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Sample records for antibody affinity maturation

  1. Visualizing Antibody Affinity Maturation in Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tas, Jeroen M.J.; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T.; Mano, Yasuko M.; Chen, Casie S.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC, and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with non-immunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  2. Affinity maturation of antibodies requires integrity of the adult thymus.

    PubMed

    AbuAttieh, Mouhammed; Bender, Diane; Liu, Esther; Wettstein, Peter; Platt, Jeffrey L; Cascalho, Marilia

    2012-02-01

    The generation of B-cell responses to proteins requires a functional thymus to produce CD4(+) T cells which helps in the activation and differentiation of B cells. Because the mature T-cell repertoire has abundant cells with the helper phenotype, one might predict that in mature individuals, the generation of B-cell memory would proceed independently of the thymus. Contrary to that prediction, we show here that the removal of the thymus after the establishment of the T-cell compartment or sham surgery without removal of the thymus impairs the affinity maturation of antibodies. Because removal or manipulation of the thymus did not decrease the frequency of mutation of the Ig variable heavy chain exons encoding antigen-specific antibodies, we conclude that the thymus controls affinity maturation of antibodies in the mature individual by facilitating the selection of B cells with high-affinity antibodies.

  3. Antibody Affinity Maturation in Fishes—Our Current Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Magor, Brad G.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been believed that fish lack antibody affinity maturation, in part because they were thought to lack germinal centers. Recent research done on sharks and bony fishes indicates that these early vertebrates are able to affinity mature their antibodies. This article reviews the functionality of the fish homologue of the immunoglobulin (Ig) mutator enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). We also consider the protein and molecular evidence for Ig somatic hypermutation and antibody affinity maturation. In the context of recent evidence for a putative proto-germinal center in fishes we propose some possible reasons that observed affinity maturation in fishes often seems lacking and propose future work that might shed further light on this process in fishes. PMID:26264036

  4. Manipulating the selection forces during affinity maturation to generate cross-reactive HIV antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shenshen; Mata-Fink, Jordi; Kriegsman, Barry; Hanson, Melissa; Irvine, Darrell J.; Eisen, Herman N.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wittrup, K. Dane; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Generation of potent antibodies by a mutation-selection process called affinity maturation is a key component of effective immune responses. Antibodies that protect against highly mutable pathogens must neutralize diverse strains. Developing effective immunization strategies to drive their evolution requires understanding how affinity maturation happens in an enviroment where variants of the same antigen are present. We present an in silico model of affinity maturation driven by antigen variants which reveals that induction of cross-reactive antibodies often occurs with low probability because conflicting selection forces, imposed by different antigen variants, can frustrate affinity maturation. We describe how variables such as temporal pattern of antigen administration influence the outcome of this frustrated evolutionary process. Our calculations predict, and experiments in mice with variant gp120 constructs of the HIV envelope protein confirm, that sequential immunization with antigen variants is preferred over a cocktail for induction of cross-reactive antibodies focused on the shared CD4 binding site epitope. PMID:25662010

  5. Structure-based affinity maturation of a chimeric anti-ricin antibody C4C13.

    PubMed

    Luo, Longlong; Luo, Qun; Guo, Leiming; Lv, Ming; Lin, Zhou; Geng, Jing; Li, Xinying; Li, Yan; Shen, Beifen; Qiao, Chunxia; Feng, Jiannan

    2014-01-01

    Ricin is a highly lethal toxin. Anti-ricin chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) C4C13 was prepared in our lab; however, its binding affinity was much weaker than that of the parent antibody 4C13. In this study, based on the computer-guided homology modeling and conformational optimization methods, the 3-D structure of C4C13 variable regions Fv was constructed and optimized. Using molecular docking and dynamics simulation methods, the 3-D complex structure of ricin and C4C13 Fv was obtained. Considering the orientation property, surface electrostatic distribution, residues chemical and physical character and intermolecular hydrogen bond, the binding mode and key residues were predicted. According to C4C13 Fv fragment and ricin complementary binding surface, electrostatic attraction periphery and van der Waals interaction interface, three mutants (i.e., M1 (N(H102)F, W(H103)Y); M2 (W(H103)Y) and M3 (R(L90)G)) were designed, in which M1 and M2 were predicted to possess higher antigen-binding activity than C4C13, while M3 was weaker. The relative affinity assays by ELISA showed that M1 and M2 mutations had higher affinity (9.6 and 18.3 nmol/L) than C4C13 (130 nmol/L) and M3 had weaker affinity (234.5 nmol/L) than C4C13. The results showed that the modeling complex structure of the antigen (ricin) and antibody (C4C13) is reasonable. Our work offered affinity maturated antibodies by site mutations, which were beneficial for valuable anti-ricin antibody design and preparation in future.

  6. Antibody affinity maturation through combining display of two-chain paired antibody and precision flow cytometric sorting.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuang; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Haifeng; Zhao, Yun; Lin, Yan; Ye, Chen; Fang, Xiangdong; Hang, Haiying

    2016-07-01

    Recombination of antibody light and heavy chain libraries greatly increases the size of a two-chain paired antibody library, thus easing the construction of large antibody libraries. Here, light and heavy chain variable domains paired by a coiled coil were applied to a bacterial inner membrane display system. However, the probability of the correct pairing of light and heavy chains through random recombination after each round of flow cytometric sorting and cloning was very low in the presence of mostly unmatched light and heavy chain genes, resulting in inefficient enrichment; a target antibody clone in the ratio of 1:100,000 negative control spheroplasts was unable to be enriched by six rounds of sorting and cloning by a conventional sorting strategy (sorting the top 1 %). By just sorting the top 0.000025 % of spheroplasts, we succeeded in enriching the target antibody clone mixed with negative control spheroplasts in a ratio of 1:10(8) by just one round of sorting and cloning. Furthermore, using this gating strategy, we efficiently enriched for an antibody clone with an affinity slightly better than the parent antibody clone from mixed spheroplasts which were present in the ratio of 1 better affinity clone to 10 parent clones to 10(6) negative control clones after just two rounds of sorting and cloning, suggesting that this gating strategy is highly sensitive in distinguishing between clones with a small difference in affinity and also enriching for clones with a higher affinity. Taken together, the combination of the display of a two-chain paired antibody library and the use of stringent gating has significantly increased the efficiency of the antibody maturation system.

  7. Low antigen dose favours selection of somatic mutants with hallmarks of antibody affinity maturation.

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, A; Milstein, C

    1998-01-01

    The immunization schedule is critical for the derivation of high-affinity antibodies, low antigen dose being particularly favourable for the development of a more efficient memory response. To analyse the molecular events underpinning this preference, we analysed the early maturation of the response to the hapten 2-phenyloxazolone (phOx) using low and high doses of immunogen. The phOx response is initially dominated by antibodies expressing the VkOx1-Jk5 light chain and the hallmark of the early stages of maturation is the substitution of His 34 by Asn or Gln increasing affinity 10- or eightfold, respectively, and of Tyr 36 by Phe. High-affinity antibodies express mutations at both sites. We cloned and sequenced VkOx1-Jk5 light chains from antigen-specific B cells taken 14 and 21 days after immunization with high and low antigen doses. We found that overall, the derived sequences were more mutated both at longer times and at higher dose. At day 14, His 34 was more frequently mutated at the higher than at the lower dose, while at day 21 the reverse was true. On the other hand, the His 34/Tyr 36 mutation pair was more frequent at low than high doses at both 14 and 21 days. Furthermore, at both times, the low immunization protocol yielded double mutants in cells with a lower mutation background. It appears therefore that while the higher dose may favour the acquisition of individual critical mutations, low-dose immunization favours the selection of a more focused mutational pattern, whereby advantageous mutations are associated with a low mutational background. Images Figure 1 PMID:9616362

  8. Deficient for endoplasmic reticulum calcium sensors Stim1 and Stim2 affects aberrant antibody affinity maturation in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xuhua; Zhang, Jianfeng; Han, Yue; Luan, Chao; Hu, Yu; Hao, Zhimin; Chen, Min

    2016-01-01

    Antigen specific B cells undergo a process termed affinity maturation in the germinal centers of secondary lymphoid organs where B cells with high affinity receptors are selected to mature into antibody-producing cells or to the memory B cell pool. It is known that B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling plays pivotal role in this selection process. Calcium influx is an essential component of BCR signaling. The current report is to determine the effect of calcium influx on antibody affinity maturation. In our studies, mice deficient for both endoplasmic reticulum calciumsensor Stim1 and Stim2 was immunized with T-cell dependent and independent antigens. Antibody affinity was measured by ELISA. We demonstrated that Stim1 &Stim2 deficient B cells exhibit accelerated pace of affinity maturation compared to wild type controls while the overall antibody production was not dramatically impaired to T-independent antigen immunization. In conclusion, calcium influx plays an important role in antibody affinity maturation in humoral immune responses. The knowledge can be used in manipulate humoral immune response for the design of effective vaccines. PMID:27572320

  9. Strategy for affinity maturation of an antibody with high evolvability to (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl hapten.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Koji; Shimizu, Takeyuki; Murakami, Akikazu; Kono, Ryo; Nakagawa, Masatoshi; Sagawa, Takuma; Yamato, Ichiro; Azuma, Takachika

    2007-03-01

    In order to quantitate the contribution of amino acid replacements to an increase in affinity during affinity maturation, we measured thermodynamic parameters of the antigen-antibody interaction for a group of anti-(4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl monoclonal antibodies whose differences in amino acid sequences had arisen only from somatic hypermutation. We prepared a common ancestor and hypothetical intermediate clones that might occur on the affinity maturation pathway, by employing site-directed mutagenesis. Isothermal calorimetric titration of the antigen-antibody reaction revealed that antibody evolution proceeds in two steps. The first step is driven by a decrease in enthalpy, in which two amino acid replacements in the VL region play an essential role. Further accumulation of amino acid replacements in VH and VL regions during the second step induce a progressive increase in affinity, which is driven by an increase in entropy, which has a cooperative mutational effect.

  10. Efficient affinity maturation of antibody variable domains requires co-selection of compensatory mutations to maintain thermodynamic stability

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Mark C.; Li, Lijuan; Garde, Shekhar; Wilen, Rebecca; Tessier, Peter M.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of antibodies to accumulate affinity-enhancing mutations in their complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) without compromising thermodynamic stability is critical to their natural function. However, it is unclear if affinity mutations in the hypervariable CDRs generally impact antibody stability and to what extent additional compensatory mutations are required to maintain stability during affinity maturation. Here we have experimentally and computationally evaluated the functional contributions of mutations acquired by a human variable (VH) domain that was evolved using strong selections for enhanced stability and affinity for the Alzheimer’s Aβ42 peptide. Interestingly, half of the key affinity mutations in the CDRs were destabilizing. Moreover, the destabilizing effects of these mutations were compensated for by a subset of the affinity mutations that were also stabilizing. Our findings demonstrate that the accumulation of both affinity and stability mutations is necessary to maintain thermodynamic stability during extensive mutagenesis and affinity maturation in vitro, which is similar to findings for natural antibodies that are subjected to somatic hypermutation in vivo. These findings for diverse antibodies and antibody fragments specific for unrelated antigens suggest that the formation of the antigen-binding site is generally a destabilizing process and that co-enrichment for compensatory mutations is critical for maintaining thermodynamic stability. PMID:28349921

  11. Limits for antibody affinity maturation and repertoire diversification in hypervaccinated humans.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Tine Rugh; Jensen, Allan; Haurum, John S; Andersen, Peter S

    2011-10-15

    The immune system is known to generate a diverse panel of high-affinity Abs by adaptively improving the recognition of pathogens during ongoing immune responses. In this study, we report the biological limits for Ag-driven affinity maturation and repertoire diversification by analyzing Ab repertoires in two adult volunteers after each of three consecutive booster vaccinations with tetanus toxoid. Maturation of on-rates and off-rates occurred independently, indicating a kinetically controlled affinity maturation process. The third vaccination induced no significant changes in the distribution of somatic mutations and binding rate constants implying that the limits for affinity maturation and repertoire diversification had been reached. These fully matured Ab repertoires remained similar in size, genetically diverse, and dynamic. Somatic mutations and kinetic rate constants showed normal and log-normal distribution profiles, respectively. Mean values can therefore be considered as biological constants defining the observed boundaries. At physiological temperature, affinity maturation peaked at k(on) = 1.6 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and k(off) = 1.7 × 10(-4) s(-1) leading to a maximum mean affinity of K(D) = 1.0 × 10(-9) M. At ambient temperature, the average affinity increased to K(D) = 3.4 × 10(-10) M mainly due to slower off-rates. This experimentally determined set of constants can be used as a benchmark for analysis of the maturation level of human Abs and Ab responses.

  12. Antibody Fragments for On-Site Testing of Cannabinoids Generated via in Vitro Affinity Maturation.

    PubMed

    Morita, Izumi; Oyama, Hiroyuki; Yasuo, Mayumi; Matsuda, Kazuhisa; Katagi, Kengo; Ito, Aya; Tatsuda, Hiroka; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Norihiro

    2017-01-01

    Law enforcement against illicit use of cannabis and related substances requires rapid, feasible, and reliable tools for on-site testing of cannabinoids. Notably, methods based on cannabinoid-specific antibodies enable efficient screening of multiple specimens. Antibody engineering may accelerate development of modern and robust testing systems. Here, we used in vitro affinity maturation to generate a single-chain Fv fragment (scFv) that recognizes with high affinity the psychoactive cannabinoid, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). A mouse monoclonal antibody against THC, Ab-THC#33, with Ka 6.2×10(7) M(-1) (as Fab fragment) was established by the hybridoma technique. Then, a "wild-type" scFv (wt-scFv) with Ka, 1.1×10(7) M(-1) was prepared by bacterial expression of a fusion gene combining the VH and VL genes for Ab-THC#33. Subsequently, random point mutations in VH and VL were generated separately, and the resulting products were assembled into mutant scFv genes, which were then phage-displayed. Repeated panning identified a mutant scFv (scFv#m1-36) with 10-fold enhanced affinity (Ka 1.1×10(8) M(-1)) for THC, in which only a single conservative substitution (Ser50Thr) was present at the N-terminus of the VH-complementarity-determining region 2 (CDR2) sequence. In competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the mutant scFv generated dose-response curves with midpoint 0.27 ng/assay THC, which was 3-fold lower than that of wt-scFv. Even higher reactivity with a major THC metabolite, 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, indicated that the mutant scFv will be useful for testing not only THC in confiscated materials, but also the metabolite in urine. Indeed, the antibody fragment is potentially suitable for use in advanced on-site testing platforms for cannabinoids.

  13. Affinity maturation of a broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody that prevents acute hepatitis C virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Wang, Yong; Lau, Patrick; Lund, Garry; Rangarajan, Sneha; Fauvelle, Catherine; Liao, Grant C; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Warfield, Kelly L; Aman, M Javad; Pierce, Brian G; Fuerst, Thomas R; Bailey, Justin R; Baumert, Thomas F; Mariuzza, Roy A; Kneteman, Norman M; Foung, Steven K H

    2016-12-01

    Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have led to a high cure rate in treated patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but this still leaves a large number of treatment failures secondary to the emergence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs). To increase the barrier to resistance, a complementary strategy is to use neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) to prevent acute infection. However, earlier efforts with the selected antibodies led to RAVs in animal and clinical studies. Therefore, we identified an HMAb that is less likely to elicit RAVs for affinity maturation to increase potency and, more important, breadth of protection. Selected matured antibodies show improved affinity and neutralization against a panel of diverse HCV isolates. Structural and modeling studies reveal that the affinity-matured HMAb mediates virus neutralization, in part, by inducing conformational change to the targeted epitope, and that the maturated light chain is responsible for the improved affinity and breadth of protection. A matured HMAb protected humanized mice when challenged with an infectious HCV human serum inoculum for a prolonged period. However, a single mouse experienced breakthrough infection after 63 days when the serum HMAb concentration dropped by several logs; sequence analysis revealed no viral escape mutation.

  14. Affinity enhancement of an in vivo matured therapeutic antibody using structure-based computational design.

    PubMed

    Clark, Louis A; Boriack-Sjodin, P Ann; Eldredge, John; Fitch, Christopher; Friedman, Bethany; Hanf, Karl J M; Jarpe, Matthew; Liparoto, Stefano F; Li, You; Lugovskoy, Alexey; Miller, Stephan; Rushe, Mia; Sherman, Woody; Simon, Kenneth; Van Vlijmen, Herman

    2006-05-01

    Improving the affinity of a high-affinity protein-protein interaction is a challenging problem that has practical applications in the development of therapeutic biomolecules. We used a combination of structure-based computational methods to optimize the binding affinity of an antibody fragment to the I-domain of the integrin VLA1. Despite the already high affinity of the antibody (Kd approximately 7 nM) and the moderate resolution (2.8 A) of the starting crystal structure, the affinity was increased by an order of magnitude primarily through a decrease in the dissociation rate. We determined the crystal structure of a high-affinity quadruple mutant complex at 2.2 A. The structure shows that the design makes the predicted contacts. Structural evidence and mutagenesis experiments that probe a hydrogen bond network illustrate the importance of satisfying hydrogen bonding requirements while seeking higher-affinity mutations. The large and diverse set of interface mutations allowed refinement of the mutant binding affinity prediction protocol and improvement of the single-mutant success rate. Our results indicate that structure-based computational design can be successfully applied to further improve the binding of high-affinity antibodies.

  15. Generation of high-affinity fully human anti-interleukin-8 antibodies from its cDNA by two-hybrid screening and affinity maturation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling; Azam, Mark; Lin, Yu-Huei; Sheridan, James; Wei, Shuanghong; Gupta, Gigi; Singh, Rakesh K; Pauling, Michelle H; Chu, Waihei; Tran, Antares; Yu, Nai-Xuan; Hu, Jiefeng; Wang, Wei; Long, Hao; Xiang, Dong; Zhu, Li; Hua, Shao-Bing

    2010-10-01

    We have developed a technology for rapidly generating novel and fully human antibodies by simply using the antigen DNA. A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was constructed in a yeast two-hybrid vector with high complexity. After cloning cDNA encoding the mature sequence of human interleukin-8 (hIL8) into the yeast two-hybrid system vector, we have screened the human scFv antibody library and obtained three distinct scFv clones that could specifically bind to hIL8. One clone was chosen for further improvement by a novel affinity maturation process using the error-prone PCR of the scFv sequence followed by additional rounds of yeast two-hybrid screening. The scFv antibodies of both primary and affinity-matured scFv clones were expressed in E. coli. All purified scFvs showed specific binding to hIL8 in reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation and ELISA assays. All scFvs, as well as a fully human IgG antibody converted from one of the scFv clones and expressed in the mammalian cells, were able to effectively inhibit hIL8 in neutrophil chemotaxis assays. The technology described can generate fully human antibodies with high efficiency and low cost.

  16. Evidence that TSH Receptor A-Subunit Multimers, Not Monomers, Drive Antibody Affinity Maturation in Graves' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aliesky, Holly A.; Chen, Chun-Rong; McLachlan, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The TSH receptor (TSHR) A-subunit shed from the cell surface contributes to the induction and/or affinity maturation of pathogenic TSHR autoantibodies in Graves' disease. Objective: This study aimed to determine whether the quaternary structure (multimerization) of shed A-subunits influences pathogenic TSHR autoantibody generation. Design: The isolated TSHR A-subunit generated by transfected mammalian cells exists in two forms; one (active) is recognized only by Graves' TSHR autoantibodies, the second (inactive) is recognized only by mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3BD10. Recent evidence suggests that both Graves' TSHR autoantibodies and mAb 3BD10 recognize the A-subunit monomer. Therefore, if the A-subunit monomer is an immunogen, Graves' sera should have antibodies to both active and inactive A-subunits. Conversely, restriction of TSHR autoantibodies to active A-subunits would be evidence of a role for shed A-subunit multimers, not monomers, in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease. Therefore, we tested a panel of Graves' sera for their relative recognition of active and inactive A-subunits. Results: Of 34 sera from unselected Graves' patients, 28 were unequivocally positive in a clinical TSH binding inhibition assay. None of the latter sera, as well as 8/9 sera from control individuals, recognized inactive A-subunits on ELISA. In contrast to Graves' sera, antibodies induced in mice, not by shedding from the TSHR holoreceptor, but by immunization with adenovirus expressing the free human A-subunit, were directed to both the active and inactive A-subunit forms. Conclusions: The present study supports the concept that pathogenic TSHR autoantibody affinity maturation in Graves' disease is driven by A-subunit multimers, not monomers. PMID:25856215

  17. Yeast surface display for antibody isolation: library construction, library screening, and affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Van Deventer, James A; Wittrup, Karl Dane

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies play key roles as reagents, diagnostics, and therapeutics in numerous biological and biomedical research settings. Although many antibodies are commercially available, oftentimes, specific applications require the development of antibodies with customized properties. Yeast surface display is a robust, versatile, and quantitative method for generating these antibodies and is accessible to single-investigator laboratories. This protocol details the key aspects of yeast surface display library construction and screening.

  18. Immunoglobulin gene insertions and deletions in the affinity maturation of HIV-1 broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Thomas B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S Munir; Bhaskarabhatla, Rekha; Zhang, Ruijun; Yandava, Chandri; Stewart, Shelley; Anasti, Kara; Kelsoe, Garnett; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Stolarchuk, Christina; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Morris, Lynn; Karim, Salim S Abdool; Cohen, Myron S; Walter, Emmanuel; Moody, M Anthony; Wu, Xueling; Altae-Tran, Han R; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kwong, Peter D; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Mascola, John R; Haynes, Barton F

    2014-09-10

    Induction of HIV-1 broad neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a goal of HIV-1 vaccine development but has remained challenging partially due to unusual traits of bnAbs, including high somatic hypermutation (SHM) frequencies and in-frame insertions and deletions (indels). Here we examined the propensity and functional requirement for indels within HIV-1 bnAbs. High-throughput sequencing of the immunoglobulin (Ig) VHDJH genes in HIV-1 infected and uninfected individuals revealed that the indel frequency was elevated among HIV-1-infected subjects, with no unique properties attributable to bnAb-producing individuals. This increased indel occurrence depended only on the frequency of SHM point mutations. Indel-encoded regions were generally proximal to antigen binding sites. Additionally, reconstruction of a HIV-1 CD4-binding site bnAb clonal lineage revealed that a large compound VHDJH indel was required for bnAb activity. Thus, vaccine development should focus on designing regimens targeted at sustained activation of bnAb lineages to achieve the required SHM and indel events.

  19. In vitro improvement of a shark IgNAR antibody by Qbeta replicase mutation and ribosome display mimics in vivo affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Kopsidas, George; Roberts, Anthony S; Coia, Gregory; Streltsov, Victor A; Nuttall, Stewart D

    2006-11-15

    We have employed a novel mutagenesis system, which utilizes an error-prone RNA dependent RNA polymerase from Qbeta bacteriophage, to create a diverse library of single domain antibody fragments based on the shark IgNAR antibody isotype. Coupling of these randomly mutated mRNA templates directly to the translating ribosome allowed in vitro selection of affinity matured variants showing enhanced binding to target, the apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) from Plasmodium falciparum. One mutation mapping to the IgNAR CDR1 loop was not readily additive to other changes, a result explained by structural analysis of aromatic interactions linking the CDR1, CDR3, and Ig framework regions. This combination appeared also to be counter-selected in experiments, suggesting that in vitro affinity maturation is additionally capable of discriminating against incorrectly produced protein variants. Interestingly, a further mutation was directed to a position in the IgNAR heavy loop 4 which is also specifically targeted during the in vivo shark response to antigen, providing a correlation between natural processes and laboratory-based affinity maturation systems.

  20. Long-term antibody synthesis in vitro. VI. Anti-allotype sera as probes of clonal products in affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Conway de Macario, E; Macario, A J; Tosi, R M; Celada, F; Landucci-Tosi, S

    1978-08-01

    A new experimental system is described for measuring the allotypic product of rabbit B cells during long-lasting in vitro antibody responses. The immunoenzymatic assays described allow determination of several parameters mapping in different regions of the same molecule, which can be measured and combined to yield a multidimensional picture of the time-course dynamics of antibody synthesis. The rabbit immune system responding to Escherichia coli beta-D-galactosidase was sample and disassembled by (a) culturing lymph node microfragments and (b) sorting out from among all anti-enzyme antibodies only those activating a mutant enzyme, AMEF, which bore the b4 or b9 allotype. A considerable simplification of the response was achieved in the microcultures as documented by cultures of heterozygous cells which produced only one allotype and by the fact that each culture showed a distinctive pattern when antibody titre, association constant, heterogeneity index, L-chain type, and k-chain allotype were considered together. This array of patterns was not an artifact but the result of disassembling a representative sample of the rabbit immune system into small components, since the b4/b9 ratio obtained by averaging the results of all cultures from a heterozygous rabbit lymph node was the same as the serum ratio. Despite the Poisson distribution of the responder microcultures, none of them was monoclonal; i.e. no antibodies homogeneous by all parameters tested were observed, This finidng supports the notion that in normal lymphoid tissue in its native tridimensional arrangement, one T cell can trigger several B cells clustered in one antibody-forming unit. This natural arrangement would ensure the monospecificity of the cluster (dictated by the T cell) while allowing for variation in affinity (depending upon the array of B cells in the unit). Accordingly our findings would results from the fact that as the size of the microfragments was reduced, the cells diluted out first were

  1. Long-term antibody synthesis in vitro. VI. Anti-allotype sera as probes of clonal products in affinity maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Conway de Macario, E; Macario, A J; Tosi, R M; Celada, F; Landucci-Tosi, S

    1978-01-01

    A new experimental system is described for measuring the allotypic product of rabbit B cells during long-lasting in vitro antibody responses. The immunoenzymatic assays described allow determination of several parameters mapping in different regions of the same molecule, which can be measured and combined to yield a multidimensional picture of the time-course dynamics of antibody synthesis. The rabbit immune system responding to Escherichia coli beta-D-galactosidase was sample and disassembled by (a) culturing lymph node microfragments and (b) sorting out from among all anti-enzyme antibodies only those activating a mutant enzyme, AMEF, which bore the b4 or b9 allotype. A considerable simplification of the response was achieved in the microcultures as documented by cultures of heterozygous cells which produced only one allotype and by the fact that each culture showed a distinctive pattern when antibody titre, association constant, heterogeneity index, L-chain type, and k-chain allotype were considered together. This array of patterns was not an artifact but the result of disassembling a representative sample of the rabbit immune system into small components, since the b4/b9 ratio obtained by averaging the results of all cultures from a heterozygous rabbit lymph node was the same as the serum ratio. Despite the Poisson distribution of the responder microcultures, none of them was monoclonal; i.e. no antibodies homogeneous by all parameters tested were observed, This finidng supports the notion that in normal lymphoid tissue in its native tridimensional arrangement, one T cell can trigger several B cells clustered in one antibody-forming unit. This natural arrangement would ensure the monospecificity of the cluster (dictated by the T cell) while allowing for variation in affinity (depending upon the array of B cells in the unit). Accordingly our findings would results from the fact that as the size of the microfragments was reduced, the cells diluted out first were

  2. XGFR*, a novel affinity-matured bispecific antibody targeting IGF-1R and EGFR with combined signaling inhibition and enhanced immune activation for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schanzer, Juergen M.; Wartha, Katharina; Moessner, Ekkehard; Hosse, Ralf J.; Moser, Samuel; Croasdale, Rebecca; Trochanowska, Halina; Shao, Cuiying; Wang, Peng; Shi, Lei; Weinzierl, Tina; Rieder, Natascha; Bacac, Marina; Ries, Carola H.; Kettenberger, Hubert; Schlothauer, Tilman; Friess, Thomas; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) play critical roles in tumor growth, providing a strong rationale for the combined inhibition of IGF-1R and EGFR signaling in cancer therapy. We describe the design, affinity maturation, in vitro and in vivo characterization of the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR*. XGFR* is based on the bispecific IgG antibody XGFR, which enabled heterodimerization of an IGF-1R binding scFab heavy chain with an EGFR-binding light and heavy chain by the “knobs-into-holes” technology. XGFR* is optimized for monovalent binding of human EGFR and IGF-1R with increased binding affinity for IGF-1R due to affinity maturation and highly improved protein stability to oxidative and thermal stress. It bears an afucosylated Fc-portion for optimal induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Stable Chinese hamster ovary cell clones with production yields of 2–3 g/L were generated, allowing for large scale production of the bispecific antibody. XGFR* potently inhibits EGFR- and IGF-1R-dependent receptor phosphorylation, reduces tumor cell proliferation in cells with heterogeneous levels of IGF-1R and EGFR receptor expression and induces strong ADCC in vitro. A comparison of pancreatic and colorectal cancer lines demonstrated superior responsiveness to XGFR*-mediated signaling and tumor growth inhibition in pancreatic cancers that frequently show a high degree of IGF-1R/EGFR co-expression. XGFR* showed potent anti-tumoral efficacy in the orthotopic MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic xenograft model, resulting in nearly complete tumor growth inhibition with significant number of tumor remissions. In summary, the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR* combines potent signaling and tumor growth inhibition with enhanced ADCC induction and represents a clinical development candidate for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26984378

  3. Enhanced humanization and affinity maturation of neutralizing anti-hepatitis B virus preS1 antibody based on antigen-antibody complex structure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hong; Gripon, Philippe; Bouezzedine, Fidaa; Jeong, Mun Sik; Chi, Seung-Wook; Ryu, Seong-Eon; Hong, Hyo Jeong

    2015-01-16

    To improve a previously constructed broadly neutralizing hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific preS1 humanized antibody (HzKR127), we further humanized it through specificity-determining residue (SDR) grafting. Moreover, we improved affinity by mutating two residues in heavy-chain complementarity-determining regions (CDR), on the basis of the crystal structure of the antigen-antibody complex. HzKR127-3.2 exhibited 2.5-fold higher affinity and enhanced virus-neutralizing activity compared to the original KR127 antibody and showed less immunogenic potential than HzKR127. Enhanced virus-neutralizing activity was achieved by the increased association rate, providing insights into engineering potent antibody therapeutics for HBV immunoprophylaxis. HzKR127-3.2 may be a good candidate for HBV immunoprophylaxis.

  4. Affinity purification of antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  5. Simulation of B Cell Affinity Maturation Explains Enhanced Antibody Cross-Reactivity Induced by the Polyvalent Malaria Vaccine AMA1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE...Enhanced Antibody Cross-Reactivity Induced by the Polyvalent Malaria Vaccine AMA1 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Induced by the Polyvalent Malaria Vaccine AMA1 Sidhartha Chaudhury, Jaques Reifman, and Anders Wallqvist Polyvalent vaccines use a mixture of Ags

  6. The function and affinity maturation of HIV-1 gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies derived from colostral B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Thomas L; Sacha, CR; Pollara, Justin; Himes, Jon; Jaeger, Frederick H; Dennison, S Moses; McGuire, Erin; Kunz, Erika; Eudailey, Joshua A; Trama, Ashley M; LaBranche, Celia; Fouda, Genevieve G; Wiehe, Kevin; Montefiori, David C; Haynes, Barton F; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Permar, Sallie R

    2015-01-01

    Despite the risk of transmitting HIV-1, mothers in resource-poor areas are encouraged to breastfeed their infants due to beneficial immunologic and nutritional factors in milk. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, the overwhelming majority of HIV-1-exposed, breastfeeding infants are naturally protected from infection. To understand the role of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific antibodies in breast milk in natural protection against infant virus transmission, we produced 19 HIV-1 Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from colostrum B cells of HIV-1-infected mothers and investigated their specificity, evolution and anti-HIV-1 functions. Despite the previously reported genetic compartmentalization and gp120-specific bias of colostrum HIV Env-specific B cells, the colostrum Env-specific mAbs described here demonstrated a broad range of gp120 epitope specificities and functions, including inhibition of epithelial cell binding and dendritic cell mediated virus transfer, neutralization, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Interestingly, we also identified divergent patterns of colostrum Env-specific B cell lineage evolution with respect to cross-reactivity to gastrointestinal commensal bacteria, indicating that commensal bacterial antigens play a role in shaping the local breast milk IgG repertoire. Maternal vaccine strategies to specifically target this breast milk B cell population may be necessary to achieve safe breastfeeding for all HIV-1-exposed infants. PMID:26242599

  7. The function and affinity maturation of HIV-1 gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies derived from colostral B cells.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, T L; Sacha, C R; Pollara, J; Himes, J; Jaeger, F H; Dennison, S M; McGuire, E; Kunz, E; Eudailey, J A; Trama, A M; LaBranche, C; Fouda, G G; Wiehe, K; Montefiori, D C; Haynes, B F; Liao, H-X; Ferrari, G; Alam, S M; Moody, M A; Permar, S R

    2016-03-01

    Despite the risk of transmitting HIV-1, mothers in resource-poor areas are encouraged to breastfeed their infants because of beneficial immunologic and nutritional factors in milk. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, the overwhelming majority of HIV-1-exposed, breastfeeding infants are naturally protected from infection. To understand the role of HIV-1 envelope (Env)-specific antibodies in breast milk in natural protection against infant virus transmission, we produced 19 HIV-1 Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from colostrum B cells of HIV-1-infected mothers and investigated their specificity, evolution, and anti-HIV-1 functions. Despite the previously reported genetic compartmentalization and gp120-specific bias of colostrum HIV Env-specific B cells, the colostrum Env-specific mAbs described here demonstrated a broad range of gp120 epitope specificities and functions, including inhibition of epithelial cell binding and dendritic cell-mediated virus transfer, neutralization, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. We also identified divergent patterns of colostrum Env-specific B-cell lineage evolution with respect to crossreactivity to gastrointestinal commensal bacteria, indicating that commensal bacterial antigens play a role in shaping the local breast milk immunoglobulin G (IgG) repertoire. Maternal vaccine strategies to specifically target this breast milk B-cell population may be necessary to achieve safe breastfeeding for all HIV-1-exposed infants.

  8. Naturally occurring human phosphorylcholine antibodies are predominantly products of affinity-matured B cells in the adult.

    PubMed

    Fiskesund, Roland; Steen, Johanna; Amara, Khaled; Murray, Fiona; Szwajda, Agnieszka; Liu, Anquan; Douagi, Iyadh; Malmström, Vivianne; Frostegård, Johan

    2014-05-15

    Phosphorylcholine (PC) is a classic T-independent Ag that is exposed on apoptotic cells, oxidized phospholipids, and bacterial polysaccharides. Experimental as well as epidemiological studies have over the past decade implicated Abs against PC (anti-PC) as anti-inflammatory and a strong protective factor in cardiovascular disease. Although clinically important, little is known about the development of anti-PC in humans. This study was conceived to dissect the human anti-PC repertoire and generate human mAbs. We designed a PC-specific probe to identify, isolate, and characterize PC-reactive B cells from 10 healthy individuals. The donors had all mounted somatically mutated Abs toward PC using a broad variety of Ig genes. PC-reactive B cells were primarily found in the IgM(+) memory subset, although significant numbers also were detected among naive, IgG(+), and CD27(+)CD43(+) B cells. Abs from these subsets were clonally related, suggesting a common origin. mAbs derived from the same donors exhibited equivalent or higher affinity for PC than the well-characterized murine T-15 clone. These results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular ontogeny of atheroprotective PC Abs, thereby offering new opportunities for Ab-based therapeutic interventions.

  9. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  10. Improving antibody binding affinity and specificity for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Jenny; Lee, Chingwei V; Haber, Lauric; Fuh, Germaine

    2009-01-01

    Affinity maturation is an important part of the therapeutic antibody development process as in vivo activity often requires high binding affinity. Here, we describe a targeted approach for affinity improvement of therapeutic antibodies. Sets of CDR residues that are solvent accessible and relatively diverse in natural antibodies are targeted for diversification. Degenerate oligonucleotides are used to generate combinatorial phage-displayed antibody libraries with varying degree of diversity at randomized positions from which high-affinity antibodies can be selected. An advantage of using antibodies for therapy is their exquisite target specificity, which enables selective antigen binding and reduces off-target effects. However, it can be useful, and often it is necessary, to generate cross-reactive antibodies binding to not only the human antigen but also the corresponding non-human primate or rodent orthologs. Such cross-reactive antibodies can be used to validate the therapeutic targeting and examine the safety profile in preclinical animal models before committing to a costly development track. We show how affinity improvement and cross-species binding can be achieved in a one-step process.

  11. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research.

  12. Genetic and structural analyses of affinity maturation in the humoral response to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Thomas B; Wiehe, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Most broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs) elicited in response to HIV-1 infection are extraordinarily mutated. One goal of HIV-1 vaccine development is to induce antibodies that are similar to the most potent and broad BNAbs isolated from infected subjects. The most effective BNAbs have very high mutation frequencies, indicative of the long periods of continual activation necessary to acquire the BNAb phenotype through affinity maturation. Understanding the mutational patterns that define the maturation pathways in BNAb development is critical to vaccine design efforts to recapitulate through vaccination the successful routes to neutralization breadth and potency that have occurred in natural infection. Studying the mutational changes that occur during affinity maturation, however, requires accurate partitioning of sequence data into B-cell clones and identification of the starting point of a B-cell clonal lineage, the initial V(D)J rearrangement. Here, we describe the statistical framework we have used to perform these tasks. Through the recent advancement of these and similar computational methods, many HIV-1 ancestral antibodies have been inferred, synthesized and their structures determined. This has allowed, for the first time, the investigation of the structural mechanisms underlying the affinity maturation process in HIV-1 antibody development. Here, we review what has been learned from this atomic-level structural characterization of affinity maturation in HIV-1 antibodies and the implications for vaccine design.

  13. Salmonella Infection Drives Promiscuous B Cell Activation Followed by Extrafollicular Affinity Maturation.

    PubMed

    Di Niro, Roberto; Lee, Seung-Joo; Vander Heiden, Jason A; Elsner, Rebecca A; Trivedi, Nikita; Bannock, Jason M; Gupta, Namita T; Kleinstein, Steven H; Vigneault, Francois; Gilbert, Tamara J; Meffre, Eric; McSorley, Stephen J; Shlomchik, Mark J

    2015-07-21

    The B cell response to Salmonella typhimurium (STm) occurs massively at extrafollicular sites, without notable germinal centers (GCs). Little is known in terms of its specificity. To expand the knowledge of antigen targets, we screened plasmablast (PB)-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for Salmonella specificity, using ELISA, flow cytometry, and antigen microarray. Only a small fraction (0.5%-2%) of the response appeared to be Salmonella-specific. Yet, infection of mice with limited B cell receptor (BCR) repertoires impaired the response, suggesting that BCR specificity was important. We showed, using laser microdissection, that somatic hypermutation (SHM) occurred efficiently at extrafollicular sites leading to affinity maturation that in turn led to detectable STm Ag-binding. These results suggest a revised vision of how clonal selection and affinity maturation operate in response to Salmonella. Clonal selection initially is promiscuous, activating cells with virtually undetectable affinity, yet SHM and selection occur during the extrafollicular response yielding higher affinity, detectable antibodies.

  14. Reconstructing a B-Cell Clonal Lineage. II. Mutation, Selection, and Affinity Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kepler, Thomas B.; Munshaw, Supriya; Wiehe, Kevin; Zhang, Ruijun; Yu, Jae-Sung; Woods, Christopher W.; Denny, Thomas N.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Alam, S. Munir; Moody, M. Anthony; Kelsoe, Garnett; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2014-01-01

    Affinity maturation of the antibody response is a fundamental process in adaptive immunity during which B-cells activated by infection or vaccination undergo rapid proliferation accompanied by the acquisition of point mutations in their rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) genes and selection for increased affinity for the eliciting antigen. The rate of somatic hypermutation at any position within an Ig gene is known to depend strongly on the local DNA sequence, and Ig genes have region-specific codon biases that influence the local mutation rate within the gene resulting in increased differential mutability in the regions that encode the antigen-binding domains. We have isolated a set of clonally related natural Ig heavy chain–light chain pairs from an experimentally infected influenza patient, inferred the unmutated ancestral rearrangements and the maturation intermediates, and synthesized all the antibodies using recombinant methods. The lineage exhibits a remarkably uniform rate of improvement of the effective affinity to influenza hemagglutinin (HA) over evolutionary time, increasing 1000-fold overall from the unmutated ancestor to the best of the observed antibodies. Furthermore, analysis of selection reveals that selection and mutation bias were concordant even at the level of maturation to a single antigen. Substantial improvement in affinity to HA occurred along mutationally preferred paths in sequence space and was thus strongly facilitated by the underlying local codon biases. PMID:24795717

  15. Reconstructing a B-Cell Clonal Lineage. II. Mutation, Selection, and Affinity Maturation.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Thomas B; Munshaw, Supriya; Wiehe, Kevin; Zhang, Ruijun; Yu, Jae-Sung; Woods, Christopher W; Denny, Thomas N; Tomaras, Georgia D; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Kelsoe, Garnett; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F

    2014-01-01

    Affinity maturation of the antibody response is a fundamental process in adaptive immunity during which B-cells activated by infection or vaccination undergo rapid proliferation accompanied by the acquisition of point mutations in their rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) genes and selection for increased affinity for the eliciting antigen. The rate of somatic hypermutation at any position within an Ig gene is known to depend strongly on the local DNA sequence, and Ig genes have region-specific codon biases that influence the local mutation rate within the gene resulting in increased differential mutability in the regions that encode the antigen-binding domains. We have isolated a set of clonally related natural Ig heavy chain-light chain pairs from an experimentally infected influenza patient, inferred the unmutated ancestral rearrangements and the maturation intermediates, and synthesized all the antibodies using recombinant methods. The lineage exhibits a remarkably uniform rate of improvement of the effective affinity to influenza hemagglutinin (HA) over evolutionary time, increasing 1000-fold overall from the unmutated ancestor to the best of the observed antibodies. Furthermore, analysis of selection reveals that selection and mutation bias were concordant even at the level of maturation to a single antigen. Substantial improvement in affinity to HA occurred along mutationally preferred paths in sequence space and was thus strongly facilitated by the underlying local codon biases.

  16. Determinism and stochasticity during maturation of the zebrafish antibody repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ning; Weinstein, Joshua A.; Penland, Lolita; White, Richard A.; Fisher, Daniel S.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    It is thought that the adaptive immune system of immature organisms follows a more deterministic program of antibody creation than is found in adults. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the diversifying antibody repertoire in zebrafish over five developmental time points. We found that the immune system begins in a highly stereotyped state with preferential use of a small number of V (variable) D (diverse) J (joining) gene segment combinations, but that this stereotypy decreases dramatically as the zebrafish mature, with many of the top VDJ combinations observed in 2-wk-old zebrafish virtually disappearing by 1 mo. However, we discovered that, in the primary repertoire, there are strong correlations in VDJ use that increase with zebrafish maturity, suggesting that VDJ recombination involves a level of deterministic programming that is unexpected. This stereotypy is masked by the complex diversification processes of antibody maturation; the variation and lack of correlation in full repertoires between individuals appears to be derived from randomness in clonal expansion during the affinity maturation process. These data provide a window into the mechanisms of VDJ recombination and diversity creation and allow us to better understand how the adaptive immune system achieves diversity. PMID:21393572

  17. H5 N-terminal β sheet promotes oligomerization of H7-HA1 that induces better antibody affinity maturation and enhanced protection against H7N7 and H7N9 viruses compared to inactivated influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Surender; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Verma, Swati; King, Lisa R; Manischewitz, Jody; Crevar, Corey J; Carter, Donald M; Ross, Ted M; Golding, Hana

    2014-11-12

    Initiation of mass vaccination is critical in response to influenza pandemic. There is an urgent need of a simple, rapid method for production of influenza vaccine that is more effective than current traditional influenza vaccines. Recent H7N9 transmissions to humans in China with high morbidity/mortality initiated extensive vaccine evaluation. We produced the HA1 domains (amino acids 1-320) from H7N9 and H7N7 strains in E. coli. Both were found to contain primarily monomers/trimers with low oligomeric content. However, when residues from the N-terminal β sheet (first 8 amino acid) of H7 HA1 domains were swapped with the corresponding amino acids from H5N1, functional oligomeric H7 HA1 were produced (HA1-DS), demonstrating strong receptor binding and hemagglutination. In rabbits, the HA1-DS from either H7N9 or H7N7 generated high neutralization titers against both homologous and heterologous H7 strains, superior to the unmodified H7 HA1 proteins. In ferrets, HA1-DS from H7N7 elicited higher (and faster) HI titers, better protected ferrets from lethality, weight loss, and reduced viral loads following challenge with wild-type highly pathogenic H7N7 virus compared with inactivated H7N7 subunit vaccine. HA1-DS vaccinated ferrets were also better protected from weight loss after challenge with the heterologous H7N9 virus compared with inactivated H7N7 subunit vaccine. Importantly, the H7N7 HA1-DS vaccine induced antibody affinity maturation far superior to the inactivated H7N7 subunit vaccine, which strongly correlated with control of viral loads in the nasal washes after challenge with either H7N7 or H7N9 strains. We conclude that N-terminus β sheet domain-swap can be used to produce stable functional oligomeric forms of better recombinant HA1 vaccines in simple, inexpensive bacterial system for rapid response to emerging pandemic threat for the global population.

  18. Generation of recombinant antibodies and means for increasing their affinity.

    PubMed

    Altshuler, E P; Serebryanaya, D V; Katrukha, A G

    2010-12-01

    Highly specific interaction with foreign molecules is a unique feature of antibodies. Since 1975, when Keller and Milstein proposed the method of hybridoma technology and prepared mouse monoclonal antibodies, many antibodies specific to various antigens have been obtained. Recent development of methods for preparation of recombinant DNA libraries and in silico bioinformatics approaches for protein structure analysis makes possible antibody preparation using gene engineering approaches. The development of gene engineering methods allowed creating recombinant antibodies and improving characteristics of existing antibodies; this significantly extends the applicability of antibodies. By modifying biochemical and immunochemical properties of antibodies by changing their amino acid sequences it is possible to create antibodies with properties optimal for certain tasks. For example, application of recombinant technologies resulted in antibody preparation of high affinity significantly exceeding the initial affinity of natural antibodies. In this review we summarize information about the structure, modes of preparation, and application of recombinant antibodies and their fragments and also consider the main approaches used to increase antibody affinity.

  19. Engineering an antibody with picomolar affinity to DOTA chelates of multiple radionuclides for pretargeted radioimmunotherapy and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Orcutt, Kelly Davis; Slusarczyk, Adrian L; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Ruiz-Yi, Benjamin; Bhushan, Kumar R; Frangioni, John V; Wittrup, K Dane

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT), a bifunctional antibody is administered and allowed to pre-localize to tumor cells. Subsequently, a chelated radionuclide is administered and captured by cell-bound antibody while unbound hapten clears rapidly from the body. We aim to engineer high-affinity binders to DOTA chelates for use in PRIT applications. Methods We mathematically modeled antibody and hapten pharmacokinetics to analyze hapten tumor retention as a function of hapten binding affinity. Motivated by model predictions, we used directed evolution and yeast surface display to affinity mature the 2D12.5 antibody to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), reformatted as a single chain variable fragment (scFv). Results Modeling predicts that for high antigen density and saturating bsAb dose, a hapten binding affinity of 100 picomolar (pM) is needed for near-maximal hapten retention. We affinity matured 2D12.5 with an initial binding constant of about 10 nanomolar (nM) to DOTA-yttrium chelates. Affinity maturation resulted in a 1000-fold affinity improvement to biotinylated DOTA-yttrium, yielding an 8.2 ± 1.9 picomolar binder. The high-affinity scFv binds DOTA complexes of lutetium and gadolinium with similar picomolar affinity and indium chelates with low nanomolar affinity. When engineered into a bispecific antibody construct targeting carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), pretargeted high-affinity scFv results in significantly higher tumor retention of a 111In-DOTA hapten compared to pretargeted wild-type scFv in a xenograft mouse model. Conclusions We have engineered a versatile, high-affinity DOTA-chelate-binding scFv. We anticipate it will prove useful in developing pretargeted imaging and therapy protocols to exploit the potential of a variety of radiometals. PMID:21315278

  20. First molecular and biochemical analysis of in vivo affinity maturation in an ectothermic vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Helen; Stanfield, Robyn L; Brady, Rebecca A; Flajnik, Martin F

    2006-02-07

    The cartilaginous fish are the oldest phylogenetic group in which Igs have been found. Sharks produce a unique Ig isotype, IgNAR, a heavy-chain homodimer that does not associate with light chains. Instead, the variable (V) regions of IgNAR bind antigen as soluble single domains. Our group has shown that IgNAR plays an integral part in the humoral response of nurse sharks (Ginglymostoma cirratum) upon antigen challenge. Here, we generated phage-displayed libraries of IgNAR V regions from an immunized animal and found a family of clones derived from the same rearrangement event but differentially mutated during expansion. Because of the cluster organization of shark Ig genes and the paucicopy nature of IgNAR, we were able to construct the putative ancestor of this family. By studying mutations in the context of clone affinities, we found evidence that affinity maturation occurs for this isotype. Subsequently, we were able to identify mutations important in the affinity improvement of this family. Because the family clones were all obtained after immunization, they provide insight into the in vivo maturation mechanisms, in general, and for single-domain antibody fragments.

  1. Maximum-Entropy Models of Sequenced Immune Repertoires Predict Antigen-Antibody Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Marcatili, Paolo; Pagnani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The immune system has developed a number of distinct complex mechanisms to shape and control the antibody repertoire. One of these mechanisms, the affinity maturation process, works in an evolutionary-like fashion: after binding to a foreign molecule, the antibody-producing B-cells exhibit a high-frequency mutation rate in the genome region that codes for the antibody active site. Eventually, cells that produce antibodies with higher affinity for their cognate antigen are selected and clonally expanded. Here, we propose a new statistical approach based on maximum entropy modeling in which a scoring function related to the binding affinity of antibodies against a specific antigen is inferred from a sample of sequences of the immune repertoire of an individual. We use our inference strategy to infer a statistical model on a data set obtained by sequencing a fairly large portion of the immune repertoire of an HIV-1 infected patient. The Pearson correlation coefficient between our scoring function and the IC50 neutralization titer measured on 30 different antibodies of known sequence is as high as 0.77 (p-value 10−6), outperforming other sequence- and structure-based models. PMID:27074145

  2. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody by structure-based computational design: generation of electrostatic interactions in the transition state stabilizes the antibody-antigen complex.

    PubMed

    Kiyoshi, Masato; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Miura, Eri; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Nakakido, Makoto; Soga, Shinji; Shirai, Hiroki; Kawabata, Shigeki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of antibodies is a desirable goal towards the development of better therapeutic strategies. The antibody 11K2 was previously developed as a therapeutic tool for inflammatory diseases, and displays very high affinity (4.6 pM) for its antigen the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1). We have employed a virtual library of mutations of 11K2 to identify antibody variants of potentially higher affinity, and to establish benchmarks in the engineering of a mature therapeutic antibody. The most promising candidates identified in the virtual screening were examined by surface plasmon resonance to validate the computational predictions, and to characterize their binding affinity and key thermodynamic properties in detail. Only mutations in the light-chain of the antibody are effective at enhancing its affinity for the antigen in vitro, suggesting that the interaction surface of the heavy-chain (dominated by the hot-spot residue Phe101) is not amenable to optimization. The single-mutation with the highest affinity is L-N31R (4.6-fold higher affinity than wild-type antibody). Importantly, all the single-mutations showing increase affinity incorporate a charged residue (Arg, Asp, or Glu). The characterization of the relevant thermodynamic parameters clarifies the energetic mechanism. Essentially, the formation of new electrostatic interactions early in the binding reaction coordinate (transition state or earlier) benefits the durability of the antibody-antigen complex. The combination of in silico calculations and thermodynamic analysis is an effective strategy to improve the affinity of a matured therapeutic antibody.

  3. Rational development of high-affinity T-cell receptor-like antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Wadle, Andreas; Hombach, Anja; Shenderov, Eugene; Held, Gerhard; Fischer, Eliane; Kleber, Sascha; Nuber, Natko; Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Bauer, Stefan; McMichael, Andrew; Knuth, Alexander; Abken, Hinrich; Hombach, Andreas A.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Jones, E. Yvonne; Renner, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    T-cell interaction with a target cell is a key event in the adaptive immune response and primarily driven by T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide-MHC (pMHC) complexes. TCR avidity for a given pMHC is determined by number of MHC molecules, availability of coreceptors, and TCR affinity for MHC or peptide, respectively, with peptide recognition being the most important factor to confer target specificity. Here we present high-resolution crystal structures of 2 Fab antibodies in complex with the immunodominant NY-ESO-1157–165 peptide analogue (SLLMWITQV) presented by HLA-A*0201 and compare them with a TCR recognizing the same pMHC. Binding to the central methionine-tryptophan peptide motif and orientation of binding were almost identical for Fabs and TCR. As the MW “peg” dominates the contacts between Fab and peptide, we estimated the contributions of individual amino acids between the Fab and peptide to provide the rational basis for a peptide-focused second-generation, high-affinity antibody library. The final Fab candidate achieved better peptide binding by 2 light-chain mutations, giving a 20-fold affinity improvement to 2–4 nM, exceeding the affinity of the TCR by 1,000-fold. The high-affinity Fab when grafted as recombinant TCR on T cells conferred specific killing of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1157–165 target cells. In summary, we prove that affinity maturation of antibodies mimicking a TCR is possible and provide a strategy for engineering high-affinity antibodies that can be used in targeting specific pMHC complexes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:19307587

  4. A complex water network contributes to high-affinity binding in an antibody-antigen interface.

    PubMed

    Marino, S F; Olal, D; Daumke, O

    2016-03-01

    This data article presents an analysis of structural water molecules in the high affinity interaction between a potent tumor growth inhibiting antibody (fragment), J22.9-xi, and the tumor marker antigen CD269 (B cell maturation antigen, BCMA). The 1.89 Å X-ray crystal structure shows exquisite details of the binding interface between the two molecules, which comprises relatively few, mostly hydrophobic, direct contacts but many indirect interactions over solvent waters. These are partly or wholly buried in, and therefore part of, the interface. A partial description of the structure is included in an article on the tumor inhibiting effects of the antibody: "Potent anti-tumor response by targeting B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) in a mouse model of multiple myeloma", Mol. Oncol. 9 (7) (2015) pp. 1348-58.

  5. Local BLyS production by T follicular cells mediates retention of high affinity B cells during affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Radhika; Matthews, Andrew H.; Zhang, Bochao; O’Neill, Patrick J.; Scholz, Jean L.; Migone, Thi-Sau; Leonard, Warren J.; Stohl, William; Hershberg, Uri

    2014-01-01

    We have assessed the role of B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) and its receptors in the germinal center (GC) reaction and affinity maturation. Despite ample BLyS retention on B cells in follicular (FO) regions, the GC microenvironment lacks substantial BLyS. This reflects IL-21–mediated down-regulation of the BLyS receptor TACI (transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor) on GC B cells, thus limiting their capacity for BLyS binding and retention. Within the GC, FO helper T cells (TFH cells) provide a local source of BLyS. Whereas T cell–derived BLyS is dispensable for normal GC cellularity and somatic hypermutation, it is required for the efficient selection of high affinity GC B cell clones. These findings suggest that during affinity maturation, high affinity clones rely on TFH-derived BLyS for their persistence. PMID:24367004

  6. Maturation of Shark Single-Domain (IgNAR) Antibodies: Evidence for Induced-Fit Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, R.L.; Dooley, H.; Verdino, P.; Flajnik, M.F.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Maryland U.

    2007-07-13

    Sharks express an unusual heavy-chain isotype called IgNAR, whose variable regions bind antigen as independent soluble domains. To further probe affinity maturation of the IgNAR response, we structurally characterized the germline and somatically matured versions of a type II variable (V) region, both in the presence and absence of its antigen, hen egg-white lysozyme. Despite a disulfide bond linking complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3, both germline and somatically matured V regions displayed significant structural changes in these CDRs upon complex formation with antigen. Somatic mutations in the IgNAR V region serve to increase the number of contacts with antigen, as reflected by a tenfold increase in affinity, and one of these mutations appears to stabilize the CDR3 region. In addition, a residue in the HV4 loop plays an important role in antibody-antigen interaction, consistent with the high rate of somatic mutations in this non-CDR loop.

  7. Maturation of shark single-domain (IgNAR) antibodies: evidence for induced-fit binding.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, Robyn L; Dooley, Helen; Verdino, Petra; Flajnik, Martin F; Wilson, Ian A

    2007-03-23

    Sharks express an unusual heavy-chain isotype called IgNAR, whose variable regions bind antigen as independent soluble domains. To further probe affinity maturation of the IgNAR response, we structurally characterized the germline and somatically matured versions of a type II variable (V) region, both in the presence and absence of its antigen, hen egg-white lysozyme. Despite a disulfide bond linking complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3, both germline and somatically matured V regions displayed significant structural changes in these CDRs upon complex formation with antigen. Somatic mutations in the IgNAR V region serve to increase the number of contacts with antigen, as reflected by a tenfold increase in affinity, and one of these mutations appears to stabilize the CDR3 region. In addition, a residue in the HV4 loop plays an important role in antibody-antigen interaction, consistent with the high rate of somatic mutations in this non-CDR loop.

  8. Selection and affinity maturation of IgNAR variable domains targeting Plasmodium falciparum AMA1.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Stewart D; Humberstone, Karen S; Krishnan, Usha V; Carmichael, Jennifer A; Doughty, Larissa; Hattarki, Meghan; Coley, Andrew M; Casey, Joanne L; Anders, Robin F; Foley, Michael; Irving, Robert A; Hudson, Peter J

    2004-04-01

    The new antigen receptor (IgNAR) is an antibody unique to sharks and consists of a disulphide-bonded dimer of two protein chains, each containing a single variable and five constant domains. The individual variable (V(NAR)) domains bind antigen independently, and are candidates for the smallest antibody-based immune recognition units. We have previously produced a library of V(NAR) domains with extensive variability in the CDR1 and CDR3 loops displayed on the surface of bacteriophage. Now, to test the efficacy of this library, and further explore the dynamics of V(NAR) antigen binding we have performed selection experiments against an infectious disease target, the malarial Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA1) from Plasmodium falciparum. Two related V(NAR) clones were selected, characterized by long (16- and 18-residue) CDR3 loops. These recombinant V(NAR)s could be harvested at yields approaching 5mg/L of monomeric protein from the E. coli periplasm, and bound AMA1 with nanomolar affinities (K(D)= approximately 2 x 10(-7) M). One clone, designated 12Y-2, was affinity-matured by error prone PCR, resulting in several variants with mutations mapping to the CDR1 and CDR3 loops. The best of these variants showed approximately 10-fold enhanced affinity over 12Y-2 and was Plasmodium falciparum strain-specific. Importantly, we demonstrated that this monovalent V(NAR) co-localized with rabbit anti-AMA1 antisera on the surface of malarial parasites and thus may have utility in diagnostic applications.

  9. Solution Equilibrium Titration for High-Throughput Affinity Estimation of Unpurified Antibodies and Antibody Fragments.

    PubMed

    Della Ducata, Daniela; Jaehrling, Jan; Hänel, Cornelia; Satzger, Marion; Wolber, Meike; Ostendorp, Ralf; Pabst, Stefan; Brocks, Bodo

    2015-12-01

    The generation of therapeutic antibodies with extremely high affinities down to the low picomolar range is today feasible with state-of-the art recombinant technologies. However, reliable and efficient identification of lead candidates with the desired affinity from a pool of thousands of antibody clones remains a challenge. Here, we describe a high-throughput procedure that allows reliable affinity screening of unpurified immunoglobulin G or antibody fragments. The method is based on the principle of solution equilibrium titration (SET) using highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence as a readout system. Because the binding partners are not labeled, the resulting KD represents a sound approximation of the real affinity. For screening, diluted bacterial lysates or cell culture supernatants are equilibrated with four different concentrations of a soluble target molecule, and unbound antibodies are subsequently quantified on 384-well Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) plates coated with the respective antigen. For determination of KD values from the resulting titration curves, fit models deduced from the law of mass action for 1:1 and 2:1 binding modes are applied to assess hundreds of interactions simultaneously. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparing results from different screening campaigns from affinity optimization projects with results from detailed affinity characterization.

  10. Influence of affinity on antibody determination in microtiter ELISA systems

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, J.H.; Voss, E.W. Jr.; Butler, J.E.

    1986-03-01

    Theoretically, all immunoassays are affinity (Ka) dependent when the product of the antibody (Ab) Ka and the free epitope concentration is less than 10. Thus, the degree of dependence on Ka depends on the concentration of available antigen in the system. The authors examined the binding of /sup 125/I-anti-fluorescein (a-FLU) monoclonal antibodies of different affinities to FLU-gelatin adsorbed on Immunlon 2 microtiter plates. Data obtained were in general agreement with our theoretical predictions; the percent of /sup 125/I-a-FLU which bound correlated with Ka, as did the shape of the titration curves. Measurement of 5 a-FLU monoclonals by the ELISA showed that the determination of Ab concentrations depends on the FLU-gelatin concentration, epitope density, and on the relationship between the Kas of test samples and the reference standard Ab preparation. Thus the ELISA is Ka dependent and should not be used routinely to estimate the absolute amount to Ab in unknown samples. However, the Ka dependency of the ELISA might provide a convenient assay for the estimation of the relative functional Ka (rfKa) of antibody preparations.

  11. Generation of metastatic melanoma specific antibodies by affinity purification

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Birgit; Koppensteiner, Anita; Schörghofer, David; Kinslechner, Katharina; Timelthaler, Gerald; Eferl, Robert; Hengstschläger, Markus; Missbichler, Albert; Hundsberger, Harald; Mikula, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer and one of the most frequent tumours in young adults. Identification of primary tumours prone to develop metastasis is of paramount importance for further patient stratification. However, till today, no markers exist that are routinely used to predict melanoma progression. To ameliorate this problem, we generated antiserum directed against metastatic melanoma tissue lysate and applied a novel approach to purify the obtained serum via consecutive affinity chromatography steps. The established antibody, termed MHA-3, showed high reactivity against metastatic melanoma cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. We also tested MHA-3 on 227 melanoma patient samples and compared staining with the melanoma marker S100b. Importantly, MHA-3 was able to differentiate between metastatic and non-metastatic melanoma samples. By proteome analysis we identified 18 distinct antigens bound by MHA-3. Combined expression profiling of all identified proteins revealed a significant survival difference in melanoma patients. In conclusion, we developed a polyclonal antibody, which is able to detect metastatic melanoma on paraffin embedded sections. Hence, we propose that this antibody will represent a valuable additional tool for precise melanoma diagnosis. PMID:27853253

  12. Co-administration of CpG oligonucleotides enhances the late affinity maturation process of human anti-hepatitis B vaccine response.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pihlgren, Maria; Tougne, Chantal; Efler, Sue M; Morris, Mary Lou; AlAdhami, Mohammed J; Cameron, D William; Cooper, Curtis L; Heathcote, Jenny; Davis, Heather L; Lambert, Paul-Henri

    2004-12-16

    We assessed the avidity maturation process elicited by human immunization with alum-adsorbed HBsAg alone or with a novel adjuvant containing CpG motifs (CpG 7909). Mean avidity indexes and distribution of low- and high-avidity anti-HBs indicated that avidity maturation essentially takes place late after priming. CpG 7909 markedly enhanced this affinity maturation process, increasing the pool of high-avidity antibodies. The influence of CpG 7909 was antigen-specific, isotype-specific and distinct from the influence on anti-HBs production, as avidity did not correlate with anti-HBs IgG titers. This is the first demonstration that a novel human adjuvant may induce antibodies with higher antigen-binding affinity.

  13. Water channel in the binding site of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Susan; Longenecker, Kenton L; Manoj, Sharmila; Judge, Russell A; Saldana, Sylvia C; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Swift, Kerry M; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2014-06-17

    In the present study, we report the structure of the free and drug-bound Fab fragment of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody and perform a thermodynamic analysis of the binding process. The anti-methotrexate Fab fragment features a remarkably rigid tunnel-like binding site that extends into a water channel serving as a specialized route to move solvent out and into the site upon ligand binding and dissociation. This new finding in antibody structure-function relationships directly relates to the fast association (1 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and slow dissociation (4 × 10⁻⁵ s⁻¹) rates determined for mAb ADD056, resulting in a very strong binding with a K(D) ~ 3.6 pM at 20 °C. As follows from the X-ray data analysis, the methotrexate-antibody complex is stabilized by an extended network of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions. The analysis also shows structural involvement of the CDR H3 in formation of the water channel revealing another important role of this hypervariable region. This suggests a new direction in natural affinity maturation and opens a new possibility in antibody engineering. Methotrexate is a widely used therapeutic agent for many malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. Unfortunately, it may also interfere with central aspects of metabolism and thereby cause inevitable side effects. Therefore, methotrexate therapy requires careful monitoring of drug blood levels, which is traditionally done by immunoassays. An understanding of the structure-function properties of antibodies selected for drug monitoring substantiates the performance and robustness of such tests.

  14. Experimental Immunization Based on Plasmodium Antigens Isolated by Antibody Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Ali N.; Marín-García, Patricia; Azcárate, Isabel G.; Puyet, Antonio; Diez, Amalia; Bautista, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines blocking malaria parasites in the blood-stage diminish mortality and morbidity caused by the disease. Here, we isolated antigens from total parasite proteins by antibody affinity chromatography to test an immunization against lethal malaria infection in a murine model. We used the sera of malaria self-resistant ICR mice to lethal Plasmodium yoelii yoelii 17XL for purification of their IgGs which were subsequently employed to isolate blood-stage parasite antigens that were inoculated to immunize BALB/c mice. The presence of specific antibodies in vaccinated mice serum was studied by immunoblot analysis at different days after vaccination and showed an intensive immune response to a wide range of antigens with molecular weight ranging between 22 and 250 kDa. The humoral response allowed delay of the infection after the inoculation to high lethal doses of P. yoelii yoelii 17XL resulting in a partial protection against malaria disease, although final survival was managed in a low proportion of challenged mice. This approach shows the potential to prevent malaria disease with a set of antigens isolated from blood-stage parasites. PMID:26539558

  15. Quantifying evolutionary constraints on B-cell affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Connor O.; Bedford, Trevor; Minin, Vladimir N.; Bradley, Philip; Robins, Harlan; Matsen, Frederick A.

    2015-01-01

    The antibody repertoire of each individual is continuously updated by the evolutionary process of B-cell receptor (BCR) mutation and selection. It has recently become possible to gain detailed information concerning this process through high-throughput sequencing. Here, we develop modern statistical molecular evolution methods for the analysis of B-cell sequence data, and then apply them to a very deep short-read dataset of BCRs. We find that the substitution process is conserved across individuals but varies significantly across gene segments. We investigate selection on BCRs using a novel method that side-steps the difficulties encountered by previous work in differentiating between selection and motif-driven mutation; this is done through stochastic mapping and empirical Bayes estimators that compare the evolution of in-frame and out-of-frame rearrangements. We use this new method to derive a per-residue map of selection, which provides a more nuanced view of the constraints on framework and variable regions. PMID:26194758

  16. Robotic QM/MM-driven maturation of antibody combining sites.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Ivan V; Golovin, Andrey V; Chatziefthimiou, Spyros D; Stepanova, Anastasiya V; Peng, Yingjie; Zolotareva, Olga I; Belogurov, Alexey A; Kurkova, Inna N; Ponomarenko, Natalie A; Wilmanns, Matthias; Blackburn, G Michael; Gabibov, Alexander G; Lerner, Richard A

    2016-10-01

    In vitro selection of antibodies from large repertoires of immunoglobulin (Ig) combining sites using combinatorial libraries is a powerful tool, with great potential for generating in vivo scavengers for toxins. However, addition of a maturation function is necessary to enable these selected antibodies to more closely mimic the full mammalian immune response. We approached this goal using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations to achieve maturation in silico. We preselected A17, an Ig template, from a naïve library for its ability to disarm a toxic pesticide related to organophosphorus nerve agents. Virtual screening of 167,538 robotically generated mutants identified an optimum single point mutation, which experimentally boosted wild-type Ig scavenger performance by 170-fold. We validated the QM/MM predictions via kinetic analysis and crystal structures of mutant apo-A17 and covalently modified Ig, thereby identifying the displacement of one water molecule by an arginine as delivering this catalysis.

  17. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold.

  18. Altered Affinity Maturation in Primary Response to (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) Acetyl (NP) after Autologous Reconstitution of Irradiated C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    De Trez, Carl; Van Acker, Annette; Vansanten, Georgette; Urbain, Jacques; Brait, Maryse

    2002-01-01

    Immune responses developing in irradiated environment are profoundly altered. The memory anti-arsonate response of A/J mice is dominated by a major clonotype encoded by a single gene segment combination called CRIA. In irradiated and autoreconstituted A/J mice, the level of anti-ARS antibodies upon secondary immunization is normal but devoid of CRIA antibodies. The affinity maturation process and the somatic mutation frequency are reduced. Isotype switching and development of germinal centers (GC) are delayed. The primary antibody response of C57BL/6 mice to the hapten (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl (NP)-Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanin (KLH) is dominated by antibodies encoded by a family of closely related VH genes associated with the expression of the λ1 light chain.We investigated the anti-NP primary response in irradiated and autoreconstituted C57BL/6 mice. We observed some splenic alterations as previously described in the irradiated A/J model. Germinal center reaction is delayed although the extrafollicular foci appearance is unchanged. Irradiated C57BL/6 mice are able to mount a primary anti-NP response dominated by λ1 positive antibodies but fail to produce high affinity NP-binding IgGl antibodies. Following a second antigenic challenge, irradiated mice develop enlarged GC and foci. Furthermore, higher affinity NP-binding IgG1 antibodies are detected. PMID:12885152

  19. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody to methamphetamine and amphetamine through structure-based antibody engineering.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Nanaware-Kharade, Nisha; Celikel, Reha; Peterson, Eric C; Varughese, Kottayil I

    2014-01-14

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is a worldwide threat, without any FDA approved medications. Anti-METH IgGs and single chain fragments (scFvs) have shown efficacy in preclinical studies. Here we report affinity enhancement of an anti-METH scFv for METH and its active metabolite amphetamine (AMP), through the introduction of point mutations, rationally designed to optimize the shape and hydrophobicity of the antibody binding pocket. The binding affinity was measured using saturation binding technique. The mutant scFv-S93T showed 3.1 fold enhancement in affinity for METH and 26 fold for AMP. The scFv-I37M and scFv-Y34M mutants showed enhancement of 94, and 8 fold for AMP, respectively. Structural analysis of scFv-S93T:METH revealed that the substitution of Ser residue by Thr caused the expulsion of a water molecule from the cavity, creating a more hydrophobic environment for the binding that dramatically increases the affinities for METH and AMP.

  20. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice selectively bred to produce high affinity (HA) or low affinity (LA) antibody responses.

    PubMed Central

    Devey, M E; Major, P J; Bleasdale-Barr, K M; Holland, G P; Dal Canto, M C; Paterson, P Y

    1990-01-01

    Induction of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice genetically selected to produce either high affinity (HA) or low affinity (LA) antibody responses has revealed significant differences in disease susceptibility between the two lines. HA mice were highly susceptible to EAE following subcutaneous sensitization to mouse central nervous system (CNS) tissue emulsified in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). Furthermore, of HA mice surviving acute EAE, up to 93% subsequently developed chronic relapsing disease (CREAE) characterized by variable demyelinating inflammatory changes within the spinal cord. In contrast, LA mice, despite having a major histocompatability complex (MHC) haplotype associated with susceptibility to EAE, were highly resistant to the disease and showed no signs of CREAE when observed for up to 100 days post-sensitization. Antibodies to myelin basic protein (MBP) were detected in both lines but rising titres of high functional affinity antibodies were only seen in HA mice. These HA and LA lines of mice provide a new approach to the study of EAE and, in particular, the role of antibody and antibody affinity in the chronic relapsing form of the disease. Images Figure 2 PMID:2335373

  1. Guiding the evolution to catch the virus: An in silico study of affinity maturation against rapidly mutating antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenshen; Burton, Dennis; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup

    2014-03-01

    The immune system comprises an intricate and evolving collection of cells and molecules that enables a defense against pathogenic agents. Its workings present a rich source of physical problems that impact human health. One intriguing example is the process of affinity maturation (AM) through which an antibody (Ab)--a component of the host immune system--evolves to more efficiently bind an antigen (Ag)--a unique part of a foreign pathogen such as a virus. Sufficiently strong binding to the Ag enables recognition and neutralization. A major challenge is to contain a diversifying mixture of Ag variants, that arise in natural infection, from evading Ab neutralization. This entails a thorough understanding of AM against multiple Ag species and mutating Ag. During AM, Ab-encoding cells undergo cycles of mutation and selection, a process reminiscent of Darwinian evolution yet occurring in real time. We first cast affinity-dependent selection into an extreme value problem and show how the binding characteristics scale with Ag diversity. We then develop an agent-based residue-resolved computational model of AM which allows us to track the evolutionary trajectories of individual cells. This dynamic model not only reveals significant stochastic effects associated with the relatively small and highly dynamic population size, it also uncovers the markedly distinct maturation outcomes if designed Ag variants are presented in different temporal procedures. Insights thus obtained would guide rational design of vaccination protocols.

  2. Nonchromatographic affinity precipitation method for the purification of bivalently active pharmaceutical antibodies from biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Handlogten, Michael W; Stefanick, Jared F; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2013-05-21

    This Article describes an affinity-based precipitation method for the rapid and nonchromatographic purification of bivalently active monoclonal antibodies by combining the selectivity of affinity chromatography with the simplicity of salt-induced precipitation. This procedure involves (i) precipitation of proteins heavier than immunoglobulins with ammonium sulfate; (ii) formation and selective precipitation of cyclic antibody complexes created by binding to trivalent haptens specific for the antibody; and (iii) membrane filtration of the solubilized antibody pellet to remove the trivalent hapten from the purified antibody. We applied this technique to the purification of two pharmaceutical antibodies, trastuzumab and rituximab, by synthesizing trivalent haptens specific for each antibody. Using this method, we were able to purify both antibodies from typical contaminants including CHO cell conditioned media, ascites fluid, DNA, and other antibodies with yields >85% and with >95% purity. The purified antibodies displayed native binding levels to cell lines expressing the target proteins demonstrating that the affinity-based precipitation method did not adversely affect the antibodies. The selectivity of the affinity-based precipitation method for bivalently active antibodies was established by purifying trastuzumab from a solution containing both active and chemically denatured trastuzumab. Prior to purification, the solutions displayed 20-76% reduction in binding activity, and after purification, native binding activity was restored, indicating that the purified product contained only bivalently active antibody. Taken together, the affinity-based precipitation method provides a rapid and straightforward process for the purification of antibodies with the potential to improve product quality while decreasing the purification costs at both the lab and the industrial scale.

  3. Robotic QM/MM-driven maturation of antibody combining sites

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, Ivan V.; Golovin, Andrey V.; Chatziefthimiou, Spyros D.; Stepanova, Anastasiya V.; Peng, Yingjie; Zolotareva, Olga I.; Belogurov, Alexey A.; Kurkova, Inna N.; Ponomarenko, Natalie A.; Wilmanns, Matthias; Blackburn, G. Michael; Gabibov, Alexander G.; Lerner, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro selection of antibodies from large repertoires of immunoglobulin (Ig) combining sites using combinatorial libraries is a powerful tool, with great potential for generating in vivo scavengers for toxins. However, addition of a maturation function is necessary to enable these selected antibodies to more closely mimic the full mammalian immune response. We approached this goal using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations to achieve maturation in silico. We preselected A17, an Ig template, from a naïve library for its ability to disarm a toxic pesticide related to organophosphorus nerve agents. Virtual screening of 167,538 robotically generated mutants identified an optimum single point mutation, which experimentally boosted wild-type Ig scavenger performance by 170-fold. We validated the QM/MM predictions via kinetic analysis and crystal structures of mutant apo-A17 and covalently modified Ig, thereby identifying the displacement of one water molecule by an arginine as delivering this catalysis. PMID:27774510

  4. Synthetic polymer nanoparticles with antibody-like affinity for a hydrophilic peptide.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhiyang; Hoshino, Yu; Rodriguez, Andy; Yoo, Hoseong; Shea, Kenneth J

    2010-01-26

    Synthetic polymer nanoparticles with antibody-like affinity for a hydrophilic peptide have been prepared by inverse microemulsion polymerization. Peptide affinity was achieved in part by incorporating the target (imprint) peptide in the polymerization reaction mixture. Incorporation of the imprint peptide assists in the creation of complementary binding sites in the resulting polymer nanoparticle (NP). To orient the imprint peptide at the interface of the water and oil domains during polymerization, the peptide target was coupled with fatty acid chains of varying length. The peptide--NP binding affinities (ca. 90-900 nM) were quantitatively evaluated by a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The optimal chain length was established that created high affinity peptide binding sites on the surface of the nanoparticles. This method can be used for the preparation of nanosized synthetic polymers with antibody-like affinity for hydrophilic peptides and proteins ("plastic antibodies").

  5. A new method for the evaluation of antibody affinity based on serial dilutions of studied antibody-antigen mixture.

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A

    2002-01-01

    A new method for the evaluation of the affinity of bivalent antibodies were suggested. This method is based on the previously published by the author the idea of using so-called coordinates of dilutions. It was shown that the suggested method allows to evaluate the affinity of antibodies with high accuracy using this simple approach. It is supposed that at some conditions the suggested method could have substantial advantages in comparison to the traditional methods. This method allows to analyze situations when antibodies are already in a mixture with antigen, for example in the bloodstream in the case of infections or autoimmune diseases. The method provides useful approach for the evaluation not only antibody affinity, but also the concentration of circulated antigen.

  6. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K; Corey, David P

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications.

  7. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications. PMID:26943906

  8. Protection against measles virus-induced encephalitis by anti-mimotope antibodies: the role of antibody affinity.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, W; Obeid, O E; Steward, M W

    2000-06-20

    Synthetic peptides mimicking a conformational B-cell epitope (M2) of the measles virus fusion protein (MVF) were used for the immunization of BALB/c mice and the anti-peptide and anti-virus antibody titers induced were compared. Of the panel of tested peptides, a chimeric peptide consisting of two copies of a T-helper epitope (residues 288-302 of MVF) and one copy of the mimotope M2 (TTM2) and a multiple antigen peptide with eight copies of M2 (MAP-M2) induced the highest titers of anti-M2 and anti-MV antibodies. Furthermore, peptides TTM2 and MAP-M2 induced antibodies with highest affinity for the mimotope and highest avidity for measles virus. Immunization with the MAP-M2 construct induced high titers of high-affinity anti-M2 antibody despite the absence of a T-helper epitope, and lymphocyte proliferation data suggest that the addition of M2 to the MAP resulted in the generation of a structure capable of stimulating T-cell help. Sera with anti-M2 reactivity were pooled according to affinity values for binding to M2, and high- and low-affinity pools were tested for their ability to prevent MV-induced encephalitis in a mouse model. The high-affinity serum pool conferred protection in 100% of mice, whereas the lower affinity pool conferred protection to only 50% of animals. These results indicate the potential of mimotopes for use as synthetic peptide immunogens and highlight the importance of designing vaccines to induce antibodies of high affinity.

  9. Kosmotropes enhance the yield of antibody purified by affinity chromatography using immobilized bacterial immunoglobulin binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Ngo, That T; Narinesingh, Dyer

    2008-01-01

    The yield of antibody purified using affinity chromatography on immobilized Protein A or Protein G was increased up to 5-fold (500%) by including kosmotropic salts in the binding buffer. The binding buffer is used to equilibrate the affinity column before applying a sample to the column and also to dilute the sample prior to loading onto the affinity column to optimize conditions for a maximal binding of antibodies to affinity gels. In this study, the kosmotropic salts that were effective in greatly increasing antibody binding to Protein A included both inorganic and organic salts of ammonium; sodium; or potassium sulfate, phosphate, polycarboxylates; for example, succinate, citrate, isocitrate, N-(2-hydroxyethylene diamine triacetate (HEDTA), ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA), and ethylene glycol-O,O'-bis(2-aminoethyl)-N,N,N'N'-tetra acetate(EGTA). On an equal-molar basis, the greater the number of carboxylic groups within the polycarboxylate molecule, the greater the increase in the yield of the purified antibody that was observed. The data show that kosmotropes can be used as effective additives to enhance the binding of immunoglobulins to Protein A or Protein G gels with a resultant increase in the yield of the purified antibodies. Thus, it appears that strongly hydrated anions (citrate, sulfate, and phosphate) and weakly hydrated cations (ammonium, potassium) increase the yield of antibody purified on either Protein A or Protein G affinity gels.

  10. Affinity-based precipitation via a bivalent peptidic hapten for the purification of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Handlogten, Michael W; Stefanick, Jared F; Deak, Peter E; Bilgicer, Basar

    2014-09-07

    In a previous study, we demonstrated a non-chromatographic affinity-based precipitation method, using trivalent haptens, for the purification of mAbs. In this study, we significantly improved this process by using a simplified bivalent peptidic hapten (BPH) design, which enables facile and rapid purification of mAbs while overcoming the limitations of the previous trivalent design. The improved affinity-based precipitation method (ABP(BPH)) combines the simplicity of salt-induced precipitation with the selectivity of affinity chromatography for the purification of mAbs. The ABP(BPH) method involves 3 steps: (i) precipitation and separation of protein contaminants larger than immunoglobulins with ammonium sulfate; (ii) selective precipitation of the target-antibody via BPH by inducing antibody-complex formation; (iii) solubilization of the antibody pellet and removal of BPH with membrane filtration resulting in the pure antibody. The ABP(BPH) method was evaluated by purifying the pharmaceutical antibody trastuzumab from common contaminants including CHO cell conditioned media, DNA, ascites fluid, other antibodies, and denatured antibody with >85% yield and >97% purity. Importantly, the purified antibody demonstrated native binding activity to cell lines expressing the target protein, HER2. Combined, the ABP(BPH) method is a rapid and scalable process for the purification of antibodies with the potential to improve product quality while decreasing purification costs.

  11. Quality control of coated antibodies: new, rapid determination of binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Ricoux, R; Chazaud, B; Tresca, J P; Pontet, M

    2000-03-01

    A procedure is described for the determination of the affinity constant between a fluid-phase biotinylated antigen and a solid-phase monoclonal antibody. This procedure allows evaluation of the efficiency of an antibody as a coated tool for an immunoassay. For this purpose, the biotinylation of the antigen and its further quantitative measurement by streptavidin-peroxidase led to a single reversible interaction, the binding affinity of which greatly determines the quality of the assay. The free and bound fractions of the biotinylated antigen were obtained in wells coated with a low level of immobilized antibodies. At the equilibrium state, the free antigen present in the supernatant of these wells was further transferred to high level antibody coated wells which captured all the free antigen molecules. These molecules were quantified using a standard curve established with known concentrations of biotinylated antigen, also incubated in wells coated with the high level of antibody.

  12. Co-evolution of affinity and stability of grafted amyloid-motif domain antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Mark C.; Lee, Christine C.; Tiller, Kathryn E.; Rabia, Lilia A.; Day, Evan K.; Schick, Arthur J.; Tessier, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    An attractive approach for designing lead antibody candidates is to mimic natural protein interactions by grafting peptide recognition motifs into the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs). We are using this approach to generate single-domain (VH) antibodies specific for amyloid-forming proteins such as the Alzheimer's Aβ peptide. Here, we use random mutagenesis and yeast surface display to improve the binding affinity of a lead VH domain grafted with Aβ residues 33–42 in CDR3. Interestingly, co-selection for improved Aβ binding and VH display on the surface of yeast yields antibody domains with improved affinity and reduced stability. The highest affinity VH domains were strongly destabilized on the surface of yeast as well as unfolded when isolated as autonomous domains. In contrast, stable VH domains with improved affinity were reliably identified using yeast surface display by replacing the display antibody that recognizes a linear epitope tag at the terminus of both folded and unfolded VH domains with a conformational ligand (Protein A) that recognizes a discontinuous epitope on the framework of folded VH domains. Importantly, we find that selection for improved stability using Protein A without simultaneous co-selection for improved Aβ binding leads to strong enrichment for stabilizing mutations that reduce antigen binding. Our findings highlight the importance of simultaneously optimizing affinity and stability to improve the rapid isolation of well-folded and specific antibody fragments. PMID:26386257

  13. Humanization of high-affinity antibodies targeting glypican-3 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Ho, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We have generated a group of high-affinity mouse monoclonal antibodies targeting GPC3. Here, we report the humanization and testing of these antibodies for clinical development. We compared the affinity and cytotoxicity of recombinant immunotoxins containing mouse single-chain variable regions fused with a Pseudomonas toxin. To humanize the mouse Fvs, we grafted the combined KABAT/IMGT complementarity determining regions (CDR) into a human IgG germline framework. Interestingly, we found that the proline at position 41, a non-CDR residue in heavy chain variable regions (VH), is important for humanization of mouse antibodies. We also showed that two humanized anti-GPC3 antibodies (hYP7 and hYP9.1b) in the IgG format induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent-cytotoxicity in GPC3-positive cancer cells. The hYP7 antibody was tested and showed inhibition of HCC xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. This study successfully humanizes and validates high affinity anti-GPC3 antibodies and sets a foundation for future development of these antibodies in various clinical formats in the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:27667400

  14. Affinity immunoblotting - High resolution isoelectric focusing analysis of antibody clonotype distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knisley, Keith A.; Rodkey, L. Scott

    1986-01-01

    A sensitive and specific method is proposed for the analysis of specific antibody clonotype changes occurring during an immune response and for comparing multiple sera for antibody clonotype similarities. Polyclonal serum antibodies separated by isoelectric focusing (IEF) were analyzed by an affinity immunoblotting method using antigen-coated nitrocellulose membranes. Antibodies present on the surface of the acrylamide gels following IEF bind the antigen on the nitrocellulose when the coated nitrocellulose is laid over the gels. The technique has been used to analyze Ig clonotypes specific for five protein antigens and two carbohydrate antigens. Optimal antigen concentrations for coating the nitrocellulose membranes were found to range from 10-100 microgram/ml.

  15. Quality control of murine monoclonal antibodies using isoelectric focusing affinity immunoblot analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Robert G.; Rodkey, L. Scott; Reimer, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    The quality control of murine hybridoma secretory products has been performed using two approaches for isoelectric focusing affinity immunoblot analysis: (1) a method in which antigen-coated nitrocellulose is placed on top of an acrylamide gel containing isoelectrically focused ascites to bind the antigen specific monoclonal antibody; and (2) a method in which focused ascite proteins were passively blotted onto nitrocellulose and specific monoclonal antibodies were detected with enzyme-conjugated antigen. Analysis by both methods of batches of ascites containing antihuman IgG antibodies that were produced by six hybridomas permitted effective monitoring of immunoreactive antibodies for pI microheterogeneity.

  16. Generation of an affinity column for antibody purification by intein-mediated protein ligation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luo; Ghosh, Inca; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2003-11-01

    Coupling an antigenic peptide to a solid support is a crucial step in the affinity purification of a peptide-specific antibody. Conventional methods for generating reactive agarose, cellulose or other matrices for peptide conjugation are laborious and can result in a significant amount of chemical waste. In this report, we present a novel method for the facile production of a peptide affinity column by employing intein-mediated protein ligation (IPL) in conjunction with chitin affinity chromatography. A reactive thioester was generated at the C-terminal of the chitin binding domain (CBD) from the chitinase A1 of Bacillus circulans WL-2 by thiol-induced cleavage of the peptide bond between the CBD and a modified intein. Peptide epitopes possessing an N-terminal cysteine were ligated to the chitin bound CBD tag. We demonstrate that the resulting peptide columns permit the highly specific and efficient affinity purification of antibodies from animal sera.

  17. The impact of antigen density and antibody affinity on antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity: relevance for immunotherapy of carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Velders, M. P.; van Rhijn, C. M.; Oskam, E.; Fleuren, G. J.; Warnaar, S. O.; Litvinov, S. V.

    1998-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is considered to be the major mechanism through which tumour cells, upon treatment with anti-tumour MAbs, are eliminated in vivo. However, the relative importance of various parameters that influence the efficacy of ADCC is unclear. Here we present in vitro data on the impact of MAb affinity and antigen density on ADCC, as obtained by comparison of two MAbs against the tumour-associated antigen Ep-CAM. The low-affinity MAb 17-1A (Ka = 5 x 10(7)M(-1)) currently used for therapy, and the high-affinity MAb 323/A3 (Ka = 2 x 10(9) M(-1)), were compared in ADCC experiments against murine and human tumour target cells transfected with the Ep-CAM cDNA under the control of an inducible promoter to enable regulation of the target antigen expression levels. Data obtained from these studies revealed that the high-affinity MAb, in contrast to the low-affinity MAb, could mediate killing of tumour cells with low antigen expression levels. Even at comparable MAb-binding levels, ADCC mediated by the high-affinity MAb was more effective. The kinetics of ADCC was also found to be determined by the level of antigen expression, and by the affinity and the concentration of the MAb used. The efficacy of ADCC with both low- and high-affinity MAbs further depended on adhesive interactions between effector and target cells mediated by CD18. However, at every given MAb concentration these interactions were of less importance for the high-affinity MAb than for the low-affinity MAb. As heterogeneity of a target antigen expression is a common feature of all tumours, and some tumour cells express very low levels of the antigen, the use of high-affinity MAbs in immunotherapy may significantly improve the clinical results obtained to the present date in the treatment of minimal residual disease. PMID:9716030

  18. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Rosenfeld, Ronit; Ariel, Naomi; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Zvi, Anat; Kronman, Chanoch; Ordentlich, Arie; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit) was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (koff < 1 × 10−7 s−1) that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication. PMID:26950154

  19. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates.

    PubMed

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Rosenfeld, Ronit; Ariel, Naomi; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Zvi, Anat; Kronman, Chanoch; Ordentlich, Arie; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-03-03

    Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit) was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (k(off )< 1 × 10(-7) s(-1)) that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication.

  20. Structural Basis of HIV-1 Neutralization by Affinity Matured Fabs Directed against the Internal Trimeric Coiled-Coil of gp41

    SciTech Connect

    Gustchina, Elena; Li, Mi; Louis, John M.; Anderson, D.Eric; Lloyd, John; Frisch, Christian; Bewley, Carole A.; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander; Clore, G.Marius

    2010-12-03

    The conserved internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR) of HIV-1 gp41 is transiently exposed during the fusion process by forming a pre-hairpin intermediate, thus representing an attractive target for the design of fusion inhibitors and neutralizing antibodies. In previous studies we reported a series of broadly neutralizing mini-antibodies derived from a synthetic naive human combinatorial antibody library by panning against a mimetic of the trimeric N-HR coiled coil, followed by affinity maturation using targeted diversification of the CDR-H2 loop. Here we report crystal structures of the N-HR mimetic 5-Helix with two Fabs that represent the extremes of this series: Fab 8066 is broadly neutralizing across a wide panel of B and C type HIV-1 viruses, whereas Fab 8062 is non-neutralizing. The crystal structures reveal important differences in the conformations of the CDR-H2 loops in the complexes that propagate into other regions of the antigen-antibody interface, and suggest that both neutralization properties and affinity for the target can be attributed, at least in part, to the differences in the interactions of the CDR-H2 loops with the antigen. Furthermore, modeling of the complex of an N-HR trimer with three Fabs suggests that the CDR-H2 loop may be involved in close intermolecular contacts between neighboring antibody molecules, and that such contacts may hinder the formation of complexes between the N-HR trimer and more than one antibody molecule depending on the conformation of the bound CDR-H2 loop which is defined by its interactions with antigen. Comparison with the crystal structure of the complex of 5-Helix with another neutralizing monoclonal antibody known as D5, derived using an entirely different antibody library and panning procedure, reveals remarkable convergence in the optimal sequence and conformation of the CDR-H2 loop.

  1. Measuring the sequence-affinity landscape of antibodies with massively parallel titration curves

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rhys M; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Kinney, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Despite the central role that antibodies play in the adaptive immune system and in biotechnology, much remains unknown about the quantitative relationship between an antibody’s amino acid sequence and its antigen binding affinity. Here we describe a new experimental approach, called Tite-Seq, that is capable of measuring binding titration curves and corresponding affinities for thousands of variant antibodies in parallel. The measurement of titration curves eliminates the confounding effects of antibody expression and stability that arise in standard deep mutational scanning assays. We demonstrate Tite-Seq on the CDR1H and CDR3H regions of a well-studied scFv antibody. Our data shed light on the structural basis for antigen binding affinity and suggests a role for secondary CDR loops in establishing antibody stability. Tite-Seq fills a large gap in the ability to measure critical aspects of the adaptive immune system, and can be readily used for studying sequence-affinity landscapes in other protein systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23156.001 PMID:28035901

  2. Affinity-purified respiratory syncytial virus antibodies from intravenous immunoglobulin exert potent antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nimesh; LeGoff, Jerome; Chamat, Soulaima; Mercier-Delarue, Severine; Touzelet, Olivier; Power, Ultan F; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Simon, Francois; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sebastien; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas V

    2013-01-01

    Mixed infections are one of the major therapeutic challenges, as the current strategies have had limited success. One of the most common and widespread conditions of mixed infection is respiratory syncytial virus-mediated pathology of the respiratory tract in children. There is a dire need for the development of novel therapeutic approaches during mixed infections. Therapeutic intravenous immunoglobulin preparations, obtained from plasma pools of healthy donors have been used in immune deficiencies. This study was thus designed to characterize the functional efficacy of RSV-specific antibodies in IVIg. To explore the functional ability of these affinity-purified RSV-specific antibodies, the antibody-dependent and complement dependent cytotoxicity was determined using peripheral cells of healthy donors. This study demonstrates the existence of highly potent RSV-specific antibodies in IVIg preparations and provides the basis for the use of IVIg as broad-spectrum protective shield to RSV-infected children during mixed infections.

  3. Affinity-Purified Respiratory Syncytial Virus Antibodies from Intravenous Immunoglobulin Exert Potent Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nimesh; LeGoff, Jerome; Chamat, Soulaima; Mercier-Delarue, Severine; Touzelet, Olivier; Power, Ultan F.; Kazatchkine, Michel D.; Simon, Francois; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sebastien; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas V.

    2013-01-01

    Mixed infections are one of the major therapeutic challenges, as the current strategies have had limited success. One of the most common and widespread conditions of mixed infection is respiratory syncytial virus-mediated pathology of the respiratory tract in children. There is a dire need for the development of novel therapeutic approaches during mixed infections. Therapeutic intravenous immunoglobulin preparations, obtained from plasma pools of healthy donors have been used in immune deficiencies. This study was thus designed to characterize the functional efficacy of RSV-specific antibodies in IVIg. To explore the functional ability of these affinity-purified RSV-specific antibodies, the antibody-dependent and complement dependent cytotoxicity was determined using peripheral cells of healthy donors. This study demonstrates the existence of highly potent RSV-specific antibodies in IVIg preparations and provides the basis for the use of IVIg as broad-spectrum protective shield to RSV-infected children during mixed infections. PMID:23894466

  4. Shark immunity bites back: affinity maturation and memory response in the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Helen; Flajnik, Martin F

    2005-03-01

    The cartilaginous fish are the oldest phylogenetic group in which all of the molecular components of the adaptive immune system have been found. Although early studies clearly showed that sharks could produce an IgM-based response following immunization, evidence for memory, affinity maturation and roles for the other isotypes (notably IgNAR) in this group remained inconclusive. The data presented here illustrate that the nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) is able to produce not only an IgM response, but we also show for the first time a highly antigen-specific IgNAR response. Additionally, under appropriate conditions, a memory response for both isotypes can be elicited. Analysis of the response shows differential expression of pentameric and monomeric IgM. Pentameric IgM provides the 'first line of defense' through high-avidity, low-affinity interaction with antigen. In contrast, monomeric IgM and IgNAR seem responsible for the specific, antigen-driven response. We propose the presence of distinct lineages of B cells in sharks. As there is no conventional isotype switching, each lineage seems pre-determined to express a single isotype (IgM versus IgNAR). However, our data suggest that there may also be specific lineages for the different forms (pentameric versus monomeric) of the IgM isotype.

  5. Disturbance of hapten-antibody equilibria by ammonium sulphate solutions. A source of error in antibody affinity determinations.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, I J

    1975-12-01

    The affinity of anti-hapten antibody can be conveniently measured by precipitating immune complexes with ammonium sulphate. The method has, however, not proved very reproducible. Here is described one variable difficult to control in the assay: the ammonium sulphate was found to cause dissociation of ligands from hapten (NIP)--antibody complexes. The reason was the volume increase caused by addition of ammonium sulphate. The study suggested that in the calculation of the free hapten concentration the final volume during precipitation should be used. The precipitate should not be washed when hapten binding capacities are measured.

  6. Deconvolution of antibody affinities and concentrations by non-linear regression analysis of competitive ELISA data.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Bobrovnik, S. A.; Biosciences Division; Palladin Inst. Biochemistry

    2007-12-01

    Physiological responses of the adaptive immune system are polyclonal in nature whether induced by a naturally occurring infection, by vaccination to prevent infection or, in the case of animals, by challenge with antigen to generate reagents of research or commercial significance. The composition of the polyclonal responses is distinct to each individual or animal and changes over time. Differences exist in the affinities of the constituents and their relative proportion of the responsive population. In addition, some of the antibodies bind to different sites on the antigen, whereas other pairs of antibodies are sterically restricted from concurrent interaction with the antigen. Even if generation of a monoclonal antibody is the ultimate goal of a project, the quality of the resulting reagent is ultimately related to the characteristics of the initial immune response. It is probably impossible to quantitatively parse the composition of a polyclonal response to antigen. However, molecular regression allows further parameterization of a polyclonal antiserum in the context of certain simplifying assumptions. The antiserum is described as consisting of two competing populations of high- and low-affinity and unknown relative proportions. This simple model allows the quantitative determination of representative affinities and proportions. These parameters may be of use in evaluating responses to vaccines, to evaluating continuity of antibody production whether in vaccine recipients or animals used for the production of antisera, or in optimizing selection of donors for the production of monoclonal antibodies.

  7. Affinity Chromatography of Native and Recombinant Proteins from Receptors for Insulin and IGF-I to Recombinant Single Chain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is an efficient method to isolate proteins by taking advantage of their affinities for specific molecules such as substrates, inhibitors, antigens, ligands, antibodies, and other interacting molecules, including subunits. Nowadays, we take the effectiveness and excellence of this technology for granted. This essay will mainly cover the use of affinity chromatography based on my experience. PMID:26579073

  8. Significance of antibody orientation unraveled: well-oriented antibodies recorded high binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Nobuyuki; Takai, Madoka; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2011-03-15

    To investigate the effect of antibody orientation on its immunological activities, we developed a novel and versatile platform consisting of a well-defined phospholipid polymer surface on which staphylococcal protein A (SpA) was site-selectively immobilized. The application of a biocompatible phospholipid-based platform ensured minimal denaturation of immobilized antibodies, and the site-selective immobilization of SpA clarified the effect of antibody orientation on immunological activities. The phospholipid polymer platform was prepared on silicon substrates using the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) technique. An enzymatic reaction was performed for orientation-selective coupling of SpA molecules to the polymer brush surface. Orientation-controlled antibodies were achieved using enzymatic reactions, and these antibodies captured 1.8 ± 0.1 antigens on average, implying that at least 80% of immobilized antibodies reacted with two antigens. Theoretical multivalent binding analysis further revealed that orientation-controlled antibodies had antigen-antibody reaction equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) as low as 8.6 × 10(-10) mol/L, whereas randomly oriented and partially oriented antibodies showed K(d) values of 2.0 × 10(-7) and 1.2 × 10(-7) mol/L, respectively. Strict control of antibody orientation not only formed an approximately 100-fold stronger antigen-antibody complex than the controls but also sustained the native antibody K(d) (10(-10)-10(-9) mol/L). These findings support the significance of antibody orientation because controlling the orientation resulted in high reactivity and theoretical binding capacity.

  9. [Obtaining of the affinity purified antibodies against survivin for the structure functional study of the protein].

    PubMed

    Akhidova, E V; Volkova, T D; Koroev, D O; Yakupov, I Iu; Kalintseva, M V; Zavalishina, L E; Kaplun, A P; Zharskaia, O O; Zatsepina, O V; Vol'pina, O M

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated protein survivin is the bifunctional protein which can participate either in cell division regulation or in apoptosis inhibition depending on its localization and structure state. The aim of this work was to obtain monospecific antibodies useful for investigation of protein structure and functional features. Six affinity purified antibodies directed to different protein regions were obtained. The ability of antibodies obtained to detect survivin in tumor cells and breast cancer tissues was studied. It was shown that antibodies to (1-22) and (95-105) survivin fragments have the highest specific activity. In western-blot antibodies to (1-22) region predominantly binds with survivin-containing complex, which may be the survivin dimer as we suppose, while antibodies to (95-105) region detects only monomeric form of the protein. Breast cancer tissues study demonstrated that survivin monomer presents only in the tumor core tissues, while survivin-containing complex is expressed both in tumor core and tumor periphery tissues. It was shown that antibodies to (1-22) fragment detect predominantly nuclear survivin, which participates in mitosis regulation, while antibodies to (95-105) fragment gave nucleoplasm and cytoplasm staining at all stages of cell cycle. Thereby antibodies obtained are the useful tool for structure-functional study of survivin.

  10. Determination of equilibrium dissociation constants for recombinant antibodies by high-throughput affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuchen; Sackmann, Eric K; Wypisniak, Karolina; Hornsby, Michael; Datwani, Sammy S; Herr, Amy E

    2016-12-23

    High-quality immunoreagents enhance the performance and reproducibility of immunoassays and, in turn, the quality of both biological and clinical measurements. High quality recombinant immunoreagents are generated using antibody-phage display. One metric of antibody quality - the binding affinity - is quantified through the dissociation constant (KD) of each recombinant antibody and the target antigen. To characterize the KD of recombinant antibodies and target antigen, we introduce affinity electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) in a high-throughput format suitable for small volume samples. A microfluidic card comprised of free-standing polyacrylamide gel (fsPAG) separation lanes supports 384 concurrent EMSAs in 30 s using a single power source. Sample is dispensed onto the microfluidic EMSA card by acoustic droplet ejection (ADE), which reduces EMSA variability compared to sample dispensing using manual or pin tools. The KD for each of a six-member fragment antigen-binding fragment library is reported using ~25-fold less sample mass and ~5-fold less time than conventional heterogeneous assays. Given the form factor and performance of this micro- and mesofluidic workflow, we have developed a sample-sparing, high-throughput, solution-phase alternative for biomolecular affinity characterization.

  11. Polystyrene as an affinity chromatography matrix for the purification of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Staak, C; Salchow, F; Clausen, P H; Luge, E

    1996-08-14

    Affinity chromatography is used for the purification of diagnostic polyclonal antibodies in order to ensure specificity. Most commonly, activated bead-formed agarose or its derivatives are used as gel matrices. Alternative matrix materials have been described, but as yet they do not appear to offer important advantages. In this study, pulverized polystyrene (PS 158K, BASF, Mannheim, Germany) was used as a solid phase for the immobilisation of bovine immunoglobulins (Ig). Affinity chromatography was performed using these coated polystyrene beads as the column matrix material in the purification of anti-bovine Ig. The polystyrene binding capacity for the different bovine Ig classes was compared using the Mancini single radial immunodiffusion technique, and ELISA procedures were used to monitor the antibody reactivity of purified and unpurified antibodies. The degree of purification was comparable to the most commonly used procedure using gel matrices from activated bead-formed agarose (e.g. CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B, Pharmacia/LKB Biotechnology, Uppsala, Sweden), but the antibody yield per ml column volume was distinctly lower. In order to raise the yield, such polystyrene bead columns with immobilized antigen can be re-used without loss of activity or larger column volumes can be used to raise the binding capacity. The polystyrene material is quite durable, chemically and immunologically inert and has a long shelf life. We conclude that polystyrene based affinity chromatography is efficient, simple and cheap.

  12. Determination of equilibrium dissociation constants for recombinant antibodies by high-throughput affinity electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yuchen; Sackmann, Eric K.; Wypisniak, Karolina; Hornsby, Michael; Datwani, Sammy S.; Herr, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    High-quality immunoreagents enhance the performance and reproducibility of immunoassays and, in turn, the quality of both biological and clinical measurements. High quality recombinant immunoreagents are generated using antibody-phage display. One metric of antibody quality – the binding affinity – is quantified through the dissociation constant (KD) of each recombinant antibody and the target antigen. To characterize the KD of recombinant antibodies and target antigen, we introduce affinity electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) in a high-throughput format suitable for small volume samples. A microfluidic card comprised of free-standing polyacrylamide gel (fsPAG) separation lanes supports 384 concurrent EMSAs in 30 s using a single power source. Sample is dispensed onto the microfluidic EMSA card by acoustic droplet ejection (ADE), which reduces EMSA variability compared to sample dispensing using manual or pin tools. The KD for each of a six-member fragment antigen-binding fragment library is reported using ~25-fold less sample mass and ~5-fold less time than conventional heterogeneous assays. Given the form factor and performance of this micro- and mesofluidic workflow, we have developed a sample-sparing, high-throughput, solution-phase alternative for biomolecular affinity characterization. PMID:28008969

  13. Affinity binding of inclusion bodies on supermacroporous monolithic cryogels using labeling with specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Josefin; Kumar, Ashok; Sundström, Heléne; Ledung, Erika; Hörnsten, E Gunnar; Enfors, Sven-Olof; Mattiasson, Bo

    2006-03-23

    A new chromatographic method based on affinity supermacroporous monolithic cryogels is developed for binding and analyzing inclusion bodies during fermentation. The work demonstrated that it is possible to bind specific IgG and IgY antibodies to the 15 and 17 amino acids at the terminus ends of a 33 kDa target protein aggregated as inclusion bodies. The antibody treated inclusion bodies from lysed fermentation broth can be specifically retained in protein A and pseudo-biospecific ligand sulfamethazine modified supermacroporous cryogels. The degree of binding of IgG and IgY treated inclusion bodies to the Protein A and sulfamethazine gels are investigated, as well as the influence of pH on the sulfamethazine ligand. Optimum binding of 78 and 72% was observed on both protein A and sulfamethazine modified cryogel columns, respectively, using IgG labeling of the inclusion bodies. The antibody treated inclusion bodies pass through unretained in the sulfamethazine supermacroporous gel at pH that does not favour the binding between the ligand on the gel and the antibodies on the surface of inclusion bodies. Also the unlabeled inclusion bodies went through the gel unretained, showing no non-specific binding or trapping within the gel. These findings may very well be the foundation for the building of a powerful analytical tool during fermentation of inclusion bodies as well as a convenient way to purify them from fermentation broth. These results also support our earlier findings [Kumar, A., Plieva, F.M., Galaev, I.Yu., Mattiasson, B., 2003. Affinity fractionation of lymphocytes using a monolithic cyogel. J. Immunol. Methods 283, 185-194] with mammalian cells that were surface labeled with specific antibodies and recognized on protein A supermacroporous gels. A general binding and separation system can be established on antibody binding cryogel affinity matrices.

  14. AB-Bind: Antibody binding mutational database for computational affinity predictions.

    PubMed

    Sirin, Sarah; Apgar, James R; Bennett, Eric M; Keating, Amy E

    2016-02-01

    Antibodies (Abs) are a crucial component of the immune system and are often used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The need for high-affinity and high-specificity antibodies in research and medicine is driving the development of computational tools for accelerating antibody design and discovery. We report a diverse set of antibody binding data with accompanying structures that can be used to evaluate methods for modeling antibody interactions. Our Antibody-Bind (AB-Bind) database includes 1101 mutants with experimentally determined changes in binding free energies (ΔΔG) across 32 complexes. Using the AB-Bind data set, we evaluated the performance of protein scoring potentials in their ability to predict changes in binding free energies upon mutagenesis. Numerical correlations between computed and observed ΔΔG values were low (r = 0.16-0.45), but the potentials exhibited predictive power for classifying variants as improved vs weakened binders. Performance was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) for receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves; the highest AUC values for 527 mutants with |ΔΔG| > 1.0 kcal/mol were 0.81, 0.87, and 0.88 using STATIUM, FoldX, and Discovery Studio scoring potentials, respectively. Some methods could also enrich for variants with improved binding affinity; FoldX and Discovery Studio were able to correctly rank 42% and 30%, respectively, of the 80 most improved binders (those with ΔΔG < -1.0 kcal/mol) in the top 5% of the database. This modest predictive performance has value but demonstrates the continuing need to develop and improve protein energy functions for affinity prediction.

  15. Dual-display of small molecules enables the discovery of ligand pairs and facilitates affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Wichert, Moreno; Krall, Nikolaus; Decurtins, Willy; Franzini, Raphael M; Pretto, Francesca; Schneider, Petra; Neri, Dario; Scheuermann, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to standard fragment-based drug discovery approaches, dual-display DNA-encoded chemical libraries have the potential to identify fragment pairs that bind simultaneously and benefit from the chelate effect. However, the technology has been limited by the difficulty in unambiguously decoding the ligand pairs from large combinatorial libraries. Here we report a strategy that overcomes this limitation and enables the efficient identification of ligand pairs that bind to a target protein. Small organic molecules were conjugated to the 5' and 3' ends of complementary DNA strands that contain a unique identifying code. DNA hybridization followed by an inter-strand code-transfer created a stable dual-display DNA-encoded chemical library of 111,100 members. Using this approach we report the discovery of a low micromolar binder to alpha-1-acid glycoprotein and the affinity maturation of a ligand to carbonic anhydrase IX, an established marker of renal cell carcinoma. The newly discovered subnanomolar carbonic anhydrase IX binder dramatically improved tumour targeting performance in vivo.

  16. Dual-display of small molecules enables the discovery of ligand pairs and facilitates affinity maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichert, Moreno; Krall, Nikolaus; Decurtins, Willy; Franzini, Raphael M.; Pretto, Francesca; Schneider, Petra; Neri, Dario; Scheuermann, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to standard fragment-based drug discovery approaches, dual-display DNA-encoded chemical libraries have the potential to identify fragment pairs that bind simultaneously and benefit from the chelate effect. However, the technology has been limited by the difficulty in unambiguously decoding the ligand pairs from large combinatorial libraries. Here we report a strategy that overcomes this limitation and enables the efficient identification of ligand pairs that bind to a target protein. Small organic molecules were conjugated to the 5‧ and 3‧ ends of complementary DNA strands that contain a unique identifying code. DNA hybridization followed by an inter-strand code-transfer created a stable dual-display DNA-encoded chemical library of 111,100 members. Using this approach we report the discovery of a low micromolar binder to alpha-1-acid glycoprotein and the affinity maturation of a ligand to carbonic anhydrase IX, an established marker of renal cell carcinoma. The newly discovered subnanomolar carbonic anhydrase IX binder dramatically improved tumour targeting performance in vivo.

  17. Purification of anti-bromelain antibodies by affinity precipitation using pNIPAm-linked bromelain.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Rubab

    2016-01-01

    Affinity precipitation has emerged as a very useful technique for the purification of proteins. Here it has been employed for the purification of anti-bromelain antibodies from rabbit serum. A system has been developed for reversibly binding and thermoprecipitating antibodies. Anti-bromelain antibodies were raised in rabbit by immunizing it with bromelain. Poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (pNIPAm)-bromelain conjugate was prepared and incubated with rabbit serum. After that the temperature was raised for thermal precipitation of the polymer. Antibodies were then eluted from the complex by incubating it with a small volume of buffer, pH 3.0. This method is very effective in concentrating the antibodies. Purity and specificity of the antibodies were checked by gel electrophoresis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The study of the effect of pH and temperature on the binding of the antibodies to the conjugate showed that the optimum binding occurred at pH 8.0 and 25°C.The polymer enzyme conjugate was further used for another cycle.

  18. The identification of affinity peptide ligands specific to the variable region of human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Miyata, Haruo; Komiyama, Masaru; Nogami, Masahiro; Ozawa, Kazumichi; Oshita, Chie; Kume, Akiko; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Sakura, Naoki; Mochizuki, Tohru; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Of all potential biological therapeutics, monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based therapies are becoming the dominant focus of clinical research. In particular, smaller recombinant antibody fragments such as single-chain variable fragments (scFv) have become the subject of intense focus. However, an efficient affinity ligand for antibody fragment purification has not been developed. In the present study, we designed a consensus sequence for the human antibody heavy or light chain-variable regions (Fv) based on the antibody sequences available in the ImMunoGeneTics information system (IMGT), and synthesized these consensus sequences as template Fv antibodies. We then screened peptide ligands that specifically bind to the repertoire-derived human Fv consensus antibody using a 12-mer-peptide library expressed-phage display method. Subsequently, 1 peptide for the VH template and 8 peptides for the VK template were selected as the candidate ligands after 4 rounds of panning the phage display. Using peptide-bead-based immunoprecipitation, the code-4 and code-13 peptides showed recovery rates of the VH and VK templates that were 20-30% and 40-50%, respectively. Both peptides exhibited better recovery rates for trastuzumab scFv (approximately 40%). If it were possible to identify the best combination of VH and VK-binding peptides among the ligand peptides suitable for the human mAb Fv sequence, the result could be a promising purification tool that might greatly improve the cost efficiencies of the purification process.

  19. High-affinity antibodies to the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.P.; Sharp, A.; Strom, M.; Kahl, S.D.

    1986-05-01

    Antibodies with high affinity and specificity for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers have been produced in rabbits by immunization with dihydropyridine-protein conjugates. Anti-dihydropyridine antibodies were found to specifically bind (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine, (/sup 3/H)-nimodipine, (/sup 3/H)nisoldipine, and (/sup 3/H)PN 200-110 (all 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers) with high affinity, while (/sup 3/H)verapamil, (/sup 3/H)diltiazem, and (/sup 3/H)trifluoperazine were not recognized. The average dissociation constant of the (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine-antibody complex was 0.06 (+/- 0.02) X 10(-9) M for an antiserum studied in detail and ranged from 0.01 to 0.24 X 10(-9) M for all antisera. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding was specific for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel modifiers and the concentrations required for half-maximal inhibition ranged between 0.25 and 0.90 nM. Structurally unrelated Ca2+-channel blockers, calmodulin antagonists, inactive metabolites of nitrendipine, and UV-inactivated nisoldipine did not modify (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding to the anti-dihydropyridine antibodies. Dihydropyridines without a bulky substituent in the 4-position of the heterocycle were able to displace (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding, but the concentrations required for half-maximal inhibition were greater than 800 nM. In summary, anti-dihydropyridine antibodies have been shown to have high affinity and specificity for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers and to exhibit dihydropyridine binding properties similar to the membrane receptor for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers.

  20. Antibody VH and VL recombination using phage and ribosome display technologies reveals distinct structural routes to affinity improvements with VH-VL interface residues providing important structural diversity.

    PubMed

    Groves, Maria A T; Amanuel, Lily; Campbell, Jamie I; Rees, D Gareth; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2014-01-01

    In vitro selection technologies are an important means of affinity maturing antibodies to generate the optimal therapeutic profile for a particular disease target. Here, we describe the isolation of a parent antibody, KENB061 using phage display and solution phase selections with soluble biotinylated human IL-1R1. KENB061 was affinity matured using phage display and targeted mutagenesis of VH and VL CDR3 using NNS randomization. Affinity matured VHCDR3 and VLCDR3 library blocks were recombined and selected using phage and ribosome display protocol. A direct comparison of the phage and ribosome display antibodies generated was made to determine their functional characteristics.In our analyses, we observed distinct differences in the pattern of beneficial mutations in antibodies derived from phage and ribosome display selections, and discovered the lead antibody Jedi067 had a ~3700-fold improvement in KD over the parent KENB061. We constructed a homology model of the Fv region of Jedi067 to map the specific positions where mutations occurred in the CDR3 loops. For VL CDR3, positions 94 to 97 carry greater diversity in the ribosome display variants compared with the phage display. The positions 95a, 95b and 96 of VLCDR3 form part of the interface with VH in this model. The model shows that positions 96, 98, 100e, 100f, 100 g, 100h, 100i and 101 of the VHCDR3 include residues at the VH and VL interface. Importantly, Leu96 and Tyr98 are conserved at the interface positions in both phage and ribosome display indicating their importance in maintaining the VH-VL interface. For antibodies derived from ribosome display, there is significant diversity at residues 100a to 100f of the VH CDR3 compared with phage display. A unique deletion of isoleucine at position 102 of the lead candidate, Jedi067, also occurs in the VHCDR3.As anticipated, recombining the mutations via ribosome display led to a greater structural diversity, particularly in the heavy chain CDR3, which in turn

  1. Protection against anthrax toxin by recombinant antibody fragments correlates with antigen affinity.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Jennifer A; Maassen, Catharina B M; Leppla, Stephen H; Brasky, Kathleen; Patterson, Jean L; Iverson, Brent L; Georgiou, George

    2002-06-01

    The tripartite toxin produced by Bacillus anthracis is the key determinant in the etiology of anthrax. We have engineered a panel of toxin-neutralizing antibodies, including single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) and scFvs fused to a human constant kappa domain (scAbs), that bind to the protective antigen subunit of the toxin with equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) between 63 nM and 0.25 nM. The entire antibody panel showed high serum, thermal, and denaturant stability. In vitro, post-challenge protection of macrophages from the action of the holotoxin correlated with the K(d) of the scFv variants. Strong correlations among antibody construct affinity, serum half-life, and protection were also observed in a rat model of toxin challenge. High-affinity toxin-neutralizing antibodies may be of therapeutic value for alleviating the symptoms of anthrax toxin in infected individuals and for medium-term prophylaxis to infection.

  2. Subcutaneous bioavailability of therapeutic antibodies as a function of FcRn binding affinity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Y Gloria; Hoyte, Kwame; Lutman, Jeff; Lu, Yanmei; Iyer, Suhasini; DeForge, Laura E; Theil, Frank-Peter; Fielder, Paul J; Prabhu, Saileta

    2012-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) plays an important and well-known role in immunoglobulin G (IgG) catabolism; however, its role in the disposition of IgG after subcutaneous (SC) administration, including bioavailability, is relatively unknown. To examine the potential effect of FcRn on IgG SC bioavailability, we engineered three anti-amyloid β monoclonal antibody (mAb) reverse chimeric mouse IgG2a (mIgG2a) Fc variants (I253A.H435A, N434H and N434Y) with different binding affinities to mouse FcRn (mFcRn) and compared their SC bioavailability to that of the wild-type (WT) mAb in mice. Our results indicated that the SC bioavailability of mIgG2a was affected by mFcRn-binding affinity. Variant I253A.H435A, which did not bind to mFcRn at either pH 6.0 or pH 7.4, had the lowest bioavailability (41.8%). Variant N434Y, which had the greatest increase in binding affinity at both pH 6.0 and pH 7.4, had comparable bioavailability to the WT antibody (86.1% vs. 76.3%), whereas Variant N434H, which had modestly increased binding affinity at pH 6.0 to mFcRn and affinity comparable to the WT antibody at pH 7.4, had the highest bioavailability (94.7%). A semi-mechanism-based pharmacokinetic model, which described well the observed data with the WT antibody and variant I253A.H435A, is consistent with the hypothesis that the decreased bioavailability of variant I253A.H435A was due to loss of the FcRn-mediated protection from catabolism at the absorption site. Together, these data demonstrate that FcRn plays an important role in SC bioavailability of therapeutic IgG antibodies. PMID:22327433

  3. Direct detection of antibody concentration and affinity in human serum using microscale thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lippok, Svenja; Seidel, Susanne A I; Duhr, Stefan; Uhland, Kerstin; Holthoff, Hans-Peter; Jenne, Dieter; Braun, Dieter

    2012-04-17

    The direct quantification of both the binding affinity and absolute concentration of disease-related biomarkers in biological fluids is particularly beneficial for differential diagnosis and therapy monitoring. Here, we extend microscale thermophoresis to target immunological questions. Optically generated thermal gradients were used to deplete fluorescently marked antigens in 2- and 10-fold-diluted human serum. We devised and validated an autocompetitive strategy to independently fit the concentration and dissociation constant of autoimmune antibodies against the cardiac β1-adrenergic receptor related to dilated cardiomyopathy. As an artificial antigen, the peptide COR1 was designed to mimic the second extracellular receptor loop. Thermophoresis resolved antibody concentrations from 2 to 200 nM and measured the dissociation constant as 75 nM. The approach quantifies antibody binding in its native serum environment within microliter volumes and without any surface attachments. The simplicity of the mix and probe protocol minimizes systematic errors, making thermophoresis a promising detection method for personalized medicine.

  4. Improving the binding affinity of an antibody using molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Casipit, C. L.; Tal, R.; Wittman, V.; Chavaillaz, P. A.; Arbuthnott, K.; Weidanz, J. A.; Jiao, J. A.; Wong, H. C.

    1998-01-01

    Activated Factor X releases F1.2, a 271-amino acid peptide, from the amino terminus of prothrombin during blood coagulation. A nine-amino acid peptide, C9 (DSDRAIEGR), corresponding to the carboxyl terminus of F1.2 was synthesized and used to produce a monoclonal antibody, TA1 (K(D)) 1.22 x 10(-6) M). To model the TA1 antibody, we entered the sequence information of the cloned TA1 Fv into the antibody modeling program, ABM, which combines homology methods, conformational search procedures, and energy screening and has proved to be a reliable and reproducible antibody modeling method. Using a novel protein fusion procedure, we expressed the C9 peptide fused to the carboxyl terminus of the PENI repressor protein from Bacillus licheniformis in Escherichia coli. We constructed fusion proteins containing alanine substitutions for each amino acid in the C9 epitope. Binding studies, using the C9 alanine mutants and TA1, and spatial constraints predicted by the modeled TA1 binding cleft enabled us to establish a plausible conformation for C9 complexed with TA1. Furthermore, based on binding results of conservative amino acid substitutions in C9 and mutations in the antibody, we were able to refine the complex model and identify antibody mutations that would improve binding affinity. PMID:10082364

  5. Antibody affinities and relative titers in polyclonal populations: surface plasmon resonance analysis of anti-DNA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sem, D S; McNeeley, P A; Linnik, M D

    1999-12-01

    This paper presents the equations and methodology for the measurement and interpretation of apparent dissociation constants for polyclonal populations of antibodies, where antigen is kept trace relative to antibody concentration. Surface plasmon resonance is used to determine K(d)s for the binding of anti-DNA antibodies to trace amounts of DNA antigen on a chip. Since the approach taken relies on equilibrium measurements, kinetic mass transport artifacts are avoided. The apparent K(d) is a weighted average of all the K(d)s for the clonally related subpopulations within the polyclonal pool, where each weighting factor is the relative titer (fractional presence) of the subpopulation. Titration curves appear as if there is one monoclonal population with that titer-weighted-average K(d). Implications of changes in the antibody affinity distribution within the population are discussed. The equations described herein provide a better physical understanding of the apparent K(d) that is obtained when a heterogeneous population of receptors is titrated against a trace ligand.

  6. Human Monoclonal Antibody Fragments Binding to Insulin-like Growth Factors 1 and 2 with Picomolar Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Feng, Yang; Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2011-01-01

    The type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) and its ligands (IGF1 and IGF2) have been implicated in a variety of physiological processes and in diseases such as cancer. In addition to IGF1R, IGF2 also activates the insulin receptor (IR) isoform A and therefore antibodies against IGF2 can inhibit cell proliferation mediated by the signaling through both IGF1R and IR triggered by IGF2. We identified a new human monoclonal antibody (mAb), m708.2, which bound to IGF1 and IGF2 but not to insulin. m708.2 potently inhibited signal transduction mediated by the interaction of IGF1 or IGF2 with the IGF1R and IGF2 with the IR. It also inhibited the growth of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. An affinity-matured derivative of m708.2, m708.5, bound to IGF1 with equilibrium dissociation constant, KD = 200 pM and to IGF2 with KD = 60 pM. m708.5 inhibited signal transduction mediated by IGF1 and IGF2 and cancer cell growth more potently than m708.2. These results suggest that m708.5 could have potential as a candidate therapeutic for cancers driven by the IGF1,2 interactions with IGF1R and IR. PMID:21750218

  7. Immunoproteomics using polyclonal antibodies and stable isotope-labeled affinity-purified recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Edfors, Fredrik; Boström, Tove; Forsström, Björn; Zeiler, Marlis; Johansson, Henrik; Lundberg, Emma; Hober, Sophia; Lehtiö, Janne; Mann, Matthias; Uhlen, Mathias

    2014-06-01

    The combination of immuno-based methods and mass spectrometry detection has great potential in the field of quantitative proteomics. Here, we describe a new method (immuno-SILAC) for the absolute quantification of proteins in complex samples based on polyclonal antibodies and stable isotope-labeled recombinant protein fragments to allow affinity enrichment prior to mass spectrometry analysis and accurate quantification. We took advantage of the antibody resources publicly available from the Human Protein Atlas project covering more than 80% of all human protein-coding genes. Epitope mapping revealed that a majority of the polyclonal antibodies recognized multiple linear epitopes, and based on these results, a semi-automated method was developed for peptide enrichment using polyclonal antibodies immobilized on protein A-coated magnetic beads. A protocol based on the simultaneous multiplex capture of more than 40 protein targets showed that approximately half of the antibodies enriched at least one functional peptide detected in the subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. The approach was further developed to also generate quantitative data via the addition of heavy isotope-labeled recombinant protein fragment standards prior to trypsin digestion. Here, we show that we were able to use small amounts of antibodies (50 ng per target) in this manner for efficient multiplex analysis of quantitative levels of proteins in a human HeLa cell lysate. The results suggest that polyclonal antibodies generated via immunization of recombinant protein fragments could be used for the enrichment of target peptides to allow for rapid mass spectrometry analysis taking advantage of a substantial reduction in sample complexity. The possibility of building up a proteome-wide resource for immuno-SILAC assays based on publicly available antibody resources is discussed.

  8. Antibody Maturation in Women Who Acquire HIV Infection While Using Antiretroviral Preexposure Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Laeyendecker, Oliver; Redd, Andrew D; Nason, Martha; Longosz, Andrew F; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Naranbhai, Vivek; Garrett, Nigel; Eshleman, Susan H; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Quinn, Thomas C

    2015-09-01

    The CAPRISA 004 preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) randomized trial demonstrated that women who used a vaginal gel containing the antiretroviral drug tenofovir (TFV) had a 39% lower risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is not known whether topical TFV alters the antibody response to breakthrough HIV infection. In this study, antibody maturation was evaluated using 3 serologic assays: the BED capture enzyme immunoassay (CEIA), the Bio-Plex (Luminex) assay, and the Bio-Rad avidity assay. Tests were performed using serum samples collected 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 36, 48, and >48 months after seroconversion from 95 women in the CAPRISA 004 trial (35 in the TFV gel arm and 60 in the placebo arm). For the BED CEIA and Luminex assay, linear mixed effects models were used to examine test results by study arm. Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to examine time to avidity cutoff. Anti-HIV antibody titers did not differ between study arms. Women assigned to TFV gel demonstrated slower antibody avidity maturation, as determined by the Bio-Rad (P = .04) and gp120 Bio-Plex (P = .028) assays. Women who were assigned to receive topical TFV but became infected had slower antibody avidity maturation, with potential implications for diagnosis and antibody-based incidence assays as access to antiretroviral therapy-based PrEP is increased.

  9. Affinity separation using an Fv antibody fragment-"smart" polymer conjugate.

    PubMed

    Fong, Robin B; Ding, Zhongli; Hoffman, Allan S; Stayton, Patrick S

    2002-08-05

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), or PNIPAAm, is considered a "smart" polymer because it sharply precipitates when heated above a critical temperature, about 32 degrees C in water, and redissolves when cooled. Conjugates made of PNIPAAm and IgG antibodies also exhibit the same critical temperature behavior. Interestingly, antigens that are complexed with these conjugates can also be phase-separated along with the conjugates. In this work, we conjugated PNIPAAm for the first time to the immunoglobulin Fv fragment, the smallest fragment of an antibody that still retains the antigenic affinity of the whole antibody. For our studies, we used an Fv fragment that strongly binds hen egg white lysozyme (HEL). The purified Fv fragment-polymer conjugate precipitated at the same temperature as did the pure polymer. After addition of the conjugate to a mixture containing HEL and after thermal separation of the conjugate at 37 degrees C, the amount of HEL in solution was reduced by as much as 80%. We were able to demonstrate the reversibility of the separation through three cycles of precipitation and dissolution. It was also possible to recover free HEL by thermal separation of the conjugate in the presence of an eluant, 50 mM diethylamine. The conjugate can then be recycled for second use. In conclusion, immunoseparations can be performed using smart polymer conjugates made with just the variable domains of an antibody. Unlike whole antibodies, fragments of antibodies can be produced in Escherichia coli, allowing easier genetic engineering of the antibody and tailoring of the conjugate.

  10. Maturation of human B lymphocytes--studies with a panel of monoclonal antibodies against membrane antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Zola, H; McNamara, P J; Moore, H A; Smart, I J; Brooks, D A; Beckman, I G; Bradley, J

    1983-01-01

    The expression of six different membrane markers by cells of the human B lymphocyte lineage has been studied, using monoclonal antibodies. B cells representing various stages of differentiation/maturation have been examined, using normal cells, leukaemia cells, and continuous cell lines. The expression of the six markers has been compared with maturation stages defined by immunoglobulin expression. The HLA/beta 2-microglobulin complex is present throughout the B cell lineage, whilst the Ia (p28,33) marker is present from the earliest stage that can be attributed to the B lineage, but is lost during plasma cell differentiation. A marker detected by monoclonal antibody FMC 1 is present only on mature B lymphocytes, being absent from pre-B cells or plasma cells. FMC 7 detects an antigen found on a relatively mature subpopulation, whereas FMC 8 detects early as well as mature B cells. FMC 3 expression is found on a proportion of cells at any maturation stage, suggesting that expression of this marker is controlled by factors unrelated to maturation. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6191892

  11. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Neuropeptides Using Affinity-Enhanced Microdialysis with Antibody-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Schmerberg, Claire M.; Li, Lingjun

    2012-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) is a useful sampling tool for many applications due to its ability to permit sampling from an animal concurrent with normal activity. MD is of particular importance in the field of neuroscience, in which it is used to sample neurotransmitters (NTs) while the animal is behaving in order to correlate dynamic changes in NTs with behavior. One important class of signaling molecules, the neuropeptides (NPs), however, presented significant challenges when studied with MD, due to the low relative recovery (RR) of NPs by this technique. Affinity-enhanced microdialysis (AE-MD) has previously been used to improve recovery of NPs and similar molecules. For AE-MD, an affinity agent (AA), such as an antibody-coated particle or free antibody, is added to the liquid perfusing the MD probe. This AA provides an additional mass transport driving force for analyte to pass through the dialysis membrane, and thus increases the RR. In this work, a variety of AAs have been investigated for AE-MD of NPs in vitro and in vivo, including particles with C18 surface functionality and antibody-coated particles. Antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles (AbMnP) provided the best RR enhancement in vitro, with statistically significant (p<0.05) enhancements for 4 out of 6 NP standards tested, and RR increases up to 41-fold. These particles were then used for in vivo MD in the Jonah crab, Cancer borealis, during a feeding study, with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. 31 NPs were detected in a 30 min collection sample, compared to 17 when no AA was used. The use of AbMnP also increased the temporal resolution from 4–18 hrs in previous studies to just 30 min in this study. The levels of NPs detected were also sufficient for reliable quantitation with the MS system in use, permitting quantitative analysis of the concentration changes for 7 identified NPs on a 30 min time course during feeding. PMID:23249250

  12. Immunological and structural characterization of a high affinity anti-fluorescein single-chain antibody.

    PubMed

    Bedzyk, W D; Weidner, K M; Denzin, L K; Johnson, L S; Hardman, K D; Pantoliano, M W; Asel, E D; Voss, E W

    1990-10-25

    Single-chain antibody of the (NH2) VL-linker-VH (COOH) design, was constructed based on prototype high affinity anti-fluorescein monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4-4-20. Purified single-chain antibody (SCA) 4-4-20/212 was studied relative to Ig mAb 4-4-20 in terms of ligand binding, kinetics, idiotypy, metatypy, and stability in denaturing agents. Ligand-binding data correlated with metatypic relatedness of the liganded site. Anti-metatypic reagents reacted preferentially with the liganded conformer of the 4-4-20 antibody active site and were unreactive with free ligand and the non-liganded (idiotypic) state. All results were consistent with the conclusion that SCA 4-4-20/212, with a 14-amino acid linker folded into a native conformational state that closely simulated the prototypical mAb. Furthermore, GndHCl unfolding and refolding studies demonstrated H and L chain variable domain intrinsic stability between SCA 4-4-20/212 and a 50 kDa antigen-binding fragment were nearly identical. This suggested CH1 and CL domain interactions may be more prevalent in V region molecular dynamics than structure.

  13. In-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to monitor affinity chromatography purification of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Kazarian, Sergei G.; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    In recent years many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have entered the biotherapeutics market, offering new treatments for chronic and life-threatening diseases. Protein A resin captures monoclonal antibody (mAb) effectively, but the binding capacity decays over repeated purification cycles. On an industrial scale, replacing fouled Protein A affinity chromatography resin accounts for a large proportion of the raw material cost. Cleaning-in-place (CIP) procedures were developed to extend Protein A resin lifespan, but chromatograms cannot reliably quantify any remaining contaminants over repeated cycles. To study resin fouling in situ, we coupled affinity chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the first time, by embedding an attenuated total reflection (ATR) sensor inside a micro-scale column while measuring the UV 280 nm and conductivity. Our approach quantified the in-column protein concentration in the resin bed and determined protein conformation. Our results show that Protein A ligand leached during CIP. We also found that host cell proteins bound to the Protein A resin even more strongly than mAbs and that typical CIP conditions do not remove all fouling contaminants. The insights derived from in-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopic monitoring could contribute to mAb purification quality assurance as well as guide the development of more effective CIP conditions to optimise resin lifespan. PMID:27470880

  14. In-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to monitor affinity chromatography purification of monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Kazarian, Sergei G.; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-07-01

    In recent years many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have entered the biotherapeutics market, offering new treatments for chronic and life-threatening diseases. Protein A resin captures monoclonal antibody (mAb) effectively, but the binding capacity decays over repeated purification cycles. On an industrial scale, replacing fouled Protein A affinity chromatography resin accounts for a large proportion of the raw material cost. Cleaning-in-place (CIP) procedures were developed to extend Protein A resin lifespan, but chromatograms cannot reliably quantify any remaining contaminants over repeated cycles. To study resin fouling in situ, we coupled affinity chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the first time, by embedding an attenuated total reflection (ATR) sensor inside a micro-scale column while measuring the UV 280 nm and conductivity. Our approach quantified the in-column protein concentration in the resin bed and determined protein conformation. Our results show that Protein A ligand leached during CIP. We also found that host cell proteins bound to the Protein A resin even more strongly than mAbs and that typical CIP conditions do not remove all fouling contaminants. The insights derived from in-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopic monitoring could contribute to mAb purification quality assurance as well as guide the development of more effective CIP conditions to optimise resin lifespan.

  15. Quantitation of tyrosine hydroxylase, protein levels: Spot immunolabeling with an affinity-purified antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Haycock, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase was purified from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells and rat pheochromocytoma using a rapid (less than 2 days) procedure performed at room temperature. Rabbits were immunized with purified enzyme that was denatured with sodium dodecylsulfate, and antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase were affinity-purified from immune sera. A Western blot procedure using the affinity-purified antibodies and {sup 125}I-protein A demonstrated a selective labeling of a single Mr approximately 62,000 band in samples from a number of different tissues. The relative lack of background {sup 125}I-protein A binding permitted the development of a quantitative spot immunolabeling procedure for tyrosine hydroxylase protein. The sensitivity of the assay is 1-2 ng of enzyme. Essentially identical standard curves were obtained with tyrosine hydroxylase purified from rat pheochromocytoma, rat corpus striatum, and bovine adrenal medulla. An extract of PC 12 cells (clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells) was calibrated against purified rat pheochromocytoma tyrosine hydroxylase and used as an external standard against which levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells and other tissue were quantified. With this procedure, qualitative assessment of tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels can be obtained in a few hours and quantitative assessment can be obtained in less than a day.

  16. Enhanced tumor-targeting selectivity by modulating bispecific antibody binding affinity and format valence

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Yariv; Sachsenmeier, Kris F.; Yang, Chunning; Hansen, Anna; Filderman, Jessica; Mulgrew, Kathy; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.

    2017-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies are considered attractive bio-therapeutic agents owing to their ability to target two distinct disease mediators. Cross-arm avidity targeting of antigen double-positive cancer cells over single-positive normal tissue is believed to enhance the therapeutic efficacy, restrict major escape mechanisms and increase tumor-targeting selectivity, leading to reduced systemic toxicity and improved therapeutic index. However, the interplay of factors regulating target selectivity is not well understood and often overlooked when developing clinically relevant bispecific therapeutics. We show in vivo that dual targeting alone is not sufficient to endow selective tumor-targeting, and report the pivotal roles played by the affinity of the individual arms, overall avidity and format valence. Specifically, a series of monovalent and bivalent bispecific IgGs composed of the anti-HER2 trastuzumab moiety paired with affinity-modulated VH and VL regions of the anti-EGFR GA201 mAb were tested for selective targeting and eradication of double-positive human NCI-H358 non-small cell lung cancer target tumors over single-positive, non-target NCI-H358-HER2 CRISPR knock out tumors in nude mice bearing dual-flank tumor xenografts. Affinity-reduced monovalent bispecific variants, but not their bivalent bispecific counterparts, mediated a greater degree of tumor targeting selectivity, while the overall efficacy against the targeted tumor was not substantially affected. PMID:28067257

  17. Maturation Pathway from Germline to Broad HIV-1 Neutralizer of a CD4-Mimic Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Zhou, Tongqing; Sheng, Zizhang; Chen, Lei; Gao, Feng; Joyce, M.  Gordon; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Schramm, Chaim A.; Wiehe, Kevin; Alam, S.  Munir; Bradley, Todd; Gladden, Morgan A.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Iyengar, Sheelah; Kumar, Amit; Lu, Xiaozhi; Luo, Kan; Mangiapani, Michael C.; Parks, Robert J.; Song, Hongshuo; Acharya, Priyamvada; Bailer, Robert T.; Cao, Allen; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Kwon, Young D.; Louder, Mark K.; Zhang, Baoshan; Zheng, Anqi; Hill, Brenna J.; Kong, Rui; Soto, Cinque; Mullikin, James C.; Douek, Daniel C.; Montefiori, David C.; Moody, Michael A.; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Kelsoe, Garnett; Hraber, Peter T.; Korber, Bette T.; Boyd, Scott D.; Fire, Andrew Z.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Ward, Andrew B.; Mascola, John R.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Kwong, Peter D.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we report that antibodies with ontogenies from VH1-2 or VH1-46-germline genes dominate the broadly neutralizing response against the CD4-binding site (CD4bs) on HIV-1. We define with longitudinal sampling from time-of-infection the development of a VH1-46-derived antibody lineage that matured to neutralize 90% of HIV-1 isolates. Structures of lineage antibodies CH235 (week 41 from time-of-infection, 18% breadth), CH235.9 (week 152, 77%), and CH235.12 (week 323, 90%) demonstrated the maturing epitope to focus on the conformationally invariant portion of the CD4bs. Similarities between CH235 lineage and five unrelated CD4bs lineages in epitope focusing, length-of-time to develop breadth, and extraordinary level of somatic hypermutation suggested commonalities in maturation among all CD4bs antibodies. Fortunately, the required CH235-lineage hypermutation appeared substantially guided by the intrinsic mutability of the VH1-46 gene, which closely resembled VH1-2. Lastly, we integrated our CH235-lineage findings with a second broadly neutralizing lineage and HIV-1 co-evolution to suggest a vaccination strategy for inducing both lineages.

  18. Maturation Pathway from Germline to Broad HIV-1 Neutralizer of a CD4-Mimic Antibody

    DOE PAGES

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Zhou, Tongqing; Sheng, Zizhang; ...

    2016-04-01

    Here, we report that antibodies with ontogenies from VH1-2 or VH1-46-germline genes dominate the broadly neutralizing response against the CD4-binding site (CD4bs) on HIV-1. We define with longitudinal sampling from time-of-infection the development of a VH1-46-derived antibody lineage that matured to neutralize 90% of HIV-1 isolates. Structures of lineage antibodies CH235 (week 41 from time-of-infection, 18% breadth), CH235.9 (week 152, 77%), and CH235.12 (week 323, 90%) demonstrated the maturing epitope to focus on the conformationally invariant portion of the CD4bs. Similarities between CH235 lineage and five unrelated CD4bs lineages in epitope focusing, length-of-time to develop breadth, and extraordinary level ofmore » somatic hypermutation suggested commonalities in maturation among all CD4bs antibodies. Fortunately, the required CH235-lineage hypermutation appeared substantially guided by the intrinsic mutability of the VH1-46 gene, which closely resembled VH1-2. Lastly, we integrated our CH235-lineage findings with a second broadly neutralizing lineage and HIV-1 co-evolution to suggest a vaccination strategy for inducing both lineages.« less

  19. Maturation Pathway from Germline to Broad HIV-1 Neutralizer of a CD4-Mimic Antibody.

    PubMed

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Zhou, Tongqing; Sheng, Zizhang; Chen, Lei; Gao, Feng; Joyce, M Gordon; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Schramm, Chaim A; Wiehe, Kevin; Alam, S Munir; Bradley, Todd; Gladden, Morgan A; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Iyengar, Sheelah; Kumar, Amit; Lu, Xiaozhi; Luo, Kan; Mangiapani, Michael C; Parks, Robert J; Song, Hongshuo; Acharya, Priyamvada; Bailer, Robert T; Cao, Allen; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kwon, Young D; Louder, Mark K; Zhang, Baoshan; Zheng, Anqi; Hill, Brenna J; Kong, Rui; Soto, Cinque; Mullikin, James C; Douek, Daniel C; Montefiori, David C; Moody, Michael A; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kelsoe, Garnett; Hraber, Peter T; Korber, Bette T; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Kepler, Thomas B; Shapiro, Lawrence; Ward, Andrew B; Mascola, John R; Liao, Hua-Xin; Kwong, Peter D; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-04-07

    Antibodies with ontogenies from VH1-2 or VH1-46-germline genes dominate the broadly neutralizing response against the CD4-binding site (CD4bs) on HIV-1. Here, we define with longitudinal sampling from time-of-infection the development of a VH1-46-derived antibody lineage that matured to neutralize 90% of HIV-1 isolates. Structures of lineage antibodies CH235 (week 41 from time-of-infection, 18% breadth), CH235.9 (week 152, 77%), and CH235.12 (week 323, 90%) demonstrated the maturing epitope to focus on the conformationally invariant portion of the CD4bs. Similarities between CH235 lineage and five unrelated CD4bs lineages in epitope focusing, length-of-time to develop breadth, and extraordinary level of somatic hypermutation suggested commonalities in maturation among all CD4bs antibodies. Fortunately, the required CH235-lineage hypermutation appeared substantially guided by the intrinsic mutability of the VH1-46 gene, which closely resembled VH1-2. We integrated our CH235-lineage findings with a second broadly neutralizing lineage and HIV-1 co-evolution to suggest a vaccination strategy for inducing both lineages.

  20. Polyclonal antibody localizes glia maturation factor beta-like immunoreactivity in neurons and glia.

    PubMed

    Wang, B R; Zaheer, A; Lim, R

    1992-09-18

    A rabbit polyclonal antibody (91-01) was raised against recombinant human glia maturation factor beta (r-hGMF-beta). The antibody did not cross-react with a number of other growth factors on ELISA test. When compared with the monoclonal antibody G2-09 previously obtained, 91-01 immunoblotted the same protein band in rat brain extract. However, unlike G2-09 which immunostained only astrocytes and Bergmann glia, 91-01 stained neurons as well. Many but not all neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system were positive for GMF-beta. The larger cell population stained by the polyclonal antibody was most likely due to its increased sensitivity, although other explanations are possible. The presence of GMF-beta-like immunoreactivity in both neurons and glia raises the possibility of a wider range of cell-cell interaction than was previously considered.

  1. Affinity maturation of single-chain variable fragment specific for aflatoxin B(1) using yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Min, Won-Ki; Kim, Sung-Gun; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    As aflatoxin B1 is one of the most toxic mycotoxins, it is important to detect and to quantify aflatoxin B1 accurately by immunological methods. To enhance aflatoxin B1-binding affinity of the single-chain variable fragment, yeast surface display technique combined with fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied. A randomly mutated scFv library was subjected to 4 rounds of fluorescence-activated cell sorting, resulting in isolation of 5 scFv variants showing an affinity improvement compared to the parental wild type scFv. The best scFv with a 9-fold improvement in affinity for aflatoxin B1 exhibited similar specificity to the monoclonal antibody. Most of the mutations in scFv-M37 were located outside of the canonical antigen-contact loops, suggesting that its affinity improvement might be driven by an allosteric effect inducing scFv-M37 to form a more favorable binding pocket for aflatoxin B1 than the wild type scFv.

  2. A peroxovanadium compound induces Xenopus oocyte maturation: inhibition by a neutralizing anti-insulin receptor antibody.

    PubMed

    Cummings, C; Zhu, L; Sorisky, A; Liu, X J

    1996-05-01

    Synthetic peroxovanadium compounds are a new class of potent inhibitors of protein phosphotyrosine phosphatases. These compounds exhibit insulin-like activity both in vitro and in experimental animals. However, the molecular mechanism by which these compounds exert their biological effect is not well defined. We demonstrate here that several of these compounds induce Xenopus oocyte maturation in vitro, as indicated by germinal vesicle breakdown. Using one of these compounds for further studies, we show that the induction is dose-dependent and is accompanied by activation of maturation promoting factor as well as activation of Xenopus MAP kinase. Like insulin, bpV(pic) causes an acute accumulation of PI(3,4,5)P3 (phosphotidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate), a product of PI 3-kinase. More importantly, bpV(pic)-induced oocyte maturation was abolished by microinjection of a neutralizing monoclonal anti-insulin receptor antibody (17A3) into oocytes or preincubation of oocytes with a PI 3-kinase inhibitor (wortmannin). These results suggest that bpV(pic) acts upstream of the Xenopus IGF-1 receptor in the induction of meiotic maturation, presumably by neutralizing an inhibitory protein tyrosine phosphatase(s) that may regulate the receptor. Finally, using an oocyte-follicle cell complex that responded to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) to undergo GVBD, we showed that injection of 17A3 anti-insulin receptor antibody into oocytes did not affect hCG-induced oocyte maturation.

  3. In Vivo Neutralization of α-Cobratoxin with High-Affinity Llama Single-Domain Antibodies (VHHs) and a VHH-Fc Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Gabrielle; Meyers, Ashley J.; McLean, Michael D.; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi; MacKenzie, Roger; Hall, J. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Small recombinant antibody fragments (e.g. scFvs and VHHs), which are highly tissue permeable, are being investigated for antivenom production as conventional antivenoms consisting of IgG or F(ab’)2 antibody fragments do not effectively neutralize venom toxins located in deep tissues. However, antivenoms composed entirely of small antibody fragments may have poor therapeutic efficacy due to their short serum half-lives. To increase serum persistence and maintain tissue penetration, we prepared low and high molecular mass antivenom antibodies. Four llama VHHs were isolated from an immune VHH-displayed phage library and were shown to have high affinity, in the low nM range, for α-cobratoxin (α–Cbtx), the most lethal component of Naja kaouthia venom. Subsequently, our highest affinity VHH (C2) was fused to a human Fc fragment to create a VHH2-Fc antibody that would offer prolonged serum persistence. After in planta (Nicotiana benthamiana) expression and purification, we show that our VHH2-Fc antibody retained high affinity binding to α–Cbtx. Mouse α–Cbtx challenge studies showed that our highest affinity VHHs (C2 and C20) and the VHH2-Fc antibody effectively neutralized lethality induced by α–Cbtx at an antibody:toxin molar ratio as low as ca. 0.75×:1. Further research towards the development of an antivenom therapeutic involving these anti-α-Cbtx VHHs and VHH2-Fc antibody molecules should involve testing them as a combination, to determine whether they maintain tissue penetration capability and low immunogenicity, and whether they exhibit improved serum persistence and therapeutic efficacy. PMID:23894495

  4. A comparison of two strategies for affinity maturation of a BH3 peptide toward pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyan; Long, Angel; Link, A James

    2012-03-16

    The Bcl-2 family of proteins regulates apoptosis at the level of mitochondrial permeabilization. Pro-death members of the family, including Bak and Bax, initiate apoptosis, whereas pro-survival members such as Bcl-x(L) and Mcl-1 antagonize the function of Bak and Bax via heterodimeric interactions. These heterodimeric interactions are primarily mediated by the binding of the helical amphipathic BH3 domain from a pro-death protein to a hydrophobic cleft on the surface of the pro-survival protein. Since high levels of pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins are present in many cancers, peptides corresponding to pro-death BH3 domains hold promise as therapeutics. Here we apply a high-throughput flow cytometry assay to engineer the Bak BH3 domain for improved affinity toward the pro-survival proteins Bcl-x(L) and Mcl-1. Two strategies, engineering the hydrophobic face of the Bak BH3 peptide and increasing its overall helicity, are successful in identifying Bak BH3 variants with improved affinity to Bcl-x(L) and Mcl-1. Hydrophobic face engineering of the Bak BH3 peptide led to variants with up to a 15-fold increase in affinity for Bcl-x(L) and increased specificity toward Bcl-x(L). Engineering of the helicity of Bak BH3 led to modest (3- to 4-fold) improvements in affinity with retention of promiscuous binding to all pro-survival proteins. HeLa cell killing studies demonstrate that the affinity matured Bak BH3 variants retain their expected biological function.

  5. Measuring affinity constants of 1450 monoclonal antibodies to peptide targets with a microarray-based label-free assay platform.

    PubMed

    Landry, J P; Ke, Yaohuang; Yu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, X D

    2015-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are major reagents for research and clinical diagnosis. For their inherently high specificities to intended antigen targets and thus low toxicity in general, they are pursued as one of the major classes of new drugs. Yet binding properties of most monoclonal antibodies are not well characterized in terms of affinity constants and how they vary with presentations and/or conformational isomers of antigens, buffer compositions, and temperature. We here report a microarray-based label-free assay platform for high-throughput measurements of monoclonal antibody affinity constants to antigens immobilized on solid surfaces. Using this platform we measured affinity constants of over 1410 rabbit monoclonal antibodies and 46 mouse monoclonal antibodies to peptide targets that are immobilized through a terminal cysteine residue to a glass surface. The experimentally measured affinity constants vary from 10 pM to 200 pM with the median value at 66 pM. We compare the results obtained from the microarray-based platform with those from a benchmarking surface-plasmon-resonance-based (SPR) sensor (Biacore 3000).

  6. Tandem affinity purification combined with inducible shRNA expression as a tool to study the maturation of macromolecular assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Wyler, Emanuel; Zimmermann, Mirjam; Widmann, Barbara; Gstaiger, Matthias; Pfannstiel, Jens; Kutay, Ulrike; Zemp, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is an efficient method for the purification and characterization of large macromolecular complexes. To elucidate the role of specific components of such complexes, it is important to address the question of how loss of a specific factor affects complex composition. Here, we introduce a method that combines TAP of large macromolecular assemblies with inducible shRNA-mediated protein depletion in human somatic cells. As a proof of principle, we have applied this method to the purification of human pre-ribosomal particles. Using inducible expression of ribosome assembly factors as bait proteins, different pre-40S particles could be isolated and characterized, revealing high conservation of the ribosome biogenesis pathway from yeast to human cells. Besides known ribosome maturation factors, C21orf70 was identified as a novel pre-40S component. By combining TAP of pre-40S particles with shRNA-mediated depletion of the pre-40S-associated protein kinase Rio2, we observed that increased levels of the nuclear HEAT-repeat protein Rrp12 are associated with 40S precursors in absence of Rio2. Further analyses revealed that Rrp12 is partially mislocalized to the cytoplasm and trapped on late 40S precursors upon loss of Rio2, and therefore fails to efficiently recycle to the nucleus. Thus, the combination of tandem affinity purification and shRNA induction provided further insights into late cytoplasmic 40S maturation steps, demonstrating the high potential of this method. PMID:21097556

  7. Tandem affinity purification combined with inducible shRNA expression as a tool to study the maturation of macromolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Wyler, Emanuel; Zimmermann, Mirjam; Widmann, Barbara; Gstaiger, Matthias; Pfannstiel, Jens; Kutay, Ulrike; Zemp, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is an efficient method for the purification and characterization of large macromolecular complexes. To elucidate the role of specific components of such complexes, it is important to address the question of how loss of a specific factor affects complex composition. Here, we introduce a method that combines TAP of large macromolecular assemblies with inducible shRNA-mediated protein depletion in human somatic cells. As a proof of principle, we have applied this method to the purification of human pre-ribosomal particles. Using inducible expression of ribosome assembly factors as bait proteins, different pre-40S particles could be isolated and characterized, revealing high conservation of the ribosome biogenesis pathway from yeast to human cells. Besides known ribosome maturation factors, C21orf70 was identified as a novel pre-40S component. By combining TAP of pre-40S particles with shRNA-mediated depletion of the pre-40S-associated protein kinase Rio2, we observed that increased levels of the nuclear HEAT-repeat protein Rrp12 are associated with 40S precursors in absence of Rio2. Further analyses revealed that Rrp12 is partially mislocalized to the cytoplasm and trapped on late 40S precursors upon loss of Rio2, and therefore fails to efficiently recycle to the nucleus. Thus, the combination of tandem affinity purification and shRNA induction provided further insights into late cytoplasmic 40S maturation steps, demonstrating the high potential of this method.

  8. Optimal Affinity of a Monoclonal Antibody: Guiding Principles Using Mechanistic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Abhinav; Abraham, Anson K; Harrold, John M; Zutshi, Anup; Singh, Pratap

    2017-03-01

    Affinity optimization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is essential for developing drug candidates with the highest likelihood of clinical success; however, a quantitative approach for setting affinity requirements is often lacking. In this study, we computationally analyzed the in vivo mAb-target binding kinetics to delineate general principles for defining optimal equilibrium dissociation constant ([Formula: see text]) of mAbs against soluble and membrane-bound targets. Our analysis shows that in general [Formula: see text] to achieve 90% coverage for a soluble target is one tenth of its baseline concentration ([Formula: see text]), and is independent of the dosing interval, target turnover rate or the presence of competing ligands. For membrane-bound internalizing targets, it is equal to the ratio of internalization rate of mAb-target complex and association rate constant ([Formula: see text]). In cases where soluble and membrane-bound forms of the target co-exist, [Formula: see text] lies within a range determined by the internalization rate ([Formula: see text]) of the mAb-membrane target complex and the ratio of baseline concentrations of soluble and membrane-bound forms ([Formula: see text]). Finally, to demonstrate practical application of these general rules, we collected target expression and turnover data to project [Formula: see text] for a number of marketed mAbs against soluble (TNFα, RANKL, and VEGF) and membrane-bound targets (CD20, EGFR, and HER2).

  9. Conformation-dependent high-affinity potent ricin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Hu, Charles Chen; Lillico, Dustin; Yu, Justin; Negrych, Laurel M; Cherwonogrodzky, John W

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potential biothreat agent with no approved antidote available for ricin poisoning. The aim of this study was to develop potent antibody-based antiricin antidotes. Four strong ricin resistant hybridoma clones secreting antiricin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. All four mAbs are bound to conformational epitopes of ricin toxin B (RTB) with high affinity (KD values from 2.55 to 36.27 nM). RTB not only triggers cellular uptake of ricin, but also facilitates transport of the ricin toxin A (RTA) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, where RTA exerts its toxic activity. The four mAbs were found to have potent ricin-neutralizing capacities and synergistic effects among them as determined by an in vitro neutralization assay. In vivo protection assay demonstrated that all four mAbs had strong efficacy against ricin challenges. D9 was found to be exceptionally effective. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of D9, at a dose of 5 μ g, 6 weeks before or 6 hours after an i.p. challenge with 5 × LD50 of ricin was able to protect or rescue 100% of the mice, indicating that mAb D9 is an excellent candidate to be developed as a potent antidote against ricin poisoning for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes.

  10. Conformation-Dependent High-Affinity Potent Ricin-Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Hu, Charles Chen; Lillico, Dustin; Yu, Justin; Negrych, Laurel M.; Cherwonogrodzky, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potential biothreat agent with no approved antidote available for ricin poisoning. The aim of this study was to develop potent antibody-based antiricin antidotes. Four strong ricin resistant hybridoma clones secreting antiricin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. All four mAbs are bound to conformational epitopes of ricin toxin B (RTB) with high affinity (KD values from 2.55 to 36.27 nM). RTB not only triggers cellular uptake of ricin, but also facilitates transport of the ricin toxin A (RTA) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, where RTA exerts its toxic activity. The four mAbs were found to have potent ricin-neutralizing capacities and synergistic effects among them as determined by an in vitro neutralization assay. In vivo protection assay demonstrated that all four mAbs had strong efficacy against ricin challenges. D9 was found to be exceptionally effective. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of D9, at a dose of 5 μg, 6 weeks before or 6 hours after an i.p. challenge with 5 × LD50 of ricin was able to protect or rescue 100% of the mice, indicating that mAb D9 is an excellent candidate to be developed as a potent antidote against ricin poisoning for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:23484120

  11. Poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) based affinity membranes for in vitro removal of anti-dsDNA antibodies from SLE plasma.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Lokman; Yavuz, Handan; Osman, Bilgen; Celik, Hamdi; Denizli, Adil

    2010-07-01

    The preparation of polymeric membrane using affinity technology for application in blood filtration devices is described here. DNA attached poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) based microporous affinity membrane was prepared for selective removal of anti-dsDNA antibodies from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patient plasma in in vitro. In order to further increase blood-compatibility of affinity membrane, aminoacid based comonomer N-methacryloyl-L-alanine (MAAL) was included in the polymerization recipe. PHEMAAL membrane was produced by a photopolymerization technique and then characterized by swelling tests and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies. Blood-compatibility tests were also performed. The water swelling ratio of PHEMAAL membrane increased significantly (133.2%) compared with PHEMA (58%). PHEMAAL membrane has large pores around in the range of 5-10 microm. All the clotting times increased when compared with PHEMA membrane. Loss of platelets and leukocytes was very low. DNA loading was 7.8 mg/g. There was a very low anti-dsDNA-antibody adsorption onto the plain PHEMAAL membrane, about 78 IU/g. The PHEMAAL-DNA membrane adsorbed anti-dsDNA-antibody in the range of 10-68 x 10(3)IU/g from SLE plasma. Anti-dsDNA-antibody concentration decreased significantly from 875 to 144 IU/ml with the time. Anti-dsDNA-antibodies could be repeatedly adsorbed and eluted without noticeable loss in the anti-dsDNA-antibody adsorption amount.

  12. New high affinity monoclonal antibodies recognize non-overlapping epitopes on mesothelin for monitoring and treating mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Phung, Yen; Gao, Wei; Kawa, Seiji; Hassan, Raffit; Pastan, Ira; Ho, Mitchell

    2015-05-21

    Mesothelin is an emerging cell surface target in mesothelioma and other solid tumors. Most antibody drug candidates recognize highly immunogenic Region I (296-390) on mesothelin. Here, we report a group of high-affinity non-Region I rabbit monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies do not compete for mesothelin binding with the immunotoxin SS1P that binds Region I of mesothelin. One pair of antibodies (YP218 and YP223) is suitable to detect soluble mesothelin in a sandwich ELISA with high sensitivity. The new assay can also be used to measure serum mesothelin concentration in mesothelioma patients, indicating its potential use for monitoring patients treated with current antibody therapies targeting Region I. The antibodies are highly specific and sensitive in immunostaining of mesothelioma. To explore their use in tumor therapy, we have generated the immunotoxins based on the Fv of these antibodies. One immunotoxin (YP218 Fv-PE38) exhibits potent anti-tumor cytotoxicity towards primary mesothelioma cell lines in vitro and an NCI-H226 xenograft tumor in mice. Furthermore, we have engineered a humanized YP218 Fv that retains full binding affinity for mesothelin-expressing cancer cells. In conclusion, with their unique binding properties, these antibodies may be promising candidates for monitoring and treating mesothelioma and other mesothelin-expressing cancers.

  13. An improved affinity tag based on the FLAG peptide for the detection and purification of recombinant antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Knappik, A; Plückthun, A

    1994-10-01

    The commercially available monoclonal antibodies M1 and M2 were raised against and bind the FLAG sequence DYKDDDDK with high specificity. Using the calcium-dependent M1 antibody and the FLAG tag attached to the N terminus of various fragments of the antibody McPC603 expressed in Escherichia coli, we found that the M1 antibody binds with almost the same affinity to a much shorter version of this sequence (DYKD). Since most antibody light chains start with an aspartate, the addition of only three additional amino acids to the N terminus is sufficient to detect and quantify the expressed antibody fragments using standard immunological methods. Similarly, the heavy chain can be detected specifically with the sequence DYKD, which requires four additional amino acids since most heavy chains do not start with Asp. The signal sequence of both chains that is necessary for the transport of the chains to the periplasm of E. coli is processed correctly. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of the amino acid at the fifth position of the FLAG sequence on the binding affinity of the M1 antibody and found that a glutamate at this position increased the sensitivity in Western blots sixfold over the original long FLAG sequence containing an aspartate residue at this position. Together, the improved FLAG is a versatile tool for both sensitive detection and one-step purification of recombinant proteins.

  14. Design, synthesis and application of benzyl-sulfonate biomimetic affinity adsorbents for monoclonal antibody purification from transgenic corn.

    PubMed

    Maltezos, Anastasios; Platis, Dimitris; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Kossida, Sophia; Marinou, Marigianna; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2014-01-01

    The human anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody 2G12 (mAb 2G12) is one of the most broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV that recognizes a unique epitope on the surface glycoprotein gp120. In the present work, a limited affinity-ligand library was synthesized and evaluated for its ability to bind and purify recombinant mAb 2G12 expressed in transgenic corn. The affinity ligands were structural fragments of polysulfonate triazine dye Cibacron Blue 3GA (CB3GA) and represent novel lead scaffolds for designing synthetic affinity ligands. Solid phase chemistry was used to synthesize variants of CB3GA lead ligand. One immobilized ligand, bearing 4-aminobenzyl sulfonic acid (4ABS) linked on two chlorine atoms of the triazine ring (4ABS-Trz-4ABS), displayed high affinity for mAb 2G12. Absorption equilibrium, 3D molecular modelling and molecular dynamics simulation studies were carried out to provide a detailed picture of the 4ABS-Trz-4ABS interaction with mAb 2G12. This biomimetic affinity ligand was exploited for the development of a facile two-step purification protocol for mAb 2G12. In the first step of the procedure, mAb 2G12 was purified on an S-Sepharose FF cation exchanger, and in the second step, mAb 2G12 was purified using affinity chromatography on 4ABS-Trz-4ABS affinity adsorbent. Analysis of the antibody preparation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the mAb 2G12 was fully active and of sufficient purity suitable for analytical applications.

  15. Optimization of pore structure and particle morphology of mesoporous silica for antibody adsorption for use in affinity chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikosaka, Ryouichi; Nagata, Fukue; Tomita, Masahiro; Kato, Katsuya

    2016-10-01

    Antibodies have received significant attention for use as antibody drugs, because they bind the objective protein (antigen) via antigen-antibody reactions. Recently, many reports have appeared on various monoclonal antibodies that recognize a single antigen. In this study, monoclonal antibodies are used as adsorbates on mesoporous silica (MPS) for affinity chromatography. MPS has high surface area and large pore volume; moreover, pore diameter, pore structure, and particle morphology are relatively easy to tune by adjusting the conditions of synthesis. The pore structure (two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal and three-dimensional cubic) and particle morphology (spherical and polyhedral) of MPS are optimized for use in a monoclonal antibody/MPS composite. When anti-IgG (one of the monoclonal antibodies) adsorbs on the MPS material and IgG (antigen) binds to anti-IgG/MPS composites, MCM-41p with a 2D-hexagonal pore structure and polyhedral particle morphology has the highest IgG binding efficiency. In addition, the antibody/MPS composites remain stable in chaotropic and low-pH solutions and can be cycled at least five times without decreasing IgG elution. In purification and removal tests, the use of the antibody/MPS composites allows only the objective protein from protein mixtures to be bound and eluted.

  16. Unique carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are required for high affinity binding between FcgammaRIII and antibodies lacking core fucose.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Claudia; Grau, Sandra; Jäger, Christiane; Sondermann, Peter; Brünker, Peter; Waldhauer, Inja; Hennig, Michael; Ruf, Armin; Rufer, Arne Christian; Stihle, Martine; Umaña, Pablo; Benz, Jörg

    2011-08-02

    Antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key immune effector mechanism, relies on the binding of antigen-antibody complexes to Fcγ receptors expressed on immune cells. Antibodies lacking core fucosylation show a large increase in affinity for FcγRIIIa leading to an improved receptor-mediated effector function. Although afucosylated IgGs exist naturally, a next generation of recombinant therapeutic, glycoenginereed antibodies is currently being developed to exploit this finding. In this study, the crystal structures of a glycosylated Fcγ receptor complexed with either afucosylated or fucosylated Fc were determined allowing a detailed, molecular understanding of the regulatory role of Fc-oligosaccharide core fucosylation in improving ADCC. The structures reveal a unique type of interface consisting of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions between glycans of the receptor and the afucosylated Fc. In contrast, in the complex structure with fucosylated Fc, these contacts are weakened or nonexistent, explaining the decreased affinity for the receptor. These findings allow us to understand the higher efficacy of therapeutic antibodies lacking the core fucose and also suggest a unique mechanism by which the immune system can regulate antibody-mediated effector functions.

  17. Kinetic exclusion assay of monoclonal antibody affinity to the membrane protein Roundabout 1 displayed on baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Kusano-Arai, Osamu; Fukuda, Rie; Kamiya, Wakana; Iwanari, Hiroko; Hamakubo, Takao

    2016-07-01

    The reliable assessment of monoclonal antibody (mAb) affinity against membrane proteins in vivo is a major issue in the development of cancer therapeutics. We describe here a simple and highly sensitive method for the evaluation of mAbs against membrane proteins by means of a kinetic exclusion assay (KinExA) in combination with our previously developed membrane protein display system using budded baculovirus (BV). In our BV display system, the membrane proteins are displayed on the viral surface in their native form. The BVs on which the liver cancer antigen Roundabout 1 (Robo1) was displayed were adsorbed onto magnetic beads without fixative (BV beads). The dissociation constant (Kd, ∼10(-11) M) that was measured on the Robo1 expressed BV beads correlated well with the value from a whole cell assay (the coefficient of determination, R(2) = 0.998) but not with the value for the soluble extracellular domains of Robo1 (R(2) = 0.834). These results suggest that the BV-KinExA method described here provides a suitably accurate Kd evaluation of mAbs against proteins on the cell surface.

  18. Titre and affinity of propylthiouracil-induced anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies are closely associated with the development of clinical vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hua; Gao, Ying; Guo, Xiao-Hui; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2005-10-01

    Substantial evidences suggested that propylthiouracil (PTU) could induced anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) antibodies in sera from patients with hyperthyroidism, however, only a subgroup of the PTU-induced anti-MPO antibody positive patients developed clinical evident vasculitis. The aim of this study is to compare the titres and affinities of PTU induced anti-MPO antibodies in sera from patients with hyperthyroidism with and without clinical vasculitis. Anti-MPO antibody positive sera from patients diagnosed hyperthyroidism with (n = 13) and without (n = 14) clinical evident vasculitis were collected. The titre was determined by MPO-ELISA and expressed as logarithm value (lgT). The affinity constant (aK) of anti-MPO IgG was measured by antigen inhibition assay. The titre and aK values were compared between patients with and without vasculitis. In patients with vasculitis, the mean lgT of anti-MPO antibodies was 3.62 +/- 0.66; the median aK was 4.47 x 10(7)M(-1). In patients without vasculitis, the mean lgT was 2.54 +/- 0.29; the median aK was 0.14 x 10(7)M(-1), and both were significant lower than those in patients with vasculitis (t = 5.464; P = 0.000 & z = -4.373; P = 0.000, respectively). We concluded that the titre and affinity of anti-MPO antibodies might be associated with the development of clinical vasculitis in patients with PTU-induced ANCA.

  19. Antigen-Antibody Affinity for Dry Eye Biomarkers by Label Free Biosensing. Comparison with the ELISA Technique

    PubMed Central

    Laguna, Maríafe; Holgado, Miguel; Hernandez, Ana L.; Santamaría, Beatriz; Lavín, Alvaro; Soria, Javier; Suarez, Tatiana; Bardina, Carlota; Jara, Mónica; Sanza, Francisco J.; Casquel, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The specificity and affinity of antibody-antigen interactions is a fundamental way to achieve reliable biosensing responses. Different proteins involved with dry eye dysfunction: ANXA1, ANXA11, CST4, PRDX5, PLAA and S100A6; were validated as biomarkers. In this work several antibodies were tested for ANXA1, ANXA11 and PRDX5 to select the best candidates for each biomarker. The results were obtained by using Biophotonic Sensing Cells (BICELLs) as an efficient methodology for label-free biosensing and compared with the Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (ELISA) technique. PMID:26287192

  20. Antigen-Antibody Affinity for Dry Eye Biomarkers by Label Free Biosensing. Comparison with the ELISA Technique.

    PubMed

    Laguna, Maríafe; Holgado, Miguel; Hernandez, Ana L; Santamaría, Beatriz; Lavín, Alvaro; Soria, Javier; Suarez, Tatiana; Bardina, Carlota; Jara, Mónica; Sanza, Francisco J; Casquel, Rafael

    2015-08-13

    The specificity and affinity of antibody-antigen interactions is a fundamental way to achieve reliable biosensing responses. Different proteins involved with dry eye dysfunction: ANXA1, ANXA11, CST4, PRDX5, PLAA and S100A6; were validated as biomarkers. In this work several antibodies were tested for ANXA1, ANXA11 and PRDX5 to select the best candidates for each biomarker. The results were obtained by using Biophotonic Sensing Cells (BICELLs) as an efficient methodology for label-free biosensing and compared with the Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (ELISA) technique.

  1. An affinity improved single-chain antibody from phage display of a library derived from monoclonal antibodies detects fumonisins by immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zu-Quan; Li, He-Ping; Wu, Ping; Li, Ya-Bo; Zhou, Zhu-Qing; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Liu, Jin-Long; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2015-03-31

    Fumonisin B analogs, particularly FB1, FB2, and FB3, are major mycotoxins found in cereals. Single-chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies represent a promising alternative immunoassay system. A phage-displayed antibody library derived from four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) generated against FB1 was used to screen high binding affinity scFv antibodies; the best candidate was designated H2. Surface plasmon resonance measurements confirmed that the H2 scFv displayed a 82-fold higher binding affinity than its parent mAb. Direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated that the H2 antibody could competitively bind to free FB1, FB2, and FB3, with an IC50 of 0.11, 0.04, and 0.10 μM, respectively; it had no cross-reactivity to deoxynivalenol, nivalenol and aflatoxin. Validation assays with naturally contaminated samples revealed a linear relationship between the H2 antibody-based assay results and chemical analysis results, that could be expressed as y=1.7072x+5.5606 (R(2)=0.8883). Homology modeling of H2 revealed a favorable binding structure highly complementary to the three fumonisins. Molecular docking analyses suggested that the preferential binding of the H2 scFv to FB2 was due to the presence of a hydrogen radical in its R1 position, leading to a proper electrostatic matching and hydrophobic interaction. The H2 scFv antibody can be used for the rapid, accurate, and specific detection of fumonisin contamination in agricultural samples.

  2. AGIA Tag System Based on a High Affinity Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody against Human Dopamine Receptor D1 for Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Tomoya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Shunsuke; Nemoto, Keiichirou; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide tag technology is widely used for protein detection and affinity purification. It consists of two fundamental elements: a peptide sequence and a binder which specifically binds to the peptide tag. In many tag systems, antibodies have been used as binder due to their high affinity and specificity. Recently, we obtained clone Ra48, a high-affinity rabbit monoclonal antibody (mAb) against dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1). Here, we report a novel tag system composed of Ra48 antibody and its epitope sequence. Using a deletion assay, we identified EEAAGIARP in the C-terminal region of DRD1 as the minimal epitope of Ra48 mAb, and we named this sequence the “AGIA” tag, based on its central sequence. The tag sequence does not include the four amino acids, Ser, Thr, Tyr, or Lys, which are susceptible to post-translational modification. We demonstrated performance of this new tag system in biochemical and cell biology applications. SPR analysis demonstrated that the affinity of the Ra48 mAb to the AGIA tag was 4.90 × 10−9 M. AGIA tag showed remarkably high sensitivity and specificity in immunoblotting. A number of AGIA-fused proteins overexpressed in animal and plant cells were detected by anti-AGIA antibody in immunoblotting and immunostaining with low background, and were immunoprecipitated efficiently. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution of the second Glu to Asp (AGIA/E2D) enabled competitive dissociation of AGIA/E2D-tagged protein by adding wild-type AGIA peptide. It enabled one-step purification of AGIA/E2D-tagged recombinant proteins by peptide competition under physiological conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of the AGIA system makes it suitable for use in multiple methods for protein analysis. PMID:27271343

  3. Ebolavirus Nucleoprotein C-Termini Potently Attract Single Domain Antibodies Enabling Monoclonal Affinity Reagent Sandwich Assay (MARSA) Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Laura J.; Hayhurst, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Background Antigen detection assays can play an important part in environmental surveillance and diagnostics for emerging threats. We are interested in accelerating assay formulation; targeting the agents themselves to bypass requirements for a priori genome information or surrogates. Previously, using in vitro affinity reagent selection on Marburg virus we rapidly established monoclonal affinity reagent sandwich assay (MARSA) where one recombinant antibody clone was both captor and tracer for polyvalent nucleoprotein (NP). Hypothesizing that the closely related Ebolavirus genus may share the same Achilles' heel, we redirected the scheme to see whether similar assays could be delivered and began to explore their mechanism. Methods and Findings In parallel we selected panels of llama single domain antibodies (sdAb) from a semi-synthetic library against Zaire, Sudan, Ivory Coast, and Reston Ebola viruses. Each could perform as both captor and tracer in the same antigen sandwich capture assay thereby forming MARSAs. All sdAb were specific for NP and those tested required the C-terminal domain for recognition. Several clones were cross-reactive, indicating epitope conservation across the Ebolavirus genus. Analysis of two immune shark sdAb revealed they also targeted the C-terminal domain, and could be similarly employed, yet were less sensitive than a comparable llama sdAb despite stemming from immune selections. Conclusions The C-terminal domain of Ebolavirus NP is a strong attractant for antibodies and enables sensitive sandwich immunoassays to be rapidly generated using a single antibody clone. The polyvalent nature of nucleocapsid borne NP and display of the C-terminal region likely serves as a bountiful affinity sink during selections, and a highly avid target for subsequent immunoassay capture. Combined with the high degree of amino acid conservation through 37 years and across wide geographies, this domain makes an ideal handle for monoclonal affinity reagent

  4. Performance of protein-A-based affinity membranes for antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Lokman; Türkmen, Deniz; Karakoç, Veyis; Yavuz, Handan; Denizli, Adil

    2011-01-01

    The preparation of affinity membranes for application in antibody purification studies is described here. Protein-A-attached poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-alanine) (PHEMAAL) membranes were produced by a photopolymerization technique and then characterized by swelling tests, surface area measurements, contact angle and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies. The water swelling ratio of the PHEMAAL membrane was 133.2%. PHEMAAL membranes have large pores with a size in the range of 5-10 μm. Protein A was covalently attached onto the PHEMAAL membranes via cyanogen bromide (CNBr) activation. Maximum protein A loading was 4.7 mg/g. There was a very low non-specific IgG adsorption onto the PHEMAAL membranes, about 0.38 mg/g. The maximum IgG adsorption on the PHEMAAL-protein A membrane was found to be 9.8 mg/g at pH 7.4 from aqueous solutions. Higher adsorption amount was observed from human plasma (up to 37.3 mg/g). Adsorbed IgG was eluted using 0.1 M glycine-HCl buffer (pH 3.5) with a purity of 93%. PHEMAAL-protein A membrane was used for repetitive adsorption/elution of IgG without noticeable loss in IgG adsorption amount after 10 cycles. The PHEMAAL-protein A membrane showed several advantages, such as simpler preparation procedure, good selectivity for IgG purification from human plasma and good stability throughout repeated adsorption-elution cycles.

  5. Use of thermodynamic coupling between antibody-antigen binding and phospholipid acyl chain phase transition energetics to predict immunoliposome targeting affinity.

    PubMed

    Klegerman, Melvin E; Zou, Yuejiao; Golunski, Eva; Peng, Tao; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D

    2014-09-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of ligand-target binding has been a useful tool for dissecting the nature of the binding mechanism and, therefore, potentially can provide valuable information regarding the utility of targeted formulations. Based on a consistent coupling of antibody-antigen binding and gel-liquid crystal transition energetics observed for antibody-phosphatidylethanolamine (Ab-PE) conjugates, we hypothesized that the thermodynamic parameters and the affinity for antigen of the Ab-PE conjugates could be effectively predicted once the corresponding information for the unconjugated antibody is determined. This hypothesis has now been tested in nine different antibody-targeted echogenic liposome (ELIP) preparations, where antibody is conjugated to dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) head groups through a thioether linkage. Predictions were satisfactory (affinity not significantly different from the population of values found) in five cases (55.6%), but the affinity of the unconjugated antibody was not significantly different from the population of values found in six cases (66.7%), indicating that the affinities of the conjugated antibody tended not to deviate appreciably from those of the free antibody. While knowledge of the affinities of free antibodies may be sufficient to judge their suitability as targeting agents, thermodynamic analysis may still provide valuable information regarding their usefulness for specific applications.

  6. Persistent Low-Level Replication of SIVΔnef Drives Maturation of Antibody and CD8 T Cell Responses to Induce Protective Immunity against Vaginal SIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Jacqueline; Wong, Fay E.; Yu, Yi; Camp, Jeremy V.; Li, Qingsheng; Connole, Michelle; Li, Yuan; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Li, Wenjun; Keele, Brandon F.; Kozlowski, Pamela A.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Haase, Ashley T.

    2016-01-01

    Defining the correlates of immune protection conferred by SIVΔnef, the most effective vaccine against SIV challenge, could enable the design of a protective vaccine against HIV infection. Here we provide a comprehensive assessment of immune responses that protect against SIV infection through detailed analyses of cellular and humoral immune responses in the blood and tissues of rhesus macaques vaccinated with SIVΔnef and then vaginally challenged with wild-type SIV. Despite the presence of robust cellular immune responses, animals at 5 weeks after vaccination displayed only transient viral suppression of challenge virus, whereas all macaques challenged at weeks 20 and 40 post-SIVΔnef vaccination were protected, as defined by either apparent sterile protection or significant suppression of viremia in infected animals. Multiple parameters of CD8 T cell function temporally correlated with maturation of protection, including polyfunctionality, phenotypic differentiation, and redistribution to gut and lymphoid tissues. Importantly, we also demonstrate the induction of a tissue-resident memory population of SIV-specific CD8 T cells in the vaginal mucosa, which was dependent on ongoing low-level antigenic stimulation. Moreover, we show that vaginal and serum antibody titers inversely correlated with post-challenge peak viral load, and we correlate the accumulation and affinity maturation of the antibody response to the duration of the vaccination period as well as to the SIVΔnef antigenic load. In conclusion, maturation of SIVΔnef-induced CD8 T cell and antibody responses, both propelled by viral persistence in the gut mucosa and secondary lymphoid tissues, results in protective immune responses that are able to interrupt viral transmission at mucosal portals of entry as well as potential sites of viral dissemination. PMID:27959961

  7. Purification of antibodies against N-homocysteinylated proteins by affinity chromatography on Nomega-homocysteinyl-aminohexyl-Agarose.

    PubMed

    Perła, Joanna; Undas, Anetta; Twardowski, Tomasz; Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2004-08-05

    Modification with homocysteine (Hcy)-thiolactone leads to the formation of N-Hcy-Lys-protein. Although N-Hcy-Lys-proteins are immunogenic, pure antibodies have not yet been obtained. Here we describe synthesis and application of Nomega-homocysteinyl-aminohexyl-Agarose for affinity purification of anti-N-Hcy-Lys-protein antibodies. Nomega-homocysteinyl-aminohexyl-Agarose was prepared by N-homocysteinylation of omega-aminohexyl-Agarose with Hcy-thiolactone. Immune serum was obtained from rabbits inoculated with N-Hcy-Lys-keyhole limpet hemocyanine and IgG fraction prepared by chromatography on protein A-Agarose. Anti-N-Hcy-Lys-protein IgG was adsorbed on Nomega-homocysteinyl-aminohexyl-Agarose column at pH 8.6 and eluted with a pH 2.3 buffer. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays demonstrate that the antibody recognizes specifically N-homocysteinylated variants of hemoglobin, albumin, transferrin, and antitrypsin.

  8. Maturation and Diversity of the VRC01-Antibody Lineage over 15 Years of Chronic HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xueling; Zhang, Zhenhai; Schramm, Chaim A; Joyce, M Gordon; Kwon, Young Do; Zhou, Tongqing; Sheng, Zizhang; Zhang, Baoshan; O'Dell, Sijy; McKee, Krisha; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Longo, Nancy S; Lynch, Rebecca M; Saunders, Kevin O; Soto, Cinque; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Yang, Yongping; Bailer, Robert T; Louder, Mark K; Mullikin, James C; Connors, Mark; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2015-04-23

    HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies develop in most HIV-1-infected individuals, although highly effective antibodies are generally observed only after years of chronic infection. Here, we characterize the rate of maturation and extent of diversity for the lineage that produced the broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01 through longitudinal sampling of peripheral B cell transcripts over 15 years and co-crystal structures of lineage members. Next-generation sequencing identified VRC01-lineage transcripts, which encompassed diverse antibodies organized into distinct phylogenetic clades. Prevalent clades maintained characteristic features of antigen recognition, though each evolved binding loops and disulfides that formed distinct recognition surfaces. Over the course of the study period, VRC01-lineage clades showed continuous evolution, with rates of ∼2 substitutions per 100 nucleotides per year, comparable to that of HIV-1 evolution. This high rate of antibody evolution provides a mechanism by which antibody lineages can achieve extraordinary diversity and, over years of chronic infection, develop effective HIV-1 neutralization.

  9. SNAP-Tag Technology: A Useful Tool To Determine Affinity Constants and Other Functional Parameters of Novel Antibody Fragments.

    PubMed

    Niesen, Judith; Sack, Markus; Seidel, Melanie; Fendel, Rolf; Barth, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer; Stein, Christoph

    2016-08-17

    Antibody derivatives, such as the single chain fragment variable (scFv), can be developed as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in cancer research, especially in the form of fusion proteins. Such derivatives are easier to produce and modify than monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and achieve better tissue/tumor penetration. The genetic modification of scFvs is also much more straightforward than the challenging chemical modification of mAbs. Therefore, we constructed two scFvs derived from the approved monoclonal antibodies cetuximab (scFv2112) and panitumumab (scFv1711), both of which are specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a well-characterized solid tumor antigen. Both scFvs were genetically fused to the SNAP-tag, an engineered version of the human DNA repair enzyme O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase that allows the covalent coupling of benzylguanine (BG)-modified substrates such as fluorescent dyes. The SNAP-tag achieves controllable and irreversible protein modification and is an important tool for experimental studies in vitro and in vivo. The affinity constant of a scFv is a key functional parameter, especially in the context of a fusion protein. Therefore, we developed a method to define the affinity constants of scFv-SNAP fusion proteins by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. We could confirm that both scFvs retained their functionality after fusion to the SNAP-tag in a variety of procedures and assays, including ELISA, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. The experimental procedures described herein, and the new protocol for affinity determination by SPR spectroscopy, are suitable for the preclinical evaluation of diverse antibody formats and derivatives.

  10. Importance of Hypervariable Region 2 for Stability and Affinity of a Shark Single-Domain Antibody Specific for Ebola Virus Nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, George P.; Teichler, Daniel D.; Zabetakis, Dan; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Liu, Jinny L.; Lonsdale, Stephen G.; Goodchild, Sarah A.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2016-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies derived from the unique New Antigen Receptor found in sharks have numerous potential applications, ranging from diagnostic reagents to therapeutics. Shark-derived single-domain antibodies possess the same characteristic ability to refold after heat denaturation found in single-domain antibodies derived from camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies. Recently, two shark derived single-domain antibodies specific for the nucleoprotein of Ebola virus were described. Our evaluation confirmed their high affinity for the nucleoprotein, but found their melting temperatures to be low relative to most single-domain antibodies. Our first approach towards improving their stability was grafting antigen-binding regions (complementarity determining regions) of one of these single-domain antibodies onto a high melting temperature shark single-domain antibody. This resulted in two variants: one that displayed excellent affinity with a low melting temperature, while the other had poor affinity but a higher melting temperature. These new proteins, however, differed in only 3 amino acids within the complementarity determining region 2 sequence. In shark single-domain antibodies, the complementarity determining region 2 is often referred to as hypervariable region 2, as this segment of the antibody domain is truncated compared to the sequence in camelid single-domain antibodies and conventional heavy chain variable domains. To elucidate which of the three amino acids or combinations thereof were responsible for the affinity and stability we made the 6 double and single point mutants that covered the intermediates between these two clones. We found a single amino acid change that achieved a 10°C higher melting temperature while maintaining sub nM affinity. This research gives insights into the impact of the shark sdAb hypervariable 2 region on both stability and affinity. PMID:27494523

  11. Epitope structure and binding affinity of single chain llama anti-β-amyloid antibodies revealed by proteolytic excision affinity-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paraschiv, Gabriela; Vincke, Cécile; Czaplewska, Paulina; Manea, Marilena; Muyldermans, Serge; Przybylski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    ß-Amyloid (Aß) immunotherapy has become a promising strategy for reducing the level of Aß in brain. New immunological approaches have been recently proposed for rapid, early diagnosis, and molecular treatment of neurodegenerative diseases related to Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The combination of proteolytic epitope excision and extraction and mass spectrometry using digestion with various proteases has been shown to be an efficient tool for the identification and molecular characterization of antigenic determinants. Here, we report the identification of the Aβ epitope recognized by the variable domain of single chain llama anti-Aβ-antibodies, termed Aβ-nanobodies, that have been discovered in the blood of camelids and found to be promising candidates for immunotherapy of AD. The epitope recognized by two Aβ-specific nanobodies was identified by proteolytic epitope extraction- and excision-mass spectrometry using a series of proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin, GluC-protease, and LysC-protease). Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization--mass spectrometric analysis of the affinity--elution fraction provided the epitope, Aβ(17-28), in the mid- to carboxy-terminal domain of Aβ, which has been shown to exert an Aß-fibril inhibiting effect. Affinity studies of the synthetic epitope confirmed that the Aβ(17-28) peptide is the minimal fragment that binds to the nanobodies. The interactions between the nanobodies and full length Aβ(1-40) or Aβ-peptides containing or lacking the epitope sequence were further characterized by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and bioaffinity analysis. Determinations of binding affinities between the Aβ-nanobodies and Aβ(1-40) and the Aβ(17-28) epitope provided K(D) values of approximately 150 and 700 nmol, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of the epitope may be highly useful for future studies of Aβ-aggregation (oligomerization and fibril formation) and for designing new aggregation inhibitors.

  12. Obstruction of dengue virus maturation by Fab fragments of the 2H2 antibody.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqing; Li, Long; Pennington, Janice G; Sheng, Ju; Yap, Moh Lan; Plevka, Pavel; Meng, Geng; Sun, Lei; Jiang, Wen; Rossmann, Michael G

    2013-08-01

    The 2H2 monoclonal antibody recognizes the precursor peptide on immature dengue virus and might therefore be a useful tool for investigating the conformational change that occurs when the immature virus enters an acidic environment. During dengue virus maturation, spiky, immature, noninfectious virions change their structure to form smooth-surfaced particles in the slightly acidic environment of the trans-Golgi network, thereby allowing cellular furin to cleave the precursor-membrane proteins. The dengue virions become fully infectious when they release the cleaved precursor peptide upon reaching the neutral-pH environment of the extracellular space. Here we report on the cryo-electron microscopy structures of the immature virus complexed with the 2H2 antigen binding fragments (Fab) at different concentrations and under various pH conditions. At neutral pH and a high concentration of Fab molecules, three Fab molecules bind to three precursor-membrane proteins on each spike of the immature virus. However, at a low concentration of Fab molecules and pH 7.0, only two Fab molecules bind to each spike. Changing to a slightly acidic pH caused no detectable change of structure for the sample with a high Fab concentration but caused severe structural damage to the low-concentration sample. Therefore, the 2H2 Fab inhibits the maturation process of immature dengue virus when Fab molecules are present at a high concentration, because the three Fab molecules on each spike hold the precursor-membrane molecules together, thereby inhibiting the normal conformational change that occurs during maturation.

  13. Early postnatal B cell ontogeny and antibody repertoire maturation in the opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinxin; Sharp, Alana R; Miller, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    Marsupials are a lineage of mammals noted for giving birth to highly altricial young, which complete much of their "fetal" development externally attached to a teat. Postnatal B cell ontogeny and diversity was investigated in a model marsupial species, the gray short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica. The results support the initiation of B cell development late in gestation and progressing into the first two weeks of postnatal life. Transcription of CD79a and CD79b was detected in embryonic tissue prior to birth, while immunoglobulin heavy chain locus transcription was not detected until the first postnatal 24 hours. Transcription of the Ig light chains was not detected until postnatal day 7 at the earliest. The predicted timing of the earliest appearance of mature B cells and completion of gene rearrangements is consistent with previous analyses on the timing of endogenous antibody responses in newborn marsupials. The diversity of early B cell IgH chains is limited, as has been seen in fetal humans and mice, but lacks bias in the gene segments used to encode the variable domains. Newborn light chain diversity is, from the start, comparable to that of the adult, consistent with an earlier hypothesis that light chains contribute extensively to antibody diversity in this species.

  14. HIV-specific antibody-dependent phagocytosis matures during HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda; Johnston, Angus P R; Liu, Haiyin; Center, Robert J; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Kelleher, Anthony D; Stratov, Ivan; Kent, Stephen J; Kramski, Marit

    2014-09-01

    Antibody-dependent phagocytosis (ADP) is a potentially important immune mechanism to clear HIV. How HIV-specific ADP responses mature during HIV infection or in response to vaccinations administered, including the partially successful RV144 HIV vaccine, is not known. We established a modified ADP assay to measure internalisation of HIV antibody (Ab)-opsonised targets using a specific hybridisation internalisation probe. Labelled beads were coated with both biotinylated HIV gp140 envelope protein and a fluorescent internalisation probe, opsonised with Abs and incubated with a monocytic cell line. The fluorescence derived from the fluorescent internalisation probe on surface-bound beads, but not from internalised beads, was quenched by the addition of a complementary quencher probe. HIV Env-specific ADP was measured in 31 subjects during primary infection and early chronic HIV infection. Although ADP responses were present early during HIV infection, a significant increase in ADP responses in all 31 subjects studied was detected (P<0.001). However, when we tested 30 HIV-negative human subjects immunised with the Canarypox/gp120 vaccine regimen (subjects from the RV144 trial) we did not detect HIV-specific ADP activity. In conclusion, a modified assay was developed to measure HIV-specific ADP. Enhanced ADP responses early in the course of HIV infection were observed but no ADP activity was detected following the vaccinations administered in the RV144 trial. Improved vaccine regimens may be needed to capitalise on ADP-mediated immunity against HIV.

  15. Trimeric gp120-specific bovine monoclonal antibodies require cysteine and aromatic residues in CDRH3 for high affinity binding to HIV Env.

    PubMed

    Heydarchi, Behnaz; Center, Rob J; Bebbington, Jonathan; Cuthbertson, Jack; Gonelli, Christopher; Khoury, Georges; Mackenzie, Charlene; Lichtfuss, Marit; Rawlin, Grant; Muller, Brian; Purcell, Damian

    2017-04-01

    We isolated HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific memory B cells from a cow that had developed high titer polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) with broad neutralizing activity after a long duration vaccination with HIV-1AD8 Env gp140 trimers. We cloned the bovine IgG matched heavy (H) and light (L) chain variable (V) genes from these memory B cells and constructed IgG monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with either a human constant (C)-region/bovine V-region chimeric or fully bovine C and V regions. Among 42 selected Ig+ memory B cells, two mAbs (6A and 8C) showed high affinity binding to gp140 Env. Characterization of both the fully bovine and human chimeric isoforms of these two mAbs revealed them as highly type-specific and capable of binding only to soluble AD8 uncleaved gp140 trimers and covalently stabilized AD8 SOSIP gp140 cleaved trimers, but not monomeric gp120. Genomic sequence analysis of the V genes showed the third heavy complementarity-determining region (CDRH3) of 6A mAb was 21 amino acids in length while 8C CDRH3 was 14 amino acids long. The entire V heavy (VH) region was 27% and 25% diverged for 6A and 8C, respectively, from the best matched germline V genes available, and the CDRH3 regions of 6A and 8C were 47.62% and 78.57% somatically mutated, respectively, suggesting a high level of somatic hypermutation compared with CDRH3 of other species. Alanine mutagenesis of the VH genes of 6A and 8C, showed that CDRH3 cysteine and tryptophan amino acids were crucial for antigen binding. Therefore, these bovine vaccine-induced anti-HIV antibodies shared some of the notable structural features of elite human broadly neutralizing antibodies, such as CDRH3 size and somatic mutation during affinity-maturation. However, while the 6A and 8C mAbs inhibited soluble CD4 binding to gp140 Env, they did not recapitulate the neutralizing activity of the polyclonal antibodies against HIV infection.

  16. Trimeric gp120-specific bovine monoclonal antibodies require cysteine and aromatic residues in CDRH3 for high affinity binding to HIV Env

    PubMed Central

    Center, Rob J.; Bebbington, Jonathan; Cuthbertson, Jack; Khoury, Georges; Lichtfuss, Marit; Rawlin, Grant; Purcell, Damian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We isolated HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific memory B cells from a cow that had developed high titer polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) with broad neutralizing activity after a long duration vaccination with HIV-1AD8 Env gp140 trimers. We cloned the bovine IgG matched heavy (H) and light (L) chain variable (V) genes from these memory B cells and constructed IgG monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with either a human constant (C)-region/bovine V-region chimeric or fully bovine C and V regions. Among 42 selected Ig+ memory B cells, two mAbs (6A and 8C) showed high affinity binding to gp140 Env. Characterization of both the fully bovine and human chimeric isoforms of these two mAbs revealed them as highly type-specific and capable of binding only to soluble AD8 uncleaved gp140 trimers and covalently stabilized AD8 SOSIP gp140 cleaved trimers, but not monomeric gp120. Genomic sequence analysis of the V genes showed the third heavy complementarity-determining region (CDRH3) of 6A mAb was 21 amino acids in length while 8C CDRH3 was 14 amino acids long. The entire V heavy (VH) region was 27% and 25% diverged for 6A and 8C, respectively, from the best matched germline V genes available, and the CDRH3 regions of 6A and 8C were 47.62% and 78.57% somatically mutated, respectively, suggesting a high level of somatic hypermutation compared with CDRH3 of other species. Alanine mutagenesis of the VH genes of 6A and 8C, showed that CDRH3 cysteine and tryptophan amino acids were crucial for antigen binding. Therefore, these bovine vaccine-induced anti-HIV antibodies shared some of the notable structural features of elite human broadly neutralizing antibodies, such as CDRH3 size and somatic mutation during affinity-maturation. However, while the 6A and 8C mAbs inhibited soluble CD4 binding to gp140 Env, they did not recapitulate the neutralizing activity of the polyclonal antibodies against HIV infection. PMID:27996375

  17. Affitins as robust tailored reagents for affinity chromatography purification of antibodies and non-immunoglobulin proteins.

    PubMed

    Béhar, Ghislaine; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Mouratou, Barbara; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2016-04-08

    Affinity chromatography is a convenient way of purifying proteins, as a high degree of purity can be reached in one step. The use of tags has greatly contributed to the popularity of this technique. However, the addition of tags may not be desirable or possible for the production of biopharmaceuticals. There is thus a need for tailored artificial affinity ligands. We have developed the use of archaeal extremophilic proteins as scaffolds to generate affinity proteins (Affitins). Here, we explored the potential of Affitins as ligand to design affinity columns. Affitins specific for human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), bacterial PulD protein, and chicken egg lysozyme were immobilized on an agarose matrix. The columns obtained were functional and highly selective for their cognate target, even in the presence of exogenous proteins as found in cell culture media, ascites and bacterial lysates, which result in a high degree of purity (∼95%) and recovery (∼100%) in a single step. Anti-hIgG Affitin columns withstand repetitive cycles of purification and cleaning-in-place treatments with 0.25 M NaOH as well as Protein A does. High levels of Affitin productions in Escherichia coli makes it possible to produce these affinity columns at low cost. Our results validate Affitins as a new class of tailored ligands for the affinity chromatography purification of potentially any proteins of interest including biopharmaceuticals.

  18. Antibody to FcεRIα Suppresses Immunoglobulin E Binding to High-Affinity Receptor I in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jung Yeon; Bae, Jong-Hwan; Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Mina; Kim, Min Hee; Kang, Hyun Jung; Park, Eun Hye; Yoo, Kyung Sook; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Kim, Kyung Won; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High-affinity receptor I (FcεRI) on mast cells and basophils plays a key role in the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated type I hypersensitivity mediated by allergen cross-linking of the specific IgE-FcεRI complex. Thus, prevention of IgE binding to FcεRI on these cells is an effective therapy for allergic disease. We have developed a strategy to disrupt IgE binding to FcεRI using an antibody targeting FcεRIα. Materials and Methods Fab fragment antibodies, which lack the Fc domain, with high affinity and specificity for FcεRIα and effective inhibitory activity against IgE-FcεRI binding were screened. IgE-induced histamine, β-hexosaminidase and Ca2+ release in basophils were determined by ELISA. A B6.Cg-Fcer1atm1Knt Tg(FCER1A)1Bhk/J mouse model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) was used to examine the inhibitory effect of NPB311 on allergic skin inflammation. Results NPB311 exhibited high affinity to human FcεRIα (KD=4 nM) and inhibited histamine, β-hexosaminidase and Ca2+ release in a concentration-dependent manner in hFcεRI-expressing cells. In hFcεRIα-expressing mice, dye leakage was higher in the PCA group than in controls, but decreased after NPB311 treatment. NPB311 could form a complex with FcεRIα and inhibit the release of inflammation mediators. Conclusion Our approach for producing anti-FcεRIα Fab fragment antibody NPB311 may enable clinical application to a therapeutic pathway in IgE/FcεRI-mediated diseases. PMID:27593869

  19. Inhibition of Enterococcus faecium adherence to collagen by antibodies against high-affinity binding subdomains of Acm.

    PubMed

    Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R; Sillanpää, Jouko; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K; Höök, Magnus; Murray, Barbara E

    2007-06-01

    Strains of Enterococcus faecium express a cell wall-anchored protein, Acm, which mediates adherence to collagen. Here, we (i) identify the minimal and high-affinity binding subsegments of Acm and (ii) show that anti-Acm immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs) purified against these subsegments reduced E. faecium TX2535 strain collagen adherence up to 73 and 50%, respectively, significantly more than the total IgGs against the full-length Acm A domain (28%) (P < 0.0001). Blocking Acm adherence with functional subsegment-specific antibodies raises the possibility of their use as therapeutic or prophylactic agents.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies to human interferon-gamma: production, affinity purification and radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Novick, D; Eshhar, Z; Fischer, D G; Friedlander, J; Rubinstein, M

    1983-01-01

    Human interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by a cation exchange h.p.l.c., was used for the development of monoclonal antibodies. Following immunization, spleen lymphocytes of two mice showing the highest binding and neutralizing titers were isolated, fused with NSO mouse myeloma cells and cloned. The screening of hybridomas was based on precipitation of the immune complexes with a second antibody and recovery of the biological activity of IFN-gamma from the precipitate. Twenty nine independent hybridomas secreting antibodies specific to IFN-gamma were obtained. Twelve out of these 29 hybridomas produced antibodies that neutralized the antiviral activity of pure as well as crude IFN-gamma. Moreover, IFN-gamma obtained by various induction procedures was neutralized as well, indicating that these various IFN-gamma subtypes are immunologically cross-reactive. Immune precipitation of partially purified 125I-labelled IFN-gamma by several monoclonal antibodies revealed two protein bands of 26,000 and 21,000 daltons. Immunoaffinity chromatography of IFN-gamma gave a 50-fold purification to a specific activity > or = 4 x 10(7) units/mg. Two of the monoclonal antibodies were found suitable for a sensitive and rapid double antibody solid-phase radioimmunoassay, allowing the detection of IFN-gamma at concentrations of at least 4 ng/ml (150 units/ml) within 8 h. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:11892806

  1. Deep Sequencing-guided Design of a High Affinity Dual Specificity Antibody to Target Two Angiogenic Factors in Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Patrick; Lee, Chingwei V.; Sanowar, Sarah; Wu, Ping; Stinson, Jeremy; Harris, Seth F.; Fuh, Germaine

    2015-01-01

    The development of dual targeting antibodies promises therapies with improved efficacy over mono-specific antibodies. Here, we engineered a Two-in-One VEGF/angiopoietin 2 antibody with dual action Fab (DAF) as a potential therapeutic for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Crystal structures of the VEGF/angiopoietin 2 DAF in complex with its two antigens showed highly overlapping binding sites. To achieve sufficient affinity of the DAF to block both angiogenic factors, we turned to deep mutational scanning in the complementarity determining regions (CDRs). By mutating all three CDRs of each antibody chain simultaneously, we were able not only to identify affinity improving single mutations but also mutation pairs from different CDRs that synergistically improve both binding functions. Furthermore, insights into the cooperativity between mutations allowed us to identify fold-stabilizing mutations in the CDRs. The data obtained from deep mutational scanning reveal that the majority of the 52 CDR residues are utilized differently for the two antigen binding function and permit, for the first time, the engineering of several DAF variants with sub-nanomolar affinity against two structurally unrelated antigens. The improved variants show similar blocking activity of receptor binding as the high affinity mono-specific antibodies against these two proteins, demonstrating the feasibility of generating a dual specificity binding surface with comparable properties to individual high affinity mono-specific antibodies. PMID:26088137

  2. Methylated-antibody affinity purification to improve proteomic identification of plant RNA polymerase Pol V complex and the interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Guochen; Ma, Jun; Chen, Xiaomei; Chu, Zhaoqing; She, Yi-Min

    2017-01-01

    Affinity purification followed by enzymatic digestion and mass spectrometry has been widely utilized for the sensitive detection of interacting proteins and protein complexes in various organisms. In plants, the method is technically challenging due to the low abundance proteins, non-specific binding and difficulties of eluting interacting proteins from antibody beads. In this report, we describe a strategy to modify antibodies by reductive methylation of lysines without affecting their binding properties, followed by on-bead digestion of bound proteins with endoproteinase Lys-C. By this method, the antibody remains intact and does not interfere with the downstream identification of interacting proteins. Non-specific binding proteins were excluded using 14N/15N-metabolic labeling of wild-type and the transgenic plant counterparts. The method was employed to identify 12 co-immunoprecipitated protein subunits in Pol V complex and to discover 17 potential interacting protein targets in Arabidopsis. Our results demonstrated that the modification of antibodies by reductive dimethylation can improve the reliability and sensitivity of identifying low-abundance proteins through on-bead digestion and mass spectrometry. We also show that coupling this technique with chemical crosslinking enables in-depth characterization of endogenous protein complexes and the protein-protein interaction networks including mapping the surface topology and post-translational modifications of interacting proteins. PMID:28224978

  3. Methylated-antibody affinity purification to improve proteomic identification of plant RNA polymerase Pol V complex and the interacting proteins.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guochen; Ma, Jun; Chen, Xiaomei; Chu, Zhaoqing; She, Yi-Min

    2017-02-22

    Affinity purification followed by enzymatic digestion and mass spectrometry has been widely utilized for the sensitive detection of interacting proteins and protein complexes in various organisms. In plants, the method is technically challenging due to the low abundance proteins, non-specific binding and difficulties of eluting interacting proteins from antibody beads. In this report, we describe a strategy to modify antibodies by reductive methylation of lysines without affecting their binding properties, followed by on-bead digestion of bound proteins with endoproteinase Lys-C. By this method, the antibody remains intact and does not interfere with the downstream identification of interacting proteins. Non-specific binding proteins were excluded using (14)N/(15)N-metabolic labeling of wild-type and the transgenic plant counterparts. The method was employed to identify 12 co-immunoprecipitated protein subunits in Pol V complex and to discover 17 potential interacting protein targets in Arabidopsis. Our results demonstrated that the modification of antibodies by reductive dimethylation can improve the reliability and sensitivity of identifying low-abundance proteins through on-bead digestion and mass spectrometry. We also show that coupling this technique with chemical crosslinking enables in-depth characterization of endogenous protein complexes and the protein-protein interaction networks including mapping the surface topology and post-translational modifications of interacting proteins.

  4. Magnetic poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) microspheres for affinity purification of antibodies for early diagnosis of multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Horak, Daniel; Hlidkova, Helena; Kit, Yurii; Stoika, Rostyslav; Antonyuk, Volodymyr; Myronovsky, Severyn

    2017-03-28

    The aim of this work is to develop new magnetic polymer microspheres with functional groups available for easy protein and antibody binding. Monodisperse macroporous poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA-COOH) microspheres ca. 4 µm in diameter and containing ~ 1 mmol COOH/g were synthesized by multistep swelling polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA), and [(methoxycarbonyl)methoxy]ethyl methacrylate (MCMEMA), which was followed by MCMEMA hydrolysis. The microspheres were rendered magnetic by precipitation of iron oxide inside the pores, which made them easily separable in a magnetic field. Properties of the resulting magnetic poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (mgt.PHEMA) particles with COOH functionality were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), static volumetric adsorption of helium and nitrogen, mercury porosimetry, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), and elemental analysis. Mgt.PHEMA microspheres were coupled with p46/Myo1C protein purified from blood serum of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, which enabled easy isolation of monospecific anti-p46/Myo1C immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies from crude antibody preparations of mouse blood serum. High efficiency of this approach was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, Western blot, and dot blot analyses. The newly developed mgt.PHEMA microspheres conjugated with a potential disease biomarker, p46/Myo1C protein, are thus a promising tool for affinity purification of antibodies, which can improve diagnosis and treatment of MS patients.

  5. Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an in vitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim(®)), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117 mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim(®) attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim(®) antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p < 0.05). The amounts of PA which remained in the solution after passing PA spiked PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p < 0

  6. A novel computer algorithm improves antibody epitope prediction using affinity-selected mimotopes: a case study using monoclonal antibodies against the West Nile virus E protein.

    PubMed

    Denisova, Galina F; Denisov, Dimitri A; Yeung, Jeffrey; Loeb, Mark B; Diamond, Michael S; Bramson, Jonathan L

    2008-11-01

    Understanding antibody function is often enhanced by knowledge of the specific binding epitope. Here, we describe a computer algorithm that permits epitope prediction based on a collection of random peptide epitopes (mimotopes) isolated by antibody affinity purification. We applied this methodology to the prediction of epitopes for five monoclonal antibodies against the West Nile virus (WNV) E protein, two of which exhibit therapeutic activity in vivo. This strategy was validated by comparison of our results with existing F(ab)-E protein crystal structures and mutational analysis by yeast surface display. We demonstrate that by combining the results of the mimotope method with our data from mutational analysis, epitopes could be predicted with greater certainty. The two methods displayed great complementarity as the mutational analysis facilitated epitope prediction when the results with the mimotope method were equivocal and the mimotope method revealed a broader number of residues within the epitope than the mutational analysis. Our results demonstrate that the combination of these two prediction strategies provides a robust platform for epitope characterization.

  7. An illustration of the clinical relevance of detecting human antimouse antibody interference by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Koper, N P; Massuger, L F; Thomas, C M; Beyer, C; Crooy, M J

    1999-10-01

    Elevated Cancer antigen 125 (CA 125) serum concentrations (up to 221 kU/1) were measured in a 39 year old woman with a positive family history of breast cancer. The serum determinations were performed with the automated Immulite OM-MA chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay system (Diagnostic Products). Laparoscopic evaluation of the ovaries did not reveal any abnormalities. CA 125 measurements in the same patient using the automated IMx immunoassay system (Abbott) demonstrated normal serum levels. Using a previously reported chromatography procedure IgG type human antimouse antibody activity was found to be present in the serum samples explaining the falsely elevated levels. To prevent this interference the manufacturer modified the assay system by replacing the monoclonal M11 detection antibody with a rabbit polyclonal antibody. Using the modified OM-MA CA 125 assay results were comparable with the IMx values.

  8. High-affinity anti-ganglioside IgG antibodies raised in complex ganglioside knockout mice: reexamination of GD1a immunolocalization.

    PubMed

    Lunn, M P; Johnson, L A; Fromholt, S E; Itonori, S; Huang, J; Vyas, A A; Hildreth, J E; Griffin, J W; Schnaar, R L; Sheikh, K A

    2000-07-01

    Gangliosides, sialic acid-bearing glycosphingolipids, are highly enriched in the vertebrate nervous system. Anti-ganglioside antibodies are associated with various human neuropathies, although the pathogenicity of these antibodies remains unproven. Testing the pathogenic role of anti-ganglioside antibodies will be facilitated by developing high-affinity IgG-class complement-fixing monoclonal anti-bodies against major brain gangliosides, a goal that has been difficult to achieve. In this study, mice lacking complex gangliosides were used as immune-naive hosts to raise anti-ganglioside antibodies. Wild-type mice and knockout mice with a disrupted gene for GM2/GD2 synthase (UDP-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine : GM3/GD3 N-acetyl-D-glactosaminyltransferase) were immunized with GD1a conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin. The knockout mice produced a vigorous anti-GD1a IgG response, whereas wildtype littermates failed to do so. Fusion of spleen cells from an immunized knockout mouse with myeloma cells yielded numerous IgG anti-GD1a antibody-producing colonies. Ganglioside binding studies revealed two specificity classes; one colony representing each class was cloned and characterized. High-affinity monoclonal antibody was produced by each hybridoma : an IgG1 that bound nearly exclusively to GD1a and an IgG2b that bound GD1a, GT1b, and GT1aalpha. Both antibodies readily readily detected gangliosides via ELISA, TLC immune overlay, immunohistochemistry, and immunocytochemistry. In contrast to prior reports using anti-GD1a and anti-GT1b IgM class monoclonal antibodies, the new antibodies bound avidly to granule neurons in brain tissue sections and cell cultures. Mice lacking complex gangliosides are improved hosts for raising high-affinity, high-titer anti-ganglioside IgG antibodies for probing for the distribution and physiology of gangliosides and the pathophysiology of anti-ganglioside antibodies.

  9. Selection of Recombinant Human Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tomszak, Florian; Weber, Susanne; Zantow, Jonas; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of therapeutic antibodies the demand of recombinant human antibodies is steadily increasing. Traditionally, therapeutic antibodies were generated by immunization of rat or mice, the generation of hybridoma clones, cloning of the antibody genes and subsequent humanization and engineering of the lead candidates. In the last few years, techniques were developed that use transgenic animals with a human antibody gene repertoire. Here, modern recombinant DNA technologies can be combined with well established immunization and hybridoma technologies to generate already affinity maturated human antibodies. An alternative are in vitro technologies which enabled the generation of fully human antibodies from antibody gene libraries that even exceed the human antibody repertoire. Specific antibodies can be isolated from these libraries in a very short time and therefore reduce the development time of an antibody drug at a very early stage.In this review, we describe different technologies that are currently used for the in vitro and in vivo generation of human antibodies.

  10. Naturally produced opsonizing antibodies restrict the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages by augmenting phagosome maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashi Kant; Singh, Padam; Sinha, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that serum antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis present in naturally infected healthy subjects of a tuberculosis (TB) endemic area could create and/or sustain the latent form of infection. All five apparently healthy Indian donors showed high titres of serum antibodies against M. tuberculosis cell membrane antigens, including lipoarabinomannan and alpha crystallin. Uptake and killing of bacilli by the donor macrophages was significantly enhanced following their opsonization with antibody-rich, heat-inactivated autologous sera. However, the capability to opsonize was apparent for antibodies against some and not other antigens. High-content cell imaging of infected macrophages revealed significantly enhanced colocalization of the phagosome maturation marker LAMP-1, though not of calmodulin, with antibody-opsonized compared with unopsonized M. tuberculosis. Key enablers of macrophage microbicidal action—proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-6), phagosome acidification, inducible NO synthase and nitric oxide—were also significantly enhanced following antibody opsonization. Interestingly, heat-killed M. tuberculosis also elevated these mediators to the levels comparable to, if not higher than, opsonized M. tuberculosis. Results of the study support the emerging view that an efficacious vaccine against TB should, apart from targeting cell-mediated immunity, also generate ‘protective’ antibodies. PMID:26674415

  11. High-affinity, noninhibitory pathogenic C1 domain antibodies are present in patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Batsuli, Glaivy; Deng, Wei; Healey, John F.; Parker, Ernest T.; Baldwin, W. Hunter; Cox, Courtney; Nguyen, Brenda; Kahle, Joerg; Königs, Christoph; Li, Renhao; Lollar, Pete

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor formation in hemophilia A is the most feared treatment-related complication of factor VIII (fVIII) therapy. Most inhibitor patients with hemophilia A develop antibodies against the fVIII A2 and C2 domains. Recent evidence demonstrates that the C1 domain contributes to the inhibitor response. Inhibitory anti-C1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been identified that bind to putative phospholipid and von Willebrand factor (VWF) binding epitopes and block endocytosis of fVIII by antigen presenting cells. We now demonstrate by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry that 7 of 9 anti-human C1 mAbs tested recognize an epitope distinct from the C1 phospholipid binding site. These mAbs, designated group A, display high binding affinities for fVIII, weakly inhibit fVIII procoagulant activity, poorly inhibit fVIII binding to phospholipid, and exhibit heterogeneity with respect to blocking fVIII binding to VWF. Another mAb, designated group B, inhibits fVIII procoagulant activity, fVIII binding to VWF and phospholipid, fVIIIa incorporation into the intrinsic Xase complex, thrombin generation in plasma, and fVIII uptake by dendritic cells. Group A and B epitopes are distinct from the epitope recognized by the canonical, human-derived inhibitory anti-C1 mAb, KM33, whose epitope overlaps both groups A and B. Antibodies recognizing group A and B epitopes are present in inhibitor plasmas from patients with hemophilia A. Additionally, group A and B mAbs increase fVIII clearance and are pathogenic in a hemophilia A mouse tail snip bleeding model. Group A anti-C1 mAbs represent the first identification of pathogenic, weakly inhibitory antibodies that increase fVIII clearance. PMID:27381905

  12. Affinity purification of antibodies using immobilized FB domain of protein A.

    PubMed

    Solomon, B; Raviv, O; Leibman, E; Fleminger, G

    1992-04-24

    A continuous method for the efficient digestion of protein A into active fragments (FB, Mr = 7000) using immobilized trypsin was developed. These fragments originate from almost identical five-repeated monovalent Fc-binding units of 58 residues each. The fragments obtained were found to be similar to the recently described genetically engineered fragment B. Antibody-binding characteristics of the FB domain and also of intact protein A, immobilized on to adipic dihydrazide-modified Eupergit CB6200 beads, were investigated. Based on the experimental data obtained, a high-performance liquid chromatographic column containing C30N Eupergit C-immobilized FB domain was prepared and its performance in antibody purification was compared with that of Eupergit C-immobilized intact protein A.

  13. High affinity antibodies against Lex and sialyl Lex from a phage display library.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Q; Weng, N P; Kiso, M; Ishida, H; Hasegawa, A; Marcus, D M

    1996-07-15

    Our previous studies of seven murine mAbs against the carbohydrate Lex Ag demonstrated that they were all encoded by VH441 and V kappa 24B. To obtain higher affinity Abs, and to ascertain whether their L chains could be encoded by other genes, we constructed a phage display library in a modified pComb 8 vector. The library contained random L chains, and Fd segments enriched in VH domains encoded by the VHX24 gene family. We selected phage with an Lex-BSA Ag, and obtained two Fab mAbs, clones 23 and 24, whose affinities were more than 100-fold higher than hybridoma mAb PM81. Both new mAbs were encoded by VH441, and their L chains were encoded by genes of the V kappa Ox1 and V kappa 9 families. In contrast to hybridoma mAb PM81, which binds only Lex, clones 23 and 24 bound sialyl Lex (SLex) as well as Lex, and clone 23 also binds the backbone carbohydrate structure nLacCer. Analysis of the binding of these three mAbs to synthetic glycolipids that contained structural modifications indicated that they recognize different aspects of the Lex structure, and suggested that they bind to limited regions of the oligosaccharide.

  14. Maturation and Diversity of the VRC01-Antibody Lineage over 15 Years of Chronic HIV-1 Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xueling; Zhang, Zhenhai; Schramm, Chaim A.; Joyce, M.  Gordon; Do Kwon, Young; Zhou, Tongqing; Sheng, Zizhang; Zhang, Baoshan; O’Dell, Sijy; McKee, Krisha; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Longo, Nancy S.; Lynch, Rebecca M.; Saunders, Kevin O.; Soto, Cinque; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Yang, Yongping; Bailer, Robert T.; Louder, Mark K.; Mullikin, James C.; Connors, Mark; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Benjamin, Betty; Blakesley, Robert; Bouffard, Gerry; Brooks, Shelise; Coleman, Holly; Dekhtyar, Mila; Gregory, Michael; Guan, Xiaobin; Gupta, Jyoti; Han, Joel; Hargrove, April; Ho, Shi-ling; Legaspi, Richelle; Maduro, Quino; Masiello, Cathy; Maskeri, Baishali; McDowell, Jenny; Montemayor, Casandra; Park, Morgan; Riebow, Nancy; Schandler, Karen; Schmidt, Brian; Sison, Christina; Stantripop, Mal; Thomas, James; Thomas, Pam; Vemulapalli, Meg; Young, Alice

    2015-04-09

    HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies develop in most HIV-1-infected individuals, although highly effective antibodies are generally observed only after years of chronic infection. Here in this paper, we characterize the rate of maturation and extent of diversity for the lineage that produced the broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01 through longitudinal sampling of peripheral B cell transcripts over 15 years and co-crystal structures of lineage members. Next-generation sequencing identified VRC01-lineage transcripts, which encompassed diverse antibodies organized into distinct phylogenetic clades. Prevalent clades maintained characteristic features of antigen recognition, though each evolved binding loops and disulfides that formed distinct recognition surfaces. Over the course of the study period, VRC01-lineage clades showed continuous evolution, with rates of ~2 substitutions per 100 nucleotides per year, comparable to that of HIV-1 evolution. This high rate of antibody evolution provides a mechanism by which antibody lineages can achieve extraordinary diversity and, over years of chronic infection, develop effective HIV-1 neutralization.

  15. Maturation and Diversity of the VRC01-Antibody Lineage over 15 Years of Chronic HIV-1 Infection

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Xueling; Zhang, Zhenhai; Schramm, Chaim A.; ...

    2015-04-09

    HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies develop in most HIV-1-infected individuals, although highly effective antibodies are generally observed only after years of chronic infection. Here in this paper, we characterize the rate of maturation and extent of diversity for the lineage that produced the broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01 through longitudinal sampling of peripheral B cell transcripts over 15 years and co-crystal structures of lineage members. Next-generation sequencing identified VRC01-lineage transcripts, which encompassed diverse antibodies organized into distinct phylogenetic clades. Prevalent clades maintained characteristic features of antigen recognition, though each evolved binding loops and disulfides that formed distinct recognition surfaces. Over the course of themore » study period, VRC01-lineage clades showed continuous evolution, with rates of ~2 substitutions per 100 nucleotides per year, comparable to that of HIV-1 evolution. This high rate of antibody evolution provides a mechanism by which antibody lineages can achieve extraordinary diversity and, over years of chronic infection, develop effective HIV-1 neutralization.« less

  16. Label-free Fab and Fc affinity/avidity profiling of the antibody complex half-life for polyclonal and monoclonal efficacy screening.

    PubMed

    Read, Thomas; Olkhov, Rouslan V; Williamson, E Diane; Shaw, Andrew M

    2015-09-01

    A unified approach to affinity screening for Fab and Fc interactions of an antibody for its antigen and FcγR receptor has been developed. An antigen array is used for the Fab affinity and cross-reactivity screening and protein A/G proxy is the FcγR receptor. The affinities are derived using a simple 1:1 binding model with a consistent error analysis. The association and dissociation kinetics are measured over optimised times for accurate determination. The Fab/Fc affinities are derived for ten antibodies: mAb-actin (mouse), pAb-BSA (sheep), pAb-collagen V (rabbit), pAb-CRP (goat), mAb-F1 (mouse), mAbs (mouse) 7.3, 12.3, 29.3, 36.3 and 46.3 raised against LcrV in Yersinia pestis. The rate of the dissociation of antigen-antibody complexes relates directly to their immunological function as does the Fc-FcγR complex and a new half-life plot has been defined with a Fab/Fc half-life range of 17-470 min. The upper half-life value points to surface avidity. Two antibodies that are protective as an immunotherapy define a Fab half-life >250 min and an Fc half-life >50 min as characteristics of ideal interactions which can form the basis of an antibody screen for immunotherapy.

  17. Identification of a high-affinity monoclonal antibody against ochratoxin A and its application in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Sun, Mengjiao; Kang, Yue; Xie, Hui; Wang, Xin; Song, Houhui; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2015-11-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most commonly occurring mycotoxins produced by some species of Aspergillus and can contaminate cereal and cereal products. A high-affinity anti-OTA monoclonal antibody (mAb) was generated from a hybridoma cell line 2D8 using splenocytes from a BALB/c mouse immunized with synthesized OTA-bovine serum albumin conjugate. The mAb 2D8 is specific with high affinity (3.75 × 10(9) L/M). An indirect competitive ELISA (ic-ELISA) was then developed using this mAb for quantitative determination of OTA in corn and feed samples. Using the optimized conditions, there was good linearity between OTA concentration and competitive inhibition (y = -0.6076x + 0.2441, R(2) = 0.9923) with the working range from 2.4 to 23.6 μg/kg, IC50 at 7.6 μg/kg and lower limit of detection at 1.4 μg/kg. The recovery rates in spiked samples were 91.2-110.3%. Of the 56 corn and feed samples, this ic-ELISA and a commercial kit both found the same 13 samples positive for OTA with good linear correlation between the two methods in OTA quantification (R(2) = 0.9706). We conclude that this ic-ELISA can be used for rapid and quantitative screening of corn and feed samples for the presence of OTA.

  18. Single-step Antibody-based Affinity Cryo-Electron Microscopy for Imaging and Structural Analysis of Macromolecular Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guimei; Vago, Frank; Zhang, Dongsheng; Snyder, Jonathan E.; Yan, Rui; Zhang, Ci; Benjamin, Christopher; Jiang, Xi; Kuhn, Richard J.; Serwer, Philip; Thompson, David H.; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is an emerging powerful tool for structural studies of macromolecular assemblies (i.e., protein complexes and viruses). Although single particle cryo-EM requires less concentrated and smaller amounts of samples than X-ray crystallography, it remains challenging to study specimens that are low-abundance, low-yield, or short-lived. The recent development of affinity grid techniques can potentially further extend single particle cryo-EM to these challenging samples by combining sample purification and cryo-EM grid preparation into a single step. Here we report a new design of affinity cryo-EM approach, cryo-SPIEM, that applies a traditional pathogen diagnosis tool Solid Phase Immune Electron Microscopy (SPIEM) to the single particle cryo-EM method. This approach provides an alternative, largely simplified and easier to use affinity grid that directly works with most native macromolecular complexes with established antibodies, and enables cryo-EM studies of native samples directly from cell cultures. In the present work, we extensively tested the feasibility of cryo-SPIEM with multiple samples including those of high or low molecular weight, macromolecules with low or high symmetry, His-tagged or native particles, and high- or low-yield macromolecules. Results for all these samples (nonpurified His-tagged bacteriophage T7, His-tagged E. coli ribosomes, native Sindbis virus, and purified but low-concentration native Tulane virus) demonstrated the capability of cryo-SPIEM approach in specifically trapping and concentrating target particles on TEM grids with minimal view constraints for cryo-EM imaging and determination of 3D structures. PMID:24780590

  19. Affinity precipitation of a monoclonal antibody from an industrial harvest feedstock using an ELP-Z stimuli responsive biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Rahul D; Jin, Mi; Bhut, Bharat V; Li, Zhengjian; Chen, Wilfred; Cramer, Steven M

    2014-08-01

    In this work, a proof of concept elastin-like polypeptide-Z domain fusion (ELP-Z) based affinity precipitation process is developed for monoclonal antibody (mAb) purification from industrial harvest feeds. Greater than 99% mAb recoveries are obtained during the initial binding step of the process for both pure mAb and the mAb harvest feeds. Great than 90% overall mAb yields are also obtained for the subsequent elution step of the process with no measurable mAb aggregation. The process is shown to result in more than 2 logs of host cell protein (HCP) and more than 4 logs of DNA clearance from the harvest feed. While the overall mAb yield and HCP clearance for the affinity precipitation process was comparable to Protein A chromatography the DNA clearance was clearly superior. Performance is maintained for mAb final elution concentrations up to 20 g/L, demonstrating the ability of the process to both concentrate and purify the mAb. Effective ELP-Z regeneration is also demonstrated using 0.1 M NaOH with no adverse effect on subsequent capture efficiency. Finally, the reusability of the ELP-Z construct and robustness of the process is demonstrated for up to three purification-regeneration cycles with minimal product and impurity carryover and high yields and purity. This work demonstrates that the ELP-Z based precipitation approach can be successfully employed as an affinity capture step for industrial mAbs.

  20. Single-step antibody-based affinity cryo-electron microscopy for imaging and structural analysis of macromolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guimei; Vago, Frank; Zhang, Dongsheng; Snyder, Jonathan E; Yan, Rui; Zhang, Ci; Benjamin, Christopher; Jiang, Xi; Kuhn, Richard J; Serwer, Philip; Thompson, David H; Jiang, Wen

    2014-07-01

    Single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is an emerging powerful tool for structural studies of macromolecular assemblies (i.e., protein complexes and viruses). Although single particle cryo-EM requires less concentrated and smaller amounts of samples than X-ray crystallography, it remains challenging to study specimens that are low-abundance, low-yield, or short-lived. The recent development of affinity grid techniques can potentially further extend single particle cryo-EM to these challenging samples by combining sample purification and cryo-EM grid preparation into a single step. Here we report a new design of affinity cryo-EM approach, cryo-SPIEM, that applies a traditional pathogen diagnosis tool Solid Phase Immune Electron Microscopy (SPIEM) to the single particle cryo-EM method. This approach provides an alternative, largely simplified and easier to use affinity grid that directly works with most native macromolecular complexes with established antibodies, and enables cryo-EM studies of native samples directly from cell cultures. In the present work, we extensively tested the feasibility of cryo-SPIEM with multiple samples including those of high or low molecular weight, macromolecules with low or high symmetry, His-tagged or native particles, and high- or low-yield macromolecules. Results for all these samples (non-purified His-tagged bacteriophage T7, His-tagged Escherichiacoli ribosomes, native Sindbis virus, and purified but low-concentration native Tulane virus) demonstrated the capability of cryo-SPIEM approach in specifically trapping and concentrating target particles on TEM grids with minimal view constraints for cryo-EM imaging and determination of 3D structures.

  1. Evaluation of affinity-based serum clean-up in mass spectrometric analysis: Plastic vs monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Cecilia; Levernæs, Maren C S; Reubsaet, Léon; Halvorsen, Trine G

    2016-11-04

    Mass spectrometric assays are now of great relevance for trace compound analysis in complex matrices such as serum and plasma samples. Especially in the quantification of low abundant protein-biomarkers, the choice of the sample preparation is crucial. In the present paper immunocapture and Molecular Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) have been applied in the determination of pro-gastrin-releasing peptide, a Small Cell Lung Cancer marker. These affinity-based techniques were compared in terms of matrix effect, limits of detection, repeatability and extraction specificity. In addition, protein precipitation was included for comparison as it is a typical sample preparation method of biological matrices. The results highlighted differences in the methods' performance and specificity, strongly affecting the outcome of the mass spectrometric determination. Plastic and monoclonal antibodies confirmed to be sensitive and specific sample preparations able to determine ProGRP at clinical relevant concentration, although only the use of monoclonal antibodies allowed the reliable quantification of ProGRP at reference levels (8pM). In addition better insight in the specificity of the three sample preparation techniques was gained. This might also be of interest for other biological applications.

  2. Detection of Hepatitis C core antibody by dual-affinity yeast chimera and smartphone-based electrochemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Venkatesh, A G; Sun, Alex; Brickner, Howard; Looney, David; Hall, Drew A

    2016-12-15

    Yeast cell lines were genetically engineered to display Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen linked to gold binding peptide (GBP) as a dual-affinity biobrick chimera. These multifunctional yeast cells adhere to the gold sensor surface while simultaneously acting as a "renewable" capture reagent for anti-HCV core antibody. This streamlined functionalization and detection strategy removes the need for traditional purification and immobilization techniques. With this biobrick construct, both optical and electrochemical immunoassays were developed. The optical immunoassays demonstrated detection of anti-HCV core antibody down to 12.3pM concentrations while the electrochemical assay demonstrated higher binding constants and dynamic range. The electrochemical format and a custom, low-cost smartphone-based potentiostat ($20 USD) yielded comparable results to assays performed on a state-of-the-art electrochemical workstation. We propose this combination of synthetic biology and scalable, point-of-care sensing has potential to provide low-cost, cutting edge diagnostic capability for many pathogens in a variety of settings.

  3. A monoclonal rat anti-mouse EMAP II antibody that functionally neutralizes pro- and mature-EMAP II in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rajashekhar, Gangaraju; Mitnacht-Kraus, Rita; Ispe, Ute; Garrison, Jana; Hou, Yonghao; Taylor, Brian; Petrache, Irina; Vestweber, Dietmar; Clauss, Matthias

    2009-10-31

    EMAP II is an endothelial cell and monocyte activating proinflammatory cytokine, which has been demonstrated to induce endothelial cell apoptosis. In order to analyze its role in disease models linked to inflammation and endothelial cell death, we aimed to develop a neutralizing antibody against mouse EMAP II. Therefore, we generated rat monoclonal anti-mouse EMAP II antibodies by immunization with recombinant full length, mouse pro-EMAP II protein. We could identify by ELISA, hybridoma clones from fusion with mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells which produced antibodies recognizing both full length and mature EMAP II. We further characterized one antibody, M7/1 and demonstrated its ability to detect both EMAP II forms in Western blotting and to neutralize EMAP II directed migration of human peripheral blood monocytes as well as EMAP II induced apoptosis of tumor and endothelial cells. We conclude that this antibody can be useful to both target and analyze murine disease models, in which EMAP II may be involved.

  4. Theoretical study of catalytic efficiency of a Diels-Alderase catalytic antibody: an indirect effect produced during the maturation process.

    PubMed

    Martí, Sergio; Andrés, Juan; Moliner, Vicent; Silla, Estanislao; Tuñón, Iñaki; Bertrán, Juan

    2008-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is one of the most important and versatile transformations available to organic chemists for the construction of complex natural products, therapeutics agents, and synthetic materials. Given the lack of efficient enzymes capable of catalyzing this kind of reaction, it is of interest to ask whether a biological catalyst could be designed from an antibody-combining site. In the present work, a theoretical study of the different behavior of a germline catalytic antibody (CA) and its matured form, 39 A-11, that catalyze a Diels-Alder reaction has been carried out. A free-energy perturbation technique based on a hybrid quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics scheme, together with internal energy minimizations, has allowed free-energy profiles to be obtained for both CAs. The profiles show a smaller barrier for the matured form, which is in agreement with the experimental observation. Free-energy profiles were obtained with this methodology, thereby avoiding the much more demanding two-dimensional calculations of the energy surfaces that are normally required to study this kind of reaction. Structural analysis and energy evaluations of substrate-protein interactions have been performed from averaged structures, which allows understanding of how the single mutations carried out during the maturation process can be responsible for the observed fourfold enhancement of the catalytic rate constant. The conclusion is that the mutation effect in this studied germline CA produces a complex indirect effect through coupled movements of the backbone of the protein and the substrate.

  5. Crystal structure of an in vitro affinity- and specificity-matured anti-testosterone Fab in complex with testosterone. Improved affinity results from small structural changes within the variable domains.

    PubMed

    Valjakka, Jarkko; Hemminki, Ari; Niemi, Seija; Söderlund, Hans; Takkinen, Kristiina; Rouvinen, Juha

    2002-11-15

    A highly selective, high affinity recombinant anti-testosterone Fab fragment has been generated by stepwise optimization of the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) by random mutagenesis and phage display selection of a monoclonal antibody (3-C(4)F(5)). The best mutant (77 Fab) was obtained by evaluating the additivity effects of different independently selected CDR mutations. The 77 Fab contains 20 mutations and has about 40-fold increased affinity (K(d) = 3 x 10(-10) m) when compared with the wild-type (3-C(4)F(5)) Fab. To obtain structural insight into factors, which are needed to improve binding properties, we have determined the crystal structures of the mutant 77 Fab fragment with (2.15 A) and without testosterone (2.10 A) and compared these with previously determined wild-type structures. The overall testosterone binding of the 77 Fab is similar to that of the wild-type. The improved affinity and specificity of the 77 Fab fragment are due to more comprehensive packing of the testosterone with the protein, which is the result of small structural changes within the variable domains. Only one important binding site residue Glu-95 of the heavy chain CDR3 is mutated to alanine in the 77 Fab fragment. This mutation, originally selected from the phage library based on improved specificity, provides more free space for the testosterone D-ring. The light chain CDR1 of 77 Fab containing eight mutations has the most significant effect on the improved affinity, although it has no direct contact with the testosterone. The mutations of CDR-L1 cause a rearrangement in its conformation, leading to an overall fine reshaping of the binding site.

  6. Gum Arabic coated magnetic nanoparticles with affinity ligands specific for antibodies.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Iris L; Hussain, Abid; Roque, A C A

    2010-01-01

    A novel magnetic support based on gum Arabic (GA) coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) has been endowed with affinity properties towards immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules. The success of the in situ triazine ligand synthesis was confirmed by fluorescence assays. Two synthetic ligands previously developed for binding to IgG, named as ligand 22/8 (artificial Protein A) and ligand 8/7 (artificial Protein L) were immobilized on to MNPs coated with GA (MNP_GA). The dimension of the particles core was not affected by the surface functionalization with GA and triazine ligands. The hydrodynamic diameters of the magnetic supports indicate that the coupling of GA leads to the formation of larger agglomerates of particles with about 1 microm, but the introduction of the triazine ligands leads to a decrease on MNPs size. The non-functionalized MNP_GA bound 28 mg IgG/g, two times less than bare MNP (60 mg IgG/g). MNP_GA modified with ligand 22/8 bound 133 mg IgG/g support, twice higher than the value obtained for ligand 8/7 magnetic adsorbents (65 mg/g). Supports modified with ligand 22/8 were selected to study the adsorption and the elution of IgG. The adsorption of human IgG on this support followed a Langmuir behavior with a Q(máx) of 344 mg IgG/g support and K(a) of 1.5 x 10(5) M. The studies on different elution conditions indicated that although the 0.05 M citrate buffer (pH 3) presented good recovery yields (elution 64% of bound protein), there was occurrence of iron leaching at this acidic pH. Therefore, a potential alternative would be to elute bound protein with a 0.05 M glycine-NaOH (pH 11) buffer.

  7. A strategy to identify linker-based modules for the allosteric regulation of antibody-antigen binding affinities of different scFvs

    PubMed Central

    Thie, Holger

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibody single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) are used in a variety of applications, such as for research, diagnosis and therapy. Essential for these applications is the extraordinary specificity, selectivity and affinity of antibody paratopes, which can also be used for efficient protein purification. However, this use is hampered by the high affinity for the protein to be purified because harsh elution conditions, which may impair folding, integrity or viability of the eluted biomaterials, are typically required. In this study, we developed a strategy to obtain structural elements that provide allosteric modulation of the affinities of different antibody scFvs for their antigen. To identify suitable allosteric modules, a complete set of cyclic permutations of calmodulin variants was generated and tested for modulation of the affinity when substituting the linker between VH and VL. Modulation of affinity induced by addition of different calmodulin-binding peptides at physiologic conditions was demonstrated for 5 of 6 tested scFvs of different specificities and antigens ranging from cell surface proteins to haptens. In addition, a variety of different modulator peptides were tested. Different structural solutions were found in respect of the optimal calmodulin permutation, the optimal peptide and the allosteric effect for scFvs binding to different antigen structures. Significantly, effective linker modules were identified for scFvs with both VH-VL and VL-VH architecture. The results suggest that this approach may offer a rapid, paratope-independent strategy to provide allosteric regulation of affinity for many other antibody scFvs. PMID:28055297

  8. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope.

  9. Monoclonal antibody TSd-1 is specific to elongating and matured spermatids in testis of common tree shrew (Tupaia glis).

    PubMed

    Maeda, S; Nakamuta, N; Nam, S Y; Kimura, J; Endo, H; Rerkamnuaychoke, W; Kurohmaru, M; Yamada, J; Hayashi, Y; Nishida, T

    1998-03-01

    The monoclonal antibody (MAb), named TSd-1, specific to spermatogenic cells of the common tree shrew (Tupaia glis) was established and characterized using immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. MAb TSd-1 reacted with elongating and matured spermatids in a stage-dependent manner. TSd-1 recognized a 94 kilodalton (kDa) peptide in the plasma membrane and cytosol. Additionally, an extremely weak 107 kDa band was detected only in the cytosol. The reactions were not detected in round spermatids. In elongating Stage VI spermatids, the plasma membrane and the granular structure within the cytoplasm were intensely positive, and most intense after the appearance of new round spermatids in the lower layer (Stage I). The reactions were observed neither in the other organs of the common tree shrew nor in the testes of other animals, indicating that TSd-1 antigen is specific to the spermatogenic cells of the common tree shrew, and may act on elongating or matured spermatids.

  10. Single-chain antibody-based immunotoxins targeting Her2/neu: design optimization and impact of affinity on antitumor efficacy and off-target toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Marks, James D; Huang, Qian; Rudnick, Stephen I; Xiong, Chiyi; Hittelman, Walter N; Wen, Xiaoxia; Marks, John W; Cheung, Lawrence H; Boland, Kim; Li, Chun; Adams, Gregory P; Rosenblum, Michael G

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant immunotoxins, consisting of single-chain variable fragments (scFv) genetically fused to polypeptide toxins, represent potentially effective candidates for cancer therapeutics. We evaluated the affinity of various anti-Her2/neu scFv fused to recombinant gelonin (rGel) and its effect on antitumor efficacy and off-target toxicity. A series of rGel-based immunotoxins were created from the human anti-Her2/neu scFv C6.5 and various affinity mutants (designated ML3-9, MH3-B1, and B1D3) with affinities ranging from 10(-8) to 10(-11) mol/L. Against Her2/neu-overexpressing tumor cells, immunotoxins with increasing affinity displayed improved internalization and enhanced autophagic cytotoxicity. Targeting indices were highest for the highest affinity B1D3/rGel construct. However, the addition of free Her2/neu extracellular domain (ECD) significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of B1D3/rGel because of immune complex formation. In contrast, ECD addition had little impact on the lower affinity constructs in vitro. In vivo studies against established BT474 M1 xenografts showed growth suppression by all immunotoxins. Surprisingly, therapy with the B1D3-rGel induced significant liver toxicity because of immune complex formation with shed Her2/neu antigen in circulation. The MH3-B1/rGel construct with intermediate affinity showed effective tumor growth inhibition without inducing hepatotoxicity or complex formation. These findings show that while high-affinity constructs can be potent antitumor agents, they may also be associated with mistargeting through the facile formation of complexes with soluble antigen leading to significant off-target toxicity. Constructs composed of intermediate-affinity antibodies are also potent agents that are more resistant to immune complex formation. Therefore, affinity is an exceptionally important consideration when evaluating the design and efficacy of targeted therapeutics.

  11. F-actin flow drives affinity maturation and spatial organization of LFA-1 at the immunological synapse

    PubMed Central

    Comrie, William A.; Babich, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Integrin-dependent interactions between T cells and antigen-presenting cells are vital for proper T cell activation, effector function, and memory. Regulation of integrin function occurs via conformational change, which modulates ligand affinity, and receptor clustering, which modulates valency. Here, we show that conformational intermediates of leukocyte functional antigen 1 (LFA-1) form a concentric array at the immunological synapse. Using an inhibitor cocktail to arrest F-actin dynamics, we show that organization of this array depends on F-actin flow and ligand mobility. Furthermore, F-actin flow is critical for maintaining the high affinity conformation of LFA-1, for increasing valency by recruiting LFA-1 to the immunological synapse, and ultimately for promoting intracellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) binding. Finally, we show that F-actin forces are opposed by immobilized ICAM-1, which triggers LFA-1 activation through a combination of induced fit and tension-based mechanisms. Our data provide direct support for a model in which the T cell actin network generates mechanical forces that regulate LFA-1 activity at the immunological synapse. PMID:25666810

  12. G196 epitope tag system: a novel monoclonal antibody, G196, recognizes the small, soluble peptide DLVPR with high affinity

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Kasumi; Sakashita, Gyosuke; Nariai, Yuko; Okazaki, Kosuke; Kato, Hiroaki; Obayashi, Eiji; Yoshida, Hisashi; Sugiyama, Kanako; Park, Sam-Yong; Sekine, Joji; Urano, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    The recognition specificity of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has made mAbs among the most frequently used tools in both basic science research and in clinical diagnosis and therapies. Precise determination of the epitope allows the development of epitope tag systems to be used with recombinant proteins for various purposes. Here we describe a new family of tag derived from the epitope recognized by a highly specific mAb G196. The minimal epitope was identified as the five amino acid sequence Asp-Leu-Val-Pro-Arg. Permutation analysis was used to characterize the binding requirements of mAb G196, and the variable regions of the mAb G196 were identified and structurally analyzed by X-ray crystallography. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed the high affinity (Kd = 1.25 nM) of the mAb G196/G196-epitope peptide interaction, and G196-tag was used to detect several recombinant cytosolic and nuclear proteins in human and yeast cells. mAb G196 is valuable for developing a new peptide tagging system for cell biology and biochemistry research. PMID:28266535

  13. Purification of GFP fusion proteins with high purity and yield by monoclonal antibody-coupled affinity column chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ran; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Rui; Song, Chaojun; Yang, Kun; Yang, Angang; Jin, Boquan

    2008-05-01

    GFP has often been used as a marker of gene expression, protein localization in living and fixed tissues as well as for protein targeting in intact cells and organisms. Monitoring foreign protein expression via GFP fusion is also very appealing for bioprocess applications. Many cells, including bacterial, fungal, plant, insect and mammalian cells, can express recombinant GFP (rGFP) efficiently. Several methods and procedures have been developed to purify the rGFP or recombinant proteins fused with GFP tag. However, most current GFP purification methods are limited by poor yields and low purity. In the current study, we developed an improved purification method, utilizing a FMU-GFP.5 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to GFP together with a mAb-coupled affinity chromatography column. The method resulted in a sample that was highly pure (more than 97% homogeneity) and had a sample yield of about 90%. Moreover, the GFP epitope permitted the isolation of almost all the active recombinant target proteins fused with GFP, directly and easily, from the crude cellular sources. Our data suggests this method is more efficient than any currently available method for purification of GFP protein.

  14. Induction of in vitro heart block is not restricted to affinity purified anti-52 kDa Ro/SSA antibody from mothers of children with neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Viana, V S; Garcia, S; Nascimento, J H; Elkon, K B; Brot, N; Campos de Carvalho, A C; Bonfá, E

    1998-01-01

    The ability of affinity purified anti-52 kDa Ro/SSA antibody from patients without obstetric history of neonatal lupus to cause heart block using an experimental model was investigated. IgG-enriched fractions from sera of 20 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and one Sjögren's syndrome (SS) all positives for anti-Ro/SSA antibodies as detected by CIE, were perfused on isolated whole rabbit hearts. Only six (29%) samples induced A-V block, five of them presenting low anti-Ro/SSA titre. All of them recognized the 52 kDa isoform on ELISA whereas only one had a concomitant binding to the 60 kDa protein. Moreover, affinity purified antibodies from two sera previously known to induce A-V block were obtained by affinity chromatography using a column containing the full-length 52 kDa Ro/SSA fusion protein. Paired eluate and effluent devoid of anti-52 kDa activity from the same patient were individually perfused in whole hearts. The ability to cause cardiac blockade was restricted to the affinity anti-52 kDa eluates. In addition, anti-52 kDa eluates from three IgG fractions that primarily failed to induce blockade remained ineffective. The present study has added to our knowledge that affinity anti-52 kDa Ro/SSA antibodies from mothers with healthy infants are capable of causing in vitro cardiac conduction disturbances. A prospective follow up of these patients will better delineate the clinical usefulness of this experimental model.

  15. Expression and Functional Properties of an Anti-Triazophos High-Affinity Single-Chain Variable Fragment Antibody with Specific Lambda Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Liang, Xiao; Xiang, Dandan; Guo, Yirong; Liu, Yihua; Zhu, Guonian

    2016-01-01

    Triazophos is a widely used organophosphorous insecticide that has potentially adverse effects to organisms. In the present study, a high-affinity single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody with specific lambda light chain was developed for residue monitoring. First, the specific variable regions were correctly amplified from a hybridoma cell line 8C10 that secreted monoclonal antibody (mAb) against triazophos. The regions were then assembled as scFv via splicing by overlap extension polymerase chain reaction. Subsequently, the recombinant anti-triazophos scFv-8C10 was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli strain HB2151 in soluble form, purified through immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, and verified via Western blot and peptide mass fingerprinting analyses. Afterward, an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was established based on the purified anti-triazophos scFv-8C10 antibody. The assay exhibited properties similar to those based on the parent mAb, with a high sensitivity (IC50 of 1.73 ng/mL) to triazophos and no cross reaction for other organophosphorus pesticides; it was reliable in detecting triazophos residues in spiked water samples. Moreover, kinetic measurement using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor indicated that the purified scFv-8C10 antibody had a high affinity of 1.8 × 10−10 M and exhibited good binding stability. Results indicated that the recombinant high-affinity scFv-8C10 antibody was an effective detection material that would be promising for monitoring triazophos residues in environment samples. PMID:27338340

  16. A simple nonradioactive method for the determination of the binding affinities of antibodies induced by hapten bioconjugates for drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Torres, Oscar B; Antoline, Joshua F G; Li, Fuying; Jalah, Rashmi; Jacobson, Arthur E; Rice, Kenner C; Alving, Carl R; Matyas, Gary R

    2016-02-01

    The accurate analytical measurement of binding affinities of polyclonal antibody in sera to heroin, 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM), and morphine has been a challenging task. A simple nonradioactive method that uses deuterium-labeled drug tracers and equilibrium dialysis (ED) combined with ultra performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) to measure the apparent dissociation constant (K d) of antibodies to 6-AM and morphine is described. The method can readily detect antibodies with K d in the low nanomolar range. Since heroin is rapidly degraded in sera, esterase inhibitors were included in the assay, greatly reducing heroin hydrolysis. MS/MS detection directly measured the heroin in the assay after overnight ED, thereby allowing the quantitation of % bound heroin in lieu of K d as an alternative measurement to assess heroin binding to polyclonal antibody sera. This is the first report that utilizes a solution-based assay to quantify heroin-antibody binding without being confounded by the presence of 6-AM and morphine and to measure K d of polyclonal antibody to 6-AM. Hapten surrogates 6-AcMorHap, 6-PrOxyHap, MorHap, DiAmHap, and DiPrOxyHap coupled to tetanus toxoid (TT) were used to generate high affinity antibodies to heroin, 6-AM, and morphine. In comparison to competition ED-UPLC/MS/MS which gave K d values in the nanomolar range, the commonly used competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measured the 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) values in the micromolar range. Despite the differences in K d and IC50 values, similar trends in affinities of hapten antibodies to heroin, 6-AM, and morphine were observed by both methods. Competition ED-UPLC/MS/MS revealed that among the five TT-hapten bioconjugates, TT-6-AcMorHap and TT-6-PrOxyHap induced antibodies that bound heroin, 6-AM, and morphine. In contrast, TT-MorHap induced antibodies that poorly bound heroin, while TT-DiAmHap and TT-DiPrOxyHap induced antibodies either did not

  17. The binding affinity of a soluble TCR-Fc fusion protein is significantly improved by crosslinkage with an anti-C{beta} antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Horii, Masae; Kobayashi, Eiji; Jin, Aishun; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Muraguchi, Atsushi

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel soluble TCR composed of TCR V and C regions with Ig Fc region is generated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody bound to a p/MHC tetramer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding affinity of TCR-Fc was markedly increased by binding with anti-C{beta} antibody. -- Abstract: The identification and cloning of tumor antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) and the production of the soluble form of the TCR (sTCR) contributed to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for cancer. Recently, several groups have reported the development of technologies for the production of sTCRs. The native sTCR has a very low binding affinity for the antigenic peptide/MHC (p/MHC) complex. In this study, we established a technology to produce high affinity, functional sTCRs. We generated a novel sTCR-Fc fusion protein composed of the TCR V and C regions of the TCR linked to the immunoglobulin (Ig) Fc region. A Western blot analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the fusion protein was approximately 60 kDa under reducing conditions and approximately 100-200 kDa under non-reducing conditions. ELISAs using various antibodies showed that the structure of each domain of the TCR-Fc protein was intact. The TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody effectively bound to a p/MHC tetramer. An SPR analysis showed that the TCR-Fc protein had a low binding affinity (KD; 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M) to the p/MHC monomer. Interestingly, when the TCR-Fc protein was pre-incubated with an anti-C{beta} antibody, its binding affinity for p/MHC increased by 5-fold (2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M). We demonstrated a novel method for constructing a functional soluble TCR using the Ig Fc region and showed that the binding affinity of the functional sTCR-Fc was markedly increased by an anti-C{beta} antibody, which is probably due to the stabilization of the V

  18. Purification of chimeric heavy chain monoclonal antibody EG2-hFc using hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography: an alternative to protein-A affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sadavarte, Rahul; Spearman, Maureen; Okun, Natalie; Butler, Michael; Ghosh, Raja

    2014-06-01

    Heavy chain monoclonal antibodies are being considered as alternative to whole-IgG monoclonal antibodies for certain niche applications. Protein-A chromatography which is widely used for purifying IgG monoclonal antibodies is also used for purifying heavy chain monoclonal antibodies as these molecules possess fully functional Fc regions. However, the acidic conditions used to elute bound antibody may sometimes also leach protein-A, which is immunotoxic. Low pH conditions also tend to make the mAb molecules unstable and prone to aggregation. Moreover, protein-A affinity chromatography does not remove aggregates already present in the feed. Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography (or HIMC) has already been studied as an alternative to protein-A chromatography for purifying whole-IgG monoclonal antibodies. This paper describes the use of HIMC for capturing a humanized chimeric heavy chain monoclonal antibody (EG2-hFC). Binding and eluting conditions were suitably optimized using pure EG2-hFC. Based on this, an HIMC method was developed for capture of EG2-hFC directly from cell culture supernatant. The EG2-hFc purity obtained in this single-step process was high. The glycan profiles of protein-A and HIMC purified monoclonal antibody samples were similar, clearly demonstrating that both techniques captured similarly glycosylated population of EG2-hFc. Moreover, this technique was able to resolve aggregates from monomeric form of the EG2-hFc.

  19. Increasing FcγRIIa affinity of an FcγRIII-optimized anti-EGFR antibody restores neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Derer, Stefanie; Glorius, Pia; Schlaeth, Martin; Lohse, Stefan; Klausz, Katja; Muchhal, Umesh; Desjarlais, John R; Humpe, Andreas; Valerius, Thomas; Peipp, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) has been suggested as an essential mechanism for the in vivo activity of cetuximab, an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting therapeutic antibody. Thus, enhancing the affinity of human IgG1 antibodies to natural killer (NK) cell-expressed FcγRIIIa by glyco- or protein-engineering of their Fc portion has been demonstrated to improve NK cell-mediated ADCC and to represent a promising strategy to improve antibody therapy. However, human polymorphonuclear (PMN) effector cells express the highly homologous FcγRIIIb isoform, which is described to be ineffective in triggering ADCC. Here, non-fucosylated or protein-engineered anti-EGFR antibodies with optimized FcγRIIIa affinities demonstrated the expected benefit in NK cell-mediated ADCC, but did not mediate ADCC by PMN, which could be restored by FcγRIIIb blockade. Furthermore, eosinophils and PMN from paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria patients that expressed no or low levels of FcγRIIIb mediated effective ADCC with FcγRIII-optimized anti-EGFR antibody. Additional experiments with double FcγRIIa/FcγRIII-optimized constructs demonstrated enhanced PMN-mediated ADCC compared with single FcγRIII-optimized antibody. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that FcγRIIIb engagement impairs PMN-mediated ADCC activity of FcγRIII-optimized anti-EGFR antibodies, while further optimization of FcγRIIa binding significantly restores PMN recruitment. PMID:24492248

  20. Purification of polyclonal anti-conformational antibodies for use in affinity selection from random peptide phage display libraries: A study using the hydatid vaccine EG95

    PubMed Central

    Read, A.J.; Gauci, C.G.; Lightowlers, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    The use of polyclonal antibodies to screen random peptide phage display libraries often results in the recognition of a large number of peptides that mimic linear epitopes on various proteins. There appears to be a bias in the use of this technology toward the selection of peptides that mimic linear epitopes. In many circumstances the correct folding of a protein immunogen is required for conferring protection. The use of random peptide phage display libraries to identify peptide mimics of conformational epitopes in these cases requires a strategy for overcoming this bias. Conformational epitopes on the hydatid vaccine EG95 have been shown to result in protective immunity in sheep, whereas linear epitopes are not protective. In this paper we describe a strategy that results in the purification of polyclonal antibodies directed against conformational epitopes while eliminating antibodies directed against linear epitopes. These affinity purified antibodies were then used to select a peptide from a random peptide phage display library that has the capacity to mimic conformational epitopes on EG95. This peptide was subsequently used to affinity purify monospecific antibodies against EG95. PMID:19349218

  1. Adjuvant dependence of APS pathology-related low-affinity antibodies during secondary immune response to tetanus toxoid in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zivković, Irena; Petrušić, Vladimir; Dimitrijević, Rajna; Stojanović, Marijana; Dimitrijević, Ljiljana

    2013-05-01

    One of the established animal models for autoimmune disease antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is TTd hyperimmunization of mice. Tetanus toxoid (TTd) and plasma protein β2GPI share structural homology so that immunization with TTd induces appearance of cross-reactive antibodies. In this paper, we have investigated the presence and dynamic of fluctuation of specific (anti-TTd) and auto (anti-β2GPI) antibodies induced in BALB/c mice during secondary immune response after TTd immunization with alhydrogel or glycerol as adjuvants. In addition, we followed the induced reproductive pathology as a sign of autoimmune outcome. We show undoubtedly adjuvant dependance of (1) level of induced anti-TTd IgG antibodies, (2) changes in levels of low-affinity anti-β2GPI IgG antibodies, and (3) change in fecundity and fertility during secondary immune response. These findings once more indicate the importance of chosen adjuvants used for successful immunization and eventual autoantibody outcome, this time associated with the processes involving low affinity, natural antibodies.

  2. Isolation of a Trypanosoma cruzi antigen by affinity chromatography with a monoclonal antibody. Preliminary evaluation of its possible applications in serological tests.

    PubMed Central

    Carbonetto, C H; Malchiodi, E L; Chiaramonte, M; Durante de Isola, E; Fossati, C A; Margni, R A

    1990-01-01

    By affinity chromatography with a monoclonal antibody (163B6), obtained in our laboratory, we have isolated a T. cruzi antigen which could be useful for differential diagnosis of Chagas' disease from leishmaniasis. This antigen, a 52-kD protein, reacted with all sera from Chagas' disease patients tested but not with sera from patients with leishmania, in ELISA. The 52-kD antigen is widely distributed in the Trypanosoma genus since the 163B6 monoclonal antibody reacts with T. rangeli and 8 strains and a clone of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2119921

  3. Engineering of Bispecific Affinity Proteins with High Affinity for ERBB2 and Adaptable Binding to Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Åstrand, Mikael; Georgieva-Kotseva, Maria; Björnmalm, Mattias; Löfblom, John; Hober, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor 2, ERBB2, is a well-validated target for cancer diagnostics and therapy. Recent studies suggest that the over-expression of this receptor in various cancers might also be exploited for antibody-based payload delivery, e.g. antibody drug conjugates. In such strategies, the full-length antibody format is probably not required for therapeutic effect and smaller tumor-specific affinity proteins might be an alternative. However, small proteins and peptides generally suffer from fast excretion through the kidneys, and thereby require frequent administration in order to maintain a therapeutic concentration. In an attempt aimed at combining ERBB2-targeting with antibody-like pharmacokinetic properties in a small protein format, we have engineered bispecific ERBB2-binding proteins that are based on a small albumin-binding domain. Phage display selection against ERBB2 was used for identification of a lead candidate, followed by affinity maturation using second-generation libraries. Cell surface display and flow-cytometric sorting allowed stringent selection of top candidates from pools pre-enriched by phage display. Several affinity-matured molecules were shown to bind human ERBB2 with sub-nanomolar affinity while retaining the interaction with human serum albumin. Moreover, parallel selections against ERBB2 in the presence of human serum albumin identified several amino acid substitutions that dramatically modulate the albumin affinity, which could provide a convenient means to control the pharmacokinetics. The new affinity proteins competed for ERBB2-binding with the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and recognized the native receptor on a human cancer cell line. Hence, high affinity tumor targeting and tunable albumin binding were combined in one small adaptable protein. PMID:25089830

  4. Treatment with anti-LFA-1 alpha monoclonal antibody selectively interferes with the maturation of CD4- 8+ thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Revilla, C; González, A L; Conde, C; López-Hoyos, M; Merino, J

    1997-04-01

    Maturation of T lymphocytes in the thymus is driven by signals provided by soluble factors and by the direct interaction between thymocytes and stromal cells. Although the interaction between T-cell receptor (TCR) and major histocompalibility complex (MHC) molecules on stromal cells is crucial for T-cell development, other accessory molecules seem to play a role in this process. In order to better understand the role of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) molecules in thymocyte maturation, mice were treated from birth with saturating doses of non-cytolytic-specific monoclonal antibodies. The effect of this treatment on thymocyte subpopulations and the expression of CD3 and TCR-alpha beta by these cells was investigated by flow cytometry. Our data demonstrated that the effective saturation of LFA-1 alpha chain in the thymus, but not ICAM-I or LFA-I beta chain, selectively interfered with the maturation of CD8+ T cells, as manifested by a marked reduction in the frequency of CD4-8+ thymocytes expressing high levels of CD3 and TCR-alpha beta. This selective reduction was also observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and spleen cells. The analysis of the frequencies of various V beta TCR showed that CD4-8+ thymocytes were globally affected by the treatment. These results underline the importance of the interaction between LFA-1 and its ligands in the maturation of CD8+ T cells and document the existence of different molecular requirements for the differentiation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells.

  5. Monoclonal antibody to microtubule-associated STOP protein: affinity purification of neuronal STOP activity and comparison of antigen with activity in neuronal and nonneuronal cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Pirollet, F; Rauch, C T; Job, D; Margolis, R L

    1989-01-24

    Microtubules, ordinarily cold-labile structures, are made entirely resistant to cold temperature by the presence of substoichiometric amounts of STOP (stable tubule only polypeptide), a microtubule-associated protein. We have produced a monoclonal antibody which specifically recognizes a 145-kDa protein previously implicated in STOP activity in rat brain extracts. An antibody affinity column removes both the 145-kDa protein and STOP activity from solution. A urea eluate from the affinity column contains the 145-kDa protein and exhibits substantial STOP activity. We conclude the 145-kDa protein accounts for all measurable STOP activity in rat neuronal extracts. For this work, we have developed an assay of microtubule cold stability which is generally applicable to the detection of STOP activity in various tissues. Using this assay, we show STOP activity is most abundant in neuronal tissue but is detectable in all tissues tested, with the exception of heart muscle. In all tissues that we have examined, STOP activity elutes as a single peak from heparin affinity columns, and in common with brain STOP, all activity is Ca2+-calmodulin sensitive. The monoclonal antibody recognizes the 145-kDa STOP in rat neuronal extracts but reacts with no protein in active fractions from other tissue. A similar, but not identical, analogue of brain STOP thus appears to be widespread in mammalian tissues.

  6. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  7. Purification of anti-MUC1 antibodies by peptide mimotope affinity chromatography using peptides derived from a polyvalent phage display library.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard G; Missailidis, Sotiris; Price, Michael R

    2002-01-05

    A polyvalent, lytic phage display system (T7Select415-1b) displaying a random peptide library has been investigated for its ability to discover novel mimotopes reactive with the therapeutic monoclonal antibody C595. Sequence analysis of enriched phage lead to the identification of a predominant sequence RNREAPRGKICS, and two other consensus sequences RXXP and RXP. The novel synthetic peptide RNREAPRGKICS was linked to beaded agarose and the performance as a mimotope affinity chromatography matrix evaluated. Antibody purified using the novel matrix was found to be of higher specific reactivity than antibody purified using the conventional epitope matrix (peptide APDTRPAPG). The RNREAPRGKICS peptide binding to C595 demonstrated a higher equilibrium association constant (K(A)=0.75 x 10(6)) than the epitope peptide (K(A)=0.16 x 10(6)). Circular dichroism showed that the novel peptide had a more highly ordered structure at 4 degrees C and room temperature, than the epitope peptide.

  8. Complexes of neutralizing and non-neutralizing affinity matured Fabs with a mimetic of the internal trimeric coiled-coil of HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Gustchina, Elena; Li, Mi; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Schuck, Peter; Louis, John M; Pierson, Jason; Rao, Prashant; Subramaniam, Sriram; Gustchina, Alla; Clore, G Marius; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    A series of mini-antibodies (monovalent and bivalent Fabs) targeting the conserved internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR) of HIV-1 gp41 has been previously constructed and reported. Crystal structures of two closely related monovalent Fabs, one (Fab 8066) broadly neutralizing across a wide panel of HIV-1 subtype B and C viruses, and the other (Fab 8062) non-neutralizing, representing the extremes of this series, were previously solved as complexes with 5-Helix, a gp41 pre-hairpin intermediate mimetic. Binding of these Fabs to covalently stabilized chimeric trimers of N-peptides of HIV-1 gp41 (named (CCIZN36)3 or 3-H) has now been investigated using X-ray crystallography, cryo-electron microscopy, and a variety of biophysical methods. Crystal structures of the complexes between 3-H and Fab 8066 and Fab 8062 were determined at 2.8 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Although the structures of the complexes with the neutralizing Fab 8066 and its non-neutralizing counterpart Fab 8062 were generally similar, small differences between them could be correlated with the biological properties of these antibodies. The conformations of the corresponding CDRs of each antibody in the complexes with 3-H and 5-Helix are very similar. The adaptation to a different target upon complex formation is predominantly achieved by changes in the structure of the trimer of N-HR helices, as well as by adjustment of the orientation of the Fab molecule relative to the N-HR in the complex, via rigid-body movement. The structural data presented here indicate that binding of three Fabs 8062 with high affinity requires more significant changes in the structure of the N-HR trimer compared to binding of Fab 8066. A comparative analysis of the structures of Fabs complexed to different gp41 intermediate mimetics allows further evaluation of biological relevance for generation of neutralizing antibodies, as well as provides novel structural insights into immunogen design.

  9. MATURATION OF THE IMMUNE RESPONSE IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Macario, Alberto J. L.; de Macario, Everly Conway; Franceschi, Claudio; Celada, Franco

    1972-01-01

    We have cultivated lymph node microfragments from β-D-galactosidase (Escherichia coli) primed rabbits and have measured their secondary response directed towards the whole molecule (precipitating antibodies) and to a single determinant (activating antibodies) of the antigen. By decreasing the size of the fragments to 105 cells, we began to observe heterogeneity among identical cultures in terms of positivity of response, antibody specificity, and titers. The affinity of "early" activating antibodies was inversely proportional to the dose of challenge. While no maturation was seen in low and excessive challenge, in all cultures receiving intermediate doses the association constant was raised several orders of magnitude within periods of 20 days. The relevance of these data to the mechanism of affinity selection of antigen-sensitive cells is discussed. PMID:4557772

  10. Facile fabrication and instant application of miniaturized antibody-decorated affinity columns for higher-order structure and functional characterization of TRIM21 epitope peptides.

    PubMed

    Al-Majdoub, M; Opuni, K F M; Koy, C; Glocker, M O

    2013-11-05

    Both epitope excision and epitope extraction methods, combined with mass spectrometry, generate precise informations on binding surfaces of full-length proteins, identifying sequential (linear) or assembled (conformational) epitopes, respectively. Here, we describe the one-step fabrication and application of affinity columns using reversibly immobilized antibodies with highest flexibility with respect to antibody sources and lowest sample amount requirements (fmol range). Depending on the antibody source, we made use of protein G- or protein A-coated resins as support materials. These materials are packed in pipet tips and in combination with a programmable multichannel pipet form a highly efficient epitope mapping system. In addition to epitope identification, the influence of epitope structure modifications on antibody binding specificities could be studied in detail with synthetic peptides. Elution of epitope peptides was optimized such that mass spectrometric analysis was feasible after a single desalting step. Epitope peptides were identified by accurate molecular mass determinations or by partial amino acid sequence analysis. In addition, charge state comparison or ion mobility analysis of eluted epitope peptides enabled investigation of higher-order structures. The epitope peptide of the TRIM21 (TRIM: tripartite motif) autoantigen that is recognized by a polyclonal antibody was determined as assembling an "L-E-Q-L" motif on an α-helix. Secondary structure determination by circular dichroism spectroscopy and structure modeling are in accordance with the mass spectrometric results and the antigenic behavior of the 17-mer epitope peptide variants from the full-length autoantigen.

  11. Characterization of the native and denatured herceptin by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and quartz crystal microbalance using a high-affinity single chain fragment variable recombinant antibody.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yuqin; Mernaugh, Ray; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2012-10-02

    Herceptin/Trastuzumab is a humanized IgG1κ light chain antibody used to treat some forms of breast cancer. A phage-displayed recombinant antibody library was used to obtain a single chain fragment variable (scFv, designated 2B4) to a linear synthetic peptide representing Herceptin's heavy chain CDR3. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and piezoimmunosensor/quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) assays were used to characterize 2B4-binding activity to both native and heat denatured Herceptin. The 2B4 scFv specifically bound to heat denatured Herceptin in a concentration dependent manner over a wide (35-220.5 nM) dynamic range. Herceptin denatures and forms significant amounts of aggregates when heated. UV-vis characterization confirms that Herceptin forms aggregates as the temperature used to heat Herceptin increases. QCM affinity assay shows that binding stoichiometry between 2B4 scFv and Herceptin follows a 1:2 relationship proving that 2B4 scFv binds strongly to the dimers of heat denatured Herceptin aggregates and exhibits an affinity constant of 7.17 × 10(13) M(-2). The 2B4-based QCM assay was more sensitive than the corresponding ELISA. Combining QCM with ELISA can be used to more fully characterize nonspecific binding events in assays. The potential theoretical and clinical implications of these results and the advantages of the use of QCM to characterize human therapeutic antibodies in samples are also discussed.

  12. Single-chain site-specific mutations of fluorescein-amino acid contact residues in high affinity monoclonal antibody 4-4-20.

    PubMed

    Denzin, L K; Whitlow, M; Voss, E W

    1991-07-25

    Previous crystallographic studies of high affinity anti-fluorescein monoclonal antibody 4-4-20 (Ka = 1.7 x 10(10) M-1) complexed with fluorescyl ligand resolved active site contact residues involved in binding. For better definition of the relative roles of three light chain antigen contact residues (L27dhis, L32tyr and L34arg), four site-specific mutations (L27dhis to L27lys, L32tyr to L32phe, and L34arg to L34lys and L34his) were generated and expressed in single-chain antigen binding derivatives of monoclonal antibody 4-4-20 containing two different polypeptide linkers (SCA 4-4-20/205c, 25 amino acids and SCA 4-4-20/212, 14 amino acids). Results showed that L27dhis and L32tyr were necessary for wild type binding affinities, however, were not required for near-wild type Qmax values (where Qmax is the maximum fluoroscein fluorescence quenching expressed as percent). Tyrosine L32 which hydrogen bonds with ligand was also characterized at the haptenic level through the use of 9-hydroxyphenylfluoron which lacks the carboxyl group to which L32 tyrosine forms a hydrogen bond. Results demonstrated that wild type SCA and mutant L32phe possessed similar HPF binding characteristics. Active site contact residue L34arg was important for fluorescein quenching maxima and binding affinity (L34his mutant), however, substitution of lysine for arginine at L34 did not have a significant effect on observed Qmax value. In addition, substitutions had no effect on structural and topological characteristics, since all mutants retained similar idiotypic and metatypic properties. Finally, two linkers were comparatively examined to determine relative contributions to mutant binding properties and stability. No linker effects were observed. Collectively, these results verified the importance of these light chain fluorescein contact residues in the binding pocket of monoclonal antibody 4-4-20.

  13. Selective targeting of the IL23 pathway: Generation and characterization of a novel high-affinity humanized anti-IL23A antibody

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjaya; Kroe-Barrett, Rachel R; Canada, Keith A; Zhu, Xiang; Sepulveda, Eliud; Wu, Helen; He, Yaqin; Raymond, Ernest L; Ahlberg, Jennifer; Frego, Lee E; Amodeo, Laura M; Catron, Katrina M; Presky, David H; Hanke, Jeffrey H

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we describe the generation and characterization of BI 655066, a novel, highly potent neutralizing anti-interleukin-23 (IL23) monoclonal antibody in clinical development for autoimmune conditions, including psoriasis and Crohn's disease. IL23 is a key driver of the differentiation, maintenance, and activity of a number of immune cell subsets, including T helper 17 (Th17) cells, which are believed to mediate the pathogenesis of several immune-mediated disorders. Thus, IL23 neutralization is an attractive therapeutic approach. Designing an antibody for clinical activity and convenience for the patient requires certain properties, such as high affinity, specificity, and solubility. These properties were achieved by directed design of the immunization, lead identification, and humanization procedures. Favorable substance and pharmacokinetic properties were established by biophysical assessments and studies in cynomolgus monkeys. PMID:25905918

  14. Enzyme-amplified protein micorarray and a fluidic renewable surface fluorescence immunoassay for botulinum neurotoxin detection using high-affinity recombinant antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Warner, Marvin G.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Anheier, Norman C.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Smith, Leonard A.; Feldhaus, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2006-06-16

    With the use of high-affinity recombinant monoclonal antibodies against the receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A), two separate immunoassay platforms were developed for either the sensitive or the rapid detection of BoNT/A. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray was developed for the specific and sensitive detection of BoNT in buffer and clinical fluids. This assay has the sensitivity to detect BoNT in diverse samples down to 14 fM (1.4 pg/mL). Using the recombinant monoclonal antibodies, a renewable surface microcolumn sensor was developed for the rapid detection of BoNT/A in an automated fluidic system. While the ELISA microarray assay, because of its sensitivity, offers an alternative to the mouse bioassay, the renewable surface assay has potential as a rapid screening assay for the analysis of complex environmental samples.

  15. Purification of HBsAg produced by the human hepatoma cell line PLC/PRE/5 by affinity chromatography using monoclonal antibodies and application for ELISA diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Merten, O W; Reiter, S; Scheirer, W; Katinger, H

    1983-01-01

    The human cell line PLC/PRF/5 (5) was used for the production of hepatitis B surface antigen subtype ad (HBsAg ad) and purified by affinity chromatography (AC) with monoclonal antibodies (mAb). mAb to HBsAg from mouse ascites have been purified by Protein A - AC prior coupling to AH-Sepharose 4B (Pharmacia). The combined procedure of ammonium-sulphate-precipitation of HBsAg from culture supernatants and immunosorbent-AC leads to approx. 700-fold purification. ELISA results using the mAb and the HBsAg for diagnostics of human serum, positive for anti-HBsAg-antibodies correlate with the RIA (AUSAB, Abbott).

  16. Isoelectric focusing-affinity immunoblot analysis of mouse monoclonal antibodies to the four human IgG subclasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Robert G.; Roebber, Marianne; Rodkey, L. Scott; Reimer, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF)/affinity immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used for parallel analysis of murine monoclonal antihuman IgG-subclass antisera (MoAbs). Coomassie Blue-stained protein bands in the pH region 5.5-8.0 were shown to be murine IgG by direct blotting onto nitrocellulose followed by detection with conjugated antimouse IgG. Use of IgG myeloma antigen-coated nitrocellulose in the IEF-affinity immunoblot allowed detection of the charge microheterogeneity of MoAbs. The MoAb group contained one to five major dense bands flanked by up to four minor fainter bands, all with pIs ranging from 6.1 to 7.8. Semiquantitative estimates of binding specificity in the IEF-affinity blot compared well with cross-reactivity data obtained from a quantitative ELISA.

  17. Quantum dot immunoassays in renewable surface column and 96-well plate formats for the fluorescence detection of Botulinum neurotoxin using high-affinity antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Marvin G.; Grate, Jay W.; Tyler, Abby J.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Miller, Keith D.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2009-09-01

    A fluorescence sandwich immunoassay using high affinity antibodies and quantum dot (QD) reporters has been developed for detection of botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A). For the development of the assay, a nontoxic recombinant fragment of the holotoxin (BoNT/A-HC-fragment) has been used as a structurally valid simulant for the full toxin molecule. The antibodies used, AR4 and RAZ1, bind to nonoverlapping epitopes present on both the full toxin and on the recombinant fragment. In one format, the immunoassay is carried out in a 96-well plate with detection in a standard plate reader. Detection down to 31 pM of the BoNT/Hc-fragment was demonstrated with a total incubation time of 3 hours, using AR4 as the capture antibody and QD-coupled RAZ1 as the reporter. In a second format, the AR4 capture antibody was coupled to Sepharose beads, and the immunochemical reactions were carried out in microcentrifuge tubes with an incubation time of 1 hour. These beads were subsequently captured and concentrated in a rotating rod “renewable surface” flow cell as part of a sequential injection fluidic system. This flow cell was equipped with a fiber optic system for fluorescence measurements. In PBS buffer solution matrix, the BoNT/A-HC-fragment was detected to concentrations as low as 5 pM using the fluidic measurement approach.

  18. [One amino acid mutation in an anti-CD20 antibody fragment that affects the yield bacterial secretion and the affinity].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin-Xing; Xiong, Dong-Sheng; Fan, Dong-Mei; Shao, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Yuan-Fu; Zhu, Zhen-Ping; Yang, Chun-Zheng

    2003-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) directed against CD20, either unmodified or in radiolabeled forms, have been successfully exploited in clinic as effective therapeutic agents in the management of non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma. The antibody fragment is a potential agent in image and therapy of tumor. To further improve the soluble expression of anti-CD20 antibody Fab' fragment, PCR was used to mutate the anti-CD20 VL and VH genes and its biological activity was identified. The expression vector of chimeric antibody Fab' was constructed and expressed in E. coli. The data of mutant clone DNA sequence showed that the amino acid of light chain gene of the parent anti-CD20 antibody (H47) was successful mutated as Ser (GAG)-Asn (CAG). The soluble expression of mutated anti-CD20 Fab' (CD20-7) was 3.8 mg/g dry cell weight, while the parent (CD20-2) was 1.3 mg/g dry cell weight. The affinity constant Ka of CD20-7 was 2.2 x 10(9) L/mol. The primary results of competitive assays by FACS showed that CD20-7 could partially block the sites through which parent antibody (HI47) bind to Raji cells. There was difference in the Raji cells (CD20+)-binding activity between the mutant CD20-7 and parent CD20-2. The site mutation of anti-CD20 Fab' gene make it possible that the anti-CD20 antibody fragment was succeeded to obtain higher expression. In this thesis, we succeeded in completing mutation and expression of anti-CD20 Fab' genes, distinguishing its biological activity, and obtaining its highly expression. These period results will lay a foundation for development of other kind of anti-CD20 engineering antibody (for instance: Fab' Diabody and miniantibody), and make it possible for anti-CD20 antibody to be applied to tumor therapy in civil in the future.

  19. Glycoengineered Monoclonal Antibodies with Homogeneous Glycan (M3, G0, G2, and A2) Using a Chemoenzymatic Approach Have Different Affinities for FcγRIIIa and Variable Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Activities

    PubMed Central

    Kurogochi, Masaki; Mori, Masako; Osumi, Kenji; Tojino, Mami; Sugawara, Shu-ichi; Takashima, Shou; Hirose, Yuriko; Tsukimura, Wataru; Mizuno, Mamoru; Amano, Junko; Matsuda, Akio; Tomita, Masahiro; Takayanagi, Atsushi; Shoda, Shin-Ichiro; Shirai, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic antibodies have been developed, and IgG antibodies have been extensively generated in various cell expression systems. IgG antibodies contain N-glycans at the constant region of the heavy chain (Fc domain), and their N-glycosylation patterns differ during various processes or among cell expression systems. The Fc N-glycan can modulate the effector functions of IgG antibodies, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). To control Fc N-glycans, we performed a rearrangement of Fc N-glycans from a heterogeneous N-glycosylation pattern to homogeneous N-glycans using chemoenzymatic approaches with two types of endo-β-N-acetyl glucosaminidases (ENG’ases), one that works as a hydrolase to cleave all heterogeneous N-glycans, another that is used as a glycosynthase to generate homogeneous N-glycans. As starting materials, we used an anti-Her2 antibody produced in transgenic silkworm cocoon, which consists of non-fucosylated pauci-mannose type (Man2-3GlcNAc2), high-mannose type (Man4-9GlcNAc2), and complex type (Man3GlcNAc3-4) N-glycans. As a result of the cleavage of several ENG’ases (endoS, endoM, endoD, endoH, and endoLL), the heterogeneous glycans on antibodies were fully transformed into homogeneous-GlcNAc by a combination of endoS, endoD, and endoLL. Next, the desired N-glycans (M3; Man3GlcNAc1, G0; GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1, G2; Gal2GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1, A2; NeuAc2Gal2GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1) were transferred from the corresponding oxazolines to the GlcNAc residue on the intact anti-Her2 antibody with an ENG’ase mutant (endoS-D233Q), and the glycoengineered anti-Her2 antibody was obtained. The binding assay of anti-Her2 antibody with homogenous N-glycans with FcγRIIIa-V158 showed that the glycoform influenced the affinity for FcγRIIIa-V158. In addition, the ADCC assay for the glycoengineered anti-Her2 antibody (mAb-M3, mAb-G0, mAb-G2, and mAb-A2) was performed using SKBR-3 and BT-474 as target cells

  20. Glycoengineered Monoclonal Antibodies with Homogeneous Glycan (M3, G0, G2, and A2) Using a Chemoenzymatic Approach Have Different Affinities for FcγRIIIa and Variable Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Activities.

    PubMed

    Kurogochi, Masaki; Mori, Masako; Osumi, Kenji; Tojino, Mami; Sugawara, Shu-Ichi; Takashima, Shou; Hirose, Yuriko; Tsukimura, Wataru; Mizuno, Mamoru; Amano, Junko; Matsuda, Akio; Tomita, Masahiro; Takayanagi, Atsushi; Shoda, Shin-Ichiro; Shirai, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic antibodies have been developed, and IgG antibodies have been extensively generated in various cell expression systems. IgG antibodies contain N-glycans at the constant region of the heavy chain (Fc domain), and their N-glycosylation patterns differ during various processes or among cell expression systems. The Fc N-glycan can modulate the effector functions of IgG antibodies, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). To control Fc N-glycans, we performed a rearrangement of Fc N-glycans from a heterogeneous N-glycosylation pattern to homogeneous N-glycans using chemoenzymatic approaches with two types of endo-β-N-acetyl glucosaminidases (ENG'ases), one that works as a hydrolase to cleave all heterogeneous N-glycans, another that is used as a glycosynthase to generate homogeneous N-glycans. As starting materials, we used an anti-Her2 antibody produced in transgenic silkworm cocoon, which consists of non-fucosylated pauci-mannose type (Man2-3GlcNAc2), high-mannose type (Man4-9GlcNAc2), and complex type (Man3GlcNAc3-4) N-glycans. As a result of the cleavage of several ENG'ases (endoS, endoM, endoD, endoH, and endoLL), the heterogeneous glycans on antibodies were fully transformed into homogeneous-GlcNAc by a combination of endoS, endoD, and endoLL. Next, the desired N-glycans (M3; Man3GlcNAc1, G0; GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1, G2; Gal2GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1, A2; NeuAc2Gal2GlcNAc2Man3GlcNAc1) were transferred from the corresponding oxazolines to the GlcNAc residue on the intact anti-Her2 antibody with an ENG'ase mutant (endoS-D233Q), and the glycoengineered anti-Her2 antibody was obtained. The binding assay of anti-Her2 antibody with homogenous N-glycans with FcγRIIIa-V158 showed that the glycoform influenced the affinity for FcγRIIIa-V158. In addition, the ADCC assay for the glycoengineered anti-Her2 antibody (mAb-M3, mAb-G0, mAb-G2, and mAb-A2) was performed using SKBR-3 and BT-474 as target cells, and

  1. High-throughput screening for the development of a monoclonal antibody affinity precipitation step using ELP-z stimuli responsive biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Rahul D; Madan, Bhawna; Chen, Wilfred; Cramer, Steven M

    2013-10-01

    This study provides a detailed investigation into the performance of a stimuli responsive ELP-Z based process for monoclonal antibody (mAb) affinity precipitation. A multidimensional high-throughput screening (HTS) protocol was developed and employed to investigate the effects of a variety of operating conditions on mAb yield and aggregation during the process. Precipitation efficiency of ELP-Z in the absence of mAb was first determined as a function of temperature and sodium sulfate concentration and conditions producing high yields were identified. HTS was then employed to determine appropriate conditions for the initial capture and co-precipitation of mAbs at high yields using ELP-Z. mAb elution from ELP-Z was then examined using HTS and the mAb yields and aggregate content of the overall process were determined. It was observed that mAb aggregation was sensitive primarily to the elution conditions and that this behavior was antibody specific and a strong function of operating temperature and elution pH. Importantly, for both mAbs examined in this study, the results indicated that room temperature operation and appropriate elution pH could be readily employed to produce both high mAb yields and low aggregate content using this approach. This study demonstrates the ability of ELP-Z based affinity precipitation for mAb purification and shows that HTS can be successfully employed to rapidly develop a robust and high yield process.

  2. Process for purification of monoclonal antibody expressed in transgenic Lemna plant extract using dextran-coated charcoal and hexamer peptide affinity resin.

    PubMed

    Naik, Amith D; Menegatti, Stefano; Reese, Hannah R; Gurgel, Patrick V; Carbonell, Ruben G

    2012-10-19

    The production of therapeutic proteins using transgenic plants offers several advantages, including low production cost, absence of human pathogens, presence of glycosylation mechanisms, and the ability to fold complex therapeutic proteins into their proper conformation. However, impurities such as phenolic compounds and pigments encountered during purification are quite different from those faced during purification from mammalian cell culture supernatants. This paper deals with the development of a pretreatment and affinity separation process for the purification of a monoclonal antibody from transgenic Lemna plant extract. A pretreatment step is described using dextran-coated charcoal for the removal of pigments and phenolic compounds without reducing the antibody concentration. Then, the peptide affinity ligand HWRGWV coupled to a commercial polymethacrylate resin is used for the capture and purification of MAb from the pretreated plant extract. The final yield and purity of the MAb obtained were 90% and 96% respectively. The performance of the hexamer peptide resin after the pretreatment step was found to be similar to that obtained with a commercial Protein A resin.

  3. Diversity Against Adversity: How Adaptive Immune System Evolves Potent Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Muyoung; Zeldovich, Konstantin B.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2011-07-01

    Adaptive immunity is an amazing mechanism, whereby new protein functions—affinity of antibodies (Immunoglobulins) to new antigens—evolve through mutation and selection in a matter of a few days. Despite numerous experimental studies, the fundamental physical principles underlying immune response are still poorly understood. In considerable departure from past approaches, here, we propose a microscopic multiscale model of adaptive immune response, which consists of three essential players: The host cells, viruses, and B-cells in Germinal Centers (GC). Each moiety carries a genome, which encodes proteins whose stability and interactions are determined from their sequences using laws of Statistical Mechanics, providing an exact relationship between genomic sequences and strength of interactions between pathogens and antibodies and antibodies and host proteins (autoimmunity). We find that evolution of potent antibodies (the process known as Affinity Maturation (AM)) is a delicate balancing act, which has to reconcile the conflicting requirements of protein stability, lack of autoimmunity, and high affinity of antibodies to incoming antigens. This becomes possible only when antibody producing B cells elevate their mutation rates (process known as Somatic Hypermutation (SHM)) to fall into a certain range—not too low to find potency increasing mutations but not too high to destroy stable Immunoglobulins and/or already achieved affinity. Potent antibodies develop through clonal expansion of initial B cells expressing marginally potent antibodies followed by their subsequent affinity maturation through mutation and selection. As a result, in each GC the population of mature potent Immunoglobulins is monoclonal being ancestors of a single cell from initial (germline) pool. We developed a simple analytical theory, which provides further rationale to our findings. The model and theory reveal the molecular factors that determine the efficiency of affinity maturation

  4. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  5. The Fingerprint of Anti-Bromodeoxyuridine Antibodies and Its Use for the Assessment of Their Affinity to 5-Bromo-2'-Deoxyuridine in Cellular DNA under Various Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ligasová, Anna; Liboska, Radek; Rosenberg, Ivan; Koberna, Karel

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a simple system for the analysis of the affinity of anti-bromodeoxyuridine antibodies. The system is based on the anchored oligonucleotides containing 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) at three different positions. It allows a reliable estimation of the reactivity of particular clones of monoclonal anti-bromodeoxyuridine antibodies with BrdU in fixed and permeabilized cells. Using oligonucleotide probes and four different protocols for the detection of BrdU incorporated in cellular DNA, we identified two antibody clones that evinced sufficient reactivity to BrdU in all the tested protocols. One of these clones exhibited higher reactivity to 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (IdU) than to BrdU. It allowed us to increase the sensitivity of the used protocols without a negative effect on the cell physiology as the cytotoxicity of IdU was comparable with BrdU and negligible when compared to 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine. The combination of IdU and the improved protocol for oxidative degradation of DNA provided a sensitive and reliable approach for the situations when the low degradation of DNA and high BrdU signal is a priority. PMID:26161977

  6. Detection and quantification of affinity ligand leaching and specific antibody fragment concentration within chromatographic fractions using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Thillaivinayagalingam, Pranavan; Newcombe, Anthony R; O'Donovan, Kieran; Francis, Richard; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli

    2007-12-01

    Rapid analyses of chromatographic steps within a biopharmaceutical manufacturing process are often desirable to evaluate column performance, provide mass balance data and to permit accurate calculations of yields and recoveries. Using SPR (surface plasmon resonance) biosensor (Biacore) technology, we have developed a sandwich immunoassay to quantify polyclonal anti-digoxin Fab fragments used for the production of the FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved biotherapeutic DigiFab. The results show that specific Fab may be quantified in all affinity process streams and accurate yield and mass balance data calculated. Control experiments using sheep Fab and Fc indicate that the assay is specific to DigiFab. The quantification of potential leached ligand within chromatographic fractions may also be technically challenging, particularly when low-molecular-mass ligands are covalently coupled with an affinity absorbent. Typical methods to assess ligand leakage such as DDMA (digoxin-dicarboxymethoxylamine; digoxin analogue) often involve the use of labelled ligands and relatively complex and labour-intensive analytical techniques. Using the same analytical methodologies, an assay to detect leached or eluted ligand off the column was developed. The results indicate minimal levels of leached ligand in all chromatographic fractions, with total levels of leached DDMA calculated to be 1.52 microg. This is less than 0.01% of the total amount of DDMA coupled with the laboratory-scale affinity column. The SPR methods described in the present study may be applicable for the rapid in-process analysis of specific polyclonal Fab fragments (within a polyclonal mixture) and to rapidly assess leakage of small molecule ligands covalently attached to chromatographic supports.

  7. A safe, effective, and facility compatible cleaning in place procedure for affinity resin in large-scale monoclonal antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Dembecki, Jill; Jaffe, Neil E; O'Mara, Brian W; Cai, Hui; Sparks, Colleen N; Zhang, Jian; Laino, Sarah G; Russell, Reb J; Wang, Michelle

    2013-09-20

    Cleaning-in-place (CIP) for column chromatography plays an important role in therapeutic protein production. A robust and efficient CIP procedure ensures product quality, improves column life time and reduces the cost of the purification processes, particularly for those using expensive affinity resins, such as MabSelect protein A resin. Cleaning efficiency, resin compatibility, and facility compatibility are the three major aspects to consider in CIP process design. Cleaning MabSelect resin with 50mM sodium hydroxide (NaOH) along with 1M sodium chloride is one of the most popular cleaning procedures used in biopharmaceutical industries. However, high concentration sodium chloride is a leading cause of corrosion in the stainless steel containers used in large scale manufacture. Corroded containers may potentially introduce metal contaminants into purified drug products. Therefore, it is challenging to apply this cleaning procedure into commercial manufacturing due to facility compatibility and drug safety concerns. This paper reports a safe, effective and environmental and facility-friendly cleaning procedure that is suitable for large scale affinity chromatography. An alternative salt (sodium sulfate) is used to prevent the stainless steel corrosion caused by sodium chloride. Sodium hydroxide and salt concentrations were optimized using a high throughput screening approach to achieve the best combination of facility compatibility, cleaning efficiency and resin stability. Additionally, benzyl alcohol is applied to achieve more effective microbial control. Based on the findings, the recommended optimum cleaning strategy is cleaning MabSelect resin with 25 mM NaOH, 0.25 M Na2SO4 and 1% benzyl alcohol solution every cycle, followed by a more stringent cleaning using 50 mM NaOH with 0.25 M Na2SO4 and 1% benzyl alcohol at the end of each manufacturing campaign. A resin life cycle study using the MabSelect affinity resin demonstrates that the new cleaning strategy

  8. Physiologically relevant binding affinity quantification of monoclonal antibody PF‐00547659 to mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule for in vitro in vivo correlation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengmeng; Kussrow, Amanda K; Ocana, Mireia Fernandez; Chabot, Jeffrey R; Lepsy, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose A monoclonal antibody (PF‐00547659) against mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule (MAdCAM), expressed as both soluble (sMAdCAM) and trans‐membrane (mMAdCAM) target forms, showed over 30‐fold difference in antibody‐target KD between in vitro (Biacore) and clinically derived (KD,in‐vivo) values. Back‐scattering interferometry (BSI) was applied to acquire physiologically relevant KD values which were used to establish in vitro and in vivo correlation (IVIVC). Experimental Approach BSI was applied to obtain KD values between PF‐00547659 and recombinant human MAdCAM in buffer or CHO cells and endogenous MAdCAM in human serum or colon tissue. CHO cells and tissue were minimally processed to yield homogenate containing membrane vesicles and soluble proteins. A series of binding affinities in serum with various dilution factors was used to estimate both KD,in‐vivo and target concentrations; MAdCAM concentrations were also measured using LC–MS/MS. Key Results BSI measurements revealed low KD values (higher affinity) for sMAdCAM in buffer and serum, yet a 20‐fold higher KD value (lower affinity) for mMAdCAM in CHO, mMAdCAM and sMAdCAM in tissue. BSI predicted KD,in‐vivo in serum was similar to clinically derived KD,in‐vivo, and the BSI‐estimated serum sMAdCAM concentration also matched the measured concentration by LC–MS/MS. Conclusions and Implications Our results successfully demonstrated that BSI measurements of physiologically relevant KD values can be used to establish IVIVC, for PF‐00547659 to MAdCAM despite the lack of correlation when using Biacore measured KD and accurately estimates endogenous target concentrations. The application of BSI would greatly enhance successful basic pharmacological research and drug development. PMID:27760281

  9. Persistence and avidity maturation of antibodies to A(H1N1)pdm09 in healthcare workers following repeated annual vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Eidem, Synnøve; Tete, Sarah M; Jul-Larsen, Åsne; Hoschler, Katja; Montomoli, Emanuele; Brokstad, Karl A; Cox, Rebecca J

    2015-08-07

    Healthcare workers are at increased risk of influenza infection through direct patient care, particularly during the early stages of a pandemic. Although influenza vaccination is widely recommended in Healthcare workers, data on long-term immunogenicity of vaccination in healthcare workers are lacking. The present study was designed to assess the persistence of the humoral response after pandemic vaccination as well as the impact of repeated annual vaccination in healthcare workers (n=24). Pandemic influenza vaccination resulted in a significant increase in haemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers with 93-100% of subjects achieving protective titers 21-days post each of the three annual vaccinations. Seroprotective antibodies measured by HI, microneutralization and single radial hemolysis assays were present in 77-94% of healthcare workers 6 months post-vaccination. Repeated vaccination resulted in an increased duration of seroprotective antibodies with seroprotective titers increasing from 35-62% 12 months after 2009 pandemic vaccination to 50-75% 12 months after 2010 vaccination. Furthermore, repeated annual vaccination augmented the avidity of influenza-specific IgG antibodies. In conclusion, we have shown that A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination induces high seroprotective titers that persist for at least 6 months. We demonstrate that repeated vaccination is beneficial to healthcare workers and results in further avidity maturation of vaccine-induced antibodies.

  10. Crystal Structures of the Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-23 and Its Complex with a High-Affinity Neutralizing Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, Brian M.; Ingram, Richard; Ramanathan, Lata; Reichert, Paul; Le, Hung V.; Madison, Vincent; Orth, Peter

    2009-06-25

    Interleukin (IL)-23 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine playing a key role in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We have determined the crystal structures of the heterodimeric p19-p40 IL-23 and its complex with the Fab (antigen-binding fragment) of a neutralizing antibody at 2.9 and 1.9 {angstrom}, respectively. The IL-23 structure closely resembles that of IL-12. They share the common p40 subunit, and IL-23 p19 overlaps well with IL-12 p35. Along the hydrophilic heterodimeric interface, fewer charged residues are involved for IL-23 compared with IL-12. The binding site of the Fab is located exclusively on the p19 subunit, and comparison with published cytokine-receptor structures suggests that it overlaps with the IL-23 receptor binding site.

  11. Natural and man-made V-gene repertoires for antibody discovery

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, William J. J.; Almagro, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies are the fastest-growing segment of the biologics market. The success of antibody-based drugs resides in their exquisite specificity, high potency, stability, solubility, safety, and relatively inexpensive manufacturing process in comparison with other biologics. We outline here the structural studies and fundamental principles that define how antibodies interact with diverse targets. We also describe the antibody repertoires and affinity maturation mechanisms of humans, mice, and chickens, plus the use of novel single-domain antibodies in camelids and sharks. These species all utilize diverse evolutionary solutions to generate specific and high affinity antibodies and illustrate the plasticity of natural antibody repertoires. In addition, we discuss the multiple variations of man-made antibody repertoires designed and validated in the last two decades, which have served as tools to explore how the size, diversity, and composition of a repertoire impact the antibody discovery process. PMID:23162556

  12. Affinity maturation of human CD4 by yeast surface display and crystal structure of a CD4–HLA-DR1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin Xiang; Li, Yili; Yin, Yiyuan; Mo, Min; Wang, Qian; Gao, Wei; Wang, Lili; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    2011-01-01

    Helper T-cell activation generally requires the coreceptor CD4, which binds MHC class II molecules. A remarkable feature of the CD4–MHC class II interaction is its exceptionally low affinity, which ranges from KD = ∼200 μM to >2 mM. Investigating the biological role of the much lower affinity of this interaction than those of other cell–cell recognition molecules will require CD4 mutants with enhanced binding to MHC class II for testing in models of T-cell development. To this end, we used in vitro-directed evolution to increase the affinity of human CD4 for HLA-DR1. A mutant CD4 library was displayed on the surface of yeast and selected using HLA-DR1 tetramers or monomers, resulting in isolation of a CD4 clone containing 11 mutations. Reversion mutagenesis showed that most of the affinity increase derived from just two substitutions, Gln40Tyr and Thr45Trp. A CD4 variant bearing these mutations bound HLA-DR1 with KD = 8.8 μM, compared with >400 μM for wild-type CD4. To understand the basis for improved affinity, we determined the structure of this CD4 variant in complex with HLA-DR1 to 2.4 Å resolution. The structure provides an atomic-level description of the CD4-binding site on MHC class II and reveals how CD4 recognizes highly polymorphic HLA-DR, -DP, and -DQ molecules by targeting invariant residues in their α2 and β2 domains. In addition, the CD4 mutants reported here constitute unique tools for probing the influence of CD4 affinity on T-cell activation and development. PMID:21900604

  13. Monoclonal antibody affinity purification of a Leishmania membrane glycoprotein and its inhibition of leishmania-macrophage binding.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C S; Chang, K P

    1986-01-01

    Specific monoclonal antibody coupled to Affi-Gel 10 was used to purify a major membrane glycoprotein of Leishmania mexicana amazonensis, one of a group of parasitic protozoa that specifically infect mammalian macrophages. Immobilized antigen was eluted at a 34% efficiency with buffers at either pH 2.5 or 11 or with MgCl2, but only the antigen eluted under basic conditions could be readsorbed to the immunobeads. Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration of the purified antigen gave a single peak of protein estimated to have a molecular mass of 400 kDa. However, NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band of this protein with an apparent molecular mass of 63 kDa. The antigen is an N-linked glycoprotein, as indicated by its increase in electrophoretic mobility after treatment with endoglycosidase H and by its binding to lentil lectin-Sepharose, elutable with methyl alpha-D-mannoside and methyl alpha-D-glucoside. Purified antigen inhibits the binding of leishmania cells to macrophages by 50%, suggesting that it may play a role in the process of infection. Images PMID:3079902

  14. Involvement of spleen components of mature fowl in the primary and secondary humoral antibody response following experimental EDS'76 virus infection.

    PubMed

    van Eck, J H

    1986-04-01

    Cellular changes in spleens of mature fowl in relation to both the primary and secondary humoral antibody response following experimental EDS'76 virus infection were studied. The influence of splenectomy on humoral antibody response was also examined. Experimental fowl had been naturally infected with fowl adenovirus (FAV) but did not possess precipitins to these viruses at the time of EDS'76 virus infection. Since EDS'76 infection provokes a recall of the group antibody to FAV, this infection simultaneously induces a primary response against EDS'76 virus and a secondary response due to the recall of the group antibody to FAV. HI and precipitating antibody to EDS'76 virus (primary response) were first detected at 6 and 8 days p.i. respectively. Curves of HI, precipitating and neutralising antibody titres were biphasic; the first peak (IgM peak) occurred at 10-11 days p.i., the second (IgG peak) at 16-28 days p.i. Precipitating antibodies to FAV (secondary response) were demonstrated from 4 days p.i. The curve of these antibody titres was also biphasic, with peaks at the same times as in the primary response. Based on HI and AGP testing of primary and secondary immune response in both splenectomised and non-splenectomised fowl it is concluded that in the primary response the spleen of the adult fowl is involved significantly in only IgM secretion, while in the secondary response it is likely that both IgM and IgG are secreted in considerable amounts. Clusters of lymphoblasts and plasmablasts were observed at 3 days p.i. in the red pulp. It is very likely that antigen-antibody complexes are formed from that time and circulate bound to the surface of lymphocytes. These antigen-loaded lymphocytes are 'picked up' from the blood stream by -red pulp macrophages, leading to enhanced formation of lymphoblasts in the red pulp. Great numbers of these cells (which are very probably IgM secreting cells) were present on days 6 and 7 p.i., but were no longer detectable after day

  15. A High-Affinity Native Human Antibody Disrupts Biofilm from Staphylococcus aureus Bacteria and Potentiates Antibiotic Efficacy in a Mouse Implant Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Estellés, Angeles; Woischnig, Anne-Kathrin; Liu, Keyi; Stephenson, Robert; Lomongsod, Evelene; Nguyen, Da; Zhang, Jianzhong; Heidecker, Manfred; Yang, Yifan; Simon, Reyna J.; Tenorio, Edgar; Ellsworth, Stote; Leighton, Anton; Ryser, Stefan; Gremmelmaier, Nina Khanna

    2016-01-01

    Many serious bacterial infections are difficult to treat due to biofilm formation, which provides physical protection and induces a sessile phenotype refractory to antibiotic treatment compared to the planktonic state. A key structural component of biofilm is extracellular DNA, which is held in place by secreted bacterial proteins from the DNABII family: integration host factor (IHF) and histone-like (HU) proteins. A native human monoclonal antibody, TRL1068, has been discovered using single B-lymphocyte screening technology. It has low-picomolar affinity against DNABII homologs from important Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. The disruption of established biofilm was observed in vitro at an antibody concentration of 1.2 μg/ml over 12 h. The effect of TRL1068 in vivo was evaluated in a murine tissue cage infection model in which a biofilm is formed by infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; ATCC 43300). Treatment of the established biofilm by combination therapy of TRL1068 (15 mg/kg of body weight, intraperitoneal [i.p.] administration) with daptomycin (50 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced adherent bacterial count compared to that after daptomycin treatment alone, accompanied by significant reduction in planktonic bacterial numbers. The quantification of TRL1068 in sample matrices showed substantial penetration of TRL1068 from serum into the cage interior. TRL1068 is a clinical candidate for combination treatment with standard-of-care antibiotics to overcome the drug-refractory state associated with biofilm formation, with potential utility for a broad spectrum of difficult-to-treat bacterial infections. PMID:26833157

  16. Requirement for both H and L chain V regions, VH and VK joining amino acids, and the unique H chain D region for the high affinity binding of an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody.

    PubMed

    Ruff-Jamison, S; Glenney, J R

    1993-04-15

    Sequence analysis of a panel of antibodies to phosphotyrosine revealed predominant H and L chain V regions in the immune response and a unique D segment in the Py20 mAb, which exhibits a high affinity for phosphotyrosine. In order to determine the influence of somatic diversity on the high affinity binding of Py20, H and L chain V regions were expressed in Escherichia coli as an Fv dimer. Whereas the H or L chain V regions of Py20 alone were unable to bind phosphotyrosine, the Fv binds phosphotyrosine with an affinity comparable with the intact IgG as determined by fluorescence quenching experiments (1.55 x 10(-7) M vs 1.25 x 10(-7) M, respectively). Substitution of the Py20 V regions with other IgG V regions that differed greatly in sequence abolished binding. A high affinity Py20-combining site was dependent on the presence of the unique D-D segment. Replacement of the Py20 D-D region with a single homologous D region resulted in a decrease in affinity (5.9 x 10(-7) M). Substitution of this D-D region for the D region of another anti-phosphotyrosine antibody that is known to bind phosphotyrosine weakly (1 x 10(-3) M) conferred high affinity binding. Removal of three tyrosines from the first of the two D regions was accompanied by a fivefold reduction in affinity for phosphotyrosine. In addition, changing the VK and VH junctional amino acids resulted in a complete loss of binding. Therefore, the formation of the high affinity Py20 combining site requires both a H and L chain that are similar in sequence to those of Py20 including the unique D region and the junctional amino acids.

  17. Development and partial characterization of high-affinity monoclonal antibodies for botulinum toxin type A and their use in analysis of milk by sandwich ELISA.

    PubMed

    Stanker, Larry H; Merrill, Paul; Scotcher, Miles C; Cheng, Luisa W

    2008-07-20

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT), produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum, cause severe neuroparalytic disease and are considered the most toxic biological agents known. While botulism is rare in the U.S. it often is fatal if not treated quickly, and recovery is long, requiring intensive treatment. BoNT is synthesized as a 150 kDa precursor protein (holotoxin), which is then enzymatically cleaved to form two subunit chains linked by a single disulfide bond. The 'gold standard' for BoNT detection relies on a mouse bioassay. This is a time consuming (up to 4 days) assay and it lacks specificity, however, it gives a sensitivity (mouse LD(50)) of approximately 10 pg mL(-1). Most BoNT immunoassays are much less sensitive. In this study we describe the development of four high-affinity (dissociation constants (Kd's) in the low pM range) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that specifically bind BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A). These antibodies, designated F1-2, F1-5, F1-40, and F2-43 are IgG1 subclass mAbs with kappa light chains and they specifically bind BoNT serotype A. Western blot analyses following SDS-PAGE demonstrate that mAbs F1-2 and F1-5 bind the 100 kDa heavy chain subunit and that mAb F1-40 binds the 50 kDa light chain. The fourth antibody demonstrated strong binding to the 150 kDa holotoxin in the ELISA and on Western blots following electrophoresis on native gels. However binding in Western blot studies was not observed for mAb F2-43 following SDS-PAGE. A highly sensitive sandwich ELISA, capable of detecting as little as 2 pg/mL BoNT/A was developed using mAbs F1-2 and F1-40. Such an assay represents a realistic, high sensitivity alternative to the mouse bioassay.

  18. Efficacy, but not antibody titer or affinity, of a heroin hapten conjugate vaccine correlates with increasing hapten densities on tetanus toxoid, but not on CRM197 carriers.

    PubMed

    Jalah, Rashmi; Torres, Oscar B; Mayorov, Alexander V; Li, Fuying; Antoline, Joshua F G; Jacobson, Arthur E; Rice, Kenner C; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Beck, Zoltan; Alving, Carl R; Matyas, Gary R

    2015-06-17

    Vaccines against drugs of abuse have induced antibodies in animals that blocked the biological effects of the drug by sequestering the drug in the blood and preventing it from crossing the blood-brain barrier. Drugs of abuse are too small to induce antibodies and, therefore, require conjugation of drug hapten analogs to a carrier protein. The efficacy of these conjugate vaccines depends on several factors including hapten design, coupling strategy, hapten density, carrier protein selection, and vaccine adjuvant. Previously, we have shown that 1 (MorHap), a heroin/morphine hapten, conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT) and mixed with liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A [L(MPLA)] as adjuvant, partially blocked the antinociceptive effects of heroin in mice. Herein, we extended those findings, demonstrating greatly improved vaccine induced antinociceptive effects up to 3% mean maximal potential effect (%MPE). This was obtained by evaluating the effects of vaccine efficacy of hapten 1 vaccine conjugates with varying hapten densities using two different commonly used carrier proteins, TT and cross-reactive material 197 (CRM197). Immunization of mice with these conjugates mixed with L(MPLA) induced very high anti-1 IgG peak levels of 400-1500 μg/mL that bound to both heroin and its metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine. Except for the lowest hapten density for each carrier, the antibody titers and affinity were independent of hapten density. The TT carrier based vaccines induced long-lived inhibition of heroin-induced antinociception that correlated with increasing hapten density. The best formulation contained TT with the highest hapten density of ≥30 haptens/TT molecule and induced %MPE of approximately 3% after heroin challenge. In contrast, the best formulation using CRM197 was with intermediate 1 densities (10-15 haptens/CRM197 molecule), but the %MPE was approximately 13%. In addition, the chemical synthesis of 1, the optimization of the conjugation

  19. Effect of VK framework-1 glycosylation on the binding affinity of lymphoma-specific murine and chimeric LL2 antibodies and its potential use as a novel conjugation site.

    PubMed

    Leung, S O; Dion, A S; Pellegrini, M C; Losman, M J; Grebenau, R C; Goldenberg, D M; Hansen, H J

    1995-02-08

    A potential asparagine (Asn)-linked glycosylation site was identified in the VK FRI sequence of an anti-B lymphoma monoclonal antibody (MAb), LL2.SDS-PAGE analysis and endo-F treatment of both murine and chimeric LL2 antibodies indicated that this site was glycosylated; however, no differences in the binding affinity to Raji cells were observed between the native murine LL2 and the endo-F-deglycosylated murine LL2 antibodies. Elimination of the glycosylation site from the chimeric LL2 antibody was accomplished by an Asn to Gln mutation in the tri-acceptor site found in the light chain. The resultant aglycosylated chimeric LL2 exhibited a similar Raji cell binding affinity to that of the glycosylated form. The results are in agreement with computer modeling studies which suggested the lack of interactions between the oligosaccharide moiety and the CDRs. The finding is interesting because it enables a wider choice of human framework sequences, which in most cases do not have a corresponding glycosylation site, for the humanization of the LL2 VK domain, as well as a greater latitude of host expression systems. Most importantly, the LL2 VK carbohydrate moiety might be used as a novel conjugation site for drugs and radionuclides without compromising the immunoreactivity of the antibody.

  20. Developing recombinant antibodies for biomarker detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Miller, Keith D.; Kagen, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have an essential role in biomarker validation and diagnostic assays. A barrier to pursuing these applications is the reliance on immunization and hybridomas to produce mAbs, which is time-consuming and may not yield the desired mAb. We recommend a process flow for affinity reagent production that utilizes combinatorial protein display systems (eg, yeast surface display or phage display) rather than hybridomas. These systems link a selectable phenotype-binding conferred by an antibody fragment-with a means for recovering the encoding gene. Recombinant libraries obtained from immunizations can produce high-affinity antibodies (<10 nM) more quickly than other methods. Non-immune libraries provide an alternate route when immunizations are not possible, or when suitable mAbs are not recovered from an immune library. Directed molecular evolution (DME) is an integral part of optimizing mAbs obtained from combinatorial protein display, but can also be used on hybridoma-derived mAbs. Variants can easily be obtained and screened to increase the affinity of the parent mAb (affinity maturation). We discuss examples where DME has been used to tailor affinity reagents to specific applications. Combinatorial protein display also provides an accessible method for identifying antibody pairs, which are necessary for sandwich-type diagnostic assays.

  1. OptMAVEn – A New Framework for the de novo Design of Antibody Variable Region Models Targeting Specific Antigen Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Pantazes, Robert J.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics provides novel and efficacious treatments for a number of diseases. Traditional experimental approaches for designing therapeutic antibodies rely on raising antibodies against a target antigen in an immunized animal or directed evolution of antibodies with low affinity for the desired antigen. However, these methods remain time consuming, cannot target a specific epitope and do not lead to broad design principles informing other studies. Computational design methods can overcome some of these limitations by using biophysics models to rationally select antibody parts that maximize affinity for a target antigen epitope. This has been addressed to some extend by OptCDR for the design of complementary determining regions. Here, we extend this earlier contribution by addressing the de novo design of a model of the entire antibody variable region against a given antigen epitope while safeguarding for immunogenicity (Optimal Method for Antibody Variable region Engineering, OptMAVEn). OptMAVEn simulates in silico the in vivo steps of antibody generation and evolution, and is capable of capturing the critical structural features responsible for affinity maturation of antibodies. In addition, a humanization procedure was developed and incorporated into OptMAVEn to minimize the potential immunogenicity of the designed antibody models. As case studies, OptMAVEn was applied to design models of neutralizing antibodies targeting influenza hemagglutinin and HIV gp120. For both HA and gp120, novel computational antibody models with numerous interactions with their target epitopes were generated. The observed rates of mutations and types of amino acid changes during in silico affinity maturation are consistent with what has been observed during in vivo affinity maturation. The results demonstrate that OptMAVEn can efficiently generate diverse computational antibody models with both optimized binding affinity to antigens and reduced immunogenicity. PMID

  2. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies promote apoptosis of mature human Saos-2 osteoblasts via cell-surface binding to citrullinated heat shock protein 60.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Chi; Yu, Chia-Li; Yu, Hui-Chun; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Koo, Malcolm; Lai, Ning-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) react with osteoblast surface citrullinated proteins and affect cell function, leading to joint damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). First, we purified ACPAs by cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP)-conjugated affinity column chromatography. The cognate antigens of ACPAs on Saos-2 cells, a sarcoma osteogenic cell line generated from human osteoblasts, were probed by ACPAs, and the reactive bands were analyzed using proteomic analyses. We found that ACPAs bind to Saos-2 cell membrane, and several protein candidates, including HSP60, were identified. We then cloned and purified recombinant heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) and citrullinated HSP60 (citHSP60) and investigated the effect of ACPAs on Saos-2 cell. We confirmed that HSP60 obtained from Saos-2 cell membrane were citrullinated and reacted with ACPAs, which induces Saos-2 cells apoptosis via binding to surface-expressed citHSP60 through Toll-like receptor 4 signaling. ACPAs promoted interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 expression in Saos-2 cells. Finally, sera from patients with RA and healthy controls were examined for their titers of anti-HSP60 and anti-citHSP60 antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The radiographic change in patients with RA was evaluated using the Genant-modified Sharp scoring system. Patients with RA showed higher sera titers of anti-citHSP60, but not anti-HSP60, antibodies when compared with controls. In addition, the anti-citHSP60 level was positively associated with increased joint damage in patients with RA. In conclusion, Saos-2 cell apoptosis was mediated by ACPAs via binding to cell surface-expressed citHSP60 and the titer of anti-citHSP60 in patients with RA positively associated with joint damage.

  3. Dissection of the IgNAR V domain: molecular scanning and orthologue database mining define novel IgNAR hallmarks and affinity maturation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fennell, B J; Darmanin-Sheehan, A; Hufton, S E; Calabro, V; Wu, L; Müller, M R; Cao, W; Gill, D; Cunningham, O; Finlay, W J J

    2010-07-09

    The shark antigen-binding V(NAR) domain has the potential to provide an attractive alternative to traditional biotherapeutics based on its small size, advantageous physiochemical properties, and unusual ability to target clefts in enzymes or cell surface molecules. The V(NAR) shares many of the properties of the well-characterised single-domain camelid V(H)H but is much less understood at the molecular level. We chose the hen-egg-lysozyme-specific archetypal Type I V(NAR) 5A7 and used ribosome display in combination with error-prone mutagenesis to interrogate the entire sequence space. We found a high level of mutational plasticity across the V(NAR) domain, particularly within the framework 2 and hypervariable region 2 regions. A number of residues important for affinity were identified, and a triple mutant combining A1D, S61R, and G62R resulted in a K(D) of 460 pM for hen egg lysozyme, a 20-fold improvement over wild-type 5A7, and the highest K(D) yet reported for V(NAR)-antigen interactions. These findings were rationalised using structural modelling and indicate the importance of residues outside the classical complementarity determining regions in making novel antigen contacts that modulate affinity. We also located two solvent-exposed residues (G15 and G42), distant from the V(NAR) paratope, which retain function upon mutation to cysteine and have the potential to be exploited as sites for targeted covalent modification. Our findings with 5A7 were extended to all known NAR structures using an in-depth bioinformatic analysis of sequence data available in the literature and a newly generated V(NAR) database. This study allowed us to identify, for the first time, both V(NAR)-specific and V(NAR)/Ig V(L)/TCR V(alpha) overlapping hallmark residues, which are critical for the structural and functional integrity of the single domain. Intriguingly, each of our designated V(NAR)-specific hallmarks align precisely with previously defined mutational 'cold spots' in

  4. The challenges of modelling antibody repertoire dynamics in HIV infection

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-07-20

    Antibody affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation of B-cell immunoglobulin variable region genes has been studied for decades in various model systems using well-defined antigens. While much is known about the molecular details of the process, our understanding of the selective forces that generate affinity maturation are less well developed, particularly in the case of a co-evolving pathogen such as HIV. Despite this gap in understanding, high-throughput antibody sequence data are increasingly being collected to investigate the evolutionary trajectories of antibody lineages in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we review what is known in controlled experimental systems about the mechanisms underlying antibody selectionmore » and compare this to the observed temporal patterns of antibody evolution in HIV infection. In addition, we describe how our current understanding of antibody selection mechanisms leaves questions about antibody dynamics in HIV infection unanswered. Without a mechanistic understanding of antibody selection in the context of a co-evolving viral population, modelling and analysis of antibody sequences in HIV-infected individuals will be limited in their interpretation and predictive ability.« less

  5. The challenges of modelling antibody repertoire dynamics in HIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-07-20

    Antibody affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation of B-cell immunoglobulin variable region genes has been studied for decades in various model systems using well-defined antigens. While much is known about the molecular details of the process, our understanding of the selective forces that generate affinity maturation are less well developed, particularly in the case of a co-evolving pathogen such as HIV. Despite this gap in understanding, high-throughput antibody sequence data are increasingly being collected to investigate the evolutionary trajectories of antibody lineages in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we review what is known in controlled experimental systems about the mechanisms underlying antibody selection and compare this to the observed temporal patterns of antibody evolution in HIV infection. In addition, we describe how our current understanding of antibody selection mechanisms leaves questions about antibody dynamics in HIV infection unanswered. Without a mechanistic understanding of antibody selection in the context of a co-evolving viral population, modelling and analysis of antibody sequences in HIV-infected individuals will be limited in their interpretation and predictive ability.

  6. Spiramycin treatment of Toxoplasma gondii infection in pregnant women impairs the production and the avidity maturation of T. gondii-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies.

    PubMed

    Meroni, V; Genco, F; Tinelli, C; Lanzarini, P; Bollani, L; Stronati, M; Petersen, E

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of treatment with spiramycin on the increase of immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers and IgG avidity indexes (AI) in pregnant women with seroconversion from the beginning of therapy until delivery and after delivery. This group was compared with adult patients with recently acquired untreated toxoplasmosis. One hundred four samples from 32 pregnant women with seroconversion for toxoplasmosis and/or very low IgG AI were followed from the beginning of therapy with spiramycin until delivery. Twenty-nine women were further followed some months after delivery and interruption of therapy. Thirty-eight samples from 16 untreated, nonpregnant patients were evaluated as the control group. The Toxoplasma gondii-specific IgG antibody and the T. gondii-specific IgG AI were significantly delayed in pregnant women receiving therapy compared to nonpregnant, untreated controls, and the findings were consistent with the results of assays from two different manufacturers. The T. gondii-specific IgG AI increased in pregnant women after they gave birth. Avidity maturation is delayed during pregnancy and treatment, and low-avidity antibodies in pregnant women within 3 to 4 months cannot be taken as a sign of infection.

  7. Focused Evolution of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Revealed by Structures and Deep Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xueling; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Baoshan; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wang, Charlene; Chen, Xuejun; Longo, Nancy S.; Louder, Mark; McKee, Krisha; O’Dell, Sijy; Perfetto, Stephen; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Shi, Wei; Wu, Lan; Yang, Yongping; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Zhongjia; Zhang, Zhenhai; Bonsignori, Mattia; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Simek, Melissa; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Connors, Mark; Mullikin, James C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Roederer, Mario; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.

    2013-03-04

    Antibody VRC01 is a human immunoglobulin that neutralizes about 90% of HIV-1 isolates. To understand how such broadly neutralizing antibodies develop, we used x-ray crystallography and 454 pyrosequencing to characterize additional VRC01-like antibodies from HIV-1-infected individuals. Crystal structures revealed a convergent mode of binding for diverse antibodies to the same CD4-binding-site epitope. A functional genomics analysis of expressed heavy and light chains revealed common pathways of antibody-heavy chain maturation, confined to the IGHV1-2*02 lineage, involving dozens of somatic changes, and capable of pairing with different light chains. Broadly neutralizing HIV-1 immunity associated with VRC01-like antibodies thus involves the evolution of antibodies to a highly affinity-matured state required to recognize an invariant viral structure, with lineages defined from thousands of sequences providing a genetic roadmap of their development.

  8. MicroRNA-155 controls affinity-based selection by protecting c-MYC+ B cells from apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Rinako; Leyland, Rebecca; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Lu, Dong; Turner, Martin; Arbore, Giuseppina; Phan, Tri Giang; Brink, Robert; Vigorito, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The production of high-affinity antibodies by B cells is essential for pathogen clearance. Antibody affinity for antigen is increased through the affinity maturation in germinal centers (GCs). This is an iterative process in which B cells cycle between proliferation coupled with the acquisition of mutations and antigen-based positive selection, resulting in retention of the highest-affinity B cell clones. The posttranscriptional regulator microRNA-155 (miR-155) is critical for efficient affinity maturation and the maintenance of the GCs; however, the cellular and molecular mechanism by which miR-155 regulates GC responses is not well understood. Here, we utilized a miR-155 reporter mouse strain and showed that miR-155 is coexpressed with the proto-oncogene encoding c-MYC in positively selected B cells. Functionally, miR-155 protected positively selected c-MYC+ B cells from apoptosis, allowing clonal expansion of this population, providing an explanation as to why Mir155 deletion impairs affinity maturation and promotes the premature collapse of GCs. We determined that miR-155 directly inhibits the Jumonji family member JARID2, which enhances B cell apoptosis when overexpressed, and thereby promotes GC B cell survival. Our findings also suggest that there is cooperation between c-MYC and miR-155 during the normal GC response, a cooperation that may explain how c-MYC and miR-155 can collaboratively function as oncogenes. PMID:26657861

  9. Lectin affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka

    2014-01-01

    An interaction or a binding event typically changes the electrophoretic properties of a molecule. Affinity electrophoresis methods detect changes in the electrophoretic pattern of molecules (mainly macromolecules) that occur as a result of biospecific interactions or complex formation. Lectin affinity electrophoresis is a very effective method for the detection and analysis of trace amounts of glycobiological substances. It is particularly useful for isolating and separating the glycoisomers of target molecules. Here, we describe a sensitive technique for the detection of glycoproteins separated by agarose gel-lectin affinity electrophoresis that uses antibody-affinity blotting. The technique is tested using α-fetoprotein with lectin (Lens culinaris agglutinin and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin)-agarose gels.

  10. Anti-IgD antibody attenuates collagen-induced arthritis by selectively depleting mature B-cells and promoting immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tue G; Little, Christopher B; Yenson, Vanessa M; Jackson, Christopher J; McCracken, Sharon A; Warning, Julia; Stevens, Veronica; Gallery, Eileen G; Morris, Jonathan M

    2010-08-01

    Membrane (m)IgD forms a major part of B-cell receptor complexes. Its wider role in the immune system has been enigmatic. Stimulation of mIgD with an antibody (anti-IgD) can activate B-cells and elicit a broad immune response in vivo. Given the role of B-cells in autoimmune diseases and the profound impact of anti-IgD on B-cells, the potential effects of anti-IgD on autoimmune conditions are intriguing and yet to be explored. Here we report a novel therapeutic effect of anti-IgD in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. Administration of anti-IgD at the onset of early clinical symptoms as a therapeutic intervention, but not as a prophylactic treatment, significantly ameliorates disease severity and joint pathology. Anti-IgD treatment selectively depletes mature B cells while it spares regulatory B-cell subsets. This results in a significant reduction of autoantibody levels but does not affect antibody responses to a T-cell-dependent antigen. Therapeutic treatment with anti-IgD increases the numbers of regulatory B-cells and regulatory T-cells whilst it augments adaptive Th1/Th2 responses in vivo. In human PBMC samples, anti-IgD also promotes adaptive Th1/Th2 responses and modulates the innate responses toward an anti-inflammatory Th2-biased response. Collectively, anti-IgD treatment may offer a selective approach to B-cell depletion that also promotes immune tolerance and anti-inflammatory tendencies without compromising the general adaptive B-cell and T-cell responses. The multiple mechanisms of action by anti-IgD treatment suggest a wider clinical application for a number of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions.

  11. Functional comparison of engineered T cells carrying a native TCR versus TCR-like antibody-based chimeric antigen receptors indicates affinity/avidity thresholds.

    PubMed

    Oren, Ravit; Hod-Marco, Moran; Haus-Cohen, Maya; Thomas, Sharyn; Blat, Dan; Duvshani, Nerri; Denkberg, Galit; Elbaz, Yael; Benchetrit, Fabrice; Eshhar, Zelig; Stauss, Hans; Reiter, Yoram

    2014-12-01

    Adoptive transfer of Ag-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for cancers. However, acquiring sufficient numbers of host-derived tumor-specific T lymphocytes by selection and expansion is challenging, as these cells may be rare or anergic. Using engineered T cells can overcome this difficulty. Such engineered cells can be generated using a chimeric Ag receptor based on common formats composed from Ag-recognition elements such as αβ-TCR genes with the desired specificity, or Ab variable domain fragments fused with T cell-signaling moieties. Combining these recognition elements are Abs that recognize peptide-MHC. Such TCR-like Abs mimic the fine specificity of TCRs and exhibit both the binding properties and kinetics of high-affinity Abs. In this study, we compared the functional properties of engineered T cells expressing a native low affinity αβ-TCR chains or high affinity TCR-like Ab-based CAR targeting the same specificity. We isolated high-affinity TCR-like Abs recognizing HLA-A2-WT1Db126 complexes and constructed CAR that was transduced into T cells. Comparative analysis revealed major differences in function and specificity of such CAR-T cells or native TCR toward the same antigenic complex. Whereas the native low-affinity αβ-TCR maintained potent cytotoxic activity and specificity, the high-affinity TCR-like Ab CAR exhibited reduced activity and loss of specificity. These results suggest an upper affinity threshold for TCR-based recognition to mediate effective functional outcomes of engineered T cells. The rational design of TCRs and TCR-based constructs may need to be optimized up to a given affinity threshold to achieve optimal T cell function.

  12. Rigidity Emerges during Antibody Evolution in Three Distinct Antibody Systems: Evidence from QSFR Analysis of Fab Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Tracka, Malgorzata B.; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Jacobs, Donald J.; Livesay, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of somatic mutations that transform polyspecific germline (GL) antibodies to affinity mature (AM) antibodies with monospecificity are compared among three GL-AM Fab pairs. In particular, changes in conformational flexibility are assessed using a Distance Constraint Model (DCM). We have previously established that the DCM can be robustly applied across a series of antibody fragments (VL to Fab), and subsequently, the DCM was combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to similarly characterize five thermostabilizing scFv mutants. The DCM is an ensemble based statistical mechanical approach that accounts for enthalpy/entropy compensation due to network rigidity, which has been quite successful in elucidating conformational flexibility and Quantitative Stability/Flexibility Relationships (QSFR) in proteins. Applied to three disparate antibody systems changes in QSFR quantities indicate that the VH domain is typically rigidified, whereas the VL domain and CDR L2 loop become more flexible during affinity maturation. The increase in CDR H3 loop rigidity is consistent with other studies in the literature. The redistribution of conformational flexibility is largely controlled by nonspecific changes in the H-bond network, although certain Arg to Asp salt bridges create highly localized rigidity increases. Taken together, these results reveal an intricate flexibility/rigidity response that accompanies affinity maturation. PMID:26132144

  13. Rigidity Emerges during Antibody Evolution in Three Distinct Antibody Systems: Evidence from QSFR Analysis of Fab Fragments.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Tracka, Malgorzata B; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Jacobs, Donald J; Livesay, Dennis R

    2015-07-01

    The effects of somatic mutations that transform polyspecific germline (GL) antibodies to affinity mature (AM) antibodies with monospecificity are compared among three GL-AM Fab pairs. In particular, changes in conformational flexibility are assessed using a Distance Constraint Model (DCM). We have previously established that the DCM can be robustly applied across a series of antibody fragments (VL to Fab), and subsequently, the DCM was combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to similarly characterize five thermostabilizing scFv mutants. The DCM is an ensemble based statistical mechanical approach that accounts for enthalpy/entropy compensation due to network rigidity, which has been quite successful in elucidating conformational flexibility and Quantitative Stability/Flexibility Relationships (QSFR) in proteins. Applied to three disparate antibody systems changes in QSFR quantities indicate that the VH domain is typically rigidified, whereas the VL domain and CDR L2 loop become more flexible during affinity maturation. The increase in CDR H3 loop rigidity is consistent with other studies in the literature. The redistribution of conformational flexibility is largely controlled by nonspecific changes in the H-bond network, although certain Arg to Asp salt bridges create highly localized rigidity increases. Taken together, these results reveal an intricate flexibility/rigidity response that accompanies affinity maturation.

  14. Mitogenicity and down-regulation of high-affinity interleukin 2 receptor by YTA-1 and YTA-2, monoclonal antibodies that recognize 75-kDa molecules on human large granular lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Y; Inamoto, T; Sugie, K; Masutani, H; Shindo, T; Tagaya, Y; Yamauchi, A; Ozawa, K; Yodoi, J

    1989-01-01

    A large number of interleukin 2 receptors lacking the Tac epitope (IL-2R/p75) were found to be constitutively expressed on the human large granular lymphocyte/natural killer cell line YT, which bears inducible IL-2R/p55 associated with Tac antigen. Two anti-YT IgG1 monoclonal antibodies, YTA-1 and YTA-2, recognizing different epitopes of the same 75- to 80-kDa molecule, were established. The 75-kDa antigen recognized by these monoclonal antibodies was strongly expressed on the large granular lymphocytes of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells and on various lymphoid cell lines bearing IL-2R/p75. The YTA-1 and YTA-2 antibodies were mitogenic and were different from other mitogenic monoclonal antibodies such as anti-T3 (CD3), anti-T11 (CD2), and KOLT-2 (CD28). Further, they down-regulated the high-affinity IL-2R of peripheral blood mononuclear cells within 24 hr in culture. The relationship between the YTA-1/2 antigen and the IL-2R system is discussed. Images PMID:2465549

  15. A dynamic mathematical model for monoclonal antibody N-linked glycosylation and nucleotide sugar donor transport within a maturing Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Jimenez del Val, Ioscani; Nagy, Judit M; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are one of the most important products of the biopharmaceutical industry. Their therapeutic efficacy depends on the post-translational process of glycosylation, which is influenced by manufacturing process conditions. Herein, we present a dynamic mathematical model for mAb glycosylation that considers cisternal maturation by approximating the Golgi apparatus to a plug flow reactor and by including recycling of Golgi-resident proteins (glycosylation enzymes and transport proteins [TPs]). The glycosylation reaction rate expressions were derived based on the reported kinetic mechanisms for each enzyme, and transport of nucleotide sugar donors [NSDs] from the cytosol to the Golgi lumen was modeled to serve as a link between glycosylation and cellular metabolism. Optimization-based methodologies were developed for estimating unknown enzyme and TP concentration profile parameters. The resulting model is capable of reproducing glycosylation profiles of commercial mAbs. It can further reproduce the effect gene silencing of the FucT glycosylation enzyme and cytosolic NSD depletion have on the mAb oligosaccharide profile. All novel elements of our model are based on biological evidence and generate more accurate results than previous reports. We therefore believe that the improvements contribute to a more detailed representation of the N-linked glycosylation process. The overall results show the potential of our model toward evaluating cell engineering strategies that yield desired glycosylation profiles. Additionally, when coupled to cellular metabolism, this model could be used to assess the effect of process conditions on glycosylation and aid in the design, control, and optimization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes.

  16. How to assess the binding strength of antibodies elicited by vaccination against HIV and other viruses

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vaccines that protect against viral infections generally induce neutralizing antibodies. When vaccines are evaluated, the need arises to assess the affinity maturation of the antibody responses. Binding titers of polyclonal sera depend not only on the affinities of the constituent antibodies but also on their individual concentrations, which are difficult to ascertain. Therefore an assay based on chaotrope disruption of antibody-antigen complexes was designed for measuring binding strength. This assay works well with many viral antigens but gives differential results depending on the conformational dependence of epitopes on complex antigens such as the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1. Kinetic binding assays might offer alternatives, since they can measure average off-rate constants for polyclonal antibodies in a serum. Here, potentials and fallacies of these techniques are discussed. PMID:26641943

  17. The use of ammonium sulphate precipitation method for the determination of antigen-binding capacity and affinity of anti-tetanus antibodies in human serum.

    PubMed

    Alausa, O K

    1975-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay of anti-tetanus antibodies produced in human serum in response to tetanus toxoid immunization was carried out by employing the non-specific precipitation effect of ammonium sulphate described by Farr (1958). The results showed that the method was sensitive and was able to differentiate between immune and non-immune persons. The effects of booster dose injection on the quantity and quality of antibodies produced during immunization were discussed, and the possible use of the method to predict the amount of immunogen, the timing and number of injections required for optimal host response in immunization schedules was suggested.

  18. An asymmetric antibody repertoire is shaped between plasmablasts and plasma cells after secondary immunization with (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl chicken γ-globulin.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Yasuyuki; Murakami, Akikazu; Goizuka, Ryo; Shimizu, Takeyuki; Kishimoto, Hidehiro; Azuma, Takachika

    2015-12-01

    Studies on the structural basis of antibody affinity maturation have been carried out by measuring the affinity of secreted antibodies, and information on structures has often been obtained from nucleotide sequences of BCRs of memory B cells. We considered it important to establish whether the repertoire of secreted antibodies from plasma cells is really in accord with that of BCRs on memory B cells at the same time points post-immunization. We isolated plasma cells secreting antibodies specific to (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl (NP) hapten by affinity matrix technology using biotin-anti-CD138 and streptavidin-NP-allophycocyanin, to which anti-NP antibodies secreted by autologous plasma cells bound preferentially. We found that plasmablasts occupied >90% of the antibody-secreting cell compartment in the primary response and that they secreted antibodies whose VH regions were encoded by V186.2(+)Tyr95(+) sequences, which provided an increase in the medium level of affinity by somatic hypermutation (SHM) of heavy chains at position 33. After secondary immunization, a further increase in antibody affinity was observed, which was explained by the appearance of a number of plasma cells secreting V186.2(+)Gly95(+) antibodies that acquired high affinity by multiple SHMs as well as plasmablasts secreting V186.2(+)Tyr95(+) antibodies. However, we did not detect any plasmablasts secreting V186.2(+)Gly95(+) antibodies, showing that plasmablasts and plasma cells have a different antibody repertoire, i.e. their respective repertoires are asymmetric. On the basis of these findings, we discussed the relationship between the BCR affinity of memory B cells and plasmablasts as well as plasma cells as pertaining to their ontogeny.

  19. Experimental and theoretical investigation of effect of spacer arm and support matrix of synthetic affinity chromatographic materials for the purification of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zamolo, Laura; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Cavallotti, Carlo; Galarza, Benedict; Sadler, Chris; Williams, Sharon; Hofer, Stefan; Horak, Jeannie; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2010-07-29

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of each material component-the support, the spacer, and the surface chemistry-on the overall material performance of an affinity type purification media for the capture of immunoglobulin G (IgG). Material properties were investigated in terms of an experimental evaluation using affinity chromatography as well as computer modeling. The biomimetic triazine-based A2P affinity ligand was chosen as a fixed point, while spacer and support were varied. The investigated spacers were 1-2-diaminoethane (2LP), 1,3-propanedithiol (SS3), 3,6-dioxo-1,8-octanedithiol (DES), and a 1,4-substituted [1,2,3]-triazole spacer (TRZ). The support media considered were the agarose (AG) resins, PuraBead, the polyvinylether, Fractoprep, the polymethacrylate, Fractogel, and the porous silica, Fractosil. All materials were tested with pure IgG standard solution, with a mock feed solution as well as real cell culture supernatant. The interaction between IgG and A2P linked through the investigated spacers to AG was studied using molecular dynamics. The effect of a modification of the support chemical structure or of the protein-ligand binding site on the material performances was studied through target oriented simulations. Dynamic binding experiments (DBC) revealed that the performances of materials containing 2LP spacers were significantly decreased in the presence of Pluronic F68. The simulations indicated that this is probably determined by the establishment of intermolecular interactions between the 2LP charged amino group and the ether oxygen of Pluronic F68. The spacer giving the highest IgG dynamic binding capacity when Pluronic F68 was present in the feed was TRZ. The simulations showed that, among the investigated spacers, TRZ is the only one that prevents the adsorption of A2P on the support surface, thus suggesting that the mobility and lack of interaction of the ligand with the support is an important property for an affinity

  20. Antibody i-Patch prediction of the antibody binding site improves rigid local antibody-antigen docking.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Konrad; Baker, Terry; Shi, Jiye; Deane, Charlotte M

    2013-10-01

    Antibodies are a class of proteins indispensable for the vertebrate immune system. The general architecture of all antibodies is very similar, but they contain a hypervariable region which allows millions of antibody variants to exist, each of which can bind to different molecules. This binding malleability means that antibodies are an increasingly important category of biopharmaceuticals and biomarkers. We present Antibody i-Patch, a method that annotates the most likely antibody residues to be in contact with the antigen. We show that our predictions correlate with energetic importance and thus we argue that they may be useful in guiding mutations in the artificial affinity maturation process. Using our predictions as constraints for a rigid-body docking algorithm, we are able to obtain high-quality results in minutes. Our annotation method and re-scoring system for docking achieve their predictive power by using antibody-specific statistics. Antibody i-Patch is available from http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/research/proteins/resources.

  1. Structural insights into the evolution of an antibody combining site

    SciTech Connect

    Wedemayer, G.J.; Patten, P.A.; Wang, L.H.; Schultz, P.G.; Stevens, R.C. |

    1997-06-13

    The crystal structures of a germline antibody Fab fragment and its complex with hapten have been solved at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. These structures are compared with the corresponding crystal structures of the affinity-matured antibody, 48G7, which has a 30,000 times higher affinity for hapten as a result of nine replacement somatic mutations. Significant changes in the configuration of the combining site occur upon binding of hapten to the germline antibody, whereas hapten binds to the mature antibody by a lock-and-key fit mechanism. The reorganization of the combining site that was nucleated by hapten binding is further optimized by somatic mutations that occur up to 15 {angstrom} from bound hapten. These results suggest that the binding potential of the primary antibody repertoire may be significantly expanded by the ability of germline antibodies to adopt more than one combining-site configuration, with both antigen binding and somatic mutation stabilizing the configuration with optimal hapten complementarily.

  2. Production and characterization of high-affinity human monoclonal antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins in a mouse model expressing human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Neil C; Davies, Sarah L; Jeffs, Simon A; Vieira, Sueli M; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2007-02-01

    Human (Hu) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) are useful tools in the structural and functional analysis of Env, are under development both as potential prophylaxis and as therapy for established HIV-1 infection, and have crucial roles in guiding the design of preventative vaccines. Despite representing more than 50% of infections globally, no MAbs have been generated in any species against C clade HIV-1 Env. To generate HuMAbs to a novel Chinese C clade Env vaccine candidate (primary isolate strain HIV-1(97CN54)), we used BAB5 mice that express a human immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody repertoire in place of endogenous murine immunoglobulins. When immunized with HIV-1(97CN54) Env, these mice developed antigen-specific IgM antibodies. Hybridoma fusions using splenocytes from these mice enabled the isolation of two Env-specific IgM HuMAbs: N3C5 and N03B11. N3C5 bound to HIV-1 Env from clades A and C, whereas N03B11 bound two geographically distant clade C isolates but not Env from other clades. These HuMAbs bind conformational epitopes within the immunodominant region of the gp41 ectodomain. N3C5 weakly neutralized the autologous isolate in the absence of complement and weakly enhanced infection in the presence of complement. N03B11 has no effect on infectivity in either the presence or the absence of complement. These novel HuMAbs are useful reagents for the study of HIV-1 Env relevant to the global pandemic, and mice producing human immunoglobulin present a tool for the production of such antibodies.

  3. Comparison of monoclonal antibodies 17-1A and 323/A3: the influence of the affinity on tumour uptake and efficacy of radioimmunotherapy in human ovarian cancer xenografts.

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, E.; Pinedo, H. M.; Schlüper, H. M.; Haisma, H. J.; Boven, E.

    1996-01-01

    The low-affinity monoclonal antibody (MAb) chimeric 17-1A(c-17-1A) and the high-affinity MAb mouse 323/A3 (m-323/A3) were used to study the effect of the MAb affinity on the tumour uptake and efficacy of radioimmunotherapy in nude mice bearing subcutaneously the human ovarian cancer xenografts FMa, OVCAR-3 and Ov.Pe. Both MAbs are directed against the same pancarcinoma glycoprotein. In vitro, the number of binding sites on tumour cells at 4 degrees C was similar for both MAbs, but m-323/A3 had an approximately 5-fold higher affinity (1.3-3.0x10(9) M-1) than c-17-1A (3.0-5.4x10(8) M-1). This difference in affinity was more extreme at 37 degrees C, when no binding of c-17-1A could be observed. MAb m-323/A3 completely blocked binding of c-17-1A to tumour cells, whereas the reverse was not observed. Immunohistochemistry showed a similar but more intense staining pattern of m-323/A3 in human ovarian cancer xenografts than of c-17-1A. In vivo, the blood clearance in non-tumour-bearing nude mice was similar for both MAbs with terminal half-lives of 71.4 h for m-323/A3 and 62.7 h for c-17-1A. MAb m-323/A3 targeted better to tumour tissue, but was more heterogeneously distributed than c-17-1A. The cumulative absorbed radiation dose delivered by m-323/A3 to tumour tissue was 2.5- to 4.7-fold higher than that delivered by c-17-1A. When mice were treated with equivalent radiation doses of 131(I)m-323/A3 and 131(I)c-17-1A, based on a correction for the immunoreactivity of the radiolabelled MAbs, m-323/A3 induced a better growth inhibition in two of the three xenografts. When the radiation doses were adjusted to obtain a similar amount of radiation in the tumour c-17-1A was more effective in tumour growth inhibition in all three xenografts. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8595159

  4. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  5. Directed Evolution of a Yeast-Displayed HIV-1 SOSIP gp140 Spike Protein toward Improved Expression and Affinity for Conformational Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Sebastian K.; Battles, Michael B.; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Design of an envelope-based immunogen capable of inducing a broadly neutralizing antibody response is thought to be key to the development of a protective HIV-1 vaccine. However, the broad diversity of viral variants and a limited ability to produce native envelope have hampered such design efforts. Here we describe adaptation of the yeast display system and use of a combinatorial protein engineering approach to permit directed evolution of HIV envelope variants. Because the intrinsic instability and complexity of this trimeric glycoprotein has greatly impeded the development of immunogens that properly represent the structure of native envelope, this platform addresses an essential need for methodologies with the capacity to rapidly engineer HIV spike proteins towards improved homogeneity, stability, and presentation of neutralizing epitopes. We report for the first time the display of a designed SOSIP gp140 on yeast, and the in vitro evolution of derivatives with greatly improved expression and binding to conformation-dependent antibodies. These efforts represent an initial and critical step toward the ability to rapidly engineer HIV-1 envelope immunogens via directed evolution. PMID:25688555

  6. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200.

    PubMed

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N S; Bäck, Tom; Machado, Camila Maria L; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Moro, Ana Maria; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Jacobsson, Lars; Cederkrantz, Elin; Washiyama, Kohshin; Aneheim, Emma; Palm, Stig; Jensen, Holger; Tuma, Maria Carolina B; Chammas, Roger; Hultborn, Ragnar; Albertsson, Per

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovarian cancer with 211At-Rebmab200. Here, the biodistribution of 211At-Rebmab200 was evaluated, as was the utility of 99mTc-Rebmab200 for bioimaging. Rebmab200 was directly compared with its murine counterpart MX35 in terms of its in-vitro capacity for binding the immobilized NaPi2B epitope and live cells; we also assessed its biodistribution in nude mice carrying subcutaneous OVCAR-3 tumors. Tumor antigen and cell binding were similar between Rebmab200 and murine MX35, as was biodistribution, including normal tissue uptake and in-vivo tumor binding. We also demonstrated that 99mTc-Rebmab200 can be used for single-photon emission computed tomography of subcutaneous ovarian carcinomas in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data support the further development of Rebmab200 for radioimmunotherapy and diagnostics.

  7. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200

    PubMed Central

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N. S.; Bäck, Tom; Machado, Camila Maria L.; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Moro, Ana Maria; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Jacobsson, Lars; Cederkrantz, Elin; Washiyama, Kohshin; Aneheim, Emma; Palm, Stig; Jensen, Holger; Tuma, Maria Carolina B.; Chammas, Roger; Hultborn, Ragnar; Albertsson, Per

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovarian cancer with 211At-Rebmab200. Here, the biodistribution of 211At-Rebmab200 was evaluated, as was the utility of 99mTc-Rebmab200 for bioimaging. Rebmab200 was directly compared with its murine counterpart MX35 in terms of its in-vitro capacity for binding the immobilized NaPi2B epitope and live cells; we also assessed its biodistribution in nude mice carrying subcutaneous OVCAR-3 tumors. Tumor antigen and cell binding were similar between Rebmab200 and murine MX35, as was biodistribution, including normal tissue uptake and in-vivo tumor binding. We also demonstrated that 99mTc-Rebmab200 can be used for single-photon emission computed tomography of subcutaneous ovarian carcinomas in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data support the further development of Rebmab200 for radioimmunotherapy and diagnostics. PMID:25970341

  8. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  9. Heteroantibody-mediated cytotoxicity: antibody to the high affinity Fc receptor for IgG mediates cytotoxicity by human monocytes that is enhanced by interferon-gamma and is not blocked by human IgG.

    PubMed

    Shen, L; Guyre, P M; Anderson, C L; Fanger, M W

    1986-12-01

    An IgG1 monoclonal antibody, 32.2, raised against the 72,000 dalton monocyte high affinity Fc receptor, was used to examine the role of this receptor in ADCC. This antibody did not inhibit the binding of human IgG1 to monocytes or to the U937 cell line, nor did it block or stimulate their killing of IgG-coated chicken erythrocytes (CE). Whole 32.2 or its Fab fragments were cross-linked to Fab fragments of rabbit anti-CE by using the agent SPDP. The resulting heteroantibodies (32.2 X Fab anti-CE) mediated monocyte and U937 cytotoxicity against CE, whereas an anti-HLA X anti-CE reagent did not. Both FcR expression and heteroantibody-mediated cytotoxicity were increased by culturing monocytes or U937 with IFN-gamma. Although IgG-mediated ADCC was significantly inhibited by 40 micrograms/ml human IgG1, cytotoxicity mediated by 32.2 X Fab anti-CE was not blocked by 2 mg/ml human IgG1, suggesting that such cytotoxicity might not be blocked by IgG in vivo. These data indicate the potential of 32.2 heteroantibodies in analysis of FcR function and in therapy.

  10. Somatic Hypermutation-Induced Changes in the Structure and Dynamics of HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Thaddeus M; Gorman, Jason; Joyce, M Gordon; Zhou, Tongqing; Soto, Cinque; Guttman, Miklos; Moquin, Stephanie; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-07-20

    Antibody somatic hypermutation (SHM) and affinity maturation enhance antigen recognition by modifying antibody paratope structure to improve its complementarity with the target epitope. SHM-induced changes in paratope dynamics may also contribute to antibody maturation, but direct evidence of this is limited. Here, we examine two classes of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) for SHM-induced changes in structure and dynamics, and delineate the effects of these changes on interactions with the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). In combination with new and existing structures of unmutated and affinity matured antibody Fab fragments, we used hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry to directly measure Fab structural dynamics. Changes in antibody structure and dynamics were positioned to improve complementarity with Env, with changes in dynamics primarily observed at the paratope peripheries. We conclude that SHM optimizes paratope complementarity to conserved HIV-1 epitopes and restricts the mobility of paratope-peripheral residues to minimize clashes with variable features on HIV-1 Env.

  11. A human monoclonal antibody that binds serotype A botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Adekar, Sharad P; Jones, R Mark; Elias, M D; Al-Saleem, Fetweh H; Root, Michael J; Simpson, Lance L; Dessain, Scott K

    2008-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have demonstrated significant potential as therapeutics for botulinum neurotoxin exposures. We previously described a hybridoma method for cloning native human antibodies that uses a murine myeloma cell line that ectopically expresses the human telomerase catalytic subunit gene (hTERT) and the murine interleukin-6 gene (mIL-6). Here we describe a heterohybridoma cell line that ectopically expresses mIL-6 and hTERT and has improved stability of hTERT expression. We fused this cell line to human peripheral blood B cells from a subject who had received the botulinum toxoid vaccine, cloning a high-affinity antibody (13A) specific for serotype A botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT/A). The 13A antibody is an affinity-matured, post-germinal center IgG(1) lambda antibody that has partial neutralization activity in vivo. 13A binds an epitope on BoNT/A that overlaps the binding epitope of an IgG antibody previously shown to fully neutralize a lethal dose of BoNT/A in vivo. The 13A antibody may be useful for diagnostic testing or for incorporation into an oligoclonal therapeutic to counteract BoNT/A exposure.

  12. Framework selection can influence pharmacokinetics of a humanized therapeutic antibody through differences in molecule charge

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Tesar, Devin; Boswell, C Andrew; Cahaya, Hendry S; Wong, Anne; Zhang, Jianhuan; Meng, Y Gloria; Eigenbrot, Charles; Pantua, Homer; Diao, Jinyu; Kapadia, Sharookh B; Deng, Rong; Kelley, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) testing of a humanized (κI, VH3 framework) and affinity matured anti-hepatitis C virus E2-glycoprotein (HCV-E2) antibody (hu5B3.κ1VH3.v3) in rats revealed unexpected fast clearance (34.9 mL/day/kg). This antibody binds to the rat recycling receptor FcRn as expected for a human IgG1 antibody and does not display non-specific binding to baculovirus particles in an assay that is correlated with fast clearance in cynomolgus monkey. The antigen is not expressed in rat so target-dependent clearance does not contribute to PK. Removal of the affinity maturation changes (hu5B3.κ1VH3.v1) did not restore normal clearance. The antibody was re-humanized on a κ4, VH1 framework and the non-affinity matured version (hu5B3.κ4VH1.v1) was shown to have normal clearance (8.5 mL/day/kg). Since the change in framework results in a lower pI, primarily due to more negative charge on the κ4 template, the effect of additional charge variation on antibody PK was tested by incorporating substitutions obtained through phage display affinity maturation of hu5B3.κ1VH3.v1. A variant having a pI of 8.61 gave very fast clearance (140 mL/day/kg) whereas a molecule with pI of 6.10 gave slow clearance (5.8 mL/kg/day). Both antibodies exhibited comparable binding to rat FcRn, but biodistribution experiments showed that the high pI variant was catabolized in liver and spleen. These results suggest antibody charge can have an effect on PK through alterations in antibody catabolism independent of FcRn-mediated recycling. Furthermore, introduction of affinity maturation changes into the lower pI framework yielded a candidate with PK and virus neutralization properties suitable for clinical development. PMID:25517310

  13. Oxidation in the complementarity-determining regions differentially influences the properties of therapeutic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Dashivets, Tetyana; Stracke, Jan; Dengl, Stefan; Knaupp, Alexander; Pollmann, Jan; Buchner, Johannes; Schlothauer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Therapeutic antibodies can undergo a variety of chemical modification reactions in vitro. Depending on the site of modification, either antigen binding or Fc-mediated functions can be affected. Oxidation of tryptophan residues is one of the post-translational modifications leading to altered antibody functionality. In this study, we examined the structural and functional properties of a therapeutic antibody construct and 2 affinity matured variants thereof. Two of the 3 antibodies carry an oxidation-prone tryptophan residue in the complementarity-determining region of the VL domain. We demonstrate the differences in the stability and bioactivity of the 3 antibodies, and reveal differential degradation pathways for the antibodies susceptible to oxidation. PMID:27612038

  14. Efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) affinity-purified anti-desmoglein anti-idiotypic antibodies in the treatment of an experimental model of pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mimouni, D; Blank, M; Payne, A S; Anhalt, G J; Avivi, C; Barshack, I; David, M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2010-12-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a rare life-threatening autoimmune bullous disease caused by immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies directed against desmogleins 1 and 3. Previously, we showed that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) ameliorates anti-desmoglein-induced experimental pemphigus vulgaris in newborn naive mice. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of anti-anti-desmoglein-specific IVIG in a similar model. Pemphigus-vulgaris-specific IVIG (PV-sIVIG) was affinity-purified from IVIG on a column of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) anti-desmogleins 1 and 3. The anti-idiotypic activity of PV-sIVIG was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, inhibition assay. After induction of pemphigus by injection of anti-desmogleins 1 and 3 scFv to newborn mice, the animals were treated with PV-sIVIG, IVIG (low or high dose) or IgG from a healthy donor (n = 10 each). The skin was examined 24-48 h later, and samples of affected areas were analysed by histology and immunofluorescence. In vitro study showed that PV-sIVIG significantly inhibited anti-desmogleins 1 and 3 scFv binding to recombinant desmoglein-3 in a dose-dependent manner. Specificity was confirmed by inhibition assay. In vivo analysis revealed cutaneous lesions of pemphigus vulgaris in mice injected with normal IgG (nine of 10 mice) or low-dose IVIG (nine of 10 mice), but not in mice treated with PV-sIVIG (none of 10) or high-dose IVIG (none of 10). On immunopathological study, PV-sIVIG and regular IVIG prevented the formation of acantholysis and deposition of IgG in intercellular spaces. In conclusion, the PV-sIVIG preparation is more effective than native IVIG in inhibiting anti-desmoglein-induced pemphigus vulgaris in mice and might serve as a future therapy in patients with the clinical disease.

  15. Comparative analysis of binding affinities to epidermal growth factor receptor of monoclonal antibodies nimotuzumab and cetuximab using different experimental animal models.

    PubMed

    Ledón, N; Casacó, A; Casanova, E; Beausoleil, I

    2011-07-01

    Although pharmaco/toxicological studies have always been conducted in pharmacologically relevant species in which the test material is pharmacologically active, the very specificity of many biopharmaceuticals could present challenges in the identification of a relevant species for pharmaco/toxicological studies. Alternative approaches may improve the predictive value of preclinical assessments of species-specific biopharmaceuticals. This could lead to improved decision-making, reduce the number of experimental animals by eliminating non-relevant studies, and decrease the time and cost involved in the drug development process. As an alternative to utilizing traditional animal models, this study investigated the activity of human EGF and the anti-EGF receptor monoclonal antibodies nimotuzumab and cetuximab using the placenta microsomal fraction of different experimental animals. Ligand-receptor binding curves were obtained from the different experimental animal models, and binding constants were calculated based on the Scatchard plots. The constants for human and monkey EGF receptor expressed on the placental extract showed a K(a)<10(-8)M, while rabbits, mice and rats showed a K(a)>10(-8)M. The K(a) values obtained from animal placentas show that Macaca fascicularis and Cercopitecus aethiops monkeys are relevant species for studying the pharmaco/toxicological properties of nimotuzumab and cetuximab.

  16. A simplified method to attach antibodies on liposomes by biotin-streptavidin affinity for rapid and economical screening of targeted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Papadia, Konstantina; Markoutsa, Eleni; Antimisiaris, Sophia G

    2014-05-01

    The biotin-Streptavidin (STREP) technique for attachment of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (or other ligand types) on liposome surface offers high attachment yield, however it is time consuming and expensive due to the number of steps used and the consumption of large quantities of STREP. Herein, a simplified, fast and economic technique, by incubating pre-mixed biotin-mAb/STREP with biotin-liposomes, at a 3:1:1 biotin-mAb/STREP/biotin-LIP ratio (mol/mol/mol) was evaluated. The physichochemical properties, final mAb attachment yield and targeting potential of liposomes decorated with an anti-transferrin receptor mAb (TfR-mAb), prepared by the simple method (SM) and the conventional method (CM), were compared. The vesicle uptake by hCMEC/D3 cells (known to overexpress TfR) were considered as a measure of liposome targeting capability. Results show that both targeted liposome types (SM and CM) have small size (mean diameters around 150 nm), low poly-dispersity (approx. 0.20) and similar mAb attachment yield (between 64-88%). However, the uptake of the SM-liposomes is slightly lower compared to CM-LIP (24-30% decrease), suggesting that the modulated conformation of mAbs on the liposome surface (triplets attached to one single STREP molecule) results in decreased targeting capability. Nevertheless, the simpler and faster one-step preparation procedure which has very high lipid recovery (> 95%) compared to the CM (50-60%) and 15-30 times lower consumption of STREP, may be a good alternative for initial screening of various mAbs as ligands for targeted liposomal or other nanotechnologies, during pre-clinical development.

  17. Production of human or humanized antibodies in mice.

    PubMed

    Laffleur, Brice; Pascal, Virginie; Sirac, Christophe; Cogné, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Mice are widely available laboratory animals that can easily be used for the production of antibodies against a broad range of antigens, using well-defined immunization protocols. Such an approach allows optimal in vivo affinity maturation of the humoral response. In addition, high-affinity antibodies arising in this context can readily be further characterized and produced as monoclonals after immortalizing and selecting specific antibody-producing cells through hybridoma derivation. Using such conventional strategies combined with mice that are either genetically engineered to carry humanized immunoglobulin (Ig) genes or engrafted with a human immune system, it is thus easy to obtain and immortalize clones that produce either fully human Ig or antibodies associating variable (V) domains with selected antigen specificities to customized human-like constant regions, with defined effector functions. In some instances, where there is a need for in vivo functional assays of a single antibody with a known specificity, it might be of interest to transiently express that gene in mice by in vivo gene transfer. This approach allows a rapid functional assay. More commonly, mice are used to obtain a diversified repertoire of antibody specificities after immunization by producing antibody molecules in the mouse B cell lineage from mouse strains with transgene Ig genes which are of human, humanized, or chimeric origin. After in vivo maturation of the immune response, this will lead to the secretion of antibodies with optimized antigen binding sites, associated to the desired human constant domains. This chapter focuses on two simple methods: (1) to obtain such humanized Ig mice and (2) to transiently express a human Ig gene in mice using hydrodynamics-based transfection.

  18. Chemoenzymatic synthesis and Fcγ receptor binding of homogeneous glycoforms of antibody Fc domain. Presence of a bisecting sugar moiety enhances the affinity of Fc to FcγIIIa receptor.

    PubMed

    Zou, Guozhang; Ochiai, Hirofumi; Huang, Wei; Yang, Qiang; Li, Cishan; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2011-11-23

    Structurally well-defined IgG-Fc glycoforms are highly demanded for understanding the effects of glycosylation on an antibody's effector functions. We report in this paper chemoenzymatic synthesis and Fcγ receptor binding of an array of homogeneous IgG-Fc glycoforms. The chemoenzymatic approach consists of the chemical synthesis of defined N-glycan oxazolines as donor substrates, the expression of the Fc domain in a CHO cell line in the presence of an α-mannosidase inhibitor kifunensine, and an endoglycosidase-catalyzed glycosylation of the deglycosylated Fc domain (GlcNAc-Fc homodimer) with the synthetic glycan oxazolines. The enzyme from Arthrobacter protophormiae (Endo-A) was found to be remarkably efficient to take various modified N-glycan core oxazolines, including the bisecting sugar-containing derivatives, for Fc glycosylation remodeling, resulting in the formation of the corresponding homogeneous Fc glycoforms. Nevertheless, neither Endo-A nor the Mucor hiemalis endoglycosidase mutants (EndoM-N175A and EndoM-N175Q) were able to transfer full-length complex-type N-glycan to the Fc domain, implicating the limitations of these two enzymes in Fc glycosylation remodeling. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding studies with the synthetic IgG-Fc glycoforms unambiguously proved that the presence of a bisecting GlcNAc moiety could significantly enhance the binding of Fc to FcγRIIIa, the activating Fcγ receptor, independent of Fc core-fucosylation. Interestingly, the Fc glycoforms carrying an unusual bisecting sugar moiety such as a mannose or a LacNAc moiety also demonstrated enhanced affinity to FcγRIIIa. On the orther hand, the presence of a bisecting GlcNAc or core-fucosylation had little effect on the affinity of Fc to the inhibitory Fcγ receptor, FcγRIIb. Our experimental data also showed that the α-linked mannose residues in the pentasaccharide Man3GlcNAc2 core was essential to maintain a high affinity of Fc to both FcγRIIIa and FcγRIIb. The

  19. Sequence-Intrinsic Mechanisms that Target AID Mutational Outcomes on Antibody Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yeap, Leng-Siew; Hwang, Joyce K.; Du, Zhou; Meyers, Robin M.; Meng, Fei-Long; Jakubauskaitė, Agnė; Liu, Mengyuan; Mani, Vinidhra; Neuberg, Donna; Kepler, Thomas B.; Wang, Jing H.; Alt, Frederick W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary In activated B lymphocytes, AID initiates antibody variable (V) exon somatic hypermutation (SHM) for affinity maturation in germinal centers (GCs) and IgH switch (S) region DNA breaks (DSBs) for class-switch recombination (CSR). To resolve long-standing questions, we have developed an in vivo assay to study AID-targeting of passenger sequences replacing a V exon. First, we find AID targets SHM hotspots within V exon and S region passengers at similar frequencies and that the normal SHM process frequently generates deletions, indicating that SHM and CSR employ the same mechanism. Second, AID mutates targets in diverse non-Ig passengers in GC B cells at levels similar to those of V exons, definitively establishing the V exon location as "privileged" for SHM. Finally, Peyer's patch GC B cells generate a reservoir of V exons that are highly mutated before selection for affinity maturation. We discuss implications of these findings for harnessing antibody diversification mechanisms. PMID:26582132

  20. Generation of “LYmph Node Derived Antibody Libraries” (LYNDAL) for selecting fully human antibody fragments with therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Diebolder, Philipp; Keller, Armin; Haase, Stephanie; Schlegelmilch, Anne; Kiefer, Jonathan D; Karimi, Tamana; Weber, Tobias; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Kehm, Roland; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M; Jäger, Dirk; Federspil, Philippe A; Herold-Mende, Christel; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Kontermann, Roland E; Arndt, Michaela AE; Krauss, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The development of efficient strategies for generating fully human monoclonal antibodies with unique functional properties that are exploitable for tailored therapeutic interventions remains a major challenge in the antibody technology field. Here, we present a methodology for recovering such antibodies from antigen-encountered human B cell repertoires. As the source for variable antibody genes, we cloned immunoglobulin G (IgG)-derived B cell repertoires from lymph nodes of 20 individuals undergoing surgery for head and neck cancer. Sequence analysis of unselected “LYmph Node Derived Antibody Libraries” (LYNDAL) revealed a naturally occurring distribution pattern of rearranged antibody sequences, representing all known variable gene families and most functional germline sequences. To demonstrate the feasibility for selecting antibodies with therapeutic potential from these repertoires, seven LYNDAL from donors with high serum titers against herpes simplex virus (HSV) were panned on recombinant glycoprotein B of HSV-1. Screening for specific binders delivered 34 single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) with unique sequences. Sequence analysis revealed extensive somatic hypermutation of enriched clones as a result of affinity maturation. Binding of scFvs to common glycoprotein B variants from HSV-1 and HSV-2 strains was highly specific, and the majority of analyzed antibody fragments bound to the target antigen with nanomolar affinity. From eight scFvs with HSV-neutralizing capacity in vitro, the most potent antibody neutralized 50% HSV-2 at 4.5 nM as a dimeric (scFv)2. We anticipate our approach to be useful for recovering fully human antibodies with therapeutic potential. PMID:24256717

  1. The monoclonal antibody GZS-1 detects a maturation-associated antigen of human spermatozoa that is also present on the surface of human mononuclear blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hutter, H; Hammer, A; Blaschitz, A; Hartmann, M; Mahnert, W; Sedlmayr, P; Primus, G; Rosenkranz, C; Gebru, G; Henkel, R; Dohr, G

    1996-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody (GZS-1) has been generated by fusion of mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunised with human sperm cells. The antibody was determined to be an IgG1. The corresponding antigen is present on the whole surface of ejaculated human spermatozoa. It is not detectable on spermatozoa of other mammalian species (rabbit, cat, dog, sheep, boar, bull, horse). In human male genital organs, immunostaining with GZS-1 is observed on sperm cells in the epididymis and the ductus deferens together with the lining epithelium of those organs. No reactivity of sperm cells or germ cell precursors in the testis has been detected. Functional tests using the antibody show a strong inhibitory effect of human sperm in the hamster egg penetration assay. Furthermore, the GZS-1 antigen is detectable on the surface of human lymphocytes and monocytes by immunogold electron microscopy and FACS analysis. By Western blotting of human sperm and seminal plasma performed under reducing conditions immunostaining was detected at 21-25, 31, 51-54, and 62 kDa. The reaction with human lymphocytes shows one major band at 62 kDa and additional bands at 31 and 54 kDa. The results suggest that the monoclonal antibody GZS-1 may recognise an antigen which is secreted from the epithelial cells of the epididymis and binds to ejaculated spermatozoa as a sperm coating antigen. This component may be involved in the capacitation of the sperm and the acrosome reaction. Molecules that are expressed both on sperm and on immunocompetent cells may be relevant for the regulation of immunological processes or for the development of the related immunological tolerance of sperm in the female reproductive tract.

  2. Spatially addressed combinatorial protein libraries for recombinant antibody discovery and optimization.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hongyuan; Graziano, James J; Chase, Tyson M A; Bentley, Cornelia A; Bazirgan, Omar A; Reddy, Neil P; Song, Byeong Doo; Smider, Vaughn V

    2010-11-01

    Antibody discovery typically uses hybridoma- or display-based selection approaches, which lack the advantages of directly screening spatially addressed compound libraries as in small-molecule discovery. Here we apply the latter strategy to antibody discovery, using a library of ∼10,000 human germline antibody Fabs created by de novo DNA synthesis and automated protein expression and purification. In multiplexed screening assays, we obtained specific hits against seven of nine antigens. Using sequence-activity relationships and iterative mutagenesis, we optimized the binding affinities of two hits to the low nanomolar range. The matured Fabs showed full and partial antagonism activities in cell-based assays. Thus, protein drug leads can be discovered using surprisingly small libraries of proteins with known sequences, questioning the requirement for billions of members in an antibody discovery library. This methodology also provides sequence, expression and specificity information at the first step of the discovery process, and could enable novel antibody discovery in functional screens.

  3. Affinity improvement by fine tuning of single-chain variable fragment against aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Min, Won-Ki; Na, Kang-In; Yoon, Jung-Hyun; Heo, Yoon-Jee; Lee, Daesang; Kim, Sung-Gun; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2016-10-15

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) produced in Aspergillus flavus is a major hepatocarcinogen found in foods and feed. For effective immunological detection of AFB1 at low concentrations, the development of high affinity antibody for AFB1 is required. Previously, an affinity-maturated single-chain variable fragment containing 6 mutations (scFv-M37) was isolated from an artificial mutagenic library, which showed a 9-fold higher affinity than its wild type scFv. In this study, the effect of the 6 mutated residues on the affinity improvement was characterized using surface plasmon resonance analysis, which identified a deleterious mutation (VH-A110T) located on a framework region of the scFv-M37. The back mutation of VH-A110T resulted in a 3.2-fold affinity improvement, which was attributed to decrease of dissociation rate constant (kd) in interaction between AFB1 and the back mutant scFv. The biophysical analyses using circular dichroism and gel filtration revealed that the back mutation of VH-A110T caused a subtle conformational change of the scFv toward tighter binding to AFB1.

  4. Optimization of affinity, specificity and function of designed influenza inhibitors using deep sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, Timothy A.; Chevalier, Aaron; Song, Yifan; Dreyfus, Cyrille; Fleishman, Sarel J.; De Mattos, Cecilia; Myers, Chris A.; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Blair, Patrick; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker, David

    2012-06-19

    We show that comprehensive sequence-function maps obtained by deep sequencing can be used to reprogram interaction specificity and to leapfrog over bottlenecks in affinity maturation by combining many individually small contributions not detectable in conventional approaches. We use this approach to optimize two computationally designed inhibitors against H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin and, in both cases, obtain variants with subnanomolar binding affinity. The most potent of these, a 51-residue protein, is broadly cross-reactive against all influenza group 1 hemagglutinins, including human H2, and neutralizes H1N1 viruses with a potency that rivals that of several human monoclonal antibodies, demonstrating that computational design followed by comprehensive energy landscape mapping can generate proteins with potential therapeutic utility.

  5. Affinity Electrophoresis Using Ligands Attached To Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Harris, J. M.; Brooks, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    In new technique, reduction of electrophoretic mobilities by addition of polyethylene glycol to ligands increases electrophoretic separabilities. In immuno-affinity electrophoresis, modification of ligands extends specificity of electrophoretic separation to particles having surface electric-charge structures otherwise making them electrophoretically inseparable. Modification of antibodies by polyethylene glycol greatly reduces ability to aggregate while enhancing ability to affect electrophoretic mobilities of cells. In hydrophobic-affinity electrophoresis, addition of polyethylene glycol reduces tendency toward aggregation of cells or macromolecules.

  6. Viral receptor-binding site antibodies with diverse germline origins

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Aaron G.; Therkelsen, Matthew D.; Stewart, Shaun; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony; Haynes, Barton F.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines for rapidly evolving pathogens will confer lasting immunity if they elicit antibodies recognizing conserved epitopes, such as a receptor-binding site (RBS). From characteristics of an influenza-virus RBS-directed antibody, we devised a signature motif to search for similar antibodies. We identified, from three vaccinees, over 100 candidates encoded by eleven different VH genes. Crystal structures show that antibodies in this class engage the hemagglutinin RBS and mimic binding of the receptor, sialic acid, by supplying a critical dipeptide on their projecting, heavy-chain third complementarity determining region. They share contacts with conserved, receptor-binding residues but contact different residues on the RBS periphery, limiting the likelihood of viral escape when several such antibodies are present. These data show that related modes of RBS recognition can arise from different germline origins and mature through diverse affinity maturation pathways. Immunogens focused on an RBS-directed response will thus have a broad range of B-cell targets. PMID:25959776

  7. Fully Human Antagonistic Antibodies against CCR4 Potently Inhibit Cell Signaling and Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Géraudie, Solène; Scheffler, Ulrike; Griep, Remko A.; Reiersen, Herald; Duncan, Alexander R.; Kiprijanov, Sergej M.

    2014-01-01

    Background CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) represents a potentially important target for cancer immunotherapy due to its expression on tumor infiltrating immune cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and on tumor cells in several cancer types and its role in metastasis. Methodology Using phage display, human antibody library, affinity maturation and a cell-based antibody selection strategy, the antibody variants against human CCR4 were generated. These antibodies effectively competed with ligand binding, were able to block ligand-induced signaling and cell migration, and demonstrated efficient killing of CCR4-positive tumor cells via ADCC and phagocytosis. In a mouse model of human T-cell lymphoma, significant survival benefit was demonstrated for animals treated with the newly selected anti-CCR4 antibodies. Significance For the first time, successful generation of anti- G-protein coupled chemokine receptor (GPCR) antibodies using human non-immune library and phage display on GPCR-expressing cells was demonstrated. The generated anti-CCR4 antibodies possess a dual mode of action (inhibition of ligand-induced signaling and antibody-directed tumor cell killing). The data demonstrate that the anti-tumor activity in vivo is mediated, at least in part, through Fc-receptor dependent effector mechanisms, such as ADCC and phagocytosis. Anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 antibodies inhibiting receptor signaling have potential as immunomodulatory antibodies for cancer. PMID:25080123

  8. B cell function in mice transgenic for mCTLA4-H gamma 1: lack of germinal centers correlated with poor affinity maturation and class switching despite normal priming of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    This report outlines the B cell phenotype of transgenic mice that overexpresses the mouse CTLA-4-human gamma 1 (mCTLA4-H gamma 1) protein. Despite the fact that these mice prime CD4+ T cells (Ronchese, F., B. Housemann, S. Hubele, and P. Lane. 1994. J. Exp. Med. 179:809), antibody responses to T-dependent antigens are severely impaired. In contrast, T-independent responses are normal which suggests mCTLA4-H gamma 1 does not act directly on B cells, but acts indirectly by impairing T cell help. The impaired antibody defect is associated with impaired class switching, with low total immunoglobulin (Ig)G and antigen-specific IgG responses, and an absence of germinal center formation in spleen and lymph nodes but not gut-associated tissues. The defective germinal center formation is associated with a reduction in the degree of somatic mutation in hybridomas made from transgenic mice in comparison with those made from normal mice. It seems likely that mCTLA4-H gamma 1 exerts its effect by blocking an interaction between T and B cells that induce T cell help for B cells. PMID:7509361

  9. Reversible immobilization of proteins with streptavidin affinity tags on a surface plasmon resonance biosensor chip.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Jin; Bi, Li-Jun; Zhang, Xian-En; Zhou, Ya-Feng; Zhang, Ji-Bin; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Ping

    2006-11-01

    Dissociation of biotin from streptavidin is very difficult due to their high binding affinity. The re-use of streptavidin-modified surfaces is therefore almost impossible, making devices containing them (e.g. surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor chips) expensive. This paper describes a new protocol for reversible and site-directed immobilization of proteins with streptavidin affinity tags on the streptavidin-coated SPR biosensor chip (SA chip). Two streptavidin affinity tags, nano-tag and streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP tag), were applied. They both can specifically interact with streptavidin but have weaker binding force compared to the biotin-streptavidin system, thus allowing association and dissociation under controlled conditions. The SA chip surface could be regenerated repeatedly without loss of activity by injection of 50 mM NaOH solution. The fusion construct of a SBP tag and a single-chain antibody to mature bovine prion protein (scFv-Z186-SBP) interacts with the SA chip, resulting in a single-chain-antibody-modified surface. The chip showed kinetic response to the prion antigen with equilibrium dissociation constant K (D) approximately equal to 4.01 x 10(-7). All results indicated that the capture activity of the SA chip has no irreversible loss after repeated immobilization and regeneration cycles. The method should be of great benefit to various biosensors, biochips and immunoassay applications based on the streptavidin capture surface.

  10. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J.

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  11. A community standard format for the representation of protein affinity reagents.

    PubMed

    Gloriam, David E; Orchard, Sandra; Bertinetti, Daniela; Björling, Erik; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Borrebaeck, Carl A K; Bourbeillon, Julie; Bradbury, Andrew R M; de Daruvar, Antoine; Dübel, Stefan; Frank, Ronald; Gibson, Toby J; Gold, Larry; Haslam, Niall; Herberg, Friedrich W; Hiltke, Tara; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Kerrien, Samuel; Koegl, Manfred; Konthur, Zoltán; Korn, Bernhard; Landegren, Ulf; Montecchi-Palazzi, Luisa; Palcy, Sandrine; Rodriguez, Henry; Schweinsberg, Sonja; Sievert, Volker; Stoevesandt, Oda; Taussig, Michael J; Ueffing, Marius; Uhlén, Mathias; van der Maarel, Silvère; Wingren, Christer; Woollard, Peter; Sherman, David J; Hermjakob, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Protein affinity reagents (PARs), most commonly antibodies, are essential reagents for protein characterization in basic research, biotechnology, and diagnostics as well as the fastest growing class of therapeutics. Large numbers of PARs are available commercially; however, their quality is often uncertain. In addition, currently available PARs cover only a fraction of the human proteome, and their cost is prohibitive for proteome scale applications. This situation has triggered several initiatives involving large scale generation and validation of antibodies, for example the Swedish Human Protein Atlas and the German Antibody Factory. Antibodies targeting specific subproteomes are being pursued by members of Human Proteome Organisation (plasma and liver proteome projects) and the United States National Cancer Institute (cancer-associated antigens). ProteomeBinders, a European consortium, aims to set up a resource of consistently quality-controlled protein-binding reagents for the whole human proteome. An ultimate PAR database resource would allow consumers to visit one on-line warehouse and find all available affinity reagents from different providers together with documentation that facilitates easy comparison of their cost and quality. However, in contrast to, for example, nucleotide databases among which data are synchronized between the major data providers, current PAR producers, quality control centers, and commercial companies all use incompatible formats, hindering data exchange. Here we propose Proteomics Standards Initiative (PSI)-PAR as a global community standard format for the representation and exchange of protein affinity reagent data. The PSI-PAR format is maintained by the Human Proteome Organisation PSI and was developed within the context of ProteomeBinders by building on a mature proteomics standard format, PSI-molecular interaction, which is a widely accepted and established community standard for molecular interaction data. Further

  12. Structural Basis for Broad and Potent Neutralization of HIV-1 by Antibody VRC01

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tongqing; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Dai, Kaifan; Finzi, Andrés; Kwon, Young Do; Scheid, Johannes F.; Shi, Wei; Xu, Ling; Yang, Yongping; Zhu, Jiang; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Sodroski, Joseph; Shapiro, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-08-26

    During HIV-1 infection, antibodies are generated against the region of the viral gp120 envelope glycoprotein that binds CD4, the primary receptor for HIV-1. Among these antibodies, VRC01 achieves broad neutralization of diverse viral strains. We determined the crystal structure of VRC01 in complex with a human immunodeficiency virus HIV-1 gp120 core. VRC01 partially mimics CD4 interaction with gp120. A shift from the CD4-defined orientation, however, focuses VRC01 onto the vulnerable site of initial CD4 attachment, allowing it to overcome the glycan and conformational masking that diminishes the neutralization potency of most CD4-binding-site antibodies. To achieve this recognition, VRC01 contacts gp120 mainly through immunoglobulin V-gene regions substantially altered from their genomic precursors. Partial receptor mimicry and extensive affinity maturation thus facilitate neutralization of HIV-1 by natural human antibodies.

  13. REAL-Select: full-length antibody display and library screening by surface capture on yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Rhiel, Laura; Krah, Simon; Günther, Ralf; Becker, Stefan; Kolmar, Harald; Hock, Björn

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel approach named REAL-Select for the non-covalent display of IgG-molecules on the surface of yeast cells for the purpose of antibody engineering and selection. It relies on the capture of secreted native full-length antibodies on the cell surface via binding to an externally immobilized ZZ domain, which tightly binds antibody Fc. It is beneficial for high-throughput screening of yeast-displayed IgG-libraries during antibody discovery and development. In a model experiment, antibody-displaying yeast cells were isolated from a 1:1,000,000 mixture with control cells confirming the maintenance of genotype-phenotype linkage. Antibodies with improved binding characteristics were obtained by affinity maturation using REAL-Select, demonstrating the ability of this system to display antibodies in their native form and to detect subtle changes in affinity by flow cytometry. The biotinylation of the cell surface followed by functionalization with a streptavidin-ZZ fusion protein is an approach that is independent of the genetic background of the antibody-producing host and therefore can be expected to be compatible with other eukaryotic expression hosts such as P. pastoris or mammalian cells.

  14. The sclerostin-neutralizing antibody AbD09097 recognizes an epitope adjacent to sclerostin's binding site for the Wnt co-receptor LRP6

    PubMed Central

    Boschert, V.; Frisch, C.; Back, J. W.; van Pee, K.; Weidauer, S. E.; Muth, E.-M.; Schmieder, P.; Beerbaum, M.; Knappik, A.; Timmerman, P.

    2016-01-01

    The glycoprotein sclerostin has been identified as a negative regulator of bone growth. It exerts its function by interacting with the Wnt co-receptor LRP5/6, blocks the binding of Wnt factors and thereby inhibits Wnt signalling. Neutralizing anti-sclerostin antibodies are able to restore Wnt activity and enhance bone growth thereby presenting a new osteoanabolic therapy approach for diseases such as osteoporosis. We have generated various Fab antibodies against human and murine sclerostin using a phage display set-up. Biochemical analyses have identified one Fab developed against murine sclerostin, AbD09097 that efficiently neutralizes sclerostin's Wnt inhibitory activity. In vitro interaction analysis using sclerostin variants revealed that this neutralizing Fab binds to sclerostin's flexible second loop, which has been shown to harbour the LRP5/6 binding motif. Affinity maturation was then applied to AbD09097, providing a set of improved neutralizing Fab antibodies which particularly bind human sclerostin with enhanced affinity. Determining the crystal structure of AbD09097 provides first insights into how this antibody might recognize and neutralize sclerostin. Together with the structure–function relationship derived from affinity maturation these new data will foster the rational design of new and highly efficient anti-sclerostin antibodies for the therapy of bone loss diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27558933

  15. Camelid VHH affinity ligands enable separation of closely related biopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Pabst, Timothy M.; Wendeler, Michaela; Wang, Xiangyang; Bezemer, Sandra; Hermans, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Interest in new and diverse classes of molecules such as recombinant toxins, enzymes, and blood factors continues to grow for use a biotherapeutics. Compared to monoclonal antibodies, these novel drugs typically lack a commercially available affinity chromatography option, which leads to greater process complexity, longer development timelines, and poor platformability. To date, for both monoclonal antibodies and novel molecules, affinity chromatography has been mostly reserved for separation of process‐related impurities such as host cell proteins and DNA. Reports of affinity purification of closely related product variants and modified forms are much rarer. In this work we describe custom affinity chromatography development using camelid VHH antibody fragments as "tunable" immunoaffinity ligands for separation of product‐related impurities. One example demonstrates high selectivity for a recombinant immunotoxin where no binding was observed for an undesired deamidated species. Also discussed is affinity purification of a coagulation factor through specific recognition of the gamma‐carboxylglutamic acid domain. PMID:27677057

  16. Germinal center reaction: antigen affinity and presentation explain it all.

    PubMed

    Oropallo, Michael A; Cerutti, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    The selection and expansion of B cells undergoing affinity maturation in the germinal center is a hallmark of humoral immunity. A recent paper in Nature provides new insights into the relationships between the affinity of the immunoglobulin receptor for antigen, the ability of B cells to present antigen to T cells, and the processes of selection, mutation, and clonal expansion in the germinal center.

  17. Molecular deconvolution of the monoclonal antibodies that comprise the polyclonal serum response

    PubMed Central

    Wine, Yariv; Boutz, Daniel R.; Lavinder, Jason J.; Miklos, Aleksandr E.; Hughes, Randall A.; Hoi, Kam Hon; Jung, Sang Taek; Horton, Andrew P.; Murrin, Ellen M.; Ellington, Andrew D.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Georgiou, George

    2013-01-01

    We have developed and validated a methodology for determining the antibody composition of the polyclonal serum response after immunization. Pepsin-digested serum IgGs were subjected to standard antigen-affinity chromatography, and resulting elution, wash, and flow-through fractions were analyzed by bottom-up, liquid chromatography–high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Identification of individual monoclonal antibodies required the generation of a database of IgG variable gene (V-gene) sequences constructed by NextGen sequencing of mature B cells. Antibody V-gene sequences are characterized by short complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of high diversity adjacent to framework regions shared across thousands of IgGs, greatly complicating the identification of antigen-specific IgGs from proteomically observed peptides. By mapping peptides marking unique VH CDRH3 sequences, we identified a set of V-genes heavily enriched in the affinity chromatography elution, constituting the serum polyclonal response. After booster immunization in a rabbit, we find that the antigen-specific serum immune response is oligoclonal, comprising antibodies encoding 34 different CDRH3s that group into 30 distinct antibody VH clonotypes. Of these 34 CDRH3s, 12 account for ∼60% of the antigen-specific CDRH3 peptide mass spectral counts. For comparison, antibodies with 18 different CDRH3s (12 clonotypes) were represented in the antigen-specific IgG fraction from an unimmunized rabbit that fortuitously displayed a moderate titer for BSA. Proteomically identified antibodies were synthesized and shown to display subnanomolar affinities. The ability to deconvolute the polyclonal serum response is likely to be of key importance for analyzing antibody responses after vaccination and for more completely understanding adaptive immune responses in health and disease. PMID:23382245

  18. Cloning single-chain antibody fragments (ScFv) from hyrbidoma cells.

    PubMed

    Toleikis, Lars; Frenzel, André

    2012-01-01

    Despite the rising impact of the generation of antibodies by phage display and other technologies, hybridoma technology still provides a valuable tool for the generation of high-affinity binders against different targets. But there exist several limitations of using hybridoma-derived antibodies. The source of the hybridoma clones are mostly rat or mouse B-lymphocytes. Therefore a human-anti-mouse or human-anti-rat antibody response may result in immunogenicity of these antibodies. This leads to the necessity of humanization of these antibodies where the knowledge of the amino acid sequence of the proteins is inalienable. Furthermore, additional in vitro modifications, e.g., affinity maturation or fusion to other proteins, are dependent on cloning of the antigen-binding domains.Here we describe the isolation of RNA from hybridoma cells and the primers that can be used for the amplification of VL and VH as well as the cloning of the antibody in scFv format and its expression in Escherichia coli.

  19. Optimal Sequential Immunization Can Focus Antibody Responses against Diversity Loss and Distraction

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Affinity maturation is a Darwinian process in which B lymphocytes evolve potent antibodies to encountered antigens and generate immune memory. Highly mutable complex pathogens present an immense antigenic diversity that continues to challenge natural immunity and vaccine design. Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against this diversity by vaccination likely requires multiple exposures to distinct but related antigen variants, and yet how affinity maturation advances under such complex stimulation remains poorly understood. To fill the gap, we present an in silico model of affinity maturation to examine two realistic new aspects pertinent to vaccine development: loss in B cell diversity across successive immunization periods against different variants, and the presence of distracting epitopes that entropically disfavor the evolution of bnAbs. We find these new factors, which introduce additional selection pressures and constraints, significantly influence antibody breadth development, in a way that depends crucially on the temporal pattern of immunization (or selection forces). Curiously, a less diverse B cell seed may even favor the expansion and dominance of cross-reactive clones, but only when conflicting selection forces are presented in series rather than in a mixture. Moreover, the level of frustration due to evolutionary conflict dictates the degree of distraction. We further describe how antigenic histories select evolutionary paths of B cell lineages and determine the predominant mode of antibody responses. Sequential immunization with mutationally distant variants is shown to robustly induce bnAbs that focus on conserved elements of the target epitope, by thwarting strain-specific and distracted lineages. An optimal range of antigen dose underlies a fine balance between efficient adaptation and persistent reaction. These findings provide mechanistic guides to aid in design of vaccine strategies against fast mutating pathogens. PMID

  20. Modification of the Fc Region of a Human Anti-oncostatin M Monoclonal Antibody for Higher Affinity to FcRn Receptor and Extension of Half-life in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nnane, Ivo P; Han, Chao; Jiao, Qun; Tam, Susan H; Davis, Hugh M; Xu, Zhenhua

    2017-01-28

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of anti-oncostatin M (OSM) IgG1 monoclonal antibodies, CNTO 1119 and its Fc variant (CNTO 8212), which incorporates the LS(Xtend) mutation to extend terminal half-life (T1/2 ), after a single intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) administration in cynomolgus monkeys, and to predict human PK. In study 1, single doses of CNTO 1119 and CNTO 8212 were administered IV or SC at 3 mg/kg to cynomolgus monkeys (n = 3 per group). In study 2, single doses of CNTO 8212 were administered IV at 1, 5 or 20 mg/kg, or SC at 5 mg/kg to cynomolgus monkeys (n = 5 per group). Serial blood samples were collected for assessment of serum concentrations of CNTO 1119 and/or CNTO 8212. A two-compartment population PK model with first-order elimination was utilized to simultaneously describe the serum concentrations of CNTO 1119 and CNTO 8212 over time after IV and SC administration in cynomolgus monkeys. The typical population PK parameter estimates for CNTO 1119 in cynomolgus monkeys were clearance (CL) = 2.81 mL/day/kg, volume of distribution of central compartment (V1 ) = 31.3 mL/kg, volume of distribution of peripheral compartment (V2 ) = 23.3 mL/kg, absolute bioavailability (F) = 0.84 and T1/2 = 13.4 days. In comparison, the typical population PK parameter estimates for CNTO 8212 in cynomolgus monkeys were CL = 1.41 mL/day/kg, V1 = 39.8 mL/kg, V2 = 32.6 mL/kg, F = 0.75 and T1/2 = 35.7 days. The mean CL of CNTO 8212 was ~50% lower compared with that for CNTO 1119 in cynomolgus monkeys. The overall volume of distribution (V1 +V2 ) for CNTO 8212 was about 32% larger compared with that for CNTO 1119, but generally similar to the vascular volume in cynomolgus monkeys. The T1/2 of CNTO 8212 was significantly (p < 0.05) longer by about 2.7-fold than that for CNTO 1119 in cynomolgus monkeys. Thus, the modification of the Fc portion of an anti-OSM IgG1 mAb for higher FcRn binding affinity resulted in lower systemic clearance and

  1. Selection of recombinant anti-SH3 domain antibodies by high-throughput phage display.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiming; Economopoulos, Nicolas O; Liu, Bernard A; Uetrecht, Andrea; Gu, Jun; Jarvik, Nick; Nadeem, Vincent; Pawson, Tony; Moffat, Jason; Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies are indispensable tools in biochemical research and play an expanding role as therapeutics. While hybridoma technology is the dominant method for antibody production, phage display is an emerging technology. Here, we developed and employed a high-throughput pipeline that enables selection of antibodies against hundreds of antigens in parallel. Binding selections using a phage-displayed synthetic antigen-binding fragment (Fab) library against 110 human SH3 domains yielded hundreds of Fabs targeting 58 antigens. Affinity assays demonstrated that representative Fabs bind tightly and specifically to their targets. Furthermore, we developed an efficient affinity maturation strategy adaptable to high-throughput, which increased affinity dramatically but did not compromise specificity. Finally, we tested Fabs in common cell biology applications and confirmed recognition of the full-length antigen in immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. In summary, we have established a rapid and robust high-throughput methodology that can be applied to generate highly functional and renewable antibodies targeting protein domains on a proteome-wide scale.

  2. Selection of recombinant anti-SH3 domain antibodies by high-throughput phage display

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiming; Economopoulos, Nicolas O; Liu, Bernard A; Uetrecht, Andrea; Gu, Jun; Jarvik, Nick; Nadeem, Vincent; Pawson, Tony; Moffat, Jason; Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are indispensable tools in biochemical research and play an expanding role as therapeutics. While hybridoma technology is the dominant method for antibody production, phage display is an emerging technology. Here, we developed and employed a high-throughput pipeline that enables selection of antibodies against hundreds of antigens in parallel. Binding selections using a phage-displayed synthetic antigen-binding fragment (Fab) library against 110 human SH3 domains yielded hundreds of Fabs targeting 58 antigens. Affinity assays demonstrated that representative Fabs bind tightly and specifically to their targets. Furthermore, we developed an efficient affinity maturation strategy adaptable to high-throughput, which increased affinity dramatically but did not compromise specificity. Finally, we tested Fabs in common cell biology applications and confirmed recognition of the full-length antigen in immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. In summary, we have established a rapid and robust high-throughput methodology that can be applied to generate highly functional and renewable antibodies targeting protein domains on a proteome-wide scale. PMID:26332758

  3. Enhanced phagocytic activity of HIV-specific antibodies correlates with natural production of immunoglobulins with skewed affinity for FcγR2a and FcγR2b.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Margaret E; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; McAndrew, Elizabeth G; Tsoukas, Stephen; Licht, Anna F; Irvine, Darrell J; Alter, Galit

    2013-05-01

    While development of an HIV vaccine that can induce neutralizing antibodies remains a priority, decades of research have proven that this is a daunting task. However, accumulating evidence suggests that antibodies with the capacity to harness innate immunity may provide some protection. While significant research has focused on the cytolytic properties of antibodies in acquisition and control, less is known about the role of additional effector functions. In this study, we investigated antibody-dependent phagocytosis of HIV immune complexes, and we observed significant differences in the ability of antibodies from infected subjects to mediate this critical effector function. We observed both quantitative differences in the capacity of antibodies to drive phagocytosis and qualitative differences in their FcγR usage profile. We demonstrate that antibodies from controllers and untreated progressors exhibit increased phagocytic activity, altered Fc domain glycosylation, and skewed interactions with FcγR2a and FcγR2b in both bulk plasma and HIV-specific IgG. While increased phagocytic activity may directly influence immune activation via clearance of inflammatory immune complexes, it is also plausible that Fc receptor usage patterns may regulate the immune response by modulating downstream signals following phagocytosis--driving passive degradation of internalized virus, release of immune modulating cytokines and chemokines, or priming of a more effective adaptive immune response.

  4. Protein engineering and preclinical development of a GM-CSF receptor antibody for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Minter, RR; Cohen, ES; Wang, B; Liang, M; Vainshtein, I; Rees, G; Eghobamien, L; Harrison, P; Sims, DA; Matthews, C; Wilkinson, T; Monk, P; Drinkwater, C; Fabri, L; Nash, A; McCourt, M; Jermutus, L; Roskos, L; Anderson, IK; Sleeman, MA

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose For antibody therapies against receptor targets, in vivo outcomes can be difficult to predict because of target-mediated clearance or antigen ‘sink’ effects. The purpose of this work was to engineer an antibody to the GM-CSF receptor α (GM-CSFRα) with pharmacological properties optimized for chronic, s.c. treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Experimental Approach We used an in silico model of receptor occupancy to guide the target affinity and a combinatorial phage display approach for affinity maturation. Mechanism of action and internalization assays were performed on the optimized antibody in vitro before refining the modelling predictions of the eventual dosing in man. Finally, in vivo pharmacology studies in cynomolgus monkeys were carried out to inform the predictions and support future clinical development. Key Results Antibody potency was improved 8600-fold, and the target affinity was reached. The refined model predicted pharmacodynamic effects at doses as low as 1 mg kg−1 and a study in cynomolgus monkeys confirmed in vivo efficacy at 1 mg kg−1 dosing. Conclusions and Implications This rational approach to antibody drug discovery enabled the isolation of a potent molecule compatible with chronic, s.c. self-administration by RA patients. We believe this general approach enables the development of optimal biopharmaceuticals. PMID:22913645

  5. Polyreactive Antibodies: Function and Quantification.

    PubMed

    Gunti, Sreenivasulu; Notkins, Abner Louis

    2015-07-15

    Polyreactive antibodies, a major component of the natural antibody repertoire, bind with low affinity to a variety of structurally unrelated antigens. Many of these antibodies are germline or near germline in sequence. Little is known, however, about the function of these antibodies. In the present mini-review we show: (1) that the broad antibacterial activity of the natural antibody repertoire is largely due to polyreactive antibodies, which in the presence of complement lyse bacteria and enhance phagocytosis; (2) that polyreactive antibodies bind to UV- or human immunodeficiency virus-induced apoptotic cells and with complement enhance the phagocytosis of these cells by macrophages; and (3) that dinitrophenol can be used as a surrogate for quantitating the level of polyreactive antibodies in serum. We conclude that polyreactive antibodies protect the host against both foreign invaders and its own damaged/apoptotic cells.

  6. Antibody humanization by structure-based computational protein design.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoonjoo; Hua, Casey; Sentman, Charles L; Ackerman, Margaret E; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies derived from non-human sources must be modified for therapeutic use so as to mitigate undesirable immune responses. While complementarity-determining region (CDR) grafting-based humanization techniques have been successfully applied in many cases, it remains challenging to maintain the desired stability and antigen binding affinity upon grafting. We developed an alternative humanization approach called CoDAH ("Computationally-Driven Antibody Humanization") in which computational protein design methods directly select sets of amino acids to incorporate from human germline sequences to increase humanness while maintaining structural stability. Retrospective studies show that CoDAH is able to identify variants deemed beneficial according to both humanness and structural stability criteria, even for targets lacking crystal structures. Prospective application to TZ47, a murine anti-human B7H6 antibody, demonstrates the approach. Four diverse humanized variants were designed, and all possible unique VH/VL combinations were produced as full-length IgG1 antibodies. Soluble and cell surface expressed antigen binding assays showed that 75% (6 of 8) of the computationally designed VH/VL variants were successfully expressed and competed with the murine TZ47 for binding to B7H6 antigen. Furthermore, 4 of the 6 bound with an estimated KD within an order of magnitude of the original TZ47 antibody. In contrast, a traditional CDR-grafted variant could not be expressed. These results suggest that the computational protein design approach described here can be used to efficiently generate functional humanized antibodies and provide humanized templates for further affinity maturation.

  7. Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Sundberg, Mårten; Gundberg, Anna; Sivertsson, Asa; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-06-15

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  8. Single domain camel antibodies: current status.

    PubMed

    Muyldermans, S

    2001-06-01

    The antigen-binding capacity of the paired variable domains of an antibody is well established. The observation that the isolated heavy chains of anti-hapten antibodies retain some antigen-binding capacity in the absence of light chains led to attempts to obtain an even smaller antigen-binding unit in a VH format. Unfortunately, the poor solubility, the reduced affinity for the antigen and the irreproducible outcome showed that additional protein engineering would be required to successfully generate single-domain antibody fragments. By serendipity, it was discovered that this engineering is already performed continuously in nature. Part of the humoral immune response of camels and llamas is based largely on heavy-chain antibodies where the light chain is totally absent. These unique antibody isotypes interact with the antigen by virtue of only one single variable domain, referred to as VHH. Despite the absence of the VH-VL combinatorial diversity, these heavy-chain antibodies exhibit a broad antigen-binding repertoire by enlarging their hypervariable regions. Methods are described to tap the VHH repertoire of an immunised dromedary or llama. These VHH libraries contain a high titre of intact antigen-specific binders that were matured in vivo. Synthetic libraries of a 'camelised' human VH, a mouse VH or a camelid VHH scaffold with a randomised CDR3 could constitute a valid alternative to immune libraries to retrieve useful single-domain antigen binders. The recombinant VHH that are selected from such libraries are well expressed, highly soluble in aqueous environments and very robust. Some in vivo matured VHH were also shown to be potent enzyme inhibitors, and the low complexity of the antigen-binding site is an asset in the design of peptide mimetics. Because of their smaller size and the above properties, the VHH clearly offer added-value over conventional antibody fragments. They are expected to open perspectives as enzyme inhibitors and intrabodies, as modular

  9. From rabbit antibody repertoires to rabbit monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Justus; Peng, Haiyong; Rader, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we explain why and how rabbit monoclonal antibodies have become outstanding reagents for laboratory research and increasingly for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Starting with the unique ontogeny of rabbit B cells that affords highly distinctive antibody repertoires rich in in vivo pruned binders of high diversity, affinity and specificity, we describe the generation of rabbit monoclonal antibodies by hybridoma technology, phage display and alternative methods, along with an account of successful humanization strategies. PMID:28336958

  10. Constant domain-regulated antibody catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sapparapu, Gopal; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; McLean, Gary; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Paul, Sudhir

    2012-10-19

    Some antibodies contain variable (V) domain catalytic sites. We report the superior amide and peptide bond-hydrolyzing activity of the same heavy and light chain V domains expressed in the IgM constant domain scaffold compared with the IgG scaffold. The superior catalytic activity of recombinant IgM was evident using two substrates, a small model peptide that is hydrolyzed without involvement of high affinity epitope binding, and HIV gp120, which is recognized specifically by noncovalent means prior to the hydrolytic reaction. The catalytic activity was inhibited by an electrophilic phosphonate diester, consistent with a nucleophilic catalytic mechanism. All 13 monoclonal IgMs tested displayed robust hydrolytic activities varying over a 91-fold range, consistent with expression of the catalytic functions at distinct levels by different V domains. The catalytic activity of polyclonal IgM was superior to polyclonal IgG from the same sera, indicating that on average IgMs express the catalytic function at levels greater than IgGs. The findings indicate a favorable effect of the remote IgM constant domain scaffold on the integrity of the V-domain catalytic site and provide a structural basis for conceiving antibody catalysis as a first line immune function expressed at high levels prior to development of mature IgG class antibodies.

  11. High-affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal myeloid lineage without HSC toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lynn, R C; Feng, Y; Schutsky, K; Poussin, M; Kalota, A; Dimitrov, D S; Powell, D J

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here we isolated a high-affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific single-chain variable fragment (2.48 nm KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ(+) AML in vitro and in vivo compared with a low-affinity FRβ CAR (54.3 nm KD). Using the HA-FRβ immunoglobulin G, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T cells lysed mature CD14(+) monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T cells retained effective antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity.

  12. A novel highly potent therapeutic antibody neutralizes multiple human chemokines and mimics viral immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Scalley-Kim, Michelle L; Hess, Bruce W; Kelly, Ryan L; Krostag, Anne-Rachel F; Lustig, Kurt H; Marken, John S; Ovendale, Pamela J; Posey, Aaron R; Smolak, Pamela J; Taylor, Janelle D L; Wood, C L; Bienvenue, David L; Probst, Peter; Salmon, Ruth A; Allison, Daniel S; Foy, Teresa M; Raport, Carol J

    2012-01-01

    Chemokines play a key role in leukocyte recruitment during inflammation and are implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of autoimmune diseases. As such, inhibiting chemokine signaling has been of keen interest for the development of therapeutic agents. This endeavor, however, has been hampered due to complexities in the chemokine system. Many chemokines have been shown to signal through multiple receptors and, conversely, most chemokine receptors bind to more than one chemokine. One approach to overcoming this complexity is to develop a single therapeutic agent that binds and inactivates multiple chemokines, similar to an immune evasion strategy utilized by a number of viruses. Here, we describe the development and characterization of a novel therapeutic antibody that targets a subset of human CC chemokines, specifically CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5, involved in chronic inflammatory diseases. Using a sequential immunization approach, followed by humanization and phage display affinity maturation, a therapeutic antibody was developed that displays high binding affinity towards the three targeted chemokines. In vitro, this antibody potently inhibits chemotaxis and chemokine-mediated signaling through CCR1 and CCR5, primary chemokine receptors for the targeted chemokines. Furthermore, we have demonstrated in vivo efficacy of the antibody in a SCID-hu mouse model of skin leukocyte migration, thus confirming its potential as a novel therapeutic chemokine antagonist. We anticipate that this antibody will have broad therapeutic utility in the treatment of a number of autoimmune diseases due to its ability to simultaneously neutralize multiple chemokines implicated in disease pathogenesis.

  13. Structural basis for germline antibody recognition of HIV-1 immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Louise; West, Anthony P; Sievers, Stuart A; Chen, Courtney; Jiang, Siduo; Gao, Han; Gray, Matthew D; McGuire, Andrew T; Scheid, Johannes F; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1 require understanding germline bNAb recognition of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). The VRC01-class bNAb family derived from the VH1-2*02 germline allele arose in multiple HIV-1–infected donors, yet targets the CD4-binding site on Env with common interactions. Modified forms of the 426c Env that activate germline-reverted B cell receptors are candidate immunogens for eliciting VRC01-class bNAbs. We present structures of germline-reverted VRC01-class bNAbs alone and complexed with 426c-based gp120 immunogens. Germline bNAb–426c gp120 complexes showed preservation of VRC01-class signature residues and gp120 contacts, but detectably different binding modes compared to mature bNAb-gp120 complexes. Unlike typical antibody-antigen interactions, VRC01–class germline antibodies exhibited preformed antigen-binding conformations for recognizing immunogens. Affinity maturation introduced substitutions increasing induced-fit recognition and electropositivity, potentially to accommodate negatively-charged complex-type N-glycans on gp120. These results provide general principles relevant to the unusual evolution of VRC01–class bNAbs and guidelines for structure-based immunogen design. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13783.001 PMID:26997349

  14. Picomolar affinity fibronectin domains engineered utilizing loop length diversity, recursive mutagenesis, and loop shuffling.

    PubMed

    Hackel, Benjamin J; Kapila, Atul; Wittrup, K Dane

    2008-09-19

    The 10th type III domain of human fibronectin (Fn3) has been validated as an effective scaffold for molecular recognition. In the current work, it was desired to improve the robustness of selection of stable, high-affinity Fn3 domains. A yeast surface display library of Fn3 was created in which three solvent-exposed loops were diversified in terms of amino acid composition and loop length. The library was screened by fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate binders to lysozyme. An affinity maturation scheme was developed to rapidly and broadly diversify populations of clones by random mutagenesis as well as homologous recombination-driven shuffling of mutagenized loops. The novel library and affinity maturation scheme combined to yield stable, monomeric Fn3 domains with 3 pM affinity for lysozyme. A secondary affinity maturation identified a stable 1.1 pM binder, the highest affinity yet reported for an Fn3 domain. In addition to extension of the affinity limit for this scaffold, the results demonstrate the ability to achieve high-affinity binding while preserving stability and the monomeric state. This library design and affinity maturation scheme is highly efficient, utilizing an initial diversity of 2x10(7) clones and screening only 1x10(8) mutants (totaled over all affinity maturation libraries). Analysis of intermediate populations revealed that loop length diversity, loop shuffling, and recursive mutagenesis of diverse populations are all critical components.

  15. Surface plasmon resonance measurements of plasma antibody avidity during primary and secondary responses to anthrax protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Heather E; Stewart, Shelley M; Kepler, Thomas B; Sempowski, Gregory D; Alam, S Munir

    2014-02-01

    Establishment of humoral immunity against pathogens is dependent on events that occur in the germinal center and the subsequent induction of high-affinity neutralizing antibodies. Quantitative assays that allow monitoring of affinity maturation and duration of antibody responses can provide useful information regarding the efficacy of vaccines and adjuvants. Using an anthrax protective antigen (rPA) and alum model antigen/adjuvant system, we describe a methodology for monitoring antigen-specific serum antibody concentration and avidity by surface plasmon resonance during primary and secondary immune responses. Our analyses showed that following a priming dose in mice, rPA-specific antibody concentration and avidity increases over time and reaches a maximal response in about six weeks, but gradually declines in the absence of antigenic boost. Germinal center reactions were observed early with maximal development achieved during the primary response, which coincided with peak antibody avidity responses to primary immunization. Boosting with antigen resulted in a rapid increase in rPA-specific antibody concentration and five-fold increase in avidity, which was not dependent on sustained GC development. The described methodology couples surface plasmon resonance-based plasma avidity measurements with germinal center analysis and provides a novel way to monitor humoral responses that can play a role in facilitating vaccine and adjuvant development.

  16. Insulin action is blocked by a monoclonal antibody that inhibits insulin receptor kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.O.; Ho, L.; Korn, L.J.; Roth, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor were produced. Thirty-four bound the intracellular domain of the receptor ..beta.. subunit, the domain containing the tyrosine-specific kinase activity. Of these 34 antibodies, 33 recognized the rat receptor and 1 was shown to precipitate the receptors from mice, chickens and frogs with high affinity. Another of the antibodies inhibited the kinase activities of the human and frog receptors with equal potencies. This antibody inhibited the kinase activities of these receptors by more than 90%, whereas others had no effect on either kinase activity. Microinjection of the inhibiting antibody into Xenopus oocytes blocked the ability of insulin to stimulate oocyte maturation. In contrast, this inhibiting antibody did not block the ability of progesterone to stimulate the same response. Furthermore, control immunoglobulin and a noninhibiting antibody to the receptor ..beta.. subunit did not block this response to insulin. These results strongly support a role for the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor in mediating this biological effect of insulin.

  17. Insulin Action is Blocked by a Monoclonal Antibody That Inhibits the Insulin Receptor Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, David O.; Ho, Lisa; Korn, Laurence J.; Roth, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor were produced. Thirty-four bound the intracellular domain of the receptor β subunit, the domain containing the tyrosine-specific kinase activity. Of these 34 antibodies, 33 recognized the rat receptor and 1 was shown to precipitate the receptors from mice, chickens, and frogs with high affinity. Another of the antibodies inhibited the kinase activities of the human and frog receptors with equal potencies. This antibody inhibited the kinase activities of these receptors by more than 90%, whereas others had no effect on either kinase activity. Microinjection of the inhibiting antibody into Xenopus oocytes blocked the ability of insulin to stimulate oocyte maturation. In contrast, this inhibiting antibody did not block the ability of progesterone to stimulate the same response. Furthermore, control immunoglobulin and a noninhibiting antibody to the receptor β subunit did not block this response to insulin. These results strongly support a role for the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor in mediating this biological effect of insulin.

  18. Antibody Request - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  19. Dimerisation strategies for shark IgNAR single domain antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Simmons, David P; Abregu, Fiona A; Krishnan, Usha V; Proll, David F; Streltsov, Victor A; Doughty, Larissa; Hattarki, Meghan K; Nuttall, Stewart D

    2006-08-31

    Immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are unique single domain antibodies found in the serum of sharks. The individual variable (VNAR) domains bind antigen independently and are candidates for the smallest antibody-based immune recognition units (approximately 13 kDa). Here, we first isolated and sequenced the cDNA of a mature IgNAR antibody from the spotted wobbegong shark (Orectolobus maculatus) and confirmed the independent nature of the VNAR domains by dynamic light scattering. Second, we asked which of the reported antibody fragment dimerisation strategies could be applied to VNAR domains to produce small bivalent proteins with high functional affinity (avidity). In contrast to single chain Fv (scFv) fragments, separate IgNARs could not be linked into a tandem single chain format, with the resulting proteins exhibited only monovalent binding due solely to interaction of the N-terminal domain with antigen. Similarly, incorporation of C-terminal helix-turn-helix (dhlx) motifs, while resulting in efficiently dimerised protein, resulted in only a modest enhancement of affinity, probably due to an insufficiently long hinge region linking the antibody to the dhlx motif. Finally, generation of mutants containing half-cystine residues at the VNAR C-terminus produced dimeric recombinant proteins exhibiting high functional affinity for the target antigens, but at the cost of 50-fold decreased protein expression levels. This study demonstrates the potential for construction of bivalent or bispecific IgNAR-based binding reagents of relatively small size (approximately 26 kDa), equivalent to a monovalent antibody Fv fragment, for formulation into future diagnostic and therapeutic formats.

  20. Synthetic human monoclonal antibodies toward staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) protective against toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karauzum, Hatice; Chen, Gang; Abaandou, Laura; Mahmoudieh, Mahta; Boroun, Atefeh R; Shulenin, Sergey; Devi, V Sathya; Stavale, Eric; Warfield, Kelly L; Zeitlin, Larry; Roy, Chad J; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Aman, M Javad

    2012-07-20

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a potent toxin that can cause toxic shock syndrome and act as a lethal and incapacitating agent when used as a bioweapon. There are currently no vaccines or immunotherapeutics available against this toxin. Using phage display technology, human antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) were selected against SEB, and proteins were produced in Escherichia coli cells and characterized for their binding affinity and their toxin neutralizing activity in vitro and in vivo. Highly protective Fabs were converted into full-length IgGs and produced in mammalian cells. Additionally, the production of anti-SEB antibodies was explored in the Nicotiana benthamiana plant expression system. Affinity maturation was performed to produce optimized lead anti-SEB antibody candidates with subnanomolar affinities. IgGs produced in N. benthamiana showed characteristics comparable with those of counterparts produced in mammalian cells. IgGs were tested for their therapeutic efficacy in the mouse toxic shock model using different challenge doses of SEB and a treatment with 200 μg of IgGs 1 h after SEB challenge. The lead candidates displayed full protection from lethal challenge over a wide range of SEB challenge doses. Furthermore, mice that were treated with anti-SEB IgG had significantly lower IFNγ and IL-2 levels in serum compared with mock-treated mice. In summary, these anti-SEB monoclonal antibodies represent excellent therapeutic candidates for further preclinical and clinical development.

  1. Synthetic Human Monoclonal Antibodies toward Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) Protective against Toxic Shock Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Karauzum, Hatice; Chen, Gang; Abaandou, Laura; Mahmoudieh, Mahta; Boroun, Atefeh R.; Shulenin, Sergey; Devi, V. Sathya; Stavale, Eric; Warfield, Kelly L.; Zeitlin, Larry; Roy, Chad J.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Aman, M. Javad

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a potent toxin that can cause toxic shock syndrome and act as a lethal and incapacitating agent when used as a bioweapon. There are currently no vaccines or immunotherapeutics available against this toxin. Using phage display technology, human antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) were selected against SEB, and proteins were produced in Escherichia coli cells and characterized for their binding affinity and their toxin neutralizing activity in vitro and in vivo. Highly protective Fabs were converted into full-length IgGs and produced in mammalian cells. Additionally, the production of anti-SEB antibodies was explored in the Nicotiana benthamiana plant expression system. Affinity maturation was performed to produce optimized lead anti-SEB antibody candidates with subnanomolar affinities. IgGs produced in N. benthamiana showed characteristics comparable with those of counterparts produced in mammalian cells. IgGs were tested for their therapeutic efficacy in the mouse toxic shock model using different challenge doses of SEB and a treatment with 200 μg of IgGs 1 h after SEB challenge. The lead candidates displayed full protection from lethal challenge over a wide range of SEB challenge doses. Furthermore, mice that were treated with anti-SEB IgG had significantly lower IFNγ and IL-2 levels in serum compared with mock-treated mice. In summary, these anti-SEB monoclonal antibodies represent excellent therapeutic candidates for further preclinical and clinical development. PMID:22645125

  2. B cells populating the multiple sclerosis brain mature in the draining cervical lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Joel N. H.; Yaari, Gur; Vander Heiden, Jason A.; Church, George; Donahue, William F.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; Huttner, Anita J.; Laman, Jon D.; Nagra, Rashed M.; Nylander, Alyssa; Pitt, David; Ramanan, Sriram; Siddiqui, Bilal A.; Vigneault, Francois; Kleinstein, Steven H.; Hafler, David A.; O’Connor, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by autoimmune mediated demyelination and neurodegeneration. The CNS of patients with MS harbors expanded clones of antigen-experienced B cells that reside in distinct compartments including the meninges, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and parenchyma. It is not understood whether this immune infiltrate initiates its development in the CNS or in peripheral tissues. B cells in the CSF can exchange with those in peripheral blood, implying that CNS B cells may have access to lymphoid tissue that may be the specific compartment(s) in which CNS resident B cells encounter antigen and experience affinity maturation. In this study, paired tissues were used to determine whether the B cells that populate the CNS mature in the draining cervical lymph nodes (CLNs). High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire demonstrated that clonally expanded B cells were present in both compartments. Founding members of clonal families were more often found in the draining CLNs. More mature clonal family members derived from these founders were observed in the draining CLNs and also in the CNS, including lesions. These data provide new evidence that B cells traffic freely across the tissue barrier with the majority of B cell maturation occurring outside of the CNS in the secondary lymphoid tissue. Our study may aid in further defining the mechanisms of immunomodulatory therapies that either deplete circulating B cells or impact the intrathecal B cell compartment by inhibiting lymphocyte transmigration into the CNS. PMID:25100741

  3. A dielectric affinity microbiosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Schultz, Jerome S.; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2010-01-01

    We present an affinity biosensing approach that exploits changes in dielectric properties of a polymer due to its specific, reversible binding with an analyte. The approach is demonstrated using a microsensor comprising a pair of thin-film capacitive electrodes sandwiching a solution of poly(acrylamide-ran-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid), a synthetic polymer with specific affinity to glucose. Binding with glucose induces changes in the permittivity of the polymer, which can be measured capacitively for specific glucose detection, as confirmed by experimental results at physiologically relevant concentrations. The dielectric affinity biosensing approach holds the potential for practical applications such as long-term continuous glucose monitoring.

  4. Affinity in electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Niels H H

    2009-06-01

    The journal Electrophoresis has greatly influenced my approaches to biomolecular affinity studies. The methods that I have chosen as my main tools to study interacting biomolecules--native gel and later capillary zone electrophoresis--have been the topic of numerous articles in Electrophoresis. Below, the role of the journal in the development and dissemination of these techniques and applications reviewed. Many exhaustive reviews on affinity electrophoresis and affinity CE have been published in the last few years and are not in any way replaced by the present deliberations that are focused on papers published by the journal.

  5. Characterization of antibodies to synthetic nerve growth factor (NGF) and proNGF peptides.

    PubMed

    Ebendal, T; Persson, H; Larhammar, D; Lundströmer, K; Olson, L

    1989-03-01

    Sequence data for the mature nerve growth factor (NGF) protein and its precursor are available from molecular cloning of the NGF gene in several species, including mice, humans, rats, and chickens. Hydrophilicity analysis of the predicted rat and chicken prepro-NGF was carried out to locate putative antigenic determinants. Eight peptides were selected and synthesized based on hydrophilicity profiles. Two peptides represent sequences in the rat (and mouse) pro-NGF, one peptide (our peptide P3) represents a highly conserved region of the mature NGF protein (identical in humans, mice, rats, and chickens), two peptides are specific for the mature chicken NGF, and the remaining three peptides are specific for the mature rat NGF (each with only one amino acid substitution compared with corresponding segments of the mouse NGF). For immunization, the peptides were conjugated to keyhold limpet hemocyanin and used to produce antisera in rabbits. After bleeding, peptide-specific antibodies were purified on affinity columns prepared by coupling each of the synthetic peptides. The different peptide antisera and affinity-purified antibodies then were characterized by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry of the male mouse submandibular gland, a rich exocrine source of NGF. ELISA analysis showed that all peptide antisera bound two to four orders of magnitude better than normal rabbit serum to a coat of their proper peptide. The higher binding was retained by the purified peptide antibodies compared with normal rabbit immunoglobulin. Specific tests, in which one peptide antiserum was checked against different peptide coats in the ELISA, also showed two to four orders of magnitude higher binding of antibodies to the proper synthetic peptide. The peptide antibodies also were tested for their ability to bind to native mouse beta NGF coated to the immunoplates. Only antibodies raised to the conserved P3 peptide recognized native NGF to an extent similar to that

  6. Complementary combining site contact residue mutations of the anti-digoxin Fab 26-10 permit high affinity wild-type binding.

    PubMed

    Short, Mary K; Krykbaev, Rustem A; Jeffrey, Philip D; Margolies, Michael N

    2002-05-10

    Antibody 26-10, obtained in a secondary immune response, binds digoxin with high affinity (K(a) = 1.3 x 10(10) M(-1)) because of extensive shape complementarity. We demonstrated previously that mutations of the hapten contact residue HTrp-100 to Arg (where H refers to the heavy chain) resulted in increased specificity for digoxin analogs substituted at the cardenolide 16 position. However, mutagenesis of H:CDR1 did not result in such a specificity change despite the proximity of the H:CDR1 hapten contact residue Asn-35 to the cardenolide 16 position. Here we constructed a bacteriophage-displayed library containing randomized mutations at H chain residues 30-35 in a 26-10 mutant containing Arg-100 (26-10-RRALD). Phage were selected by panning against digoxin, gitoxin (16-OH), and 16-acetylgitoxin coupled to bovine serum albumin. Clones that retained wild-type Asn at position 35 showed preferred binding to gitoxin, like the 26-10-RRALD parent. In contrast, clones containing Val-35 selected mainly on digoxin-bovine serum albumin demonstrated a shift back to wild-type specificity. Several clones containing Val-35 bound digoxin with increased affinity, approaching that of the wild type in a few instances, in contrast to the mutation Val-35 in the wild-type 26-10 background, which reduces affinity for digoxin 90-fold. It has therefore proven possible to reorder the 26-10 binding site by mutations including two major contact residues on opposite sides of the site and yet to retain high affinity for binding for digoxin. Thus, even among antibodies that have undergone affinity maturation in vivo, different structural solutions to high affinity binding may be revealed.

  7. High-affinity IgG antibodies develop naturally in Ig-knockout rats carrying germline human IgH/Igκ/Igλ loci bearing the rat CH region.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Michael J; Ma, Biao; Avis, Suzanne; Binnie, Ashleigh; Dilley, Jeanette; Yang, Xi; Lindquist, Kevin; Ménoret, Séverine; Iscache, Anne-Laure; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; Rajpal, Arvind; Anegon, Ignacio; Neuberger, Michael S; Buelow, Roland; Brüggemann, Marianne

    2013-02-15

    Mice transgenic for human Ig loci are an invaluable resource for the production of human Abs. However, such mice often do not yield human mAbs as effectively as conventional mice yield mouse mAbs. Suboptimal efficacy in delivery of human Abs might reflect imperfect interaction between the human membrane IgH chains and the mouse cellular signaling machinery. To obviate this problem, in this study we generated a humanized rat strain (OmniRat) carrying a chimeric human/rat IgH locus (comprising 22 human V(H)s, all human D and J(H) segments in natural configuration linked to the rat C(H) locus) together with fully human IgL loci (12 Vκs linked to Jκ-Cκ and 16 Vλs linked to Jλ-Cλ). The endogenous Ig loci were silenced using designer zinc finger nucleases. Breeding to homozygosity resulted in a novel transgenic rat line exclusively producing chimeric Abs with human idiotypes. B cell recovery was indistinguishable from wild-type animals, and human V(D)J transcripts were highly diverse. Following immunization, the OmniRat strain performed as efficiently as did normal rats in yielding high-affinity serum IgG. mAbs, comprising fully human variable regions with subnanomolar Ag affinity and carrying extensive somatic mutations, are readily obtainable, similarly to conventional mAbs from normal rats.

  8. Affine dynamics with torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gültekin, Kemal

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we give a thorough analysis of a general affine gravity with torsion. After a brief exposition of the affine gravities considered by Eddington and Schrödinger, we construct and analyze different affine gravities based on the determinants of the Ricci tensor, the torsion tensor, the Riemann tensor, and their combinations. In each case we reduce equations of motion to their simplest forms and give a detailed analysis of their solutions. Our analyses lead to the construction of the affine connection in terms of the curvature and torsion tensors. Our solutions of the dynamical equations show that the curvature tensors at different points are correlated via non-local, exponential rescaling factors determined by the torsion tensor.

  9. PURE ribosome display and its application in antibody technology.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Takashi; Fujino, Yasuhiro; Ueda, Takuya

    2014-11-01

    Ribosome display utilizes formation of the mRNA-ribosome-polypeptide ternary complex in a cell-free protein synthesis system to link genotype (mRNA) to phenotype (polypeptide). However, the presence of intrinsic components, such as nucleases in the cell-extract-based cell-free protein synthesis system, reduces the stability of the ternary complex, which would prevent attainment of reliable results. We have developed an efficient and highly controllable ribosome display system using the PURE (Protein synthesis Using Recombinant Elements) system. The mRNA-ribosome-polypeptide ternary complex is highly stable in the PURE system, and the selected mRNA can be easily recovered because activities of nucleases and other inhibitory factors are very low in the PURE system. We have applied the PURE ribosome display to antibody engineering approaches, such as epitope mapping and affinity maturation of antibodies, and obtained results showing that the PURE ribosome display is more efficient than the conventional method. We believe that the PURE ribosome display can contribute to the development of useful antibodies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in molecular engineering of antibody.

  10. Alternative Recognition of the Conserved Stem Epitope in Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin by a VH3-30-Encoded Heterosubtypic Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Wyrzucki, Arkadiusz; Dreyfus, Cyrille; Kohler, Ines; Steck, Marco

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A human monoclonal heterosubtypic antibody, MAb 3.1, with its heavy chain encoded by VH3-30, was isolated using phage display with immobilized hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza virus A/Japan/305/1957(H2N2) as the target. Antibody 3.1 potently neutralizes influenza viruses from the H1a clade (i.e., H1, H2, H5, H6) but has little neutralizing activity against the H1b clade. Its crystal structure in complex with HA from a pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, A/South Carolina/1/1918(H1N1), revealed that like other heterosubtypic anti-influenza virus antibodies, MAb 3.1 contacts a hydrophobic groove in the HA stem, primarily using its heavy chain. However, in contrast to the closely related monoclonal antibody (Mab) FI6 that relies heavily on HCDR3 for binding, MAb 3.1 utilizes residues from HCDR1, HCDR3, and framework region 3 (FR3). Interestingly, HCDR1 of MAb 3.1 adopts an α-helical conformation and engages in hydrophobic interactions with the HA very similar to those of the de novo in silico-designed and affinity-matured synthetic protein HB36.3. These findings improve our understanding of the molecular requirements for binding to the conserved epitope in the stem of the HA protein and, therefore, aid the development of more universal influenza vaccines targeting these epitopes. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses rapidly evade preexisting immunity by constantly altering the immunodominant neutralizing antibody epitopes (antigenic drift) or by acquiring new envelope serotypes (antigenic shift). As a consequence, the majority of antibodies elicited by immunization or infection protect only against the immunizing or closely related strains. Here, we describe a novel monoclonal antibody that recognizes the conserved heterosubtypic epitope in the stem of influenza A virus hemagglutinin. This antibody, referred to as MAb 3.1, recognizes its epitope in a manner that resembles recognition of a similar epitope by the de novo in silico-designed and affinity-matured synthetic

  11. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis and Fcγ Receptor Binding of Homogeneous Glycoforms of Antibody Fc Domain. Presence of a Bisecting Sugar Moiety Enhances the Affinity of Fc to FcγIIIa Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Guozhang; Ochiai, Hirofumi; Huang, Wei; Yang, Qiang; Li, Cishan; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2011-01-01

    Structurally well-defined IgG-Fc glycoforms are highly demanded for understanding the effects of glycosylation on antibody’s effector functions. We report in this paper chemoenzymatic synthesis and Fcγ receptor binding of an array of homogeneous IgG-Fc glycoforms. The chemoenzymatic approach consists of the chemical synthesis of defined N-glycan oxazolines as donor substratess, the expression of the Fc domain in a CHO cell line in the presence of an α-mannosidase inhibitor kifunensine, and an endoglycosidase-catalyzed glycosylation of the deglycosylated Fc domain (GlcNAc-Fc homodimer) with the synthetic glycan oxazolines. The enzyme from Arthrobacter protophormiae (Endo-A) was found to be remarkably efficient to take various modified N-glycan core oxazolines, including the bisecting sugar-containing derivatives, for Fc glycosylation remodeling, resulting in the formation of the corresponding homogeneous Fc glycoforms. Nevertheless, neither Endo-A, nor the Mucor hiemalis endoglycosidase mutants (EndoM-N175A and EndoM-N175Q), was able to transfer full-length complex-type N-glycan to the Fc domain, implicating the limitations of these two enzymes in Fc glycosylation remodeling. SPR binding studies with the synthetic IgG-Fc glycoforms unambiguously proved that the presence of a bisecting GlcNAc moiety could significantly enhance the binding of Fc to FcγRIIIa, the activating Fcγ receptor, independent of Fc core-fucosylation. Interestingly, the Fc glycoforms carrying an unusual bisecting sugar moiety such as a mannose or a LacNAc moiety also demonstrated enhanced affinity to FcγRIIIa. On the orther hand, the presence of a bisecting GlcNAc or core fucosylation had little effect on the affinity of Fc to the inhibitory Fcγ receptor, FcγRIIb. Our experimental data also showed that the α-linked mannose residues in the pentasaccharide Man3GlcNAc2 core was essential to maintain a high-affinity of Fc to both FcγRIIIa and FcγRIIb. The synthetic homogeneous Fc

  12. RNA recognition by a human antibody against brain cytoplasmic 200 RNA.

    PubMed

    Jung, Euihan; Lee, Jungmin; Hong, Hyo Jeong; Park, Insoo; Lee, Younghoon

    2014-06-01

    Diverse functional RNAs participate in a wide range of cellular processes. The RNA structure is critical for function, either on its own or as a complex form with proteins and other ligands. Therefore, analysis of the RNA conformation in cells is essential for understanding their functional mechanisms. However, no appropriate methods have been established as yet. Here, we developed an efficient strategy for panning and affinity maturation of anti-RNA human monoclonal antibodies from a naïve antigen binding fragment (Fab) combinatorial phage library. Brain cytoplasmic 200 (BC200) RNA, which is also highly expressed in some tumors, was used as an RNA antigen. We identified MabBC200-A3 as the optimal binding antibody. Mutagenesis and SELEX experiments showed that the antibody recognized a domain of BC200 in a structure- and sequence-dependent manner. Various breast cancer cell lines were further examined for BC200 RNA expression using conventional hybridization and immunoanalysis with MabBC200-A3 to see whether the antibody specifically recognizes BC200 RNA among the total purified RNAs. The amounts of antibody-recognizable BC200 RNA were consistent with hybridization signals among the cell lines. Furthermore, the antibody was able to discriminate BC200 RNA from other RNAs, supporting the utility of this antibody as a specific RNA structure-recognizing probe. Intriguingly, however, when permeabilized cells were subjected to immunoanalysis instead of purified total RNA, the amount of antibody-recognizable RNA was not correlated with the cellular level of BC200 RNA, indicating that BC200 RNA exists as two distinct forms (antibody-recognizable and nonrecognizable) in breast cancer cells and that their distribution depends on the cell type. Our results clearly demonstrate that anti-RNA antibodies provide an effective novel tool for detecting and analyzing RNA conformation.

  13. Structural Requirements of the Major Protective Antibody to Haemophilus influenzae Type b

    PubMed Central

    Hougs, Lotte; Juul, Lars; Svejgaard, Arne; Barington, Torben

    1999-01-01

    Protective antibodies to the important childhood pathogen Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) are directed against the capsular polysaccharide (HibCP). Most of the antibody is encoded by a well-defined set of (“canonical”) immunoglobulin genes, including the Vκ A2 gene, and expresses an idiotypic marker (HibId-1). In comparison to noncanonical antibodies, the canonical antibody is generally of higher avidity, shows higher levels of in vitro bactericidal activity, and is more protective in infant rats. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we here characterize canonical HibCP antibodies expressed as antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) in Escherichia coli, define amino acids involved in antigen binding and idiotype expression, and propose a three-dimensional structure for the variable domains. We found that canonical Fabs, unlike a noncanonical Fab, bound effectively to HibCP in the absence of somatic mutations. Nevertheless, pronounced mutation-based affinity maturation was demonstrated in vivo. An almost perfect correlation was found between unmutated gene segments that mediated binding in vitro and those encoding canonical HibCP antibodies in vivo. Thus, the Vκ A2a gene could be replaced by the A2c gene but not by the highly homologous sister gene, A18b, corresponding to the demonstrated usage of A2c but not of A18b in vivo. Similarly, only Jκ1 and Jκ3, which predominate in the response in vivo, were able to facilitate binding in vitro. These findings suggest that the restricted immunoglobulin gene usage in HibCP antibodies reflects strict structural demands ensuring relatively high affinity prior to somatic mutations—requirements met by only a limited spectrum of immunoglobulin gene combinations. PMID:10225914

  14. Antibodies elicited by the first non-viral prophylactic cancer vaccine show tumor-specificity and immunotherapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Lohmueller, Jason J.; Sato, Shuji; Popova, Lana; Chu, Isabel M.; Tucker, Meghan A.; Barberena, Roberto; Innocenti, Gregory M.; Cudic, Mare; Ham, James D.; Cheung, Wan Cheung; Polakiewicz, Roberto D.; Finn, Olivera J.

    2016-01-01

    MUC1 is a shared tumor antigen expressed on >80% of human cancers. We completed the first prophylactic cancer vaccine clinical trial based on a non-viral antigen, MUC1, in healthy individuals at-risk for colon cancer. This trial provided a unique source of potentially effective and safe immunotherapeutic drugs, fully-human antibodies affinity-matured in a healthy host to a tumor antigen. We purified, cloned, and characterized 13 IgGs specific for several tumor-associated MUC1 epitopes with a wide range of binding affinities. These antibodies bind hypoglycosylated MUC1 on human cancer cell lines and tumor tissues but show no reactivity against fully-glycosylated MUC1 on normal cells and tissues. We found that several antibodies activate complement-mediated cytotoxicity and that T cells carrying chimeric antigen receptors with the antibody variable regions kill MUC1+ target cells, express activation markers, and produce interferon gamma. Fully-human and tumor-specific, these antibodies are candidates for further testing and development as immunotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27545199

  15. All eyes on the next generation of HIV vaccines: strategies for inducing a broadly neutralizing antibody response.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, Jeffrey D

    2014-04-01

    HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs) develop after several years of infection through a recursive process of memory B cell adaptation and maturation against co-evolving virus quasispecies. Advances in single-cell sorting and memory B cell antibody cloning methods have identified many new HIV BNAbs targeting conserved epitopes on the HIV envelope (env) protein. 3D crystal structures and biophysical analyses of BNAbs bound to invariant virus structures expressed on monomeric gp120, epitope scaffolds, core structures, and native trimers have helped us to visualize unique binding interactions and paratope orientations that have been instrumental in guiding vaccine design. A paradigm shift in the approach to structure-based design of HIV-1 envelope immunogens came recently after several laboratories discovered that native viral envelopes or "env-structures" reverse-engineered to bind with high affinity to a handful of broadly neutralizing antibodies did not in fact bind the predicted germline precursors of these broadly neutralizing antibodies. A major challenge for HIV-1 B cell vaccine development moving forward is the design of new envelope immunogens that can trigger the selection and expansion of germline precursor and intermediate memory B cells to recapitulate B cell ontogenies associated with the maturation of a broadly neutralizing antibody response. Equally important for vaccine development is the identification of delivery systems, prime-boost strategies, and synergistic adjuvant combinations that can induce the magnitude and quality of antigen-specific T follicular helper (TFH) cell responses needed to drive somatic hypermutation (SHM) and B cell maturation against heterologous primary virus envelopes. Finding the combination of multi-protein envelope immunogens and immunization strategies that can evolve a potent broadly neutralizing antibody response portends to require a complex vaccine regimen that might be difficult to implement on any scale

  16. Autoreactivity of primary human immunoglobulins ancestral to hypermutated human antibodies that neutralize HCMV.

    PubMed

    McLean, Gary R; Cho, Chin-wen; Schrader, John W

    2006-05-01

    The human antibody response to the AD-2S1 epitope of glycoprotein B (gB) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is dominated by a family of closely related somatically mutated antibodies. These antibodies neutralize viral infectivity and the genes encoding them are derived from two commonly used germ-line variable (V) region genes, IGHV3-30 and IGKV3-11. Recombination of these V genes with the appropriate junctional diversity generates genes that encode primary immunoglobulins that bind to AD-2S1. To further understand the initial primary immunoglobulin response to AD-2S1 we synthesized the germ-line-based ancestor of one such family of antibodies and showed that it bound gB at the AD-2S1 epitope. Here we show that the germ-line ancestor of a second family of antibodies likewise binds to gB. We further show that one of the ancestral primary immunoglobulins, but not the other, also recognized autoantigens. In contrast, the hypermutated derivatives did not demonstrate autoreactivity and minor structural changes in the primary immunoglobulin were sufficient to generate or abolish autoreactivity or to change specificity. Thus, our demonstration that the ancestor of a highly mutated, non-autoreactive antiviral IgG antibody binds nuclear and cell-surface autoantigens indicates for the first time that self-reactivity is not necessarily a barrier to development into a follicular B lymphocyte that undergoes antigen-initiated affinity maturation.

  17. Developmental pathway for potent V1V2-directed HIV-neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Schramm, Chaim A; Gorman, Jason; Moore, Penny L; Bhiman, Jinal N; DeKosky, Brandon J; Ernandes, Michael J; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kim, Helen J; Pancera, Marie; Staupe, Ryan P; Altae-Tran, Han R; Bailer, Robert T; Crooks, Ema T; Cupo, Albert; Druz, Aliaksandr; Garrett, Nigel J; Hoi, Kam H; Kong, Rui; Louder, Mark K; Longo, Nancy S; McKee, Krisha; Nonyane, Molati; O'Dell, Sijy; Roark, Ryan S; Rudicell, Rebecca S; Schmidt, Stephen D; Sheward, Daniel J; Soto, Cinque; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Zhenhai; Mullikin, James C; Binley, James M; Sanders, Rogier W; Wilson, Ian A; Moore, John P; Ward, Andrew B; Georgiou, George; Williamson, Carolyn; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Morris, Lynn; Kwong, Peter D; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R

    2014-05-01

    Antibodies capable of neutralizing HIV-1 often target variable regions 1 and 2 (V1V2) of the HIV-1 envelope, but the mechanism of their elicitation has been unclear. Here we define the developmental pathway by which such antibodies are generated and acquire the requisite molecular characteristics for neutralization. Twelve somatically related neutralizing antibodies (CAP256-VRC26.01-12) were isolated from donor CAP256 (from the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA)); each antibody contained the protruding tyrosine-sulphated, anionic antigen-binding loop (complementarity-determining region (CDR) H3) characteristic of this category of antibodies. Their unmutated ancestor emerged between weeks 30-38 post-infection with a 35-residue CDR H3, and neutralized the virus that superinfected this individual 15 weeks after initial infection. Improved neutralization breadth and potency occurred by week 59 with modest affinity maturation, and was preceded by extensive diversification of the virus population. HIV-1 V1V2-directed neutralizing antibodies can thus develop relatively rapidly through initial selection of B cells with a long CDR H3, and limited subsequent somatic hypermutation. These data provide important insights relevant to HIV-1 vaccine development.

  18. Trade-offs in antibody repertoires to complex antigens

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Lauren M.; Baskerville, Edward B.; Cobey, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens vary in their antigenic complexity. While some pathogens such as measles present a few relatively invariant targets to the immune system, others such as malaria display considerable antigenic diversity. How the immune response copes in the presence of multiple antigens, and whether a trade-off exists between the breadth and efficacy of antibody (Ab)-mediated immune responses, are unsolved problems. We present a theoretical model of affinity maturation of B-cell receptors (BCRs) during a primary infection and examine how variation in the number of accessible antigenic sites alters the Ab repertoire. Naive B cells with randomly generated receptor sequences initiate the germinal centre (GC) reaction. The binding affinity of a BCR to an antigen is quantified via a genotype–phenotype map, based on a random energy landscape, that combines local and distant interactions between residues. In the presence of numerous antigens or epitopes, B-cell clones with different specificities compete for stimulation during rounds of mutation within GCs. We find that the availability of many epitopes reduces the affinity and relative breadth of the Ab repertoire. Despite the stochasticity of somatic hypermutation, patterns of immunodominance are strongly shaped by chance selection of naive B cells with specificities for particular epitopes. Our model provides a mechanistic basis for the diversity of Ab repertoires and the evolutionary advantage of antigenically complex pathogens. PMID:26194759

  19. Trade-offs in antibody repertoires to complex antigens.

    PubMed

    Childs, Lauren M; Baskerville, Edward B; Cobey, Sarah

    2015-09-05

    Pathogens vary in their antigenic complexity. While some pathogens such as measles present a few relatively invariant targets to the immune system, others such as malaria display considerable antigenic diversity. How the immune response copes in the presence of multiple antigens, and whether a trade-off exists between the breadth and efficacy of antibody (Ab)-mediated immune responses, are unsolved problems. We present a theoretical model of affinity maturation of B-cell receptors (BCRs) during a primary infection and examine how variation in the number of accessible antigenic sites alters the Ab repertoire. Naive B cells with randomly generated receptor sequences initiate the germinal centre (GC) reaction. The binding affinity of a BCR to an antigen is quantified via a genotype-phenotype map, based on a random energy landscape, that combines local and distant interactions between residues. In the presence of numerous antigens or epitopes, B-cell clones with different specificities compete for stimulation during rounds of mutation within GCs. We find that the availability of many epitopes reduces the affinity and relative breadth of the Ab repertoire. Despite the stochasticity of somatic hypermutation, patterns of immunodominance are strongly shaped by chance selection of naive B cells with specificities for particular epitopes. Our model provides a mechanistic basis for the diversity of Ab repertoires and the evolutionary advantage of antigenically complex pathogens.

  20. Development of a Recombinant Antibody with Specificity for Chelated Uranyl Ions

    SciTech Connect

    X. Li; A.M. Kriegel; T.C. Bishop; R.C. Blake; E. Figueiredo; H. Yu; D.A. Blake

    2005-04-18

    canonical structures method detailed by Morea et al. (J. Mol. Biol. 275:269), and the participation of specific residues in antigen recognition was assessed using site-directed mutagenesis. Three amino acids in the light chain variable region, H39, Y54 and F103, were particularly important in antigen recognition. In a separate series of experiments, a recombinant phage-displayed antibody library has been prepared using RNA isolated from the spleens of sheep and rabbits immunized with specific metal-chelate complexes. Phage-display libraries produced from an immunized source are inclined to include variable genes specific for the immunized antigen(s), many of which are already affinity matured. An antibody fragment specific for the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-DCP complex was isolated from this combined phage display library. While the binding affinity of this antibody fragment for UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-DCP was not as high as that of the 12F6 monoclonal antibody, the beauty of antibody phage display technology is that it allows for the potential manipulation and saturation of the antibody's binding affinity, which may drastically improve and ultimately surpass that of monoclonal antibodies.

  1. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003529.htm Antimitochondrial antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. ...

  2. Crystal Structure of PG16 and Chimeric Dissection with Somatically Related PG9: Structure-Function Analysis of Two Quaternary-Specific Antibodies That Effectively Neutralize HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Pancera, Marie; McLellan, Jason S.; Wu, Xueling; Zhu, Jiang; Changela, Anita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Yang, Yongping; Zhou, Tongqing; Phogat, Sanjay; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-11-03

    HIV-1 resists neutralization by most antibodies. Two somatically related human antibodies, PG9 and PG16, however, each neutralize 70 to 80% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. Here we present the structure of the antigen-binding fragment of PG16 in monoclinic and orthorhombic lattices at 2.4 and 4.0 {angstrom}, respectively, and use a combination of structural analysis, paratope dissection, and neutralization assessment to determine the functional relevance of three unusual PG9/PG16 features: N-linked glycosylation, extensive affinity maturation, and a heavy chain-third complementarity-determining region (CDR H3) that is one of the longest observed in human antibodies. Glycosylation extended off the side of the light chain variable domain and was not required for neutralization. The CDR H3 formed an axe-shaped subdomain, which comprised 42% of the CDR surface, with the axe head looming {approx}20 {angstrom} above the other combining loops. Comprehensive sets of chimeric swaps between PG9 and PG16 of light chain, heavy chain, and CDR H3 were employed to decipher structure-function relationships. Chimeric swaps generally complemented functionally, with differences in PG9/PG16 neutralization related primarily to residue differences in CDR H3. Meanwhile, chimeric reversions to genomic V genes showed isolate-dependent effects, with affinity maturation playing a significant role in augmenting neutralization breadth (P = 0.036) and potency (P < 0.0001). The structural and functional details of extraordinary CDR H3 and extensive affinity maturation provide insights into the neutralization mechanism of and the elicitation pathway for broadly neutralizing antibodies like PG9 and PG16.

  3. Affine Sphere Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate spacetimes whose light cones could be anisotropic. We prove the equivalence of the structures: (a) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the mean Cartan torsion vanishes, (b) Lorentz-Finsler manifold for which the indicatrix (observer space) at each point is a convex hyperbolic affine sphere centered on the zero section, and (c) pair given by a spacetime volume and a sharp convex cone distribution. The equivalence suggests to describe (affine sphere) spacetimes with this structure, so that no algebraic-metrical concept enters the definition. As a result, this work shows how the metric features of spacetime emerge from elementary concepts such as measure and order. Non-relativistic spacetimes are obtained replacing proper spheres with improper spheres, so the distinction does not call for group theoretical elements. In physical terms, in affine sphere spacetimes the light cone distribution and the spacetime measure determine the motion of massive and massless particles (hence the dispersion relation). Furthermore, it is shown that, more generally, for Lorentz-Finsler theories non-differentiable at the cone, the lightlike geodesics and the transport of the particle momentum over them are well defined, though the curve parametrization could be undefined. Causality theory is also well behaved. Several results for affine sphere spacetimes are presented. Some results in Finsler geometry, for instance in the characterization of Randers spaces, are also included.

  4. Inherent specificities in natural antibodies: a key to immune defense against pathogen invasion.

    PubMed

    Baumgarth, Nicole; Tung, James W; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2005-03-01

    Natural antibodies are produced at tightly regulated levels in the complete absence of external antigenic stimulation. They provide immediate, early and broad protection against pathogens, making them a crucial non-redundant component of the humoral immune system. These antibodies are produced mainly, if not exclusively, by a subset of long-lived, self-replenishing B cells termed B-1 cells. We argue here that the unique developmental pattern of these B-1 cells, which rests on positive selection by self antigens, ensures production of natural antibodies expressing evolutionarily important specificities that are required for the initial defense against invading pathogens. Positive selection for reactivity with self antigens could also result in the production of detrimental anti-self antibodies. However, B-1 cells have evolved a unique response pattern that minimizes the risk of autoimmunity. Although these cells respond rapidly and strongly to host-derived innate signals, such as cytokines, and to pathogen-encoded signals, such as lipopolysaccharide and phosphorylcholine, they respond very poorly to receptor-mediated activation. In addition, they rarely enter germinal centers and undergo affinity maturation. Thus, their potential for producing high-affinity antibodies with harmful anti-self specificity is highly restricted. The positive selection of B-1 cells occurs during the neonatal period, during which the long-lived self-renewing B-1 population is constituted. Many of these cells (B-1a) express CD5, although a smaller subset (B-1b) does not express this surface marker. Importantly, B-1a cells should not be confused with short-lived anergic B-2 cells, which originate in the bone marrow in adults and initiate CD5 expression and programmed cell death following self-antigen recognition. In summary, we argue here that the mechanisms that enable natural antibody production by B-1 cells reflect the humoral immune system, which has evolved in layers whose distinct

  5. Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Birgersson, Elin; Mezger, Anja; Nilsson, Mats; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off‐target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi‐automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead‐based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read‐out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof‐of‐concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off‐target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA‐based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead‐based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond. PMID:26935855

  6. Engineering HIV envelope protein to activate germline B cell receptors of broadly neutralizing anti-CD4 binding site antibodies.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Andrew T; Hoot, Sam; Dreyer, Anita M; Lippy, Adriana; Stuart, Andrew; Cohen, Kristen W; Jardine, Joseph; Menis, Sergey; Scheid, Johannes F; West, Anthony P; Schief, William R; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2013-04-08

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against HIV are believed to be a critical component of the protective responses elicited by an effective HIV vaccine. Neutralizing antibodies against the evolutionarily conserved CD4-binding site (CD4-BS) on the HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) are capable of inhibiting infection of diverse HIV strains, and have been isolated from HIV-infected individuals. Despite the presence of anti-CD4-BS broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) epitopes on recombinant Env, Env immunization has so far failed to elicit such antibodies. Here, we show that Env immunogens fail to engage the germline-reverted forms of known bnAbs that target the CD4-BS. However, we found that the elimination of a conserved glycosylation site located in Loop D and two glycosylation sites located in variable region 5 of Env allows Env-binding to, and activation of, B cells expressing the germline-reverted BCRs of two potent broadly neutralizing antibodies, VRC01 and NIH45-46. Our results offer a possible explanation as to why Env immunogens have been ineffective in stimulating the production of such bNAbs. Importantly, they provide key information as to how such immunogens can be engineered to initiate the process of antibody-affinity maturation against one of the most conserved Env regions.

  7. Mature Teachers Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berl, Patricia Scallan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the consequences of losing mature teachers due to voluntary separation or retirement and the mindset of a mature teacher that is different from younger teachers in a number of ways. Mature teachers are colleagues over 45 years of age possessing significant experience in the field. Future trends in teacher…

  8. Binding affinities of anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, J.J.; Drachman, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies directed against acetylcholine (ACh) receptors are present in the sera of nearly 90% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and are involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. However, the antibody titers measured by the standard radioimmunoassay correspond poorly with the clinical severity of the disease. To determine whether this disparity could be accounted for by differences in the binding affinities of anti-ACh receptor antibodies in different patients, we have measured the binding affinities of these autoantibodies in 15 sera from MG patients. The affinity constants (K/sub o/), as determined by Scatchard analysis, were all in the range of 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/, comparable to the highest values reported in immunized animals. The affinity constants were truly representative of the population of autoantibodies detected by the radioimmunoassay, as shown by the remarkable linearity of the Scatchard plots (r/sup 2/>0.90) and the close correlation between the antibody titers determined by extrapolation of the Scatchard plots and by saturation analysis (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). There was only a 6-fold variation in affinity constants measured in this series of patients despite widely differing antibody titers and severity of the disease. Factors other than the titer and affinity of anti-ACh receptor antibodies may correlate better with the clinical manifestations of MG.

  9. Enhancement of Immune Effector Functions by Modulating IgG’s Intrinsic Affinity for Target Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Yariv; Yang, Chunning; Borrok, M. Jack; Ayriss, Joanne; Aherne, Karen; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated immune effector functions play an essential role in the anti-tumor efficacy of many therapeutic mAbs. While much of the effort to improve effector potency has focused on augmenting the interaction between the antibody-Fc and activating Fc-receptors expressed on immune cells, the role of antibody binding interactions with the target antigen remains poorly understood. We show that antibody intrinsic affinity to the target antigen clearly influences the extent and efficiency of Fc-mediated effector mechanisms, and report the pivotal role of antibody binding valence on the ability to regulate effector functions. More particularly, we used an array of affinity modulated variants of three different mAbs, anti-CD4, anti-EGFR and anti-HER2 against a panel of target cell lines expressing disparate levels of the target antigen. We found that at saturating antibody concentrations, IgG variants with moderate intrinsic affinities, similar to those generated by the natural humoral immune response, promoted superior effector functions compared to higher affinity antibodies. We hypothesize that at saturating concentrations, effector function correlates most directly with the amount of Fc bound to the cell surface. Thus, high affinity antibodies exhibiting slow off-rates are more likely to interact bivalently with the target cell, occupying two antigen sites with a single Fc. In contrast, antibodies with faster off-rates are likely to dissociate each binding arm more rapidly, resulting in a higher likelihood of monovalent binding. Monovalent binding may in turn increase target cell opsonization and lead to improved recruitment of effector cells. This unpredicted relationship between target affinity and effector function potency suggests a careful examination of antibody design and engineering for the development of next-generation immunotherapeutics. PMID:27322177

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  11. Monovalent antibody design and mechanism of action of onartuzumab, a MET antagonist with anti-tumor activity as a therapeutic agent.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Mark; Ma, Xiaolei; Maun, Henry R; Zheng, Zhong; Peng, Jing; Romero, Mally; Huang, Arthur; Yang, Nai-ying; Nishimura, Merry; Greve, Joan; Santell, Lydia; Zhang, Yu-Wen; Su, Yanli; Kaufman, Dafna W; Billeci, Karen L; Mai, Elaine; Moffat, Barbara; Lim, Amy; Duenas, Eileen T; Phillips, Heidi S; Xiang, Hong; Young, Judy C; Vande Woude, George F; Dennis, Mark S; Reilly, Dorothea E; Schwall, Ralph H; Starovasnik, Melissa A; Lazarus, Robert A; Yansura, Daniel G

    2013-08-06

    Binding of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) to the receptor tyrosine kinase MET is implicated in the malignant process of multiple cancers, making disruption of this interaction a promising therapeutic strategy. However, targeting MET with bivalent antibodies can mimic HGF agonism via receptor dimerization. To address this limitation, we have developed onartuzumab, an Escherichia coli-derived, humanized, and affinity-matured monovalent monoclonal antibody against MET, generated using the knob-into-hole technology that enables the antibody to engage the receptor in a one-to-one fashion. Onartuzumab potently inhibits HGF binding and receptor phosphorylation and signaling and has antibody-like pharmacokinetics and antitumor activity. Biochemical data and a crystal structure of a ternary complex of onartuzumab antigen-binding fragment bound to a MET extracellular domain fragment, consisting of the MET Sema domain fused to the adjacent Plexins, Semaphorins, Integrins domain (MET Sema-PSI), and the HGF β-chain demonstrate that onartuzumab acts specifically by blocking HGF α-chain (but not β-chain) binding to MET. These data suggest a likely binding site of the HGF α-chain on MET, which when dimerized leads to MET signaling. Onartuzumab, therefore, represents the founding member of a class of therapeutic monovalent antibodies that overcomes limitations of antibody bivalency for targets impacted by antibody crosslinking.

  12. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  13. Structure of a High-Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Saphire, E.O.; Montero, M.; Menendez, A.; Houten, N.E.van; Irving, M.B.; Pantophlet, R.; Swick, M.B.; Parren, P.W.H.I.; Burton, D.R.; Scott, J.K.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Simon Fraser U. /British Columbia U.

    2007-07-13

    The human antibody b12 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on gp120 and is one of the rare monoclonal antibodies that neutralize a broad range of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. We previously reported the isolation of B2.1, a dimeric peptide that binds with high specificity to b12 and competes with gp120 for b12 antibody binding. Here, we show that the affinity of B2.1 was improved 60-fold over its synthetic-peptide counterpart by fusing it to the N terminus of a soluble protein. This affinity, which is within an order of magnitude of that of gp120, probably more closely reflects the affinity of the phage-borne peptide. The crystal structure of a complex between Fab of b12 and B2.1 was determined at 1.8 Angstrom resolution. The structural data allowed the differentiation of residues that form critical contacts with b12 from those required for maintenance of the antigenic structure of the peptide, and revealed that three contiguous residues mediate B2.1's critical contacts with b12. This single region of critical contact between the B2.1 peptide and the b12 paratope is unlikely to mimic the discontinuous key binding residues involved in the full b12 epitope for gp120, as previously identified by alanine scanning substitutions on the gp120 surface. These structural observations are supported by experiments that demonstrate that B2.1 is an ineffective immunogenic mimic of the b12 epitope on gp120. Indeed, an extensive series of immunizations with B2.1 in various forms failed to produce gp120 cross-reactive sera. The functional and structural data presented here, however, suggest that the mechanism by which b12 recognizes the two antigens is very different. Here, we present the first crystal structure of peptide bound to an antibody that was originally raised against a discontinuous protein epitope. Our results highlight the challenge of producing immunogens that mimic discontinuous protein epitopes, and the necessity of combining

  14. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  15. HIV-1 VACCINES. Priming a broadly neutralizing antibody response to HIV-1 using a germline-targeting immunogen.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Joseph G; Ota, Takayuki; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Kulp, Daniel W; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Skog, Patrick D; Thinnes, Theresa C; Bhullar, Deepika; Briney, Bryan; Menis, Sergey; Jones, Meaghan; Kubitz, Mike; Spencer, Skye; Adachi, Yumiko; Burton, Dennis R; Schief, William R; Nemazee, David

    2015-07-10

    A major goal of HIV-1 vaccine research is the design of immunogens capable of inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that bind to the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). Poor binding of Env to unmutated precursors of bnAbs, including those of the VRC01 class, appears to be a major problem for bnAb induction. We engineered an immunogen that binds to VRC01-class bnAb precursors and immunized knock-in mice expressing germline-reverted VRC01 heavy chains. Induced antibodies showed characteristics of VRC01-class bnAbs, including a short CDRL3 (light-chain complementarity-determining region 3) and mutations that favored binding to near-native HIV-1 gp120 constructs. In contrast, native-like immunogens failed to activate VRC01-class precursors. The results suggest that rational epitope design can prime rare B cell precursors for affinity maturation to desired targets.

  16. Epididymosomes: a heterogeneous population of microvesicles with multiple functions in sperm maturation and storage.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular microvesicles present in the epididymal fluid have been named epididymosomes. Many epididymosome-associated proteins are transferred to spermatozoa during their maturation in the excurrent duct. Epididymosomes are heterogeneous, with their size varying between 50 and 250 nm. Two distinct population of epididymosomes characterized by different protein compositions and diameters have been isolated from the bovine epididymal fluid using different centrifugation protocols. One subpopulation of epididymosomes was characterized by CD9 and other tetraspanin partners. Transfer of proteins from these epididymosomes to maturing spermatozoa in co-incubation experiments was inhibited by antibodies against tetraspanin proteins. This suggests that this subpopulation of epididymosomes is involved in the acquisition of proteins involved in maturation by spermatozoa in the epididymis. The other population of epididymosomes was characterized by ELSPBP1 (epididymal sperm binding protein 1), known for its affinity for the phospholipid choline group. Flow cytometric analyses showed that ELSPBP1-positive epididymosomes only interacted with dying or dead epididymal spermatozoa in a Zn 2 + -dependent manner. BLVRA (biliverdin reductase) was identified as a partner of ELSPBP1. This enzyme reduces biliverdin to bilirubin: two molecules with powerful anti-oxidant properties. We hypothesize that BLVRA is involved in an ROS-scavenging mechanism protecting live epididymal spermatozoa against detrimental molecules (ROS) released by dying cells. Therefore, it appears that there are at least two epididymosome population with distinct functions: targeting specific proteins to transiting spermatozoa by tetraspanin-mediated membrane fusion, and protection of epididymal spermatozoa against ROS released from dying cells. Further work is needed to understand functions of epididymosomes in epididymal physiology and sperm maturation and storage.

  17. Noncompetitive affinity assays of glucagon and amylin using mirror-image aptamers as affinity probes.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lian; Wang, Xue; Bethge, Lucas; Klussmann, Sven; Roper, Michael G

    2016-03-21

    The ability to detect picomolar concentrations of glucagon and amylin using fluorescently labeled mirror-image aptamers, so-called Spiegelmers, is demonstrated. Spiegelmers rival the specificity of antibodies and overcome the problem of biostability of natural aptamers in a biological matrix. Using Spiegelmers as affinity probes, noncompetitive capillary electrophoresis affinity assays of glucagon and murine amylin were developed and optimized. The detection limit for glucagon was 6 pM and for amylin was 40 pM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 and -2 did not interfere with the glucagon assay, while the amylin assay showed cross-reactivity to calcitonin gene related peptide. The developed assays were combined with a competitive immunoassay for insulin to measure glucagon, amylin, and insulin secretion from batches of islets after incubation with different glucose concentrations. The development of these assays is an important step towards incorporation into an online measurement system for monitoring dynamic secretion from single islets.

  18. Kernel Affine Projection Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weifeng; Príncipe, José C.

    2008-12-01

    The combination of the famed kernel trick and affine projection algorithms (APAs) yields powerful nonlinear extensions, named collectively here, KAPA. This paper is a follow-up study of the recently introduced kernel least-mean-square algorithm (KLMS). KAPA inherits the simplicity and online nature of KLMS while reducing its gradient noise, boosting performance. More interestingly, it provides a unifying model for several neural network techniques, including kernel least-mean-square algorithms, kernel adaline, sliding-window kernel recursive-least squares (KRLS), and regularization networks. Therefore, many insights can be gained into the basic relations among them and the tradeoff between computation complexity and performance. Several simulations illustrate its wide applicability.

  19. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  20. Solid support resins and affinity purification mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Havis, Spencer; Moree, Wilna J; Mali, Sujina; Bark, Steven J

    2017-02-28

    Co-affinity purification-mass spectrometry (CoAP-MS) is a primary technology for elucidating the protein-protein interactions that form the basis of all biological processes. A critical component of CoAP-MS is the affinity purification (AP) of the bait protein, usually by immobilization of an antibody to a solid-phase resin. This Minireview discusses common resins, reagents, tagging methods, and their consideration for successful AP of tagged proteins. We discuss our experiences with different solid supports, their impact in AP experiments, and propose areas where chemistry can advance this important technology.

  1. Antibody Engineering for Pursuing a Healthier Future

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Abdullah F. U. H.; Wang, Rongzhi; Ling, Sumei; Wang, Shihua

    2017-01-01

    Since the development of antibody-production techniques, a number of immunoglobulins have been developed on a large scale using conventional methods. Hybridoma technology opened a new horizon in the production of antibodies against target antigens of infectious pathogens, malignant diseases including autoimmune disorders, and numerous potent toxins. However, these clinical humanized or chimeric murine antibodies have several limitations and complexities. Therefore, to overcome these difficulties, recent advances in genetic engineering techniques and phage display technique have allowed the production of highly specific recombinant antibodies. These engineered antibodies have been constructed in the hunt for novel therapeutic drugs equipped with enhanced immunoprotective abilities, such as engaging immune effector functions, effective development of fusion proteins, efficient tumor and tissue penetration, and high-affinity antibodies directed against conserved targets. Advanced antibody engineering techniques have extensive applications in the fields of immunology, biotechnology, diagnostics, and therapeutic medicines. However, there is limited knowledge regarding dynamic antibody development approaches. Therefore, this review extends beyond our understanding of conventional polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. Furthermore, recent advances in antibody engineering techniques together with antibody fragments, display technologies, immunomodulation, and broad applications of antibodies are discussed to enhance innovative antibody production in pursuit of a healthier future for humans.

  2. Bioconjugation of Antibodies to Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP).

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross-linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and convenient means to maintain antibody affinity while imparting a functional reporter used for antigen detection. In this chapter, we describe a process by which Sulfo-SMCC is used to generate a stable maleimide-activated HRP that is reactive with sulfhydryl groups generated in antibodies by SATA-mediated thiolation.

  3. Single-domain antibodies for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Krah, Simon; Schröter, Christian; Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Valldorf, Bernhard; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies are the smallest antigen-binding units of antibodies, consisting either only of one variable domain or one engineered constant domain that solely facilitates target binding. This class of antibody derivatives comprises naturally occurring variable domains derived from camelids and sharks as well as engineered human variable or constant antibody domains of the heavy or light chain. Because of their high affinity and specificity as well as stability, small size and benefit of multiple re-formatting opportunities, those molecules emerged as promising candidates for biomedical applications and some of these entities have already proven to be successful in clinical development.

  4. Protein Complex Affinity Capture from Cryomilled Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Jiang, Hua; Rout, Michael P

    2016-12-09

    Affinity capture is an effective technique for isolating endogenous protein complexes for further study. When used in conjunction with an antibody, this technique is also frequently referred to as immunoprecipitation. Affinity capture can be applied in a bench-scale and in a high-throughput context. When coupled with protein mass spectrometry, affinity capture has proven to be a workhorse of interactome analysis. Although there are potentially many ways to execute the numerous steps involved, the following protocols implement our favored methods. Two features are distinctive: the use of cryomilled cell powder to produce cell extracts, and antibody-coupled paramagnetic beads as the affinity medium. In many cases, we have obtained superior results to those obtained with more conventional affinity capture practices. Cryomilling avoids numerous problems associated with other forms of cell breakage. It provides efficient breakage of the material, while avoiding denaturation issues associated with heating or foaming. It retains the native protein concentration up to the point of extraction, mitigating macromolecular dissociation. It reduces the time extracted proteins spend in solution, limiting deleterious enzymatic activities, and it may reduce the non-specific adsorption of proteins by the affinity medium. Micron-scale magnetic affinity media have become more commonplace over the last several years, increasingly replacing the traditional agarose- and Sepharose-based media. Primary benefits of magnetic media include typically lower non-specific protein adsorption; no size exclusion limit because protein complex binding occurs on the bead surface rather than within pores; and ease of manipulation and handling using magnets.

  5. Protein Complex Affinity Capture from Cryomilled Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    LaCava, John; Jiang, Hua; Rout, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capture is an effective technique for isolating endogenous protein complexes for further study. When used in conjunction with an antibody, this technique is also frequently referred to as immunoprecipitation. Affinity capture can be applied in a bench-scale and in a high-throughput context. When coupled with protein mass spectrometry, affinity capture has proven to be a workhorse of interactome analysis. Although there are potentially many ways to execute the numerous steps involved, the following protocols implement our favored methods. Two features are distinctive: the use of cryomilled cell powder to produce cell extracts, and antibody-coupled paramagnetic beads as the affinity medium. In many cases, we have obtained superior results to those obtained with more conventional affinity capture practices. Cryomilling avoids numerous problems associated with other forms of cell breakage. It provides efficient breakage of the material, while avoiding denaturation issues associated with heating or foaming. It retains the native protein concentration up to the point of extraction, mitigating macromolecular dissociation. It reduces the time extracted proteins spend in solution, limiting deleterious enzymatic activities, and it may reduce the non-specific adsorption of proteins by the affinity medium. Micron-scale magnetic affinity media have become more commonplace over the last several years, increasingly replacing the traditional agarose- and Sepharose-based media. Primary benefits of magnetic media include typically lower non-specific protein adsorption; no size exclusion limit because protein complex binding occurs on the bead surface rather than within pores; and ease of manipulation and handling using magnets. PMID:28060343

  6. Dextran as a generally applicable multivalent scaffold for improving immunoglobulin-binding affinities of peptide and peptidomimetic ligands.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Jumpei; Sarkar, Mohosin; Kenrick, Sophia; Kodadek, Thomas

    2014-08-20

    Molecules able to bind the antigen-binding sites of antibodies are of interest in medicine and immunology. Since most antibodies are bivalent, higher affinity recognition can be achieved through avidity effects in which a construct containing two or more copies of the ligand engages both arms of the immunoglobulin simultaneously. This can be achieved routinely by immobilizing antibody ligands at high density on solid surfaces, such as ELISA plates, but there is surprisingly little literature on scaffolds that routinely support bivalent binding of antibody ligands in solution, particularly for the important case of human IgG antibodies. Here we show that the simple strategy of linking two antigens with a polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer long enough to span the two arms of an antibody results in higher affinity binding in some, but not all, cases. However, we found that the creation of multimeric constructs in which several antibody ligands are displayed on a dextran polymer reliably provides much higher affinity binding than is observed with the monomer in all cases tested. Since these dextran conjugates are simple to construct, they provide a general and convenient strategy to transform modest affinity antibody ligands into high affinity probes. An additional advantage is that the antibody ligands occupy only a small number of the reactive sites on the dextran, so that molecular cargo can be attached easily, creating molecules capable of delivering this cargo to cells displaying antigen-specific receptors.

  7. Adapting pharmacokinetic properties of a humanized anti-interleukin-8 antibody for therapeutic applications using site-specific pegylation.

    PubMed

    Leong, S R; DeForge, L; Presta, L; Gonzalez, T; Fan, A; Reichert, M; Chuntharapai, A; Kim, K J; Tumas, D B; Lee, W P; Gribling, P; Snedecor, B; Chen, H; Hsei, V; Schoenhoff, M; Hale, V; Deveney, J; Koumenis, I; Shahrokh, Z; McKay, P; Galan, W; Wagner, B; Narindray, D; Hébert, C; Zapata, G

    2001-11-07

    A neutralizing anti-interleukin-(IL-)8 monoclonal antibody was humanized by grafting the complementary determining regions onto the human IgG framework. Subsequent alanine scanning mutagenesis and phage display enabled the production of an affinity matured antibody with a >100-fold improvement in IL-8 binding. Antibody fragments can be efficiently produced in Escherichia coli but have the limitation of rapid clearance rates in vivo. The Fab' fragment of the antibody was therefore modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) in order to obtain a more desirable pharmacokinetic profile. PEG (5-40 kDa) was site-specifically conjugated to the Fab' via the single free cysteine residue in the hinge region. In vitro binding and bioassays showed little or no loss of activity. The pharmacokinetic profiles of the 20 kDa, 30 kDa, 40 kDa, and 40 kDa branched PEG-Fab' molecules were evaluated in rabbits. Relative to the native Fab', the clearance rates of the PEGylated molecules were decreased by 44-175-fold. In a rabbit ear model of ischemia/reperfusion injury, all PEGylated Fab' molecules were as efficacious in reducing oedema as the original monoclonal antibody. These studies demonstrate that it is possible to customize the pharmacokinetic properties of a Fab' while retaining its antigen binding activity.

  8. [Detection of AlpA and AlpB lytic endopeptidase propeptides of Lysobacter sp. XL1 by sandwich-enzyme immunoassay based on monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Rudenko, N V; Tsfasman, I M; Latypov, O R; Ledova, L A; Krasovskaia, L A; Karatovskaia, A P; Brovko, F A; Vasil'eva, N V; Stepnaia, O A

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular lytic endopeptidases AlpA and AlpB of the bacterium Lysobacter sp. XL1 are highly homologous and synthesized as precursors consisting of signal peptide, propeptide and mature form. In this work, two monoclonal antibodies against propeptide endopeptidase AlpA (ProA) and eleven against propeptide endopeptidase AlpB (ProB) were obtained to study the AlpA and AlpB endopeptidases secretion. The affinity constants of the antibodies against ProA were 2.9 x 10(9) and 3.5 x 10(9) M(-1), and the affinity constants of the antibodies against ProB were from 1.5 x 10(8) to 2.2 x 10(9) M(-1). The obtained antibodies did not have cross-reactivity between themselves, as well as mature forms of the enzymes. The monoclonal antibodies based sandwich-type enzyme immunoassay has been developed for measuring the propeptide in a native form. The linear range of determination ProA was 1.5-100 ng/mL with 6% error of measurement, and for determining ProB 0.2-6.25 ng/mL with 6% error. Using the developed assay, ProA and ProB propeptides have been detected in cell lysates of Lysobacter sp. XL1 in an amount 1.18 ± 0.03 ng and 0.096 ± 0.002 ng per 1 OD540 of the bacterial culture, respectively. The immunochemical assay for detection various forms of AlpA and AlpB lytic endopeptidases can be useful when dealing with issues related to their secretion into the environment.

  9. [Adolescent brain maturation].

    PubMed

    Holzer, L; Halfon, O; Thoua, V

    2011-05-01

    Recent progress in neuroscience has yielded major findings regarding brain maturation during adolescence. Unlike the body, which reaches adult size and morphology during this period, the adolescent brain is still maturing. The prefrontal cortex appears to be an important locus of maturational change subserving executive functions that may regulate emotional and motivational issues. The recent expansion of the adolescent period has increased the lag between the onset of emotional and motivational changes activated by puberty and the completion of cognitive development-the maturation of self-regulatory capacities and skills that are continuing to develop long after puberty has occurred. This "disconnect" predicts risk for a broad set of behavioral and emotional problems. Adolescence is a critical period for high-level cognitive functions such as socialization that rely on maturation of the prefrontal cortex. Intervention during the period of adolescent brain development provides opportunities and requires an interdisciplinary approach.

  10. Electron Affinity Calculations for Thioethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulton, Deley L.; Boothe, Michael; Ball, David W.; Morales, Wilfredo

    1997-01-01

    Previous work indicated that polyphenyl thioethers possessed chemical properties, related to their electron affinities, which could allow them to function as vapor phase lubricants (VPL). Indeed, preliminary tribological tests revealed that the thioethers could function as vapor phase lubricants but not over a wide temperature and hertzian pressure range. Increasing the electron affinity of the thioethers may improve their VPL properties over this range. Adding a substituent group to the thioether will alter its electron affinity in many cases. Molecular orbital calculations were undertaken to determine the effect of five different substituent groups on the electron affinity of polyphenyl thioethers. It was found that the NO2, F, and I groups increased the thioethers electron affinity by the greatest amount. Future work will involve the addition of these groups to the thioethers followed by tribological testing to assess their VPL properties.

  11. Complex high affinity interactions occur between MHCI and superantigens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Herpich, A. R.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins A and C1 (SEA or SEC1) bound to major histocompatibility-I (MHCI) molecules with high affinity (binding constants ranging from 1.1 microM to 79 nM). SEA and SEC1 directly bound MHCI molecules that had been captured by monoclonal antibodies specific for H-2Kk, H-2Dk, or both. In addition, MHCI-specific antibodies inhibited the binding of SEC1 to LM929 cells and SEA competitively inhibited SEC1 binding; indicating that the superantigens bound to MHCI on the cell surface. The affinity and number of superantigen binding sites differed depending on whether MHCI was expressed in the membrane of LM929 cells or whether it was captured. These data support the hypothesis that MHCI molecules can serve as superantigen receptors.

  12. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity.

  13. Selective high affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2010-02-16

    This invention provides novel polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each bind different region son the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  14. Electrochemical affinity biosensors for detection of mycotoxins: A review.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Juan C; Bonel, Laura; Ezquerra, Alba; Hernández, Susana; Bertolín, Juan R; Cubel, Carlota; Castillo, Juan R

    2013-11-15

    This review discusses the current state of electrochemical biosensors in the determination of mycotoxins in foods. Mycotoxins are highly toxic secondary metabolites produced by molds. The acute toxicity of these results in serious human and animal health problems, although it has been only since early 1960s when the first studied aflatoxins were found to be carcinogenic. Mycotoxins affect a broad range of agricultural products, most important cereals and cereal-based foods. A majority of countries, mentioning especially the European Union, have established preventive programs to control contamination and strict laws of the permitted levels in foods. Official methods of analysis of mycotoxins normally requires sophisticated instrumentation, e.g. liquid chromatography with fluorescence or mass detectors, combined with extraction procedures for sample preparation. For about sixteen years, the use of simpler and faster analytical procedures based on affinity biosensors has emerged in scientific literature as a very promising alternative, particularly electrochemical (i.e., amperometric, impedance, potentiometric or conductimetric) affinity biosensors due to their simplicity and sensitivity. Typically, electrochemical biosensors for mycotoxins use specific antibodies or aptamers as affinity ligands, although recombinant antibodies, artificial receptors and molecular imprinted polymers show potential utility. This article deals with recent advances in electrochemical affinity biosensors for mycotoxins and covers complete literature from the first reports about sixteen years ago.

  15. Factors determining antibody distribution in tumors.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Greg M; Schmidt, Michael M; Wittrup, K Dane

    2008-02-01

    The development of antibody therapies for cancer is increasing rapidly, primarily owing to their specificity. Antibody distribution in tumors is often extremely uneven, however, leading to some malignant cells being exposed to saturating concentrations of antibody, whereas others are completely untargeted. This is detrimental because large regions of cells escape therapy, whereas other regions might be exposed to suboptimal concentrations that promote a selection of resistant mutants. The distribution of antibody depends on a variety of factors, including dose, affinity, antigens per cell and molecular size. Because these parameters are often known or easily estimated, a quick calculation based on simple modeling considerations can predict the uniformity of targeting within a tumor. Such analyses should enable experimental researchers to identify in a straightforward way the limitations in achieving evenly distributed antibody, and design and test improved antibody therapeutics more rationally.

  16. Antibody to dihydropyridine calcium entry blockers

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, S.; Minaskanian, G.; Fairhurst, A.

    1986-03-05

    Antibodies that recognize dihydropyridine calcium entry blockers were elicited from rabbits. A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay for dihydropyridines was developed and its specificity compared to the DHP binding site in skeletal muscle membranes. The antibody bound (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine with a higher affinity (K/sub D/ = 0.155 nM) than did the DHP receptor of skeletal muscle (K/sub D/ = 1-3 nM). However, in contrast to the DHP receptor, the antibody recognized only those DHP drugs with meta-nitrophenyl substituents at the 4-position on the DHP ring, and thus reflected the meta position of the nitro group on the DHP hapten used as an antigen. Both the antibody and the receptor exhibited stereospecificity, with each site recognizing the (+) isomer of nicardipine as the more potent. This antibody should prove useful in the studies of some potentially irreversible DHP molecules and for use in the production of anti-idotype antibodies.

  17. Toward Teacher Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickle, Judy

    1985-01-01

    The essence of teacher maturity can be synthesized into personal, professional, and process domains. Although overlapping, these categories add a multidimensional approach to the search for what is good in teaching and provide a model for professional development. (MT)

  18. Antibodies for immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Newman, D J

    2000-01-01

    What is an immunoassay without an antibody? Clearly the name provides the answer to this question; without antibodies there would be no immunoassays. An immunoassay is an analytical technique, quantitative or qualitative, that relies absolutely on the specificity and affinity of the interaction between epitope and paratope for generation of a detectable response. The actual detection of this binding interaction can be via one of literally hundreds of different signal transduction mechanisms, e.g., fluorimetry, chemiluminescence, agglutination (turbidimetry or nephelometry) enzyme reactions, and so forth (1 -4), but these are simply transducing systems for the primary binding interaction. Antibodies thus provide us with an exquisitely sensitive and specific analytical technology for detecting and quantifying epitopic structures. These structures include amino-acid derivatives, e.g., thyroid hormones, peptides, e.g., vasopressin, proteins, e.g., cytokines, as well as carbohydrate structures, e.g., CA-125. Immunoassay technology has developed to such an extent that it is probably the most versatile analytical tool available able to identify and quantify epitopic structures across the milli- to zeptomolar concentration ranges (2).

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Geskin, Larisa J

    2015-10-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized cancer therapy. Approaches targeting specific cellular targets on the malignant cells and in tumor microenvironment have been proved to be successful in hematologic malignancies, including cutaneous lymphomas. mAb-based therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma has demonstrated high response rates and a favorable toxicity profile in clinical trials. Several antibodies and antibody-based conjugates are approved for use in clinical practice, and many more are in ongoing and planned clinical trials. In addition, these safe and effective drugs can be used as pillars for sequential therapies in a rational stepwise manner.

  20. Contractions of affine spherical varieties

    SciTech Connect

    Arzhantsev, I V

    1999-08-31

    The language of filtrations and contractions is used to describe the class of G-varieties obtainable as the total spaces of the construction of contraction applied to affine spherical varieties, which is well-known in invariant theory. These varieties are local models for arbitrary affine G-varieties of complexity 1 with a one-dimensional categorical quotient. As examples, reductive algebraic semigroups and three-dimensional SL{sub 2}-varieties are considered.

  1. Protein A affinity precipitation of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Janoschek, Lars; Freiherr von Roman, Matthias; Berensmeier, Sonja

    2014-08-15

    The potential of protein A affinity precipitation as an alternative method for traditional antibody purification techniques was investigated. Recombinant produced protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA) was covalently linked to the pH-responsive copolymer Eudragit(®) S-100 and used for purification of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG). The Eudragit-SpA conjugate had a static binding capacity of 93.9 ± 2.8 mg hIgG per g conjugate and a dissociation constant of 787 ± 67 nM at 7 ± 1°C. The antibody was adsorbed rapidly onto Eudragit-SpA and reached equilibrium within 5 min. An excess of hIgG binding sites, provided by the conjugate, as well as adjusted elution conditions resulted in an appropriate hIgG purification performance. In summary, Eudragit-SpA was successfully applied to capture hIgG from a protein mixture with 65% antibody yield in the elution step. Nearly 96% purity and a purification factor of 12.4 were achieved. The Eudragit-SpA conjugate showed a stable ligand density over several cycles, which enabled reusability for repeated precipitation of hIgG. According to this, pH induced affinity precipitation can be seen as a potential alternative for protein A chromatography in antibody purification processes.

  2. Novel antibodies as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zafir-Lavie, I; Michaeli, Y; Reiter, Y

    2007-05-28

    In recent years antibodies, whether generated by traditional hybridoma technology or by recombinant DNA strategies, have evolved from Paul Ehrlich's 'magic bullets' to a modern age 'guided missile'. In the recent years of immunologic research, we are witnessing development in the fields of antigen screening and protein engineering in order to create specific anticancer remedies. The developments in the field of recombinant DNA, protein engineering and cancer biology have let us gain insight into many cancer-related mechanisms. Moreover, novel techniques have facilitated tools allowing unique distinction between malignantly transformed cells, and regular ones. This understanding has paved the way for the rational design of a new age of pharmaceuticals: monoclonal antibodies and their fragments. Antibodies can select antigens on both a specific and a high-affinity account, and further implementation of these qualities is used to target cancer cells by specifically identifying exogenous antigens of cancer cell populations. The structure of the antibody provides plasticity resonating from its functional sites. This review will screen some of the many novel antibodies and antibody-based approaches that are being currently developed for clinical applications as the new generation of anticancer agents.

  3. Characteristics of antibody responses in Pigeon Fanciers' Lung.

    PubMed

    Nademi, Zohreh; Todryk, Stephen; Baldwin, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    The aetiology of Pigeon Fanciers' Lung (PFL) is believed to include immune complex formation between inhaled pigeon antigens and antibodies generated against them. However it is unclear why some fanciers are asymptomatic despite the presence of high levels of anti-avian antigen antibodies in their serum. In this study we investigated whether qualitative differences in specific antibodies might contribute to disease. IgG responses among pigeon fanciers were determined by ELISA and the functional affinity of IgG1 and IgG2 against a range of pigeon antigens was determined by inhibition ELISA and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). The median titres of IgG1 and IgG2 against all the pigeon antigens tested was higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic fanciers and these differences were significant for anti-pigeon serum IgG1 (P=0.04), anti-fresh pigeon droppings (PDF) IgG2 (P=0.028), anti-old pigeon droppings (PDO) IgG2 (P=0.04) and anti-pigeon intestinal scrapings IgG2 (P=0.03). The functional affinity of IgG1 and IgG2 against PDO was higher in symptomatic individuals (P=0.006 and P=0.002, respectively) whilst the functional affinity of anti-PDF IgG2 was also significantly higher in these patients (P≤0.001). Symptomatic fanciers were also significantly more likely to have a high reaction enthalphy (ΔH) as measured by ITC and thus had higher affinity antibodies against PDO (P=0.044). This data confirms previous studies showing that the magnitude alone of the antibody response to pigeon antigens cannot determine the presence of PFL, but that antibody affinity may be important. ITC is a rapid method of measuring antibody affinity and has diagnostic potential in PFL, and may be of use in other situations where antibody affinity is important.

  4. Recombinant antibodies and their use in biosensors.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangqun; Shen, Zhihong; Mernaugh, Ray

    2012-04-01

    Inexpensive, noninvasive immunoassays can be used to quickly detect disease in humans. Immunoassay sensitivity and specificity are decidedly dependent upon high-affinity, antigen-specific antibodies. Antibodies are produced biologically. As such, antibody quality and suitability for use in immunoassays cannot be readily determined or controlled by human intervention. However, the process through which high-quality antibodies can be obtained has been shortened and streamlined by use of genetic engineering and recombinant antibody techniques. Antibodies that traditionally take several months or more to produce when animals are used can now be developed in a few weeks as recombinant antibodies produced in bacteria, yeast, or other cell types. Typically most immunoassays use two or more antibodies or antibody fragments to detect antigens that are indicators of disease. However, a label-free biosensor, for example, a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) needs one antibody only. As such, the cost and time needed to design and develop an immunoassay can be substantially reduced if recombinant antibodies and biosensors are used rather than traditional antibody and assay (e.g. enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, ELISA) methods. Unlike traditional antibodies, recombinant antibodies can be genetically engineered to self-assemble on biosensor surfaces, at high density, and correctly oriented to enhance antigen-binding activity and to increase assay sensitivity, specificity, and stability. Additionally, biosensor surface chemistry and physical and electronic properties can be modified to further increase immunoassay performance above and beyond that obtained by use of traditional methods. This review describes some of the techniques investigators have used to develop highly specific and sensitive, recombinant antibody-based biosensors for detection of antigens in simple or complex biological samples.

  5. Postbooster Antibodies from Humans as Source of Diphtheria Antitoxin

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Alonso, Ana; González-Rivera, Milagros; Tamayo, Eduardo; Eiros, Jose María; Almansa, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Diphtheria antitoxin for therapeutic use is in limited supply. A potential source might be affinity-purified antibodies originally derived from plasma of adults who received a booster dose of a vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid. These antibodies might be useful for treating even severe cases of diphtheria. PMID:27314309

  6. Oral immunization with xenogeneic antibodies stimulates the production of systemic and mucosal anti-idiotypic antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, A M; Roberton, D M; Hosking, C S; Flannery, G R

    1991-01-01

    The humoral and mucosal immune responses to oral immunization with xenogeneic antibodies were studied using an animal model in which female rabbits were fed daily doses of the MOPC-315 murine IgA antibody, and were mated during the course of the feeding programme. Serum and colostrum samples were assayed for the presence of anti-idiotypic antibodies by ELISA assay, before and after depletion of anti-IgA antibodies, by affinity chromatography using another murine IgA idiotype. It was shown that all animals responded to exposure to the MOPC-315 idiotype with the production of serum anti-murine immunoglobulin antibodies and that four of six animals produced serum anti-idiotypic antibodies. That the immune response included antibodies directed against the antigen-binding site was confirmed by competition ELISA assay. Mucosal IgG and IgA anti-immunoglobulin antibodies were present in milk from all antibody-fed rabbits tested, and IgA anti-idiotypic antibodies were detectable in the colostrum of one rabbit. The results provide some support for the hypothesis that human exposure to xenogeneic antibodies, most commonly bovine milk immunoglobulins, may provoke the production of anti-idiotypic antibodies, and that such exposure may lead to disturbances of immune regulation. PMID:1916890

  7. Changes in surface antigens of Hymenolepis nana during differentiation and maturation in mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, A; Onitake, K

    1987-06-01

    The surface antigens of oncosphere, cysticercoid, adult scolex and adult strobila (other than scolex) of Hymenolepis nana differ critically from one another. When the oncosphere of H. nana undergoes differentiation and development into the mature tapeworm, the infected mouse first produces anti-oncosphere antibody, followed by anti-cysticercoid, anti-adult scolex and finally anti-strobila (other than scolex region) antibodies of IgG, IgM and IgA isotypes as detected by indirect immunofluorescent antibody test. The parasite changed its surface antigens throughout its differentiation and maturation, and all developmental stages were recognized by the infected mouse host. However, there appeared no further changes in surface antigens during aging after maturation. The antibody responses were always delayed compared with the differentiation and maturation of the parasite.

  8. Novel trends in affinity biosensors: current challenges and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arugula, Mary A.; Simonian, Aleksandr

    2014-03-01

    Molecular biorecognition processes facilitate physical and biochemical interactions between molecules in all crucial metabolic pathways. Perhaps the target analyte and the biorecognition element interactions have the most impactful use in biosensing applications. Traditional analytical sensing systems offer excellent biorecognition elements with the ability to detect and determine the presence of analytes. High affinity antibodies and DNA play an important role in the development of affinity biosensors based on electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive approaches. Advancements in this area routinely employ labels, label free, nanoparticles, multifunctional matrices, carbon nanotubes and other methods to meet the requirements of its own application. However, despite increasing affinity ceilings for conventional biosensors, the field draws back in meeting specifically important demands, such as long-term stability, ultrasensitivity, rapid detection, extreme selectivity, strong biological base, calibration, in vivo measurements, regeneration, satisfactory performance and ease of production. Nevertheless, recent efforts through this line have produced novel high-tech nanosensing systems such as ‘aptamers’ and ‘phages’ which exhibit high-throughput sensing. Aptamers and phages are powerful tools that excel over antibodies in sensibility, stability, multi-detection, in vivo measurements and regeneration. Phages are superior in stability, screening for affinity-based target molecules ranging from small to proteins and even cells, and easy production. In this review, we focus mainly on recent developments in affinity-based biosensors such as immunosensors, DNA sensors, emphasizing aptasensors and phage-based biosensors basing on novel electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive detection techniques. We also address enzyme inhibition-based biosensors and the current problems associated with the above sensors and their future perspectives.

  9. Phagosome maturation: aging gracefully.

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Otilia V; Botelho, Roberto J; Grinstein, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Foreign particles and apoptotic bodies are eliminated from the body by phagocytic leucocytes. The initial stage of the elimination process is the internalization of the particles into a plasma membrane-derived vacuole known as the phagosome. Such nascent phagosomes, however, lack the ability to kill pathogens or to degrade the ingested targets. These properties are acquired during the course of phagosomal maturation, a complex sequence of reactions that result in drastic remodelling of the phagosomal membrane and contents. The determinants and consequences of the fusion and fission reactions that underlie phagosomal maturation are the topic of this review. PMID:12061891

  10. The Use of Antibodies in Small-Molecule Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Catherine J; Eckersley, Sonia; Hebditch, Max; Kvist, Alexander J; Milner, Roy; Mitchell, Danielle; Warwicker, Juli; Marley, Anna E

    2014-07-01

    Antibodies are powerful research tools that can be used in many areas of biology to probe, measure, and perturb various biological structures. Successful drug discovery is dependent on the correct identification of a target implicated in disease, coupled with the successful selection, optimization, and development of a candidate drug. Because of their specific binding characteristics, with regard to specificity, affinity, and avidity, coupled with their amenability to protein engineering, antibodies have become a key tool in drug discovery, enabling the quantification, localization, and modulation of proteins of interest. This review summarizes the application of antibodies and other protein affinity reagents as specific research tools within the drug discovery process.

  11. The change of the scFv into the Fab format improves the stability and in vivo toxin neutralization capacity of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Quintero-Hernández, Veronica; Juárez-González, Victor R; Ortíz-León, Mauricio; Sánchez, Rosalba; Possani, Lourival D; Becerril, Baltazar

    2007-02-01

    The antigen-binding fragment (Fab) has been considered a more functionally stable version of recombinant antibodies than single chain antibody fragments (scFvs), however this intuitive consideration has not been sufficiently proven in vivo. This communication shows that three out of four specific scFvs against a scorpion toxin, with different affinities and stabilities, become neutralizing in vivo when expressed as Fabs, despite the fact that they are not neutralizing in the scFv format. A scFv fragment previously obtained from a neutralizing mouse antibody (BCF2) was used to produce three derived scFvs by directed evolution. Only one of them was neutralizing, however when expressed as Fab, all of them became neutralizing fragments in vivo. The initial scFvBCF2 (earlier used for directed evolution) was not neutralizing in the scFv format. After expressing it as Fab did not become a neutralizing fragment, but did reduce the intoxication symptoms of experimental mice. The stability of the four Fabs derived from their respective scFvs was improved when tested in the presence of guanidinium chloride. The in vitro stability of the Fab format has been shown earlier, but the physiological consequences of this stability are shown in this communication. The present results indicate that improved functional stability conferred by the Fab format can replace additional maturation steps, when the affinity and stability are close to the minimum necessary to be neutralizing.

  12. Brain maturation and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dulac, Olivier; Milh, Mathieu; Holmes, Gregory L

    2013-01-01

    At full term, both glutamate and gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) are excitatory; cortical synapses are beginning to appear, there is little myelin in the cerebral hemispheres, and long tracts hardly start to develop. Neonatal myoclonic encephalopathy can result from premature activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) transmission. Benign neonatal seizures and migrating partial seizures in infancy could involve excessive or premature excitability of deep cortical layers. Benign rolandic epilepsy and continuous spike waves in slow sleep are consistent with an excess of both excitatory and inhibitory cortical synapses. West and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes express age-related diffuse cortical hyperexcitability, the pattern depending on the age of occurrence; synchronization of spikes is becoming possible with maturation of the myelin. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy is itself modulated by maturation that causes frontal hyperexcitability generating myoclonic-astatic seizures, between the ages of infantile and juvenile myoclonic epilepsies. Physiological delay of hippocampo-neocortical pathways maturation could account for the delayed occurrence of mesial temporal epilepsy following infantile damage, whereas premature maturation could contribute to fronto-temporal damage characteristic of fever-induced epileptic encephalopathy in school-age children, a dramatic school-age epileptic encephalopathy.

  13. Maturation in Larch 1

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Michael S.; Hopper, Catherine A.; Hutchison, Keith W.

    1989-01-01

    The time course of maturation in eastern larch (Larix laricina [Du Roi] K. Koch) was examined by grafting scions from trees of different ages onto 2-year-old root stock and following scion development for several years. Height, diameter, foliar chlorophyll content, and rooting ability of scion-derived cuttings all varied linearly as a function of log10 age. Chlorophyll content (milligrams per gram of dry weight) increased while height, diameter, and ability to root decreased with age (P < 0.01). The tendency toward orthotropic growth and branch formation per centimeter of main stem decreased abruptly between age 1 and 5 years (P < 0.01). Total chlorophyll content of both long and short shoot foliage increased by 30 to 50% with increasing age, but the chlorophyll a/b ratio did not change. Also, juvenile long shoot needles were significantly longer than mature (P < 0.01). Surprisingly, the juvenile scions produced more total strobili over two successive years, but the mature scions produced a significantly higher proportion of male strobili (P < 0.001 year 1; P < 0.02 year 2). The age-related changes in foliar traits were not associated with changes in DNA methylation between juvenile and mature scions. Using HPLC, we found that 20% of foliar DNA cytosine residues were methylated in both scion types. Images Figure 1 PMID:16666785

  14. Mature Students Studying Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Keith

    1999-01-01

    Discusses mature students in the single subject area of mathematics in a single institution and makes comparisons with traditional universities. Reviews some features of the age distribution, entry qualifications, degree-class distribution, non-completion rates and gender distribution. (Author/ASK)

  15. Preselection Thymocytes Are More Sensitive to T Cell Receptor Stimulation Than Mature T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Gayle M.; Schober, Sonya L.; Endrizzi, Bart T.; Dutcher, Angela K.; Jameson, Stephen C.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    1998-01-01

    During T cell development, thymocytes which are tolerant to self-peptides but reactive to foreign peptides are selected. The current model for thymocyte selection proposes that self-peptide–major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes that bind the T cell receptor with low affinity will promote positive selection while those with high affinity will result in negative selection. Upon thymocyte maturation, such low affinity self-peptide–MHC ligands no longer provoke a response, but foreign peptides can incidentally be high affinity ligands and can therefore stimulate T cells. For this model to work, thymocytes must be more sensitive to ligand than mature T cells. Contrary to this expectation, several groups have shown that thymocytes are less responsive than mature T cells to anti-T cell receptor for antigen (TCR)/CD3 mAb stimulation. Additionally, the lower TCR levels on thymocytes, compared with T cells, would potentially correlate with decreased thymocyte sensitivity. Here we compared preselection thymocytes and mature T cells for early activation events in response to peptide–MHC ligands. Remarkably, the preselection thymocytes were more responsive than mature T cells when stimulated with low affinity peptide variants, while both populations responded equally well to the antigenic peptide. This directly demonstrates the increased sensitivity of thymocytes compared with T cells for TCR engagement by peptide–MHC complexes. PMID:9815264

  16. Potent neutralization of VEGF biological activities with a fully human antibody Fab fragment directed against VEGF receptor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, H.-Q. . E-mail: hua-quan.miao@imclone.com; Hu, Kun; Jimenez, Xenia; Navarro, Elizabeth; Zhang, Haifan; Lu Dan; Ludwig, Dale L.; Balderes, Paul; Zhu Zhenping . E-mail: zhenping.zhu@imclone.com

    2006-06-23

    Compelling evidence suggest that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors, especially receptor 2 (VEGFR2, or kinase insert domain-containing receptor, KDR), play a critical role in angiogenesis under both physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer and angiogenic retinopathies such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To this end, inhibition of angiogenesis with antagonists to either VEGF or KDR has yielded significant therapeutic efficacy both in preclinical studies in animal models and in clinical trials in patients with cancer and AMD. We previously reported the identification of a high affinity, fully human anti-KDR antibody fragment, 1121B Fab, through a highly stringent affinity maturation process with a Fab originally isolated from a naive human antibody phage display library. In this study, we demonstrate that 1121B Fab is able to strongly block KDR/VEGF interaction, resulting in potent inhibition of an array of biological activities of VEGF, including activation of the receptor and its signaling pathway, intracellular calcium mobilization, and migration and proliferation of endothelial cells. Taken together, our data lend strong support to the further development of 1121B Fab fragment as an anti-angiogenesis agent in both cancer and angiogenic retinopathies.

  17. Antibody-controlled actuation of DNA-based molecular circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelen, Wouter; Meijer, Lenny H. H.; Somers, Bram; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Merkx, Maarten

    2017-02-01

    DNA-based molecular circuits allow autonomous signal processing, but their actuation has relied mostly on RNA/DNA-based inputs, limiting their application in synthetic biology, biomedicine and molecular diagnostics. Here we introduce a generic method to translate the presence of an antibody into a unique DNA strand, enabling the use of antibodies as specific inputs for DNA-based molecular computing. Our approach, antibody-templated strand exchange (ATSE), uses the characteristic bivalent architecture of antibodies to promote DNA-strand exchange reactions both thermodynamically and kinetically. Detailed characterization of the ATSE reaction allowed the establishment of a comprehensive model that describes the kinetics and thermodynamics of ATSE as a function of toehold length, antibody-epitope affinity and concentration. ATSE enables the introduction of complex signal processing in antibody-based diagnostics, as demonstrated here by constructing molecular circuits for multiplex antibody detection, integration of multiple antibody inputs using logic gates and actuation of enzymes and DNAzymes for signal amplification.

  18. Chemical binding affinity estimation using MSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.

    2011-03-01

    Binding affinity can be estimated in several ways in the laboratory but there is no viable way to estimate binding affinity in vivo without assumptions on the number of binding sites. Magnetic spectroscopy of nanoparticle Brownian motion, MSB, measures the rotational Brownian motion. The MSB signal is affected by nanoparticle binding affinity so it provides a mechanism to measure the chemical binding affinity. We present a possible mechanism to quantify the binding affinity and test that mechanism using viscous solutions.

  19. The functional repertoire of rabbit antibodies and antibody discovery via next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kodangattil, Sreekumar; Huard, Christine; Ross, Cindy; Li, Jian; Gao, Huilan; Mascioni, Alessandro; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Naik, Snehal; Min-debartolo, Jessica; Visintin, Alberto; Almagro, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into the functional antibody repertoire of rabbits, the VH and VL repertoires of bone marrow (BM) and spleen (SP) of a naïve New Zealand White rabbit (NZW; Oryctolagus cuniculus) and that of lymphocytes collected from a NZW rabbit immunized (IM) with a 16-mer peptide were deep-sequenced. Two closely related genes, IGHV1S40 (VH1a3) and IGHV1S45 (VH4), were found to dominate (~90%) the VH repertoire of BM and SP, whereas, IGHV1S69 (VH1a1) contributed significantly (~40%) to IM. BM and SP antibodies recombined predominantly with IGHJ4. A significant proportion (~30%) of IM sequences recombined with IGHJ2. The VK repertoire was encoded by nine IGKV genes recombined with one IGKJ gene, IGKJ1. No significant bias in the VK repertoire of the BM, SP and IM samples was observed. The complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 and -L3 length distributions were similar in the three samples following a Gaussian curve with average length of 12.2 ± 2.4 and 11.1 ± 1.1 amino acids, respectively. The amino acid composition of the predominant CDR-H3 and -L3 loop lengths was similar to that of humans and mice, rich in Tyr, Gly, Ser and, in some specific positions, Asp. The average number of mutations along the IGHV/KV genes was similar in BM, SP and IM; close to 12 and 15 mutations for VH and VL, respectively. A monoclonal antibody specific for the peptide used as immunogen was obtained from the IM rabbit. The CDR-H3 sequence was found in 1,559 of 61,728 (2.5%) sequences, at position 10, in the rank order of the CDR-H3 frequencies. The CDR-L3 was found in 24 of 11,215 (0.2%) sequences, ranking 102. No match was found in the BM and SP samples, indicating positive selection for the hybridoma sequence. Altogether, these findings lay foundations for engineering of rabbit V regions to enhance their potential as therapeutics, i.e., design of strategies for selection of specific rabbit V regions from NGS data mining, humanization and design of libraries for affinity

  20. Developmental Pathway of the MPER-Directed HIV-1-Neutralizing Antibody 10E8

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baoshan; McKee, Krisha; Longo, Nancy S.; Yang, Yongping; Huang, Jinghe; Parks, Robert; Eudailey, Joshua; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Mullikin, James C.; Connors, Mark; Mascola, John R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody 10E8 targets the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41, neutralizes >97% of HIV-1 isolates, and lacks the auto-reactivity often associated with MPER-directed antibodies. The developmental pathway of 10E8 might therefore serve as a promising template for vaccine design, but samples from time-of-infection—often used to infer the B cell record—are unavailable. In this study, we used crystallography, next-generation sequencing (NGS), and functional assessments to infer the 10E8 developmental pathway from a single time point. Mutational analysis indicated somatic hypermutation of the 2nd-heavy chain-complementarity determining region (CDR H2) to be critical for neutralization, and structures of 10E8 variants with V-gene regions reverted to genomic origin for heavy-and-light chains or heavy chain-only showed structural differences >2 Å relative to mature 10E8 in the CDR H2 and H3. To understand these developmental changes, we used bioinformatic sieving, maximum likelihood, and parsimony analyses of immunoglobulin transcripts to identify 10E8-lineage members, to infer the 10E8-unmutated common ancestor (UCA), and to calculate 10E8-developmental intermediates. We were assisted in this analysis by the preservation of a critical D-gene segment, which was unmutated in most 10E8-lineage sequences. UCA and early intermediates weakly bound a 26-residue-MPER peptide, whereas HIV-1 neutralization and epitope recognition in liposomes were only observed with late intermediates. Antibody 10E8 thus develops from a UCA with weak MPER affinity and substantial differences in CDR H2 and H3 from the mature 10E8; only after extensive somatic hypermutation do 10E8-lineage members gain recognition in the context of membrane and HIV-1 neutralization. PMID:27299673

  1. Germinal Center B-Cell-Associated Nuclear Protein (GANP) Involved in RNA Metabolism for B Cell Maturation.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, N; Maeda, K

    2016-01-01

    Germinal center B-cell-associated nuclear protein (GANP) is upregulated in germinal center B cells against T-cell-dependent antigens in mice and humans. In mice, GANP depletion in B cells impairs antibody affinity maturation. Conversely, its transgenic overexpression augments the generation of high-affinity antigen-specific B cells. GANP associates with AID in the cytoplasm, shepherds AID into the nucleus, and augments its access to the rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region of the genome in B cells, thereby precipitating the somatic hypermutation of V region genes. GANP is also upregulated in human CD4(+) T cells and is associated with APOBEC3G (A3G). GANP interacts with A3G and escorts it to the virion cores to potentiate its antiretroviral activity by inactivating HIV-1 genomic cDNA. Thus, GANP is characterized as a cofactor associated with AID/APOBEC cytidine deaminase family molecules in generating diversity of the IgV region of the genome and genetic alterations of exogenously introduced viral targets. GANP, encoded by human chromosome 21, as well as its mouse equivalent on chromosome 10, contains a region homologous to Saccharomyces Sac3 that was characterized as a component of the transcription/export 2 (TREX-2) complex and was predicted to be involved in RNA export and metabolism in mammalian cells. The metabolism of RNA during its maturation, from the transcription site at the chromosome within the nucleus to the cytoplasmic translation apparatus, needs to be elaborated with regard to acquired and innate immunity. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on GANP as a component of TREX-2 in mammalian cells.

  2. Collagen-bound von Willebrand factor has reduced affinity for factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Bendetowicz, A V; Wise, R J; Gilbert, G E

    1999-04-30

    von Willebrand factor (vWf) is a multimeric adhesive glycoprotein that serves as a carrier for factor VIII in plasma. Although each vWf subunit displays a high affinity binding site for factor VIII in vitro, in plasma, only 2% of the vWf sites for factor VIII are occupied. We investigated whether interaction of plasma proteins with vWf or adhesion of vWf to collagen may alter the affinity or availability of factor VIII-binding sites on vWf. When vWf was immobilized on agarose-linked monoclonal antibody, factor VIII bound to vWf with high affinity, and neither the affinity nor binding site availability was influenced by the presence of 50% plasma. Therefore, plasma proteins do not alter the affinity or availability of factor VIII-binding sites. In contrast, when vWf was immobilized on agarose-linked collagen, its affinity for factor VIII was reduced 4-fold, with KD increasing from 0.9 to 3.8 nM. However, one factor VIII-binding site remained available on each vWf subunit. A comparable reduction in affinity for factor VIII was observed when vWf was a constituent of the subendothelial cell matrix and when it was bound to purified type VI collagen. In parallel with the decreased affinity for factor VIII, collagen-bound vWf displayed a 6-fold lower affinity for monoclonal antibody W5-6A, with an epitope composed of residues 78-96 within the factor VIII-binding motif of vWf. We conclude that collagen induces a conformational change within the factor VIII-binding motif of vWf that lowers the affinity for factor VIII.

  3. Reconciling the structural attributes of avian antibodies.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Paul J; Law, Ruby H P; Gilgunn, Sarah; Hearty, Stephen; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T; Lloyd, Gordon; O'Kennedy, Richard J; Whisstock, James C

    2014-05-30

    Antibodies are high value therapeutic, diagnostic, biotechnological, and research tools. Combinatorial approaches to antibody discovery have facilitated access to unique antibodies by surpassing the diversity limitations of the natural repertoire, exploitation of immune repertoires from multiple species, and tailoring selections to isolate antibodies with desirable biophysical attributes. The V-gene repertoire of the chicken does not utilize highly diverse sequence and structures, which is in stark contrast to the mechanism employed by humans, mice, and primates. Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has generated high quality, high affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic, diagnostic and biotechnological applications. Furthermore, extensive examination of the amino acid characteristics of the chicken repertoire has provided significant insight into mechanisms employed by the avian immune system. A paucity of avian antibody crystal structures has limited our understanding of the structural consequences of these uniquely chicken features. This paper presents the crystal structure of two chicken single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies generated from large libraries by phage display against important human antigen targets, which capture two unique CDRL1 canonical classes in the presence and absence of a non-canonical disulfide constrained CDRH3. These structures cast light on the unique structural features of chicken antibodies and contribute further to our collective understanding of the unique mechanisms of diversity and biochemical attributes that render the chicken repertoire of particular value for antibody generation.

  4. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  5. Affinity-aware checkpoint restart

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Ajay; Rezaei, Arash; Mueller, Frank; Hargrove, Paul; Roman, Eric

    2014-12-08

    Current checkpointing techniques employed to overcome faults for HPC applications result in inferior application performance after restart from a checkpoint for a number of applications. This is due to a lack of page and core affinity awareness of the checkpoint/restart (C/R) mechanism, i.e., application tasks originally pinned to cores may be restarted on different cores, and in case of non-uniform memory architectures (NUMA), quite common today, memory pages associated with tasks on a NUMA node may be associated with a different NUMA node after restart. Here, this work contributes a novel design technique for C/R mechanisms to preserve task-to-core maps and NUMA node specific page affinities across restarts. Experimental results with BLCR, a C/R mechanism, enhanced with affinity awareness demonstrate significant performance benefits of 37%-73% for the NAS Parallel Benchmark codes and 6-12% for NAMD with negligible overheads instead of up to nearly four times longer an execution times without affinity-aware restarts on 16 cores.

  6. Affinity-aware checkpoint restart

    DOE PAGES

    Saini, Ajay; Rezaei, Arash; Mueller, Frank; ...

    2014-12-08

    Current checkpointing techniques employed to overcome faults for HPC applications result in inferior application performance after restart from a checkpoint for a number of applications. This is due to a lack of page and core affinity awareness of the checkpoint/restart (C/R) mechanism, i.e., application tasks originally pinned to cores may be restarted on different cores, and in case of non-uniform memory architectures (NUMA), quite common today, memory pages associated with tasks on a NUMA node may be associated with a different NUMA node after restart. Here, this work contributes a novel design technique for C/R mechanisms to preserve task-to-core mapsmore » and NUMA node specific page affinities across restarts. Experimental results with BLCR, a C/R mechanism, enhanced with affinity awareness demonstrate significant performance benefits of 37%-73% for the NAS Parallel Benchmark codes and 6-12% for NAMD with negligible overheads instead of up to nearly four times longer an execution times without affinity-aware restarts on 16 cores.« less

  7. ELECTRON AFFINITIES OF INORGANIC RADICALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    energy in the latter compound is 110 kcals/mole, distinctly higher than in ammonia. Cyanogen (CN)2 and hydrocyanic acid (HCN) yield values for the...ions very readily, and the electron affinity is 49 kcals/mole. A comparison with the results from thiocyanic acid (HNCS) indicates that the H-N bond

  8. The absence of IgE antibody-mediated augmentation of immune responses in CD23-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, H; Kikutani, H; Suematsu, S; Naka, T; Yoshida, K; Yoshida, K; Tanaka, T; Suemura, M; Matsumoto, N; Kojima, S

    1994-01-01

    The CD23 antigen, a low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc epsilon RII), is a type II membrane-bound glycoprotein expressed on various cells, particularly mature B cells. A number of functions have been ascribed to CD23, including specific regulation of IgE production, IgE-mediated cytotoxicity and release of mediators, IgE-dependent antigen focusing, promotion of B-cell growth, prevention of germinal center B cells from apoptosis, proliferation of myeloid precursors, and maturation of early thymocytes. It is not clear whether these activities represent in vivo functions. To explore in vivo functions of CD23, we have produced CD23-deficient mice. These mice displayed normal lymphocyte differentiation and could mount normal antibody responses, including IgE responses upon immunization with T-dependent antigens and infection with Nippostrongyrus brasiliensis. Germinal center formation after immunization and in vitro proliferative response of B cells were not affected in mutant mice. However, antigen-specific IgE-mediated enhancement of antibody responses was severely impaired. Images PMID:8041705

  9. CD27− B-Cells Produce Class Switched and Somatically Hyper-Mutated Antibodies during Chronic HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cagigi, Alberto; Du, Likun; Dang, Linh Vu Phuong; Grutzmeier, Sven; Atlas, Ann; Chiodi, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation occur in mature B-cells in response to antigen stimulation. These processes are crucial for the generation of functional antibodies. During HIV-1 infection, loss of memory B-cells, together with an altered differentiation of naïve B-cells result in production of low quality antibodies, which may be due to impaired immunoglobulin affinity maturation. In the current study, we evaluated the effect of HIV-1 infection on class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation by studying the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in peripheral B-cells from a cohort of chronically HIV-1 infected patients as compared to a group of healthy controls. In parallel, we also characterized the phenotype of B-cells and their ability to produce immunoglobulins in vitro. Cells from HIV-1 infected patients showed higher baseline levels of AID expression and increased IgA production measured ex-vivo and upon CD40 and TLR9 stimulation in vitro. Moreover, the percentage of CD27−IgA+ and CD27−IgG+ B-cells in blood was significantly increased in HIV-1 infected patients as compared to controls. Interestingly, our results showed a significantly increased number of somatic hypermutations in the VH genes in CD27− cells from patients. Taken together, these results show that during HIV-1 infection, CD27− B-cells can also produce class switched and somatically hypermutated antibodies. Our data add important information for the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the loss of specific antibody production observed during HIV-1 infection. PMID:19412542

  10. Delayed visual maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, G F; Hungerford, J; Jones, R B

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen blind babies who were considered to be showing the characteristics of delayed visual maturation were studied prospectively. The diagnosis was made on clinical grounds, and the criteria for this are discussed. All of these infants developed visual responses between 4 and 6 months of age and had normal or near normal visual acuities by 1 year of age. Long term follow up, however, has shown neurological abnormalities in some of these children. PMID:6200080

  11. Theoretical proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX.

    PubMed

    Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji; Viggiano, Al A

    2010-12-23

    Proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX at all of its possible sites were calculated at the RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31G* and RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels, respectively. The protonation leads to various unique structures, with H(+) attached to oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms; among which the nitrogen site possesses the highest proton affinity of -ΔE ∼ 251 kcal/mol, suggesting that this is likely to be the major product. In addition some H(2), CH(4) dissociation as well as destruction channels have been found, among which the CH(4) + [Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-S-(CH(2))(2)-N(+)(iPr)═CHMe] product and the destruction product forming Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-SMe + CH(2)═N(+)(iPr)(2) are only 9 kcal/mol less stable than the most stable N-protonated product. For fluoridization, the S-P destruction channel to give Et-O-P(═O)(Me)(F) + [S-(CH(2))(2)-N-(iPr)(2)](-) is energetically the most favorable, with a fluoride affinity of -ΔE ∼ 44 kcal. Various F(-) ion-molecule complexes are also found, with the one having F(-) interacting with two hydrogen atoms in different alkyl groups to be only 9 kcal/mol higher than the above destruction product. These results suggest VX behaves quite differently from surrogate systems.

  12. Immune and endocrine responses of adult spring Chinook salmon during freshwater migration and sexual maturation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maule, A.G.; Schrock, R.M.; Slater, C.; Fitzpatrick, M.S.; Schreck, C. B.

    1996-01-01

    The immune –endocrine responses in spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were examined during their freshwater migration and final maturation. In 1990, migrating fish had high plasma cortisol titres (means 200 ng ml−1) and generated relatively few antibody-producing cells (APC) from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) (100 –200 per culture). After three weeks acclimation in constant environmental conditions, plasma cortisol was reduced and APC increased. There were no changes in number or affinity of glucocorticoid receptors. Concentrations of several sex steroids correlated with APC in females, but there were no such correlations in males. In 1993, fish in a hatchery had significantly greater cortisol concentrations in primary circulation than in secondary circulation, but sex steroid concentrations did not differ between circulations. Mean lysozyme activity in the primary and secondary circulation did not differ in June. In August, activity in the primary circulation was significantly less than that of the secondary, perhaps the result of acute stress associated with sampling. While some sex steroids correlated with lysozyme activity, the fact that in both years all endocrine and immune variables that correlated with each other also correlated with the date of sample, raises the question as to whether or not these are cause-and-effect relations.

  13. The Cellular Bases of Antibody Responses during Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Aguilar-Medina, Elsa Maribel; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab) responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG) memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell-dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic, or memory) B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections. This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events such as the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation, and germinal centers (GCs) formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs), till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated.

  14. The Cellular Bases of Antibody Responses during Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Aguilar-Medina, Elsa Maribel; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab) responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG) memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell-dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic, or memory) B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections. This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events such as the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation, and germinal centers (GCs) formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs), till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated. PMID:27375618

  15. The Interplay of Dengue Virus Morphological Diversity and Human Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lok, Shee-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infects ∼400 million people annually, and there is no available vaccine or therapeutics. It is not clear why candidate vaccines provide only modest protection. In addition to the presence of four different dengue serotypes, there is also structural heterogeneity in DENV infectious particles, even within a strain. This severely complicates the development of vaccines and therapeutics. The currently known different morphologies of DENV are: immature, partially mature, compact mature, and expanded mature forms of the virus. In this review I describe these forms of the virus, their infectivity, and how antibodies could recognize these morphologies. I also discuss possible vaccine and antibody therapeutic formulations to protect against all morphologies.

  16. Combining Phage and Yeast Cell Surface Antibody Display to Identify Novel Cell Type-Selective Internalizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Using phage antibody display, large libraries can be generated and screened to identify monoclonal antibodies with affinity for target antigens. However, while library size and diversity is an advantage of the phage display method, there is limited ability to quantitatively enrich for specific binding properties such as affinity. One way of overcoming this limitation is to combine the scale of phage display selections with the flexibility and quantitativeness of FACS-based yeast surface display selections. In this chapter we describe protocols for generating yeast surface antibody display libraries using phage antibody display selection outputs as starting material and FACS-based enrichment of target antigen-binding clones from these libraries. These methods should be widely applicable for the identification of monoclonal antibodies with specific binding properties.

  17. Affinity Pull-Down of Proteins Using Anti-FLAG M2 Agarose Beads.

    PubMed

    Gerace, Erica; Moazed, Danesh

    2015-01-01

    FLAG is an affinity tag widely used for rapid and highly specific one-step protein purification. Native elution of protein from anti-FLAG antibody resins allows the identification of protein and nucleic acid binding partners and functional analysis using biochemical activity assays.

  18. Vocational Maturity and Self Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helbing, Hans

    The relationship between separate dimensions of vocational maturity and different self-concept and identity variables were examined. Subjects were Dutch students, age 14-18 years. The vocational maturity dimensions were measured by Dutch adaptations of American vocational maturity scales. Instruments for self-concept and identity measurement were…

  19. Development of new versions of anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies with potentially reduced immunogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Weizhu; Wang Ling; Li Bohua; Wang Hao; Hou Sheng; Hong Xueyu; Zhang Dapeng; Guo Yajun

    2008-03-07

    Despite the widespread clinical use of CD34 antibodies for the purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, all the current anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are murine, which have the potential to elicit human antimouse antibody (HAMA) immune response. In the present study, we developed three new mouse anti-human CD34 mAbs which, respectively, belonged to class I, class II and class III CD34 epitope antibodies. In an attempt to reduce the immunogenicity of these three murine mAbs, their chimeric antibodies, which consisted of mouse antibody variable regions fused genetically to human antibody constant regions, were constructed and characterized. The anti-CD34 chimeric antibodies were shown to possess affinity and specificity similar to that of their respective parental murine antibodies. Due to the potentially better safety profiles, these chimeric antibodies might become alternatives to mouse anti-CD34 antibodies routinely used for clinical application.

  20. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future.

  1. Comparing CDRH3 diversity captured from secondary lymphoid organs for the generation of recombinant human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Venet, Sophie; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Fischer, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The plasticity of natural immunoglobulin repertoires can be exploited for the generation of phage display libraries. Secondary lymphoid organs, such as the spleen and the lymph nodes, constitute interesting sources of diversity because they are rich in B cells, part of which can be affinity matured. These organs, however, differ in their anatomical structure, reflecting the different fluids they drain, which affects the B cell repertoires. The CDRH3 repertoires from these organs, extracted from naïve or immunized mice, were compared in the context of phage display libraries using human antibody framework families. Deep sequencing analysis revealed that all libraries displayed different CDRH3 repertoires, but the one derived from lymph nodes of naïve mice was the most diverse. Library performance was assessed by in vitro selection. For both organs, immunization increased substantially the frequency of molecules able to bind to the immunogen. The library derived from lymph nodes from naïve mice, however, was the most effective in generating diverse and high affinity candidates. These results illustrate that the use of a biased CDRH3 repertoire increases the performance of libraries, but reduces the clonal diversity, which may be detrimental for certain strategies.

  2. Importance of neonatal FcR in regulating the serum half-life of therapeutic proteins containing the Fc domain of human IgG1: a comparative study of the affinity of monoclonal antibodies and Fc-fusion proteins to human neonatal FcR.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takuo; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Tada, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Kanayasu-Toyoda, Toshie; Kawanishi, Toru; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-15

    The neonatal FcR (FcRn) binds to the Fc domain of IgG at acidic pH in the endosome and protects IgG from degradation, thereby contributing to the long serum half-life of IgG. To date, more than 20 mAb products and 5 Fc-fusion protein products have received marketing authorization approval in the United States, the European Union, or Japan. Many of these therapeutic proteins have the Fc domain of human IgG1; however, the serum half-lives differ in each protein. To elucidate the role of FcRn in the pharmacokinetics of Fc domain-containing therapeutic proteins, we evaluated the affinity of the clinically used human, humanized, chimeric, or mouse mAbs and Fc-fusion proteins to recombinant human FcRn by surface plasmon resonance analysis. The affinities of these therapeutic proteins to FcRn were found to be closely correlated with the serum half-lives reported from clinical studies, suggesting the important role of FcRn in regulating their serum half-lives. The relatively short serum half-life of Fc-fusion proteins was thought to arise from the low affinity to FcRn. The existence of some mAbs having high affinity to FcRn and a short serum half-life, however, suggested the involvement of other critical factor(s) in determining the serum half-life of such Abs. We further investigated the reason for the relatively low affinity of Fc-fusion proteins to FcRn and suggested the possibility that the receptor domain of Fc-fusion protein influences the structural environment of the FcRn binding region but not of the FcgammaRI binding region of the Fc domain.

  3. High Affinity Binders to EphA2 Isolated from Abdurin Scaffold Libraries; Characterization, Binding and Tumor Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Christopher; Mathonet, Pascale; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Diamandakis, Agata; Tomei, Licia; Demartis, Anna; Nardi, Chiara; Sambucini, Sonia; Missineo, Antonino; Alt, Karen; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.; Harris, Matt; Hedt, Amos; Weis, Roland; Gehlsen, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Abdurins are a novel antibody-like scaffold derived from the engineering of a single isolated CH2 domain of human IgG. Previous studies established the prolonged serum half-life of Abdurins, the result of a retained FcRn binding motif. Here we present data on the construction of large, diverse, phage-display and cell-free DNA display libraries and the isolation of high affinity binders to the cancer target, membrane-bound ephrin receptor tyrosine kinase class A2 (EphA2). Antigen binding regions were created by designing combinatorial libraries into the structural loops and Abdurins were selected using phage display methods. Initial binders were reformatted into new maturation libraries and low nanomolar binders were isolated using cell-free DNA display, CIS display. Further characterization confirmed binding of the Abdurins to both human and murine EphA2 proteins and exclusively to cell lines that expressed EphA2, followed by rapid internalization. Two different EphA2 binders were labeled with 64Cu, using a bifunctional MeCOSar chelator, and administered to mice bearing tumors from transplanted human prostate cancer cells, followed by PET/CT imaging. The anti-EphA2 Abdurins localized in the tumors as early as 4 hours after injection and continued to accumulate up to 48 hours when the imaging was completed. These data demonstrate the ability to isolate high affinity binders from the engineered Abdurin scaffold, which retain a long serum half-life, and specifically target tumors in a xenograft model. PMID:26313909

  4. Dissociation of motor maturation.

    PubMed

    DiMario, Francis J

    2003-06-01

    We prospectively acquired clinical data regarding the presentation, evaluation, and developmental progress of all patients identified with dissociated motor maturation to define their clinical outcomes. Children (N = 8) referred for evaluation of suspected cerebral palsy because of delayed sitting or walking and identified to have dissociated motor maturation were followed with serial clinical examination. All displayed the characteristic "sitting on air" posture while held in vertical suspension and had otherwise normal developmental assessments. This posture is composed of the hips held in flexion and abduction with the knees extended and feet plantar or dorsiflexed. Three children were initially evaluated at 10 months of age owing to absence of sitting and five other children were evaluated at a mean of 14 months (range 12-19 months) owing to inability to stand. Follow-up evaluations were conducted over a mean of 10.5 months (range 5-34 months). Five children were born prematurely at 34 to 36 weeks gestation. Denver Developmental Screening Test and general and neurologic examinations were normal except to note hypotonia in six children and the "sitting on air" posture in all of the children. Four children have older siblings or parents who "walked late" (after 15 months). On average, the children attained sitting by 8 months (range 7-10 months). One child did not crawl prior to independent walking, two children scooted rather than crawled, and five children crawled at an average of 13.5 months (range 10-16 months). All children cruised by a mean of 18 months (range 16-21.5 months) and attained independent walking by 20.1 months (range 18-25 months). Neuroimaging and serum creatine kinase enzyme testing were normal in two children who were tested. These eight children conform to the syndrome of dissociated motor maturation. The "sitting on air" posture serves as a diagnostic sign and anticipated excellent prognosis, but follow-up is required to ensure a normal

  5. Maturation in Larch 1

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Keith W.; Sherman, Christopher D.; Weber, Jill; Smith, Sandra Schiller; Singer, Patricia B.; Greenwood, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of maturation on the morphological and photosynthetic characteristics, as well as the expression of two genes involved in photosynthesis in the developing, current year foliage of Eastern larch (Larix laricina [Du Roi]) is described. These effects were observed on foliage during the third growing season after grafting of scions from trees of different ages onto 2 year old rootstock. Specific leaf weight (gram dry weight per square meter), leaf cross-sectional area (per square millimeter), and chlorophyll content (milligram per gram dry weight) all increase with increasing age in long shoot foliage from both indoor- and outdoor-grown trees. Net photosynthesis (NPS) (mole of CO2 per square millimeter per second) increases with age on indoor- but not outdoor-grown trees. NPS also increases with increased chlorophyll content, but outdoor-grown scions of all ages had higher chlorophyll content, and chlorophyll does not appear to be limiting for NPS outdoors. To extend these studies of maturation-related differences in foliar morphology and physiology to the molecular genetic level, sequences were cloned from the cab and rbsS gene families of larch. Both cab and rbcS gene families are expressed in foliage but not in roots, and they are expressed in light-grown seedlings of larch but only at very low levels in dark-grown seedlings (~2% of light-grown seedlings). Steady-state cab mRNA levels are relatively higher (~40%) in newly expanding short shoot foliage from juvenile plants compared to mature plants. Unlike cab, the expression of the rbcS gene family did not seem to vary with age. These data show that the maturation-related changes in morphological and physiological phenotypes are associated with changes in gene expression. No causal relationship has been established, however. Indeed, we conclude that the faster growth of juvenile scions reported previously (MS Greenwood, CA Hopper, KW Hutchison [1989] Plant Physiol 90: 406-412) is not due to increased NPS

  6. Generation, use, and validation of receptor-selective antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mackrill, John J

    2004-01-01

    Antibodies have proved invaluable in the study of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The utility of these immunoglobulin probes for investigation of protein structures and functions arises from their selectivity as well as their versatility. Antibodies can be used to analyze GPCR size, abundance, distribution, turnover, modification, interaction with other proteins, and functional properties. In this chapter, techniques for the generation and characterization of receptor-selective antibodies are described. Two protocols are given for the generation of antibodies: (1) development of polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) against synthetic peptides corresponding to a specific site within a GPCR and (2) selection of synthetic single-chain fragment variable (scFv) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from libraries expressed on the surface of bacteriophage. Immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for characterization of the selectivity and affinity of such antibodies are described. Finally, methods are given for improvement of the titer and specificity of PAbs.

  7. Production and Purification of Antibodies Against Histone Modifications.

    PubMed

    Guillemette, Benoit; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Wurtele, Hugo; Verreault, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies that recognize specific histone modifications are invaluable tools to study chromatin structure and function. There are numerous commercially available antibodies that recognize a remarkable diversity of histone modifications. Unfortunately, many of them fail to work in certain applications or lack the high degree of specificity required of these reagents. The production of affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies against histone modifications demands a little effort but, in return, provides extremely valuable tools that overcome many of the concerns and limitations of commercial antibodies. We present a series of protocols and guidelines for the production and use of large amounts of polyclonal antibodies that recognize modifications of canonical histones. Our protocols can be applied to obtain antibodies that occur in histone variants and proteins other than histones. In addition, some of our protocols are compatible with the production of monoclonal or recombinant antibodies.

  8. Advancements in nanosensors using plastic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Volkert, Anna A; Haes, Amanda J

    2014-01-07

    Biosensors possess recognition elements that bind to target molecules which lead to detectable signals. Incorporation of noble metal nanomaterials into biosensors allows for rapid and simple biomolecule detection. Herein, recent developments in affinity nanosensors will be discussed. These sensors often include naturally occurring recognition elements such as antibodies and DNA. As samples become more complex, new recognition elements are sought. For instance, plastic antibodies provide alternative and more environmentally stable recognition elements than traditional antibodies. Molecular imprinted polymers, a class of plastic antibodies, promote biomolecule recognition and detection. The incorporation of noble metal nanomaterials into molecular imprinted polymer biosensors for real world applications will be explored. Further improvements in the design of artificial recognition agents are envisioned to facilitate new methods for complex biological and chemical analyses.

  9. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  10. Antibody Isotype Switching in Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Senger, Kate; Hackney, Jason; Payandeh, Jian; Zarrin, Ali A

    2015-01-01

    The humoral or antibody-mediated immune response in vertebrates has evolved to respond to diverse antigenic challenges in various anatomical locations. Diversification of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) constant region via isotype switching allows for remarkable plasticity in the immune response, including versatile tissue distribution, Fc receptor binding, and complement fixation. This enables antibody molecules to exert various biological functions while maintaining antigen-binding specificity. Different immunoglobulin (Ig) classes include IgM, IgD, IgG, IgE, and IgA, which exist as surface-bound and secreted forms. High-affinity autoantibodies are associated with various autoimmune diseases such as lupus and arthritis, while defects in components of isotype switching are associated with infections. A major route of infection used by a large number of pathogens is invasion of mucosal surfaces within the respiratory, digestive, or urinary tract. Most infections of this nature are initially limited by effector mechanisms such as secretory IgA antibodies. Mucosal surfaces have been proposed as a major site for the genesis of adaptive immune responses, not just in fighting infections but also in tolerating commensals and constant dietary antigens. We will discuss the evolution of isotype switching in various species and provide an overview of the function of various isotypes with a focus on IgA, which is universally important in gut homeostasis as well as pathogen clearance. Finally, we will discuss the utility of antibodies as therapeutic modalities.

  11. Studies on the Transfer of Antibody Producing Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Nossal, G. J. V.

    1959-01-01

    Normal adult spleen cells were antigenically stimulated by incubation with isolated flagella from Salmonella bacteria, and after neutralization of free antigen and washing, were transferred to normal and sublethally X-irradiated mice and rats of various ages by intraperitoneal injection. Neonatal rats and Hall Institute mice could not produce antibody following such injections, but more mature rats and Hall Institute mice, and neonatal C3H mice, could produce antibody. Cells from immunized spleens were secondarily stimulated in vitro and transferred to neonatal and more mature recipients. Regardless of the age of the recipients, antibody production typical of a secondary response ensued. Cells from neonatal rat spleens were stimulated in vitro and transferred to more mature recipient rats. Some antibody production resulted. The theoretical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:13653734

  12. Minute Time Scale Prolyl Isomerization Governs Antibody Recognition of an Intrinsically Disordered Immunodominant Epitope*

    PubMed Central

    Fassolari, Marisol; Chemes, Lucia B.; Gallo, Mariana; Smal, Clara; Sánchez, Ignacio E.; de Prat-Gay, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Conformational rearrangements in antibody·antigen recognition are essential events where kinetic discrimination of isomers expands the universe of combinations. We investigated the interaction mechanism of a monoclonal antibody, M1, raised against E7 from human papillomavirus, a prototypic viral oncoprotein and a model intrinsically disordered protein. The mapped 12-amino acid immunodominant epitope lies within a “hinge” region between the N-terminal intrinsically disordered and the C-terminal globular domains. Kinetic experiments show that despite being within an intrinsically disordered region, the hinge E7 epitope has at least two populations separated by a high energy barrier. Nuclear magnetic resonance traced the origin of this barrier to a very slow (t½ ∼4 min) trans-cis prolyl isomerization event involving changes in secondary structure. The less populated (10%) cis isomer is the binding-competent species, thus requiring the 90% of molecules in the trans configuration to isomerize before binding. The association rate for the cis isomer approaches 6 × 107 m−1 s−1, a ceiling for antigen-antibody interactions. Mutagenesis experiments showed that Pro-41 in E7Ep was required for both binding and isomerization. After a slow postbinding unimolecular rearrangement, a consolidated complex with KD = 1.2 × 10−7 m is reached. Our results suggest that presentation of this viral epitope by the antigen-presenting cells would have to be “locked” in the cis conformation, in opposition to the most populated trans isomer, in order to select the specific antibody clone that goes through affinity and kinetic maturation. PMID:23504368

  13. Human Circulating PD-1+CXCR3−CXCR5+ Memory Tfh Cells Are Highly Functional and Correlate with Broadly Neutralizing HIV Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Locci, Michela; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Landais, Elise; Wu, Jennifer; Kroenke, Mark A.; Arlehamn, Cecilia L.; Su, Laura F.; Cubas, Rafael; Davis, Mark M.; Sette, Alessandro; Haddad, Elias K.; Poignard, Pascal; Crotty, Shane

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The vast majority of currently licensed human vaccines work on the basis of long-term protective antibody responses. It is now conceivable that an antibody-dependent HIV vaccine might be possible, given the discovery of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) in some HIV-infected individuals. However, these antibodies are difficult to develop and have characteristics indicative of a high degree of affinity maturation in germinal centers (GCs). CD4+ T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are specialized for B cell help and necessary for GCs. Therefore, the development of HIV bnAbs might depend on Tfh cells. Here, we identified in normal individuals a subpopulation of circulating memory PD-1+CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells that are resting memory cells most related to bona fide GC Tfh cells by gene expression profile, cytokine profile, and functional properties. Importantly, the frequency of these cells correlated with the development of bnAbs against HIV in a large cohort of HIV+ individuals. PMID:24035365

  14. Human circulating PD-1+CXCR3-CXCR5+ memory Tfh cells are highly functional and correlate with broadly neutralizing HIV antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Locci, Michela; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Landais, Elise; Wu, Jennifer; Kroenke, Mark A; Arlehamn, Cecilia L; Su, Laura F; Cubas, Rafael; Davis, Mark M; Sette, Alessandro; Haddad, Elias K; Poignard, Pascal; Crotty, Shane

    2013-10-17

    The vast majority of currently licensed human vaccines work on the basis of long-term protective antibody responses. It is now conceivable that an antibody-dependent HIV vaccine might be possible, given the discovery of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) in some HIV-infected individuals. However, these antibodies are difficult to develop and have characteristics indicative of a high degree of affinity maturation in germinal centers (GCs). CD4⁺ T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are specialized for B cell help and necessary for GCs. Therefore, the development of HIV bnAbs might depend on Tfh cells. Here, we identified in normal individuals a subpopulation of circulating memory PD-1⁺CXCR5⁺CD4⁺ T cells that are resting memory cells most related to bona fide GC Tfh cells by gene expression profile, cytokine profile, and functional properties. Importantly, the frequency of these cells correlated with the development of bnAbs against HIV in a large cohort of HIV⁺ individuals.

  15. Quantitative cumulative biodistribution of antibodies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Victor; Palma, Enzo; Tesar, Devin B; Mundo, Eduardo E; Bumbaca, Daniela; Torres, Elizabeth K; Reyes, Noe A; Shen, Ben Q; Fielder, Paul J; Prabhu, Saileta; Khawli, Leslie A; Boswell, C Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) plays an important and well-known role in antibody recycling in endothelial and hematopoietic cells and thus it influences the systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of immunoglobulin G (IgG). However, considerably less is known about FcRn’s role in the metabolism of IgG within individual tissues after intravenous administration. To elucidate the organ distribution and gain insight into the metabolism of humanized IgG1 antibodies with different binding affinities FcRn, comparative biodistribution studies in normal CD-1 mice were conducted. Here, we generated variants of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D-specific antibody (humanized anti-gD) with increased and decreased FcRn binding affinity by genetic engineering without affecting antigen specificity. These antibodies were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, purified and paired radiolabeled with iodine-125 and indium-111. Equal amounts of I-125-labeled and In-111-labeled antibodies were mixed and intravenously administered into mice at 5 mg/kg. This approach allowed us to measure both the real-time IgG uptake (I-125) and cumulative uptake of IgG and catabolites (In-111) in individual tissues up to 1 week post-injection. The PK and distribution of the wild-type IgG and the variant with enhanced binding for FcRn were largely similar to each other, but vastly different for the rapidly cleared low-FcRn-binding variant. Uptake in individual tissues varied across time, FcRn binding affinity, and radiolabeling method. The liver and spleen emerged as the most concentrated sites of IgG catabolism in the absence of FcRn protection. These data provide an increased understanding of FcRn’s role in antibody PK and catabolism at the tissue level. PMID:24572100

  16. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  17. Molecular stabilization effects of interactions between anti-metatype antibodies and liganded antibody.

    PubMed

    Weidner, K M; Denzin, L K; Voss, E W

    1992-05-25

    Anti-metatype antibodies have been described as antibodies which recognize ligand-induced conformational changes in the antibody variable region. Additionally, anti-metatype antibodies, produced by multiple immunizations with liganded high affinity monoclonal anti-fluorescein antibody 4-4-20, enhanced the lifetime of monoclonal antibody 4-4-20-fluorescein complex. To better understand the mechanism of the delayed dissociation rate, deuterium oxide was used to probe the liganded active site. The rate and extent of deuterium oxide-mediated fluorescence enhancement of bound ligand served to monitor the conformational dynamics of the active site in the presence and absence of anti-metatype antibodies. Results showed that anti-metatype antibodies reduced the rate and extent of deuterium oxide-mediated fluorescence enhancement of 4-4-20, a single-chain derivative of 4-4-20 (consisting of the variable domains and a polylinker), and idiotypically related monoclonal anti-fluorescein antibodies suggesting that anti-metatype stabilized the liganded active site. Size exclusion liquid chromatography was utilized to isolate the liganded antibody-anti-metatype complex. Liganded single chain antibody 4-4-20 was mixed with 10-fold molar excess anti-metatype Fab fragments, and a major complex eluted with an apparent M(r) 249,000. The apparent molecular weight of this complex inferred that one liganded single chain antibody was bound by five antimetatype Fab fragments. Spectral analysis confirmed these results and the characteristic delayed rate of ligand dissociation was also observed for the isolated complex. The results suggest that anti-metatype antibodies stabilize the liganded conformation by forming a large, stable, macromolecular complex.

  18. Envelope Variants Circulating as Initial Neutralization Breadth Developed in Two HIV-Infected Subjects Stimulate Multiclade Neutralizing Antibodies in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Malherbe, Delphine C.; Pissani, Franco; Sather, D. Noah; Guo, Biwei; Pandey, Shilpi; Sutton, William F.; Stuart, Andrew B.; Robins, Harlan; Park, Byung; Krebs, Shelly J.; Schuman, Jason T.; Kalams, Spyros; Hessell, Ann J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Identifying characteristics of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope that are effective in generating broad, protective antibodies remains a hurdle to HIV vaccine design. Emerging evidence of the development of broad and potent neutralizing antibodies in HIV-infected subjects suggests that founder and subsequent progeny viruses may express unique antigenic motifs that contribute to this developmental pathway. We hypothesize that over the course of natural infection, B cells are programmed to develop broad antibodies by exposure to select populations of emerging envelope quasispecies variants. To test this hypothesis, we identified two unrelated subjects whose antibodies demonstrated increasing neutralization breadth against a panel of HIV-1 isolates over time. Full-length functional env genes were cloned longitudinally from these subjects from months after infection through 2.6 to 5.8 years of infection. Motifs associated with the development of breadth in published, cross-sectional studies were found in both subjects. We compared the immunogenicity of envelope vaccines derived from time points obtained during and after broadening of neutralization activity within these subjects. Rabbits were coimmunized four times with selected multiple gp160 DNAs and gp140-trimeric envelope proteins. The affinity of the polyclonal response increased as a function of boosting. The most rapid and persistent neutralization of multiclade tier 1 viruses was elicited by envelopes that were circulating in plasma at time points prior to the development of 50% neutralization breadth in both human subjects. The breadth elicited in rabbits was not improved by exposure to later envelope variants. These data have implications for vaccine development in describing a target time point to identify optimal envelope immunogens. IMPORTANCE Vaccine protection against viral infections correlates with the presence of neutralizing antibodies; thus, vaccine components capable

  19. Immunologic characteristics of HIV-infected individuals who make broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Borrow, Persephone; Moody, M Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) capable of inhibiting infection with diverse variants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a key, as-yet-unachieved goal of prophylactic HIV-1 vaccine strategies. However, some HIV-infected individuals develop bnAbs after approximately 2-4 years of infection, enabling analysis of features of these antibodies and the immunological environment that enables their induction. Distinct subsets of CD4(+) T cells play opposing roles in the regulation of humoral responses: T follicular helper (Tfh) cells support germinal center formation and provide help for affinity maturation and the development of memory B cells and plasma cells, while regulatory CD4(+) (Treg) cells including T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells inhibit the germinal center reaction to limit autoantibody production. BnAbs exhibit high somatic mutation frequencies, long third heavy-chain complementarity determining regions, and/or autoreactivity, suggesting that bnAb generation is likely to be highly dependent on the activity of CD4(+) Tfh cells, and may be constrained by host tolerance controls. This review discusses what is known about the immunological environment during HIV-1 infection, in particular alterations in CD4(+) Tfh, Treg, and Tfr populations and autoantibody generation, and how this is related to bnAb development, and considers the implications for HIV-1 vaccine design.

  20. Antibody-based therapeutics for the treatment of human B cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Baskar, Sivasubramanian; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2013-02-01

    The dynamic expression of various phenotypic markers during B cell development not only defines the particular stage in ontogeny but also provides the necessary growth, differentiation, maturation and survival signals. When a B cell at any given stage becomes cancerous, these cell surface molecules, intracellular signaling molecules, and the over-expressed gene products become favorite targets for potential therapeutic intervention. Various adaptive and adoptive immunotherapeutic approaches induce T cell and antibody responses against cancer cells, and successful remission leading to minimal residual disease has been obtained. Nonetheless, subsequent relapse and development of resistant clones prompted further development and several novel strategies are evolving. Engineered monoclonal antibodies with high affinity and specificity to target antigens have been developed and used either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs. They are also used as vehicles to deliver cytotoxic drugs, toxins, or radionuclides that are either directly conjugated or encapsulated in liposomal vesicles. Likewise, genetically engineered T cells bearing chimeric antigen receptors are used to redirect cytotoxicity to antigen-positive target cells. This review describes recent advancements in some of these adoptive immunotherapeutic strategies targeting B cell malignancies.

  1. Efficient method to optimize antibodies using avian leukosis virus display and eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changming; Pike, Gennett M; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Correia, Cristina; Kaufmann, Scott H; Federspiel, Mark J

    2015-08-11

    Antibody-based therapeutics have now had success in the clinic. The affinity and specificity of the antibody for the target ligand determines the specificity of therapeutic delivery and off-target side effects. The discovery and optimization of high-affinity antibodies to important therapeutic targets could be significantly improved by the availability of a robust, eukaryotic display technology comparable to phage display that would overcome the protein translation limitations of microorganisms. The use of eukaryotic cells would improve the diversity of the displayed antibodies that can be screened and optimized as well as more seamlessly transition into a large-scale mammalian expression system for clinical production. In this study, we demonstrate that the replication and polypeptide display characteristics of a eukaryotic retrovirus, avian leukosis virus (ALV), offers a robust, eukaryotic version of bacteriophage display. The binding affinity of a model single-chain Fv antibody was optimized by using ALV display, improving affinity >2,000-fold, from micromolar to picomolar levels. We believe ALV display provides an extension to antibody display on microorganisms and offers virus and cell display platforms in a eukaryotic expression system. ALV display should enable an improvement in the diversity of properly processed and functional antibody variants that can be screened and affinity-optimized to improve promising antibody candidates.

  2. Simple method of monoclonal antibody production against mammalian cellular prion protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-sheng; Ding, Yao-zhong; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Hao-tai; Zhu, Xiao-ling; Cai, Xue-peng; Liu, Xiang-tao; Xie, Qing-ge

    2010-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against prion protein (PrP) are powerful tools for diagnosis and research in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Ten MAbs to recombinant/native cellular PrP (PrPc) in mammals were prepared with a simple method and identified in detail. Normal BALB/c mice were immunized with the recombinant bovine mature PrP (rbomPrP) and PrP27-30 (rboPrP27-30) expressed in Escherichia coli. The immunized splenocytes were fused with SP2/0 mouse myeloma cells, and positive hybridomas were selected by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The characterizations of these MAbs, such as Ig, Ig subclass, titer, affinity index, specificity, epitopes recognized, and binding to recombinant/native PrPc of cattle, sheep, or human beings, were evaluated by Western blotting and indirect or sandwich ELISA. Ten MAbs could be divided into five groups depending on the results of indirect ELISA additivity test and their reaction to E. coli-expressed truncated-PrPs. Isotyping of the MAbs revealed that they belong to IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b subclass. Their indirect ELISA titers were between 10(3) and 10(6). Affinity constants were between 10(9) and 10(12) M(-1). Ten MAbs specifically reacted with the rbomPrP, without binding to prion-like protein Doppel and the lysates of E. coli. These MAbs could also respond to the recombinant mature PrP (rmPrP) of sheep and human beings. Also of interest was the ability of the MAbs to bind with dimer of rmPrP and PrP extracted from the brain tissue of cattle or sheep. We conclude that anti-PrP MAbs successfully prepared with a simple method could potentially be useful in mammalian prion research.

  3. Development of a novel mammalian cell surface antibody display platform.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Jacobsen, Frederick W; Cai, Ling; Chen, Qing; Shen, Weyen David

    2010-01-01

    Antibody display systems have been successfully applied to screen, select and characterize antibody fragments. These systems typically use prokaryotic organisms such as phage and bacteria or lower eukaryotic organisms, such as yeast. These organisms possess either no or different post-translational modification functions from mammalian cells and prefer to display small antibody fragments instead of full-length IgGs. We report here a novel mammalian cell-based antibody display platform that displays full-length functional antibodies on the surface of mammalian cells. Through recombinase-mediated DNA integration, each host cell contains one copy of the gene of interest in the genome. Utilizing a hot-spot integration site, the expression levels of the gene of interest are high and comparable between clones, ensuring a high signal to noise ratio. Coupled with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) technology, our platform is high throughput and can distinguish antibodies with very high antigen binding affinities directly on the cell surface. Single-round FACS can enrich high affinity antibodies by more than 500 fold. Antibodies with significantly improved neutralizing activity have been identified from a randomly mutagenized library, demonstrating the power of this platform in screening and selecting antibody therapeutics.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin A and cell lines for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Bigbee, William L.; Jensen, Ronald H.; Fong, Stella S. N.; Langlois, Richard G.

    1988-01-01

    Cloned mouse hybridoma cell lines have been established which continuously produce antibodies that are highly specific to and exhibit high affinity for glycophorin A.sup.N and differentiate between the M and N forms of human glycophorin A.

  5. 01-ERD-111 - The Development of Synthetic High Affinity Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J; Balhorn, R; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F; Zeller, L

    2004-02-05

    The aim of this project was to develop Synthetic High-Affinity Ligands (SHALs), which bind with high affinity and specificity to proteins of interest for national security and cancer therapy applications. The aim of producing synthetic ligands for sensory devices as an alternative to antibody-based detection assays and therapeutic agents is to overcome the drawbacks associated with antibody-based in next-generation sensors and systems. The focus area of the project was the chemical synthesis of the SHALs. The project concentrated on two different protein targets. (a) The C fragment of tetanus and botulinum toxin, potential biowarfare agents. A SHAL for tetanus or botulinum toxin would be incorporated into a sensory device for the toxins. (b) HLA-DR10, a protein found in high abundance on the surface of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. A SHAL specific to a tumor marker, labeled with a radionuclide, would enable the targeted delivery of radiation therapy to metastatic disease. The technical approach used to develop a SHAL for each protein target will be described in more detail below. However, in general, the develo