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Sample records for antibody affinity maturation

  1. Visualizing Antibody Affinity Maturation in Germinal Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tas, Jeroen M.J.; Mesin, Luka; Pasqual, Giulia; Targ, Sasha; Jacobsen, Johanne T.; Mano, Yasuko M.; Chen, Casie S.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Browne, Edward P.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Victora, Gabriel D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies somatically mutate to attain high affinity in germinal centers (GCs). There, competition between B cell clones and among somatic mutants of each clone drives an increase in average affinity across the population. The extent to which higher-affinity cells eliminating competitors restricts clonal diversity is unknown. By combining multiphoton microscopy and sequencing, we show that tens to hundreds of distinct B cell clones seed each GC, and that GCs lose clonal diversity at widely disparate rates. Furthermore, efficient affinity maturation can occur in the absence of homogenizing selection, ensuring that many clones can mature in parallel within the same GC. Our findings have implications for development of vaccines in which antibodies with non-immunodominant specificities must be elicited, as is the case for HIV-1 and influenza. PMID:26912368

  2. Antibody Affinity Maturation in Fishes—Our Current Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Magor, Brad G.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been believed that fish lack antibody affinity maturation, in part because they were thought to lack germinal centers. Recent research done on sharks and bony fishes indicates that these early vertebrates are able to affinity mature their antibodies. This article reviews the functionality of the fish homologue of the immunoglobulin (Ig) mutator enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). We also consider the protein and molecular evidence for Ig somatic hypermutation and antibody affinity maturation. In the context of recent evidence for a putative proto-germinal center in fishes we propose some possible reasons that observed affinity maturation in fishes often seems lacking and propose future work that might shed further light on this process in fishes. PMID:26264036

  3. Tailored Immunogens Direct Affinity Maturation toward HIV Neutralizing Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Briney, Bryan; Sok, Devin; Jardine, Joseph G; Kulp, Daniel W; Skog, Patrick; Menis, Sergey; Jacak, Ronald; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; de Val, Natalia; Sesterhenn, Fabian; Le, Khoa M; Ramos, Alejandra; Jones, Meaghan; Saye-Francisco, Karen L; Blane, Tanya R; Spencer, Skye; Georgeson, Erik; Hu, Xiaozhen; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; Sarkar, Anita; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B; Nemazee, David; Burton, Dennis R; Schief, William R

    2016-09-01

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a primary goal of HIV vaccine development. VRC01-class bnAbs are important vaccine leads because their precursor B cells targeted by an engineered priming immunogen are relatively common among humans. This priming immunogen has demonstrated the ability to initiate a bnAb response in animal models, but recall and maturation toward bnAb development has not been shown. Here, we report the development of boosting immunogens designed to guide the genetic and functional maturation of previously primed VRC01-class precursors. Boosting a transgenic mouse model expressing germline VRC01 heavy chains produced broad neutralization of near-native isolates (N276A) and weak neutralization of fully native HIV. Functional and genetic characteristics indicate that the boosted mAbs are consistent with partially mature VRC01-class antibodies and place them on a maturation trajectory that leads toward mature VRC01-class bnAbs. The results show how reductionist sequential immunization can guide maturation of HIV bnAb responses.

  4. Tailored Immunogens Direct Affinity Maturation toward HIV Neutralizing Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Briney, Bryan; Sok, Devin; Jardine, Joseph G; Kulp, Daniel W; Skog, Patrick; Menis, Sergey; Jacak, Ronald; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; de Val, Natalia; Sesterhenn, Fabian; Le, Khoa M; Ramos, Alejandra; Jones, Meaghan; Saye-Francisco, Karen L; Blane, Tanya R; Spencer, Skye; Georgeson, Erik; Hu, Xiaozhen; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Adachi, Yumiko; Kubitz, Michael; Sarkar, Anita; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B; Nemazee, David; Burton, Dennis R; Schief, William R

    2016-09-01

    Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a primary goal of HIV vaccine development. VRC01-class bnAbs are important vaccine leads because their precursor B cells targeted by an engineered priming immunogen are relatively common among humans. This priming immunogen has demonstrated the ability to initiate a bnAb response in animal models, but recall and maturation toward bnAb development has not been shown. Here, we report the development of boosting immunogens designed to guide the genetic and functional maturation of previously primed VRC01-class precursors. Boosting a transgenic mouse model expressing germline VRC01 heavy chains produced broad neutralization of near-native isolates (N276A) and weak neutralization of fully native HIV. Functional and genetic characteristics indicate that the boosted mAbs are consistent with partially mature VRC01-class antibodies and place them on a maturation trajectory that leads toward mature VRC01-class bnAbs. The results show how reductionist sequential immunization can guide maturation of HIV bnAb responses. PMID:27610570

  5. Antibody response and antibody affinity maturation in cats with experimental proliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Bishop, S A; Bailey, M; Lucke, V M; Stokes, C R

    1992-07-01

    An experimental model of proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) in the cat, which closely resembles human proliferative forms of GN, has been used to study the role of antibody and antibody affinity in the development of immune complex-mediated renal disease. The serum IgG and IgM antibody response to antigen, average antibody affinity (avidity) and affinity heterogeneity of the IgG and IgM populations was assessed at varying times after commencement of chronic immunization with the antigen, human serum albumin (HSA), by enzyme immunoassay. Cats could be classified according to whether they were "low", "intermediate" or "high" IgG responders, by quantification of serum IgG values. Cats with the lowest serum IgG values failed to develop glomerulonephritis. However, there was no relationship between actual IgG values and the severity of the induced disease. In contrast to IgG, there was no division of cats into low or high IgM anti-HSA responders. Again, cats with the lowest IgM values failed to develop GN, but, more interestingly, a late, marked increase in serum IgM anti-HSA occurred only in cats that developed clinical signs of GN (anterior uveitis and nephrotic syndrome). Maturation of average, functional IgG affinity (avidity) for HSA following chronic immunization was clearly demonstrated for all cats. At the end of the experiment, all cats had IgG of high affinity for HSA and the average affinity heterogeneity of the IgG populations was less than in measurements taken earlier. Values of IgG affinity at the end of the experiment were very similar both in cats which developed GN and in those which remained clinically, biochemically and pathologically normal. In contrast to IgG antibody, some cats developed IgM of increased affinity, whilst others produced antibody of reduced affinity, following chronic immunization. There was no correlation between the development of disease and the production of either low or high affinity IgM antibody. Data indicated that an

  6. Maturation of functional antibody affinity in animals immunised with synthetic foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, G; Reid, E; Dimarchi, R D; Gale, C; Doel, T R

    1992-03-01

    A good correlation exists between specific neutralising antibody titre and protection against challenge with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in infected or virus-vaccinated cattle, but not in the case of animals immunised with synthetic FMDV peptides. Therefore, mechanisms other than simple neutralisation are likely to be important in vivo. Antibody affinity may influence the protective capacity of sera from immunised animals and experiments were carried out to measure the functional affinity for synthetic FMDV peptide of sera from guinea pigs and cattle given various synthetic vaccines. In guinea pigs given a single dose of synthetic vaccine, antibody affinity increased with time after immunisation. In cattle, however, administration of a second dose of peptide 21 days after the first markedly retarded the process of affinity maturation. For guinea pig sera of equivalent neutralising activity, those of higher functional affinity had higher protective indices than those of lower functional affinity. Knowledge of the importance of antibody affinity in protection against FMD is important for an improved understanding of the mechanisms of protection and for the design of novel vaccines. PMID:1316628

  7. CD4+ T Cells Promote Antibody Production but Not Sustained Affinity Maturation during Borrelia burgdorferi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Rebecca A.; Hastey, Christine J.

    2014-01-01

    CD4 T cells are crucial for enhancing B cell-mediated immunity, supporting the induction of high-affinity, class-switched antibody responses, long-lived plasma cells, and memory B cells. Previous studies showed that the immune response to Borrelia burgdorferi appears to lack robust T-dependent B cell responses, as neither long-lived plasma cells nor memory B cells form for months after infection, and nonswitched IgM antibodies are produced continuously during this chronic disease. These data prompted us to evaluate the induction and functionality of B. burgdorferi infection-induced CD4 TFH cells. We report that CD4 T cells were effectively primed and TFH cells induced after B. burgdorferi infection. These CD4 T cells contributed to the control of B. burgdorferi burden and supported the induction of B. burgdorferi-specific IgG responses. However, while affinity maturation of antibodies against a prototypic T-dependent B. burgdorferi protein, Arthritis-related protein (Arp), were initiated, these increases were reversed later, coinciding with the previously observed involution of germinal centers. The cessation of affinity maturation was not due to the appearance of inhibitory or exhausted CD4 T cells or a strong induction of regulatory T cells. In vitro T-B cocultures demonstrated that T cells isolated from B. burgdorferi-infected but not B. burgdorferi-immunized mice supported the rapid differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells rather than continued proliferation, mirroring the induction of rapid short-lived instead of long-lived T-dependent antibody responses in vivo. The data further suggest that B. burgdorferi infection drives the humoral response away from protective, high-affinity, and long-lived antibody responses and toward the rapid induction of strongly induced, short-lived antibodies of limited efficacy. PMID:25312948

  8. Autoimmunity and antibody affinity maturation are modulated by genetic variants on mouse chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Collin, Roxanne; Dugas, Véronique; Chabot-Roy, Geneviève; Salem, David; Zahn, Astrid; Di Noia, Javier M; Rauch, Joyce; Lesage, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune diseases result from a break in immune tolerance leading to an attack on self-antigens. Autoantibody levels serve as a predictive tool for the early diagnosis of many autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. We find that a genetic locus on mouse chromosome 12 influences the affinity maturation of antibodies as well as autoantibody production. Thus, we generated a NOD.H2(k) congenic strain bearing B10 alleles at the locus comprised within the D12Mit184 and D12Mit12 markers, which we named NOD.H2(k)-Chr12. We determined the biological relevance of the Chr12 locus on the autoimmune process using an antigen-specific TCR transgenic autoimmune mouse model. Specifically, the 3A9 TCR transgene, which recognizes a peptide from hen egg lysozyme (HEL) in the context of I-A(k), and the HEL transgene, which is expressed under the rat-insulin promoter (iHEL), were bred into the NOD.H2(k)-Chr12 congenic strain. In the resulting 3A9 TCR:iHEL NOD.H2(k)-Chr12 mice, we observed a significant decrease in diabetes incidence as well as a decrease in both the quantity and affinity of HEL-specific IgG autoantibodies relative to 3A9 TCR:iHEL NOD.H2(k) mice. Notably, the decrease in autoantibodies due to the Chr12 locus was not restricted to the TCR transgenic model, as it was also observed in the non-transgenic NOD.H2(k) setting. Of importance, antibody affinity maturation upon immunization and re-challenge was also impeded in NOD.H2(k)-Chr12 congenic mice relative to NOD.H2(k) mice. Together, these results demonstrate that a genetic variant(s) present within the Chr12 locus plays a global role in modulating antibody affinity maturation.

  9. Yeast Display-Based Antibody Affinity Maturation Using Detergent-Solubilized Cell Lysates.

    PubMed

    Tillotson, Benjamin J; Lajoie, Jason M; Shusta, Eric V

    2015-01-01

    It is often desired to identify or engineer antibodies that target membrane proteins (MPs). However, due to their inherent insolubility in aqueous solutions, MPs are often incompatible with in vitro antibody discovery and optimization platforms. Recently, we adapted yeast display technology to accommodate detergent-solubilized cell lysates as sources of MP antigens. The following protocol details the incorporation of cell lysates into a kinetic screen designed to obtain antibodies with improved affinity via slowed dissociation from an MP antigen. PMID:26060070

  10. Yeast display-based antibody affinity maturation using detergent-solubilized cell lysates

    PubMed Central

    Tillotson, Benjamin J.; Lajoie, Jason M.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2016-01-01

    Summary It is often desired to identify or engineer antibodies that target membrane proteins (MPs). However, due to their inherent insolubility in aqueous solutions, MPs are often incompatible with in vitro antibody discovery and optimization platforms. Recently, we adapted yeast display technology to accommodate detergent-solubilized cell lysates as sources of MP antigens. The following protocol details the incorporation of cell lysates into a kinetic screen designed to obtain antibodies with improved affinity via slowed dissociation from an MP antigen. PMID:26060070

  11. Development of an affinity-matured humanized anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Takeshi; Maru, Takamitsu; Tahara, Kazuhiro; Sanada, Hideaki; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Asano, Ryutaro; Kumagai, Izumi

    2013-02-01

    We showed previously that humanization of 528, a murine anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody, causes reduced affinity for its target. Here, to improve the affinity of the humanized antibody for use in cancer immunotherapy, we constructed phage display libraries focused on the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of the antibody and carried out affinity selection. Two-step selections using libraries constructed in a stepwise manner enabled a 32-fold affinity enhancement of humanized 528 (h528). Thermodynamic analysis of the interactions between the variable domain fragment of h528 (h528Fv) mutants and the soluble extracellular domain of EGFR indicated that the h528Fv mutants obtained from the first selection showed a large increase in negative enthalpy change due to binding, resulting in affinity enhancement. Furthermore, mutants from the second selection showed a decrease in entropy loss, which led to further affinity maturation. These results suggest that a single mutation in the heavy chain variable domain (i.e. Tyr(52) to Trp) enthalpically contributed for overcoming the energetic barrier to the antigen-antibody interaction, which was a major hurdle for the in vitro affinity maturation of h528. We reported previously that the humanized bispecific diabody hEx3 Db, which targets EGFR and CD3, shows strong anti-tumor activity. hEx3 Db mutants, in which the variable domains of h528 were replaced with those of the affinity-enhanced mutants, were prepared and characterized. In a growth inhibition assay of tumor cells, the hEx3 Db mutants showed stronger anti-tumor activity than that of hEx3 Db, suggesting that affinity enhancement of h528Fv enhances the anti-tumor activity of the bispecific diabody. PMID:23118340

  12. Combining somatic mutations present in different in vivo affinity-matured antibodies isolated from immunized Lama glama yields ultra-potent antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Klarenbeek, Alex; Blanchetot, Christophe; Schragel, Georg; Sadi, Ava S; Ongenae, Nico; Hemrika, Wieger; Wijdenes, John; Spinelli, Silvia; Desmyter, Aline; Cambillau, Christian; Hultberg, Anna; Kretz-Rommel, Anke; Dreier, Torsten; De Haard, Hans J W; Roovers, Rob C

    2016-04-01

    Highly potent human antibodies are required to therapeutically neutralize cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) that is involved in many inflammatory diseases and malignancies. Although a number of mutagenesis approaches exist to perform antibody affinity maturation, these may cause antibody instability and production issues. Thus, a robust and easy antibody affinity maturation strategy to increase antibody potency remains highly desirable. By immunizing llama, cloning the 'immune' antibody repertoire and using phage display, we selected a diverse set of IL-6 antagonistic Fabs. Heavy chain shuffling was performed on the Fab with lowest off-rate, resulting in a panel of variants with even lower off-rate. Structural analysis of the Fab:IL-6 complex suggests that the increased affinity was partly due to a serine to tyrosine switch in HCDR2. This translated into neutralizing capacity in an in vivo model of IL-6 induced SAA production. Finally, a novel Fab library was designed, encoding all variations found in the natural repertoire of VH genes identified after heavy chain shuffling. High stringency selections resulted in identification of a Fab with 250-fold increased potency when re-formatted into IgG1. Compared with a heavily engineered anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody currently in clinical development, this IgG was at least equally potent, showing the engineering process to have had led to a highly potent anti-IL-6 antibody.

  13. Affinity Maturation of Monoclonal Antibody 1E11 by Targeted Randomization in CDR3 Regions Optimizes Therapeutic Antibody Targeting of HER2-Positive Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ko, Bong-Kook; Choi, Soyoung; Cui, Lei Guang; Lee, Young-Ha; Hwang, In-Sik; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Shim, Hyunbo; Lee, Jong-Seo

    2015-01-01

    Anti-HER2 murine monoclonal antibody 1E11 has strong and synergistic anti-tumor activity in HER2-overexpressing gastric cancer cells when used in combination with trastuzumab. We presently optimized this antibody for human therapeutics. First, the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of the murine antibody were grafted onto human germline immunoglobulin variable genes. No difference in affinity and biological activity was observed between chimeric 1E11 (ch1E11) and humanized 1E11 (hz1E11). Next, affinity maturation of hz1E11 was performed by the randomization of CDR-L3 and H3 residues followed by stringent biopanning selection. Milder selection pressure favored the selection of more diverse clones, whereas higher selection stringency resulted in the convergence of the panning output to a smaller number of clones with improved affinity. Clone 1A12 had four amino acid substitutions in CDR-L3, and showed a 10-fold increase in affinity compared to the parental clone and increased potency in an in vitro anti-proliferative activity assay with HER2-overepxressing gastric cancer cells. Clone 1A12 inhibited tumor growth of NCI-N87 xenograft model with similar efficacy to trastuzumab alone, and the combination treatment of 1A12 and trastuzumab completely removed the established tumors. These results suggest that humanized and affinity matured monoclonal antibody 1A12 is a highly optimized molecule for future therapeutic development against HER2-positive tumors.

  14. Affinity Maturation of a Potent Family of HIV Antibodies Is Primarily Focused on Accommodating or Avoiding Glycans.

    PubMed

    Garces, Fernando; Lee, Jeong Hyun; de Val, Natalia; de la Pena, Alba Torrents; Kong, Leopold; Puchades, Cristina; Hua, Yuanzi; Stanfield, Robyn L; Burton, Dennis R; Moore, John P; Sanders, Rogier W; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2015-12-15

    The high-mannose patch on the HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoprotein is the epicenter for binding of the potent broadly neutralizing PGT121 family of antibodies, but strategies for generating such antibodies by vaccination have not been defined. We generated structures of inferred antibody intermediates by X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy to elucidate the molecular events that occurred during evolution of this family. Binding analyses revealed that affinity maturation was primarily focused on avoiding, accommodating, or binding the N137 glycan. The overall antibody approach angle to Env was defined very early in the maturation process, yet some variation evolved in the PGT121 family branches that led to differences in glycan specificities in their respective epitopes. Furthermore, we determined a crystal structure of the recombinant BG505 SOSIP.664 HIV-1 trimer with a PGT121 family member at 3.0 Å that, in concert with these antibody intermediate structures, provides insights to advance design of HIV vaccine candidates. PMID:26682982

  15. Affinity maturation of T-cell receptor-like antibodies for Wilms tumor 1 peptide greatly enhances therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Tassev, Dimiter V.; Hasan, Aisha; Kuo, Tzu-Yun; Guo, Hong-fen; O’Reilly, Richard J.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2016-01-01

    WT1126 (RMFPNAPYL) is a human leukocyte antigen-A2 (HLA-A2) restricted peptide derived from Wilms tumor protein (WT1), which is widely expressed in a broad spectrum of leukemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. A novel T-cell-receptor (TCR)-like single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody specific for the T cell epitope consisting of the WT1/HLA-A2 complex was isolated from a human scFv phage library. This scFv was affinity-matured by mutagenesis combined with yeast display, and structurally analyzed using a homology model. This monovalent scFv showed a 100-fold affinity improvement (dissociation constant [KD]= 3nM) and exquisite specificity towards its targeted epitope or HLA-A2+/WT1+ tumor cells. Bivalent scFv-huIgG1-Fc fusion protein demonstrated an even higher avidity (KD = 2pM) binding to the T cell epitope and to tumor targets, and was capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity or tumor lysis by chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing human T or NK-92-MI transfected cells. This antibody demonstrated specific and potent cytotoxicity in vivo towards WT1-positive leukemia xenograft that was HLA-A2 restricted. In summary, T cell epitopes can provide novel targets for antibody-based therapeutics. By combining phage and yeast displays and scFv-Fc fusion platforms, a strategy for developing high affinity TCR-like antibodies could be rapidly explored for potential clinical development. PMID:25987253

  16. Germline variable region gene segment derivation of human monoclonal anti-Rh(D) antibodies. Evidence for affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation and repertoire shift.

    PubMed Central

    Bye, J M; Carter, C; Cui, Y; Gorick, B D; Songsivilai, S; Winter, G; Hughes-Jones, N C; Marks, J D

    1992-01-01

    To date, there has been no systematic study of the process of affinity maturation of human antibodies. We therefore sequenced the variable region genes (V genes) of 14 human monoclonal antibodies specific for the erythrocyte Rh(D) alloantigen and determined the germline gene segments of origin and extent of somatic hypermutation. These data were correlated with determinations of antibody affinity. The four IgM antibodies (low affinity) appear to be derived from two germline heavy chain variable region gene segments and one or two germline light chain variable region gene segments and were not extensively mutated. The 10 IgG antibodies (higher affinity) appear to be derived from somatic hypermutation of these V gene segments and by use of new V gene segments or V gene segment combinations (repertoire shift). Affinity generally increased with increasing somatic hypermutation; on average, there were 8.9 point mutations in the V gene segments of the four IgM antibodies (Ka = 1-4 x 10(7)/M-1) compared with 19 point mutations in the V gene segments of the 10 IgG antibodies. The four highest affinity antibodies (Ka = 0.9-3 x 10(9)/M-1) averaged 25.5 point mutations. The use of repertoire shift and somatic hypermutation in affinity maturation of human alloantibodies is similar to data obtained in inbred mice immunized with haptens. PMID:1469099

  17. Immune complex relay by subcapsular sinus macrophages and non-cognate B cells drives antibody affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Tri Giang; Green, Jesse A.; Gray, Elizabeth E.; Xu, Ying; Cyster, Jason G.

    2009-01-01

    Subcapsular sinus (SCS) macrophages capture antigens from lymph and present them intact for B cell encounter and follicular delivery. However, the properties of SCS macrophages are poorly defined. Here we show SCS macrophage development depended on lymphotoxin-α1β2 and the cells had low lysosomal enzyme expression and retained opsonized antigens on their surface. Intravital imaging revealed immune complexes moving along macrophage processes into the follicle. Moreover, non-cognate B cells relayed antigen opsonized by newly produced antibodies from the subcapsular sinus to the germinal center and affinity maturation was impaired when this transport process was disrupted. Thus, we characterize SCS macrophages as specialized antigen-presenting cells functioning at the apex of an antigen transport chain that promotes humoral immunity. PMID:19503106

  18. Immunoglobulin gene insertions and deletions in the affinity maturation of HIV-1 broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Thomas B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S Munir; Bhaskarabhatla, Rekha; Zhang, Ruijun; Yandava, Chandri; Stewart, Shelley; Anasti, Kara; Kelsoe, Garnett; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Stolarchuk, Christina; Pritchett, Jamie; Solomon, Erika; Friberg, Emma; Morris, Lynn; Karim, Salim S Abdool; Cohen, Myron S; Walter, Emmanuel; Moody, M Anthony; Wu, Xueling; Altae-Tran, Han R; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kwong, Peter D; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Mascola, John R; Haynes, Barton F

    2014-09-10

    Induction of HIV-1 broad neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) is a goal of HIV-1 vaccine development but has remained challenging partially due to unusual traits of bnAbs, including high somatic hypermutation (SHM) frequencies and in-frame insertions and deletions (indels). Here we examined the propensity and functional requirement for indels within HIV-1 bnAbs. High-throughput sequencing of the immunoglobulin (Ig) VHDJH genes in HIV-1 infected and uninfected individuals revealed that the indel frequency was elevated among HIV-1-infected subjects, with no unique properties attributable to bnAb-producing individuals. This increased indel occurrence depended only on the frequency of SHM point mutations. Indel-encoded regions were generally proximal to antigen binding sites. Additionally, reconstruction of a HIV-1 CD4-binding site bnAb clonal lineage revealed that a large compound VHDJH indel was required for bnAb activity. Thus, vaccine development should focus on designing regimens targeted at sustained activation of bnAb lineages to achieve the required SHM and indel events.

  19. XGFR*, a novel affinity-matured bispecific antibody targeting IGF-1R and EGFR with combined signaling inhibition and enhanced immune activation for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Schanzer, Juergen M; Wartha, Katharina; Moessner, Ekkehard; Hosse, Ralf J; Moser, Samuel; Croasdale, Rebecca; Trochanowska, Halina; Shao, Cuiying; Wang, Peng; Shi, Lei; Weinzierl, Tina; Rieder, Natascha; Bacac, Marina; Ries, Carola H; Kettenberger, Hubert; Schlothauer, Tilman; Friess, Thomas; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) play critical roles in tumor growth, providing a strong rationale for the combined inhibition of IGF-1R and EGFR signaling in cancer therapy. We describe the design, affinity maturation, in vitro and in vivo characterization of the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR*. XGFR* is based on the bispecific IgG antibody XGFR, which enabled heterodimerization of an IGF-1R binding scFab heavy chain with an EGFR-binding light and heavy chain by the "knobs-into-holes" technology. XGFR* is optimized for monovalent binding of human EGFR and IGF-1R with increased binding affinity for IGF-1R due to affinity maturation and highly improved protein stability to oxidative and thermal stress. It bears an afucosylated Fc-portion for optimal induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Stable Chinese hamster ovary cell clones with production yields of 2-3 g/L were generated, allowing for large scale production of the bispecific antibody. XGFR* potently inhibits EGFR- and IGF-1R-dependent receptor phosphorylation, reduces tumor cell proliferation in cells with heterogeneous levels of IGF-1R and EGFR receptor expression and induces strong ADCC in vitro. A comparison of pancreatic and colorectal cancer lines demonstrated superior responsiveness to XGFR*-mediated signaling and tumor growth inhibition in pancreatic cancers that frequently show a high degree of IGF-1R/EGFR co-expression. XGFR* showed potent anti-tumoral efficacy in the orthotopic MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic xenograft model, resulting in nearly complete tumor growth inhibition with significant number of tumor remissions. In summary, the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR* combines potent signaling and tumor growth inhibition with enhanced ADCC induction and represents a clinical development candidate for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26984378

  20. XGFR*, a novel affinity-matured bispecific antibody targeting IGF-1R and EGFR with combined signaling inhibition and enhanced immune activation for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schanzer, Juergen M.; Wartha, Katharina; Moessner, Ekkehard; Hosse, Ralf J.; Moser, Samuel; Croasdale, Rebecca; Trochanowska, Halina; Shao, Cuiying; Wang, Peng; Shi, Lei; Weinzierl, Tina; Rieder, Natascha; Bacac, Marina; Ries, Carola H.; Kettenberger, Hubert; Schlothauer, Tilman; Friess, Thomas; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) play critical roles in tumor growth, providing a strong rationale for the combined inhibition of IGF-1R and EGFR signaling in cancer therapy. We describe the design, affinity maturation, in vitro and in vivo characterization of the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR*. XGFR* is based on the bispecific IgG antibody XGFR, which enabled heterodimerization of an IGF-1R binding scFab heavy chain with an EGFR-binding light and heavy chain by the “knobs-into-holes” technology. XGFR* is optimized for monovalent binding of human EGFR and IGF-1R with increased binding affinity for IGF-1R due to affinity maturation and highly improved protein stability to oxidative and thermal stress. It bears an afucosylated Fc-portion for optimal induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Stable Chinese hamster ovary cell clones with production yields of 2–3 g/L were generated, allowing for large scale production of the bispecific antibody. XGFR* potently inhibits EGFR- and IGF-1R-dependent receptor phosphorylation, reduces tumor cell proliferation in cells with heterogeneous levels of IGF-1R and EGFR receptor expression and induces strong ADCC in vitro. A comparison of pancreatic and colorectal cancer lines demonstrated superior responsiveness to XGFR*-mediated signaling and tumor growth inhibition in pancreatic cancers that frequently show a high degree of IGF-1R/EGFR co-expression. XGFR* showed potent anti-tumoral efficacy in the orthotopic MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic xenograft model, resulting in nearly complete tumor growth inhibition with significant number of tumor remissions. In summary, the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR* combines potent signaling and tumor growth inhibition with enhanced ADCC induction and represents a clinical development candidate for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26984378

  1. Humanized Affinity-matured Monoclonal Antibody 8H9 Has Potent Antitumor Activity and Binds to FG Loop of Tumor Antigen B7-H3.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Cheng, Ming; Zhao, Qi; Goldgur, Yehuda; Cheal, Sarah M; Guo, Hong-fen; Larson, Steven M; Cheung, Nai-kong V

    2015-12-11

    B7-H3 (CD276) is both an inhibitory ligand for natural killer cells and T cells and a tumor antigen that is widely expressed among human solid tumors. Anti-B7-H3 mouse monoclonal antibody 8H9 has been successfully used for radioimmunotherapy for patients with B7-H3(+) tumors. We present the humanization, affinity maturation, and epitope mapping of 8H9 based on structure determination, modeling, and yeast display methods. The crystal structure of ch8H9 Fab fragment was solved to 2.5-Å resolution and used as a template for humanization. By displaying the humanized 8H9 single chain Fv (scFv) on the surface of yeast, the affinity was matured by sequential random mutagenesis and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Six mutations (three in the complementarity-determining region and three in the framework regions) were identified and incorporated into an affinity-matured humanized 8H9 construct (hu8H9-6m) and an affinity-matured chimeric 8H9 construct (ch8H9-6m). The hu8H9-6m scFv had a 160-fold improvement in affinity (0.9 nm KD) compared with parental hu8H9 scFv (144 nm KD). The IgG formats of ch8H9-6m and hu8H9-6m (nanomolar to subnanomolar KD) had 2-9-fold enhancements in affinity compared with their parental forms, potent in vitro antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (0.1-0.3 μg/ml EC50), and high tumor uptake in mouse xenografts. Based on in silico docking studies and experimental validation, the molecular epitope of 8H9 was determined to be dependent on the FG loop of B7-H3, a region critical to its function in immunologic blockade and unique among anti-B7-H3 antibodies published to date. PMID:26487718

  2. Affinity purification of antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  3. Affinity Purification of Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert M; McGarvey, Jeffery A

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that include antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant, or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facilitate assay reproducibility, economy, and reduced interference of nonspecific components as well as improved storage, stability, and bio-conjugation. Although not always necessary, the relative simplicity of antibody purification using commercially available protein-A, protein-G, or protein-L resins with basic chromatographic principles warrants purification when antibody source material is available in sufficient quantity. Here, we define three simple methods using immobilized (1) protein-A, (2) protein-G, and (3) protein-L agarose beads to yield highly purified antibody. PMID:26160561

  4. Generation, affinity maturation, and characterization of a human anti-human NKG2D monoclonal antibody with dual antagonistic and agonistic activity

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Ka Yin; Baskar, Sivasubramanian; Zhang, Hua; Mackall, Crystal L.; Rader, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Summary In humans, NKG2D is an activating receptor on NK cells and a costimulatory receptor on certain T cells and plays a central role in mediating immune responses in autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and cancer. Monoclonal antibodies that antagonize or agonize immune responses mediated by human NKG2D are considered to be of broad and potent therapeutic utility. Nonetheless, monoclonal antibodies to NKG2D that are suitable for clinical investigations have not been published yet. Here we describe the generation, affinity maturation, and characterization of a fully human monoclonal antibody to human NKG2D. Using phage display technology based on a newly generated naïve human Fab library in phage display vector pC3C followed by a tandem chain shuffling process designed for minimal deviation from natural human antibody sequences, we selected a human Fab, designated KYK-2.0, with high specificity and affinity to human NKG2D. KYK-2.0 Fab blocked the binding of the natural human NKG2D ligands MICA, MICB, and ULBP2 as potently as a commercially available mouse anti-human NKG2D monoclonal antibody in IgG format. Conversion of KYK-2.0 Fab to IgG1 resulted in subnanomolar avidity for human NKG2D. KYK-2.0 IgG1 was found to selectively recognize defined subpopulations of human lymphocytes known to express NKG2D, i.e. the majority of human CD8+, CD16+, and CD56+ cells as well as a small fraction of human CD4+ cells. In solution, KYK-2.0 IgG1 interfered with the cytolytic activity of ex vivo expanded human NK cells. By contrast, immobilized KYK-2.0 IgG1 was found to strongly induce human NK cell activation. The dual antagonistic and agonistic activity promises a wide range of therapeutic applications for KYK-2.0 IgG1 and its derivatives. PMID:18809410

  5. Engineering antibody affinity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Webster, D M; Roberts, S; Cheetham, J C; Griest, R; Rees, A R

    1988-01-01

    A combination of ab initio calculations, "knowledge-based prediction", molecular graphics and site-directed mutagenesis has enabled us to probe the molecular details of antibody:antigen recognition and binding and to alter the affinity and specificity of an antibody for its antigen. The significance of electrostatic hydrogen bonding, hydrophilic/hydrophobic patch matching and van der Waals interactions as well as CDR:CDR interactions are discussed in relation to the results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments on the anti-lysozyme antibody Gloop2. The ability to generate reconstructed antibodies, chimeric antibodies, catalytic antibodies and the use of modelled antibodies for the design of drugs is discussed. PMID:3209295

  6. The function and affinity maturation of HIV-1 gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies derived from colostral B cells.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, T L; Sacha, C R; Pollara, J; Himes, J; Jaeger, F H; Dennison, S M; McGuire, E; Kunz, E; Eudailey, J A; Trama, A M; LaBranche, C; Fouda, G G; Wiehe, K; Montefiori, D C; Haynes, B F; Liao, H-X; Ferrari, G; Alam, S M; Moody, M A; Permar, S R

    2016-03-01

    Despite the risk of transmitting HIV-1, mothers in resource-poor areas are encouraged to breastfeed their infants because of beneficial immunologic and nutritional factors in milk. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, the overwhelming majority of HIV-1-exposed, breastfeeding infants are naturally protected from infection. To understand the role of HIV-1 envelope (Env)-specific antibodies in breast milk in natural protection against infant virus transmission, we produced 19 HIV-1 Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from colostrum B cells of HIV-1-infected mothers and investigated their specificity, evolution, and anti-HIV-1 functions. Despite the previously reported genetic compartmentalization and gp120-specific bias of colostrum HIV Env-specific B cells, the colostrum Env-specific mAbs described here demonstrated a broad range of gp120 epitope specificities and functions, including inhibition of epithelial cell binding and dendritic cell-mediated virus transfer, neutralization, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. We also identified divergent patterns of colostrum Env-specific B-cell lineage evolution with respect to crossreactivity to gastrointestinal commensal bacteria, indicating that commensal bacterial antigens play a role in shaping the local breast milk immunoglobulin G (IgG) repertoire. Maternal vaccine strategies to specifically target this breast milk B-cell population may be necessary to achieve safe breastfeeding for all HIV-1-exposed infants. PMID:26242599

  7. The function and affinity maturation of HIV-1 gp120-specific monoclonal antibodies derived from colostral B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Thomas L; Sacha, CR; Pollara, Justin; Himes, Jon; Jaeger, Frederick H; Dennison, S Moses; McGuire, Erin; Kunz, Erika; Eudailey, Joshua A; Trama, Ashley M; LaBranche, Celia; Fouda, Genevieve G; Wiehe, Kevin; Montefiori, David C; Haynes, Barton F; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Permar, Sallie R

    2015-01-01

    Despite the risk of transmitting HIV-1, mothers in resource-poor areas are encouraged to breastfeed their infants due to beneficial immunologic and nutritional factors in milk. Interestingly, in the absence of antiretroviral prophylaxis, the overwhelming majority of HIV-1-exposed, breastfeeding infants are naturally protected from infection. To understand the role of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific antibodies in breast milk in natural protection against infant virus transmission, we produced 19 HIV-1 Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from colostrum B cells of HIV-1-infected mothers and investigated their specificity, evolution and anti-HIV-1 functions. Despite the previously reported genetic compartmentalization and gp120-specific bias of colostrum HIV Env-specific B cells, the colostrum Env-specific mAbs described here demonstrated a broad range of gp120 epitope specificities and functions, including inhibition of epithelial cell binding and dendritic cell mediated virus transfer, neutralization, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Interestingly, we also identified divergent patterns of colostrum Env-specific B cell lineage evolution with respect to cross-reactivity to gastrointestinal commensal bacteria, indicating that commensal bacterial antigens play a role in shaping the local breast milk IgG repertoire. Maternal vaccine strategies to specifically target this breast milk B cell population may be necessary to achieve safe breastfeeding for all HIV-1-exposed infants. PMID:26242599

  8. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  9. Improving antibody binding affinity and specificity for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Jenny; Lee, Chingwei V; Haber, Lauric; Fuh, Germaine

    2009-01-01

    Affinity maturation is an important part of the therapeutic antibody development process as in vivo activity often requires high binding affinity. Here, we describe a targeted approach for affinity improvement of therapeutic antibodies. Sets of CDR residues that are solvent accessible and relatively diverse in natural antibodies are targeted for diversification. Degenerate oligonucleotides are used to generate combinatorial phage-displayed antibody libraries with varying degree of diversity at randomized positions from which high-affinity antibodies can be selected. An advantage of using antibodies for therapy is their exquisite target specificity, which enables selective antigen binding and reduces off-target effects. However, it can be useful, and often it is necessary, to generate cross-reactive antibodies binding to not only the human antigen but also the corresponding non-human primate or rodent orthologs. Such cross-reactive antibodies can be used to validate the therapeutic targeting and examine the safety profile in preclinical animal models before committing to a costly development track. We show how affinity improvement and cross-species binding can be achieved in a one-step process.

  10. Molecular fine-tuning of affinity maturation in germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yee Ling; Rada, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The development of high-affinity antibodies in response to infection is an iterative process in which B cells cycle between proliferation/somatic hypermutation and antigen-driven selection. These processes occur within specific regions of the secondary lymphoid structures known as germinal centers (GCs) and the environmental and signaling cues provided by these regions guide the GC reactions that drive B cell maturation and antibody production, ultimately determining B cell fate. In this issue of the JCI, Nakagawa and colleagues examine the role of miR-155, a microRNA that is required for GC development and the production of high-affinity antibodies. They show that miR-155 is highly expressed in positively selected B cells and promotes survival of these cells by orienting the Myc transcription program toward survival rather than apoptosis through the inhibition of the transcriptional regulator JARID2. These findings illustrate the fine balance between apoptosis and proliferation that is required for the development of high-affinity antibodies.

  11. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research.

  12. Affinity enhancement of antibodies: how low-affinity antibodies produced early in immune responses are followed by high-affinity antibodies later and in memory B-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Herman N

    2014-05-01

    The antibodies produced initially in response to most antigens are high molecular weight (MW) immunoglobulins (IgM) with low affinity for the antigen, while the antibodies produced later are lower MW classes (e.g., IgG and IgA) with, on average, orders of magnitude higher affinity for that antigen. These changes, often termed affinity maturation, take place largely in small B-cell clusters (germinal center; GC) in lymphoid tissues in which proliferating antigen-stimulated B cells express the highly mutagenic cytidine deaminase that mediates immunoglobulin class-switching and sequence diversification of the immunoglobulin variable domains of antigen-binding receptors on B cells (BCR). Of the large library of BCR-mutated B cells thus rapidly generated, a small minority with affinity-enhancing mutations are selected to survive and differentiate into long-lived antibody-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells. BCRs are also endocytic receptors; they internalize and cleave BCR-bound antigen, yielding peptide-MHC complexes that are recognized by follicular helper T cells. Imperfect correlation between BCR affinity for antigen and cognate T-cell engagement may account for the increasing affinity heterogeneity that accompanies the increasing average affinity of antibodies. Conservation of mechanisms underlying mutation and selection of high-affinity antibodies over the ≈200 million years of evolution separating bird and mammal lineages points to the crucial role of antibody affinity enhancement in adaptive immunity.

  13. Picomolar affinity antibodies from a fully synthetic naive library selected and evolved by ribosome display.

    PubMed

    Hanes, J; Schaffitzel, C; Knappik, A; Plückthun, A

    2000-12-01

    Here we applied ribosome display to in vitro selection and evolution of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) from a large synthetic library (Human Combinatorial Antibody Library; HuCAL) against bovine insulin. In three independent ribosome display experiments different clusters of closely related scFvs were selected, all of which bound the antigen with high affinity and specificity. All selected scFvs had affinity-matured up to 40-fold compared to their HuCAL progenitors, by accumulating point mutations during the ribosome display cycles. The dissociation constants of the isolated scFvs were as low as 82 pM, which validates the design of the naïve library and the power of this evolutionary method. We have thus mimicked the process of antibody generation and affinity maturation with a synthetic library in a cell-free system in just a few days, obtaining molecules with higher affinities than most natural antibodies.

  14. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule.

    PubMed

    Temirov, Jamshid P; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Werner, James H

    2008-11-15

    Single molecule fluorescence microscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots to individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  15. Measuring an antibody affinity distribution molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, Andrew M; Werner, James H; Temirov, Jamshid

    2008-01-01

    Single molecule fluorescence mIcroscopy was used to observe the binding and unbinding of hapten decorated quantum dots with individual surface immobilized antibodies. The fluorescence time history from an individual antibody site can be used to calculate its binding affinity. While quantum dot blinking occurs during these measurements, we describe a simple empirical method to correct the apparent/observed affinity to account for the blinking contribution. The combination of many single molecule affinity measurements from different antibodies yields not only the average affinity, it directly measures the full shape and character of the surface affinity distribution function.

  16. An affinity matured minibody for PET imaging of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA)-expressing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Leyton, Jeffrey V.; Zhou, Yu; Olafsen, Tove; Salazar, Felix B.; McCabe, Katelyn E.; Hahm, Scott; Marks, James D.; Reiter, Robert E.; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a cell surface glycoprotein expressed in normal human prostate and bladder, is over-expressed in the majority of localized prostate cancer and most bone metastases. We have previously shown that the hu1G8 minibody, a humanized anti-PSCA antibody fragment (single-chain Fv-CH3 dimer, 80 kDa), can localize specifically and image PSCA-expressing xenografts at 21 h post-injection. However, the humanization and antibody fragment reformatting decreased its apparent affinity. Here, we sought to evaluate PET imaging contrast with affinity matured minibodies. Methods Yeast scFv display, involving four rounds of selection, was used to generate the three affinity matured antibody fragments (A2, A11, and C5) that were reformatted into minibodies. These three affinity matured anti-PSCA minibodies were characterized in vitro, and following radiolabeling with 124I were evaluated in vivo for microPET imaging of PSCA-expressing tumors. Results The A2, A11, and C5 minibody variants all demonstrated improved affinity compared to the parental (P) minibody and were ranked as follows: A2 > A11 > C5 > P. The 124I-labeled A11 minibody demonstrated higher immunoreactivity than the parental minibody and also achieved the best microPET imaging contrast in two xenograft models, LAPC-9 (prostate cancer) and Capan-1 (pancreatic cancer), when evaluated in vivo. Conclusion Of the affinity variant minibodies tested, the A11 minibody that ranked second in affinity was selected as the best immunoPET tracer to image PSCA-expressing xenografts. This candidate is currently under development for evaluation in a pilot clinical imaging study. PMID:20354850

  17. Oral priming with replicating adenovirus serotype 4 followed by subunit H5N1 vaccine boost promotes antibody affinity maturation and expands H5N1 cross-clade neutralization.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Surender; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Manischewitz, Jody; King, Lisa R; Ishioka, Glenn; Alexander, Jeff; Smith, Jon; Gurwith, Marc; Golding, Hana

    2015-01-01

    A Phase I trial conducted in 2009-2010 demonstrated that oral vaccination with a replication competent Ad4-H5 (A/Vietnam) vector with dosages ranging from 107-1011 viral particles was well tolerated. HA-specific T-cell responses were efficiently induced, but very limited hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) humoral responses were measured. However, a single boost of Ad4-H5-Vtn vaccinated individuals with a unadjuvanted licensed H5N1 (A/Vietnam) subunit vaccine resulted in superior HI titers compared with unprimed subjects. In the current study, the impact of Ad4-H5 priming on the quality of the polyclonal humoral immune response was evaluated using a real-time kinetics assay by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Total binding of serum polyclonal antibodies from the Ad4-H5-Vtn primed groups against both homologous H5N1-A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (clade 1) and heterologous A/Indonesia-5/2005 (clade 2.1) HA1 head domain was significantly higher compared with sera from individuals that received subunit H5N1 vaccination alone. SPR measurements also demonstrated that the antigen-antibody complex dissociation rates (a surrogate for antibody affinity) of serum antibodies against the HA1 of H5N1-A/Vietnam were significantly higher in the Ad4-H5 primed groups compared with those from the unprimed group. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between the antibody affinities for HA1 (but not HA2) and the virus neutralization titers against the homologous strain and a panel of heterologous clade 2 H5N1 strains. These findings support the concept of oral prime-boost vaccine approaches against pandemic influenza to elicit long-term memory B cells with high affinity capable of rapid response to variant pandemic viruses likely to emerge and adapt to human transmissions.

  18. Determinism and stochasticity during maturation of the zebrafish antibody repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ning; Weinstein, Joshua A.; Penland, Lolita; White, Richard A.; Fisher, Daniel S.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    It is thought that the adaptive immune system of immature organisms follows a more deterministic program of antibody creation than is found in adults. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the diversifying antibody repertoire in zebrafish over five developmental time points. We found that the immune system begins in a highly stereotyped state with preferential use of a small number of V (variable) D (diverse) J (joining) gene segment combinations, but that this stereotypy decreases dramatically as the zebrafish mature, with many of the top VDJ combinations observed in 2-wk-old zebrafish virtually disappearing by 1 mo. However, we discovered that, in the primary repertoire, there are strong correlations in VDJ use that increase with zebrafish maturity, suggesting that VDJ recombination involves a level of deterministic programming that is unexpected. This stereotypy is masked by the complex diversification processes of antibody maturation; the variation and lack of correlation in full repertoires between individuals appears to be derived from randomness in clonal expansion during the affinity maturation process. These data provide a window into the mechanisms of VDJ recombination and diversity creation and allow us to better understand how the adaptive immune system achieves diversity. PMID:21393572

  19. Intra-clonal competition inhibits the formation of high affinity antibody secreting cells1

    PubMed Central

    Le, Thuc-vy L.; Kim, Tea Hyun; Chaplin, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Protective immunity requires a diverse, polyclonal B cell repertoire. We demonstrate that affinity maturation of the humoral response to a hapten is impaired when pre-existing clonally restricted cells recognizing the hapten are dominant in the B cell repertoire. B1- 8i+/− mice, which feature a high frequency of B cells with nitrophenyl (NP) binding specificity, respond to NP-haptenated proteins with the production of NP-specific antibodies, but affinity maturation is impaired due to insufficient generation of high affinity antibody producing cells. We manipulated the frequency of NP-specific B cells by adoptive transfer of B1-8 B cells into naïve, wild-type recipients. Remarkably, when 104 B1-8 B cells were transferred, these cells supported efficient affinity maturation and plasma cell differentiation. In contrast, when 106 B1-8 cells were transferred, affinity maturation did not occur. These data indicate that restricting the frequency of clonally related B cells is required to support affinity maturation. PMID:18941192

  20. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination with MF59-adjuvanted H5 vaccines promotes antibody affinity maturation towards the hemagglutinin HA1 domain and broad H5N1 cross-clade neutralization.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Surender; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Dimitrova, Milena; Castellino, Flora; Nicholson, Karl; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Golding, Hana

    2014-01-01

    In an open label clinical study (2007), MF59-adjuvanted hemagglutinin (HA) vaccine from H5N1-A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (clade 1) was administered to subjects previously vaccinated (primed) with clade 0 H5N3 (A/duck/Singapore/97) vaccine at least 6 years earlier (in 1999 or 2001). The primed individuals responded rapidly and generated high neutralizing antibody titers against the H5N1-Vietnam strain within 7 days of a single booster vaccination. Furthermore, significant cross-neutralization titers were measured against H5N1 clade 0, 1, and 2 viruses. In the current study, the impact of MF59 adjuvant during heterologous priming on the quality of humoral polyclonal immune response in different vaccine arms were further evaluated using real time kinetics assay by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Total anti-H5N1 HA1 polyclonal sera antibody binding from the heterologous prime-boost groups after a single MF59-H5N1 boost was significantly higher compared with sera from unprimed individuals that received two MF59-H5N1 vaccinations. The antigen-antibody complex dissociation rates (surrogate for antibody affinity) of the polyclonal sera against HA1 of H5N1-A/Vietnam/1194/2004 from the MF59-H5N3 primed groups were significantly higher compared to sera from unadjuvanted primed groups or unprimed individuals that received two MF59-H5N1 vaccines. Furthermore, strong inverse correlations were observed between the antibody dissociation off-rates of the immune sera against HA1 (but not HA2) and the virus neutralization titers against H5 vaccine strains and heterologous H5N1 strains. These findings supports the use of oil-in-water-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccines to elicit long term memory B cells with high affinity BCR capable of responding to potential variant pandemic viruses likely to emerge and adapt to human transmissions.

  1. Assessment of Solvated Interaction Energy Function for Ranking Antibody-Antigen Binding Affinities.

    PubMed

    Sulea, Traian; Vivcharuk, Victor; Corbeil, Christopher R; Deprez, Christophe; Purisima, Enrico O

    2016-07-25

    Affinity modulation of antibodies and antibody fragments of therapeutic value is often required in order to improve their clinical efficacies. Virtual affinity maturation has the potential to quickly focus on the critical hotspot residues without the combinatorial explosion problem of conventional display and library approaches. However, this requires a binding affinity scoring function that is capable of ranking single-point mutations of a starting antibody. We focus here on assessing the solvated interaction energy (SIE) function that was originally developed for and is widely applied to scoring of protein-ligand binding affinities. To this end, we assembled a structure-function data set called Single-Point Mutant Antibody Binding (SiPMAB) comprising several antibody-antigen systems suitable for this assessment, i.e., based on high-resolution crystal structures for the parent antibodies and coupled with high-quality binding affinity measurements for sets of single-point antibody mutants in each system. Using this data set, we tested the SIE function with several mutation protocols based on the popular methods SCWRL, Rosetta, and FoldX. We found that the SIE function coupled with a protocol limited to sampling only the mutated side chain can reasonably predict relative binding affinities with a Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient of about 0.6, outperforming more aggressive sampling protocols. Importantly, this performance is maintained for each of the seven system-specific component subsets as well as for other relevant subsets including non-alanine and charge-altering mutations. The transferability and enrichment in affinity-improving mutants can be further enhanced using consensus ranking over multiple methods, including the SIE, Talaris, and FOLDEF energy functions. The knowledge gained from this study can lead to successful prospective applications of virtual affinity maturation. PMID:27367467

  2. Assessment of Solvated Interaction Energy Function for Ranking Antibody-Antigen Binding Affinities.

    PubMed

    Sulea, Traian; Vivcharuk, Victor; Corbeil, Christopher R; Deprez, Christophe; Purisima, Enrico O

    2016-07-25

    Affinity modulation of antibodies and antibody fragments of therapeutic value is often required in order to improve their clinical efficacies. Virtual affinity maturation has the potential to quickly focus on the critical hotspot residues without the combinatorial explosion problem of conventional display and library approaches. However, this requires a binding affinity scoring function that is capable of ranking single-point mutations of a starting antibody. We focus here on assessing the solvated interaction energy (SIE) function that was originally developed for and is widely applied to scoring of protein-ligand binding affinities. To this end, we assembled a structure-function data set called Single-Point Mutant Antibody Binding (SiPMAB) comprising several antibody-antigen systems suitable for this assessment, i.e., based on high-resolution crystal structures for the parent antibodies and coupled with high-quality binding affinity measurements for sets of single-point antibody mutants in each system. Using this data set, we tested the SIE function with several mutation protocols based on the popular methods SCWRL, Rosetta, and FoldX. We found that the SIE function coupled with a protocol limited to sampling only the mutated side chain can reasonably predict relative binding affinities with a Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient of about 0.6, outperforming more aggressive sampling protocols. Importantly, this performance is maintained for each of the seven system-specific component subsets as well as for other relevant subsets including non-alanine and charge-altering mutations. The transferability and enrichment in affinity-improving mutants can be further enhanced using consensus ranking over multiple methods, including the SIE, Talaris, and FOLDEF energy functions. The knowledge gained from this study can lead to successful prospective applications of virtual affinity maturation.

  3. Directed evolution of antibody fragments with monovalent femtomolar antigen-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Boder, E T; Midelfort, K S; Wittrup, K D

    2000-09-26

    Single-chain antibody mutants have been evolved in vitro with antigen-binding equilibrium dissociation constant K(d) = 48 fM and slower dissociation kinetics (half-time > 5 days) than those for the streptavidin-biotin complex. These mutants possess the highest monovalent ligand-binding affinity yet reported for an engineered protein by over two orders of magnitude. Optimal kinetic screening of randomly mutagenized libraries of 10(5)-10(7) yeast surface-displayed antibodies enabled a >1,000-fold decrease in the rate of dissociation after four cycles of affinity mutagenesis and screening. The consensus mutations are generally nonconservative by comparison with naturally occurring mouse Fv sequences and with residues that do not contact the fluorescein antigen in the wild-type complex. The existence of these mutants demonstrates that the antibody Fv architecture is not intrinsically responsible for an antigen-binding affinity ceiling during in vivo affinity maturation.

  4. Calculation of antibody affinity in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems.

    PubMed

    Chalquest, R R

    1988-12-01

    Antibody affinity is an important determinant of all antibody-antigen reactions. A new computer program, AFCRV, was developed to calculate binding constants with data from a radioimmunoassay on most microcomputers in the laboratory by using constant-ratio dilution curves. Evaluation of a homogeneous or heterogeneous antibody in the presence of a single antigen can be accomplished.

  5. Sequential class switching is required for the generation of high affinity IgE antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Huizhong; Dolpady, Jayashree; Wabl, Matthias; Curotto de Lafaille, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    IgE antibodies with high affinity for their antigens can be stably cross-linked at low concentrations by trace amounts of antigen, whereas IgE antibodies with low affinity bind their antigens weakly. In this study, we find that there are two distinct pathways to generate high and low affinity IgE. High affinity IgE is generated through sequential class switching (μ→γ→ε) in which an intermediary IgG phase is necessary for the affinity maturation of the IgE response, where the IgE inherits somatic hypermutations and high affinity from the IgG1 phase. In contrast, low affinity IgE is generated through direct class switching (μ→ε) and is much less mutated. Mice deficient in IgG1 production cannot produce high affinity IgE, even after repeated immunizations. We demonstrate that a small amount of high affinity IgE can cause anaphylaxis and is pathogenic. Low affinity IgE competes with high affinity IgE for binding to Fcε receptors and prevents anaphylaxis and is thus beneficial. PMID:22249450

  6. Affinity maturation by targeted diversification of the CDR-H2 loop of a monoclonal Fab derived from a synthetic naïve human antibody library and directed against the internal trimeric coiled-coil of gp41 yields a set of Fabs with improved HIV-1 neutralization potency and breadth

    PubMed Central

    Gustchina, Elena; Louis, John M.; Frisch, Christian; Ylera, Francisco; Lechner, Annette; Bewley, Carole A.; Clore, G. Marius

    2009-01-01

    Previously we reported a broadly HIV-1 neutralizing mini-antibody (Fab 3674) of modest potency that was derived from a human non-immune phage library by panning against the chimeric gp41-derived construct NCCG-gp41. This construct presents the N-heptad repeat of the gp41 ectodomain as a stable, helical, disulfide-linked trimer that extends in helical phase from the six-helix bundle of gp41. In this paper, Fab 3674 was subjected to affinity maturation against the NCCG-gp41 antigen by targeted diversification of the CDR-H2 loop to generate a panel of Fabs with diverse neutralization activity. Three affinity-matured Fabs selected for further study, Fabs 8060, 8066 and 8068, showed significant increases in both potency and breadth of neutralization against HIV-1 pseudotyped with envelopes of primary isolates from the standard subtypes B and C HIV-1 reference panels. The parental Fab 3674 is 10-20 fold less potent in monovalent than bivalent format over the entire B and C panels of HIV-1 pseudotypes. Of note is that the improved neutralization activity of the affinity-matured Fabs relative to the parental Fab 3674 was, on average, significantly greater for the Fabs in monovalent than bivalent format. This suggests that the increased avidity of the Fabs for the target antigen in bivalent format can be partially offset by kinetic and/or steric advantages afforded by the smaller monovalent Fabs. Indeed, the best affinity-matured Fab (8066) in monovalent format (∼50 kDa) was comparable in HIV-1 neutralization potency to the parental Fab 3674 in bivalent format (∼120 kDa) across the subtypes B and C reference panels. PMID:19695655

  7. Antibody-based affinity cryo-EM grid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guimei; Li, Kunpeng; Jiang, Wen

    2016-05-01

    The Affinity Grid technique combines sample purification and cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) grid preparation into a single step. Several types of affinity surfaces, including functionalized lipids monolayers, streptavidin 2D crystals, and covalently functionalized carbon surfaces have been reported. More recently, we presented a new affinity cryo-EM approach, cryo-SPIEM, which applies the traditional Solid Phase Immune Electron Microscopy (SPIEM) technique to cryo-EM. This approach significantly simplifies the preparation of affinity grids and directly works with native macromolecular complexes without need of target modifications. With wide availability of high affinity and high specificity antibodies, the antibody-based affinity grid would enable cryo-EM studies of the native samples directly from cell cultures, targets of low abundance, and unstable or short-lived intermediate states.

  8. Measurement of affinity of viral monoclonal antibodies by ELISA titration of free antibody in equilibrium mixtures.

    PubMed

    Azimzadeh, A; Van Regenmortel, M H

    1991-08-01

    The binding affinity of a monoclonal antibody (Mab) to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was determined by measuring, in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the amount of free antibody present after ultracentrifugation of virus-antibody complexes at equilibrium. In antibody excess, univalent binding of Mabs was observed and the affinity constant was K = 3.2 +/- 0.4 10(8) l/mol; in antigen excess, bivalent antibody binding was observed and the antibody avidity was about 15 times higher. In antigen excess, it was imperative to correct experimental data for the presence of 0.55% inactive molecules in the immunopurified antibody preparation. Modelling studies suggest that in the case of antibodies of increasing affinity, it becomes increasingly important to correct for the presence of inactive antibody in the binding assay.

  9. Latest technologies for the enhancement of antibody affinity.

    PubMed

    Wark, Kim L; Hudson, Peter J

    2006-08-01

    High affinity antibodies are crucial both for the discovery and validation of biomarkers for human health and disease and as clinical diagnostic and therapeutic reagents. This review describes some of the latest technologies for the design, mutation and selection of high affinity antibodies that provide a paradigm for molecular evolution of a far wider range of proteins including enzymes. Strategies include both in vivo and in vitro methods and embrace the latest concepts for antibody display and selection. Specifically, affinity enhancement can be tailored to the target-binding surface, typically the complementary determining region (CDR) loops in antibodies, whereas enhanced stability, expression or catalytic properties can be affected by selected changes to the core protein scaffold. Together, these technologies provide a rapid and powerful strategy to drive the next generation of protein-based reagents for numerous clinical, environmental and agribusiness applications.

  10. In Vitro Evolution and Affinity-Maturation with Coliphage Qβ Display

    PubMed Central

    Skamel, Claudia; Aller, Stephen G.; Bopda Waffo, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The Escherichia coli bacteriophage, Qβ (Coliphage Qβ), offers a favorable alternative to M13 for in vitro evolution of displayed peptides and proteins due to high mutagenesis rates in Qβ RNA replication that better simulate the affinity maturation processes of the immune response. We describe a benchtop in vitro evolution system using Qβ display of the VP1 G-H loop peptide of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). DNA encoding the G-H loop was fused to the A1 minor coat protein of Qβ resulting in a replication-competent hybrid phage that efficiently displayed the FMDV peptide. The surface-localized FMDV VP1 G-H loop cross-reacted with the anti-FMDV monoclonal antibody (mAb) SD6 and was found to decorate the corners of the Qβ icosahedral shell by electron microscopy. Evolution of Qβ-displayed peptides, starting from fully degenerate coding sequences corresponding to the immunodominant region of VP1, allowed rapid in vitro affinity maturation to SD6 mAb. Qβ selected under evolutionary pressure revealed a non-canonical, but essential epitope for mAb SD6 recognition consisting of an Arg-Gly tandem pair. Finally, the selected hybrid phages induced polyclonal antibodies in guinea pigs with good affinity to both FMDV and hybrid Qβ-G-H loop, validating the requirement of the tandem pair epitope. Qβ-display emerges as a novel framework for rapid in vitro evolution with affinity-maturation to molecular targets. PMID:25393763

  11. Maximum-Entropy Models of Sequenced Immune Repertoires Predict Antigen-Antibody Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Marcatili, Paolo; Pagnani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The immune system has developed a number of distinct complex mechanisms to shape and control the antibody repertoire. One of these mechanisms, the affinity maturation process, works in an evolutionary-like fashion: after binding to a foreign molecule, the antibody-producing B-cells exhibit a high-frequency mutation rate in the genome region that codes for the antibody active site. Eventually, cells that produce antibodies with higher affinity for their cognate antigen are selected and clonally expanded. Here, we propose a new statistical approach based on maximum entropy modeling in which a scoring function related to the binding affinity of antibodies against a specific antigen is inferred from a sample of sequences of the immune repertoire of an individual. We use our inference strategy to infer a statistical model on a data set obtained by sequencing a fairly large portion of the immune repertoire of an HIV-1 infected patient. The Pearson correlation coefficient between our scoring function and the IC50 neutralization titer measured on 30 different antibodies of known sequence is as high as 0.77 (p-value 10−6), outperforming other sequence- and structure-based models. PMID:27074145

  12. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody by structure-based computational design: generation of electrostatic interactions in the transition state stabilizes the antibody-antigen complex.

    PubMed

    Kiyoshi, Masato; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Miura, Eri; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Nakakido, Makoto; Soga, Shinji; Shirai, Hiroki; Kawabata, Shigeki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of antibodies is a desirable goal towards the development of better therapeutic strategies. The antibody 11K2 was previously developed as a therapeutic tool for inflammatory diseases, and displays very high affinity (4.6 pM) for its antigen the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1). We have employed a virtual library of mutations of 11K2 to identify antibody variants of potentially higher affinity, and to establish benchmarks in the engineering of a mature therapeutic antibody. The most promising candidates identified in the virtual screening were examined by surface plasmon resonance to validate the computational predictions, and to characterize their binding affinity and key thermodynamic properties in detail. Only mutations in the light-chain of the antibody are effective at enhancing its affinity for the antigen in vitro, suggesting that the interaction surface of the heavy-chain (dominated by the hot-spot residue Phe101) is not amenable to optimization. The single-mutation with the highest affinity is L-N31R (4.6-fold higher affinity than wild-type antibody). Importantly, all the single-mutations showing increase affinity incorporate a charged residue (Arg, Asp, or Glu). The characterization of the relevant thermodynamic parameters clarifies the energetic mechanism. Essentially, the formation of new electrostatic interactions early in the binding reaction coordinate (transition state or earlier) benefits the durability of the antibody-antigen complex. The combination of in silico calculations and thermodynamic analysis is an effective strategy to improve the affinity of a matured therapeutic antibody. PMID:24475232

  13. Molecular modeling of the affinity chromatography of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Paloni, Matteo; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Molecular modeling is a methodology that offers the possibility of studying complex systems such as protein-ligand complexes from an atomistic point of view, making available information that can be difficultly obtained from experimental studies. Here, a protocol for the construction of molecular models of the interaction between antibodies and ligands that can be used for an affinity chromatography process is presented. The outlined methodology focuses mostly on the description of a procedure that may be adopted to determine the structure and free energy of interaction between the antibody and the affinity ligand. A procedure to extend the proposed methodology to include the effect of the environment (buffer solution, spacer, support matrix) is also briefly outlined. PMID:25749965

  14. Solution Equilibrium Titration for High-Throughput Affinity Estimation of Unpurified Antibodies and Antibody Fragments.

    PubMed

    Della Ducata, Daniela; Jaehrling, Jan; Hänel, Cornelia; Satzger, Marion; Wolber, Meike; Ostendorp, Ralf; Pabst, Stefan; Brocks, Bodo

    2015-12-01

    The generation of therapeutic antibodies with extremely high affinities down to the low picomolar range is today feasible with state-of-the art recombinant technologies. However, reliable and efficient identification of lead candidates with the desired affinity from a pool of thousands of antibody clones remains a challenge. Here, we describe a high-throughput procedure that allows reliable affinity screening of unpurified immunoglobulin G or antibody fragments. The method is based on the principle of solution equilibrium titration (SET) using highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence as a readout system. Because the binding partners are not labeled, the resulting KD represents a sound approximation of the real affinity. For screening, diluted bacterial lysates or cell culture supernatants are equilibrated with four different concentrations of a soluble target molecule, and unbound antibodies are subsequently quantified on 384-well Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) plates coated with the respective antigen. For determination of KD values from the resulting titration curves, fit models deduced from the law of mass action for 1:1 and 2:1 binding modes are applied to assess hundreds of interactions simultaneously. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparing results from different screening campaigns from affinity optimization projects with results from detailed affinity characterization.

  15. Effects of whole-body irradiation on antibody affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Gorini, G; Adorini, L; Boraschi, D; Di Michele, A; Doria, G

    1977-01-01

    Mice exposed to a sublethal dose of X-rays were immunized with alum-precipitated DNP-KLH (dinitrophenyl-keyhole limpet haemocyanin) and B. pertussis either before or after irradiation. The primary anti-DNP antibody response was evaluated during 8 weeks after immunization by the equilibrium dialysis technique using ammonium sulphate- precipitated serum globulins and the ligand 3H-labelled xi-DNP-L-Lysine. The serum concentrations of antibody sites in mice immunized 1-5 days before or 2 h-8 weeks after 450 rad were below the values in unirradiated controls at all bleeding times. Antibody affinity, however, was found to be up to 20 fold higher in irradiated mice than in control mice when antigen was injected before, or 3-8 weeks after, irradiation. Spleen cells from mice exposed to 450 rad 1-9 weeks before killing were stimulated in vitro with PHA, ConA, or LPS. Recovery profiles of mitotic responsiveness suggest that enhancement of antibody affinity in irradiated mice could result from relative lack of suppressor T Cells. PMID:198358

  16. Maturation of Shark Single-Domain (IgNAR) Antibodies: Evidence for Induced-Fit Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, R.L.; Dooley, H.; Verdino, P.; Flajnik, M.F.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Maryland U.

    2007-07-13

    Sharks express an unusual heavy-chain isotype called IgNAR, whose variable regions bind antigen as independent soluble domains. To further probe affinity maturation of the IgNAR response, we structurally characterized the germline and somatically matured versions of a type II variable (V) region, both in the presence and absence of its antigen, hen egg-white lysozyme. Despite a disulfide bond linking complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3, both germline and somatically matured V regions displayed significant structural changes in these CDRs upon complex formation with antigen. Somatic mutations in the IgNAR V region serve to increase the number of contacts with antigen, as reflected by a tenfold increase in affinity, and one of these mutations appears to stabilize the CDR3 region. In addition, a residue in the HV4 loop plays an important role in antibody-antigen interaction, consistent with the high rate of somatic mutations in this non-CDR loop.

  17. High Affinity Antibodies against Influenza Characterize the Plasmablast Response in SLE Patients After Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kaval; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Smith, Kenneth; Huang, Min; Li, Lie; Pauli, Noel T.; Henry Dunand, Carole J.; Lee, Jane-Hwei; Morrissey, Michael; Wu, Yixuan; Joachims, Michelle L.; Munroe, Melissa E.; Lau, Denise; Qu, Xinyan; Krammer, Florian; Wrammert, Jens; Palese, Peter; Ahmed, Rafi; James, Judith A.; Wilson, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    Breakdown of B cell tolerance is a cardinal feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Increased numbers of autoreactive mature naïve B cells have been described in SLE patients and autoantibodies have been shown to arise from autoreactive and non-autoreactive precursors. How these defects, in the regulation of B cell tolerance and selection, influence germinal center (GC) reactions that are directed towards foreign antigens has yet to be investigated. Here, we examined the characteristics of post-GC foreign antigen-specific B cells from SLE patients and healthy controls by analyzing monoclonal antibodies generated from plasmablasts induced specifically by influenza vaccination. We report that many of the SLE patients had anti-influenza antibodies with higher binding affinity and neutralization capacity than those from controls. Although overall frequencies of autoreactivity in the influenza-specific plasmablasts were similar for SLE patients and controls, the variable gene repertoire of influenza-specific plasmablasts from SLE patients was altered, with increased usage of JH6 and long heavy chain CDR3 segments. We found that high affinity anti-influenza antibodies generally characterize the plasmablast responses of SLE patients with low levels of autoreactivity; however, certain exceptions were noted. The high-avidity antibody responses in SLE patients may also be correlated with cytokines that are abnormally expressed in lupus. These findings provide insights into the effects of dysregulated immunity on the quality of antibody responses following influenza vaccination and further our understanding of the underlying abnormalities of lupus. PMID:25951191

  18. Influence of affinity on antibody determination in microtiter ELISA systems

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, J.H.; Voss, E.W. Jr.; Butler, J.E.

    1986-03-01

    Theoretically, all immunoassays are affinity (Ka) dependent when the product of the antibody (Ab) Ka and the free epitope concentration is less than 10. Thus, the degree of dependence on Ka depends on the concentration of available antigen in the system. The authors examined the binding of /sup 125/I-anti-fluorescein (a-FLU) monoclonal antibodies of different affinities to FLU-gelatin adsorbed on Immunlon 2 microtiter plates. Data obtained were in general agreement with our theoretical predictions; the percent of /sup 125/I-a-FLU which bound correlated with Ka, as did the shape of the titration curves. Measurement of 5 a-FLU monoclonals by the ELISA showed that the determination of Ab concentrations depends on the FLU-gelatin concentration, epitope density, and on the relationship between the Kas of test samples and the reference standard Ab preparation. Thus the ELISA is Ka dependent and should not be used routinely to estimate the absolute amount to Ab in unknown samples. However, the Ka dependency of the ELISA might provide a convenient assay for the estimation of the relative functional Ka (rfKa) of antibody preparations.

  19. A general method for greatly improving the affinity of antibodies by using combinatorial libraries

    PubMed Central

    Rajpal, Arvind; Beyaz, Nurten; Haber, Lauric; Cappuccilli, Guido; Yee, Helena; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Takeuchi, Toshihiko; Lerner, Richard A.; Crea, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Look-through mutagenesis (LTM) is a multidimensional mutagenesis method that simultaneously assesses and optimizes combinatorial mutations of selected amino acids. The process focuses on a precise distribution within one or more complementarity determining region (CDR) domains and explores the synergistic contribution of amino acid side-chain chemistry. LTM was applied to an anti-TNF-α antibody, D2E7, which is a challenging test case, because D2E7 was highly optimized (Kd = 1 nM) by others. We selected and incorporated nine amino acids, representative of the major chemical functionalities, individually at every position in each CDR and across all six CDRs (57 aa). Synthetic oligonucleotides, each introducing one amino acid mutation throughout the six CDRs, were pooled to generate segregated libraries containing single mutations in one, two, and/or three CDRs for each VH and VL domain. Corresponding antibody libraries were displayed on the cell surface of yeast. After positive binding selection, 38 substitutions in 21 CDR positions were identified that resulted in higher affinity binding to TNF-α. These beneficial mutations in both VH and VL were represented in two combinatorial beneficial mutagenesis libraries and selected by FACS to produce a convergence of variants that exhibit between 500- and 870-fold higher affinities. Importantly, these enhanced affinities translate to a 15- to 30-fold improvement in in vitro TNF-α neutralization in an L929 bioassay. Thus, this LTM/combinatorial beneficial mutagenesis strategy generates a comprehensive energetic map of the antibody-binding site in a facile and rapid manner and should be broadly applicable to the affinity maturation of antibodies and other proteins. PMID:15939870

  20. [The effect of blood serum polyreactive immunoglobulins on serum antibody affinity determination].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A; Demchenko, M A; Komisarenko, S V

    2010-01-01

    The presence of polyreactive immunoglobulins in sera may substantially influence on the accuracy of antibody affinity determination. In order to obtain precise values of antibody affinity one should apply one of two following ways. First, one should block polyreactive immunoglobulins with high concentration of Twin 20 and high concentration of any antigen which does not interact with studying antibody. After this antibody affinity may be determined by traditional methods. Another way is the application of the method suggested by us earlier, which allow determining affinity of two antibodies in a mixture and the relation of their concentrations.

  1. Enhanced antigen-antibody binding affinity mediated by an anti-idiotypic antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Sawutz, D.G.; Koury, R.; Homcy, C.J.

    1987-08-25

    The authors previously described the production of four monoclonal antibodies to the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor antagonist alprenolol. One of these antibodies, 5B7 (IgG/sub 2a/, kappa), was used to raise anti-idiotypic antisera in rabbits. In contrast to the expected results, one of the anti-idiotypic antisera (R9) promotes (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopinodolol (ICYP) binding to antibody 5B7. In the presence of R9, the dissociation constant decreases 100-fold from 20 to 0.3 nM. This increase in binding affinity of antibody 5B7 for ICYP is not observed in the presence of preimmune, rabbit anti-mouse or anti-idiotypic antisera generated to a monoclonal antibody of a different specificity. Furthermore, R9 in the absence of 5B7 does not bind ICYP. The F(ab) fragments of 5B7 and T9 behaved in a similar manner, and the soluble complex responsible for the high-affinity interaction with ICYP can be identified by gel filtration chromatography. The elution position of the complex is consistent with a 5B7 F(ab)-R9 F(ab) dimer, indicating that polyvalency is not responsible for the enhanced ligand binding. Kinetic analysis of ICYP-5B7 binding revealed that the rate of ICYP dissociation from 5B7 in the presence of R9 is approximately 100 times slower than in the absence of R9, consistent with the 100-fold change in binding affinity of 5B7 for ICYP. The available data best fit a model in which an anti-idiotypic antibody binds at or near the binding site of the idiotype participating in the formation of a hybrid ligand binding site. This would allow increased contact of the ligand with the idiotype-anti-idiotype complex and result in an enhanced affinity of the ligand interaction.

  2. Monoclonal IgM antibody exhibiting high-affinity binding and cryoglobulin properties.

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, D W; Kranz, D M; Voss, E W

    1983-01-01

    A monoclonal IgM antibody (18-2-3) derived from cell fusion of (NZB X NZW) F1 splenocytes following secondary immunization with fluorescein-conjugated keyhole limpet hemocyanin was shown to exhibit high intrinsic binding affinity and cryoinsolubility. Affinity-purified preparations were determined to be IgM by immunochemical, electrophoretic, and chromatographic analyses. An intrinsic association constant (Ka) of 2.9 X 10(10) M-1 (at 2 degrees C) was measured by first-order dissociation-rate analysis. Antibody solubility at low concentration (approximately equal to 50 micrograms/ml) was shown, by absorption spectroscopy, to be temperature dependent between 4 degrees C and 32 degrees C. Insolubility at low temperature (4 degrees C) was reversible in the presence of homologous fluorescyl hapten, indicative of active site involvement in the mechanism of cryoglobulin-18-2-3 complex formation. Characteristics of clone 18-2-3 are discussed in terms of (i) its potential use as a model for examining the mechanism of cryoprecipitation and (ii) the proposed relationship between affinity maturation and the IgM to IgG class switch. Images PMID:6348779

  3. Co-administration of CpG oligonucleotides enhances the late affinity maturation process of human anti-hepatitis B vaccine response.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pihlgren, Maria; Tougne, Chantal; Efler, Sue M; Morris, Mary Lou; AlAdhami, Mohammed J; Cameron, D William; Cooper, Curtis L; Heathcote, Jenny; Davis, Heather L; Lambert, Paul-Henri

    2004-12-16

    We assessed the avidity maturation process elicited by human immunization with alum-adsorbed HBsAg alone or with a novel adjuvant containing CpG motifs (CpG 7909). Mean avidity indexes and distribution of low- and high-avidity anti-HBs indicated that avidity maturation essentially takes place late after priming. CpG 7909 markedly enhanced this affinity maturation process, increasing the pool of high-avidity antibodies. The influence of CpG 7909 was antigen-specific, isotype-specific and distinct from the influence on anti-HBs production, as avidity did not correlate with anti-HBs IgG titers. This is the first demonstration that a novel human adjuvant may induce antibodies with higher antigen-binding affinity. PMID:15542181

  4. Water channel in the binding site of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Susan; Longenecker, Kenton L; Manoj, Sharmila; Judge, Russell A; Saldana, Sylvia C; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Swift, Kerry M; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2014-06-17

    In the present study, we report the structure of the free and drug-bound Fab fragment of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody and perform a thermodynamic analysis of the binding process. The anti-methotrexate Fab fragment features a remarkably rigid tunnel-like binding site that extends into a water channel serving as a specialized route to move solvent out and into the site upon ligand binding and dissociation. This new finding in antibody structure-function relationships directly relates to the fast association (1 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and slow dissociation (4 × 10⁻⁵ s⁻¹) rates determined for mAb ADD056, resulting in a very strong binding with a K(D) ~ 3.6 pM at 20 °C. As follows from the X-ray data analysis, the methotrexate-antibody complex is stabilized by an extended network of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions. The analysis also shows structural involvement of the CDR H3 in formation of the water channel revealing another important role of this hypervariable region. This suggests a new direction in natural affinity maturation and opens a new possibility in antibody engineering. Methotrexate is a widely used therapeutic agent for many malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. Unfortunately, it may also interfere with central aspects of metabolism and thereby cause inevitable side effects. Therefore, methotrexate therapy requires careful monitoring of drug blood levels, which is traditionally done by immunoassays. An understanding of the structure-function properties of antibodies selected for drug monitoring substantiates the performance and robustness of such tests.

  5. Water channel in the binding site of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody.

    PubMed

    Gayda, Susan; Longenecker, Kenton L; Manoj, Sharmila; Judge, Russell A; Saldana, Sylvia C; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Swift, Kerry M; Tetin, Sergey Y

    2014-06-17

    In the present study, we report the structure of the free and drug-bound Fab fragment of a high affinity anti-methotrexate antibody and perform a thermodynamic analysis of the binding process. The anti-methotrexate Fab fragment features a remarkably rigid tunnel-like binding site that extends into a water channel serving as a specialized route to move solvent out and into the site upon ligand binding and dissociation. This new finding in antibody structure-function relationships directly relates to the fast association (1 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) and slow dissociation (4 × 10⁻⁵ s⁻¹) rates determined for mAb ADD056, resulting in a very strong binding with a K(D) ~ 3.6 pM at 20 °C. As follows from the X-ray data analysis, the methotrexate-antibody complex is stabilized by an extended network of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions. The analysis also shows structural involvement of the CDR H3 in formation of the water channel revealing another important role of this hypervariable region. This suggests a new direction in natural affinity maturation and opens a new possibility in antibody engineering. Methotrexate is a widely used therapeutic agent for many malignant diseases and inflammatory disorders. Unfortunately, it may also interfere with central aspects of metabolism and thereby cause inevitable side effects. Therefore, methotrexate therapy requires careful monitoring of drug blood levels, which is traditionally done by immunoassays. An understanding of the structure-function properties of antibodies selected for drug monitoring substantiates the performance and robustness of such tests. PMID:24832237

  6. Quantifying evolutionary constraints on B-cell affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Connor O.; Bedford, Trevor; Minin, Vladimir N.; Bradley, Philip; Robins, Harlan; Matsen, Frederick A.

    2015-01-01

    The antibody repertoire of each individual is continuously updated by the evolutionary process of B-cell receptor (BCR) mutation and selection. It has recently become possible to gain detailed information concerning this process through high-throughput sequencing. Here, we develop modern statistical molecular evolution methods for the analysis of B-cell sequence data, and then apply them to a very deep short-read dataset of BCRs. We find that the substitution process is conserved across individuals but varies significantly across gene segments. We investigate selection on BCRs using a novel method that side-steps the difficulties encountered by previous work in differentiating between selection and motif-driven mutation; this is done through stochastic mapping and empirical Bayes estimators that compare the evolution of in-frame and out-of-frame rearrangements. We use this new method to derive a per-residue map of selection, which provides a more nuanced view of the constraints on framework and variable regions. PMID:26194758

  7. Shark Attack: high affinity binding proteins derived from shark vNAR domains by stepwise in vitro affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Weber, Niklas; Becker, Stefan; Doerner, Achim; Christmann, Andreas; Christmann, Christine; Uth, Christina; Fritz, Janine; Schäfer, Elena; Steinmann, Björn; Empting, Martin; Ockelmann, Pia; Lierz, Michael; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-12-10

    A novel method for stepwise in vitro affinity maturation of antigen-specific shark vNAR domains is described that exclusively relies on semi-synthetic repertoires derived from non-immunized sharks. Target-specific molecules were selected from a CDR3-randomized bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) vNAR library using yeast surface display as platform technology. Various antigen-binding vNAR domains were easily isolated by screening against several therapeutically relevant antigens, including the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), the Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and the human serine protease HTRA1. Affinity maturation was demonstrated for EpCAM and HTRA1 by diversifying CDR1 of target-enriched populations which allowed for the rapid selection of nanomolar binders. EpCAM-specific vNAR molecules were produced as soluble proteins and more extensively characterized via thermal shift assays and biolayer interferometry. Essentially, we demonstrate that high-affinity binders can be generated in vitro without largely compromising the desirable high thermostability of the vNAR scaffold.

  8. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody to methamphetamine and amphetamine through structure-based antibody engineering.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Nanaware-Kharade, Nisha; Celikel, Reha; Peterson, Eric C; Varughese, Kottayil I

    2014-01-14

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is a worldwide threat, without any FDA approved medications. Anti-METH IgGs and single chain fragments (scFvs) have shown efficacy in preclinical studies. Here we report affinity enhancement of an anti-METH scFv for METH and its active metabolite amphetamine (AMP), through the introduction of point mutations, rationally designed to optimize the shape and hydrophobicity of the antibody binding pocket. The binding affinity was measured using saturation binding technique. The mutant scFv-S93T showed 3.1 fold enhancement in affinity for METH and 26 fold for AMP. The scFv-I37M and scFv-Y34M mutants showed enhancement of 94, and 8 fold for AMP, respectively. Structural analysis of scFv-S93T:METH revealed that the substitution of Ser residue by Thr caused the expulsion of a water molecule from the cavity, creating a more hydrophobic environment for the binding that dramatically increases the affinities for METH and AMP.

  9. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody to methamphetamine and amphetamine through structure-based antibody engineering

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Nanaware-Kharade, Nisha; Celikel, Reha; Peterson, Eric C.; Varughese, Kottayil I.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is a worldwide threat, without any FDA approved medications. Anti-METH IgGs and single chain fragments (scFvs) have shown efficacy in preclinical studies. Here we report affinity enhancement of an anti-METH scFv for METH and its active metabolite amphetamine (AMP), through the introduction of point mutations, rationally designed to optimize the shape and hydrophobicity of the antibody binding pocket. The binding affinity was measured using saturation binding technique. The mutant scFv-S93T showed 3.1 fold enhancement in affinity for METH and 26 fold for AMP. The scFv-I37M and scFv-Y34M mutants showed enhancement of 94, and 8 fold for AMP, respectively. Structural analysis of scFv-S93T:METH revealed that the substitution of Ser residue by Thr caused the expulsion of a water molecule from the cavity, creating a more hydrophobic environment for the binding that dramatically increases the affinities for METH and AMP. PMID:24419156

  10. Guiding the evolution to catch the virus: An in silico study of affinity maturation against rapidly mutating antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenshen; Burton, Dennis; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup

    2014-03-01

    The immune system comprises an intricate and evolving collection of cells and molecules that enables a defense against pathogenic agents. Its workings present a rich source of physical problems that impact human health. One intriguing example is the process of affinity maturation (AM) through which an antibody (Ab)--a component of the host immune system--evolves to more efficiently bind an antigen (Ag)--a unique part of a foreign pathogen such as a virus. Sufficiently strong binding to the Ag enables recognition and neutralization. A major challenge is to contain a diversifying mixture of Ag variants, that arise in natural infection, from evading Ab neutralization. This entails a thorough understanding of AM against multiple Ag species and mutating Ag. During AM, Ab-encoding cells undergo cycles of mutation and selection, a process reminiscent of Darwinian evolution yet occurring in real time. We first cast affinity-dependent selection into an extreme value problem and show how the binding characteristics scale with Ag diversity. We then develop an agent-based residue-resolved computational model of AM which allows us to track the evolutionary trajectories of individual cells. This dynamic model not only reveals significant stochastic effects associated with the relatively small and highly dynamic population size, it also uncovers the markedly distinct maturation outcomes if designed Ag variants are presented in different temporal procedures. Insights thus obtained would guide rational design of vaccination protocols.

  11. Robotic QM/MM-driven maturation of antibody combining sites

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, Ivan V.; Golovin, Andrey V.; Chatziefthimiou, Spyros D.; Stepanova, Anastasiya V.; Peng, Yingjie; Zolotareva, Olga I.; Belogurov, Alexey A.; Kurkova, Inna N.; Ponomarenko, Natalie A.; Wilmanns, Matthias; Blackburn, G. Michael; Gabibov, Alexander G.; Lerner, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro selection of antibodies from large repertoires of immunoglobulin (Ig) combining sites using combinatorial libraries is a powerful tool, with great potential for generating in vivo scavengers for toxins. However, addition of a maturation function is necessary to enable these selected antibodies to more closely mimic the full mammalian immune response. We approached this goal using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations to achieve maturation in silico. We preselected A17, an Ig template, from a naïve library for its ability to disarm a toxic pesticide related to organophosphorus nerve agents. Virtual screening of 167,538 robotically generated mutants identified an optimum single point mutation, which experimentally boosted wild-type Ig scavenger performance by 170-fold. We validated the QM/MM predictions via kinetic analysis and crystal structures of mutant apo-A17 and covalently modified Ig, thereby identifying the displacement of one water molecule by an arginine as delivering this catalysis. PMID:27774510

  12. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K; Corey, David P

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications.

  13. Three Recombinant Engineered Antibodies against Recombinant Tags with High Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shen, Ao; Xiang, Yang K.; Corey, David P.

    2016-01-01

    We describe three recombinant engineered antibodies against three recombinant epitope tags, constructed with divalent binding arms to recognize divalent epitopes and so achieve high affinity and specificity. In two versions, an epitope is inserted in tandem into a protein of interest, and a homodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing a high-affinity epitope-binding domain to a human or mouse Fc domain. In a third, a heterodimeric antibody is constructed by fusing two different epitope-binding domains which target two different binding sites in GFP, to polarized Fc fragments. These antibody/epitope pairs have affinities in the low picomolar range and are useful tools for many antibody-based applications. PMID:26943906

  14. Co-evolution of affinity and stability of grafted amyloid-motif domain antibodies.

    PubMed

    Julian, Mark C; Lee, Christine C; Tiller, Kathryn E; Rabia, Lilia A; Day, Evan K; Schick, Arthur J; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-10-01

    An attractive approach for designing lead antibody candidates is to mimic natural protein interactions by grafting peptide recognition motifs into the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs). We are using this approach to generate single-domain (VH) antibodies specific for amyloid-forming proteins such as the Alzheimer's Aβ peptide. Here, we use random mutagenesis and yeast surface display to improve the binding affinity of a lead VH domain grafted with Aβ residues 33-42 in CDR3. Interestingly, co-selection for improved Aβ binding and VH display on the surface of yeast yields antibody domains with improved affinity and reduced stability. The highest affinity VH domains were strongly destabilized on the surface of yeast as well as unfolded when isolated as autonomous domains. In contrast, stable VH domains with improved affinity were reliably identified using yeast surface display by replacing the display antibody that recognizes a linear epitope tag at the terminus of both folded and unfolded VH domains with a conformational ligand (Protein A) that recognizes a discontinuous epitope on the framework of folded VH domains. Importantly, we find that selection for improved stability using Protein A without simultaneous co-selection for improved Aβ binding leads to strong enrichment for stabilizing mutations that reduce antigen binding. Our findings highlight the importance of simultaneously optimizing affinity and stability to improve the rapid isolation of well-folded and specific antibody fragments.

  15. Co-evolution of affinity and stability of grafted amyloid-motif domain antibodies.

    PubMed

    Julian, Mark C; Lee, Christine C; Tiller, Kathryn E; Rabia, Lilia A; Day, Evan K; Schick, Arthur J; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-10-01

    An attractive approach for designing lead antibody candidates is to mimic natural protein interactions by grafting peptide recognition motifs into the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs). We are using this approach to generate single-domain (VH) antibodies specific for amyloid-forming proteins such as the Alzheimer's Aβ peptide. Here, we use random mutagenesis and yeast surface display to improve the binding affinity of a lead VH domain grafted with Aβ residues 33-42 in CDR3. Interestingly, co-selection for improved Aβ binding and VH display on the surface of yeast yields antibody domains with improved affinity and reduced stability. The highest affinity VH domains were strongly destabilized on the surface of yeast as well as unfolded when isolated as autonomous domains. In contrast, stable VH domains with improved affinity were reliably identified using yeast surface display by replacing the display antibody that recognizes a linear epitope tag at the terminus of both folded and unfolded VH domains with a conformational ligand (Protein A) that recognizes a discontinuous epitope on the framework of folded VH domains. Importantly, we find that selection for improved stability using Protein A without simultaneous co-selection for improved Aβ binding leads to strong enrichment for stabilizing mutations that reduce antigen binding. Our findings highlight the importance of simultaneously optimizing affinity and stability to improve the rapid isolation of well-folded and specific antibody fragments. PMID:26386257

  16. Co-evolution of affinity and stability of grafted amyloid-motif domain antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Mark C.; Lee, Christine C.; Tiller, Kathryn E.; Rabia, Lilia A.; Day, Evan K.; Schick, Arthur J.; Tessier, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    An attractive approach for designing lead antibody candidates is to mimic natural protein interactions by grafting peptide recognition motifs into the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs). We are using this approach to generate single-domain (VH) antibodies specific for amyloid-forming proteins such as the Alzheimer's Aβ peptide. Here, we use random mutagenesis and yeast surface display to improve the binding affinity of a lead VH domain grafted with Aβ residues 33–42 in CDR3. Interestingly, co-selection for improved Aβ binding and VH display on the surface of yeast yields antibody domains with improved affinity and reduced stability. The highest affinity VH domains were strongly destabilized on the surface of yeast as well as unfolded when isolated as autonomous domains. In contrast, stable VH domains with improved affinity were reliably identified using yeast surface display by replacing the display antibody that recognizes a linear epitope tag at the terminus of both folded and unfolded VH domains with a conformational ligand (Protein A) that recognizes a discontinuous epitope on the framework of folded VH domains. Importantly, we find that selection for improved stability using Protein A without simultaneous co-selection for improved Aβ binding leads to strong enrichment for stabilizing mutations that reduce antigen binding. Our findings highlight the importance of simultaneously optimizing affinity and stability to improve the rapid isolation of well-folded and specific antibody fragments. PMID:26386257

  17. Humanization of high-affinity antibodies targeting glypican-3 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Ho, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We have generated a group of high-affinity mouse monoclonal antibodies targeting GPC3. Here, we report the humanization and testing of these antibodies for clinical development. We compared the affinity and cytotoxicity of recombinant immunotoxins containing mouse single-chain variable regions fused with a Pseudomonas toxin. To humanize the mouse Fvs, we grafted the combined KABAT/IMGT complementarity determining regions (CDR) into a human IgG germline framework. Interestingly, we found that the proline at position 41, a non-CDR residue in heavy chain variable regions (VH), is important for humanization of mouse antibodies. We also showed that two humanized anti-GPC3 antibodies (hYP7 and hYP9.1b) in the IgG format induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent-cytotoxicity in GPC3-positive cancer cells. The hYP7 antibody was tested and showed inhibition of HCC xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. This study successfully humanizes and validates high affinity anti-GPC3 antibodies and sets a foundation for future development of these antibodies in various clinical formats in the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:27667400

  18. The Purification of Natural and Recombinant Peptide Antibodies by Affinity Chromatographic Strategies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The purification of peptide antibodies (e.g., IgG, IgY, scFv, and Fab) are described in this chapter. Affinity chromatographic purification, a very convenient and effective antibody purification strategy, is used to isolate peptide antibodies based on specific binding, i.e., binding of the antibody to a column on which its specific ligand is immobilized with subsequent elution of the purified antibody. In addition, the application of purification methods based on the use of proteins A, G, and L, each of which bind to specific domains on an antibody/fragment, or the use of specific tags (e.g., histidine and biotin) attached to antibodies or antigens are also described.

  19. Quality control of murine monoclonal antibodies using isoelectric focusing affinity immunoblot analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Robert G.; Rodkey, L. Scott; Reimer, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    The quality control of murine hybridoma secretory products has been performed using two approaches for isoelectric focusing affinity immunoblot analysis: (1) a method in which antigen-coated nitrocellulose is placed on top of an acrylamide gel containing isoelectrically focused ascites to bind the antigen specific monoclonal antibody; and (2) a method in which focused ascite proteins were passively blotted onto nitrocellulose and specific monoclonal antibodies were detected with enzyme-conjugated antigen. Analysis by both methods of batches of ascites containing antihuman IgG antibodies that were produced by six hybridomas permitted effective monitoring of immunoreactive antibodies for pI microheterogeneity.

  20. Affinity immunoblotting - High resolution isoelectric focusing analysis of antibody clonotype distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knisley, Keith A.; Rodkey, L. Scott

    1986-01-01

    A sensitive and specific method is proposed for the analysis of specific antibody clonotype changes occurring during an immune response and for comparing multiple sera for antibody clonotype similarities. Polyclonal serum antibodies separated by isoelectric focusing (IEF) were analyzed by an affinity immunoblotting method using antigen-coated nitrocellulose membranes. Antibodies present on the surface of the acrylamide gels following IEF bind the antigen on the nitrocellulose when the coated nitrocellulose is laid over the gels. The technique has been used to analyze Ig clonotypes specific for five protein antigens and two carbohydrate antigens. Optimal antigen concentrations for coating the nitrocellulose membranes were found to range from 10-100 microgram/ml.

  1. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Rosenfeld, Ronit; Ariel, Naomi; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Zvi, Anat; Kronman, Chanoch; Ordentlich, Arie; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit) was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (koff < 1 × 10−7 s−1) that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication. PMID:26950154

  2. A strategy of designing the ligand of antibody affinity chromatography based on molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Li, Weikang; Sun, Fei; Li, Baizhi; Li, Hongrui; Zhang, Hongxing; Zheng, Qingchuan; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-09-01

    Designing affinity ligands has always been the development focus of affinity chromatography. Previous antibody affinity ligand designs were mostly based on the crystal structure of protein A (UniProt code number: P38507), and the antibody-binding domains were modified according to the properties of amino acid residues. Currently, more effective bioinformatic prediction and experimental validation has been used to improve the design of antibody affinity ligands. In the present study, the complex crystal structure (the domain D of protein A and the Fab segment of IgM, PDB code: 1DEE) was used as the model. The vital site that inhibits the binding between domain D and IgM was estimated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, then MM-GBSA calculations were used to design a mutant of domain D (K46E) for improving affinity on the above vital site. The binding analysis using Biacore showed the association and dissociation parameters of K46E mutant that were optimized with IgM. The affinity increase of K46E mutant preferred for IgM, the affinity order is K46E tetramer (KD=6.02×10(-9)M)>K46E mutant (KD=6.66×10(-8)M)>domain D (KD=2.17×10(-7)M). Similar results were obtained when the optimized ligands were immobilized to the chromatography medium. A complete designing strategy was validated in this study, which will provide a novel insight into designing new ligands of antibody affinity chromatography media.

  3. A strategy of designing the ligand of antibody affinity chromatography based on molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Li, Weikang; Sun, Fei; Li, Baizhi; Li, Hongrui; Zhang, Hongxing; Zheng, Qingchuan; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-09-01

    Designing affinity ligands has always been the development focus of affinity chromatography. Previous antibody affinity ligand designs were mostly based on the crystal structure of protein A (UniProt code number: P38507), and the antibody-binding domains were modified according to the properties of amino acid residues. Currently, more effective bioinformatic prediction and experimental validation has been used to improve the design of antibody affinity ligands. In the present study, the complex crystal structure (the domain D of protein A and the Fab segment of IgM, PDB code: 1DEE) was used as the model. The vital site that inhibits the binding between domain D and IgM was estimated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, then MM-GBSA calculations were used to design a mutant of domain D (K46E) for improving affinity on the above vital site. The binding analysis using Biacore showed the association and dissociation parameters of K46E mutant that were optimized with IgM. The affinity increase of K46E mutant preferred for IgM, the affinity order is K46E tetramer (KD=6.02×10(-9)M)>K46E mutant (KD=6.66×10(-8)M)>domain D (KD=2.17×10(-7)M). Similar results were obtained when the optimized ligands were immobilized to the chromatography medium. A complete designing strategy was validated in this study, which will provide a novel insight into designing new ligands of antibody affinity chromatography media. PMID:27524303

  4. Structural Basis of HIV-1 Neutralization by Affinity Matured Fabs Directed against the Internal Trimeric Coiled-Coil of gp41

    SciTech Connect

    Gustchina, Elena; Li, Mi; Louis, John M.; Anderson, D.Eric; Lloyd, John; Frisch, Christian; Bewley, Carole A.; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander; Clore, G.Marius

    2010-12-03

    The conserved internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR) of HIV-1 gp41 is transiently exposed during the fusion process by forming a pre-hairpin intermediate, thus representing an attractive target for the design of fusion inhibitors and neutralizing antibodies. In previous studies we reported a series of broadly neutralizing mini-antibodies derived from a synthetic naive human combinatorial antibody library by panning against a mimetic of the trimeric N-HR coiled coil, followed by affinity maturation using targeted diversification of the CDR-H2 loop. Here we report crystal structures of the N-HR mimetic 5-Helix with two Fabs that represent the extremes of this series: Fab 8066 is broadly neutralizing across a wide panel of B and C type HIV-1 viruses, whereas Fab 8062 is non-neutralizing. The crystal structures reveal important differences in the conformations of the CDR-H2 loops in the complexes that propagate into other regions of the antigen-antibody interface, and suggest that both neutralization properties and affinity for the target can be attributed, at least in part, to the differences in the interactions of the CDR-H2 loops with the antigen. Furthermore, modeling of the complex of an N-HR trimer with three Fabs suggests that the CDR-H2 loop may be involved in close intermolecular contacts between neighboring antibody molecules, and that such contacts may hinder the formation of complexes between the N-HR trimer and more than one antibody molecule depending on the conformation of the bound CDR-H2 loop which is defined by its interactions with antigen. Comparison with the crystal structure of the complex of 5-Helix with another neutralizing monoclonal antibody known as D5, derived using an entirely different antibody library and panning procedure, reveals remarkable convergence in the optimal sequence and conformation of the CDR-H2 loop.

  5. Affinity-based methodologies and ligands for antibody purification: advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Roque, Ana C A; Silva, Cláudia S O; Taipa, M Angela

    2007-08-10

    Many successful, recent therapies for life-threatening diseases such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis are based on the recognition between native or genetically engineered antibodies and cell-surface receptors. Although naturally produced by the immune system, the need for antibodies with unique specificities and designed for single application, has encouraged the search for novel antibody purification strategies. The availability of these products to the end-consumer is strictly related to manufacture costs, particularly those attributed to downstream processing. Over the last decades, academia and industry have developed different types of interactions and separation techniques for antibody purification, affinity-based strategies being the most common and efficient methodologies. The affinity ligands utilized range from biological to synthetic designed molecules with enhanced resistance and stability. Despite the successes achieved, the purification "paradigm" still moves interests and efforts in the continuous demand for improved separation performances. This review will focus on recent advances and perspectives in antibody purification by affinity interactions using different techniques, with particular emphasis on affinity chromatography.

  6. Affinity-based methodologies and ligands for antibody purification: advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Roque, Ana C A; Silva, Cláudia S O; Taipa, M Angela

    2007-08-10

    Many successful, recent therapies for life-threatening diseases such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis are based on the recognition between native or genetically engineered antibodies and cell-surface receptors. Although naturally produced by the immune system, the need for antibodies with unique specificities and designed for single application, has encouraged the search for novel antibody purification strategies. The availability of these products to the end-consumer is strictly related to manufacture costs, particularly those attributed to downstream processing. Over the last decades, academia and industry have developed different types of interactions and separation techniques for antibody purification, affinity-based strategies being the most common and efficient methodologies. The affinity ligands utilized range from biological to synthetic designed molecules with enhanced resistance and stability. Despite the successes achieved, the purification "paradigm" still moves interests and efforts in the continuous demand for improved separation performances. This review will focus on recent advances and perspectives in antibody purification by affinity interactions using different techniques, with particular emphasis on affinity chromatography. PMID:17618635

  7. The maturation of antibody technology for the HIV epidemic.

    PubMed

    Winnall, Wendy R; Beasley, Matthew D; Center, Rob J; Parsons, Matthew S; Kiefel, Ben R; Kent, Stephen J

    2014-08-01

    Antibodies are one of our most useful biological tools. Indeed, improvements in antibody-based technologies have ushered in a new era of antibody-based therapeutics, research and diagnostic tools. Although improved technologies have led to the development of therapeutic antibodies for treatment of malignancies and inflammatory conditions, the use of advanced antibody technology in the therapy of viral infections is in its infancy. Non-human primate studies have demonstrated that antibodies against the HIV envelope can both prevent viral infection and control viremia. Despite the obvious potential of antibody therapies against HIV, there remain limitations in production and purification capacity that require further research. Recent advances in recombinant antibody technology have led to the development of a range of novel antibody fragments, such as single-domain nanobodies and bispecific antibodies, that are capable of targeting cancer cells to cytotoxic T cells. Novel antibody production techniques have also been designed, allowing antibodies to be obtained from non-mammalian cells, bovine colostrum and the periplasm and cytoplasm of bacteria. These advances may allow large-scale production of HIV antibodies that are capable of protecting against HIV infection or serving as therapeutics that reduce the need for life-long antiretroviral treatment. This review summarises recent advances in antibody-based technologies and discusses the possibilities and challenges of using these advances to design prophylactics and therapeutics against HIV. PMID:24797582

  8. Development of a specific affinity-matured exosite inhibitor to MT1-MMP that efficiently inhibits tumor cell invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Botkjaer, Kenneth A.; Kwok, Hang Fai; Terp, Mikkel G.; Karatt-Vellatt, Aneesh; Santamaria, Salvatore; McCafferty, John; Andreasen, Peter A.; Itoh, Yoshifumi; Ditzel, Henrik J.; Murphy, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase-14, MT1-MMP, has been implicated in pericellular proteolysis with an important role in cellular invasion of collagenous tissues. It is substantially upregulated in various cancers and rheumatoid arthritis, and has been considered as a potential therapeutic target. Here, we report the identification of antibody fragments to MT1-MMP that potently and specifically inhibit its cell surface functions. Lead antibody clones displayed inhibitory activity towards pro-MMP-2 activation, collagen-film degradation and gelatin-film degradation, and were shown to bind to the MT1-MMP catalytic domain outside the active site cleft, inhibiting binding to triple helical collagen. Affinity maturation using CDR3 randomization created a second generation of antibody fragments with dissociation constants down to 0.11 nM, corresponding to an improved affinity of 332-fold with the ability to interfere with cell-surface MT1-MMP functions, displaying IC50 values down to 5 nM. Importantly, the new inhibitors were able to inhibit collagen invasion by tumor-cells in vitro and in vivo primary tumor growth and metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells in a mouse orthotopic xenograft model. Herein is the first demonstration that an inhibitory antibody targeting sites outside the catalytic cleft of MT1-MMP can effectively abrogate its in vivo activity during tumorigenesis and metastasis. PMID:26934448

  9. Deconvolution of antibody affinities and concentrations by non-linear regression analysis of competitive ELISA data.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Bobrovnik, S. A.; Biosciences Division; Palladin Inst. Biochemistry

    2007-12-01

    Physiological responses of the adaptive immune system are polyclonal in nature whether induced by a naturally occurring infection, by vaccination to prevent infection or, in the case of animals, by challenge with antigen to generate reagents of research or commercial significance. The composition of the polyclonal responses is distinct to each individual or animal and changes over time. Differences exist in the affinities of the constituents and their relative proportion of the responsive population. In addition, some of the antibodies bind to different sites on the antigen, whereas other pairs of antibodies are sterically restricted from concurrent interaction with the antigen. Even if generation of a monoclonal antibody is the ultimate goal of a project, the quality of the resulting reagent is ultimately related to the characteristics of the initial immune response. It is probably impossible to quantitatively parse the composition of a polyclonal response to antigen. However, molecular regression allows further parameterization of a polyclonal antiserum in the context of certain simplifying assumptions. The antiserum is described as consisting of two competing populations of high- and low-affinity and unknown relative proportions. This simple model allows the quantitative determination of representative affinities and proportions. These parameters may be of use in evaluating responses to vaccines, to evaluating continuity of antibody production whether in vaccine recipients or animals used for the production of antisera, or in optimizing selection of donors for the production of monoclonal antibodies.

  10. Affinity Chromatography of Native and Recombinant Proteins from Receptors for Insulin and IGF-I to Recombinant Single Chain Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is an efficient method to isolate proteins by taking advantage of their affinities for specific molecules such as substrates, inhibitors, antigens, ligands, antibodies, and other interacting molecules, including subunits. Nowadays, we take the effectiveness and excellence of this technology for granted. This essay will mainly cover the use of affinity chromatography based on my experience. PMID:26579073

  11. Affinity Chromatography of Native and Recombinant Proteins from Receptors for Insulin and IGF-I to Recombinant Single Chain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is an efficient method to isolate proteins by taking advantage of their affinities for specific molecules such as substrates, inhibitors, antigens, ligands, antibodies, and other interacting molecules, including subunits. Nowadays, we take the effectiveness and excellence of this technology for granted. This essay will mainly cover the use of affinity chromatography based on my experience. PMID:26579073

  12. Kinetics of anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody internalization: effects of affinity, bivalency, and stability

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Michael M.; Thurber, Greg M.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical analyses suggest that the cellular internalization and catabolism of bound antibodies contribute significantly to poor penetration into tumors. Here we quantitatively assess the internalization of antibodies and antibody fragments against the commonly targeted antigen carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Although CEA is often referred to as a non-internalizing or shed antigen, anti-CEA antibodies and antibody fragments are shown to be slowly endocytosed by LS174T cells with a half-time of 10–16 h, a time scale consistent with the metabolic turnover rate of CEA in the absence of antibody. Anti-CEA single chain variable fragments (scFvs) with significant differences in affinity, stability against protease digestion, and valency exhibit similar uptake rates of bound antibody. In contrast, one anti-CEA IgG exhibits unique binding and trafficking properties with twice as many molecules bound per cell at saturation and significantly faster cellular internalization after binding. The internalization rates measured herein can be used in simple computational models to predict the microdistribution of these antibodies in tumor spheroids. PMID:18408925

  13. Alteration of Electrostatic Surface Potential Enhances Affinity and Tumor Killing Properties of Anti-ganglioside GD2 Monoclonal Antibody hu3F8.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Guo, Hong-fen; Cheung, Irene Y; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2015-05-22

    Ganglioside GD2 is highly expressed on neuroectodermal tumors and an attractive therapeutic target for antibodies that have already shown some clinical efficacy. To further improve the current antibodies, which have modest affinity, we sought to improve affinity by using a combined method of random mutagenesis and in silico assisted design to affinity-mature the anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu3F8. Using yeast display, mutants in the Fv with enhanced binding over the parental clone were FACS-sorted and cloned. In silico modeling identified the minimal key interacting residues involved in the important charged interactions with the sialic acid groups of GD2. Two mutations, D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) altered the electrostatic surface potential of the antigen binding site, allowing for an increase in positive charge to enhance the interaction with the negatively charged GD2-pentasaccharide headgroup. Purified scFv and IgG mutant forms were then tested for antigen specificity by ELISA, for tissue specificity by immunohistochemistry, for affinity by BIACORE, for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro, and for anti-tumor efficacy in xenografted humanized mice. The nearly 7-fold improvement in affinity of hu3F8 with a single D32H (L-CDR1) mutation translated into a ∼12-fold improvement in NK92MI-transfected CD16-mediated ADCC, a 6-fold improvement in CD32-mediated ADCC, and a 2.5-fold improvement in complement-mediated cytotoxicity while maintaining restricted normal tissue cross-reactivity and achieving substantial improvement in tumor ablation in vivo. Despite increasing GD2 affinity, the double mutation D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) did not further improve anti-tumor efficacy.

  14. Alteration of Electrostatic Surface Potential Enhances Affinity and Tumor Killing Properties of Anti-ganglioside GD2 Monoclonal Antibody hu3F8.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Guo, Hong-fen; Cheung, Irene Y; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2015-05-22

    Ganglioside GD2 is highly expressed on neuroectodermal tumors and an attractive therapeutic target for antibodies that have already shown some clinical efficacy. To further improve the current antibodies, which have modest affinity, we sought to improve affinity by using a combined method of random mutagenesis and in silico assisted design to affinity-mature the anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu3F8. Using yeast display, mutants in the Fv with enhanced binding over the parental clone were FACS-sorted and cloned. In silico modeling identified the minimal key interacting residues involved in the important charged interactions with the sialic acid groups of GD2. Two mutations, D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) altered the electrostatic surface potential of the antigen binding site, allowing for an increase in positive charge to enhance the interaction with the negatively charged GD2-pentasaccharide headgroup. Purified scFv and IgG mutant forms were then tested for antigen specificity by ELISA, for tissue specificity by immunohistochemistry, for affinity by BIACORE, for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro, and for anti-tumor efficacy in xenografted humanized mice. The nearly 7-fold improvement in affinity of hu3F8 with a single D32H (L-CDR1) mutation translated into a ∼12-fold improvement in NK92MI-transfected CD16-mediated ADCC, a 6-fold improvement in CD32-mediated ADCC, and a 2.5-fold improvement in complement-mediated cytotoxicity while maintaining restricted normal tissue cross-reactivity and achieving substantial improvement in tumor ablation in vivo. Despite increasing GD2 affinity, the double mutation D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) did not further improve anti-tumor efficacy. PMID:25851904

  15. Alteration of Electrostatic Surface Potential Enhances Affinity and Tumor Killing Properties of Anti-ganglioside GD2 Monoclonal Antibody hu3F8*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Guo, Hong-fen; Cheung, Irene Y.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioside GD2 is highly expressed on neuroectodermal tumors and an attractive therapeutic target for antibodies that have already shown some clinical efficacy. To further improve the current antibodies, which have modest affinity, we sought to improve affinity by using a combined method of random mutagenesis and in silico assisted design to affinity-mature the anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu3F8. Using yeast display, mutants in the Fv with enhanced binding over the parental clone were FACS-sorted and cloned. In silico modeling identified the minimal key interacting residues involved in the important charged interactions with the sialic acid groups of GD2. Two mutations, D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) altered the electrostatic surface potential of the antigen binding site, allowing for an increase in positive charge to enhance the interaction with the negatively charged GD2-pentasaccharide headgroup. Purified scFv and IgG mutant forms were then tested for antigen specificity by ELISA, for tissue specificity by immunohistochemistry, for affinity by BIACORE, for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro, and for anti-tumor efficacy in xenografted humanized mice. The nearly 7-fold improvement in affinity of hu3F8 with a single D32H (L-CDR1) mutation translated into a ∼12-fold improvement in NK92MI-transfected CD16-mediated ADCC, a 6-fold improvement in CD32-mediated ADCC, and a 2.5-fold improvement in complement-mediated cytotoxicity while maintaining restricted normal tissue cross-reactivity and achieving substantial improvement in tumor ablation in vivo. Despite increasing GD2 affinity, the double mutation D32H (L-CDR1) and E1K (L-FR1) did not further improve anti-tumor efficacy. PMID:25851904

  16. Affinity binding of inclusion bodies on supermacroporous monolithic cryogels using labeling with specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Josefin; Kumar, Ashok; Sundström, Heléne; Ledung, Erika; Hörnsten, E Gunnar; Enfors, Sven-Olof; Mattiasson, Bo

    2006-03-23

    A new chromatographic method based on affinity supermacroporous monolithic cryogels is developed for binding and analyzing inclusion bodies during fermentation. The work demonstrated that it is possible to bind specific IgG and IgY antibodies to the 15 and 17 amino acids at the terminus ends of a 33 kDa target protein aggregated as inclusion bodies. The antibody treated inclusion bodies from lysed fermentation broth can be specifically retained in protein A and pseudo-biospecific ligand sulfamethazine modified supermacroporous cryogels. The degree of binding of IgG and IgY treated inclusion bodies to the Protein A and sulfamethazine gels are investigated, as well as the influence of pH on the sulfamethazine ligand. Optimum binding of 78 and 72% was observed on both protein A and sulfamethazine modified cryogel columns, respectively, using IgG labeling of the inclusion bodies. The antibody treated inclusion bodies pass through unretained in the sulfamethazine supermacroporous gel at pH that does not favour the binding between the ligand on the gel and the antibodies on the surface of inclusion bodies. Also the unlabeled inclusion bodies went through the gel unretained, showing no non-specific binding or trapping within the gel. These findings may very well be the foundation for the building of a powerful analytical tool during fermentation of inclusion bodies as well as a convenient way to purify them from fermentation broth. These results also support our earlier findings [Kumar, A., Plieva, F.M., Galaev, I.Yu., Mattiasson, B., 2003. Affinity fractionation of lymphocytes using a monolithic cyogel. J. Immunol. Methods 283, 185-194] with mammalian cells that were surface labeled with specific antibodies and recognized on protein A supermacroporous gels. A general binding and separation system can be established on antibody binding cryogel affinity matrices.

  17. AB-Bind: Antibody binding mutational database for computational affinity predictions.

    PubMed

    Sirin, Sarah; Apgar, James R; Bennett, Eric M; Keating, Amy E

    2016-02-01

    Antibodies (Abs) are a crucial component of the immune system and are often used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The need for high-affinity and high-specificity antibodies in research and medicine is driving the development of computational tools for accelerating antibody design and discovery. We report a diverse set of antibody binding data with accompanying structures that can be used to evaluate methods for modeling antibody interactions. Our Antibody-Bind (AB-Bind) database includes 1101 mutants with experimentally determined changes in binding free energies (ΔΔG) across 32 complexes. Using the AB-Bind data set, we evaluated the performance of protein scoring potentials in their ability to predict changes in binding free energies upon mutagenesis. Numerical correlations between computed and observed ΔΔG values were low (r = 0.16-0.45), but the potentials exhibited predictive power for classifying variants as improved vs weakened binders. Performance was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) for receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves; the highest AUC values for 527 mutants with |ΔΔG| > 1.0 kcal/mol were 0.81, 0.87, and 0.88 using STATIUM, FoldX, and Discovery Studio scoring potentials, respectively. Some methods could also enrich for variants with improved binding affinity; FoldX and Discovery Studio were able to correctly rank 42% and 30%, respectively, of the 80 most improved binders (those with ΔΔG < -1.0 kcal/mol) in the top 5% of the database. This modest predictive performance has value but demonstrates the continuing need to develop and improve protein energy functions for affinity prediction. PMID:26473627

  18. Generating new ligand-binding RNAs by affinity maturation and disintegration of allosteric ribozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Soukup, G A; DeRose, E C; Koizumi, M; Breaker, R R

    2001-01-01

    Allosteric ribozymes are engineered RNAs that operate as molecular switches whose rates of catalytic activity are modulated by the binding of specific effector molecules. New RNA molecular switches can be created by using "allosteric selection," a molecular engineering process that combines modular rational design and in vitro evolution strategies. In this report, we describe the characterization of 3',5'-cyclic nucleotide monophosphate (cNMP)-dependent hammerhead ribozymes that were created using allosteric selection (Koizumi et al., Nat Struct Biol, 1999, 6:1062-1071). Artificial phylogeny data generated by random mutagenesis and reselection of existing cGMP-, cCMP-, and cAMP-dependent ribozymes indicate that each is comprised of distinct effector-binding and catalytic domains. In addition, patterns of nucleotide covariation and direct mutational analysis both support distinct secondary-structure organizations for the effector-binding domains. Guided by these structural models, we were able to disintegrate each allosteric ribozyme into separate ligand-binding and catalytic modules. Examinations of the independent effector-binding domains reveal that each retains its corresponding cNMP-binding function. These results validate the use of allosteric selection and modular engineering as a means of simultaneously generating new nucleic acid structures that selectively bind ligands. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the binding affinity of an allosteric ribozyme can be improved through random mutagenesis and allosteric selection under conditions that favor tighter binding. This "affinity maturation" effect is expected to be a valuable attribute of allosteric selection as future endeavors seek to apply engineered allosteric ribozymes as biosensor components and as controllable genetic switches. PMID:11345431

  19. Purification of infective bluetongue virus particles by immuno-affinity chromatography using anti-core antibody.

    PubMed

    Chand, Karam; Biswas, Sanchay K; Mondal, Bimalendu

    2016-03-01

    An immuno-affinity chromatography technique for purification of infective bluetongue virus (BTV) has been descried using anti-core antibodies. BTV anti-core antibodies (prepared in guinea pig) were mixed with cell culture-grown BTV-1 and then the mixture was added to the cyanogens bromide-activated protein-A Sepharose column. Protein A binds to the antibody which in turn binds to the antigen (i.e. BTV). After thorough washing, antigen-antibody and antibody-protein A couplings were dissociated with 4M MgCl2, pH6.5. Antibody molecules were removed by dialysis and virus particles were concentrated by spin column ultrafiltration. Dialyzed and concentrated material was tested positive for BTV antigen by a sandwich ELISA and the infectivity of the chromatography-purified virus was demonstrated in cell culture. This method was applied for selective capture of BTV from a mixture of other viruses. As group-specific antibodies (against BTV core) were used to capture the virus, it is expected that virus of all BTV serotypes could be purified by this method. This method will be helpful for selective capture and enrichment of BTV from concurrently infected blood or tissue samples for efficient isolation in cell culture. Further, this method can be used for small scale purification of BTV avoiding ultracentrifugation. PMID:26925450

  20. Purification of anti-bromelain antibodies by affinity precipitation using pNIPAm-linked bromelain.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Rubab

    2016-01-01

    Affinity precipitation has emerged as a very useful technique for the purification of proteins. Here it has been employed for the purification of anti-bromelain antibodies from rabbit serum. A system has been developed for reversibly binding and thermoprecipitating antibodies. Anti-bromelain antibodies were raised in rabbit by immunizing it with bromelain. Poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (pNIPAm)-bromelain conjugate was prepared and incubated with rabbit serum. After that the temperature was raised for thermal precipitation of the polymer. Antibodies were then eluted from the complex by incubating it with a small volume of buffer, pH 3.0. This method is very effective in concentrating the antibodies. Purity and specificity of the antibodies were checked by gel electrophoresis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The study of the effect of pH and temperature on the binding of the antibodies to the conjugate showed that the optimum binding occurred at pH 8.0 and 25°C.The polymer enzyme conjugate was further used for another cycle.

  1. High-affinity antibodies to the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.P.; Sharp, A.; Strom, M.; Kahl, S.D.

    1986-05-01

    Antibodies with high affinity and specificity for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers have been produced in rabbits by immunization with dihydropyridine-protein conjugates. Anti-dihydropyridine antibodies were found to specifically bind (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine, (/sup 3/H)-nimodipine, (/sup 3/H)nisoldipine, and (/sup 3/H)PN 200-110 (all 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers) with high affinity, while (/sup 3/H)verapamil, (/sup 3/H)diltiazem, and (/sup 3/H)trifluoperazine were not recognized. The average dissociation constant of the (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine-antibody complex was 0.06 (+/- 0.02) X 10(-9) M for an antiserum studied in detail and ranged from 0.01 to 0.24 X 10(-9) M for all antisera. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding was specific for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel modifiers and the concentrations required for half-maximal inhibition ranged between 0.25 and 0.90 nM. Structurally unrelated Ca2+-channel blockers, calmodulin antagonists, inactive metabolites of nitrendipine, and UV-inactivated nisoldipine did not modify (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding to the anti-dihydropyridine antibodies. Dihydropyridines without a bulky substituent in the 4-position of the heterocycle were able to displace (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding, but the concentrations required for half-maximal inhibition were greater than 800 nM. In summary, anti-dihydropyridine antibodies have been shown to have high affinity and specificity for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers and to exhibit dihydropyridine binding properties similar to the membrane receptor for the 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blockers.

  2. Antibody VH and VL recombination using phage and ribosome display technologies reveals distinct structural routes to affinity improvements with VH-VL interface residues providing important structural diversity.

    PubMed

    Groves, Maria A T; Amanuel, Lily; Campbell, Jamie I; Rees, D Gareth; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2014-01-01

    In vitro selection technologies are an important means of affinity maturing antibodies to generate the optimal therapeutic profile for a particular disease target. Here, we describe the isolation of a parent antibody, KENB061 using phage display and solution phase selections with soluble biotinylated human IL-1R1. KENB061 was affinity matured using phage display and targeted mutagenesis of VH and VL CDR3 using NNS randomization. Affinity matured VHCDR3 and VLCDR3 library blocks were recombined and selected using phage and ribosome display protocol. A direct comparison of the phage and ribosome display antibodies generated was made to determine their functional characteristics.In our analyses, we observed distinct differences in the pattern of beneficial mutations in antibodies derived from phage and ribosome display selections, and discovered the lead antibody Jedi067 had a ~3700-fold improvement in KD over the parent KENB061. We constructed a homology model of the Fv region of Jedi067 to map the specific positions where mutations occurred in the CDR3 loops. For VL CDR3, positions 94 to 97 carry greater diversity in the ribosome display variants compared with the phage display. The positions 95a, 95b and 96 of VLCDR3 form part of the interface with VH in this model. The model shows that positions 96, 98, 100e, 100f, 100 g, 100h, 100i and 101 of the VHCDR3 include residues at the VH and VL interface. Importantly, Leu96 and Tyr98 are conserved at the interface positions in both phage and ribosome display indicating their importance in maintaining the VH-VL interface. For antibodies derived from ribosome display, there is significant diversity at residues 100a to 100f of the VH CDR3 compared with phage display. A unique deletion of isoleucine at position 102 of the lead candidate, Jedi067, also occurs in the VHCDR3.As anticipated, recombining the mutations via ribosome display led to a greater structural diversity, particularly in the heavy chain CDR3, which in turn

  3. Dual-display of small molecules enables the discovery of ligand pairs and facilitates affinity maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichert, Moreno; Krall, Nikolaus; Decurtins, Willy; Franzini, Raphael M.; Pretto, Francesca; Schneider, Petra; Neri, Dario; Scheuermann, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to standard fragment-based drug discovery approaches, dual-display DNA-encoded chemical libraries have the potential to identify fragment pairs that bind simultaneously and benefit from the chelate effect. However, the technology has been limited by the difficulty in unambiguously decoding the ligand pairs from large combinatorial libraries. Here we report a strategy that overcomes this limitation and enables the efficient identification of ligand pairs that bind to a target protein. Small organic molecules were conjugated to the 5‧ and 3‧ ends of complementary DNA strands that contain a unique identifying code. DNA hybridization followed by an inter-strand code-transfer created a stable dual-display DNA-encoded chemical library of 111,100 members. Using this approach we report the discovery of a low micromolar binder to alpha-1-acid glycoprotein and the affinity maturation of a ligand to carbonic anhydrase IX, an established marker of renal cell carcinoma. The newly discovered subnanomolar carbonic anhydrase IX binder dramatically improved tumour targeting performance in vivo.

  4. BIOINTERACTION ANALYSIS BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY: KINETIC STUDIES OF IMMOBILIZED ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Mary Anne; Moser, Annette; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    A system based on high-performance affinity chromatography was developed for characterizing the binding, elution and regeneration kinetics of immobilized antibodies and immunoaffinity supports. This information was provided by using a combination of frontal analysis, split-peak analysis and peak decay analysis to determine the rate constants for antibody-antigen interactions under typical sample application and elution conditions. This technique was tested using immunoaffinity supports that contained monoclonal antibodies for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Association equilibrium constants measured by frontal analysis for 2,4-D and related compounds with the immobilized antibodies were 1.7–12 × 106 M−1 at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Split-peak analysis gave association rate constants of 1.4–12 × 105 M−1s−1 and calculated dissociation rate constants of 0.01–0.4 s−1 under the application conditions. Elution at pH 2.5 for the analytes from the antibodies was examined by peak decay analysis and gave dissociation rate constants of 0.056–0.17 s−1. A comparison of frontal analysis results after various periods of column regeneration allowed the rate of antibody regeneration to be examined, with the results giving a first-order regeneration rate constant of 2.4 × 10−4 s−1. This combined approach and the information it provides should be useful in the design and optimization of immunoaffinity chromatography and other analytical methods that employ immobilized antibodies. The methods described are not limited to the particular analytes and antibodies employed in this study but should be useful in characterizing other targets, ligands and supports. PMID:19394281

  5. Optimal fusion of antibody binding domains resulted in higher affinity and wider specificity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinhua; Kojima, Tomoki; Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Antibody is a very important protein in biotechnological and biomedical fields because of its high affinity and specificity to various antigens. Due to the rise of human antibody therapeutics, its cost-effective purification is an urgent issue for bio-industry. In this study, we made novel fusion proteins PAxPG with a flexible (DDAKK)n linker between the two Ig binding domains derived from Staphylococcus protein A and Streptococcus protein G. The fusion proteins bound human and mouse IgGs and their fragments with up to 58-times higher affinity and wider specificity than the parental binding domains. Interestingly, the optimal linker for human Fab fragment was n = 4, which was close to the modeled distance between the termini of domains bound to heavy chain, implying increased avidity as a possible mechanism. For binding to Fc, the longest n=6 linker gave the highest affinity, implying longer interchain distance between the two binding sites. The novel fusion protein with optimized interdomain linker length will be a useful tool for the purification and detection of various IgGs including mouse IgG1 that binds only weakly to natural protein A. PMID:25910963

  6. Increased Antibody Affinity Confers Broad In Vitro Protection against Escape Mutants of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Mridula; Bolles, Meagan; Donaldson, Eric F.; Van Blarcom, Thomas; Baric, Ralph; Iverson, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Even though the effect of antibody affinity on neutralization potency is well documented, surprisingly, its impact on neutralization breadth and escape has not been systematically determined. Here, random mutagenesis and DNA shuffling of the single-chain variable fragment of the neutralizing antibody 80R followed by bacterial display screening using anchored periplasmic expression (APEx) were used to generate a number of higher-affinity variants of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-neutralizing antibody 80R with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) as low as 37 pM, a >270-fold improvement relative to that of the parental 80R single-chain variable fragment (scFv). As expected, antigen affinity was shown to correlate directly with neutralization potency toward the icUrbani strain of SARS-CoV. Additionally, the highest-affinity antibody fragment displayed 10-fold-increased broad neutralization in vitro and completely protected against several SARS-CoV strains containing substitutions associated with antibody escape. Importantly, higher affinity also led to the suppression of viral escape mutants in vitro. Escape from the highest-affinity variant required reduced selective pressure and multiple substitutions in the binding epitope. Collectively, these results support the hypothesis that engineered antibodies with picomolar dissociation constants for a neutralizing epitope can confer escape-resistant protection. PMID:22696652

  7. Purification of antibodies to O antigen of Salmonella Typhimurium from human serum by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Micoli, Francesca; Gavini, Massimiliano; Goodall, Margaret; Cobbold, Mark; Saul, Allan; Maclennan, Calman A

    2013-01-31

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae (NTS) are a common cause of bacteraemia in children and HIV-infected adults in Sub-Saharan Africa. We have previously shown that antibodies play a key role in both bactericidal and cellular mechanisms of immunity to NTS, but found that high concentrations of antibody to Salmonella Typhimurium O antigen (OAg) in the serum of some HIV-infected African adults is associated with impaired killing of NTS. To further investigate the function of antibodies to the OAg of NTS, we developed a method to purify these antibodies from human serum by affinity chromatography. Purified Salmonella Typhimurium OAg was activated with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) via two different chemistries before linking to N-hydroxysuccinamide-Sepharose resin: one ADH molecule was introduced per OAg chain on its terminal 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid sugar (OAg-ADH), or multiple ADH molecules were attached along the OAg chain after oxidation with sodium periodate (OAgoxADH). Both resulting columns worked well when tested with commercial polyclonal anti-O:4,5 antibodies from rabbit serum. Over 90% of the applied antibodies bound to the resin and 89% of these antibodies were then eluted as detected by ELISA. OAg-ADH was preferred as the method for OAg derivatisation as it does not modify the saccharide chain and can be applied to OAg from different bacteria. Both columns were able to bind OAg-specific antibodies in human serum, but antibody recovery was initially low. Different elution buffers were tested and different amounts of OAg-ADH were linked to the resin to improve the yield. Optimal recovery (51%) was obtained by loading 1mg of activated OAg per ml of resin and eluting with 0.1M glycine, 0.1M NaCl pH2.4. The column matrix could be regenerated following elution with no detectable loss in performance for over ten uses. This method offers the potential to purify antibodies to Salmonella OAg from polyclonal serum following vaccination or natural exposure to Salmonella

  8. Design of Cyclic Peptides That Bind Protein Surfaces with Antibody-Like Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Millward, Steven W.; Fiacco, Stephen; Austin, Ryan J.; Roberts, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    There is a pressing need for new molecular tools to target protein surfaces with high affinity and specificity. Here, we describe cyclic messenger RNA display with a trillion-member covalent peptide macrocycle library. Using this library, we have designed a number of high-affinity, redox-insensitive, cyclic peptides that target the signaling protein Gαi1. In addition to cyclization, our library construction took advantage of an expanded genetic code, utilizing nonsense suppression to insert N-methylphenylalanine as a 21st amino acid. The designed macrocycles exhibit several intriguing features. First, the core motif seen in all of the selected variants is the same and shares an identical context with respect to the macrocyclic scaffold, consistent with the idea that selection simultaneously optimizes both the cyclization chemistry and the structural placement of the binding epitope. Second, detailed characterization of one molecule, cyclic Gαi binding peptide (cycGiBP), demonstrates substantially enhanced proteolytic stability relative to that of the parent linear molecule. Third and perhaps most important, the cycGiBP peptide binds the target with very high affinity (Ki ≈ 2.1 nM), similar to those of many of the best monoclonal antibodies and higher than that of the βγ heterodimer, an endogenous Gαi1 ligand. Overall the work provides a general route to design novel, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity ligands that target protein surfaces. PMID:17894440

  9. Design of cyclic peptides that bind protein surfaces with antibody-like affinity.

    PubMed

    Millward, Steven W; Fiacco, Stephen; Austin, Ryan J; Roberts, Richard W

    2007-09-21

    There is a pressing need for new molecular tools to target protein surfaces with high affinity and specificity. Here, we describe cyclic messenger RNA display with a trillion-member covalent peptide macrocycle library. Using this library, we have designed a number of high-affinity, redox-insensitive, cyclic peptides that target the signaling protein G alpha i1. In addition to cyclization, our library construction took advantage of an expanded genetic code, utilizing nonsense suppression to insert N-methylphenylalanine as a 21st amino acid. The designed macrocycles exhibit several intriguing features. First, the core motif seen in all of the selected variants is the same and shares an identical context with respect to the macrocyclic scaffold, consistent with the idea that selection simultaneously optimizes both the cyclization chemistry and the structural placement of the binding epitope. Second, detailed characterization of one molecule, cyclic G alpha i binding peptide (cycGiBP), demonstrates substantially enhanced proteolytic stability relative to that of the parent linear molecule. Third and perhaps most important, the cycGiBP peptide binds the target with very high affinity ( K i approximately 2.1 nM), similar to those of many of the best monoclonal antibodies and higher than that of the betagamma heterodimer, an endogenous G alpha i1 ligand. Overall the work provides a general route to design novel, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity ligands that target protein surfaces.

  10. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling by follicular dendritic cells is pivotal for germinal center onset and affinity maturation.

    PubMed

    Garin, Alexandre; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Contie, Mathias; Figge, Marc Thilo; Buatois, Vanessa; Gunzer, Matthias; Toellner, Kai-Michael; Elson, Greg; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie H

    2010-07-23

    Germinal centers (GCs) are specialized microenvironments where antigen-activated B cells undergo proliferation, immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination, somatic hypermutation (SHM), and affinity maturation. Within GCs, follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are key players in driving these events via direct interaction with GC B cells. Here, we provide in vivo evidence that FDCs express and upregulate Toll-like-receptor (TLR) 4 in situ during germinal center reactions, confirm that their maturation is driven by TLR4, and associate the role of FDC-expressed TLR4 with quantitative and qualitative affects of GC biology. In iterative cycles of predictions by in silico modeling subsequently verified by in vivo experiments, we demonstrated that TLR4 signaling modulates FDC activation, strongly impacting SHM and generation of Ig class-switched high-affinity plasma and memory B cells. Thus, our data place TLR4 in the heart of adaptive humoral immunity, providing further insight into mechanisms driving GCs arising in both health and disease.

  11. Multivalent scaffolds for affinity maturation of small molecule cell surface-binders and their application to prostate tumor targeting

    PubMed Central

    Humblet, Valerie; Misra, Preeti; Bhushan, Kumar R.; Nasr, Khaled; Ko, Yao-Sen; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Pannier, Nadine; Frangioni, John V.; Maison, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Adamantane scaffolds for affinity maturation of prostate cancer specific ligands of low molecular mass are described. These scaffolds are modular and can be used for conjugation of up to three ligands and an additional effector molecule by standard peptide coupling techniques. The potential of the scaffolds is demonstrated with the multimerization of GPI 1, a prostate cancer specific small molecule. A detailed study of multimerized GPI conjugates with NIR-fluorophores and their binding properties to different prostate cancer cell lines shows the specific binding of these conjugates to cell types positive for prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA). We demonstrate that these conjugates allow the sensitive imaging of prostate cancer cells with NIR methodology and suggest that our adamantane scaffolds might be generally useful for affinity maturation of small molecules targeting cell surface epitopes. PMID:19108655

  12. Antibody Maturation in Women Who Acquire HIV Infection While Using Antiretroviral Preexposure Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Laeyendecker, Oliver; Redd, Andrew D; Nason, Martha; Longosz, Andrew F; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Naranbhai, Vivek; Garrett, Nigel; Eshleman, Susan H; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Quinn, Thomas C

    2015-09-01

    The CAPRISA 004 preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) randomized trial demonstrated that women who used a vaginal gel containing the antiretroviral drug tenofovir (TFV) had a 39% lower risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is not known whether topical TFV alters the antibody response to breakthrough HIV infection. In this study, antibody maturation was evaluated using 3 serologic assays: the BED capture enzyme immunoassay (CEIA), the Bio-Plex (Luminex) assay, and the Bio-Rad avidity assay. Tests were performed using serum samples collected 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 36, 48, and >48 months after seroconversion from 95 women in the CAPRISA 004 trial (35 in the TFV gel arm and 60 in the placebo arm). For the BED CEIA and Luminex assay, linear mixed effects models were used to examine test results by study arm. Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to examine time to avidity cutoff. Anti-HIV antibody titers did not differ between study arms. Women assigned to TFV gel demonstrated slower antibody avidity maturation, as determined by the Bio-Rad (P = .04) and gp120 Bio-Plex (P = .028) assays. Women who were assigned to receive topical TFV but became infected had slower antibody avidity maturation, with potential implications for diagnosis and antibody-based incidence assays as access to antiretroviral therapy-based PrEP is increased.

  13. Cytotoxic sperm antibodies and in vitro fertilization of mature oocytes: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Mathur, S; Mathur, R S; Holtz, G L; Tsai, C C; Rust, P F; Williamson, H O

    1987-06-01

    The fertilization rates of mature oocytes during in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) using fetal cord serum-supplemented insemination media were greater than or equal to 57% for five infertile couples without sperm antibodies (group 1). But they were less than or equal to 50% for four of nine infertile couples (group 2) with cytotoxic sperm antibodies in both partners (n = 6) or the husband alone (n = 3). Two women in group 1 were successful in achieving normal, full-term pregnancies with the delivery of normal infants (chi2 = 4.2, P less than 0.05, by chi-square analysis). One of them consistently tested negative for sperm antibodies, while her husband was previously treated with antibiotics for infection and transient sperm antibodies in the seminal plasma. Subsequently, antibody titers in the husband were in the normal range when the successful IVF-ET was performed. One woman in group 2, with antibodies to her autoimmune husband's sperm but not control sperm and with a long-standing poor postcoital test sperm motility, conceived through artificial insemination with donor sperm (AID) after failing to conceive with her husband through IVF-ET. These data suggest that the presence of cytotoxic sperm antibodies in the serum and/or secretions of both partners reduces the rates of fertilization of mature oocytes in spite of using fetal cord serum in the IVF media. Pregnancy achievement is impaired in this group.

  14. In-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to monitor affinity chromatography purification of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Kazarian, Sergei G.; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    In recent years many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have entered the biotherapeutics market, offering new treatments for chronic and life-threatening diseases. Protein A resin captures monoclonal antibody (mAb) effectively, but the binding capacity decays over repeated purification cycles. On an industrial scale, replacing fouled Protein A affinity chromatography resin accounts for a large proportion of the raw material cost. Cleaning-in-place (CIP) procedures were developed to extend Protein A resin lifespan, but chromatograms cannot reliably quantify any remaining contaminants over repeated cycles. To study resin fouling in situ, we coupled affinity chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the first time, by embedding an attenuated total reflection (ATR) sensor inside a micro-scale column while measuring the UV 280 nm and conductivity. Our approach quantified the in-column protein concentration in the resin bed and determined protein conformation. Our results show that Protein A ligand leached during CIP. We also found that host cell proteins bound to the Protein A resin even more strongly than mAbs and that typical CIP conditions do not remove all fouling contaminants. The insights derived from in-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopic monitoring could contribute to mAb purification quality assurance as well as guide the development of more effective CIP conditions to optimise resin lifespan. PMID:27470880

  15. Quantitation of tyrosine hydroxylase, protein levels: Spot immunolabeling with an affinity-purified antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Haycock, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase was purified from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells and rat pheochromocytoma using a rapid (less than 2 days) procedure performed at room temperature. Rabbits were immunized with purified enzyme that was denatured with sodium dodecylsulfate, and antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase were affinity-purified from immune sera. A Western blot procedure using the affinity-purified antibodies and {sup 125}I-protein A demonstrated a selective labeling of a single Mr approximately 62,000 band in samples from a number of different tissues. The relative lack of background {sup 125}I-protein A binding permitted the development of a quantitative spot immunolabeling procedure for tyrosine hydroxylase protein. The sensitivity of the assay is 1-2 ng of enzyme. Essentially identical standard curves were obtained with tyrosine hydroxylase purified from rat pheochromocytoma, rat corpus striatum, and bovine adrenal medulla. An extract of PC 12 cells (clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells) was calibrated against purified rat pheochromocytoma tyrosine hydroxylase and used as an external standard against which levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells and other tissue were quantified. With this procedure, qualitative assessment of tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels can be obtained in a few hours and quantitative assessment can be obtained in less than a day.

  16. In-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to monitor affinity chromatography purification of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Kazarian, Sergei G; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    In recent years many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have entered the biotherapeutics market, offering new treatments for chronic and life-threatening diseases. Protein A resin captures monoclonal antibody (mAb) effectively, but the binding capacity decays over repeated purification cycles. On an industrial scale, replacing fouled Protein A affinity chromatography resin accounts for a large proportion of the raw material cost. Cleaning-in-place (CIP) procedures were developed to extend Protein A resin lifespan, but chromatograms cannot reliably quantify any remaining contaminants over repeated cycles. To study resin fouling in situ, we coupled affinity chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the first time, by embedding an attenuated total reflection (ATR) sensor inside a micro-scale column while measuring the UV 280 nm and conductivity. Our approach quantified the in-column protein concentration in the resin bed and determined protein conformation. Our results show that Protein A ligand leached during CIP. We also found that host cell proteins bound to the Protein A resin even more strongly than mAbs and that typical CIP conditions do not remove all fouling contaminants. The insights derived from in-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopic monitoring could contribute to mAb purification quality assurance as well as guide the development of more effective CIP conditions to optimise resin lifespan. PMID:27470880

  17. In-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to monitor affinity chromatography purification of monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Kazarian, Sergei G.; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-07-01

    In recent years many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have entered the biotherapeutics market, offering new treatments for chronic and life-threatening diseases. Protein A resin captures monoclonal antibody (mAb) effectively, but the binding capacity decays over repeated purification cycles. On an industrial scale, replacing fouled Protein A affinity chromatography resin accounts for a large proportion of the raw material cost. Cleaning-in-place (CIP) procedures were developed to extend Protein A resin lifespan, but chromatograms cannot reliably quantify any remaining contaminants over repeated cycles. To study resin fouling in situ, we coupled affinity chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the first time, by embedding an attenuated total reflection (ATR) sensor inside a micro-scale column while measuring the UV 280 nm and conductivity. Our approach quantified the in-column protein concentration in the resin bed and determined protein conformation. Our results show that Protein A ligand leached during CIP. We also found that host cell proteins bound to the Protein A resin even more strongly than mAbs and that typical CIP conditions do not remove all fouling contaminants. The insights derived from in-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopic monitoring could contribute to mAb purification quality assurance as well as guide the development of more effective CIP conditions to optimise resin lifespan.

  18. Antilymphocytic antibodies and marrow transplantation. VIII. Recipient conditioning with Clq-affine monoclonal anti-pan T antibodies prevents GVHD in homozygous fully mismatched mice

    SciTech Connect

    Thierfelder, S.; Kummer, U.; Schuh, R.; Mysliwietz, J.

    1986-10-01

    An approach to suppressing secondary disease with antibodies was studied that differed from conventional antibody treatment of donor marrow in vitro. It consisted of the selection of anti-Thy-1 antibodies with high affinity for Clq, the first subunit of the complement cascade, and a single injection of such antibodies into prospective irradiated marrow recipients. Monoclonal mouse IgM and rat IgG 2c antibodies of high titers in complement-dependent test systems but with low affinity for Clq caused little immunosuppression. Monoclonal rat IgG2b or mouse IgG2a anti-Thy-1 antibodies with high affinity for Clq prevented acute and chronic mortality of graft-v-host disease (GVHD), however, when injected in irradiated CBA or AKR mice prior to C57BL/6 spleen and/or bone marrow cell transfusion. This treatment simultaneously suppressed residual host-v-graft reactivity of the irradiated mice, so that permanent hematopoietic engraftment ensued even at 5 or 6 Gy. Full chimerism and specific tolerance were obtained. Primary immune response to SRBC was clearly depressed in the chimeras; secondary immune response was not. Clearance of T cell antibody activity (greater than 6 days), timing, and dose of injected antibody, as well as other modalities of the conditioning treatment that may have contributed to the remarkable immunosuppression, are discussed.

  19. Analytical FcRn affinity chromatography for functional characterization of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Schlothauer, Tilman; Rueger, Petra; Stracke, Jan Olaf; Hertenberger, Hubert; Fingas, Felix; Kling, Lothar; Emrich, Thomas; Drabner, Georg; Seeber, Stefan; Auer, Johannes; Koch, Stefan; Papadimitriou, Apollon

    2013-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is important for the metabolic fate of IgG antibodies in vivo. Analysis of the interaction between FcRn and IgG in vitro might provide insight into the structural and functional integrity of therapeutic IgG that may affect pharmacokinetics (PK) in vivo. We developed a standardized pH gradient FcRn affinity liquid chromatography method with conditions closely resembling the physiological mechanism of interaction between IgG and FcRn. This method allows the separation of molecular IgG isoforms, degradation products and engineered molecules based on their affinity to FcRn. Human FcRn was immobilized on the column and a linear pH gradient from pH 5.5 to 8.8 was applied. FcRn chromatography was used in comparison to surface plasmon resonance to characterize different monoclonal IgG preparations, e.g., oxidized or aggregated species. Wild-type and engineered IgGs were compared in vitro by FcRn chromatography and in vivo by PK studies in huFcRn transgenic mice. Analytical FcRn chromatography allows differentiation of IgG samples and variants by peak pattern and retention time profile. The method can distinguish: 1) IgGs with different Fabs, 2) oxidized from native IgG, 3) aggregates from monomer and 4) antibodies with mutations in the Fc part from wild-type IgGs. Changes in the FcRn chromatographic behavior of mutant IgGs relative to the wild-type IgG correlate to changes in the PK profile in the FcRn transgenic mice. These results demonstrate that FcRn affinity chromatography is a useful new method for the assessment of IgG integrity. PMID:23765230

  20. Kinetic analysis of a high-affinity antibody/antigen interaction performed by multiple Biacore users.

    PubMed

    Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Navratilova, Iva; Calderon-Cacia, Maria; Fan, Linsey; Thornton, Kevin; Zhu, Mingde; Bos, Tim Vanden; Forte, Carla; Friend, Della; Laird-Offringa, Ite; Tavares, Gisele; Whatley, John; Shi, Ergang; Widom, Angela; Lindquist, Kevin C; Klakamp, Scott; Drake, Andrew; Bohmann, David; Roell, Marina; Rose, Larry; Dorocke, Jill; Roth, Bruce; Luginbühl, Béatrice; Myszka, David G

    2006-05-15

    To explore the reliability of Biacore-based assays, 22 study participants measured the binding of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) to a monoclonal antibody (mAb). Each participant was provided with the same reagents and a detailed experimental protocol. The mAb was immobilized on the sensor chip at three different densities and a two-step assay was used to determine the kinetic and affinity parameters of the PSA/mAb complex. First, PSA was tested over a concentration range of 2.5-600 nM to obtain k(a) information. Second, to define the k(d) of this stable antigen/antibody complex accurately, the highest PSA concentration was retested with the dissociation phase of each binding cycle monitored for 1h. All participants collected data that could be analyzed to obtain kinetic parameters for the interaction. The association and the extended-dissociation data derived from the three antibody surfaces were globally fit using a simple 1:1 interaction model. The average k(a) and k(d) for the PSA/mAb interaction as calculated from the 22 analyses were (4.1+/-0.6) x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and (4.5+/-0.6) x 10(-5) s(-1), respectively. Overall, the experimental standard errors in the rate constants were only approximately 14%. Based on the kinetic rate constants, the affinity (K(D)) of the PSA/mAb interaction was 1.1+/-0.2 nM.

  1. Potent dengue virus neutralization by a therapeutic antibody with low monovalent affinity requires bivalent engagement.

    PubMed

    Edeling, Melissa A; Austin, S Kyle; Shrestha, Bimmi; Dowd, Kimberly A; Mukherjee, Swati; Nelson, Christopher A; Johnson, Syd; Mabila, Manu N; Christian, Elizabeth A; Rucker, Joseph; Pierson, Theodore C; Diamond, Michael S; Fremont, Daved H

    2014-04-01

    We recently described our most potently neutralizing monoclonal antibody, E106, which protected against lethal Dengue virus type 1 (DENV-1) infection in mice. To further understand its functional properties, we determined the crystal structure of E106 Fab in complex with domain III (DIII) of DENV-1 envelope (E) protein to 2.45 Å resolution. Analysis of the complex revealed a small antibody-antigen interface with the epitope on DIII composed of nine residues along the lateral ridge and A-strand regions. Despite strong virus neutralizing activity of E106 IgG at picomolar concentrations, E106 Fab exhibited a ∼20,000-fold decrease in virus neutralization and bound isolated DIII, E, or viral particles with only a micromolar monovalent affinity. In comparison, E106 IgG bound DENV-1 virions with nanomolar avidity. The E106 epitope appears readily accessible on virions, as neutralization was largely temperature-independent. Collectively, our data suggest that E106 neutralizes DENV-1 infection through bivalent engagement of adjacent DIII subunits on a single virion. The isolation of anti-flavivirus antibodies that require bivalent binding to inhibit infection efficiently may be a rare event due to the unique icosahedral arrangement of envelope proteins on the virion surface. PMID:24743696

  2. In Vivo Neutralization of α-Cobratoxin with High-Affinity Llama Single-Domain Antibodies (VHHs) and a VHH-Fc Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Gabrielle; Meyers, Ashley J.; McLean, Michael D.; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi; MacKenzie, Roger; Hall, J. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Small recombinant antibody fragments (e.g. scFvs and VHHs), which are highly tissue permeable, are being investigated for antivenom production as conventional antivenoms consisting of IgG or F(ab’)2 antibody fragments do not effectively neutralize venom toxins located in deep tissues. However, antivenoms composed entirely of small antibody fragments may have poor therapeutic efficacy due to their short serum half-lives. To increase serum persistence and maintain tissue penetration, we prepared low and high molecular mass antivenom antibodies. Four llama VHHs were isolated from an immune VHH-displayed phage library and were shown to have high affinity, in the low nM range, for α-cobratoxin (α–Cbtx), the most lethal component of Naja kaouthia venom. Subsequently, our highest affinity VHH (C2) was fused to a human Fc fragment to create a VHH2-Fc antibody that would offer prolonged serum persistence. After in planta (Nicotiana benthamiana) expression and purification, we show that our VHH2-Fc antibody retained high affinity binding to α–Cbtx. Mouse α–Cbtx challenge studies showed that our highest affinity VHHs (C2 and C20) and the VHH2-Fc antibody effectively neutralized lethality induced by α–Cbtx at an antibody:toxin molar ratio as low as ca. 0.75×:1. Further research towards the development of an antivenom therapeutic involving these anti-α-Cbtx VHHs and VHH2-Fc antibody molecules should involve testing them as a combination, to determine whether they maintain tissue penetration capability and low immunogenicity, and whether they exhibit improved serum persistence and therapeutic efficacy. PMID:23894495

  3. Maturation Pathway from Germline to Broad HIV-1 Neutralizer of a CD4-Mimic Antibody.

    PubMed

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Zhou, Tongqing; Sheng, Zizhang; Chen, Lei; Gao, Feng; Joyce, M Gordon; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Schramm, Chaim A; Wiehe, Kevin; Alam, S Munir; Bradley, Todd; Gladden, Morgan A; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Iyengar, Sheelah; Kumar, Amit; Lu, Xiaozhi; Luo, Kan; Mangiapani, Michael C; Parks, Robert J; Song, Hongshuo; Acharya, Priyamvada; Bailer, Robert T; Cao, Allen; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kwon, Young D; Louder, Mark K; Zhang, Baoshan; Zheng, Anqi; Hill, Brenna J; Kong, Rui; Soto, Cinque; Mullikin, James C; Douek, Daniel C; Montefiori, David C; Moody, Michael A; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kelsoe, Garnett; Hraber, Peter T; Korber, Bette T; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Kepler, Thomas B; Shapiro, Lawrence; Ward, Andrew B; Mascola, John R; Liao, Hua-Xin; Kwong, Peter D; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies with ontogenies from VH1-2 or VH1-46-germline genes dominate the broadly neutralizing response against the CD4-binding site (CD4bs) on HIV-1. Here, we define with longitudinal sampling from time-of-infection the development of a VH1-46-derived antibody lineage that matured to neutralize 90% of HIV-1 isolates. Structures of lineage antibodies CH235 (week 41 from time-of-infection, 18% breadth), CH235.9 (week 152, 77%), and CH235.12 (week 323, 90%) demonstrated the maturing epitope to focus on the conformationally invariant portion of the CD4bs. Similarities between CH235 lineage and five unrelated CD4bs lineages in epitope focusing, length-of-time to develop breadth, and extraordinary level of somatic hypermutation suggested commonalities in maturation among all CD4bs antibodies. Fortunately, the required CH235-lineage hypermutation appeared substantially guided by the intrinsic mutability of the VH1-46 gene, which closely resembled VH1-2. We integrated our CH235-lineage findings with a second broadly neutralizing lineage and HIV-1 co-evolution to suggest a vaccination strategy for inducing both lineages.

  4. Maturation Pathway from Germline to Broad HIV-1 Neutralizer of a CD4-Mimic Antibody.

    PubMed

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Zhou, Tongqing; Sheng, Zizhang; Chen, Lei; Gao, Feng; Joyce, M Gordon; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Schramm, Chaim A; Wiehe, Kevin; Alam, S Munir; Bradley, Todd; Gladden, Morgan A; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Iyengar, Sheelah; Kumar, Amit; Lu, Xiaozhi; Luo, Kan; Mangiapani, Michael C; Parks, Robert J; Song, Hongshuo; Acharya, Priyamvada; Bailer, Robert T; Cao, Allen; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kwon, Young D; Louder, Mark K; Zhang, Baoshan; Zheng, Anqi; Hill, Brenna J; Kong, Rui; Soto, Cinque; Mullikin, James C; Douek, Daniel C; Montefiori, David C; Moody, Michael A; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kelsoe, Garnett; Hraber, Peter T; Korber, Bette T; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Kepler, Thomas B; Shapiro, Lawrence; Ward, Andrew B; Mascola, John R; Liao, Hua-Xin; Kwong, Peter D; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies with ontogenies from VH1-2 or VH1-46-germline genes dominate the broadly neutralizing response against the CD4-binding site (CD4bs) on HIV-1. Here, we define with longitudinal sampling from time-of-infection the development of a VH1-46-derived antibody lineage that matured to neutralize 90% of HIV-1 isolates. Structures of lineage antibodies CH235 (week 41 from time-of-infection, 18% breadth), CH235.9 (week 152, 77%), and CH235.12 (week 323, 90%) demonstrated the maturing epitope to focus on the conformationally invariant portion of the CD4bs. Similarities between CH235 lineage and five unrelated CD4bs lineages in epitope focusing, length-of-time to develop breadth, and extraordinary level of somatic hypermutation suggested commonalities in maturation among all CD4bs antibodies. Fortunately, the required CH235-lineage hypermutation appeared substantially guided by the intrinsic mutability of the VH1-46 gene, which closely resembled VH1-2. We integrated our CH235-lineage findings with a second broadly neutralizing lineage and HIV-1 co-evolution to suggest a vaccination strategy for inducing both lineages. PMID:26949186

  5. Maturation Pathway from Germline to Broad HIV-1 Neutralizer of a CD4-Mimic Antibody

    DOE PAGES

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Zhou, Tongqing; Sheng, Zizhang; Chen, Lei; Gao, Feng; Joyce, M.  Gordon; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Schramm, Chaim A.; Wiehe, Kevin; et al

    2016-04-01

    Here, we report that antibodies with ontogenies from VH1-2 or VH1-46-germline genes dominate the broadly neutralizing response against the CD4-binding site (CD4bs) on HIV-1. We define with longitudinal sampling from time-of-infection the development of a VH1-46-derived antibody lineage that matured to neutralize 90% of HIV-1 isolates. Structures of lineage antibodies CH235 (week 41 from time-of-infection, 18% breadth), CH235.9 (week 152, 77%), and CH235.12 (week 323, 90%) demonstrated the maturing epitope to focus on the conformationally invariant portion of the CD4bs. Similarities between CH235 lineage and five unrelated CD4bs lineages in epitope focusing, length-of-time to develop breadth, and extraordinary level ofmore » somatic hypermutation suggested commonalities in maturation among all CD4bs antibodies. Fortunately, the required CH235-lineage hypermutation appeared substantially guided by the intrinsic mutability of the VH1-46 gene, which closely resembled VH1-2. Lastly, we integrated our CH235-lineage findings with a second broadly neutralizing lineage and HIV-1 co-evolution to suggest a vaccination strategy for inducing both lineages.« less

  6. Antibody microarray analyses of signal transduction protein expression and phosphorylation during porcine oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Pelech, Steven; Jelinkova, Lucie; Susor, Andrej; Zhang, Hong; Shi, Xiaoqing; Pavlok, Antonin; Kubelka, Michal; Kovarova, Hana

    2008-07-01

    Kinex antibody microarray analyses was used to investigate the regulation of 188 protein kinases, 24 protein phosphatases, and 170 other regulatory proteins during meiotic maturation of immature germinal vesicle (GV+) pig oocytes to maturing oocytes that had completed meiosis I (MI), and fully mature oocytes arrested at metaphase of meiosis II (MII). Increases in apparent protein levels of protein kinases accounted for most of the detected changes during the GV to MI transition, whereas reduced protein kinase levels and increased protein phosphorylation characterized the MI to MII transition. During the MI to MII period, many of the MI-associated increased levels of the proteins and phosphosites were completely or partially reversed. The regulation of these proteins were also examined in parallel during the meiotic maturation of bovine, frog, and sea star oocytes with the Kinex antibody microarray. Western blotting analyses confirmed altered expression levels of Bub1A, IRAK4, MST2, PP4C, and Rsk2, and the phosphorylation site changes in the kinases Erk5 (T218 + Y220), FAK (S722), GSK3-beta (Y216), MEK1 (S217 + S221) and PKR1 (T451), and nucleophosmin/B23 (S4) during pig oocyte maturation.

  7. Affinity maturation of single-chain variable fragment specific for aflatoxin B(1) using yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Min, Won-Ki; Kim, Sung-Gun; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    As aflatoxin B1 is one of the most toxic mycotoxins, it is important to detect and to quantify aflatoxin B1 accurately by immunological methods. To enhance aflatoxin B1-binding affinity of the single-chain variable fragment, yeast surface display technique combined with fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied. A randomly mutated scFv library was subjected to 4 rounds of fluorescence-activated cell sorting, resulting in isolation of 5 scFv variants showing an affinity improvement compared to the parental wild type scFv. The best scFv with a 9-fold improvement in affinity for aflatoxin B1 exhibited similar specificity to the monoclonal antibody. Most of the mutations in scFv-M37 were located outside of the canonical antigen-contact loops, suggesting that its affinity improvement might be driven by an allosteric effect inducing scFv-M37 to form a more favorable binding pocket for aflatoxin B1 than the wild type scFv. PMID:26041237

  8. Delta Inulin Adjuvant Enhances Plasmablast Generation, Expression of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase and B-Cell Affinity Maturation in Human Subjects Receiving Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Li, Connie; Sajkov, Dimitar; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    There is a major need for new adjuvants to improve the efficacy of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. Advax is a novel polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin that has been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of influenza vaccine in animal models and human clinical trials. To better understand the mechanism for this enhancement, we sought to assess its effect on the plasmablast response in human subjects. This pilot study utilised cryopreserved 7 day post-vaccination (7dpv) peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples obtained from a subset of 25 adult subjects from the FLU006-12 trial who had been immunized intramuscularly with a standard dose of 2012 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) alone (n=9 subjects) or combined with 5mg (n=8) or 10mg (n=8) of Advax adjuvant. Subjects receiving Advax adjuvant had increased 7dpv plasmablasts, which in turn exhibited a 2-3 fold higher rate of non-silent mutations in the B-cell receptor CDR3 region associated with higher expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the major enzyme controlling BCR affinity maturation. Together, these data suggest that Advax adjuvant enhances influenza immunity in immunized subjects via multiple mechanisms including increased plasmablast generation, AID expression and CDR3 mutagenesis resulting in enhanced BCR affinity maturation and increased production of high avidity antibody. How Advax adjuvant achieves these beneficial effects on plasmablasts remains the subject of ongoing investigation. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12612000709842 https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=362709 PMID:26177480

  9. Direct binding of radioiodinated monoclonal antibody to tumor cells: significance of antibody purity and affinity for drug targeting or tumor imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, S.J.; Foote, L.J.; Lankford, P.K.; Johnson, M.; Mitchell, T.; Braslawsky, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    For MoAb to be used efficiently for drug targeting and tumor imaging, the fraction of antibody binding to tumor cells must be maximized. We have studied the binding of 125I MoAb in three different tumor systems. The fraction of antibody that could be bound to the cell surface was directly proportional to the antibody purity. The affinity constant also limits the fraction of antibody that can bind to cells at a given antigen concentration. Rearrangement of the standard expression for univalent equilibrium binding between two reactants shows that in antigen excess, the maximum fraction of antibody that can bind (formula; see text). Binding data using four different MoAb with three cell systems confirm this relationship. Estimates for reasonable concentrations of tumor antigens in vivo indicate that antibodies with binding constants less than 10(8) M-1 are not likely to be useful for drug targeting or tumor imaging.

  10. Purification of infectious canine parvovirus from cell culture by affinity chromatography with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rimmelzwaan, G F; Groen, J; Juntti, N; Teppema, J S; UytdeHaag, F G; Osterhaus, A D

    1987-03-01

    Immuno affinity chromatography with virus neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, directed to the haemagglutinating protein of canine parvovirus (CPV) was used to purify and concentrate CPV from infected cell culture. The procedure was monitored by testing the respective fractions in an infectivity titration system, in an ELISA, in a haemagglutination assay and by negative contrast electron microscopy to quantify CPV or CPV antigen. The degree of purification was further estimated by testing the fractions for total protein content in a colorimetric method, for bovine serum albumin content in an ELISA and by SDS-PAGE. Over 99% of the contaminating proteins proved to be removed, and 20% or 70-90% of infectious CPV or CPV antigen, respectively, was recovered.

  11. Discovery of high affinity anti-ricin antibodies by B cell receptor sequencing and by yeast display of combinatorial VH:VL libraries from immunized animals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Lee, Chang-Han; Johnson, Erik L; Kluwe, Christien A; Cunningham, Josephine C; Tanno, Hidetaka; Crooks, Richard M; Georgiou, George; Ellington, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is a toxin that could potentially be used as a bioweapon. We identified anti-ricin A chain antibodies by sequencing the antibody repertoire from immunized mice and by selecting high affinity antibodies using yeast surface display. These methods led to the isolation of multiple antibodies with high (sub-nanomolar) affinity. Interestingly, the antibodies identified by the 2 independent approaches are from the same clonal lineages, indicating for the first time that yeast surface display can identify native antibodies. The new antibodies represent well-characterized reagents for biodefense diagnostics and therapeutics development.

  12. Discovery of high affinity anti-ricin antibodies by B cell receptor sequencing and by yeast display of combinatorial VH:VL libraries from immunized animals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Lee, Chang-Han; Johnson, Erik L; Kluwe, Christien A; Cunningham, Josephine C; Tanno, Hidetaka; Crooks, Richard M; Georgiou, George; Ellington, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is a toxin that could potentially be used as a bioweapon. We identified anti-ricin A chain antibodies by sequencing the antibody repertoire from immunized mice and by selecting high affinity antibodies using yeast surface display. These methods led to the isolation of multiple antibodies with high (sub-nanomolar) affinity. Interestingly, the antibodies identified by the 2 independent approaches are from the same clonal lineages, indicating for the first time that yeast surface display can identify native antibodies. The new antibodies represent well-characterized reagents for biodefense diagnostics and therapeutics development. PMID:27224530

  13. Antibody Binding Selectivity: Alternative Sets of Antigen Residues Entail High-Affinity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Nominé, Yves; Choulier, Laurence; Travé, Gilles; Vernet, Thierry; Altschuh, Danièle

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between protein sequence and molecular recognition selectivity remains a major challenge. The antibody fragment scFv1F4 recognizes with sub nM affinity a decapeptide (sequence 6TAMFQDPQER15) derived from the N-terminal end of human papilloma virus E6 oncoprotein. Using this decapeptide as antigen, we had previously shown that only the wild type amino-acid or conservative replacements were allowed at positions 9 to 12 and 15 of the peptide, indicating a strong binding selectivity. Nevertheless phenylalanine (F) was equally well tolerated as the wild type glutamine (Q) at position 13, while all other amino acids led to weaker scFv binding. The interfaces of complexes involving either Q or F are expected to diverge, due to the different physico-chemistry of these residues. This would imply that high-affinity binding can be achieved through distinct interfacial geometries. In order to investigate this point, we disrupted the scFv–peptide interface by modifying one or several peptide positions. We then analyzed the effect on binding of amino acid changes at the remaining positions, an altered susceptibility being indicative of an altered role in complex formation. The 23 starting variants analyzed contained replacements whose effects on scFv1F4 binding ranged from minor to drastic. A permutation analysis (effect of replacing each peptide position by all other amino acids except cysteine) was carried out on the 23 variants using the PEPperCHIP® Platform technology. A comparison of their permutation patterns with that of the wild type peptide indicated that starting replacements at position 11, 12 or 13 modified the tolerance to amino-acid changes at the other two positions. The interdependence between the three positions was confirmed by SPR (Biacore® technology). Our data demonstrate that binding selectivity does not preclude the existence of alternative high-affinity recognition modes. PMID:26629896

  14. New High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Recognize Non-Overlapping Epitopes On Mesothelin For Monitoring And Treating Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Phung, Yen; Gao, Wei; Kawa, Seiji; Hassan, Raffit; Pastan, Ira; Ho, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Mesothelin is an emerging cell surface target in mesothelioma and other solid tumors. Most antibody drug candidates recognize highly immunogenic Region I (296–390) on mesothelin. Here, we report a group of high-affinity non-Region I rabbit monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies do not compete for mesothelin binding with the immunotoxin SS1P that binds Region I of mesothelin. One pair of antibodies (YP218 and YP223) is suitable to detect soluble mesothelin in a sandwich ELISA with high sensitivity. The new assay can also be used to measure serum mesothelin concentration in mesothelioma patients, indicating its potential use for monitoring patients treated with current antibody therapies targeting Region I. The antibodies are highly specific and sensitive in immunostaining of mesothelioma. To explore their use in tumor therapy, we have generated the immunotoxins based on the Fv of these antibodies. One immunotoxin (YP218 Fv-PE38) exhibits potent anti-tumor cytotoxicity towards primary mesothelioma cell lines in vitro and an NCI-H226 xenograft tumor in mice. Furthermore, we have engineered a humanized YP218 Fv that retains full binding affinity for mesothelin-expressing cancer cells. In conclusion, with their unique binding properties, these antibodies may be promising candidates for monitoring and treating mesothelioma and other mesothelin-expressing cancers. PMID:25996440

  15. Affinity maturation of an anti-V antigen IgG expressed in situ through adenovirus gene delivery confers enhanced protection against Yersinia pestis challenge.

    PubMed

    Van Blarcom, T J; Sofer-Podesta, C; Ang, J; Boyer, J L; Crystal, R G; Georgiou, G

    2010-07-01

    Genetic transfer of neutralizing antibodies (Abs) has been shown to confer strong and persistent protection against bacterial and viral infectious agents. Although it is well established that for many exogenous neutralizing Abs increased antigen affinity correlates with protection, the effect of antigen affinity on Abs produced in situ after adenoviral gene transfer has not been examined. The mouse IgG2b monoclonal Ab, 2C12.4, recognizes the Yersinia pestis type III secretion apparatus protein, LcrV (V antigen), and confers protection in mice when administered as an IgG intraperitoneally or after genetic immunization with engineered, replication-defective serotype 5 human adenovirus (Ad). The 2C12.4 Ab was expressed as a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) in Escherichia coli and was shown to display an equilibrium dissociation constant (K(D))=3.5 nM by surface plasmon resonance analysis. The 2C12.4 scFv was subjected to random mutagenesis, and variants with increased affinity were isolated by flow cytometry using the anchored periplasmic expression bacterial display system. After a single round of mutagenesis, variants displaying up to 35-fold lower K(D) values (H8, K(D)=100 pM) were isolated. The variable domains of the H8 scFv were used to replace those of the parental 2C12.4 IgG encoded in the Ad vector, AdalphaV, giving rise to AdalphaV.H8. The two adenoviral vectors resulted in similar titers of anti-V antigen Abs 3 days after immunization, with 10(9), 10(10) or 10(11) particle units (pu). After intranasal challenge with 363 LD(50) (lethal dose, 50%) of Y. pestis CO92, 54% of the mice immunized with 10(10) pu of AdalphaV.H8 survived through the 14 day end point compared with only 15% survivors for the group immunized with AdalphaV expressing the lower-affinity 2C12.4 (P<0.04; AdalphaV versus AdalphaV.H8). These results indicate that affinity maturation of a neutralizing Ab delivered by genetic transfer may confer increased protection not only for Y. pestis

  16. Conformation-Dependent High-Affinity Potent Ricin-Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Hu, Charles Chen; Lillico, Dustin; Yu, Justin; Negrych, Laurel M.; Cherwonogrodzky, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potential biothreat agent with no approved antidote available for ricin poisoning. The aim of this study was to develop potent antibody-based antiricin antidotes. Four strong ricin resistant hybridoma clones secreting antiricin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. All four mAbs are bound to conformational epitopes of ricin toxin B (RTB) with high affinity (KD values from 2.55 to 36.27 nM). RTB not only triggers cellular uptake of ricin, but also facilitates transport of the ricin toxin A (RTA) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, where RTA exerts its toxic activity. The four mAbs were found to have potent ricin-neutralizing capacities and synergistic effects among them as determined by an in vitro neutralization assay. In vivo protection assay demonstrated that all four mAbs had strong efficacy against ricin challenges. D9 was found to be exceptionally effective. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of D9, at a dose of 5 μg, 6 weeks before or 6 hours after an i.p. challenge with 5 × LD50 of ricin was able to protect or rescue 100% of the mice, indicating that mAb D9 is an excellent candidate to be developed as a potent antidote against ricin poisoning for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:23484120

  17. Conformation-dependent high-affinity potent ricin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Hu, Charles Chen; Lillico, Dustin; Yu, Justin; Negrych, Laurel M; Cherwonogrodzky, John W

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potential biothreat agent with no approved antidote available for ricin poisoning. The aim of this study was to develop potent antibody-based antiricin antidotes. Four strong ricin resistant hybridoma clones secreting antiricin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. All four mAbs are bound to conformational epitopes of ricin toxin B (RTB) with high affinity (KD values from 2.55 to 36.27 nM). RTB not only triggers cellular uptake of ricin, but also facilitates transport of the ricin toxin A (RTA) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, where RTA exerts its toxic activity. The four mAbs were found to have potent ricin-neutralizing capacities and synergistic effects among them as determined by an in vitro neutralization assay. In vivo protection assay demonstrated that all four mAbs had strong efficacy against ricin challenges. D9 was found to be exceptionally effective. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of D9, at a dose of 5 μ g, 6 weeks before or 6 hours after an i.p. challenge with 5 × LD50 of ricin was able to protect or rescue 100% of the mice, indicating that mAb D9 is an excellent candidate to be developed as a potent antidote against ricin poisoning for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:23484120

  18. Determination of Mother Centriole Maturation in CPAP-Depleted Cells Using the Ninein Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Miseon

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in centrosomal protein genes have been identified in a number of genetic diseases in brain development, including microcephaly. Centrosomal P4.1-associated protein (CPAP) is one of the causal genes implicated in primary microcephaly. We previously proposed that CPAP is essential for mother centriole maturation during mitosis. Methods We immunostained CPAP-depleted cells using the ninein antibody, which selectively detects subdistal appendages in mature mother centrioles. Results Ninein signals were significantly impaired in CPAP-depleted cells. Conclusion The results suggest that CPAP is required for mother centriole maturation in mammalian cells. The selective absence of centriolar appendages in young mother centrioles may be responsible for asymmetric spindle pole formation in CPAP-depleted cells. PMID:25827458

  19. "Velcro" engineering of high affinity CD47 ectodomain as signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) antagonists that enhance antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chia Chi M; Guo, Nan; Sockolosky, Jonathan T; Ring, Aaron M; Weiskopf, Kipp; Özkan, Engin; Mori, Yasuo; Weissman, Irving L; Garcia, K Christopher

    2015-05-15

    CD47 is a cell surface protein that transmits an anti-phagocytic signal, known as the "don't-eat-me" signal, to macrophages upon engaging its receptor signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα). Molecules that antagonize the CD47-SIRPα interaction by binding to CD47, such as anti-CD47 antibodies and the engineered SIRPα variant CV1, have been shown to facilitate macrophage-mediated anti-tumor responses. However, these strategies targeting CD47 are handicapped by large antigen sinks in vivo and indiscriminate cell binding due to ubiquitous expression of CD47. These factors reduce bioavailability and increase the risk of toxicity. Here, we present an alternative strategy to antagonize the CD47-SIRPα pathway by engineering high affinity CD47 variants that target SIRPα, which has restricted tissue expression. CD47 proved to be refractive to conventional affinity maturation techniques targeting its binding interface with SIRPα. Therefore, we developed a novel engineering approach, whereby we augmented the existing contact interface via N-terminal peptide extension, coined "Velcro" engineering. The high affinity variant (Velcro-CD47) bound to the two most prominent human SIRPα alleles with greatly increased affinity relative to wild-type CD47 and potently antagonized CD47 binding to SIRPα on human macrophages. Velcro-CD47 synergizes with tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies to enhance macrophage phagocytosis of tumor cells in vitro, with similar potency as CV1. Finally, Velcro-CD47 interacts specifically with a subset of myeloid-derived cells in human blood, whereas CV1 binds all myeloid, lymphoid, and erythroid populations interrogated. This is consistent with the restricted expression of SIRPα compared with CD47. Herein, we have demonstrated that "Velcro" engineering is a powerful protein-engineering tool with potential applications to other systems and that Velcro-CD47 could be an alternative adjuvant to CD47-targeting agents for cancer immunotherapy.

  20. “Velcro” Engineering of High Affinity CD47 Ectodomain as Signal Regulatory Protein α (SIRPα) Antagonists That Enhance Antibody-dependent Cellular Phagocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chia Chi M.; Guo, Nan; Sockolosky, Jonathan T.; Ring, Aaron M.; Weiskopf, Kipp; Özkan, Engin; Mori, Yasuo; Weissman, Irving L.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    CD47 is a cell surface protein that transmits an anti-phagocytic signal, known as the “don't-eat-me” signal, to macrophages upon engaging its receptor signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα). Molecules that antagonize the CD47-SIRPα interaction by binding to CD47, such as anti-CD47 antibodies and the engineered SIRPα variant CV1, have been shown to facilitate macrophage-mediated anti-tumor responses. However, these strategies targeting CD47 are handicapped by large antigen sinks in vivo and indiscriminate cell binding due to ubiquitous expression of CD47. These factors reduce bioavailability and increase the risk of toxicity. Here, we present an alternative strategy to antagonize the CD47-SIRPα pathway by engineering high affinity CD47 variants that target SIRPα, which has restricted tissue expression. CD47 proved to be refractive to conventional affinity maturation techniques targeting its binding interface with SIRPα. Therefore, we developed a novel engineering approach, whereby we augmented the existing contact interface via N-terminal peptide extension, coined “Velcro” engineering. The high affinity variant (Velcro-CD47) bound to the two most prominent human SIRPα alleles with greatly increased affinity relative to wild-type CD47 and potently antagonized CD47 binding to SIRPα on human macrophages. Velcro-CD47 synergizes with tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies to enhance macrophage phagocytosis of tumor cells in vitro, with similar potency as CV1. Finally, Velcro-CD47 interacts specifically with a subset of myeloid-derived cells in human blood, whereas CV1 binds all myeloid, lymphoid, and erythroid populations interrogated. This is consistent with the restricted expression of SIRPα compared with CD47. Herein, we have demonstrated that “Velcro” engineering is a powerful protein-engineering tool with potential applications to other systems and that Velcro-CD47 could be an alternative adjuvant to CD47-targeting agents for cancer immunotherapy

  1. Design, synthesis and application of benzyl-sulfonate biomimetic affinity adsorbents for monoclonal antibody purification from transgenic corn.

    PubMed

    Maltezos, Anastasios; Platis, Dimitris; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Kossida, Sophia; Marinou, Marigianna; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2014-01-01

    The human anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody 2G12 (mAb 2G12) is one of the most broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV that recognizes a unique epitope on the surface glycoprotein gp120. In the present work, a limited affinity-ligand library was synthesized and evaluated for its ability to bind and purify recombinant mAb 2G12 expressed in transgenic corn. The affinity ligands were structural fragments of polysulfonate triazine dye Cibacron Blue 3GA (CB3GA) and represent novel lead scaffolds for designing synthetic affinity ligands. Solid phase chemistry was used to synthesize variants of CB3GA lead ligand. One immobilized ligand, bearing 4-aminobenzyl sulfonic acid (4ABS) linked on two chlorine atoms of the triazine ring (4ABS-Trz-4ABS), displayed high affinity for mAb 2G12. Absorption equilibrium, 3D molecular modelling and molecular dynamics simulation studies were carried out to provide a detailed picture of the 4ABS-Trz-4ABS interaction with mAb 2G12. This biomimetic affinity ligand was exploited for the development of a facile two-step purification protocol for mAb 2G12. In the first step of the procedure, mAb 2G12 was purified on an S-Sepharose FF cation exchanger, and in the second step, mAb 2G12 was purified using affinity chromatography on 4ABS-Trz-4ABS affinity adsorbent. Analysis of the antibody preparation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the mAb 2G12 was fully active and of sufficient purity suitable for analytical applications.

  2. Design, synthesis and application of benzyl-sulfonate biomimetic affinity adsorbents for monoclonal antibody purification from transgenic corn.

    PubMed

    Maltezos, Anastasios; Platis, Dimitris; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Kossida, Sophia; Marinou, Marigianna; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2014-01-01

    The human anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody 2G12 (mAb 2G12) is one of the most broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV that recognizes a unique epitope on the surface glycoprotein gp120. In the present work, a limited affinity-ligand library was synthesized and evaluated for its ability to bind and purify recombinant mAb 2G12 expressed in transgenic corn. The affinity ligands were structural fragments of polysulfonate triazine dye Cibacron Blue 3GA (CB3GA) and represent novel lead scaffolds for designing synthetic affinity ligands. Solid phase chemistry was used to synthesize variants of CB3GA lead ligand. One immobilized ligand, bearing 4-aminobenzyl sulfonic acid (4ABS) linked on two chlorine atoms of the triazine ring (4ABS-Trz-4ABS), displayed high affinity for mAb 2G12. Absorption equilibrium, 3D molecular modelling and molecular dynamics simulation studies were carried out to provide a detailed picture of the 4ABS-Trz-4ABS interaction with mAb 2G12. This biomimetic affinity ligand was exploited for the development of a facile two-step purification protocol for mAb 2G12. In the first step of the procedure, mAb 2G12 was purified on an S-Sepharose FF cation exchanger, and in the second step, mAb 2G12 was purified using affinity chromatography on 4ABS-Trz-4ABS affinity adsorbent. Analysis of the antibody preparation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the mAb 2G12 was fully active and of sufficient purity suitable for analytical applications. PMID:24375581

  3. Optimization of pore structure and particle morphology of mesoporous silica for antibody adsorption for use in affinity chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikosaka, Ryouichi; Nagata, Fukue; Tomita, Masahiro; Kato, Katsuya

    2016-10-01

    Antibodies have received significant attention for use as antibody drugs, because they bind the objective protein (antigen) via antigen-antibody reactions. Recently, many reports have appeared on various monoclonal antibodies that recognize a single antigen. In this study, monoclonal antibodies are used as adsorbates on mesoporous silica (MPS) for affinity chromatography. MPS has high surface area and large pore volume; moreover, pore diameter, pore structure, and particle morphology are relatively easy to tune by adjusting the conditions of synthesis. The pore structure (two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal and three-dimensional cubic) and particle morphology (spherical and polyhedral) of MPS are optimized for use in a monoclonal antibody/MPS composite. When anti-IgG (one of the monoclonal antibodies) adsorbs on the MPS material and IgG (antigen) binds to anti-IgG/MPS composites, MCM-41p with a 2D-hexagonal pore structure and polyhedral particle morphology has the highest IgG binding efficiency. In addition, the antibody/MPS composites remain stable in chaotropic and low-pH solutions and can be cycled at least five times without decreasing IgG elution. In purification and removal tests, the use of the antibody/MPS composites allows only the objective protein from protein mixtures to be bound and eluted.

  4. Affinity maturation of immunoglobulin A anti-tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies during development of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Westerlund, A; Ankelo, M; Simell, S; Ilonen, J; Knip, M; Simell, O; Hinkkanen, A E

    2007-05-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by ingestion of wheat gluten and related cereals in genetically predisposed individuals. Circulating immunoglobulin A (IgA) class autoantibodies against tissue transglutaminase (IgA-TGA) are highly specific and sensitive serological markers for CD, which is ultimately confirmed by duodenal biopsy. Although CD is considered a life-long disorder, transient or fluctuating IgA-TGA seropositivity has been observed in asymptomatic individuals on a gluten-containing diet. We set out to explore possible differences in the maturation of IgA-TGA avidity between individuals progressing to CD and subjects remaining healthy despite occasional expression of autoantibodies. We developed a time-resolved fluorometric IgA-TGA assay based on human recombinant tissue transglutaminase (tTG), and further modified the method to also measure urea-dependent avidity of the autoantibodies. We measured the autoantibody titres and avidities of sequential serum samples from 10 children developing CD and 10 children presenting transient or fluctuating autoantibodies. Both the initial titres at seroconversion and peak values of transient/fluctuating IgA-TGA were significantly lower than corresponding autoantibody titres in samples drawn from individuals with progressing CD (P = 0.004 and P = 0.0002, respectively). However, there were no statistically significant differences in the initial or peak avidity index values between the two groups of children. The avidity index values increased during the follow-up period (P = 0.013 for both groups) with no significant difference in the rate of avidity maturation between children with transient/fluctuating IgA-TGA and children developing CD. According to our results, high autoantibody titres have a higher predictive value than avidity maturation of TGA-IgA in screening for CD.

  5. Unique carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are required for high affinity binding between FcgammaRIII and antibodies lacking core fucose.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Claudia; Grau, Sandra; Jäger, Christiane; Sondermann, Peter; Brünker, Peter; Waldhauer, Inja; Hennig, Michael; Ruf, Armin; Rufer, Arne Christian; Stihle, Martine; Umaña, Pablo; Benz, Jörg

    2011-08-01

    Antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key immune effector mechanism, relies on the binding of antigen-antibody complexes to Fcγ receptors expressed on immune cells. Antibodies lacking core fucosylation show a large increase in affinity for FcγRIIIa leading to an improved receptor-mediated effector function. Although afucosylated IgGs exist naturally, a next generation of recombinant therapeutic, glycoenginereed antibodies is currently being developed to exploit this finding. In this study, the crystal structures of a glycosylated Fcγ receptor complexed with either afucosylated or fucosylated Fc were determined allowing a detailed, molecular understanding of the regulatory role of Fc-oligosaccharide core fucosylation in improving ADCC. The structures reveal a unique type of interface consisting of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions between glycans of the receptor and the afucosylated Fc. In contrast, in the complex structure with fucosylated Fc, these contacts are weakened or nonexistent, explaining the decreased affinity for the receptor. These findings allow us to understand the higher efficacy of therapeutic antibodies lacking the core fucose and also suggest a unique mechanism by which the immune system can regulate antibody-mediated effector functions.

  6. Comparison of biosensor platforms in the evaluation of high affinity antibody-antigen binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Danlin; Singh, Ajit; Wu, Helen; Kroe-Barrett, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    The acquisition of reliable kinetic parameters for the characterization of biomolecular interactions is an important component of the drug discovery and development process. While several benchmark studies have explored the variability of kinetic rate constants obtained from multiple laboratories and biosensors, a direct comparison of these instruments' performance has not been undertaken, and systematic factors contributing to data variability from these systems have not been discussed. To address these questions, a panel of ten high-affinity monoclonal antibodies was simultaneously evaluated for their binding kinetics against the same antigen on four biosensor platforms: GE Healthcare's Biacore T100, Bio-Rad's ProteOn XPR36, ForteBio's Octet RED384, and Wasatch Microfluidics's IBIS MX96. We compared the strengths and weaknesses of these systems and found that despite certain inherent systematic limitations in instrumentation, the rank orders of both the association and dissociation rate constants were highly correlated between these instruments. Our results also revealed a trade-off between data reliability and sample throughput. Biacore T100, followed by ProteOn XPR36, exhibited excellent data quality and consistency, whereas Octet RED384 and IBIS MX96 demonstrated high flexibility and throughput with compromises in data accuracy and reproducibility. Our results support the need for a "fit-for-purpose" approach in instrument selection for biosensor studies. PMID:27365220

  7. Ultrasensitive Analysis of Binding Affinity of HIV Receptor and Neutralizing Antibody Using Solution-Phase Electrochemiluminescence Assay

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Hong Nancy; Wen, Zhaoyang; Brownlow, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Binding of a few ligand molecules with its receptors on cell surface can initiate cellular signaling transduction pathways, and trigger viral infection of host cells. HIV-1 infects host T-cells by binding its viral envelope protein (gp120) with its receptor (a glycoprotein, CD4) on T cells. Primary strategies to prevent and treat HIV infection is to develop therapies (e.g., neutralizing antibodies) that can block specific binding of CD4 with gp120. The infection often leads to the lower counts of CD4 cells, which makes it an effective biomarker to monitor the AIDS progression and treatment. Despite research over decades, quantitative assays for effective measurements of binding affinities of protein-protein (ligand-receptor, antigen-antibody) interactions remains highly sought. Solid-phase electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassay has been commonly used to capture analytes from the solution for analysis, which involves immobilization of antibody on solid surfaces (micron-sized beads), but it cannot quantitatively measure binding affinities of molecular interactions. In this study, we have developed solution-phase ECL assay with a wide dynamic range (0–2 nM) and high sensitivity and specificity for quantitative analysis of CD4 at femtomolar level and their binding affinity with gp120 and monoclonal antibodies (MABs). We found that binding affinities of CD4 with gp120 and MAB (Q4120) are 9.5×108 and 1.2×109 M−1, respectively. The results also show that MAB (Q4120) of CD4 can completely block the binding of gp120 with CD4, while MAB (17b) of gp120 can only partially block their interaction. This study demonstrates that the solution-phase ECL assay can be used for ultrasensitive and quantitative analysis of binding affinities of protein-protein interactions in solution for better understating of protein functions and identification of effective therapies to block their interactions. PMID:23565071

  8. Combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and time-resolved luminescence for high affinity antibody-ligand interaction thermodynamics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Aweda, Tolulope A; Meares, Claude F

    2012-02-01

    For experiments using synthetic ligands as probes for biological experiments, it is useful to determine the specificity and affinity of the ligands for their receptors. As ligands with higher affinities are developed (K(A)>10(8)M(-1); K(D)<10(-8)M), a new challenge arises: to measure these values accurately. Isothermal titration calorimetry measures heat produced or consumed during ligand binding, and also provides the equilibrium binding constant. However, as normally practiced, its range is limited. Displacement titration, where a competing weaker ligand is used to lower the apparent affinity of the stronger ligand, can be used to determine the binding affinity as well as the complete thermodynamic data for ligand-antibody complexes with very high affinity. These equilibrium data have been combined with kinetic measurements to yield the rate constants as well. We describe this methodology, using as an example antibody 2D12.5, which captures yttrium S-2-(4-aminobenzyl)-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetate.

  9. Development of an automated mid-scale parallel protein purification system for antibody purification and affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Long, Alexander M; Swalm, Brooke; Charest, Ken; Wang, Yan; Hu, Jiali; Schulz, Craig; Goetzinger, Wolfgang; Hall, Brian E

    2016-12-01

    Protein purification is often a bottleneck during protein generation for large molecule drug discovery. Therapeutic antibody campaigns typically require the purification of hundreds of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) during the hybridoma process and lead optimization. With the increase in high-throughput cloning, faster DNA sequencing, and the use of parallel protein expression systems, a need for high-throughput purification approaches has evolved, particularly in the midsize range between 20 ml and 100 ml. To address this we modified a four channel Gilson solid phase extraction system (referred to as MG-SPE) with switching valves and sample holding loops to be able to perform standard affinity purification using commercially available columns and micro-titer format deep well blocks. By running 4 samples in parallel, the MG-SPE has the capacity to purify up to 24 samples of greater than 50 ml each using a single-step affinity purification protocol or a two-step protocol consisting of affinity chromatography followed by desalting/buffer exchange overnight (∼12 h run time). Our evaluation of affinity purification using mAbs and Fc-fusion proteins from mammalian cell supernatants demonstrates that the MG-SPE compared favorably with industry standard systems for both protein quality and yield. Overall the system is simple to operate and fills a void in purification processes where a simple, efficient, automated system is needed for affinity purification of midsize research samples. PMID:27498022

  10. Development of an automated mid-scale parallel protein purification system for antibody purification and affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Long, Alexander M; Swalm, Brooke; Charest, Ken; Wang, Yan; Hu, Jiali; Schulz, Craig; Goetzinger, Wolfgang; Hall, Brian E

    2016-12-01

    Protein purification is often a bottleneck during protein generation for large molecule drug discovery. Therapeutic antibody campaigns typically require the purification of hundreds of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) during the hybridoma process and lead optimization. With the increase in high-throughput cloning, faster DNA sequencing, and the use of parallel protein expression systems, a need for high-throughput purification approaches has evolved, particularly in the midsize range between 20 ml and 100 ml. To address this we modified a four channel Gilson solid phase extraction system (referred to as MG-SPE) with switching valves and sample holding loops to be able to perform standard affinity purification using commercially available columns and micro-titer format deep well blocks. By running 4 samples in parallel, the MG-SPE has the capacity to purify up to 24 samples of greater than 50 ml each using a single-step affinity purification protocol or a two-step protocol consisting of affinity chromatography followed by desalting/buffer exchange overnight (∼12 h run time). Our evaluation of affinity purification using mAbs and Fc-fusion proteins from mammalian cell supernatants demonstrates that the MG-SPE compared favorably with industry standard systems for both protein quality and yield. Overall the system is simple to operate and fills a void in purification processes where a simple, efficient, automated system is needed for affinity purification of midsize research samples.

  11. Somatic mutations and affinity maturation are impaired by excessive numbers of T follicular helper cells and restored by Treg cells or memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Preite, Silvia; Baumjohann, Dirk; Foglierini, Mathilde; Basso, Camilla; Ronchi, Francesca; Rodriguez, Blanca M. Fernandez; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that Cd3e‐deficient mice adoptively transferred with CD4+ T cells generate high numbers of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, which go on to induce a strong B‐cell and germinal center (GC) reaction. Here, we show that in this system, GC B cells display an altered distribution between the dark and light zones, and express low levels of activation‐induced cytidine deaminase. Furthermore, GC B cells from Cd3e –/– mice accumulate fewer somatic mutations as compared with GC B cells from wild‐type mice, and exhibit impaired affinity maturation and reduced differentiation into long‐lived plasma cells. Reconstitution of Cd3e –/– mice with regulatory T (Treg) cells restored Tfh‐cell numbers, GC B‐cell numbers and B‐cell distribution within dark and light zones, and the rate of antibody somatic mutations. Tfh‐cell numbers and GC B‐cell numbers and dynamics were also restored by pre‐reconstitution of Cd3e –/– mice with Cxcr5 –/– Treg cells or non‐regulatory, memory CD4+ T cells. Taken together, these findings underline the importance of a quantitatively regulated Tfh‐cell response for an efficient and long‐lasting serological response. PMID:26332258

  12. Topography of the high-affinity lysine binding site of plasminogen as defined with a specific antibody probe

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, L.A.; Plow, E.F.

    1986-11-04

    An antibody population that reacted with the high-affinity lysine binding site of human plasminogen was elicited by immunizing rabbits with an elastase degradation product containing kringles 1-3 (EDP I). This antibody was immunopurified by affinity chromatography on plasminogen-Sepharose and elution with 0.2 M 6-aminohexanoic acid. The eluted antibodies bound (/sup 125/I)EDP I, (/sup 125/I)Glu-plasminogen, and (/sup 125/I)Lys-plasminogen in radioimmunoassays, and binding of each ligand was at least 99% inhibited by 0.2 M 6-aminohexanoic acid. The concentrations for 50% inhibition of (/sup 125/I)EDP I binding by tranexamic acid, 6-aminohexanoic acid, and lysine were 2.6, 46, and l730 ..mu..M, respectively. Similar values were obtained with plasminogen and suggested that an unoccupied high-affinity lysine binding site was required for antibody recognition. The antiserum reacted exclusively with plasminogen derivatives containing the EDP I region and did not react with those lacking an EDP I region, or with tissue plasminogen activator or prothrombin, which also contains kringles. By immunoblotting analyses, a chymotryptic degradation product of M/sub r/ 20,000 was derived from EDP I that retained reactivity with the antibody. ..cap alpha../sub 2/-Antiplasmin inhibited the binding of radiolabeled EDP I, Glu-plasminogen, or Lys-plasminogen by the antiserum, suggesting that the recognized site is involved in the noncovalent interaction of the inhibitor with plasminogen. The binding of (/sup 125/I)EDP I to fibrin was also inhibited by the antiserum. The observations provide independent evidence for the role of the high-affinity lysine binding site in the functional interactions of plasminogen with its primary substrate and inhibitor.

  13. Glycosylation of a VH residue of a monoclonal antibody against alpha (1- ---6) dextran increases its affinity for antigen

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have observed that antidextran hybridomas with potential N-linked glycosylation sites in VH have higher affinity for polymeric dextran and for isomaltoheptaose than those lacking potential glycosylation sites. In these studies we have used gene transfection and expression techniques to verify that the carbohydrate addition sites in VH were used. The carbohydrate of the VH region was accessible for binding by the lectin Con A. By ELISA analysis it was demonstrated that the aKa of the antibody for dextran was influenced by the presence of carbohydrate in VH, with the aglycosylated antibody having an aKa 15-fold lower than its untreated counterpart. The aKa for antigen of antibodies that contain carbohydrate only in their constant region was unaffected by lack of carbohydrate. Thus, not only the amino acid sequence of the variable region but also its carbohydrate moieties can determine the magnitude of the antigen-antibody interaction. PMID:2459288

  14. The Interplay of Antigen Affinity, Internalization, and Pharmacokinetics on CD44-Positive Tumor Targeting of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Glatt, Dylan M; Beckford Vera, Denis R; Parrott, Matthew C; Luft, J Christopher; Benhabbour, S Rahima; Mumper, Russell J

    2016-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) offer promise as effective tumor targeting and drug delivery agents for cancer therapy. However, comparative biological and clinical characteristics of mAbs targeting the same tumor-associated antigen (TAA) often differ widely. This study examined the characteristics of mAbs that impact tumor targeting using a panel of mAb clones specific to the cancer-associated cell-surface receptor and cancer stem cell marker CD44. CD44 mAbs were screened for cell-surface binding, antigen affinity, internalization, and CD44-mediated tumor uptake by CD44-positive A549 cells. It was hypothesized that high-affinity, rapidly internalizing CD44 mAbs would result in high tumor uptake and prolonged tumor retention. Although high-affinity clones rapidly bound and were internalized by A549 cells in vitro, an intermediate-affinity clone demonstrated significantly greater tumor uptake and retention than high-affinity clones in vivo. Systemic exposure, rather than high antigen affinity or rapid internalization, best associated with tumor targeting of CD44 mAbs in A549 tumor-bearing mice. PMID:27079967

  15. Antigen-Antibody Affinity for Dry Eye Biomarkers by Label Free Biosensing. Comparison with the ELISA Technique

    PubMed Central

    Laguna, Maríafe; Holgado, Miguel; Hernandez, Ana L.; Santamaría, Beatriz; Lavín, Alvaro; Soria, Javier; Suarez, Tatiana; Bardina, Carlota; Jara, Mónica; Sanza, Francisco J.; Casquel, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The specificity and affinity of antibody-antigen interactions is a fundamental way to achieve reliable biosensing responses. Different proteins involved with dry eye dysfunction: ANXA1, ANXA11, CST4, PRDX5, PLAA and S100A6; were validated as biomarkers. In this work several antibodies were tested for ANXA1, ANXA11 and PRDX5 to select the best candidates for each biomarker. The results were obtained by using Biophotonic Sensing Cells (BICELLs) as an efficient methodology for label-free biosensing and compared with the Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (ELISA) technique. PMID:26287192

  16. Antigen-Antibody Affinity for Dry Eye Biomarkers by Label Free Biosensing. Comparison with the ELISA Technique.

    PubMed

    Laguna, Maríafe; Holgado, Miguel; Hernandez, Ana L; Santamaría, Beatriz; Lavín, Alvaro; Soria, Javier; Suarez, Tatiana; Bardina, Carlota; Jara, Mónica; Sanza, Francisco J; Casquel, Rafael

    2015-08-13

    The specificity and affinity of antibody-antigen interactions is a fundamental way to achieve reliable biosensing responses. Different proteins involved with dry eye dysfunction: ANXA1, ANXA11, CST4, PRDX5, PLAA and S100A6; were validated as biomarkers. In this work several antibodies were tested for ANXA1, ANXA11 and PRDX5 to select the best candidates for each biomarker. The results were obtained by using Biophotonic Sensing Cells (BICELLs) as an efficient methodology for label-free biosensing and compared with the Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (ELISA) technique.

  17. Peptide-based protein capture agents with high affinity, selectivity, and stability as antibody replacements in biodetection assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, Matthew B.; Farrow, Blake; Warner, Candice; Finch, Amethist S.; Lai, Bert; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Heath, James R.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2014-05-01

    Current biodetection assays that employ monoclonal antibodies as primary capture agents exhibit limited fieldability, shelf life, and performance due to batch-to-batch production variability and restricted thermal stability. In order to improve upon the detection of biological threats in fieldable assays and systems for the Army, we are investigating protein catalyzed capture (PCC) agents as drop-in replacements for the existing antibody technology through iterative in situ click chemistry. The PCC agent oligopeptides are developed against known protein epitopes and can be mass produced using robotic methods. In this work, a PCC agent under development will be discussed. The performance, including affinity, selectivity, and stability of the capture agent technology, is analyzed by immunoprecipitation, western blotting, and ELISA experiments. The oligopeptide demonstrates superb selectivity coupled with high affinity through multi-ligand design, and improved thermal, chemical, and biochemical stability due to non-natural amino acid PCC agent design.

  18. Ebolavirus Nucleoprotein C-Termini Potently Attract Single Domain Antibodies Enabling Monoclonal Affinity Reagent Sandwich Assay (MARSA) Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Laura J.; Hayhurst, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Background Antigen detection assays can play an important part in environmental surveillance and diagnostics for emerging threats. We are interested in accelerating assay formulation; targeting the agents themselves to bypass requirements for a priori genome information or surrogates. Previously, using in vitro affinity reagent selection on Marburg virus we rapidly established monoclonal affinity reagent sandwich assay (MARSA) where one recombinant antibody clone was both captor and tracer for polyvalent nucleoprotein (NP). Hypothesizing that the closely related Ebolavirus genus may share the same Achilles' heel, we redirected the scheme to see whether similar assays could be delivered and began to explore their mechanism. Methods and Findings In parallel we selected panels of llama single domain antibodies (sdAb) from a semi-synthetic library against Zaire, Sudan, Ivory Coast, and Reston Ebola viruses. Each could perform as both captor and tracer in the same antigen sandwich capture assay thereby forming MARSAs. All sdAb were specific for NP and those tested required the C-terminal domain for recognition. Several clones were cross-reactive, indicating epitope conservation across the Ebolavirus genus. Analysis of two immune shark sdAb revealed they also targeted the C-terminal domain, and could be similarly employed, yet were less sensitive than a comparable llama sdAb despite stemming from immune selections. Conclusions The C-terminal domain of Ebolavirus NP is a strong attractant for antibodies and enables sensitive sandwich immunoassays to be rapidly generated using a single antibody clone. The polyvalent nature of nucleocapsid borne NP and display of the C-terminal region likely serves as a bountiful affinity sink during selections, and a highly avid target for subsequent immunoassay capture. Combined with the high degree of amino acid conservation through 37 years and across wide geographies, this domain makes an ideal handle for monoclonal affinity reagent

  19. AGIA Tag System Based on a High Affinity Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody against Human Dopamine Receptor D1 for Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Tomoya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Shunsuke; Nemoto, Keiichirou; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide tag technology is widely used for protein detection and affinity purification. It consists of two fundamental elements: a peptide sequence and a binder which specifically binds to the peptide tag. In many tag systems, antibodies have been used as binder due to their high affinity and specificity. Recently, we obtained clone Ra48, a high-affinity rabbit monoclonal antibody (mAb) against dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1). Here, we report a novel tag system composed of Ra48 antibody and its epitope sequence. Using a deletion assay, we identified EEAAGIARP in the C-terminal region of DRD1 as the minimal epitope of Ra48 mAb, and we named this sequence the “AGIA” tag, based on its central sequence. The tag sequence does not include the four amino acids, Ser, Thr, Tyr, or Lys, which are susceptible to post-translational modification. We demonstrated performance of this new tag system in biochemical and cell biology applications. SPR analysis demonstrated that the affinity of the Ra48 mAb to the AGIA tag was 4.90 × 10−9 M. AGIA tag showed remarkably high sensitivity and specificity in immunoblotting. A number of AGIA-fused proteins overexpressed in animal and plant cells were detected by anti-AGIA antibody in immunoblotting and immunostaining with low background, and were immunoprecipitated efficiently. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution of the second Glu to Asp (AGIA/E2D) enabled competitive dissociation of AGIA/E2D-tagged protein by adding wild-type AGIA peptide. It enabled one-step purification of AGIA/E2D-tagged recombinant proteins by peptide competition under physiological conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of the AGIA system makes it suitable for use in multiple methods for protein analysis. PMID:27271343

  20. Direct binding of radioiodinated monoclonal antibody to tumor cells: significance of antibody purity and affinity for drug targeting or tumor imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, S.J.; Foote, L.J.; Lankford, P.K.; Johnson, M.; Mitchell, T.; Braslawsky, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    For MoAb to be used efficiently for drug targeting and tumor imaging, the fraction of antibody binding to tumor cells must be maximized. The authors have studied the binding of /sup 125/I MoAb in three different tumor systems. The fraction of antibody that could be bound to the cell surface was directly proportional to the antibody purity. The affinity constant also limits the fraction of antibody that can bind to cells at a given antigen concentration. Rearrangement of the standard expression for univalent equilibrium binding between two reactants shows that in antigen excess, the maximum fraction of antibody that can bind =Ka(Ag total)/1 + Ka(Ag total). Binding data using four different MoAb with three cell systems confirm this relationship. Estimates for reasonable concentrations of tumor antigens in vivo indicate that antibodies with binding constants less than 10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/ are not likely to be useful for drug targeting or tumor imaging.

  1. Identification and subcellular localization of a 21-kilodalton molecule using affinity-purified antibodies against. cap alpha. -transforming growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Hazarika, P.; Pardue, R.L.; Earls, R.; Dedman, J.R.

    1987-04-07

    Monospecific antibodies were generated against each of six different peptide sequences derived from rat and human ..cap alpha..-transforming growth factor (..cap alpha..-TGF). The affinity-purified antibody to the 17 amino acid carboxyl-terminal portion of the molecule proved most useful in detecting ..cap alpha..-TGF. When used in a peptide-based radioimmunoassay, it was possible to measure nanogram quantities of native ..cap alpha..-TGF in conditioned cell culture media. When used to analyze cell lysate, these antibodies specifically recognized a 21-kilodalton protein species. Indirect immunofluorescence localization procedures revealed a high concentration of ..cap alpha..-TCF in a perinuclear ring with a diffuse cytoplasmic distribution. These results suggest that a precursor form of ..cap alpha..-TGF has a cellular role beyond that of an autocrine growth factor.

  2. Importance of Hypervariable Region 2 for Stability and Affinity of a Shark Single-Domain Antibody Specific for Ebola Virus Nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, George P.; Teichler, Daniel D.; Zabetakis, Dan; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Liu, Jinny L.; Lonsdale, Stephen G.; Goodchild, Sarah A.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2016-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies derived from the unique New Antigen Receptor found in sharks have numerous potential applications, ranging from diagnostic reagents to therapeutics. Shark-derived single-domain antibodies possess the same characteristic ability to refold after heat denaturation found in single-domain antibodies derived from camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies. Recently, two shark derived single-domain antibodies specific for the nucleoprotein of Ebola virus were described. Our evaluation confirmed their high affinity for the nucleoprotein, but found their melting temperatures to be low relative to most single-domain antibodies. Our first approach towards improving their stability was grafting antigen-binding regions (complementarity determining regions) of one of these single-domain antibodies onto a high melting temperature shark single-domain antibody. This resulted in two variants: one that displayed excellent affinity with a low melting temperature, while the other had poor affinity but a higher melting temperature. These new proteins, however, differed in only 3 amino acids within the complementarity determining region 2 sequence. In shark single-domain antibodies, the complementarity determining region 2 is often referred to as hypervariable region 2, as this segment of the antibody domain is truncated compared to the sequence in camelid single-domain antibodies and conventional heavy chain variable domains. To elucidate which of the three amino acids or combinations thereof were responsible for the affinity and stability we made the 6 double and single point mutants that covered the intermediates between these two clones. We found a single amino acid change that achieved a 10°C higher melting temperature while maintaining sub nM affinity. This research gives insights into the impact of the shark sdAb hypervariable 2 region on both stability and affinity. PMID:27494523

  3. Importance of Hypervariable Region 2 for Stability and Affinity of a Shark Single-Domain Antibody Specific for Ebola Virus Nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Anderson, George P; Teichler, Daniel D; Zabetakis, Dan; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C; Liu, Jinny L; Lonsdale, Stephen G; Goodchild, Sarah A; Goldman, Ellen R

    2016-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies derived from the unique New Antigen Receptor found in sharks have numerous potential applications, ranging from diagnostic reagents to therapeutics. Shark-derived single-domain antibodies possess the same characteristic ability to refold after heat denaturation found in single-domain antibodies derived from camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies. Recently, two shark derived single-domain antibodies specific for the nucleoprotein of Ebola virus were described. Our evaluation confirmed their high affinity for the nucleoprotein, but found their melting temperatures to be low relative to most single-domain antibodies. Our first approach towards improving their stability was grafting antigen-binding regions (complementarity determining regions) of one of these single-domain antibodies onto a high melting temperature shark single-domain antibody. This resulted in two variants: one that displayed excellent affinity with a low melting temperature, while the other had poor affinity but a higher melting temperature. These new proteins, however, differed in only 3 amino acids within the complementarity determining region 2 sequence. In shark single-domain antibodies, the complementarity determining region 2 is often referred to as hypervariable region 2, as this segment of the antibody domain is truncated compared to the sequence in camelid single-domain antibodies and conventional heavy chain variable domains. To elucidate which of the three amino acids or combinations thereof were responsible for the affinity and stability we made the 6 double and single point mutants that covered the intermediates between these two clones. We found a single amino acid change that achieved a 10°C higher melting temperature while maintaining sub nM affinity. This research gives insights into the impact of the shark sdAb hypervariable 2 region on both stability and affinity. PMID:27494523

  4. SNAP-Tag Technology: A Useful Tool To Determine Affinity Constants and Other Functional Parameters of Novel Antibody Fragments.

    PubMed

    Niesen, Judith; Sack, Markus; Seidel, Melanie; Fendel, Rolf; Barth, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer; Stein, Christoph

    2016-08-17

    Antibody derivatives, such as the single chain fragment variable (scFv), can be developed as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in cancer research, especially in the form of fusion proteins. Such derivatives are easier to produce and modify than monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and achieve better tissue/tumor penetration. The genetic modification of scFvs is also much more straightforward than the challenging chemical modification of mAbs. Therefore, we constructed two scFvs derived from the approved monoclonal antibodies cetuximab (scFv2112) and panitumumab (scFv1711), both of which are specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a well-characterized solid tumor antigen. Both scFvs were genetically fused to the SNAP-tag, an engineered version of the human DNA repair enzyme O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase that allows the covalent coupling of benzylguanine (BG)-modified substrates such as fluorescent dyes. The SNAP-tag achieves controllable and irreversible protein modification and is an important tool for experimental studies in vitro and in vivo. The affinity constant of a scFv is a key functional parameter, especially in the context of a fusion protein. Therefore, we developed a method to define the affinity constants of scFv-SNAP fusion proteins by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. We could confirm that both scFvs retained their functionality after fusion to the SNAP-tag in a variety of procedures and assays, including ELISA, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. The experimental procedures described herein, and the new protocol for affinity determination by SPR spectroscopy, are suitable for the preclinical evaluation of diverse antibody formats and derivatives. PMID:27391930

  5. Improvement in affinity and HIV-1 neutralization by somatic mutation in the heavy chain first complementarity-determining region of antibodies triggered by HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Torán, J L; Sánchez-Pulido, L; Kremer, L; del Real, G; Valencia, A; Martínez-A, C

    2001-01-01

    We assessed the impact of somatic hypermutation in the framework region 1 (FR1) and complementarity-determining region 1 (CDR1) of three clonally-related heavy chains from the human monovalent antigen-binding fragments Fab S19, S8 and S20 on gp120 binding and HIV-1 neutralization capacity. Nucleotide changes were introduced in the heavy chains to revert single and multiple amino acid residues, and two Fab libraries were constructed with the same light chain to express equivalent amounts of parental and reverted phage Fab. We studied the contribution of each amino acid replacement to antigen binding by calculating the frequency of phage Fab retrieval after competitive library selection on gp120. Whereas mutations in FR1 had no effect on antigen binding, somatic replacements in the CDR1 of the heavy chain (HCDR1) appeared to produce significant changes. In S19 HCDR1, somatic mutation of residue 32 reduced gp120 binding. In Fab S20, the Arg(30) and Asp(31) somatically replaced residues in HCDR1 improved antigen binding. Both of these residues are necessary to increase Fab binding to gp120; reversion of either residue alone results in a decrease in binding. The impact of these two replacements was confirmed by the greater neutralization capacity of S20 compared to the other Fab. Molecular modeling of S20 HCDR1 suggests that Arg(30) and Asp(31) are the main interaction sites for gp120, increasing antibody affinity and promoting the enhanced neutralization ability of S20. These findings are consistent with a gp120-driven process, supporting a role for affinity maturation and intraclonal evolution of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies.

  6. Oriented covalent immobilization of antibodies onto heterofunctional agarose supports: a highly efficient immuno-affinity chromatography platform.

    PubMed

    Batalla, Pilar; Bolívar, Juan M; Lopez-Gallego, Fernando; Guisan, Jose M

    2012-11-01

    The development of new bioconjugates formed by one antibody optimally bound (through its Fc region) to fairly inert solid surfaces is of primary relevance in immuno-affinity chromatography. Immunoglobulins G (IgG) have a Fc region very rich in histidine (His) residues. In this way, immobilization of IgGs on heterofunctional metal chelate-glyoxyl supports (Ag-Me(2+)/G) takes place in two steps: firstly the antibodies are conjugated to the support via His-metal coordination bonds. Secondly, their incubation under alkaline condition promotes an intramolecular covalent attachment between lysine residues at the Fc region and glyoxyl groups on the support surface. The IgG that recognizes as antigen the HRP (antiHRP-IgG) has been conjugated to Ag-Me(2+)/G supports. The resulting bioconjugate is highly inert and able to specifically bind the antigen (HRP) without significant unspecific binding of any other proteins, resulting in an excellent HRP purification platform. The binding activity of this bioconjugate has been optimized by controlling the antibody distribution throughout the bead's surface in order to avoid high antibody densities that led to a low binding activity of the antibodies. The optimal antibody distribution has been achieved when these proteins were slowly immobilized on Ag-Cu(2+)/G in presence of imidazole. This bioconjugate was able to bind up to 1.5 moles of antigen per mole of antibody, only 1.3-fold less than the antibody in solution. Hence, we have been able to develop an optimal protocol to prepare bioconjugated composites in an oriented and irreversible fashion which results in highly efficient and specific surfaces for the exclusive biological recognition. PMID:23021645

  7. A likelihood-based index of protein protein binding affinities with application to influenza HA escape from antibodies.

    PubMed

    Watabe, Teruaki; Kishino, Hirohisa; de Oliveira Martins, Leonardo; Kitazoe, Yasuhiro

    2007-08-01

    In many biological systems, proteins interact with other organic molecules to produce indispensable functions, in which molecular recognition phenomena are essential. Proteins have kept or gained their functions during molecular evolution. Their functions seem to be flexible, and a few amino acid substitutions sometimes cause drastic changes in function. In order to monitor and predict such drastic changes in the early stages in target populations, we need to identify patterns of structural changes during molecular evolution causing decreases or increases in the binding affinity of protein complexes. In previous work, we developed a likelihood-based index to quantify the degree to which a sequence fits a given structure. This index was named the sequence-structure fitness (SSF) and is calculated empirically based on amino acid preferences and pairwise interactions in the structural environment present in template structures. In the present work, we used the SSF to develop an index to measure the binding affinity of protein-protein complexes defined as the log likelihood ratio, contrasting the fitness of the sequences to the structure of the complex and that of the uncomplexed proteins. We applied the developed index to the complexes formed between influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) and four antibodies. The antibody-antigen binding region of HA is under strong selection pressure by the host immune system. Hence, examination of the long-term adaptation of HA to the four antibodies could reveal the strategy of the molecular evolution of HA. Two antibodies cover the HA receptor-binding region, while the other two bind away from the receptor-binding region. By focusing on branches with a significant decline in binding ability, we could detect key amino acid replacements and investigate the mechanism via conditional probabilities. The contrast between the adaptations to the two types of antibodies suggests that the virus adapts to the immune system at the cost of structural

  8. Surface antigens on cat leukemic cells induced by feline leukemia virus: area density and antibody-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Boone, C W; Gordin, F; Kawakami, T G

    1973-04-01

    The binding of autologous bovine antibody to feline leukemia virus-induced cell surface antigens (FeCSA) on cat leukemia cells was studied by performing certain titration procedures with a mixture of immune and normal sera labeled with different iodine radioisotopes (paired-label technique). By using plots of titration data which conformed to linear equations derived from the mass action law, we determined the following constants. (i) The density of FeCSA was 2.03 x 10(6) sites per cell, or 5,230 sites per mum(2). (ii) The equilibrium constant of the FeCSA-antibody reaction was 2.67 x 10(7), from which the antibody binding affinity or standard free energy of the FeCSA-antibody bond was determined to be - 10.48 kcal (-43,869.28 J) per mol. The use of the techniques described to measure the concentration of antibody in antiserum, in micrograms per milliliter, is discussed.

  9. Obstruction of dengue virus maturation by Fab fragments of the 2H2 antibody.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqing; Li, Long; Pennington, Janice G; Sheng, Ju; Yap, Moh Lan; Plevka, Pavel; Meng, Geng; Sun, Lei; Jiang, Wen; Rossmann, Michael G

    2013-08-01

    The 2H2 monoclonal antibody recognizes the precursor peptide on immature dengue virus and might therefore be a useful tool for investigating the conformational change that occurs when the immature virus enters an acidic environment. During dengue virus maturation, spiky, immature, noninfectious virions change their structure to form smooth-surfaced particles in the slightly acidic environment of the trans-Golgi network, thereby allowing cellular furin to cleave the precursor-membrane proteins. The dengue virions become fully infectious when they release the cleaved precursor peptide upon reaching the neutral-pH environment of the extracellular space. Here we report on the cryo-electron microscopy structures of the immature virus complexed with the 2H2 antigen binding fragments (Fab) at different concentrations and under various pH conditions. At neutral pH and a high concentration of Fab molecules, three Fab molecules bind to three precursor-membrane proteins on each spike of the immature virus. However, at a low concentration of Fab molecules and pH 7.0, only two Fab molecules bind to each spike. Changing to a slightly acidic pH caused no detectable change of structure for the sample with a high Fab concentration but caused severe structural damage to the low-concentration sample. Therefore, the 2H2 Fab inhibits the maturation process of immature dengue virus when Fab molecules are present at a high concentration, because the three Fab molecules on each spike hold the precursor-membrane molecules together, thereby inhibiting the normal conformational change that occurs during maturation.

  10. Competitive Selection from Single Domain Antibody Libraries Allows Isolation of High-Affinity Antihapten Antibodies That Are Not Favored in the llama Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Sofia Tabares-da; Rossotti, Martin; Carleiza, Carmen; Carrión, Federico; Pritsch, Otto; Ahn, Ki Chang; Last, Jerold A.; Hammock, Bruce D; González-Sapienza, Gualberto

    2011-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) found in camelids, lack a light chain and their antigen-binding site sits completely in the heavy-chain variable domain (VHH). Their simplicity, thermostability, and ease in expression have made VHHs highly attractive. While this has been successfully exploited for macromolecular antigens, their application to the detection of small molecules is still limited to a very few reports, mostly describing low affinity VHHs. Using triclocarban (TCC) as a model hapten, we found that conventional antibodies, IgG1 fraction, reacted with free TCC with a higher relative affinity (IC50 51.0 ng/mL) than did the sdAbs (IgG2 and IgG3, 497 and 370 ng/mL, respectively). A VHH library was prepared, and by elution of phage with limiting concentrations of TCC and competitive selection of binders, we were able to isolate high-affinity clones, KD 0.98–1.37 nM (SPR) which allowed development of a competitive assay for TCC with an IC50 = 3.5 ng/mL (11 nM). This represents a 100-fold improvement with regard to the performance of the sdAb serum fraction, and it is 100-fold better than the IC50 attained with other anti-hapten VHHs reported thus far. Despite the modest overall anti-hapten sdAbs response in llamas, a small subpopulation of high affinity VHHs are generated that can be isolated by carefully design of the selection process. PMID:21827167

  11. Variation in antigen-antibody affinity among serotypes of Salmonella O4 serogroup, determined using specific antisera.

    PubMed

    Aribam, Swarmistha Devi; Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Matsui, Hidenori; Hirota, Jiro; Shiraiwa, Kazumasa; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Hikono, Hirokazu; Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Serotyping is widely used for typing Salmonella during surveillance, and depends on determining the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen and the flagellar protein (H-antigens) components. As the O-antigen is highly variable, and structurally unique to each serotype, we investigated the binding affinities of LPS from Salmonella serotypes of O4 serogroup with specific anti-antigen serum via immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Since the serotypes from O4 serogroup also express the O-antigen factor 12, O12 antiserum was also used for the analysis. LPS from the different serotypes showed different binding affinities with the antisera. Therefore, based on the antigen-antibody affinity, a modified agglutination assay was carried out by using O4 and O12 antisera. Although serotypes from O4 serogroup have the common O-antigen factors 4 and 12, the analysis showed that the degree of agglutination reaction is different for each of the serotypes. We suggest that Salmonella serogroup O4 serotypes exhibit different binding affinities with specific antisera despite the presence of common O-antigen factors 4 and 12.

  12. Affitins as robust tailored reagents for affinity chromatography purification of antibodies and non-immunoglobulin proteins.

    PubMed

    Béhar, Ghislaine; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Mouratou, Barbara; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Affinity chromatography is a convenient way of purifying proteins, as a high degree of purity can be reached in one step. The use of tags has greatly contributed to the popularity of this technique. However, the addition of tags may not be desirable or possible for the production of biopharmaceuticals. There is thus a need for tailored artificial affinity ligands. We have developed the use of archaeal extremophilic proteins as scaffolds to generate affinity proteins (Affitins). Here, we explored the potential of Affitins as ligand to design affinity columns. Affitins specific for human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), bacterial PulD protein, and chicken egg lysozyme were immobilized on an agarose matrix. The columns obtained were functional and highly selective for their cognate target, even in the presence of exogenous proteins as found in cell culture media, ascites and bacterial lysates, which result in a high degree of purity (∼95%) and recovery (∼100%) in a single step. Anti-hIgG Affitin columns withstand repetitive cycles of purification and cleaning-in-place treatments with 0.25 M NaOH as well as Protein A does. High levels of Affitin productions in Escherichia coli makes it possible to produce these affinity columns at low cost. Our results validate Affitins as a new class of tailored ligands for the affinity chromatography purification of potentially any proteins of interest including biopharmaceuticals.

  13. Affitins as robust tailored reagents for affinity chromatography purification of antibodies and non-immunoglobulin proteins.

    PubMed

    Béhar, Ghislaine; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Mouratou, Barbara; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Affinity chromatography is a convenient way of purifying proteins, as a high degree of purity can be reached in one step. The use of tags has greatly contributed to the popularity of this technique. However, the addition of tags may not be desirable or possible for the production of biopharmaceuticals. There is thus a need for tailored artificial affinity ligands. We have developed the use of archaeal extremophilic proteins as scaffolds to generate affinity proteins (Affitins). Here, we explored the potential of Affitins as ligand to design affinity columns. Affitins specific for human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), bacterial PulD protein, and chicken egg lysozyme were immobilized on an agarose matrix. The columns obtained were functional and highly selective for their cognate target, even in the presence of exogenous proteins as found in cell culture media, ascites and bacterial lysates, which result in a high degree of purity (∼95%) and recovery (∼100%) in a single step. Anti-hIgG Affitin columns withstand repetitive cycles of purification and cleaning-in-place treatments with 0.25 M NaOH as well as Protein A does. High levels of Affitin productions in Escherichia coli makes it possible to produce these affinity columns at low cost. Our results validate Affitins as a new class of tailored ligands for the affinity chromatography purification of potentially any proteins of interest including biopharmaceuticals. PMID:26952369

  14. The effects of affinity-purified anti-DNA antibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus on the fluorescent antinuclear antibody assay using HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kimihiro; Kawamura, Masahide; Mineo, Midori; Shinohara, Tadashi; Kataharada, Koji; Okada, Makoto; Takada, Kunio; Miyawaki, Shoji; Ohsuzu, Fumitaka

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of anti-dsDNA antibodies on the titer and the nuclear staining pattern(s) in a fluorescent antinuclear antibody (FANA) assay using HEp-2 cells. Anti-dsDNA derived from 14 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was individually affinity-purified. The anti-dsDNA titer of the purified anti-dsDNA solution was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) or by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the FANA assay, the anti-dsDNA solution was diluted in a stepwise manner and its titer was expressed by the endpoint dilution. The nuclear staining pattern in the anti-dsDNA solution was examined at the 1:5 and 1:20 dilutions and at the endpoint dilution. The anti-dsDNA titers of the affinity-purified anti-dsDNA solution were high enough (13 to 126 IU/ml) to be measured by RIA. However, the antinuclear antibody (ANA) titers of this solution were relatively low: 1:20 to 1:320. In the study of nuclear staining the peripheral pattern was observed in nine of the 14 cases at a 1:5 dilution. However, at the endpoint dilution, all cases exhibited the homogeneous pattern. These findings indicate that in the FANA assay using HEp-2 cells, 1) although serum samples show high anti-dsDNA titers by RIA or by ELISA, the antibodies' direct contribution to ANA titers is limited, and 2) when samples reveal a homogeneous staining pattern at the endpoint dilution, this suggests the presence of anti-dsDNA.

  15. The Fc region of an antibody impacts the neutralization of West Nile viruses in different maturation states.

    PubMed

    Lee, Phong D; Mukherjee, Swati; Edeling, Melissa A; Dowd, Kimberly A; Austin, S Kyle; Manhart, Carolyn J; Diamond, Michael S; Fremont, Daved H; Pierson, Theodore C

    2013-12-01

    Flavivirus-infected cells secrete a structurally heterogeneous population of viruses because of an inefficient virion maturation process. Flaviviruses assemble as noninfectious, immature virions composed of trimers of envelope (E) and precursor membrane (prM) protein heterodimers. Cleavage of prM is a required process during virion maturation, although this often remains incomplete for infectious virus particles. Previous work demonstrated that the efficiency of virion maturation could impact antibody neutralization through changes in the accessibility of otherwise cryptic epitopes on the virion. In this study, we show that the neutralization potency of monoclonal antibody (MAb) E33 is sensitive to the maturation state of West Nile virus (WNV), despite its recognition of an accessible epitope, the domain III lateral ridge (DIII-LR). Comprehensive epitope mapping studies with 166 E protein DIII-LR variants revealed that the functional footprint of MAb E33 on the E protein differs subtly from that of the well-characterized DIII-LR MAb E16. Remarkably, aromatic substitutions at E protein residue 306 ablated the maturation state sensitivity of E33 IgG, and the neutralization efficacy of E33 Fab fragments was not affected by changes in the virion maturation state. We propose that E33 IgG binding on mature virions orients the Fc region in a manner that impacts subsequent antibody binding to nearby sites. This Fc-mediated steric constraint is a novel mechanism by which the maturation state of a virion modulates the efficacy of the humoral immune response to flavivirus infection.

  16. The Fc region of an antibody impacts the neutralization of West Nile viruses in different maturation states.

    PubMed

    Lee, Phong D; Mukherjee, Swati; Edeling, Melissa A; Dowd, Kimberly A; Austin, S Kyle; Manhart, Carolyn J; Diamond, Michael S; Fremont, Daved H; Pierson, Theodore C

    2013-12-01

    Flavivirus-infected cells secrete a structurally heterogeneous population of viruses because of an inefficient virion maturation process. Flaviviruses assemble as noninfectious, immature virions composed of trimers of envelope (E) and precursor membrane (prM) protein heterodimers. Cleavage of prM is a required process during virion maturation, although this often remains incomplete for infectious virus particles. Previous work demonstrated that the efficiency of virion maturation could impact antibody neutralization through changes in the accessibility of otherwise cryptic epitopes on the virion. In this study, we show that the neutralization potency of monoclonal antibody (MAb) E33 is sensitive to the maturation state of West Nile virus (WNV), despite its recognition of an accessible epitope, the domain III lateral ridge (DIII-LR). Comprehensive epitope mapping studies with 166 E protein DIII-LR variants revealed that the functional footprint of MAb E33 on the E protein differs subtly from that of the well-characterized DIII-LR MAb E16. Remarkably, aromatic substitutions at E protein residue 306 ablated the maturation state sensitivity of E33 IgG, and the neutralization efficacy of E33 Fab fragments was not affected by changes in the virion maturation state. We propose that E33 IgG binding on mature virions orients the Fc region in a manner that impacts subsequent antibody binding to nearby sites. This Fc-mediated steric constraint is a novel mechanism by which the maturation state of a virion modulates the efficacy of the humoral immune response to flavivirus infection. PMID:24109224

  17. Binding affinity of anti-xylitol antibodies to canine hepatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Imai, Akihiro; Nishita, Toshiho; Ichihara, Nobutsune; Shirota, Kinji; Orito, Kensuke

    2012-09-15

    Xylitol is used as a sugar substitute in food products. Dogs have been reported to experience lethal liver injury after accidental ingestion of xylitol. Because liver injury may be a serious consequence of canine immune-mediated reactions, antibodies produced against xylitol may attack the liver. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated whether binding sites for xylitol antibodies are located at the liver or not. Anti-xylitol antibodies were generated by immunization of rabbits with a xylose-bovine serum albumin conjugate. Immunohistological examination showed that binding sites for the anti-xylitol antibodies were located in the hepatic arteries and the portal veins. Western blotting analyses by using a canine liver homogenate showed 4 protein bands with different molecular weights which reacted with anti-xylitol antibodies. Therefore, binding of anti-xylitol antibodies to the vessels may be the first step in an immune-mediated pathogenic response in xylitol toxicity. Further studies are necessary to determine the effects of anti-xylitol antibodies on the liver in the pathogenesis of xylitol toxicity.

  18. TRIM21 Immune Signaling Is More Sensitive to Antibody Affinity Than Its Neutralization Activity.

    PubMed

    Foss, Stian; Watkinson, Ruth E; Grevys, Algirdas; McAdam, Martin B; Bern, Malin; Høydahl, Lene Stokken; Dalhus, Bjørn; Michaelsen, Terje E; Sandlie, Inger; James, Leo C; Andersen, Jan Terje

    2016-04-15

    Ab-coated viruses can be detected in the cytosol by the FcR tripartite motif-containing 21 (TRIM21), which rapidly recruits the proteasomal machinery and triggers induction of immune signaling. As such, TRIM21 plays a key role in intracellular protection by targeting invading viruses for destruction and alerting the immune system. A hallmark of immunity is elicitation of a balanced response that is proportionate to the threat, to avoid unnecessary inflammation. In this article, we show how Ab affinity modulates TRIM21 immune function. We constructed a humanized monoclonal IgG1 against human adenovirus type 5 (AdV5) and a panel of Fc-engineered variants with a wide range of affinities for TRIM21. We found that IgG1-coated viral particles were neutralized via TRIM21, even when affinity was reduced by as much as 100-fold. In contrast, induction of NF-κB signaling was more sensitive to reduced affinity between TRIM21 and the Ab variants. Thus, TRIM21 mediates neutralization under suboptimal conditions, whereas induction of immune signaling is balanced according to the functional affinity for the incoming immune stimuli. Our findings have implications for engineering of antiviral IgG therapeutics with tailored effector functions. PMID:26962230

  19. Deep Sequencing-guided Design of a High Affinity Dual Specificity Antibody to Target Two Angiogenic Factors in Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Patrick; Lee, Chingwei V; Sanowar, Sarah; Wu, Ping; Stinson, Jeremy; Harris, Seth F; Fuh, Germaine

    2015-09-01

    The development of dual targeting antibodies promises therapies with improved efficacy over mono-specific antibodies. Here, we engineered a Two-in-One VEGF/angiopoietin 2 antibody with dual action Fab (DAF) as a potential therapeutic for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Crystal structures of the VEGF/angiopoietin 2 DAF in complex with its two antigens showed highly overlapping binding sites. To achieve sufficient affinity of the DAF to block both angiogenic factors, we turned to deep mutational scanning in the complementarity determining regions (CDRs). By mutating all three CDRs of each antibody chain simultaneously, we were able not only to identify affinity improving single mutations but also mutation pairs from different CDRs that synergistically improve both binding functions. Furthermore, insights into the cooperativity between mutations allowed us to identify fold-stabilizing mutations in the CDRs. The data obtained from deep mutational scanning reveal that the majority of the 52 CDR residues are utilized differently for the two antigen binding function and permit, for the first time, the engineering of several DAF variants with sub-nanomolar affinity against two structurally unrelated antigens. The improved variants show similar blocking activity of receptor binding as the high affinity mono-specific antibodies against these two proteins, demonstrating the feasibility of generating a dual specificity binding surface with comparable properties to individual high affinity mono-specific antibodies.

  20. Diversity and maturation in the anti-dansyl antibody response of the Balb/C mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, F.R.

    1987-01-01

    Ten hybridoma cell lines that produce antibodies with specificity for the 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl(dansyl)-lysine hapten, were studied. Single stranded cDNAs were generated by reverse transcription of the immunoglobulin (Ig) mRNAs primed by 5' P-32 labeled oligonucleotides complementary to specific regions of the Ig message. Nucleic acid sequences of 4 mu heavy chains was sufficient to reveal that the early immune response involves members of at least three distinct heavy chain variable region (V/sub H/) gene families. Nucleic acid sequences and Southern blot data from 6 gamma heavy chains reveal that the gamma response is comprised of members of only a single V/sub H/ family although representation from that family derives from at least three distinguishable germline genes. The abrupt restriction of V/sub H/ family usage at the point of class switch can not be explained on the basis of antigen driven selection or of idio-type repression. The data indicate a mechanism for preferential class switch of a particular V/sub H/ family independent of affinity considerations or repression of other idiotypes.

  1. Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an in vitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim(®)), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117 mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim(®) attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim(®) antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p < 0.05). The amounts of PA which remained in the solution after passing PA spiked PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p < 0

  2. Affinity binding of antibodies to supermacroporous cryogel adsorbents with immobilized protein A for removal of anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Ingavle, Ganesh C; Baillie, Les W J; Zheng, Yishan; Lis, Elzbieta K; Savina, Irina N; Howell, Carol A; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Sandeman, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    Polymeric cryogels are efficient carriers for the immobilization of biomolecules because of their unique macroporous structure, permeability, mechanical stability and different surface chemical functionalities. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the potential use of macroporous monolithic cryogels for biotoxin removal using anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA), the central cell-binding component of the anthrax exotoxins, and covalent immobilization of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity ligand (protein A) was chemically coupled to the reactive hydroxyl and epoxy-derivatized monolithic cryogels and the binding efficiencies of protein A, monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel column were determined. Our results show differences in the binding capacity of protein A as well as monoclonal antibodies to the cryogel adsorbents caused by ligand concentrations, physical properties and morphology of surface matrices. The cytotoxicity potential of the cryogels was determined by an in vitro viability assay using V79 lung fibroblast as a model cell and the results reveal that the cryogels are non-cytotoxic. Finally, the adsorptive capacities of PA from phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were evaluated towards a non-glycosylated, plant-derived human monoclonal antibody (PANG) and a glycosylated human monoclonal antibody (Valortim(®)), both of which were covalently attached via protein A immobilization. Optimal binding capacities of 108 and 117 mg/g of antibody to the adsorbent were observed for PANG attached poly(acrylamide-allyl glycidyl ether) [poly(AAm-AGE)] and Valortim(®) attached poly(AAm-AGE) cryogels, respectively, This indicated that glycosylation status of Valortim(®) antibody could significantly increase (8%) its binding capacity relative to the PANG antibody on poly(AAm-AGE)-protien-A column (p < 0.05). The amounts of PA which remained in the solution after passing PA spiked PBS through PANG or Valortim bound poly(AAm-AGE) cryogel were significantly (p < 0

  3. Generation of a novel high-affinity monoclonal antibody with conformational recognition epitope on human IgM.

    PubMed

    Sarikhani, Sina; Mirshahi, Manouchehr; Gharaati, Mohammad Reza; Mirshahi, Tooran

    2010-11-01

    As IgM is the first isotype of antibody which appears in blood after initial exposure to a foreign antigen in the pattern of primary response, detection, and quantification of this molecule in blood seems invaluable. To approach these goals, generation, and characterization of a highly specific mAb (monoclonal antibody) against human IgM were investigated. Human IgM immunoglobulins were used to immunize Balb/c mice. Spleen cells taken from the immunized animals were fused with SP2/O myeloma cells using PEG (polyethylene glycol, MW 1450) as fusogen. The hybridomas were cultured in HAT containing medium and supernatants from the growing hybrids were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using plates coated with pure human IgM and the positive wells were then cloned at limiting dilutions. The best clone designated as MAN-1, was injected intraperitoneally to some Pristane-injected mice. Anti-IgM mAb was purified from the animals' ascitic fluid by protein-G sepharose followed by DEAE-cellulose ion exchange chromatography. MAN-1 interacted with human IgM with a very high specificity and affinity. The purity of the sample was tested by SDS-PAGE and the affinity constant was measured (K(a) = 3.5 x 10(9)M(-1). Immunoblotting and competitive ELISA were done and the results showed that the harvested antibody recognizes a conformational epitope on the mu chain of human IgM and there was no cross-reactivity with other subclasses of immunoglobulins. Furthermore, isotyping test was done and the results showed the subclass of the obtained mAb which was IgG(1)kappa. PMID:20162378

  4. Affinity chromatography of human leukocyte and diploid cell interferons on sepharose-bound antibodies.

    PubMed

    Berg, K; Ogburn, C A; Paucker, K; Mogensen, K E; Cantell, K

    1975-02-01

    Interferons produced in human peripheral leukocytes (LE) and foreskin fibroblast (FS-4) cells were subjected to affinity chromatography on Sepharose-bound globulins from rabbits immunized with these interferons. Anti-LE interferon sera neutralized both interferons, but titers against FS-4 interferon were consistently lower than those against LE interferon. Anti-FS-4 interferon sera neutralized only FS-4 but not LE interferon. Accordingly, affinity columns constructed with anti-FS-4 globulin excluded LE but not FS-4 interferon, whereas those prepared with anti-LE interferon globulin bound and eluted both LE and FS-4 interferons. Purification of native interferons of both types on anti-LE interferon-Sepharose ranged from 680- to 3,600-fold and recoveries from 72 to 126%. Specific activities of eluate pools varied from 4 to 30 times 10-6 reference (B, 69/19) units per milligram protien.

  5. Engineered Cystine-Knot Peptides That Bind αvβ3 Integrin With Antibody-Like Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Adam P.; Levin, Aron M.; Lahti, Jennifer L.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2010-01-01

    validate AgRP as a scaffold for protein engineering and demonstrate that modification of a single loop can lead to AgRP-based peptides with antibody-like affinities for their target. PMID:19038268

  6. Naturally produced opsonizing antibodies restrict the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages by augmenting phagosome maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashi Kant; Singh, Padam; Sinha, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that serum antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis present in naturally infected healthy subjects of a tuberculosis (TB) endemic area could create and/or sustain the latent form of infection. All five apparently healthy Indian donors showed high titres of serum antibodies against M. tuberculosis cell membrane antigens, including lipoarabinomannan and alpha crystallin. Uptake and killing of bacilli by the donor macrophages was significantly enhanced following their opsonization with antibody-rich, heat-inactivated autologous sera. However, the capability to opsonize was apparent for antibodies against some and not other antigens. High-content cell imaging of infected macrophages revealed significantly enhanced colocalization of the phagosome maturation marker LAMP-1, though not of calmodulin, with antibody-opsonized compared with unopsonized M. tuberculosis. Key enablers of macrophage microbicidal action—proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-6), phagosome acidification, inducible NO synthase and nitric oxide—were also significantly enhanced following antibody opsonization. Interestingly, heat-killed M. tuberculosis also elevated these mediators to the levels comparable to, if not higher than, opsonized M. tuberculosis. Results of the study support the emerging view that an efficacious vaccine against TB should, apart from targeting cell-mediated immunity, also generate ‘protective’ antibodies. PMID:26674415

  7. Naturally produced opsonizing antibodies restrict the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages by augmenting phagosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shashi Kant; Singh, Padam; Sinha, Sudhir

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that serum antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis present in naturally infected healthy subjects of a tuberculosis (TB) endemic area could create and/or sustain the latent form of infection. All five apparently healthy Indian donors showed high titres of serum antibodies against M. tuberculosis cell membrane antigens, including lipoarabinomannan and alpha crystallin. Uptake and killing of bacilli by the donor macrophages was significantly enhanced following their opsonization with antibody-rich, heat-inactivated autologous sera. However, the capability to opsonize was apparent for antibodies against some and not other antigens. High-content cell imaging of infected macrophages revealed significantly enhanced colocalization of the phagosome maturation marker LAMP-1, though not of calmodulin, with antibody-opsonized compared with unopsonized M. tuberculosis. Key enablers of macrophage microbicidal action--proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-6), phagosome acidification, inducible NO synthase and nitric oxide--were also significantly enhanced following antibody opsonization. Interestingly, heat-killed M. tuberculosis also elevated these mediators to the levels comparable to, if not higher than, opsonized M. tuberculosis. Results of the study support the emerging view that an efficacious vaccine against TB should, apart from targeting cell-mediated immunity, also generate 'protective' antibodies.

  8. High-Resolution Longitudinal Study of HIV-1 Env Vaccine-Elicited B Cell Responses to the Virus Primary Receptor Binding Site Reveals Affinity Maturation and Clonal Persistence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimeng; Sundling, Christopher; Wilson, Richard; O'Dell, Sijy; Chen, Yajing; Dai, Kaifan; Phad, Ganesh E; Zhu, Jiang; Xiao, Yongli; Mascola, John R; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Wyatt, Richard T; Li, Yuxing

    2016-05-01

    Because of the genetic variability of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), the elicitation of neutralizing Abs to conserved neutralization determinants including the primary receptor binding site, CD4 binding site (CD4bs), is a major focus of vaccine development. To gain insight into the evolution of Env-elicited Ab responses, we used single B cell analysis to interrogate the memory B cell Ig repertoires from two rhesus macaques after five serial immunizations with Env/adjuvant. We observed that the CD4bs-specific repertoire displayed unique features in the third CDR of Ig H chains with minor alterations along the immunization course. Progressive affinity maturation occurred as evidenced by elevated levels of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in Ab sequences isolated at the late immunization time point compared with the early time point. Abs with higher SHM were associated with increased binding affinity and virus neutralization capacity. Moreover, a notable portion of the CD4bs-specific repertoire was maintained between early and late immunization time points, suggesting that persistent clonal lineages were induced by Env vaccination. Furthermore, we found that the predominant persistent CD4bs-specific clonal lineages had larger population sizes and higher affinities than that from the rest of the repertoires, underscoring the critical role of Ag affinity selection in Ab maturation and clonal expansion. Genetic and functional analyses revealed that the accumulation of SHM in both framework regions and CDRs contributed to the clonal affinity and antigenicity evolution. Our longitudinal study provides high-resolution understanding of the dynamically evolving CD4bs-specific B cell response after Env immunization in primates. PMID:27001953

  9. High-affinity, noninhibitory pathogenic C1 domain antibodies are present in patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Batsuli, Glaivy; Deng, Wei; Healey, John F.; Parker, Ernest T.; Baldwin, W. Hunter; Cox, Courtney; Nguyen, Brenda; Kahle, Joerg; Königs, Christoph; Li, Renhao; Lollar, Pete

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor formation in hemophilia A is the most feared treatment-related complication of factor VIII (fVIII) therapy. Most inhibitor patients with hemophilia A develop antibodies against the fVIII A2 and C2 domains. Recent evidence demonstrates that the C1 domain contributes to the inhibitor response. Inhibitory anti-C1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been identified that bind to putative phospholipid and von Willebrand factor (VWF) binding epitopes and block endocytosis of fVIII by antigen presenting cells. We now demonstrate by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry that 7 of 9 anti-human C1 mAbs tested recognize an epitope distinct from the C1 phospholipid binding site. These mAbs, designated group A, display high binding affinities for fVIII, weakly inhibit fVIII procoagulant activity, poorly inhibit fVIII binding to phospholipid, and exhibit heterogeneity with respect to blocking fVIII binding to VWF. Another mAb, designated group B, inhibits fVIII procoagulant activity, fVIII binding to VWF and phospholipid, fVIIIa incorporation into the intrinsic Xase complex, thrombin generation in plasma, and fVIII uptake by dendritic cells. Group A and B epitopes are distinct from the epitope recognized by the canonical, human-derived inhibitory anti-C1 mAb, KM33, whose epitope overlaps both groups A and B. Antibodies recognizing group A and B epitopes are present in inhibitor plasmas from patients with hemophilia A. Additionally, group A and B mAbs increase fVIII clearance and are pathogenic in a hemophilia A mouse tail snip bleeding model. Group A anti-C1 mAbs represent the first identification of pathogenic, weakly inhibitory antibodies that increase fVIII clearance. PMID:27381905

  10. Affinity purification of antibodies using immobilized FB domain of protein A.

    PubMed

    Solomon, B; Raviv, O; Leibman, E; Fleminger, G

    1992-04-24

    A continuous method for the efficient digestion of protein A into active fragments (FB, Mr = 7000) using immobilized trypsin was developed. These fragments originate from almost identical five-repeated monovalent Fc-binding units of 58 residues each. The fragments obtained were found to be similar to the recently described genetically engineered fragment B. Antibody-binding characteristics of the FB domain and also of intact protein A, immobilized on to adipic dihydrazide-modified Eupergit CB6200 beads, were investigated. Based on the experimental data obtained, a high-performance liquid chromatographic column containing C30N Eupergit C-immobilized FB domain was prepared and its performance in antibody purification was compared with that of Eupergit C-immobilized intact protein A. PMID:1517325

  11. The influence of orientation and number of copies of T and B cell epitopes on the specificity and affinity of antibodies induced by chimeric peptides.

    PubMed

    Partidos, C; Stanley, C; Steward, M

    1992-10-01

    CBA and TO mice were immunized with chimeric peptide immunogens consisting of B cell (residues 404-414) and T cell (residues 288-302) epitopes from the F protein of measles virus. The chimeras were co-linearly synthesized to contain one or two copies of the T cell epitope linked to one or two copies of the B cell epitope via a glycine.glycine spacer. Two orientations were synthesized such that the T cell epitope(s) were located at either the amino or carboxyl terminus of the B cell epitope(s). The levels of antibody induced following immunization with the chimeras were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using microtiter plates coated with either the homologous chimera or the B cell epitope sequence. The affinities of the anti-chimera antibodies for the B cell epitope were assessed by a fluid-phase double-isotope radioimmunoassay. All the chimeras induced good antibody responses in both strains of mice with specificity for the B cell epitope. Chimeras containing two copies of the T cell epitope induced antibodies with higher affinity for the B cell epitope than did chimeras containing one copy of the T cell epitope or two copies of the B cell epitope. Furthermore, the amino terminal location of the T cell epitope in relation to the B cell epitope in the chimera induced higher affinity anti-B cell antibody than did the reverse orientation. These results suggest that orientation of epitopes and amino acid composition of chimeric peptides affect antigen processing and presentation to T cells which govern both the specificity and affinity of antibody produced. Thus, for the production of synthetic peptide immunogens with vaccine potential, attention needs to be given to the number and orientation of the component epitopes required to produce highest affinity antibody.

  12. Arginine as an eluent overcomes the hindrance of monoclonal antibody quantification by dextran sulfate in protein A affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong Gyun; Park, Hong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Analytical chromatography using protein A affinity columns was employed for the fast and simple quantitative analysis of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) from suspension cultures of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells. Reliable results could not be obtained from analysis of rCHO cell culture supernatants containing dextran sulfate using elution buffers such as phosphate, glycine, or MgCl2 . These problems increased as the number of analysis and the concentration of dextran sulfate in samples increased. Arginine was identified as an alternative eluent to overcome the hindrance by dextran sulfate. When the samples contain dextran sulfate up to 100 mg/L, the elution buffer containing 0.6-1.0 M arginine at pH 3.0-3.8 is useful for the effective analysis. Reproducible results in the mAb quantification could be obtained by this developed arginine elution buffer from rCHO cell culture supernatants containing dextran sulfate.

  13. Arginine as an eluent overcomes the hindrance of monoclonal antibody quantification by dextran sulfate in protein A affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong Gyun; Park, Hong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Analytical chromatography using protein A affinity columns was employed for the fast and simple quantitative analysis of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) from suspension cultures of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells. Reliable results could not be obtained from analysis of rCHO cell culture supernatants containing dextran sulfate using elution buffers such as phosphate, glycine, or MgCl2 . These problems increased as the number of analysis and the concentration of dextran sulfate in samples increased. Arginine was identified as an alternative eluent to overcome the hindrance by dextran sulfate. When the samples contain dextran sulfate up to 100 mg/L, the elution buffer containing 0.6-1.0 M arginine at pH 3.0-3.8 is useful for the effective analysis. Reproducible results in the mAb quantification could be obtained by this developed arginine elution buffer from rCHO cell culture supernatants containing dextran sulfate. PMID:26363185

  14. Label-free Fab and Fc affinity/avidity profiling of the antibody complex half-life for polyclonal and monoclonal efficacy screening.

    PubMed

    Read, Thomas; Olkhov, Rouslan V; Williamson, E Diane; Shaw, Andrew M

    2015-09-01

    A unified approach to affinity screening for Fab and Fc interactions of an antibody for its antigen and FcγR receptor has been developed. An antigen array is used for the Fab affinity and cross-reactivity screening and protein A/G proxy is the FcγR receptor. The affinities are derived using a simple 1:1 binding model with a consistent error analysis. The association and dissociation kinetics are measured over optimised times for accurate determination. The Fab/Fc affinities are derived for ten antibodies: mAb-actin (mouse), pAb-BSA (sheep), pAb-collagen V (rabbit), pAb-CRP (goat), mAb-F1 (mouse), mAbs (mouse) 7.3, 12.3, 29.3, 36.3 and 46.3 raised against LcrV in Yersinia pestis. The rate of the dissociation of antigen-antibody complexes relates directly to their immunological function as does the Fc-FcγR complex and a new half-life plot has been defined with a Fab/Fc half-life range of 17-470 min. The upper half-life value points to surface avidity. Two antibodies that are protective as an immunotherapy define a Fab half-life >250 min and an Fc half-life >50 min as characteristics of ideal interactions which can form the basis of an antibody screen for immunotherapy.

  15. Single-step antibody-based affinity cryo-electron microscopy for imaging and structural analysis of macromolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guimei; Vago, Frank; Zhang, Dongsheng; Snyder, Jonathan E; Yan, Rui; Zhang, Ci; Benjamin, Christopher; Jiang, Xi; Kuhn, Richard J; Serwer, Philip; Thompson, David H; Jiang, Wen

    2014-07-01

    Single particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is an emerging powerful tool for structural studies of macromolecular assemblies (i.e., protein complexes and viruses). Although single particle cryo-EM requires less concentrated and smaller amounts of samples than X-ray crystallography, it remains challenging to study specimens that are low-abundance, low-yield, or short-lived. The recent development of affinity grid techniques can potentially further extend single particle cryo-EM to these challenging samples by combining sample purification and cryo-EM grid preparation into a single step. Here we report a new design of affinity cryo-EM approach, cryo-SPIEM, that applies a traditional pathogen diagnosis tool Solid Phase Immune Electron Microscopy (SPIEM) to the single particle cryo-EM method. This approach provides an alternative, largely simplified and easier to use affinity grid that directly works with most native macromolecular complexes with established antibodies, and enables cryo-EM studies of native samples directly from cell cultures. In the present work, we extensively tested the feasibility of cryo-SPIEM with multiple samples including those of high or low molecular weight, macromolecules with low or high symmetry, His-tagged or native particles, and high- or low-yield macromolecules. Results for all these samples (non-purified His-tagged bacteriophage T7, His-tagged Escherichiacoli ribosomes, native Sindbis virus, and purified but low-concentration native Tulane virus) demonstrated the capability of cryo-SPIEM approach in specifically trapping and concentrating target particles on TEM grids with minimal view constraints for cryo-EM imaging and determination of 3D structures.

  16. Viral variants that initiate and drive maturation of V1V2-directed HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bhiman, Jinal N.; Anthony, Colin; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Karimanzira, Owen; Schramm, Chaim A.; Khoza, Thandeka; Kitchin, Dale; Botha, Gordon; Gorman, Jason; Garrett, Nigel J.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Williamson, Carolyn; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Morris, Lynn; Moore, Penny L.

    2015-01-01

    The elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) is likely to be essential for a preventative HIV-1 vaccine, but this has not yet been achieved by immunization. In contrast some HIV-1-infected individuals naturally mount bNAb responses during chronic infection, suggesting that years of maturation are required for breadth1-6. Recent studies have shown that viral diversification precedes the emergence of bNAbs but the significance of this observation is unknown7,8. Here, we delineate the key viral events that drove neutralization breadth within the CAP256-VRC26 family of 33 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from a superinfected individual. First, we identified minority viral variants that were distinct from both transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses and efficiently engaged the bNAb precursor, termed bNAb-initiating envelopes. Second, deep sequencing revealed a pool of diverse epitope variants (immunotypes) that were preferentially neutralized by broader members of the antibody lineage. In contrast, a “dead-end” antibody sublineage unable to neutralize these immunotypes showed limited evolution and failed to develop breadth. Thus, early viral escape at key antibody-virus contact sites selects for sublineages that can tolerate these changes, providing a new mechanism for the generation of neutralization breadth within a developing antibody lineage. PMID:26457756

  17. Maturation and Diversity of the VRC01-Antibody Lineage over 15 Years of Chronic HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xueling; Zhang, Zhenhai; Schramm, Chaim A; Joyce, M Gordon; Kwon, Young Do; Zhou, Tongqing; Sheng, Zizhang; Zhang, Baoshan; O'Dell, Sijy; McKee, Krisha; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Longo, Nancy S; Lynch, Rebecca M; Saunders, Kevin O; Soto, Cinque; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Yang, Yongping; Bailer, Robert T; Louder, Mark K; Mullikin, James C; Connors, Mark; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2015-04-23

    HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies develop in most HIV-1-infected individuals, although highly effective antibodies are generally observed only after years of chronic infection. Here, we characterize the rate of maturation and extent of diversity for the lineage that produced the broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01 through longitudinal sampling of peripheral B cell transcripts over 15 years and co-crystal structures of lineage members. Next-generation sequencing identified VRC01-lineage transcripts, which encompassed diverse antibodies organized into distinct phylogenetic clades. Prevalent clades maintained characteristic features of antigen recognition, though each evolved binding loops and disulfides that formed distinct recognition surfaces. Over the course of the study period, VRC01-lineage clades showed continuous evolution, with rates of ∼2 substitutions per 100 nucleotides per year, comparable to that of HIV-1 evolution. This high rate of antibody evolution provides a mechanism by which antibody lineages can achieve extraordinary diversity and, over years of chronic infection, develop effective HIV-1 neutralization. PMID:25865483

  18. Detection of Hepatitis C core antibody by dual-affinity yeast chimera and smartphone-based electrochemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Venkatesh, A G; Sun, Alex; Brickner, Howard; Looney, David; Hall, Drew A

    2016-12-15

    Yeast cell lines were genetically engineered to display Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen linked to gold binding peptide (GBP) as a dual-affinity biobrick chimera. These multifunctional yeast cells adhere to the gold sensor surface while simultaneously acting as a "renewable" capture reagent for anti-HCV core antibody. This streamlined functionalization and detection strategy removes the need for traditional purification and immobilization techniques. With this biobrick construct, both optical and electrochemical immunoassays were developed. The optical immunoassays demonstrated detection of anti-HCV core antibody down to 12.3pM concentrations while the electrochemical assay demonstrated higher binding constants and dynamic range. The electrochemical format and a custom, low-cost smartphone-based potentiostat ($20 USD) yielded comparable results to assays performed on a state-of-the-art electrochemical workstation. We propose this combination of synthetic biology and scalable, point-of-care sensing has potential to provide low-cost, cutting edge diagnostic capability for many pathogens in a variety of settings.

  19. Detection of Hepatitis C core antibody by dual-affinity yeast chimera and smartphone-based electrochemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Venkatesh, A G; Sun, Alex; Brickner, Howard; Looney, David; Hall, Drew A

    2016-12-15

    Yeast cell lines were genetically engineered to display Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen linked to gold binding peptide (GBP) as a dual-affinity biobrick chimera. These multifunctional yeast cells adhere to the gold sensor surface while simultaneously acting as a "renewable" capture reagent for anti-HCV core antibody. This streamlined functionalization and detection strategy removes the need for traditional purification and immobilization techniques. With this biobrick construct, both optical and electrochemical immunoassays were developed. The optical immunoassays demonstrated detection of anti-HCV core antibody down to 12.3pM concentrations while the electrochemical assay demonstrated higher binding constants and dynamic range. The electrochemical format and a custom, low-cost smartphone-based potentiostat ($20 USD) yielded comparable results to assays performed on a state-of-the-art electrochemical workstation. We propose this combination of synthetic biology and scalable, point-of-care sensing has potential to provide low-cost, cutting edge diagnostic capability for many pathogens in a variety of settings. PMID:27472403

  20. An HLA-B27 Homodimer Specific Antibody Recognizes a Discontinuous Mixed-Disulfide Epitope as Identified by Affinity-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuraşcu, Marius-Ionuţ; Marroquin Belaunzanar, Osiris; Cozma, Claudia; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph; Przybylski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    HLA-B27 homodimer formation is believed to be a hallmark of HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthritides. Recently, we have generated a homodimer-specific monoclonal antibody (HD6) and have demonstrated that HLA-B27 homodimer complexes are present on monocytes of healthy HLA-B27 gene carriers at low levels, with significantly increased levels at active disease. The capability of the HD6 antibody to discriminate between correctly formed HLA-B27 heterotrimers and pathology-associated homodimers is striking and cannot be explained by the primary structure of HLA-B27. We hypothesized that HD6 accesses a unique epitope and used affinity-mass spectrometry for its identification. The HD6 antibody was immobilized on an activated sepharose affinity column, and HLA-B27 homodimer characterized for affinity. The epitope was identified by proteolytic epitope excision and MALDI mass spectrometry, and shown to comprise a discontinuous Cys-203- 257-Cys mixed-disulfide peptide structure that is not accessible in HLA-B27 heterotrimers due to protection by noncovalently linked β2-microglobulin. The epitope peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis, and the two monomeric peptide components, HLA-B27(203-219) and HLA-B27(257-273), as well as the homo- and hetero-dimeric disulfide linked combinations prepared. The affinity binding constants KD towards the antibodies were determined using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor, and showed the highest affinity with a KD of approximately 40 nM to the HD6 antibody for the (203-219)-SS-(257-273) mixed disulfide epitope.

  1. Human IgA-binding peptides selected from random peptide libraries: affinity maturation and application in IgA purification.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Takaaki; Ohzono, Shinji; Park, Mirae; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Tsukamoto, Shogo; Sugita, Ryohei; Ishitobi, Hiroyuki; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ito, Osamu; Sorajo, Koichi; Sugimura, Kazuhisa; Ham, Sihyun; Ito, Yuji

    2012-12-14

    Phage display system is a powerful tool to design specific ligands for target molecules. Here, we used disulfide-constrained random peptide libraries constructed with the T7 phage display system to isolate peptides specific to human IgA. The binding clones (A1-A4) isolated by biopanning exhibited clear specificity to human IgA, but the synthetic peptide derived from the A2 clone exhibited a low specificity/affinity (K(d) = 1.3 μm). Therefore, we tried to improve the peptide using a partial randomized phage display library and mutational studies on the synthetic peptides. The designed Opt-1 peptide exhibited a 39-fold higher affinity (K(d) = 33 nm) than the A2 peptide. An Opt-1 peptide-conjugated column was used to purify IgA from human plasma. However, the recovered IgA fraction was contaminated with other proteins, indicating nonspecific binding. To design a peptide with increased binding specificity, we examined the structural features of Opt-1 and the Opt-1-IgA complex using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water. The simulation results revealed that the Opt-1 peptide displayed partial helicity in the N-terminal region and possessed a hydrophobic cluster that played a significant role in tight binding with IgA-Fc. However, these hydrophobic residues of Opt-1 may contribute to nonspecific binding with other proteins. To increase binding specificity, we introduced several mutations in the hydrophobic residues of Opt-1. The resultant Opt-3 peptide exhibited high specificity and high binding affinity for IgA, leading to successful isolation of IgA without contamination.

  2. F-actin flow drives affinity maturation and spatial organization of LFA-1 at the immunological synapse

    PubMed Central

    Comrie, William A.; Babich, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Integrin-dependent interactions between T cells and antigen-presenting cells are vital for proper T cell activation, effector function, and memory. Regulation of integrin function occurs via conformational change, which modulates ligand affinity, and receptor clustering, which modulates valency. Here, we show that conformational intermediates of leukocyte functional antigen 1 (LFA-1) form a concentric array at the immunological synapse. Using an inhibitor cocktail to arrest F-actin dynamics, we show that organization of this array depends on F-actin flow and ligand mobility. Furthermore, F-actin flow is critical for maintaining the high affinity conformation of LFA-1, for increasing valency by recruiting LFA-1 to the immunological synapse, and ultimately for promoting intracellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) binding. Finally, we show that F-actin forces are opposed by immobilized ICAM-1, which triggers LFA-1 activation through a combination of induced fit and tension-based mechanisms. Our data provide direct support for a model in which the T cell actin network generates mechanical forces that regulate LFA-1 activity at the immunological synapse. PMID:25666810

  3. Expression and Functional Properties of an Anti-Triazophos High-Affinity Single-Chain Variable Fragment Antibody with Specific Lambda Light Chain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Liang, Xiao; Xiang, Dandan; Guo, Yirong; Liu, Yihua; Zhu, Guonian

    2016-01-01

    Triazophos is a widely used organophosphorous insecticide that has potentially adverse effects to organisms. In the present study, a high-affinity single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody with specific lambda light chain was developed for residue monitoring. First, the specific variable regions were correctly amplified from a hybridoma cell line 8C10 that secreted monoclonal antibody (mAb) against triazophos. The regions were then assembled as scFv via splicing by overlap extension polymerase chain reaction. Subsequently, the recombinant anti-triazophos scFv-8C10 was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli strain HB2151 in soluble form, purified through immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, and verified via Western blot and peptide mass fingerprinting analyses. Afterward, an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was established based on the purified anti-triazophos scFv-8C10 antibody. The assay exhibited properties similar to those based on the parent mAb, with a high sensitivity (IC50 of 1.73 ng/mL) to triazophos and no cross reaction for other organophosphorus pesticides; it was reliable in detecting triazophos residues in spiked water samples. Moreover, kinetic measurement using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor indicated that the purified scFv-8C10 antibody had a high affinity of 1.8 × 10(-10) M and exhibited good binding stability. Results indicated that the recombinant high-affinity scFv-8C10 antibody was an effective detection material that would be promising for monitoring triazophos residues in environment samples. PMID:27338340

  4. Expression and Functional Properties of an Anti-Triazophos High-Affinity Single-Chain Variable Fragment Antibody with Specific Lambda Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Liang, Xiao; Xiang, Dandan; Guo, Yirong; Liu, Yihua; Zhu, Guonian

    2016-01-01

    Triazophos is a widely used organophosphorous insecticide that has potentially adverse effects to organisms. In the present study, a high-affinity single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody with specific lambda light chain was developed for residue monitoring. First, the specific variable regions were correctly amplified from a hybridoma cell line 8C10 that secreted monoclonal antibody (mAb) against triazophos. The regions were then assembled as scFv via splicing by overlap extension polymerase chain reaction. Subsequently, the recombinant anti-triazophos scFv-8C10 was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli strain HB2151 in soluble form, purified through immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, and verified via Western blot and peptide mass fingerprinting analyses. Afterward, an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was established based on the purified anti-triazophos scFv-8C10 antibody. The assay exhibited properties similar to those based on the parent mAb, with a high sensitivity (IC50 of 1.73 ng/mL) to triazophos and no cross reaction for other organophosphorus pesticides; it was reliable in detecting triazophos residues in spiked water samples. Moreover, kinetic measurement using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor indicated that the purified scFv-8C10 antibody had a high affinity of 1.8 × 10−10 M and exhibited good binding stability. Results indicated that the recombinant high-affinity scFv-8C10 antibody was an effective detection material that would be promising for monitoring triazophos residues in environment samples. PMID:27338340

  5. A simple nonradioactive method for the determination of the binding affinities of antibodies induced by hapten bioconjugates for drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Torres, Oscar B; Antoline, Joshua F G; Li, Fuying; Jalah, Rashmi; Jacobson, Arthur E; Rice, Kenner C; Alving, Carl R; Matyas, Gary R

    2016-02-01

    The accurate analytical measurement of binding affinities of polyclonal antibody in sera to heroin, 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM), and morphine has been a challenging task. A simple nonradioactive method that uses deuterium-labeled drug tracers and equilibrium dialysis (ED) combined with ultra performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) to measure the apparent dissociation constant (K d) of antibodies to 6-AM and morphine is described. The method can readily detect antibodies with K d in the low nanomolar range. Since heroin is rapidly degraded in sera, esterase inhibitors were included in the assay, greatly reducing heroin hydrolysis. MS/MS detection directly measured the heroin in the assay after overnight ED, thereby allowing the quantitation of % bound heroin in lieu of K d as an alternative measurement to assess heroin binding to polyclonal antibody sera. This is the first report that utilizes a solution-based assay to quantify heroin-antibody binding without being confounded by the presence of 6-AM and morphine and to measure K d of polyclonal antibody to 6-AM. Hapten surrogates 6-AcMorHap, 6-PrOxyHap, MorHap, DiAmHap, and DiPrOxyHap coupled to tetanus toxoid (TT) were used to generate high affinity antibodies to heroin, 6-AM, and morphine. In comparison to competition ED-UPLC/MS/MS which gave K d values in the nanomolar range, the commonly used competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measured the 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) values in the micromolar range. Despite the differences in K d and IC50 values, similar trends in affinities of hapten antibodies to heroin, 6-AM, and morphine were observed by both methods. Competition ED-UPLC/MS/MS revealed that among the five TT-hapten bioconjugates, TT-6-AcMorHap and TT-6-PrOxyHap induced antibodies that bound heroin, 6-AM, and morphine. In contrast, TT-MorHap induced antibodies that poorly bound heroin, while TT-DiAmHap and TT-DiPrOxyHap induced antibodies either did not

  6. The binding affinity of a soluble TCR-Fc fusion protein is significantly improved by crosslinkage with an anti-C{beta} antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Horii, Masae; Kobayashi, Eiji; Jin, Aishun; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Muraguchi, Atsushi

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel soluble TCR composed of TCR V and C regions with Ig Fc region is generated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody bound to a p/MHC tetramer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding affinity of TCR-Fc was markedly increased by binding with anti-C{beta} antibody. -- Abstract: The identification and cloning of tumor antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) and the production of the soluble form of the TCR (sTCR) contributed to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for cancer. Recently, several groups have reported the development of technologies for the production of sTCRs. The native sTCR has a very low binding affinity for the antigenic peptide/MHC (p/MHC) complex. In this study, we established a technology to produce high affinity, functional sTCRs. We generated a novel sTCR-Fc fusion protein composed of the TCR V and C regions of the TCR linked to the immunoglobulin (Ig) Fc region. A Western blot analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the fusion protein was approximately 60 kDa under reducing conditions and approximately 100-200 kDa under non-reducing conditions. ELISAs using various antibodies showed that the structure of each domain of the TCR-Fc protein was intact. The TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody effectively bound to a p/MHC tetramer. An SPR analysis showed that the TCR-Fc protein had a low binding affinity (KD; 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M) to the p/MHC monomer. Interestingly, when the TCR-Fc protein was pre-incubated with an anti-C{beta} antibody, its binding affinity for p/MHC increased by 5-fold (2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M). We demonstrated a novel method for constructing a functional soluble TCR using the Ig Fc region and showed that the binding affinity of the functional sTCR-Fc was markedly increased by an anti-C{beta} antibody, which is probably due to the stabilization of the V

  7. Adjuvant dependence of APS pathology-related low-affinity antibodies during secondary immune response to tetanus toxoid in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zivković, Irena; Petrušić, Vladimir; Dimitrijević, Rajna; Stojanović, Marijana; Dimitrijević, Ljiljana

    2013-05-01

    One of the established animal models for autoimmune disease antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is TTd hyperimmunization of mice. Tetanus toxoid (TTd) and plasma protein β2GPI share structural homology so that immunization with TTd induces appearance of cross-reactive antibodies. In this paper, we have investigated the presence and dynamic of fluctuation of specific (anti-TTd) and auto (anti-β2GPI) antibodies induced in BALB/c mice during secondary immune response after TTd immunization with alhydrogel or glycerol as adjuvants. In addition, we followed the induced reproductive pathology as a sign of autoimmune outcome. We show undoubtedly adjuvant dependance of (1) level of induced anti-TTd IgG antibodies, (2) changes in levels of low-affinity anti-β2GPI IgG antibodies, and (3) change in fecundity and fertility during secondary immune response. These findings once more indicate the importance of chosen adjuvants used for successful immunization and eventual autoantibody outcome, this time associated with the processes involving low affinity, natural antibodies.

  8. Antibody-free magnetic cell sorting of genetically modified primary human CD4+ T cells by one-step streptavidin affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Nicholas J; Peden, Andrew A; Lehner, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Existing methods for phenotypic selection of genetically modified mammalian cells suffer disadvantages of time, cost and scalability and, where antibodies are used to bind exogenous cell surface markers for magnetic selection, typically yield cells coated with antibody-antigen complexes and beads. To overcome these limitations we have developed a method termed Antibody-Free Magnetic Cell Sorting in which the 38 amino acid Streptavidin Binding Peptide (SBP) is displayed at the cell surface by the truncated Low Affinity Nerve Growth Receptor (LNGFRF) and used as an affinity tag for one-step selection with streptavidin-conjugated magnetic beads. Cells are released through competition with the naturally occurring vitamin biotin, free of either beads or antibody-antigen complexes and ready for culture or use in downstream applications. Antibody-Free Magnetic Cell Sorting is a rapid, cost-effective, scalable method of magnetic selection applicable to either viral transduction or transient transfection of cell lines or primary cells. We have optimised the system for enrichment of primary human CD4+ T cells expressing shRNAs and exogenous genes of interest to purities of >99%, and used it to isolate cells following Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 genome editing.

  9. Isolation of a Trypanosoma cruzi antigen by affinity chromatography with a monoclonal antibody. Preliminary evaluation of its possible applications in serological tests.

    PubMed Central

    Carbonetto, C H; Malchiodi, E L; Chiaramonte, M; Durante de Isola, E; Fossati, C A; Margni, R A

    1990-01-01

    By affinity chromatography with a monoclonal antibody (163B6), obtained in our laboratory, we have isolated a T. cruzi antigen which could be useful for differential diagnosis of Chagas' disease from leishmaniasis. This antigen, a 52-kD protein, reacted with all sera from Chagas' disease patients tested but not with sera from patients with leishmania, in ELISA. The 52-kD antigen is widely distributed in the Trypanosoma genus since the 163B6 monoclonal antibody reacts with T. rangeli and 8 strains and a clone of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2119921

  10. Manganese-induced integrin affinity maturation promotes recruitment of alpha V beta 3 integrin to focal adhesions in endothelial cells: evidence for a role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Src.

    PubMed

    Dormond, Olivier; Ponsonnet, Lionel; Hasmim, Meriem; Foletti, Alessandro; Rüegg, Curzio

    2004-07-01

    Integrin activity is controlled by changes in affinity (i.e. ligand binding) and avidity (i.e. receptor clustering). Little is known, however, about the effect of affinity maturation on integrin avidity and on the associated signaling pathways. To study the effect of affinity maturation on integrin avidity, we stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with MnCl(2) to increase integrin affinity and monitored clustering of beta 1 and beta 3 integrins. In unstimulated HUVEC, beta 1 integrins were present in fibrillar adhesions, while alpha V beta 3 was detected in peripheral focal adhesions. Clustered beta 1 and beta 3 integrins expressed high affinity/ligand-induced binding site (LIBS) epitopes. MnCl(2)-stimulation promoted focal adhesion and actin stress fiber formation at the basal surface of the cells, and strongly enhanced mAb LM609 staining and expression of beta 3 high affinity/LIBS epitopes at focal adhesions. MnCl(2)-induced alpha V beta 3 clustering was blocked by a soluble RGD peptide, by wortmannin and LY294002, two pharmacological inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K), and by over-expressing a dominant negative PI 3-K mutant protein. Conversely, over-expression of active PI 3-K and pharmacological inhibiton of Src with PP2 and CGP77675, enhanced basal and manganese-induced alpha V beta 3 clustering. Transient increased phosphorylation of protein kinase B/Akt, a direct target of PI 3K, occurred upon manganese stimulation. MnCl(2) did not alter beta 1 integrin distribution or beta1 high-affinity/LIBS epitope expression. Based on these results, we conclude that MnCl(2)-induced alpha V beta 3 integrin affinity maturation stimulates focal adhesion and actin stress fiber formation, and promotes recruitment of high affinity alpha V beta 3 to focal adhesions. Affinity-modulated alpha V beta 3 clustering requires PI3-K signaling and is negatively regulate by Src.

  11. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  12. Novel asymmetrically engineered antibody Fc variant with superior FcγR binding affinity and specificity compared with afucosylated Fc variant

    PubMed Central

    Mimoto, Futa; Igawa, Tomoyuki; Kuramochi, Taichi; Katada, Hitoshi; Kadono, Shojiro; Kamikawa, Takayuki; Shida-Kawazoe, Meiri; Hattori, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    Fc engineering is a promising approach to enhance the antitumor efficacy of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) through antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Glyco- and protein-Fc engineering have been employed to enhance FcγR binding and ADCC activity of mAbs; the drawbacks of previous approaches lie in their binding affinity to both FcγRIIIa allotypes, the ratio of activating FcγR binding to inhibitory FcγR binding (A/I ratio) or the melting temperature (TM) of the CH2 domain. To date, no engineered Fc variant has been reported that satisfies all these points. Herein, we present a novel Fc engineering approach that introduces different substitutions in each Fc domain asymmetrically, conferring optimal binding affinity to FcγR and specificity to the activating FcγR without impairing the stability. We successfully designed an asymmetric Fc variant with the highest binding affinity for both FcγRIIIa allotypes and the highest A/I ratio compared with previously reported symmetrically engineered Fc variants, and superior or at least comparable in vitro ADCC activity compared with afucosylated Fc variants. In addition, the asymmetric Fc engineering approach offered higher stability by minimizing the use of substitutions that reduce the TM of the CH2 domain compared with the symmetric approach. These results demonstrate that the asymmetric Fc engineering platform provides best-in-class effector function for therapeutic antibodies against tumor antigens. PMID:23406628

  13. Antibody raised to AKAAAKAAAKA sequence on tropoelastin recognizes tropoelastin but not mature crosslinked elastin: A new tool in metabolic and structural studies of elastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Starcher, B; Conrad, N; Hinek, A; Hill, C H

    1999-01-01

    Tropoelastin, which is secreted from the cell in a soluble form, contains specific alanine rich repeat domains that are destined to form covalent desmosine and isodesmosine crosslinks in mature insoluble elastin. We raised a monospecific polyclonal antibody to a AKAAAKAAAKA synthetic peptide (AKA) which represents this alanine rich region of tropoelastin. The antibody was reactive with the original peptide antigen and purified tropoelastin, but not with mature crosslinked elastin isolated from several animal species. Conditioned media from chick aorta smooth muscle cells in culture reacted in an ELISA with the AKA antibody, but only in the presence of BAPN to block the conversion of the epsilon-amino groups to aldehydes. Immunofluorescence demonstrated that the AKA antibody decorated newly deposited tropoelastin assembled in fine fibrils in matrix produced by cultured human skin fibroblasts. EM-immunogold specifically localized this antibody to the immature elastic fibers present in fetal sheep ductus arteriosus. Moreover, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the antibody recognized nonpolymerized tropoelastin assembled on the periphery of elastic fibers in the aorta of chicks raised on copper deficient and BAPN containing diets. These studies demonstrate that this new anti-tropoelastin antibody can be used as a useful tool to investigate elastin metabolism where it is important to distinguish between tropoelastin and mature crosslinked elastin. PMID:10757115

  14. Novel anti–B-cell maturation antigen antibody-drug conjugate (GSK2857916) selectively induces killing of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Patrick A.; Acharya, Chirag; Zhong, Mike Y.; Cea, Michele; Cagnetta, Antonia; Craigen, Jenny; Yates, John; Gliddon, Louise; Fieles, William; Hoang, Bao; Tunstead, James; Christie, Amanda L.; Kung, Andrew L.; Richardson, Paul; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), highly expressed on malignant plasma cells in human multiple myeloma (MM), has not been effectively targeted with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. We here show that BCMA is universally expressed on the MM cell surface and determine specific anti-MM activity of J6M0-mcMMAF (GSK2857916), a novel humanized and afucosylated antagonistic anti-BCMA antibody-drug conjugate via a noncleavable linker. J6M0-mcMMAF specifically blocks cell growth via G2/M arrest and induces caspase 3–dependent apoptosis in MM cells, alone and in coculture with bone marrow stromal cells or various effector cells. It strongly inhibits colony formation by MM cells while sparing surrounding BCMA-negative normal cells. J6M0-mcMMAF significantly induces effector cell-mediated lysis against allogeneic or autologous patient MM cells, with increased potency and efficacy compared with the wild-type J6M0 without Fc enhancement. The antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptotic activity of J6M0-mcMMAF is further enhanced by lenalidomide. Importantly, J6M0-mcMMAF rapidly eliminates myeloma cells in subcutaneous and disseminated mouse models, and mice remain tumor-free up to 3.5 months. Furthermore, J6M0-mcMMAF recruits macrophages and mediates antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis of MM cells. Together, these results demonstrate that GSK2857916 has potent and selective anti-MM activities via multiple cytotoxic mechanisms, providing a promising next-generation immunotherapeutic in this cancer. PMID:24569262

  15. Hybridization of an Aβ-specific antibody fragment with aminopyrazole-based β-sheet ligands displays striking enhancement of target affinity.

    PubMed

    Hellmert, Marco; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas; Peters, Max Sena; Korth, Carsten; Schrader, Thomas

    2015-03-14

    Determining Aβ levels in body fluids remains a powerful tool in the diagnostics of Alzheimer's disease. This report delineates a new supramolecular strategy which increases the affinity of antibodies towards Aβ to make diagnostic procedures more sensitive. A monoclonal antibody IC16 was generated to an N-terminal epitope of Aβ and the variable regions of the heavy and light chains were cloned as a recombinant protein (scFv). A 6 × histidine tag was fused to the C-terminus of IC16-scFv allowing hybridization with a small organic β-sheet binder via Ni-NTA complexation. On the other hand, a multivalent nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-equipped trimeric aminopyrazole (AP) derivative was synthesized based on a cyclam platform; and experimental evidence was obtained for efficient Ni(2+)-mediated complex formation with the histidine-tagged antibody species. In a proof of principle experiment the hybrid molecule showed a strong increase in affinity towards Aβ. Thus, the specific binding power of recombinant antibody fragments to their β-sheet rich targets can be conveniently enhanced by non-covalent hybridization with small organic β-sheet binders.

  16. Characterization of a low molecular weight protein of the ATP synthetase complex from beef heart and rat liver mitochondria with a high affinity monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Woldegiorgis, G; Contreras, L; Shrago, E

    1990-06-15

    A monoclonal antibody raised against beef heart mitochondria elicited a strong reaction on Western Blot with a 16 kD protein in preparations of beef heart mitochondria, ammonia particles, oligomycin sensitive ATPase and Complex V, in addition to showing a lesser affinity for the partially purified 30 kD ADP/ATP carrier. The antibody also reacted with a 17 kD protein in rat liver mitochondria and an enriched membrane vesicle fraction. The N-terminal sequence of the first twenty amino acids of both the beef heart and rat liver proteins contained significant homology. Comparison with results in the literature indicate that the proteins represent the delta subunit of the ATP synthetase complex. Further evidence suggests that the epitope for the antibody may reside at the C-terminal 30-40 amino acid residues of both proteins.

  17. Evaluation of B cell maturation antigen as a target for antibody drug conjugate mediated cytotoxicity in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lydia; Bounds, Danton; Paterson, Jennifer; Herledan, Gaelle; Sully, Katherine; Seestaller-Wehr, Laura M; Fieles, William E; Tunstead, James; McCahon, Lee; Germaschewski, Fiona M; Mayes, Patrick A; Craigen, Jenny L; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Yong, Kwee L

    2016-09-01

    B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA, also termed TNFRSF17) is an attractive therapeutic target due to its restricted expression on normal and malignant plasma cells (PC). GSK2857916 (or J6M0-MMAF) is a BCMA-specific antibody conjugated to the microtubule-disrupting agent monomethyl auristatin F (MMAF) via a protease-resistant linker. To evaluate the clinical potential of this agent, tumour cells from seventy multiple myeloma (MM) patients were assessed for BCMA expression by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. All patients tested expressed BCMA, at varying levels, and both surface and intracellular expression were observed. BCMA expression is maintained through relapse, extramedullary spread and in residual disease post therapy. BCMA levels may also be prognostically useful as higher levels of BCMA were associated with poorer outcomes, even taking into account genetic risk. We observed rapid internalization of surface BCMA and newly expressed protein by 1 h, suggesting a mechanism for J6M0-MMAF activity even with low surface antigen. J6M0-MMAF mediated cytotoxicity of MM cells varied with dose and antigen levels, with clonogenic progenitors killed at lower doses than mature cells. In comparison, J6M0-MMAF killing of primary CD138(+) myeloma cells occurred with slower kinetics. Our observations support BCMA to be a promising therapeutic target in MM for novel therapies such as J6M0-MMAF. PMID:27313079

  18. Facile fabrication and instant application of miniaturized antibody-decorated affinity columns for higher-order structure and functional characterization of TRIM21 epitope peptides.

    PubMed

    Al-Majdoub, M; Opuni, K F M; Koy, C; Glocker, M O

    2013-11-01

    Both epitope excision and epitope extraction methods, combined with mass spectrometry, generate precise informations on binding surfaces of full-length proteins, identifying sequential (linear) or assembled (conformational) epitopes, respectively. Here, we describe the one-step fabrication and application of affinity columns using reversibly immobilized antibodies with highest flexibility with respect to antibody sources and lowest sample amount requirements (fmol range). Depending on the antibody source, we made use of protein G- or protein A-coated resins as support materials. These materials are packed in pipet tips and in combination with a programmable multichannel pipet form a highly efficient epitope mapping system. In addition to epitope identification, the influence of epitope structure modifications on antibody binding specificities could be studied in detail with synthetic peptides. Elution of epitope peptides was optimized such that mass spectrometric analysis was feasible after a single desalting step. Epitope peptides were identified by accurate molecular mass determinations or by partial amino acid sequence analysis. In addition, charge state comparison or ion mobility analysis of eluted epitope peptides enabled investigation of higher-order structures. The epitope peptide of the TRIM21 (TRIM: tripartite motif) autoantigen that is recognized by a polyclonal antibody was determined as assembling an "L-E-Q-L" motif on an α-helix. Secondary structure determination by circular dichroism spectroscopy and structure modeling are in accordance with the mass spectrometric results and the antigenic behavior of the 17-mer epitope peptide variants from the full-length autoantigen. PMID:24094071

  19. Characterization of the Native and Denatured Herceptin by ELISA and QCM using a High-Affinity Single Chain Fragment Variable (scFv) Recombinant Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yuqin; Mernaugh, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Herceptin/Trastuzumab is a humanized IgG1κ light chain antibody used to treat some forms of breast cancer. A phage-displayed recombinant antibody library was used to obtain an scFv (designated 2B4) to a linear synthetic peptide representing Herceptin’s heavy chain CDR3. ELISAs and piezoimmunosensor/quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) assays were used to characterize 2B4-binding activity to both native and heat denatured Herceptin. The 2B4 scFv specifically bound to heat denatured Herceptin in a concentration dependent manner over a wide (35–220.5 nM) dynamic range. Herceptin denatures and forms significant amount of aggregates when heated. UV-Vis characterization confirms that Herceptin forms aggregates as the temperature used to heat Herceptin increases. QCM affinity assay shows that binding stoichiometry between 2B4 scFv and Herceptin follows a 1:2 relationship proving that 2B4 scFv binds strongly to the dimers of heat denatured Herceptin aggregates and exhibits an affinity constant of 7.17 × 1013 M−2. The 2B4-based QCM assay was more sensitive than the corresponding ELISA. Combining QCM with ELISA can be used to more fully characterize non-specific binding events in assays. The potential theoretical and clinical implications of these results and the advantages of using QCM to characterize human therapeutic antibodies in samples are also discussed. PMID:22934911

  20. Strain specificity and binding affinity requirements of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to the C4 domain of gp120 from human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, G R; Byrn, R; Wilkes, D M; Fox, J A; Hobbs, M R; Hastings, R; Wessling, H C; Norcross, M A; Fendly, B M; Berman, P W

    1993-01-01

    The binding properties of seven CD4-blocking monoclonal antibodies raised against recombinant gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strain MN (HIV-1MN) and two CD4-blocking monoclonal antibodies to recombinant envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp160 of substrain IIIB of HIVLAI were analyzed. With a panel of recombinant gp120s from seven diverse HIV-1 isolates, eight of the nine antibodies were found to be strain specific and one was broadly cross-reactive. Epitope mapping revealed that all nine antibodies bound to epitopes located in the fourth conserved domain (C4) of gp120. Within this region, three distinct epitopes could be identified: two were polymorphic between HIV-1 strains, and one was highly conserved. Studies with synthetic peptides demonstrated that the conserved epitope, recognized by antibody 13H8, was located between residues 431 and 439. Site-directed mutagenesis of gp120 demonstrated that residue 429 and/or 432 was critical for the binding of the seven antibodies to gp120 from HIV-1MN. Similarly, residues 423 and 429 were essential for the binding of monoclonal antibody 5C2 raised against gp120 from HIV-1IIIB. The amino acids located at positions 423 and 429 were found to vary between strains of HIV-1 as well as between molecular clones derived from the MN and LAI isolates of HIV-1. Polymorphism at these positions prevented the binding of virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and raised the possibility that HIV-1 neutralization serotypes may be defined on the basis of C4 domain sequences. Analysis of the binding characteristics of the CD4-blocking antibodies demonstrated that their virus-neutralizing activity was directly proportional to their gp120-binding affinity. These studies account for the strain specificity of antibodies to the C4 domain of gp120 and demonstrate for the first time that antibodies to this region can be as effective as those directed to the principal neutralizing determinant (V3 domain) in neutralizing HIV-1

  1. Engineering antibodies by yeast display.

    PubMed

    Boder, Eric T; Raeeszadeh-Sarmazdeh, Maryam; Price, J Vincent

    2012-10-15

    Since its first application to antibody engineering 15 years ago, yeast display technology has been developed into a highly potent tool for both affinity maturing lead molecules and isolating novel antibodies and antibody-like species. Robust approaches to the creation of diversity, construction of yeast libraries, and library screening or selection have been elaborated, improving the quality of engineered molecules and certainty of success in an antibody engineering campaign and positioning yeast display as one of the premier antibody engineering technologies currently in use. Here, we summarize the history of antibody engineering by yeast surface display, approaches used in its application, and a number of examples highlighting the utility of this method for antibody engineering.

  2. Novel asymmetrically engineered antibody Fc variant with superior FcγR binding affinity and specificity compared with afucosylated Fc variant.

    PubMed

    Mimoto, Futa; Igawa, Tomoyuki; Kuramochi, Taichi; Katada, Hitoshi; Kadono, Shojiro; Kamikawa, Takayuki; Shida-Kawazoe, Meiri; Hattori, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    Fc engineering is a promising approach to enhance the antitumor efficacy of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) through antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Glyco- and protein-Fc engineering have been employed to enhance FcγR binding and ADCC activity of mAbs; the drawbacks of previous approaches lie in their binding affinity to both FcγRIIIa allotypes, the ratio of activating FcγR binding to inhibitory FcγR binding (A/I ratio) or the melting temperature (T(M)) of the C(H)2 domain. To date, no engineered Fc variant has been reported that satisfies all these points. Herein, we present a novel Fc engineering approach that introduces different substitutions in each Fc domain asymmetrically, conferring optimal binding affinity to FcγR and specificity to the activating FcγR without impairing the stability. We successfully designed an asymmetric Fc variant with the highest binding affinity for both FcγRIIIa allotypes and the highest A/I ratio compared with previously reported symmetrically engineered Fc variants, and superior or at least comparable in vitro ADCC activity compared with afucosylated Fc variants. In addition, the asymmetric Fc engineering approach offered higher stability by minimizing the use of substitutions that reduce the T(M) of the C(H)2 domain compared with the symmetric approach. These results demonstrate that the asymmetric Fc engineering platform provides best-in-class effector function for therapeutic antibodies against tumor antigens.

  3. Selective targeting of the IL23 pathway: Generation and characterization of a novel high-affinity humanized anti-IL23A antibody

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjaya; Kroe-Barrett, Rachel R; Canada, Keith A; Zhu, Xiang; Sepulveda, Eliud; Wu, Helen; He, Yaqin; Raymond, Ernest L; Ahlberg, Jennifer; Frego, Lee E; Amodeo, Laura M; Catron, Katrina M; Presky, David H; Hanke, Jeffrey H

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we describe the generation and characterization of BI 655066, a novel, highly potent neutralizing anti-interleukin-23 (IL23) monoclonal antibody in clinical development for autoimmune conditions, including psoriasis and Crohn's disease. IL23 is a key driver of the differentiation, maintenance, and activity of a number of immune cell subsets, including T helper 17 (Th17) cells, which are believed to mediate the pathogenesis of several immune-mediated disorders. Thus, IL23 neutralization is an attractive therapeutic approach. Designing an antibody for clinical activity and convenience for the patient requires certain properties, such as high affinity, specificity, and solubility. These properties were achieved by directed design of the immunization, lead identification, and humanization procedures. Favorable substance and pharmacokinetic properties were established by biophysical assessments and studies in cynomolgus monkeys. PMID:25905918

  4. FYWHCLDE-based affinity chromatography of IgG: effect of ligand density and purifications of human IgG and monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Shi, Qing-Hong; Sun, Yan

    2014-08-15

    This work reports the development of an octapeptide-based affinity adsorbent for the purification of human IgG (hIgG) and monoclonal antibody (mAb). The octapeptide was FYWHCLDE selected earlier by the biomimetic design of affinity peptide ligands for hIgG. The ligand was coupled to Sepharose gel at four densities from 10.4 to 31.0μmol/mL, and the effect of peptide density on the adsorption of hIgG and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was first investigated. The binding capacity of hIgG increased from 104.2 to 176.4mg/mL within the ligand density range, and the binding affinity (dissociation constant) kept at 2.4-3.7μM. Batch adsorption revealed that the selectivity of FYWHCLDE-Sepharose for IgG was 30-40 times over BSA. The effective pore diffusivity of IgG decreased somewhat with increasing ligand density, but the dynamic binding capacity at 10% breakthrough, measured by using 10-fold diluted human serum as feedstock, doubled with increasing ligand density from 10.4 to 31.0μmol/mL due to the remarkable increase of static binding capacity. By using the affinity column with a ligand density of 23.9μmol/mL, hIgG and humanized mAb purifications from human serum and cell culture supernatant, respectively, were achieved at high purities and recovery yields. Finally, the robustness of the peptide gel was demonstrated by recycled use of the affinity column in 20 breakthrough cycles. PMID:24947889

  5. Affinity-purified antibodies of defined specificity for use in a solid-phase microplate radioimmunoassay of human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein in urine.

    PubMed

    Hunt, J S; McGiven, A R; Groufsky, A; Lynn, K L; Taylor, M C

    1985-05-01

    Rabbit antibodies to human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein (prepared by salt precipitation from normal urine) were purified by affinity chromatography using columns containing Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein linked to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. The specificity of these antibodies was determined by analysis of their binding characteristics on Western blots of Tamm-Horsfall protein from sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gradient gels and comparison with the reactivity of monoclonal antibodies to this glycoprotein. Optimal conditions of adsorption to poly(vinyl chloride) microtitre plates were established such that these purified antibodies could be used in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay for the determination of urinary Tamm-Horsfall-glycoprotein concentration. The specificity of the immunoassay was confirmed by competitive inhibition of the urinary Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein by purified freeze-dried material in solution. A standard curve obtained with this material showed the radioimmunoassay to have a sensitivity of at least 5 ng/ml, with linearity between 30 and 600 ng/ml. The mean coefficient of variation over the linear section of the curve was 11.3 +/- 2.2% (n = 13). The effects of dialysis and freezing of urine samples before determination of Tamm-Horsfall-glycoprotein concentrations were investigated and the mean 24 h urinary excretion rate in 60 normal donors was shown to be 84.9 +/- 44.1 mg.

  6. Quantum dot immunoassays in renewable surface column and 96-well plate formats for the fluorescence detection of Botulinum neurotoxin using high-affinity antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Marvin G.; Grate, Jay W.; Tyler, Abby J.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Miller, Keith D.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2009-09-01

    A fluorescence sandwich immunoassay using high affinity antibodies and quantum dot (QD) reporters has been developed for detection of botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A). For the development of the assay, a nontoxic recombinant fragment of the holotoxin (BoNT/A-HC-fragment) has been used as a structurally valid simulant for the full toxin molecule. The antibodies used, AR4 and RAZ1, bind to nonoverlapping epitopes present on both the full toxin and on the recombinant fragment. In one format, the immunoassay is carried out in a 96-well plate with detection in a standard plate reader. Detection down to 31 pM of the BoNT/Hc-fragment was demonstrated with a total incubation time of 3 hours, using AR4 as the capture antibody and QD-coupled RAZ1 as the reporter. In a second format, the AR4 capture antibody was coupled to Sepharose beads, and the immunochemical reactions were carried out in microcentrifuge tubes with an incubation time of 1 hour. These beads were subsequently captured and concentrated in a rotating rod “renewable surface” flow cell as part of a sequential injection fluidic system. This flow cell was equipped with a fiber optic system for fluorescence measurements. In PBS buffer solution matrix, the BoNT/A-HC-fragment was detected to concentrations as low as 5 pM using the fluidic measurement approach.

  7. Isoelectric focusing-affinity immunoblot analysis of mouse monoclonal antibodies to the four human IgG subclasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Robert G.; Roebber, Marianne; Rodkey, L. Scott; Reimer, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF)/affinity immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used for parallel analysis of murine monoclonal antihuman IgG-subclass antisera (MoAbs). Coomassie Blue-stained protein bands in the pH region 5.5-8.0 were shown to be murine IgG by direct blotting onto nitrocellulose followed by detection with conjugated antimouse IgG. Use of IgG myeloma antigen-coated nitrocellulose in the IEF-affinity immunoblot allowed detection of the charge microheterogeneity of MoAbs. The MoAb group contained one to five major dense bands flanked by up to four minor fainter bands, all with pIs ranging from 6.1 to 7.8. Semiquantitative estimates of binding specificity in the IEF-affinity blot compared well with cross-reactivity data obtained from a quantitative ELISA.

  8. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  9. Molecular engineering of high affinity single-chain antibody fragment for endothelial targeting of proteins and nanocarriers in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Greineder, Colin F; Hood, Elizabeth D; Yao, Anning; Khoshnejad, Makan; Brenner, Jake S; Johnston, Ian H; Poncz, Mortimer; Gottstein, Claudia; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2016-03-28

    Endothelial cells (EC) represent an important target for pharmacologic intervention, given their central role in a wide variety of human pathophysiologic processes. Studies in lab animal species have established that conjugation of drugs and carriers with antibodies directed to surface targets like the Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (PECAM-1, a highly expressed endothelial transmembrane protein) help to achieve specific therapeutic interventions in ECs. To translate such "vascular immunotargeting" to clinical practice, it is necessary to replace antibodies by advanced ligands that are more amenable to use in humans. We report the molecular design of a single chain variable antibody fragment (scFv) that binds with high affinity to human PECAM-1 and cross-reacts with its counterpart in rats and other animal species, allowing parallel testing in vivo and in human endothelial cells in microfluidic model. Site-specific modification of the scFv allows conjugation of protein cargo and liposomes, enabling their endothelial targeting in these models. This study provides a template for molecular engineering of ligands, enabling studies of drug targeting in animal species and subsequent use in humans. PMID:26855052

  10. Estimation of interaction between oriented immobilized green fluorescent protein and its antibody by high performance affinity chromatography and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Jing; Yang, Lingjian; Gao, Xiaokang; Chen, Hongwei; Zhao, Xinfeng; Bian, Liujiao; Zheng, Xiaohui

    2015-07-01

    Although green fluorescence protein (GFP) and its antibody are widely used to track a protein or a cell in life sciences, the binding behavior between them remains unclear. In this work, diazo coupling method that synthesized a new stationary GFP was oriented immobilized on the surface of macro-porous silica gel by a phase. The stationary phase was utilized to confirm the validation of injection amount-dependent analysis in exploring protein-protein interaction that use GFP antibody as a probe. GFP antibody was proved to have one type of binding site on immobilized GFP. The number of binding site and association constant were calculated to be (6.41 ± 0.76) × 10(-10) M and (1.39 ± 0.12) × 10(9) M(-1). Further analysis by molecular docking showed that the binding of GFP to its antibody is mainly driven by hydrogen bonds and salt bridges. These results indicated that injection amount-dependent analysis is capable of exploring the protein-protein interactions with the advantages of ligand and time saving. It is a valuable methodology for the ligands, which are expensive or difficult to obtain. PMID:25727342

  11. STRUCTURE OF A HIGH-AFFINITY “MIMOTOPE” PEPTIDE BOUND TO HIV-1-NEUTRALIZING ANTIBODY b12 EXPLAINS ITS INABILITY TO ELICIT gp120 CROSS-REACTIVE ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Montero, Marinieve; Menendez, Alfredo; van Houten, Nienke E.; Irving, Melita B.; Pantophlet, Ralph; Zwick, Michael B.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Burton, Dennis R.; Scott, Jamie K.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2007-01-01

    The human antibody b12 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on gp120 and is one of the rare monoclonal antibodies that neutralize a broad range of primary HIV-1 isolates. We previously reported the isolation of B2.1, a dimeric peptide that binds with high specificity to b12 and competes with gp120 for b12 antibody binding. Here, we show that the affinity of B2.1 was improved 60-fold over its synthetic-peptide counterpart by fusing it to the N-terminus of a soluble protein. This affinity, which is within an order of magnitude of that of gp120, probably more closely reflects the affinity of the phage-borne peptide. The crystal structure of a complex between Fab of b12 and B2.1 was determined at 1.8 Å resolution. The structural data allowed the differentiation of residues that form critical contacts with b12 from those required for maintenance of the antigenic structure of the peptide, and revealed that three contiguous residues mediate B2.1's critical contacts with b12. This single region of critical contact between the B2.1 peptide and the b12 paratope is unlikely to mimic the discontinuous key binding residues involved in the full b12 epitope for gp120, as previously identified by alanine scanning substitutions on the gp120 surface. These structural observations are supported by experiments that demonstrate that B2.1 is an ineffective immunogenic mimic of the b12 epitope on gp120. Indeed, an extensive series of immunizations with B2.1 in various forms failed to produce gp120 cross-reactive sera. The functional and structural data presented here, however, suggest that the mechanism by which b12 recognizes the two antigens is very different. Here, we present the first crystal structure of peptide bound to an antibody that was originally raised against a discontinuous protein epitope. Our results highlight the challenge of producing immunogens that mimic discontinuous protein epitopes, and the necessity of combining complementary experimental approaches in analyzing

  12. Preclinical evaluation of multistep targeting of diasialoganglioside GD2 using an IgG-scFv bispecific antibody with high affinity for GD2 and DOTA metal complex.

    PubMed

    Cheal, Sarah M; Xu, Hong; Guo, Hong-fen; Zanzonico, Pat B; Larson, Steven M; Cheung, Nai-Kong

    2014-07-01

    Bispecific antibodies (BsAb) have proven to be useful targeting vectors for pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT). We sought to overcome key PRIT limitations such as high renal radiation exposure and immunogenicity (e.g., of streptavidin-antibody fusions), to advance clinical translation of this PRIT strategy for diasialoganglioside GD2-positive [GD2(+)] tumors. For this purpose, an IgG-scFv BsAb was engineered using the sequences for the anti-GD2 humanized monoclonal antibody hu3F8 and C825, a murine scFv antibody with high affinity for the chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) complexed with β-particle-emitting radiometals such as (177)Lu and (90)Y. A three-step regimen, including hu3F8-C825, a dextran-based clearing agent, and p-aminobenzyl-DOTA radiolabeled with (177)Lu (as (177)Lu-DOTA-Bn; t1/2 = 6.71 days), was optimized in immunocompromised mice carrying subcutaneous human GD2(+) neuroblastoma (NB) xenografts. Absorbed doses for tumor and normal tissues were approximately 85 cGy/MBq and ≤3.7 cGy/MBq, respectively, with therapeutic indices (TI) of 142 for blood and 23 for kidney. A therapy study (n = 5/group; tumor volume, 240 ± 160 mm(3)) with three successive PRIT cycles (total (177)Lu: ∼33 MBq; tumor dose ∼3,400 cGy), revealed complete tumor response in 5 of 5 animals, with no recurrence up to 28 days after treatment. Tumor ablation was confirmed histologically in 4 of 5 mice, and normal organs showed minimal overall toxicities. All nontreated mice required sacrifice within 12 days (>1.0-cm(3) tumor volume). We conclude that this novel anti-GD2 PRIT approach has sufficient TI to successfully ablate subcutaneous GD2(+)-NB in mice while sparing kidney and bone marrow.

  13. Peptides and Anti-peptide Antibodies for Small and Medium Scale Peptide and Anti-peptide Affinity Microarrays: Antigenic Peptide Selection, Immobilization, and Processing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Briones, Andrea; Soloviev, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of selection of antigenic peptides for the development of anti-peptide antibodies for use in microarray-based multiplex affinity assays and also with mass-spectrometry detection. The methods described here are mostly applicable to small to medium scale arrays. Although the same principles of peptide selection would be suitable for larger scale arrays (with 100+ features) the actual informatics software and printing methods may well be different. Because of the sheer number of proteins/peptides to be processed and analyzed dedicated software capable of processing all the proteins and an enterprise level array robotics may be necessary for larger scale efforts. This report aims to provide practical advice to those who develop or use arrays with up to ~100 different peptide or protein features.

  14. Substitution of Heavy Complementarity Determining Region 3 (CDR-H3) Residues Can Synergistically Enhance Functional Activity of Antibody and Its Binding Affinity to HER2 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Seung Kee; Park, So Ra; Park, Ami; Oh, Hyun Mi; Shin, Hyun Jung; Jeon, Eun Ju; Kim, Seiwhan; Park, Hyun June; Yeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Young Je

    2016-01-01

    To generate a biobetter that has improved therapeutic activity, we constructed scFv libraries via random mutagenesis of several residues of CDR-H3 and -L3 of hu4D5. The scFv clones were isolated from the phage display libraries by stringent panning, and their anti-proliferative activity against HER2-positive cancer cells was evaluated as a primary selection criterion. Consequently, we selected AH06 as a biobetter antibody that had a 7.2-fold increase in anti-proliferative activity (IC50: 0.81 nM) against the gastric cancer cell line NCI-N87 and a 7.4-fold increase in binding affinity (KD: 60 pM) to HER2 compared to hu4D5. The binding energy calculation and molecular modeling suggest that the substitution of residues of CDR-H3 to W98, F100c, A101 and L102 could stabilize binding of the antibody to HER2 and there could be direct hydrophobic interactions between the aromatic ring of W98 and the aliphatic group of I613 within HER2 domain IV as well as the heavy and light chain hydrophobic interactions by residues F100c, A101 and L102 of CDR-H3. Therefore, we speculate that two such interactions were exerted by the residues W98 and F100c. A101 and L102 may have a synergistic effect on the increase in the binding affinity to HER2. AH06 specifically binds to domain IV of HER2, and it decreased the phosphorylation level of HER2 and AKT. Above all, it highly increased the overall level of p27 compared to hu4D5 in the gastric cancer cell line NCI-N82, suggesting that AH06 could potentially be a more efficient therapeutic agent than hu4D5. PMID:26743905

  15. Substitution of Heavy Complementarity Determining Region 3 (CDR-H3) Residues Can Synergistically Enhance Functional Activity of Antibody and Its Binding Affinity to HER2 Antigen.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seung Kee; Park, So Ra; Park, Ami; Oh, Hyun Mi; Shin, Hyun Jung; Jeon, Eun Ju; Kim, Seiwhan; Park, Hyun June; Yeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Young Je

    2016-03-01

    To generate a biobetter that has improved therapeutic activity, we constructed scFv libraries via random mutagenesis of several residues of CDR-H3 and -L3 of hu4D5. The scFv clones were isolated from the phage display libraries by stringent panning, and their anti-proliferative activity against HER2-positive cancer cells was evaluated as a primary selection criterion. Consequently, we selected AH06 as a biobetter antibody that had a 7.2-fold increase in anti-proliferative activity (IC50: 0.81 nM) against the gastric cancer cell line NCI-N87 and a 7.4-fold increase in binding affinity (KD: 60 pM) to HER2 compared to hu4D5. The binding energy calculation and molecular modeling suggest that the substitution of residues of CDR-H3 to W98, F100c, A101 and L102 could stabilize binding of the antibody to HER2 and there could be direct hydrophobic interactions between the aromatic ring of W98 and the aliphatic group of I613 within HER2 domain IV as well as the heavy and light chain hydrophobic interactions by residues F100c, A101 and L102 of CDR-H3. Therefore, we speculate that two such interactions were exerted by the residues W98 and F100c. A101 and L102 may have a synergistic effect on the increase in the binding affinity to HER2. AH06 specifically binds to domain IV of HER2, and it decreased the phosphorylation level of HER2 and AKT. Above all, it highly increased the overall level of p27 compared to hu4D5 in the gastric cancer cell line NCI-N82, suggesting that AH06 could potentially be a more efficient therapeutic agent than hu4D5.

  16. Affinity and folding properties both influence the selection of antibodies with the selectively infective phage (SIP) methodology.

    PubMed

    Pedrazzi, G; Schwesinger, F; Honegger, A; Krebber, C; Plückthun, A

    1997-10-01

    We investigated which molecules are selected from a model library by the selectively infective phage (SIP) methodology. As a model system, we used the fluorescein binding single-chain Fv fragment FITC-E2, and from a 3D-model, we identified 11 residues potentially involved in hapten binding and mutated them individually to alanines. The binding constant of each mutant was determined by fluorescence titration, and each mutant was tested individually as well as in competitive SIP experiments for infectivity. After three rounds of SIP, only molecules with KD values within a factor of 2 of the tightest binder remain, and among those, a mutant no longer carrying an unnecessary exposed tryptophan residue is preferentially selected. SIP is shown to select for the best overall properties of the displayed molecules, including folding behavior, stability and affinity.

  17. Separation and characterization of anti-benzylpenicilloyl (BPO) antibodies. I. Biochemical and biophysical properties of anti-BPO-IgG obtained by affinity and subsequent ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Scheiner, O; Stemberger, H; Kraft, D; Wiedermann, G

    1978-01-01

    Anti-BPO antibodies were purified by means of affinity chromatography using AH-Sepharose 4B coated with covalently bound BPO groups. Specific elution was achieved by the hapten analogue BPO-epsilon-aminocaproic acid (BPO-EACA); desorption of the remaining antibody was performed thereafter by 0.1 M acetic acid. The resulting antibody fractions--hapten-eluted antibody (H-Ab) and acid eluted antibody (A-Ab), respectively--were further separated by ion-exchange chromatography which led to the appearance of 3 subfractions in the case of H-Ab (H1, H2, H3) and 2 subfractions in the case of A-Ab (A1 and A2). In liquid isoelectrofocusing an inhomogeneous pattern resulted. The bulk of antibodies focused between pH 6.5 and 7.0. The average avidity of H-Ab was found to be higher than that of A-Ab suggesting that avidity may influence the elution pattern in affinity chromatography. The hydrophobic influence of the "spacer" and/or interactions of antibodies directed against the hydrophobic regions of the BPO group may explain why a considerable part of the antibodies could be recovered from the immunosorbent only by acid elution.

  18. Capillary electrophoresis of affinity complexes between subviral 80S particles of human rhinovirus and monoclonal antibody 2G2.

    PubMed

    Kremser, Leopold; Petsch, Martina; Blaas, Dieter; Kenndler, Ernst

    2006-07-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs), the main etiologic agents of the common cold, transform into subviral B- or 80S particles (they sediment at 80S upon sucrose density gradient centrifugation) during infection and, in vitro, upon exposure to a temperature between 50 and 56 degrees C. With respect to the native virion they lack the genomic RNA and the viral capsid protein VP4. 80S particles are unstable and easily disintegrate into their components, VP1, VP2, and VP3 in buffers containing SDS. However, this detergent was found to be a necessary constituent of the BGE for the analysis of these viruses and their complexes with receptors and antibodies by CE. We here demonstrate that dodecylpoly(ethyleneglycol ether) (D-PEG) a nonionic detergent, is suitable for analysis of subviral particles as it preserves their integrity, in contrast to SDS. Electrophoresis of the 80S particles in borate buffer (pH 8.3, 100 mM) containing 10 mM D-PEG resulted in a well-defined electrophoretic peak. The identity of the peak was confirmed, among other means, by complexation with mAb 2G2, which recognizes a structural epitope exclusively present on subviral particles but not on native virus. Upon incubation of the 80S particles with mAb 2G2 the peak disappeared, but a new peak, attributed to the antibody complex emerged. The separation system allowed following the time course of the transformation of intact HRV serotype 2 into 80S particles upon incubation at temperatures between 40 and 65 degrees C. We also demonstrate that subviral particles derived from HRV2 labeled with the fluorescence dyes FITC or Cy3.5 were stable in the separation system containing D-PEG. Dye-modified particles were still recognized by mAb 2G2, suggesting that the exposed lysines that are derivatized by the reagent do not form part of the epitope of the antibody.

  19. Natural and man-made V-gene repertoires for antibody discovery

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, William J. J.; Almagro, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies are the fastest-growing segment of the biologics market. The success of antibody-based drugs resides in their exquisite specificity, high potency, stability, solubility, safety, and relatively inexpensive manufacturing process in comparison with other biologics. We outline here the structural studies and fundamental principles that define how antibodies interact with diverse targets. We also describe the antibody repertoires and affinity maturation mechanisms of humans, mice, and chickens, plus the use of novel single-domain antibodies in camelids and sharks. These species all utilize diverse evolutionary solutions to generate specific and high affinity antibodies and illustrate the plasticity of natural antibody repertoires. In addition, we discuss the multiple variations of man-made antibody repertoires designed and validated in the last two decades, which have served as tools to explore how the size, diversity, and composition of a repertoire impact the antibody discovery process. PMID:23162556

  20. Germinal center B cells govern their own fate via antibody feedback

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; George, Laura A.; Figge, Marc Thilo; Khan, Mahmood; Goodall, Margaret; Young, Stephen P.; Reynolds, Adam; Falciani, Francesco; Waisman, Ari; Notley, Clare A.; Ehrenstein, Michael R.; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Affinity maturation of B cells in germinal centers (GCs) is a process of evolution, involving random mutation of immunoglobulin genes followed by natural selection by T cells. Only B cells that have acquired antigen are able to interact with T cells. Antigen acquisition is dependent on the interaction of B cells with immune complexes inside GCs. It is not clear how efficient selection of B cells is maintained while their affinity matures. Here we show that the B cells’ own secreted products, antibodies, regulate GC selection by limiting antigen access. By manipulating the GC response with monoclonal antibodies of defined affinities, we show that antibodies in GCs are in affinity-dependent equilibrium with antibodies produced outside and that restriction of antigen access influences B cell selection, seen as variations in apoptosis, plasma cell output, T cell interaction, and antibody affinity. Feedback through antibodies produced by GC-derived plasma cells can explain how GCs maintain an adequate directional selection pressure over a large range of affinities throughout the course of an immune response, accelerating the emergence of B cells of highest affinities. Furthermore, this mechanism may explain how spatially separated GCs communicate and how the GC reaction terminates. PMID:23420879

  1. Preclinical evaluation of multistep targeting of diasialoganglioside GD2 using a IgG-scFv bispecific antibody with high affinity for GD2 and DOTA metal complex

    PubMed Central

    Cheal, Sarah M.; Xu, Hong; Guo, Hong-fen; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Larson, Steven M.; Cheung, Nai-Kong

    2014-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies (BsAb) have proven to be useful targeting vectors for pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT). We sought to overcome key PRIT limitations such as high renal radiation exposure and immunogenicity (e.g. of streptavidin-antibody fusions), to advance clinical translation of this PRIT strategy for diasialoganglioside GD2-positive (GD2(+)) tumors. For this purpose, a IgG-scFv BsAb was engineered using the sequences for the anti-GD2 humanized monoclonal antibody hu3F8 (1) and C825, a murine scFv antibody with high affinity for the chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) complexed with beta-particle emitting radiometals such as 177Lu and 90Y (2, 3). A three-step regimen including hu3F8-C825, a dextran-based clearing agent, and p-aminobenzyl-DOTA radiolabeled with 177Lu (as 177Lu-DOTA-Bn; t1/2 = 6.71 days (d)) was optimized in immunocompromised mice carrying subcutaneous (s.c.) human GD2(+) neuroblastoma (NB) xenografts. Absorbed doses for tumor and normal tissues were ∼85 cGy/MBq and ≤3.7 cGy/MBq, respectively, with therapeutic indicies (TI) of 142 for blood and 23 for kidney. A therapy study (n = 5 per group; tumor volume: 240 ± 160 mm3) with three successive PRIT cycles (total 177Lu: ∼33 MBq; tumor dose ∼3400 cGy), revealed complete tumor response in 5/5 animals, with no recurrence up to 28 d post-treatment. Tumor ablation was confirmed histologically in 4/5 mice, and normal organs showed minimal overall toxicities. All non-treated mice required sacrifice within 12 d (>1.0 cm3 tumor volume). We conclude that this novel anti-GD2 PRIT approach has sufficient TI to successfully ablate s.c. GD2(+)–NB in mice while sparing kidney and bone marrow. PMID:24944121

  2. Efficacy, but not antibody titer or affinity, of a heroin hapten conjugate vaccine correlates with increasing hapten densities on tetanus toxoid, but not on CRM197 carriers.

    PubMed

    Jalah, Rashmi; Torres, Oscar B; Mayorov, Alexander V; Li, Fuying; Antoline, Joshua F G; Jacobson, Arthur E; Rice, Kenner C; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Beck, Zoltan; Alving, Carl R; Matyas, Gary R

    2015-06-17

    Vaccines against drugs of abuse have induced antibodies in animals that blocked the biological effects of the drug by sequestering the drug in the blood and preventing it from crossing the blood-brain barrier. Drugs of abuse are too small to induce antibodies and, therefore, require conjugation of drug hapten analogs to a carrier protein. The efficacy of these conjugate vaccines depends on several factors including hapten design, coupling strategy, hapten density, carrier protein selection, and vaccine adjuvant. Previously, we have shown that 1 (MorHap), a heroin/morphine hapten, conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT) and mixed with liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A [L(MPLA)] as adjuvant, partially blocked the antinociceptive effects of heroin in mice. Herein, we extended those findings, demonstrating greatly improved vaccine induced antinociceptive effects up to 3% mean maximal potential effect (%MPE). This was obtained by evaluating the effects of vaccine efficacy of hapten 1 vaccine conjugates with varying hapten densities using two different commonly used carrier proteins, TT and cross-reactive material 197 (CRM197). Immunization of mice with these conjugates mixed with L(MPLA) induced very high anti-1 IgG peak levels of 400-1500 μg/mL that bound to both heroin and its metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine. Except for the lowest hapten density for each carrier, the antibody titers and affinity were independent of hapten density. The TT carrier based vaccines induced long-lived inhibition of heroin-induced antinociception that correlated with increasing hapten density. The best formulation contained TT with the highest hapten density of ≥30 haptens/TT molecule and induced %MPE of approximately 3% after heroin challenge. In contrast, the best formulation using CRM197 was with intermediate 1 densities (10-15 haptens/CRM197 molecule), but the %MPE was approximately 13%. In addition, the chemical synthesis of 1, the optimization of the conjugation

  3. Developing recombinant antibodies for biomarker detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Miller, Keith D.; Kagen, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have an essential role in biomarker validation and diagnostic assays. A barrier to pursuing these applications is the reliance on immunization and hybridomas to produce mAbs, which is time-consuming and may not yield the desired mAb. We recommend a process flow for affinity reagent production that utilizes combinatorial protein display systems (eg, yeast surface display or phage display) rather than hybridomas. These systems link a selectable phenotype-binding conferred by an antibody fragment-with a means for recovering the encoding gene. Recombinant libraries obtained from immunizations can produce high-affinity antibodies (<10 nM) more quickly than other methods. Non-immune libraries provide an alternate route when immunizations are not possible, or when suitable mAbs are not recovered from an immune library. Directed molecular evolution (DME) is an integral part of optimizing mAbs obtained from combinatorial protein display, but can also be used on hybridoma-derived mAbs. Variants can easily be obtained and screened to increase the affinity of the parent mAb (affinity maturation). We discuss examples where DME has been used to tailor affinity reagents to specific applications. Combinatorial protein display also provides an accessible method for identifying antibody pairs, which are necessary for sandwich-type diagnostic assays.

  4. OptMAVEn – A New Framework for the de novo Design of Antibody Variable Region Models Targeting Specific Antigen Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Pantazes, Robert J.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics provides novel and efficacious treatments for a number of diseases. Traditional experimental approaches for designing therapeutic antibodies rely on raising antibodies against a target antigen in an immunized animal or directed evolution of antibodies with low affinity for the desired antigen. However, these methods remain time consuming, cannot target a specific epitope and do not lead to broad design principles informing other studies. Computational design methods can overcome some of these limitations by using biophysics models to rationally select antibody parts that maximize affinity for a target antigen epitope. This has been addressed to some extend by OptCDR for the design of complementary determining regions. Here, we extend this earlier contribution by addressing the de novo design of a model of the entire antibody variable region against a given antigen epitope while safeguarding for immunogenicity (Optimal Method for Antibody Variable region Engineering, OptMAVEn). OptMAVEn simulates in silico the in vivo steps of antibody generation and evolution, and is capable of capturing the critical structural features responsible for affinity maturation of antibodies. In addition, a humanization procedure was developed and incorporated into OptMAVEn to minimize the potential immunogenicity of the designed antibody models. As case studies, OptMAVEn was applied to design models of neutralizing antibodies targeting influenza hemagglutinin and HIV gp120. For both HA and gp120, novel computational antibody models with numerous interactions with their target epitopes were generated. The observed rates of mutations and types of amino acid changes during in silico affinity maturation are consistent with what has been observed during in vivo affinity maturation. The results demonstrate that OptMAVEn can efficiently generate diverse computational antibody models with both optimized binding affinity to antigens and reduced immunogenicity. PMID

  5. The challenges of modelling antibody repertoire dynamics in HIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-07-20

    Antibody affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation of B-cell immunoglobulin variable region genes has been studied for decades in various model systems using well-defined antigens. While much is known about the molecular details of the process, our understanding of the selective forces that generate affinity maturation are less well developed, particularly in the case of a co-evolving pathogen such as HIV. Despite this gap in understanding, high-throughput antibody sequence data are increasingly being collected to investigate the evolutionary trajectories of antibody lineages in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we review what is known in controlled experimental systems about the mechanisms underlying antibody selection and compare this to the observed temporal patterns of antibody evolution in HIV infection. In addition, we describe how our current understanding of antibody selection mechanisms leaves questions about antibody dynamics in HIV infection unanswered. Without a mechanistic understanding of antibody selection in the context of a co-evolving viral population, modelling and analysis of antibody sequences in HIV-infected individuals will be limited in their interpretation and predictive ability.

  6. The challenges of modelling antibody repertoire dynamics in HIV infection

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-07-20

    Antibody affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation of B-cell immunoglobulin variable region genes has been studied for decades in various model systems using well-defined antigens. While much is known about the molecular details of the process, our understanding of the selective forces that generate affinity maturation are less well developed, particularly in the case of a co-evolving pathogen such as HIV. Despite this gap in understanding, high-throughput antibody sequence data are increasingly being collected to investigate the evolutionary trajectories of antibody lineages in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we review what is known in controlled experimental systems about the mechanisms underlying antibody selectionmore » and compare this to the observed temporal patterns of antibody evolution in HIV infection. In addition, we describe how our current understanding of antibody selection mechanisms leaves questions about antibody dynamics in HIV infection unanswered. Without a mechanistic understanding of antibody selection in the context of a co-evolving viral population, modelling and analysis of antibody sequences in HIV-infected individuals will be limited in their interpretation and predictive ability.« less

  7. Focused Evolution of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Revealed by Structures and Deep Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xueling; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Baoshan; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wang, Charlene; Chen, Xuejun; Longo, Nancy S.; Louder, Mark; McKee, Krisha; O’Dell, Sijy; Perfetto, Stephen; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Shi, Wei; Wu, Lan; Yang, Yongping; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Zhongjia; Zhang, Zhenhai; Bonsignori, Mattia; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Simek, Melissa; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Connors, Mark; Mullikin, James C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Roederer, Mario; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.

    2013-03-04

    Antibody VRC01 is a human immunoglobulin that neutralizes about 90% of HIV-1 isolates. To understand how such broadly neutralizing antibodies develop, we used x-ray crystallography and 454 pyrosequencing to characterize additional VRC01-like antibodies from HIV-1-infected individuals. Crystal structures revealed a convergent mode of binding for diverse antibodies to the same CD4-binding-site epitope. A functional genomics analysis of expressed heavy and light chains revealed common pathways of antibody-heavy chain maturation, confined to the IGHV1-2*02 lineage, involving dozens of somatic changes, and capable of pairing with different light chains. Broadly neutralizing HIV-1 immunity associated with VRC01-like antibodies thus involves the evolution of antibodies to a highly affinity-matured state required to recognize an invariant viral structure, with lineages defined from thousands of sequences providing a genetic roadmap of their development.

  8. Sequencing Antibody Repertoires Provides Evidence for Original Antigenic Sin Shaping the Antibody Response to Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yann-Chong; Scalfone, Lisa K.; Kongpachith, Sarah; Ju, Chia-Hsin; Cai, Xiaoyong; Lindstrom, Tamsin M.; Sokolove, Jeremy; Robinson, William H.

    2014-01-01

    We used a DNA barcoding method to enable high-throughput sequencing of the cognate heavy- and light-chain pairs of expressed antibodies. We used this approach to elucidate the plasmablast antibody response to influenza vaccination. We show that >75% of the rationally selected plasmablast antibodies bind and neutralize influenza, and that antibodies from clonal families, defined by sharing both heavy chain VJ and light chain VJ sequence usage, do so most effectively. Vaccine-induced heavy chain VJ regions contained on average >20 nucleotide mutations as compared to their predicted germline gene sequences, and some vaccine-induced antibodies exhibited higher binding affinities for hemagglutinins derived from prior years’ seasonal influenza as compared to their affinities for the immunization strains. Our results show that influenza vaccination induces the recall of memory B cells that express antibodies that previously underwent affinity maturation against prior years’ seasonal influenza, suggesting that ‘original antigenic sin’ shapes the antibody response to influenza vaccination. PMID:24525048

  9. MicroRNA-155 controls affinity-based selection by protecting c-MYC+ B cells from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Rinako; Leyland, Rebecca; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Lu, Dong; Turner, Martin; Arbore, Giuseppina; Phan, Tri Giang; Brink, Robert; Vigorito, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The production of high-affinity antibodies by B cells is essential for pathogen clearance. Antibody affinity for antigen is increased through the affinity maturation in germinal centers (GCs). This is an iterative process in which B cells cycle between proliferation coupled with the acquisition of mutations and antigen-based positive selection, resulting in retention of the highest-affinity B cell clones. The posttranscriptional regulator microRNA-155 (miR-155) is critical for efficient affinity maturation and the maintenance of the GCs; however, the cellular and molecular mechanism by which miR-155 regulates GC responses is not well understood. Here, we utilized a miR-155 reporter mouse strain and showed that miR-155 is coexpressed with the proto-oncogene encoding c-MYC in positively selected B cells. Functionally, miR-155 protected positively selected c-MYC+ B cells from apoptosis, allowing clonal expansion of this population, providing an explanation as to why Mir155 deletion impairs affinity maturation and promotes the premature collapse of GCs. We determined that miR-155 directly inhibits the Jumonji family member JARID2, which enhances B cell apoptosis when overexpressed, and thereby promotes GC B cell survival. Our findings also suggest that there is cooperation between c-MYC and miR-155 during the normal GC response, a cooperation that may explain how c-MYC and miR-155 can collaboratively function as oncogenes.

  10. MicroRNA-155 controls affinity-based selection by protecting c-MYC+ B cells from apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Rinako; Leyland, Rebecca; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Lu, Dong; Turner, Martin; Arbore, Giuseppina; Phan, Tri Giang; Brink, Robert; Vigorito, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The production of high-affinity antibodies by B cells is essential for pathogen clearance. Antibody affinity for antigen is increased through the affinity maturation in germinal centers (GCs). This is an iterative process in which B cells cycle between proliferation coupled with the acquisition of mutations and antigen-based positive selection, resulting in retention of the highest-affinity B cell clones. The posttranscriptional regulator microRNA-155 (miR-155) is critical for efficient affinity maturation and the maintenance of the GCs; however, the cellular and molecular mechanism by which miR-155 regulates GC responses is not well understood. Here, we utilized a miR-155 reporter mouse strain and showed that miR-155 is coexpressed with the proto-oncogene encoding c-MYC in positively selected B cells. Functionally, miR-155 protected positively selected c-MYC+ B cells from apoptosis, allowing clonal expansion of this population, providing an explanation as to why Mir155 deletion impairs affinity maturation and promotes the premature collapse of GCs. We determined that miR-155 directly inhibits the Jumonji family member JARID2, which enhances B cell apoptosis when overexpressed, and thereby promotes GC B cell survival. Our findings also suggest that there is cooperation between c-MYC and miR-155 during the normal GC response, a cooperation that may explain how c-MYC and miR-155 can collaboratively function as oncogenes. PMID:26657861

  11. Femtomolar Fab binding affinities to a protein target by alternative CDR residue co-optimization strategies without phage or cell surface display

    PubMed Central

    Plittersdorf, Hanna; Hesse, Oliver; Scheidig, Andreas; Strerath, Michael; Gritzan, Uwe; Pellengahr, Klaus; Scholz, Peter; Eicker, Andrea; Myszka, David; Haupts, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In therapeutic or diagnostic antibody discovery, affinity maturation is frequently required to optimize binding properties. In some cases, achieving very high affinity is challenging using the display-based optimization technologies. Here we present an approach that begins with the creation and clonal, quantitative analysis of soluble Fab libraries with complete diversification in adjacent residue pairs encompassing every complementarity-determining region position. This was followed by alternative recombination approaches and high throughput screening to co-optimize large sets of the found improving mutations. We applied this approach to the affinity maturation of the anti-tumor necrosis factor antibody adalimumab and achieved ~500-fold affinity improvement, resulting in femtomolar binding. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the in vitro engineering of a femtomolar affinity antibody against a protein target without display screening. We compare our findings to a previous report that employed extensive mutagenesis and recombination libraries with yeast display screening. The present approach is widely applicable to the most challenging of affinity maturation efforts. PMID:22531438

  12. Antibody microinjection reveals an essential role for human polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) in the functional maturation of mitotic centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Mammalian polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is structurally related to the polo gene product of Drosophila melanogaster, Cdc5p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and plo1+ of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a newly emerging family of serine-threonine kinases implicated in cell cycle regulation. Based on data obtained for its putative homologues in invertebrates and yeasts, human Plk1 is suspected to regulate some fundamental aspect(s) of mitosis, but no direct experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis has previously been reported. In this study, we have used a cell duplication, microinjection assay to investigate the in vivo function of Plk1 in both immortalized (HeLa) and nonimmortalized (Hs68) human cells. Injection of anti-Plk1 antibodies (Plk1+) at various stages of the cell cycle had no effect on the kinetics of DNA replication but severely impaired the ability of cells to divide. Analysis of Plk1(+)-injected, mitotically arrested HeLa cells by fluorescence microscopy revealed abnormal distributions of condensed chromatin and monoastral microtubule arrays that were nucleated from duplicated but unseparated centrosomes. Most strikingly, centrosomes in Plk1(+)-injected cells were drastically reduced in size, and the accumulation of both gamma-tubulin and MPM-2 immunoreactivity was impaired. These data indicate that Plk1 activity is necessary for the functional maturation of centrosomes in late G2/early prophase and, consequently, for the establishment of a bipolar spindle. Additional roles for Plk1 at later stages of mitosis are not excluded, although injection of Plk1+ after the completion of spindle formation did not interfere with cytokinesis. Injection of Plk1+ into nonimmortalized Hs68 cells produced qualitatively similar phenotypes, but the vast majority of the injected Hs68 cells arrested as single, mononucleated cells in G2. This latter observation hints at the existence, in nonimmortalized cells, of a centrosome-maturation checkpoint sensitive to the impairment

  13. Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Gary R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents selected recent advances in immobilization chemistry which have important connections to affinity chromatography. Discusses ligand immobilization and support modification. Cites 51 references. (CS)

  14. Rigidity Emerges during Antibody Evolution in Three Distinct Antibody Systems: Evidence from QSFR Analysis of Fab Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Tracka, Malgorzata B.; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Jacobs, Donald J.; Livesay, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of somatic mutations that transform polyspecific germline (GL) antibodies to affinity mature (AM) antibodies with monospecificity are compared among three GL-AM Fab pairs. In particular, changes in conformational flexibility are assessed using a Distance Constraint Model (DCM). We have previously established that the DCM can be robustly applied across a series of antibody fragments (VL to Fab), and subsequently, the DCM was combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to similarly characterize five thermostabilizing scFv mutants. The DCM is an ensemble based statistical mechanical approach that accounts for enthalpy/entropy compensation due to network rigidity, which has been quite successful in elucidating conformational flexibility and Quantitative Stability/Flexibility Relationships (QSFR) in proteins. Applied to three disparate antibody systems changes in QSFR quantities indicate that the VH domain is typically rigidified, whereas the VL domain and CDR L2 loop become more flexible during affinity maturation. The increase in CDR H3 loop rigidity is consistent with other studies in the literature. The redistribution of conformational flexibility is largely controlled by nonspecific changes in the H-bond network, although certain Arg to Asp salt bridges create highly localized rigidity increases. Taken together, these results reveal an intricate flexibility/rigidity response that accompanies affinity maturation. PMID:26132144

  15. Rigidity Emerges during Antibody Evolution in Three Distinct Antibody Systems: Evidence from QSFR Analysis of Fab Fragments.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Tracka, Malgorzata B; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Jacobs, Donald J; Livesay, Dennis R

    2015-07-01

    The effects of somatic mutations that transform polyspecific germline (GL) antibodies to affinity mature (AM) antibodies with monospecificity are compared among three GL-AM Fab pairs. In particular, changes in conformational flexibility are assessed using a Distance Constraint Model (DCM). We have previously established that the DCM can be robustly applied across a series of antibody fragments (VL to Fab), and subsequently, the DCM was combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to similarly characterize five thermostabilizing scFv mutants. The DCM is an ensemble based statistical mechanical approach that accounts for enthalpy/entropy compensation due to network rigidity, which has been quite successful in elucidating conformational flexibility and Quantitative Stability/Flexibility Relationships (QSFR) in proteins. Applied to three disparate antibody systems changes in QSFR quantities indicate that the VH domain is typically rigidified, whereas the VL domain and CDR L2 loop become more flexible during affinity maturation. The increase in CDR H3 loop rigidity is consistent with other studies in the literature. The redistribution of conformational flexibility is largely controlled by nonspecific changes in the H-bond network, although certain Arg to Asp salt bridges create highly localized rigidity increases. Taken together, these results reveal an intricate flexibility/rigidity response that accompanies affinity maturation.

  16. Novel Human Three-Domain Antibody Fragments Against sTNFα as Well as tmTNFα with High Affinity Generated by the Combination of Ribosome Display and E. coli Expression System.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X-L; Tian, L-F; Zhang, S-J; Li, J-M; Feng, H; Wang, L-M; Wang, S; Wang, J; Wang, T; Chen, W-Q

    2016-04-01

    Human tumour necrosis factor α (hTNFα) has been proved to be a validated therapeutic target in a number of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs). Fully human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that can neutralize soluble hTNFα (sTNFα) as well as transmembrane hTNFα (tmTNFα) are more desirable hTNFα antagonists. Here, we report that novel anti-hTNFα human low-molecular-weight MAbs have been selected and identified using both sTNFα and tmTNFα as target antigens by the combination of ribosome display and E. coli expression system for the first time. As a newly born engineering small molecular antibody, three-domain antibody fragment (VH /κ) provides an alternative promising molecular principle to generate biological agents for TNFα-dependent IMIDs. In this study, a panel of novel human VH /κs (F09, F21, F49 and F409) with high affinity (10(-10) -10(-9) mol/l) to neutralize sTNFα as well as tmTNFα was generated by the combination of ribosome display and E. coli expression system. Among the four clones, F21 and F409 could reduce cytotoxicity on L929 cells induced by sTNFα as well as tmTNFα effectively, and both of them had great potential to inhibit hTNFα-mediated NF-κB activation. Soluble F21 and F409 were also able to inhibit the binding of hTNFα to TNFR1 and TNFR2. The new human antibodies described here have desirable capability to neutralize sTNFα as well as tmTNFα effectively with high affinity and reasonable stability; this may provide an alternative approach for patients who are not responding adequately to currently available anti-TNFα agents. PMID:26860639

  17. Natural monoclonal antibodies and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vollmers, Peter H; Brändlein, Stephanie

    2008-06-01

    Immunity is responsible for recognition and elimination of infectious particles and for removal of cellular waste, modified self structures and transformed cells. Innate or natural immunity acts as a first line defense and is also the link to acquired immunity and memory. By using the human hybridoma technology, a series of monoclonal antibodies and several new tumor-specific targets could be identified. A striking phenomenon of immunity against malignant cells is that all so far isolated tumor-specific antibodies were germ-line coded natural IgM antibodies. And neither in animals nor in humans affinity-maturated tumor-specific IgG antibodies have been detected so far. These IgM's preferentially bind to carbohydrate epitopes on post-transcriptionally modified surface receptors, which are recently patented and preferentially remove malignant cells by inducing apoptosis to avoid inflammatory processes. Our "biology-" or "function-driven" method represents a unique yet powerful approach compared to the typical approaches on screening compounds or antibodies against non-validated targets (mostly differentially expressed). Moreover, the approach creates a competitive patenting strategy of creating proprietary antibodies and validated targets at the same time, which has the potential of further streamlining the discovery of new cancer therapies. PMID:18537750

  18. Serial studies on the affinity and heterogeneity of human autoantibodies to thyroglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Devey, M E; Bleasdale-Barr, K M; McLachlan, S M; Bradbury, J; Clark, F; Young, E T

    1989-01-01

    The functional affinity and heterogeneity of autoantibodies to thyroglobulin (Tg) were measured by an IgG subclass-specific solid-phase competition ELISA in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. High-affinity IgG1 and IgG4 antibodies formed the major anti-Tg response. Both titre and affinity of IgG3 and IgG2 anti-Tg were generally low but in some Hashimoto's disease patients high-affinity IgG2 anti-Tg were found and IgG2 anti-Tg, unlike those of other subclasses, showed very restricted heterogeneity. The affinity of IgG4 anti-Tg was similar in patients with thyroid disease and their clinically euthyroid (normal) relatives. In contrast, a progressive increase in IgG1 anti-Tg affinity was seen in clinically euthyroid individuals compared with their relatives with thyroid disease and high titred Hashimoto's disease patients, suggesting that either rising titres of high affinity IgG1 anti-Tg or affinity maturation of IgG1 anti-Tg may be indicative of impending hypothyroidism. PMID:2776357

  19. Comparison of affinity chromatography and adsorption to vaccinia virus recombinant infected cells for depletion of antibodies directed against respiratory syncytial virus glycoproteins present in a human immunoglobulin preparation.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Patricia; Melero, José A; García-Barreno, Blanca; Palomo, Concepción

    2005-06-01

    Antibodies directed against human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) glycoproteins were depleted from a commercial immunoglobulin preparation (RespiGam) by two different methods. The first method consisted of repeated adsorption of RespiGam to Sepharose beads with covalently bound soluble forms of the two major viral glycoproteins (F or G). The second method consisted of adsorption of immunoglobulins to live cells expressing F or G glycoproteins on their surfaces after infection with vaccinia virus recombinants. While the first method removed efficiently antibodies that reacted with F and/or G glycoproteins by ELISA, it was inefficient in the elimination of anti-HRSV neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, the second method removed efficiently anti-HRSV antibodies that both reacted by ELISA and neutralized virus infectivity. These results confirm that human neutralizing antibodies are directed exclusively against HRSV F and G glycoproteins, and, they raise the possibility that F and G glycoproteins inserted into cell membranes differ antigenically from their soluble forms linked covalently to Sepharose beads.

  20. How to assess the binding strength of antibodies elicited by vaccination against HIV and other viruses

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vaccines that protect against viral infections generally induce neutralizing antibodies. When vaccines are evaluated, the need arises to assess the affinity maturation of the antibody responses. Binding titers of polyclonal sera depend not only on the affinities of the constituent antibodies but also on their individual concentrations, which are difficult to ascertain. Therefore an assay based on chaotrope disruption of antibody-antigen complexes was designed for measuring binding strength. This assay works well with many viral antigens but gives differential results depending on the conformational dependence of epitopes on complex antigens such as the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1. Kinetic binding assays might offer alternatives, since they can measure average off-rate constants for polyclonal antibodies in a serum. Here, potentials and fallacies of these techniques are discussed. PMID:26641943

  1. A dynamic mathematical model for monoclonal antibody N-linked glycosylation and nucleotide sugar donor transport within a maturing Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Jimenez del Val, Ioscani; Nagy, Judit M; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are one of the most important products of the biopharmaceutical industry. Their therapeutic efficacy depends on the post-translational process of glycosylation, which is influenced by manufacturing process conditions. Herein, we present a dynamic mathematical model for mAb glycosylation that considers cisternal maturation by approximating the Golgi apparatus to a plug flow reactor and by including recycling of Golgi-resident proteins (glycosylation enzymes and transport proteins [TPs]). The glycosylation reaction rate expressions were derived based on the reported kinetic mechanisms for each enzyme, and transport of nucleotide sugar donors [NSDs] from the cytosol to the Golgi lumen was modeled to serve as a link between glycosylation and cellular metabolism. Optimization-based methodologies were developed for estimating unknown enzyme and TP concentration profile parameters. The resulting model is capable of reproducing glycosylation profiles of commercial mAbs. It can further reproduce the effect gene silencing of the FucT glycosylation enzyme and cytosolic NSD depletion have on the mAb oligosaccharide profile. All novel elements of our model are based on biological evidence and generate more accurate results than previous reports. We therefore believe that the improvements contribute to a more detailed representation of the N-linked glycosylation process. The overall results show the potential of our model toward evaluating cell engineering strategies that yield desired glycosylation profiles. Additionally, when coupled to cellular metabolism, this model could be used to assess the effect of process conditions on glycosylation and aid in the design, control, and optimization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes.

  2. Correlation of IgE/IgG4 milk epitopes and affinity of milk-specific IgE antibodies with different phenotypes of clinical milk allergy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Julie; Lin, Jing; Bardina, Ludmilla; Goldis, Marina; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna; Shreffler, Wayne G.; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Results from large-scale epitope mapping using peptide microarray have been shown to correlate with clinical features of milk allergy. Objectives We sought to assess IgE and IgG4 epitope diversity and IgE affinity in different clinical phenotypes of milk allergy and identify informative epitopes that may be predictive of clinical outcomes of milk allergy. Methods Forty-one subjects were recruited from a larger study on the effects of ingesting heat-denatured milk proteins in milk-allergic individuals. Using food challenges, subjects were characterized as clinically reactive to all forms of milk (n = 17), tolerant to heated milk (HM) products (n = 16), or outgrown their milk allergy (n = 8). Eleven non-milk allergic, healthy volunteers served as controls. Peptide microarray was performed using the previously published protocol. Results Milk allergic subjects had increased epitope diversity as compared to those who outgrew their allergy. HM tolerant subjects had IgE binding patterns similar to those who had outgrown their allergy, but IgG4 binding patterns that were more similar to the allergic group. Binding to higher numbers of IgE peptides was associated with more severe allergic reactions during challenge. There was no association between IgG4 peptides and clinical features of milk allergy. Using a competitive peptide microarray assay, allergic patients demonstrated a combination of high and low affinity IgE binding whereas HM tolerant subjects and those who had outgrown their milk allergy had primarily low affinity binding. Conclusions Greater IgE epitope diversity and higher affinity as determined by peptide microarray were associated with clinical phenotypes and severity of milk allergy. PMID:20226304

  3. Production and characterization of high-affinity human monoclonal antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins in a mouse model expressing human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Neil C; Davies, Sarah L; Jeffs, Simon A; Vieira, Sueli M; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2007-02-01

    Human (Hu) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) are useful tools in the structural and functional analysis of Env, are under development both as potential prophylaxis and as therapy for established HIV-1 infection, and have crucial roles in guiding the design of preventative vaccines. Despite representing more than 50% of infections globally, no MAbs have been generated in any species against C clade HIV-1 Env. To generate HuMAbs to a novel Chinese C clade Env vaccine candidate (primary isolate strain HIV-1(97CN54)), we used BAB5 mice that express a human immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody repertoire in place of endogenous murine immunoglobulins. When immunized with HIV-1(97CN54) Env, these mice developed antigen-specific IgM antibodies. Hybridoma fusions using splenocytes from these mice enabled the isolation of two Env-specific IgM HuMAbs: N3C5 and N03B11. N3C5 bound to HIV-1 Env from clades A and C, whereas N03B11 bound two geographically distant clade C isolates but not Env from other clades. These HuMAbs bind conformational epitopes within the immunodominant region of the gp41 ectodomain. N3C5 weakly neutralized the autologous isolate in the absence of complement and weakly enhanced infection in the presence of complement. N03B11 has no effect on infectivity in either the presence or the absence of complement. These novel HuMAbs are useful reagents for the study of HIV-1 Env relevant to the global pandemic, and mice producing human immunoglobulin present a tool for the production of such antibodies.

  4. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  5. Semi-quantitative Measurement of a Specific Glycoform Using a DNA-tagged Antibody and Lectin Affinity Chromatography for Glyco-biomarker Development*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hee; Cho, Chang Hee; Kim, Sun Hee; Kang, Jeong Gu; Yoo, Jong Shin; Chang, Chulhun Ludgerus; Ko, Jeong-Heon; Kim, Yong-Sam

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation-targeted disease biomarker development is based on cumulative evidence that certain glycoforms are mass-produced in a disease-specific manner. However, the development process has been hampered by the absence of an efficient validation method based on a sensitive and multiplexed platform. In particular, ELISA-based analytical tools are not adequate for this purpose, mainly because of the presence of a pair of N-glycans of IgG-type antibodies. To overcome the associated hurdles in this study, antibodies were tagged with oligonucleotides with T7 promoter and then allowed to form a complex with corresponding antigens. An antibody-bound specific glycoform was isolated by lectin chromatography and quantitatively measured on a DNA microarray chip following production of fluorescent RNA by T7-trascription. This tool ensured measurement of targeted glycoforms of multiple biomarkers with high sensitivity and multiplexity. This analytical method was applied to an in vitro diagnostic multivariate index assay where a panel of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) biomarkers comprising alpha-fetoprotein, hemopexin, and alpha-2-macroglobulin (A2M) was examined in terms of the serum level and their fuco-fractions. The results indicated that the tests using the multiplexed fuco-biomarkers provided improved discriminatory power between non- hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma subjects compared with the alpha-fetoprotein level or fuco-alpha-fetoprotein test alone. The developed method is expected to facilitate the validation of disease-specific glycan biomarker candidates. PMID:25525205

  6. Semi-quantitative measurement of a specific glycoform using a DNA-tagged antibody and lectin affinity chromatography for glyco-biomarker development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hee; Cho, Chang Hee; Kim, Sun Hee; Kang, Jeong Gu; Yoo, Jong Shin; Chang, Chulhun Ludgerus; Ko, Jeong-Heon; Kim, Yong-Sam

    2015-03-01

    Aberrant glycosylation-targeted disease biomarker development is based on cumulative evidence that certain glycoforms are mass-produced in a disease-specific manner. However, the development process has been hampered by the absence of an efficient validation method based on a sensitive and multiplexed platform. In particular, ELISA-based analytical tools are not adequate for this purpose, mainly because of the presence of a pair of N-glycans of IgG-type antibodies. To overcome the associated hurdles in this study, antibodies were tagged with oligonucleotides with T7 promoter and then allowed to form a complex with corresponding antigens. An antibody-bound specific glycoform was isolated by lectin chromatography and quantitatively measured on a DNA microarray chip following production of fluorescent RNA by T7-trascription. This tool ensured measurement of targeted glycoforms of multiple biomarkers with high sensitivity and multiplexity. This analytical method was applied to an in vitro diagnostic multivariate index assay where a panel of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) biomarkers comprising alpha-fetoprotein, hemopexin, and alpha-2-macroglobulin (A2M) was examined in terms of the serum level and their fuco-fractions. The results indicated that the tests using the multiplexed fuco-biomarkers provided improved discriminatory power between non- hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma subjects compared with the alpha-fetoprotein level or fuco-alpha-fetoprotein test alone. The developed method is expected to facilitate the validation of disease-specific glycan biomarker candidates. PMID:25525205

  7. Phase 1/2 study of ocaratuzumab, an Fc-engineered humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, in low-affinity FcγRIIIa patients with previously treated follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ganjoo, Kristen N; de Vos, Sven; Pohlman, Brad L; Flinn, Ian W; Forero-Torres, Andres; Enas, Nathan H; Cronier, Damien M; Dang, Nam H; Foon, Kenneth A; Carpenter, Susan P; Slapak, Christopher A; Link, Brian K; Smith, Mitchell R; Mapara, Markus Y; Wooldridge, James E

    2015-01-01

    This phase 2 study assessed the safety and efficacy of ocaratuzumab, a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody. Fifty patients with previously treated follicular lymphoma (FL) and a low-affinity genotype of FcγRIIIa received ocaratuzumab 375 mg/m(2) weekly for 4 weeks. Grade 3/4/5 adverse events (AEs) were reported in 11/1/1 patients, respectively. Serious AEs were reported by 11/50 patients, and three discontinued due to AEs. One patient died from aspiration pneumonia due to possibly drug-related nausea and vomiting. Investigator-assessed response rate was 30% (15/50), including four complete responses (CR), three CR unconfirmed (CRu) and eight partial responses (PR). Investigator-assessed median Progression-free survivial (PFS) was 38.3 weeks. Ocaratuzumab's pharmacokinetic profile was similar to that reported for rituximab. Lymphocyte subset analysis showed significant, selective reduction of B-cells during and after ocaratuzumab treatment. Ocaratuzumab at this dose and schedule is active and well tolerated in patients with previously treated FL with low affinity FcγRIIIa genotypes. ClinTrials registry number: NCT00354926.

  8. On-line coupling of surface plasmon resonance optical sensing to size-exclusion chromatography for affinity assessment of antibody samples.

    PubMed

    Lakayan, Dina; Haselberg, Rob; Niessen, Wilfried M A; Somsen, Govert W; Kool, Jeroen

    2016-06-24

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is an optical technique that measures biomolecular interactions. Stand-alone SPR cannot distinguish different binding components present in one sample. Moreover, sample matrix components may show non-specific binding to the sensor surface, leading to detection interferences. This study describes the development of coupled size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) SPR sensing for the separation of sample components prior to their on-line bio-interaction analysis. A heterogeneous polyclonal human serum albumin antibody (anti-HSA) sample, which was characterized by proteomics analysis, was used as test sample. The proposed SEC-SPR coupling was optimized by studying system parameters, such as injection volume, flow rate and sample concentration, using immobilized HSA on the sensor chip. Automated switch valves were used for on-line regeneration of the SPR sensor chip in between injections and for potential chromatographic heart cutting experiments, allowing SPR detection of individual components. The performance of the SEC-SPR system was evaluated by the analysis of papain-digested anti-HSA sampled at different incubation time points. The new on-line SEC-SPR methodology allows specific label-free analysis of real-time interactions of eluting antibody sample constituents towards their antigenic target. PMID:27215465

  9. Directed evolution of a yeast-displayed HIV-1 SOSIP gp140 spike protein toward improved expression and affinity for conformational antibodies.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sebastian K; Battles, Michael B; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2015-01-01

    Design of an envelope-based immunogen capable of inducing a broadly neutralizing antibody response is thought to be key to the development of a protective HIV-1 vaccine. However, the broad diversity of viral variants and a limited ability to produce native envelope have hampered such design efforts. Here we describe adaptation of the yeast display system and use of a combinatorial protein engineering approach to permit directed evolution of HIV envelope variants. Because the intrinsic instability and complexity of this trimeric glycoprotein has greatly impeded the development of immunogens that properly represent the structure of native envelope, this platform addresses an essential need for methodologies with the capacity to rapidly engineer HIV spike proteins towards improved homogeneity, stability, and presentation of neutralizing epitopes. We report for the first time the display of a designed SOSIP gp140 on yeast, and the in vitro evolution of derivatives with greatly improved expression and binding to conformation-dependent antibodies. These efforts represent an initial and critical step toward the ability to rapidly engineer HIV-1 envelope immunogens via directed evolution.

  10. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200.

    PubMed

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N S; Bäck, Tom; Machado, Camila Maria L; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Moro, Ana Maria; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Jacobsson, Lars; Cederkrantz, Elin; Washiyama, Kohshin; Aneheim, Emma; Palm, Stig; Jensen, Holger; Tuma, Maria Carolina B; Chammas, Roger; Hultborn, Ragnar; Albertsson, Per

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovarian cancer with 211At-Rebmab200. Here, the biodistribution of 211At-Rebmab200 was evaluated, as was the utility of 99mTc-Rebmab200 for bioimaging. Rebmab200 was directly compared with its murine counterpart MX35 in terms of its in-vitro capacity for binding the immobilized NaPi2B epitope and live cells; we also assessed its biodistribution in nude mice carrying subcutaneous OVCAR-3 tumors. Tumor antigen and cell binding were similar between Rebmab200 and murine MX35, as was biodistribution, including normal tissue uptake and in-vivo tumor binding. We also demonstrated that 99mTc-Rebmab200 can be used for single-photon emission computed tomography of subcutaneous ovarian carcinomas in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data support the further development of Rebmab200 for radioimmunotherapy and diagnostics. PMID:25970341

  11. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200

    PubMed Central

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N. S.; Bäck, Tom; Machado, Camila Maria L.; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Moro, Ana Maria; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Jacobsson, Lars; Cederkrantz, Elin; Washiyama, Kohshin; Aneheim, Emma; Palm, Stig; Jensen, Holger; Tuma, Maria Carolina B.; Chammas, Roger; Hultborn, Ragnar; Albertsson, Per

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovarian cancer with 211At-Rebmab200. Here, the biodistribution of 211At-Rebmab200 was evaluated, as was the utility of 99mTc-Rebmab200 for bioimaging. Rebmab200 was directly compared with its murine counterpart MX35 in terms of its in-vitro capacity for binding the immobilized NaPi2B epitope and live cells; we also assessed its biodistribution in nude mice carrying subcutaneous OVCAR-3 tumors. Tumor antigen and cell binding were similar between Rebmab200 and murine MX35, as was biodistribution, including normal tissue uptake and in-vivo tumor binding. We also demonstrated that 99mTc-Rebmab200 can be used for single-photon emission computed tomography of subcutaneous ovarian carcinomas in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data support the further development of Rebmab200 for radioimmunotherapy and diagnostics. PMID:25970341

  12. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200.

    PubMed

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N S; Bäck, Tom; Machado, Camila Maria L; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Moro, Ana Maria; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Jacobsson, Lars; Cederkrantz, Elin; Washiyama, Kohshin; Aneheim, Emma; Palm, Stig; Jensen, Holger; Tuma, Maria Carolina B; Chammas, Roger; Hultborn, Ragnar; Albertsson, Per

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovarian cancer with 211At-Rebmab200. Here, the biodistribution of 211At-Rebmab200 was evaluated, as was the utility of 99mTc-Rebmab200 for bioimaging. Rebmab200 was directly compared with its murine counterpart MX35 in terms of its in-vitro capacity for binding the immobilized NaPi2B epitope and live cells; we also assessed its biodistribution in nude mice carrying subcutaneous OVCAR-3 tumors. Tumor antigen and cell binding were similar between Rebmab200 and murine MX35, as was biodistribution, including normal tissue uptake and in-vivo tumor binding. We also demonstrated that 99mTc-Rebmab200 can be used for single-photon emission computed tomography of subcutaneous ovarian carcinomas in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data support the further development of Rebmab200 for radioimmunotherapy and diagnostics.

  13. Use of affinity-directed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to map the epitopes of a factor VIII inhibitor antibody fraction

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Amy E.; Wang, Wensheng; Hagen, Fred K.; Fay, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Neutralizing factor (F) VIII antibodies develop in ~30% of individuals with hemophilia A and show specificity to multiple sites in the FVIII protein. Methods Reactive epitopes to an immobilized IgG fraction prepared from a high-titer, FVIII inhibitor plasma were determined following immuno-precipitation (IP) of tryptic and chymotryptic peptides derived from digests of the A1 and A2 subunits of FVIIIa and FVIII light chain. Peptides were detected and identified using highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Results Coverage maps of the A1 subunit, A2 subunit and light chain represented 79%, 69% and 90%, respectively, of the protein sequences. Dot blots indicated that the inhibitor IgG reacted with epitopes contained within each subunit of FVIIIa. IP coupled with LC-MS identified 19 peptides representing epitopes from all FVIII A and C domains. The majority of peptides (10) were derived from the A2 domain. Three peptides mapped to the C2 domain, while two mapped to the A1 and A3 domains, and single peptides mapped to the a1 segment and C1 domain. Epitopes were typically defined by peptide sequences of <12 residues. Conclusions IP coupled with LC-MS identified extensive antibody reactivity at high resolution over the entire functional FVIII molecule and yielded sequence lengths of less than 15 residues. A number of the peptides identified mapped to known sequences involved in functionally important protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions. PMID:21668738

  14. Transgenic mouse strains as platforms for the successful discovery and development of human therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Green, Larry L

    2014-03-01

    Transgenic mice have yielded seven of the ten currently-approved human antibody drugs, making them the most successful platform for the discovery of fully human antibody therapeutics. The use of the in vivo immune system helps drive this success by taking advantage of the natural selection process that produces antibodies with desirable characteristics. Appropriately genetically-engineered mice act as robust engines for the generation of diverse repertoires of affinity- matured fully human variable regions with intrinsic properties necessary for successful antibody drug development including high potency, specificity, manufacturability, solubility and low risk of immunogenicity. A broad range of mAb drug targets are addressable in these mice, comprising both secreted and transmembrane targets, including membrane multi-spanning targets, as well as human target antigens that share high sequence identity with their mouse orthologue. Transgenic mice can routinely yield antibodies with sub-nanomolar binding affinity for their antigen, with lead candidate mAbs frequently possessing affinities for binding to their target of less than 100 picomolar, without requiring any ex vivo affinity optimization. While the originator transgenic mice platforms are no longer broadly available, a new generation of transgenic platforms is in development for discovery of the next wave of human therapeutic antibodies.

  15. Framework selection can influence pharmacokinetics of a humanized therapeutic antibody through differences in molecule charge

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Tesar, Devin; Boswell, C Andrew; Cahaya, Hendry S; Wong, Anne; Zhang, Jianhuan; Meng, Y Gloria; Eigenbrot, Charles; Pantua, Homer; Diao, Jinyu; Kapadia, Sharookh B; Deng, Rong; Kelley, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) testing of a humanized (κI, VH3 framework) and affinity matured anti-hepatitis C virus E2-glycoprotein (HCV-E2) antibody (hu5B3.κ1VH3.v3) in rats revealed unexpected fast clearance (34.9 mL/day/kg). This antibody binds to the rat recycling receptor FcRn as expected for a human IgG1 antibody and does not display non-specific binding to baculovirus particles in an assay that is correlated with fast clearance in cynomolgus monkey. The antigen is not expressed in rat so target-dependent clearance does not contribute to PK. Removal of the affinity maturation changes (hu5B3.κ1VH3.v1) did not restore normal clearance. The antibody was re-humanized on a κ4, VH1 framework and the non-affinity matured version (hu5B3.κ4VH1.v1) was shown to have normal clearance (8.5 mL/day/kg). Since the change in framework results in a lower pI, primarily due to more negative charge on the κ4 template, the effect of additional charge variation on antibody PK was tested by incorporating substitutions obtained through phage display affinity maturation of hu5B3.κ1VH3.v1. A variant having a pI of 8.61 gave very fast clearance (140 mL/day/kg) whereas a molecule with pI of 6.10 gave slow clearance (5.8 mL/kg/day). Both antibodies exhibited comparable binding to rat FcRn, but biodistribution experiments showed that the high pI variant was catabolized in liver and spleen. These results suggest antibody charge can have an effect on PK through alterations in antibody catabolism independent of FcRn-mediated recycling. Furthermore, introduction of affinity maturation changes into the lower pI framework yielded a candidate with PK and virus neutralization properties suitable for clinical development. PMID:25517310

  16. Therapeutic effects of antigen affinity-purified polyclonal anti-receptor of advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) antibodies on cholestasis-induced liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Deng, Qing; Gao, Jin; Yu, Xiaolan; Zhang, Yang; Li, Jingjing; Guan, Wen; Hu, Jianjun; Tan, Quanhui; Zhou, Liang; Han, Wei; Yuan, Yunsheng; Yu, Yan

    2016-05-15

    Cholestasis leads to acute hepatic injury, fibrosis/cirrhosis, inflammation, and duct proliferation. We investigated whether blocking receptor of advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) with polyclonal anti-RAGE antibodies (anti-RAGE) could regulate acute liver injury and fibrosis in a rat bile duct ligation (BDL) model. Male Wister rats received 0.5mg/kg rabbit anti-RAGE or an equal amount of rabbit IgG by subcutaneous injection twice a week after BDL. Samples of liver tissue and peripheral blood were collected at 14 days after BDL. Serum biochemistry and histology were used to analyze the degree of liver injury. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and immunohistochemical staining were used to further analyze liver injury. Anti-RAGE improved the gross appearance of the liver and the rat survival rate. Liver tissue histology and relevant serum biochemistry indicated that anti-RAGE attenuated liver necrosis, inflammation, liver fibrosis, and duct proliferation in the BDL model. qPCR and western blotting showed significant reductions in interleukin-1β expression levels in the liver by treatment with anti-RAGE. Anti-RAGE also significantly reduced the mRNA levels of α1(1) collagen (Col1α1) and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, and the ratio of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 to matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the liver. In addition, anti-RAGE regulated the transcriptional level of Col1α1 and MMP-9 in transforming growth factor-β-induced activated LX-2 cells in vitro. Anti-RAGE was found to inhibit hepatic stellate cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, anti-RAGE can protect the liver from injury induced by BDL in rats. PMID:26970185

  17. Chemoenzymatic synthesis and Fcγ receptor binding of homogeneous glycoforms of antibody Fc domain. Presence of a bisecting sugar moiety enhances the affinity of Fc to FcγIIIa receptor.

    PubMed

    Zou, Guozhang; Ochiai, Hirofumi; Huang, Wei; Yang, Qiang; Li, Cishan; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2011-11-23

    Structurally well-defined IgG-Fc glycoforms are highly demanded for understanding the effects of glycosylation on an antibody's effector functions. We report in this paper chemoenzymatic synthesis and Fcγ receptor binding of an array of homogeneous IgG-Fc glycoforms. The chemoenzymatic approach consists of the chemical synthesis of defined N-glycan oxazolines as donor substrates, the expression of the Fc domain in a CHO cell line in the presence of an α-mannosidase inhibitor kifunensine, and an endoglycosidase-catalyzed glycosylation of the deglycosylated Fc domain (GlcNAc-Fc homodimer) with the synthetic glycan oxazolines. The enzyme from Arthrobacter protophormiae (Endo-A) was found to be remarkably efficient to take various modified N-glycan core oxazolines, including the bisecting sugar-containing derivatives, for Fc glycosylation remodeling, resulting in the formation of the corresponding homogeneous Fc glycoforms. Nevertheless, neither Endo-A nor the Mucor hiemalis endoglycosidase mutants (EndoM-N175A and EndoM-N175Q) were able to transfer full-length complex-type N-glycan to the Fc domain, implicating the limitations of these two enzymes in Fc glycosylation remodeling. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding studies with the synthetic IgG-Fc glycoforms unambiguously proved that the presence of a bisecting GlcNAc moiety could significantly enhance the binding of Fc to FcγRIIIa, the activating Fcγ receptor, independent of Fc core-fucosylation. Interestingly, the Fc glycoforms carrying an unusual bisecting sugar moiety such as a mannose or a LacNAc moiety also demonstrated enhanced affinity to FcγRIIIa. On the orther hand, the presence of a bisecting GlcNAc or core-fucosylation had little effect on the affinity of Fc to the inhibitory Fcγ receptor, FcγRIIb. Our experimental data also showed that the α-linked mannose residues in the pentasaccharide Man3GlcNAc2 core was essential to maintain a high affinity of Fc to both FcγRIIIa and FcγRIIb. The

  18. Studies on the control of antibody synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Werblin, T. P.; Kim, Young Tai; Quagliata, F.; Siskind, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    The distribution and heterogeneity of antibody affinity has been followed with time after immunization. Initially, a symmetrical distribution of heterogeneous low affinity antibody molecules is present. With time the population becomes skewed towards the high affinity end of the distribution, the average affinity increases, and the bulk of the antibody generally comes to be present in a subpopulation of high affinity and of relatively restricted heterogeneity. Still later after immunization, the proportion of high affinity antibody decreases and a highly heterogeneous population of antibody molecules is present with a somewhat decreased average affinity. Low affinity subpopulations were found to persist throughout the course of the immune response. In addition it was noted that by day 42 after immunization a significant amount of the highest affinity antibody that a given rabbit would synthesize at any time during its immune response was already present. Thus, changes in average affinity can be accounted for by shifts in the relative amounts of those antibody subpopulations already present by day 42 and do not require the appearance of any new antibody species. The results can be interpreted as consistent with a selection theory of antibody synthesis in which cells of high affinity are preferentially selected in what amounts to a micro-evolutionary system. PMID:4574576

  19. Highly sensitive and unbiased approach for elucidating antibody repertoires.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sherry G; Ba, Zhaoqing; Du, Zhou; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Jiazhi; Alt, Frederick W

    2016-07-12

    Developing B lymphocytes undergo V(D)J recombination to assemble germ-line V, D, and J gene segments into exons that encode the antigen-binding variable region of Ig heavy (H) and light (L) chains. IgH and IgL chains associate to form the B-cell receptor (BCR), which, upon antigen binding, activates B cells to secrete BCR as an antibody. Each of the huge number of clonally independent B cells expresses a unique set of IgH and IgL variable regions. The ability of V(D)J recombination to generate vast primary B-cell repertoires results from a combinatorial assortment of large numbers of different V, D, and J segments, coupled with diversification of the junctions between them to generate the complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) for antigen contact. Approaches to evaluate in depth the content of primary antibody repertoires and, ultimately, to study how they are further molded by secondary mutation and affinity maturation processes are of great importance to the B-cell development, vaccine, and antibody fields. We now describe an unbiased, sensitive, and readily accessible assay, referred to as high-throughput genome-wide translocation sequencing-adapted repertoire sequencing (HTGTS-Rep-seq), to quantify antibody repertoires. HTGTS-Rep-seq quantitatively identifies the vast majority of IgH and IgL V(D)J exons, including their unique CDR3 sequences, from progenitor and mature mouse B lineage cells via the use of specific J primers. HTGTS-Rep-seq also accurately quantifies DJH intermediates and V(D)J exons in either productive or nonproductive configurations. HTGTS-Rep-seq should be useful for studies of human samples, including clonal B-cell expansions, and also for following antibody affinity maturation processes. PMID:27354528

  20. Optimization of affinity, specificity and function of designed influenza inhibitors using deep sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, Timothy A.; Chevalier, Aaron; Song, Yifan; Dreyfus, Cyrille; Fleishman, Sarel J.; De Mattos, Cecilia; Myers, Chris A.; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Blair, Patrick; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker, David

    2012-06-19

    We show that comprehensive sequence-function maps obtained by deep sequencing can be used to reprogram interaction specificity and to leapfrog over bottlenecks in affinity maturation by combining many individually small contributions not detectable in conventional approaches. We use this approach to optimize two computationally designed inhibitors against H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin and, in both cases, obtain variants with subnanomolar binding affinity. The most potent of these, a 51-residue protein, is broadly cross-reactive against all influenza group 1 hemagglutinins, including human H2, and neutralizes H1N1 viruses with a potency that rivals that of several human monoclonal antibodies, demonstrating that computational design followed by comprehensive energy landscape mapping can generate proteins with potential therapeutic utility.

  1. Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Rodney R.

    1985-01-01

    Supports, affinity ligands, immobilization, elution methods, and a number of applications are among the topics considered in this discussion of affinity chromatography. An outline of the basic principles of affinity chromatography is included. (JN)

  2. Integrated Mimicry of B Cell Antibody Mutagenesis Using Yeast Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Wittrup, K. Dane

    2014-01-01

    Antibody affinity maturation proceeds in vivo via a combination of point mutations, insertions, deletions, and combinatorial shuffling of light chains or portions of the heavy chain, thereby reducing the probability of trapping in local affinity optima in sequence space. In vivo homologous recombination in yeast can be exploited to mimic the broad spectrum of mutational types deployed by B cells, incorporating both receptor revision and receptor editing together with polymerase-directed point mutagenesis. This method was used to effect a 10,000-fold affinity improvement in an anti-peptide single-chain antibody in three rounds of mutagenesis and screening, and a 1,000-fold affinity improvement in an anti-protein single-chain antibody in a single round. When recombinational mutagenesis (CDR or chain shuffling) was directly compared to error-prone PCR, the recombinational approach yielded greater affinity improvement with substantially reduced divergence from germline sequences, demonstrating an advantage of simultaneously testing a broad range of mutational strategies. PMID:20645027

  3. Integrated mimicry of B cell antibody mutagenesis using yeast homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Swers, Jeffrey S; Yeung, Yik A; Wittrup, K Dane

    2011-01-01

    Antibody affinity maturation proceeds in vivo via a combination of point mutations, insertions, deletions, and combinatorial shuffling of light chains or portions of the heavy chain, thereby reducing the probability of trapping in local affinity optima in sequence space. In vivo homologous recombination in yeast can be exploited to mimic the broad spectrum of mutational types deployed by B cells, incorporating both receptor revision and receptor editing together with polymerase-directed point mutagenesis. This method was used to effect a 10,000-fold affinity improvement in an anti-peptide single-chain antibody in three rounds of mutagenesis and screening, and a 1,000-fold affinity improvement in an anti-protein single-chain antibody in a single round. When recombinational mutagenesis (CDR or chain shuffling) was directly compared to error-prone PCR, the recombinational approach yielded greater affinity improvement with substantially reduced divergence from germline sequences, demonstrating an advantage of simultaneously testing a broad range of mutational strategies.

  4. HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies with Limited Hypermutation from an Infant.

    PubMed

    Simonich, Cassandra A; Williams, Katherine L; Verkerke, Hans P; Williams, James A; Nduati, Ruth; Lee, Kelly K; Overbaugh, Julie

    2016-06-30

    HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) develop in a subset of infected adults and exhibit high levels of somatic hypermutation (SHM) due to years of affinity maturation. There is no precedent for eliciting highly mutated antibodies by vaccination, nor is it practical to wait years for a desired response. Infants develop broad responses early, which may suggest a more direct path to generating bnAbs. Here, we isolated ten neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) contributing to plasma breadth of an infant at ∼1 year post-infection, including one with cross-clade breadth. The nAbs bind to envelope trimer from the transmitted virus, suggesting that this interaction may have initiated development of the infant nAbs. The infant cross-clade bnAb targets the N332 supersite on envelope but, unlike adult bnAbs targeting this site, lacks indels and has low SHM. The identification of this infant bnAb illustrates that HIV-1-specific neutralization breadth can develop without prolonged affinity maturation and extensive SHM. PMID:27345369

  5. Affinity Electrophoresis Using Ligands Attached To Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Snyder, Robert S.; Harris, J. M.; Brooks, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    In new technique, reduction of electrophoretic mobilities by addition of polyethylene glycol to ligands increases electrophoretic separabilities. In immuno-affinity electrophoresis, modification of ligands extends specificity of electrophoretic separation to particles having surface electric-charge structures otherwise making them electrophoretically inseparable. Modification of antibodies by polyethylene glycol greatly reduces ability to aggregate while enhancing ability to affect electrophoretic mobilities of cells. In hydrophobic-affinity electrophoresis, addition of polyethylene glycol reduces tendency toward aggregation of cells or macromolecules.

  6. Career Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crites, John O.

    1973-01-01

    Research in the field of Career Maturity is reviewed and summarized, with particular attention to Super's Career Pattern Study, Gribbons and Lohnes' Career Development Study, and Crites' Vocational Development Project. Crites' organization and revision into a hierarchical structure of the five dimensions of vocational maturity proposed in Supers'…

  7. Fully Human Antagonistic Antibodies against CCR4 Potently Inhibit Cell Signaling and Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Géraudie, Solène; Scheffler, Ulrike; Griep, Remko A.; Reiersen, Herald; Duncan, Alexander R.; Kiprijanov, Sergej M.

    2014-01-01

    Background CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) represents a potentially important target for cancer immunotherapy due to its expression on tumor infiltrating immune cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and on tumor cells in several cancer types and its role in metastasis. Methodology Using phage display, human antibody library, affinity maturation and a cell-based antibody selection strategy, the antibody variants against human CCR4 were generated. These antibodies effectively competed with ligand binding, were able to block ligand-induced signaling and cell migration, and demonstrated efficient killing of CCR4-positive tumor cells via ADCC and phagocytosis. In a mouse model of human T-cell lymphoma, significant survival benefit was demonstrated for animals treated with the newly selected anti-CCR4 antibodies. Significance For the first time, successful generation of anti- G-protein coupled chemokine receptor (GPCR) antibodies using human non-immune library and phage display on GPCR-expressing cells was demonstrated. The generated anti-CCR4 antibodies possess a dual mode of action (inhibition of ligand-induced signaling and antibody-directed tumor cell killing). The data demonstrate that the anti-tumor activity in vivo is mediated, at least in part, through Fc-receptor dependent effector mechanisms, such as ADCC and phagocytosis. Anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 antibodies inhibiting receptor signaling have potential as immunomodulatory antibodies for cancer. PMID:25080123

  8. Virus Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Veesler, David; Johnson, John E.

    2013-01-01

    We examined virus maturation of selected non-enveloped and enveloped ssRNA viruses; retroviruses; bacteriophages and herpes virus. Processes associated with maturation in the RNA viruses range from subtle (noda and picornaviruses) to dramatic (tetraviruses and togaviruses). The elaborate assembly and maturation pathway of HIV is discussed in contrast to the less sophisticated but highly efficient processes associated with togaviruses. Bacteriophage assembly and maturation are discussed in general terms with specific examples chosen for emphasis. Finally the herpes viruses are compared with bacteriophages. The data support divergent evolution of noda, picorna and tetraviruses from a common ancestor and divergent evolution of alpha and flaviviruses from a common ancestor. Likewise, bacteriophages and herpes viruses almost certainly share a common ancestor in their evolution. Comparing all the viruses, we conclude that maturation is a convergent process that is required to solve conflicting requirements in biological dynamics and function. PMID:22404678

  9. Ablation of the cellular prion protein, PrPC, specifically on follicular dendritic cells has no effect on their maturation or function

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Laura; Brown, Karen L.; Mabbott, Neil A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Follicular dendritic cells (FDC) are situated in the primary follicles of lymphoid tissues where they maintain the structural integrity of the B‐lymphocyte follicle, and help to drive immunoglobulin class‐switch recombination, somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation during the germinal centre response. FDC can also provide a reservoir for pathogens that infect germinal centres including HIV and prions. FDC express high levels of the normal cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC), which makes them susceptible to prion infection. The function of PrPC is uncertain and it is not known why FDC require such high levels of expression of a protein that is found mainly on cells of the central nervous system. In this study, the function of FDC was assessed in mice that had PrPC ablated specifically in their FDC. In mice with FDC‐specific PrPC ablation, our analysis revealed no observable deficits in lymphoid follicle microarchitecture and FDC status. No effects on FDC ability to trap immune complexes or drive antigen‐specific antibody responses and affinity maturation in B lymphocytes were observed. These data clearly demonstrate that PrPC expression is dispensable for the functional maturation of FDC and their ability to maintain antigen‐specific antibody responses and affinity maturation. PMID:23121447

  10. Affinity Proteomics in the mountains: Alpbach 2015.

    PubMed

    Taussig, Michael J

    2016-09-25

    The 2015 Alpbach Workshop on Affinity Proteomics, organised by the EU AFFINOMICS consortium, was the 7th workshop in this series. As in previous years, the focus of the event was the current state of affinity methods for proteome analysis, including complementarity with mass spectrometry, progress in recombinant binder production methods, alternatives to classical antibodies as affinity reagents, analysis of proteome targets, industry focus on biomarkers, and diagnostic and clinical applications. The combination of excellent science with Austrian mountain scenery and winter sports engender an atmosphere that makes this series of workshops exceptional. The articles in this Special Issue represent a cross-section of the presentations at the 2015 meeting. PMID:27118167

  11. Aptamers in Affinity Separations: Stationary Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelet, Corinne; Peyrin, Eric

    The use of DNA or RNA aptamers as tools in analytical chemistry is a very promising field of research because of their capabilities to bind specifically the target molecules with an affinity similar to that of antibodies. Notably, they appear to be of great interest as target-specific ligands for the separation and capture of various analytes in affinity chromatography and related affinity-based methods such as magnetic bead technology. In this chapter, the recent developments of these aptamer-based separation/capture approaches are addressed.

  12. Ligand-inducible dimeric antibody for selecting antibodies against a membrane protein based on mammalian cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Miura, Tomohiro; Nagamune, Teruyuki; Kawahara, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    A method for selecting antibodies against a membrane protein is important for attaining a variety of antibody-based diagnostics and therapies. In this study, we propose a novel system to select specific antibodies against a membrane protein based on mammalian cell proliferation as a readout. The system employs a chimeric membrane protein in which a target membrane protein of interest is fused to the intracellular signaling domain of a cytokine receptor. The chimeric membrane protein transduces a cell proliferation signal through dimerization when co-expressed with a specific single-chain Fv fused with a mutant of FK-binding protein 12 (scFv-Fk) that can be conditionally dimerized by a synthetic ligand AP20187. To demonstrate this system, ErbB2 and gp130 were chosen as the target membrane protein and cytokine receptor, respectively. Consequently, co-expression of the ErbB2/gp130 chimera and ErbB2-specific scFv-Fk rendered the cells proliferative in response to AP20187. The system also allowed selection of high-affinity binders from a mixture composed of dominant low-affinity binders. This system may be extended to affinity maturation of scFvs by modulating AP20187 concentration in the selection process.

  13. Specific Fluorine Labeling of the HyHEL10 Antibody Affects Antigen Binding and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Acchione, Mauro; Lee, Yi-Chien; DeSantis, Morgan E.; Lipschultz, Claudia A.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Li, Mi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Walter, Richard L.; Smith-Gill, Sandra; Barchi, Jr., Joseph J.

    2012-10-16

    To more fully understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for variations in binding affinity with antibody maturation, we explored the use of site specific fluorine labeling and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Several single-chain (scFv) antibodies, derived from an affinity-matured series of anti-hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) mouse IgG1, were constructed with either complete or individual replacement of tryptophan residues with 5-fluorotryptophan ({sup 5F}W). An array of biophysical techniques was used to gain insight into the impact of fluorine substitution on the overall protein structure and antigen binding. SPR measurements indicated that {sup 5F}W incorporation lowered binding affinity for the HEL antigen. The degree of analogue impact was residue-dependent, and the greatest decrease in affinity was observed when {sup 5F}W was substituted for residues near the binding interface. In contrast, corresponding crystal structures in complex with HEL were essentially indistinguishable from the unsubstituted antibody. {sup 19}F NMR analysis showed severe overlap of signals in the free fluorinated protein that was resolved upon binding to antigen, suggesting very distinct chemical environments for each {sup 5F}W in the complex. Preliminary relaxation analysis suggested the presence of chemical exchange in the antibody-antigen complex that could not be observed by X-ray crystallography. These data demonstrate that fluorine NMR can be an extremely useful tool for discerning structural changes in scFv antibody-antigen complexes with altered function that may not be discernible by other biophysical techniques.

  14. Advances in Antibody Design.

    PubMed

    Tiller, Kathryn E; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics requires optimizing several of their key attributes. These include binding affinity and specificity, folding stability, solubility, pharmacokinetics, effector functions, and compatibility with the attachment of additional antibody domains (bispecific antibodies) and cytotoxic drugs (antibody-drug conjugates). Addressing these and other challenges requires the use of systematic design methods that complement powerful immunization and in vitro screening methods. We review advances in designing the binding loops, scaffolds, domain interfaces, constant regions, post-translational and chemical modifications, and bispecific architectures of antibodies and fragments thereof to improve their bioactivity. We also highlight unmet challenges in antibody design that must be overcome to generate potent antibody therapeutics. PMID:26274600

  15. Structural Basis for Broad and Potent Neutralization of HIV-1 by Antibody VRC01

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tongqing; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Dai, Kaifan; Finzi, Andrés; Kwon, Young Do; Scheid, Johannes F.; Shi, Wei; Xu, Ling; Yang, Yongping; Zhu, Jiang; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Sodroski, Joseph; Shapiro, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-08-26

    During HIV-1 infection, antibodies are generated against the region of the viral gp120 envelope glycoprotein that binds CD4, the primary receptor for HIV-1. Among these antibodies, VRC01 achieves broad neutralization of diverse viral strains. We determined the crystal structure of VRC01 in complex with a human immunodeficiency virus HIV-1 gp120 core. VRC01 partially mimics CD4 interaction with gp120. A shift from the CD4-defined orientation, however, focuses VRC01 onto the vulnerable site of initial CD4 attachment, allowing it to overcome the glycan and conformational masking that diminishes the neutralization potency of most CD4-binding-site antibodies. To achieve this recognition, VRC01 contacts gp120 mainly through immunoglobulin V-gene regions substantially altered from their genomic precursors. Partial receptor mimicry and extensive affinity maturation thus facilitate neutralization of HIV-1 by natural human antibodies.

  16. REAL-Select: Full-Length Antibody Display and Library Screening by Surface Capture on Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Ralf; Becker, Stefan; Kolmar, Harald; Hock, Björn

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel approach named REAL-Select for the non-covalent display of IgG-molecules on the surface of yeast cells for the purpose of antibody engineering and selection. It relies on the capture of secreted native full-length antibodies on the cell surface via binding to an externally immobilized ZZ domain, which tightly binds antibody Fc. It is beneficial for high-throughput screening of yeast-displayed IgG-libraries during antibody discovery and development. In a model experiment, antibody-displaying yeast cells were isolated from a 1∶1,000,000 mixture with control cells confirming the maintenance of genotype-phenotype linkage. Antibodies with improved binding characteristics were obtained by affinity maturation using REAL-Select, demonstrating the ability of this system to display antibodies in their native form and to detect subtle changes in affinity by flow cytometry. The biotinylation of the cell surface followed by functionalization with a streptavidin-ZZ fusion protein is an approach that is independent of the genetic background of the antibody-producing host and therefore can be expected to be compatible with other eukaryotic expression hosts such as P. pastoris or mammalian cells. PMID:25501029

  17. Antibody-specific model of amino acid substitution for immunological inferences from alignments of antibody sequences.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Alexander; Kazandjian, Linda; Anisimova, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins produced by the immune system as a dynamically adaptive line of defense against invading pathogens. Very elegant and specific mutational mechanisms allow B lymphocytes to produce a large and diversified repertoire of antibodies, which is modified and enhanced throughout all adulthood. One of these mechanisms is somatic hypermutation, which stochastically mutates nucleotides in the antibody genes, forming new sequences with different properties and, eventually, higher affinity and selectivity to the pathogenic target. As somatic hypermutation involves fast mutation of antibody sequences, this process can be described using a Markov substitution model of molecular evolution. Here, using large sets of antibody sequences from mice and humans, we infer an empirical amino acid substitution model AB, which is specific to antibody sequences. Compared with existing general amino acid models, we show that the AB model provides significantly better description for the somatic evolution of mice and human antibody sequences, as demonstrated on large next generation sequencing (NGS) antibody data. General amino acid models are reflective of conservation at the protein level due to functional constraints, with most frequent amino acids exchanges taking place between residues with the same or similar physicochemical properties. In contrast, within the variable part of antibody sequences we observed an elevated frequency of exchanges between amino acids with distinct physicochemical properties. This is indicative of a sui generis mutational mechanism, specific to antibody somatic hypermutation. We illustrate this property of antibody sequences by a comparative analysis of the network modularity implied by the AB model and general amino acid substitution models. We recommend using the new model for computational studies of antibody sequence maturation, including inference of alignments and phylogenetic trees describing antibody somatic hypermutation in

  18. The sclerostin-neutralizing antibody AbD09097 recognizes an epitope adjacent to sclerostin's binding site for the Wnt co-receptor LRP6.

    PubMed

    Boschert, V; Frisch, C; Back, J W; van Pee, K; Weidauer, S E; Muth, E-M; Schmieder, P; Beerbaum, M; Knappik, A; Timmerman, P; Mueller, T D

    2016-08-01

    The glycoprotein sclerostin has been identified as a negative regulator of bone growth. It exerts its function by interacting with the Wnt co-receptor LRP5/6, blocks the binding of Wnt factors and thereby inhibits Wnt signalling. Neutralizing anti-sclerostin antibodies are able to restore Wnt activity and enhance bone growth thereby presenting a new osteoanabolic therapy approach for diseases such as osteoporosis. We have generated various Fab antibodies against human and murine sclerostin using a phage display set-up. Biochemical analyses have identified one Fab developed against murine sclerostin, AbD09097 that efficiently neutralizes sclerostin's Wnt inhibitory activity. In vitro interaction analysis using sclerostin variants revealed that this neutralizing Fab binds to sclerostin's flexible second loop, which has been shown to harbour the LRP5/6 binding motif. Affinity maturation was then applied to AbD09097, providing a set of improved neutralizing Fab antibodies which particularly bind human sclerostin with enhanced affinity. Determining the crystal structure of AbD09097 provides first insights into how this antibody might recognize and neutralize sclerostin. Together with the structure-function relationship derived from affinity maturation these new data will foster the rational design of new and highly efficient anti-sclerostin antibodies for the therapy of bone loss diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27558933

  19. The sclerostin-neutralizing antibody AbD09097 recognizes an epitope adjacent to sclerostin's binding site for the Wnt co-receptor LRP6

    PubMed Central

    Boschert, V.; Frisch, C.; Back, J. W.; van Pee, K.; Weidauer, S. E.; Muth, E.-M.; Schmieder, P.; Beerbaum, M.; Knappik, A.; Timmerman, P.

    2016-01-01

    The glycoprotein sclerostin has been identified as a negative regulator of bone growth. It exerts its function by interacting with the Wnt co-receptor LRP5/6, blocks the binding of Wnt factors and thereby inhibits Wnt signalling. Neutralizing anti-sclerostin antibodies are able to restore Wnt activity and enhance bone growth thereby presenting a new osteoanabolic therapy approach for diseases such as osteoporosis. We have generated various Fab antibodies against human and murine sclerostin using a phage display set-up. Biochemical analyses have identified one Fab developed against murine sclerostin, AbD09097 that efficiently neutralizes sclerostin's Wnt inhibitory activity. In vitro interaction analysis using sclerostin variants revealed that this neutralizing Fab binds to sclerostin's flexible second loop, which has been shown to harbour the LRP5/6 binding motif. Affinity maturation was then applied to AbD09097, providing a set of improved neutralizing Fab antibodies which particularly bind human sclerostin with enhanced affinity. Determining the crystal structure of AbD09097 provides first insights into how this antibody might recognize and neutralize sclerostin. Together with the structure–function relationship derived from affinity maturation these new data will foster the rational design of new and highly efficient anti-sclerostin antibodies for the therapy of bone loss diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27558933

  20. Molecular deconvolution of the monoclonal antibodies that comprise the polyclonal serum response

    PubMed Central

    Wine, Yariv; Boutz, Daniel R.; Lavinder, Jason J.; Miklos, Aleksandr E.; Hughes, Randall A.; Hoi, Kam Hon; Jung, Sang Taek; Horton, Andrew P.; Murrin, Ellen M.; Ellington, Andrew D.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Georgiou, George

    2013-01-01

    We have developed and validated a methodology for determining the antibody composition of the polyclonal serum response after immunization. Pepsin-digested serum IgGs were subjected to standard antigen-affinity chromatography, and resulting elution, wash, and flow-through fractions were analyzed by bottom-up, liquid chromatography–high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Identification of individual monoclonal antibodies required the generation of a database of IgG variable gene (V-gene) sequences constructed by NextGen sequencing of mature B cells. Antibody V-gene sequences are characterized by short complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of high diversity adjacent to framework regions shared across thousands of IgGs, greatly complicating the identification of antigen-specific IgGs from proteomically observed peptides. By mapping peptides marking unique VH CDRH3 sequences, we identified a set of V-genes heavily enriched in the affinity chromatography elution, constituting the serum polyclonal response. After booster immunization in a rabbit, we find that the antigen-specific serum immune response is oligoclonal, comprising antibodies encoding 34 different CDRH3s that group into 30 distinct antibody VH clonotypes. Of these 34 CDRH3s, 12 account for ∼60% of the antigen-specific CDRH3 peptide mass spectral counts. For comparison, antibodies with 18 different CDRH3s (12 clonotypes) were represented in the antigen-specific IgG fraction from an unimmunized rabbit that fortuitously displayed a moderate titer for BSA. Proteomically identified antibodies were synthesized and shown to display subnanomolar affinities. The ability to deconvolute the polyclonal serum response is likely to be of key importance for analyzing antibody responses after vaccination and for more completely understanding adaptive immune responses in health and disease. PMID:23382245

  1. Selection of recombinant anti-SH3 domain antibodies by high-throughput phage display.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiming; Economopoulos, Nicolas O; Liu, Bernard A; Uetrecht, Andrea; Gu, Jun; Jarvik, Nick; Nadeem, Vincent; Pawson, Tony; Moffat, Jason; Miersch, Shane; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies are indispensable tools in biochemical research and play an expanding role as therapeutics. While hybridoma technology is the dominant method for antibody production, phage display is an emerging technology. Here, we developed and employed a high-throughput pipeline that enables selection of antibodies against hundreds of antigens in parallel. Binding selections using a phage-displayed synthetic antigen-binding fragment (Fab) library against 110 human SH3 domains yielded hundreds of Fabs targeting 58 antigens. Affinity assays demonstrated that representative Fabs bind tightly and specifically to their targets. Furthermore, we developed an efficient affinity maturation strategy adaptable to high-throughput, which increased affinity dramatically but did not compromise specificity. Finally, we tested Fabs in common cell biology applications and confirmed recognition of the full-length antigen in immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. In summary, we have established a rapid and robust high-throughput methodology that can be applied to generate highly functional and renewable antibodies targeting protein domains on a proteome-wide scale.

  2. Polyreactive Antibodies: Function and Quantification.

    PubMed

    Gunti, Sreenivasulu; Notkins, Abner Louis

    2015-07-15

    Polyreactive antibodies, a major component of the natural antibody repertoire, bind with low affinity to a variety of structurally unrelated antigens. Many of these antibodies are germline or near germline in sequence. Little is known, however, about the function of these antibodies. In the present mini-review we show: (1) that the broad antibacterial activity of the natural antibody repertoire is largely due to polyreactive antibodies, which in the presence of complement lyse bacteria and enhance phagocytosis; (2) that polyreactive antibodies bind to UV- or human immunodeficiency virus-induced apoptotic cells and with complement enhance the phagocytosis of these cells by macrophages; and (3) that dinitrophenol can be used as a surrogate for quantitating the level of polyreactive antibodies in serum. We conclude that polyreactive antibodies protect the host against both foreign invaders and its own damaged/apoptotic cells.

  3. Enhanced phagocytic activity of HIV-specific antibodies correlates with natural production of immunoglobulins with skewed affinity for FcγR2a and FcγR2b.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Margaret E; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; McAndrew, Elizabeth G; Tsoukas, Stephen; Licht, Anna F; Irvine, Darrell J; Alter, Galit

    2013-05-01

    While development of an HIV vaccine that can induce neutralizing antibodies remains a priority, decades of research have proven that this is a daunting task. However, accumulating evidence suggests that antibodies with the capacity to harness innate immunity may provide some protection. While significant research has focused on the cytolytic properties of antibodies in acquisition and control, less is known about the role of additional effector functions. In this study, we investigated antibody-dependent phagocytosis of HIV immune complexes, and we observed significant differences in the ability of antibodies from infected subjects to mediate this critical effector function. We observed both quantitative differences in the capacity of antibodies to drive phagocytosis and qualitative differences in their FcγR usage profile. We demonstrate that antibodies from controllers and untreated progressors exhibit increased phagocytic activity, altered Fc domain glycosylation, and skewed interactions with FcγR2a and FcγR2b in both bulk plasma and HIV-specific IgG. While increased phagocytic activity may directly influence immune activation via clearance of inflammatory immune complexes, it is also plausible that Fc receptor usage patterns may regulate the immune response by modulating downstream signals following phagocytosis--driving passive degradation of internalized virus, release of immune modulating cytokines and chemokines, or priming of a more effective adaptive immune response.

  4. Antibody humanization by structure-based computational protein design

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoonjoo; Hua, Casey; Sentman, Charles L; Ackerman, Margaret E; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies derived from non-human sources must be modified for therapeutic use so as to mitigate undesirable immune responses. While complementarity-determining region (CDR) grafting-based humanization techniques have been successfully applied in many cases, it remains challenging to maintain the desired stability and antigen binding affinity upon grafting. We developed an alternative humanization approach called CoDAH (“Computationally-Driven Antibody Humanization”) in which computational protein design methods directly select sets of amino acids to incorporate from human germline sequences to increase humanness while maintaining structural stability. Retrospective studies show that CoDAH is able to identify variants deemed beneficial according to both humanness and structural stability criteria, even for targets lacking crystal structures. Prospective application to TZ47, a murine anti-human B7H6 antibody, demonstrates the approach. Four diverse humanized variants were designed, and all possible unique VH/VL combinations were produced as full-length IgG1 antibodies. Soluble and cell surface expressed antigen binding assays showed that 75% (6 of 8) of the computationally designed VH/VL variants were successfully expressed and competed with the murine TZ47 for binding to B7H6 antigen. Furthermore, 4 of the 6 bound with an estimated KD within an order of magnitude of the original TZ47 antibody. In contrast, a traditional CDR-grafted variant could not be expressed. These results suggest that the computational protein design approach described here can be used to efficiently generate functional humanized antibodies and provide humanized templates for further affinity maturation. PMID:26252731

  5. High-affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal myeloid lineage without HSC toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lynn, R C; Feng, Y; Schutsky, K; Poussin, M; Kalota, A; Dimitrov, D S; Powell, D J

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here we isolated a high-affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific single-chain variable fragment (2.48 nm KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ(+) AML in vitro and in vivo compared with a low-affinity FRβ CAR (54.3 nm KD). Using the HA-FRβ immunoglobulin G, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T cells lysed mature CD14(+) monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T cells retained effective antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity.

  6. Structural evolution of glycan recognition by a family of potent HIV antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Garces, Fernando; Sok, Devin; Kong, Leopold; McBride, Ryan; Kim, Helen J.; Saye-Francisco, Karen F.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Hua, Yuanzi; Cupo, Albert; Moore, John P.; Paulson, James C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) is densely covered with self-glycans that should help shield it from recognition by the human immune system. Here we examine how a particularly potent family of broadly neutralizing antibodies (Abs) has evolved common and distinct structural features to counter the glycan shield and interact with both glycan and protein components of HIV Env. The inferred germline antibody already harbors potential binding pockets for a glycan and a short protein segment. Affinity maturation then leads to divergent evolutionary branches that either focus on a single glycan and protein segment (e.g. Ab PGT124) or engage multiple glycans (e.g. Abs PGT121-123). Furthermore, other surrounding glycans are avoided by selecting an appropriate initial antibody shape that prevents steric hindrance. Such molecular recognition lessons are important for engineering proteins that can recognize or accommodate glycans. PMID:25259921

  7. A novel antibody discovery platform identifies anti-influenza A broadly neutralizing antibodies from human memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiaodong; Chen, Yan; Varkey, Reena; Kallewaard, Nicole; Koksal, Adem C; Zhu, Qing; Wu, Herren; Chowdhury, Partha S; Dall'Acqua, William F

    2016-07-01

    Monoclonal antibody isolation directly from circulating human B cells is a powerful tool to delineate humoral responses to pathological conditions and discover antibody therapeutics. We have developed a platform aimed at improving the efficiencies of B cell selection and V gene recovery. Here, memory B cells are activated and amplified using Epstein-Barr virus infection, co-cultured with CHO-muCD40L cells, and then assessed by functional screenings. An in vitro transcription and translation (IVTT) approach was used to analyze variable (V) genes recovered from each B cell sample and identify the relevant heavy/light chain pair(s). We achieved efficient amplification and activation of memory B cells, and eliminated the need to: 1) seed B cells at clonal level (≤1 cell/well) or perform limited dilution cloning; 2) immortalize B cells; or 3) assemble V genes into an IgG expression vector to confirm the relevant heavy/light chain pairing. Cross-reactive antibodies targeting a conserved epitope on influenza A hemagglutinin were successfully isolated from a healthy donor. In-depth analysis of the isolated antibodies suggested their potential uses as anti-influenza A antibody therapeutics and uncovered a distinct affinity maturation pathway. Importantly, our results showed that cognate heavy/light chain pairings contributed to both the expression level and binding abilities of our newly isolated VH1-69 family, influenza A neutralizing antibodies, contrasting with previous observations that light chains do not significantly contribute to the function of this group of antibodies. Our results further suggest the potential use of the IVTT as a powerful antibody developability assessment tool. PMID:27049174

  8. Structural basis for germline antibody recognition of HIV-1 immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Louise; West, Anthony P; Sievers, Stuart A; Chen, Courtney; Jiang, Siduo; Gao, Han; Gray, Matthew D; McGuire, Andrew T; Scheid, Johannes F; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1 require understanding germline bNAb recognition of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). The VRC01-class bNAb family derived from the VH1-2*02 germline allele arose in multiple HIV-1–infected donors, yet targets the CD4-binding site on Env with common interactions. Modified forms of the 426c Env that activate germline-reverted B cell receptors are candidate immunogens for eliciting VRC01-class bNAbs. We present structures of germline-reverted VRC01-class bNAbs alone and complexed with 426c-based gp120 immunogens. Germline bNAb–426c gp120 complexes showed preservation of VRC01-class signature residues and gp120 contacts, but detectably different binding modes compared to mature bNAb-gp120 complexes. Unlike typical antibody-antigen interactions, VRC01–class germline antibodies exhibited preformed antigen-binding conformations for recognizing immunogens. Affinity maturation introduced substitutions increasing induced-fit recognition and electropositivity, potentially to accommodate negatively-charged complex-type N-glycans on gp120. These results provide general principles relevant to the unusual evolution of VRC01–class bNAbs and guidelines for structure-based immunogen design. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13783.001 PMID:26997349

  9. Surface plasmon resonance measurements of plasma antibody avidity during primary and secondary responses to anthrax protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Heather E; Stewart, Shelley M; Kepler, Thomas B; Sempowski, Gregory D; Alam, S Munir

    2014-02-01

    Establishment of humoral immunity against pathogens is dependent on events that occur in the germinal center and the subsequent induction of high-affinity neutralizing antibodies. Quantitative assays that allow monitoring of affinity maturation and duration of antibody responses can provide useful information regarding the efficacy of vaccines and adjuvants. Using an anthrax protective antigen (rPA) and alum model antigen/adjuvant system, we describe a methodology for monitoring antigen-specific serum antibody concentration and avidity by surface plasmon resonance during primary and secondary immune responses. Our analyses showed that following a priming dose in mice, rPA-specific antibody concentration and avidity increases over time and reaches a maximal response in about six weeks, but gradually declines in the absence of antigenic boost. Germinal center reactions were observed early with maximal development achieved during the primary response, which coincided with peak antibody avidity responses to primary immunization. Boosting with antigen resulted in a rapid increase in rPA-specific antibody concentration and five-fold increase in avidity, which was not dependent on sustained GC development. The described methodology couples surface plasmon resonance-based plasma avidity measurements with germinal center analysis and provides a novel way to monitor humoral responses that can play a role in facilitating vaccine and adjuvant development.

  10. Structural dynamics of a single-chain Fv antibody against (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yusui; Tanaka, Yusuke; Inaba, Satomi; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruno, Takahiro; Sasaki, Yuji C; Fukada, Harumi; Kobayashi, Yuji; Azuma, Takachika; Oda, Masayuki

    2016-10-01

    Protein structure dynamics are critical for understanding structure-function relationships. An antibody can recognize its antigen, and can evolve toward the immunogen to increase binding strength, in a process referred to as affinity maturation. In this study, a single-chain Fv (scFv) antibody against (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl, derived from affinity matured type, C6, was designed to comprise the variable regions of light and heavy chains connected by a (GGGGS)3 linker peptide. This scFv was expressed in Escherichia coli in the insoluble fraction, solubilized in the presence of urea, and refolded by stepwise dialysis. The correctly refolded scFv was purified, and its structural, physical, and functional properties were analyzed using analytical ultracentrifugation, circular dichroism spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance biosensor. Thermal stability of C6 scFv increased greatly upon antigen binding, due to favorable enthalpic contributions. Antigen binding kinetics were comparable to those of the intact C6 antibody. Structural dynamics were analyzed using the diffracted X-ray tracking method, showing that fluctuations were suppressed upon antigen binding. The antigen binding energy determined from the angular diffusion coefficients was in good agreement with that calculated from the kinetics analysis, indicating that the fluctuations detected at single-molecule level are well reflected by antigen binding events. PMID:27222286

  11. Insulin Action is Blocked by a Monoclonal Antibody That Inhibits the Insulin Receptor Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, David O.; Ho, Lisa; Korn, Laurence J.; Roth, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor were produced. Thirty-four bound the intracellular domain of the receptor β subunit, the domain containing the tyrosine-specific kinase activity. Of these 34 antibodies, 33 recognized the rat receptor and 1 was shown to precipitate the receptors from mice, chickens, and frogs with high affinity. Another of the antibodies inhibited the kinase activities of the human and frog receptors with equal potencies. This antibody inhibited the kinase activities of these receptors by more than 90%, whereas others had no effect on either kinase activity. Microinjection of the inhibiting antibody into Xenopus oocytes blocked the ability of insulin to stimulate oocyte maturation. In contrast, this inhibiting antibody did not block the ability of progesterone to stimulate the same response. Furthermore, control immunoglobulin and a noninhibiting antibody to the receptor β subunit did not block this response to insulin. These results strongly support a role for the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor in mediating this biological effect of insulin.

  12. Antibody Request - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  13. Market maturity

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, B.; Bowden, S.; Ellis, M

    1995-02-01

    The power sector in the Philipines provides one of the most mature independent power markets in Asia. Over the past five years, National Power Corp. (NPC), the government owned utility, has actively invited the power sector into power generation. Distribution has remained in the hands of private and rural cooperative utilities. Private utilities have been operating as full requirements customers of NPC while the growth in capacity additions by independent power producers (IPPs) has outpaced NPC`s for the second year in a row. With a recovering economy and regulatory reform proceeding, the outlook for independent power remains strong through the end of the decade. The Philipine Congress is now reviewing draft legislation that will decentralize NPC and begin the process of privatization and market-based reforms throughout the country`s power sector.

  14. Antibody-induced Enhancement of Factor VIIa Activity through Distinct Allosteric Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Lisbeth M.; Andreasen, Peter A.; Svendsen, Ivan; Keemink, Janneke; Østergaard, Henrik; Persson, Egon

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of its cofactor tissue factor (TF), coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) predominantly exists in a zymogen-like, catalytically incompetent state. Here we demonstrate that conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be used to characterize structural features determining the activity of FVIIa. We isolated two classes of mAbs, which both increased the catalytic efficiency of FVIIa more than 150-fold. The effects of the antibodies were retained with a FVIIa variant, which has been shown to be inert to allosteric activation by the natural activator TF, suggesting that the antibodies and TF employ distinct mechanisms of activation. The antibodies could be classified into two groups based on their patterns of affinities for different conformations of FVIIa. Whereas one class of antibodies affected both the Km and kcat, the other class mainly affected the Km. The antibody-induced activity enhancement could be traced to maturation of the S1 substrate binding pocket and the oxyanion hole, evident by an increased affinity for p-aminobenzamidine, an increased rate of antithrombin inhibition, an increased rate of incorporation of diisopropylfluorophosphate, and an enhanced fraction of molecules with a buried N terminus of the catalytic domain in the presence of antibodies. As demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis, the two groups of antibodies appear to have overlapping, although clearly different, epitopes in the 170-loop. Our findings suggest that binding of ligands to specific residues in the 170-loop or its spatial vicinity may stabilize the S1 pocket and the oxyanion hole, and they may have general implications for the molecular understanding of FVIIa regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22275370

  15. Antibody-induced enhancement of factor VIIa activity through distinct allosteric pathways.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lisbeth M; Andreasen, Peter A; Svendsen, Ivan; Keemink, Janneke; Østergaard, Henrik; Persson, Egon

    2012-03-16

    In the absence of its cofactor tissue factor (TF), coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) predominantly exists in a zymogen-like, catalytically incompetent state. Here we demonstrate that conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be used to characterize structural features determining the activity of FVIIa. We isolated two classes of mAbs, which both increased the catalytic efficiency of FVIIa more than 150-fold. The effects of the antibodies were retained with a FVIIa variant, which has been shown to be inert to allosteric activation by the natural activator TF, suggesting that the antibodies and TF employ distinct mechanisms of activation. The antibodies could be classified into two groups based on their patterns of affinities for different conformations of FVIIa. Whereas one class of antibodies affected both the K(m) and k(cat), the other class mainly affected the K(m). The antibody-induced activity enhancement could be traced to maturation of the S1 substrate binding pocket and the oxyanion hole, evident by an increased affinity for p-aminobenzamidine, an increased rate of antithrombin inhibition, an increased rate of incorporation of diisopropylfluorophosphate, and an enhanced fraction of molecules with a buried N terminus of the catalytic domain in the presence of antibodies. As demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis, the two groups of antibodies appear to have overlapping, although clearly different, epitopes in the 170-loop. Our findings suggest that binding of ligands to specific residues in the 170-loop or its spatial vicinity may stabilize the S1 pocket and the oxyanion hole, and they may have general implications for the molecular understanding of FVIIa regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22275370

  16. Affine projective Osserman structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkey, P.; Nikčević, S.

    2013-08-01

    By considering the projectivized spectrum of the Jacobi operator, we introduce the concept of projective Osserman manifold in both the affine and in the pseudo-Riemannian settings. If M is an affine projective Osserman manifold, then the deformed Riemannian extension metric on the cotangent bundle is both spacelike and timelike projective Osserman. Since any rank-1-symmetric space is affine projective Osserman, this provides additional information concerning the cotangent bundle of a rank-1 Riemannian symmetric space with the deformed Riemannian extension metric. We construct other examples of affine projective Osserman manifolds where the Ricci tensor is not symmetric and thus the connection in question is not the Levi-Civita connection of any metric. If the dimension is odd, we use methods of algebraic topology to show the Jacobi operator of an affine projective Osserman manifold has only one non-zero eigenvalue and that eigenvalue is real.

  17. Development of a novel affinity chromatography resin for platform purification of lambda fabs.

    PubMed

    Eifler, Nora; Medaglia, Giovanni; Anderka, Oliver; Laurin, Linus; Hermans, Pim

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) are novel formats in the growing pipeline of biotherapeutics. Sharing similar features to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with regard to expression, Fabs are considered as unchallenging for upstream development. Yet for downstream processing, the mature mAb downstream purification platform is not directly applicable. New approaches need to be found to achieve a lean purification process that maintains quality, productivity, and timelines while being generically applicable independent of the expression system. In a successful collaboration, BAC BV, GE Healthcare, and Novartis Pharma AG have developed a new affinity chromatography medium (resin) suitable to support cGMP manufacturing of lambda Fabs. We show that using this novel chromatography medium for the capture step, a purification platform for lambda Fabs can be established. PMID:25082738

  18. A Single-Chain Antibody Using LoxP511 as the Linker Enables Large-Content Phage Library Construction via Cre/LoxP Recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Wei; Lv, Ming; Lin, Zhou; Geng, Jing; Li, Yali; Shen, Beifen; Ma, Yuanfang; Li, Yan; Qiao, Chunxia; Feng, Jiannan

    2014-07-01

    To obtain natural or "me-better" antibodies (e.g., affinity-maturated antibodies), phage display libraries are widely used. However, the likelihood of obtaining satisfactory antibodies depends on the library content. Here, we used computer-aided design to model the use of the LoxP511 site as a linker between the heavy and light variable domains of an antibody for construction of a large single-chain fragment (scFv) antibody phage library by using the Cre/LoxP recombinant system. Then, we constructed two novel scFvs based on 2C4, namely, AH_scFv15 (15 amino acid [aa] linker; common [SG4]3 sequence) and AH_scFv21 (21-aa linker; LoxP511 sequence), to verify the use of the LoxP511 site as a linker. Our results indicate that LoxP511 could be used effectively for the construction of a large (e.g., 5 × 10(12)) phage display library of scFv antibodies from which it was possible to isolate an antibody with the same epitope as 2C4 but with higher affinity.

  19. Antibodies as natural adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies in complex with specific antigen can dramatically change the antibody response to this antigen. Depending on antibody class and type of antigen, >99 % suppression or >100-fold enhancement of the response can take place. IgM and IgG3 are efficient enhancers and operate via the complement system. In contrast, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b enhance antibody and CD4(+) T cell responses to protein antigens via activating Fcγ-receptors. IgE also enhances antibody and CD4(+) T cell responses to small proteins but uses the low-affinity receptor for IgE, CD23. Most likely, IgM and IgG3 work by increasing the effective concentration of antigen on follicular dendritic cells in splenic follicles. IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgE probably enhance antibody responses by increasing antigen presentation by dendritic cells to T helper cells. IgG antibodies of all subclasses have a dual effect, and suppress antibody responses to particulate antigens such as erythrocytes. This capacity is used in the clinic to prevent immunization of Rhesus-negative women to Rhesus-positive fetal erythrocytes acquired via transplacental hemorrage. IgG-mediated suppression in mouse models can take place in the absence of Fcγ-receptors and complement and to date no knock-out mouse strain has been found where suppression is abrogated.

  20. Engineering antibodies for therapy.

    PubMed

    Adair, J R

    1992-12-01

    Success in the generation of an antibody-based therapeutic requires careful consideration of the binding site, to achieve specificity and high affinity; of the effector, to produce the desired therapeutic effect; of the means of attachment of the effector to the binding site; production of the end product; and the response made by the patient to the administered compound. Each of these areas is receiving attention by antibody-engineering techniques. The number of potentially useful monoclonal antibodies developed over the last 10 years, and currently in clinical trials or preregistration, is now being increased by these engineered newcomers. It will be interesting to see over the next few years how many of these antibodies, and of which kind, emerge as products.

  1. Anti-idiotypic nanobody as citrinin mimotope from a naive alpaca heavy chain single domain antibody library.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Xiong, Liang; Li, Yanping; Xiong, Yonghua; Tu, Zhui; Fu, Jinheng; Chen, Bo

    2015-07-01

    Compared with peptide-based mimotope, anti-idiotypic antibodies (AIds) are considered as promising biosynthetic surrogate antigen because these antibodies display stable protein conformation. Nevertheless, conventional AIds are generated by immunizing animals with heterologous idiotypic antibody in vivo; isolated AIds commonly exhibit a higher affinity to primary antibodies than target analytes because AIds undergo an affinity-matured process during immune responses, resulting in low sensitivity in competitive immunoassay. In the present study, an anti-citrinin monoclonal antibody (anti-CIT McAb) was designed as primary antibody; one β-type AI alpaca heavy chain single domain antibody (β-AI VHH) was selected as a citrinin (CIT) surrogate from a naive phage-displayed VHH library. The affinity constant (K D) of obtained β-AI VHH to anti-CIT McAb (160 nM) is 2.35 times lower than that of CIT and ovalbumin conjugates (CIT-OVA) to anti-CIT McAb (68 nM). The developed VHH-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (V-ELISA) can be used to perform dynamic linear detection of CIT in 10% (v/v) methanol/PBS from 5.0 to 300.0 ng/mL, with a median inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 44.6 ng/mL (n = 3); this result was twice as good as that of indirect competitive ELISA (ic-ELISA, IC50 = 96.2 ng/mL) with CIT-OVA as a coating antigen. Moreover, the precision of V-ELISA was evaluated by analyzing average recoveries and coefficient of variations of CIT-spiked cereal sample; the reliability of V-ELISA was also validated with a conventional ic-ELISA. In summary, the proposed strategy has a great potential for panning other β-AI VHH toward small organic molecules from a naive VHH library.

  2. Alternative Recognition of the Conserved Stem Epitope in Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinin by a VH3-30-Encoded Heterosubtypic Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Wyrzucki, Arkadiusz; Dreyfus, Cyrille; Kohler, Ines; Steck, Marco

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A human monoclonal heterosubtypic antibody, MAb 3.1, with its heavy chain encoded by VH3-30, was isolated using phage display with immobilized hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza virus A/Japan/305/1957(H2N2) as the target. Antibody 3.1 potently neutralizes influenza viruses from the H1a clade (i.e., H1, H2, H5, H6) but has little neutralizing activity against the H1b clade. Its crystal structure in complex with HA from a pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, A/South Carolina/1/1918(H1N1), revealed that like other heterosubtypic anti-influenza virus antibodies, MAb 3.1 contacts a hydrophobic groove in the HA stem, primarily using its heavy chain. However, in contrast to the closely related monoclonal antibody (Mab) FI6 that relies heavily on HCDR3 for binding, MAb 3.1 utilizes residues from HCDR1, HCDR3, and framework region 3 (FR3). Interestingly, HCDR1 of MAb 3.1 adopts an α-helical conformation and engages in hydrophobic interactions with the HA very similar to those of the de novo in silico-designed and affinity-matured synthetic protein HB36.3. These findings improve our understanding of the molecular requirements for binding to the conserved epitope in the stem of the HA protein and, therefore, aid the development of more universal influenza vaccines targeting these epitopes. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses rapidly evade preexisting immunity by constantly altering the immunodominant neutralizing antibody epitopes (antigenic drift) or by acquiring new envelope serotypes (antigenic shift). As a consequence, the majority of antibodies elicited by immunization or infection protect only against the immunizing or closely related strains. Here, we describe a novel monoclonal antibody that recognizes the conserved heterosubtypic epitope in the stem of influenza A virus hemagglutinin. This antibody, referred to as MAb 3.1, recognizes its epitope in a manner that resembles recognition of a similar epitope by the de novo in silico-designed and affinity-matured synthetic

  3. Special Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Indu; Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    1985-01-01

    Describes the nature of affinity chromatography and its use in purifying enzymes, studying cell interactions, exploring hormone receptors, and other areas. The potential the technique may have in treating disease is also considered. (JN)

  4. RNA recognition by a human antibody against brain cytoplasmic 200 RNA.

    PubMed

    Jung, Euihan; Lee, Jungmin; Hong, Hyo Jeong; Park, Insoo; Lee, Younghoon

    2014-06-01

    Diverse functional RNAs participate in a wide range of cellular processes. The RNA structure is critical for function, either on its own or as a complex form with proteins and other ligands. Therefore, analysis of the RNA conformation in cells is essential for understanding their functional mechanisms. However, no appropriate methods have been established as yet. Here, we developed an efficient strategy for panning and affinity maturation of anti-RNA human monoclonal antibodies from a naïve antigen binding fragment (Fab) combinatorial phage library. Brain cytoplasmic 200 (BC200) RNA, which is also highly expressed in some tumors, was used as an RNA antigen. We identified MabBC200-A3 as the optimal binding antibody. Mutagenesis and SELEX experiments showed that the antibody recognized a domain of BC200 in a structure- and sequence-dependent manner. Various breast cancer cell lines were further examined for BC200 RNA expression using conventional hybridization and immunoanalysis with MabBC200-A3 to see whether the antibody specifically recognizes BC200 RNA among the total purified RNAs. The amounts of antibody-recognizable BC200 RNA were consistent with hybridization signals among the cell lines. Furthermore, the antibody was able to discriminate BC200 RNA from other RNAs, supporting the utility of this antibody as a specific RNA structure-recognizing probe. Intriguingly, however, when permeabilized cells were subjected to immunoanalysis instead of purified total RNA, the amount of antibody-recognizable RNA was not correlated with the cellular level of BC200 RNA, indicating that BC200 RNA exists as two distinct forms (antibody-recognizable and nonrecognizable) in breast cancer cells and that their distribution depends on the cell type. Our results clearly demonstrate that anti-RNA antibodies provide an effective novel tool for detecting and analyzing RNA conformation.

  5. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis and Fcγ Receptor Binding of Homogeneous Glycoforms of Antibody Fc Domain. Presence of a Bisecting Sugar Moiety Enhances the Affinity of Fc to FcγIIIa Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Guozhang; Ochiai, Hirofumi; Huang, Wei; Yang, Qiang; Li, Cishan; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2011-01-01

    Structurally well-defined IgG-Fc glycoforms are highly demanded for understanding the effects of glycosylation on antibody’s effector functions. We report in this paper chemoenzymatic synthesis and Fcγ receptor binding of an array of homogeneous IgG-Fc glycoforms. The chemoenzymatic approach consists of the chemical synthesis of defined N-glycan oxazolines as donor substratess, the expression of the Fc domain in a CHO cell line in the presence of an α-mannosidase inhibitor kifunensine, and an endoglycosidase-catalyzed glycosylation of the deglycosylated Fc domain (GlcNAc-Fc homodimer) with the synthetic glycan oxazolines. The enzyme from Arthrobacter protophormiae (Endo-A) was found to be remarkably efficient to take various modified N-glycan core oxazolines, including the bisecting sugar-containing derivatives, for Fc glycosylation remodeling, resulting in the formation of the corresponding homogeneous Fc glycoforms. Nevertheless, neither Endo-A, nor the Mucor hiemalis endoglycosidase mutants (EndoM-N175A and EndoM-N175Q), was able to transfer full-length complex-type N-glycan to the Fc domain, implicating the limitations of these two enzymes in Fc glycosylation remodeling. SPR binding studies with the synthetic IgG-Fc glycoforms unambiguously proved that the presence of a bisecting GlcNAc moiety could significantly enhance the binding of Fc to FcγRIIIa, the activating Fcγ receptor, independent of Fc core-fucosylation. Interestingly, the Fc glycoforms carrying an unusual bisecting sugar moiety such as a mannose or a LacNAc moiety also demonstrated enhanced affinity to FcγRIIIa. On the orther hand, the presence of a bisecting GlcNAc or core fucosylation had little effect on the affinity of Fc to the inhibitory Fcγ receptor, FcγRIIb. Our experimental data also showed that the α-linked mannose residues in the pentasaccharide Man3GlcNAc2 core was essential to maintain a high-affinity of Fc to both FcγRIIIa and FcγRIIb. The synthetic homogeneous Fc

  6. Antibodies elicited by the first non-viral prophylactic cancer vaccine show tumor-specificity and immunotherapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Lohmueller, Jason J; Sato, Shuji; Popova, Lana; Chu, Isabel M; Tucker, Meghan A; Barberena, Roberto; Innocenti, Gregory M; Cudic, Mare; Ham, James D; Cheung, Wan Cheung; Polakiewicz, Roberto D; Finn, Olivera J

    2016-08-22

    MUC1 is a shared tumor antigen expressed on >80% of human cancers. We completed the first prophylactic cancer vaccine clinical trial based on a non-viral antigen, MUC1, in healthy individuals at-risk for colon cancer. This trial provided a unique source of potentially effective and safe immunotherapeutic drugs, fully-human antibodies affinity-matured in a healthy host to a tumor antigen. We purified, cloned, and characterized 13 IgGs specific for several tumor-associated MUC1 epitopes with a wide range of binding affinities. These antibodies bind hypoglycosylated MUC1 on human cancer cell lines and tumor tissues but show no reactivity against fully-glycosylated MUC1 on normal cells and tissues. We found that several antibodies activate complement-mediated cytotoxicity and that T cells carrying chimeric antigen receptors with the antibody variable regions kill MUC1(+) target cells, express activation markers, and produce interferon gamma. Fully-human and tumor-specific, these antibodies are candidates for further testing and development as immunotherapeutic drugs.

  7. Antibodies elicited by the first non-viral prophylactic cancer vaccine show tumor-specificity and immunotherapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Lohmueller, Jason J; Sato, Shuji; Popova, Lana; Chu, Isabel M; Tucker, Meghan A; Barberena, Roberto; Innocenti, Gregory M; Cudic, Mare; Ham, James D; Cheung, Wan Cheung; Polakiewicz, Roberto D; Finn, Olivera J

    2016-01-01

    MUC1 is a shared tumor antigen expressed on >80% of human cancers. We completed the first prophylactic cancer vaccine clinical trial based on a non-viral antigen, MUC1, in healthy individuals at-risk for colon cancer. This trial provided a unique source of potentially effective and safe immunotherapeutic drugs, fully-human antibodies affinity-matured in a healthy host to a tumor antigen. We purified, cloned, and characterized 13 IgGs specific for several tumor-associated MUC1 epitopes with a wide range of binding affinities. These antibodies bind hypoglycosylated MUC1 on human cancer cell lines and tumor tissues but show no reactivity against fully-glycosylated MUC1 on normal cells and tissues. We found that several antibodies activate complement-mediated cytotoxicity and that T cells carrying chimeric antigen receptors with the antibody variable regions kill MUC1(+) target cells, express activation markers, and produce interferon gamma. Fully-human and tumor-specific, these antibodies are candidates for further testing and development as immunotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27545199

  8. Antibodies elicited by the first non-viral prophylactic cancer vaccine show tumor-specificity and immunotherapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Lohmueller, Jason J.; Sato, Shuji; Popova, Lana; Chu, Isabel M.; Tucker, Meghan A.; Barberena, Roberto; Innocenti, Gregory M.; Cudic, Mare; Ham, James D.; Cheung, Wan Cheung; Polakiewicz, Roberto D.; Finn, Olivera J.

    2016-01-01

    MUC1 is a shared tumor antigen expressed on >80% of human cancers. We completed the first prophylactic cancer vaccine clinical trial based on a non-viral antigen, MUC1, in healthy individuals at-risk for colon cancer. This trial provided a unique source of potentially effective and safe immunotherapeutic drugs, fully-human antibodies affinity-matured in a healthy host to a tumor antigen. We purified, cloned, and characterized 13 IgGs specific for several tumor-associated MUC1 epitopes with a wide range of binding affinities. These antibodies bind hypoglycosylated MUC1 on human cancer cell lines and tumor tissues but show no reactivity against fully-glycosylated MUC1 on normal cells and tissues. We found that several antibodies activate complement-mediated cytotoxicity and that T cells carrying chimeric antigen receptors with the antibody variable regions kill MUC1+ target cells, express activation markers, and produce interferon gamma. Fully-human and tumor-specific, these antibodies are candidates for further testing and development as immunotherapeutic drugs. PMID:27545199

  9. Autoreactivity of primary human immunoglobulins ancestral to hypermutated human antibodies that neutralize HCMV.

    PubMed

    McLean, Gary R; Cho, Chin-wen; Schrader, John W

    2006-05-01

    The human antibody response to the AD-2S1 epitope of glycoprotein B (gB) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is dominated by a family of closely related somatically mutated antibodies. These antibodies neutralize viral infectivity and the genes encoding them are derived from two commonly used germ-line variable (V) region genes, IGHV3-30 and IGKV3-11. Recombination of these V genes with the appropriate junctional diversity generates genes that encode primary immunoglobulins that bind to AD-2S1. To further understand the initial primary immunoglobulin response to AD-2S1 we synthesized the germ-line-based ancestor of one such family of antibodies and showed that it bound gB at the AD-2S1 epitope. Here we show that the germ-line ancestor of a second family of antibodies likewise binds to gB. We further show that one of the ancestral primary immunoglobulins, but not the other, also recognized autoantigens. In contrast, the hypermutated derivatives did not demonstrate autoreactivity and minor structural changes in the primary immunoglobulin were sufficient to generate or abolish autoreactivity or to change specificity. Thus, our demonstration that the ancestor of a highly mutated, non-autoreactive antiviral IgG antibody binds nuclear and cell-surface autoantigens indicates for the first time that self-reactivity is not necessarily a barrier to development into a follicular B lymphocyte that undergoes antigen-initiated affinity maturation.

  10. Developmental pathway for potent V1V2-directed HIV-neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Schramm, Chaim A.; Gorman, Jason; Moore, Penny L.; Bhiman, Jinal N.; DeKosky, Brandon J.; Ernandes, Michael J.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Kim, Helen J.; Pancera, Marie; Staupe, Ryan P.; Altae-Tran, Han R.; Bailer, Robert T.; Crooks, Ema T.; Cupo, Albert; Druz, Aliaksandr; Garrett, Nigel J.; Hoi, Kam H.; Kong, Rui; Louder, Mark K.; Longo, Nancy S.; McKee, Krisha; Nonyane, Molati; O’Dell, Sijy; Roark, Ryan S.; Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Sheward, Daniel J.; Soto, Cinque; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Zhenhai; Mullikin, James C.; Binley, James M.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Wilson, Ian A.; Moore, John P.; Ward, Andrew B.; Georgiou, George; Williamson, Carolyn; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Morris, Lynn; Kwong, Peter D.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Antibodies capable of neutralizing HIV-1 often target variable regions 1 and 2 (V1V2) of the HIV-1 envelope, but the mechanism of their elicitation has been unclear. Here we define the developmental pathway by which such antibodies are generated and acquire the requisite molecular characteristics for neutralization. Twelve somatically related neutralizing antibodies (CAP256-VRC26.01-12) were isolated from CAPRISA-donor CAP256; each antibody contained the protruding tyrosine-sulfated, anionic antigen-binding loop (CDR H3) characteristic of this category of antibodies. Their unmutated ancestor emerged between weeks 30–38 post-infection with a 35-residue CDR H3, and neutralized the virus that superinfected this individual 15 weeks after initial infection. Improved neutralization breadth occurred by week 59 with modest affinity maturation, and was preceded by extensive diversification of the virus population. HIV-1 V1V2-directed neutralizing antibodies can thus develop relatively rapidly through initial selection of B cells with a long CDR H3, and limited subsequent somatic hypermutation, an important vaccine insight. PMID:24590074

  11. Development of a Recombinant Antibody with Specificity for Chelated Uranyl Ions

    SciTech Connect

    X. Li; A.M. Kriegel; T.C. Bishop; R.C. Blake; E. Figueiredo; H. Yu; D.A. Blake

    2005-04-18

    canonical structures method detailed by Morea et al. (J. Mol. Biol. 275:269), and the participation of specific residues in antigen recognition was assessed using site-directed mutagenesis. Three amino acids in the light chain variable region, H39, Y54 and F103, were particularly important in antigen recognition. In a separate series of experiments, a recombinant phage-displayed antibody library has been prepared using RNA isolated from the spleens of sheep and rabbits immunized with specific metal-chelate complexes. Phage-display libraries produced from an immunized source are inclined to include variable genes specific for the immunized antigen(s), many of which are already affinity matured. An antibody fragment specific for the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-DCP complex was isolated from this combined phage display library. While the binding affinity of this antibody fragment for UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-DCP was not as high as that of the 12F6 monoclonal antibody, the beauty of antibody phage display technology is that it allows for the potential manipulation and saturation of the antibody's binding affinity, which may drastically improve and ultimately surpass that of monoclonal antibodies.

  12. Antitubulin antibody in healthy adults and patients with infectious mononucleosis and its relationship to smooth muscle antibody (SMA).

    PubMed Central

    Mead, G M; Cowin, P; Whitehouse, J M

    1980-01-01

    Antibody to tubulin in man has been studied using a specific radioimmunoassay, affinity chromatography radioimmunoassay but markedly increased levels were noted in patients with infectious mononucleosis where the antibody was predominantly IgM in type. This finding was confirmed on fluorescence microscopy. Affinity chromatography purified antibody produced characteristic microtubular staining of fixed 3T3 cells, but in addition, produced weak staining of cryostat sections of rat tissue, similar in distribution to that of smooth muscle antibody. Our studies indicate that the IgM smooth muscle antibody found in infectious mononucleosis by IF techniques is at least in part due to an antitubulin antibody. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6993069

  13. Antibody avidity in swine lymphocyte antigen-defined miniature pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Appleyard, G D; Mallard, B A; Kennedy, B W; Wilkie, B N

    1992-01-01

    Antibody avidity to hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was measured by thiocyanate ion elution enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in swine lymphocyte antigen (SLA) defined miniature pigs. Serum antibody avidity was evaluated on day 14 and 30 after primary (day 0) and secondary (day 14) immunizations in eight to ten week old miniature pigs previously typed for swine lymphocyte antigen genotype. The effect of SLA genotype, litter, and gender on anti-HEWL antibody avidity was determined by least squares. Antibody avidity varied amongst individuals. Antibody avidity maturation was observed as a mean rise in antibody avidity from primary response (0.89 +/- 0.64) to secondary response (1.23 +/- 0.54) (p < 0.0005). Overall, SLA genotype did not significantly influence antibody avidity or avidity maturation, but pigs of dd genotype had greater avidity maturation between primary and secondary responses than other genotypes. Litter effects significantly affected antibody avidity and maturation. PMID:1477799

  14. Antibody Avidity in Humoral Immune Responses in Bangladeshi Children and Adults following Administration of an Oral Killed Cholera Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Mohammad Murshid; Leung, Daniel T.; Akhtar, Marjahan; Nazim, Mohammad; Akter, Sarmin; Uddin, Taher; Khanam, Farhana; Mahbuba, Deena Al; Ahmad, Shaikh Meshbahuddin; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Ryan, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Antibody avidity for antigens following disease or vaccination increases with affinity maturation and somatic hypermutation. In this study, we followed children and adults in Bangladesh for 1 year following oral cholera vaccination and measured the avidity of antibodies to the T cell-dependent antigen cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and the T cell-independent antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in comparison with responses in other immunological measurements. Children produced CTB-specific IgG and IgA antibodies of high avidity following vaccination, which persisted for several months; the magnitudes of responses were comparable to those seen in adult vaccinees. The avidity of LPS-specific IgG and IgA antibodies in vaccinees increased significantly shortly after the second dose of vaccine but waned rapidly to baseline levels thereafter. CTB-specific memory B cells were present for only a short time following vaccination, and we did not find significant memory B cell responses to LPS in any age group. For older children, there was a significant correlation between CTB-specific memory T cell responses after the second dose of vaccine and CTB-specific IgG antibody avidity indices over the subsequent year. These findings suggest that vaccination induces a longer-lasting increase in the avidity of antibodies to a T cell-dependent antigen than is measured by a memory B cell response to that antigen and that early memory T cell responses correlate well with the subsequent development of higher-avidity antibodies. PMID:23925888

  15. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column. PMID:27515072

  16. Crystal Structure of PG16 and Chimeric Dissection with Somatically Related PG9: Structure-Function Analysis of Two Quaternary-Specific Antibodies That Effectively Neutralize HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Pancera, Marie; McLellan, Jason S.; Wu, Xueling; Zhu, Jiang; Changela, Anita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Yang, Yongping; Zhou, Tongqing; Phogat, Sanjay; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-11-03

    HIV-1 resists neutralization by most antibodies. Two somatically related human antibodies, PG9 and PG16, however, each neutralize 70 to 80% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. Here we present the structure of the antigen-binding fragment of PG16 in monoclinic and orthorhombic lattices at 2.4 and 4.0 {angstrom}, respectively, and use a combination of structural analysis, paratope dissection, and neutralization assessment to determine the functional relevance of three unusual PG9/PG16 features: N-linked glycosylation, extensive affinity maturation, and a heavy chain-third complementarity-determining region (CDR H3) that is one of the longest observed in human antibodies. Glycosylation extended off the side of the light chain variable domain and was not required for neutralization. The CDR H3 formed an axe-shaped subdomain, which comprised 42% of the CDR surface, with the axe head looming {approx}20 {angstrom} above the other combining loops. Comprehensive sets of chimeric swaps between PG9 and PG16 of light chain, heavy chain, and CDR H3 were employed to decipher structure-function relationships. Chimeric swaps generally complemented functionally, with differences in PG9/PG16 neutralization related primarily to residue differences in CDR H3. Meanwhile, chimeric reversions to genomic V genes showed isolate-dependent effects, with affinity maturation playing a significant role in augmenting neutralization breadth (P = 0.036) and potency (P < 0.0001). The structural and functional details of extraordinary CDR H3 and extensive affinity maturation provide insights into the neutralization mechanism of and the elicitation pathway for broadly neutralizing antibodies like PG9 and PG16.

  17. European and international collaboration in affinity proteomics.

    PubMed

    Stoevesandt, Oda; Taussig, Michael J

    2012-06-15

    In affinity proteomics, specific protein-binding molecules (a.k.a. binders), principally antibodies, are applied as reagents in proteome analysis. In recent years, advances in binder technologies have created the potential for an unprecedented view on protein expression and distribution patterns in plasma, cells and tissues and increasingly on protein function. Particular strengths of affinity proteomics methods include detecting proteins in their natural environments of cell or tissue, high sensitivity and selectivity for detection of low abundance proteins and exploiting binding actions such as functional interference in living cells. To maximise the use and impact of affinity reagents, it will be essential to create comprehensive, standardised binder collections. With this in mind, the EU FP7 programme AFFINOMICS (http://www.affinomics.org), together with the preceding EU programmes ProteomeBinders and AffinityProteome, aims to extend affinity proteomics research by generating a large-scale resource of validated protein-binding molecules for characterisation of the human proteome. Activity is directed at producing binders to about 1000 protein targets, primarily in signal transduction and cancer, by establishing a high throughput, coordinated production pipeline. An important aspect of AFFINOMICS is the development of highly efficient recombinant selection methods, based on phage, cell and ribosome display, capable of producing high quality binders at greater throughput and lower cost than hitherto. The programme also involves development of innovative and sensitive technologies for specific detection of target proteins and their interactions, and deployment of binders in proteomics studies of clinical relevance. The need for such binder generation programmes is now recognised internationally, with parallel initiatives in the USA for cancer (NCI) and transcription factors (NIH) and within the Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO). The papers in this volume of New

  18. Priming a broadly neutralizing antibody response to HIV-1 using a germline-targeting immunogen

    PubMed Central

    Jardine, Joseph G.; Ota, Takayuki; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Kulp, Daniel W.; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Skog, Patrick D.; Thinnes, Theresa C.; Bhullar, Deepika; Briney, Bryan; Menis, Sergey; Jones, Meaghan; Kubitz, Mike; Spencer, Skye; Adachi, Yumiko; Burton, Dennis R.; Schief, William R.; Nemazee, David

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of HIV-1 vaccine research is the design of immunogens capable of inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that bind to the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). Poor binding of Env to unmutated precursors of bnAbs, including those of the VRC01-class, appears to be a major problem for bnAb induction. We engineered an immunogen that binds to VRC01-class bnAb precursors and immunized knock-in mice expressing germline-reverted VRC01 heavy chains. Induced antibodies showed characteristics of VRC01-class bnAbs, including a short light chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDRL3) and mutations that favored binding to near-native HIV-1 gp120 constructs. In contrast, native-like immunogens failed to activate VRC01-class precursors. The results suggest that rational epitope design can prime rare B cell precursors for affinity maturation to desired targets. PMID:26089355

  19. Expression and purification of recombinant antibody formats and antibody fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Siegemund, Martin; Richter, Fabian; Seifert, Oliver; Unverdorben, Felix; Kontermann, Roland E

    2014-01-01

    In the laboratory-scale production of antibody fragments or antibody fusion proteins, it is often difficult to keep track on the most suitable affinity tags for protein purification from either prokaryotic or eukaryotic host systems. Here, we describe how such recombinant proteins derived from Escherichia coli lysates as well as HEK293 cell culture supernatants are purified by IMAC and by different affinity chromatography methods based on fusions to FLAG-tag, Strep-tag, and Fc domains. PMID:24515473

  20. Induction of HIV Neutralizing Antibody Lineages in Mice with Diverse Precursor Repertoires.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ming; Cheng, Cheng; Chen, Xuejun; Duan, Hongying; Cheng, Hwei-Ling; Dao, Mai; Sheng, Zizhang; Kimble, Michael; Wang, Lingshu; Lin, Sherry; Schmidt, Stephen D; Du, Zhou; Joyce, M Gordon; Chen, Yiwei; DeKosky, Brandon J; Chen, Yimin; Normandin, Erica; Cantor, Elizabeth; Chen, Rita E; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Zhang, Yi; Shi, Wei; Kong, Wing-Pui; Choe, Misook; Henry, Amy R; Laboune, Farida; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Huang, Pei-Yi; Jain, Suvi; McGuire, Andrew T; Georgeson, Eric; Menis, Sergey; Douek, Daniel C; Schief, William R; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Kwong, Peter D; Shapiro, Lawrence; Haynes, Barton F; Mascola, John R; Alt, Frederick W

    2016-09-01

    The design of immunogens that elicit broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) has been a major obstacle to HIV-1 vaccine development. One approach to assess potential immunogens is to use mice expressing precursors of human bnAbs as vaccination models. The bnAbs of the VRC01-class derive from the IGHV1-2 immunoglobulin heavy chain and neutralize a wide spectrum of HIV-1 strains via targeting the CD4 binding site of the envelope glycoprotein gp120. We now describe a mouse vaccination model that allows a germline human IGHV1-2(∗)02 segment to undergo normal V(D)J recombination and, thereby, leads to the generation of peripheral B cells that express a highly diverse repertoire of VRC01-related receptors. When sequentially immunized with modified gp120 glycoproteins designed to engage VRC01 germline and intermediate antibodies, IGHV1-2(∗)02-rearranging mice, which also express a VRC01-antibody precursor light chain, can support the affinity maturation of VRC01 precursor antibodies into HIV-neutralizing antibody lineages. PMID:27610571

  1. QUANTITATIVE INVESTIGATIONS OF IDIOTYPIC ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Brient, Bruce W.; Nisonoff, Alfred

    1970-01-01

    Rabbit anti-idiotypic antibodies were prepared by injection of specifically purified anti-p-azobenzoate antibodies (D) from individual donor rabbits. Benzoate derivatives were found to be strong inhibitors of the reactions of D with anti-D antisera. There was a close correlation between the combining affinities of the benzoate derivatives used and their effectiveness as inhibitors. Compounds tested that are chemically unrelated to benzoate were ineffective. The results indicate either that the combining site of anti-benzoate antibody is part of an important idiotypic determinant, which is sterically blocked by hapten, or that the hapten induces a conformational change which alters idiotypic determinants not involving the active site. Such conformational changes, if they occur, must be restricted since hapten has little effect on the reactions of F(ab')2 fragments of anti-benzoate antibodies with antisera directed to rabbit fragment Fab and no detectable effect on reactions with antibodies directed to allotypic determinants. PMID:4097134

  2. Affinity driven social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruyú, B.; Kuperman, M. N.

    2007-04-01

    In this work we present a model for evolving networks, where the driven force is related to the social affinity between individuals of a population. In the model, a set of individuals initially arranged on a regular ordered network and thus linked with their closest neighbors are allowed to rearrange their connections according to a dynamics closely related to that of the stable marriage problem. We show that the behavior of some topological properties of the resulting networks follows a non trivial pattern.

  3. Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Birgersson, Elin; Mezger, Anja; Nilsson, Mats; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off‐target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi‐automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead‐based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read‐out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof‐of‐concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off‐target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA‐based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead‐based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond. PMID:26935855

  4. High affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal yeloid lineage without HSC toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Rachel C; Feng, Yang; Schutsky, Keith; Poussin, Mathilde; Kalota, Anna; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Powell, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here, we isolated a high affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific scFv (2.48nM KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T-cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ+ AML in vitro and in vivo compared to a low affinity (LA) FRβ CAR (54.3nM KD). Using the HA-FRβ IgG, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T-cells lysed mature CD14+ monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T-cells retained effective anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T-cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity. PMID:26898190

  5. Engineered affinity proteins for tumour-targeting applications.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mikaela; Ståhl, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Targeting of tumour-associated antigens is an expanding treatment modality in clinical oncology as an alternative to, or in combination with, conventional treatments, such as chemotherapy, external-radiation therapy and surgery. Targeting of antigens that are unique or more highly expressed in tumours than in normal tissues can be used to increase the specificity and reduce the cytotoxic effect on normal tissues. Several targeting agents have been studied for clinical use, where monoclonal antibodies have been the ones most widely used. More than 20 monoclonal antibodies are approved for therapy today and the largest field is oncology. Advances in genetic engineering and in vitro selection technology has enabled the feasible high-throughput generation of monoclonal antibodies, antibody derivatives [e.g. scFvs, Fab molecules, dAbs (single-domain antibodies), diabodies and minibodies] and more recently also non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins. Several of these affinity proteins have been investigated for both in vivo diagnostics and therapy. Affinity proteins in tumour-targeted therapy can affect tumour progression by altering signal transduction or by delivering a payload of toxin, drug or radionuclide. The ErbB receptor family has been extensively studied as biomarkers in tumour targeting, primarily for therapy using monoclonal antibodies. Two receptors in the ErbB family, EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and HER2 (epidermal growth factor receptor 2), are overexpressed in various malignancies and associated with poor patient prognosis and are therefore interesting targets for solid tumours. In the present review, strategies are described for tumour targeting of solid tumours using affinity proteins to deliver radionuclides, either for molecular imaging or radiotherapy. Antibodies, antibody derivatives and non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins are discussed with a certain focus on the affibody (Affibody) molecule. PMID:19341363

  6. Binding affinities of anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, J.J.; Drachman, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies directed against acetylcholine (ACh) receptors are present in the sera of nearly 90% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and are involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. However, the antibody titers measured by the standard radioimmunoassay correspond poorly with the clinical severity of the disease. To determine whether this disparity could be accounted for by differences in the binding affinities of anti-ACh receptor antibodies in different patients, we have measured the binding affinities of these autoantibodies in 15 sera from MG patients. The affinity constants (K/sub o/), as determined by Scatchard analysis, were all in the range of 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/, comparable to the highest values reported in immunized animals. The affinity constants were truly representative of the population of autoantibodies detected by the radioimmunoassay, as shown by the remarkable linearity of the Scatchard plots (r/sup 2/>0.90) and the close correlation between the antibody titers determined by extrapolation of the Scatchard plots and by saturation analysis (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). There was only a 6-fold variation in affinity constants measured in this series of patients despite widely differing antibody titers and severity of the disease. Factors other than the titer and affinity of anti-ACh receptor antibodies may correlate better with the clinical manifestations of MG.

  7. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  8. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  9. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. The mitochondria are an important part of cells. They are ... often, in people with other kinds of liver disease and some autoimmune diseases. Risks Risks for having ...

  10. Enhancement of Immune Effector Functions by Modulating IgG’s Intrinsic Affinity for Target Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Yariv; Yang, Chunning; Borrok, M. Jack; Ayriss, Joanne; Aherne, Karen; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated immune effector functions play an essential role in the anti-tumor efficacy of many therapeutic mAbs. While much of the effort to improve effector potency has focused on augmenting the interaction between the antibody-Fc and activating Fc-receptors expressed on immune cells, the role of antibody binding interactions with the target antigen remains poorly understood. We show that antibody intrinsic affinity to the target antigen clearly influences the extent and efficiency of Fc-mediated effector mechanisms, and report the pivotal role of antibody binding valence on the ability to regulate effector functions. More particularly, we used an array of affinity modulated variants of three different mAbs, anti-CD4, anti-EGFR and anti-HER2 against a panel of target cell lines expressing disparate levels of the target antigen. We found that at saturating antibody concentrations, IgG variants with moderate intrinsic affinities, similar to those generated by the natural humoral immune response, promoted superior effector functions compared to higher affinity antibodies. We hypothesize that at saturating concentrations, effector function correlates most directly with the amount of Fc bound to the cell surface. Thus, high affinity antibodies exhibiting slow off-rates are more likely to interact bivalently with the target cell, occupying two antigen sites with a single Fc. In contrast, antibodies with faster off-rates are likely to dissociate each binding arm more rapidly, resulting in a higher likelihood of monovalent binding. Monovalent binding may in turn increase target cell opsonization and lead to improved recruitment of effector cells. This unpredicted relationship between target affinity and effector function potency suggests a careful examination of antibody design and engineering for the development of next-generation immunotherapeutics. PMID:27322177

  11. Broadly cross-reactive antibodies dominate the human B cell response against 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Wrammert, Jens; Koutsonanos, Dimitrios; Li, Gui-Mei; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Sui, Jianhua; Morrissey, Michael; McCausland, Megan; Skountzou, Ioanna; Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W. Ian; Mehta, Aneesh; Razavi, Behzad; Del Rio, Carlos; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Lee, Jane-Hwei; Huang, Min; Ali, Zahida; Kaur, Kaval; Andrews, Sarah; Amara, Rama Rao; Wang, Youliang; Das, Suman Ranjan; O'Donnell, Christopher David; Yewdell, Jon W.; Subbarao, Kanta; Marasco, Wayne A.; Mulligan, Mark J.; Compans, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza pandemic demonstrated the global health threat of reassortant influenza strains. Herein, we report a detailed analysis of plasmablast and monoclonal antibody responses induced by pandemic H1N1 infection in humans. Unlike antibodies elicited by annual influenza vaccinations, most neutralizing antibodies induced by pandemic H1N1 infection were broadly cross-reactive against epitopes in the hemagglutinin (HA) stalk and head domain of multiple influenza strains. The antibodies were from cells that had undergone extensive affinity maturation. Based on these observations, we postulate that the plasmablasts producing these broadly neutralizing antibodies were predominantly derived from activated memory B cells specific for epitopes conserved in several influenza strains. Consequently, most neutralizing antibodies were broadly reactive against divergent H1N1 and H5N1 influenza strains. This suggests that a pan-influenza vaccine may be possible, given the right immunogen. Antibodies generated potently protected and rescued mice from lethal challenge with pandemic H1N1 or antigenically distinct influenza strains, making them excellent therapeutic candidates. PMID:21220454

  12. A human antibody recognizing a conserved epitope of H5 hemagglutinin broadly neutralizes highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongxing; Voss, Jarrod; Zhang, Guoliang; Buchy, Philippi; Zuo, Teng; Wang, Lulan; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Fan; Wang, Guiqing; Tsai, Cheguo; Calder, Lesley; Gamblin, Steve J; Zhang, Linqi; Deubel, Vincent; Zhou, Boping; Skehel, John J; Zhou, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Influenza A virus infection is a persistent threat to public health worldwide due to its ability to evade immune surveillance through rapid genetic drift and shift. Current vaccines against influenza A virus provide immunity to viral isolates that are similar to vaccine strains. High-affinity neutralizing antibodies against conserved epitopes could provide immunity to diverse influenza virus strains and protection against future pandemic viruses. In this study, by using a highly sensitive H5N1 pseudotype-based neutralization assay to screen human monoclonal antibodies produced by memory B cells from an H5N1-infected individual and molecular cloning techniques, we developed three fully human monoclonal antibodies. Among them, antibody 65C6 exhibited potent neutralization activity against all H5 clades and subclades except for subclade 7.2 and prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy against highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses in mice. Studies on hemagglutinin (HA)-antibody complexes by electron microscopy and epitope mapping indicate that antibody 65C6 binds to a conformational epitope comprising amino acid residues at positions 118, 121, 161, 164, and 167 (according to mature H5 numbering) on the tip of the membrane-distal globular domain of HA. Thus, we conclude that antibody 65C6 recognizes a neutralization epitope in the globular head of HA that is conserved among almost all divergent H5N1 influenza stains. PMID:22238297

  13. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  14. Structure of a High-Affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Saphire, E.O.; Montero, M.; Menendez, A.; Houten, N.E.van; Irving, M.B.; Pantophlet, R.; Swick, M.B.; Parren, P.W.H.I.; Burton, D.R.; Scott, J.K.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Simon Fraser U. /British Columbia U.

    2007-07-13

    The human antibody b12 recognizes a discontinuous epitope on gp120 and is one of the rare monoclonal antibodies that neutralize a broad range of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. We previously reported the isolation of B2.1, a dimeric peptide that binds with high specificity to b12 and competes with gp120 for b12 antibody binding. Here, we show that the affinity of B2.1 was improved 60-fold over its synthetic-peptide counterpart by fusing it to the N terminus of a soluble protein. This affinity, which is within an order of magnitude of that of gp120, probably more closely reflects the affinity of the phage-borne peptide. The crystal structure of a complex between Fab of b12 and B2.1 was determined at 1.8 Angstrom resolution. The structural data allowed the differentiation of residues that form critical contacts with b12 from those required for maintenance of the antigenic structure of the peptide, and revealed that three contiguous residues mediate B2.1's critical contacts with b12. This single region of critical contact between the B2.1 peptide and the b12 paratope is unlikely to mimic the discontinuous key binding residues involved in the full b12 epitope for gp120, as previously identified by alanine scanning substitutions on the gp120 surface. These structural observations are supported by experiments that demonstrate that B2.1 is an ineffective immunogenic mimic of the b12 epitope on gp120. Indeed, an extensive series of immunizations with B2.1 in various forms failed to produce gp120 cross-reactive sera. The functional and structural data presented here, however, suggest that the mechanism by which b12 recognizes the two antigens is very different. Here, we present the first crystal structure of peptide bound to an antibody that was originally raised against a discontinuous protein epitope. Our results highlight the challenge of producing immunogens that mimic discontinuous protein epitopes, and the necessity of combining

  15. HIV-1 VACCINES. Priming a broadly neutralizing antibody response to HIV-1 using a germline-targeting immunogen.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Joseph G; Ota, Takayuki; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Kulp, Daniel W; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Skog, Patrick D; Thinnes, Theresa C; Bhullar, Deepika; Briney, Bryan; Menis, Sergey; Jones, Meaghan; Kubitz, Mike; Spencer, Skye; Adachi, Yumiko; Burton, Dennis R; Schief, William R; Nemazee, David

    2015-07-10

    A major goal of HIV-1 vaccine research is the design of immunogens capable of inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that bind to the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). Poor binding of Env to unmutated precursors of bnAbs, including those of the VRC01 class, appears to be a major problem for bnAb induction. We engineered an immunogen that binds to VRC01-class bnAb precursors and immunized knock-in mice expressing germline-reverted VRC01 heavy chains. Induced antibodies showed characteristics of VRC01-class bnAbs, including a short CDRL3 (light-chain complementarity-determining region 3) and mutations that favored binding to near-native HIV-1 gp120 constructs. In contrast, native-like immunogens failed to activate VRC01-class precursors. The results suggest that rational epitope design can prime rare B cell precursors for affinity maturation to desired targets.

  16. Antibody validation

    PubMed Central

    Bordeaux, Jennifer; Welsh, Allison W.; Agarwal, Seema; Killiam, Elizabeth; Baquero, Maria T.; Hanna, Jason A.; Anagnostou, Valsamo K.; Rimm, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are among the most frequently used tools in basic science research and in clinical assays, but there are no universally accepted guidelines or standardized methods for determining the validity of these reagents. Furthermore, for commercially available antibodies, it is clear that what is on the label does not necessarily correspond to what is in the tube. To validate an antibody, it must be shown to be specific, selective, and reproducible in the context for which it is to be used. In this review, we highlight the common pitfalls when working with antibodies, common practices for validating antibodies, and levels of commercial antibody validation for seven vendors. Finally, we share our algorithm for antibody validation for immunohistochemistry and quantitative immunofluorescence. PMID:20359301

  17. Somatic hypermutations and isotype restricted exceptionally long CDR3H contribute to antibody diversification in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Azad K; Kehrli, Marcus E; Kurtz, A; Ng, S; Koti, M; Shojaei, F; Saini, Surinder S

    2009-01-15

    Antibody diversification in IgM and IgG antibodies was analyzed in an 18-month old bovine (Bos taurus) suffering from naturally occurring chronic and recurrent infections due to bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD). The BLAD, involving impaired leukocyte beta2 integrin expression on leukocytes, develops due to a single point mutation in conserved region of the CD18 gene resulting in substitution of aspartic acid128 with glycine (D128G). Twenty four VDJCmu and 25 VDJCgamma recombinations from randomly constructed cDNA libraries, originating from peripheral blood lymphocytes, were examined for the variable-region structural characteristics in IgM and IgG antibody isotypes. These analyses led to conclude that: (a) expression of exceptionally long CDR3H is isotype restricted to cattle IgM antibody; (b) VDJ recombinations encoding IgM with exceptionally long CDR3H undergo clonal selection and affinity maturation via somatic mutations similar to conventional antibodies; (c) somatic mutations contribute significantly to both IgM and IgG antibody diversification but significant differences exist in the patterns of 'hot spot' in the FR1, FR3 and CDR1H and, also, position-dependant amino acid diversity; and (d) transition nucleotide substitutions predominate over transversions in both VDJCmu and VDJCgamma recombinations consistent with the evolutionary conservation of somatic mutation machinery. Overall, these studies suggest that both somatic mutations and exceptional CDR3H size generation contribute to IgM and IgG antibody diversification in cattle during the development of immune response to naturally occurring chronic and multiple microbial infections. PMID:19012969

  18. Epigenetics of the antibody response.

    PubMed

    Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications and miRNAs, are induced in B cells by the same stimuli that drive the antibody response. They play major roles in regulating somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch DNA recombination (CSR), and differentiation to plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. Histone modifications target the CSR and, possibly, SHM machinery to the immunoglobulin locus; they together with DNA methylation and miRNAs modulate the expression of critical elements of that machinery, such as activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), as well as factors central to plasma cell differentiation, such as B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1). These inducible B cell-intrinsic epigenetic marks instruct the maturation of antibody responses. Their dysregulation plays an important role in aberrant antibody responses to foreign antigens, such as those of microbial pathogens, and self-antigens, such as those targeted in autoimmunity, and B cell neoplasia.

  19. Fluorogen-Activating-Proteins as Universal Affinity Biosensors for Immunodetection

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Eugenio; Vasilev, Kalin V.; Jarvik, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Fluorogen-activating-proteins (FAPs) are a novel platform of fluorescence biosensors utilized for protein discovery. The technology currently demands molecular manipulation methods that limit its application and adaptability. Here, we highlight an alternative approach based on universal affinity reagents for protein detection. The affinity reagents were engineered as bi-partite fusion proteins, where the specificity moiety is derived from IgG-binding proteins –Protein-A or Protein-G – and the signaling element is a FAP. In this manner, primary antibodies provide the antigenic selectivity against a desired protein in biological samples, while FAP affinity reagents target the constant region (Fc) of antibodies and provide the biosensor component of detection. Fluorescence results using various techniques indicate minimal background and high target specificity for exogenous and endogenous proteins in mammalian cells. Additionally, FAP-based affinity reagents provide enhanced properties of detection previously absent using conventional affinity systems. Distinct features explored in this report include: (1) unfixed signal wavelengths (excitation and emission) determined by the particular fluorogen chosen, (2) real-time user controlled fluorescence on-set and off-set, (3) signal wavelength substitution while performing live analysis, and (4) enhanced resistance to photobleaching. PMID:24122476

  20. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Gearhart, Patricia J; Castiblanco, Diana P; Russell Knode, Lisa M

    2015-12-01

    Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations. PMID:26641938

  1. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations

    PubMed Central

    Gearhart, Patricia J.; Castiblanco, Diana P.; Russell Knode, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations. PMID:26641938

  2. Alternative downstream processes for production of antibodies and antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Ejima, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    Protein-A or Protein-L affinity chromatography and virus inactivation are key processes for the manufacturing of therapeutic antibodies and antibody fragments. These two processes often involve exposure of therapeutic proteins to denaturing low pH conditions. Antibodies have been shown to undergo conformational changes at low pH, which can lead to irreversible damages on the final product. Here, we review alternative downstream approaches that can reduce the degree of low pH exposure and consequently damaged product. We and others have been developing technologies that minimize or eliminate such low pH processes. We here cover facilitated elution of antibodies using arginine in Protein-A and Protein-G affinity chromatography, a more positively charged amidated Protein-A, two Protein-A mimetics (MEP and Mabsorbent), mixed-mode and steric exclusion chromatography, and finally enhanced virus inactivation by solvents containing arginine. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in molecular engineering of antibody. PMID:24859179

  3. Analysis of heavy and light chain pairings indicates that receptor editing shapes the human antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    de Wildt, R M; Hoet, R M; van Venrooij, W J; Tomlinson, I M; Winter, G

    1999-01-22

    In the bone marrow, diversity in the primary antibody repertoire is created by the combinatorial rearrangement of different gene segments and by the association of different heavy and light chains. During the secondary response in the germinal centres, antibodies are diversified by somatic mutation and possibly by further rearrangements, or "receptor editing". Here, we have analysed the pairings of heavy and light chain variable domains (VH and VL) in 365 human IgG+ B cells from peripheral blood, and established that these pairings are largely random. The repertoire is dominated by a limited number of pairings of segments and folds. Among these pairings we identified two identical mutated heavy chains in combination with two different mutated light chains (one kappa and one lambda). This shows that receptor editing occurs in the human periphery and that the same antibody lineage can be subjected to both receptor editing and somatic hypermutation. This suggests that receptor editing may be used together with somatic mutation for the affinity maturation of antibodies. We also propose that receptor editing has shaped variable gene segment use and the evolution of V gene families.

  4. Paratope diversity in the human antibody response to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianhui; Ullal, Anuska; Liberato, Justine; Sun, Jinying; Keitel, Wendy; Reason, Donald C

    2008-01-01

    The active component of the licensed human anthrax vaccine (BioThrax, or AVA) is a Bacillus anthracis toxin known as protective antigen (PA). Second generation anthrax vaccines currently under development are also based on a recombinant form of PA. Since the current and future anthrax vaccines are based on this toxin, it is important that the immunobiology of this protein in vaccinated humans be understood in detail. We have isolated and analyzed the PA-specific antibody repertoire from an AVA-vaccinated individual. When examined at the clonal level, we find an antibody response that is complex in terms of the combinatorial elements and immunoglobulin variable genes employed. All PA-specific antibodies had undergone somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, both signs of affinity maturation. Although the antigenic epitopes recognized by the response were distributed throughout the PA monomer, the majority of antibodies arising in this individual following vaccination recognize determinants located on the amino-terminal (PA20) sub-domain of the molecule. This latter finding may have implications for the rational design of future PA-based anthrax vaccines.

  5. Crystal structure of human prostate-specific antigen in a sandwich antibody complex.

    PubMed

    Stura, Enrico A; Muller, Bruno H; Bossus, Marc; Michel, Sandrine; Jolivet-Reynaud, Colette; Ducancel, Frédéric

    2011-12-01

    Human prostate-specific antigen (PSA or human kallikrein-related peptidase 3) present in small quantities in the sera of healthy men becomes elevated in prostate cancer (PCa) and other prostate disorders. The ability to identify the free PSA fraction associated with PCa could increase the reliability of the PSA diagnostic test. Here we present the crystal structure of human PSA from seminal fluid in a sandwich complex with two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). MAb 5D5A5 captures total PSA with exceptionally high affinity, and mAb 5D3D11 selectively discriminates between free PSA subforms that are more abundant in sera from patients with PCa. Although the antigen is not of seric origin, several insights into cancer diagnosis can be discerned from this complex. MAb 5D3D11 recognizes a PSA conformation different from that previously reported. Interacting with the kallikrein loop, the PSA N-linked glycan attached to asparagine 61 is an uncommonly complex sialated triantennary chain. O-linked glycosylation is observed at threonine 125. The description of how PSA subforms in prostatic fluid can be discriminated using pairs of antibodies is a first step in the design of new strategies that are capable of real discrimination among PSA subforms, which will lead to the formulation of more reliable diagnostic tests. In a companion article [Muller, B. H., Savatier, A., L'Hostis, G., Costa, N., Bossus, M., Michel, S., et al. (2011). In vitro affinity maturation of an anti-PSA antibody for prostate cancer diagnostic assay. J. Mol. Biol.], we describe engineering efforts to improve the affinity of mAb 5D3D11, a first step towards such goal. PMID:22037582

  6. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  7. Polyreactive antibodies in adaptive immune responses to viruses.

    PubMed

    Mouquet, Hugo; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2012-05-01

    B cells express immunoglobulins on their surface where they serve as antigen receptors. When secreted as antibodies, the same molecules are key elements of the humoral immune response against pathogens such as viruses. Although most antibodies are restricted to binding a specific antigen, some are polyreactive and have the ability to bind to several different ligands, usually with low affinity. Highly polyreactive antibodies are removed from the repertoire during B-cell development by physiologic tolerance mechanisms including deletion and receptor editing. However, a low level of antibody polyreactivity is tolerated and can confer additional binding properties to pathogen-specific antibodies. For example, high-affinity human antibodies to HIV are frequently polyreactive. Here we review the evidence suggesting that in the case of some pathogens like HIV, polyreactivity may confer a selective advantage to pathogen-specific antibodies.

  8. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity.

  9. Structural analysis of the unmutated ancestor of the HIV-1 envelope V2 region antibody CH58 isolated from an RV144 vaccine efficacy trial vaccinee☆

    PubMed Central

    Nicely, Nathan I.; Wiehe, Kevin; Kepler, Thomas B.; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Dennison, S. Moses; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Robb, Merlin L.; O'Connell, Robert J.; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Munir Alam, S.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Bonsignori, Mattia; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibody CH58 isolated from an RV144 vaccinee binds at Lys169 of the HIV-1 Env gp120 V2 region, a site of vaccine-induced immune pressure. CH58 neutralizes HIV-1 CRF_01 AE strain 92TH023 and mediates ADCC against CD4 + T cell targets infected with CRF_01 AE tier 2 virus. CH58 and other antibodies that bind to a gp120 V2 epitope have a second light chain complementarity determining region (LCDR2) bearing a glutamic acid, aspartic acid (ED) motif involved in forming salt bridges with polar, basic side amino acid side chains in V2. In an effort to learn how V2 responses develop, we determined the crystal structures of the CH58-UA antibody unliganded and bound to V2 peptide. The structures showed an LCDR2 structurally pre-conformed from germline to interact with V2 residue Lys169. LCDR3 was subject to conformational selection through the affinity maturation process. Kinetic analyses demonstrate that only a few contacts were responsible for a 2000-fold increase in KD through maturation, and this effect was predominantly due to an improvement in off-rate. This study shows that preconformation and preconfiguration can work in concert to produce antibodies with desired immunogenic properties. PMID:26288844

  10. Structural analysis of the unmutated ancestor of the HIV-1 envelope V2 region antibody CH58 isolated from an RV144 vaccine efficacy trial vaccinee.

    PubMed

    Nicely, Nathan I; Wiehe, Kevin; Kepler, Thomas B; Jaeger, Frederick H; Dennison, S Moses; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Robb, Merlin L; O'Connell, Robert J; Michael, Nelson L; Kim, Jerome H; Liao, Hua-Xin; Munir Alam, S; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Bonsignori, Mattia; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibody CH58 isolated from an RV144 vaccinee binds at Lys169 of the HIV-1 Env gp120 V2 region, a site of vaccine-induced immune pressure. CH58 neutralizes HIV-1 CRF_01 AE strain 92TH023 and mediates ADCC against CD4 + T cell targets infected with CRF_01 AE tier 2 virus. CH58 and other antibodies that bind to a gp120 V2 epitope have a second light chain complementarity determining region (LCDR2) bearing a glutamic acid, aspartic acid (ED) motif involved in forming salt bridges with polar, basic side amino acid side chains in V2. In an effort to learn how V2 responses develop, we determined the crystal structures of the CH58-UA antibody unliganded and bound to V2 peptide. The structures showed an LCDR2 structurally pre-conformed from germline to interact with V2 residue Lys169. LCDR3 was subject to conformational selection through the affinity maturation process. Kinetic analyses demonstrate that only a few contacts were responsible for a 2000-fold increase in KD through maturation, and this effect was predominantly due to an improvement in off-rate. This study shows that preconformation and preconfiguration can work in concert to produce antibodies with desired immunogenic properties. PMID:26288844

  11. Complex high affinity interactions occur between MHCI and superantigens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Herpich, A. R.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins A and C1 (SEA or SEC1) bound to major histocompatibility-I (MHCI) molecules with high affinity (binding constants ranging from 1.1 microM to 79 nM). SEA and SEC1 directly bound MHCI molecules that had been captured by monoclonal antibodies specific for H-2Kk, H-2Dk, or both. In addition, MHCI-specific antibodies inhibited the binding of SEC1 to LM929 cells and SEA competitively inhibited SEC1 binding; indicating that the superantigens bound to MHCI on the cell surface. The affinity and number of superantigen binding sites differed depending on whether MHCI was expressed in the membrane of LM929 cells or whether it was captured. These data support the hypothesis that MHCI molecules can serve as superantigen receptors.

  12. Affinity chromatography: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Hage, David S; Matsuda, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is one of the most selective and versatile forms of liquid chromatography for the separation or analysis of chemicals in complex mixtures. This method makes use of a biologically related agent as the stationary phase, which provides an affinity column with the ability to bind selectively and reversibly to a given target in a sample. This review examines the early work in this method and various developments that have lead to the current status of this technique. The general principles of affinity chromatography are briefly described as part of this discussion. Past and recent efforts in the generation of new binding agents, supports, and immobilization methods for this method are considered. Various applications of affinity chromatography are also summarized, as well as the influence this field has played in the creation of other affinity-based separation or analysis methods. PMID:25749941

  13. Selective high affinity polydentate ligands and methods of making such

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally; DeNardo, Gerald; Balhorn, Rodney

    2010-02-16

    This invention provides novel polydentate selective high affinity ligands (SHALs) that can be used in a variety of applications in a manner analogous to the use of antibodies. SHALs typically comprise a multiplicity of ligands that each bind different region son the target molecule. The ligands are joined directly or through a linker thereby forming a polydentate moiety that typically binds the target molecule with high selectivity and avidity.

  14. Factors determining antibody distribution in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    The development of antibody therapies for cancer is increasing rapidly, primarily owing to their specificity. Antibody distribution in tumors is often extremely uneven, however, leading to some malignant cells being exposed to saturating concentrations of antibody, whereas others are completely untargeted. This is detrimental because large regions of cells escape therapy, whereas other regions might be exposed to suboptimal concentrations that promote a selection of resistant mutants. The distribution of antibody depends on a variety of factors, including dose, affinity, antigens per cell and molecular size. Because these parameters are often known or easily estimated, a quick calculation based on simple modeling considerations can predict the uniformity of targeting within a tumor. Such analyses should enable experimental researchers to identify in a straightforward way the limitations in achieving evenly distributed antibody, and design and test improved antibody therapeutics more rationally. PMID:18179828

  15. Recent advances in affinity capillary electrophoresis for binding studies.

    PubMed

    Albishri, Hassan M; El Deeb, Sami; AlGarabli, Noura; AlAstal, Raghda; Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Wätzig, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    The present review covers recent advances and important applications of affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE). It provides an overview about various ACE types, including ACE-MS, the multiple injection mode, the use of microchips and field-amplified sample injection-ACE. The most common scenarios of the studied affinity interactions are protein-drug, protein-metal ion, protein-protein, protein-DNA, protein-carbohydrate, carbohydrate-drug, peptide-peptide, DNA-drug and antigen-antibody. Approaches for the improvements of ACE in term of precision, rinsing protocols and sensitivity are discussed. The combined use of computer simulation programs to support data evaluation is presented. In conclusion, the performance of ACE is compared with other techniques such as equilibrium dialysis, parallel artificial membrane permeability assay, high-performance affinity chromatography as well as surface plasmon resonance, ultraviolet, circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, fluorescence, MS and isothermal titration calorimetry. PMID:25534793

  16. Thermodynamic basis for antibody binding to Z-DNA: comparison of a monoclonal antibody and its recombinant derivatives.

    PubMed

    Vaz de Andrade, Edmar; Freitas, Sonia Maria; Ventura, Manuel Mateus; Maranhão, Andréa Queiroz; Brigido, Marcelo Macedo

    2005-11-30

    Antibody engineering represents a promising area in biotechnology. Recombinant antibodies can be easily manipulated generating new ligand and effector activities that can be used as prototype magic bullets. On the other hand, an extensive knowledge of recombinant antibody binding and stability features are essential for an efficient substitution. In this study, we compared the stability and protein binding properties of two recombinant antibody fragments with their parental monoclonal antibody. The recombinant fragments were a monomeric scFv and a dimeric one, harboring human IgG1 CH2-CH3 domains. We have used fluorescence titration quenching to determine the thermodynamics of the interaction between an anti-Z-DNA monoclonal antibody and its recombinant antibody fragments with Z-DNA. All the antibody fragments seemed to bind DNA similarly, in peculiar two-affinity states. Enthalpy-entropy compensation was observed for both affinity states, but a marked entropy difference was observed for the monomeric scFv antibody fragment, mainly for the high affinity binding. In addition, we compared the stability of the dimeric antibody fragment and found differences favoring the monoclonal antibody. These differences seem to derive from the heterologous expression system used.

  17. Electrochemical affinity biosensors for detection of mycotoxins: A review.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Juan C; Bonel, Laura; Ezquerra, Alba; Hernández, Susana; Bertolín, Juan R; Cubel, Carlota; Castillo, Juan R

    2013-11-15

    This review discusses the current state of electrochemical biosensors in the determination of mycotoxins in foods. Mycotoxins are highly toxic secondary metabolites produced by molds. The acute toxicity of these results in serious human and animal health problems, although it has been only since early 1960s when the first studied aflatoxins were found to be carcinogenic. Mycotoxins affect a broad range of agricultural products, most important cereals and cereal-based foods. A majority of countries, mentioning especially the European Union, have established preventive programs to control contamination and strict laws of the permitted levels in foods. Official methods of analysis of mycotoxins normally requires sophisticated instrumentation, e.g. liquid chromatography with fluorescence or mass detectors, combined with extraction procedures for sample preparation. For about sixteen years, the use of simpler and faster analytical procedures based on affinity biosensors has emerged in scientific literature as a very promising alternative, particularly electrochemical (i.e., amperometric, impedance, potentiometric or conductimetric) affinity biosensors due to their simplicity and sensitivity. Typically, electrochemical biosensors for mycotoxins use specific antibodies or aptamers as affinity ligands, although recombinant antibodies, artificial receptors and molecular imprinted polymers show potential utility. This article deals with recent advances in electrochemical affinity biosensors for mycotoxins and covers complete literature from the first reports about sixteen years ago.

  18. Receptor affinity and extracellular domain modifications affect tumor recognition by ROR1-specific chimeric antigen receptor T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Hudecek, Michael; Lupo-Stanghellini, Maria-Teresa; Kosasih, Paula L.; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Jensen, Michael C.; Rader, Christoph; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The adoptive transfer of T-cells modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) comprised of an extracellular single chain antibody (scFV) fragment specific for a tumor cell surface molecule, and linked to an intracellular signaling module has activity in advanced malignancies. ROR1 is a tumor-associated molecule expressed on prevalent B-lymphoid and epithelial cancers, and is absent on normal mature B-cells and vital tissues, making it a candidate for CAR T-cell therapy. Experimental Design We constructed ROR1-CARs from scFVs with different affinities and containing extracellular IgG4-Fc spacer domains of different lengths, and evaluated the ability of T-cells expressing each CAR to recognize ROR1+ hematopoietic and epithelial tumors in vitro, and to eliminate human mantle cell lymphoma engrafted into immunodeficient mice. Results ROR1-CARs containing a short ‘Hinge-only’ extracellular spacer conferred superior lysis of ROR1+ tumor cells and induction of T-cell effector functions compared to CARs with long ‘Hinge-CH2-CH3’ spacers. CARs derived from a higher affinity scFV conferred maximum T-cell effector function against primary CLL and ROR1+ epithelial cancer lines in vitro without inducing activation induced T-cell death. T-cells modified with an optimal ROR1-CAR were equivalently effective as CD19-CAR modified T-cells in mediating regression of JeKo-1 mantle cell lymphoma in immunodeficient mice. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that customizing spacer design and increasing affinity of ROR1-CARs enhances T-cell effector function and recognition of ROR1+ tumors. T-cells modified with an optimized ROR1-CAR have significant anti-tumor efficacy in a preclinical model in vivo, suggesting they may be useful to treat ROR1+ tumors in clinical applications. PMID:23620405

  19. Novel antibodies as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zafir-Lavie, I; Michaeli, Y; Reiter, Y

    2007-05-28

    In recent years antibodies, whether generated by traditional hybridoma technology or by recombinant DNA strategies, have evolved from Paul Ehrlich's 'magic bullets' to a modern age 'guided missile'. In the recent years of immunologic research, we are witnessing development in the fields of antigen screening and protein engineering in order to create specific anticancer remedies. The developments in the field of recombinant DNA, protein engineering and cancer biology have let us gain insight into many cancer-related mechanisms. Moreover, novel techniques have facilitated tools allowing unique distinction between malignantly transformed cells, and regular ones. This understanding has paved the way for the rational design of a new age of pharmaceuticals: monoclonal antibodies and their fragments. Antibodies can select antigens on both a specific and a high-affinity account, and further implementation of these qualities is used to target cancer cells by specifically identifying exogenous antigens of cancer cell populations. The structure of the antibody provides plasticity resonating from its functional sites. This review will screen some of the many novel antibodies and antibody-based approaches that are being currently developed for clinical applications as the new generation of anticancer agents. PMID:17530025

  20. Computer-aided antibody design

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Daisuke; Shirai, Hiroki; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Nakamura, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    Recent clinical trials using antibodies with low toxicity and high efficiency have raised expectations for the development of next-generation protein therapeutics. However, the process of obtaining therapeutic antibodies remains time consuming and empirical. This review summarizes recent progresses in the field of computer-aided antibody development mainly focusing on antibody modeling, which is divided essentially into two parts: (i) modeling the antigen-binding site, also called the complementarity determining regions (CDRs), and (ii) predicting the relative orientations of the variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) chains. Among the six CDR loops, the greatest challenge is predicting the conformation of CDR-H3, which is the most important in antigen recognition. Further computational methods could be used in drug development based on crystal structures or homology models, including antibody–antigen dockings and energy calculations with approximate potential functions. These methods should guide experimental studies to improve the affinities and physicochemical properties of antibodies. Finally, several successful examples of in silico structure-based antibody designs are reviewed. We also briefly review structure-based antigen or immunogen design, with application to rational vaccine development. PMID:22661385

  1. Characteristics of antibody responses in Pigeon Fanciers' Lung.

    PubMed

    Nademi, Zohreh; Todryk, Stephen; Baldwin, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    The aetiology of Pigeon Fanciers' Lung (PFL) is believed to include immune complex formation between inhaled pigeon antigens and antibodies generated against them. However it is unclear why some fanciers are asymptomatic despite the presence of high levels of anti-avian antigen antibodies in their serum. In this study we investigated whether qualitative differences in specific antibodies might contribute to disease. IgG responses among pigeon fanciers were determined by ELISA and the functional affinity of IgG1 and IgG2 against a range of pigeon antigens was determined by inhibition ELISA and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). The median titres of IgG1 and IgG2 against all the pigeon antigens tested was higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic fanciers and these differences were significant for anti-pigeon serum IgG1 (P=0.04), anti-fresh pigeon droppings (PDF) IgG2 (P=0.028), anti-old pigeon droppings (PDO) IgG2 (P=0.04) and anti-pigeon intestinal scrapings IgG2 (P=0.03). The functional affinity of IgG1 and IgG2 against PDO was higher in symptomatic individuals (P=0.006 and P=0.002, respectively) whilst the functional affinity of anti-PDF IgG2 was also significantly higher in these patients (P≤0.001). Symptomatic fanciers were also significantly more likely to have a high reaction enthalphy (ΔH) as measured by ITC and thus had higher affinity antibodies against PDO (P=0.044). This data confirms previous studies showing that the magnitude alone of the antibody response to pigeon antigens cannot determine the presence of PFL, but that antibody affinity may be important. ITC is a rapid method of measuring antibody affinity and has diagnostic potential in PFL, and may be of use in other situations where antibody affinity is important.

  2. Postbooster Antibodies from Humans as Source of Diphtheria Antitoxin

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Alonso, Ana; González-Rivera, Milagros; Tamayo, Eduardo; Eiros, Jose María; Almansa, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Diphtheria antitoxin for therapeutic use is in limited supply. A potential source might be affinity-purified antibodies originally derived from plasma of adults who received a booster dose of a vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid. These antibodies might be useful for treating even severe cases of diphtheria. PMID:27314309

  3. Data Product Maturity

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-25

    ... document, maturity levels are provided separately for each scientific data set (SDS) included with the data files. The data product ... indiscriminate use of these data products as the basis for research findings, journal publications, and/or presentations.   ...

  4. Proteomic analysis and discovery using affinity proteomics and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Niclas; Wingren, Christer; Mattsson, Mikael; James, Peter; O'Connell, David; Nilsson, Fredrik; Cahill, Dolores J; Borrebaeck, Carl A K

    2011-10-01

    Antibody-based microarrays are a rapidly evolving affinity-proteomic methodology that recently has shown great promise in clinical applications. The resolution of these proteomic analyses is, however, directly related to the number of data-points, i.e. antibodies, included on the array. Currently, this is a key bottleneck because of limited availability of numerous highly characterized antibodies. Here, we present a conceptually new method, denoted global proteome survey, opening up the possibility to probe any proteome in a species-independent manner while still using a limited set of antibodies. We use context-independent-motif-specific antibodies directed against short amino acid motifs, where each motif is present in up to a few hundred different proteins. First, the digested proteome is exposed to these antibodies, whereby motif-containing peptides are enriched, which then are detected and identified by mass spectrometry. In this study, we profiled extracts from human colon tissue, yeast cells lysate, and mouse liver tissue to demonstrate proof-of-concept.

  5. Effects of Darwinian Selection and Mutability on Rate of Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Evolution during HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zizhang; Schramm, Chaim A.; Connors, Mark; Morris, Lynn; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of somatic mutations in antibody variable regions is critical for antibody affinity maturation, with HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) generally requiring years to develop. We recently found that the rate at which mutations accumulate decreases over time, but the mechanism governing this slowing is unclear. In this study, we investigated whether natural selection and/or mutability of the antibody variable region contributed significantly to observed decrease in rate. We used longitudinally sampled sequences of immunoglobulin transcripts of single lineages from each of 3 donors, as determined by next generation sequencing. We estimated the evolutionary rates of the complementarity determining regions (CDRs), which are most significant for functional selection, and found they evolved about 1.5- to 2- fold faster than the framework regions. We also analyzed the presence of AID hotspots and coldspots at different points in lineage development and observed an average decrease in mutability of less than 10 percent over time. Altogether, the correlation between Darwinian selection strength and evolutionary rate trended toward significance, especially for CDRs, but cannot fully explain the observed changes in evolutionary rate. The mutability modulated by AID hotspots and coldspots changes correlated only weakly with evolutionary rates. The combined effects of Darwinian selection and mutability contribute substantially to, but do not fully explain, evolutionary rate change for HIV-1-targeting bnAb lineages. PMID:27191167

  6. Conformational maturation of measles virus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gombart, A F; Hirano, A; Wong, T C

    1993-01-01

    We have obtained a polyclonal antiserum, N-BE, against the denatured, amino-terminal half of the measles virus (MV) nucleocapsid (N) protein and a monoclonal antibody (MAb), N46, which recognizes a conformation-dependent epitope in the same region. Amino acid residues 23 to 239 were required and sufficient for the formation of the conformational epitope. Using these antibodies, we show that the N protein of MV is synthesized as a relatively unfolded protein which first appears in the free-protein pool. This nascent N protein undergoes a conformational change into a more folded mature form. This change does not require the participation of other viral proteins or genomic RNA. The mature N protein does not accumulate in the free-protein pool but is quickly and selectively incorporated into the viral nucleocapsids. The mature N protein is a target for interaction with the phosphoprotein (P protein) of MV. This interaction interferes with the recognition of the N protein by the N46 MAb. This suggests that the association with the P protein may mask the binding site for the N46 MAb or that it induces a conformational change in the N protein. Images PMID:7685410

  7. B-cell memory and the persistence of antibody responses.

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, I C; García de Vinuesa, C; Casamayor-Palleja, M

    2000-01-01

    Antigens such as viral envelope proteins and bacterial exotoxins induce responses which result in the production of neutralizing antibody. These responses persist for years and provide highly efficient defence against reinfection. During these antibody responses a proportion of participating B cells mutate the genes that encode their immunoglobulin variable regions. This can increase the affinity of the antibody, but can also induce autoreactive B cells. Selection mechanisms operate which allow the cells with high affinity for the provoking antigen to persist, while other B cells recruited into the response die. PMID:10794052

  8. Novel trends in affinity biosensors: current challenges and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arugula, Mary A.; Simonian, Aleksandr

    2014-03-01

    Molecular biorecognition processes facilitate physical and biochemical interactions between molecules in all crucial metabolic pathways. Perhaps the target analyte and the biorecognition element interactions have the most impactful use in biosensing applications. Traditional analytical sensing systems offer excellent biorecognition elements with the ability to detect and determine the presence of analytes. High affinity antibodies and DNA play an important role in the development of affinity biosensors based on electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive approaches. Advancements in this area routinely employ labels, label free, nanoparticles, multifunctional matrices, carbon nanotubes and other methods to meet the requirements of its own application. However, despite increasing affinity ceilings for conventional biosensors, the field draws back in meeting specifically important demands, such as long-term stability, ultrasensitivity, rapid detection, extreme selectivity, strong biological base, calibration, in vivo measurements, regeneration, satisfactory performance and ease of production. Nevertheless, recent efforts through this line have produced novel high-tech nanosensing systems such as ‘aptamers’ and ‘phages’ which exhibit high-throughput sensing. Aptamers and phages are powerful tools that excel over antibodies in sensibility, stability, multi-detection, in vivo measurements and regeneration. Phages are superior in stability, screening for affinity-based target molecules ranging from small to proteins and even cells, and easy production. In this review, we focus mainly on recent developments in affinity-based biosensors such as immunosensors, DNA sensors, emphasizing aptasensors and phage-based biosensors basing on novel electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive detection techniques. We also address enzyme inhibition-based biosensors and the current problems associated with the above sensors and their future perspectives.

  9. Development trends for generation of single-chain antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Farajnia, Safar; Ahmadzadeh, Vahideh; Tanomand, Asghar; Veisi, Kamal; Khosroshahi, Shiva Ahdi; Rahbarnia, Leila

    2014-10-01

    Recombinant antibodies are increasingly being employed as therapeutic agents especially in combination with anti-cancer drugs. The single-chain antibody fragments are small antigen-binding proteins which provide the most commonly used antibody formats for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. These antibody fragments have more rapid tumor penetration and clearance from the serum relative to full-length monoclonal antibodies. There are in vitro antibody-display technologies such as phage display, cell surface display, ribosome display and mRNA display that can be used to isolate high specificity and affinity single-chain antibodies against a wide variety of targets. We review these strategies for generation of stable and active antibody fragments in the present article.

  10. Cesium cation affinities and basicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Jean-François; Maria, Pierre-Charles; Massi, Lionel; Mayeux, Charly; Burk, Peeter; Tammiku-Taul, Jaana

    2007-11-01

    This review focuses on the quantitative data related to cesium cation interaction with neutral or negatively charged ligands. The techniques used for measuring the cesium cation affinity (enthalpies, CCA), and cesium cation basicities (Gibbs free energies, CCB) are briefly described. The quantum chemical calculations methods that were specifically designed for the determination of cesium cation adduct structures and the energetic aspects of the interaction are discussed. The experimental results, obtained essentially from mass spectrometry techniques, and complemented by thermochemical data, are tabulated and commented. In particular, the correlations between cesium cation affinities and lithium cation affinities for the various kinds of ligands (rare gases, polyatomic neutral molecules, among them aromatic compounds and negative ions) serve as a basis for the interpretation of the diverse electrostatic modes of interaction. A brief account of some recent analytical applications of ion/molecule reactions with Cs+, as well as other cationization approaches by Cs+, is given.

  11. Structural design of disialoganglioside GD2 and CD3-bispecific antibodies to redirect T cells for tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ming; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Xu, Hong; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody based immunotherapy has proven efficacy for patients with high risk neuroblastoma. However, despite being the most efficient tumoricidal effectors, T cells are underutilized because they lack Fc receptors. Using a monovalent single chain fragment (ScFv) platform, we engineered tandem scFv bispecific antibodies (BsAbs) that specifically target disialoganglioside (GD2) on tumor cells and CD3 on T cells. Structural variants of BsAbs were constructed and ranked based on binding to GD2, and on competency in inducing T cell mediated tumor cytotoxicity. In vitro thermal stability and binding measurements were used to characterize each of the constructs, and in silico molecular modeling was used to show how the orientation of the variable region heavy (VH) and light (VL) chains of the anti-GD2 ScFv could alter the conformations of key residues responsible for high affinity binding. We showed that the VH-VL orientation, the (GGGGS)3 linker, disulfide bond stabilization of scFv, when combined with an affinity matured mutation provided the most efficient BsAb to direct T cells to lyse GD2 positive tumor cells. In vivo, the optimized BsAb could efficiently inhibit melanoma and neuroblastoma xenograft growth. These findings provide preclinical validation of a structure-based method to assist in designing BsAb for T-cell mediated therapy. PMID:24895182

  12. Structural design of disialoganglioside GD2 and CD3-bispecific antibodies to redirect T cells for tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Xu, Hong; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2015-01-15

    Antibody-based immunotherapy has proven efficacy for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. However, despite being the most efficient tumoricidal effectors, T cells are underutilized because they lack Fc receptors. Using a monovalent single-chain fragment (ScFv) platform, we engineered tandem scFv bispecific antibodies (BsAbs) that specifically target disialoganglioside (GD2) on tumor cells and CD3 on T cells. Structural variants of BsAbs were constructed and ranked based on binding to GD2, and on competency in inducing T-cell-mediated tumor cytotoxicity. In vitro thermal stability and binding measurements were used to characterize each of the constructs, and in silico molecular modeling was used to show how the orientation of the variable region heavy (VH) and light (VL) chains of the anti-GD2 ScFv could alter the conformations of key residues responsible for high affinity binding. We showed that the VH-VL orientation, the (GGGGS)3 linker, disulfide bond stabilization of scFv, when combined with an affinity matured mutation provided the most efficient BsAb to direct T cells to lyse GD2-positive tumor cells. In vivo, the optimized BsAb could efficiently inhibit melanoma and neuroblastoma xenograft growth. These findings provide preclinical validation of a structure-based method to assist in designing BsAb for T-cell-mediated therapy.

  13. Potent neutralization of VEGF biological activities with a fully human antibody Fab fragment directed against VEGF receptor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, H.-Q. . E-mail: hua-quan.miao@imclone.com; Hu, Kun; Jimenez, Xenia; Navarro, Elizabeth; Zhang, Haifan; Lu Dan; Ludwig, Dale L.; Balderes, Paul; Zhu Zhenping . E-mail: zhenping.zhu@imclone.com

    2006-06-23

    Compelling evidence suggest that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors, especially receptor 2 (VEGFR2, or kinase insert domain-containing receptor, KDR), play a critical role in angiogenesis under both physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer and angiogenic retinopathies such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To this end, inhibition of angiogenesis with antagonists to either VEGF or KDR has yielded significant therapeutic efficacy both in preclinical studies in animal models and in clinical trials in patients with cancer and AMD. We previously reported the identification of a high affinity, fully human anti-KDR antibody fragment, 1121B Fab, through a highly stringent affinity maturation process with a Fab originally isolated from a naive human antibody phage display library. In this study, we demonstrate that 1121B Fab is able to strongly block KDR/VEGF interaction, resulting in potent inhibition of an array of biological activities of VEGF, including activation of the receptor and its signaling pathway, intracellular calcium mobilization, and migration and proliferation of endothelial cells. Taken together, our data lend strong support to the further development of 1121B Fab fragment as an anti-angiogenesis agent in both cancer and angiogenic retinopathies.

  14. Highly specific off-target binding identified and eliminated during the humanization of an antibody against FGF receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Arthur E; Lin, Benjamin C; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Desnoyers, Luc; Shen, Ben-Quan

    2011-01-01

    Off-target binding can significantly affect the pharmacokinetics (PK), tissue distribution, efficacy and toxicity of a therapeutic antibody. Herein we describe the development of a humanized anti-fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) antibody as a potential therapeutic for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A chimeric anti-FGFR4 monoclonal antibody (chLD1) was previously shown to block ligand binding and to inhibit FGFR4-mediated signaling as well as tumor growth in vivo. A humanized version of chLD1, hLD1.vB, had similar binding affinity and in vitro blocking activity, but it exhibited rapid clearance, poor target tissue biodistribution and limited efficacy when compared to chLD1 in a HUH7 human HCC xenograft mouse model. These problems were traced to instability of the molecule in rodent serum. Size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography, immunoprecipitation and mass spectral sequencing identified a specific interaction between hLD1.vB and mouse complement component 3 (C3). A PK study in C3 knock-out mice further confirmed this specific interaction. Subsequently, an affinity-matured variant derived from hLD1.vB (hLD1.v22), specifically selected for its lack of binding to mouse C3 was demonstrated to have a PK profile and in vivo efficacy similar to that of chLD1 in mice. Although reports of non-specific off-target binding have been observed for other antibodies, this represents the first report identifying a specific off-target interaction that affected disposition and biological activity. Screens developed to identify general non-specific interactions are likely to miss the rare and highly specific cross-reactivity identified in this study, thus highlighting the importance of animal models as a proxy for avoiding unexpected clinical outcomes. PMID:21540647

  15. Use of protein-protein interactions in affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Muronetz, V I; Sholukh, M; Korpela, T

    2001-10-30

    Biospecific recognition between proteins is a phenomenon that can be exploited for designing affinity-chromatographic purification systems for proteins. In principle, the approach is straightforward, and there are usually many alternative ways, since a protein can be always found which binds specifically enough to the desired protein. Routine immunoaffinity chromatography utilizes the recognition of antigenic epitopes by antibodies. However, forces involved in protein-protein interactions as well the forces keeping the three-dimensional structures of proteins intact are complicated, and proteins are easily unfolded by various factors with unpredictable results. Because of this and because of the generally high association strength between proteins, the correct adjustment of binding forces between an immobilized protein and the protein to be purified as well as the release of bound proteins in biologically active form from affinity complexes are the main problem. Affinity systems involving interactions like enzyme-enzyme, subunit-oligomer, protein-antibody, protein-chaperone and the specific features involved in each case are presented as examples. This article also aims to sketch prospects for further development of the use of protein-protein interactions for the purification of proteins. PMID:11694271

  16. Supramolecular Affinity Chromatography for Methylation-Targeted Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Garnett, Graham A E; Starke, Melissa J; Shaurya, Alok; Li, Janessa; Hof, Fraser

    2016-04-01

    Proteome-wide studies of post-translationally methylated species using mass spectrometry are complicated by high sample diversity, competition for ionization among peptides, and mass redundancies. Antibody-based enrichment has powered methylation proteomics until now, but the reliability, pan-specificity, polyclonal nature, and stability of the available pan-specific antibodies are problematic and do not provide a standard, reliable platform for investigators. We have invented an anionic supramolecular host that can form host-guest complexes selectively with methyllysine-containing peptides and used it to create a methylysine-affinity column. The column resolves peptides on the basis of methylation-a feat impossible with a comparable commercial cation-exchange column. A proteolyzed nuclear extract was separated on the methyl-affinity column prior to standard proteomics analysis. This experiment demonstrates that such chemical methyl-affinity columns are capable of enriching and improving the analysis of methyllysine residues from complex protein mixtures. We discuss the importance of this advance in the context of biomolecule-driven enrichment methods. PMID:26973166

  17. Mechanics of bacteriophage maturation.

    PubMed

    Roos, Wouter H; Gertsman, Ilya; May, Eric R; Brooks, Charles L; Johnson, John E; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2012-02-14

    Capsid maturation with large-scale subunit reorganization occurs in virtually all viruses that use a motor to package nucleic acid into preformed particles. A variety of ensemble studies indicate that the particles gain greater stability during this process, however, it is unknown which material properties of the fragile procapsids change. Using Atomic Force Microscopy-based nano-indentation, we study the development of the mechanical properties during maturation of bacteriophage HK97, a λ-like phage of which the maturation-induced morphological changes are well described. We show that mechanical stabilization and strengthening occurs in three independent ways: (i) an increase of the Young's modulus, (ii) a strong rise of the capsid's ultimate strength, and (iii) a growth of the resistance against material fatigue. The Young's modulus of immature and mature capsids, as determined from thin shell theory, fit with the values calculated using a new multiscale simulation approach. This multiscale calculation shows that the increase in Young's modulus isn't dependent on the crosslinking between capsomers. In contrast, the ultimate strength of the capsids does increase even when a limited number of cross-links are formed while full crosslinking appears to protect the shell against material fatigue. Compared to phage λ, the covalent crosslinking at the icosahedral and quasi threefold axes of HK97 yields a mechanically more robust particle than the addition of the gpD protein during maturation of phage λ. These results corroborate the expected increase in capsid stability and strength during maturation, however in an unexpected intricate way, underlining the complex structure of these self-assembling nanocontainers.

  18. "Clickable" agarose for affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Punna, Sreenivas; Kaltgrad, Eiton; Finn, M G

    2005-01-01

    Successful purification of biological molecules by affinity chromatography requires the attachment of desired ligands to biocompatible chromatographic supports. The Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition of azides and alkynes-the premier example of "click chemistry"-is an efficient way to make covalent connections among diverse molecules and materials. Both azide and alkyne units are highly selective in their reactivity, being inert to most chemical functionalities and stable to wide ranges of solvent, temperature, and pH. We show that agarose beads bearing alkyne and azide groups can be easily made and are practical precursors to functionalized agarose materials for affinity chromatography.

  19. Phagosome maturation: aging gracefully.

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Otilia V; Botelho, Roberto J; Grinstein, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Foreign particles and apoptotic bodies are eliminated from the body by phagocytic leucocytes. The initial stage of the elimination process is the internalization of the particles into a plasma membrane-derived vacuole known as the phagosome. Such nascent phagosomes, however, lack the ability to kill pathogens or to degrade the ingested targets. These properties are acquired during the course of phagosomal maturation, a complex sequence of reactions that result in drastic remodelling of the phagosomal membrane and contents. The determinants and consequences of the fusion and fission reactions that underlie phagosomal maturation are the topic of this review. PMID:12061891

  20. Developmental Pathway of the MPER-Directed HIV-1-Neutralizing Antibody 10E8.

    PubMed

    Soto, Cinque; Ofek, Gilad; Joyce, M Gordon; Zhang, Baoshan; McKee, Krisha; Longo, Nancy S; Yang, Yongping; Huang, Jinghe; Parks, Robert; Eudailey, Joshua; Lloyd, Krissey E; Alam, S Munir; Haynes, Barton F; Mullikin, James C; Connors, Mark; Mascola, John R; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Antibody 10E8 targets the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41, neutralizes >97% of HIV-1 isolates, and lacks the auto-reactivity often associated with MPER-directed antibodies. The developmental pathway of 10E8 might therefore serve as a promising template for vaccine design, but samples from time-of-infection-often used to infer the B cell record-are unavailable. In this study, we used crystallography, next-generation sequencing (NGS), and functional assessments to infer the 10E8 developmental pathway from a single time point. Mutational analysis indicated somatic hypermutation of the 2nd-heavy chain-complementarity determining region (CDR H2) to be critical for neutralization, and structures of 10E8 variants with V-gene regions reverted to genomic origin for heavy-and-light chains or heavy chain-only showed structural differences >2 Å relative to mature 10E8 in the CDR H2 and H3. To understand these developmental changes, we used bioinformatic sieving, maximum likelihood, and parsimony analyses of immunoglobulin transcripts to identify 10E8-lineage members, to infer the 10E8-unmutated common ancestor (UCA), and to calculate 10E8-developmental intermediates. We were assisted in this analysis by the preservation of a critical D-gene segment, which was unmutated in most 10E8-lineage sequences. UCA and early intermediates weakly bound a 26-residue-MPER peptide, whereas HIV-1 neutralization and epitope recognition in liposomes were only observed with late intermediates. Antibody 10E8 thus develops from a UCA with weak MPER affinity and substantial differences in CDR H2 and H3 from the mature 10E8; only after extensive somatic hypermutation do 10E8-lineage members gain recognition in the context of membrane and HIV-1 neutralization.

  1. Developmental Pathway of the MPER-Directed HIV-1-Neutralizing Antibody 10E8

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baoshan; McKee, Krisha; Longo, Nancy S.; Yang, Yongping; Huang, Jinghe; Parks, Robert; Eudailey, Joshua; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Mullikin, James C.; Connors, Mark; Mascola, John R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody 10E8 targets the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41, neutralizes >97% of HIV-1 isolates, and lacks the auto-reactivity often associated with MPER-directed antibodies. The developmental pathway of 10E8 might therefore serve as a promising template for vaccine design, but samples from time-of-infection—often used to infer the B cell record—are unavailable. In this study, we used crystallography, next-generation sequencing (NGS), and functional assessments to infer the 10E8 developmental pathway from a single time point. Mutational analysis indicated somatic hypermutation of the 2nd-heavy chain-complementarity determining region (CDR H2) to be critical for neutralization, and structures of 10E8 variants with V-gene regions reverted to genomic origin for heavy-and-light chains or heavy chain-only showed structural differences >2 Å relative to mature 10E8 in the CDR H2 and H3. To understand these developmental changes, we used bioinformatic sieving, maximum likelihood, and parsimony analyses of immunoglobulin transcripts to identify 10E8-lineage members, to infer the 10E8-unmutated common ancestor (UCA), and to calculate 10E8-developmental intermediates. We were assisted in this analysis by the preservation of a critical D-gene segment, which was unmutated in most 10E8-lineage sequences. UCA and early intermediates weakly bound a 26-residue-MPER peptide, whereas HIV-1 neutralization and epitope recognition in liposomes were only observed with late intermediates. Antibody 10E8 thus develops from a UCA with weak MPER affinity and substantial differences in CDR H2 and H3 from the mature 10E8; only after extensive somatic hypermutation do 10E8-lineage members gain recognition in the context of membrane and HIV-1 neutralization. PMID:27299673

  2. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Brill, Allison L; Pasker, Renee L

    2013-01-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, as well as for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:24510596

  3. Development of high-affinity single chain Fv against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Joon-Goo; Jeong, Gu Min; Yim, Sung Sun; Jeong, Ki Jun

    2016-03-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is caused by the FMD virus (FMDV) and results in severe economic losses in livestock farming. For rapid FMD diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, an effective antibody against FMDV is needed. Here, we developed a high-affinity antibody against FMDV by FACS-based high throughput screening of a random library. With the FITC-conjugated VP1 epitope of FMDV and high-speed FACS sorting, we screened the synthetic antibody (scFv) library in which antibody variants are displayed in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. After three rounds of sorting, we isolated one antibody fragment (#138-scFv) against the VP1 epitope of FMDV. Next, to improve its affinity, a mutation library of #138-scFV was constructed by error-prone PCR and screened by FACS. After three rounds of sorting, we isolated one antibody (AM-32 scFv), which has a higher binding affinity (KD=42.7nM) than that of the original #138-scFv. We also confirmed that it specifically binds to whole inactivated FMDV. PMID:26827774

  4. The Effects of Somatic Hypermutation on Neutralization and Binding in the PGT121 Family of Broadly Neutralizing HIV Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Vigneault, Francois; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Briney, Bryan; Ramos, Alejandra; Saye, Karen F.; Le, Khoa; Mahan, Alison; Wang, Shenshen; Kardar, Mehran; Yaari, Gur; Walker, Laura M.; Simen, Birgitte B.; St. John, Elizabeth P.; Chan-Hui, Po-Ying; Swiderek, Kristine; Kleinstein, Stephen H.; Alter, Galit; Seaman, Michael S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Koller, Daphne; Wilson, Ian A.; Church, George M.; Burton, Dennis R.; Poignard, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies (bnAbs) are typically highly somatically mutated, raising doubts as to whether they can be elicited by vaccination. We used 454 sequencing and designed a novel phylogenetic method to model lineage evolution of the bnAbs PGT121–134 and found a positive correlation between the level of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and the development of neutralization breadth and potency. Strikingly, putative intermediates were characterized that show approximately half the mutation level of PGT121–134 but were still capable of neutralizing roughly 40–80% of PGT121–134 sensitive viruses in a 74-virus panel at median titers between 15- and 3-fold higher than PGT121–134. Such antibodies with lower levels of SHM may be more amenable to elicitation through vaccination while still providing noteworthy coverage. Binding characterization indicated a preference of inferred intermediates for native Env binding over monomeric gp120, suggesting that the PGT121–134 lineage may have been selected for binding to native Env at some point during maturation. Analysis of glycan-dependent neutralization for inferred intermediates identified additional adjacent glycans that comprise the epitope and suggests changes in glycan dependency or recognition over the course of affinity maturation for this lineage. Finally, patterns of neutralization of inferred bnAb intermediates suggest hypotheses as to how SHM may lead to potent and broad HIV neutralization and provide important clues for immunogen design. PMID:24278016

  5. Quantifying Affinity among Chinese Dialects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Chin-Chuan

    A study of the relationships between Chinese dialects based on a quantitative measure of dialect affinity is summarized. First, tone values in all the dialect localities available in the early 1970s were used to calculate the dialectal differences in terms of tone height with respect to the "yin and yang" split. In the late 1970s, calculations of…

  6. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  7. Accurate Evaluation Method of Molecular Binding Affinity from Fluctuation Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Tyuji; Iwamoto, Koji; Ode, Hirotaka; Ohdomari, Iwao

    2008-05-01

    Exact estimation of the molecular binding affinity is significantly important for drug discovery. The energy calculation is a direct method to compute the strength of the interaction between two molecules. This energetic approach is, however, not accurate enough to evaluate a slight difference in binding affinity when distinguishing a prospective substance from dozens of candidates for medicine. Hence more accurate estimation of drug efficacy in a computer is currently demanded. Previously we proposed a concept of estimating molecular binding affinity, focusing on the fluctuation at an interface between two molecules. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the compatibility between the proposed computational technique and experimental measurements, through several examples for computer simulations of an association of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease and its inhibitor (an example for a drug-enzyme binding), a complexation of an antigen and its antibody (an example for a protein-protein binding), and a combination of estrogen receptor and its ligand chemicals (an example for a ligand-receptor binding). The proposed affinity estimation has proven to be a promising technique in the advanced stage of the discovery and the design of drugs.

  8. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ...

  9. Combining Phage and Yeast Cell Surface Antibody Display to Identify Novel Cell Type-Selective Internalizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Using phage antibody display, large libraries can be generated and screened to identify monoclonal antibodies with affinity for target antigens. However, while library size and diversity is an advantage of the phage display method, there is limited ability to quantitatively enrich for specific binding properties such as affinity. One way of overcoming this limitation is to combine the scale of phage display selections with the flexibility and quantitativeness of FACS-based yeast surface display selections. In this chapter we describe protocols for generating yeast surface antibody display libraries using phage antibody display selection outputs as starting material and FACS-based enrichment of target antigen-binding clones from these libraries. These methods should be widely applicable for the identification of monoclonal antibodies with specific binding properties. PMID:26060069

  10. Platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pulkrabek, S M

    1996-12-01

    The proper diagnosis of patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenias can be accomplished by using the advances made in the field of platelet serology. These techniques range from solid phase red cell adherence to sequencing platelet antigen amino acids by polymerase chain reaction. This article describes platelet antigens, the clinical tests available to detect platelet antigens and antibodies, and the value of these tests in supporting clinical diagnoses.

  11. Development of new versions of anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies with potentially reduced immunogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Weizhu; Wang Ling; Li Bohua; Wang Hao; Hou Sheng; Hong Xueyu; Zhang Dapeng; Guo Yajun

    2008-03-07

    Despite the widespread clinical use of CD34 antibodies for the purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, all the current anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are murine, which have the potential to elicit human antimouse antibody (HAMA) immune response. In the present study, we developed three new mouse anti-human CD34 mAbs which, respectively, belonged to class I, class II and class III CD34 epitope antibodies. In an attempt to reduce the immunogenicity of these three murine mAbs, their chimeric antibodies, which consisted of mouse antibody variable regions fused genetically to human antibody constant regions, were constructed and characterized. The anti-CD34 chimeric antibodies were shown to possess affinity and specificity similar to that of their respective parental murine antibodies. Due to the potentially better safety profiles, these chimeric antibodies might become alternatives to mouse anti-CD34 antibodies routinely used for clinical application.

  12. The Cellular Bases of Antibody Responses during Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Aguilar-Medina, Elsa Maribel; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab) responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG) memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell-dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic, or memory) B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections. This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events such as the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation, and germinal centers (GCs) formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs), till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated. PMID:27375618

  13. The Cellular Bases of Antibody Responses during Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Aguilar-Medina, Elsa Maribel; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab) responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG) memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell-dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic, or memory) B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections. This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events such as the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation, and germinal centers (GCs) formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs), till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated. PMID:27375618

  14. The Cellular Bases of Antibody Responses during Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Aguilar-Medina, Elsa Maribel; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab) responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG) memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell-dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic, or memory) B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections. This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events such as the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation, and germinal centers (GCs) formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs), till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated.

  15. Affinity Pull-Down of Proteins Using Anti-FLAG M2 Agarose Beads

    PubMed Central

    Gerace, Erica; Moazed, Danesh

    2016-01-01

    FLAG is an affinity tag widely used for rapid and highly specific one-step protein purification. Native elution of protein from anti-FLAG antibody resins allows the identification of protein and nucleic acid binding partners and functional analysis using biochemical activity assays. PMID:26096505

  16. Affinity Pull-Down of Proteins Using Anti-FLAG M2 Agarose Beads.

    PubMed

    Gerace, Erica; Moazed, Danesh

    2015-01-01

    FLAG is an affinity tag widely used for rapid and highly specific one-step protein purification. Native elution of protein from anti-FLAG antibody resins allows the identification of protein and nucleic acid binding partners and functional analysis using biochemical activity assays.

  17. Immune and endocrine responses of adult spring Chinook salmon during freshwater migration and sexual maturation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maule, A.G.; Schrock, R.M.; Slater, C.; Fitzpatrick, M.S.; Schreck, C. B.

    1996-01-01

    The immune –endocrine responses in spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were examined during their freshwater migration and final maturation. In 1990, migrating fish had high plasma cortisol titres (means 200 ng ml−1) and generated relatively few antibody-producing cells (APC) from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) (100 –200 per culture). After three weeks acclimation in constant environmental conditions, plasma cortisol was reduced and APC increased. There were no changes in number or affinity of glucocorticoid receptors. Concentrations of several sex steroids correlated with APC in females, but there were no such correlations in males. In 1993, fish in a hatchery had significantly greater cortisol concentrations in primary circulation than in secondary circulation, but sex steroid concentrations did not differ between circulations. Mean lysozyme activity in the primary and secondary circulation did not differ in June. In August, activity in the primary circulation was significantly less than that of the secondary, perhaps the result of acute stress associated with sampling. While some sex steroids correlated with lysozyme activity, the fact that in both years all endocrine and immune variables that correlated with each other also correlated with the date of sample, raises the question as to whether or not these are cause-and-effect relations.

  18. Analyzing antibody-Fc-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Nimmerjahn, Falk; Ravetch, Jeffrey V

    2008-01-01

    Cellular receptors for immunoglobulins (Fc-receptors; FcR) are central mediators of antibody-triggered effector functions. Immune complex (IC) binding to FcRs results in a variety of reactions such as the release of inflammatory mediators, antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis of ICs. Analyzing antibody-FcR (Ab-FcR) interactions in vitro is essential to determine the effector mechanisms, binding characteristics and affinity parameters that will impact and predict antibody activity in vivo. The methods described in this chapter include the generation of ICs and soluble FcR variants, as well as ELISA and FACS-based assays to study Ab-FcR interactions.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies: their importance to surgeons.

    PubMed

    Estabrook, A; Mesa-Tejada, R

    1989-01-01

    A tremendous technological advance occurred in 1975 when a method was developed to fuse two cells producing a "hybridoma" which secretes a single clone of antibody, having one immunoglobulin (Ig) class, one structure, one affinity, and one specificity for an antigenic determinant. Because monoclonal antibodies are more precise reagents than conventional antisera they open new doors to diagnosis and therapy of disease, and they are useful tools in research. The pathologist uses monoclonals in immunocytochemistry to determine tumor type; the surgeon uses monoclonals for immunosuppression in renal transplantation; the immunologist uses monoclonals to decipher cellular and humoral interactions that could not be appreciated with polyclonal reagents. This review outlines the background of monoclonal antibodies and some of their clinically important uses, both in vitro and in vivo. We also project into the future and describe chimeric antibodies and their possible uses.

  20. Antibody discovery ex vivo accelerated by the LacO/LacI regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Munehisa; Cummings, W Jason; Leppard, John B; Immormino, Robert M; Wood, Christi L; Allison, Daniel S; Gray, Patrick W; Tjoelker, Larry W; Maizels, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be potent and highly specific therapeutics, diagnostics and research reagents. Nonetheless, mAb discovery using current in vivo or in vitro approaches can be costly and time-consuming, with no guarantee of success. We have established a platform for rapid discovery and optimization of mAbs ex vivo. This DTLacO platform derives from a chicken B cell line that has been engineered to enable rapid selection and seamless maturation of high affinity mAbs. We have validated the DTLacO platform by generation of high affinity and specific mAbs to five cell surface targets, the receptor tyrosine kinases VEGFR2 and TIE2, the glycoprotein TROP2, the small TNF receptor family member FN14, and the G protein-coupled receptor FZD10. mAb discovery is rapid and humanization is straightforward, establishing the utility of the DTLacO platform for identification of mAbs for therapeutic and other applications. PMID:22558313

  1. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future.

  2. Advances in affinity ligand-functionalized nanomaterials for biomagnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Conor; Li, Peng; O'Mahony, James J; Lee, Gil U

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of proteins remains the most significant cost in protein production, and is largely attributed to rigorous chromatographic purification protocols, where the stringency of purity for biopharmaceutical products sometimes exceeds 99%. With an ever burgeoning biotechnology market, there is a constant demand for alternative purification methodologies, to ameliorate the dependence on chromatography, while still adhering to regulatory concerns over product purity and safety. In this article, we present an up-to-date view of bioseparation, with emphasis on magnetic separation and its potential application in the field. Additionally, we discuss the economic and performance benefits of synthetic ligands, in the form of peptides and miniaturized antibody fragments, compared to full-length antibodies. We propose that adoption of synthetic affinity ligands coupled with magnetic adsorbents, will play an important role in enabling sustainable bioprocessing in the future. PMID:26032605

  3. Identification of antibody glycosylation structures that predict monoclonal antibody Fc-effector function

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Amy W.; Crispin, Max; Pritchard, Laura; Robinson, Hannah; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Yu, Xiaojie; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Scanlan, Chris; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Alter, Galit

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine monoclonal antibody (mAb) features that predict fragment crystalizable (Fc)-mediated effector functions against HIV. Design Monoclonal antibodies, derived from Chinese hamster ovary cells or Epstein–Barr virus-immortalized mouse heteromyelomas, with specificity to key regions of the HIV envelope including gp120-V2, gp120-V3 loop, gp120-CD4+ binding site, and gp41-specific antibodies, were functionally profiled to determine the relative contribution of the variable and constant domain features of the antibodies in driving robust Fc-effector functions. Methods Each mAb was assayed for antibody-binding affinity to gp140SF162, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and for the ability to bind to FcgRIIa, FcgRIIb and FcgRIIIa receptors. Antibody glycan profiles were determined by HPLC. Results Neither the specificity nor the affinity of the mAbs determined the potency of Fc-effector function. FcgRIIIa binding strongly predicted ADCC and decreased galactose content inversely correlated with ADCP, whereas N-glycolylneuraminic acid-containing structures exhibited enhanced ADCP. Additionally, the bi-antenary glycan arm onto which galactose was added predicted enhanced binding to FcgRIIIa and ADCC activity, independent of the specificity of the mAb. Conclusions Our studies point to the specific Fc-glycan structures that can selectively promote Fc-effector functions independently of the antibody specificity. Furthermore, we demonstrated antibody glycan structures associated with enhanced ADCP activity, an emerging Fc-effector function that may aid in the control and clearance of HIV infection. PMID:25160934

  4. High Affinity Binders to EphA2 Isolated from Abdurin Scaffold Libraries; Characterization, Binding and Tumor Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Christopher; Mathonet, Pascale; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Diamandakis, Agata; Tomei, Licia; Demartis, Anna; Nardi, Chiara; Sambucini, Sonia; Missineo, Antonino; Alt, Karen; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.; Harris, Matt; Hedt, Amos; Weis, Roland; Gehlsen, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Abdurins are a novel antibody-like scaffold derived from the engineering of a single isolated CH2 domain of human IgG. Previous studies established the prolonged serum half-life of Abdurins, the result of a retained FcRn binding motif. Here we present data on the construction of large, diverse, phage-display and cell-free DNA display libraries and the isolation of high affinity binders to the cancer target, membrane-bound ephrin receptor tyrosine kinase class A2 (EphA2). Antigen binding regions were created by designing combinatorial libraries into the structural loops and Abdurins were selected using phage display methods. Initial binders were reformatted into new maturation libraries and low nanomolar binders were isolated using cell-free DNA display, CIS display. Further characterization confirmed binding of the Abdurins to both human and murine EphA2 proteins and exclusively to cell lines that expressed EphA2, followed by rapid internalization. Two different EphA2 binders were labeled with 64Cu, using a bifunctional MeCOSar chelator, and administered to mice bearing tumors from transplanted human prostate cancer cells, followed by PET/CT imaging. The anti-EphA2 Abdurins localized in the tumors as early as 4 hours after injection and continued to accumulate up to 48 hours when the imaging was completed. These data demonstrate the ability to isolate high affinity binders from the engineered Abdurin scaffold, which retain a long serum half-life, and specifically target tumors in a xenograft model. PMID:26313909

  5. Lectin affinity chromatography of glycolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.V.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Since glycolipids (GLs) are either insoluble or form mixed micelles in water, lectin affinity chromatography in aqueous systems has not been applied to their separation. They have overcome this problem by using tetrahydrofuran (THF) in the mobile phase during chromatography. Affinity columns prepared with the GalNAc-specific Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and equilibrated in THF specifically bind the (/sup 3/H)oligosaccharide derived from Forssman GL indicating that the immobilized HPA retained its carbohydrate-binding specificity in this solvent. Intact Forssman GL was bound by the HPA-column equilibrated in THF and was specifically eluted with 0.1 mg/ml GalNAc in THF. Purification of the Forssman GL was achieved when a crude lipid extract of sheep erythrocyte membranes was applied to the HPA-column in THF. Non-specifically bound GLs were eluted from the column using a step gradient of aqueous buffer in THF, while the addition of GalNAc was required to elute the specifically bound GLs. Using this procedure the A-active GLs were purified from a crude lipid extract of type A human erythrocytes in a single chromatographic step. The use of solvents that maintain carbohydrate-binding specificity and lipid solubility will permit the application of affinity chromatography on immobilized carbohydrate-binding proteins to intact GLs.

  6. ELISA-mimic screen for synthetic polymer nanoparticles with high affinity to target proteins.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Yusuke; Hoshino, Yu; Shea, Kenneth J

    2012-09-10

    Synthetic polymer nanoparticles (NPs) that display high affinity to protein targets have significant potential for medical and biotechnological applications as protein capture agents or functional replacements of antibodies ("plastic antibodies"). In this study, we modified an immunological assay (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay: ELISA) into a high-throughput screening method to select nanoparticles with high affinity to target proteins. Histone and fibrinogen were chosen as target proteins to demonstrate this concept. The selection process utilized a biotinylated NP library constructed with combinations of functional monomers. The screen identified NPs with distinctive functional group compositions that exhibited high affinity to either histone or fibrinogen. The variation of protein affinity with changes in the nature and amount of functional groups in the NP provided chemical insight into the principle determinants of protein-NP binding. The NP affinity was semiquantified using the ELISA-mimic assay by varying the NP concentrations. The screening results were found to correlate with solution-based assay results. This screening system utilizing a biotinylated NP is a general approach to optimize functional monomer compositions and can be used to rapidly search for synthetic polymers with high (or low) affinity for target biological macromolecules. PMID:22813352

  7. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  8. High-content affinity-based proteomics: unlocking protein biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Brody, Edward N; Gold, Larry; Lawn, Richard M; Walker, Jeffrey J; Zichi, Dom

    2010-11-01

    Single protein biomarkers measured with antibody-based affinity assays are the basis of molecular diagnostics in clinical practice today. There is great hope in discovering new protein biomarkers and combinations of protein biomarkers for advancing medicine through monitoring health, diagnosing disease, guiding treatment, and developing new therapeutics. The goal of high-content proteomics is to unlock protein biomarker discovery by measuring many (thousands) or all (∼23,000) proteins in the human proteome in an unbiased, data-driven approach. High-content proteomics has proven technically difficult due to the diversity of proteins, the complexity of relevant biological samples, such as blood and tissue, and large concentration ranges (in the order of 10(12) in blood). Mass spectrometry and affinity methods based on antibodies have dominated approaches to high-content proteomics. For technical reasons, neither has achieved adequate simultaneous performance and high-content. Here we review antibody-based protein measurement, multiplexed antibody-based protein measurement, and limitations of antibodies for high-content proteomics due to their inherent cross-reactivity. Finally, we review a new affinity-based proteomic technology developed from the ground up to solve the problem of high content with high sensitivity and specificity. Based on a new generation of slow off-rate modified aptamers (SOMAmers), this technology is unlocking biomarker discovery.

  9. A novel strategy for generating monoclonal antibodies from single, isolated lymphocytes producing antibodies of defined specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Babcook, J S; Leslie, K B; Olsen, O A; Salmon, R A; Schrader, J W

    1996-01-01

    We report a novel approach to the generation of monoclonal antibodies based on the molecular cloning and expression of immunoglobulin variable region cDNAs generated from single rabbit or murine lymphocytes that were selected for the production of specific antibodies. Single cells secreting antibodies for a specific peptide either from gp116 of the human cytomegalovirus or from gp120 of HIV-1 or for sheep red blood cells were selected using antigen-specific hemolytic plaque assays. Sheep red blood cells were coated with specific peptides in a procedure applicable to any antigen that can be biotinylated. Heavy- and light-chain variable region cDNAs were rescued from single cells by reverse transcription-PCR and expressed in the context of human immunoglobulin constant regions. These chimeric murine and rabbit monoclonal antibodies replicated the target specificities of the original antibody-forming cells. The selected lymphocyte antibody method exploits the in vivo mechanisms that generate high-affinity antibodies. This method can use lymphocytes from peripheral blood, can exploit a variety of procedures that identify individual lymphocytes producing a particular antibody, and is applicable to the generation of monoclonal antibodies from many species, including humans. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8755564

  10. Cyclic peptide ligand with high binding capacity for affinity purification of immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyo Jin; Choe, Weonu; Min, Jeong-Ki; Lee, Young-Mi; Kim, B Moon; Chung, Sang J

    2016-09-30

    The rapidly increasing implementation of antibodies in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has necessitated the development of antibody production and purification technologies for both academic and industrial usage. Bacterial Protein A and Protein G are known to bind antibodies with high affinity and have facilitated the isolation and purification thereof. Recently, small peptide ligands (i.e. IgG Fc domain-binding peptides, FcBP) that specifically bind to the Fc-domain of antibodies were reported. In the present study we describe the development of a reusable high affinity column for antibody purification utilizing immobilized FcBP, comprising 13 amino acids residues, on a sepharose resin. In addition to FcBP, Cys to Ser substituted FcBP (FcBP-Ser), reduced FcBP (FcBP-Red), commercial Protein A and Protein G resins, packed into columns, were evaluated for antibody purification. All these columns except the FcBP-Ser one showed good binding capacity for a humanized IgG (trastuzumab) and a chimeric IgG (cetuximab). The column packed with FcBP-Red allowed antibody purification at a less acidic pH (pH 4.8) than was required for the other ligand affinity columns used in our experiments (i.e., pH 3.2 for Protein G and FcBP columns, and pH 3.5 for Protein A column, respectively). Utilizing the FcBP column, antibodies from swine human sera were isolated with a purity of 95%. Interestingly, the FcBP column could be easily regenerated and operated without loss of efficiency for up to 60 runs, the maximum number of runs performed in the present study.

  11. A Socioanalytic Model of Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Robert; Roberts, Brent W.

    2004-01-01

    K0 describes a point of view on maturity that departs from earlier treatments in two ways. First, it rejects the popular assumption from humanistic psychology that maturity is a function of self-actualization and stipulates that maturity is related to certain performance capacities--namely, the ability to form lasting relationships and to achieve…

  12. VARIABLES ASSOCIATED WITH VOCATIONAL MATURITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REICHMAN, WALTER

    EVIDENCE ABOUT THE CONSTRUCT VALIDITY OF PRESUMED VOCATIONAL MATURITY FACTOR SCORES WAS OBTAINED BY STUDYING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FACTORS OF VOCATIONAL MATURITY AND A GROUP OF CONCURRENT VARIABLES DEEMED RELEVANT TO VOCATIONAL MATURITY. THESE VARIABLES WERE CLASSIFIED INTO FIVE GROUPS--FAMILY SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS, ABILITY AND ACHIEVEMENT,…

  13. Envelope Variants Circulating as Initial Neutralization Breadth Developed in Two HIV-Infected Subjects Stimulate Multiclade Neutralizing Antibodies in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Malherbe, Delphine C.; Pissani, Franco; Sather, D. Noah; Guo, Biwei; Pandey, Shilpi; Sutton, William F.; Stuart, Andrew B.; Robins, Harlan; Park, Byung; Krebs, Shelly J.; Schuman, Jason T.; Kalams, Spyros; Hessell, Ann J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Identifying characteristics of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope that are effective in generating broad, protective antibodies remains a hurdle to HIV vaccine design. Emerging evidence of the development of broad and potent neutralizing antibodies in HIV-infected subjects suggests that founder and subsequent progeny viruses may express unique antigenic motifs that contribute to this developmental pathway. We hypothesize that over the course of natural infection, B cells are programmed to develop broad antibodies by exposure to select populations of emerging envelope quasispecies variants. To test this hypothesis, we identified two unrelated subjects whose antibodies demonstrated increasing neutralization breadth against a panel of HIV-1 isolates over time. Full-length functional env genes were cloned longitudinally from these subjects from months after infection through 2.6 to 5.8 years of infection. Motifs associated with the development of breadth in published, cross-sectional studies were found in both subjects. We compared the immunogenicity of envelope vaccines derived from time points obtained during and after broadening of neutralization activity within these subjects. Rabbits were coimmunized four times with selected multiple gp160 DNAs and gp140-trimeric envelope proteins. The affinity of the polyclonal response increased as a function of boosting. The most rapid and persistent neutralization of multiclade tier 1 viruses was elicited by envelopes that were circulating in plasma at time points prior to the development of 50% neutralization breadth in both human subjects. The breadth elicited in rabbits was not improved by exposure to later envelope variants. These data have implications for vaccine development in describing a target time point to identify optimal envelope immunogens. IMPORTANCE Vaccine protection against viral infections correlates with the presence of neutralizing antibodies; thus, vaccine components capable

  14. Efficient method to optimize antibodies using avian leukosis virus display and eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changming; Pike, Gennett M; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Correia, Cristina; Kaufmann, Scott H; Federspiel, Mark J

    2015-08-11

    Antibody-based therapeutics have now had success in the clinic. The affinity and specificity of the antibody for the target ligand determines the specificity of therapeutic delivery and off-target side effects. The discovery and optimization of high-affinity antibodies to important therapeutic targets could be significantly improved by the availability of a robust, eukaryotic display technology comparable to phage display that would overcome the protein translation limitations of microorganisms. The use of eukaryotic cells would improve the diversity of the displayed antibodies that can be screened and optimized as well as more seamlessly transition into a large-scale mammalian expression system for clinical production. In this study, we demonstrate that the replication and polypeptide display characteristics of a eukaryotic retrovirus, avian leukosis virus (ALV), offers a robust, eukaryotic version of bacteriophage display. The binding affinity of a model single-chain Fv antibody was optimized by using ALV display, improving affinity >2,000-fold, from micromolar to picomolar levels. We believe ALV display provides an extension to antibody display on microorganisms and offers virus and cell display platforms in a eukaryotic expression system. ALV display should enable an improvement in the diversity of properly processed and functional antibody variants that can be screened and affinity-optimized to improve promising antibody candidates.

  15. Two-parameter twisted quantum affine algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Naihuan; Zhang, Honglian

    2016-09-01

    We establish Drinfeld realization for the two-parameter twisted quantum affine algebras using a new method. The Hopf algebra structure for Drinfeld generators is given for both untwisted and twisted two-parameter quantum affine algebras, which include the quantum affine algebras as special cases.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin A and cell lines for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Bigbee, William L.; Jensen, Ronald H.; Fong, Stella S. N.; Langlois, Richard G.

    1988-01-01

    Cloned mouse hybridoma cell lines have been established which continuously produce antibodies that are highly specific to and exhibit high affinity for glycophorin A.sup.N and differentiate between the M and N forms of human glycophorin A.

  17. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  18. Exploiting Cross-reactivity to Neutralize Two Different Scorpion Venoms with One Single Chain Antibody Fragment*

    PubMed Central

    Riaño-Umbarila, Lidia; Contreras-Ferrat, Gabriel; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Morelos-Juárez, Citlalli; Corzo, Gerardo; Possani, Lourival D.; Becerril, Baltazar

    2011-01-01

    We report the optimization of a family of human single chain antibody fragments (scFv) for neutralizing two scorpion venoms. The parental scFv 3F recognizes the main toxins of Centruroides noxius Hoffmann (Cn2) and Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css2), albeit with low affinity. This scFv was subjected to independent processes of directed evolution to improve its recognition toward Cn2 (Riaño-Umbarila, L., Juárez-González, V. R., Olamendi-Portugal, T., Ortíz-León, M., Possani, L. D., and Becerril, B. (2005) FEBS J. 272, 2591–2601) and Css2 (this work). Each evolved variant showed strong cross-reactivity against several toxins, and was capable of neutralizing Cn2 and Css2. Furthermore, each variant neutralized the whole venoms of the above species. As far as we know, this is the first report of antibodies with such characteristics. Maturation processes revealed key residue changes to attain expression, stability, and affinity improvements as compared with the parental scFv. Combination of these changes resulted in the scFv LR, which is capable of rescuing mice from severe envenomation by 3 LD50 of freshly prepared whole venom of C. noxius (7.5 μg/20 g of mouse) and C. suffusus (26.25 μg/20 g of mouse), with surviving rates between 90 and 100%. Our research is leading to the formulation of an antivenom consisting of a discrete number of human scFvs endowed with strong cross-reactivity and low immunogenicity. PMID:21156801

  19. 01-ERD-111 - The Development of Synthetic High Affinity Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, J; Balhorn, R; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F; Zeller, L

    2004-02-05

    The aim of this project was to develop Synthetic High-Affinity Ligands (SHALs), which bind with high affinity and specificity to proteins of interest for national security and cancer therapy applications. The aim of producing synthetic ligands for sensory devices as an alternative to antibody-based detection assays and therapeutic agents is to overcome the drawbacks associated with antibody-based in next-generation sensors and systems. The focus area of the project was the chemical synthesis of the SHALs. The project concentrated on two different protein targets. (a) The C fragment of tetanus and botulinum toxin, potential biowarfare agents. A SHAL for tetanus or botulinum toxin would be incorporated into a sensory device for the toxins. (b) HLA-DR10, a protein found in high abundance on the surface of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. A SHAL specific to a tumor marker, labeled with a radionuclide, would enable the targeted delivery of radiation therapy to metastatic disease. The technical approach used to develop a SHAL for each protein target will be described in more detail below. However, in general, the development of a SHAL requires a combination of computational modeling techniques, modern nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and synthetic chemistry.

  20. Propolis inhibits osteoclast maturation.

    PubMed

    Pileggi, Roberta; Antony, Kathryn; Johnson, Kristie; Zuo, Jian; Shannon Holliday, L

    2009-12-01

    Propolis, a natural product produced by the honey bee, has been successfully used in medicine as an anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial agent. Traumatic injuries to the teeth, especially avulsion injuries, present a challenging situation for the clinician because of post-treatment complications, such as inflammatory and/or replacement resorption. Agents that reduce osteoclast numbers and activity may be useful in the treatment of traumatic injuries to the teeth. In this study, we evaluated propolis as an anti-resorptive agent. Calcitriol-stimulated mouse marrow cultures, which contain both osteoclasts and osteoblasts, were exposed to the ethanol extracts of propolis or vehicle control and stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-activity to identify osteoclasts. A significant, dose-dependent reduction in multinuclear TRAP+ cells was demonstrated, although the propolis treatment accommodated cell growth and survival (P < 0.05). Propolis also reduced the formation of actin rings in pure cultures of RAW 264.7 osteoclast-like cells, suggesting that it exerts direct actions on osteoclast maturation. In summary, our data suggest that propolis inhibits late stages of osteoclast maturation including fusion of osteoclasts precursors to form giant cells and formation of actin rings. This supports the hypothesis that it may prove useful as a medicament to reduce resorption associated with traumatic injuries to the teeth. PMID:19843135

  1. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  2. Anti-Sulfoglucuronosyl Paragloboside Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongpei; Usuki, Seigo; Quarles, Brandy; Rivner, Michael H.; Ariga, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. Although the etiology of ALS is obscure, genetic studies of familiar ALS suggest a multifactorial etiology for this condition. Similarly, there probably are multiple causes for sporadic ALS. Autoimmune-mediated motor neuron dysfunction is one proposed etiology for sporadic ALS. In the present study, anti-glycolipid antibodies including GM1, GD1b, GD3, and sulfoglucuronosyl paragloboside (SGPG) were investigated in the sera of a large number of patient samples, including 113 ALS patients and 50 healthy controls, by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with affinity parametric complex criterion evaluation and thin-layer chromatography immunooverlay (immuno-TLC). Anti-SGPG antibodies were found in the sera of 13.3% ALS patients (15 out of 113). The highest titer reached 1:1600. The presence of anti-SGPG antibodies in the serum samples was also confirmed by immuno-TLC. Importantly, a multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of anti-SGPG antibody was positively correlated with age (p < .01) and negatively correlated with ALS Functional Rating Scale score (p < .05). Moreover, the localization of SGPG-immunoreactivity on the motor neurons of rat spinal cord and a mouse motor neuronal cell line, NSC-34 was observed by an immunofluorescence method. These data suggest that SGPG could represent a specific pathogenic antigen in those ALS patients. The presence of anti-SGPG antibodies in the serum of ALS patients should represent a diagnostic biomarker of ALS, and it could reflect the severity of the disease. PMID:27683876

  3. Development of monoclonal antibodies to pre-haptoglobin 2 and their use in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

    PubMed

    Flanagan, J J; Arjomandi, A; Delanoy, M L; Du Paty, E; Galea, P; Laune, D; Rieunier, F; Walker, R P; Binder, S R

    2014-04-01

    Haptoglobins (HPs) are alpha 2-globulin proteins that bind free hemoglobin in plasma to prevent oxidative damage. HPs are produced as preproteins that are proteolytically cleaved in the ER into alpha and beta chains prior to forming mature, functional tetramers. Two alleles exist in humans (HP1 and HP2), therefore three genotypes are present in the population, i.e., HP1-1, HP2-1, and HP2-2. A biochemical role for nascent haptoglobin 2 (pre-haptoglobin 2 or pre-HP2) as the only known modulator of intestinal permeability has been established. In addition, elevated levels of serum pre-HP2 have been detected in multiple conditions including celiac disease and type I diabetes, which are believed to result in part through dysregulation of the intestinal barrier. In this study, we report the development of a monoclonal antibody that is specific for pre-HP2 with a binding affinity in the nanomolar range. Additional antibodies with specificities for preHP but not mature haptoglobin were also characterized. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was established and validated. The ELISA showed high specificity for pre-HP2 even in the presence of excess pre-HP1 or mature haptoglobins, and has excellent linearity and inter- and intra-assay reproducibility with a working range from 3.1ng/mL to 200ng/mL. Testing of sera from 76 healthy patients revealed a non-Gaussian distribution of pre-HP2 levels with a mean concentration of 221.2ng/mL (95% CI: 106.5-335.9ng/mL) and a median value of 23.9ng/mL. Compared to current approaches, this ELISA offers a validated, monoclonal-based method with high sensitivity and specificity for measuring pre-HP2 in human serum. PMID:24583194

  4. [Development of antibody medicines by bio-venture: lesson from license negotiations with mega pharmacies].

    PubMed

    Takada, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    The current method of antibody production is mainly the hybridoma method, in which mice are immunized with an excess amount of antigen for a short period to promote activation and proliferation of B-lymphocytes producing the antibodies of interest. Because of the excess antigen, those producing low-affinity antibodies are activated. In contrast, human blood B-lymphocytes are activated through natural immune reactions, such as the reaction to infection. B-lymphocytes are stimulated repeatedly with a small amount of antigen, and thus only those producing high-affinity antibodies are activated. Consequently, the lymphocytes producing the high-affinity antibodies are accumulated in human blood. Therefore, human lymphocytes are an excellent source of high-affinity antibodies. Evec, Inc. has established a unique method to produce high-affinity antibodies from human lymphocytes using Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which induces the proliferation of B-lymphocytes. The method first induces the proliferation of B-lymphocytes from human blood using EBV, and then isolates those producing the antibodies of interest. The key features of the Evec technique are: 1) development of a lymphocyte library consisting of 150 donors' lymphocytes from which donors suited to develop the antibodies of interest can be selected in 4 days; and 2) development of a sorting method and cell microarray method for selecting lymphocyte clones producing the target antibodies. Licensing agreements have been concluded with European and Japanese pharmaceutical companies for two types of antibody. This paper describes Evec's antibody technology and experience in license negotiations with Mega Pharmacies. PMID:23292021

  5. [Development of antibody medicines by bio-venture: lesson from license negotiations with mega pharmacies].

    PubMed

    Takada, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    The current method of antibody production is mainly the hybridoma method, in which mice are immunized with an excess amount of antigen for a short period to promote activation and proliferation of B-lymphocytes producing the antibodies of interest. Because of the excess antigen, those producing low-affinity antibodies are activated. In contrast, human blood B-lymphocytes are activated through natural immune reactions, such as the reaction to infection. B-lymphocytes are stimulated repeatedly with a small amount of antigen, and thus only those producing high-affinity antibodies are activated. Consequently, the lymphocytes producing the high-affinity antibodies are accumulated in human blood. Therefore, human lymphocytes are an excellent source of high-affinity antibodies. Evec, Inc. has established a unique method to produce high-affinity antibodies from human lymphocytes using Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which induces the proliferation of B-lymphocytes. The method first induces the proliferation of B-lymphocytes from human blood using EBV, and then isolates those producing the antibodies of interest. The key features of the Evec technique are: 1) development of a lymphocyte library consisting of 150 donors' lymphocytes from which donors suited to develop the antibodies of interest can be selected in 4 days; and 2) development of a sorting method and cell microarray method for selecting lymphocyte clones producing the target antibodies. Licensing agreements have been concluded with European and Japanese pharmaceutical companies for two types of antibody. This paper describes Evec's antibody technology and experience in license negotiations with Mega Pharmacies.

  6. Rational Design of CXCR4 Specific Antibodies with Elongated CDRs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The bovine antibody (BLV1H12) which has an ultralong heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDRH3) provides a novel scaffold for antibody engineering. By substituting the extended CDRH3 of BLV1H12 with modified CXCR4 binding peptides that adopt a β-hairpin conformation, we generated antibodies specifically targeting the ligand binding pocket of CXCR4 receptor. These engineered antibodies selectively bind to CXCR4 expressing cells with binding affinities in the low nanomolar range. In addition, they inhibit SDF-1-dependent signal transduction and cell migration in a transwell assay. Finally, we also demonstrate that a similar strategy can be applied to other CDRs and show that a CDRH2-peptide fusion binds CXCR4 with a Kd of 0.9 nM. This work illustrates the versatility of scaffold-based antibody engineering and could greatly expand the antibody functional repertoire in the future. PMID:25041362

  7. Higher cytotoxicity of divalent antibody-toxins than monovalent antibody-toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Won, JaeSeon; Nam, PilWon; Lee, YongChan; Choe, MuHyeon

    2009-04-24

    Recombinant antibody-toxins are constructed via the fusion of a 'carcinoma-specific' antibody fragment to a toxin. Due to the high affinity and high selectivity of the antibody fragments, antibody-toxins can bind to surface antigens on cancer cells and kill them without harming normal cells [L.H. Pai, J.K. Batra, D.J. FitzGerald, M.C. Willingham, I. Pastan, Anti-tumor activities of immunotoxins made of monoclonal antibody B3 and various forms of Pseudomonas exotoxin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88 (1991) 3358-3362]. In this study, we constructed the antibody-toxin, Fab-SWn-PE38, with SWn (n = 3, 6, 9) sequences containing n-time repeated (G{sub 4}S) between the Fab fragment and PE38 (38 kDa truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A). The SWn sequence also harbored one cysteine residue that could form a disulfide bridge between two Fab-SWn-PE38 monomers. We assessed the cytotoxicity of the monovalent (Fab-SWn-PE38), and divalent ([Fab-SWn-PE38]{sub 2}) antibody-toxins. The cytotoxicity of the dimer against the CRL1739 cell line was approximately 18.8-fold higher than that of the monomer on the ng/ml scale, which was approximately 37.6-fold higher on the pM scale. These results strongly indicate that divalency provides higher cytotoxicity for an antibody-toxin.

  8. CFD - Mature Technology?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, numerical methods and simulation tools for fluid dynamic problems have advanced as a new discipline, namely, computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Although a wide spectrum of flow regimes are encountered in many areas of science and engineering, simulation of compressible flow has been the major driver for developing computational algorithms and tools. This is probably due to a large demand for predicting the aerodynamic performance characteristics of flight vehicles, such as commercial, military, and space vehicles. As flow analysis is required to be more accurate and computationally efficient for both commercial and mission-oriented applications (such as those encountered in meteorology, aerospace vehicle development, general fluid engineering and biofluid analysis) CFD tools for engineering become increasingly important for predicting safety, performance and cost. This paper presents the author's perspective on the maturity of CFD, especially from an aerospace engineering point of view.

  9. Single-Chain Antibody Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baird, Cheryl

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have constructed a nonimmune library consisting of 109 human antibody scFv fragments, which have been cloned and expressed on the surface of yeast. Nanomolar-affinity scFvs are routinely obtained by magnetic bead screening and flow cytometric sorting. The yeast library can be amplified 1010 fold without measurable loss of clonal diversity. This allows for indefinite expansion of the library. All scFv clones can be assessed directly on the yeast cell surface by immunofluorescent labeling and flow cytometry, obviating separate subcloning, expression, and purification steps. The ability to use multiplex library screening demonstrates the utility of this approach for high-throughput antibody isolation for proteomic applications. The yeast library may be used for research projects or teaching performed for U.S. Government purposes only. If you would like to request an aliquot of the single-chain antibody library for your research, please print and fill out the Materials Transfer Agreement (MTA) [PDF, 20K]. The website provides the contact information for mailing the MTA. [copied from http://www.sysbio.org/dataresources/singlechain.stm

  10. SIGNIFICANCE OF BIVALENCE OF ANTIBODY IN VIRAL NEUTRALIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Robert W.; Nisonoff, Alfred; Uhr, Jonathan W.

    1971-01-01

    The role of bivalence of antibody in its capacity to neutralize virus was studied with rabbit antibodies to the bacteriophage, φX174. Univalent Fab or Fab' fragments of IgG isolated from antiviral antisera obtained early in the immunization schedule had virtually no activity compared to that of the intact IgG. When the antibodies were isolated from antisera of the same rabbits several months later, the univalent fragments and IgG were essentially equal in activity. The results are interpreted on the basis that an IgG molecule, because of its bivalence, has a higher effective combining affinity (avidity) than a univalent fragment. After prolonged immunization, however, the affinity of univalent antibody becomes sufficiently high that it exceeds a threshold value, above which further increase in affinity, through bivalence, is no longer significant. The results could explain the variability in relative effectiveness of univalent antibodies observed in previous studies. These data, and the fact that F(ab')2 fragments from either "early" or "late" antisera were as effective as IgG, indicate that fragment Fc is not a significant factor in neutralization. No differences in dissociation from the virus of univalent antibody from early and late antisera could be demonstrated by dilution at temperatures up to 47°C. The attachment at sites of neutralization on the virus appears to be functionally almost irreversible in this system. PMID:5166611

  11. Molecular Evolution of Antibody Cross-Reactivity for Two Subtypes of Type a Botulinum Neurotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Rodriguez, C.; Levy, R.; Arndt, J.W.; Forsyth, C.M.; Razai, A.; Lou, J.; Geren, I.; Stevens, R.C.; Marks, J.D.; /UC, San Francisco /Scripps Res. Inst.

    2007-07-09

    Broadening antibody specificity without compromising affinity should facilitate detection and neutralization of toxin and viral subtypes. We used yeast display and a co-selection strategy to increase cross-reactivity of a single chain (sc) Fv antibody to botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A). Starting with a scFv that binds the BoNT/A1 subtype with high affinity (136 pM) and the BoNT/A2 subtype with low affinity (109 nM), we increased its affinity for BoNT/A2 1,250-fold, to 87 pM, while maintaining high-affinity binding to BoNT/A1 (115 pM). To find the molecular basis for improved cross-reactivity, we determined the X-ray co-crystal structures of wild-type and cross-reactive antibodies complexed to BoNT/A1 at resolutions up to 2.6 A, and measured the thermodynamic contribution of BoNT/A1 and A2 amino acids to wild-type and cross-reactive antibody binding. The results show how an antibody can be engineered to bind two different antigens despite structural differences in the antigen-antibody interface and may provide a general strategy for tuning antibody specificity and cross-reactivity.

  12. Antibody Labeling with Fluorescent Dyes Using Magnetic Protein A and Protein G Beads.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nidhi; Godat, Becky; Urh, Marjeta

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies labeled with small molecules like fluorescent dyes, cytotoxic drugs, and radioactive tracers are essential tools in biomedical research, immunodiagnostics and more recently as therapeutic agents. Traditional methods for labeling antibodies with small molecules require purified antibodies at relatively high concentration, involve multiple dialysis steps and have limited throughput. However, several applications, including the field of Antibody Drug Conjugates (ADCs), will benefit from new methods that will allow labeling of antibodies directly from cell media. Such methods may allow antibodies to be screened in biologically relevant assays, for example, the receptor-mediated antibody internalization assay in the case of ADCs. Here, we describe a method (on-bead method) that enables labeling of small amounts of antibodies directly from cell media. This approach utilizes high capacity magnetic Protein A and Protein G affinity beads to capture antibodies from the cell media followed by labeling with small molecules using either amine or thiol chemistry and subsequent elution of the labeled antibodies. Taking fluorescent dyes as surrogates for small molecules, we demonstrate the on-bead labeling of three different mouse antibodies directly from cell media using both amine and thiol labeling chemistry. The high binding affinity of antibodies to Protein A and Protein G ensures high recoveries as well as high purity of the labeled antibodies. In addition, use of magnetic beads allows multiple samples to be handled manually, thereby significantly improving labeling throughput. PMID:27685323

  13. Rational design of a low-affinity peptide for the detection of cystatin C in a fast homogeneous immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Dobslaff, Kristin; Zscharnack, Kristin; Kreisig, Thomas; Zuchner, Thole

    2016-02-01

    Immunoassays play an essential role in current research and diagnostics resulting in a variety of detection principles. Thereby, homogeneous assays are often used for a fast signal response as demanded for example in point-of-care diagnostics. These systems often rely on a competitive assay design where the sample analyte and the corresponding dye-labeled substance are competing for binding sites on an antibody present in limited amounts. Due to the similar affinities of the antibody towards the sample analyte and the competitor, both sensitivity and assay time are limited. As a consequence, a competitor with a slightly reduced affinity towards the antibody can potentially overcome these drawbacks. Here, we present the rational design of a low-affinity peptide (donor peptide) as a specific analyte competitor for a FRET-based homogeneous immunoassay for the analysis of the protein cystatin C. Thereby, the strategy of peptide-induced antibody generation was combined with the selective variation of the immunization sequence in order to achieve a lower affinity towards the antibody. We could show that shortened donor peptides improved the resulting quenching efficiency in the immunoassay. In addition, the substitution of small hydrophobic amino acids by those with a higher steric demand appeared to be the most promising strategy providing a fast assay response for cystatin C of only 90 s.

  14. Affinity purification of egg yolk immunoglobulins (IgY) using a human mycoplasma protein.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuemei; Diraviyam, Thirumalai; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-02-15

    Egg yolk immunoglobulin (IgY) is a superior functional equivalent to mammalian IgG. However, the preparation of refined and highly purified IgY is still attributed as difficult task. Protein M (a transmembrane protein from human mycoplasma) has been newly demonstrated as an ideal affinity regent for mammalian antibody purification. This study aimed to evaluate the interaction between protein M and IgY. The results showed protein M could be a superior affinity reagent for IgY, scFv as well as IgYΔFc, based on pull down and western blot investigations; in addition, it was found that ∼125 times increase of effective IgY in the elutent was obtained using protein M affinity chromatography column compared with traditional IgY extraction methods. This indicates, the purification strategy of protein M is entirely different to traditional IBPs and the salient purification feature of protein M would be a breakthrough for purifying not only non-mammalian antibodies, but also monoclonal antibodies and engineered antibodies based on variable region.

  15. XGef Mediates Early CPEB Phosphorylation during Xenopus Oocyte Meiotic Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Susana E.; Yuan, Lei; Lacza, Charlemagne; Ransom, Heather; Mahon, Gwendolyn M.; Whitehead, Ian P.; Hake, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    Polyadenylation-induced translation is an important regulatory mechanism during metazoan development. During Xenopus oocyte meiotic progression, polyadenylation-induced translation is regulated by CPEB, which is activated by phosphorylation. XGef, a guanine exchange factor, is a CPEB-interacting protein involved in the early steps of progesterone-stimulated oocyte maturation. We find that XGef influences early oocyte maturation by directly influencing CPEB function. XGef and CPEB interact during oogenesis and oocyte maturation and are present in a c-mos messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP). Both proteins also interact directly in vitro. XGef overexpression increases the level of CPEB phosphorylated early during oocyte maturation, and this directly correlates with increased Mos protein accumulation and acceleration of meiotic resumption. To exert this effect, XGef must retain guanine exchange activity and the interaction with CPEB. Overexpression of a guanine exchange deficient version of XGef, which interacts with CPEB, does not enhance early CPEB phosphorylation. Overexpression of a version of XGef that has significantly reduced interaction with CPEB, but retains guanine exchange activity, decreases early CPEB phosphorylation and delays oocyte maturation. Injection of XGef antibodies into oocytes blocks progesterone-induced oocyte maturation and early CPEB phosphorylation. These findings indicate that XGef is involved in early CPEB activation and implicate GTPase signaling in this process. PMID:15635100

  16. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  17. Discovering neutralizing antibodies targeting the stem epitope of H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin with synthetic phage-displayed antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chao-Ping; Chen, Ing-Chien; Yu, Chung-Ming; Peng, Hung-Pin; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Ma, Shiou-Hwa; Lee, Yu-Ching; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Yang, An-Suei

    2015-10-12

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies developed from the IGHV1-69 germline gene are known to bind to the stem region of hemagglutinin in diverse influenza viruses but the sequence determinants for the antigen recognition, including neutralization potency and binding affinity, are not clearly understood. Such understanding could inform designs of synthetic antibody libraries targeting the stem epitope on hemagglutinin, leading to artificially designed antibodies that are functionally advantageous over antibodies from natural antibody repertoires. In this work, the sequence space of the complementarity determining regions of a broadly neutralizing antibody (F10) targeting the stem epitope on the hemagglutinin of a strain of H1N1 influenza virus was systematically explored; the elucidated antibody-hemagglutinin recognition principles were used to design a phage-displayed antibody library, which was then used to discover neutralizing antibodies against another strain of H1N1 virus. More than 1000 functional antibody candidates were selected from the antibody library and were shown to neutralize the corresponding strain of influenza virus with up to 7 folds higher potency comparing with the parent F10 antibody. The antibody library could be used to discover functionally effective antibodies against other H1N1 influenza viruses, supporting the notion that target-specific antibody libraries can be designed and constructed with systematic sequence-function information.

  18. The maximal affinity of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, I. D.; Chen, K.; Sharp, K. A.; Kollman, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    We explore the question of what are the best ligands for macromolecular targets. A survey of experimental data on a large number of the strongest-binding ligands indicates that the free energy of binding increases with the number of nonhydrogen atoms with an initial slope of ≈−1.5 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.18 J) per atom. For ligands that contain more than 15 nonhydrogen atoms, the free energy of binding increases very little with relative molecular mass. This nonlinearity is largely ascribed to nonthermodynamic factors. An analysis of the dominant interactions suggests that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic effects provide a reasonable basis for understanding binding affinities across the entire set of ligands. Interesting outliers that bind unusually strongly on a per atom basis include metal ions, covalently attached ligands, and a few well known complexes such as biotin–avidin. PMID:10468550

  19. Proton affinities of hydrated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadbeigi, Younes

    2016-09-01

    Proton affinities (PA) of non-hydrated, M, and hydrated forms, M(H2O)1,2,3, of 20 organic molecules including alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones and amines were calculated by the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. For homogeneous families, linear correlations were observed between PAs of the M(H2O)1,2,3 and the PAs of the non-hydrated molecules. Also, the absolute values of the hydration enthalpies of the protonated molecules decreased linearly with the PAs. The correlation functions predicted that for an amine with PA < 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is larger than the corresponding PA, while for an amine with PA > 1100 kJ/mol the PA(M(H2O)) is smaller than the PA.

  20. Surface-modified magnetic colloids for affinity adsorption of immunoglobulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Fernanda; Pinho, Samantha C.; Zollner, Terezinha C. A.; Zollner, Ricardo L.; de Cuyper, Marcel; Santana, Maria Helena A.

    This work describes the preparation, characterization and in vitro adsorption tests of surface-modified magnetoliposomes for affinity binding of (i) anticardiolipin (isotype G) antibodies and (ii) specific isotype E antibodies generated by hypersensitivity reactions in humans with respiratory allergy. In the first case, cardiolipin embedded in the bilayer of magnetoliposomes was used as specific ligand. In the second case, antigenic proteins present in an extract of Dermatophagoids pteronyssinus and Blomia tropicalis mites were covalently coupled on the surface of magnetoliposomes via a diglycolic spacer arm, and used as specific ligands for IgE. Antibody adsorption was performed in a high-gradient magnetophoresis system, using either sera of healthy individuals or a pool of sera from autoimmune or allergic patients. The selectivity and capacity of the system were quantified by a frontal analysis in a capillary column, and by constructing breakthrough curves. The results show that the highest yield and selectivity were obtained if the ligand was extended into the aqueous layer surrounding the magnetoliposome surface. A 100% selectivity was obtained for adsorption of specific IgE, and 8% for IgG. These results demonstrate the potentialities of both types of surface-modified magnetic biocolloids in the field of in vitro diagnosis tests for allergic or autoimmune conditions.

  1. Methods for conjugating antibodies to nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Wagh, Anil; Law, Benedict

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are one of the most commonly used targeting ligands for nanocarriers, mainly because they are specific, have a strong binding affinity, and are available for a number of disease biomarkers. The bioconjugation chemistry can be a crucial factor in determining the targeting efficiency of drug delivery and should be chosen on a case-by-case basis. An antibody consists of a number of functional groups which offer many flexible options for bioconjugation. This chapter focuses on discussing some of the approaches including periodate oxidation, carbodiimide, maleimide, and heterofunctional linkers, for conjugating antibodies to different nanocarriers. The advantages and limitations are described herein. Specific examples are selected to demonstrate the experimental procedures and to illustrate the potential for applying to other nanocarrier system. PMID:23913152

  2. Methods for conjugating antibodies to nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Wagh, Anil; Law, Benedict

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are one of the most commonly used targeting ligands for nanocarriers, mainly because they are specific, have a strong binding affinity, and are available for a number of disease biomarkers. The bioconjugation chemistry can be a crucial factor in determining the targeting efficiency of drug delivery and should be chosen on a case-by-case basis. An antibody consists of a number of functional groups which offer many flexible options for bioconjugation. This chapter focuses on discussing some of the approaches including periodate oxidation, carbodiimide, maleimide, and heterofunctional linkers, for conjugating antibodies to different nanocarriers. The advantages and limitations are described herein. Specific examples are selected to demonstrate the experimental procedures and to illustrate the potential for applying to other nanocarrier system.

  3. An immunosuppressive antibody-drug conjugate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongsheng E; Liu, Tao; Wang, Ying; Cao, Yu; Du, Jintang; Luo, Xiaozhou; Deshmukh, Vishal; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Lawson, Brian R; Tremblay, Matthew S; Young, Travis S; Kazane, Stephanie A; Wang, Feng; Schultz, Peter G

    2015-03-11

    We have developed a novel antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) that can selectively deliver the Lck inhibitor dasatinib to human T lymphocytes. This ADC is based on a humanized antibody that selectively binds with high affinity to CXCR4, an antigen that is selectively expressed on hematopoietic cells. The resulting dasatinib-antibody conjugate suppresses T-cell-receptor (TCR)-mediated T-cell activation and cytokine expression with low nM EC50 and has minimal effects on cell viability. This ADC may lead to a new class of selective immunosuppressive drugs with improved safety and extend the ADC strategy to the targeted delivery of kinase inhibitors for indications beyond oncology.

  4. Antidrug Antibodies: B Cell Immunity Against Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fogdell-Hahn, A

    2015-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are now treated with a range of different biopharmaceuticals, often requiring lifelong parenteral administrations. This exposure to drugs is unnatural and can trigger the immune system and result in the formation of antidrug antibodies. Drug-specific antibodies will, if of sufficiently high titre and affinity, block the intended effect of the drug, increase its clearance and make continued treatment worthless. We expect the immune system to react towards therapies against which tolerance has never been established, which is the case for factor VIII treatment in patients with haemophilia A. However, even biopharmaceutical molecules that we should be tolerant against can elicit antidrug antibodies, for instance in treatment of multiple sclerosis patients with recombinant human interferon-beta. Possible immunological mechanisms behind the breaking of tolerance against drugs, the impact this has on continuous treatment success, clinical practice and drug development, will be discussed in this review.

  5. Interpolation method for accurate affinity ranking of arrayed ligand-analyte interactions.

    PubMed

    Schasfoort, Richard B M; Andree, Kiki C; van der Velde, Niels; van der Kooi, Alex; Stojanović, Ivan; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2016-05-01

    The values of the affinity constants (kd, ka, and KD) that are determined by label-free interaction analysis methods are affected by the ligand density. This article outlines a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging method that yields high-throughput globally fitted affinity ranking values using a 96-plex array. A kinetic titration experiment without a regeneration step has been applied for various coupled antibodies binding to a single antigen. Globally fitted rate (kd and ka) and dissociation equilibrium (KD) constants for various ligand densities and analyte concentrations are exponentially interpolated to the KD at Rmax = 100 RU response level (KD(R100)).

  6. Conformal field theory on affine Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Clubok, K.S.

    1996-04-01

    Working directly on affine Lie groups, we construct several new formulations of the WZW model, the gauged WZW model, and the generic affine-Virasoro action. In one formulation each of these conformal field theories (CFTs) is expressed as a one-dimensional mechanical system whose variables are coordinates on the affine Lie group. When written in terms of the affine group element, this formulation exhibits a two-dimensional WZW term. In another formulation each CFT is written as a two-dimensional field theory, with a three- dimensional WZW term, whose fields are coordinates on the affine group. On the basis of these equivalent formulations, we develop a translation dictionary in which the new formulations on the affine Lie group are understood as mode formulations of the conventional formulations on the Lie group. Using this dictionary, we also express each CFT as a three-dimensional field theory on the Lie group with a four-dimensional WZW term. 36 refs.

  7. Discovery of functional antibodies targeting ion channels.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I; Gardener, Matthew J; Williams, Wendy A

    2015-04-01

    Ion channels play critical roles in physiology and disease by modulation of cellular functions such as electrical excitability, secretion, cell migration, and gene transcription. Ion channels represent an important target class for drug discovery that has been largely addressed, to date, using small-molecule approaches. A significant opportunity exists to target these channels with antibodies and alternative formats of biologics. Antibodies display high specificity and affinity for their target antigen, and they have the potential to target ion channels very selectively. Nevertheless, isolating antibodies to this target class is challenging due to the difficulties in expression and purification of ion channels in a format suitable for antibody drug discovery in addition to the complexity of screening for function. In this article, we will review the current state of ion channel biologics discovery and the progress that has been made. We will also highlight the challenges in isolating functional antibodies to these targets and how these challenges may be addressed. Finally, we also illustrate successful approaches to isolating functional monoclonal antibodies targeting ion channels by way of a number of case studies drawn from recent publications.

  8. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science.

  9. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  10. Non-affine deformations in polymer hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Qi; Basu, Anindita; Janmey, Paul A.; Yodh, A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Most theories of soft matter elasticity assume that the local strain in a sample after deformation is identical everywhere and equal to the macroscopic strain, or equivalently that the deformation is affine. We discuss the elasticity of hydrogels of crosslinked polymers with special attention to affine and non-affine theories of elasticity. Experimental procedures to measure non-affine deformations are also described. Entropic theories, which account for gel elasticity based on stretching out individual polymer chains, predict affine deformations. In contrast, simulations of network deformation that result in bending of the stiff constituent filaments generally predict non-affine behavior. Results from experiments show significant non-affine deformation in hydrogels even when they are formed by flexible polymers for which bending would appear to be negligible compared to stretching. However, this finding is not necessarily an experimental proof of the non-affine model for elasticity. We emphasize the insights gained from experiments using confocal rheoscope and show that, in addition to filament bending, sample micro-inhomogeneity can be a significant alternative source of non-affine deformation. PMID:23002395

  11. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  12. Indium-111 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    A monoclonal antibody to a high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen was chelated and radiolabeled with indium-111. This material shows high affinity for melanoma and thus can be used in the detection, localization and imaging of melanoma. 1 figure.

  13. Improving Binding Affinity and Selectivity of Computationally Designed Ligand-Binding Proteins Using Experiments.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    The ability to de novo design proteins that can bind small molecules has wide implications for synthetic biology and medicine. Combining computational protein design with the high-throughput screening of mutagenic libraries of computationally designed proteins is emerging as a general approach for creating binding proteins with programmable binding modes, affinities, and selectivities. The computational step enables the creation of a binding site in a protein that otherwise does not (measurably) bind the intended ligand, and targeted mutagenic screening allows for validation and refinement of the computational model as well as provides orders-of-magnitude increases in the binding affinity. Deep sequencing of mutagenic libraries can provide insights into the mutagenic binding landscape and enable further affinity improvements. Moreover, in such a combined computational-experimental approach where the binding mode is preprogrammed and iteratively refined, selectivity can be achieved (and modulated) by the placement of specified amino acid side chain groups around the ligand in defined orientations. Here, we describe the experimental aspects of a combined computational-experimental approach for des