an article (2012 Am. J. Phys. 80 780-14), quantum and classical uncertainties for dimensionless variables of position and momentum were evaluated in three potentials: infinite well, bouncing ball, and harmonic oscillator. While original quantum uncertainty products depend on {{\\hslash }} and the number of states (n), a dimensionless approach makes the comparison between quantum uncertainty and classical dispersion possible by excluding {{\\hslash }}. But the question is whether the uncertainty still remains dependent on quantum number n. In the above-mentioned article, there lies this contrast; on the one hand, the dimensionless quantum uncertainty of the potential box approaches classical dispersion only in the limit of large quantum numbers (n\\to ∞ )—consistent with the correspondence principle. On the other hand, similar evaluations for bouncing ball and harmonic oscillator potentials are equal to their classical counterparts independent of n. This equality may hide the quantum feature of low energy levels. In the current study, we change the potential intervals in order to make them symmetric for the linear potential and non-symmetric for the quadratic potential. As a result, it is shown in this paper that the dimensionless quantum uncertainty of these potentials in the new potential intervals is expressed in terms of quantum number n. In other words, the uncertainty requires the correspondence principle in order to approach the classical limit. Therefore, it can be concluded that the dimensionless analysis, as a useful pedagogical method, does not take away the quantum feature of the n-dependence of quantum uncertainty in general. Moreover, our numerical calculations include the higher powers of the position for the potentials.

  8. Engineering Venom’s Toxin-Neutralizing Antibody Fragments and Its Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Alvarenga, Larissa M.; Zahid, Muhammad; di Tommaso, Anne; Juste, Matthieu O.; Aubrey, Nicolas; Billiald, Philippe; Muzard, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Serum therapy remains the only specific treatment against envenoming, but anti-venoms are still prepared by fragmentation of polyclonal antibodies isolated from hyper-immunized horse serum. Most of these anti-venoms are considered to be efficient, but their production is tedious, and their use may be associated with adverse effects. Recombinant antibodies and smaller functional units are now emerging as credible alternatives and constitute a source of still unexploited biomolecules capable of neutralizing venoms. This review will be a walk through the technologies that have recently been applied leading to novel antibody formats with better properties in terms of homogeneity, specific activity and possible safety. PMID:25153256

  9. Antibodies elicited by the first non-viral prophylactic cancer vaccine show tumor-specificity and immunotherapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Lohmueller, Jason J; Sato, Shuji; Popova, Lana; Chu, Isabel M; Tucker, Meghan A; Barberena, Roberto; Innocenti, Gregory M; Cudic, Mare; Ham, James D; Cheung, Wan Cheung; Polakiewicz, Roberto D; Finn, Olivera J

    2016-08-22

    MUC1 is a shared tumor antigen expressed on >80% of human cancers. We completed the first prophylactic cancer vaccine clinical trial based on a non-viral antigen, MUC1, in healthy individuals at-risk for colon cancer. This trial provided a unique source of potentially effective and safe immunotherapeutic drugs, fully-human antibodies affinity-matured in a healthy host to a tumor antigen. We purified, cloned, and characterized 13 IgGs specific for several tumor-associated MUC1 epitopes with a wide range of binding affinities. These antibodies bind hypoglycosylated MUC1 on human cancer cell lines and tumor tissues but show no reactivity against fully-glycosylated MUC1 on normal cells and tissues. We found that several antibodies activate complement-mediated cytotoxicity and that T cells carrying chimeric antigen receptors with the antibody variable regions kill MUC1(+) target cells, express activation markers, and produce interferon gamma. Fully-human and tumor-specific, these antibodies are candidates for further testing and development as immunotherapeutic drugs.

  10. Antibodies elicited by the first non-viral prophylactic cancer vaccine show tumor-specificity and immunotherapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Lohmueller, Jason J; Sato, Shuji; Popova, Lana; Chu, Isabel M; Tucker, Meghan A; Barberena, Roberto; Innocenti, Gregory M; Cudic, Mare; Ham, James D; Cheung, Wan Cheung; Polakiewicz, Roberto D; Finn, Olivera J

    2016-01-01

    MUC1 is a shared tumor antigen expressed on >80% of human cancers. We completed the first prophylactic cancer vaccine clinical trial based on a non-viral antigen, MUC1, in healthy individuals at-risk for colon cancer. This trial provided a unique source of potentially effective and safe immunotherapeutic drugs, fully-human antibodies affinity-matured in a healthy host to a tumor antigen. We purified, cloned, and characterized 13 IgGs specific for several tumor-associated MUC1 epitopes with a wide range of binding affinities. These antibodies bind hypoglycosylated MUC1 on human cancer cell lines and tumor tissues but show no reactivity against fully-glycosylated MUC1 on normal cells and tissues. We found that several antibodies activate complement-mediated cytotoxicity and that T cells carrying chimeric antigen receptors with the antibody variable regions kill MUC1(+) target cells, express activation markers, and produce interferon gamma. Fully-human and tumor-specific, these antibodies are candidates for further testing and development as immunotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27545199

  11. Antibodies elicited by the first non-viral prophylactic cancer vaccine show tumor-specificity and immunotherapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Lohmueller, Jason J.; Sato, Shuji; Popova, Lana; Chu, Isabel M.; Tucker, Meghan A.; Barberena, Roberto; Innocenti, Gregory M.; Cudic, Mare; Ham, James D.; Cheung, Wan Cheung; Polakiewicz, Roberto D.; Finn, Olivera J.

    2016-01-01

    MUC1 is a shared tumor antigen expressed on >80% of human cancers. We completed the first prophylactic cancer vaccine clinical trial based on a non-viral antigen, MUC1, in healthy individuals at-risk for colon cancer. This trial provided a unique source of potentially effective and safe immunotherapeutic drugs, fully-human antibodies affinity-matured in a healthy host to a tumor antigen. We purified, cloned, and characterized 13 IgGs specific for several tumor-associated MUC1 epitopes with a wide range of binding affinities. These antibodies bind hypoglycosylated MUC1 on human cancer cell lines and tumor tissues but show no reactivity against fully-glycosylated MUC1 on normal cells and tissues. We found that several antibodies activate complement-mediated cytotoxicity and that T cells carrying chimeric antigen receptors with the antibody variable regions kill MUC1+ target cells, express activation markers, and produce interferon gamma. Fully-human and tumor-specific, these antibodies are candidates for further testing and development as immunotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27545199

  12. Structures of HIV-1-Env V1V2 with broadly neutralizing antibodies reveal commonalities that enable vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Jason; Soto, Cinque; Yang, Max M.; Davenport, Thaddeus M.; Guttman, Miklos; Bailer, Robert T.; Chambers, Michael; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; DeKosky, Brandon J.; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Druz, Aliaksandr; Ernandes, Michael J.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Jarosinski, Marissa C.; Joyce, M. Gordon; Lemmin, Thomas M.; Leung, Sherman; Louder, Mark K.; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Narpala, Sandeep; Pancera, Marie; Stuckey, Jonathan; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhou, Tongqing; Mullikin, James C.; Baxa, Ulrich; Georgiou, George; McDermott, Adrian B.; Bonsignori, Mattia; Haynes, Barton F.; Moore, Penny L.; Morris, Lynn; Lee, Kelly K.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1-Env V1V2 arise in multiple donors. However, atomic-level interactions had only been determined with antibodies from a single donor, making commonalities in recognition uncertain. Here we report the co-crystal structure of V1V2 with antibody CH03 from a second donor and model Env interactions of antibody CAP256-VRC26 from a third. These V1V2-directed bNAbs utilized strand-strand interactions between a protruding antibody loop and a V1V2 strand, but differed in their N-glycan recognition. Ontogeny analysis indicated protruding loops to develop early, with glycan interactions maturing over time. Altogether, the multidonor information suggested V1V2-directed bNAbs to form an ‘extended class’, for which we engineered ontogeny-specific antigens: Env trimers with chimeric V1V2s that interacted with inferred ancestor and intermediate antibodies. The ontogeny-based design of vaccine antigens described here may provide a general means for eliciting antibodies of a desired class. PMID:26689967

  13. Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for STAT3β Reveal Its Contribution to Constitutive STAT3 Phosphorylation in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Kasembeli, Moses M.; Eckols, T. Kris; Kolosov, Mikhail; Lang, Paul; Christensen, Kurt; Edwards, Dean P.; Tweardy, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery in mice and humans 19 years ago, the contribution of alternatively spliced Stat3, Stat3β, to the overall functions of Stat3 has been controversial. Tyrosine-phosphorylated (p) Stat3β homodimers are more stable, bind DNA more avidly, are less susceptible to dephosphorylation, and exhibit distinct intracellular dynamics, most notably markedly prolonged nuclear retention, compared to pStat3α homodimers. Overexpression of one or the other isoform in cell lines demonstrated that Stat3β acted as a dominant-negative of Stat3α in transformation assays; however, studies with mouse strains deficient in one or the other isoform indicated distinct contributions of Stat3 isoforms to inflammation. Current immunological reagents cannot differentiate Stat3β proteins derived from alternative splicing vs. proteolytic cleavage of Stat3α. We developed monoclonal antibodies that recognize the 7 C-terminal amino acids unique to Stat3β (CT7) and do not cross-react with Stat3α. Immunoblotting studies revealed that levels of Stat3β protein, but not Stat3α, in breast cancer cell lines positively correlated with overall pStat3 levels, suggesting that Stat3β may contribute to constitutive Stat3 activation in this tumor system. The ability to unambiguously discriminate splice alternative Stat3β from proteolytic Stat3β and Stat3α will provide new insights into the contribution of Stat3β vs. Stat3α to oncogenesis, as well as other biological and pathological processes. PMID:25268166

  14. Boronated monoclonal antibody 225. 28S for potential use in neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tamat, S.R.; Moore, D.E.; Patwardhan, A.; Hersey, P. )

    1989-07-01

    The concept of conjugating boron cluster compounds to monoclonal antibodies has been examined by several groups of research workers in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The procedures reported to date for boronation of monoclonal antibodies resulted in either an inadequate level of boron incorporation, the precipitation of the conjugates, or a loss of immunological activity. The present report describes the conjugation of dicesium-mercapto-undecahydrododecaborate (Cs2B12H11SH) to 225.28S monoclonal antibody directed against high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigens (HMW-MAA), using poly-L-ornithine as a bridge to increase the carrying capacity of the antibody and to minimize change in the conformational structure of antibody. The method produces a boron content of 1,300 to 1,700 B atoms per molecule 225.28S while retaining the immunoreactivity. Characterization in terms of the homogeneity of the conjugation of the boron-monoclonal antibody conjugates has been studied by gel electrophoresis and ion-exchange HPLC.

  15. Human antibodies reveal a protective epitope that is highly conserved among human and nonhuman influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Grandea, Andres G.; Olsen, Ole A.; Cox, Thomas C.; Renshaw, Mark; Hammond, Philip W.; Chan-Hui, Po-Ying; Mitcham, Jennifer L.; Cieplak, Witold; Stewart, Shaun M.; Grantham, Michael L.; Pekosz, Andrew; Kiso, Maki; Shinya, Kyoko; Hatta, Masato; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Moyle, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Influenza remains a serious public health threat throughout the world. Vaccines and antivirals are available that can provide protection from infection. However, new viral strains emerge continuously because of the plasticity of the influenza genome, which necessitates annual reformulation of vaccine antigens, and resistance to antivirals can appear rapidly and become entrenched in circulating virus populations. In addition, the spread of new pandemic strains is difficult to contain because of the time required to engineer and manufacture effective vaccines. Monoclonal antibodies that target highly conserved viral epitopes might offer an alternative protection paradigm. Herein we describe the isolation of a panel of monoclonal antibodies derived from the IgG+ memory B cells of healthy, human subjects that recognize a previously unknown conformational epitope within the ectodomain of the influenza matrix 2 protein, M2e. This antibody binding region is highly conserved in influenza A viruses, being present in nearly all strains detected to date, including highly pathogenic viruses that infect primarily birds and swine, and the current 2009 swine-origin H1N1 pandemic strain (S-OIV). Furthermore, these human anti-M2e monoclonal antibodies protect mice from lethal challenges with either H5N1 or H1N1 influenza viruses. These results suggest that viral M2e can elicit broadly cross-reactive and protective antibodies in humans. Accordingly, recombinant forms of these human antibodies may provide useful therapeutic agents to protect against infection from a broad spectrum of influenza A strains. PMID:20615945

  16. Epitope Structure of the Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of Asialoglycoprotein Receptor to a Monoclonal Antibody Revealed by High-Resolution Proteolytic Excision Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanescu, Raluca; Born, Rita; Moise, Adrian; Ernst, Beat; Przybylski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the H1 subunit of the carbohydrate recognition domain (H1CRD) of the asialoglycoprotein receptor is used as an entry site into hepatocytes by hepatitis A and B viruses and Marburg virus. Thus, molecules binding specifically to the CRD might exert inhibition towards these diseases by blocking the virus entry site. We report here the identification of the epitope structure of H1CRD to a monoclonal antibody by proteolytic epitope excision of the immune complex and high-resolution MALDI-FTICR mass spectrometry. As a prerequisite of the epitope determination, the primary structure of the H1CRD antigen was characterised by ESI-FTICR-MS of the intact protein and by LC-MS/MS of tryptic digest mixtures. Molecular mass determination and proteolytic fragments provided the identification of two intramolecular disulfide bridges (seven Cys residues), and a Cys-mercaptoethanol adduct formed by treatment with β-mercaptoethanol during protein extraction. The H1CRD antigen binds to the monoclonal antibody in both native and Cys-alkylated form. For identification of the epitope, the antibody was immobilized on N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-activated Sepharose. Epitope excision and epitope extraction with trypsin and FTICR-MS of affinity-bound peptides provided the identification of two specific epitope peptides (5-16) and (17-23) that showed high affinity to the antibody. Affinity studies of the synthetic epitope peptides revealed independent binding of each peptide to the antibody.

  17. Antibody-based analysis reveals “filamentous vs. non-filamentous” and “cytoplasmic vs. nuclear” crosstalk of cytoskeletal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kumeta, Masahiro; Hirai, Yuya; Yoshimura, Shige H.; Horigome, Tsuneyoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2013-12-10

    To uncover the molecular composition and dynamics of the functional scaffold for the nucleus, three fractions of biochemically-stable nuclear protein complexes were extracted and used as immunogens to produce a variety of monoclonal antibodies. Many helix-based cytoskeletal proteins were identified as antigens, suggesting their dynamic contribution to nuclear architecture and function. Interestingly, sets of antibodies distinguished distinct subcellular localization of a single isoform of certain cytoskeletal proteins; distinct molecular forms of keratin and actinin were found in the nucleus. Their nuclear shuttling properties were verified by the apparent nuclear accumulations under inhibition of CRM1-dependent nuclear export. Nuclear keratins do not take an obvious filamentous structure, as was revealed by non-filamentous cytoplasmic keratin-specific monoclonal antibody. These results suggest the distinct roles of the helix-based cytoskeletal proteins in the nucleus. - Highlights: • A set of monoclonal antibodies were raised against nuclear scaffold proteins. • Helix-based cytoskeletal proteins were involved in nuclear scaffold. • Many cytoskeletal components shuttle into the nucleus in a CRM1-dependent manner. • Sets of antibodies distinguished distinct subcellular localization of a single isoform. • Nuclear keratin is soluble and does not form an obvious filamentous structure.

  18. A Hybrid Protein–Polymer Nanoworm Potentiates Apoptosis Better than a Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    B-cell lymphomas continue to occur with a high incidence. The chimeric antibody known as Rituximab (Rituxan) has become a vital therapy for these patients. Rituximab induces cell death via binding and clustering of the CD20 receptor by Fcγ expressing effector cells. Because of the limited mobility of effector cells, it may be advantageous to cluster CD20 directly using multivalent nanostructures. To explore this strategy, this manuscript introduces a nanoparticle that assembles from a fusion between a single chain antibody and a soluble protein polymer. These hybrid proteins express in Escherichia coli and do not require bioconjugation between the antibody and a substrate. Surprisingly a fusion between an anti-CD20 single chain antibody and a soluble protein polymer assemble worm-like nanostructures, which were characterized using light scattering and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. These nanoworms competitively bind CD20 on two B-cell lymphoma cell lines, exhibit concentration-dependent induction of apoptosis, and induce apoptosis better than Rituximab alone. Similar activity was observed in vivo using a non-Hodgkin lymphoma xenograft model. In comparison to Rituximab, systemic nanoworms significantly slowed tumor growth. These findings suggest that hybrid nanoworms targeted at CD20 may be useful treatments for B-cell related malignancies. Because of the ubiquity of antibody therapeutics, related nanoworms may have uses against other molecular targets. PMID:24484356

  19. Potential deleterious role of anti-Neu5Gc antibodies in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Salama, Apolline; Evanno, Gwénaëlle; Harb, Jean; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Human beings do not synthesize the glycolyl form of the sialic acid (Neu5Gc) and only express the acetylated form of the sugar, whereas a diet-based intake of Neu5Gc provokes a natural immunization and production of anti-Neu5Gc antibodies in human serum. However, Neu5Gc is expressed on mammal glycoproteins and glycolipids in most organs and cells. We review here the relevance of Neu5Gc and anti-Neu5Gc antibodies in the context of xenotransplantation and the use of animal-derived molecules and products, as well as the possible consequences of a long-term exposure to anti-Neu5Gc antibodies in recipients of xenografts. In addition, the importance of an accurate estimation of the anti-Neu5Gc response following xenotransplantation and the future contribution of knockout animals mimicking the human situation are also assessed.

  20. Next-Generation Sequencing of a Single Domain Antibody Repertoire Reveals Quality of Phage Display Selected Candidates.

    PubMed

    Turner, Kendrick B; Naciri, Jennifer; Liu, Jinny L; Anderson, George P; Goldman, Ellen R; Zabetakis, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing and bioinformatics are powerful tools for analyzing the large number of DNA sequences present in an immune library. In this work, we constructed a cDNA library of single domain antibodies from a llama immunized with staphylococcal enterotoxin B. The resulting library was sequenced, resulting in approximately 8.5 million sequences with 5.4 million representing intact, useful sequences. The sequenced library was interrogated using sequences of known SEB-binding single domain antibodies from the library obtained through phage display panning methods in a previous study. New antibodies were identified, produced, and characterized, and were shown to have affinities and melting temperatures comparable to those obtained by traditional panning methods. This demonstrates the utility of using NGS as a complementary tool to phage-displayed biopanning as a means for rapidly obtaining additional antibodies from an immune library. It also shows that phage display, using a library of high diversity, is able to select high quality antibodies even when they are low in frequency. PMID:26895405

  1. Next-Generation Sequencing of a Single Domain Antibody Repertoire Reveals Quality of Phage Display Selected Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kendrick B.; Naciri, Jennifer; Liu, Jinny L.; Anderson, George P.; Goldman, Ellen R.; Zabetakis, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing and bioinformatics are powerful tools for analyzing the large number of DNA sequences present in an immune library. In this work, we constructed a cDNA library of single domain antibodies from a llama immunized with staphylococcal enterotoxin B. The resulting library was sequenced, resulting in approximately 8.5 million sequences with 5.4 million representing intact, useful sequences. The sequenced library was interrogated using sequences of known SEB-binding single domain antibodies from the library obtained through phage display panning methods in a previous study. New antibodies were identified, produced, and characterized, and were shown to have affinities and melting temperatures comparable to those obtained by traditional panning methods. This demonstrates the utility of using NGS as a complementary tool to phage-displayed biopanning as a means for rapidly obtaining additional antibodies from an immune library. It also shows that phage display, using a library of high diversity, is able to select high quality antibodies even when they are low in frequency. PMID:26895405

  2. Characterization and immunotherapeutic potential of a monoclonal antibody against a ras oncogene transformed cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, R.S. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Transformed cells express cell surface antigens not present, or present in diminished amounts on normal cells. Monoclonal antibodies can be used to identify and biochemically characterize tumor-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 45-2D9 was produced by immunization of BALB/c mice with a transformed cell line (45-2D9) induced by transfection of NIH 3T3 cells with a c-H-ras oncogene in DNA isolated from a human lung carcinoma. By immunoperoxidase staining, this antibody binds to the 45-342 cells as well as to the ras transformed primary and 3 secondary transfectants, including the one used to induce 45-342, but not to other ras transformed cell lines. Murine tumors as well as human fetal and most normal adult tissues are not stained. This antibody does bind to a variety of human tumors, including lung adenocarcinomas, as well as breast, colon and esophageal carcinomas. The ability of MoAb 45-2D9 to target ricin toxin A chain (RTA) and radio-isotopes to gp74 expressing cells was investigated. An immunotoxin generated by conjugating RTA to MoAb 45-2D9 inhibits protein and DNA synthesis by the 45-342 cells. Radiolabeled antibody specifically localizes to and can be used to image subcutaneous and pulmonary gp74 expressing tumors in nu/nu mice. Monoclonal antibodies against oncogene transformed cell lines may be useful for the detection and characterization of tumor-associated antigens as well as for the development of new tumor therapeutic and diagnostic reagents.

  3. [Anti-sclerostin antibody : its bone formation effect and therapeutic potential for osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Endo, Itsuro

    2014-01-01

    In a rare accident of nature, some families have been found to have dense and strong bones due to a recessive loss of function mutation in the SOST gene that encodes for sclerostin, a protein expressed by osteocytes that downregulates osteoblastic bone formation. Knowledge of this molecule and its actions led rather quickly to the development of anti-sclerostin antibodies that lead to marked increases in bone mass in both animals and human subjects. Blocking sclerostin action with anti-sclerostin antibodies is a promising new therapeutic approach to osteoanabolic therapy of osteoporosis.

  4. Structure and function of broadly reactive antibody PG16 reveal an H3 subdomain that mediates potent neutralization of HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Pejchal, Robert; Walker, Laura M.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Phogat, Sanjay K.; Koff, Wayne C.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-11-15

    Development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 will likely require elicitation of broad and potent neutralizing antibodies against the trimeric surface envelope glycoprotein (Env). Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) PG9 and PG16 neutralize {approx}80% of HIV-1 isolates across all clades with extraordinary potency and target novel epitopes preferentially expressed on Env trimers. As these neutralization properties are ideal for a vaccine-elicited antibody response to HIV-1, their structural basis was investigated. The crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of PG16 at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution revealed its unusually long, 28-residue, complementarity determining region (CDR) H3 forms a unique, stable subdomain that towers above the antibody surface. A 7-residue 'specificity loop' on the 'hammerhead' subdomain was identified that, when transplanted from PG16 to PG9 and vice versa, accounted for differences in the fine specificity and neutralization of these two mAbs. The PG16 electron density maps also revealed that a CDR H3 tyrosine was sulfated, which was confirmed for both PG9 (doubly) and PG16 (singly) by mass spectral analysis. We further showed that tyrosine sulfation plays a role in binding and neutralization. An N-linked glycan modification is observed in the variable light chain, but not required for antigen recognition. Further, the crystal structure of the PG9 light chain at 3.0 {angstrom} facilitated homology modeling to support the presence of these unusual features in PG9. Thus, PG9 and PG16 use unique structural features to mediate potent neutralization of HIV-1 that may be of utility in antibody engineering and for high-affinity recognition of a variety of therapeutic targets.

  5. Antibody microarray profiling of osteosarcoma cell serum for identifying potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zi-Qiang; Tang, Jin-Shan; Gang, Duan; Wang, Ming-Xing; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Lei, Zhou; Feng, Zhou; Fang, Ming-Liang; Yan, Lin

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify biomarkers in osteosarcoma (OS) cell serum by antibody microarray profiling, which may be used for OS diagnosis and therapy. An antibody microarray was used to detect the expression levels of cytokines in serum samples from 20 patients with OS and 20 healthy individuals. Significantly expressed cytokines in OS serum were selected when P<0.05 and fold change >2. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to validate the antibody microarray results. Finally, classification accuracy was calculated by cluster analysis. Twenty one cytokines were significantly upregulated in OS cell serum samples compared with control samples. Expression of interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor growth factor-β, growth-related oncogene, hepatocyte growth factor, chemokine ligand 16, Endoglin, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and platelet-derived growth factor-AA was validated by ELISAs. OS serum samples and control samples were distinguished by significantly expressed cytokines with an accuracy of 95%. The results demonstrated that expressed cytokines identified by antibody microarray may be used as biomarkers for OS diagnosis and therapy.

  6. Manipulation of immunodominant dengue virus E protein epitopes reduces potential antibody-dependent enhancement

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue viruses (DENV) are the most important arboviruses of humans and cause significant disease. Infection with DENV elicits antibody responses to the envelope glycoprotein, predominantly against immunodominant, cross-reactive, weakly-neutralizing epitopes. These weakly-neutralizing antibodies are implicated in enhancing infection via Fcγ receptor bearing cells and can lead to increased viral loads that are associated with severe disease. Here we describe results from the development and testing of cross-reactivity reduced DENV-2 DNA vaccine candidates that contain substitutions in immunodominant B cell epitopes of the fusion peptide and domain III of the envelope protein. Results Cross-reactivity reduced and wild-type vaccine candidates were similarly immunogenic in outbred mice and elicited high levels of neutralizing antibody, however mice immunized with cross-reactivity reduced vaccines produced significantly reduced levels of immunodominant cross-reactive antibodies. Sera from mice immunized with wild-type, fusion peptide-, or domain III- substitution containing vaccines enhanced heterologous DENV infection in vitro, unlike sera from mice immunized with a vaccine containing a combination of both fusion peptide and domain III substitutions. Passive transfer of immune sera from mice immunized with fusion peptide and domain III substitutions also reduced the development of severe DENV disease in AG129 mice when compared to mice receiving wild type immune sera. Conclusions Reducing cross-reactivity in the envelope glycoprotein of DENV may be an approach to improve the quality of the anti-DENV immune response. PMID:22709350

  7. Application of a multiplex immunoassay for detection of salivary antibody responses to selected potentially waterborne pathogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy. Pathogen-specific antibodies in saliva can be used as bioindicators of recent or ongoing infection. Because collection of saliva is easy and painless, i...

  8. Antibody microarray profiling of osteosarcoma cell serum for identifying potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zi-Qiang; Tang, Jin-Shan; Gang, Duan; Wang, Ming-Xing; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Lei, Zhou; Feng, Zhou; Fang, Ming-Liang; Yan, Lin

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify biomarkers in osteosarcoma (OS) cell serum by antibody microarray profiling, which may be used for OS diagnosis and therapy. An antibody microarray was used to detect the expression levels of cytokines in serum samples from 20 patients with OS and 20 healthy individuals. Significantly expressed cytokines in OS serum were selected when P<0.05 and fold change >2. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to validate the antibody microarray results. Finally, classification accuracy was calculated by cluster analysis. Twenty one cytokines were significantly upregulated in OS cell serum samples compared with control samples. Expression of interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor growth factor-β, growth-related oncogene, hepatocyte growth factor, chemokine ligand 16, Endoglin, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and platelet-derived growth factor-AA was validated by ELISAs. OS serum samples and control samples were distinguished by significantly expressed cytokines with an accuracy of 95%. The results demonstrated that expressed cytokines identified by antibody microarray may be used as biomarkers for OS diagnosis and therapy. PMID:25815525

  9. Antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as potential markers of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vlagea, Alexandru; Gil, Antonio; Cuesta, Maria V; Arribas, Florencia; Diez, Jesús; Lavilla, Paz; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora

    2013-06-01

    The antiphospholipid antibodies present in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are directed at a number of phospholipid-binding proteins: β2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI), prothrombin, and so on. Antibodies directed at β2GPI are accepted as a classification criterion for APS, while the presence of antiprothrombin antibodies is not. In the present article, we investigated the possible role of antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies (aPS/PT) as marker of APS on a cohort of 295 individuals with APS (95 primary APS and 45 secondary APS) and APS-related diseases. We found aPS/PT to be highly associated with venous thrombosis (immunoglobulin G [IgG] aPS/PT odds ratio [OR], 7.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.97-13.92 and IgM aPS/PT OR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.35-4.77) and obstetric abnormalities (IgG aPS/PT OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.04-5.43), but not with arterial thrombosis. A very high degree of concordance between the concentration of aPS/PT and lupus anticoagulant activity was demonstrated. Therefore, we support the inclusion of aPS/PT determination as second-level assay to confirm APS classification.

  10. Affinity maturation of T-cell receptor-like antibodies for Wilms tumor 1 peptide greatly enhances therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Tassev, Dimiter V.; Hasan, Aisha; Kuo, Tzu-Yun; Guo, Hong-fen; O’Reilly, Richard J.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2016-01-01

    WT1126 (RMFPNAPYL) is a human leukocyte antigen-A2 (HLA-A2) restricted peptide derived from Wilms tumor protein (WT1), which is widely expressed in a broad spectrum of leukemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. A novel T-cell-receptor (TCR)-like single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody specific for the T cell epitope consisting of the WT1/HLA-A2 complex was isolated from a human scFv phage library. This scFv was affinity-matured by mutagenesis combined with yeast display, and structurally analyzed using a homology model. This monovalent scFv showed a 100-fold affinity improvement (dissociation constant [KD]= 3nM) and exquisite specificity towards its targeted epitope or HLA-A2+/WT1+ tumor cells. Bivalent scFv-huIgG1-Fc fusion protein demonstrated an even higher avidity (KD = 2pM) binding to the T cell epitope and to tumor targets, and was capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity or tumor lysis by chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing human T or NK-92-MI transfected cells. This antibody demonstrated specific and potent cytotoxicity in vivo towards WT1-positive leukemia xenograft that was HLA-A2 restricted. In summary, T cell epitopes can provide novel targets for antibody-based therapeutics. By combining phage and yeast displays and scFv-Fc fusion platforms, a strategy for developing high affinity TCR-like antibodies could be rapidly explored for potential clinical development. PMID:25987253

  11. Pre-Clinical Development of a Humanized Anti-CD47 Antibody with Anti-Cancer Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Lijuan; Zhao, Feifei; Tseng, Serena; Narayanan, Cyndhavi; Shura, Lei; Willingham, Stephen; Howard, Maureen; Prohaska, Susan; Volkmer, Jens; Chao, Mark; Weissman, Irving L.; Majeti, Ravindra

    2015-01-01

    CD47 is a widely expressed cell surface protein that functions as a regulator of phagocytosis mediated by cells of the innate immune system, such as macrophages and dendritic cells. CD47 serves as the ligand for a receptor on these innate immune cells, SIRP-alpha, which in turn delivers an inhibitory signal for phagocytosis. We previously found increased expression of CD47 on primary human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) stem cells, and demonstrated that blocking monoclonal antibodies directed against CD47 enabled the phagocytosis and elimination of AML, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), and many solid tumors in xenograft models. Here, we report the development of a humanized anti-CD47 antibody with potent efficacy and favorable toxicokinetic properties as a candidate therapeutic. A novel monoclonal anti-human CD47 antibody, 5F9, was generated, and antibody humanization was carried out by grafting its complementarity determining regions (CDRs) onto a human IgG4 format. The resulting humanized 5F9 antibody (Hu5F9-G4) bound monomeric human CD47 with an 8 nM affinity. Hu5F9-G4 induced potent macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of primary human AML cells in vitro and completely eradicated human AML in vivo, leading to long-term disease-free survival of patient-derived xenografts. Moreover, Hu5F9-G4 synergized with rituximab to eliminate NHL engraftment and cure xenografted mice. Finally, toxicokinetic studies in non-human primates showed that Hu5F9-G4 could be safely administered intravenously at doses able to achieve potentially therapeutic serum levels. Thus, Hu5F9-G4 is actively being developed for and has been entered into clinical trials in patients with AML and solid tumors (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02216409). PMID:26390038

  12. A novel mouse with B cells but lacking serum antibody reveals an antibody-independent role for B cells in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Chan, O T; Hannum, L G; Haberman, A M; Madaio, M P; Shlomchik, M J

    1999-05-17

    The precise role of B cells in systemic autoimmunity is incompletely understood. Although B cells are necessary for expression of disease (Chan, O., and M.J. Shlomchik. 1998. J. Immunol. 160:51-59, and Shlomchik, M.J., M.P. Madaio, D. Ni, M. Trounstine, and D. Huszar. 1994. J. Exp. Med. 180:1295-1306), it is unclear whether autoantibody production, antigen presentation, and/or other B cell functions are required for the complete pathologic phenotype. To address this issue, two experimental approaches were used. In the first, the individual contributions of circulating antibodies and B cells were analyzed using MRL/MpJ-Faslpr (MRL/lpr) mice that expressed a mutant transgene encoding surface immunoglobulin (Ig), but which did not permit the secretion of circulating Ig. These mice developed nephritis, characterized by cellular infiltration within the kidney, indicating that B cells themselves, without soluble autoantibody production, exert a pathogenic role. The results indicate that, independent of serum autoantibody, functional B cells expressing surface Ig are essential for disease expression, either by serving as antigen-presenting cells for antigen-specific, autoreactive T cells, or by contributing directly to local inflammation.

  13. Crystal Structures of Mite Allergens Der f 1 and Der p 1 Reveal Differences in Surface-Exposed Residues that May Influence Antibody Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Chapman, Martin D.; Vailes, Lisa D.; Stura, Enrico A.; Saint-Remy, Jean-Marie; Minor, Wladek; Pomés, Anna

    2009-12-01

    The Group 1 mite allergens, Der f 1 and Der p 1, are potent allergens excreted by Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, respectively. The human IgE antibody responses to the Group 1 allergens show more cross-reactivity than the murine IgG antibody responses which are largely species-specific. Here, we report the crystal structure of the mature form of Der f 1, which was isolated from its natural source, and a new, high-resolution structure of mature recombinant Der p 1. Unlike Der p 1, Der f 1 is monomeric both in the crystalline state and in solution. Moreover, no metal binding is observed in the structure of Der f 1, despite the fact that all amino acids involved in Ca{sup 2+} binding in Der p 1 are completely conserved in Der f 1. Although Der p 1 and Der f 1 share extensive sequence identity, comparison of the crystal structures of both allergens revealed structural features which could explain the differences in murine and human IgE antibody responses to these allergens. There are structural differences between Der f 1 and Der p 1 which are unevenly distributed on the allergens' surfaces. This uneven spatial arrangement of conserved versus altered residues could explain both the specificity and cross-reactivity of antibodies against Der f 1 and Der p 1.

  14. Structure of Antibody F425-B4e8 in Complex With a V3 Peptide Reveals a New Binding Mode for Hiv-1 Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, C.H.; Pantophlet, R.; Schiefner, A.; Cavacini, L.A.; Stanfield, R.L.; Burton, D.R.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-11

    F425-B4e8 (B4e8) is a monoclonal antibody isolated from a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individual that recognizes the V3 variable loop on the gp120 subunit of the viral envelope spike. B4e8 neutralizes a subset of HIV-1 primary isolates from subtypes B, C and D, which places this antibody among the very few human anti-V3 antibodies with notable cross-neutralizing activity. Here, the crystal structure of the B4e8 Fab fragment in complex with a 24-mer V3 peptide (RP142) at 2.8 A resolution is described. The complex structure reveals that the antibody recognizes a novel V3 loop conformation, featuring a five-residue alpha-turn around the conserved GPGRA apex of the beta-hairpin loop. In agreement with previous mutagenesis analyses, the Fab interacts primarily with V3 through side-chain contacts with just two residues, Ile(P309) and Arg(P315), while the remaining contacts are to the main chain. The structure helps explain how B4e8 can tolerate a certain degree of sequence variation within V3 and, hence, is able to neutralize an appreciable number of different HIV-1 isolates.

  15. Camelid Ig V genes reveal significant human homology not seen in therapeutic target genes, providing for a powerful therapeutic antibody platform

    PubMed Central

    Klarenbeek, Alex; Mazouari, Khalil El; Desmyter, Aline; Blanchetot, Christophe; Hultberg, Anna; de Jonge, Natalie; Roovers, Rob C; Cambillau, Christian; Spinelli, Sylvia; Del-Favero, Jurgen; Verrips, Theo; de Haard, Hans J; Achour, Ikbel

    2015-01-01

    Camelid immunoglobulin variable (IGV) regions were found homologous to their human counterparts; however, the germline V repertoires of camelid heavy and light chains are still incomplete and their therapeutic potential is only beginning to be appreciated. We therefore leveraged the publicly available HTG and WGS databases of Lama pacos and Camelus ferus to retrieve the germline repertoire of V genes using human IGV genes as reference. In addition, we amplified IGKV and IGLV genes to uncover the V germline repertoire of Lama glama and sequenced BAC clones covering part of the Lama pacos IGK and IGL loci. Our in silico analysis showed that camelid counterparts of all human IGKV and IGLV families and most IGHV families could be identified, based on canonical structure and sequence homology. Interestingly, this sequence homology seemed largely restricted to the Ig V genes and was far less apparent in other genes: 6 therapeutically relevant target genes differed significantly from their human orthologs. This contributed to efficient immunization of llamas with the human proteins CD70, MET, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, resulting in large panels of functional antibodies. The in silico predicted human-homologous canonical folds of camelid-derived antibodies were confirmed by X-ray crystallography solving the structure of 2 selected camelid anti-CD70 and anti-MET antibodies. These antibodies showed identical fold combinations as found in the corresponding human germline V families, yielding binding site structures closely similar to those occurring in human antibodies. In conclusion, our results indicate that active immunization of camelids can be a powerful therapeutic antibody platform. PMID:26018625

  16. Seroprevalence of antibodies against fHbp and NadA, two potential vaccine antigens for Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Jacobsson, Susanne; Mölling, Paula; Olcén, Per

    2009-09-25

    The IgG antibody levels directed against fHbp and NadA, two potential vaccine antigens for Neisseria meningitidis, were examined in order to investigate the extent of natural immunisation against these antigens in different age groups. As a comparison, the IgG antibody levels against Haemophilus influenzae type b were examined. In the two youngest age groups, below 10 years of age, relatively low levels of both anti-fHbp and anti-NadA were measured. A 15-fold higher geometric mean concentration of anti-fHbp was noted in the age group 20-29 years as compared to the age group 15-19 years. The peak concentration was found at 30-39 years, followed by decreased levels with age. Anti-NadA showed a certain increase up to 9 years followed by an even increase up to 40-49 years.

  17. Continuous separation of cells of high osteoblastic differentiation potential from mesenchymal stem cells on an antibody-immobilized column.

    PubMed

    Mahara, Atsushi; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2010-05-01

    Here, we report that two distinctive cell populations with osteoblastic differentiation ability were found in adherent cell populations from bone marrow. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were conventionally isolated by using adherent property of bone marrow cells onto a plastic culture dish. MSCs enriched on the basis of their adherent property were considered phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous. We developed a ligand-immobilized surface for separating subpopulation of adherent cells derived from bone marrow by the cell rolling process. We successfully isolate two cell populations with high differentiation ability for osteoblasts in adherent bone marrow cells by using the anti-CD34 antibody-immobilized column. The antibody was covalently conjugated with polyacrylic acid and introduced onto the inner surface of a silicone tube. When cell suspension of MSCs was injected into the antibody-immobilized column, different cell populations were isolated. After the cultivation of isolated cells in the osteoblastic differentiation medium for 1 week, few sub-populations were strongly induced to form osteoblastic cells. This study revealed that the ligand-immobilized surface can be used to continually separate cell populations under a labeling-free condition. PMID:20185169

  18. Generation of recombinant antibody fragments with toxin-neutralizing potential in loxoscelism.

    PubMed

    Karim-Silva, Sabrina; Moura, Juliana de; Noiray, Magali; Minozzo, Joao Carlos; Aubrey, Nicolas; Alvarenga, Larissa M; Billiald, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Loxosceles spider bites often lead to serious envenomings and no definite therapy has yet been established. In such a context, it is of interest to consider an antibody-based targeted therapy. We have previously prepared a murine monoclonal IgG (LiMab7) that binds to 32-35kDa components of Loxosceles intermedia venom and neutralizes the dermonecrotic activity of the venom. Here, we re-engineered LiMab7 into a recombinant diabody. The protein was produced in bacteria and then it was functionally characterized. It proved to be efficient at neutralizing sphingomyelinase and hemolytic activities of the crude venom despite the slightly altered binding kinetic constants and the limited stability of the dimeric configuration. This is the first report of a specific recombinant antibody for a next-generation of Loxosceles antivenoms. PMID:27288291

  19. [Canakinumab, a monoclonal antibody against IL-1β, with potential utility in different inflammatory processes].

    PubMed

    Carné, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Canakinumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody targeted at IL-1β which has shown to be effective in the control the symptoms of patients affected by CAPS and other autoinflammatory diseases. Its effect is rapid and sustained. In clinical trials conducted up until now, the most common adverse effects reported with the use of this drug have been different types of infections, migraines and vertigo.

  20. An Ultra-specific Avian Antibody to Phosphorylated Tau Protein Reveals a Unique Mechanism for Phosphoepitope Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Heather H.; Tu, Chao; Cao, Wei; Klein, Anne; Ramsey, Renee; Fennell, Brian J.; Lambert, Matthew; Ní Shúilleabháin, Deirdre; Autin, Bénédicte; Kouranova, Eugenia; Laxmanan, Sri; Braithwaite, Steven; Wu, Leeying; Ait-Zahra, Mostafa; Milici, Anthony J.; Dumin, Jo Ann; LaVallie, Edward R.; Arai, Maya; Corcoran, Christopher; Paulsen, Janet E.; Gill, Davinder; Cunningham, Orla; Bard, Joel; Mosyak, Lydia; Finlay, William J. J.

    2012-01-01

    Highly specific antibodies to phosphoepitopes are valuable tools to study phosphorylation in disease states, but their discovery is largely empirical, and the molecular mechanisms mediating phosphospecific binding are poorly understood. Here, we report the generation and characterization of extremely specific recombinant chicken antibodies to three phosphoepitopes on the Alzheimer disease-associated protein tau. Each antibody shows full specificity for a single phosphopeptide. The chimeric IgG pT231/pS235_1 exhibits a KD of 0.35 nm in 1:1 binding to its cognate phosphopeptide. This IgG is murine ortholog-cross-reactive, specifically recognizing the pathological form of tau in brain samples from Alzheimer patients and a mouse model of tauopathy. To better understand the underlying binding mechanisms allowing such remarkable specificity, we determined the structure of pT231/pS235_1 Fab in complex with its cognate phosphopeptide at 1.9 Å resolution. The Fab fragment exhibits novel complementarity determining region (CDR) structures with a “bowl-like” conformation in CDR-H2 that tightly and specifically interacts with the phospho-Thr-231 phosphate group, as well as a long, disulfide-constrained CDR-H3 that mediates peptide recognition. This binding mechanism differs distinctly from either peptide- or hapten-specific antibodies described to date. Surface plasmon resonance analyses showed that pT231/pS235_1 binds a truly compound epitope, as neither phosphorylated Ser-235 nor free peptide shows any measurable binding affinity. PMID:23148212

  1. Differential transgene expression patterns in Alzheimer mouse models revealed by novel human amyloid precursor protein-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Höfling, Corinna; Morawski, Markus; Zeitschel, Ulrike; Zanier, Elisa R; Moschke, Katrin; Serdaroglu, Alperen; Canneva, Fabio; von Hörsten, Stephan; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Forloni, Gianluigi; Jäger, Carsten; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Roßner, Steffen; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is histopathologically characterized by neurodegeneration, the formation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular Aβ deposits that derive from proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). As rodents do not normally develop Aβ pathology, various transgenic animal models of AD were designed to overexpress human APP with mutations favouring its amyloidogenic processing. However, these mouse models display tremendous differences in the spatial and temporal appearance of Aβ deposits, synaptic dysfunction, neurodegeneration and the manifestation of learning deficits which may be caused by age-related and brain region-specific differences in APP transgene levels. Consequentially, a comparative temporal and regional analysis of the pathological effects of Aβ in mouse brains is difficult complicating the validation of therapeutic AD treatment strategies in different mouse models. To date, no antibodies are available that properly discriminate endogenous rodent and transgenic human APP in brains of APP-transgenic animals. Here, we developed and characterized rat monoclonal antibodies by immunohistochemistry and Western blot that detect human but not murine APP in brains of three APP-transgenic mouse and one APP-transgenic rat model. We observed remarkable differences in expression levels and brain region-specific expression of human APP among the investigated transgenic mouse lines. This may explain the differences between APP-transgenic models mentioned above. Furthermore, we provide compelling evidence that our new antibodies specifically detect endogenous human APP in immunocytochemistry, FACS and immunoprecipitation. Hence, we propose these antibodies as standard tool for monitoring expression of endogenous or transfected APP in human cells and APP expression in transgenic animals. PMID:27470171

  2. Structural and Functional Characterization of Anti-A33 Antibodies Reveal a Potent Cross-Species Orthopoxviruses Neutralizer

    PubMed Central

    Matho, Michael H.; Schlossman, Andrew; Meng, Xiangzhi; Benhnia, Mohammed Rafii-El-Idrissi; Kaever, Thomas; Buller, Mark; Doronin, Konstantin; Parker, Scott; Peters, Bjoern; Crotty, Shane; Xiang, Yan; Zajonc, Dirk M.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus A33 is an extracellular enveloped virus (EEV)-specific type II membrane glycoprotein that is essential for efficient EEV formation and long-range viral spread within the host. A33 is a target for neutralizing antibody responses against EEV. In this study, we produced seven murine anti-A33 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) by immunizing mice with live VACV, followed by boosting with the soluble A33 homodimeric ectodomain. Five A33 specific MAbs were capable of neutralizing EEV in the presence of complement. All MAbs bind to conformational epitopes on A33 but not to linear peptides. To identify the epitopes, we have adetermined the crystal structures of three representative neutralizing MAbs in complex with A33. We have further determined the binding kinetics for each of the three antibodies to wild-type A33, as well as to engineered A33 that contained single alanine substitutions within the epitopes of the three crystallized antibodies. While the Fab of both MAbs A2C7 and A20G2 binds to a single A33 subunit, the Fab from MAb A27D7 binds to both A33 subunits simultaneously. A27D7 binding is resistant to single alanine substitutions within the A33 epitope. A27D7 also demonstrated high-affinity binding with recombinant A33 protein that mimics other orthopoxvirus strains in the A27D7 epitope, such as ectromelia, monkeypox, and cowpox virus, suggesting that A27D7 is a potent cross-neutralizer. Finally, we confirmed that A27D7 protects mice against a lethal challenge with ectromelia virus. PMID:26325270

  3. Intracellular interactome of secreted antibody Fab fragment in Pichia pastoris reveals its routes of secretion and degradation.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Martin; Maurer, Michael; Stadlmann, Johannes; Grass, Josephine; Delic, Marizela; Altmann, Friedrich; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2012-03-01

    Protein translation, translocation, folding, processing, and secretion in eukaryotic cells are complex and not always straightforward processes, e.g., different routes of secretion and degradation exist. Formation of malfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can be one of the major bottlenecks for recombinant protein production. In this regard, an in-depth analysis of the interactions of a secreted protein during its pathway through the cell may be beneficial, as realized in this study for the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The antibody fragment Fab3H6 used here is the anti-idiotype to the HIV neutralizing antibody 2F5 and is known to be intracellularly degraded in significant amounts when expressed in P. pastoris. The interactome of Fab3H6 was analyzed by using a pull-down mass spectrometry approach, and 23 proteins were found to bind specifically to the antibody fragment. Those allowed concluding that Fab3H6 is post-translationally translocated into the ER and degraded via the proteasome as well as the vacuole. In line with this, the expression of Fab3H6 increased the proteasomal activities by over 20%. Partial inhibition of the proteasome resulted in a significant increase of extracellular Fab3H6. Thus, it seems that ER quality control overshoots its requirements for the recombinant protein expressed and that more than just terminally malfolded protein is degraded by ER-associated degradation. This work will further facilitate our understanding how recombinant proteins behave in the secretory pathway. PMID:22350260

  4. Qualification and application of a surface plasmon resonance-based assay for monitoring potential HAHA responses induced after passive administration of a humanized anti Lewis-Y antibody.

    PubMed

    Szolar, O H J; Stranner, S; Zinoecker, I; Mudde, G C; Himmler, G; Waxenecker, G; Nechansky, A

    2006-06-16

    A sensitive, surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based assay monitoring potential human-anti-human antibody (HAHA) reactions against the monoclonal antibody (mAb) IGN311 is presented. The latter is a fully humanized Lewis-Y carbohydrate specific mAb that is currently tested in a passive immune therapy approach in a clinical phase I trial. For the SPR experiments a BIACORE 3000 analyzer was used. The ligand IGN311 was covalently coupled to the carboxy-methylated dextran matrix of a CM5 research grade chip (BIACORE). In the course of a fully nested experimental design, a four parameter logistic equation was identified as appropriate calibration model ranging from 0.3 microg/mL (lower limit of quantitation, LLOQ) to 200 microg/mL (upper limit of quantitation, ULOQ) using an anti-idiotypic mAb ('HAHA mimic') as calibrator. The bias ranged from -2.4% to 5.5% and the intermediate precision expressed as 95% CI revealed values from 5.6% to 8.3%. Specificity was evaluated using six human serum matrices from healthy donors spiked with calibrator at the limit of quantitation (LOQ) with >80% of values being recovered with less than 25% relative error. The qualified assay was applied to monitor potentially induced HAHA reactivity in 11 patients from a clinical phase I trial with passively administered IGN311. Of the 11 patients, one high HAHA responder and several low responders were identified. Protein-G depletion experiments with human serum samples revealed that the observed response is predominantly caused by IgG binding to the ligand. The characteristics of these HAHA responses were all of the so-called 'Type I' which is defined by a peak response around day 15 that decreases from this point steadily suggesting that some kind of tolerance is established. Therefore, this type of HAHA response is regarded as non critical for the patient's safety.

  5. Potentiation of thrombin generation in hemophilia A plasma by coagulation factor VIII and characterization of antibody-specific inhibition.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Bhavya S; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Doering, Christopher B; Meeks, Shannon L

    2012-01-01

    Development of inhibitory antibodies to coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is the primary obstacle to the treatment of hemophilia A in the developed world. This adverse reaction occurs in 20-30% of persons with severe hemophilia A treated with fVIII-replacement products and is characterized by the development of a humoral and neutralizing immune response to fVIII. Patients with inhibitory anti-fVIII antibodies are treated with bypassing agents including recombinant factor VIIa (rfVIIa). However, some patients display poor hemostatic response to bypass therapy and improved treatment options are needed. Recently, we demonstrated that fVIII inhibitors display widely variable kinetics of inhibition that correlate with their respective target epitopes. Thus, it was hypothesized that for antibodies that display slow rates of inhibition, supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII would result in improved thrombin generation and be predictive of clinical responses to this novel treatment regimen. In order to test this hypothesis, 10 murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with non-overlapping epitopes spanning fVIII, differential inhibition titers, and inhibition kinetics were studied using a thrombin generation assay. Of the 3 MAbs with high inhibitory titers, only the one with fast and complete (classically defined as "type I") kinetics displayed significant inhibition of thrombin generation with no improvement upon supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII. The other two MAbs that displayed incomplete (classically defined as "type II") inhibition did not suppress the potentiation of thrombin generation by fVIII. All antibodies that did not completely inhibit fVIII activity demonstrated potentiation of thrombin generation by the addition of fVIII as compared to rfVIIa alone. In conclusion, fVIII alone or in combination with rfVIIa corrects the thrombin generation defect produced by the majority of anti-fVIII MAbs better than single agent rfVIIa. Therefore, combined fVIII/rfVIIa therapy

  6. LGR5 expressing cells of hair follicle as potential targets for antibody mediated anti-cancer laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris V.

    2013-02-01

    Near infrared laser immunotherapy becomes now a new promising research field to cure the patients with cancers. One of the critical limitation in medical application of this treatment is availability of the specific markers for delivery of laser-sensitive nanoparticles. When coupled to antibodies to the cancer stem cells markers these nanoparticles may be delivered to the cancer tissue and mediate the laser induced thermolysis of the cancer stem cells that initiate and drive growth of cancer. This paper addresses the Lgr5 cell surface marker mediating the Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction as a potential target for anti-cancer laser immunotherapy of skin cancers.

  7. Computational prediction of antibody binding sites on tetracycline antibiotics: electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies on molecular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Pankaj; Sukumar, N; Murray, Jane S; Giese, Rossman F; Wood, Troy D

    2009-01-29

    Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used for the analysis of tetracycline, chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline, and their transformed compounds in environmental water samples. The antibodies employed in ELISA showed high relative affinity for tetracycline, epitetracycline, chlortetracycline, and epichlortetracycline as compared to anhydrotetracycline, epianhydrotetracycline, and anhydrochlortetracycline. The specificity and crossreactivity of these antibodies are discussed in relation to the electrostatic potentials and average local ionization energies computed on the molecular surfaces of tetracycline antibiotics and their transformed compounds with an objective of identifying common features as well as differences that may be related to the experimentally observed variation in cross-reactivity values. The computations were performed at both the HF/STO-3G and HF/6-31+G* levels using the Gaussian 98 program. The results in this study are based upon molecular electrostatic potentials and local ionization energies computed on isodensity molecular surfaces. The surface electrostatic potentials are characterized in terms of a group of statistically defined quantities, which include the average deviation, the positive, negative, and total variances, positive and negative surface extrema, and a parameter indicating the degree of electrostatic balance.

  8. Antibody Binding Studies Reveal Conformational Flexibility of the Bacillus cereus Non-Hemolytic Enterotoxin (Nhe) A-Component

    PubMed Central

    Märtlbauer, E.

    2016-01-01

    The non-hemolytic enterotoxin complex (Nhe) is supposed to be the main virulence factor of B. cereus causing a diarrheal outcome of food poisoning. This tripartite toxin consists of the single components NheA, -B and -C all of them being necessary for maximum toxicity. In the past, research activities aiming to elucidate the mode-of-action of Nhe were mostly focused on the B- and C-component. In this study the generation of novel monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and their thorough characterization enabled the determination of key features for NheA. By the means of immunoaffinity chromatography it could be shown that NheA does not interact with -B and -C in solution. Additionally, the establishment of a highly sensitive sandwich-EIA now enables the detection of NheA in B. cereus supernatants down to 20 pg ml-1.Peptide-based epitope mapping in combination with partially deleted recombinant NheA fragments allowed the allocation of the binding regions for the three mAbs under study. Furthermore, by different EIA set-ups the conformational flexibility of NheA could be shown. For two of the antibodies under study different mechanisms of NheA neutralization were proven. Due to prevention of complete pore formation by one of the antibodies, NheA could be detected in an intermediate stage of the tripartite complex on the cell surface. Taken together, the results obtained in the present study allow a refinement of the mode-of-action for the Nhe toxin-complex. PMID:27768742

  9. Multiple Active States and Oligomerization of CCR5 Revealed by Functional Properties of Monoclonal AntibodiesV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Blanpain, Cédric; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Cihak, Josef; Wittamer, Valérie; Le Poul, Emmanuel; Issafras, Hassan; Stangassinger, Manfred; Vassart, Gilbert; Marullo, Stefano; Schloō̈ndorff, Detlef; Parmentier, Marc; Mack, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is the principal coreceptor for macrophage-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). We have generated a set of anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibodies and characterized them in terms of epitope recognition, competition with chemokine binding, receptor activation and trafficking, and coreceptor activity. MC-4, MC-5, and MC-7 mapped to the amino-terminal domain, MC-1 to the second extracellular loop, and MC-6 to a conformational epitope covering multiple extracellular domains. MC-1 and MC-6 inhibited regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), macrophage inflammatory polypeptide-1β, and Env binding, whereas MC-5 inhibited macrophage inflammatory polypeptide-1β and Env but not RANTES binding. MC-6 induced signaling in different functional assays, suggesting that this monoclonal antibody stabilizes an active conformation of CCR5. Flow cytometry and real-time confocal microscopy showed that MC-1 promoted strong CCR5 endocytosis. MC-1 but not its monovalent isoforms induced an increase in the transfer of energy between CCR5 molecules. Also, its monovalent isoforms bound efficiently, but did not internalize the receptor. In contrast, MC-4 did not prevent RANTES binding or subsequent signaling, but inhibited its ability to promote CCR5 internalization. These results suggest the existence of multiple active conformations of CCR5 and indicate that CCR5 oligomers are involved in an internalization process that is distinct from that induced by the receptor's agonists. PMID:11854425

  10. Monoclonal antibodies that coimmunoprecipitate the 1,4-dihydropyridine and phenylalkylamine receptors and reveal the Ca/sup 2 +/ channel structure

    SciTech Connect

    Vandaele, S.; Fosset, M.; Galizzi, J.P.; Lazdunski, M.

    1987-01-13

    Monoclonal hybridoma cell lines secreting antibodies against the (+)-PN 200-110 and the (-)-demethoxyverapamil binding components of the voltage-dependent calcium channel from rabbit transverse-tubule membranes have been isolated. The specificity of these monoclonal antibodies was established by their ability to coimmunoprecipitate (+)-(/sup 3/H)PN 200-110 and (-)-(/sup 3/H)demethoxyverapamil receptors. Monoclonal antibodies described in this work cross-reacted with rat, mouse, chicken, and frog skeletal muscle Ca/sup 2 +/ channels but not with crayfish muscle Ca/sup 2 +/ channels. Cross-reactivity was also detected with membranes prepared from rabbit heart, brain, and intestinal smooth muscle. These antibodies were used in immunoprecipitation experiments with /sup 125/I-labeled detergent (3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) and digitonin) solubilized membranes. They revealed a single immunoprecipitating component of molecular weight (M/sub r/) 170,000 in nonreducing conditions. After disulfide bridge reduction the CHAPS-solubilized (+)-PN 200-110-(-)-demethoxyverapamil binding component gave rise to a large peptide of M/sub r/ 140,000 and to smaller polypeptides of M/sub r/ 30,000 and 26,000 whereas the digitonin-solubilized receptor appeared with subunits at M/sub r/ 170,000, 140,000, 30,000, and 26,000. All these results taken together are interpreted as showing that both the 1,4-dihydropyridine and the phenylalkylamine receptors are part of a single polypeptide chain of M/sub r/ 170,000.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to a 100-kd protein reveal abundant A beta-negative plaques throughout gray matter of Alzheimer's disease brains.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, M. L.; Lee, V. M.; Forman, M.; Chiu, T. S.; Trojanowski, J. Q.

    1997-01-01

    Here we describe the initial characterization of a 100-kd protein recognized by four new monoclonal antibodies that reveal abundant and unique plaque-like lesions throughout gray matter of Alzheimer's disease brains. This 100-kd protein and these new plaque-like lesions were identified by four monoclonal antibodies raised to immunogens extracted from Alzheimer's disease neurofibrillary abnormalities. However, these antibodies did not recognize hyperphosphorylated tau in Western blots or neurofibrillary lesions by immunohistochemistry. As all of these antibodies displayed similar properties, one, AMY117, was used to characterize the new plaque-like lesions in detail. These studies demonstrated that AMY117-positive plaques were not visualized by amyloid stains and never co-localized with A beta deposits, although AMY117-positive and A beta-positive lesions frequently occurred in the same cortical and subcortical gray matter regions. Abundant AMY117-positive plaques were found in the brains of all 32 sporadic Alzheimer's disease patients and all 6 elderly Down's syndrome subjects. Although AMY117-positive plaques also were seen in the brains of nondemented patients with numerous A beta deposits. AMY117-positive plaques were rare or absent in the brains of other elderly controls and patients with other neurodegenerative or neuropsychiatric disorders. We conclude that the AMY117-positive plaques described here for the first time are major lesions of the Alzheimer's disease brain. Thus, it will be important to elucidate the role played by the 100-kd protein and the AMY117 plaques in the etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9212733

  12. Monoclonal antibodies raised to paraffin wax embedded archival tissue; feasibility study of their potential to detect novel antigenic markers.

    PubMed

    Moran, E; Larkin, A; Cleary, I; Barnes, C; Kennedy, S M; Kelehan, P; Clynes, M

    1998-10-01

    A study to determine the feasibility of using archival paraffin wax embedded tissue to generate monoclonal antibodies is described. Specifically, monoclonal antibodies were raised to paraffin wax embedded normal human kidney tissue to test the possibility of producing antibodies to such tissue samples prior to attempting generation of antibodies to valuable archival tissue. Multiple sections (10 x 5 microm) were pooled and dewaxed as for immunohistochemical procedures and combined with Freund's adjuvant for immunization of BALB/c mice in vivo. Immunized spleen cells were fused with SP2 myeloma cells and subsequent clones screened on paraffin wax embedded normal human kidney sections, a range of cell lines and normal mouse tissue. Supernatants from 11 wells (from a total of 90 wells screened) showed different staining patterns on sections of paraffin wax embedded kidney. One clone, 1/11C, (isotype IgG1) which exhibited strong staining on all kidney tubules by immunohistochemical studies (glomeruli interstitium and vessels were unstained) and identified a band at 52 kDa on immunoblots of dewaxed kidney tissue (as used for immunogen) was chosen for further characterization. Immunoblotting of five mammalian cell lines showed differential expression of this 52 kDa band (distinct expression on 3/5, weak expression on 2/5 cell lines) whereas, all cell lines displayed a band at 44 kDa and a third band at 70 kDa was observed on 2/5 cell lines. In mouse tissue extracts, the 52 kDa band was identified in kidney tissue only (not in the lung, liver or spleen) with the 44 kDa and 70 kDa bands weakly expressed in all tissues. This preliminary investigation of a novel approach to identifying possible new antigenic markers or producing monoclonal antibodies which react better to known antigens on sections of paraffin wax embedded tissue showed that this method is feasible. The need to have a comprehensive screening system in place and the ability to identify potentially useful

  13. Antibody activation and immune reactions: potential linkage to pain and neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, L S

    2000-12-01

    Immune responses are an input source of modulation/modification for the peripheral nervous system that can result in pain and/or peripheral neuropathy. The resulting pain can be a significant debilitating component of many diseases as well as an untoward side effect of treatment. This paper briefly describes three sources of peripheral neuropathy generated in the presence of, or associated with, an immune response. Two are classified as autoimmune diseases. The body, in an attempt to rid itself of a tumor or an invading bacterial infection or virus, attacks its nervous system due to molecular mimicry; this results in, respectively, paraneoplastic neuropathy or inflammatory polyneuropathy. The third neuropathic pain syndrome is iatrogenic and occurs after administration of an antibody to GD2 ganglioside as an immunotherapy for neuroblastoma. This paper will attempt to point out some common elements in their neuropathologies and mechanisms.

  14. Potentiated antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the therapy of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kozlovskaya, L V; Mukhin, N A; Rameev, V V; Sarkisova, I A; Epstein, O I

    2003-01-01

    We studied the efficiency and safety of a new homeopathic preparation Artrofoon containing affinely purified antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the therapy of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Artrofoon produced a positive antiinflammatory effect on the course of rheumatoid arthritis. This preparation reduced the severity of arthralgia (indexes of Li and Ritchie) and morning stiffness and decreased the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and contents of rheumatoid factor and C-reactive protein. One-month therapy improved the state of patients. Artrofoon was well tolerable. The preparation did not cause the ulcerogenic and nephrotoxic effects. Artrofoon holds much promise for combination therapy of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (including severe articular-and-visceral forms) and complications after treatment with nonsteroid antiinflammatory preparations.

  15. Piezometric biosensors for anti-apoptotic protein survivin based on buried positive-potential barrier and immobilized monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Stobiecka, Magdalena; Chalupa, Agata; Dworakowska, Beata

    2016-10-15

    The anti-apoptotic protein survivin (Sur) plays an important role in the regulation of cell division and inducing the chemotherapeutic drug resistance. The Sur protein and its mRNA have recently been studied as cancer biomarkers and potential targets for cancer therapy. In this work, we have focused on the design of immunosensors for the detection of Sur based on buried positive-potential barrier layer structure and anti-survivin antibody. The modification of solid AuQC piezoelectrodes was monitored by recording the resonance frequency shift and electrochemical measurements during each step of the sensor preparation. Our results indicate that the immunosensor with covalently bound monoclonal anti-survivin antibody can detect Sur with the limit of detection, LOD=1.7nM (S/N=3σ). The immunosensor applicability for the analysis of real samples was assessed by testing samples of cell lysate solutions obtained from human astrocytoma (glioblastoma) U-87MG cell line, with the experiments performed using the standard addition method. The good linearity of the calibration curves for PBS and lysate solutions at low Sur concentrations confirm the high specificity of the proposed biosensor and good discrimination against nonspecific interactions with lysate components. The calculations indicate that there is still room to increase the Sur capture capacity for Sur while miniaturizing the sensor. The important advantage of the sensor is that it can be reused by a simple regeneration procedure.

  16. Targeting tumor-associated macrophages with anti-CSF-1R antibody reveals a strategy for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ries, Carola H; Cannarile, Michael A; Hoves, Sabine; Benz, Jörg; Wartha, Katharina; Runza, Valeria; Rey-Giraud, Flora; Pradel, Leon P; Feuerhake, Friedrich; Klaman, Irina; Jones, Tobin; Jucknischke, Ute; Scheiblich, Stefan; Kaluza, Klaus; Gorr, Ingo H; Walz, Antje; Abiraj, Keelara; Cassier, Philippe A; Sica, Antonio; Gomez-Roca, Carlos; de Visser, Karin E; Italiano, Antoine; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Levitsky, Hyam; Blay, Jean-Yves; Rüttinger, Dominik

    2014-06-16

    Macrophage infiltration has been identified as an independent poor prognostic factor in several cancer types. The major survival factor for these macrophages is macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1). We generated a monoclonal antibody (RG7155) that inhibits CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) activation. In vitro RG7155 treatment results in cell death of CSF-1-differentiated macrophages. In animal models, CSF-1R inhibition strongly reduces F4/80(+) tumor-associated macrophages accompanied by an increase of the CD8(+)/CD4(+) T cell ratio. Administration of RG7155 to patients led to striking reductions of CSF-1R(+)CD163(+) macrophages in tumor tissues, which translated into clinical objective responses in diffuse-type giant cell tumor (Dt-GCT) patients.

  17. Contribution of Antibody Hydrodynamic Size to Vitreal Clearance Revealed through Rabbit Studies Using a Species-Matched Fab.

    PubMed

    Shatz, Whitney; Hass, Philip E; Mathieu, Mary; Kim, Hok Seon; Leach, Kim; Zhou, Michelle; Crawford, Yongping; Shen, Amy; Wang, Kathryn; Chang, Debby P; Maia, Mauricio; Crowell, Susan R; Dickmann, Leslie; Scheer, Justin M; Kelley, Robert F

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a tool Fab fragment of a rabbit monoclonal antibody that is useful for early evaluation in rabbit models of technologies for long acting delivery (LAD) of proteins to the eye. Using this Fab we show that vitreal clearance can be slowed through increased hydrodynamic size. Fab (G10rabFab) and Fab' (G10rabFab') fragments of a rabbit monoclonal antibody (G10rabIgG) were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and purified using antigen-based affinity chromatography. G10rabFab retains antigen-binding upon thermal stress (37 °C) for 8 weeks in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and can be detected in rabbit tissues using an antigen-based ELISA. Hydrodynamic radius, measured using quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS), was increased through site-specific modification of the G10rabFab' free cysteine with linear methoxy-polyethylene glycol(PEG)-maleimide of 20000 or 40000 molecular weight. Pharmacokinetic studies upon intravitreal dosing in New Zealand white rabbits were conducted on the G10rabFab and PEGylated G10rabFab'. Results of single and multidose pharmacokinetic experiments yield reproducible results and a vitreal half-life for G10rabFab of 3.2 days. Clearance from the eye is slowed through increased hydrodynamic size, with vitreal half-life showing a linear dependence on hydrodynamic radius (RH). A linear dependence of vitreal half-life on RH suggests that molecule diffusivity makes an important contribution to vitreal clearance. A method for prediction of vitreal half-life from RH measurements is proposed.

  18. Comprehensive interrogation of a minimalist synthetic CDR-H3 library and its ability to generate antibodies with therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Ciara M; Lambert, Matthew A; Glanville, Jacob; Wade, Jason M; Fennell, Brian J; Krebs, Mark R; Armellino, Douglas; Yang, Sharon; Liu, Xuemei; O'Sullivan, Cliona M; Autin, Benedicte; Oficjalska, Katarzyna; Bloom, Laird; Paulsen, Janet; Gill, Davinder; Damelin, Marc; Cunningham, Orla; Finlay, William J J

    2013-05-27

    We have generated large libraries of single-chain Fv antibody fragments (>10(10) transformants) containing unbiased amino acid diversity that is restricted to the central combining site of the stable, well-expressed DP47 and DPK22 germline V-genes. Library WySH2A was constructed to examine the potential for synthetic complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 diversity to act as the lone source of binding specificity. Library WySH2B was constructed to assess the necessity for diversification in both the H3 and L3. Both libraries provided diverse, specific antibodies, yielding a total of 243 unique hits against 7 different targets, but WySH2B produced fewer hits than WySH2A when selected in parallel. WySH2A also consistently produced hits of similar quality to WySH2B, demonstrating that the diversification of the CDR-L3 reduces library fitness. Despite the absence of deliberate bias in the library design, CDR length was strongly associated with the number of hits produced, leading to a functional loop length distribution profile that mimics the biases observed in the natural repertoire. A similar trend was also observed for the CDR-L3. After target selections, several key amino acids were enriched in the CDR-H3 (e.g., small and aromatic residues) while others were reduced (e.g., strongly charged residues) in a manner that was specific to position, preferentially occurred in CDR-H3 stem positions, and tended towards residues associated with loop stabilization. As proof of principle for the WySH2 libraries to produce viable lead candidate antibodies, 114 unique hits were produced against Delta-like ligand 4 (DLL4). Leads exhibited nanomolar binding affinities, highly specific staining of DLL4+ cells, and biochemical neutralization of DLL4-NOTCH1 interaction.

  19. Rapid Screening for Potential Epitopes Reactive with a Polycolonal Antibody by Solution-Phase H/D Exchange Monitored by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Noble, Kyle A.; Mao, Yuan; Young, Nicolas L.; Sathe, Shridhar K.; Roux, Kenneth H.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2013-07-01

    The potential epitopes of a recombinant food allergen protein, cashew Ana o 2, reactive to polyclonal antibodies, were mapped by solution-phase amide backbone H/D exchange (HDX) coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Ana o 2 polyclonal antibodies were purified in the serum from a goat immunized with cashew nut extract. Antibodies were incubated with recombinant Ana o 2 (rAna o 2) to form antigen:polyclonal antibody (Ag:pAb) complexes. Complexed and uncomplexed (free) rAna o 2 were then subjected to HDX-MS analysis. Four regions protected from H/D exchange upon pAb binding are identified as potential epitopes and mapped onto a homologous model.

  20. The potential role of anti-PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies in the management of hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Lepor, Norman E; Contreras, Laurn; Desai, Chirag; Kereiakes, Dean J

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is the leading cause of death and disability in developed nations, and it is rising rapidly in other parts of the developing world. Levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) are directly correlated with atherogenic risk, and statin-based therapy is the most common management for these patients. However, many patients exhibit resistance to and/or adverse effects from statin therapy, and there is a need for adjunctive therapies or statin alternatives for these patients. The recently discovered human protein proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) plays an important role in LDL-C metabolism. PCSK9 promotes LDL receptor (LDL-R) degradation with a consequent reduction in LDL-R density and an increase in LDL-C levels. Consequently, PCSK9 inhibition to reduce LDL-C levels has become a primary focus for drug development. Numerous clinical trials focusing on monoclonal antibodies against PCSK9 have demonstrated efficacy equal to or greater than statin therapy for lowering LDL-C levels. Long-term trials are underway to assess safety, tolerability, and ability to reduce ASCVD. PMID:25662924

  1. In vitro characterization of 211 At-labeled antibody A33--a potential therapeutic agent against metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Ylva; Orlova, Anna; Sjöström, Anna; Jensen, Holger J; Lundqvist, Hans; Sundin, Anders; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2005-10-01

    The humanized antibody A33 binds to the A33 antigen, expressed in 95% of primary and metastatic colorectal carcinomas. The restricted pattern of expression in normal tissue makes this antigen a possible target for radioimmunotherapy of colorectal micrometastases. In this study, the A33 antibody was labeled with the therapeutic nuclide (211)At using N-succinimidyl para-(tri-methylstannyl)benzoate (SPMB). The in vitro characteristics of the (211)At-benzoate-A33 conjugate ((211)At-A33) were investigated and found to be similar to those of (125)I-benzoate-A33 ((125)I-A33) in different assays. Both conjugates bound with high affinity to SW1222 cells (K(d) = 1.7 +/- 0.2 nM, and 1.8 +/- 0.1 nM for (211)At-A33 and (125)I-A33, respectively), and both showed good intracellular retention (70% of the radioactivity was still cell associated after 20 hours). The cytotoxic effect of (211)At-A33 was also confirmed. After incubation with (211)At-A33, SW1222 cells had a survival of approximately 0.3% when exposed to some 150 decays per cell (DPC). The cytotoxic effect was found to be dose-dependent, as cells exposed to only 56 DPC had a survival of approximately 5%. The (211)At-A33 conjugate shows promise as a potential radioimmunotherapy agent for treatment of micrometastases originating from colorectal carcinoma. PMID:16248767

  2. Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody Directed against Mytilus spp Larvae Reveals an Antigen Involved in Shell Biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Iglesias, Juan; Pérez-Estévez, Daniel; Lorenzo-Abalde, Silvia; Sánchez-Correa, Beatriz; Quiroga, María Isabel; Fuentes, José M; González-Fernández, África

    2016-01-01

    The M22.8 monoclonal antibody (mAb) developed against an antigen expressed at the mussel larval and postlarval stages of Mytilus galloprovincialis was studied on adult samples. Antigenic characterization by Western blot showed that the antigen MSP22.8 has a restricted distribution that includes mantle edge tissue, extrapallial fluid, extrapallial fluid hemocytes, and the shell organic matrix of adult samples. Other tissues such as central mantle, gonadal tissue, digestive gland, labial palps, foot, and byssal retractor muscle did not express the antigen. Immunohistochemistry assays identified MSP22.8 in cells located in the outer fold epithelium of the mantle edge up to the pallial line. Flow cytometry analysis showed that hemocytes from the extrapallial fluid also contain the antigen intracellularly. Furthermore, hemocytes from hemolymph have the ability to internalize the antigen when exposed to a cell-free extrapallial fluid solution. Our findings indicate that hemocytes could play an important role in the biomineralization process and, as a consequence, they have been included in a model of shell formation. This is the first report concerning a protein secreted by the mantle edge into the extrapallial space and how it becomes part of the shell matrix framework in M. galloprovincialis mussels.

  3. Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody Directed against Mytilus spp Larvae Reveals an Antigen Involved in Shell Biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Iglesias, Juan; Pérez-Estévez, Daniel; Lorenzo-Abalde, Silvia; Sánchez-Correa, Beatriz; Quiroga, María Isabel; Fuentes, José M; González-Fernández, África

    2016-01-01

    The M22.8 monoclonal antibody (mAb) developed against an antigen expressed at the mussel larval and postlarval stages of Mytilus galloprovincialis was studied on adult samples. Antigenic characterization by Western blot showed that the antigen MSP22.8 has a restricted distribution that includes mantle edge tissue, extrapallial fluid, extrapallial fluid hemocytes, and the shell organic matrix of adult samples. Other tissues such as central mantle, gonadal tissue, digestive gland, labial palps, foot, and byssal retractor muscle did not express the antigen. Immunohistochemistry assays identified MSP22.8 in cells located in the outer fold epithelium of the mantle edge up to the pallial line. Flow cytometry analysis showed that hemocytes from the extrapallial fluid also contain the antigen intracellularly. Furthermore, hemocytes from hemolymph have the ability to internalize the antigen when exposed to a cell-free extrapallial fluid solution. Our findings indicate that hemocytes could play an important role in the biomineralization process and, as a consequence, they have been included in a model of shell formation. This is the first report concerning a protein secreted by the mantle edge into the extrapallial space and how it becomes part of the shell matrix framework in M. galloprovincialis mussels. PMID:27008638

  4. Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody Directed against Mytilus spp Larvae Reveals an Antigen Involved in Shell Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Iglesias, Juan; Pérez-Estévez, Daniel; Lorenzo-Abalde, Silvia; Sánchez-Correa, Beatriz; Quiroga, María Isabel; Fuentes, José M.; González-Fernández, África

    2016-01-01

    The M22.8 monoclonal antibody (mAb) developed against an antigen expressed at the mussel larval and postlarval stages of Mytilus galloprovincialis was studied on adult samples. Antigenic characterization by Western blot showed that the antigen MSP22.8 has a restricted distribution that includes mantle edge tissue, extrapallial fluid, extrapallial fluid hemocytes, and the shell organic matrix of adult samples. Other tissues such as central mantle, gonadal tissue, digestive gland, labial palps, foot, and byssal retractor muscle did not express the antigen. Immunohistochemistry assays identified MSP22.8 in cells located in the outer fold epithelium of the mantle edge up to the pallial line. Flow cytometry analysis showed that hemocytes from the extrapallial fluid also contain the antigen intracellularly. Furthermore, hemocytes from hemolymph have the ability to internalize the antigen when exposed to a cell-free extrapallial fluid solution. Our findings indicate that hemocytes could play an important role in the biomineralization process and, as a consequence, they have been included in a model of shell formation. This is the first report concerning a protein secreted by the mantle edge into the extrapallial space and how it becomes part of the shell matrix framework in M. galloprovincialis mussels. PMID:27008638

  5. Genetic Diversity in Cellular Slime Molds: Allozyme Electrophoresis and a Monoclonal Antibody Reveal Cryptic Species among Dictyostelium discoideum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Briscoe, David A.; Gooley, Andrew A.; Bernstein, R. L.; McKay, George M.; Williams, Keith L.

    1987-01-01

    Cellular slime molds have been classified on the basis of a small number of descriptive criteria such as fruiting body color and morphology, and, in heterothallic species, by assignment to compatible mating groups. However, some isolates which are morphologically classified as conspecific do not fall into a simple mating-type classification; for example some are asexual or homothallic. An increasing interest in inter-strain genetic variation in studies of development and simple behavior has led us to reassess genetic relationships among a number of frequently used isolates. Allozyme electrophoresis of 16 soluble enzymes and use of a monoclonal antibody show that there is relatively little genetic diversity among sexually competent Dictyostelium discoideum isolates, despite considerable variation in geographic origin and time since isolation in the laboratory. In contrast a pair of asexual strains and each of two homothallic strains are genetically quite distinct and differ sufficiently from each other, and from sexually competent isolates, to warrant their recognition as separate species. There are probably four biological species represented in the supposedly D. discoideum isolates studied. This heterogeneity extends to other cellular slime mold species. Each of three isolates of Dictyostelium purpureum is genetically distinct from the others. Limited analysis of other cellular slime molds indicates that the generic distinction of Dictyostelium and Polysphondylium must be questioned. This study emphasizes that caution should be applied in classifying simple organisms on morphological criteria. PMID:17246401

  6. Monoclonal antibody-targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG encapsulating doxorubicin as a potential theranostic agent.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Neus; Al-Ahmady, Zahraa S; Beziere, Nicolas S; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2015-03-30

    Indocyanine green (ICG) is an FDA-approved, strongly photo-absorbent/fluorescent probe that has been incorporated into a clinically-relevant PEGylated liposome as a flexible optoacoustic contrast agent platform. This study describes the engineering of targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG using the anti-MUC-1 "humanized" monoclonal antibody (MoAb) hCTM01 as a tumour-specific theranostic system. We aimed to visualise non-invasively the tumour accumulation of these MoAb-targeted liposomes over time in tumour-bearing mice using multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT). Preferential accumulation of targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG was studied after intravenous administration in comparison to non-targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG using both fast growing (4T1) and slow growing (HT-29) MUC-1 positive tumour models. Monitoring liposomal ICG in the tumour showed that both targeted and non-targeted liposome-ICG formulations preferentially accumulated into the tumour models studied. Rapid accumulation was observed for targeted liposomes at early time points mainly in the periphery of the tumour volume suggesting binding to available MUC-1 receptors. In contrast, non-targeted PEGylated liposomes showed accumulation at the centre of the tumour at later time points. In an attempt to take this a step further, we successfully encapsulated the anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX) into both targeted and non-targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG. The engineering of DOX-loaded targeted ICG liposome systems present a novel platform for combined tumour-specific therapy and diagnosis. This can open new possibilities in the design of advanced image-guided cancer therapeutics.

  7. Monoclonal antibody-targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG encapsulating doxorubicin as a potential theranostic agent.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Neus; Al-Ahmady, Zahraa S; Beziere, Nicolas S; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2015-03-30

    Indocyanine green (ICG) is an FDA-approved, strongly photo-absorbent/fluorescent probe that has been incorporated into a clinically-relevant PEGylated liposome as a flexible optoacoustic contrast agent platform. This study describes the engineering of targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG using the anti-MUC-1 "humanized" monoclonal antibody (MoAb) hCTM01 as a tumour-specific theranostic system. We aimed to visualise non-invasively the tumour accumulation of these MoAb-targeted liposomes over time in tumour-bearing mice using multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT). Preferential accumulation of targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG was studied after intravenous administration in comparison to non-targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG using both fast growing (4T1) and slow growing (HT-29) MUC-1 positive tumour models. Monitoring liposomal ICG in the tumour showed that both targeted and non-targeted liposome-ICG formulations preferentially accumulated into the tumour models studied. Rapid accumulation was observed for targeted liposomes at early time points mainly in the periphery of the tumour volume suggesting binding to available MUC-1 receptors. In contrast, non-targeted PEGylated liposomes showed accumulation at the centre of the tumour at later time points. In an attempt to take this a step further, we successfully encapsulated the anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX) into both targeted and non-targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG. The engineering of DOX-loaded targeted ICG liposome systems present a novel platform for combined tumour-specific therapy and diagnosis. This can open new possibilities in the design of advanced image-guided cancer therapeutics. PMID:25445515

  8. Antigenic Fingerprinting following Primary RSV Infection in Young Children Identifies Novel Antigenic Sites and Reveals Unlinked Evolution of Human Antibody Repertoires to Fusion and Attachment Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Sandra; Coyle, Elizabeth M.; Beeler, Judy; Golding, Hana; Khurana, Surender

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the major cause of pneumonia among infants. Here we elucidated the antibody repertoire following primary RSV infection and traced its evolution through adolescence and adulthood. Whole genome-fragment phage display libraries (GFPDL) expressing linear and conformational epitopes in the RSV fusion protein (F) and attachment protein (G) were used for unbiased epitope profiling of infant sera prior to and following RSV infection. F-GFPDL analyses demonstrated modest changes in the anti-F epitope repertoires post-RSV infection, while G-GFPDL analyses revealed 100-fold increase in number of bound phages. The G-reactive epitopes spanned the N- and C-terminus of the G ectodomain, along with increased reactivity to the central conserved domain (CCD). Panels of F and G antigenic sites were synthesized to evaluate sera from young children (<2 yr), adolescents (14–18 yr) and adults (30–45 yr) in SPR real-time kinetics assays. A steady increase in RSV-F epitope repertoires from young children to adults was observed using peptides and F proteins. Importantly, several novel epitopes were identified in pre-fusion F and an immunodominant epitope in the F-p27. In all age groups, antibody binding to pre-fusion F was 2–3 folds higher than to post-fusion form. For RSV-G, antibody responses were high following early RSV infection in children, but declined significantly in adults, using either G proteins or peptides. This study identified unlinked evolution of anti-F and anti G responses and supportive evidence for immune pressure driven evolution of RSV-G. These findings could help development of effective countermeasures including vaccines. PMID:27100289

  9. Structural mimicry of O-antigen by a peptide revealed in a complex with an antibody raised against Shigella flexneri serotype 2a.

    PubMed

    Theillet, François-Xavier; Saul, Frederick A; Vulliez-Le Normand, Brigitte; Hoos, Sylviane; Felici, Franco; Weintraub, Andrej; Mulard, Laurence A; Phalipon, Armelle; Delepierre, Muriel; Bentley, Graham A

    2009-05-15

    The use of carbohydrate-mimicking peptides to induce immune responses against surface polysaccharides of pathogenic bacteria offers a novel approach to vaccine development. Factors governing antigenic and immunogenic mimicry, however, are complex and poorly understood. We have addressed this question using the anti-lipopolysaccharide monoclonal antibody F22-4, which was raised against Shigella flexneri serotype 2a and shown to protect against homologous infection in a mouse model. In a previous crystallographic study, we described F22-4 in complex with two synthetic fragments of the O-antigen, the serotype-specific saccharide moiety of lipopolysaccharide. Here, we present a crystallographic and NMR study of the interaction of F22-4 with a dodecapeptide selected by phage display using the monoclonal antibody. Like the synthetic decasaccharide, the peptide binds to F22-4 with micromolar affinity. Although the peptide and decasaccharide use very similar regions of the antigen-binding site, indicating good antigenic mimicry, immunogenic mimicry by the peptide was not observed. The F22-4-antigen interaction is significantly more hydrophobic with the peptide than with oligosaccharides; nonetheless, all hydrogen bonds formed between the peptide and F22-4 have equivalents in the oligosaccharide complex. Two bridging water molecules are also in common, adding to partial structural mimicry. Whereas the bound peptide is entirely helical, its structure in solution, as shown by NMR, is helical in the central region only. Moreover, docking the NMR structure into the antigen-binding site shows that steric hindrance would occur, revealing poor complementarity between the major solution conformation and the antibody that could contribute to the absence of immunogenic mimicry.

  10. Quantifying variation in the potential for antibody-mediated apparent competition among nine genotypes of the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi☆

    PubMed Central

    Fairlie-Clarke, Karen J.; Allen, Judith E.; Read, Andrew F.; Graham, Andrea L.

    2013-01-01

    Within-host competition among parasite genotypes affects epidemiology as well as the evolution of virulence. In the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi, competition among genotypes, as well as clone-specific and clone-transcending immunity are well documented. However, variation among genotypes in the induction of antibodies is not well understood, despite the important role of antibodies in the clearance of malaria infection. Here, we quantify the potential for antibodies induced by one clone to bind another (i.e., to cause antibody-mediated apparent competition) for nine genetically distinct P. chabaudi clones. We hypothesised that clones would vary in the strength of antibody induction, and that the propensity for clone-transcending immunity between a pair of clones would increase with increasing genetic relatedness at key antigenic loci. Using serum collected from mice 35 days post-infection, we measured titres of antibody to an unrelated antigen, Keyhole Limpet Haemocyanin (KLH), and two malaria antigens: recombinant Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA-1) and Merozoite Surface Protein-119 (MSP-119). Amino acid sequence homology within each antigenic locus was used as a measure of relatedness. We found significant parasite genetic variation for the strength of antibody induction. We also found that relatedness at MSP-119 but not AMA-1 predicted clone-transcending binding. Our results help explain the outcome of chronic-phase mixed infections and generate testable predictions about the pairwise competitive ability of P. chabaudi clones. PMID:24056014

  11. Antibodies to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Potentiate the Response of Human T Lymphocyte Clones to the Same Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, Esteban; Chang, Tse Wen

    1984-04-01

    Human T-helper lymphocyte clones specific for hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) proliferate on stimulation with HBsAg in vitro. Antibodies specific for HBsAg, but no other antibodies, augment this proliferative response. In the presence of antibodies to HBsAg, the maximum response could be achieved at HBsAg concentrations that were 1 percent of those required in the absence of the antibodies. These findings suggest that antigen-specific antibodies exert regulatory controls on T cells that recognize the same antigens.

  12. Educational games for brain health: revealing their unexplored potential through a neurocognitive approach

    PubMed Central

    Fissler, Patrick; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Schrader, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Educational games link the motivational nature of games with learning of knowledge and skills. Here, we go beyond effects on these learning outcomes. We review two lines of evidence which indicate the currently unexplored potential of educational games to promote brain health: First, gaming with specific neurocognitive demands (e.g., executive control), and second, educational learning experiences (e.g., studying foreign languages) improve brain health markers. These markers include cognitive ability, brain function, and brain structure. As educational games allow the combination of specific neurocognitive demands with educational learning experiences, they seem to be optimally suited for promoting brain health. We propose a neurocognitive approach to reveal this unexplored potential of educational games in future research. PMID:26257697

  13. Educational games for brain health: revealing their unexplored potential through a neurocognitive approach.

    PubMed

    Fissler, Patrick; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Schrader, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Educational games link the motivational nature of games with learning of knowledge and skills. Here, we go beyond effects on these learning outcomes. We review two lines of evidence which indicate the currently unexplored potential of educational games to promote brain health: First, gaming with specific neurocognitive demands (e.g., executive control), and second, educational learning experiences (e.g., studying foreign languages) improve brain health markers. These markers include cognitive ability, brain function, and brain structure. As educational games allow the combination of specific neurocognitive demands with educational learning experiences, they seem to be optimally suited for promoting brain health. We propose a neurocognitive approach to reveal this unexplored potential of educational games in future research. PMID:26257697

  14. Educational games for brain health: revealing their unexplored potential through a neurocognitive approach.

    PubMed

    Fissler, Patrick; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Schrader, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Educational games link the motivational nature of games with learning of knowledge and skills. Here, we go beyond effects on these learning outcomes. We review two lines of evidence which indicate the currently unexplored potential of educational games to promote brain health: First, gaming with specific neurocognitive demands (e.g., executive control), and second, educational learning experiences (e.g., studying foreign languages) improve brain health markers. These markers include cognitive ability, brain function, and brain structure. As educational games allow the combination of specific neurocognitive demands with educational learning experiences, they seem to be optimally suited for promoting brain health. We propose a neurocognitive approach to reveal this unexplored potential of educational games in future research.

  15. Tuberculosis in Elephants: Antibody Responses to Defined Antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Potential for Early Diagnosis, and Monitoring of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; Olsen, John H.; Ball, Ray; Dumonceaux, Genevieve; Dunker, Freeland; Buckley, Carol; Richard, Michael; Murray, Suzan; Payeur, Janet B.; Andersen, Peter; Pollock, John M.; Mikota, Susan; Miller, Michele; Sofranko, Denise; Waters, W. Ray

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in elephants is a re-emerging zoonotic disease caused primarily by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Current diagnosis relies on trunk wash culture, the only officially recognized test, which has serious limitations. Innovative and efficient diagnostic methods are urgently needed. Rapid identification of infected animals is a crucial prerequisite for more effective control of TB, as early diagnosis allows timely initiation of chemotherapy. Serology has diagnostic potential, although key antigens have not been identified and optimal immunoassay formats are not established. To characterize the humoral responses in elephant TB, we tested 143 serum samples collected from 15 elephants over time. These included 48 samples from five culture-confirmed TB cases, of which four were in Asian elephants infected with M. tuberculosis and one was in an African elephant with Mycobacterium bovis. Multiantigen print immunoassay (MAPIA) employing a panel of 12 defined antigens was used to identify serologic correlates of active disease. ESAT-6 was the immunodominant antigen recognized in elephant TB. Serum immunoglobulin G antibodies to ESAT-6 and other proteins were detected up to 3.5 years prior to culture of M. tuberculosis from trunk washes. Antibody levels to certain antigens gradually decreased in response to antitubercular therapy, suggesting the possibility of treatment monitoring. In addition to MAPIA, serum samples were evaluated with a recently developed rapid test (RT) based on lateral flow technology (ElephantTB STAT-PAK). Similarly to MAPIA, infected elephants were identified using the RT up to 4 years prior to positive culture. These findings demonstrate the potential for TB surveillance and treatment monitoring using the RT and MAPIA, respectively. PMID:16829608

  16. Computational analysis of anti-HIV-1 antibody neutralization panel data to identify potential functional epitope residues.

    PubMed

    West, Anthony P; Scharf, Louise; Horwitz, Joshua; Klein, Florian; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2013-06-25

    Advances in single-cell antibody cloning methods have led to the identification of a variety of broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibodies. We developed a computational tool (Antibody Database) to help identify critical residues on the HIV-1 envelope protein whose natural variation affects antibody activity. Our simplifying assumption was that, for a given antibody, a significant portion of the dispersion of neutralization activity across a panel of HIV-1 strains is due to the amino acid identity or glycosylation state at a small number of specific sites, each acting independently. A model of an antibody's neutralization IC50 was developed in which each site contributes a term to the logarithm of the modeled IC50. The analysis program attempts to determine the set of rules that minimizes the sum of the residuals between observed and modeled IC50 values. The predictive quality of the identified rules may be assessed in part by whether there is support for rules within individual viral clades. As a test case, we analyzed antibody 8ANC195, an anti-glycoprotein gp120 antibody of unknown specificity. The model for this antibody indicated that several glycosylation sites were critical for neutralization. We evaluated this prediction by measuring neutralization potencies of 8ANC195 against HIV-1 in vitro and in an antibody therapy experiment in humanized mice. These experiments confirmed that 8ANC195 represents a distinct class of glycan-dependent anti-HIV-1 antibody and validated the utility of computational analysis of neutralization panel data.

  17. Comprehensive molecular pathology analysis of small bowel adenocarcinoma reveals novel targets with potential for clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Paul; Fuchs, Marc-Aurel; Alderdice, Matthew; McCabe, Clare M.; Bingham, Victoria; McGready, Claire; Tripathi, Shailesh; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Loughrey, Maurice B.; McQuaid, Stephen; Maxwell, Perry; Hamilton, Peter W.; Turkington, Richard; James, Jacqueline A.; Wilson, Richard H.; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel accounts for only 0.5% of cancer cases in the US but incidence rates have been rising at 2.4% per year over the past decade. One-third of these are adenocarcinomas but little is known about their molecular pathology and no molecular markers are available for clinical use. Using a retrospective 28 patient matched normal-tumor cohort, next-generation sequencing, gene expression arrays and CpG methylation arrays were used for molecular profiling. Next-generation sequencing identified novel mutations in IDH1, CDH1, KIT, FGFR2, FLT3, NPM1, PTEN, MET, AKT1, RET, NOTCH1 and ERBB4. Array data revealed 17% of CpGs and 5% of RNA transcripts assayed to be differentially methylated and expressed respectively (p < 0.01). Merging gene expression and DNA methylation data revealed CHN2 as consistently hypermethylated and downregulated in this disease (Spearman −0.71, p < 0.001). Mutations in TP53 which were found in more than half of the cohort (15/28) and Kazald1 hypomethylation were both were indicative of poor survival (p = 0.03, HR = 3.2 and p = 0.01, HR = 4.9 respectively). By integrating high-throughput mutational, gene expression and DNA methylation data, this study reveals for the first time the distinct molecular profile of small bowel adenocarcinoma and highlights potential clinically exploitable markers. PMID:26315110

  18. Comprehensive molecular pathology analysis of small bowel adenocarcinoma reveals novel targets with potential for clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Alvi, Muhammad A; McArt, Darragh G; Kelly, Paul; Fuchs, Marc-Aurel; Alderdice, Matthew; McCabe, Clare M; Bingham, Victoria; McGready, Claire; Tripathi, Shailesh; Emmert-Streib, Frank; Loughrey, Maurice B; McQuaid, Stephen; Maxwell, Perry; Hamilton, Peter W; Turkington, Richard; James, Jacqueline A; Wilson, Richard H; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2015-08-28

    Small bowel accounts for only 0.5% of cancer cases in the US but incidence rates have been rising at 2.4% per year over the past decade. One-third of these are adenocarcinomas but little is known about their molecular pathology and no molecular markers are available for clinical use. Using a retrospective 28 patient matched normal-tumor cohort, next-generation sequencing, gene expression arrays and CpG methylation arrays were used for molecular profiling. Next-generation sequencing identified novel mutations in IDH1, CDH1, KIT, FGFR2, FLT3, NPM1, PTEN, MET, AKT1, RET, NOTCH1 and ERBB4. Array data revealed 17% of CpGs and 5% of RNA transcripts assayed to be differentially methylated and expressed respectively (p < 0.01). Merging gene expression and DNA methylation data revealed CHN2 as consistently hypermethylated and downregulated in this disease (Spearman -0.71, p < 0.001). Mutations in TP53 which were found in more than half of the cohort (15/28) and Kazald1 hypomethylation were both were indicative of poor survival (p = 0.03, HR = 3.2 and p = 0.01, HR = 4.9 respectively). By integrating high-throughput mutational, gene expression and DNA methylation data, this study reveals for the first time the distinct molecular profile of small bowel adenocarcinoma and highlights potential clinically exploitable markers.

  19. Thrombography reveals thrombin generation potential continues to deteriorate following cardiopulmonary bypass surgery despite adequate hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Raymond K; Sleep, Joseph R; Visner, Allison J; Raasch, David J; Lanza, Louis A; DeValeria, Patrick A; Torloni, Antonio S; Arabia, Francisco A

    2011-03-01

    The intrinsic and extrinsic activation pathways of the hemostatic system converge when prothrombin is converted to thrombin. The ability to generate an adequate thrombin burst is the most central aspect of the coagulation cascade. The thrombin-generating potential in patients following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may be indicative of their hemostatic status. In this report, thrombography, a unique technique for directly measuring the potential of patients' blood samples to generate adequate thrombin bursts, is used to characterize the coagulopathic profile in post-CPB patients. Post-CPB hemostasis is typically achieved with protamine reversal of heparin anticoagulation and occasionally supplemented with blood product component transfusions. In this pilot study, platelet poor plasma samples were derived from 11 primary cardiac surgery patients at five time points: prior to CPB, immediately post-protamine, upon arrival to the intensive care unit (ICU), 3 hours post-ICU admission, and 24 hours after ICU arrival. Thrombography revealed that the Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) was not different between [Baseline] and [PostProtamine] but proceeded to deteriorate in the immediate postoperative period. At the [3HourPostICU] time point, the ETP was significantly lower than the [Baseline] values, 1233 +/- 591 versus 595 +/- 379 nM.min (mean +/- SD; n=9, p < .005), despite continued adequacy of hemostasis. ETPs returned to baseline values the day after surgery. Transfusions received, conventional blood coagulation testing results, and blood loss volumes are also presented. Despite adequate hemostasis, thrombography reveals an underlying coagulopathic process that could put some cardiac surgical patients at risk for postoperative bleeding. Thrombography is a novel technique that could be developed into a useful tool for perfusionists and physicians to identify coagulopathies and optimize blood management following CPB. PMID:21449230

  20. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Capucine L.; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A.; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs. PMID:27698437

  1. Cross-reactivity between Candida albicans and human ovarian carcinoma as revealed by monoclonal antibodies PA10F and C6.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, J.; Moragues, D.; Martínez, N.; Romero, H.; Jimenez, E.; Pontón, J.

    1998-01-01

    Summary Antibodies against Candida albicans antigenic determinants have been reported to cross-react with human tumour cells. We have found that two monoclonal antibodies, C6 and PA1OF, developed at our laboratory against C. albicans antigenic determinants, cross-react with human ovarian cancer on Western blots and immunohistochemistry. We have subsequently used one of them, PA10OF, to test by means of immunohistochemistry a series of 37 human ovarian carcinomas. Out of 37 tumours, 25 (67.6%) expressed the antigen recognized by PA1OF. The reactivity, however, was concentrated on the subgroup of particularly aggressive, invasive carcinomas in advanced stages of the disease (19 out of 24 positive), whereas the antigen was expressed significantly less (P=0.0007) in the subgroup of much less aggressive stage I tumours of low malignant potential, also called borderline carcinomas (2 out of 13 positive). This cross-reactivity between C. albicans and ovarian carcinoma seems to be attributable to a common antigenic determinant related to tumour aggressiveness. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9528850

  2. Exploring the potential of monoclonal antibody therapeutics for HIV-1 eradication.

    PubMed

    Euler, Zelda; Alter, Galit

    2015-01-01

    The HIV field has seen an increased interest in novel cure strategies. In particular, new latency reversal agents are in development to reverse latency to flush the virus out of its hiding place. Combining these efforts with immunotherapeutic approaches may not only drive the virus out of latency, but allow for the rapid elimination of these infected cells in a "shock and kill" approach. Beyond cell-based approaches, growing interest lies in the potential use of functionally enhanced "killer" monoclonal therapeutics to purge the reservoir. Here we discuss prospects for a monoclonal therapeutic-based "shock and kill" strategy that may lead to the permanent elimination of replication-competent virus, making a functional cure a reality for all patients afflicted with HIV worldwide.

  3. ELPylated haemagglutinins produced in tobacco plants induce potentially neutralizing antibodies against H5N1 viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Phan, Hoang T; Pohl, Julia; Floss, Doreen M; Rabenstein, Frank; Veits, Jutta; Le, Binh T; Chu, Ha H; Hause, Gerd; Mettenleiter, Thomas; Conrad, Udo

    2013-06-01

    Reducing the cost of vaccine production is a key priority for veterinary research, and the possibility of heterologously expressing antigen in plants provides a particularly attractive means of achieving this. Here, we report the expression of the avian influenza virus haemagglutinin (AIV HA) in tobacco, both as a monomer and as a trimer in its native and its ELPylated form. We firstly presented evidence to produce stabilized trimers of soluble HA in plants. ELPylation of these trimers does not influence the trimerization. Strong expression enhancement in planta caused by ELPylation was demonstrated for trimerized H5-ELP. ELPylated trimers could be purified by a membrane-based inverse transition cycling procedure with the potential of successful scale-up. The trimeric form of AIV HA was found to enhance the HA-specific immune response compared with the monomeric form. Plant-derived AIV HA trimers elicited potentially neutralizing antibodies interacting with both homologous virus-like particles from plants and heterologous inactivated AIV. ELPylation did not influence the functionality and the antigenicity of the stabilized H5 trimers. These data allow further developments including scale-up of production, purification and virus challenge experiments with the final goal to achieve suitable technologies for efficient avian flu vaccine production.

  4. Computational bacterial genome-wide analysis of phylogenetic profiles reveals potential virulence genes of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Frank Po-Yen; Lan, Ruiting; Sintchenko, Vitali; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Kong, Fanrong; Coiera, Enrico

    2011-04-04

    The phylogenetic profile of a gene is a reflection of its evolutionary history and can be defined as the differential presence or absence of a gene in a set of reference genomes. It has been employed to facilitate the prediction of gene functions. However, the hypothesis that the application of this concept can also facilitate the discovery of bacterial virulence factors has not been fully examined. In this paper, we test this hypothesis and report a computational pipeline designed to identify previously unknown bacterial virulence genes using group B streptococcus (GBS) as an example. Phylogenetic profiles of all GBS genes across 467 bacterial reference genomes were determined by candidate-against-all BLAST searches,which were then used to identify candidate virulence genes by machine learning models. Evaluation experiments with known GBS virulence genes suggested good functional and model consistency in cross-validation analyses (areas under ROC curve, 0.80 and 0.98 respectively). Inspection of the top-10 genes in each of the 15 virulence functional groups revealed at least 15 (of 119) homologous genes implicated in virulence in other human pathogens but previously unrecognized as potential virulence genes in GBS. Among these highly-ranked genes, many encode hypothetical proteins with possible roles in GBS virulence. Thus, our approach has led to the identification of a set of genes potentially affecting the virulence potential of GBS, which are potential candidates for further in vitro and in vivo investigations. This computational pipeline can also be extended to in silico analysis of virulence determinants of other bacterial pathogens.

  5. Early somatosensory event-related potentials reveal attentional bias for internal stimuli in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yoshihiro; Nittono, Hiroshi; Kubo, Kenta; Sasaki-Aoki, Shoko; Iwanaga, Makoto

    2012-03-01

    The present study used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to investigate allocation of attentional resources to internal and external stimuli in individuals with social anxiety. High and low socially anxious individuals were presented with depictions of various facial expressions or household objects, followed by an internal (vibration presented to the finger) or external probe (the letter "E"). Participants were told that the vibration signals physiological changes and were asked to detect both probes. High socially anxious individuals showed larger front-central N140 amplitudes in response to vibratory internal probes as compared to non-anxious controls. ERPs elicited by picture stimuli and external probes and reaction times in response to both probe types did not differ between high and low social anxiety individuals. Early somatosensory ERPs reveal an attentional bias for internal stimuli that does not appear in overt behavior. PMID:22285128

  6. Revealing Nature’s Synthetic Potential Through the Study of Ribosomal Natural Product Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Kyle L.; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesized posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are a rapidly growing class of natural products with diverse structures and activities. In recent years, a great deal of progress has been made in elucidating the biosynthesis of various RiPP family members. As with the study of nonribosomal peptide and polyketide biosynthetic enzymes, these investigations have led to the discovery of entirely new biological chemistry. With each unique enzyme investigated, a more complex picture of Nature’s synthetic potential is revealed. This review focuses on recent reports (since 2008) that have changed the way that we think about ribosomal natural product biosynthesis and the enzymology of complex bond-forming reactions. PMID:23286465

  7. Movement patterns and dispersal potential of Pecos bluntnose shiner (Notropis simus pecosensis) revealed using otolith microchemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, Nathan M.; Caldwell, Colleen A.; Carleton, Scott A.; Gould, William R.; Hobbs, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Natal origin and dispersal potential of the federally threatened Pecos bluntnose shiner (Notropis simus pecosensis) were successfully characterized using otolith microchemistry and swimming performance trials. Strontium isotope ratios (87Sr:86Sr) of otoliths within the resident plains killifish (Fundulus zebrinus) were successfully used as a surrogate for strontium isotope ratios in water and revealed three isotopically distinct reaches throughout 297 km of the Pecos River, New Mexico, USA. Two different life history movement patterns were revealed in Pecos bluntnose shiner. Eggs and fry were either retained in upper river reaches or passively dispersed downriver followed by upriver movement during the first year of life, with some fish achieving a minimum movement of 56 km. Swimming ability of Pecos bluntnose shiner confirmed upper critical swimming speeds (Ucrit) as high as 43.8 cm·s−1 and 20.6 body lengths·s−1 in 30 days posthatch fish. Strong swimming ability early in life supports our observations of upriver movement using otolith microchemistry and confirms movement patterns that were previously unknown for the species. Understanding patterns of dispersal of this and other small-bodied fishes using otolith microchemistry may help redirect conservation and management efforts for Great Plains fishes.

  8. Multi-platform molecular profiling of a large cohort of glioblastomas reveals potential therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Joanne; Piccioni, David; Juarez, Tiffany; Pingle, Sandeep C; Hu, Jethro; Rudnick, Jeremy; Fink, Karen; Spetzler, David B; Maney, Todd; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Bender, Ryan; Gatalica, Zoran; Reddy, Sandeep; Sanai, Nader; Idbaih, Ahmed; Glantz, Michael; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-04-19

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most aggressive and prevalent form of gliomas with abysmal prognosis and limited treatment options. We analyzed clinically relevant molecular aberrations suggestive of response to therapies in 1035 GBM tumors. Our analysis revealed mutations in 39 genes of 48 tested. IHC revealed expression of PD-L1 in 19% and PD-1 in 46%. MGMT-methylation was seen in 43%, EGFRvIII in 19% and 1p19q co-deletion in 2%. TP53 mutation was associated with concurrent mutations, while IDH1 mutation was associated with MGMT-methylation and TP53 mutation and was mutually exclusive of EGFRvIII mutation. Distinct biomarker profiles were seen in GBM compared with WHO grade III astrocytoma, suggesting different biology and potentially different treatment approaches. Analysis of 17 metachronous paired tumors showed frequent biomarker changes, including MGMT-methylation and EGFR aberrations, indicating the need for a re-biopsy for tumor profiling to direct subsequent therapy. MGMT-methylation, PR and TOPO1 appeared as significant prognostic markers in sub-cohorts of GBM defined by age. The current study represents the largest biomarker study on clinical GBM tumors using multiple technologies to detect gene mutation, amplification, protein expression and promoter methylation. These data will inform planning for future personalized biomarker-based clinical trials and identifying effective treatments based on tumor biomarkers. PMID:26933808

  9. Multi-platform molecular profiling of a large cohort of glioblastomas reveals potential therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Xiu, Joanne; Piccioni, David; Juarez, Tiffany; Pingle, Sandeep C.; Hu, Jethro; Rudnick, Jeremy; Fink, Karen; Spetzler, David B.; Maney, Todd; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Bender, Ryan; Gatalica, Zoran; Reddy, Sandeep; Sanai, Nader; Idbaih, Ahmed; Glantz, Michael; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are the most aggressive and prevalent form of gliomas with abysmal prognosis and limited treatment options. We analyzed clinically relevant molecular aberrations suggestive of response to therapies in 1035 GBM tumors. Our analysis revealed mutations in 39 genes of 48 tested. IHC revealed expression of PD-L1 in 19% and PD-1 in 46%. MGMT-methylation was seen in 43%, EGFRvIII in 19% and 1p19q co-deletion in 2%. TP53 mutation was associated with concurrent mutations, while IDH1 mutation was associated with MGMT-methylation and TP53 mutation and was mutually exclusive of EGFRvIII mutation. Distinct biomarker profiles were seen in GBM compared with WHO grade III astrocytoma, suggesting different biology and potentially different treatment approaches. Analysis of 17 metachronous paired tumors showed frequent biomarker changes, including MGMT-methylation and EGFR aberrations, indicating the need for a re-biopsy for tumor profiling to direct subsequent therapy. MGMT-methylation, PR and TOPO1 appeared as significant prognostic markers in sub-cohorts of GBM defined by age. The current study represents the largest biomarker study on clinical GBM tumors using multiple technologies to detect gene mutation, amplification, protein expression and promoter methylation. These data will inform planning for future personalized biomarker-based clinical trials and identifying effective treatments based on tumor biomarkers. PMID:26933808

  10. Analyses of soil microbial community compositions and functional genes reveal potential consequences of natural forest succession

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Jing; Yang, Yunfeng; Liu, Xueduan; Lu, Hui; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Diqiang; Yin, Huaqun; Ding, Junjun; Zhang, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    The succession of microbial community structure and function is a central ecological topic, as microbes drive the Earth’s biogeochemical cycles. To elucidate the response and mechanistic underpinnings of soil microbial community structure and metabolic potential relevant to natural forest succession, we compared soil microbial communities from three adjacent natural forests: a coniferous forest (CF), a mixed broadleaf forest (MBF) and a deciduous broadleaf forest (DBF) on Shennongjia Mountain in central China. In contrary to plant communities, the microbial taxonomic diversity of the DBF was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those of CF and MBF, rendering their microbial community compositions markedly different. Consistently, microbial functional diversity was also highest in the DBF. Furthermore, a network analysis of microbial carbon and nitrogen cycling genes showed the network for the DBF samples was relatively large and tight, revealing strong couplings between microbes. Soil temperature, reflective of climate regimes, was important in shaping microbial communities at both taxonomic and functional gene levels. As a first glimpse of both the taxonomic and functional compositions of soil microbial communities, our results suggest that microbial community structure and function potentials will be altered by future environmental changes, which have implications for forest succession. PMID:25943705

  11. Revealing the potential of Didodecyldimethylammonium bromide as efficient scaffold for fabrication of nano liquid crystalline structures.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Rohini; Kaur, Gurpreet; Mehta, S K

    2016-03-01

    To exploit the potential of Didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (D12DAB) as a core lipidic constituent, an attempt was made to fabricate and optimize cationic nanostructured lipid carriers (cNLCs) using a cost-effective microemulsification methodology. Designed composition was optimized by studying the effect of different microemulsion components on D12DAB cNLCs characteristics. ​Spherical shaped D12DAB cNLCs were obtained with an average size of ∼160 nm and zeta potential of +30.2 mV. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) depicted the presence of thermotropic character, whereas polarized optical microscopy confirmed the mesophase like behavior of D12DAB based cNLCs. In addition, hemolysis analysis revealed that the toxicity was concentration dependent as LC50 was reached at a concentration of 50 μg/mL of cNLCs. This class of cNLCs is expected to become a potent candidate for a broad spectrum of medicaments as carriers, targeting for pharmaceutical and medicinal purposes, due to the combination of a hard lipid with a soft lipid, where the liquid crystalline structure of the lipid co-exists.

  12. Revealing the potential of Didodecyldimethylammonium bromide as efficient scaffold for fabrication of nano liquid crystalline structures.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Rohini; Kaur, Gurpreet; Mehta, S K

    2016-03-01

    To exploit the potential of Didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (D12DAB) as a core lipidic constituent, an attempt was made to fabricate and optimize cationic nanostructured lipid carriers (cNLCs) using a cost-effective microemulsification methodology. Designed composition was optimized by studying the effect of different microemulsion components on D12DAB cNLCs characteristics. ​Spherical shaped D12DAB cNLCs were obtained with an average size of ∼160 nm and zeta potential of +30.2 mV. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) depicted the presence of thermotropic character, whereas polarized optical microscopy confirmed the mesophase like behavior of D12DAB based cNLCs. In addition, hemolysis analysis revealed that the toxicity was concentration dependent as LC50 was reached at a concentration of 50 μg/mL of cNLCs. This class of cNLCs is expected to become a potent candidate for a broad spectrum of medicaments as carriers, targeting for pharmaceutical and medicinal purposes, due to the combination of a hard lipid with a soft lipid, where the liquid crystalline structure of the lipid co-exists. PMID:26896840

  13. Revealing the potential of squid chitosan-based structures for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Reys, L L; Silva, S S; Oliveira, J M; Caridade, S G; Mano, J F; Silva, T H; Reis, R L

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, much attention has been given to different marine organisms, namely as potential sources of valuable materials with a vast range of properties and characteristics. In this work, β-chitin was isolated from the endoskeleton of the giant squid Dosidicus gigas and further deacetylated to produce chitosan. Then, the squid chitosan was processed into membranes and scaffolds using solvent casting and freeze-drying, respectively, to assess their potential biomedical application. The developed membranes have shown to be stiffer and less hydrophobic than those obtained with commercial chitosan. On the other hand, the morphological characterization of the developed scaffolds, by SEM and micro-computed tomography, revealed that the matrices were formed with a lamellar structure. The findings also indicated that the treatment with ethanol prior to neutralization with sodium hydroxide caused the formation of larger pores and loss of some lamellar features. The in vitro cell culture study has shown that all chitosan scaffolds exhibited a non-cytotoxic effect over the mouse fibroblast-like cell line, L929 cells. Thus, chitosan produced from the endoskeletons of the giant squid Dosidicus gigas has proven to be a valuable alternative to existing commercial materials when considering its use as biomaterial.

  14. Analyses of soil microbial community compositions and functional genes reveal potential consequences of natural forest succession.

    PubMed

    Cong, Jing; Yang, Yunfeng; Liu, Xueduan; Lu, Hui; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Diqiang; Yin, Huaqun; Ding, Junjun; Zhang, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    The succession of microbial community structure and function is a central ecological topic, as microbes drive the Earth's biogeochemical cycles. To elucidate the response and mechanistic underpinnings of soil microbial community structure and metabolic potential relevant to natural forest succession, we compared soil microbial communities from three adjacent natural forests: a coniferous forest (CF), a mixed broadleaf forest (MBF) and a deciduous broadleaf forest (DBF) on Shennongjia Mountain in central China. In contrary to plant communities, the microbial taxonomic diversity of the DBF was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those of CF and MBF, rendering their microbial community compositions markedly different. Consistently, microbial functional diversity was also highest in the DBF. Furthermore, a network analysis of microbial carbon and nitrogen cycling genes showed the network for the DBF samples was relatively large and tight, revealing strong couplings between microbes. Soil temperature, reflective of climate regimes, was important in shaping microbial communities at both taxonomic and functional gene levels. As a first glimpse of both the taxonomic and functional compositions of soil microbial communities, our results suggest that microbial community structure and function potentials will be altered by future environmental changes, which have implications for forest succession. PMID:25943705

  15. Analyses of soil microbial community compositions and functional genes reveal potential consequences of natural forest succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Jing; Yang, Yunfeng; Liu, Xueduan; Lu, Hui; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Diqiang; Yin, Huaqun; Ding, Junjun; Zhang, Yuguang

    2015-05-01

    The succession of microbial community structure and function is a central ecological topic, as microbes drive the Earth’s biogeochemical cycles. To elucidate the response and mechanistic underpinnings of soil microbial community structure and metabolic potential relevant to natural forest succession, we compared soil microbial communities from three adjacent natural forests: a coniferous forest (CF), a mixed broadleaf forest (MBF) and a deciduous broadleaf forest (DBF) on Shennongjia Mountain in central China. In contrary to plant communities, the microbial taxonomic diversity of the DBF was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those of CF and MBF, rendering their microbial community compositions markedly different. Consistently, microbial functional diversity was also highest in the DBF. Furthermore, a network analysis of microbial carbon and nitrogen cycling genes showed the network for the DBF samples was relatively large and tight, revealing strong couplings between microbes. Soil temperature, reflective of climate regimes, was important in shaping microbial communities at both taxonomic and functional gene levels. As a first glimpse of both the taxonomic and functional compositions of soil microbial communities, our results suggest that microbial community structure and function potentials will be altered by future environmental changes, which have implications for forest succession.

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of Lactobacillus plantarum ZJ316 reveals its genetic adaptation and potential probiotic profiles* #

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Li, Xuan; Gu, Qing; Lou, Xiu-yu; Zhang, Xiao-mei; Song, Da-feng; Zhang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In previous studies, Lactobacillus plantarum ZJ316 showed probiotic properties, such as antimicrobial activity against various pathogens and the capacity to significantly improve pig growth and pork quality. The purpose of this study was to reveal the genes potentially related to its genetic adaptation and probiotic profiles based on comparative genomic analysis. Methods: The genome sequence of L. plantarum ZJ316 was compared with those of eight L. plantarum strains deposited in GenBank. BLASTN, Mauve, and MUMmer programs were used for genome alignment and comparison. CRISPRFinder was applied for searching the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Results: We identified genes that encode proteins related to genetic adaptation and probiotic profiles, including carbohydrate transport and metabolism, proteolytic enzyme systems and amino acid biosynthesis, CRISPR adaptive immunity, stress responses, bile salt resistance, ability to adhere to the host intestinal wall, exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis, and bacteriocin biosynthesis. Conclusions: Comparative characterization of the L. plantarum ZJ316 genome provided the genetic basis for further elucidating the functional mechanisms of its probiotic properties. ZJ316 could be considered a potential probiotic candidate. PMID:27487802

  17. Analyses of soil microbial community compositions and functional genes reveal potential consequences of natural forest succession.

    PubMed

    Cong, Jing; Yang, Yunfeng; Liu, Xueduan; Lu, Hui; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Diqiang; Yin, Huaqun; Ding, Junjun; Zhang, Yuguang

    2015-05-06

    The succession of microbial community structure and function is a central ecological topic, as microbes drive the Earth's biogeochemical cycles. To elucidate the response and mechanistic underpinnings of soil microbial community structure and metabolic potential relevant to natural forest succession, we compared soil microbial communities from three adjacent natural forests: a coniferous forest (CF), a mixed broadleaf forest (MBF) and a deciduous broadleaf forest (DBF) on Shennongjia Mountain in central China. In contrary to plant communities, the microbial taxonomic diversity of the DBF was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than those of CF and MBF, rendering their microbial community compositions markedly different. Consistently, microbial functional diversity was also highest in the DBF. Furthermore, a network analysis of microbial carbon and nitrogen cycling genes showed the network for the DBF samples was relatively large and tight, revealing strong couplings between microbes. Soil temperature, reflective of climate regimes, was important in shaping microbial communities at both taxonomic and functional gene levels. As a first glimpse of both the taxonomic and functional compositions of soil microbial communities, our results suggest that microbial community structure and function potentials will be altered by future environmental changes, which have implications for forest succession.

  18. Genome sequence of the pattern forming Paenibacillus vortex bacterium reveals potential for thriving in complex environments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The pattern-forming bacterium Paenibacillus vortex is notable for its advanced social behavior, which is reflected in development of colonies with highly intricate architectures. Prior to this study, only two other Paenibacillus species (Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 and Paenibacillus larvae) have been sequenced. However, no genomic data is available on the Paenibacillus species with pattern-forming and complex social motility. Here we report the de novo genome sequence of this Gram-positive, soil-dwelling, sporulating bacterium. Results The complete P. vortex genome was sequenced by a hybrid approach using 454 Life Sciences and Illumina, achieving a total of 289× coverage, with 99.8% sequence identity between the two methods. The sequencing results were validated using a custom designed Agilent microarray expression chip which represented the coding and the non-coding regions. Analysis of the P. vortex genome revealed 6,437 open reading frames (ORFs) and 73 non-coding RNA genes. Comparative genomic analysis with 500 complete bacterial genomes revealed exceptionally high number of two-component system (TCS) genes, transcription factors (TFs), transport and defense related genes. Additionally, we have identified genes involved in the production of antimicrobial compounds and extracellular degrading enzymes. Conclusions These findings suggest that P. vortex has advanced faculties to perceive and react to a wide range of signaling molecules and environmental conditions, which could be associated with its ability to reconfigure and replicate complex colony architectures. Additionally, P. vortex is likely to serve as a rich source of genes important for agricultural, medical and industrial applications and it has the potential to advance the study of social microbiology within Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:21167037

  19. Deficiency in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway reveals the toxic potential of autophagy under ER stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Deegan, Shane; Saveljeva, Svetlana; Logue, Susan E; Pakos-Zebrucka, Karolina; Gupta, Sanjeev; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bertrand, Mathieu JM; Samali, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced cell death is normally associated with activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is characterized by CYCS (cytochrome c, somatic) release, apoptosome formation, and caspase activation, resulting in cell death. In this study, we demonstrate that under conditions of ER stress cells devoid of CASP9/caspase-9 or BAX and BAK1, and therefore defective in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, still undergo a delayed form of cell death associated with the activation of caspases, therefore revealing the existence of an alternative stress-induced caspase activation pathway. We identified CASP8/caspase-8 as the apical protease in this caspase cascade, and found that knockdown of either of the key autophagic genes, ATG5 or ATG7, impacted on CASP8 activation and cell death induction, highlighting the crucial role of autophagy in the activation of this novel ER stress-induced death pathway. In line with this, we identified a protein complex composed of ATG5, FADD, and pro-CASP8 whose assembly coincides with caspase activation and cell death induction. Together, our results reveal the toxic potential of autophagy in cells undergoing ER stress that are defective in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and suggest a model in which the autophagosome functions as a platform facilitating pro-CASP8 activation. Chemoresistance, a common problem in the treatment of cancer, is frequently caused by the downregulation of key mitochondrial death effector proteins. Alternate stress-induced apoptotic pathways, such as the one described here, may become of particular relevance for tackling the problem of chemoresistance in cancer cells. PMID:25470234

  20. Deficiency in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway reveals the toxic potential of autophagy under ER stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Shane; Saveljeva, Svetlana; Logue, Susan E; Pakos-Zebrucka, Karolina; Gupta, Sanjeev; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bertrand, Mathieu J M; Samali, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced cell death is normally associated with activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is characterized by CYCS (cytochrome c, somatic) release, apoptosome formation, and caspase activation, resulting in cell death. In this study, we demonstrate that under conditions of ER stress cells devoid of CASP9/caspase-9 or BAX and BAK1, and therefore defective in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, still undergo a delayed form of cell death associated with the activation of caspases, therefore revealing the existence of an alternative stress-induced caspase activation pathway. We identified CASP8/caspase-8 as the apical protease in this caspase cascade, and found that knockdown of either of the key autophagic genes, ATG5 or ATG7, impacted on CASP8 activation and cell death induction, highlighting the crucial role of autophagy in the activation of this novel ER stress-induced death pathway. In line with this, we identified a protein complex composed of ATG5, FADD, and pro-CASP8 whose assembly coincides with caspase activation and cell death induction. Together, our results reveal the toxic potential of autophagy in cells undergoing ER stress that are defective in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and suggest a model in which the autophagosome functions as a platform facilitating pro-CASP8 activation. Chemoresistance, a common problem in the treatment of cancer, is frequently caused by the downregulation of key mitochondrial death effector proteins. Alternate stress-induced apoptotic pathways, such as the one described here, may become of particular relevance for tackling the problem of chemoresistance in cancer cells.

  1. Deficiency in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway reveals the toxic potential of autophagy under ER stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Shane; Saveljeva, Svetlana; Logue, Susan E; Pakos-Zebrucka, Karolina; Gupta, Sanjeev; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bertrand, Mathieu J M; Samali, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced cell death is normally associated with activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is characterized by CYCS (cytochrome c, somatic) release, apoptosome formation, and caspase activation, resulting in cell death. In this study, we demonstrate that under conditions of ER stress cells devoid of CASP9/caspase-9 or BAX and BAK1, and therefore defective in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, still undergo a delayed form of cell death associated with the activation of caspases, therefore revealing the existence of an alternative stress-induced caspase activation pathway. We identified CASP8/caspase-8 as the apical protease in this caspase cascade, and found that knockdown of either of the key autophagic genes, ATG5 or ATG7, impacted on CASP8 activation and cell death induction, highlighting the crucial role of autophagy in the activation of this novel ER stress-induced death pathway. In line with this, we identified a protein complex composed of ATG5, FADD, and pro-CASP8 whose assembly coincides with caspase activation and cell death induction. Together, our results reveal the toxic potential of autophagy in cells undergoing ER stress that are defective in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and suggest a model in which the autophagosome functions as a platform facilitating pro-CASP8 activation. Chemoresistance, a common problem in the treatment of cancer, is frequently caused by the downregulation of key mitochondrial death effector proteins. Alternate stress-induced apoptotic pathways, such as the one described here, may become of particular relevance for tackling the problem of chemoresistance in cancer cells. PMID:25470234

  2. Electrophysiological potentials reveal cortical mechanisms for mental imagery, mental simulation, and grounded (embodied) cognition.

    PubMed

    Schendan, Haline E; Ganis, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Grounded cognition theory proposes that cognition, including meaning, is grounded in sensorimotor processing. The mechanism for grounding cognition is mental simulation, which is a type of mental imagery that re-enacts modal processing. To reveal top-down, cortical mechanisms for mental simulation of shape, event-related potentials were recorded to face and object pictures preceded by mental imagery. Mental imagery of the identical face or object picture (congruous condition) facilitated not only categorical perception (VPP/N170) but also later visual knowledge [N3(00) complex] and linguistic knowledge (N400) for faces more than objects, and strategic semantic analysis (late positive complex) between 200 and 700 ms. The later effects resembled semantic congruity effects with pictures. Mental imagery also facilitated category decisions, as a P3 peaked earlier for congruous than incongruous (other category) pictures, resembling the case when identical pictures repeat immediately. Thus mental imagery mimics semantic congruity and immediate repetition priming processes with pictures. Perception control results showed the opposite for faces and were in the same direction for objects: Perceptual repetition adapts (and so impairs) processing of perceived faces from categorical perception onward, but primes processing of objects during categorical perception, visual knowledge processes, and strategic semantic analysis. For both imagery and perception, differences between faces and objects support domain-specificity and indicate that cognition is grounded in modal processing. Altogether, this direct neural evidence reveals that top-down processes of mental imagery sustain an imagistic representation that mimics perception well enough to prime subsequent perception and cognition. Findings also suggest that automatic mental simulation of the visual shape of faces and objects operates between 200 and 400 ms, and strategic mental simulation operates between 400 and 700

  3. Quantitative proteomic analysis of amniocytes reveals potentially dysregulated molecular networks in Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Down syndrome (DS), caused by an extra copy of chromosome 21, affects 1 in 750 live births and is characterized by cognitive impairment and a constellation of congenital defects. Currently, little is known about the molecular pathogenesis and no direct genotype-phenotype relationship has yet been confirmed. Since DS amniocytes are expected to have a distinct biological behaviour compared to normal amniocytes, we hypothesize that relative quantification of proteins produced from trisomy and euploid (chromosomally normal) amniocytes will reveal dysregulated molecular pathways. Results Chromosomally normal- and Trisomy 21-amniocytes were quantitatively analyzed by using Stable Isotope Labeling of Amino acids in Cell culture and tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 4919 unique proteins were identified from the supernatant and cell lysate proteome. More specifically, 4548 unique proteins were identified from the lysate, and 91% of these proteins were quantified based on MS/MS spectra ratios of peptides containing isotope-labeled amino acids. A total of 904 proteins showed significant differential expression and were involved in 25 molecular pathways, each containing a minimum of 16 proteins. Sixty of these proteins consistently showed aberrant expression from trisomy 21 affected amniocytes, indicating their potential role in DS pathogenesis. Nine proteins were analyzed with a multiplex selected reaction monitoring assay in an independent set of Trisomy 21-amniocyte samples and two of them (SOD1 and NES) showed a consistent differential expression. Conclusions The most extensive proteome of amniocytes and amniotic fluid has been generated and differentially expressed proteins from amniocytes with Trisomy 21 revealed molecular pathways that seem to be most significantly affected by the presence of an extra copy of chromosome 21. PMID:23394617

  4. Low-Temperature Biodiesel Research Reveals Potential Key to Successful Blend Performance (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-02-01

    Relatively low-cost solutions could improve reliability while making biodiesel blends an affordable option. While biodiesel has very low production costs and the potential to displace up to 10% of petroleum diesel, until now, issues with cold weather performance have prevented biodiesel blends from being widely adopted. Some biodiesel blends have exhibited unexplained low-temperature performance problems even at blend levels as low as 2% by volume. The most common low-temperature performance issue is vehicle stalling caused by fuel filter clogging, which prevents fuel from reaching the engine. Research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) reveals the properties responsible for these problems, clearing a path for the development of solutions and expanded use of energy-conserving and low-emissions alternative fuel. NREL researchers set out to study the unpredictable nature of biodiesel crystallization, the condition that impedes the flow of fuel in cold weather. Their research revealed for the first time that saturated monoglyceride impurities common to the biodiesel manufacturing process create crystals that can cause fuel filter clogging and other problems when cooling at slow rates. Biodiesel low-temperature operational problems are commonly referred to as 'precipitates above the cloud point (CP).' NREL's Advanced Biofuels team spiked distilled soy and animal fat-derived B100, as well as B20, B10, and B5 biodiesel blends with three saturated monoglycerides (SMGs) at concentration levels comparable to those of real-world fuels. Above a threshold or eutectic concentration, the SMGs (monomyristin, monopalmitin, and monostearin) were shown to significantly raise the biodiesel CP, and had an even greater impact on the final melting temperature. Researchers discovered that upon cooling, monoglyceride initially precipitates as a metastable crystal, but it transforms over time or upon slight heating into a more stable crystal with a much lower solubility and

  5. The dynamics of filamentous structures in the apical band, oral crescent, fission line and the postoral meridional filament in Tetrahymena thermophila revealed by monoclonal antibody 12G9.

    PubMed

    Jerka-Dziadosz, M; Strzyewska-Jówko, I; Wojsa-Lugowska, U; Krawczyńska, W; Krzywicka, A

    2001-05-01

    The ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila possesses a multitude of cytoskeletal structures whose differentiation is related to the basal bodies - the main mediators of the cortical pattern. This investigation deals with immunolocalization using light and electron microscopy of filaments labeled by the monoclonal antibody 12G9, which in other ciliates identifies filaments involved in transmission of cellular polarities and marks cell meridians with the highest morphogenetic potential. In Tetrahymena interphase cells, mAb 12G9 localizes to the sites of basal bodies and to the striated ciliary rootlets, to the apical band of filaments and to the fine fibrillar oral crescent. We followed the sequence of development of these structures during divisional morphogenesis. The labeling of the maternal oral crescent disappears in pre-metaphase cells and reappears during anaphase, concomitantly with differentiation of the new structure in the posterior daughter cell. In the posterior daughter cell, the new apical band originates as small clusters of filaments located at the base of the anterior basal bodies of the apical basal body couplets during early anaphase. The differentiation of the band is completed in the final stages of cytokinesis and in the young post-dividing cell. The maternal band is reorganized earlier, simultaneously with the oral structure. The mAb 12G9 identifies two transient structures present only in dividing cells. One is a medial structure demarcating the two daughter cells during metaphase and anaphase, and defining the new anterior border of the posterior daughter cell. The other is a post-oral meridional filament marking the stomatogenic meridian in postmetaphase cells. Comparative analysis of immunolocalization of transient filaments labeled with mAb12G9 in Tetrahymena and other ciliates indicates that this antibody identifies a protein bound to filamentous structures, which might play a role in relying polarities of cortical domains and could be a part

  6. Evaluation of the diagnostic potential of antibodies to beta2-glycoprotein 1 domain 1 in Chinese patients with antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shulan; Wu, Ziyan; Chen, Si; Li, Jing; Wen, Xiaoting; Li, Liubing; Zhang, Wen; Zhao, Jiuliang; Zhang, Fengchun; Li, Yongzhe

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the clinical performance of anti-β2-glycoprotein 1 domain 1 antibodies (aβ2GP1-D1) in the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Sera from 229 subjects were tested, including 35 patients with primary APS, 51 patients with APS associated to other diseases, 30 patients with non-APS thrombosis, 32 patients with non-APS pregnancy-related morbidity, 42 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and 39 healthy controls (HC). Serum IgG aβ2GP1-D1, IgG/IgM anti-cardiolipin (aCL) and IgG/IgM aβ2GP1 were measured by a chemiluminescence assay. The levels of IgG aβ2GP1-D1 were significantly increased in patients with APS, compared with disease controls and HCs (p < 0.001). Significant correlation was identified between IgG aβ2GP1-D1 and IgG aβ2GP1 (p < 0.0001), indicating IgG aβ2GP1-D1 were the predominant domain-specific antibodies in IgG aβ2GP1 family. Importantly, aβ2GP1-D1, but not aβ2GP1 non-D1, was significantly correlated with thrombotic events. Interestingly, no significant correlation between IgG aβ2GP1-D1 and obstetric complications was observed. Additionally, significantly higher levels of IgG aβ2GP1-D1 were found in patients with triple aPL positivity, compared with patients with double and single aPL positivity. Our findings suggest a potential role of IgG aβ2GP1-D1 in identifying APS patients with high risk of thrombosis, shedding insight on the introduction of IgG aβ2GP1-D1 in China. PMID:27053361

  7. Molecular Expression Profile Reveals Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets in Canine Endometrial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Voorwald, Fabiana Azevedo; Marchi, Fabio Albuquerque; Villacis, Rolando Andre Rios; Alves, Carlos Eduardo Fonseca; Toniollo, Gilson Hélio; Amorim, Renee Laufer

    2015-01-01

    Cystic endometrial hyperplasia (CEH), mucometra, and pyometra are common uterine diseases in intact dogs, with pyometra being a life threatening disease. This study aimed to determine the gene expression profile of these lesions and potential biomarkers for closed-cervix pyometra, the most severe condition. Total RNA was extracted from 69 fresh endometrium samples collected from 21 healthy female dogs during diestrus, 16 CEH, 15 mucometra and 17 pyometra (eight open and nine closed-cervixes). Global gene expression was detected using the Affymetrix Canine Gene 1.0 ST Array. Unsupervised analysis revealed two clusters, one mainly composed of diestrus and CEH samples and the other by 12/15 mucometra and all pyometra samples. When comparing pyometra with other groups, 189 differentially expressed genes were detected. SLPI, PTGS2/COX2, MMP1, S100A8, S100A9 and IL8 were among the top up-regulated genes detected in pyometra, further confirmed by external expression data. Notably, a particular molecular profile in pyometra from animals previously treated with exogenous progesterone compounds was observed in comparison with pyometra from untreated dogs as well as with other groups irrespective of exogenous hormone treatment status. In addition to S100A8 and S100A9 genes, overexpression of the inflammatory cytokines IL1B, TNF and IL6 as well as LTF were detected in the pyometra from treated animals. Interestingly, closed pyometra was more frequently detected in treated dogs (64% versus 33%), with IL1B, TNF, LBP and CXCL10 among the most relevant overexpressed genes. This molecular signature associated with potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets, such as CXCL10 and COX2, should guide future clinical studies. Based on the gene expression profile we suggested that pyometra from progesterone treated dogs is a distinct molecular entity. PMID:26222498

  8. Molecular Expression Profile Reveals Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets in Canine Endometrial Lesions.

    PubMed

    Voorwald, Fabiana Azevedo; Marchi, Fabio Albuquerque; Villacis, Rolando Andre Rios; Alves, Carlos Eduardo Fonseca; Toniollo, Gilson Hélio; Amorim, Renee Laufer; Drigo, Sandra Aparecida; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2015-01-01

    Cystic endometrial hyperplasia (CEH), mucometra, and pyometra are common uterine diseases in intact dogs, with pyometra being a life threatening disease. This study aimed to determine the gene expression profile of these lesions and potential biomarkers for closed-cervix pyometra, the most severe condition. Total RNA was extracted from 69 fresh endometrium samples collected from 21 healthy female dogs during diestrus, 16 CEH, 15 mucometra and 17 pyometra (eight open and nine closed-cervixes). Global gene expression was detected using the Affymetrix Canine Gene 1.0 ST Array. Unsupervised analysis revealed two clusters, one mainly composed of diestrus and CEH samples and the other by 12/15 mucometra and all pyometra samples. When comparing pyometra with other groups, 189 differentially expressed genes were detected. SLPI, PTGS2/COX2, MMP1, S100A8, S100A9 and IL8 were among the top up-regulated genes detected in pyometra, further confirmed by external expression data. Notably, a particular molecular profile in pyometra from animals previously treated with exogenous progesterone compounds was observed in comparison with pyometra from untreated dogs as well as with other groups irrespective of exogenous hormone treatment status. In addition to S100A8 and S100A9 genes, overexpression of the inflammatory cytokines IL1B, TNF and IL6 as well as LTF were detected in the pyometra from treated animals. Interestingly, closed pyometra was more frequently detected in treated dogs (64% versus 33%), with IL1B, TNF, LBP and CXCL10 among the most relevant overexpressed genes. This molecular signature associated with potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets, such as CXCL10 and COX2, should guide future clinical studies. Based on the gene expression profile we suggested that pyometra from progesterone treated dogs is a distinct molecular entity. PMID:26222498

  9. Broadly-Reactive Neutralizing and Non-neutralizing Antibodies Directed against the H7 Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Reveal Divergent Mechanisms of Protection

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Randy A.; Margine, Irina; Hirsh, Ariana; Bahl, Justin; Krammer, Florian

    2016-01-01

    In the early spring of 2013, Chinese health authorities reported several cases of H7N9 influenza virus infections in humans. Since then the virus has established itself at the human-animal interface in Eastern China and continues to cause several hundred infections annually. In order to characterize the antibody response to the H7N9 virus we generated several mouse monoclonal antibodies against the hemagglutinin of the A/Shanghai/1/13 (H7N9) virus. Of particular note are two monoclonal antibodies, 1B2 and 1H5, that show broad reactivity to divergent H7 hemagglutinins. Monoclonal antibody 1B2 binds to viruses of the Eurasian and North American H7 lineages and monoclonal antibody 1H5 reacts broadly to virus isolates of the Eurasian lineage. Interestingly, 1B2 shows broad hemagglutination inhibiting and neutralizing activity, while 1H5 fails to inhibit hemagglutination and demonstrates no neutralizing activity in vitro. However, both monoclonal antibodies were highly protective in an in vivo passive transfer challenge model in mice, even at low doses. Experiments using mutant antibodies that lack the ability for Fc/Fc-receptor and Fc/complement interactions suggest that the protection provided by mAb 1H5 is, at least in part, mediated by the Fc-fragment of the mAb. These findings highlight that a protective response to a pathogen may not only be due to neutralizing antibodies, but can also be the result of highly efficacious non-neutralizing antibodies not readily detected by classical in vitro neutralization or hemagglutination inhibition assays. This is of interest because H7 influenza virus vaccines induce only low hemagglutination inhibiting antibody titers while eliciting robust antibody titers as measured by ELISA. Our data suggest that these binding but non-neutralizing antibodies contribute to protection in vivo. PMID:27081859

  10. A potentially exhaustive screening strategy reveals two novel divergent myosins in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, E C; Geissler, H; Soldati, T

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, the myosin superfamily has kept expanding at an explosive rate, but the understanding of their complex functions has been lagging. Therefore, Dictyostelium discoideum, a genetically and biochemically tractable eukaryotic amoeba, appears as a powerful model organism to investigate the involvement of the actomyosin cytoskeleton in a variety of cellular tasks. Because of the relatively high degree of functional redundancy, such studies would be greatly facilitated by the prior knowledge of the whole myosin repertoire in this organism. Here, we present a strategy based on PCR amplification using degenerate primers and followed by negative hybridization screening which led to the potentially exhaustive identification of members of the myosin family in D. discoideum. Two novel myosins were identified and their genetic loci mapped by hybridization to an ordered YAC library. Preliminary inspection of myoK and myoM sequences revealed that, despite carrying most of the hallmarks of myosin motors, both molecules harbor features surprisingly divergent from most known myosins. PMID:10403059

  11. Brain Signals of Face Processing as Revealed by Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Ela I.; Iglesias, Jaime; Saavedra, Cristina; Trujillo-Barreto, Nelson J.; Valdés-Sosa, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the functional significance of different event-related potentials (ERPs) as electrophysiological indices of face perception and face recognition, according to cognitive and neurofunctional models of face processing. Initially, the processing of faces seems to be supported by early extrastriate occipital cortices and revealed by modulations of the occipital P1. This early response is thought to reflect the detection of certain primary structural aspects indicating the presence grosso modo of a face within the visual field. The posterior-temporal N170 is more sensitive to the detection of faces as complex-structured stimuli and, therefore, to the presence of its distinctive organizational characteristics prior to within-category identification. In turn, the relatively late and probably more rostrally generated N250r and N400-like responses might respectively indicate processes of access and retrieval of face-related information, which is stored in long-term memory (LTM). New methods of analysis of electrophysiological and neuroanatomical data, namely, dynamic causal modeling, single-trial and time-frequency analyses, are highly recommended to advance in the knowledge of those brain mechanisms concerning face processing. PMID:26160999

  12. Genome-sequence analysis of Acinetobacter johnsonii MB44 reveals potential nematode-virulent factors.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shijing; Ali, Muhammad; Xie, Li; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter johnsonii is generally recognized as a nonpathogenic bacterium although it is often found in hospital environments. However, a newly identified isolate of this species from a frost-plant-tissue sample, namely, A. johnsonii MB44, showed significant nematicidal activity against the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. To expand our understanding of this bacterial species, we generated a draft genome sequence of MB44 and analyzed its genomic features related to nematicidal attributes. The 3.36 Mb long genome contains 3636 predicted protein-coding genes and 95 RNA genes (including 14 rRNA genes), with a G + C content of 41.37 %. Genomic analysis of the prediction of nematicidal proteins using the software MP3 revealed a total of 108 potential virulence proteins. Some of these proteins were homologous to the known virulent proteins identified from Acinetobacter baumannii, a pathogenic species of the genus Acinetobacter. These virulent proteins included the outer membrane protein A, the phospholipase D, and penicillin-binding protein 7/8. Moreover, one siderophore biosynthesis gene cluster and one capsular polysaccharide gene cluster, which were predicted to be important virulence factors for C. elegans, were identified in the MB44 genome. The current study demonstrated that A. johnsonii MB44, with its nematicidal activity, could be an opportunistic pathogen to animals. PMID:27429894

  13. Genomic Analyses Reveal Potential Independent Adaptation to High Altitude in Tibetan Chickens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Shan; Li, Yan; Peng, Min-Sheng; Zhong, Li; Wang, Zong-Ji; Li, Qi-Ye; Tu, Xiao-Long; Dong, Yang; Zhu, Chun-Ling; Wang, Lu; Yang, Min-Min; Wu, Shi-Fang; Miao, Yong-Wang; Liu, Jian-Ping; Irwin, David M; Wang, Wen; Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-07-01

    Much like other indigenous domesticated animals, Tibetan chickens living at high altitudes (2,200-4,100 m) show specific physiological adaptations to the extreme environmental conditions of the Tibetan Plateau, but the genetic bases of these adaptations are not well characterized. Here, we assembled a de novo genome of a Tibetan chicken and resequenced whole genomes of 32 additional chickens, including Tibetan chickens, village chickens, game fowl, and Red Junglefowl, and found that the Tibetan chickens could broadly be placed into two groups. Further analyses revealed that several candidate genes in the calcium-signaling pathway are possibly involved in adaptation to the hypoxia experienced by these chickens, as these genes appear to have experienced directional selection in the two Tibetan chicken populations, suggesting a potential genetic mechanism underlying high altitude adaptation in Tibetan chickens. The candidate selected genes identified in this study, and their variants, may be useful targets for clarifying our understanding of the domestication of chickens in Tibet, and might be useful in current breeding efforts to develop improved breeds for the highlands. PMID:25788450

  14. The neural origins of visual crowding as revealed by event-related potentials and oscillatory dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ronconi, Luca; Bertoni, Sara; Bellacosa Marotti, Rosilari

    2016-06-01

    Visual crowding is the difficulty in perceiving a target in the presence of nearby flankers. Most neurophysiological studies of crowding employed functional neuroimaging, but because of its low temporal resolution, no definitive answer can be given to the question: is crowding arising at the earliest or at later stages of visual processing? Here, we used a classic letters crowding paradigm in combination with electroencephalography (EEG). We manipulated the critical space between peripheral target and flankers, while ensuring a proper control of basic stimulus characteristics. Analyses were focused on event-related potentials (ERPs) and oscillatory activity in the alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (15-30 Hz) and gamma (30-80 Hz) bands. At the ERP level, we found that the first sign of a crowding-induced modulation of EEG activity was a suppression of the N1 component. Oscillatory analysis revealed an early stimulus-evoked gamma enhancement and a later alpha reduction that, however, were not influenced by the amount of crowding. Importantly, reduction in the beta band reflected the amount of crowding (i.e., stronger reduction for strong relative to mid crowding condition) and correlated with individual behavioral performance. Collectively, these findings show that crowding for complex objects emerges at later stages of visual processing, possibly as a result of large-scale network interaction.

  15. Potential Role of the Last Half Repeat in TAL Effectors Revealed by a Molecular Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hua; Chang, Shan; Hu, Jian-ping; Tian, Xu-hong

    2016-01-01

    TAL effectors (TALEs) contain a modular DNA-binding domain that is composed of tandem repeats. In all naturally occurring TALEs, the end of tandem repeats is invariantly a truncated half repeat. To investigate the potential role of the last half repeat in TALEs, we performed comparative molecular dynamics simulations for the crystal structure of DNA-bound TALE AvrBs3 lacking the last half repeat and its modeled structure having the last half repeat. The structural stability analysis indicates that the modeled system is more stable than the nonmodeled system. Based on the principle component analysis, it is found that the AvrBs3 increases its structural compactness in the presence of the last half repeat. The comparison of DNA groove parameters of the two systems implies that the last half repeat also causes the change of DNA major groove binding efficiency. The following calculation of hydrogen bond reveals that, by stabilizing the phosphate binding with DNA at the C-terminus, the last half repeat helps to adopt a compact conformation at the protein-DNA interface. It further mediates more contacts between TAL repeats and DNA nucleotide bases. Finally, we suggest that the last half repeat is required for the high-efficient recognition of DNA by TALE. PMID:27803930

  16. Event-related potentials reveal early activation of syntax information in Chinese verb processing.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuan; Wu, Qiuyan; Wang, Jin; Feng, Liping; Xiao, Qing

    2016-09-19

    By taking advantage of the semantic-syntactic characteristics of Chinese verbs, the current study examined the brain activity of automatic activation of syntactic features at the single word level. Both syntactic (transitivity) and semantic (integrity) features of the verb were manipulated. Event-related potentials were measured while subjects performed lexical decision tasks on visually presented verbs at the single word level. The results showed that there was a significant transitivity effect in both lateral and midline areas for the 150-200ms time window (N200 effect), indicating the retrieval of the syntactic feature. There was also a significant syntactic-semantic interaction at the late stage of verb processing (N400 effect) in the midline central-parietal region, reflecting syntactic influences on semantic processing. These findings suggest that transitivity is an integral part of the mental representation of Chinese verbs and such information can be retrieved at the early stage of single verb processing and can influence subsequent semantic integration. These results also reveal the special features of Chinese language processing. PMID:27466021

  17. Event-related potentials reveal early activation of syntax information in Chinese verb processing.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuan; Wu, Qiuyan; Wang, Jin; Feng, Liping; Xiao, Qing

    2016-09-19

    By taking advantage of the semantic-syntactic characteristics of Chinese verbs, the current study examined the brain activity of automatic activation of syntactic features at the single word level. Both syntactic (transitivity) and semantic (integrity) features of the verb were manipulated. Event-related potentials were measured while subjects performed lexical decision tasks on visually presented verbs at the single word level. The results showed that there was a significant transitivity effect in both lateral and midline areas for the 150-200ms time window (N200 effect), indicating the retrieval of the syntactic feature. There was also a significant syntactic-semantic interaction at the late stage of verb processing (N400 effect) in the midline central-parietal region, reflecting syntactic influences on semantic processing. These findings suggest that transitivity is an integral part of the mental representation of Chinese verbs and such information can be retrieved at the early stage of single verb processing and can influence subsequent semantic integration. These results also reveal the special features of Chinese language processing.

  18. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals Specific Novel Tetrapeptide and Potential Anti-Inflammatory Metabolites in Pathogenic Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kim-Chung; Tam, Emily W T; Lo, Ka-Ching; Tsang, Alan K L; Lau, Candy C Y; To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Jasper F W; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-01-01

    Infections related to Aspergillus species have emerged to become an important focus in infectious diseases, as a result of the increasing use of immunosuppressive agents and high fatality associated with invasive aspergillosis. However, laboratory diagnosis of Aspergillus infections remains difficult. In this study, by comparing the metabolomic profiles of the culture supernatants of 30 strains of six pathogenic Aspergillus species (A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. terreus, A. nomius and A. tamarii) and 31 strains of 10 non-Aspergillus fungi, eight compounds present in all strains of the six Aspergillus species but not in any strain of the non-Aspergillus fungi were observed. One of the eight compounds, Leu-Glu-Leu-Glu, is a novel tetrapeptide and represents the first linear tetrapeptide observed in Aspergillus species, which we propose to be named aspergitide. Two other closely related Aspergillus-specific compounds, hydroxy-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid and (sulfooxy)benzoic acid, may possess anti-inflammatory properties, as 2-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid possesses a structure similar to those of aspirin [2-(acetoxy)benzoic acid] and salicylic acid (2-hydroxybenzoic acid). Further studies to examine the potentials of these Aspergillus-specific compounds for laboratory diagnosis of aspergillosis are warranted and further experiments will reveal whether Leu-Glu-Leu-Glu, hydroxy-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid and (sulfooxy)benzoic acid are virulent factors of the pathogenic Aspergillus species. PMID:26090713

  19. Potential translational targets revealed by linking mouse grooming behavioral phenotypes to gene expression using public databases.

    PubMed

    Roth, Andrew; Kyzar, Evan J; Cachat, Jonathan; Stewart, Adam Michael; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; O'Leary, Timothy P; Tabakoff, Boris; Brown, Richard E; Kalueff, Allan V

    2013-01-10

    Rodent self-grooming is an important, evolutionarily conserved behavior, highly sensitive to pharmacological and genetic manipulations. Mice with aberrant grooming phenotypes are currently used to model various human disorders. Therefore, it is critical to understand the biology of grooming behavior, and to assess its translational validity to humans. The present in-silico study used publicly available gene expression and behavioral data obtained from several inbred mouse strains in the open-field, light-dark box, elevated plus- and elevated zero-maze tests. As grooming duration differed between strains, our analysis revealed several candidate genes with significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and grooming duration. The Allen Brain Atlas, STRING, GoMiner and Mouse Genome Informatics databases were used to functionally map and analyze these candidate mouse genes against their human orthologs, assessing the strain ranking of their expression and the regional distribution of expression in the mouse brain. This allowed us to identify an interconnected network of candidate genes (which have expression levels that correlate with grooming behavior), display altered patterns of expression in key brain areas related to grooming, and underlie important functions in the brain. Collectively, our results demonstrate the utility of large-scale, high-throughput data-mining and in-silico modeling for linking genomic and behavioral data, as well as their potential to identify novel neural targets for complex neurobehavioral phenotypes, including grooming.

  20. Genetic diversity and population structure of endangered Aquilaria malaccensis revealed potential for future conservation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pradeep; Nag, Akshay; Parmar, Rajni; Ghosh, Sneha; Bhau, Brijmohan Singh; Sharma, Ram Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The endangered Aquilaria malaccensis,is an important plant with high economic values. Characterization of genetic diversity and population structure is receiving tremendous attention for effective conservation of genetic resources. Considering important repositories of biological diversity, the genetic relationships of 127 A. malaccensis accessions from 10 home gardens of three states of northeast India were assessed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Of the 1153 fragments amplified with four AFLP primer combinations, 916 (79.4%) were found to be polymorphic. Polymorphic information content (PIC) and marker index (MI) of each primer combination correlate significantly with the number of genotypes resolved. Overall, a high genetic diversity (avg. 71.85%) was recorded. Further, high gene flow (Nm: 3.37), low genetic differentiation (FST: 0.069) and high within population genetic variation (93%) suggests that most of the genetic diversity is restricted within population. Neighbour joining (NJ), principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and Bayesian-based STRUCTURE grouped all the accessions in two clusters with significant intermixing between populations, therefore, revealed that two genetically distinct gene pools are operating in the A. malaccensis populations cultivated in home gardens. Based on the various diversity inferences, five diverse populations (JOH, FN, HLF, DHM and ITN) were identified, which can be potentially exploited to develop conservation strategies for A. malaccensis.

  1. Morphology-based mammalian stem cell tests reveal potential developmental toxicity of donepezil.

    PubMed

    Lau, Caroline G Y; Marikawa, Yusuke

    2014-11-01

    Various compounds, including therapeutic drugs, can adversely impact the survival and development of embryos in the uterus. Identification of such development-interfering agents is a challenging task, although multi-angle approaches--including the use of in vitro toxicology studies involving embryonic stem cells--should alleviate some of the current difficulties. In the present study, we utilized the in vitro elongation of embryoid bodies (EBs) derived from mouse embryonal carcinoma stem cell line P19C5 as a model of early embryological events, specifically that of gastrulation and axial patterning. From our study, we identified donepezil, a medication indicated for the management of Alzheimer's disease, as a potential developmental toxicant. The extent of P19C5 EB axial elongation was diminished by donepezil in a dose-dependent manner. Although donepezil is a known inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, interference of elongation was not mediated through this enzyme. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR revealed that donepezil altered the expression pattern of a specific set of developmental regulator genes involved in patterning along the anterior-posterior body axis. When tested in mouse whole embryo culture, donepezil caused morphological abnormalities including impaired somitogenesis. Donepezil also diminished elongation morphogenesis of EBs generated from human embryonic stem cells. These results suggest that donepezil interferes with axial elongation morphogenesis of early embryos by altering the expression pattern of regulators of axial development.

  2. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals Specific Novel Tetrapeptide and Potential Anti-Inflammatory Metabolites in Pathogenic Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kim-Chung; Tam, Emily W T; Lo, Ka-Ching; Tsang, Alan K L; Lau, Candy C Y; To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Jasper F W; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-06-17

    Infections related to Aspergillus species have emerged to become an important focus in infectious diseases, as a result of the increasing use of immunosuppressive agents and high fatality associated with invasive aspergillosis. However, laboratory diagnosis of Aspergillus infections remains difficult. In this study, by comparing the metabolomic profiles of the culture supernatants of 30 strains of six pathogenic Aspergillus species (A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. terreus, A. nomius and A. tamarii) and 31 strains of 10 non-Aspergillus fungi, eight compounds present in all strains of the six Aspergillus species but not in any strain of the non-Aspergillus fungi were observed. One of the eight compounds, Leu-Glu-Leu-Glu, is a novel tetrapeptide and represents the first linear tetrapeptide observed in Aspergillus species, which we propose to be named aspergitide. Two other closely related Aspergillus-specific compounds, hydroxy-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid and (sulfooxy)benzoic acid, may possess anti-inflammatory properties, as 2-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid possesses a structure similar to those of aspirin [2-(acetoxy)benzoic acid] and salicylic acid (2-hydroxybenzoic acid). Further studies to examine the potentials of these Aspergillus-specific compounds for laboratory diagnosis of aspergillosis are warranted and further experiments will reveal whether Leu-Glu-Leu-Glu, hydroxy-(sulfooxy)benzoic acid and (sulfooxy)benzoic acid are virulent factors of the pathogenic Aspergillus species.

  3. The time course of word retrieval revealed by event-related brain potentials during overt speech

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Albert; Strijkers, Kristof; Martin, Clara; Thierry, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    Speech production is one of the most fundamental activities of humans. A core cognitive operation involved in this skill is the retrieval of words from long-term memory, that is, from the mental lexicon. In this article, we establish the time course of lexical access by recording the brain electrical activity of participants while they named pictures aloud. By manipulating the ordinal position of pictures belonging to the same semantic categories, the cumulative semantic interference effect, we were able to measure the exact time at which lexical access takes place. We found significant correlations between naming latencies, ordinal position of pictures, and event-related potential mean amplitudes starting 200 ms after picture presentation and lasting for 180 ms. The study reveals that the brain engages extremely fast in the retrieval of words one wishes to utter and offers a clear time frame of how long it takes for the competitive process of activating and selecting words in the course of speech to be resolved. PMID:19934043

  4. Genomic Analyses Reveal Potential Independent Adaptation to High Altitude in Tibetan Chickens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Shan; Li, Yan; Peng, Min-Sheng; Zhong, Li; Wang, Zong-Ji; Li, Qi-Ye; Tu, Xiao-Long; Dong, Yang; Zhu, Chun-Ling; Wang, Lu; Yang, Min-Min; Wu, Shi-Fang; Miao, Yong-Wang; Liu, Jian-Ping; Irwin, David M; Wang, Wen; Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-07-01

    Much like other indigenous domesticated animals, Tibetan chickens living at high altitudes (2,200-4,100 m) show specific physiological adaptations to the extreme environmental conditions of the Tibetan Plateau, but the genetic bases of these adaptations are not well characterized. Here, we assembled a de novo genome of a Tibetan chicken and resequenced whole genomes of 32 additional chickens, including Tibetan chickens, village chickens, game fowl, and Red Junglefowl, and found that the Tibetan chickens could broadly be placed into two groups. Further analyses revealed that several candidate genes in the calcium-signaling pathway are possibly involved in adaptation to the hypoxia experienced by these chickens, as these genes appear to have experienced directional selection in the two Tibetan chicken populations, suggesting a potential genetic mechanism underlying high altitude adaptation in Tibetan chickens. The candidate selected genes identified in this study, and their variants, may be useful targets for clarifying our understanding of the domestication of chickens in Tibet, and might be useful in current breeding efforts to develop improved breeds for the highlands.

  5. Perceptual shift in bilingualism: brain potentials reveal plasticity in pre-attentive colour perception.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Panos; Dering, Benjamin; Wiggett, Alison; Kuipers, Jan-Rouke; Thierry, Guillaume

    2010-09-01

    The validity of the linguistic relativity principle continues to stimulate vigorous debate and research. The debate has recently shifted from the behavioural investigation arena to a more biologically grounded field, in which tangible physiological evidence for language effects on perception can be obtained. Using brain potentials in a colour oddball detection task with Greek and English speakers, a recent study suggests that language effects may exist at early stages of perceptual integration [Thierry, G., Athanasopoulos, P., Wiggett, A., Dering, B., & Kuipers, J. (2009). Unconscious effects of language-specific terminology on pre-attentive colour perception. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106, 4567-4570]. In this paper, we test whether in Greek speakers exposure to a new cultural environment (UK) with contrasting colour terminology from their native language affects early perceptual processing as indexed by an electrophysiological correlate of visual detection of colour luminance. We also report semantic mapping of native colour terms and colour similarity judgements. Results reveal convergence of linguistic descriptions, cognitive processing, and early perception of colour in bilinguals. This result demonstrates for the first time substantial plasticity in early, pre-attentive colour perception and has important implications for the mechanisms that are involved in perceptual changes during the processes of language learning and acculturation.

  6. Zero-expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR: recent developments reveal high potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Jedamzik, Ralf; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    ZERODUR® is a well-established material in astronomy and all fields of applications where temperature gradients might limit extreme precision and stability. Together with its rich heritage come a series of recent developments, which reveal the potential of the material for broader and more demanding applications. The outstanding degree of light-weighting achieved with progress in CNC grinding in the last two years shows its high suitability for space telescope mirrors. This is supported by new data on strength enabling higher mechanical loads. Also ground based telescopes benefit from the improved light-weight processing such as solar telescopes and downstream mirrors of extremely large telescopes. More and better data have been collected demonstrating the unique CTE homogeneity of ZERODUR® and its very high reproducibility a necessary precondition for large series mirror production. Deliveries of more than 250 ZERODUR mirrors of 1.5 m in diameter prove the availability of robust industrial serial production capability inevitable for ELT mirror segment production.

  7. A Novel Platform for the Potentiation of Therapeutic Antibodies Based on Antigen-Dependent Formation of IgG Hexamers at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Verploegen, Sandra; Strumane, Kristin; van Kampen, Muriel D.; Voorhorst, Marleen; Horstman, Wendy; Engelberts, Patrick J.; Oostindie, Simone C.; Wang, Guanbo; Heck, Albert J. R.; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    2016-01-01

    IgG antibodies can organize into ordered hexamers on cell surfaces after binding their antigen. These hexamers bind the first component of complement C1 inducing complement-dependent target cell killing. Here, we translated this natural concept into a novel technology platform (HexaBody technology) for therapeutic antibody potentiation. We identified mutations that enhanced hexamer formation and complement activation by IgG1 antibodies against a range of targets on cells from hematological and solid tumor indications. IgG1 backbones with preferred mutations E345K or E430G conveyed a strong ability to induce conditional complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of cell lines and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patient tumor cells, while retaining regular pharmacokinetics and biopharmaceutical developability. Both mutations potently enhanced CDC- and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of a type II CD20 antibody that was ineffective in complement activation, while retaining its ability to induce apoptosis. The identified IgG1 Fc backbones provide a novel platform for the generation of therapeutics with enhanced effector functions that only become activated upon binding to target cell–expressed antigen. PMID:26736041

  8. A Novel Platform for the Potentiation of Therapeutic Antibodies Based on Antigen-Dependent Formation of IgG Hexamers at the Cell Surface.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Rob N; Beurskens, Frank J; Verploegen, Sandra; Strumane, Kristin; van Kampen, Muriel D; Voorhorst, Marleen; Horstman, Wendy; Engelberts, Patrick J; Oostindie, Simone C; Wang, Guanbo; Heck, Albert J R; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I

    2016-01-01

    IgG antibodies can organize into ordered hexamers on cell surfaces after binding their antigen. These hexamers bind the first component of complement C1 inducing complement-dependent target cell killing. Here, we translated this natural concept into a novel technology platform (HexaBody technology) for therapeutic antibody potentiation. We identified mutations that enhanced hexamer formation and complement activation by IgG1 antibodies against a range of targets on cells from hematological and solid tumor indications. IgG1 backbones with preferred mutations E345K or E430G conveyed a strong ability to induce conditional complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of cell lines and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patient tumor cells, while retaining regular pharmacokinetics and biopharmaceutical developability. Both mutations potently enhanced CDC- and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of a type II CD20 antibody that was ineffective in complement activation, while retaining its ability to induce apoptosis. The identified IgG1 Fc backbones provide a novel platform for the generation of therapeutics with enhanced effector functions that only become activated upon binding to target cell-expressed antigen. PMID:26736041

  9. Magnetic particle-linked anti hCG β antibody for immunoassay of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), potential application to early pregnancy diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsiao-Ting; Yeh, Jay Z; Jiang, Chi-Ming; Wu, Ming-Chang

    2012-07-31

    The objective of this study was to develop a magnetic particle-linked monoclonal antibody to hCG β for immunosorbent assay of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) with improved detection sensitivity. Monoclonal antibody against hCG β was found to be optimally cross-linked to the superparamagnetic particles (SPIO) using EDC and NHS as cross-linking reagents. This superparamagnetic particle-linked monoclonal antibody was able to concentrate hCG from a tested solution for further ELISA assay using horse radish peroxidase-labeled monoclonal antibody against hCG β. This hybrid technique had greatly decreased the detection limit to 0.1 mIU/mL, making an early detection of pregnancy possible. With an improved sensitivity and simple operation, the magnetic particle-linked anti hCG β antibody for immunoassay of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has a great potential to supersede the traditional ELISA for pregnancy diagnosis. PMID:22542932

  10. Co-immunoprecipitation with Tau Isoform-specific Antibodies Reveals Distinct Protein Interactions and Highlights a Putative Role for 2N Tau in Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Song, Xiaomin; Nisbet, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates multiple isoforms of the microtubule-associated protein Tau, but little is known about their specific function. In the adult mouse brain, three Tau isoforms are expressed that contain either 0, 1, or 2 N-terminal inserts (0N, 1N, and 2N). We generated Tau isoform-specific antibodies and performed co-immunoprecipitations followed by tandem mass tag multiplexed quantitative mass spectrometry. We identified novel Tau-interacting proteins of which one-half comprised membrane-bound proteins, localized to the plasma membrane, mitochondria, and other organelles. Tau was also found to interact with proteins involved in presynaptic signal transduction. MetaCore analysis revealed one major Tau interaction cluster that contained 33 Tau pulldown proteins. To explore the pathways in which these proteins are involved, we conducted an ingenuity pathway analysis that revealed two significant overlapping pathways, “cell-to-cell signaling and interaction” and “neurological disease.” The functional enrichment tool DAVID showed that in particular the 2N Tau-interacting proteins were specifically associated with neurological disease. Finally, for a subset of Tau interactions (apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), apoE, mitochondrial creatine kinase U-type, β-synuclein, synaptogyrin-3, synaptophysin, syntaxin 1B, synaptotagmin, and synapsin 1), we performed reverse co-immunoprecipitations, confirming the preferential interaction of specific isoforms. For example, apoA1 displayed a 5-fold preference for the interaction with 2N, whereas β-synuclein showed preference for 0N. Remarkably, a reverse immunoprecipitation with apoA1 detected only the 2N isoform. This highlights distinct protein interactions of the different Tau isoforms, suggesting that they execute different functions in brain tissue. PMID:26861879

  11. Dynamics and Predictive Potential of Antibodies against Insect-Derived Recombinant Leishmania infantum Proteins during Chemotherapy of Naturally Infected Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Todolí, Felicitat; Galindo, Inmaculada; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Pérez-Filgueira, Mariano; Escribano, José M.; Alberola, Jordi; Rodríguez-Cortés, Alhelí

    2010-01-01

    A predictive marker for the success treatment of canine leishmaniasis is required for the application of a more rational therapy protocol, which must improve the probability of cure and reduce Leishmania resistance to drugs. We investigated the dynamics and predictive value of antibodies against insect-derived recombinant L. infantum proteins rKMPII and rTRYP by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with retrospective serum samples from 36 dogs during treatment of canine leishmaniasis. In the entire group of dogs, concentrations of antibodies against rKMPII and rTRYP significantly decreased earlier than concentrations of antibodies against crude total Leishmania antigen (one versus six months), which suggested that the dynamics of antibodies against recombinant proteins may be useful for assessing clinical improvement after treatment. Interestingly, decreases in antibody concentrations against rKMPII occurred earlier in disease-free dogs than in dogs that remain clinically ill one year after beginning of treatment, which suggested that these antibodies may be useful for predicting disease-free survival one year after the beginning of therapy against canine leishmaniasis. PMID:20439957

  12. Endogenous Voltage Potentials and the Microenvironment: Bioelectric Signals that Reveal, Induce and Normalize Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chernet, Brook; Levin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cancer may be a disease of geometry: a misregulation of the field of information that orchestrates individual cells’ activities towards normal anatomy. Recent work identified molecular mechanisms underlying a novel system of developmental control: bioelectric gradients. Endogenous spatio-temporal differences in resting potential of non-neural cells provide instructive cues for cell regulation and complex patterning during embryogenesis and regeneration. It is now appreciated that these cues are an important layer of the dysregulation of cell: cell interactions that leads to cancer. Abnormal depolarization of resting potential (Vmem) is a convenient marker for neoplasia and activates a metastatic phenotype in genetically-normal cells in vivo. Moreover, oncogene expression depolarizes cells that form tumor-like structures, but is unable to form tumors if this depolarization is artificially prevented by misexpression of hyperpolarizing ion channels. Vmem triggers metastatic behaviors at considerable distance, mediated by transcriptional and epigenetic effects of electrically-modulated flows of serotonin and butyrate. While in vivo data on voltages in carcinogenesis comes mainly from the amphibian model, unbiased genetic screens and network profiling in rodents and human tissues reveal several ion channel proteins as bona fide oncogene and promising targets for cancer drug development. However, we propose that a focus on specific channel genes is just the tip of the iceberg. Bioelectric state is determined by post-translational gating of ion channels, not only from genetically-specified complements of ion translocators. A better model is a statistical dynamics view of spatial Vmem gradients. Cancer may not originate at the single cell level, since gap junctional coupling results in multi-cellular physiological networks with multiple stable attractors in bioelectrical state space. New medical applications await a detailed understanding of the mechanisms by which organ

  13. Metabolomic Profiling Reveals Potential Markers and Bioprocesses Altered in Bladder Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Shojaie, Ali; Vasu, Vihas T; Vareed, Shaiju K.; Nalluri, Srilatha; Putluri, Vasanta; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Panzitt, Katrin; Tallman, Christopher T.; Butler, Charles; Sana, Theodore R.; Fischer, Steven M.; Sica, Gabriel; Brat, Daniel J.; Shi, Huidong; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Lotan, Yair; Weizer, Alon Z.; Terris, Martha K.; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-01-01

    While alterations in xenobiotic metabolism are considered causal in the development of bladder cancer (BCa), the precise mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we used high-throughput mass spectrometry to measure over 2,000 compounds in 58 clinical specimens, identifying 35 metabolites which exhibited significant changes in BCa. This metabolic signature distinguished both normal and benign bladder from BCa. Exploratory analyses of this metabolomic signature in urine showed promise in distinguishing BCa from controls, and also non-muscle from muscle-invasive BCa. Subsequent enrichment-based bioprocess mapping revealed alterations in phase I/II metabolism and suggested a possible role for DNA methylation in perturbing xenobiotic metabolism in BCa. In particular, we validated tumor-associated hypermethylation in the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 promoters of BCa tissues by bisulfite sequence analysis and methylation-specific PCR, and also by in vitro treatment of T-24 BCa cell line with the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Further, we showed that expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 was reduced significantly in an independent cohort of BCa specimens compared to matched benign adjacent tissues. In summary, our findings identified candidate diagnostic and prognostic markers and highlighted mechanisms associated with the silencing of xenobiotic metabolism. The metabolomic signature we describe offers potential as a urinary biomarker for early detection and staging of BCa, highlighting the utility of evaluating metabolomic profiles of cancer to gain insights into bioprocesses perturbed during tumor development and progression. PMID:21990318

  14. Metabolomic profiling reveals potential markers and bioprocesses altered in bladder cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Shojaie, Ali; Vasu, Vihas T; Vareed, Shaiju K; Nalluri, Srilatha; Putluri, Vasanta; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Panzitt, Katrin; Tallman, Christopher T; Butler, Charles; Sana, Theodore R; Fischer, Steven M; Sica, Gabriel; Brat, Daniel J; Shi, Huidong; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Lotan, Yair; Weizer, Alon Z; Terris, Martha K; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-12-15

    Although alterations in xenobiotic metabolism are considered causal in the development of bladder cancer, the precise mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we used high-throughput mass spectrometry to measure over 2,000 compounds in 58 clinical specimens, identifying 35 metabolites which exhibited significant changes in bladder cancer. This metabolic signature distinguished both normal and benign bladder from bladder cancer. Exploratory analyses of this metabolomic signature in urine showed promise in distinguishing bladder cancer from controls and also nonmuscle from muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Subsequent enrichment-based bioprocess mapping revealed alterations in phase I/II metabolism and suggested a possible role for DNA methylation in perturbing xenobiotic metabolism in bladder cancer. In particular, we validated tumor-associated hypermethylation in the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) promoters of bladder cancer tissues by bisulfite sequence analysis and methylation-specific PCR and also by in vitro treatment of T-24 bladder cancer cell line with the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. Furthermore, we showed that expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 was reduced significantly in an independent cohort of bladder cancer specimens compared with matched benign adjacent tissues. In summary, our findings identified candidate diagnostic and prognostic markers and highlighted mechanisms associated with the silencing of xenobiotic metabolism. The metabolomic signature we describe offers potential as a urinary biomarker for early detection and staging of bladder cancer, highlighting the utility of evaluating metabolomic profiles of cancer to gain insights into bioprocesses perturbed during tumor development and progression. PMID:21990318

  15. An Integrative Genomic and Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Potential Targets Associated with Cell Proliferation in Uterine Leiomyomas

    PubMed Central

    Cirilo, Priscila Daniele Ramos; Marchi, Fábio Albuquerque; Barros Filho, Mateus de Camargo; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; Domingues, Maria Aparecida Custódio; Jurisica, Igor; Pontes, Anagloria; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2013-01-01

    Background Uterine Leiomyomas (ULs) are the most common benign tumours affecting women of reproductive age. ULs represent a major problem in public health, as they are the main indication for hysterectomy. Approximately 40–50% of ULs have non-random cytogenetic abnormalities, and half of ULs may have copy number alterations (CNAs). Gene expression microarrays studies have demonstrated that cell proliferation genes act in response to growth factors and steroids. However, only a few genes mapping to CNAs regions were found to be associated with ULs. Methodology We applied an integrative analysis using genomic and transcriptomic data to identify the pathways and molecular markers associated with ULs. Fifty-one fresh frozen specimens were evaluated by array CGH (JISTIC) and gene expression microarrays (SAM). The CONEXIC algorithm was applied to integrate the data. Principal Findings The integrated analysis identified the top 30 significant genes (P<0.01), which comprised genes associated with cancer, whereas the protein-protein interaction analysis indicated a strong association between FANCA and BRCA1. Functional in silico analysis revealed target molecules for drugs involved in cell proliferation, including FGFR1 and IGFBP5. Transcriptional and protein analyses showed that FGFR1 (P = 0.006 and P<0.01, respectively) and IGFBP5 (P = 0.0002 and P = 0.006, respectively) were up-regulated in the tumours when compared with the adjacent normal myometrium. Conclusions The integrative genomic and transcriptomic approach indicated that FGFR1 and IGFBP5 amplification, as well as the consequent up-regulation of the protein products, plays an important role in the aetiology of ULs and thus provides data for potential drug therapies development to target genes associated with cellular proliferation in ULs. PMID:23483937

  16. Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard Allen; Power, Ian M.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Southam, Gordon; Suttle, Curtis A.

    2015-01-01

    Within the subarctic climate of Clinton Creek, Yukon, Canada, lies an abandoned and flooded open-pit asbestos mine that harbors rapidly growing microbialites. To understand their formation we completed a metagenomic community profile of the microbialites and their surrounding sediments. Assembled metagenomic data revealed that bacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria numerically dominated this system, although the relative abundances of taxa within the phylum varied among environments. Bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were dominant in the microbialites and sediments, respectively. The microbialites were also home to many other groups associated with microbialite formation including filamentous cyanobacteria and dissimilatory sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria, consistent with the idea of a shared global microbialite microbiome. Other members were present that are typically not associated with microbialites including Gemmatimonadetes and iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, which participate in carbon metabolism and iron cycling. Compared to the sediments, the microbialite microbiome has significantly more genes associated with photosynthetic processes (e.g., photosystem II reaction centers, carotenoid, and chlorophyll biosynthesis) and carbon fixation (e.g., CO dehydrogenase). The Clinton Creek microbialite communities had strikingly similar functional potentials to non-lithifying microbial mats from the Canadian High Arctic and Antarctica, but are functionally distinct, from non-lithifying mats or biofilms from Yellowstone. Clinton Creek microbialites also share metabolic genes (R2 < 0.750) with freshwater microbial mats from Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico, but are more similar to polar Arctic mats (R2 > 0.900). These metagenomic profiles from an anthropogenic microbialite-forming ecosystem provide context to microbialite formation on a human-relevant timescale. PMID:26441900

  17. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  18. The potential of magnetic nanocluster and dual-functional protein-based strategy for noninvasive detection of HBV surface antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hengyao; Yang, Hao; Li, Ding; Wang, Kan; Ruan, Jing; Zhang, Xueqing; Chen, Jun; Bao, Chenchen; Ji, Jiajia; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Daxiang

    2011-02-21

    Magnetic nanoclusters (MNCs) were synthesized in a one-pot process, carboxylic MNCs and dual-functional protein were prepared and used to capture hepatitis B virus surface antibodies (anti-HBs) in simulated diseased oral mucosal transudate (OMT) samples. The specific substrate of dual-functional protein, dual-labeled double-chained DNA molecules, based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), was used to amplify the detection signal and the detection limit of 0.1 ng mL(-1) of anti-HBs monoclonal antibodies was achieved. Combination MNCs with dual-functional protein enables the noninvasive detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antibodies in OMT samples, showing promise as a diagnostic tool for the OMT diagnosis of infectious diseases with sensitive, specific and facile capabilities.

  19. Using antibodies against ATPase and microarray immunoassays for the search for potential extraterrestrial life in saline environments on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigl, Andreas; Gruber, Claudia; Blanco-López, Yolanda; Rivas, Luis A.; Parro, Victor; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2010-05-01

    For the search for extraterrestrial life it is proposed to use receptors such as labelled antibodies for the detection of organic biomarkers. One of these organic molecules to be tested is the universal enzyme ATP synthase which is present in highly conserved forms in all organisms on earth. Therefore it is necessary to evaluate antibodies against ATPase respectively ATP synthase and their subunits. As it is known, that there are halite deposits on Mars the experiments in this study have been carried out with regard to halophile microorganisms and saline environments. Standard F1F0 ATPase from Escherichia coli LE 392 and Bacillus megaterium as well as haloarchaeal A-ATPase from Halorubrum saccharovorum and Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 were used. The cultivated cells, except Bacillus, were broken by passage through a French Pressure Cell. Separation of enzyme subunits was performed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Western Blotting with antisera produced in rabbit against A-ATPase subunits A (85 kD) and subunits B (60 kD) from Halorubrrum saccharovorum (1) showed positive reactions with the membrane fraction, which should be enriched with ATPase from Halorubrum saccharovorum, Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 and Escherichia coli LE 392. Particular attention was given to the question if ATPase subunits can be detected in whole cells. Therefore whole cell preparations of all cells and spore suspensions from Geobacillus stearothermophilus were tested against the antiserum as well as against protein-A-purified antibody against A-ATPase subunit A from Halorubrum saccharovorum. A positive immuno reaction of all cell preparations with the antiserum as well as with the purified antibody was detected. The spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus reacted positively with the antiserum against subunit A of the A-ATPase from Hrr. saccharovorum. A commercial antibody Rabbit Anti-V-ATPase subunit A polyclonal antibody from the GenScript Corporation reacted positively with

  20. Antibody microinjection reveals an essential role for human polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) in the functional maturation of mitotic centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Mammalian polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is structurally related to the polo gene product of Drosophila melanogaster, Cdc5p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and plo1+ of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a newly emerging family of serine-threonine kinases implicated in cell cycle regulation. Based on data obtained for its putative homologues in invertebrates and yeasts, human Plk1 is suspected to regulate some fundamental aspect(s) of mitosis, but no direct experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis has previously been reported. In this study, we have used a cell duplication, microinjection assay to investigate the in vivo function of Plk1 in both immortalized (HeLa) and nonimmortalized (Hs68) human cells. Injection of anti-Plk1 antibodies (Plk1+) at various stages of the cell cycle had no effect on the kinetics of DNA replication but severely impaired the ability of cells to divide. Analysis of Plk1(+)-injected, mitotically arrested HeLa cells by fluorescence microscopy revealed abnormal distributions of condensed chromatin and monoastral microtubule arrays that were nucleated from duplicated but unseparated centrosomes. Most strikingly, centrosomes in Plk1(+)-injected cells were drastically reduced in size, and the accumulation of both gamma-tubulin and MPM-2 immunoreactivity was impaired. These data indicate that Plk1 activity is necessary for the functional maturation of centrosomes in late G2/early prophase and, consequently, for the establishment of a bipolar spindle. Additional roles for Plk1 at later stages of mitosis are not excluded, although injection of Plk1+ after the completion of spindle formation did not interfere with cytokinesis. Injection of Plk1+ into nonimmortalized Hs68 cells produced qualitatively similar phenotypes, but the vast majority of the injected Hs68 cells arrested as single, mononucleated cells in G2. This latter observation hints at the existence, in nonimmortalized cells, of a centrosome-maturation checkpoint sensitive to the impairment

  1. NCI Researchers Discover Exceptionally Potent Antibodies with Potential for Prophylaxis and Therapy of MERS-Coronavirus Infections | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer In a recent article published in the Journal of Virology, Tianlei Ying, Ph.D., Dimiter Dimitrov, Ph.D., and their colleagues in the Laboratory of Experimental Immunology (LEI), Cancer and Inflammation Program, NCI Center for Cancer Research, reported the identification of three human monoclonal antibodies (m336, m337, and m338) that target the part of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) that is responsible for binding to its receptor. These antibodies are exceptionally potent inhibitors of MERS-CoV infection and also provide a basis for creating a future MERS-CoV vaccine.

  2. A novel ligand of calcitonin receptor reveals a potential new sensor that modulates programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Furness, SGB; Hare, DL; Kourakis, A; Turnley, AM; Wookey, PJ

    2016-01-01

    We have discovered that the accumulation of an anti-calcitonin receptor (anti-CTR) antibody conjugated to a fluorophore (mAb2C4:AF568) provides a robust signal for cells undergoing apoptotic programmed cell death (PCD). PCD is an absolute requirement for normal development of metazoan organisms. PCD is a hallmark of common diseases such as cardiovascular disease and tissue rejection in graft versus host pathologies, and chemotherapeutics work by increasing PCD. This robust signal or high fluorescent events were verified by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry in several cell lines and a primary culture in which PCD had been induced. In Jurkat cells, GBM-L2 and MG63 cells, the percentage undergoing PCD that were positive for both mAb2C4:AF568 and annexin V ranged between 70 and >90%. In MG63 cells induced for the preapoptotic cell stress response (PACSR), the normal expression of α-tubulin, a key structural component of the cytoskeleton, and accumulation of mAb2C4:AF568 were mutually exclusive. Our data support a model in which CTR is upregulated during PACSR and recycles to the plasma membrane with apoptosis. In cells committed to apoptosis (α-tubulin negative), there is accumulation of the CTR-ligand mAb2C4:AF568 generating a high fluorescent event. The reagent mAb2C4:AF568 effectively identifies a novel event linked to apoptosis. PMID:27777788

  3. Mean-spherical model for soft potentials - The hard core revealed as a perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Y.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1979-01-01

    The mean-spherical approximation for fluids is extended to treat the case of dense systems interacting via soft potentials. The extension takes the form of a generalized statement concerning the behavior of the direct-correlation function c(r) and the radial-distribution function g(r). From a detailed analysis that views the hard-core portion of a potential as a perturbation on the whole, a specific model is proposed which possesses analytic solutions for both Coulomb and Yukawa potentials, in addition to certain other remarkable properties. A variational principle for the model leads to a relatively simple method for obtaining numerical solutions.

  4. A mean spherical model for soft potentials: The hard core revealed as a perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Y.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1978-01-01

    The mean spherical approximation for fluids is extended to treat the case of dense systems interacting via soft-potentials. The extension takes the form of a generalized statement concerning the behavior of the direct correlation function c(r) and radial distribution g(r). From a detailed analysis that views the hard core portion of a potential as a perturbation on the whole, a specific model is proposed which possesses analytic solutions for both Coulomb and Yukawa potentials, in addition to certain other remarkable properties. A variational principle for the model leads to a relatively simple method for obtaining numerical solutions.

  5. Antibodies in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs from one individual to another can incite the production of antibodies specific for foreign antigens, especially major histocompatibility antigens, in the graft. Antibodies specific for a graft provide an index of immunity and a potential trigger for injury and rejection. However, the index of immunity can sometimes miss antibody-mediated rejection and besides causing injury the antibodies against a graft can also protect a graft from injury by blocking immune recognition, called enhancement, regulating activation of complement, and inducing changes in the graft that resist damage. Reviewed here are potential limitations in the use of antibodies as an index of immunity and the ways antibodies cause and/or prevent injury. PMID:20807473

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deep-Sea Basidiomycetous Yeast Cryptococcus sp. Strain Mo29 Reveals Its Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Rédou, Vanessa; Kumar, Abhishek; Hainaut, Matthieu; Henrissat, Bernard; Record, Eric; Barbier, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus sp. strain Mo29 was isolated from the Rainbow hydrothermal site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this basidiomycetous yeast strain, which has highlighted its biotechnological potential as revealed by the presence of genes involved in the synthesis of secondary metabolites and biotechnologically important enzymes. PMID:27389259

  7. The potential role of functional inhibition of T regulatory cells by anti-TGFβ antibody in photodynamic therapy of renal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of inducing tumor-directed immune response. We hypothesized that PDT could be combined with anti-transforming growth factor (TGF) beta antibody that does not significantly affect the population of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) but at the same time, has the potential to decrease the immunosuppressive effects of regulatory T-cells (Treg) mediated by TGF beta. This hypothesis was tested with aTGF-beta antibody combined with BPD-mediated PDT in a BALB/c renal cell carcinoma model. Evidence of positive benefits of the combination therapy over individual treatments alone was obtained.

  8. Detection of Human Papillomavirus 16-Specific IgG and IgM Antibodies in Patient Sera: A Potential Indicator of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Risk Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kerishnan, Jesinda P.; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Kai, Sia Bik; Tang, Thean-Hock; Ng, Helen Lee-Ching; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Hashim, Uda; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    The association between human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) and oral cancer has been widely reported. However, detecting anti-HPV antibodies in patient sera to determine risk for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has not been well studied. In the present investigation, a total of 206 OSCC serum samples from the Malaysian Oral Cancer Database & Tissue Bank System, with 134 control serum samples, were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) to detect HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies. In addition, nested PCR analysis using comprehensive consensus primers (PGMY09/11 and GP5+/6+) was used to confirm the presence of HPV. Furthermore, we have evaluated the association of various additional causal factors (e.g., smoking, alcohol consumption, and betel quid chewing) in HPV-infected OSCC patients. Statistical analysis of the Malaysian population indicated that OSCC was more prevalent in female Indian patients that practices betel quid chewing. ELISA revealed that HPV16 IgG, which demonstrates past exposure, could be detected in 197 (95.6%) OSCC patients and HPV16-specific IgM was found in a total of 42 (20.4%) OSCC patients, indicating current exposure. Taken together, our study suggest that HPV infection may play a significant role in OSCC (OR: 13.6; 95% CI: 3.89-47.51) and HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies could represent a significant indicator of risk factors in OSCC patients. PMID:27279791

  9. Detection of Human Papillomavirus 16-Specific IgG and IgM Antibodies in Patient Sera: A Potential Indicator of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Risk Factor.

    PubMed

    Kerishnan, Jesinda P; Gopinath, Subash C B; Kai, Sia Bik; Tang, Thean-Hock; Ng, Helen Lee-Ching; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Hashim, Uda; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    The association between human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) and oral cancer has been widely reported. However, detecting anti-HPV antibodies in patient sera to determine risk for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has not been well studied. In the present investigation, a total of 206 OSCC serum samples from the Malaysian Oral Cancer Database & Tissue Bank System, with 134 control serum samples, were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) to detect HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies. In addition, nested PCR analysis using comprehensive consensus primers (PGMY09/11 and GP5(+)/6(+)) was used to confirm the presence of HPV. Furthermore, we have evaluated the association of various additional causal factors (e.g., smoking, alcohol consumption, and betel quid chewing) in HPV-infected OSCC patients. Statistical analysis of the Malaysian population indicated that OSCC was more prevalent in female Indian patients that practices betel quid chewing. ELISA revealed that HPV16 IgG, which demonstrates past exposure, could be detected in 197 (95.6%) OSCC patients and HPV16-specific IgM was found in a total of 42 (20.4%) OSCC patients, indicating current exposure. Taken together, our study suggest that HPV infection may play a significant role in OSCC (OR: 13.6; 95% CI: 3.89-47.51) and HPV16-specific IgG and IgM antibodies could represent a significant indicator of risk factors in OSCC patients.

  10. Ecological succession reveals potential signatures of marine-terrestrial transition in salt marsh fungal communities.

    PubMed

    Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Pylro, Victor Satler; Baldrian, Petr; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Salles, Joana Falcão

    2016-08-01

    Marine-to-terrestrial transition represents one of the most fundamental shifts in microbial life. Understanding the distribution and drivers of soil microbial communities across coastal ecosystems is critical given the roles of microbes in soil biogeochemistry and their multifaceted influence on landscape succession. Here, we studied the fungal community dynamics in a well-established salt marsh chronosequence that spans over a century of ecosystem development. We focussed on providing high-resolution assessments of community composition, diversity and ecophysiological shifts that yielded patterns of ecological succession through soil formation. Notably, despite containing 10- to 100-fold lower fungal internal transcribed spacer abundances, early-successional sites revealed fungal richnesses comparable to those of more mature soils. These newly formed sites also exhibited significant temporal variations in β-diversity that may be attributed to the highly dynamic nature of the system imposed by the tidal regime. The fungal community compositions and ecophysiological assignments changed substantially along the successional gradient, revealing a clear signature of ecological replacement and gradually transforming the environment from a marine into a terrestrial system. Moreover, distance-based linear modelling revealed soil physical structure and organic matter to be the best predictors of the shifts in fungal β-diversity along the chronosequence. Taken together, our study lays the basis for a better understanding of the spatiotemporally determined fungal community dynamics in salt marshes and highlights their ecophysiological traits and adaptation in an evolving ecosystem. PMID:26824176

  11. Evaluation of IgE Antibodies to Omalizumab (Xolair®) and Their Potential Correlation to Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Baker, Dana L; Nakamura, Gerald R; Lowman, Henry B; Fischer, Saloumeh Kadkhodayan

    2016-01-01

    Omalizumab (Xolair®) is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that selectively binds to human immunoglobulin E (IgE). Omalizumab is used to treat IgE-mediated diseases such as chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and moderate to severe allergic asthma. In pre-marketing clinical trials in patients with asthma, anaphylaxis was reported in 3 of 3,507 (0.1%) patients. In post-marketing spontaneous reports, the frequency of anaphylaxis attributed to omalizumab use was estimated to be at least 0.2% of patients based on an estimated exposure of about 57,300 patients from June 2003 through December 2006. To better understand the risk of anaphylaxis in patients with allergic asthma receiving omalizumab, a post-marketing pharmacosurveillance study was initiated in 2009. As part of this study, an assay was developed to detect antibodies of IgE isotype to omalizumab. Serum samples from patients in the study were evaluated using this assay. Our results indicated that there was no observable correlation between either anaphylaxis or skin test reactivity and the presence of antibodies of IgE isotype to omalizumab. Here, we discuss the development of this assay as well as the results of the immunogenicity assessment.

  12. Global metabolomics reveals potential urinary biomarkers of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma for diagnosis and staging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Chen, Yanhua; Zhang, Ruiping; He, Jiuming; Song, Yongmei; Wang, Jingbo; Wang, Huiqing; Wang, Luhua; Zhan, Qimin; Abliz, Zeper

    2016-01-01

    We performed a metabolomics study using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) combined with multivariate data analysis (MVDA) to discriminate global urine profiles in urine samples from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients and healthy controls (NC). Our work evaluated the feasibility of employing urine metabolomics for the diagnosis and staging of ESCC. The satisfactory classification between the healthy controls and ESCC patients was obtained using the MVDA model, and obvious classification of early-stage and advanced-stage patients was also observed. The results suggest that the combination of LC-MS analysis and MVDA may have potential applications for ESCC diagnosis and staging. We then conducted LC-MS/MS experiments to identify the potential biomarkers with large contributions to the discrimination. A total of 83 potential diagnostic biomarkers for ESCC were screened out, and 19 potential biomarkers were identified; the variations between the differences in staging using these potential biomarkers were further analyzed. These biomarkers may not be unique to ESCCs, but instead result from any malignant disease. To further elucidate the pathophysiology of ESCC, we studied related metabolic pathways and found that ESCC is associated with perturbations of fatty acid β-oxidation and the metabolism of amino acids, purines, and pyrimidines. PMID:27725730

  13. Comparison of mHTT Antibodies in Huntington's Disease Mouse Models Reveal Specific Binding Profiles and Steady-State Ubiquitin Levels with Disease Development.

    PubMed

    Bayram-Weston, Zubeyde; Jones, Lesley; Dunnett, Stephen B; Brooks, Simon P

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) cellular pathology is characterised by the aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHTT) protein into inclusion bodies. The present paper compared the sensitivity of five widely used mHTT antibodies (S830; MW8; EM48; 1C2; ubiquitin) against mice from five commonly used HD mouse models (R6/1; YAC128; HdhQ92; B6 HdhQ150; B6 x129/Ola HdhQ150) at two ages to determine: the most sensitive antibodies for each model; whether mHTT antibody binding differed depending on aggregation stage (diffuse versus frank inclusion); the role of ubiquitin during aggregation as the ubiquitin proteosome system has been implicated in disease development. The models demonstrated unique profiles of antibody binding even when the models varied only by background strain (HdhQ150). MW8 was highly sensitive for detecting frank inclusions in all lines whereas EM48, ubiquitin and 1C2 demonstrated consistent staining in all models irrespective of age or form of mHTT. MW8 and S830 were the most sensitive antibodies with 1C2 the least. Ubiquitin levels were stable for each model regardless of age. Ubiquitin was particularly sensitive in young YAC128 mice that demonstrate an absence of inclusions until ~12 months of age suggesting high affinity to mHTT in its diffuse form. The data indicate that generalisations across models regarding the quantification of aggregations may not be valid and that mHTT antibody binding is unique to the mouse model and sensitive to changes in inclusion development. PMID:27196694

  14. Comparison of mHTT Antibodies in Huntington’s Disease Mouse Models Reveal Specific Binding Profiles and Steady-State Ubiquitin Levels with Disease Development

    PubMed Central

    Bayram-Weston, Zubeyde; Jones, Lesley; Dunnett, Stephen B.; Brooks, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) cellular pathology is characterised by the aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHTT) protein into inclusion bodies. The present paper compared the sensitivity of five widely used mHTT antibodies (S830; MW8; EM48; 1C2; ubiquitin) against mice from five commonly used HD mouse models (R6/1; YAC128; HdhQ92; B6 HdhQ150; B6 x129/Ola HdhQ150) at two ages to determine: the most sensitive antibodies for each model; whether mHTT antibody binding differed depending on aggregation stage (diffuse versus frank inclusion); the role of ubiquitin during aggregation as the ubiquitin proteosome system has been implicated in disease development. The models demonstrated unique profiles of antibody binding even when the models varied only by background strain (HdhQ150). MW8 was highly sensitive for detecting frank inclusions in all lines whereas EM48, ubiquitin and 1C2 demonstrated consistent staining in all models irrespective of age or form of mHTT. MW8 and S830 were the most sensitive antibodies with 1C2 the least. Ubiquitin levels were stable for each model regardless of age. Ubiquitin was particularly sensitive in young YAC128 mice that demonstrate an absence of inclusions until ~12 months of age suggesting high affinity to mHTT in its diffuse form. The data indicate that generalisations across models regarding the quantification of aggregations may not be valid and that mHTT antibody binding is unique to the mouse model and sensitive to changes in inclusion development. PMID:27196694

  15. The Art of Making Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headon, Denis R.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the nature and production of antibodies. Points out that the production of monoclonal antibodies blends the malignant with the beneficial to create a medical tool of exciting potential. (JN)

  16. Antibody VH and VL recombination using phage and ribosome display technologies reveals distinct structural routes to affinity improvements with VH-VL interface residues providing important structural diversity.

    PubMed

    Groves, Maria A T; Amanuel, Lily; Campbell, Jamie I; Rees, D Gareth; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2014-01-01

    In vitro selection technologies are an important means of affinity maturing antibodies to generate the optimal therapeutic profile for a particular disease target. Here, we describe the isolation of a parent antibody, KENB061 using phage display and solution phase selections with soluble biotinylated human IL-1R1. KENB061 was affinity matured using phage display and targeted mutagenesis of VH and VL CDR3 using NNS randomization. Affinity matured VHCDR3 and VLCDR3 library blocks were recombined and selected using phage and ribosome display protocol. A direct comparison of the phage and ribosome display antibodies generated was made to determine their functional characteristics.In our analyses, we observed distinct differences in the pattern of beneficial mutations in antibodies derived from phage and ribosome display selections, and discovered the lead antibody Jedi067 had a ~3700-fold improvement in KD over the parent KENB061. We constructed a homology model of the Fv region of Jedi067 to map the specific positions where mutations occurred in the CDR3 loops. For VL CDR3, positions 94 to 97 carry greater diversity in the ribosome display variants compared with the phage display. The positions 95a, 95b and 96 of VLCDR3 form part of the interface with VH in this model. The model shows that positions 96, 98, 100e, 100f, 100 g, 100h, 100i and 101 of the VHCDR3 include residues at the VH and VL interface. Importantly, Leu96 and Tyr98 are conserved at the interface positions in both phage and ribosome display indicating their importance in maintaining the VH-VL interface. For antibodies derived from ribosome display, there is significant diversity at residues 100a to 100f of the VH CDR3 compared with phage display. A unique deletion of isoleucine at position 102 of the lead candidate, Jedi067, also occurs in the VHCDR3.As anticipated, recombining the mutations via ribosome display led to a greater structural diversity, particularly in the heavy chain CDR3, which in turn

  17. Secukinumab, a novel anti-IL-17A antibody, shows low immunogenicity potential in human in vitro assays comparable to other marketed biotherapeutics with low clinical immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Karle, Anette; Spindeldreher, Sebastian; Kolbinger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Secukinumab is a human monoclonal antibody that selectively targets interleukin-17A and has been demonstrated to be highly efficacious in the treatment of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, starting at early time points, with a sustained effect and a favorable safety profile. Biotherapeutics--including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs)--can be immunogenic, leading to formation of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) that can result in unwanted effects, including hypersensitivity reactions or compromised therapeutic efficacy. To gain insight into possible explanations for the clinically observed low immunogenicity of secukinumab, we evaluated its immunogenicity potential by applying 2 different in vitro assays: T-cell activation and major histocompatibility complex-associated peptide proteomics (MAPPs). For both assays, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) from healthy donors were exposed in vitro to biotherapeutic proteins. DCs naturally process proteins and present the derived peptides in the context of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-class II. HLA-DR-associated biotherapeutic-derived peptides, representing potential T-cell epitopes, were identified in the MAPPs assay. In the T-cell assay, autologous CD4(+) T cells were co-cultured with secukinumab-exposed DCs and T-cell activation was measured by proliferation and interleukin-2 secretion. In the MAPPs analysis and T-cell activation assays, secukinumab consistently showed relatively low numbers of potential T-cell epitopes and low T-cell response rates, respectively, comparable to other biotherapeutics with known low clinical immunogenicity. In contrast, biotherapeutics with elevated clinical immunogenicity rates showed increased numbers of potential T-cell epitopes and increased T-cell response rates in T-cell activation assays, indicating an approximate correlation between in vitro assay results and clinical immunogenicity incidence. PMID:26817498

  18. Secukinumab, a novel anti–IL-17A antibody, shows low immunogenicity potential in human in vitro assays comparable to other marketed biotherapeutics with low clinical immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Karle, Anette; Spindeldreher, Sebastian; Kolbinger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Secukinumab is a human monoclonal antibody that selectively targets interleukin-17A and has been demonstrated to be highly efficacious in the treatment of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, starting at early time points, with a sustained effect and a favorable safety profile. Biotherapeutics—including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs)—can be immunogenic, leading to formation of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) that can result in unwanted effects, including hypersensitivity reactions or compromised therapeutic efficacy. To gain insight into possible explanations for the clinically observed low immunogenicity of secukinumab, we evaluated its immunogenicity potential by applying 2 different in vitro assays: T-cell activation and major histocompatibility complex–associated peptide proteomics (MAPPs). For both assays, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) from healthy donors were exposed in vitro to biotherapeutic proteins. DCs naturally process proteins and present the derived peptides in the context of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-class II. HLA-DR–associated biotherapeutic-derived peptides, representing potential T–cell epitopes, were identified in the MAPPs assay. In the T-cell assay, autologous CD4+ T cells were co-cultured with secukinumab-exposed DCs and T-cell activation was measured by proliferation and interleukin-2 secretion. In the MAPPs analysis and T-cell activation assays, secukinumab consistently showed relatively low numbers of potential T-cell epitopes and low T-cell response rates, respectively, comparable to other biotherapeutics with known low clinical immunogenicity. In contrast, biotherapeutics with elevated clinical immunogenicity rates showed increased numbers of potential T-cell epitopes and increased T-cell response rates in T-cell activation assays, indicating an approximate correlation between in vitro assay results and clinical immunogenicity incidence. PMID:26817498

  19. Perceptual Shift in Bilingualism: Brain Potentials Reveal Plasticity in Pre-Attentive Colour Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athanasopoulos, Panos; Dering, Benjamin; Wiggett, Alison; Kuipers, Jan-Rouke; Thierry, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    The validity of the linguistic relativity principle continues to stimulate vigorous debate and research. The debate has recently shifted from the behavioural investigation arena to a more biologically grounded field, in which tangible physiological evidence for language effects on perception can be obtained. Using brain potentials in a colour…

  20. Potential human pathogenic bacteria in a mixed urban watershed as revealed by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Ibekwe, A Mark; Leddy, Menu; Murinda, Shelton E

    2013-01-01

    Current microbial source tracking (MST) methods for water depend on testing for fecal indicator bacterial counts or specific marker gene sequences to identify fecal contamination where potential human pathogenic bacteria could be present. In this study, we applied 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing to identify bacterial pathogen DNA sequences, including those not traditionally monitored by MST and correlated their abundances to specific sources of contamination such as urban runoff and agricultural runoff from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), recreation park area, waste-water treatment plants, and natural sites with little or no human activities. Samples for pyrosequencing were surface water, and sediment collected from 19 sites. A total of 12,959 16S rRNA gene sequences with average length of ≤400 bp were obtained, and were assigned to corresponding taxonomic ranks using ribosomal database project (RDP), Classifier and Greengenes databases. The percent of total potential pathogens were highest in urban runoff water (7.94%), agricultural runoff sediment (6.52%), and Prado Park sediment (6.00%), respectively. Although the numbers of DNA sequence tags from pyrosequencing were very high for the natural site, corresponding percent potential pathogens were very low (3.78-4.08%). Most of the potential pathogenic bacterial sequences identified were from three major phyla, namely, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The use of deep sequencing may provide improved and faster methods for the identification of pathogen sources in most watersheds so that better risk assessment methods may be developed to enhance public health.

  1. Atypical Brain Responses to Reward Cues in Autism as Revealed by Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohls, Gregor; Peltzer, Judith; Schulte-Ruther, Martin; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Remschmidt, Helmut; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    Social motivation deficit theories suggest that children with autism do not properly anticipate and appreciate the pleasure of social stimuli. In this study, we investigated event-related brain potentials evoked by cues that triggered social versus monetary reward anticipation in children with autism. Children with autism showed attenuated P3…

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteomics Reveals Potential Pathogenic Changes in the Brains of SIV-infected Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Pendyala, Gurudutt; Trauger, Sunia A.; Kalisiak, Ewa; Ellis, Ronald J.; Siuzdak, Gary; Fox, Howard S.

    2009-01-01

    The HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder occurs in approximately one-third of infected individuals. It has persisted in the current era of anti-retroviral therapy, and its study is complicated by the lack of biomarkers for this condition. Since the cerebrospinal fluid is the most proximal biofluid to the site of pathology, we studied the cerebrospinal fluid in a nonhuman primate model for HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder. Here we present a simple and efficient liquid chromatography coupled mass spectrometry based proteomics approach that utilizes small amounts of cerebrospinal fluid. First, we demonstrate the validity of the methodology using human cerebrospinal fluid. Next, using the simian immunodeficiency virus infected monkey model, we show its efficacy in identifying proteins such as alpha-1-antitrypsin, complement C3, hemopexin, IgM heavy chain and plasminogen, whose increased expression is linked to disease. Finally, we find that the increase in cerebrospinal fluid proteins is linked to increased expression of their genes in the brain parenchyma, revealing that the cerebrospinal fluid alterations identified reflect changes in the brain itself and not merely leakage of the blood-brain or blood- cerebrospinal fluid barriers. This study reveals new central nervous system alterations in lentivirus-induced neurological disease, and this technique can be applied to other systems in which limited amounts of biofluids can be obtained. PMID:19281240

  3. Presence of human antibodies reacting with Candida albicans O-linked oligomannosides revealed by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and neoglycolipids.

    PubMed Central

    Hayette, M P; Strecker, G; Faille, C; Dive, D; Camus, D; Mackenzie, D W; Poulain, D

    1992-01-01

    In order to study the presence of antibodies directed against Candida albicans O-linked oligomannosides (oligomannosides O) in patient sera, we have developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) involving neoglycolipids constructed with these residues (NGLO). Oligomannosides O released by mild alkaline degradation of the C. albicans cell wall phosphopeptidomannan (PPM) contained one to seven mannose residues, among which the quantitatively major components, mannobiose and mannotriose, were shown by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance to contain exclusively alpha (1-2) linkages. The pool of oligomannosides was converted to neoglycolipids by coupling them to 4-hexadecylaniline in an equimolar reaction checked by thin-layer chromatography. We have tested against these neoantigens, coated on ELISA plates, 15 pairs of sera corresponding to individual seroconversions observed in 15 patients during the course of a mycological and serological survey of candidiasis. For all patients, seroconversions resulted in an increased level of antibodies against NGLO. A significant correlation was observed between the results of ELISA-NGLO, ELISA involving the original PPM molecule, and routine antibody detection tests, indirect immunofluorescence assay, and cocounterimmunoelectrophoresis. These results therefore demonstrate the synthesis of human antibodies reactive with oligomannosides O constitutive of the C. albicans mannan molecule which have been previously described as exhibiting an inhibitory effect on human lymphocytic proliferation. Images PMID:1537911

  4. Molecular characterization of five human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody heavy chains reveals extensive somatic mutation typical of an antigen-driven immune response.

    PubMed Central

    Andris, J S; Johnson, S; Zolla-Pazner, S; Capra, J D

    1991-01-01

    We report the heavy chain variable region sequences from the cDNAs of five previously described monoclonal cell lines producing human antibodies specific for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and detail the molecular characteristics, germ-line origins, and extent of somatic mutation among these antibodies. Three of the five heavy chain variable regions derive from the VHIV gene family, but each has arisen from a different heavy chain variable region (VH) gene segment within the VHIV family. In addition, one is derived from a VHI gene segment, and one is derived from a VHV gene segment. Since four of the five antibodies arise from known germ-line VH elements, a precise determination of the extent of somatic variation is possible. The amount of variation from the closest germ-line sequence ranges from 4.5% to 14.8% among these antibodies, most of which is concentrated in the complementarity-determining regions. In general, the diversity (D) segments are long, characteristic of D-D fusions and/or extensive terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase activity; however, definitive homologies cannot be found with the known germ-line D segments. Joining (JH) gene segment utilization appears random. The use of five different germ-line VH gene segments and extensive somatic mutation provides evidence that a polyclonal, antigen-driven immune response occurs during the natural infection with human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:1909030

  5. Development of camelid single chain antibodies against Shiga toxin type 2 (Stx2) with therapeutic potential against Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS).

    PubMed

    Mejías, Maria P; Hiriart, Yanina; Lauché, Constanza; Fernández-Brando, Romina J; Pardo, Romina; Bruballa, Andrea; Ramos, María V; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Palermo, Marina S; Zylberman, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections are implicated in the development of the life-threatening Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). Despite the magnitude of the social and economic problems caused by STEC infections, no licensed vaccine or effective therapy is presently available for human use. Single chain antibodies (VHH) produced by camelids exhibit several advantages in comparison with conventional antibodies, making them promising tools for diagnosis and therapy. In the present work, the properties of a recently developed immunogen, which induces high affinity and protective antibodies against Stx type 2 (Stx2), were exploited to develop VHHs with therapeutic potential against HUS. We identified a family of VHHs against the B subunit of Stx2 (Stx2B) that neutralize Stx2 in vitro at subnanomolar concentrations. One VHH was selected and was engineered into a trivalent molecule (two copies of anti-Stx2B VHH and one anti-seroalbumin VHH). The resulting molecule presented extended in vivo half-life and high therapeutic activity, as demonstrated in three different mouse models of Stx2-toxicity: a single i.v. lethal dose of Stx2, several i.v. incremental doses of Stx2 and intragastrical STEC infection. This simple antitoxin agent should offer new therapeutic options for treating STEC infections to prevent or ameliorate HUS outcome. PMID:27118524

  6. Development of camelid single chain antibodies against Shiga toxin type 2 (Stx2) with therapeutic potential against Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS)

    PubMed Central

    Mejías, Maria P.; Hiriart, Yanina; Lauché, Constanza; Fernández-Brando, Romina J.; Pardo, Romina; Bruballa, Andrea; Ramos, María V.; Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Palermo, Marina S.; Zylberman, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections are implicated in the development of the life-threatening Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). Despite the magnitude of the social and economic problems caused by STEC infections, no licensed vaccine or effective therapy is presently available for human use. Single chain antibodies (VHH) produced by camelids exhibit several advantages in comparison with conventional antibodies, making them promising tools for diagnosis and therapy. In the present work, the properties of a recently developed immunogen, which induces high affinity and protective antibodies against Stx type 2 (Stx2), were exploited to develop VHHs with therapeutic potential against HUS. We identified a family of VHHs against the B subunit of Stx2 (Stx2B) that neutralize Stx2 in vitro at subnanomolar concentrations. One VHH was selected and was engineered into a trivalent molecule (two copies of anti-Stx2B VHH and one anti-seroalbumin VHH). The resulting molecule presented extended in vivo half-life and high therapeutic activity, as demonstrated in three different mouse models of Stx2-toxicity: a single i.v. lethal dose of Stx2, several i.v. incremental doses of Stx2 and intragastrical STEC infection. This simple antitoxin agent should offer new therapeutic options for treating STEC infections to prevent or ameliorate HUS outcome. PMID:27118524

  7. Potential Human Pathogenic Bacteria in a Mixed Urban Watershed as Revealed by Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ibekwe, A. Mark; Leddy, Menu; Murinda, Shelton E.

    2013-01-01

    Current microbial source tracking (MST) methods for water depend on testing for fecal indicator bacterial counts or specific marker gene sequences to identify fecal contamination where potential human pathogenic bacteria could be present. In this study, we applied 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing to identify bacterial pathogen DNA sequences, including those not traditionally monitored by MST and correlated their abundances to specific sources of contamination such as urban runoff and agricultural runoff from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), recreation park area, waste-water treatment plants, and natural sites with little or no human activities. Samples for pyrosequencing were surface water, and sediment collected from 19 sites. A total of 12,959 16S rRNA gene sequences with average length of ≤400 bp were obtained, and were assigned to corresponding taxonomic ranks using ribosomal database project (RDP), Classifier and Greengenes databases. The percent of total potential pathogens were highest in urban runoff water (7.94%), agricultural runoff sediment (6.52%), and Prado Park sediment (6.00%), respectively. Although the numbers of DNA sequence tags from pyrosequencing were very high for the natural site, corresponding percent potential pathogens were very low (3.78–4.08%). Most of the potential pathogenic bacterial sequences identified were from three major phyla, namely, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes. The use of deep sequencing may provide improved and faster methods for the identification of pathogen sources in most watersheds so that better risk assessment methods may be developed to enhance public health. PMID:24278139

  8. Potential genotoxic effects of melted snow from an urban area revealed by the Allium cepa test.

    PubMed

    Blagojević, Jelena; Stamenković, Gorana; Vujosević, Mladen

    2009-09-01

    The presence of well-known atmospheric pollutants is regularly screened for in large towns but knowledge about the effects of mixtures of different pollutants and especially their genotoxic potential is largely missing. Since falling snow collects pollutants from the air, melted snow samples could be suitable for evaluating potential genotoxicity. For this purpose the Allium cepa anaphase-telophase test was used to analyse melted snow samples from Belgrade, the capital city of Serbia. Samples of snow were taken at two sites, characterized by differences in pollution intensity, in three successive years. At the more polluted site the analyses showed a very high degree of both toxicity and genotoxicity in the first year of the study corresponding to the effects of the known mutagen used as the positive control. At the other site the situation was much better but not without warning signals. The results showed that standard analyses for the presence of certain contaminants in the air do not give an accurate picture of the possible consequences of urban air pollution because the genotoxic potential remains hidden. The A. cepa test has been demonstrated to be very convenient for evaluation of air pollution through analyses of melted snow samples. PMID:19589556

  9. N-Terminal Protease Gene Phylogeny Reveals the Potential for Novel Cyanobactin Diversity in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Joana; Leão, Pedro N.; Ramos, Vitor; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobactins are a recently recognized group of ribosomal cyclic peptides produced by cyanobacteria, which have been studied because of their interesting biological activities. Here, we have used a PCR-based approach to detect the N-terminal protease (A) gene from cyanobactin synthetase gene clusters, in a set of diverse cyanobacteria from our culture collection (Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, Genomics and Evolution (LEGE) CC). Homologues of this gene were found in Microcystis and Rivularia strains, and for the first time in Cuspidothrix, Phormidium and Sphaerospermopsis strains. Phylogenetic relationships inferred from available A-gene sequences, including those obtained in this work, revealed two new groups of phylotypes, harboring Phormidium, Sphaerospermopsis and Rivularia LEGE isolates. Thus, this study shows that, using underexplored cyanobacterial strains, it is still possible to expand the known genetic diversity of genes involved in cyanobactin biosynthesis. PMID:24351973

  10. Membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plants reveal diverse yeast and protist communities of potential significance in biofouling.

    PubMed

    Liébana, Raquel; Arregui, Lucía; Belda, Ignacio; Gamella, Luis; Santos, Antonio; Marquina, Domingo; Serrano, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The yeast community was studied in a municipal full-scale membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plant (MBR-WWTP). The unexpectedly high diversity of yeasts indicated that the activated sludge formed a suitable environment for them to proliferate, with cellular concentrations of 2.2 ± 0.8 × 10(3) CFU ml(-1). Sixteen species of seven genera were present in the biological reactor, with Ascomycetes being the most prevalent group (93%). Most isolates were able to grow in a synthetic wastewater medium, adhere to polyethylene surfaces, and develop biofilms of variable complexity. The relationship between yeast populations and the protists in the MBR-WWTP was also studied, revealing that some protist species preyed on and ingested yeasts. These results suggest that yeast populations may play a role in the food web of a WWTP and, to some extent, contribute to membrane biofouling in MBR systems. PMID:25588128

  11. Membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plants reveal diverse yeast and protist communities of potential significance in biofouling.

    PubMed

    Liébana, Raquel; Arregui, Lucía; Belda, Ignacio; Gamella, Luis; Santos, Antonio; Marquina, Domingo; Serrano, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The yeast community was studied in a municipal full-scale membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plant (MBR-WWTP). The unexpectedly high diversity of yeasts indicated that the activated sludge formed a suitable environment for them to proliferate, with cellular concentrations of 2.2 ± 0.8 × 10(3) CFU ml(-1). Sixteen species of seven genera were present in the biological reactor, with Ascomycetes being the most prevalent group (93%). Most isolates were able to grow in a synthetic wastewater medium, adhere to polyethylene surfaces, and develop biofilms of variable complexity. The relationship between yeast populations and the protists in the MBR-WWTP was also studied, revealing that some protist species preyed on and ingested yeasts. These results suggest that yeast populations may play a role in the food web of a WWTP and, to some extent, contribute to membrane biofouling in MBR systems.

  12. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  13. Citrullination within the atherosclerotic plaque: A potential target for the anti-citrullinated protein antibody response in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sokolove, Jeremy; Sharpe, Orr; Brennan, Matthew; Lahey, Lauren J.; Kao, Amy H.; Krishnan, Eswar; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Lepus, Christin M.; Wasko, Mary Chester; Robinson, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Purpose Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, an observation not explained by traditional cardiac risk factors and generally limited to those with RA-associated autoantibodies such as rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA). We hypothesized that citrullinated proteins within the atherosclerotic plaque can be targeted by ACPA, forming stimulatory immune complexes which propagate the progression of atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Protein lysates prepared from atherosclerotic segments of human aorta were investigated for the presence of citrulline-modified proteins and specifically citrullinated fibrinogen (cFb) by immunoprecipitation and/or immunoblotting followed by mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemistry was performed in coronary artery plaques for the presence of citrullinated proteins and the PAD4 enzyme. Levels of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP), anti-citrullinated vimentin (cVim), and anti-cFb antibodies were measured in 134 women with seropositive RA previously characterized for the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis by electron beam CT scan (EBCT). Western analysis of atherosclerotic plaque lysates demonstrated several citrullinated proteins and the presence of cFb was confirmed by immunoprecipitation, and mass spectroscopy. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated co-localization of citrullinated proteins and the PAD4 enzyme within the coronary artery plaque. In age-adjusted regression models, antibodies targeting cFb and cit-vimentin, but not CCP2, were associated with an increased aortic plaque burden. Conclusion Citrullinated proteins are prevalent within the atherosclerotic plaque, and certain ACPAs are associated with atherosclerotic burden. These observations suggest that targeting of citrullinated epitopes, specifically cFb, within the atherosclerotic plaque could provide a mechanism for accelerated atherosclerosis observed in patients with RA. PMID

  14. Whole-Chain Tick Saliva Proteins Presented on Hepatitis B Virus Capsid-Like Particles Induce High-Titered Antibodies with Neutralizing Potential.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Philipp; Wallich, Reinhard; Nassal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ticks are vectors for various, including pathogenic, microbes. Tick saliva contains multiple anti-host defense factors that enable ticks their bloodmeals yet also facilitate microbe transmission. Lyme disease-causing borreliae profit specifically from the broadly conserved tick histamine release factor (tHRF), and from cysteine-rich glycoproteins represented by Salp15 from Ixodes scapularis and Iric-1 from Ixodes ricinus ticks which they recruit to their outer surface protein C (OspC). Hence these tick proteins are attractive targets for anti-tick vaccines that simultaneously impair borrelia transmission. Main obstacles are the tick proteins´ immunosuppressive activities, and for Salp15 orthologs, the lack of efficient recombinant expression systems. Here, we exploited the immune-enhancing properties of hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) derived capsid-like particles (CLPs) to generate, in E. coli, nanoparticulate vaccines presenting tHRF and, as surrogates for the barely soluble wild-type proteins, cysteine-free Salp15 and Iric-1 variants. The latter CLPs were exclusively accessible in the less sterically constrained SplitCore system. Mice immunized with tHRF CLPs mounted a strong anti-tHRF antibody response. CLPs presenting cysteine-free Salp15 and Iric-1 induced antibodies to wild-type, including glycosylated, Salp15 and Iric-1. The broadly distributed epitopes included the OspC interaction sites. In vitro, the anti-Salp15 antibodies interfered with OspC binding and enhanced human complement-mediated killing of Salp15 decorated borreliae. A mixture of all three CLPs induced high titered antibodies against all three targets, suggesting the feasibility of combination vaccines. These data warrant in vivo validation of the new candidate vaccines´ protective potential against tick infestation and Borrelia transmission.

  15. Alteration of Electrostatic Surface Potential Enhances Affinity and Tumor Killing Properties of Anti-ganglioside GD2 Monoclonal Antibody hu3F8.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Guo, Hong-fen; Cheung, Irene Y; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2015-05-22

    Ganglioside GD2 is highly expressed on neuroectodermal tumors and an attractive therapeutic target for antibodies that have already shown some clinical efficacy. To further improve the current antibodies, which have modest affinity, we sought to improve affinity by using a combined method of random mutagenesis and in silico assisted design to affinity-mature the anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu3F8. Using yeast display, mutants in the Fv with enhanced binding over the parental clone were FACS-sorted and cloned. In silico modeling identified the minimal key interacting residues involved in the important charged interactions with the sialic acid groups of GD2. Two mutations, D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) altered the electrostatic surface potential of the antigen binding site, allowing for an increase in positive charge to enhance the interaction with the negatively charged GD2-pentasaccharide headgroup. Purified scFv and IgG mutant forms were then tested for antigen specificity by ELISA, for tissue specificity by immunohistochemistry, for affinity by BIACORE, for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro, and for anti-tumor efficacy in xenografted humanized mice. The nearly 7-fold improvement in affinity of hu3F8 with a single D32H (L-CDR1) mutation translated into a ∼12-fold improvement in NK92MI-transfected CD16-mediated ADCC, a 6-fold improvement in CD32-mediated ADCC, and a 2.5-fold improvement in complement-mediated cytotoxicity while maintaining restricted normal tissue cross-reactivity and achieving substantial improvement in tumor ablation in vivo. Despite increasing GD2 affinity, the double mutation D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) did not further improve anti-tumor efficacy.

  16. Alteration of Electrostatic Surface Potential Enhances Affinity and Tumor Killing Properties of Anti-ganglioside GD2 Monoclonal Antibody hu3F8.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Guo, Hong-fen; Cheung, Irene Y; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2015-05-22

    Ganglioside GD2 is highly expressed on neuroectodermal tumors and an attractive therapeutic target for antibodies that have already shown some clinical efficacy. To further improve the current antibodies, which have modest affinity, we sought to improve affinity by using a combined method of random mutagenesis and in silico assisted design to affinity-mature the anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu3F8. Using yeast display, mutants in the Fv with enhanced binding over the parental clone were FACS-sorted and cloned. In silico modeling identified the minimal key interacting residues involved in the important charged interactions with the sialic acid groups of GD2. Two mutations, D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) altered the electrostatic surface potential of the antigen binding site, allowing for an increase in positive charge to enhance the interaction with the negatively charged GD2-pentasaccharide headgroup. Purified scFv and IgG mutant forms were then tested for antigen specificity by ELISA, for tissue specificity by immunohistochemistry, for affinity by BIACORE, for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro, and for anti-tumor efficacy in xenografted humanized mice. The nearly 7-fold improvement in affinity of hu3F8 with a single D32H (L-CDR1) mutation translated into a ∼12-fold improvement in NK92MI-transfected CD16-mediated ADCC, a 6-fold improvement in CD32-mediated ADCC, and a 2.5-fold improvement in complement-mediated cytotoxicity while maintaining restricted normal tissue cross-reactivity and achieving substantial improvement in tumor ablation in vivo. Despite increasing GD2 affinity, the double mutation D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) did not further improve anti-tumor efficacy. PMID:25851904

  17. Whole-Chain Tick Saliva Proteins Presented on Hepatitis B Virus Capsid-Like Particles Induce High-Titered Antibodies with Neutralizing Potential

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Philipp; Wallich, Reinhard; Nassal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ticks are vectors for various, including pathogenic, microbes. Tick saliva contains multiple anti-host defense factors that enable ticks their bloodmeals yet also facilitate microbe transmission. Lyme disease-causing borreliae profit specifically from the broadly conserved tick histamine release factor (tHRF), and from cysteine-rich glycoproteins represented by Salp15 from Ixodes scapularis and Iric-1 from Ixodes ricinus ticks which they recruit to their outer surface protein C (OspC). Hence these tick proteins are attractive targets for anti-tick vaccines that simultaneously impair borrelia transmission. Main obstacles are the tick proteins´ immunosuppressive activities, and for Salp15 orthologs, the lack of efficient recombinant expression systems. Here, we exploited the immune-enhancing properties of hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) derived capsid-like particles (CLPs) to generate, in E. coli, nanoparticulate vaccines presenting tHRF and, as surrogates for the barely soluble wild-type proteins, cysteine-free Salp15 and Iric-1 variants. The latter CLPs were exclusively accessible in the less sterically constrained SplitCore system. Mice immunized with tHRF CLPs mounted a strong anti-tHRF antibody response. CLPs presenting cysteine-free Salp15 and Iric-1 induced antibodies to wild-type, including glycosylated, Salp15 and Iric-1. The broadly distributed epitopes included the OspC interaction sites. In vitro, the anti-Salp15 antibodies interfered with OspC binding and enhanced human complement-mediated killing of Salp15 decorated borreliae. A mixture of all three CLPs induced high titered antibodies against all three targets, suggesting the feasibility of combination vaccines. These data warrant in vivo validation of the new candidate vaccines´ protective potential against tick infestation and Borrelia transmission. PMID:26352137

  18. Alteration of Electrostatic Surface Potential Enhances Affinity and Tumor Killing Properties of Anti-ganglioside GD2 Monoclonal Antibody hu3F8*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Guo, Hong-fen; Cheung, Irene Y.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioside GD2 is highly expressed on neuroectodermal tumors and an attractive therapeutic target for antibodies that have already shown some clinical efficacy. To further improve the current antibodies, which have modest affinity, we sought to improve affinity by using a combined method of random mutagenesis and in silico assisted design to affinity-mature the anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu3F8. Using yeast display, mutants in the Fv with enhanced binding over the parental clone were FACS-sorted and cloned. In silico modeling identified the minimal key interacting residues involved in the important charged interactions with the sialic acid groups of GD2. Two mutations, D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) altered the electrostatic surface potential of the antigen binding site, allowing for an increase in positive charge to enhance the interaction with the negatively charged GD2-pentasaccharide headgroup. Purified scFv and IgG mutant forms were then tested for antigen specificity by ELISA, for tissue specificity by immunohistochemistry, for affinity by BIACORE, for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro, and for anti-tumor efficacy in xenografted humanized mice. The nearly 7-fold improvement in affinity of hu3F8 with a single D32H (L-CDR1) mutation translated into a ∼12-fold improvement in NK92MI-transfected CD16-mediated ADCC, a 6-fold improvement in CD32-mediated ADCC, and a 2.5-fold improvement in complement-mediated cytotoxicity while maintaining restricted normal tissue cross-reactivity and achieving substantial improvement in tumor ablation in vivo. Despite increasing GD2 affinity, the double mutation D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) did not further improve anti-tumor efficacy. PMID:25851904

  19. Cardiac-Oxidized Antigens Are Targets of Immune Recognition by Antibodies and Potential Molecular Determinants in Chagas Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Monisha; Zago, Maria Paola; Nunez, Sonia; Amoroso, Alejandro; Rementeria, Hugo; Dousset, Pierre; Burgos, Federico Nunez; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi elicits reactive oxygen species (ROS) of inflammatory and mitochondrial origin in infected hosts. In this study, we examined ROS-induced oxidative modifications in the heart and determined whether the resultant oxidized cardiac proteins are targets of immune response and of pathological significance in Chagas disease. Heart biopsies from chagasic mice, rats and human patients exhibited, when compared to those from normal controls, a substantial increase in protein 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), malondialdehyde (MDA), carbonyl, and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) adducts. To evaluate whether oxidized proteins gain antigenic properties, heart homogenates or isolated cardiomyocytes were oxidized in vitro and one- or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE)/Western blotting (WB) was performed to investigate the proteomic oxidative changes and recognition of oxidized proteins by sera antibodies in chagasic rodents (mice, rats) and human patients. Human cardiomyocytes exhibited LD50 sensitivity to 30 µM 4-HNE and 100 µM H2O2 at 6 h and 12 h, respectively. In vitro oxidation with 4-HNE or H2O2 resulted in a substantial increase in 4-HNE- and carbonyl-modified proteins that correlated with increased recognition of cardiac (cardiomyocytes) proteins by sera antibodies of chagasic rodents and human patients. 2D-GE/Western blotting followed by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis to identify cardiac proteins that were oxidized and recognized by human chagasic sera yielded 82 unique proteins. We validated the 2D-GE results by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and WB and demonstrated that oxidation of recombinant titin enhanced its immunogenicity and recognition by sera antibodies from chagasic hosts (rats and humans). Treatment of infected rats with phenyl-α-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN, antioxidant) resulted in normalized immune detection of cardiac proteins associated with control of cardiac pathology and preservation of heart contractile function in chagasic rats. We

  20. In silico pathway analysis in cervical carcinoma reveals potential new targets for treatment

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, Peter A.; van Dam, Pieter-Jan H. H.; Rolfo, Christian; Giallombardo, Marco; van Berckelaer, Christophe; Trinh, Xuan Bich; Altintas, Sevilay; Huizing, Manon; Papadimitriou, Kostas; Tjalma, Wiebren A. A.; van Laere, Steven

    2016-01-01

    An in silico pathway analysis was performed in order to improve current knowledge on the molecular drivers of cervical cancer and detect potential targets for treatment. Three publicly available Affymetrix gene expression data-sets (GSE5787, GSE7803, GSE9750) were retrieved, vouching for a total of 9 cervical cancer cell lines (CCCLs), 39 normal cervical samples, 7 CIN3 samples and 111 cervical cancer samples (CCSs). Predication analysis of microarrays was performed in the Affymetrix sets to identify cervical cancer biomarkers. To select cancer cell-specific genes the CCSs were compared to the CCCLs. Validated genes were submitted to a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and Expression2Kinases (E2K). In the CCSs a total of 1,547 probe sets were identified that were overexpressed (FDR < 0.1). Comparing to CCCLs 560 probe sets (481 unique genes) had a cancer cell-specific expression profile, and 315 of these genes (65%) were validated. GSEA identified 5 cancer hallmarks enriched in CCSs (P < 0.01 and FDR < 0.25) showing that deregulation of the cell cycle is a major component of cervical cancer biology. E2K identified a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of 162 nodes (including 20 drugable kinases) and 1626 edges. This PPI-network consists of 5 signaling modules associated with MYC signaling (Module 1), cell cycle deregulation (Module 2), TGFβ-signaling (Module 3), MAPK signaling (Module 4) and chromatin modeling (Module 5). Potential targets for treatment which could be identified were CDK1, CDK2, ABL1, ATM, AKT1, MAPK1, MAPK3 among others. The present study identified important driver pathways in cervical carcinogenesis which should be assessed for their potential therapeutic drugability. PMID:26701206

  1. In silico pathway analysis in cervical carcinoma reveals potential new targets for treatment.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Peter A; van Dam, Pieter-Jan H H; Rolfo, Christian; Giallombardo, Marco; van Berckelaer, Christophe; Trinh, Xuan Bich; Altintas, Sevilay; Huizing, Manon; Papadimitriou, Kostas; Tjalma, Wiebren A A; van Laere, Steven

    2016-01-19

    An in silico pathway analysis was performed in order to improve current knowledge on the molecular drivers of cervical cancer and detect potential targets for treatment. Three publicly available Affymetrix gene expression data-sets (GSE5787, GSE7803, GSE9750) were retrieved, vouching for a total of 9 cervical cancer cell lines (CCCLs), 39 normal cervical samples, 7 CIN3 samples and 111 cervical cancer samples (CCSs). Predication analysis of microarrays was performed in the Affymetrix sets to identify cervical cancer biomarkers. To select cancer cell-specific genes the CCSs were compared to the CCCLs. Validated genes were submitted to a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and Expression2Kinases (E2K). In the CCSs a total of 1,547 probe sets were identified that were overexpressed (FDR < 0.1). Comparing to CCCLs 560 probe sets (481 unique genes) had a cancer cell-specific expression profile, and 315 of these genes (65%) were validated. GSEA identified 5 cancer hallmarks enriched in CCSs (P < 0.01 and FDR < 0.25) showing that deregulation of the cell cycle is a major component of cervical cancer biology. E2K identified a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of 162 nodes (including 20 drugable kinases) and 1626 edges. This PPI-network consists of 5 signaling modules associated with MYC signaling (Module 1), cell cycle deregulation (Module 2), TGFβ-signaling (Module 3), MAPK signaling (Module 4) and chromatin modeling (Module 5). Potential targets for treatment which could be identified were CDK1, CDK2, ABL1, ATM, AKT1, MAPK1, MAPK3 among others. The present study identified important driver pathways in cervical carcinogenesis which should be assessed for their potential therapeutic drugability. PMID:26701206

  2. Picocyanobacteria from a clade of marine Cyanobium revealed bioactive potential against microalgae, bacteria, and marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Costa, Maria Sofia; Costa, Margarida; Ramos, Vítor; Leão, Pedro N; Barreiro, Aldo; Vasconcelos, Vítor; Martins, Rosário

    2015-01-01

    The production of bioactive compounds either toxic or with pharmacological applications by cyanobacteria is well established. However, picoplanktonic forms within this group of organisms have rarely been studied in this context. In this study, the toxicological potential of picocyanobacteria from a clade of marine Cyanobium strains isolated from the Portuguese coast was examined using different biological models. First, strains were identified by applying morphological and molecular approaches and cultured under lab conditions. A crude extract and three fractions reflecting a preliminary segregation of lipophilic metabolites were tested for toxicity with the marine microalga Nannochloropsis sp., the bacteria Pseudomonas sp., the brine shrimp Artemia salina, and fertilized eggs of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. No significant apparent adverse effects were noted against Artemia salina. However, significant adverse effects were found in all other assays, with an inhibition of Nannochloropsis sp. and Pseudomonas sp. growth and marked reduction in Paracentrotus lividus larvae length. The results obtained indicated that Cyanobium genus may serve as a potential source of interesting bioactive compounds and emphasize the importance of also studying smaller picoplanktonic fractions of marine cyanobacteria. PMID:25785557

  3. Genomic characterization of brain metastases reveals branched evolution and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Santagata, Sandro; Cahill, Daniel P.; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Jones, Robert T.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Ligon, Keith L.; Tabernero, Josep; Seoane, Joan; Martinez-Saez, Elena; Curry, William T.; Dunn, Ian F.; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Sung-Hye; McKenna, Aaron; Chevalier, Aaron; Rosenberg, Mara; Barker, Frederick G.; Gill, Corey M.; Van Hummelen, Paul; Thorner, Aaron R.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Hoang, Mai P.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Signoretti, Sabina; Sougnez, Carrie; Rabin, Michael S.; Lin, Nancy U.; Winer, Eric P.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Meyerson, Matthew; Garraway, Levi; Gabriel, Stacey; Lander, Eric S.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Baselga, Jose; Louis, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are associated with a dismal prognosis. Whether brain metastases harbor distinct genetic alterations beyond those observed in primary tumors is unknown. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 86 matched brain metastases, primary tumors and normal tissue. In all clonally related cancer samples, we observed branched evolution, where all metastatic and primary sites shared a common ancestor yet continued to evolve independently. In 53% of cases, we found potentially clinically informative alterations in the brain metastases not detected in the matched primary-tumor sample. In contrast, spatially and temporally separated brain metastasis sites were genetically homogenous. Distal extracranial and regional lymph node metastases were highly divergent from brain metastases. We detected alterations associated with sensitivity to PI3K/AKT/mTOR, CDK, and HER2/EGFR inhibitors in the brain metastases. Genomic analysis of brain metastases provides an opportunity to identify potentially clinically informative alterations not detected in clinically sampled primary tumors, regional lymph nodes, or extracranial metastases. PMID:26410082

  4. A Five-Year Survey of Dematiaceous Fungi in a Tropical Hospital Reveals Potential Opportunistic Species

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Su Mei; Chan, Chai Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Na, Shiang Ling; Tan, Ruixin; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Ng, Kee Peng

    2014-01-01

    Dematiaceous fungi (black fungi) are a heterogeneous group of fungi present in diverse environments worldwide. Many species in this group are known to cause allergic reactions and potentially fatal diseases in humans and animals, especially in tropical and subtropical climates. This study represents the first survey of dematiaceous fungi in Malaysia and provides observations on their diversity as well as in vitro response to antifungal drugs. Seventy-five strains isolated from various clinical specimens were identified by morphology as well as an internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-based phylogenetic analysis. The combined molecular and conventional approach enabled the identification of three classes of the Ascomycota phylum and 16 genera, the most common being Cladosporium, Cochliobolus and Neoscytalidium. Several of the species identified have not been associated before with human infections. Among 8 antifungal agents tested, the azoles posaconazole (96%), voriconazole (90.7%), ketoconazole (86.7%) and itraconazole (85.3%) showed in vitro activity (MIC ≤1 µg/mL) to the largest number of strains, followed by anidulafungin (89.3%), caspofungin (74.7%) and amphotericin B (70.7%). Fluconazole appeared to be the least effective with only 10.7% of isolates showing in vitro susceptibility. Overall, almost half (45.3%) of the isolates showed reduced susceptibility (MIC >1 µg/mL) to at least one antifungal agent, and three strains (one Pyrenochaeta unguis-hominis and two Nigrospora oryzae) showed potential multidrug resistance. PMID:25098697

  5. Analysis of laser-microdissected prostate cancer tissues reveals potential tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Lindstrot, Andreas; Buettner, Reinhard; Wernert, Nicolas

    2011-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is a clinically heterogeneous and often multifocal disease with a clinical outcome difficult to predict. A deeper knowledge of the molecular basis of the disease may lead to a better prediction of prognosis. Therefore, in this study we investigated the molecular basis of PCA by identifying potential tumor markers in laser-microdisected PCA tissues. Among a group of PCA patients, quantitative RT-PCR analysis was performed to compare the expression of 70 genes. These genes were selected from the results of two microarrays which investigated the gene expression profile differences between moderately or poorly differentiated prostate carcinoma glands and the corresponding normal glands. Among the genes examined, CDKN2A, GATA3, CREBBP, ITGA2, NBL1 and TGM4 were down-regulated in the prostate carcinoma glands compared to the corresponding normal glands, whereas TFF3, TMPRSS2 and ERG were up-regulated. Our findings indicate that these genes may play roles as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes in PCA, and may serve as potential tumor markers and novel therapeutic targets.

  6. Gene expression profiling of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia reveals ADAMTS2 overexpression as a potential marker.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shang-Hui; Yang, Wen-Jun; Liu, Sheng-Wen; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Chun-Ye; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Chen-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) as an abnormal bone growth is one of the common fibro-osseous leasions (FOL) in oral and maxillofacial region, however, its etiology still remains unclear. Here, we performed gene expression profiling of FD using microarray analysis to explore the key molecule events in FD development, and develop potential diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets for FD. We found that 1,881 genes exhibited differential expression with more than two-fold changes in FD compared to normal bone tissues, including 1,200 upregulated genes and 681 downregulated genes. Pathway analysis indicated that obviously activated pathways are Ribosome and ECM-receptor interaction pathways; downregulated pathways are "Hepatitis C" and "cancer" signaling pathways. We further validated the expression of ADAMTS2, one of most differentiated expressed genes, by Immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 40 of FD cases. Results showed that ADAMTS2 was significantly overexpressed in FD tissues, but rarely expressed in normal bone tissues, suggesting that ADAMTS2 could be a potential biomarker for FD. Thus, this study uncovered differentially expressed candidate genes in FD, which provides pilot data for understanding FD pathogenesis, and developing novel biomarkers for diagnosis and targeting of FD.

  7. Profiling Antibody Responses to Infections by Chlamydia abortus Enables Identification of Potential Virulence Factors and Candidates for Serodiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Forsbach-Birk, Vera; Foddis, Corinna; Simnacher, Ulrike; Wilkat, Max; Longbottom, David; Walder, Gernot; Benesch, Christiane; Ganter, Martin; Sachse, Konrad; Essig, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Enzootic abortion of ewes (EAE) due to infection with the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia (C.) abortus is an important zoonosis leading to considerable economic loss to agriculture worldwide. The pathogen can be transmitted to humans and may lead to serious infection in pregnant women. Knowledge about epidemiology, clinical course and transmission to humans is hampered by the lack of reliable diagnostic tools. Immunoreactive proteins, which are expressed in infected animals and humans, may serve as novel candidates for diagnostic marker proteins and represent putative virulence factors. In order to broaden the spectrum of immunogenic C. abortus proteins we applied 2D immunoblot analysis and screening of an expression library using human and animal sera. We have identified 48 immunoreactive proteins representing potential diagnostic markers and also putative virulence factors, such as CAB080 (homologue of the “macrophage infectivity potentiator”, MIP), CAB167 (homologue of the “translocated actin recruitment protein”, TARP), CAB712 (homologue of the “chlamydial protease-like activity factor”, CPAF), CAB776 (homologue of the “Polymorphic membrane protein D”, PmpD), and the “hypothetical proteins” CAB063, CAB408 and CAB821, which are predicted to be type III secreted. We selected two putative virulence factors for further characterization, i.e. CAB080 (cMIP) and CAB063, and studied their expression profiles at transcript and protein levels. Analysis of the subcellular localization of both proteins throughout the developmental cycle revealed CAB063 being the first C. abortus protein shown to be translocated to the host cell nucleus. PMID:24260366

  8. [Anti-PD-1 Antibody Drugs - Potential of Plasma PD-L1 Protein as a Biomarker].

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Hisae; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Uehara, Hirofumi; Kawamura, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    The superior therapeutic effects of antibodies targeting immune checkpoints have been reported in the treatment of various cancers including non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC)and malignant melanoma. However, the risk of reactivity against selfantigens and the high prices of these drugs are major concerns. Previously, PD-L1 protein expression and the number of infiltrating T cells in tumor tissues were investigated by immunohistochemical staining, as biomarkers for therapeutic anti-PD- 1 antibodies. However, further research into the clinical significance of PD-L1 expression in tumor tissues is still required. A promising and comprehensive gene mutation analysis of tumor tissues and T cell repertoire analysis has recently been undertaken. Liquid biopsy, which has the benefit of being minimally invasive, has also been investigated. We are currently, investigating the utility of plasma PD-L1 protein levels as a predictive biomarker of prognosis in NSCLC. Furthermore, it is important to explore useful biomarkers and develop reliable companion diagnostics for the individualized treatment with immune checkpoint drugs. PMID:27628543

  9. Targeted Disruption of ALK Reveals a Potential Role in Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Witek, Barbara; El Wakil, Abeer; Nord, Christoffer; Ahlgren, Ulf; Eriksson, Maria; Vernersson-Lindahl, Emma; Helland, Åslaug; Alexeyev, Oleg A; Hallberg, Bengt; Palmer, Ruth H

    2015-01-01

    Mice lacking ALK activity have previously been reported to exhibit subtle behavioral phenotypes. In this study of ALK of loss of function mice we present data supporting a role for ALK in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in male mice. We observed lower level of serum testosterone at P40 in ALK knock-out males, accompanied by mild disorganization of seminiferous tubules exhibiting decreased numbers of GATA4 expressing cells. These observations highlight a role for ALK in testis function and are further supported by experiments in which chemical inhibition of ALK activity with the ALK TKI crizotinib was employed. Oral administration of crizotinib resulted in a decrease of serum testosterone levels in adult wild type male mice, which reverted to normal levels after cessation of treatment. Analysis of GnRH expression in neurons of the hypothalamus revealed a significant decrease in the number of GnRH positive neurons in ALK knock-out mice at P40 when compared with control littermates. Thus, ALK appears to be involved in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism by regulating the timing of pubertal onset and testis function at the upper levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis.

  10. Up-regulated expression of Ran reveals its potential role to deltamethrin stress in Kc cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Xu, Qin; Chi, Qingping; Hu, Junli; Li, Fengliang; Cheng, Luogen

    2016-05-25

    The GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran has mostly been reported to be an essential player in nuclear transport, chromosome alignment, microtubule dynamics, centrosome duplication, kinetochore attachment of microtubules, nuclear-envelope dynamics, and phagocytosis. However, until now, there has been no report showing the involvement of Ran in DM stress. In this paper, two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis showed that the expression level of Ran in Kc cells in response to DM was higher than that in the control group. In addition, quantitative analysis using real-time PCR revealed that the expression of Ran was obviously up-regulated at various concentrations of DM. Western blot analysis showed that Ran was up-regulated 2.27-fold over the control at 48h. Because we still could not pinpoint whether Ran was actually involved in DM stress reaction, to further verify the role of Ran in stress reaction, RNA interference and cell transfection were utilized. Overexpression of Ran in cells conferred a degree of protection against DM after 72h. Furthermore, interference with Ran significantly decrease cell viability. All of the above findings strongly imply that Ran may participate in the development of stress reaction to DM. Therefore, investigating the possible role of Ran in DM stress will broaden our limited knowledge regarding DM stress inducible genes. PMID:26924245

  11. Potential microRNA-mediated oncogenic intercellular communication revealed by pan-cancer analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2014-11-01

    Carcinogenesis consists of oncogenesis and metastasis, and intriguingly microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in both processes. Although aberrant miRNA activities are prevalent in diverse tumor types, the exact mechanisms for how they regulate cancerous processes are not always clear. To this end, we performed a large-scale pan-cancer analysis via a novel probabilistic approach to infer recurrent miRNA-target interactions implicated in 12 cancer types using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We discovered ~20,000 recurrent miRNA regulations, which are enriched for cancer-related miRNAs/genes. Notably, miRNA 200 family (miR-200/141/429) is among the most prominent miRNA regulators, which is known to be involved in metastasis. Importantly, the recurrent miRNA regulatory network is not only enriched for cancer pathways but also for extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and ECM-receptor interactions. The results suggest an intriguing cancer mechanism involving miRNA-mediated cell-to-cell communication, which possibly involves delivery of tumorigenic miRNA messengers to adjacent cells via exosomes. Finally, survival analysis revealed 414 recurrent-prognostic associations, where both gene and miRNA involved in each interaction conferred significant prognostic power in one or more cancer types. Together, our comprehensive pan-cancer analysis provided not only biological insights into metastasis but also brought to bear the clinical relevance of the proposed recurrent miRNA-gene associations.

  12. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals a Possible Novel Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterium Species with High Pathogenic Potential.

    PubMed

    Choo, Siew Woh; Dutta, Avirup; Wong, Guat Jah; Wee, Wei Yee; Ang, Mia Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria have been reported to cause a wide range of human diseases. We present the first whole-genome study of a Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterium, Mycobacterium sp. UM_CSW (referred to hereafter as UM_CSW), isolated from a patient diagnosed with bronchiectasis. Our data suggest that this clinical isolate is likely a novel mycobacterial species, supported by clear evidence from molecular phylogenetic, comparative genomic, ANI and AAI analyses. UM_CSW is closely related to the Mycobacterium avium complex. While it has characteristic features of an environmental bacterium, it also shows a high pathogenic potential with the presence of a wide variety of putative genes related to bacterial virulence and shares very similar pathogenomic profiles with the known pathogenic mycobacterial species. Thus, we conclude that this possible novel Mycobacterium species should be tightly monitored for its possible causative role in human infections. PMID:27035710

  13. Early age-related changes in episodic memory retrieval as revealed by event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Cécile; Clochon, Patrice; Denise, Pierre; Rauchs, Géraldine; Guillery-Girard, Bérengère; Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice

    2009-01-28

    Familiarity is better preserved than recollection in ageing. The age at which changes first occur and the slope of the subsequent decline, however, remain unclear. In this study, we investigated changes in episodic memory, by using event-related potentials (ERPs) in young (m=24), middle-aged (m=58) and older (m=70) adults. Although behavioural performance did not change before the age of 65 years, changes in ERP correlates were already present in the middle-aged adults. The ERP correlates of recollection and monitoring processes were the first to be affected by ageing, with a linear decrease as age increased. Conversely, the ERP correlate of familiarity remained unchanged, at least up to the age of 65 years. These results suggest a differential time course for the age effects on episodic retrieval. PMID:19104457

  14. Source identification and distribution reveals the potential of the geochemical Antarctic sea ice proxy IPSO25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belt, S. T.; Smik, L.; Brown, T. A.; Kim, J.-H.; Rowland, S. J.; Allen, C. S.; Gal, J.-K.; Shin, K.-H.; Lee, J. I.; Taylor, K. W. R.

    2016-08-01

    The presence of a di-unsaturated highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) lipid biomarker (diene II) in Southern Ocean sediments has previously been proposed as a proxy measure of palaeo Antarctic sea ice. Here we show that a source of diene II is the sympagic diatom Berkeleya adeliensis Medlin. Furthermore, the propensity for B. adeliensis to flourish in platelet ice is reflected by an offshore downward gradient in diene II concentration in >100 surface sediments from Antarctic coastal and near-coastal environments. Since platelet ice formation is strongly associated with super-cooled freshwater inflow, we further hypothesize that sedimentary diene II provides a potentially sensitive proxy indicator of landfast sea ice influenced by meltwater discharge from nearby glaciers and ice shelves, and re-examination of some previous diene II downcore records supports this hypothesis. The term IPSO25--Ice Proxy for the Southern Ocean with 25 carbon atoms--is proposed as a proxy name for diene II.

  15. Source identification and distribution reveals the potential of the geochemical Antarctic sea ice proxy IPSO25.

    PubMed

    Belt, S T; Smik, L; Brown, T A; Kim, J-H; Rowland, S J; Allen, C S; Gal, J-K; Shin, K-H; Lee, J I; Taylor, K W R

    2016-08-30

    The presence of a di-unsaturated highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) lipid biomarker (diene II) in Southern Ocean sediments has previously been proposed as a proxy measure of palaeo Antarctic sea ice. Here we show that a source of diene II is the sympagic diatom Berkeleya adeliensis Medlin. Furthermore, the propensity for B. adeliensis to flourish in platelet ice is reflected by an offshore downward gradient in diene II concentration in >100 surface sediments from Antarctic coastal and near-coastal environments. Since platelet ice formation is strongly associated with super-cooled freshwater inflow, we further hypothesize that sedimentary diene II provides a potentially sensitive proxy indicator of landfast sea ice influenced by meltwater discharge from nearby glaciers and ice shelves, and re-examination of some previous diene II downcore records supports this hypothesis. The term IPSO25-Ice Proxy for the Southern Ocean with 25 carbon atoms-is proposed as a proxy name for diene II.

  16. Analysis of climate paths reveals potential limitations on species range shifts.

    PubMed

    Early, Regan; Sax, Dov F

    2011-11-01

    Forecasts of species endangerment under climate change usually ignore the processes by which species ranges shift. By analysing the 'climate paths' that range shifts might follow, and two key range-shift processes--dispersal and population persistence--we show that short-term climatic and population characteristics have dramatic effects on range-shift forecasts. By employing this approach with 15 amphibian species in the western USA, we make unexpected predictions. First, inter-decadal variability in climate change can prevent range shifts by causing gaps in climate paths, even in the absence of geographic barriers. Second, the hitherto unappreciated trait of persistence during unfavourable climatic conditions is critical to species range shifts. Third, climatic fluctuations and low persistence could lead to endangerment even if the future potential range size is large. These considerations may render habitat corridors ineffectual for some species, and conservationists may need to consider managed relocation and augmentation of in situ populations. PMID:21955643

  17. Event related potentials reveal differences between morphological (prefixes) and phonological (syllables) processing of words.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Alberto; Alija, Maira; Cuetos, Fernando; de Vega, Mauel

    2006-11-01

    Behavioral measures in visual priming tasks show opposite effects for syllables and morphemes, which indicate that they are processed by two independent systems. We used event related potentials (ERPs) to explore two priming situations in Spanish: prefix related words (reacción-REFORMA [reaction-reform]), in which prime and target words shared a first syllable that was also a prefix, and syllable related words (regalo-REFORMA [gift-reform.]), in which the shared first syllable was a pseudoprefix in the prime word. Prefix related pairs, unlike syllable related pairs, evoked a very early positivity in reaction to the target (at 150-250ms window), suggesting that the prefix information is immediately available, at a prelexical stage. By contrast, syllable related pairs showed a larger N400 effect. This late negativity may be caused by lateral inhibition among lexical candidates activated in the lexicon by the prime's first syllable. PMID:16996688

  18. Social Network Analysis Reveals Potential Fission-Fusion Behavior in a Shark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haulsee, Danielle E.; Fox, Dewayne A.; Breece, Matthew W.; Brown, Lori M.; Kneebone, Jeff; Skomal, Gregory B.; Oliver, Matthew J.

    2016-09-01

    Complex social networks and behaviors are difficult to observe for free-living marine species, especially those that move great distances. Using implanted acoustic transceivers to study the inter- and intraspecific interactions of sand tiger sharks Carcharias taurus, we observed group behavior that has historically been associated with higher order mammals. We found evidence strongly suggestive of fission-fusion behavior, or changes in group size and composition of sand tigers, related to five behavioral modes (summering, south migration, community bottleneck, dispersal, north migration). Our study shows sexually dimorphic behavior during migration, in addition to presenting evidence of a potential solitary phase for these typically gregarious sharks. Sand tigers spent up to 95 consecutive and 335 cumulative hours together, with the strongest relationships occurring between males. Species that exhibit fission-fusion group dynamics pose a particularly challenging issue for conservation and management because changes in group size and composition affect population estimates and amplify anthropogenic impacts.

  19. Social Network Analysis Reveals Potential Fission-Fusion Behavior in a Shark

    PubMed Central

    Haulsee, Danielle E.; Fox, Dewayne A.; Breece, Matthew W.; Brown, Lori M.; Kneebone, Jeff; Skomal, Gregory B.; Oliver, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Complex social networks and behaviors are difficult to observe for free-living marine species, especially those that move great distances. Using implanted acoustic transceivers to study the inter- and intraspecific interactions of sand tiger sharks Carcharias taurus, we observed group behavior that has historically been associated with higher order mammals. We found evidence strongly suggestive of fission-fusion behavior, or changes in group size and composition of sand tigers, related to five behavioral modes (summering, south migration, community bottleneck, dispersal, north migration). Our study shows sexually dimorphic behavior during migration, in addition to presenting evidence of a potential solitary phase for these typically gregarious sharks. Sand tigers spent up to 95 consecutive and 335 cumulative hours together, with the strongest relationships occurring between males. Species that exhibit fission-fusion group dynamics pose a particularly challenging issue for conservation and management because changes in group size and composition affect population estimates and amplify anthropogenic impacts. PMID:27686155

  20. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals a Possible Novel Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterium Species with High Pathogenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Siew Woh; Dutta, Avirup; Wong, Guat Jah; Wee, Wei Yee; Ang, Mia Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria have been reported to cause a wide range of human diseases. We present the first whole-genome study of a Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterium, Mycobacterium sp. UM_CSW (referred to hereafter as UM_CSW), isolated from a patient diagnosed with bronchiectasis. Our data suggest that this clinical isolate is likely a novel mycobacterial species, supported by clear evidence from molecular phylogenetic, comparative genomic, ANI and AAI analyses. UM_CSW is closely related to the Mycobacterium avium complex. While it has characteristic features of an environmental bacterium, it also shows a high pathogenic potential with the presence of a wide variety of putative genes related to bacterial virulence and shares very similar pathogenomic profiles with the known pathogenic mycobacterial species. Thus, we conclude that this possible novel Mycobacterium species should be tightly monitored for its possible causative role in human infections. PMID:27035710

  1. Source identification and distribution reveals the potential of the geochemical Antarctic sea ice proxy IPSO25.

    PubMed

    Belt, S T; Smik, L; Brown, T A; Kim, J-H; Rowland, S J; Allen, C S; Gal, J-K; Shin, K-H; Lee, J I; Taylor, K W R

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a di-unsaturated highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) lipid biomarker (diene II) in Southern Ocean sediments has previously been proposed as a proxy measure of palaeo Antarctic sea ice. Here we show that a source of diene II is the sympagic diatom Berkeleya adeliensis Medlin. Furthermore, the propensity for B. adeliensis to flourish in platelet ice is reflected by an offshore downward gradient in diene II concentration in >100 surface sediments from Antarctic coastal and near-coastal environments. Since platelet ice formation is strongly associated with super-cooled freshwater inflow, we further hypothesize that sedimentary diene II provides a potentially sensitive proxy indicator of landfast sea ice influenced by meltwater discharge from nearby glaciers and ice shelves, and re-examination of some previous diene II downcore records supports this hypothesis. The term IPSO25-Ice Proxy for the Southern Ocean with 25 carbon atoms-is proposed as a proxy name for diene II. PMID:27573030

  2. Event related potentials reveal differences between morphological (prefixes) and phonological (syllables) processing of words.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Alberto; Alija, Maira; Cuetos, Fernando; de Vega, Mauel

    2006-11-01

    Behavioral measures in visual priming tasks show opposite effects for syllables and morphemes, which indicate that they are processed by two independent systems. We used event related potentials (ERPs) to explore two priming situations in Spanish: prefix related words (reacción-REFORMA [reaction-reform]), in which prime and target words shared a first syllable that was also a prefix, and syllable related words (regalo-REFORMA [gift-reform.]), in which the shared first syllable was a pseudoprefix in the prime word. Prefix related pairs, unlike syllable related pairs, evoked a very early positivity in reaction to the target (at 150-250ms window), suggesting that the prefix information is immediately available, at a prelexical stage. By contrast, syllable related pairs showed a larger N400 effect. This late negativity may be caused by lateral inhibition among lexical candidates activated in the lexicon by the prime's first syllable.

  3. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T; Winget, Danielle M; White, Richard A; Hallam, Steven J; Suttle, Curtis A

    2015-01-01

    Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10 m) and oxygen-starved basin (200 m) waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs) predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n = 5010) had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P) waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI's non-redundant "nr" database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems. PMID:25914678

  4. Revealing the potential pathogenesis of glioma by utilizing a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weiran; Li, Gang; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Miao, Jinming

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to explore the potential mechanism of glioma through bioinformatic approaches. The gene expression profile (GSE4290) of glioma tumor and non-tumor samples was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. A total of 180 samples were available, including 23 non-tumor and 157 tumor samples. Then the raw data were preprocessed using robust multiarray analysis, and 8,890 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by using t-test (false discovery rate < 0.0005). Furthermore, 16 known glioma related genes were abstracted from Genetic Association Database. After mapping 8,890 DEGs and 16 known glioma related genes to Human Protein Reference Database, a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network (GAPN) was constructed. In addition, 51 sub-networks in GAPN were screened out through Molecular Complex Detection (score ≥ 1), and sub-network 1 was found to have the closest interaction (score = 3). What' more, for the top 10 sub-networks, Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis (p value < 0.05) was performed, and DEGs involved in sub-network 1 and 2, such as BRMS1L and CCNA1, were predicted to regulate cell growth, cell cycle, and DNA replication via interacting with known glioma related genes. Finally, the overlaps of DEGs and human essential, housekeeping, tissue-specific genes were calculated (p value = 1.0, 1.0, and 0.00014, respectively) and visualized by Venn Diagram package in R. About 61% of human tissue-specific genes were DEGs as well. This research shed new light on the pathogenesis of glioma based on DEGs and GAPN, and our findings might provide potential targets for clinical glioma treatment.

  5. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T; Winget, Danielle M; White, Richard A; Hallam, Steven J; Suttle, Curtis A

    2015-01-01

    Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10 m) and oxygen-starved basin (200 m) waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs) predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n = 5010) had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P) waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI's non-redundant "nr" database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems.

  6. Genetic and genomic dissection of Prolactin revealed potential association with milk production traits in riverine buffalo.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, A; Maryam, J

    2016-08-01

    Milk yield and quality has been a major selection criterion for genetic improvement in livestock species. Role of Prolactin gene in determining milk quality in terms of protein profile, lactose, lipids and other imperative macromolecules is very important. In this context, genetic profiling of Prolactin gene in riverine buffalo of Pakistan was performed and potential genetic markers were identified illustrating worth of this gene in marker-assisted selection of superior dairy buffaloes. Series of wet and dry lab experimentation was performed starting with genomic DNA isolation from true to breed representatives of indigenous river buffalo (Nili-Ravi). After amplification of coding regions of Prolactin gene, products were eluted and sequenced by Sanger's chain termination method and aligned to get variations in genomic region. A total of 15 novel variations were identified and analyzed statistically for their significance at population level, haplotypes were constructed, and association was estimated. Phylogenetic analysis was performed to evaluate the rate of evolution for Prolactin gene in various mammalian species. Lastly, biological networking for this molecule was predicted to get the bigger pictorial of its functional machinery. Pathway analysis was performed to find its physiological mode of action in milk synthesis. This is a first report toward complete genetic screening of Prolactin gene in Pakistani buffaloes. Results of this study not only provide an insight for potential role of Prolactin gene in milk-producing abilities of buffalo but also suggest new directions for exploration of more genes that may have promising role to enhance future milk production capabilities of river buffalo breeds of Asian region through marker-assisted selection. PMID:27240674

  7. Human antibody technology and the development of antibodies against cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Ohlin, Mats; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2015-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a virus that causes chronic infections in a large set of the population. It may cause severe disease in immunocompromised individuals, is linked to immunosenescence and implied to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Modulation of the immune system's abilities to manage the virus represent a highly viable therapeutic option and passive immunotherapy with polyclonal antibody preparations is already in clinical use. Defined monoclonal antibodies offer many advantages over polyclonal antibodies purified from serum. Human CMV-specific monoclonal antibodies have consequently been thoroughly investigated with respect to their potential in the treatment of diseases caused by CMV. Recent advances in human antibody technology have substantially expanded the breadth of antibodies for such applications. This review summarizes the fundamental basis for treating CMV disease by use of antibodies, the basic technologies to be used to develop such antibodies, and relevant human antibody specificities available to target this virus.

  8. Digital sleep logs reveal potential impacts of modern temporal structure on class performance in different chronotypes.

    PubMed

    Smarr, Benjamin Lee

    2015-02-01

    Stability of sleep and circadian rhythms are important for healthy learning and memory. While experimental manipulations of lifestyle and learning outcomes present major obstacles, the ongoing increase in data sources allows retrospective data mining of people's sleep timing variation. Here I use digital sleep-log data generated by 1109 students in a biology lab course at the University of Washington to test the hypothesis that higher variance in time asleep and later sleep-onset times negatively correlate with class performance, used here as a real-world proxy for learning and memory. I find that sleep duration variance and mean sleep-onset times both significantly correlate with class performance. These correlations are powerful on weeknights but undetectable on Friday and Saturday nights ("free nights"). Finally, although these data come with no demographic information beyond sex, the constructed demographic groups of "larks" and "owls" within the sexes reveal a significant decrease in performance of owls relative to larks in male students, whereas the correlation of performance with sleep-onset time for all male students was only a near-significant trend. This provides a proof of concept that deeper demographic mining of digital logs in the future may identify subgroups for which certain sleep phenotypes have greater predictive value for performance outcomes. The data analyzed are consistent with known patterns, including sleep-timing delays from weeknights to free nights and sleep-timing delays in men relative to women. These findings support the hypothesis that modern schedule impositions on sleep and circadian timing have consequences for real-world learning and memory. This study also highlights the low-cost, large-scale benefits of personal, daily, digital records as an augmentation of sleep and circadian studies.

  9. Digital sleep logs reveal potential impacts of modern temporal structure on class performance in different chronotypes.

    PubMed

    Smarr, Benjamin Lee

    2015-02-01

    Stability of sleep and circadian rhythms are important for healthy learning and memory. While experimental manipulations of lifestyle and learning outcomes present major obstacles, the ongoing increase in data sources allows retrospective data mining of people's sleep timing variation. Here I use digital sleep-log data generated by 1109 students in a biology lab course at the University of Washington to test the hypothesis that higher variance in time asleep and later sleep-onset times negatively correlate with class performance, used here as a real-world proxy for learning and memory. I find that sleep duration variance and mean sleep-onset times both significantly correlate with class performance. These correlations are powerful on weeknights but undetectable on Friday and Saturday nights ("free nights"). Finally, although these data come with no demographic information beyond sex, the constructed demographic groups of "larks" and "owls" within the sexes reveal a significant decrease in performance of owls relative to larks in male students, whereas the correlation of performance with sleep-onset time for all male students was only a near-significant trend. This provides a proof of concept that deeper demographic mining of digital logs in the future may identify subgroups for which certain sleep phenotypes have greater predictive value for performance outcomes. The data analyzed are consistent with known patterns, including sleep-timing delays from weeknights to free nights and sleep-timing delays in men relative to women. These findings support the hypothesis that modern schedule impositions on sleep and circadian timing have consequences for real-world learning and memory. This study also highlights the low-cost, large-scale benefits of personal, daily, digital records as an augmentation of sleep and circadian studies. PMID:25564433

  10. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Mo, Charlie Y; Manning, Sara A; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J; Samuels, Amanda N; Sniegowski, Paul D; Goulian, Mark; Kohli, Rahul M

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role in

  11. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Charlie Y.; Manning, Sara A.; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J.; Samuels, Amanda N.; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Goulian, Mark

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role

  12. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Mo, Charlie Y; Manning, Sara A; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J; Samuels, Amanda N; Sniegowski, Paul D; Goulian, Mark; Kohli, Rahul M

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role in

  13. A Cryo-Electron Microscopy Study Identifies the Complete H16.V5 Epitope and Reveals Global Conformational Changes Initiated by Binding of the Neutralizing Antibody Fragment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunwook; Brendle, Sarah A.; Bywaters, Stephanie M.; Guan, Jian; Ashley, Robert E.; Yoder, Joshua D.; Makhov, Alexander M.; Conway, James F.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a worldwide health threat and an etiologic agent of cervical cancer. To understand the antigenic properties of HPV16, we pursued a structural study to elucidate HPV capsids and antibody interactions. The cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of a mature HPV16 particle and an altered capsid particle were solved individually and as complexes with fragment of antibody (Fab) from the neutralizing antibody H16.V5. Fitted crystal structures provided a pseudoatomic model of the virus-Fab complex, which identified a precise footprint of H16.V5, including previously unrecognized residues. The altered-capsid–Fab complex map showed that binding of the Fab induced significant conformational changes that were not seen in the altered-capsid structure alone. These changes included more ordered surface loops, consolidated so-called “invading-arm” structures, and tighter intercapsomeric connections at the capsid floor. The H16.V5 Fab preferentially bound hexavalent capsomers likely with a stabilizing effect that directly correlated with the number of bound Fabs. Additional cryo-EM reconstructions of the virus-Fab complex for different incubation times and structural analysis provide a model for a hyperstabilization of the capsomer by H16.V5 Fab and showed that the Fab distinguishes subtle differences between antigenic sites. IMPORTANCE Our analysis of the cryo-EM reconstructions of the HPV16 capsids and virus-Fab complexes has identified the entire HPV.V5 conformational epitope and demonstrated a detailed neutralization mechanism of this clinically important monoclonal antibody against HPV16. The Fab bound and ordered the apical loops of HPV16. This conformational change was transmitted to the lower region of the capsomer, resulting in enhanced intercapsomeric interactions evidenced by the more ordered capsid floor and “invading-arm” structures. This study advances the understanding of the neutralization mechanism used

  14. Auditory information processing during human sleep as revealed by event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Atienza, M; Cantero, J L; Escera, C

    2001-11-01

    The main goal of this review is to elucidate up to what extent pre-attentive auditory information processing is affected during human sleep. Evidence from event-related brain potential (ERP) studies indicates that auditory information processing is selectively affected, even at early phases, across the different stages of sleep-wakefulness continuum. According to these studies, 3 main conclusions are drawn: (1) the sleeping brain is able to automatically detect stimulus occurrence and trigger an orienting response towards that stimulus if its degree of novelty is large; (2) auditory stimuli are represented in the auditory system and maintained for a period of time in sensory memory, making the automatic-change detection during sleep possible; and (3) there are specific brain mechanisms (sleep-specific ERP components associated with the presence of vertex waves and K-complexes) by which information processing can be improved during non-rapid eye movement sleep. However, the remarkably affected amplitude and latency of the waking-ERPs during the different stages of sleep suggests deficits in the building and maintenance of a neural representation of the stimulus as well as in the process by which neural events lead to an orienting response toward such a stimulus. The deactivation of areas in the dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex during sleep contributing to the generation of these ERP components is hypothesized to be one of the main causes for the attenuated amplitude of these ERPs during human sleep. PMID:11682341

  15. Pathway Analysis Revealed Potential Diverse Health Impacts of Flavonoids that Bind Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ge, Weigong; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are frequently used as dietary supplements in the absence of research evidence regarding health benefits or toxicity. Furthermore, ingested doses could far exceed those received from diet in the course of normal living. Some flavonoids exhibit binding to estrogen receptors (ERs) with consequential vigilance by regulatory authorities at the U.S. EPA and FDA. Regulatory authorities must consider both beneficial claims and potential adverse effects, warranting the increases in research that has spanned almost two decades. Here, we report pathway enrichment of 14 targets from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) and the Herbal Ingredients’ Targets (HIT) database for 22 flavonoids that bind ERs. The selected flavonoids are confirmed ER binders from our earlier studies, and were here found in mainly involved in three types of biological processes, ER regulation, estrogen metabolism and synthesis, and apoptosis. Besides cancers, we conjecture that the flavonoids may affect several diseases via apoptosis pathways. Diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, viral myocarditis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease could be implicated. More generally, apoptosis processes may be importantly evolved biological functions of flavonoids that bind ERs and high dose ingestion of those flavonoids could adversely disrupt the cellular apoptosis process. PMID:27023590

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Pneumococcal Meningitis Reveals Potential Biomarkers Associated with Survival

    PubMed Central

    Goonetilleke, Upali R.; Scarborough, Matthew; Ward, Stephen A.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with pneumococcal meningitis often die or have severe neurological damage despite optimal antibiotic therapy. New or improved therapy is required. The delivery of new interventions will require an improved understanding of the disease pathogenesis. Our objective was to learn more about the pathophysiology of severe meningitis through the interpretation of differences in the proteomic profile of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with meningitis. Methods Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of CSF from normal subjects (controls, n = 10) and patients with pneumococcal meningitis (n = 20) was analyzed. Spot differences were compared and identified between controls, nonsurvivors (n = 9), and survivors (n = 11). Results Protein concentration in CSF of patients with meningitis was 4-fold higher than in CSF of control subjects (7.0 mg/mL vs 0.23 mg/mL; P < .01). A mean of 2466 discrete protein spots was present in CSF of patients with meningitis. Thirty-four protein spots were differentially expressed in CSF of nonsurvivors, compared with survivors. None of these protein spots were observed in CSF of control subjects. Conclusions Proteomic screening of CSF yields potential biomarkers capable of differentiating control subjects from nonsurvivors and survivors of meningitis. Proteins involved in the inflammatory process and central metabolism were represented in the differentially expressed protein repertoire. PMID:20608875

  17. Source identification and distribution reveals the potential of the geochemical Antarctic sea ice proxy IPSO25

    PubMed Central

    Belt, S. T.; Smik, L.; Brown, T. A.; Kim, J.-H.; Rowland, S. J.; Allen, C. S.; Gal, J.-K.; Shin, K.-H.; Lee, J. I.; Taylor, K. W. R.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a di-unsaturated highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) lipid biomarker (diene II) in Southern Ocean sediments has previously been proposed as a proxy measure of palaeo Antarctic sea ice. Here we show that a source of diene II is the sympagic diatom Berkeleya adeliensis Medlin. Furthermore, the propensity for B. adeliensis to flourish in platelet ice is reflected by an offshore downward gradient in diene II concentration in >100 surface sediments from Antarctic coastal and near-coastal environments. Since platelet ice formation is strongly associated with super-cooled freshwater inflow, we further hypothesize that sedimentary diene II provides a potentially sensitive proxy indicator of landfast sea ice influenced by meltwater discharge from nearby glaciers and ice shelves, and re-examination of some previous diene II downcore records supports this hypothesis. The term IPSO25—Ice Proxy for the Southern Ocean with 25 carbon atoms—is proposed as a proxy name for diene II. PMID:27573030

  18. Metagenomic analysis reveals potential biodegradation pathways of persistent pesticides in freshwater and marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hua; Cai, Lin; Yang, Ying; Ju, Feng; Li, Xiangdong; Yu, Yunlong; Zhang, Tong

    2014-02-01

    The abundance and diversity of biodegradation genes (BDGs) and potential degradation pathways of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), and atrazine (ATZ) in freshwater and marine sediments were investigated by metagenomic analysis using 6 datasets (16Gb in total). The datasets were derived using Illumina high-throughput sequencing and were based on BLAST against self-established databases of BDGs, DDT degradation genes (DDGs), HCH degradation genes (HDGs), and ATZ degradation genes (ADGs). The results showed that the abundance and diversity of BDGs, DDGs, HDGs, and ADGs varied with sample source and locations. The lip and mnp genes, which encode for peroxidase, and the carA gene, which encodes for laccase, were detected as the dominant genes for degradation of organic pollutants. The hdt, hdg, and atzB genes, which encode for hydratase, dehalogenase, and ethylaminohydrolase, were found to be the most abundant genes involved in DDT, HCH, and ATZ degradation, respectively. The identified 69 genera capable of degrading organic pollutants were mostly affiliated with Proteobacteria (49.3%) and Actinobacteria (21.7%). Four genera, including Plesiocystis, Anaerolinea, Jannaschia, and Mycobacterium, were the major biodegradation populations in all sediments. In this study, the nearly complete biodegradation pathways of DDT and ATZ were found, and the partial degradation pathway of HCH was detected in all sediments.

  19. Crystal structure of the APOBEC3G catalytic domain reveals potential oligomerization interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shandilya, Shivender M. D.; Nalam, Madhavi N. L.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Gross, Phillip J.; Valesano, John C.; Shindo, Keisuke; Li, Ming; Munson, Mary; Harjes, Elena; Kouno, Takahide; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary APOBEC3G is a DNA cytidine deaminase that has anti-viral activity against HIV-1 and other pathogenic viruses. In this study the crystal structure of the catalytically active C-terminal domain was determined to 2.25 Å. This structure corroborates features previously observed in NMR studies, a bulge in the second β-strand and a lengthening of the second α-helix. Oligomerization is postulated to be critical for the function of APOBEC3G. In this structure, four extensive intermolecular interfaces are observed suggesting potential models for APOBEC3G oligomerization. The structural and functional significance of these interfaces was probed by solution NMR and disruptive variants were designed and tested for DNA deaminase and anti-HIV activities. The variant designed to disrupt the most extensive interface lost both activities. NMR solution data provides evidence that another interface, which coordinates a novel zinc site, also exists. Thus, the observed crystallographic interfaces of APOBEC3G may be important for both oligomerization and function. PMID:20152150

  20. Crystal Structure of the APOBEC3G Catalytic Domain Reveals Potential Oligomerization Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Gross, Phillip J.; Valesano, Johnathan C.; Shindo, Keisuke; Li, Ming; Munson, Mary; Royer, William E.; Harjes, Elena; Kono, Takahide; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-02-11

    APOBEC3G is a DNA cytidine deaminase that has antiviral activity against HIV-1 and other pathogenic viruses. In this study the crystal structure of the catalytically active C-terminal domain was determined to 2.25 {angstrom}. This structure corroborates features previously observed in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, a bulge in the second {beta} strand and a lengthening of the second {alpha} helix. Oligomerization is postulated to be critical for the function of APOBEC3G. In this structure, four extensive intermolecular interfaces are observed, suggesting potential models for APOBEC3G oligomerization. The structural and functional significance of these interfaces was probed by solution NMR and disruptive variants were designed and tested for DNA deaminase and anti-HIV activities. The variant designed to disrupt the most extensive interface lost both activities. NMR solution data provides evidence that another interface, which coordinates a novel zinc site, also exists. Thus, the observed crystallographic interfaces of APOBEC3G may be important for both oligomerization and function.

  1. Dynamics of the spatial scale of visual attention revealed by brain event-related potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Y. J.; Greenwood, P. M.; Parasuraman, R.

    2001-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of the spatial scaling of attention during visual search were examined by recording event-related potentials (ERPs). A total of 16 young participants performed a search task in which the search array was preceded by valid cues that varied in size and hence in precision of target localization. The effects of cue size on short-latency (P1 and N1) ERP components, and the time course of these effects with variation in cue-target stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), were examined. Reaction time (RT) to discriminate a target was prolonged as cue size increased. The amplitudes of the posterior P1 and N1 components of the ERP evoked by the search array were affected in opposite ways by the size of the precue: P1 amplitude increased whereas N1 amplitude decreased as cue size increased, particularly following the shortest SOA. The results show that when top-down information about the region to be searched is less precise (larger cues), RT is slowed and the neural generators of P1 become more active, reflecting the additional computations required in changing the spatial scale of attention to the appropriate element size to facilitate target discrimination. In contrast, the decrease in N1 amplitude with cue size may reflect a broadening of the spatial gradient of attention. The results provide electrophysiological evidence that changes in the spatial scale of attention modulate neural activity in early visual cortical areas and activate at least two temporally overlapping component processes during visual search.

  2. Integration of Metabolomics and Transcriptomics Reveals Major Metabolic Pathways and Potential Biomarker Involved in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shancheng; Shao, Yaping; Zhao, Xinjie; Hong, Christopher S; Wang, Fubo; Lu, Xin; Li, Jia; Ye, Guozhu; Yan, Min; Zhuang, Zhengping; Xu, Chuanliang; Xu, Guowang; Sun, Yinghao

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a highly prevalent tumor affecting millions of men worldwide, but poor understanding of its pathogenesis has limited effective clinical management of patients. In addition to transcriptional profiling or transcriptomics, metabolomics is being increasingly utilized to discover key molecular changes underlying tumorigenesis. In this study, we integrated transcriptomics and metabolomics to analyze 25 paired human prostate cancer tissues and adjacent noncancerous tissues, followed by further validation of our findings in an additional cohort of 51 prostate cancer patients and 16 benign prostatic hyperplasia patients. We found several altered pathways aberrantly expressed at both metabolic and transcriptional levels, including cysteine and methionine metabolism, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolism, and hexosamine biosynthesis. Additionally, the metabolite sphingosine demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity for distinguishing prostate cancer from benign prostatic hyperplasia, particularly for patients with low prostate specific antigen level (0-10 ng/ml). We also found impaired sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 signaling, downstream of sphingosine, representing a loss of tumor suppressor gene and a potential key oncogenic pathway for therapeutic targeting. By integrating metabolomics and transcriptomics, we have provided both a broad picture of the molecular perturbations underlying prostate cancer and a preliminary study of a novel metabolic signature, which may help to discriminate prostate cancer from normal tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  3. Recent advances reveal IL-8 signaling as a potential key to targeting breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagdeep K; Simões, Bruno M; Howell, Sacha J; Farnie, Gillian; Clarke, Robert B

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are an important therapeutic target as they are purported to be responsible for tumor initiation, maintenance, metastases, and disease recurrence. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is upregulated in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue and is associated with poor prognosis. IL-8 is reported to promote breast cancer progression by increasing cell invasion, angiogenesis, and metastases and is upregulated in HER2-positive cancers. Recently, we and others have established that IL-8 via its cognate receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, is also involved in regulating breast CSC activity. Our work demonstrates that in metastatic breast CSCs, CXCR1/2 signals via transactivation of HER2. Given the importance of HER2 in breast cancer and in regulating CSC activity, a pathway driving the activation of these receptors would have important biological and clinical consequences, especially in tumors that express high levels of IL-8 and other CXCR1/2-activating ligands. Here, we review the IL-8 signaling pathway and the role of HER2 in maintaining an IL-8 inflammatory loop and discuss the potential of combining CXCR1/2 inhibitors with other treatments such as HER2-targeted therapy as a novel approach to eliminate CSCs and improve patient survival.

  4. Event-related potentials reveal early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Aitao; Liu, Jing; Zhang, John X

    2012-03-01

    With tasks involving action concept comprehension, many fMRI studies have reported brain activations in sensori-motor regions specific to effectors of the referent action. There is relatively less evidence whether such activations reflect early semantic access or late conceptual re-processing. Here we recorded event-related potentials when participants recognized noun-verb pairs. For Congruent pairs, the verb was the one most commonly associated with the noun (e.g., football-kick). Compared with a control condition, verbs in Congruent pairs showed priming effects in the time windows of 100-150 ms and 210-260 ms. Such activation seems to be specific to body part but not other aspects of the action as similar priming effect was also found when the noun and verb involved different actions though sharing the same body part (e.g., football-jump), documenting for the first time the early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension. PMID:22306088

  5. A potential source for cellulolytic enzyme discovery and environmental aspects revealed through metagenomics of Brazilian mangroves.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Claudia Elizabeth; Beys-da-Silva, Walter Orlando; Santi, Lucélia; Berger, Markus; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; Guima Rães, Jorge Almeida; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    The mangroves are among the most productive and biologically important environments. The possible presence of cellulolytic enzymes and microorganisms useful for biomass degradation as well as taxonomic and functional aspects of two Brazilian mangroves were evaluated using cultivation and metagenomic approaches. From a total of 296 microorganisms with visual differences in colony morphology and growth (including bacteria, yeast and filamentous fungus), 179 (60.5%) and 117 (39.5%) were isolated from the Rio de Janeiro (RJ) and Bahia (BA) samples, respectively. RJ metagenome showed the higher number of microbial isolates, which is consistent with its most conserved state and higher diversity. The metagenomic sequencing data showed similar predominant bacterial phyla in the BA and RJ mangroves with an abundance of Proteobacteria (57.8% and 44.6%), Firmicutes (11% and 12.3%) and Actinobacteria (8.4% and 7.5%). A higher number of enzymes involved in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic compounds were found in the BA mangrove. Specific sequences involved in the cellulolytic degradation, belonging to cellulases, hemicellulases, carbohydrate binding domains, dockerins and cohesins were identified, and it was possible to isolate cultivable fungi and bacteria related to biomass decomposition and with potential applications for the production of biofuels. These results showed that the mangroves possess all fundamental molecular tools required for building the cellulosome, which is required for the efficient degradation of cellulose material and sugar release.

  6. A potential source for cellulolytic enzyme discovery and environmental aspects revealed through metagenomics of Brazilian mangroves

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The mangroves are among the most productive and biologically important environments. The possible presence of cellulolytic enzymes and microorganisms useful for biomass degradation as well as taxonomic and functional aspects of two Brazilian mangroves were evaluated using cultivation and metagenomic approaches. From a total of 296 microorganisms with visual differences in colony morphology and growth (including bacteria, yeast and filamentous fungus), 179 (60.5%) and 117 (39.5%) were isolated from the Rio de Janeiro (RJ) and Bahia (BA) samples, respectively. RJ metagenome showed the higher number of microbial isolates, which is consistent with its most conserved state and higher diversity. The metagenomic sequencing data showed similar predominant bacterial phyla in the BA and RJ mangroves with an abundance of Proteobacteria (57.8% and 44.6%), Firmicutes (11% and 12.3%) and Actinobacteria (8.4% and 7.5%). A higher number of enzymes involved in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic compounds were found in the BA mangrove. Specific sequences involved in the cellulolytic degradation, belonging to cellulases, hemicellulases, carbohydrate binding domains, dockerins and cohesins were identified, and it was possible to isolate cultivable fungi and bacteria related to biomass decomposition and with potential applications for the production of biofuels. These results showed that the mangroves possess all fundamental molecular tools required for building the cellulosome, which is required for the efficient degradation of cellulose material and sugar release. PMID:24160319

  7. Event-related potentials reveal early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Aitao; Liu, Jing; Zhang, John X

    2012-03-01

    With tasks involving action concept comprehension, many fMRI studies have reported brain activations in sensori-motor regions specific to effectors of the referent action. There is relatively less evidence whether such activations reflect early semantic access or late conceptual re-processing. Here we recorded event-related potentials when participants recognized noun-verb pairs. For Congruent pairs, the verb was the one most commonly associated with the noun (e.g., football-kick). Compared with a control condition, verbs in Congruent pairs showed priming effects in the time windows of 100-150 ms and 210-260 ms. Such activation seems to be specific to body part but not other aspects of the action as similar priming effect was also found when the noun and verb involved different actions though sharing the same body part (e.g., football-jump), documenting for the first time the early activation of body part representations in action concept comprehension.

  8. Multi-analytical approach reveals potential microbial indicators in soil for sugarcane model systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Diniz, Tatiana Rosa; Braga, Lucas Palma Perez; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Zacarias; Franchini, Julio Cezar; Rossetto, Raffaella; Edwards, Robert Alan; Tsai, Siu Mui; Lehman, R. Michael

    2015-06-09

    This study focused on the effects of organic and inorganic amendments and straw retention on the microbial biomass (MB) and taxonomic groups of bacteria in sugarcane-cultivated soils in a greenhouse mesocosm experiment monitored for gas emissions and chemical factors. The experiment consisted of combinations of synthetic nitrogen (N), vinasse (V; a liquid waste from ethanol production), and sugarcane-straw blankets. Increases in CO2-C and N2O-N emissions were identified shortly after the addition of both N and V to the soils, thus increasing MB nitrogen (MB-N) and decreasing MB carbon (MB-C) in the N+V-amended soils and altering soil chemical factors that weremore » correlated with the MB. Across 57 soil metagenomic datasets, Actinobacteria (31.5%), Planctomycetes (12.3%), Deltaproteobacteria (12.3%), Alphaproteobacteria (12.0%) and Betaproteobacteria (11.1%) were the most dominant bacterial groups during the experiment. Differences in relative abundance of metagenomic sequences were mainly revealed for Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia with regard to N+V fertilization and straw retention. Differential abundances in bacterial groups were confirmed using 16S rRNA gene-targeted phylum-specific primers for real-time PCR analysis in all soil samples, whose results were in accordance with sequence data, except for Gammaproteobacteria. Actinobacteria were more responsive to straw retention with Rubrobacterales, Bifidobacteriales and Actinomycetales related to the chemical factors of N+V-amended soils. Acidobacteria subgroup 7 and Opitutae, a verrucomicrobial class, were related to the chemical factors of soils without straw retention as a surface blanket. Taken together, the results showed that MB-C and MB-N responded to changes in soil chemical factors and CO2-C and N2O-N emissions, especially for N+V-amended soils. The results also indicated that several taxonomic groups of bacteria, such as Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and

  9. Multi-analytical approach reveals potential microbial indicators in soil for sugarcane model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Diniz, Tatiana Rosa; Braga, Lucas Palma Perez; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Zacarias; Franchini, Julio Cezar; Rossetto, Raffaella; Edwards, Robert Alan; Tsai, Siu Mui; Lehman, R. Michael

    2015-06-09

    This study focused on the effects of organic and inorganic amendments and straw retention on the microbial biomass (MB) and taxonomic groups of bacteria in sugarcane-cultivated soils in a greenhouse mesocosm experiment monitored for gas emissions and chemical factors. The experiment consisted of combinations of synthetic nitrogen (N), vinasse (V; a liquid waste from ethanol production), and sugarcane-straw blankets. Increases in CO2-C and N2O-N emissions were identified shortly after the addition of both N and V to the soils, thus increasing MB nitrogen (MB-N) and decreasing MB carbon (MB-C) in the N+V-amended soils and altering soil chemical factors that were correlated with the MB. Across 57 soil metagenomic datasets, Actinobacteria (31.5%), Planctomycetes (12.3%), Deltaproteobacteria (12.3%), Alphaproteobacteria (12.0%) and Betaproteobacteria (11.1%) were the most dominant bacterial groups during the experiment. Differences in relative abundance of metagenomic sequences were mainly revealed for Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia with regard to N+V fertilization and straw retention. Differential abundances in bacterial groups were confirmed using 16S rRNA gene-targeted phylum-specific primers for real-time PCR analysis in all soil samples, whose results were in accordance with sequence data, except for Gammaproteobacteria. Actinobacteria were more responsive to straw retention with Rubrobacterales, Bifidobacteriales and Actinomycetales related to the chemical factors of N+V-amended soils. Acidobacteria subgroup 7 and Opitutae, a verrucomicrobial class, were related to the chemical factors of soils without straw retention as a surface blanket. Taken together, the results showed that MB-C and MB-N responded to changes in soil chemical factors and CO2-C and N2O-N emissions

  10. Multi-Analytical Approach Reveals Potential Microbial Indicators in Soil for Sugarcane Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Diniz, Tatiana Rosa; Braga, Lucas Palma Perez; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Zacarias; Franchini, Julio Cezar; Rossetto, Raffaella; Edwards, Robert Alan; Tsai, Siu Mui

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the effects of organic and inorganic amendments and straw retention on the microbial biomass (MB) and taxonomic groups of bacteria in sugarcane-cultivated soils in a greenhouse mesocosm experiment monitored for gas emissions and chemical factors. The experiment consisted of combinations of synthetic nitrogen (N), vinasse (V; a liquid waste from ethanol production), and sugarcane-straw blankets. Increases in CO2-C and N2O-N emissions were identified shortly after the addition of both N and V to the soils, thus increasing MB nitrogen (MB-N) and decreasing MB carbon (MB-C) in the N+V-amended soils and altering soil chemical factors that were correlated with the MB. Across 57 soil metagenomic datasets, Actinobacteria (31.5%), Planctomycetes (12.3%), Deltaproteobacteria (12.3%), Alphaproteobacteria (12.0%) and Betaproteobacteria (11.1%) were the most dominant bacterial groups during the experiment. Differences in relative abundance of metagenomic sequences were mainly revealed for Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia with regard to N+V fertilization and straw retention. Differential abundances in bacterial groups were confirmed using 16S rRNA gene-targeted phylum-specific primers for real-time PCR analysis in all soil samples, whose results were in accordance with sequence data, except for Gammaproteobacteria. Actinobacteria were more responsive to straw retention with Rubrobacterales, Bifidobacteriales and Actinomycetales related to the chemical factors of N+V-amended soils. Acidobacteria subgroup 7 and Opitutae, a verrucomicrobial class, were related to the chemical factors of soils without straw retention as a surface blanket. Taken together, the results showed that MB-C and MB-N responded to changes in soil chemical factors and CO2-C and N2O-N emissions, especially for N+V-amended soils. The results also indicated that several taxonomic groups of bacteria, such as Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and

  11. Multi-Analytical Approach Reveals Potential Microbial Indicators in Soil for Sugarcane Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Diniz, Tatiana Rosa; Braga, Lucas Palma Perez; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Zacarias; Franchini, Julio Cezar; Rossetto, Raffaella; Edwards, Robert Alan; Tsai, Siu Mui

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the effects of organic and inorganic amendments and straw retention on the microbial biomass (MB) and taxonomic groups of bacteria in sugarcane-cultivated soils in a greenhouse mesocosm experiment monitored for gas emissions and chemical factors. The experiment consisted of combinations of synthetic nitrogen (N), vinasse (V; a liquid waste from ethanol production), and sugarcane-straw blankets. Increases in CO2-C and N2O-N emissions were identified shortly after the addition of both N and V to the soils, thus increasing MB nitrogen (MB-N) and decreasing MB carbon (MB-C) in the N+V-amended soils and altering soil chemical factors that were correlated with the MB. Across 57 soil metagenomic datasets, Actinobacteria (31.5%), Planctomycetes (12.3%), Deltaproteobacteria (12.3%), Alphaproteobacteria (12.0%) and Betaproteobacteria (11.1%) were the most dominant bacterial groups during the experiment. Differences in relative abundance of metagenomic sequences were mainly revealed for Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia with regard to N+V fertilization and straw retention. Differential abundances in bacterial groups were confirmed using 16S rRNA gene-targeted phylum-specific primers for real-time PCR analysis in all soil samples, whose results were in accordance with sequence data, except for Gammaproteobacteria. Actinobacteria were more responsive to straw retention with Rubrobacterales, Bifidobacteriales and Actinomycetales related to the chemical factors of N+V-amended soils. Acidobacteria subgroup 7 and Opitutae, a verrucomicrobial class, were related to the chemical factors of soils without straw retention as a surface blanket. Taken together, the results showed that MB-C and MB-N responded to changes in soil chemical factors and CO2-C and N2O-N emissions, especially for N+V-amended soils. The results also indicated that several taxonomic groups of bacteria, such as Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and

  12. Multi-Analytical Approach Reveals Potential Microbial Indicators in Soil for Sugarcane Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Diniz, Tatiana Rosa; Braga, Lucas Palma Perez; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Zacarias; Franchini, Julio Cezar; Rossetto, Raffaella; Edwards, Robert Alan; Tsai, Siu Mui

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the effects of organic and inorganic amendments and straw retention on the microbial biomass (MB) and taxonomic groups of bacteria in sugarcane-cultivated soils in a greenhouse mesocosm experiment monitored for gas emissions and chemical factors. The experiment consisted of combinations of synthetic nitrogen (N), vinasse (V; a liquid waste from ethanol production), and sugarcane-straw blankets. Increases in CO2-C and N2O-N emissions were identified shortly after the addition of both N and V to the soils, thus increasing MB nitrogen (MB-N) and decreasing MB carbon (MB-C) in the N+V-amended soils and altering soil chemical factors that were correlated with the MB. Across 57 soil metagenomic datasets, Actinobacteria (31.5%), Planctomycetes (12.3%), Deltaproteobacteria (12.3%), Alphaproteobacteria (12.0%) and Betaproteobacteria (11.1%) were the most dominant bacterial groups during the experiment. Differences in relative abundance of metagenomic sequences were mainly revealed for Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia with regard to N+V fertilization and straw retention. Differential abundances in bacterial groups were confirmed using 16S rRNA gene-targeted phylum-specific primers for real-time PCR analysis in all soil samples, whose results were in accordance with sequence data, except for Gammaproteobacteria. Actinobacteria were more responsive to straw retention with Rubrobacterales, Bifidobacteriales and Actinomycetales related to the chemical factors of N+V-amended soils. Acidobacteria subgroup 7 and Opitutae, a verrucomicrobial class, were related to the chemical factors of soils without straw retention as a surface blanket. Taken together, the results showed that MB-C and MB-N responded to changes in soil chemical factors and CO2-C and N2O-N emissions, especially for N+V-amended soils. The results also indicated that several taxonomic groups of bacteria, such as Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and

  13. Screening for celiac disease in Down’s syndrome patients revealed cases of subtotal villous atrophy without typical for celiFac disease HLA-DQ and tissue transglutaminase antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Uibo, Oivi; Teesalu, Kaupo; Metsküla, Kaja; Reimand, Tiia; Saat, Riste; Sillat, Tarvo; Reimand, Koit; Talvik, Tiina; Uibo, Raivo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of celiac disease (CD) as well as CD marker antibodies and susceptibility HLA-DQ haplotypes in 134 karyotyped Down’s syndrome (DS) patients. METHODS: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) and G (IgG) type anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA), IgA type anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies (anti-tTG) with antigen of guinea pig and human source were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and endomysium antibodies (EMA) by indirect immunofluoresence test. HLA-DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201 (DQ2) was revealed by polymerase chain reaction. Celiac disease was diagnosed by revised ESPGHAN criteria. RESULTS: 41 % of DS patients had AGA, 6.0 % IgA anti-tTG with guinea pig antigen, and 3.0 % IgA EMA (all positive for anti-tTG with human tTG). Subtotal villous atrophy was found in 5 out of 9 DS patients who had agreed to small bowel biopsy. One of them had DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201 and anti-tTG and EMA i.e. typical for CD markers (this case also fulfilled the ESPGHAN diagnostic criteria), but other four lacked these markers. Three non-biopsied DS patients had also most probably CD because DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201 and IgA anti-tTG (EMA) were detected. Thus, the prevalence of CD among our DS patients population is 3.0 % (95 % of confidence interval [CI]: 0.1-5.9 %). CONCLUSION: We confirm the increased frequency of CD among DS patients. In addition, we have revealed a subgroup of patients with subtotal villous atrophy but without characteristic for CD immunological and genetic markers. Whether these cases represent CD (with atypical immunopathogenesis) or some other immune enteropathy, requires further investigations. PMID:16552815

  14. Metabolic profiling reveals biochemical pathways and potential biomarkers associated with the pathogenesis of Krabbe disease.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Nadav I; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Feltri, M Laura; Shin, Daesung

    2016-11-01

    Krabbe disease (KD) is caused by mutations in the galactosylceramidase (GALC) gene, which encodes a lysosomal enzyme that degrades galactolipids, including galactosylceramide and galactosylsphingosine (psychosine). GALC deficiency results in progressive intracellular accumulation of psychosine, which is believed to be the main cause for the demyelinating neurodegeneration in KD pathology. Umbilical cord blood transplantation slows disease progression when performed presymptomatically but carries a significant risk of morbidity and mortality. Accurate presymptomatic diagnosis is therefore critical to facilitate the efficacy of existing transplant approaches and to avoid unnecessary treatment of children who will not develop KD. Unfortunately, current diagnostic criteria, including GALC activity, genetic analysis, and psychosine measurement, are insufficient for secure presymptomatic diagnosis. This study performs a global metabolomic analysis to identify pathogenetic metabolic pathways and novel biomarkers implicated in the authentic mouse model of KD known as twitcher. At a time point before onset of signs of disease, twitcher hindbrains had metabolic profiles similar to WT, with the exception of a decrease in metabolites related to glucose energy metabolism. Many metabolic pathways were altered after early signs of disease in the twitcher, including decreased phospholipid turnover, restricted mitochondrial metabolism of branched-chain amino acids, increased inflammation, and changes in neurotransmitter metabolism and osmolytes. Hypoxanthine, a purine derivative, is increased before signs of disease appear, suggesting its potential as a biomarker for early diagnosis of KD. Additionally, given the early changes in glucose metabolism in the pathogenesis of KD, diagnostic modalities that report metabolic function, such as positron emission tomography, may be useful in KD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638595

  15. Phase noise reveals early category-specific modulation of the event-related potentials

    PubMed Central

    Németh, Kornél; Kovács, Petra; Vakli, Pál; Kovács, Gyula; Zimmer, Márta

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have found that the amplitude of the early event-related potential (ERP) components evoked by faces, such as N170 and P2, changes systematically as a function of noise added to the stimuli. This change has been linked to an increased perceptual processing demand and to enhanced difficulty in perceptual decision making about faces. However, to date it has not yet been tested whether noise manipulation affects the neural correlates of decisions about face and non-face stimuli similarly. To this end, we measured the ERPs for faces and cars at three different phase noise levels. Subjects performed the same two-alternative age-discrimination task on stimuli chosen from young–old morphing continua that were created from faces as well as cars and were calibrated to lead to similar performances at each noise-level. Adding phase noise to the stimuli reduced performance and enhanced response latency for the two categories to the same extent. Parallel to that, phase noise reduced the amplitude and prolonged the latency of the face-specific N170 component. The amplitude of the P1 showed category-specific noise dependence: it was enhanced over the right hemisphere for cars and over the left hemisphere for faces as a result of adding phase noise to the stimuli, but remained stable across noise levels for cars over the left and for faces over the right hemisphere. Moreover, noise modulation altered the category-selectivity of the N170, while the P2 ERP component, typically associated with task decision difficulty, was larger for the more noisy stimuli regardless of stimulus category. Our results suggest that the category-specificity of noise-induced modulations of ERP responses starts at around 100 ms post-stimulus. PMID:24795689

  16. Action potential processing in a detailed Purkinje cell model reveals a critical role for axonal compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Masoli, Stefano; Solinas, Sergio; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    The Purkinje cell (PC) is among the most complex neurons in the brain and plays a critical role for cerebellar functioning. PCs operate as fast pacemakers modulated by synaptic inputs but can switch from simple spikes to complex bursts and, in some conditions, show bistability. In contrast to original works emphasizing dendritic Ca-dependent mechanisms, recent experiments have supported a primary role for axonal Na-dependent processing, which could effectively regulate spike generation and transmission to deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). In order to account for the numerous ionic mechanisms involved (at present including Nav1.6, Cav2.1, Cav3.1, Cav3.2, Cav3.3, Kv1.1, Kv1.5, Kv3.3, Kv3.4, Kv4.3, KCa1.1, KCa2.2, KCa3.1, Kir2.x, HCN1), we have elaborated a multicompartmental model incorporating available knowledge on localization and gating of PC ionic channels. The axon, including initial segment (AIS) and Ranvier nodes (RNs), proved critical to obtain appropriate pacemaking and firing frequency modulation. Simple spikes initiated in the AIS and protracted discharges were stabilized in the soma through Na-dependent mechanisms, while somato-dendritic Ca channels contributed to sustain pacemaking and to generate complex bursting at high discharge regimes. Bistability occurred only following Na and Ca channel down-regulation. In addition, specific properties in RNs K currents were required to limit spike transmission frequency along the axon. The model showed how organized electroresponsive functions could emerge from the molecular complexity of PCs and showed that the axon is fundamental to complement ionic channel compartmentalization enabling action potential processing and transmission of specific spike patterns to DCN. PMID:25759640

  17. Environmental metabarcodes for insects: in silico PCR reveals potential for taxonomic bias.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Laurence J; Soubrier, Julien; Weyrich, Laura S; Cooper, Alan

    2014-11-01

    Studies of insect assemblages are suited to the simultaneous DNA-based identification of multiple taxa known as metabarcoding. To obtain accurate estimates of diversity, metabarcoding markers ideally possess appropriate taxonomic coverage to avoid PCR-amplification bias, as well as sufficient sequence divergence to resolve species. We used in silico PCR to compare the taxonomic coverage and resolution of newly designed insect metabarcodes (targeting 16S) with that of existing markers [16S and cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (COI)] and then compared their efficiency in vitro. Existing metabarcoding primers amplified in silico <75% of insect species with complete mitochondrial genomes available, whereas new primers targeting 16S provided >90% coverage. Furthermore, metabarcodes targeting COI appeared to introduce taxonomic PCR-amplification bias, typically amplifying a greater percentage of Lepidoptera and Diptera species, while failing to amplify certain orders in silico. To test whether bias predicted in silico was observed in vitro, we created an artificial DNA blend containing equal amounts of DNA from 14 species, representing 11 insect orders and one arachnid. We PCR-amplified the blend using five primer sets, targeting either COI or 16S, with high-throughput amplicon sequencing yielding more than 6 million reads. In vitro results typically corresponded to in silico PCR predictions, with newly designed 16S primers detecting 11 insect taxa present, thus providing equivalent or better taxonomic coverage than COI metabarcodes. Our results demonstrate that in silico PCR is a useful tool for predicting taxonomic bias in mixed template PCR and that researchers should be wary of potential bias when selecting metabarcoding markers.

  18. Marked enhancement of antibody synthesis following immunization with antigen bound to host lymphocytes. A potential treatment of patients with allergy.

    PubMed

    Richter, M; Daquillard, F

    1980-03-01

    Immunization of rabbits with I ugm of the gammaglobulins in goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulin antiserum (GG-GARIG) immunologically bound to circulating rabbit lymphocytes results in a humoral immune response to normal goat gammaglobulin (NGGG) super to that induced following repeated immunization with 10 mg GG-GARIG or NGGG. This form of immunization can only be carried out with antigen bound to cells possessing receptors for the antigen. Such a situation exists with respect to the allergic individual who possesses circulating lymphocytes capable of interacting with the specific allergen. It is suggested that desensitization or immunotherapy of the allergic individual with the allergen immunologically bound to autologous lymphocytes will result in extensive formation of IgG blocking antibodies unaccompanied by an anaphylactic reaction in view of the very minute quantity of allergen administered. PMID:6153873

  19. Engineering towards a complete heterologous cellulase secretome in Yarrowia lipolytica reveals its potential for consolidated bioprocessing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wei, Hui; Wang, Wei; Alahuhta, Markus; Vander Wall, Todd; Baker, John O.; Taylor, Larry E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Zhang, Min

    2014-10-16

    Background: Yarrowia lipolytica is an oleaginous yeast capable of metabolizing glucose to lipids, which then accumulate intracellularly. However, it lacks the suite of cellulolytic enzymes required to break down biomass cellulose and cannot therefore utilize biomass directly as a carbon source. Toward the development of a direct microbial conversion platform for the production of hydrocarbon fuels from cellulosic biomass, the potential for Y. lipolytica to function as a consolidated bioprocessing strain was investigated by first conducting a genomic search and functional testing of its endogenous glycoside hydrolases. Once the range of endogenous enzymes was determined, the critical cellulases from Trichodermamore » reesei were cloned into Yarrowia. Results: Initially, work to express T. reesei endoglucanase II (EGII) and cellobiohydrolase (CBH) II in Y. lipolytica resulted in the successful secretion of active enzymes. However, a critical cellulase, T. reesei CBHI, while successfully expressed in and secreted from Yarrowia, showed less than expected enzymatic activity, suggesting an incompatibility (probably at the post-translational level) for its expression in Yarrowia. This result prompted us to evaluate alternative or modified CBHI enzymes. Our subsequent expression of a T. reesei-Talaromyces emersonii (Tr-Te) chimeric CBHI, Chaetomium thermophilum CBHI, and Humicola grisea CBHI demonstrated remarkably improved enzymatic activities. Specifically, the purified chimeric Tr-Te CBHI showed a specific activity on Avicel that is comparable to that of the native T. reesei CBHI. Furthermore, the chimeric Tr-Te CBHI also showed significant synergism with EGII and CBHII in degrading cellulosic substrates, using either mixed supernatants or co-cultures of the corresponding Y. lipolytica transformants. The consortia system approach also allows rational volume mixing of the transformant cultures in accordance with the optimal ratio of cellulases required for efficient

  20. Engineering towards a complete heterologous cellulase secretome in Yarrowia lipolytica reveals its potential for consolidated bioprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Hui; Wang, Wei; Alahuhta, Markus; Vander Wall, Todd; Baker, John O.; Taylor, Larry E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Zhang, Min

    2014-10-16

    Background: Yarrowia lipolytica is an oleaginous yeast capable of metabolizing glucose to lipids, which then accumulate intracellularly. However, it lacks the suite of cellulolytic enzymes required to break down biomass cellulose and cannot therefore utilize biomass directly as a carbon source. Toward the development of a direct microbial conversion platform for the production of hydrocarbon fuels from cellulosic biomass, the potential for Y. lipolytica to function as a consolidated bioprocessing strain was investigated by first conducting a genomic search and functional testing of its endogenous glycoside hydrolases. Once the range of endogenous enzymes was determined, the critical cellulases from Trichoderma reesei were cloned into Yarrowia. Results: Initially, work to express T. reesei endoglucanase II (EGII) and cellobiohydrolase (CBH) II in Y. lipolytica resulted in the successful secretion of active enzymes. However, a critical cellulase, T. reesei CBHI, while successfully expressed in and secreted from Yarrowia, showed less than expected enzymatic activity, suggesting an incompatibility (probably at the post-translational level) for its expression in Yarrowia. This result prompted us to evaluate alternative or modified CBHI enzymes. Our subsequent expression of a T. reesei-Talaromyces emersonii (Tr-Te) chimeric CBHI, Chaetomium thermophilum CBHI, and Humicola grisea CBHI demonstrated remarkably improved enzymatic activities. Specifically, the purified chimeric Tr-Te CBHI showed a specific activity on Avicel that is comparable to that of the native T. reesei CBHI. Furthermore, the chimeric Tr-Te CBHI also showed significant synergism with EGII and CBHII in degrading cellulosic substrates, using either mixed supernatants or co-cultures of the corresponding Y. lipolytica transformants. The consortia system approach also allows rational volume mixing of the transformant cultures in accordance with the optimal ratio of cellulases required for efficient

  1. Global Gene Expression Profiling Reveals SPINK1 as a Potential Hepatocellular Carcinoma Marker

    PubMed Central

    Kutter, Claudia; Davies, Susan; Alexander, Graeme; Odom, Duncan T.

    2013-01-01

    potential as a diagnostic HCC marker and should be evaluated in future studies. PMID:23527199

  2. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  3. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  4. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. The mitochondria are an important part of cells. They are ... often, in people with other kinds of liver disease and some autoimmune diseases. Risks Risks for having ...

  5. Natural Killer Cell Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Tumor Immunotherapy with Therapeutic Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Ursula J. E.; Schlegel, Patrick; Lang, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade several therapeutic antibodies have been Federal Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMEA) approved. Although their mechanisms of action in vivo is not fully elucidated, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by natural killer (NK) cells is presumed to be a key effector function. A substantial role of ADCC has been demonstrated in vitro and in mouse tumor models. However, a direct in vivo effect of ADCC in tumor reactivity in humans remains to be shown. Several studies revealed a predictive value of FcγRIIIa-V158F polymorphism in monoclonal antibody treatment, indicating a potential effect of ADCC on outcome for certain indications. Furthermore, the use of therapeutic antibodies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an interesting option. Studying the role of the FcγRIIIa-V158F polymorphism and the influence of Killer-cell Immunoglobuline-like Receptor (KIR) receptor ligand incompatibility on ADCC in this approach may contribute to future transplantation strategies. Despite the success of approved second-generation antibodies in the treatment of several malignancies, efforts are made to further augment ADCC in vivo by antibody engineering. Here, we review currently used therapeutic antibodies for which ADCC has been suggested as effector function. PMID:23543707

  6. Molecular Docking and In Silico ADMET Study Reveals Acylguanidine 7a as a Potential Inhibitor of β-Secretase

    PubMed Central

    Nisha, Chaluveelaveedu Murleedharan; Kumar, Ashwini; Nair, Prateek; Gupta, Nityasha; Silakari, Chitrangda; Tripathi, Timir; Kumar, Awanish

    2016-01-01

    Amyloidogenic pathway in Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves breakdown of APP by β-secretase followed by γ-secretase and results in formation of amyloid beta plaque. β-secretase has been a promising target for developing novel anti-Alzheimer drugs. To test different molecules for this purpose, test ligands like acylguanidine 7a, rosiglitazone, pioglitazone, and tartaric acid were docked against our target protein β-secretase enzyme retrieved from Protein Data Bank, considering MK-8931 (phase III trial, Merck) as the positive control. Docking revealed that, with respect to their free binding energy, acylguanidine 7a has the lowest binding energy followed by MK-8931 and pioglitazone and binds significantly to β-secretase. In silico ADMET predictions revealed that except tartaric acid all other compounds had minimal toxic effects and had good absorption as well as solubility characteristics. These compounds may serve as potential lead compound for developing new anti-Alzheimer drug. PMID:27190510

  7. Hyperimmune Bovine Colostrum as a Low-Cost, Large-Scale Source of Antibodies with Broad Neutralizing Activity for HIV-1 Envelope with Potential Use in Microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Kramski, Marit; Center, Rob J.; Wheatley, Adam K.; Jacobson, Jonathan C.; Alexander, Marina R.; Rawlin, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Bovine colostrum (first milk) contains very high concentrations of IgG, and on average 1 kg (500 g/liter) of IgG can be harvested from each immunized cow immediately after calving. We used a modified vaccination strategy together with established production systems from the dairy food industry for the large-scale manufacture of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 IgG. This approach provides a low-cost mucosal HIV preventive agent potentially suitable for a topical microbicide. Four cows were vaccinated pre- and/or postconception with recombinant HIV-1 gp140 envelope (Env) oligomers of clade B or A, B, and C. Colostrum and purified colostrum IgG were assessed for cross-clade binding and neutralization against a panel of 27 Env-pseudotyped reporter viruses. Vaccination elicited high anti-gp140 IgG titers in serum and colostrum with reciprocal endpoint titers of up to 1 × 105. While nonimmune colostrum showed some intrinsic neutralizing activity, colostrum from 2 cows receiving a longer-duration vaccination regimen demonstrated broad HIV-1-neutralizing activity. Colostrum-purified polyclonal IgG retained gp140 reactivity and neutralization activity and blocked the binding of the b12 monoclonal antibody to gp140, showing specificity for the CD4 binding site. Colostrum-derived anti-HIV antibodies offer a cost-effective option for preparing the substantial quantities of broadly neutralizing antibodies that would be needed in a low-cost topical combination HIV-1 microbicide. PMID:22664963

  8. Hyperimmune bovine colostrum as a low-cost, large-scale source of antibodies with broad neutralizing activity for HIV-1 envelope with potential use in microbicides.

    PubMed

    Kramski, Marit; Center, Rob J; Wheatley, Adam K; Jacobson, Jonathan C; Alexander, Marina R; Rawlin, Grant; Purcell, Damian F J

    2012-08-01

    Bovine colostrum (first milk) contains very high concentrations of IgG, and on average 1 kg (500 g/liter) of IgG can be harvested from each immunized cow immediately after calving. We used a modified vaccination strategy together with established production systems from the dairy food industry for the large-scale manufacture of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 IgG. This approach provides a low-cost mucosal HIV preventive agent potentially suitable for a topical microbicide. Four cows were vaccinated pre- and/or postconception with recombinant HIV-1 gp140 envelope (Env) oligomers of clade B or A, B, and C. Colostrum and purified colostrum IgG were assessed for cross-clade binding and neutralization against a panel of 27 Env-pseudotyped reporter viruses. Vaccination elicited high anti-gp140 IgG titers in serum and colostrum with reciprocal endpoint titers of up to 1 × 10(5). While nonimmune colostrum showed some intrinsic neutralizing activity, colostrum from 2 cows receiving a longer-duration vaccination regimen demonstrated broad HIV-1-neutralizing activity. Colostrum-purified polyclonal IgG retained gp140 reactivity and neutralization activity and blocked the binding of the b12 monoclonal antibody to gp140, showing specificity for the CD4 binding site. Colostrum-derived anti-HIV antibodies offer a cost-effective option for preparing the substantial quantities of broadly neutralizing antibodies that would be needed in a low-cost topical combination HIV-1 microbicide. PMID:22664963

  9. Unique potential of 4-1BB agonist antibody to promote durable regression of HPV+ tumors when combined with an E6/E7 peptide vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bartkowiak, Todd; Singh, Shailbala; Yang, Guojun; Galvan, Gloria; Haria, Dhwani; Ai, Midan; Allison, James P; Sastry, K Jagannadha; Curran, Michael A

    2015-09-22

    Antibody modulation of T-cell coinhibitory (e.g., CTLA-4) or costimulatory (e.g., 4-1BB) receptors promotes clinical responses to a variety of cancers. Therapeutic cancer vaccination, in contrast, has produced limited clinical benefit and no curative therapies. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins of human papilloma virus (HPV) drive the majority of genital cancers, and many oropharyngeal tumors. We discovered 15-19 amino acid peptides from HPV-16 E6/E7 for which induction of T-cell immunity correlates with disease-free survival in patients treated for high-grade cervical neoplasia. We report here that intranasal vaccination with these peptides and the adjuvant alpha-galactosylceramide elicits systemic and mucosal T-cell responses leading to reduced HPV(+) TC-1 tumor growth and prolonged survival in mice. We hypothesized that the inability of these T cells to fully reject established tumors resulted from suppression in the tumor microenvironment which could be ameliorated through checkpoint modulation. Combining this E6/E7 peptide vaccine with checkpoint blockade produced only modest benefit; however, coadministration with a 4-1BB agonist antibody promoted durable regression of established genital TC-1 tumors. Relative to other therapies tested, this combination of vaccine and α4-1BB promoted the highest CD8(+) versus regulatory FoxP3(+) T-cell ratios, elicited 2- to 5-fold higher infiltration by E7-specific CTL, and evoked higher densities of highly cytotoxic TcEO (T cytotoxic Eomesodermin) CD8 (>70-fold) and ThEO (T helper Eomesodermin) CD4 (>17-fold) T cells. These findings have immediate clinical relevance both in terms of the direct clinical utility of the vaccine studied and in illustrating the potential of 4-1BB antibody to convert therapeutic E6/E7 vaccines already in clinical trials into curative therapies.

  10. Unique potential of 4-1BB agonist antibody to promote durable regression of HPV+ tumors when combined with an E6/E7 peptide vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Bartkowiak, Todd; Singh, Shailbala; Yang, Guojun; Galvan, Gloria; Haria, Dhwani; Ai, Midan; Allison, James P.; Sastry, K. Jagannadha; Curran, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody modulation of T-cell coinhibitory (e.g., CTLA-4) or costimulatory (e.g., 4-1BB) receptors promotes clinical responses to a variety of cancers. Therapeutic cancer vaccination, in contrast, has produced limited clinical benefit and no curative therapies. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins of human papilloma virus (HPV) drive the majority of genital cancers, and many oropharyngeal tumors. We discovered 15–19 amino acid peptides from HPV-16 E6/E7 for which induction of T-cell immunity correlates with disease-free survival in patients treated for high-grade cervical neoplasia. We report here that intranasal vaccination with these peptides and the adjuvant alpha-galactosylceramide elicits systemic and mucosal T-cell responses leading to reduced HPV+ TC-1 tumor growth and prolonged survival in mice. We hypothesized that the inability of these T cells to fully reject established tumors resulted from suppression in the tumor microenvironment which could be ameliorated through checkpoint modulation. Combining this E6/E7 peptide vaccine with checkpoint blockade produced only modest benefit; however, coadministration with a 4-1BB agonist antibody promoted durable regression of established genital TC-1 tumors. Relative to other therapies tested, this combination of vaccine and α4-1BB promoted the highest CD8+ versus regulatory FoxP3+ T-cell ratios, elicited 2- to 5-fold higher infiltration by E7-specific CTL, and evoked higher densities of highly cytotoxic TcEO (T cytotoxic Eomesodermin) CD8 (>70-fold) and ThEO (T helper Eomesodermin) CD4 (>17-fold) T cells. These findings have immediate clinical relevance both in terms of the direct clinical utility of the vaccine studied and in illustrating the potential of 4-1BB antibody to convert therapeutic E6/E7 vaccines already in clinical trials into curative therapies. PMID:26351680

  11. Immune dysfunction in Rett syndrome patients revealed by high levels of serum anti-N(Glc) IgM antibody fraction.

    PubMed

    Papini, Anna Maria; Nuti, Francesca; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Rossi, Giada; Tiberi, Caterina; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Pandey, Shashank; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Guerranti, Roberto; Lavielle, Solange; Ciccoli, Lucia; Rovero, Paolo; De Felice, Claudio; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting exclusively (99%) female infants, is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and, more rarely, cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and forkhead box protein G1 (FOXG1). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the function of the immune system by measuring serum immunoglobulins (IgG and IgM) in RTT patients (n = 53) and, by comparison, in age-matched children affected by non-RTT pervasive developmental disorders (non-RTT PDD) (n = 82) and healthy age-matched controls (n = 29). To determine immunoglobulins we used both a conventional agglutination assay and a novel ELISA based on antibody recognition by a surrogate antigen probe, CSF114(Glc), a synthetic N-glucosylated peptide. Both assays provided evidence for an increase in IgM titer, but not in IgG, in RTT patients relative to both healthy controls and non-RTT PDD patients. The significant difference in IgM titers between RTT patients and healthy subjects in the CSF114(Glc) assay (P = 0.001) suggests that this procedure specifically detects a fraction of IgM antibodies likely to be relevant for the RTT disease. These findings offer a new insight into the mechanism underlying the Rett disease as they unveil the possible involvement of the immune system in this pathology. PMID:25389532

  12. Deep sequencing and Circos analyses of antibody libraries reveal antigen-driven selection of Ig VH genes during HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Madelyne; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Chen, Weizao; Kessing, Bailey; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2013-12-01

    The vast diversity of antibody repertoires is largely attributed to heavy chain (V(H)) recombination of variable (V), diversity (D) and joining (J) gene segments. We used 454 sequencing information of the variable domains of the antibody heavy chain repertoires from neonates, normal adults and an HIV-1-infected individual, to analyze, with Circos software, the VDJ pairing patterns at birth, adulthood and a time-dependent response to HIV-1 infection. Our comparative analyses of the Ig VDJ repertoires from these libraries indicated that, from birth to adulthood, VDJ recombination patterns remain the same with some slight changes, whereas some V(H) families are selected and preferentially expressed after long-term infection with HIV-1. We also demonstrated that the immune system responds to HIV-1 chronic infection by selectively expanding certain HV families in an attempt to combat infection. Our findings may have implications for understanding immune responses in pathology as well as for development of new therapeutics and vaccines.

  13. Immune Dysfunction in Rett Syndrome Patients Revealed by High Levels of Serum Anti-N(Glc) IgM Antibody Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Papini, Anna Maria; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Rossi, Giada; Tiberi, Caterina; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Pandey, Shashank; Lavielle, Solange; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting exclusively (99%) female infants, is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and, more rarely, cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and forkhead box protein G1 (FOXG1). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the function of the immune system by measuring serum immunoglobulins (IgG and IgM) in RTT patients (n = 53) and, by comparison, in age-matched children affected by non-RTT pervasive developmental disorders (non-RTT PDD) (n = 82) and healthy age-matched controls (n = 29). To determine immunoglobulins we used both a conventional agglutination assay and a novel ELISA based on antibody recognition by a surrogate antigen probe, CSF114(Glc), a synthetic N-glucosylated peptide. Both assays provided evidence for an increase in IgM titer, but not in IgG, in RTT patients relative to both healthy controls and non-RTT PDD patients. The significant difference in IgM titers between RTT patients and healthy subjects in the CSF114(Glc) assay (P = 0.001) suggests that this procedure specifically detects a fraction of IgM antibodies likely to be relevant for the RTT disease. These findings offer a new insight into the mechanism underlying the Rett disease as they unveil the possible involvement of the immune system in this pathology. PMID:25389532

  14. Mouse model of chromosome mosaicism reveals lineage-specific depletion of aneuploid cells and normal developmental potential.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Helen; Graham, Sarah J L; Van der Aa, Niels; Kumar, Parveen; Theunis, Koen; Fernandez Gallardo, Elia; Voet, Thierry; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Most human pre-implantation embryos are mosaics of euploid and aneuploid cells. To determine the fate of aneuploid cells and the developmental potential of mosaic embryos, here we generate a mouse model of chromosome mosaicism. By treating embryos with a spindle assembly checkpoint inhibitor during the four- to eight-cell division, we efficiently generate aneuploid cells, resulting in embryo death during peri-implantation development. Live-embryo imaging and single-cell tracking in chimeric embryos, containing aneuploid and euploid cells, reveal that the fate of aneuploid cells depends on lineage: aneuploid cells in the fetal lineage are eliminated by apoptosis, whereas those in the placental lineage show severe proliferative defects. Overall, the proportion of aneuploid cells is progressively depleted from the blastocyst stage onwards. Finally, we show that mosaic embryos have full developmental potential, provided they contain sufficient euploid cells, a finding of significance for the assessment of embryo vitality in the clinic. PMID:27021558

  15. Mouse model of chromosome mosaicism reveals lineage-specific depletion of aneuploid cells and normal developmental potential

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Helen; Graham, Sarah J. L.; Van der Aa, Niels; Kumar, Parveen; Theunis, Koen; Fernandez Gallardo, Elia; Voet, Thierry; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Most human pre-implantation embryos are mosaics of euploid and aneuploid cells. To determine the fate of aneuploid cells and the developmental potential of mosaic embryos, here we generate a mouse model of chromosome mosaicism. By treating embryos with a spindle assembly checkpoint inhibitor during the four- to eight-cell division, we efficiently generate aneuploid cells, resulting in embryo death during peri-implantation development. Live-embryo imaging and single-cell tracking in chimeric embryos, containing aneuploid and euploid cells, reveal that the fate of aneuploid cells depends on lineage: aneuploid cells in the fetal lineage are eliminated by apoptosis, whereas those in the placental lineage show severe proliferative defects. Overall, the proportion of aneuploid cells is progressively depleted from the blastocyst stage onwards. Finally, we show that mosaic embryos have full developmental potential, provided they contain sufficient euploid cells, a finding of significance for the assessment of embryo vitality in the clinic. PMID:27021558

  16. Antibody validation

    PubMed Central

    Bordeaux, Jennifer; Welsh, Allison W.; Agarwal, Seema; Killiam, Elizabeth; Baquero, Maria T.; Hanna, Jason A.; Anagnostou, Valsamo K.; Rimm, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are among the most frequently used tools in basic science research and in clinical assays, but there are no universally accepted guidelines or standardized methods for determining the validity of these reagents. Furthermore, for commercially available antibodies, it is clear that what is on the label does not necessarily correspond to what is in the tube. To validate an antibody, it must be shown to be specific, selective, and reproducible in the context for which it is to be used. In this review, we highlight the common pitfalls when working with antibodies, common practices for validating antibodies, and levels of commercial antibody validation for seven vendors. Finally, we share our algorithm for antibody validation for immunohistochemistry and quantitative immunofluorescence. PMID:20359301

  17. Inhibitors and Antibody Fragments as Potential Anti-Inflammatory Therapeutics Targeting Neutrophil Proteinase 3 in Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Brice; Lesner, Adam; Guarino, Carla; Wysocka, Magdalena; Kellenberger, Christine; Watier, Hervé; Specks, Ulrich; Gauthier, Francis; Jenne, Dieter E

    2016-07-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) has received great scientific attention after its identification as the essential antigenic target of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies in Wegener's granulomatosis (now called granulomatosis with polyangiitis). Despite many structural and functional similarities between neutrophil elastase (NE) and PR3 during biosynthesis, storage, and extracellular release, unique properties and pathobiological functions have emerged from detailed studies in recent years. The development of highly sensitive substrates and inhibitors of human PR3 and the creation of PR3-selective single knockout mice led to the identification of nonredundant roles of PR3 in cell death induction via procaspase-3 activation in cell cultures and in mouse models. According to a study in knockout mice, PR3 shortens the lifespan of infiltrating neutrophils in tissues and accelerates the clearance of aged neutrophils in mice. Membrane exposure of active human PR3 on apoptotic neutrophils reprograms the response of macrophages to phagocytosed neutrophils, triggers secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and undermines immune silencing and tissue regeneration. PR3-induced disruption of the anti-inflammatory effect of efferocytosis may be relevant for not only granulomatosis with polyangiitis but also for other autoimmune diseases with high neutrophil turnover. Inhibition of membrane-bound PR3 by endogenous inhibitors such as the α-1-protease inhibitor is comparatively weaker than that of NE, suggesting that the adverse effects of unopposed PR3 activity resurface earlier than those of NE in individuals with α-1-protease inhibitor deficiency. Effective coverage of PR3 by anti-inflammatory tools and simultaneous inhibition of both PR3 and NE should be most promising in the future. PMID:27329045

  18. Inhibitors and Antibody Fragments as Potential Anti-Inflammatory Therapeutics Targeting Neutrophil Proteinase 3 in Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Brice; Lesner, Adam; Guarino, Carla; Wysocka, Magdalena; Kellenberger, Christine; Watier, Hervé; Specks, Ulrich; Gauthier, Francis; Jenne, Dieter E

    2016-07-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) has received great scientific attention after its identification as the essential antigenic target of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies in Wegener's granulomatosis (now called granulomatosis with polyangiitis). Despite many structural and functional similarities between neutrophil elastase (NE) and PR3 during biosynthesis, storage, and extracellular release, unique properties and pathobiological functions have emerged from detailed studies in recent years. The development of highly sensitive substrates and inhibitors of human PR3 and the creation of PR3-selective single knockout mice led to the identification of nonredundant roles of PR3 in cell death induction via procaspase-3 activation in cell cultures and in mouse models. According to a study in knockout mice, PR3 shortens the lifespan of infiltrating neutrophils in tissues and accelerates the clearance of aged neutrophils in mice. Membrane exposure of active human PR3 on apoptotic neutrophils reprograms the response of macrophages to phagocytosed neutrophils, triggers secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and undermines immune silencing and tissue regeneration. PR3-induced disruption of the anti-inflammatory effect of efferocytosis may be relevant for not only granulomatosis with polyangiitis but also for other autoimmune diseases with high neutrophil turnover. Inhibition of membrane-bound PR3 by endogenous inhibitors such as the α-1-protease inhibitor is comparatively weaker than that of NE, suggesting that the adverse effects of unopposed PR3 activity resurface earlier than those of NE in individuals with α-1-protease inhibitor deficiency. Effective coverage of PR3 by anti-inflammatory tools and simultaneous inhibition of both PR3 and NE should be most promising in the future.

  19. Metabolic profiling reveals potential metabolic markers associated with Hypoxia Inducible Factor-mediated signalling in hypoxic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Emily G.; Kotze, Helen L.; Allwood, J. William; Dunn, Warwick B.; Goodacre, Royston; Williams, Kaye J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) plays an important role in oxygen compromised environments and therefore in tumour survival. In this research, metabolomics has been applied to study HIFs metabolic function in two cell models: mouse hepatocellular carcinoma and human colon carcinoma, whereby the metabolism has been profiled for a range of oxygen potentials. Wild type cells have been compared to cells deficient in HIF signalling to reveal its effect on cellular metabolism under normal oxygen conditions as well as low oxygen, hypoxic and anoxic environments. Characteristic responses to hypoxia that were conserved across both cell models involved the anti-correlation between 2-hydroxyglutarate, 2-oxoglutarate, fructose, hexadecanoic acid, hypotaurine, pyruvate and octadecenoic acid with 4-hydroxyproline, aspartate, cysteine, glutamine, lysine, malate and pyroglutamate. Further to this, network-based correlation analysis revealed HIF specific pathway responses to each oxygen condition that were also conserved between cell models. From this, 4-hydroxyproline was revealed as a regulating hub in low oxygen survival of WT cells while fructose appeared to be in HIF deficient cells. Pathways surrounding these hubs were built from the direct connections of correlated metabolites that look beyond traditional pathways in order to understand the mechanism of HIF response to low oxygen environments. PMID:26508589

  20. Stroma derived COL6A3 is a potential prognosis marker of colorectal carcinoma revealed by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sun-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Cui, Shu-Jian; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) represents the third most common cancer in males and second in females worldwide. Here, we performed a quantitative 8-plex iTRAQ proteomics analysis of the secreted proteins from five colonic fibroblast cultures and three colon cancer epithelial cell lines. We identified 1114 proteins at 0% FDR, including 587 potential secreted proteins. We further recognized 116 fibroblast-enriched proteins which were significantly associated with cell movement, angiogenesis, proliferation and wound healing, and 44 epithelial cell-enriched proteins. By interrogation of Oncomine database, we found that 20 and 8 fibroblast-enriched proteins were up- and downregulated in CRC, respectively. Western blots confirmed the fibroblast-specific secretion of filamin C, COL6A3, COL4A1 and spondin-2. Upregulated mRNA and stroma expression of COL6A3 in CRC, which were revealed by Oncomine analyses and tissue-microarray-immunohistochemistry, indicated poor prognosis. COL6A3 expression was significantly associated with Dukes stage, T stage, stage, recurrence and smoking status. Circulating plasma COL6A3 in CRC patients was upregulated significantly comparing with healthy peoples. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that COL6A3 has better predictive performance for CRC with an area under the curve of 0.885 and the best sensitivity/specificity of 92.9%/81.3%. Thus we demonstrated that COL6A3 was a potential diagnosis and prognosis marker of CRC. PMID:26338966

  1. Single cell cloning and recombinant monoclonal antibodies generation from RA synovial B cells reveal frequent targeting of citrullinated histones of NETs

    PubMed Central

    Corsiero, Elisa; Bombardieri, Michele; Carlotti, Emanuela; Pratesi, Federico; Robinson, William; Migliorini, Paola; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by breach of self-tolerance towards citrullinated antigens with generation of anti-citrullinated peptide/proteins antibodies (ACPA). Currently, the nature and source of citrullinated antigens driving the humoral autoimmune response within synovial ectopic lymphoid structures (ELS) is a crucial unknown aspect of RA pathogenesis. Here we characterised the autoreactive B-cell response of lesional B cells isolated from ELS+RA synovium. Methods Single synovial tissue CD19+cells were Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted and VH/VL Ig genes cloned to generate recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rmAbs) from patients with ELS+/ACPA+RA. Results RA-rmAbs immunoreactivity analysis provided the following key findings: (1) in a chIP-based array containing 300 autoantigens and in a ‘citrullinome’ multiplex assay, a strong reactivity against citrullinated histones H2A/H2B (citH2A/H2B) was observed in ∼40% of RA-rmAbs, followed by cit-fibrinogen and cit-vimentin; (2) anti-citH2A/H2B-reactive RA-rmAbs (but not anti-citH2A/H2B negative) selectively recognised neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) from peripheral blood and/or RA joint neutrophils; (3) anti-citH2A/citH2B and anti-NET immunobinding was dependent on affinity maturation and was completely abrogated following reversion of hypermutated IgVH/VL genes to germline sequences; (4) ELS+ (not ELS−) RA synovial tissues engrafted into Severe Combined ImmunoDeficiency (SCID) mice released human anti-citH2A/citH2B and anti-NET antibodies in association with the intra-graft expression of CXCL13 and lymphotoxin (LT)-β, two master regulators of ELS. Conclusion We provided novel evidence that B cells differentiated within synovial ELS in the RA joints frequent target deiminated proteins which could be generated during NETosis of RA synovial neutrophils including histones. Thus, NETs could represent a source of citrullinated antigens fuelling the ACPA autoimmune

  2. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  3. Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 1 (AAV1)- and AAV5-Antibody Complex Structures Reveal Evolutionary Commonalities in Parvovirus Antigenic Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yu-Shan; Gurda, Brittney L.; Chipman, Paul; McKenna, Robert; Afione, Sandra; Chiorini, John A.; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Olson, Norman H.; Baker, Timothy S.; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The clinical utility of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery system has been validated by the regulatory approval of an AAV serotype 1 (AAV1) vector for the treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency. However, neutralization from preexisting antibodies is detrimental to AAV transduction efficiency. Hence, mapping of AAV antigenic sites and engineering of neutralization-escaping vectors are important for improving clinical efficacy. We report the structures of four AAV-monoclonal antibody fragment complexes, AAV1-ADK1a, AAV1-ADK1b, AAV5-ADK5a, and AAV5-ADK5b, determined by cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction to a resolution of ∼11 to 12 Å. Pseudoatomic modeling mapped the ADK1a epitope to the protrusions surrounding the icosahedral 3-fold axis and the ADK1b and ADK5a epitopes, which overlap, to the wall between depressions at the 2- and 5-fold axes (2/5-fold wall), and the ADK5b epitope spans both the 5-fold axis-facing wall of the 3-fold protrusion and portions of the 2/5-fold wall of the capsid. Combined with the six antigenic sites previously elucidated for different AAV serotypes through structural approaches, including AAV1 and AAV5, this study identified two common AAV epitopes: one on the 3-fold protrusions and one on the 2/5-fold wall. These epitopes coincide with regions with the highest sequence and structure diversity between AAV serotypes and correspond to regions determining receptor recognition and transduction phenotypes. Significantly, these locations overlap the two dominant epitopes reported for autonomous parvoviruses. Thus, rather than the amino acid sequence alone, the antigenic sites of parvoviruses appear to be dictated by structural features evolved to enable specific infectious functions. IMPORTANCE The adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are promising vectors for in vivo therapeutic gene delivery, with more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials that

  4. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  5. Immune gene expression profiling of Proliferative Kidney Disease in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reveals a dominance of anti-inflammatory, antibody and T helper cell-like activities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The myxozoan Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is the causative agent of Proliferative Kidney Disease (PKD) targeting primarily the kidney of infected fish where it causes a chronic lymphoid immunopathology. Although known to be associated with suppression of some cellular aspects of innate immunity and a prominent lymphocytic hyperplasia, there remains a considerable knowledge gap in our understanding of the underlying immune mechanisms driving PKD pathogenesis. To provide further insights, the expression profiles of a panel of innate / inflammatory and adaptive immune molecules were examined in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss following a natural exposure to the parasite. Relative to controls, fish with early to advanced stages of kidney pathology exhibited up-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-11, although remaining refractory towards genes indicative of macrophage activity. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and anti-inflammatory markers, including cathelicidin (CATH) and IL-10 were markedly up-regulated during clinical disease. Up-regulation of adaptive immune molecules, including cell markers and antibody genes reflect the lymphocytic dominance of this disease and the likely importance of lymphocyte subsets in PKD pathogenesis. Up-regulation of T helper (TH) cell-like response genes and transcription factors implies that T. bryosalmonae may elicit a complex interplay between TH cell subsets. This work, for the first time in the study of fish-myxozoan interactions, suggests that PKD pathogenesis is shaped by an anti-inflammatory phenotype, a profound B cell / antibody response and dysregulated TH cell-like activities. A better understanding of the functional roles of fish immune cells and molecules in PKD pathogenesis may facilitate future development of control measures against this disease. PMID:23865616

  6. Potential to involve multiple effector cells with human recombinant interleukin-2 and antiganglioside monoclonal antibodies in a canine malignant melanoma immunotherapy model.

    PubMed

    Helfand, S C; Soergel, S A; Donner, R L; Gan, J; Hank, J A; Lindstrom, M J; Sondel, P M

    1994-10-01

    Human tumors originating from neuroectodermal cells such as malignant melanoma and neuroblastoma express high levels of disialogangliosides GD2 and GD3, making these antigens ideal for targeting by monoclonal antibodies (Mabs). The purpose of this study was to investigate expression and targeting of gangliosides on canine melanoma. Using immunohistochemical methods, we analyzed the expression of disialogangliosides GD2 and GD3 on canine oral malignant melanomas with murine Mabs 14.G2a and R24 that recognize GD2 and GD3 disialogangliosides, respectively, on human tumors. We also assessed the ability of Mab 14.G2a (and its mouse-human chimera, ch 14.18) to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro against a canine malignant melanoma cell line with human recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) activated canine peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), or canine neutrophil effector cells. Our data show that Mabs 14.G2a and R24 recognized fresh frozen canine oral melanoma. Mabs 14.G2a or ch 14.18, or IL-2, potentiated lysis of the canine malignant melanoma cell line by canine PBL. The killing effect observed using the combination of either Mab with IL-2 was additive. Mab 14.G2a mediated potent ADCC of canine melanoma by canine neutrophils. These studies indicate that disialogangliosides are expressed on fresh canine melanoma cells. Mabs reactive with these antigens can target and trigger tumor killing by multiple canine effector populations and IL-2 can potentiate these effects by canine lymphocytes. Thus, canine oral malignant melanoma, a spontaneously occurring, metastatic cancer in the dog, may be a relevant animal model to investigate combination immunotherapy using antitumor Mab and IL-2.

  7. Development of novel antibodies against non-structural proteins nsP1, nsP3 and nsP4 of chikungunya virus: potential use in basic research.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sameer; Mamidi, Prabhudutta; Kumar, Abhishek; Basantray, Itishree; Bramha, Umarani; Dixit, Anshuman; Maiti, Prasanta Kumar; Singh, Sujay; Suryawanshi, Amol Ratnakar; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Soma

    2015-11-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has reemerged recently as an important pathogen, causing several large epidemics worldwide. This necessitates the development of better reagents to understand its biology and to establish effective and safe control measures. The present study describes the development and characterization of polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) against synthetic peptides of CHIKV non-structural proteins (nsPs; nsP1, nsP3 and nsP4). The reactivity of these pAbs was demonstrated by ELISA and Western blot. Additionally, in vitro infection studies in a mammalian system confirmed that these pAbs are highly sensitive and specific for CHIKV nsPs, as these proteins were detected very early during viral replication. Homology analysis of the selected epitope sequences revealed that they are conserved among all of the CHIKV strains of different genotypes, while comparison with other alphavirus sequences showed that none of them are 100% identical to the epitope sequences (except Onyong-nyong and Igbo Ora viruses, which show 100% identity to the nsP4 epitope). Interestingly, two different forms of CHIKV nsP1 and three different forms of nsP3 were detected in Western blot analysis during infection; however, further experimental investigations are required to confirm their identity. Also, the use of these antibodies demonstrated faster and enhanced expression profiles of all CHIKV nsPs in 2006 Indian outbreak strains when compared to the CHIKV prototype strain, suggesting the epidemic potential of the 2006 isolate. Accordingly, it can be suggested that the pAbs reported in this study can be used as sensitive and specific tools for experimental investigations of CHIKV replication and infection. PMID:26280524

  8. Development of novel antibodies against non-structural proteins nsP1, nsP3 and nsP4 of chikungunya virus: potential use in basic research.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sameer; Mamidi, Prabhudutta; Kumar, Abhishek; Basantray, Itishree; Bramha, Umarani; Dixit, Anshuman; Maiti, Prasanta Kumar; Singh, Sujay; Suryawanshi, Amol Ratnakar; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Soma

    2015-11-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has reemerged recently as an important pathogen, causing several large epidemics worldwide. This necessitates the development of better reagents to understand its biology and to establish effective and safe control measures. The present study describes the development and characterization of polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) against synthetic peptides of CHIKV non-structural proteins (nsPs; nsP1, nsP3 and nsP4). The reactivity of these pAbs was demonstrated by ELISA and Western blot. Additionally, in vitro infection studies in a mammalian system confirmed that these pAbs are highly sensitive and specific for CHIKV nsPs, as these proteins were detected very early during viral replication. Homology analysis of the selected epitope sequences revealed that they are conserved among all of the CHIKV strains of different genotypes, while comparison with other alphavirus sequences showed that none of them are 100% identical to the epitope sequences (except Onyong-nyong and Igbo Ora viruses, which show 100% identity to the nsP4 epitope). Interestingly, two different forms of CHIKV nsP1 and three different forms of nsP3 were detected in Western blot analysis during infection; however, further experimental investigations are required to confirm their identity. Also, the use of these antibodies demonstrated faster and enhanced expression profiles of all CHIKV nsPs in 2006 Indian outbreak strains when compared to the CHIKV prototype strain, suggesting the epidemic potential of the 2006 isolate. Accordingly, it can be suggested that the pAbs reported in this study can be used as sensitive and specific tools for experimental investigations of CHIKV replication and infection.

  9. Antibody tumor penetration

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  10. Natural Selection and Functional Potentials of Human Noncoding Elements Revealed by Analysis of Next Generation Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pankaj; Lu, Dongsheng; Xu, Shuhua

    2015-01-01

    Noncoding DNA sequences (NCS) have attracted much attention recently due to their functional potentials. Here we attempted to reveal the functional roles of noncoding sequences from the point of view of natural selection that typically indicates the functional potentials of certain genomic elements. We analyzed nearly 37 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of Phase I data of the 1000 Genomes Project. We estimated a series of key parameters of population genetics and molecular evolution to characterize sequence variations of the noncoding genome within and between populations, and identified the natural selection footprints in NCS in worldwide human populations. Our results showed that purifying selection is prevalent and there is substantial constraint of variations in NCS, while positive selectionis more likely to be specific to some particular genomic regions and regional populations. Intriguingly, we observed larger fraction of non-conserved NCS variants with lower derived allele frequency in the genome, indicating possible functional gain of non-conserved NCS. Notably, NCS elements are enriched for potentially functional markers such as eQTLs, TF motif, and DNase I footprints in the genome. More interestingly, some NCS variants associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Type 1 diabetes, and immune-related bowel disorder (IBD) showed signatures of positive selection, although the majority of NCS variants, reported as risk alleles by genome-wide association studies, showed signatures of negative selection. Our analyses provided compelling evidence of natural selection forces on noncoding sequences in the human genome and advanced our understanding of their functional potentials that play important roles in disease etiology and human evolution.

  11. Perceptual suppression revealed by adaptive multi-scale entropy analysis of local field potential in monkey visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng; Liang, Hualou

    2013-04-01

    Generalized flash suppression (GFS), in which a salient visual stimulus can be rendered invisible despite continuous retinal input, provides a rare opportunity to directly study the neural mechanism of visual perception. Previous work based on linear methods, such as spectral analysis, on local field potential (LFP) during GFS has shown that the LFP power at distinctive frequency bands are differentially modulated by perceptual suppression. Yet, the linear method alone may be insufficient for the full assessment of neural dynamic due to the fundamentally nonlinear nature of neural signals. In this study, we set forth to analyze the LFP data collected from multiple visual areas in V1, V2 and V4 of macaque monkeys while performing the GFS task using a nonlinear method - adaptive multi-scale entropy (AME) - to reveal the neural dynamic of perceptual suppression. In addition, we propose a new cross-entropy measure at multiple scales, namely adaptive multi-scale cross-entropy (AMCE), to assess the nonlinear functional connectivity between two cortical areas. We show that: (1) multi-scale entropy exhibits percept-related changes in all three areas, with higher entropy observed during perceptual suppression; (2) the magnitude of the perception-related entropy changes increases systematically over successive hierarchical stages (i.e. from lower areas V1 to V2, up to higher area V4); and (3) cross-entropy between any two cortical areas reveals higher degree of asynchrony or dissimilarity during perceptual suppression, indicating a decreased functional connectivity between cortical areas. These results, taken together, suggest that perceptual suppression is related to a reduced functional connectivity and increased uncertainty of neural responses, and the modulation of perceptual suppression is more effective at higher visual cortical areas. AME is demonstrated to be a useful technique in revealing the underlying dynamic of nonlinear/nonstationary neural signal.

  12. Host-Primed Ebola Virus GP Exposes a Hydrophobic NPC1 Receptor-Binding Pocket, Revealing a Target for Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Ndungo, Esther; Fusco, Marnie L.; Bale, Shridhar; Flyak, Andrew I.; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The filovirus surface glycoprotein (GP) mediates viral entry into host cells. Following viral internalization into endosomes, GP is cleaved by host cysteine proteases to expose a receptor-binding site (RBS) that is otherwise hidden from immune surveillance. Here, we present the crystal structure of proteolytically cleaved Ebola virus GP to a resolution of 3.3 Å. We use this structure in conjunction with functional analysis of a large panel of pseudotyped viruses bearing mutant GP proteins to map the Ebola virus GP endosomal RBS at molecular resolution. Our studies indicate that binding of GP to its endosomal receptor Niemann-Pick C1 occurs in two distinct stages: the initial electrostatic interactions are followed by specific interactions with a hydrophobic trough that is exposed on the endosomally cleaved GP1 subunit. Finally, we demonstrate that monoclonal antibodies targeting the filovirus RBS neutralize all known filovirus GPs, making this conserved pocket a promising target for the development of panfilovirus therapeutics. PMID:26908579

  13. Commercial antibodies and their validation

    PubMed Central

    Voskuil, JLA

    2014-01-01

    Despite an impressive growth in the business of research antibodies a general lack of trust in commercial antibodies remains in place. A variety of issues, each one potentially causing an antibody to fail, underpin the frustrations that scientists endure. Lots of money goes to waste in buying and trying one failing antibody after the other without realizing all the pitfalls that come with the product: Antibodies can get inactivated, both the biological material and the assay itself can potentially be flawed, a single antibody featuring in many different catalogues can be deemed as a set of different products, and a bad choice of antibody type, wrong dilutions, and lack of proper validation can all jeopardize the intended experiments. Antibodies endorsed by scientific research papers do not always meet the scientist’s requirements either due to flawed specifications, or due to batch-to-batch variations. Antibodies can be found with Quality Control data obtained from previous batches that no longer represent the batch on sale. In addition, one cannot assume that every antibody is fit for every application. The best chance of success is to try an antibody that already was confirmed to perform correctly in the required platform. PMID:25324967

  14. Macrophage inhibitory factor 1 acts as a potential biomarker in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and is a target for antibody-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Bing; Jiang, Xing-Ran; Yu, Xi-Ying; Wang, Lin; He, Shun; Feng, Fei-Yue; Guo, Li-Ping; Jiang, Wei; Lu, Shih-Hsin

    2014-02-01

    Macrophage inhibitory factor 1 (MIC1) is frequently altered in various cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of MIC1 for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Serum MIC1 of 286 ESCC and 250 healthy subjects was detected, the diagnostic performance was assessed and compared with SCC, CEA, CA199 and CA724, and the value as a prognostic indicator was also evaluated. The expression of MIC1 in ESCC cell lines, tissues were detected, and the inhibition of MIC1 antibody on ESCC was carried out in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the serum MIC1 of ESCC was significantly higher than normal groups (P < 0.001), and was positively associated with tumor invasion (P = 0.030) as well as lymph node metastasis (P = 0.007). The sensitivity of MIC1 was significantly better than SCC, CEA, CA199 and CA724, especially for stage I ESCC. Patients with higher serum MIC1 also had a poorer prognosis in relapse-free (P = 0.050) and tumor-specific survival (P = 0.005). In vitro studies showed that the expression of MIC1 was upregulated in 37.5% (3/8) ESCC cell lines and 45% (18/40) tissues, and the transcription of MIC1 in tumor tissues was significantly higher than paired adjacent normal tissues (P = 0.001). The antibody of MIC1 inhibited the tumor growth (P < 0.001), and showing preference for tumor tissues in xenograft model. The decreased formation of neovascularization lumen may be involved in the mechanism. We conclude that MIC1 plays an important role in the progression of ESCC and can serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for ESCC.

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Against a Virion Core Protein of Orf Virus Strain NA1/11 As Potential Diagnostic Tool for Orf Viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jiafeng; Hao, Wenbo; Peng, Yongzheng; Li, Hong; Li, Wei; Li, Ming; Luo, Shuhong

    2015-08-01

    Orf is caused by the orf virus (ORFV) and is a non-systemic, widespread disease afflicting sheep, goats, wild ruminants, and humans. Recent outbreaks in sheep and goats in Jilin and other northern Chinese provinces raise concerns about orf control in China. Thirty-five hybridoma clones were constructed from splenocytes of BALB/c mice immunized with natural orf virus protein. These hybridomas were used to produce antibodies targeting ORFV proteins. Immunological characterization of these monoclonal antibodies (MAb) showed that the 5F2D8 hybridoma line produced MAb that can recognize the 100, 70, and 20 kDa bands from total viral lysate. This hybridoma was further characterized by immunoprecipitation and peptide sequencing. The results indicate that 5F2D8 specifically recognizes orf virus encoded protein ORFV086, a late expression virion core protein that plays important roles in progeny virus particle assembly, morphogenesis, and maturity. Further experiments demonstrate that this MAb did not react with other viral proteins of ORFV orthopoxviruses, but reacted strongly to different field isolates of orf viruses from China. Additionally, this anti-ORFV086 MAb possesses ORFV neutralizing capability. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis determined that ORFV086 of NA1/11, clustered together with NZ2 and IA82, is highly conserved and has structural similarities with the Vaccinia virus core protein P4a. As such, this MAb has great potential as a diagnostic tool for orf viruses, in the further exploration of orf pathogenesis, and in disease control and prevention.

  16. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli heat shock protein YedU reveals three potential catalytic active sites

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yonghong; Liu, Deqian; Kaluarachchi, Warna D.; Bellamy, Henry D.; White, Mark A.; Fox, Robert O.

    2003-01-01

    The mRNA of Escherichia coli yedU gene is induced 31-fold upon heat shock. The 31-kD YedU protein, also calls Hsp31, is highly conserved in several human pathogens and has chaperone activity. We solved the crystal structure of YedU at 2.2 Å resolution. YedU monomer has an α/β/α sandwich domain and a small α/β domain. YedU is a dimer in solution, and its crystal structure indicates that a significant amount of surface area is buried upon dimerization. There is an extended hydrophobic patch that crosses the dimer interface on the surface of the protein. This hydrophobic patch is likely the substrate-binding site responsible for the chaperone activity. The structure also reveals a potential protease-like catalytic triad composed of Cys184, His185, and Asp213, although no enzymatic activity could be identified. YedU coordinates a metal ion using His85, His122, and Glu90. This 2-His-1-carboxylate motif is present in carboxypeptidase A (a zinc enzyme), and a number of dioxygenases and hydroxylases that utilize iron as a cofactor, suggesting another potential function for YedU. PMID:14500888

  17. Post-genomic analyses of fungal lignocellulosic biomass degradation reveal the unexpected potential of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Filamentous fungi are potent biomass degraders due to their ability to thrive in ligno(hemi)cellulose-rich environments. During the last decade, fungal genome sequencing initiatives have yielded abundant information on the genes that are putatively involved in lignocellulose degradation. At present, additional experimental studies are essential to provide insights into the fungal secreted enzymatic pools involved in lignocellulose degradation. Results In this study, we performed a wide analysis of 20 filamentous fungi for which genomic data are available to investigate their biomass-hydrolysis potential. A comparison of fungal genomes and secretomes using enzyme activity profiling revealed discrepancies in carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) sets dedicated to plant cell wall. Investigation of the contribution made by each secretome to the saccharification of wheat straw demonstrated that most of them individually supplemented the industrial Trichoderma reesei CL847 enzymatic cocktail. Unexpectedly, the most striking effect was obtained with the phytopathogen Ustilago maydis that improved the release of total sugars by 57% and of glucose by 22%. Proteomic analyses of the best-performing secretomes indicated a specific enzymatic mechanism of U. maydis that is likely to involve oxido-reductases and hemicellulases. Conclusion This study provides insight into the lignocellulose-degradation mechanisms by filamentous fungi and allows for the identification of a number of enzymes that are potentially useful to further improve the industrial lignocellulose bioconversion process. PMID:22300648

  18. Quantitative proteome profiling of human myoma and myometrium tissue reveals kinase expression signatures with potential for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Lemeer, Simone; Gholami, Amin Moghaddas; Wu, Zhixiang; Kuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are benign tumors affecting a large proportion of the female population. Despite the very high prevalence, the molecular basis for understanding the onset and development of the disease are still poorly understood. In this study, we profiled the proteomes and kinomes of leiomyoma as well as myometrium samples from patients to a depth of >7000 proteins including 200 kinases. Statistical analysis identified a number of molecular signatures distinguishing healthy from diseased tissue. Among these, nine kinases (ADCK4, CDK5, CSNK2B, DDR1, EPHB1, MAP2K2, PRKCB, PRKG1, and RPS6KA5) representing a number of cellular signaling pathways showed particularly strong discrimination potential. Preliminary statistical analysis by receiver operator characteristics plots revealed very good performance for individual kinases (area under the curve, AUC of 0.70-0.94) as well as binary combinations thereof (AUC 0.70-1.00) that might be used to assess the activity of signaling pathways in myomas. Of note, the receptor tyrosine kinase DDR1 holds future potential as a drug target owing to its strong links to collagen signaling and the excessive formation of extracellular matrix typical for leiomyomas in humans. PMID:25327614

  19. High-Throughput Sequencing of miRNAs Reveals a Tissue Signature in Gastric Cancer and Suggests Novel Potential Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Darnet, Sylvain; Moreira, Fabiano C; Hamoy, Igor G; Burbano, Rommel; Khayat, André; Cruz, Aline; Magalhães, Leandro; Silva, Artur; Santos, Sidney; Demachki, Samia; Assumpção, Monica; Assumpção, Paulo; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer has a high incidence and mortality rate worldwide; however, the use of biomarkers for its clinical diagnosis remains limited. The microRNAs (miRNAs) are biomarkers with the potential to identify the risk and prognosis as well as therapeutic targets. We performed the ultradeep miRnomes sequencing of gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric antrum without tumor samples. We observed that a small set of those samples were responsible for approximately 80% of the total miRNAs expression, which might represent a miRNA tissue signature. Additionally, we identified seven miRNAs exhibiting significant differences, and, of these, hsa-miR-135b and hsa-miR-29c were able to discriminate antrum without tumor from gastric cancer regardless of the histological type. These findings were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that hsa-miR-135b and hsa-miR-29c are potential gastric adenocarcinoma occurrence biomarkers with the ability to identify individuals at a higher risk of developing this cancer, and could even be used as therapeutic targets to allow individualized clinical management. PMID:26157332

  20. Plasma metabolomics combined with lipidomics profiling reveals the potential antipyretic mechanisms of Qingkailing injection in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lingling; Zhang, Zhixin; Guo, Mingxing; Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Qing; Lu, Zhiwei; Zhao, Huizhen; Liu, Yuehong; Fu, Shuang; Wang, Meiling; Gao, Xiaoyan

    2016-07-25

    Qingkailing injection (QKLI) has a notable antipyretic effect and is widely used in China as a clinical emergency medicine. To elucidate the pharmacological action thoroughly, following the investigation of the urine metabolome and hypothalamus metabolome, plasma metabolomics combined with lipidomics profiling of the QKLI antipyretic effect in a rat model is described in this paper. Compared with pure metabolomics profiling, this non-targeted plasma metabolomics combined with lipidomics profiling based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography-coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC Q-TOF/MS) could be used for a large-scale detection of features in plasma samples. The results showed that 15 metabolites at the 1 h time point and 19 metabolites at the 2 h time point after QKLI administration were associated with the antipyretic effect of QKLI, including amino acid, phosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylcholine. The metabolism pathway analysis revealed that the potential biomarkers, which were important for the antipyretic mechanism of QKLI, were closely responsible for correcting the perturbed pathways of amino acid metabolism and lipid metabolism. In conclusion, the use of complementary UPLC Q-TOF/MS based metabolomics and lipidomics allows for the discovery of new potential plasma biomarkers in the QKLI antipyretic process and the associated pathways, and aided in advancing the understanding of the holism and synergism of the Chinese drug. PMID:27208622

  1. High-Throughput Sequencing of miRNAs Reveals a Tissue Signature in Gastric Cancer and Suggests Novel Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Darnet, Sylvain; Moreira, Fabiano C; Hamoy, Igor G; Burbano, Rommel; Khayat, André; Cruz, Aline; Magalhães, Leandro; Silva, Artur; Santos, Sidney; Demachki, Samia; Assumpção, Monica; Assumpção, Paulo; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer has a high incidence and mortality rate worldwide; however, the use of biomarkers for its clinical diagnosis remains limited. The microRNAs (miRNAs) are biomarkers with the potential to identify the risk and prognosis as well as therapeutic targets. We performed the ultradeep miRnomes sequencing of gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric antrum without tumor samples. We observed that a small set of those samples were responsible for approximately 80% of the total miRNAs expression, which might represent a miRNA tissue signature. Additionally, we identified seven miRNAs exhibiting significant differences, and, of these, hsa-miR-135b and hsa-miR-29c were able to discriminate antrum without tumor from gastric cancer regardless of the histological type. These findings were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that hsa-miR-135b and hsa-miR-29c are potential gastric adenocarcinoma occurrence biomarkers with the ability to identify individuals at a higher risk of developing this cancer, and could even be used as therapeutic targets to allow individualized clinical management. PMID:26157332

  2. Recombinant gp19 as a potential antigen for detecting anti-Ehrlichia canis antibodies in dog sera.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rômulo Silva de; Cunha, Rodrigo Casquero; Moraes-Filho, Jonas; Gonçales, Relber Aguiar; Lara, Ana Paula de Souza Stori de; Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa de; Labruna, Marcelo Bahia; Leite, Fábio Pereira Leivas

    2015-01-01

    The canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, caused by Ehrlichia canis, is endemic in several regions of Brazil. Some serological diagnostic techniques using immunodominant proteins of E. canis as antigens are available, but their specificities and sensitivities are questionable. Based on this, the objective of this study was to test the antigenic potential of the recombinant gp19 protein (rGP19) for subsequent use in diagnostic tests. The rGP19 expressed in the Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) C41 was recognized in the sera from experimentally infected dogs using ELISA and Western blotting. Thus, it was possible to obtain a promising antigen with the ability to differentiate between E. canis-positive and -negative animals, even 1 week after infection. PMID:26291145

  3. Hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry reveals protein interfaces and distant dynamic coupling effects during the reversible self-association of an IgG1 monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Jayant; Hickey, John M; Majumdar, Ranajoy; Esfandiary, Reza; Bishop, Steven M; Samra, Hardeep S; Middaugh, C Russell; Weis, David D; Volkin, David B

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for new analytical approaches to better characterize the nature of the concentration-dependent, reversible self-association (RSA) of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directly, and with high resolution, when these proteins are formulated as highly concentrated solutions. In the work reported here, hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS) was used to define the concentration-dependent RSA interface, and to characterize the effects of association on the backbone dynamics of an IgG1 mAb (mAb-C). Dynamic light scattering, chemical cross-linking, and solution viscosity measurements were used to determine conditions that caused the RSA of mAb-C. A novel HX-MS experimental approach was then applied to directly monitor differences in local flexibility of mAb-C due to RSA at different protein concentrations in deuterated buffers. First, a stable formulation containing lyoprotectants that permitted freeze-drying of mAb-C at both 5 and 60 mg/mL was identified. Upon reconstitution with RSA-promoting deuterated solutions, the low vs. high protein concentration samples displayed different levels of solution viscosity (i.e., approx. 1 to 75 mPa.s). The reconstituted mAb-C samples were then analyzed by HX-MS. Two specific sequences covering complementarity-determining regions CDR2H and CDR2L (in the variable heavy and light chains, respectively) showed significant protection against deuterium uptake (i.e., decreased hydrogen exchange). These results define the major protein-protein interfaces associated with the concentration-dependent RSA of mAb-C. Surprisingly, certain peptide segments in the VH domain, the constant domain (CH2), and the hinge region (CH1-CH2 interface) concomitantly showed significant increases in local flexibility at high vs. low protein concentrations. These results indicate the presence of longer-range, distant dynamic coupling effects within mAb-C occurring upon RSA. PMID:25875351

  4. Event-Related Potentials Reveal Preserved Attention Allocation but Impaired Emotion Regulation in Patients with Epilepsy and Comorbid Negative Affect

    PubMed Central

    De Taeye, Leen; Pourtois, Gilles; Meurs, Alfred; Boon, Paul; Vonck, Kristl; Carrette, Evelien; Raedt, Robrecht

    2015-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy have a high prevalence of comorbid mood disorders. This study aims to evaluate whether negative affect in epilepsy is associated with dysfunction of emotion regulation. Event-related potentials (ERPs) are used in order to unravel the exact electrophysiological time course and investigate whether a possible dysfunction arises during early (attention) and/or late (regulation) stages of emotion control. Fifty epileptic patients with (n = 25) versus without (n = 25) comorbid negative affect plus twenty-five matched controls were recruited. ERPs were recorded while subjects performed a face- or house-matching task in which fearful, sad or neutral faces were presented either at attended or unattended spatial locations. Two ERP components were analyzed: the early vertex positive potential (VPP) which is normally enhanced for faces, and the late positive potential (LPP) that is typically larger for emotional stimuli. All participants had larger amplitude of the early face-sensitive VPP for attended faces compared to houses, regardless of their emotional content. By contrast, in patients with negative affect only, the amplitude of the LPP was significantly increased for unattended negative emotional expressions. These VPP results indicate that epilepsy with or without negative affect does not interfere with the early structural encoding and attention selection of faces. However, the LPP results suggest abnormal regulation processes during the processing of unattended emotional faces in patients with epilepsy and comorbid negative affect. In conclusion, this ERP study reveals that early object-based attention processes are not compromised by epilepsy, but instead, when combined with negative affect, this neurological disease is associated with dysfunction during the later stages of emotion regulation. As such, these new neurophysiological findings shed light on the complex interplay of epilepsy with negative affect during the processing of emotional

  5. Engineering antibodies for therapy.

    PubMed

    Adair, J R

    1992-12-01

    Success in the generation of an antibody-based therapeutic requires careful consideration of the binding site, to achieve specificity and high affinity; of the effector, to produce the desired therapeutic effect; of the means of attachment of the effector to the binding site; production of the end product; and the response made by the patient to the administered compound. Each of these areas is receiving attention by antibody-engineering techniques. The number of potentially useful monoclonal antibodies developed over the last 10 years, and currently in clinical trials or preregistration, is now being increased by these engineered newcomers. It will be interesting to see over the next few years how many of these antibodies, and of which kind, emerge as products.

  6. Groundwater circulation and utilisation in an unconfined carbonate system - revealing the potential effect of climate change and humankind activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Ádám; Mádl-Szönyi, Judit

    2016-04-01

    Characteristics of gravitational groundwater flow systems in carbonate regions were presented by Mádl-Szönyi & Tóth (2015) based on theoretical considerations, identification and classification of groundwater flow-related field phenomena and numerical simulation. It was revealed that the changes of flow pattern in carbonate framework attributed to groundwater utilization and/or climate change are more apparent due to the effective hydraulic conductivity of carbonates. Consequently, natural or artificial disturbances of water level propagate farther, deeper and faster in carbonates than in siliciclastic basins. These changes could result in degradation and reorganization of hierarchical flow systems, modification of recharge and discharge areas and even alteration of physicochemical parameters (Mádl-Szönyi & Tóth, 2015). This paper presents the application of the gravity-driven regional groundwater flow concept to the hydrogeologically complex thick carbonate system of the Transdanubian Range, Hungary, depicting the flow pattern of the area and to a practical problem of a local study area, conflicts of interest of water supply and water use of a golf course. The question is how will the natural discharge on the golf course be influenced by the planned karst drinking water production well. In addition, the effects of climate change on this conflict were evaluated. We demonstrate the importance of the understanding the appropriate scale in karst studies and illustrate how the gravity-driven regional groundwater flow concept can help to determine it. For this purpose, the hydrogeological conditions of the study site were examined at different scales. The goals were to define the appropriate scale and reveal the effects of tectonic structures; and give prognoses for the possible impact of a planned drinking water well and climate change on the golf course based on numerical simulation. The study also showed the low geothermal potential of the area.

  7. Numerically bridging lamellipodial and filopodial activity during cell spreading reveals a potentially novel trigger of focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Loosli, Y; Vianay, B; Luginbuehl, R; Snedeker, J G

    2012-05-01

    We present a novel approach to modeling cell spreading, and use it to reveal a potentially central mechanism regulating focal adhesion maturation in various cell phenotypes. Actin bundles that span neighboring focal complexes at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface were assumed to be loaded by intracellular forces in proportion to bundle length. We hypothesized that the length of an actin bundle (with the corresponding accumulated force at its adhesions) may thus regulate adhesion maturation to ensure cell mechanical stability and morphological integrity. We developed a model to test this hypothesis, implementing a "top-down" approach to simplify certain cellular processes while explicitly incorporating complexity of other key subcellular mechanisms. Filopodial and lamellipodial activities were treated as modular processes with functional spatiotemporal interactions coordinated by rules regarding focal adhesion turnover and actin bundle dynamics. This theoretical framework was able to robustly predict temporal evolution of cell area and cytoskeletal organization as reported from a wide range of cell spreading experiments using micropatterned substrates. We conclude that a geometric/temporal modeling framework can capture the key functional aspects of the rapid spreading phase and resultant cytoskeletal complexity. Hence the model is used to reveal mechanistic insight into basic cell behavior essential for spreading. It demonstrates that actin bundles spanning nascent focal adhesions such that they are aligned to the leading edge may accumulate centripetal endogenous forces along their length, and could thus trigger focal adhesion maturation in a force-length dependent fashion. We suggest that this mechanism could be a central "integrating" factor that effectively coordinates force-mediated adhesion maturation at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface. PMID:22453759

  8. Yeast gain-of-function mutations reveal structure-function relationships conserved among different subfamilies of transient receptor potential channels.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhenwei; Zhou, Xinliang; Haynes, W John; Loukin, Stephen H; Anishkin, Andriy; Saimi, Yoshiro; Kung, Ching

    2007-12-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels found in animals, protists, and fungi are primary chemo-, thermo-, or mechanosensors. Current research emphasizes the characteristics of individual channels in each animal TRP subfamily but not the mechanisms common across subfamilies. A forward genetic screen of the TrpY1, the yeast TRP channel, recovered gain-of-function (GOF) mutations with phenotype in vivo and in vitro. Single-channel patch-clamp analyses of these GOF-mutant channels show prominent aberrations in open probability and channel kinetics. These mutations revealed functionally important aromatic amino acid residues in four locations: at the intracellular end of the fifth transmembrane helix (TM5), at both ends of TM6, and at the immediate extension of TM6. These aromatics have counterparts in most TRP subfamilies. The one in TM5 (F380L) aligns precisely with an exceptional Drosophila mutant allele (F550I) that causes constitutive activity in the canonical TRP channel, resulting in rapid and severe retinal degeneration beyond mere loss of phototaxis. Thus, this phenylalanine maintains the balance of various functional states (conformations) of a channel for insect phototransduction as well as one for fungal mechanotransduction. This residue is among a small cluster of phenylalanines found in all known subfamilies of TRP channels. This unique case illustrates that GOF mutations can reveal structure-function principles that can be generalized across different TRP subfamilies. It appears that the conserved aromatics in the four locations have conserved functions in most TRP channels. The possible mechanistic roles of these aromatics and the further use of yeast genetics to dissect TRP channels are discussed.

  9. Antigenic diversity of human parainfluenza virus type 1 isolates and their immunological relationship with Sendai virus revealed by using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Komada, H; Kusagawa, S; Orvell, C; Tsurudome, M; Nishio, M; Bando, H; Kawano, M; Matsumura, H; Norrby, E; Ito, Y

    1992-04-01

    Fifty-six monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against human parainfluenza virus type 1 (hPIV-1) were prepared in order to identify the structural proteins of hPIV-1, to examine the immunological relationship between hPIV-1 and Sendai virus (SV), and to determine the antigenic diversity of clinical isolates of hPIV-1. In addition, 41 MAbs characterized previously and directed against SV were used for immunological comparison of SV and hPIV-1 isolates. Of the MAbs against hPIV-1, two reacted with phospho (P) protein, 11 with nucleocapsid protein (NP), 24 with haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein and 19 with fusion (F) protein. With the aid of MAbs against hPIV-1 and those against SV showing cross-reactivity with hPIV-1, the structural proteins of hPIV-1 were identified; p83, p56, p34, gp74 and gp60 of hPIV-1 were identified as the P, NP, M, HN and F proteins, respectively. The MAbs against the P protein and NP of hPIV-1 showed limited cross-reactivity with SV, whereas they had high reactivity with clinical isolates of hPIV-1. Interestingly, one MAb against the NP of hPIV-1 lacked reactivity with clinical isolates which were isolated in the 1970s and 1980s. The MAbs against the HN of hPIV-1 also exhibited quite limited reactivity with SV and the clinical isolates; two groups of HN-specific MAbs showed almost no reactivity with the clinical isolates from the 1970s and 1980s, similarly to the NP-specific MAb. However, anti-HN MAbs belonging to the two groups showing specific activities (neuraminidase inhibition and haemolysis inhibition) reacted with almost all clinical isolates. On the other hand, although anti-F protein MAbs had limited reactivity with SV, they showed reactivity with almost all hPIV-1 isolates. The MAbs against the P, NP, M, HN and F proteins of SV also showed limited cross-reactivity with the clinical hPIV-1 isolates, and this reactivity was independent of the time and place of isolation, except for that of the F protein. These results confirm

  10. Antibodies with beta-adrenergic activity from chronic chagasic patients modulate the QT interval and M cell action potential duration

    PubMed Central

    Medei, Emiliano Horacio; Nascimento, José H.M.; Pedrosa, Roberto C.; Barcellos, Luciane; Masuda, Masako O.; Sicouri, Serge; Elizari, Marcelo V.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.

    2009-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to investigate whether the sera from chronic chagasic patients (CChPs) with beta-1 adrenergic activity (Ab-β) can modulate ventricular repolarization. Beta-adrenergic activity has been described in CChP. It increases the L-type calcium current and heart rate in isolated hearts, but its effects on ventricular repolarization has not been described. Methods and results In isolated rabbit hearts, under pacing condition, QT interval was measured under Ab-β perfusion. Beta-adrenergic activity was also tested in guinea pig ventricular M cells. Furthermore, the immunoglobulin fraction (IgG-β) of the Ab-β was tested on Ito, ICa, and Iks currents in rat, rabbit, and guinea pig myocytes, respectively. Beta-adrenergic activity shortened the QT interval. This effect was abolished in the presence of propranolol. In addition, sera from CChP without beta-adrenergic activity (Ab-β) did not modulate QT interval. The M cell action potential duration (APD) was reversibly shortened by Ab-β. Atenolol inhibited this effect of Ab-β, and Ab- did not modulate the AP of M cells. Ito was not modulated by isoproterenol nor by IgG-β. However, IgG-β increased ICa and IKs. Conclusion The shortening of the QT interval and APD in M cells and the increase of IKs and ICa induced by IgG-β contribute to repolarization changes that may trigger malignant ventricular arrhythmias observed in patients with chronic chagasic or idiopathic cardiomyopathy. PMID:18515284

  11. Proteomic analysis of imatinib-resistant CML-T1 cells reveals calcium homeostasis as a potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Toman, O.; Kabickova, T.; Vit, O.; Fiser, R.; Polakova, K. Machova; Zach, J.; Linhartova, J.; Vyoral, D.; Petrak, J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) therapy has markedly improved patient prognosis after introduction of imatinib mesylate for clinical use. However, a subset of patients develops resistance to imatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), mainly due to point mutations in the region encoding the kinase domain of the fused BCR-ABL oncogene. To identify potential therapeutic targets in imatinib-resistant CML cells, we derived imatinib-resistant CML-T1 human cell line clone (CML-T1/IR) by prolonged exposure to imatinib in growth media. Mutational analysis revealed that the Y235H mutation in BCR-ABL is probably the main cause of CML-T1/IR resistance to imatinib. To identify alternative therapeutic targets for selective elimination of imatinib-resistant cells, we compared the proteome profiles of CML-T1 and CML-T1/IR cells using 2-DE-MS. We identified eight differentially expressed proteins, with strongly upregulated Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) in the resistant cells, suggesting that this protein may influence cytosolic pH, Ca2+ concentration or signaling pathways such as Wnt in CML-T1/IR cells. We tested several compounds including drugs in clinical use that interfere with the aforementioned processes and tested their relative toxicity to CML-T1 and CML-T1/IR cells. Calcium channel blockers, calcium signaling antagonists and modulators of calcium homeostasis, namely thapsigargin, ionomycin, verapamil, carboxyamidotriazole and immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporine A and tacrolimus (FK-506) were selectively toxic to CML-T1/IR cells. The putative cellular targets of these compounds in CML-T1/IR cells are postulated in this study. We propose that Ca2+ homeostasis can be a potential therapeutic target in CML cells resistant to TKIs. We demonstrate that a proteomic approach may be used to characterize a TKI-resistant population of CML cells enabling future individualized treatment options for patients. PMID:27430982

  12. Proteome profiling of seed storage proteins reveals the nutritional potential of Salicornia brachiata Roxb., an extreme halophyte.

    PubMed

    Jha, Bhavanath; Singh, Nater Pal; Mishra, Avinash

    2012-05-01

    Salicornia brachiata is an extreme halophyte that grows in salty marshes and is considered to be a potential alternative crop for seawater agriculture. Salicornia seeds are rich in protein, and its tender shoots are eaten as salad greens. Seed storage proteins were fractionated by sequential extraction using different solvents, including distilled water for albumins, NaCl (1.0 M) for globulins, NaOH (0.1 N) for glutelins, and ethanol (70% v/v) for prolamins. Globulins accounted for 54.75% of the total seed storage proteins followed by albumins (34.30%) and glutelins (8.70%). The fractionated proteins were characterized using 2D-diagonal SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. The globulin fraction, composed of seven intermolecular disulfide-linked polypeptide pairs of molecular mass 63.5, 62.5, 54.7, 53.0, 43.2, 38.5, and 35.1 kDa, encompassed a basic and an acidic subunit. Two-dimensional gels revealed approximately 32 spots, with isoelectric points and molecular masses ranging from 4.93 to 11.6 and from ∼5.2 to ∼109.4 kDa, respectively. Protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF MS peptide mass fingerprint analysis and further classified. Homology analysis demonstrated that 19% of the proteins were involved in metabolism, 16% were involved in signaling, and 15% were regulatory proteins. Peptide mass fingerprint analysis confirmed the presence of inter- and intramolecular disulfide linkages in the globulin fraction. Sulfur-rich proteins are of high nutritional value, and disulfides make S. brachiata a potential source of dietary supplementation. PMID:22494338

  13. High-resolution, three-dimensional modeling of human leukocyte antigen class I structure and surface electrostatic potential reveals the molecular basis for alloantibody binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Dafforn, Timothy R; Chaudhry, Afzal N; Halsall, David J; Bradley, J Andrew; Taylor, Craig J

    2011-11-01

    The potential of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) to stimulate humoral alloimmunity depends on the orientation, accessibility and physiochemical properties of polymorphic amino acids. We have generated high-resolution structural and physiochemical models of all common HLA class I alleles and analyzed the impact of amino acid polymorphisms on surface electrostatic potential. Atomic resolution three-dimensional structural models of HLA class I molecules were generated using the MODELLER computer algorithm. The molecular surface electrostatic potential was calculated using the DelPhi program. To confirm that electrostatic surface topography reflects known HLA B cell epitopes, we examined Bw4 and Bw6 and ascertained the impact of amino acid polymorphisms on their tertiary and physiochemical composition. The HLA protein structures generated performed well when subjected to stereochemical and energy-based testing for structural integrity. The electrostatic pattern and conformation of Bw4 and Bw6 epitopes are maintained among HLA molecules even when expressed in a different structural context. Importantly, variation in epitope amino acid composition does not always translate into a different electrostatic motif, providing an explanation for serologic cross-reactivity. Mutations of critical amino acids that abrogate antibody binding also induce distinct changes in epitope electrostatic properties. In conclusion, high-resolution structural modeling provides a physiochemical explanation for serologic patterns of antibody binding and provides novel insights into HLA immunogenicity. PMID:21840357

  14. B cell depletion with rituximab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Multiplex bead array reveals the kinetics of IgG and IgA antibodies to citrullinated antigens.

    PubMed

    Cambridge, Geraldine; Leandro, Maria J; Lahey, Lauren J; Fairhead, Thomas; Robinson, William H; Sokolove, Jeremy

    2016-06-01

    The serology of patients with Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by persistently raised levels of autoantibodies: Rheumatoid Factors (RhF) against Fc of IgG, and to citrullinated (Cit) protein/peptide sequences: ACPA, recognizing multiple Cit-sequences. B cell depletion therapy based on rituximab delivers good clinical responses in RA patients, particularly in the seropositive group, with responses sometimes lasting beyond the phase of B cell reconstitution. In general, ACPA levels fall following rituximab, but fluctuations with respect to predicting relapse have proved disappointing. In order to identify possible immunodominant specificities within either IgG- or IgA-ACPA we used a Multiplex bead-based array consisting of 30 Cit-peptides/proteins and 22 corresponding native sequences. The kinetics of the serum ACPA response to individual specificities was measured at key points (Baseline, B cell depletion phase, Relapse) within an initial cycle of rituximab therapy in 16 consecutive patients with severe, active RA. All had achieved significant decreases in Disease Activity Scores-28 and maintained B cell depletion in the peripheral blood (<5 CD19+cells/μl) for at least 3 months. At Baseline, mean fluorescence intensity shown by individual IgG- and IgA-ACPA were strongly correlated (R(2) = 0.75; p < 0.0001) but IgA-ACPA were approximately 10-fold lower. Data were Z-normalised in order to compare serial results and antibody classes. At Baseline, a total of 68 IgG- and 51 IgA-ACPA had Z-scores ≥ 1 (above population mean) were identified, with at least one Cit-antigen identified in each serum. ACPA to individual specificities subsequently fluctuated with 3 different patterns. Most 51/68 (75%) IgG- and 48/51 IgA-ACPA (94%) fell between Baseline and Depletion, of which 57% IgG- and 65% IgA-ACPA rebounded pre-Relapse. Interestingly, 17/68 IgG-ACPA (25%) and some IgA-ACPA (3/51; 6%) transiently increased from Baseline, subsequently falling pre

  15. Metabolomics approach reveals metabolic disorders and potential biomarkers associated with the developmental toxicity of tetrabromobisphenol A and tetrachlorobisphenol A

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Guozhu; Chen, Yajie; Wang, Hong-ou; Ye, Ting; Lin, Yi; Huang, Qiansheng; Chi, Yulang; Dong, Sijun

    2016-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A and tetrachlorobisphenol A are halogenated bisphenol A (H-BPA), and has raised concerns about their adverse effects on the development of fetuses and infants, however, the molecular mechanisms are unclear, and related metabolomics studies are limited. Accordingly, a metabolomics study based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was employed to elucidate the molecular developmental toxicology of H-BPA using the marine medaka (Oryzias melastigmas) embryo model. Here, we revealed decreased synthesis of nucleosides, amino acids and lipids, and disruptions in the TCA (tricarboxylic acid) cycle, glycolysis and lipid metabolism, thus inhibiting the developmental processes of embryos exposed to H-BPA. Unexpectedly, we observed enhanced neural activity accompanied by lactate accumulation and accelerated heart rates due to an increase in dopamine pathway and a decrease in inhibitory neurotransmitters following H-BPA exposure. Notably, disorders of the neural system, and disruptions in glycolysis, the TCA cycle, nucleoside metabolism, lipid metabolism, glutamate and aspartate metabolism induced by H-BPA exposure were heritable. Furthermore, lactate and dopa were identified as potential biomarkers of the developmental toxicity of H-BPA and related genetic effects. This study has demonstrated that the metabolomics approach is a useful tool for obtaining comprehensive and novel insights into the molecular developmental toxicity of environmental pollutants. PMID:27734936

  16. Diminished social reward anticipation in the broad autism phenotype as revealed by event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Cox, Anthony; Kohls, Gregor; Naples, Adam J; Mukerji, Cora E; Coffman, Marika C; Rutherford, Helena J V; Mayes, Linda C; McPartland, James C

    2015-10-01

    Diminished responsivity to reward incentives is a key contributor to the social-communication problems seen in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Social motivation theories suggest that individuals with ASD do not experience social interactions as rewarding, leading to negative consequences for the development of brain circuitry subserving social information. In this study, we examined neural responses to social and non-social reward anticipation in 35 typically developing young adults, examining modulation of reward sensitivity by level of autistic traits. Using an Event-related potential incentive-delay task incorporating novel, more ecologically valid forms of reward, higher expression of autistic traits was associated with an attenuated P3 response to the anticipation of social (simulated real-time video feedback from an observer), but not non-social (candy), rewards. Exploratory analyses revealed that this was unrelated to mentalizing ability. The P3 component reflects motivated attention to reward signals, suggesting attenuated motivation allocation specific to social incentives. The study extends prior findings of atypical reward anticipation in ASD, demonstrating that attenuated social reward responsiveness extends to autistic traits in the range of typical functioning. Results support the development of innovative paradigms for investigating social and non-social reward responsiveness. Insight into vulnerabilities in reward processing is critical for understanding social function in ASD. PMID:25752905

  17. Assessment of the Bacteriocinogenic Potential of Marine Bacteria Reveals Lichenicidin Production by Seaweed-Derived Bacillus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Luz Prieto, Maria; O’Sullivan, Laurie; Tan, Shiau Pin; McLoughlin, Peter; Hughes, Helen; O’Connor, Paula M.; Cotter, Paul D.; Lawlor, Peadar G.; Gardiner, Gillian E.

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to assess the bacteriocinogenic potential of bacteria derived mainly from seaweed, but also sand and seawater, (2) to identify at least some of the bacteriocins produced, if any and (3) to determine if they are unique to the marine environment and/or novel. Fifteen Bacillus licheniformis or pumilus isolates with antimicrobial activity against at least one of the indicator bacteria used were recovered. Some, at least, of the antimicrobials produced were bacteriocins, as they were proteinaceous and the producers displayed immunity. Screening with PCR primers for known Bacillus bacteriocins revealed that three seaweed-derived Bacillus licheniformis harbored the bli04127 gene which encodes one of the peptides of the two-peptide lantibiotic lichenicidin. Production of both lichenicidin peptides was then confirmed by mass spectrometry. This is the first definitive proof of bacteriocin production by seaweed-derived bacteria. The authors acknowledge that the bacteriocin produced has previously been discovered and is not unique to the marine environment. However, the other marine isolates likely produce novel bacteriocins, as none harboured genes for known Bacillus bacteriocins. PMID:23170084

  18. Sex-Specific Automatic Responses to Infant Cries: TMS Reveals Greater Excitability in Females than Males in Motor Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Irene; Cattaneo, Luigi; Venuti, Paola; de Pisapia, Nicola; Serra, Mauro; Esposito, Gianluca; Rigo, Paola; Farneti, Alessandra; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging reveals that infant cries activate parts of the premotor cortical system. To validate this effect in a more direct way, we used event-related transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Here, we investigated the presence and the time course of modulation of motor cortex excitability in young adults who listened to infant cries. Specifically, we recorded motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from the biceps brachii (BB) and interosseus dorsalis primus (ID1) muscles as produced by TMS delivered from 0 to 250 ms after sound onset in six steps of 50 ms in 10 females and 10 males. We observed an excitatory modulation of MEPs at 100 ms from the onset of infant cry specific to females and to the ID1 muscle. We regard this modulation as a response to natural cry sounds because it was attenuated to stimuli increasingly different from natural cry and absent in a separate group of females who listened to non-cry stimuli physically matched to natural infant cries. Furthermore, the 100-ms latency of this response is not compatible with a voluntary reaction to the stimulus but suggests an automatic, bottom-up audiomotor association. The brains of adult females appear to be tuned to respond to infant cries with automatic motor excitation. PMID:26779061

  19. Diminished social reward anticipation in the broad autism phenotype as revealed by event-related brain potentials

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Anthony; Kohls, Gregor; Naples, Adam J.; Mukerji, Cora E.; Coffman, Marika C.; Rutherford, Helena J. V.; Mayes, Linda C.

    2015-01-01

    Diminished responsivity to reward incentives is a key contributor to the social-communication problems seen in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Social motivation theories suggest that individuals with ASD do not experience social interactions as rewarding, leading to negative consequences for the development of brain circuitry subserving social information. In this study, we examined neural responses to social and non-social reward anticipation in 35 typically developing young adults, examining modulation of reward sensitivity by level of autistic traits. Using an Event-related potential incentive-delay task incorporating novel, more ecologically valid forms of reward, higher expression of autistic traits was associated with an attenuated P3 response to the anticipation of social (simulated real-time video feedback from an observer), but not non-social (candy), rewards. Exploratory analyses revealed that this was unrelated to mentalizing ability. The P3 component reflects motivated attention to reward signals, suggesting attenuated motivation allocation specific to social incentives. The study extends prior findings of atypical reward anticipation in ASD, demonstrating that attenuated social reward responsiveness extends to autistic traits in the range of typical functioning. Results support the development of innovative paradigms for investigating social and non-social reward responsiveness. Insight into vulnerabilities in reward processing is critical for understanding social function in ASD. PMID:25752905

  20. Diminished social reward anticipation in the broad autism phenotype as revealed by event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Cox, Anthony; Kohls, Gregor; Naples, Adam J; Mukerji, Cora E; Coffman, Marika C; Rutherford, Helena J V; Mayes, Linda C; McPartland, James C

    2015-10-01

    Diminished responsivity to reward incentives is a key contributor to the social-communication problems seen in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Social motivation theories suggest that individuals with ASD do not experience social interactions as rewarding, leading to negative consequences for the development of brain circuitry subserving social information. In this study, we examined neural responses to social and non-social reward anticipation in 35 typically developing young adults, examining modulation of reward sensitivity by level of autistic traits. Using an Event-related potential incentive-delay task incorporating novel, more ecologically valid forms of reward, higher expression of autistic traits was associated with an attenuated P3 response to the anticipation of social (simulated real-time video feedback from an observer), but not non-social (candy), rewards. Exploratory analyses revealed that this was unrelated to mentalizing ability. The P3 component reflects motivated attention to reward signals, suggesting attenuated motivation allocation specific to social incentives. The study extends prior findings of atypical reward anticipation in ASD, demonstrating that attenuated social reward responsiveness extends to autistic traits in the range of typical functioning. Results support the development of innovative paradigms for investigating social and non-social reward responsiveness. Insight into vulnerabilities in reward processing is critical for understanding social function in ASD.

  1. Event-related brain potentials reveal correlates of the transformation of stimulus functions through derived relations in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, L M; Farina, F R; Hussey, I; Roche, R A P

    2015-03-01

    This research aimed to explore the neural correlates of relational learning by recording high-density EEG during a behavioural task involving derivation levels of varying complexity. A total of 15 participants (5 male; age range 18-23 years; mean age=20.0 years) completed contextual cue training, relational learning, function training and a derivation task while 128-channel event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from the scalp (Background). Differences in response latencies were observed between the two derived (symmetry and equivalence) and directly trained relations, with longest latencies found for equivalence and shortest for the directly trained relations. This pattern failed to reach statistical significance. Importantly, ERPs revealed an early P3a positivity (from 230 to 350ms) over right posterior scalp sites. Significantly larger mean amplitudes were found at three channels (P6, E115 and E121) for the equivalence relations compared to the two other types (Results). We believe this may constitute a first demonstration of differences in brain electrophysiology in the transformation of stimulus functions through derived relations of hierarchical levels of complexity (Conclusions).

  2. Metabolomics approach reveals metabolic disorders and potential biomarkers associated with the developmental toxicity of tetrabromobisphenol A and tetrachlorobisphenol A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Guozhu; Chen, Yajie; Wang, Hong-Ou; Ye, Ting; Lin, Yi; Huang, Qiansheng; Chi, Yulang; Dong, Sijun

    2016-10-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A and tetrachlorobisphenol A are halogenated bisphenol A (H-BPA), and has raised concerns about their adverse effects on the development of fetuses and infants, however, the molecular mechanisms are unclear, and related metabolomics studies are limited. Accordingly, a metabolomics study based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was employed to elucidate the molecular developmental toxicology of H-BPA using the marine medaka (Oryzias melastigmas) embryo model. Here, we revealed decreased synthesis of nucleosides, amino acids and lipids, and disruptions in the TCA (tricarboxylic acid) cycle, glycolysis and lipid metabolism, thus inhibiting the developmental processes of embryos exposed to H-BPA. Unexpectedly, we observed enhanced neural activity accompanied by lactate accumulation and accelerated heart rates due to an increase in dopamine pathway and a decrease in inhibitory neurotransmitters following H-BPA exposure. Notably, disorders of the neural system, and disruptions in glycolysis, the TCA cycle, nucleoside metabolism, lipid metabolism, glutamate and aspartate metabolism induced by H-BPA exposure were heritable. Furthermore, lactate and dopa were identified as potential biomarkers of the developmental toxicity of H-BPA and related genetic effects. This study has demonstrated that the metabolomics approach is a useful tool for obtaining comprehensive and novel insights into the molecular developmental toxicity of environmental pollutants.

  3. Human antibody response to Aedes albopictus salivary proteins: a potential biomarker to evaluate the efficacy of vector control in an area of Chikungunya and Dengue Virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Doucoure, Souleymane; Mouchet, François; Cornelie, Sylvie; Drame, Papa Makhtar; D'Ortenzio, Eric; DeHecq, Jean Sébastien; Remoue, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Aedes borne viruses represent public health problems in southern countries and threat to emerge in the developed world. Their control is currently based on vector population control. Much effort is being devoted to develop new tools to control such arbovirus. Recent findings suggest that the evaluation of human antibody (Ab) response to arthropod salivary proteins is relevant to measuring the level of human exposure to mosquito bites. Using an immunoepidemiological approach, the present study aimed to assess the usefulness of the salivary biomarker for measuring the efficacy of Ae. albopictus control strategies in La Reunion urban area. The antisaliva Ab response of adult humans exposed to Ae. albopictus was evaluated before and after vector control measures. Our results showed a significant correlation between antisaliva Ab response and the level of exposure to vectors bites. The decrease of Ae. albopictus density has been detected by this biomarker two weeks after the implementation of control measures, suggesting its potential usefulness for evaluating control strategies in a short time period. The identification of species specific salivary proteins/peptides should improve the use of this biomarker. PMID:24822216

  4. The Shark Strikes Twice: Hypervariable Loop 2 of Shark IgNAR Antibody Variable Domains and Its Potential to Function as an Autonomous Paratope.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Könning, Doreen; Grzeschik, Julius; Krah, Simon; Becker, Stefan; Dickgießer, Stephan; Kolmar, Harald

    2015-08-01

    In this present study, we engineered hypervariable loop 2 (HV2) of the IgNAR variable domain in a way that it solely facilitates antigen binding, potentially functioning as an autonomous paratope. For this, the surface-exposed loop corresponding to HV2 was diversified and antigen-specific variable domain of IgNAR antibody (vNAR) molecules were isolated by library screening using yeast surface display (YSD) as platform technology. An epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-specific vNAR was used as starting material, and nine residues in HV2 were randomized. Target-specific clones comprising a new HV2-mediated paratope were isolated against cluster of differentiation 3ε (CD3ε) and human Fcγ while retaining high affinity for EpCAM. Essentially, we demonstrate that a new paratope comprising moderate affinities against a given target molecule can be engineered into the vNAR scaffold that acts independent of the original antigen-binding site, composed of complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) and CDR1. PMID:26003538

  5. The Shark Strikes Twice: Hypervariable Loop 2 of Shark IgNAR Antibody Variable Domains and Its Potential to Function as an Autonomous Paratope.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Könning, Doreen; Grzeschik, Julius; Krah, Simon; Becker, Stefan; Dickgießer, Stephan; Kolmar, Harald

    2015-08-01

    In this present study, we engineered hypervariable loop 2 (HV2) of the IgNAR variable domain in a way that it solely facilitates antigen binding, potentially functioning as an autonomous paratope. For this, the surface-exposed loop corresponding to HV2 was diversified and antigen-specific variable domain of IgNAR antibody (vNAR) molecules were isolated by library screening using yeast surface display (YSD) as platform technology. An epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-specific vNAR was used as starting material, and nine residues in HV2 were randomized. Target-specific clones comprising a new HV2-mediated paratope were isolated against cluster of differentiation 3ε (CD3ε) and human Fcγ while retaining high affinity for EpCAM. Essentially, we demonstrate that a new paratope comprising moderate affinities against a given target molecule can be engineered into the vNAR scaffold that acts independent of the original antigen-binding site, composed of complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) and CDR1.

  6. Hep-2 cell based indirect immunofluorescence assay for antinuclear antibodies as a potential diagnosis of drug-induced autoimmunity in nonclinical toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Hong, Min; Ma, Ben; Lin, Zhi; Zhou, Xiaobing; Geng, Xingchao; Shen, Lianzhong; Li, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) are important biomarkers in the diagnosis of autoimmune diseases in humans; however, the diagnostic performance of ANA in nonclinical safety studies are not well understood. Here, we studied the use of ANAs as potential nonclinical biomarkers for drug-induced autoimmunity (DIA) using a Hep-2 based indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Initially, MRL-fas(lpr)/J mice and HgCl₂-treated rats were used as SLE-positive models. Serum samples obtained from 94 normal mice or 204 normal rats aged one to four months served as the negative control. The IFA effectively distinguished ANAs-positive samples in both species with a cut-off titer of 1:100. Brown Norway rats were treated with 450 mg/kg D-penicillamine for 30 consecutive days. ANAs were generated and corresponded with DIA development. Human Hep-2 cells, mice Neuro 2A cells, and Chinese Hamster Lung cells served as antigen from different species, which were found cross-reactive with ANA-positive serum samples from mice, rats, and humans without any differences in diagnosis. This methodology showed no species-specificity for ANA detection. Furthermore, we found approximately 20 percentage of the mice aged seven to eight months demonstrated age-related ANAs, which was consistent with humans. Overall, our findings demonstrated the use of ANA detection using IFA in the nonclinical diagnosis of murine drug-induced autoimmunity, and age-related ANAs should be considered when aged animals are used.

  7. The Complete Genome and Proteome of Laribacter hongkongensis Reveal Potential Mechanisms for Adaptations to Different Temperatures and Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Curreem, Shirly O. T.; Tsang, Alan K. L.; Fan, Rachel Y. Y.; Wong, Gilman K. M.; Huang, Yi; Loman, Nicholas J.; Snyder, Lori A. S.; Cai, James J.; Huang, Jian-Dong; Mak, William; Pallen, Mark J.; Lok, Si; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2009-01-01

    Laribacter hongkongensis is a newly discovered Gram-negative bacillus of the Neisseriaceae family associated with freshwater fish–borne gastroenteritis and traveler's diarrhea. The complete genome sequence of L. hongkongensis HLHK9, recovered from an immunocompetent patient with severe gastroenteritis, consists of a 3,169-kb chromosome with G+C content of 62.35%. Genome analysis reveals different mechanisms potentially important for its adaptation to diverse habitats of human and freshwater fish intestines and freshwater environments. The gene contents support its phenotypic properties and suggest that amino acids and fatty acids can be used as carbon sources. The extensive variety of transporters, including multidrug efflux and heavy metal transporters as well as genes involved in chemotaxis, may enable L. hongkongensis to survive in different environmental niches. Genes encoding urease, bile salts efflux pump, adhesin, catalase, superoxide dismutase, and other putative virulence factors—such as hemolysins, RTX toxins, patatin-like proteins, phospholipase A1, and collagenases—are present. Proteomes of L. hongkongensis HLHK9 cultured at 37°C (human body temperature) and 20°C (freshwater habitat temperature) showed differential gene expression, including two homologous copies of argB, argB-20, and argB-37, which encode two isoenzymes of N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK)—NAGK-20 and NAGK-37—in the arginine biosynthesis pathway. NAGK-20 showed higher expression at 20°C, whereas NAGK-37 showed higher expression at 37°C. NAGK-20 also had a lower optimal temperature for enzymatic activities and was inhibited by arginine probably as negative-feedback control. Similar duplicated copies of argB are also observed in bacteria from hot springs such as Thermus thermophilus, Deinococcus geothermalis, Deinococcus radiodurans, and Roseiflexus castenholzii, suggesting that similar mechanisms for temperature adaptation may be employed by other bacteria. Genome and

  8. Functional screen for secreted proteins by monoclonal antibody library and identification of Mac-2 Binding protein (Mac-2BP) as a potential therapeutic target and biomarker for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lichao; Chen, Lizhao; Sun, Lixin; Pan, Jian; Yu, Long; Han, LuLu; Yang, Zhihua; Luo, Yuanming; Ran, Yuliang

    2013-02-01

    Identification of secreted proteins of lung cancer could provide new candidates of serum biomarkers for cancer diagnosis or targets for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we developed a novel strategy that combined functional monoclonal antibody library screening technique and mass spectrometry to identify functional secreted proteins. BALB/c mice were immunized with cancer cells isolated from fresh human lung cancer tissues. The monoclonal antibody library containing 1160 mAbs was established with the mouse spleen cells, whose serum had most anti-proliferative effect on lung cancer cells. Monoclonal antibodies were subjected to an immunoreactive and functional screen and monoclonal antibodies that reacted strongly with secreted proteins in condition medium and lung cancer tissues with high inhibotion of cell proliferation were selected. Antigens that recognized by antibodies were obtained by immunoprecipitation and then identified by mass spectrometry. Mac-2-binding protein (Mac-2BP), the antigen of 13H3 antibody, was identified using this approach. Functional studies demonstrated that the 13H3 antibody suppressed lung cancer cell lines ANIP-973 and A549 proliferation in vitro and inhibit ANIP973 xenograft tumors growth in vivo by inducing cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase, with up-regulation of p27 and down-regulation of cyclin D1. Moreover, the serum level of Mac-2BP was significantly higher in lung cancer patients than healthy controls. At a cutoff value of 6 μg/ml, Mac-2BP might be a diagnostic biomarker of lung cancer, especially for SCLC. Mac-2BP concentrations of 6 μg/ml or higher was associated with poor overall survival in univariate analysis, and was an independent predictor in the multivariate COX analysis. Together, these results firstly demonstrated that Mac-2BP can be used as a therapeutic target and potential biomarker for lung cancer. Our strategy is feasible, which may facilitate the identification of novel secreted biomarkers of lung cancer.

  9. Functional Screen for Secreted Proteins by Monoclonal Antibody Library and Identification of Mac-2 Binding Protein (Mac-2BP) as a Potential Therapeutic Target and Biomarker for Lung Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lichao; Chen, Lizhao; Sun, Lixin; Pan, Jian; Yu, Long; Han, LuLu; Yang, Zhihua; Luo, Yuanming; Ran, Yuliang

    2013-01-01

    Identification of secreted proteins of lung cancer could provide new candidates of serum biomarkers for cancer diagnosis or targets for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we developed a novel strategy that combined functional monoclonal antibody library screening technique and mass spectrometry to identify functional secreted proteins. BALB/c mice were immunized with cancer cells isolated from fresh human lung cancer tissues. The monoclonal antibody library containing 1160 mAbs was established with the mouse spleen cells, whose serum had most anti-proliferative effect on lung cancer cells. Monoclonal antibodies were subjected to an immunoreactive and functional screen and monoclonal antibodies that reacted strongly with secreted proteins in condition medium and lung cancer tissues with high inhibotion of cell proliferation were selected. Antigens that recognized by antibodies were obtained by immunoprecipitation and then identified by mass spectrometry. Mac-2-binding protein (Mac-2BP), the antigen of 13H3 antibody, was identified using this approach. Functional studies demonstrated that the 13H3 antibody suppressed lung cancer cell lines ANIP-973 and A549 proliferation in vitro and inhibit ANIP973 xenograft tumors growth in vivo by inducing cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase, with up-regulation of p27 and down-regulation of cyclin D1. Moreover, the serum level of Mac-2BP was significantly higher in lung cancer patients than healthy controls. At a cutoff value of 6 μg/ml, Mac-2BP might be a diagnostic biomarker of lung cancer, especially for SCLC. Mac-2BP concentrations of 6 μg/ml or higher was associated with poor overall survival in univariate analysis, and was an independent predictor in the multivariate COX analysis. Together, these results firstly demonstrated that Mac-2BP can be used as a therapeutic target and potential biomarker for lung cancer. Our strategy is feasible, which may facilitate the identification of novel secreted biomarkers of lung cancer

  10. Reversion of somatic mutations of the respiratory syncytial virus-specific human monoclonal antibody Fab19 reveal a direct relationship between association rate and neutralizing potency.

    PubMed

    Bates, John T; Keefer, Christopher J; Utley, Thomas J; Correia, Bruno E; Schief, William R; Crowe, James E

    2013-04-01

    The role of affinity in determining neutralizing potency of mAbs directed against viruses is not well understood. We investigated the kinetic, structural, and functional advantage conferred by individual naturally occurring somatic mutations in the Ab H chain V region of Fab19, a well-described neutralizing human mAb directed to respiratory syncytial virus. Comparison of the affinity-matured Ab Fab19 with recombinant Fab19 Abs that were variants containing reverted amino acids from the inferred unmutated ancestor sequence revealed the molecular basis for affinity maturation of this Ab. Enhanced binding was achieved through mutations in the third H chain CDR (HCDR3) that conferred a markedly faster on-rate and a desirable increase in antiviral neutralizing activity. In contrast, most somatic mutations in the HCDR1 and HCDR2 regions did not significantly enhance Ag binding or antiviral activity. We observed a direct relationship between the measured association rate (Kon) for F protein and antiviral activity. Modeling studies of the structure of the Ag-Ab complex suggested the HCDR3 loop interacts with the antigenic site A surface loop of the respiratory syncytial virus F protein, previously shown to contain the epitope for this Ab by experimentation. These studies define a direct relationship of affinity and neutralizing activity for a viral glycoprotein-specific human mAb.

  11. Antihuman epidermal growth factor receptor 2 antibody herceptin inhibits autocrine motility factor (AMF) expression and potentiates antitumor effects of AMF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Amjad H; Bagheri-Yarmand, Rozita; Williams, Ruth R E; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Kumar, Rakesh; Raz, Avraham

    2002-10-01

    Overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 2 has been linked to the development and maintenance of malignant phenotypes in breast tumors. In addition, the growth and dissemination of human cancers are regulated in part by the autocrine motility factor (AMF)/phosphoglucose isomerase shown to be up-regulated by heregulin (HRG) in breast cancer cells. This study was undertaken to explore the effect of anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody 4D5 [Herceptin (HCT)] on AMF expression and the potential of its augmentation by specific simple sugar AMF inhibitors. Here we show that HCT treatment of high HER2-expressing breast cancer SK-BR3, BT-474, and ZR-75R cells resulted in down-regulation of AMF mRNA and protein. HCT inhibited the ability of HRG to induce AMF expression in cells with a normal HER2 level, and HCT-mediated down-regulation could be reversed by HRG treatment in breast cancer cells with a high HER2 level. HCT also inhibited transcription from a chimeric pGL3-Luc vector-based reporter system containing the 1.8-kb promoter region of human AMF. Treatment of breast cancer cells with the combination of HCT and specific AMF inhibitors, erythrose 4-phosphate or D-mannose 6-phosphate, resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on both the growth rate and invasiveness of cells as compared with treatment with each agent alone. Results presented here suggest that HCT can effectively block both ligand-induced and constitutive expression of AMF associated with high HER2 overexpression, implying a role of the AMF pathway in the action of HCT. Accordingly, the combination of AMF inhibitor with HCT can potentiate the growth-inhibitory and anti-invasive action of HCT in breast cancer cells.

  12. Comparative analysis of the peanut witches'-broom phytoplasma genome reveals horizontal transfer of potential mobile units and effectors.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wan-Chia; Chen, Ling-Ling; Lo, Wen-Sui; Lin, Chan-Pin; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are a group of bacteria that are associated with hundreds of plant diseases. Due to their economical importance and the difficulties involved in the experimental study of these obligate pathogens, genome sequencing and comparative analysis have been utilized as powerful tools to understand phytoplasma biology. To date four complete phytoplasma genome sequences have been published. However, these four strains represent limited phylogenetic diversity. In this study, we report the shotgun sequencing and evolutionary analysis of a peanut witches'-broom (PnWB) phytoplasma genome. The availability of this genome provides the first representative of the 16SrII group and substantially improves the taxon sampling to investigate genome evolution. The draft genome assembly contains 13 chromosomal contigs with a total size of 562,473 bp, covering ∼90% of the chromosome. Additionally, a complete plasmid sequence is included. Comparisons among the five available phytoplasma genomes reveal the differentiations in gene content and metabolic capacity. Notably, phylogenetic inferences of the potential mobile units (PMUs) in these genomes indicate that horizontal transfer may have occurred between divergent phytoplasma lineages. Because many effectors are associated with PMUs, the horizontal transfer of these transposon-like elements can contribute to the adaptation and diversification of these pathogens. In summary, the findings from this study highlight the importance of improving taxon sampling when investigating genome evolution. Moreover, the currently available sequences are inadequate to fully characterize the pan-genome of phytoplasmas. Future genome sequencing efforts to expand phylogenetic diversity are essential in improving our understanding of phytoplasma evolution.

  13. High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals Circulating miRNAs as Potential Biomarkers for Measuring Puberty Onset in Chicken (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yijun; Li, Guohui; Qu, Liang; Zhang, Huiyong; Wang, Kehua; Zou, Jianmin; Liu, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    There are still no highly sensitive and unique biomarkers for measurement of puberty onset. Circulating miRNAs have been shown to be promising biomarkers for diagnosis of various diseases. To identify circulating miRNAs that could be served as biomarkers for measuring chicken (Gallus gallus) puberty onset, the Solexa deep sequencing was performed to analyze the miRNA expression profiles in serum and plasma of hens from two different pubertal stages, before puberty onset (BO) and after puberty onset (AO). 197 conserved and 19 novel miRNAs (reads > 10) were identified as serum/plasma-expressed miRNAs in the chicken. The common miRNA amounts and their expression changes from BO to AO between serum and plasma were very similar, indicating the different treatments to generate serum and plasma had quite small influence on the miRNAs. 130 conserved serum-miRNAs were showed to be differentially expressed (reads > 10, P < 0.05) from BO to AO, with 68 up-regulated and 62 down-regulated. 4829 putative genes were predicted as the targets of the 40 most differentially expressed miRNAs (|log2(fold-change)|>1.0, P < 0.01). Functional analysis revealed several pathways that were associated with puberty onset. Further quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) test found that a seven-miRNA panel, including miR-29c, miR-375, miR-215, miR-217, miR-19b, miR-133a and let-7a, had great potentials to serve as novel biomarkers for measuring puberty onset in chicken. Due to highly conserved nature of miRNAs, the findings could provide cues for measurement of puberty onset in other animals as well as humans. PMID:27149515

  14. Significant Natural Product Biosynthetic Potential of Actinorhizal Symbionts of the Genus Frankia, as Revealed by Comparative Genomic and Proteomic Analyses▿

    PubMed Central

    Udwary, Daniel W.; Gontang, Erin A.; Jones, Adam C.; Jones, Carla S.; Schultz, Andrew W.; Winter, Jaclyn M.; Yang, Jane Y.; Beauchemin, Nicholas; Capson, Todd L.; Clark, Benjamin R.; Esquenazi, Eduardo; Eustáquio, Alessandra S.; Freel, Kelle; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H.; Gonzalez, David; Liu, Wei-Ting; Malloy, Karla L.; Maloney, Katherine N.; Nett, Markus; Nunnery, Joshawna K.; Penn, Kevin; Prieto-Davo, Alejandra; Simmons, Thomas L.; Weitz, Sara; Wilson, Micheal C.; Tisa, Louis S.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Frankia are mycelium-forming actinomycetes that are found as nitrogen-fixing facultative symbionts of actinorhizal plants. Although soil-dwelling actinomycetes are well-known producers of bioactive compounds, the genus Frankia has largely gone uninvestigated for this potential. Bioinformatic analysis of the genome sequences of Frankia strains ACN14a, CcI3, and EAN1pec revealed an unexpected number of secondary metabolic biosynthesis gene clusters. Our analysis led to the identification of at least 65 biosynthetic gene clusters, the vast majority of which appear to be unique and for which products have not been observed or characterized. More than 25 secondary metabolite structures or structure fragments were predicted, and these are expected to include cyclic peptides, siderophores, pigments, signaling molecules, and specialized lipids. Outside the hopanoid gene locus, no cluster could be convincingly demonstrated to be responsible for the few secondary metabolites previously isolated from other Frankia strains. Few clusters were shared among the three species, demonstrating species-specific biosynthetic diversity. Proteomic analysis of Frankia sp. strains CcI3 and EAN1pec showed that significant and diverse secondary metabolic activity was expressed in laboratory cultures. In addition, several prominent signals in the mass range of peptide natural products were observed in Frankia sp. CcI3 by intact-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). This work supports the value of bioinformatic investigation in natural products biosynthesis using genomic information and presents a clear roadmap for natural products discovery in the Frankia genus. PMID:21498757

  15. Genome sequencing of Listeria monocytogenes "Quargel" listeriosis outbreak strains reveals two different strains with distinct in vitro virulence potential.

    PubMed

    Rychli, Kathrin; Müller, Anneliese; Zaiser, Andreas; Schoder, Dagmar; Allerberger, Franz; Wagner, Martin; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    A large listeriosis outbreak occurred in Austria, Germany and the Czech Republic in 2009 and 2010. The outbreak was traced back to a traditional Austrian curd cheese called "Quargel" which was contaminated with two distinct serovar 1/2a Listeria monocytogenes strains (QOC1 and QOC2). In this study we sequenced and analysed the genomes of both outbreak strains in order to investigate the extent of genetic diversity between the two strains belonging to MLST sequence types 398 (QOC2) and 403 (QOC1). Both genomes are highly similar, but also display distinct properties: The QOC1 genome is approximately 74 kbp larger than the QOC2 genome. In addition, the strains harbour 93 (QOC1) and 45 (QOC2) genes encoding strain-specific proteins. A 21 kbp region showing highest similarity to plasmid pLMIV encoding three putative internalins is integrated in the QOC1 genome. In contrast to QOC1, strain QOC2 harbours a vip homologue, which encodes a LPXTG surface protein involved in cell invasion. In accordance, in vitro virulence assays revealed distinct differences in invasion efficiency and intracellular proliferation within different cell types. The higher virulence potential of QOC1 in non-phagocytic cells may be explained by the presence of additional internalins in the pLMIV-like region, whereas the higher invasion capability of QOC2 into phagocytic cells may be due to the presence of a vip homologue. In addition, both strains show differences in stress-related gene content. Strain QOC1 encodes a so-called stress survival islet 1, whereas strain QOC2 harbours a homologue of the uncharacterized LMOf2365_0481 gene. Consistently, QOC1 shows higher resistance to acidic, alkaline and gastric stress. In conclusion, our results show that strain QOC1 and QOC2 are distinct and did not recently evolve from a common ancestor.

  16. Comparative Analysis of the Peanut Witches'-Broom Phytoplasma Genome Reveals Horizontal Transfer of Potential Mobile Units and Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Wen-Sui; Lin, Chan-Pin; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are a group of bacteria that are associated with hundreds of plant diseases. Due to their economical importance and the difficulties involved in the experimental study of these obligate pathogens, genome sequencing and comparative analysis have been utilized as powerful tools to understand phytoplasma biology. To date four complete phytoplasma genome sequences have been published. However, these four strains represent limited phylogenetic diversity. In this study, we report the shotgun sequencing and evolutionary analysis of a peanut witches'-broom (PnWB) phytoplasma genome. The availability of this genome provides the first representative of the 16SrII group and substantially improves the taxon sampling to investigate genome evolution. The draft genome assembly contains 13 chromosomal contigs with a total size of 562,473 bp, covering ∼90% of the chromosome. Additionally, a complete plasmid sequence is included. Comparisons among the five available phytoplasma genomes reveal the differentiations in gene content and metabolic capacity. Notably, phylogenetic inferences of the potential mobile units (PMUs) in these genomes indicate that horizontal transfer may have occurred between divergent phytoplasma lineages. Because many effectors are associated with PMUs, the horizontal transfer of these transposon-like elements can contribute to the adaptation and diversification of these pathogens. In summary, the findings from this study highlight the importance of improving taxon sampling when investigating genome evolution. Moreover, the currently available sequences are inadequate to fully characterize the pan-genome of phytoplasmas. Future genome sequencing efforts to expand phylogenetic diversity are essential in improving our understanding of phytoplasma evolution. PMID:23626855

  17. Multiscale Modeling of Antibody-Drug Conjugates: Connecting Tissue and Cellular Distribution to Whole Animal Pharmacokinetics and Potential Implications for Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Cilliers, Cornelius; Guo, Hans; Liao, Jianshan; Christodolu, Nikolas; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-09-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates exhibit complex pharmacokinetics due to their combination of macromolecular and small molecule properties. These issues range from systemic concerns, such as deconjugation of the small molecule drug during the long antibody circulation time or rapid clearance from nonspecific interactions, to local tumor tissue heterogeneity, cell bystander effects, and endosomal escape. Mathematical models can be used to study the impact of these processes on overall distribution in an efficient manner, and several types of models have been used to analyze varying aspects of antibody distribution including physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models and tissue-level simulations. However, these processes are quantitative in nature and cannot be handled qualitatively in isolation. For example, free antibody from deconjugation of the small molecule will impact the distribution of conjugated antibodies within the tumor. To incorporate these effects into a unified framework, we have coupled the systemic and organ-level distribution of a PBPK model with the tissue-level detail of a distributed parameter tumor model. We used this mathematical model to analyze new experimental results on the distribution of the clinical antibody-drug conjugate Kadcyla in HER2-positive mouse xenografts. This model is able to capture the impact of the drug-antibody ratio (DAR) on tumor penetration, the net result of drug deconjugation, and the effect of using unconjugated antibody to drive ADC penetration deeper into the tumor tissue. This modeling approach will provide quantitative and mechanistic support to experimental studies trying to parse the impact of multiple mechanisms of action for these complex drugs. PMID:27287046

  18. QUANTITATIVE INVESTIGATIONS OF IDIOTYPIC ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Hopper, John E.; MacDonald, A. Bruce; Nisonoff, Alfred

    1970-01-01

    Idiotypic antibodies were investigated quantitatively by a method of indirect precipitation, which utilizes labeled F(ab')2 fragments of specifically purified antibenzoate antibody from the donor, anti-antibody, and an antiglobulin reagent. The contribution of allotypic and hidden determinants to these reactions was excluded. Greater fractions of an idiotypic antibody population are precipitated by this method, as compared to direct precipitation, and in two instances large proportions of idiotypic antibodies were detected in populations which failed to form precipitates by double diffusion in agar gel. The greater sensitivity of the indirect method was attributed to its capacity to detect molecules bearing a small number of antigenic determinants. Extensive studies of cross-reactions, carried out by an inhibition technique, failed to reveal any strong reactions of anti-idiotypic antibodies with heterologous antibenzoate antibody preparations, heterologous sera, or IgG, although a few weak cross-reactions were noted. One definite cross-reaction was observed by a direct binding measurement with heterologous antiserum. Antisera prepared in more than one recipient against a single donor preparation reacted with identical or overlapping subpopulations of the donor molecules. Instances in which two recipient antisera reacted with different proportions of the molecules of a single donor provided evidence for the existence of more than one idiotypic antibody population in the antibenzoate antibody of an individual rabbit. PMID:5308065

  19. Expression profiling of the RPE in zebrafish smarca4 mutant revealed altered signals that potentially affect RPE and retinal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ping; Collery, Ross; Trowbridge, Sara; Zhong, Wenxuan; Leung, Yuk Fai

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop a framework for analyzing retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) expression profiles from zebrafish eye mutants. Methods The fish model we used was SWI/SNF-related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4 (smarca4), a retinal dystrophic mutant with a previously described retinal phenotype and expression profiles. Histological and Affymetrix GeneChip analyses were conducted to characterize the RPE defects and underlying differential expression, respectively. Results Histological analysis revealed that smarca4 RPE was formed, but its differentiation was abnormal. In particular, ultrastructural analysis of smarca4 RPE by transmission electron microscopy demonstrated several defects in melanogenesis. The nature of these defects also suggests that the cytoskeletal dynamics, which are tightly linked with melanogenesis, were impaired in smarca4 RPE. To compare the expression profile of normal wild-type (WT) and smarca4 RPE, the gene expression profiles of microdissected retinas and RPE-attached retinas were measured with Affymetrix GeneChip analysis. The RPE expression values were then estimated from these samples by subtracting the retinal expression values from the expression values of the RPE-attached retinas. A factorial analysis was conducted using the expression values of the RPE, retinal, and whole-embryo samples. Specific rules (contrasts) were built using the coefficients of the resulting fitted models to select for three groups of genes: 1) smarca4-regulated RPE genes, 2) smarca4-regulated retinal genes, and 3) smarca4-regulated RPE genes that are not differentially expressed in the retina. Interestingly, the third group consists of 39 genes that are highly related to cytoskeletal dynamics, melanogenesis, and paracrine and intracellular signal transduction. Conclusions Our analytical framework provides an experimental approach to identify differentially-regulated genes in the

  20. Systems Perturbation Analysis of a Large-Scale Signal Transduction Model Reveals Potentially Influential Candidates for Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Allen, Laura; Hochfelder, Colleen; Majumder, Mahbubul; Helikar, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation in signal transduction pathways can lead to a variety of complex disorders, including cancer. Computational approaches such as network analysis are important tools to understand system dynamics as well as to identify critical components that could be further explored as therapeutic targets. Here, we performed perturbation analysis of a large-scale signal transduction model in extracellular environments that stimulate cell death, growth, motility, and quiescence. Each of the model’s components was perturbed under both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations. Using 1,300 simulations under both types of perturbations across various extracellular conditions, we identified the most and least influential components based on the magnitude of their influence on the rest of the system. Based on the premise that the most influential components might serve as better drug targets, we characterized them for biological functions, housekeeping genes, essential genes, and druggable proteins. The most influential components under all environmental conditions were enriched with several biological processes. The inositol pathway was found as most influential under inactivating perturbations, whereas the kinase and small lung cancer pathways were identified as the most influential under activating perturbations. The most influential components were enriched with essential genes and druggable proteins. Moreover, known cancer drug targets were also classified in influential components based on the affected components in the network. Additionally, the systemic perturbation analysis of the model revealed a network motif of most influential components which affect each other. Furthermore, our analysis predicted novel combinations of cancer drug targets with various effects on other most influential components. We found that the combinatorial perturbation consisting of PI3K inactivation and overactivation of IP3R1 can lead to increased activity levels of apoptosis

  1. Genome-wide meta-analysis of maize heterosis reveals the potential role of additive gene expression at pericentromeric loci

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The identification of QTL involved in heterosis formation is one approach to unravel the not yet fully understood genetic basis of heterosis - the improved agronomic performance of hybrid F1 plants compared to their inbred parents. The identification of candidate genes underlying a QTL is important both for developing markers and determining the molecular genetic basis of a trait, but remains difficult owing to the large number of genes often contained within individual QTL. To address this problem in heterosis analysis, we applied a meta-analysis strategy for grain yield (GY) of Zea mays L. as example, incorporating QTL-, hybrid field-, and parental gene expression data. Results For the identification of genes underlying known heterotic QTL, we made use of tight associations between gene expression pattern and the trait of interest, identified by correlation analyses. Using this approach genes strongly associated with heterosis for GY were discovered to be clustered in pericentromeric regions of the complex maize genome. This suggests that expression differences of sequences in recombination-suppressed regions are important in the establishment of heterosis for GY in F1 hybrids and also in the conservation of heterosis for GY across genotypes. Importantly functional analysis of heterosis-associated genes from these genomic regions revealed over-representation of a number of functional classes, identifying key processes contributing to heterosis for GY. Based on the finding that the majority of the analyzed heterosis-associated genes were addtitively expressed, we propose a model referring to the influence of cis-regulatory variation on heterosis for GY by the compensation of fixed detrimental expression levels in parents. Conclusions The study highlights the utility of a meta-analysis approach that integrates phenotypic and multi-level molecular data to unravel complex traits in plants. It provides prospects for the identification of genes relevant for

  2. Systems Perturbation Analysis of a Large-Scale Signal Transduction Model Reveals Potentially Influential Candidates for Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Allen, Laura; Hochfelder, Colleen; Majumder, Mahbubul; Helikar, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation in signal transduction pathways can lead to a variety of complex disorders, including cancer. Computational approaches such as network analysis are important tools to understand system dynamics as well as to identify critical components that could be further explored as therapeutic targets. Here, we performed perturbation analysis of a large-scale signal transduction model in extracellular environments that stimulate cell death, growth, motility, and quiescence. Each of the model's components was perturbed under both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations. Using 1,300 simulations under both types of perturbations across various extracellular conditions, we identified the most and least influential components based on the magnitude of their influence on the rest of the system. Based on the premise that the most influential components might serve as better drug targets, we characterized them for biological functions, housekeeping genes, essential genes, and druggable proteins. The most influential components under all environmental conditions were enriched with several biological processes. The inositol pathway was found as most influential under inactivating perturbations, whereas the kinase and small lung cancer pathways were identified as the most influential under activating perturbations. The most influential components were enriched with essential genes and druggable proteins. Moreover, known cancer drug targets were also classified in influential components based on the affected components in the network. Additionally, the systemic perturbation analysis of the model revealed a network motif of most influential components which affect each other. Furthermore, our analysis predicted novel combinations of cancer drug targets with various effects on other most influential components. We found that the combinatorial perturbation consisting of PI3K inactivation and overactivation of IP3R1 can lead to increased activity levels of apoptosis

  3. Potential involvement of rainbow trout thrombocytes in immune functions: a study using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and RT-PCR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kollner, B.; Fisher, U.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Taverne-Thiele, J.J.; Hansen, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    The functional relationship between fish and mammalian thrombocytes is relatively unknown. In this study, a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was used to investigate the functional properties of rainbow trout thrombocytes. The mAbs recognize cell-surface molecules on thrombocytes with molecular weights ranging from 17 to 160 kDa. Flow cytometric and immuno-electron microscopic analyses demonstrate that these molecules are expressed at different levels and that surface expression increased upon activation with bovine collagen. Two of these cell-surface molecules (17 and 21 kDa) were directly involved in collagen-induced aggregation of thrombocytes since aggregation was blocked upon pre-treatment with mAbs that recognize the two surface markers. Interestingly, the percentage of thrombocytes in blood increased after stimulation using different antigens. The transcriptional profile of trout thrombocytes was then examined after immuno-magnetic enrichment using the described mAbs to assess potential roles of trout thrombocytes in immune functions. Trout thrombocytes express components of the MHC class Ia pathway, IL1β, TNFα, TGFβ, the interleukin receptor common γ chain as well as CXC and CC chemokines. MHC class IIB and TNFα were expressed at low levels in resting thrombocytes. No evidence was found for the expression of TCRαβ, Ig heavy chain, CD8α or CK1 mRNA. Taken together, these results suggest that rainbow trout thrombocytes express molecules involved in activation, aggregation and genes encoding proteins, that are involved in antigen presentation and immune regulation.

  4. Reducing heterophilic antibody interference in immunoassays using single chain antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Tan, Ruimin; Fischer, Christopher J.; Victry, Kristin D.; Zangar, Richard C.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2011-12-15

    Sandwich ELISA microarrays have the potential to simultaneously quantify the levels of multiple diagnostic targets in a biological sample. However, as seen with traditional ELISA diagnostics, heterophilic antibodies (HA) in patient sera have the potential to cause interference in these assays. We demonstrate here that reducing the diagnostic capture antibody to its minimal functional unit, the variable heavy and light domains artificially connected with a short polypeptide linker (scFv), is an effective strategy for reducing the HA assay interference.

  5. Communication: Antibody stability and behavior on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bush, Derek B; Knotts, Thomas A

    2015-08-14

    Antibody microarrays have the potential to revolutionize molecular detection in scientific, medical, and other biosensor applications, but their current use is limited because of poor reliability. It is hypothesized that one reason for their poor performance results from strong antibody-surface interactions that destabilize the antibody structure and create steric interference for antigen recognition. Using a recently developed coarse-grain protein-surface model that has been parameterized against experimental data, antibody-surface interactions for two antibody orientations on two types of surfaces have been investigated. The results show that regardless of attachment geometry, antibodies tend to collapse onto hydrophobic surfaces and exhibit lower overall stability compared to antibodies on hydrophilic surfaces or in bulk solution. The results provide an unprecedented view into the dynamics of antibodies on surfaces and offer new insights into the poor performance exhibited by current antibody microarrays. PMID:26277119

  6. Radiobromination of humanized anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab using N-succinimidyl 5-bromo-3-pyridinecarboxylate, a potential label for immunoPET.

    PubMed

    Mume, Eskender; Orlova, Anna; Malmström, Per-Uno; Lundqvist, Hans; Sjöberg, Stefan; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2005-08-01

    Combining the specificity of radioimmunoscintigraphy and the high sensitivity of PET in an in vivo detection technique could improve the quality of nuclear diagnostics. Positron-emitting nuclide (76)Br (T(1/2)=16.2 h) might be a possible candidate for labeling monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and their fragments, provided that the appropriate labeling chemistry has been established. For internalizing antibodies, such as the humanized anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, radiobromine label should be residualizing, i.e., ensuring that radiocatabolites are trapped intracellularly after the proteolytic degradation of antibody. This study evaluated the chemistry of indirect radiobromination of trastuzumab using N-succinimidyl 5-(tributylstannyl)-3-pyridinecarboxylate. Literature data indicated that the use of this method provided residualizing properties for iodine and astatine labels on some antibodies. An optimized "one-pot" procedure produced an overall labeling efficiency of 45.5+/-1.2% over 15 min. The bromine label was stable under physiological and denaturing conditions. The labeled trastuzumab retained its capacity to bind specifically to HER2-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro (immunoreactivity more than 75%). However, in vitro cell test did not demonstrate that the radiobromination of trastuzumab using N-succinimidyl 5-bromo-3-pyridinecarboxylate improves cellular retention of radioactivity in comparison with the use of N-succinimidyl 4-bromobenzoate. PMID:16026708

  7. RE-186 labeled 16.88 IgM and 88BV59 IgG human antibody studies to assess potential for radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Breitz, H.; Seiler, C.; Weiden, P. ||

    1994-05-01

    Two studies with Re-186-MAG{sub 2}GABA labeled human antibodies were carried out to assess feasibility for radioimmunotherapy. Antibodies 16.88 and 88BV59 react with different epitopes of CTA 16.88, a tumor associated antigen of colorectal carcinoma. In a phase I dose escalation study, 14 patients received 60 mg/m{sup 2} 16.88 IgM MoAb. The dose of Re-186 ranged from 25 mCi/m{sup 2} to 210 mCi/m{sup 2} divided into 3 weekly infusions. In a pilot study with 88BV59, a human IgG3k MoAb, 20 mg antibody was labeled with 25 mCi/m{sup 2} Re-186 and administered to 4 patients with colon carcinoma. Tumor targeting was seen in 12 of 14 patients with 16.88 and all 4 patients with 88BV59. Retention of antibody at the tumor was longer with 88BV59. One patient developed a rash. No other acute or delayed toxicities were observed. Human anti-human antibody did not develop in any patient. The slower metabolism of the 88BV59 IgG suggests that this form of immunoconjugate merits further investigation for use in radioimmunotherapy.

  8. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ...

  9. Pr1E11, a novel anti-TROP-2 antibody isolated by adenovirus-based antibody screening, recognizes a unique epitope.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Miki; Kato, Kazunori; Nakamura, Kiminori; Shiina, Sagano; Ichikawa-Ando, Takako; Misaka, Hirofumi; Myojo, Kensuke; Nakamura, Kazuyasu; Sugimoto, Yoshiyuki; Hamada, Hirofumi

    2015-03-20

    TROP-2 is a type Ⅰ transmembrane glycoprotein that is highly expressed in various epithelial cancer cells, and its increased expression correlates with poor prognosis. Although several anti-TROP-2 antibodies have been described, they were found unsuitable for antitumor therapy use in vivo as naked antibodies. In this study, we established a novel anti-TROP-2 antibody, designated Pr1E11, from mice immunized with primary prostate cancer cells. Antibody screening was based on the infection activity of Adv-LacZ-FZ33, which displays an immunoglobulin G binding domain in the adenoviral fiber protein. We found that Pr1E11 specifically binds to TROP-2 with high affinity and recognizes diverse epithelial cancer cell lines and primary pancreatic cancer tissues. Epitope analysis using TROP-2 deletion mutants revealed that binding site of Pr1E11 is a cysteine-rich domain, a unique epitope compared with other available anti-TROP-2 antibodies. In addition, Pr1E11 exhibited low internalization activity, which may make it suitable for naked antibody therapeutics. Our results suggest that Pr1E11 may stimulate different biological activities from other anti-TROP-2 antibodies based on its unique binding epitope, and is a potential candidate for naked antibody therapeutics for various epithelial cancer treatments. PMID:25701778

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deep-Sea Ascomycetous Filamentous Fungus Cadophora malorum Mo12 from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge Reveals Its Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Rédou, Vanessa; Kumar, Abhishek; Hainaut, Matthieu; Henrissat, Bernard; Record, Eric; Barbier, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Cadophora malorum Mo12 was isolated from the Rainbow hydrothermal site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We present the draft genome sequence of this filamentous fungal strain, which has high biotechnological potentials as revealed by the presence of genes encoding biotechnologically important enzymes and genes involved in the synthesis of secondary metabolites. PMID:27389260

  11. Platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pulkrabek, S M

    1996-12-01

    The proper diagnosis of patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenias can be accomplished by using the advances made in the field of platelet serology. These techniques range from solid phase red cell adherence to sequencing platelet antigen amino acids by polymerase chain reaction. This article describes platelet antigens, the clinical tests available to detect platelet antigens and antibodies, and the value of these tests in supporting clinical diagnoses.

  12. Endogenous Antibodies for Tumor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Barrie S.; Honeyman, Joshua N.; Darcy, David G.; Smith, Peter T.; Williams, Andrew R.; Lim, Irene Isabel P.; Johnson, Linda K.; Gönen, Mithat; Simon, Joel S.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer immunology has provided diagnostic and therapeutic instruments through serum autoantibody biomarkers and exogenous monoclonal antibodies. While some endogenous antibodies are found within or surrounding transformed tissue, the extent to which this exists has not been entirely characterized. We find that in transgenic and xenograft mouse models of cancer, endogenous gamma immunoglobulin (IgG) is present at higher concentration in malignantly transformed organs compared to non-transformed organs in the same mouse or organs of cognate wild-type mice. The enrichment of endogenous antibodies within the malignant tissue provides a potential means of identifying and tracking malignant cells in vivo as they mutate and diversify. Exploiting these antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is possible through the use of agents that bind endogenous antibodies. PMID:24875800

  13. Co-expression networks revealed potential core lncRNAs in the triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ye-Huan; Dong, Si-Yang; Yao, Zhi-Han; Lv, Lin; Ma, Rui-Min; Dai, Xuan-Xuan; Wang, Jiao; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Ou-Chen

    2016-10-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive type of breast cancer with unfavorable outcome. It is urgent to explore novel biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in this malignancy. Increasing knowledge of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) significantly deepens our understanding of cancer biology. Here, we sequenced eight paired TNBC tumor tissues and non-cancerous tissues, and validated significantly differentially expressed lncRNAs. Gene ontology (GO) and pathway analysis were used to investigate the function of differentially expressed mRNAs. Further, potential core lncRNAs in TNBC were identified by co-expression networks. Kaplan-Meier analysis also indicated that breast cancer patients with lower expression level of rhabdomyosarcoma 2 associated transcript (RMST), one of the potential core lncRNAs, had worse overall survival. To the best of our knowledge, it was the first report that RMST was involved in breast cancer. Our research provided a rich resource to the research community for further investigating lncRNAs functions and identifying lncRNAs with diagnostic and therapeutic potentials in TNBC.

  14. Trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab

    PubMed Central

    Diermeier-Daucher, Simone; Ortmann, Olaf; Buchholz, Stefan; Brockhoff, Gero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab bivalently targets the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) on epithelial (tumor) cells and the T cell specific CD3 antigen, and its Fc region is selectively recognized by Fcγ type I/III receptor-positive immune cells. As a trifunctional immunoglobulin, ertumaxomab therefore not only targets Her2 on cancer cells, but also triggers immunological effector mechanisms mediated by T and accessory cells (e.g., macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells). Whether molecular effects, however, might contribute to the cellular antitumor efficiency of ertumaxomab are largely unknown. Methods: Potential molecular effects of ertumaxomab on Her2-overexpressing BT474 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells were evaluated. The dissociation constant Kd of ertumaxomab was calculated from titration curves that were recorded by flow cytometry. Treatment-induced changes in Her2 homodimerization were determined by flow cytometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements on a cell-by-cell basis. Potential activation / deactivation of Her2, ERK1/2, AKT and STAT3 were analyzed by western blotting, Immunochemistry and immunofluorescent cell staining. Results: The Kd of ertumaxomab for Her2-binding was determined at 265 nM and the ertumaxomab binding epitope was found to not overlap with that of the therapeutic anti-Her2 monoclonal antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Ertumaxomab caused an increase in Her2 phosphorylation at higher antibody concentrations, but changed neither the rate of Her2-homodimerization /-phosphorylation nor the activation state of key downstream signaling proteins analyzed. Conclusions: The unique mode of action of ertumaxomab, which relies more on activation of immune-mediated mechanisms against tumor cells compared with currently available therapeutic antibodies for breast cancer treatment, suggests that modular or sequential treatment with the trifunctional bivalent antibody might complement

  15. Principles and application of antibody libraries for infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Lim, Bee Nar; Tye, Gee Jun; Choong, Yee Siew; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Ismail, Asma; Lim, Theam Soon

    2014-12-01

    Antibodies have been used efficiently for the treatment and diagnosis of many diseases. Recombinant antibody technology allows the generation of fully human antibodies. Phage display is the gold standard for the production of human antibodies in vitro. To generate monoclonal antibodies by phage display, the generation of antibody libraries is crucial. Antibody libraries are classified according to the source where the antibody gene sequences were obtained. The most useful library for infectious diseases is the immunized library. Immunized libraries would allow better and selective enrichment of antibodies against disease antigens. The antibodies generated from these libraries can be translated for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This review focuses on the generation of immunized antibody libraries and the potential applications of the antibodies derived from these libraries.

  16. New engineered antibodies against prions

    PubMed Central

    Škrlj, Nives; Dolinar, Marko

    2014-01-01

    A number of recently developed and approved therapeutic agents based on highly specific and potent antibodies have shown the potential of antibody therapy. As the next step, antibody-based therapeutics will be bioengineered in a way that they not only bind pathogenic targets but also address other issues, including drug targeting and delivery. For antibodies that are expected to act within brain tissue, like those that are directed against the pathogenic prion protein isoform, one of the major obstacles is the blood-brain barrier which prevents efficient transfer of the antibody, even of the engineered single-chain variants. We recently demonstrated that a specific prion-specific antibody construct which was injected into the murine tail vein can be efficiently transported into brain tissue. The novelty of the work was in that the cell penetrating peptide was used as a linker connecting both specificity-determining domains of the antibody peptide, thus eliminating the need for the standard flexible linker, composed of an arrangement of three consecutive (Gly4Ser) repeats. This paves the road toward improved bioengineered antibody variants that target brain antigens. PMID:23941991

  17. Forecasting the Effects of Land Use Scenarios on Farmland Birds Reveal a Potential Mitigation of Climate Change Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Princé, Karine; Lorrillière, Romain; Barbet-Massin, Morgane; Léger, François; Jiguet, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Climate and land use changes are key drivers of current biodiversity trends, but interactions between these drivers are poorly modeled, even though they could amplify or mitigate negative impacts of climate change. Here, we attempt to predict the impacts of different agricultural change scenarios on common breeding birds within farmland included in the potential future climatic suitable areas for these species. We used the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) to integrate likely changes in species climatic suitability, based on species distribution models, and changes in area of farmland, based on the IMAGE model, inside future climatic suitable areas. We also developed six farmland cover scenarios, based on expert opinion, which cover a wide spectrum of potential changes in livestock farming and cropping patterns by 2050. We ran generalized linear mixed models to calibrate the effects of farmland cover and climate change on bird specific abundance within 386 small agricultural regions. We used model outputs to predict potential changes in bird populations on the basis of predicted changes in regional farmland cover, in area of farmland and in species climatic suitability. We then examined the species sensitivity according to their habitat requirements. A scenario based on extensification of agricultural systems (i.e., low-intensity agriculture) showed the greatest potential to reduce reverse current declines in breeding birds. To meet ecological requirements of a larger number of species, agricultural policies accounting for regional disparities and landscape structure appear more efficient than global policies uniformly implemented at national scale. Interestingly, we also found evidence that farmland cover changes can mitigate the negative effect of climate change. Here, we confirm that there is a potential for countering negative effects of climate change by adaptive management of landscape. We argue that such studies will help inform sustainable

  18. Forecasting the effects of land use scenarios on farmland birds reveal a potential mitigation of climate change impacts.

    PubMed

    Princé, Karine; Lorrillière, Romain; Barbet-Massin, Morgane; Léger, François; Jiguet, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Climate and land use changes are key drivers of current biodiversity trends, but interactions between these drivers are poorly modeled, even though they could amplify or mitigate negative impacts of climate change. Here, we attempt to predict the impacts of different agricultural change scenarios on common breeding birds within farmland included in the potential future climatic suitable areas for these species. We used the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) to integrate likely changes in species climatic suitability, based on species distribution models, and changes in area of farmland, based on the IMAGE model, inside future climatic suitable areas. We also developed six farmland cover scenarios, based on expert opinion, which cover a wide spectrum of potential changes in livestock farming and cropping patterns by 2050. We ran generalized linear mixed models to calibrate the effects of farmland cover and climate change on bird specific abundance within 386 small agricultural regions. We used model outputs to predict potential changes in bird populations on the basis of predicted changes in regional farmland cover, in area of farmland and in species climatic suitability. We then examined the species sensitivity according to their habitat requirements. A scenario based on extensification of agricultural systems (i.e., low-intensity agriculture) showed the greatest potential to reduce reverse current declines in breeding birds. To meet ecological requirements of a larger number of species, agricultural policies accounting for regional disparities and landscape structure appear more efficient than global policies uniformly implemented at national scale. Interestingly, we also found evidence that farmland cover changes can mitigate the negative effect of climate change. Here, we confirm that there is a potential for countering negative effects of climate change by adaptive management of landscape. We argue that such studies will help inform sustainable

  19. A comparison of the Caulobacter NA1000 and K31 genomes reveals extensive genome rearrangements and differences in metabolic potential

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Kurt; Brown, Theta; Watford, Tynetta; Scott, LaTia E.; Stephens, Craig; Ely, Bert

    2014-01-01

    The genus Caulobacter is found in a variety of habitats and is known for its ability to thrive in low-nutrient conditions. K31 is a novel Caulobacter isolate that has the ability to tolerate copper and chlorophenols, and can grow at 4°C with a doubling time of 40 h. K31 contains a 5.5 Mb chromosome that codes for more than 5500 proteins and two large plasmids (234 and 178 kb) that code for 438 additional proteins. A comparison of the K31 and the Caulobacter crescentus NA1000 genomes revealed extensive rearrangements of gene order, suggesting that the genomes had been randomly scrambled. However, a careful analysis revealed that the distance from the origin of replication was conserved for the majority of the genes and that many of the rearrangements involved inversions that included the origin of replication. On a finer scale, numerous small indels were observed. K31 proteins involved in essential functions shared 80–95% amino acid sequence identity with their C. crescentus homologues, while other homologue pairs tended to have lower levels of identity. In addition, the K31 chromosome contains more than 1600 genes with no homologue in NA1000. PMID:25274120

  20. Genome Analysis of the Fruiting Body-Forming Myxobacterium Chondromyces crocatus Reveals High Potential for Natural Product Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zaburannyi, Nestor; Bunk, Boyke; Maier, Josef; Overmann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the type strain of the myxobacterial genus Chondromyces, Chondromyces crocatus Cm c5. It presents one of the largest prokaryotic genomes featuring a single circular chromosome and no plasmids. Analysis revealed an enlarged set of tRNA genes, along with reduced pressure on preferred codon usage compared to that of other bacterial genomes. The large coding capacity and the plethora of encoded secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters are in line with the capability of Cm c5 to produce an arsenal of antibacterial, antifungal, and cytotoxic compounds. Known pathways of the ajudazol, chondramide, chondrochloren, crocacin, crocapeptin, and thuggacin compound families are complemented by many more natural compound biosynthetic gene clusters in the chromosome. Whole-genome comparison of the fruiting-body-forming type strain (Cm c5, DSM 14714) to an accustomed laboratory strain which has lost this ability (nonfruiting phenotype, Cm c5 fr−) revealed genetic changes in three loci. In addition to the low synteny found with the closest sequenced representative of the same family, Sorangium cellulosum, extensive genetic information duplication and broad application of eukaryotic-type signal transduction systems are hallmarks of this 11.3-Mbp prokaryotic genome. PMID:26773087

  1. Therapeutic antibodies in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Magdelaine-Beuzelin, Charlotte; Pinault, Coralie; Paintaud, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    More than a century after the first successful use of serotherapy, antibody-based therapy has been renewed by the availability of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. As in the past, current clinical experience has prompted new pharmacological questions and induced much debate among practitioners, notably in the field of ophthalmology. An examination of the history of antibodies as treatments for ocular disorders reveals interesting parallels to the modern era. The fact that a treatment administered by a systemic route could be efficacious in a local disease was not widely accepted and the “chemical” nature of antibodies was not clearly understood in the late 19th century. Clinical studies by Henry Coppez, a Belgian ophthalmologist, established in 1894 that antidiphtheric antitoxins could be used to treat conjunctival diphtheria. Nearly 20 years later, Coppez and Danis described age-related macular degeneration, a disorder which today benefits from ranibizumab therapy. The product, a locally-administered recombinant monoclonal Fab fragment, is directed against vascular endothelial growth factor A. Interestingly, its full-size counterpart, bevacizumab, which is approved for the treatment of solid tumors, has also demonstrated efficacy in age-related macular degeneration when administered either intravenously or locally, which raises new questions about antibody pharmacology and biodistribution. In order to shed some light on this debate, we recount the early history of serotherapy applied to ophthalmology, review the exact molecular differences between ranibizumab and bevacizumab, and discuss what is known about IgG and the blood-retina barrier and the possible role of FcRn, an IgG transporter. PMID:21358858

  2. Genomic analysis reveals the biotechnological and industrial potential of levan producing halophilic extremophile, Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6T.

    PubMed

    Diken, Elif; Ozer, Tugba; Arikan, Muzaffer; Emrence, Zeliha; Oner, Ebru Toksoy; Ustek, Duran; Arga, Kazim Yalcin

    2015-01-01

    Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6T is a gram negative, aerobic, and moderately halophilic bacterium, and is known to produce high levels of levan with many potential uses in foods, feeds, cosmetics, pharmaceutical and chemical industries due to its outstanding properties. Here, the whole-genome analysis was performed to gain more insight about the biological mechanisms, and the whole-genome organization of the bacterium. Industrially crucial genes, including the levansucrase, were detected and the genome-scale metabolic model of H. smyrnensis AAD6T was reconstructed. The bacterium was found to have many potential applications in biotechnology not only being a levan producer, but also because of its capacity to produce Pel exopolysaccharide, polyhydroxyalkanoates, and osmoprotectants. The genomic information presented here will not only provide additional information to enhance our understanding of the genetic and metabolic network of halophilic bacteria, but also accelerate the research on systematical design of engineering strategies for biotechnology applications. PMID:26251777

  3. Metagenomic Analyses Reveal That Energy Transfer Gene Abundances Can Predict the Syntrophic Potential of Environmental Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Oberding, Lisa; Gieg, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbon compounds can be biodegraded by anaerobic microorganisms to form methane through an energetically interdependent metabolic process known as syntrophy. The microorganisms that perform this process as well as the energy transfer mechanisms involved are difficult to study and thus are still poorly understood, especially on an environmental scale. Here, metagenomic data was analyzed for specific clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) related to key energy transfer genes thus far identified in syntrophic bacteria, and principal component analysis was used in order to determine whether potentially syntrophic environments could be distinguished using these syntroph related COGs as opposed to universally present COGs. We found that COGs related to hydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase genes were able to distinguish known syntrophic consortia and environments with the potential for syntrophy from non-syntrophic environments, indicating that these COGs could be used as a tool to identify syntrophic hydrocarbon biodegrading environments using metagenomic data. PMID:27681901

  4. Seriality of semantic and phonological processes during overt speech in Mandarin as revealed by event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuebing; Damian, Markus F; Zhang, Qingfang

    2015-05-01

    How is information transmitted across semantic and phonological levels in spoken word production? Recent evidence from speakers of Western languages such as English and Dutch suggests non-discrete transmission, but it is not clear whether this view can be generalized to other languages such as Mandarin, given potential differences in phonological encoding across languages. The present study used Mandarin speakers and combined a behavioral picture-word interference task with event-related potentials. The design factorially crossed semantic and phonological relatedness. Results showed semantic and phonological effects both in behavioral and electrophysiological measurements, with statistical additivity in latencies, and discrete time signatures (250-450 ms and 450-600 ms after picture onset for the semantic and phonological condition, respectively). Overall, results suggest that in Mandarin spoken production, information is transmitted from semantic to phonological levels in a sequential fashion. Hence, temporal signatures associated with spoken word production might differ depending on target language. PMID:25880902

  5. Metagenomic Analyses Reveal That Energy Transfer Gene Abundances Can Predict the Syntrophic Potential of Environmental Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Oberding, Lisa; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbon compounds can be biodegraded by anaerobic microorganisms to form methane through an energetically interdependent metabolic process known as syntrophy. The microorganisms that perform this process as well as the energy transfer mechanisms involved are difficult to study and thus are still poorly understood, especially on an environmental scale. Here, metagenomic data was analyzed for specific clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) related to key energy transfer genes thus far identified in syntrophic bacteria, and principal component analysis was used in order to determine whether potentially syntrophic environments could be distinguished using these syntroph related COGs as opposed to universally present COGs. We found that COGs related to hydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase genes were able to distinguish known syntrophic consortia and environments with the potential for syntrophy from non-syntrophic environments, indicating that these COGs could be used as a tool to identify syntrophic hydrocarbon biodegrading environments using metagenomic data.

  6. Metagenomic Analyses Reveal That Energy Transfer Gene Abundances Can Predict the Syntrophic Potential of Environmental Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Oberding, Lisa; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbon compounds can be biodegraded by anaerobic microorganisms to form methane through an energetically interdependent metabolic process known as syntrophy. The microorganisms that perform this process as well as the energy transfer mechanisms involved are difficult to study and thus are still poorly understood, especially on an environmental scale. Here, metagenomic data was analyzed for specific clusters of orthologous groups (COGs) related to key energy transfer genes thus far identified in syntrophic bacteria, and principal component analysis was used in order to determine whether potentially syntrophic environments could be distinguished using these syntroph related COGs as opposed to universally present COGs. We found that COGs related to hydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase genes were able to distinguish known syntrophic consortia and environments with the potential for syntrophy from non-syntrophic environments, indicating that these COGs could be used as a tool to identify syntrophic hydrocarbon biodegrading environments using metagenomic data. PMID:27681901

  7. High-Bandwidth Atomic Force Microscopy Reveals A Mechanical spike Accompanying the Action Potential in mammalian Nerve Terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzberg, Brian M.

    2008-03-01

    Information transfer from neuron to neuron within nervous systems occurs when the action potential arrives at a nerve terminal and initiates the release of a chemical messenger (neurotransmitter). In the mammalian neurohypophysis (posterior pituitary), large and rapid changes in light scattering accompany secretion of transmitter-like neuropeptides. In the mouse, these intrinsic optical signals are intimately related to the arrival of the action potential (E-wave) and the release of arginine vasopressin and oxytocin (S-wave). We have used a high bandwidth (20 kHz) atomic force microscope (AFM) to demonstrate that these light scattering signals are associated with changes in nerve terminal volume, detected as nanometer-scale movements of a cantilever positioned on top of the neurohypophysis. The most rapid mechanical response, the ``spike'', has duration comparable to that of the action potential (˜2 ms) and probably reflects an increase in terminal volume due to H2O movement associated with Na^+-influx. Elementary calculations suggest that two H2O molecules accompanying each Na^+-ion could account for the ˜0.5-1.0 å increase in the diameter of each terminal during the action potential. Distinguishable from the mechanical ``spike'', a slower mechanical event, the ``dip'', represents a decrease in nerve terminal volume, depends upon Ca^2+-entry, as well as on intra-terminal Ca^2+-transients, and appears to monitor events associated with secretion. A simple hypothesis is that this ``dip'' reflects the extrusion of the dense core granule that comprises the secretory products. These dynamic high bandwidth AFM recordings are the first to monitor mechanical events in nervous systems and may provide novel insights into the mechanism(s) by which excitation is coupled to secretion at nerve terminals.

  8. Potential contaminants at a dredged spoil placement site, Charles City County, Virginia, as revealed by sequential extraction

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianwu; Whittecar, G Richard; Johannesson, Karen H; Daniels, W Lee

    2004-01-01

    Backfills of dredged sediments onto a former sand and gravel mine site in Charles City County, VA may have the potential to contaminate local groundwater. To evaluate the mobility of trace elements and to identify the potential contaminants from the dredged sediments, a sequential extraction scheme was used to partition trace elements associated with the sediments from the local aquifer and the dredged sediments into five fractions: exchangeable, acidic, reducible, oxidizable, and residual phases. Sequential extractions indicate that, for most of the trace elements examined, the residual phases account for the largest proportion of the total concentrations, and their total extractable fractions are mainly from reducible and oxidizable phases. Only Cd, Pb, and Zn have an appreciable extractable proportion from the acidic phase in the filled dredged sediments. Our groundwater monitoring data suggest that the dredged sediments are mainly subject to a decrease in pH and a series of oxidation reactions, when exposed to the atmosphere. Because the trace elements released by carbonate dissolution and the oxidation (e.g., organic matter degradation, iron sulfide and, ammonia oxidation) are subsequently immobilized by sorption to iron, manganese, and aluminum oxides, no potential contaminants to local groundwater are expected by addition of the dredged sediments to this site.

  9. DNA methylome profiling of maternal peripheral blood and placentas reveal potential fetal DNA markers for non-invasive prenatal testing.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuqian; Zhang, Junyu; Li, Qiaoli; Zhou, Xinyao; Wang, Teng; Xu, Mingqing; Xia, Shihui; Xing, Qinghe; Wang, Lei; He, Lin; Zhao, Xinzhi

    2014-09-01

    Utilizing epigenetic (DNA methylation) differences to differentiate between maternal peripheral blood (PBL) and fetal (placental) DNA has been a promising strategy for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). However, the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) have yet to be fully ascertained. In the present study, we performed genome-wide comparative methylome analysis between maternal PBL and placental DNA from pregnancies of first trimester by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation-sequencing (MeDIP-Seq) and Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip assays. A total of 36 931 DMRs and 45 804 differentially methylated sites (DMSs) covering the whole genome, exclusive of the Y chromosome, were identified via MeDIP-Seq and Infinium 450k array, respectively, of which 3759 sites in 2188 regions were confirmed by both methods. Not only did we find the previously reported potential fetal DNA markers in our identified DMRs/DMSs but also we verified fully the identified DMRs/DMSs in the validation round by MassARRAY EpiTYPER. The screened potential fetal DNA markers may be used for NIPT on aneuploidies and other chromosomal diseases, such as cri du chat syndrome and velo-cardio-facial syndrome. In addition, these potential markers may have application in the early diagnosis of placental dysfunction, such as pre-eclampsia. PMID:24996894

  10. Signature of a Nonharmonic Potential as Revealed from a Consistent Shape and Fluctuation Analysis of an Adherent Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Daniel; Monzel, Cornelia; Bihr, Timo; Merkel, Rudolf; Seifert, Udo; Sengupta, Kheya; Smith, Ana-Sunčana

    2014-04-01

    The interaction of fluid membranes with a scaffold, which can be a planar surface or a more complex structure, is intrinsic to a number of systems from artificial supported bilayers and vesicles to cellular membranes. In principle, these interactions can be either discrete and protein mediated, or continuous. In the latter case, they emerge from ubiquitous intrinsic surface interaction potentials as well as nature-designed steric contributions of the fluctuating membrane or from the polymers of the glycocalyx. Despite the fact that these nonspecific potentials are omnipresent, their description has been a major challenge from experimental and theoretical points of view. Here, we show that a full understanding of the implications of the continuous interactions can be achieved only by expanding the standard superposition models commonly used to treat these types of systems, beyond the usual harmonic level of description. Supported by this expanded theoretical framework, we present three independent, yet mutually consistent, experimental approaches to measure the interaction potential strength and the membrane tension. Upon explicitly taking into account the nature of shot noise as well as the nature of finite experimental resolution, excellent agreement with the augmented theory is obtained, which finally provides a coherent view of the behavior of the membrane in the vicinity of a scaffold.

  11. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  12. Discovery and Characterization of Novel Allosteric Potentiators of M1 Muscarinic Receptors Reveals Multiple Modes of Activity

    PubMed Central

    Marlo, Joy E.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Days, Emily L.; Bridges, Thomas M.; Xiang, Yun; Rodriguez, Alice L.; Shirey, Jana K.; Brady, Ashley E.; Nalywajko, Tasha; Luo, Qingwei; Austin, Cheryl A.; Williams, Michael Baxter; Kim, Kwangho; Williams, Richard; Orton, Darren; Brown, H. Alex; Lindsley, Craig W.; Weaver, C. David; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Activators of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) may provide novel treatments for schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Unfortunately, the development of M1-active compounds has resulted in nonselective activation of the highly related M2 to M5 mAChR subtypes, which results in dose-limiting side effects. Using a functional screening approach, we identified several novel ligands that potentiated agonist activation of M1 with low micromolar potencies and induced 5-fold or greater leftward shifts of the acetylcholine (ACh) concentration-response curve. These ligands did not compete for binding at the ACh binding site, indicating that they modulate receptor activity by binding to allosteric sites. The two most selective compounds, cyclopentyl 1,6-dimethyl-4-(6-nitrobenzo[d][1,3]-dioxol-5-yl)-2-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carboxylate (VU0090157) and (E)-2-(4-ethoxyphenylamino)-N′-((2-hydroxynaphthalen-1-yl)methylene)acetohydrazide (VU0029767), induced progressive shifts in ACh affinity at M1 that were consistent with their effects in a functional assay, suggesting that the mechanism for enhancement of M1 activity by these compounds is by increasing agonist affinity. These compounds were strikingly different, however, in their ability to potentiate responses at a mutant M1 receptor with decreased affinity for ACh and in their ability to affect responses of the allosteric M1 agonist, 1-[1′-(2-tolyl)-1,4′-bipiperidin-4-yl]-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one. Furthermore, these two compounds were distinct in their abilities to potentiate M1-mediated activation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis and phospholipase D. The discovery of multiple structurally distinct positive allosteric modulators of M1 is an exciting advance in establishing the potential of allosteric modulators for selective activation of this receptor. These data also suggest that structurally diverse M1 potentiators may act by distinct mechanisms and differentially regulate receptor

  13. A Comprehensive Analysis of MicroProteins Reveals Their Potentially Widespread Mechanism of Transcriptional Regulation1[W

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Enrico; de Klein, Niek; Nam, Hye-In; Kim, Jung-Gun; Pham, Kimberly; Fiume, Elisa; Mudgett, Mary Beth; Rhee, Seung Yon

    2014-01-01

    Truncated transcription factor-like proteins called microProteins (miPs) can modulate transcription factor activities, thereby increasing transcriptional regulatory complexity. To understand their prevalence, evolution, and function, we predicted over 400 genes that encode putative miPs from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using a bioinformatics pipeline and validated two novel miPs involved in flowering time and response to abiotic and biotic stress. We provide an evolutionary perspective for a class of miPs targeting homeodomain transcription factors in plants and metazoans. We identify domain loss as one mechanism of miP evolution and suggest the possible roles of miPs on the evolution of their target transcription factors. Overall, we reveal a prominent layer of transcriptional regulation by miPs, show pervasiveness of such proteins both within and across genomes, and provide a framework for studying their function and evolution. PMID:24616380

  14. Blocking FGF2 with a new specific monoclonal antibody impairs angiogenesis and experimental metastatic melanoma, suggesting a potential role in adjuvant settings.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Rodrigo Barbosa; Parise, Carolina Bellini; Souza, Carolina Rosal Teixeira; Braggion, Camila; Quintilio, Wagner; Moro, Ana Maria; Navarro Marques, Fabio Luiz; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto; Chammas, Roger; de Moraes, Jane Zveiter

    2016-02-28

    Compelling evidence suggests that fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), overexpressed in melanomas, plays an important role in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic use of a new anti-FGF2 monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3F12E7, using for that the B16-F10 melanoma model. The FGF2 neutralizing effect of this antibody was certified by in vitro assays, which allowed the further track of its possible in vivo application. 3F12E7 mAb could be retained in B16-F10 tumors, as shown by antibody low-pH elution and nuclear medicine studies, and also led to reduction in number and size of metastatic foci in lungs, when treatment starts one day after intravenous injection of B16-F10 cells. Such data were accompanied by decreased CD34(+) tumor vascular density and impaired subcutaneous tumor outgrowth. Treatments starting one week after melanoma cell intravenous injection did not reduce tumor burden, remaining the therapeutic effectiveness restricted to early-adopted regimens. Altogether, the presented anti-FGF2 3F12E7 mAb stands as a promising agent to treat metastatic melanoma tumors in adjuvant settings. PMID:26655277

  15. Murine carcinoma expressing carcinoembryonic antigen-like protein is restricted by antibody against neem leaf glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Das, Arnab; Barik, Subhasis; Bose, Anamika; Roy, Soumyabrata; Biswas, Jaydip; Baral, Rathindranath; Pal, Smarajit

    2014-11-01

    We have generated a polyclonal antibody against a novel immunomodulator, neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP) that can react to a specific 47 kDa subunit of NLGP. Generated anti-NLGP antibody (primarily IgG2a) was tested for its anti-tumor activity in murine carcinoma (EC, CT-26), sarcoma (S180) and melanoma (B16Mel) tumor models. Surprisingly, tumor growth restriction was only observed in CT-26 carcinoma models, without any alteration in other tumor systems. Comparative examination of antigenicity between four different tumor models revealed high expression of CEA-like protein on the surface of CT-26 tumors. Subsequent examination of the cross-reactivity of anti-NLGP antibody with purified or cell bound CEA revealed prominent recognition of CEA by anti-NLGP antibody, as detected by ELISA, Western Blotting and immunohistochemistry. This recognition seems to be responsible for anti-tumor function of anti-NLGP antibody only on CEA-like protein expressing CT-26 tumor models, as confirmed by ADCC reaction in CEA(+) tumor systems where dependency to anti-NLGP antibody is equivalent to anti-CEA antibody. Obtained result with enormous therapeutic potential for CEA(+) tumors may be explained in view of the epitope spreading concept, however, further investigation is crucial.

  16. The functional potential of high Arctic permafrost revealed by metagenomic sequencing, qPCR and microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Yergeau, Etienne; Hogues, Hervé; Whyte, Lyle G; Greer, Charles W

    2010-09-01

    The fate of the carbon stocked in permafrost following global warming and permafrost thaw is of major concern in view of the potential for increased CH(4) and CO(2) emissions from these soils. Complex carbon compound degradation and greenhouse gas emissions are due to soil microbial communities, but no comprehensive study has yet addressed their composition and functional potential in permafrost. Here, a 2-m deep permafrost sample and its overlying active layer soil were subjected to metagenomic sequencing, quantitative PCR (qPCR) and microarray analyses. The active layer soil and the 2-m permafrost microbial community structures were very similar, with Actinobacteria being the dominant phylum. The two samples also possessed a highly similar spectrum of functional genes, especially when compared with other already published metagenomes. Key genes related to methane generation, methane oxidation and organic matter degradation were highly diverse for both samples in the metagenomic libraries and some (for example, pmoA) showed relatively high abundance in qPCR assays. Genes related to nitrogen fixation and ammonia oxidation, which could have important roles following climatic change in these nitrogen-limited environments, showed low diversity but high abundance. The 2-m permafrost showed lower abundance and diversity for all the assessed genes and taxa. Experimental biases were also evaluated using qPCR and showed that the whole-community genome amplification technique used caused representational biases in the metagenomic libraries by increasing the abundance of Bacteroidetes and decreasing the abundance of Actinobacteria. This study describes for the first time the detailed functional potential of permafrost-affected soils.

  17. Methods of identification employing antibody profiles

    DOEpatents

    Francoeur, Ann-Michele

    1993-12-14

    An identification method, applicable to the identification of animals or inanimate objects, is described. The method takes advantage of the set of individual-specific antibodies that are part of the unique antibody repertoire present in animals, by reacting an effective amount of such antibodies w