Science.gov

Sample records for antibody concentrations confers

  1. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Scott, Jamie; Larrick, James W; Plückthun, Andreas; Veldman, Trudi; Adams, Gregory P; Parren, Paul WHI; Chester, Kerry A; Bradbury, Andrew; Reichert, Janice M; Huston, James S

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Biology), who will discuss a systems approach for studying disease that is enabled by emerging technology; Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), who will discuss systems analysis of cell communication network dynamics for therapeutic biologics design; David Baker (University of Washington), who will describe computer-based design of smart protein therapeutics; and William Schief (The Scripps Research Institute), who will discuss epitope-focused immunogen design.   In this preview of the conference, the workshop and session chairs share their thoughts on what conference participants may learn in sessions on: (1) three-dimensional structure antibody modeling; (2) identifying clonal lineages from next-generation data sets of expressed VH gene sequences; (3) antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; (4) the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on the antibody response; (5) directed evolution; (6) antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; (7) use of knowledge-based design to guide development of complementarity-determining regions and epitopes to engineer or elicit the desired antibody; (8) optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; (9) antibodies in a complex environment; (10) polyclonal, oligoclonal and bispecific antibodies; (11) antibodies to watch in 2014; and (12) polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity.

  2. Antibody engineering and therapeutics conference

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, James W; Parren, Paul WHI; Huston, James S; Plückthun, Andreas; Bradbury, Andrew; Tomlinson, Ian M; Chester, Kerry A; Burton, Dennis R; Adams, Gregory P; Weiner, Louis M; Scott, Jamie K; Alfenito, Mark R; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    The 25th anniversary of the Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics Conference, the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA, December 7–11, 2014. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the event will celebrate past successes, educate participants on current activities and offer a vision of future progress in the field. Keynote addresses will be given by academic and industry experts Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Ira Pastan (National Cancer Institute), James Wells (University of California, San Francisco), Ian Tomlinson (GlaxoSmithKline) and Anthony Rees (Rees Consulting AB and Emeritus Professor, University of Bath). These speakers will provide updates of their work, placed in the context of the substantial growth of the industry over the past 25 years. PMID:25517297

  3. Conference report: hot topics in antibody-drug conjugate development.

    PubMed

    Thudium, Karen; Bilic, Sanela

    2013-12-01

    American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists National Biotechnology Conference Sheraton San Diego Hotel and Marina, San Diego, CA, USA, 19-23 May 2013 The National Biotechnology Conference, is a premier meeting for biotechnology professionals covering a broad range of hot topics in the biotechnology industry. Attracting participants from academia, industry and regulatory, this meeting features sessions that aim to address emerging subjects of interest and allows for open exchange between scientists. The 2013 conference featured leading researchers in the fields of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and immunogenicity. Herein, we present a summary of the ADC hot topics, including bioanalytical and PK considerations, quantitative evaluation of the impact of immunogenicity and ADME to understand ADC drug-drug interactions, and clinical considerations for ADC development. This article aims to summarize the recommendations that were made by the speakers during various sessions throughout the conference.

  4. IBC’s 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    PubMed Central

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H.J.; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3–6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3–5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4–5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society’s special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5–6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy. PMID:23575266

  5. Effects of medium concentration on antibody production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J.

    1984-01-01

    Antibody production by two different cell lines was measured as the media were supplemented with varied amounts of glucose and fetal bovine serum. Both cell lines elaborated antidinitrophenyl hapten antibodies. Two basic media were used: RPMI 1640 and Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. The production of antibodies was followed from 0 to 180 h and was assayed by radioimmunoassay.

  6. Antibody response to inactivated influenza vaccines of various antigenic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, K M; Monto, A S; Foster, D A

    1990-02-01

    Four inactivated influenza vaccines (containing the recommended antigens for the 1985-1986 influenza season) of various antigenic concentration levels were randomly administered to 140 study participants. The effect of the increasing antigen concentration resulted in significantly higher influenza hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody levels 3 weeks after vaccination for the A/H1N1 antigen but not for the A/H3N2 or B antigens. Also, at 3 weeks after vaccination, there were significantly lower antibody titer levels associated with increasing age for the A/H1N1 and B antigens (adjusting for the prevaccination antibody titer and antigen content).

  7. HIV-1 resistance to neutralizing antibodies: Determination of antibody concentrations leading to escape mutant evolution.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Carsten; Reh, Lucia; Trkola, Alexandra

    2016-06-15

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considered vital components of novel therapeutics and blueprints for vaccine research. Yet escape to even the most potent of these antibodies is imminent in natural infection. Measures to define antibody efficacy and prevent mutant selection are thus urgently needed. Here, we derive a mathematical framework to predict the concentration ranges for which antibody escape variants can outcompete their viral ancestors, referred to as mutant selection window (MSW). When determining the MSW, we focus on the differential efficacy of neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in two canonical infection routes, free-virus infection and cell-cell transmission. The latter has proven highly effective in vitro suggesting its importance for both in vivo spread as well as for escaping targeted intervention strategies. We observed a range of MSW patterns that highlight the potential of mutants to arise in both transmission pathways and over wide concentration ranges. Most importantly, we found that only when the arising mutant has both, residual sensitivity to the neutralizing antibody and reduced infectivity compared to the parental virus, antibody dosing outside of the MSW to restrict mutant selection is possible. Emergence of mutants that provide complete escape and have no considerable fitness loss cannot be prevented by adjusting antibody doses. The latter may in part explain the ubiquitous resistance to neutralizing antibodies observed in natural infection and antibody treatment. Based on our findings, combinations of antibodies targeting different epitopes should be favored for antibody-based interventions as this may render complete resistance less likely to occur and also increase chances that multiple escapes result in severe fitness loss of the virus making longer-term antibody treatment more feasible.

  8. IBC's 23rd Antibody Engineering and 10th Antibody Therapeutics Conferences and the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society: December 2-6, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, John; Begent, Richard H J; Chester, Kerry; Huston, James S; Bradbury, Andrew; Scott, Jamie K; Thorpe, Philip E; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M; Weiner, Louis M

    2012-01-01

    Now in its 23rd and 10th years, respectively, the Antibody Engineering and Antibody Therapeutics conferences are the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society. The scientific program covers the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development from basic science through clinical development. In this preview of the conferences, the chairs provide their thoughts on sessions that will allow participants to track emerging trends in (1) the development of next-generation immunomodulatory antibodies; (2) the complexity of the environment in which antibodies must function; (3) antibody-targeted central nervous system (CNS) therapies that cross the blood brain barrier; (4) the extension of antibody half-life for improved efficacy and pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD); and (5) the application of next generation DNA sequencing to accelerate antibody research. A pre-conference workshop on Sunday, December 2, 2012 will update participants on recent intellectual property (IP) law changes that affect antibody research, including biosimilar legislation, the America Invents Act and recent court cases. Keynote presentations will be given by Andreas Plückthun (University of Zürich), who will speak on engineering receptor ligands with powerful cellular responses; Gregory Friberg (Amgen Inc.), who will provide clinical updates of bispecific antibodies; James D. Marks (University of California, San Francisco), who will discuss a systems approach to generating tumor targeting antibodies; Dario Neri (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich), who will speak about delivering immune modulators at the sites of disease; William M. Pardridge (University of California, Los Angeles), who will discuss delivery across the blood-brain barrier; and Peter Senter (Seattle Genetics, Inc.), who will present his vision for the future of antibody-drug conjugates. For more information on these meetings or to register to attend, please visit www.IBCLifeSciences.com/Antibody

  9. IBC's 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, December 5–8, 2011, San Diego, CA

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Dunlop, D Cameron; Sircar, Aroop; Wurch, Thierry; Falkowska, Emilia; Helguera, Gustavo; Piccione, Emily C; Brack, Simon; Berger, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 5–8, 2011 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew ∼800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a preview to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 4, 2011 focused on antibodies as probes of structure. The Antibody Engineering Conference comprised eight sessions: (1) structure and dynamics of antibodies and their membrane receptor targets; (2) model-guided generation of binding sites; (3) novel selection strategies; (4) antibodies in a complex environment: targeting intracellular and misfolded proteins; (5) rational vaccine design; (6) viral retargeting with engineered binding molecules; (7) the biology behind potential blockbuster antibodies and (8) antibodies as signaling modifiers: where did we go right, and can we learn from success? The Antibody Therapeutics Conference comprised five sessions: (1) Twenty-five years of therapeutic antibodies: lessons learned and future challenges; (2) preclinical and early stage development of antibody therapeutics; (3) next generation anti-angiogenics; (4) updates of clinical stage antibody therapeutics and (5) antibody drug conjugates and bispecific antibodies. PMID:22453091

  10. IBC's 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society: December 3-6, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H J; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3-6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3-5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4-5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society's special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5-6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy.

  11. Molecular basis of high viscosity in concentrated antibody solutions: Strategies for high concentration drug product development

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Dheeraj S.; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Satish K.; Goswami, Sumit; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Effective translation of breakthrough discoveries into innovative products in the clinic requires proactive mitigation or elimination of several drug development challenges. These challenges can vary depending upon the type of drug molecule. In the case of therapeutic antibody candidates, a commonly encountered challenge is high viscosity of the concentrated antibody solutions. Concentration-dependent viscosity behaviors of mAbs and other biologic entities may depend on pairwise and higher-order intermolecular interactions, non-native aggregation, and concentration-dependent fluctuations of various antibody regions. This article reviews our current understanding of molecular origins of viscosity behaviors of antibody solutions. We discuss general strategies and guidelines to select low viscosity candidates or optimize lead candidates for lower viscosity at early drug discovery stages. Moreover, strategies for formulation optimization and excipient design are also presented for candidates already in advanced product development stages. Potential future directions for research in this field are also explored. PMID:26736022

  12. Molecular basis of high viscosity in concentrated antibody solutions: Strategies for high concentration drug product development.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Satish K; Goswami, Sumit; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Effective translation of breakthrough discoveries into innovative products in the clinic requires proactive mitigation or elimination of several drug development challenges. These challenges can vary depending upon the type of drug molecule. In the case of therapeutic antibody candidates, a commonly encountered challenge is high viscosity of the concentrated antibody solutions. Concentration-dependent viscosity behaviors of mAbs and other biologic entities may depend on pairwise and higher-order intermolecular interactions, non-native aggregation, and concentration-dependent fluctuations of various antibody regions. This article reviews our current understanding of molecular origins of viscosity behaviors of antibody solutions. We discuss general strategies and guidelines to select low viscosity candidates or optimize lead candidates for lower viscosity at early drug discovery stages. Moreover, strategies for formulation optimization and excipient design are also presented for candidates already in advanced product development stages. Potential future directions for research in this field are also explored.

  13. Live SIV vaccine correlate of protection: local antibody production and concentration on the path of virus entry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingsheng; Zeng, Ming; Duan, Lijie; Voss, James E.; Smith, Anthony J.; Pambuccian, Stefan; Shang, Liang; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Southern, Peter J.; Reilly, Cavan S.; Skinner, Pamela J.; Zupancic, Mary L.; Carlis, John V.; Piatak, Michael; Waterman, Diane; Reeves, R. Keith; Masek-Hammerman, Katherine; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Alpert, Michael D.; Evans, David T.; Kohler, Heinz; Muller, Sybille; Robinson, James; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Burton, Dennis R.; Johnson, R. Paul; Haase, Ashley T.

    2014-01-01

    We sought design principles for a vaccine to prevent HIV transmission to women by identifying correlates of protection conferred by a highly effective live attenuated SIV vaccine in the rhesus macaque animal model. We show that SIVmac239Δnef vaccination recruits plasma cells and induces ectopic lymphoid follicle formation beneath the mucosal epithelium in the rhesus macaque female reproductive tract. The plasma cells and ectopic follicles produce IgG antibodies reactive with viral envelope glycoprotein gp41 trimers, and these antibodies are concentrated on the path of virus entry by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in cervical reserve epithelium and in vaginal epithelium. This local antibody production and delivery system correlated spatially and temporally with the maturation of local protection against high dose pathogenic SIV vaginal challenge. Thus, designing vaccines to elicit production and concentration of antibodies at mucosal frontlines could aid development of an effective vaccine to protect women against HIV-1. PMID:25135832

  14. IBC's 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, December 5-8, 2011, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Dunlop, D Cameron; Sircar, Aroop; Wurch, Thierry; Falkowska, Emilia; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Piccione, Emily C; Brack, Simon; Berger, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 5-8, 2011 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew ~800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a preview to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 4, 2011 focused on antibodies as probes of structure. The Antibody Engineering Conference comprised eight sessions: (1) structure and dynamics of antibodies and their membrane receptor targets; (2) model-guided generation of binding sites; (3) novel selection strategies; (4) antibodies in a complex environment: targeting intracellular and misfolded proteins; (5) rational vaccine design; (6) viral retargeting with engineered binding molecules; (7) the biology behind potential blockbuster antibodies and (8) antibodies as signaling modifiers: where did we go right, and can we learn from success? The Antibody Therapeutics session comprised five sessions: (1)Twenty-five years of therapeutic antibodies: lessons learned and future challenges; (2) preclinical and early stage development of antibody therapeutics; (3) next generation anti-angiogenics; (4) updates of clinical stage antibody therapeutics and (5) antibody drug conjugates and bispecific antibodies.

  15. Hierarchical Cluster Formation in Concentrated Monoclonal Antibody Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Zarzar, Jonathan; Zarraga, Isidro Dan; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Wagner, Norman; Liu, Yun

    Reversible cluster formation has been identified as an underlying cause of large solution viscosities observed in some concentrated monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulations. As high solution viscosity prevents the use of subcutaneous injection as a delivery method for some mAbs, a fundamental understanding of the interactions responsible for high viscosities in concentrated mAb solutions is of significant relevance to mAb applications in human health care as well as of intellectual interest. Here, we present a detailed investigation of a well-studied IgG1 based mAb to relate the short time dynamics and microstructure to significant viscosity changes over a range of pharmaceutically relevant physiochemical conditions. Using a combination of experimental techniques, it is found that upon adding Na2SO4, these antibodies dimerize in solution. Proteins form strongly bounded reversible dimers at dilute concentrations that, when concentrated, interact with each other to form loosely bounded, large, transient clusters. The combined effect of forming strongly bounded dimers and a large transient network is a significant increase in the solution viscosity. Strongly bounded, reversible dimers may exist in many IgG1 based mAb systems such that these results contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the physical mechanisms producing high viscosities in concentrated protein solutions.

  16. Antibody engineering and therapeutics conference. The annual meeting of the antibody society, Huntington Beach, CA, December 7-11, 2014.

    PubMed

    Larrick, James W; Parren, Paul W H I; Huston, James S; Plückthun, Andreas; Bradbury, Andrew; Tomlinson, Ian M; Chester, Kerry A; Burton, Dennis R; Adams, Gregory P; Weiner, Louis M; Scott, Jamie K; Alfenito, Mark R; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    The 25th anniversary of the Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics Conference, the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA, December 7-11, 2014. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the event will celebrate past successes, educate participants on current activities and offer a vision of future progress in the field. Keynote addresses will be given by academic and industry experts Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Ira Pastan (National Cancer Institute), James Wells (University of California, San Francisco), Ian Tomlinson (GlaxoSmithKline) and Anthony Rees (Rees Consulting AB and Emeritus Professor, University of Bath). These speakers will provide updates of their work, placed in the context of the substantial growth of the industry over the past 25 years.

  17. IBC's 21st Annual Antibody Engineering and 8th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and 2010 Annual Meeting of the Antibody Society. December 5-9, 2010, San Diego, CA USA.

    PubMed

    Arnett, Samantha O; Teillaud, Jean-Luc; Wurch, Theirry; Reichert, Janice M; Dunlop, Cameron; Huber, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The 21st Annual Antibody Engineering and 8th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2010 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 5-9, 2010 in San Diego, CA. The conferences were organized with a focus on antibody engineering only on the first day and a joint engineering/therapeutics session on the last day. Delegates could select from presentations that occurred in two simultaneous sessions on days 2 and 3. Day 1 included presentations on neutralizing antibodies and the identification of vaccine targets, as well as a historical overview of 20 years of phage display utilization. Topics presented in the Antibody Engineering sessions on day 2 and 3 included antibody biosynthesis, structure and stability; antibodies in a complex environment; antibody half-life; and targeted nanoparticle therapeutics. In the Antibody Therapeutics sessions on days 2 and 3, preclinical and early stage development and clinical updates of antibody therapeutics, including TRX518, SYM004, MM111, PRO140, CVX-241, ASG-5ME, U3-1287 (AMG888), R1507 and trastuzumab emtansine, were discussed, and perspectives were provided on the development of biosimilar and biobetter antibodies, including coverage of regulatory and intellectual property issues. The joint engineering/therapeutics session on the last day focused on bispecific and next-generation antibodies.

  18. An antibody that confers plant disease resistance targets a membrane-bound glyoxal oxidase in Fusarium.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiu-Shi; Xing, Shu; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Qu, Bo; Jiang, Jin-He; Fan, Chao; Yang, Peng; Liu, Jin-Long; Hu, Zu-Quan; Xue, Sheng; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2016-05-01

    Plant germplasm resources with natural resistance against globally important toxigenic Fusarium are inadequate. CWP2, a Fusarium genus-specific antibody, confers durable resistance to different Fusarium pathogens that infect cereals and other crops, producing mycotoxins. However, the nature of the CWP2 target is not known. Thus, investigation of the gene coding for the CWP2 antibody target will likely provide critical insights into the mechanism underlying the resistance mediated by this disease-resistance antibody. Immunoblots and mass spectrometry analysis of two-dimensional electrophoresis gels containing cell wall proteins from Fusarium graminearum (Fg) revealed that a glyoxal oxidase (GLX) is the CWP2 antigen. Cellular localization studies showed that GLX is localized to the plasma membrane. This GLX efficiently catalyzes hydrogen peroxide production; this enzymatic activity was specifically inhibited by the CWP2 antibody. GLX-deletion strains of Fg, F. verticillioides (Fv) and F. oxysporum had significantly reduced virulence on plants. The GLX-deletion Fg and Fv strains had markedly reduced mycotoxin accumulation, and the expression of key genes in mycotoxin metabolism was downregulated. This study reveals a single gene-encoded and highly conserved cellular surface antigen that is specifically recognized by the disease-resistance antibody CWP2 and regulates both virulence and mycotoxin biosynthesis in Fusarium species.

  19. Kinetics of Monoclonal Antibody Aggregation from Dilute toward Concentrated Conditions.

    PubMed

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Jagielski, Jakub; Pfister, David; Lazzari, Stefano; Massant, Jan; Lattuada, Marco; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-04-07

    Gaining understanding on the aggregation behavior of proteins under concentrated conditions is of both fundamental and industrial relevance. Here, we study the aggregation kinetics of a model monoclonal antibody (mAb) under thermal stress over a wide range of protein concentrations in various buffer solutions. We follow experimentally the monomer depletion and the aggregate growth by size exclusion chromatography with inline light scattering. We describe the experimental results in the frame of a kinetic model based on population balance equations, which allows one to discriminate the contributions of the conformational and of the colloidal stabilities to the global aggregation rate. Finally, we propose an expression for the aggregation rate constant, which accounts for solution viscosity, protein-protein interactions, as well as aggregate compactness. All these effects can be quantified by light scattering techniques. It is found that the model describes well the experimental data under dilute conditions. Under concentrated conditions, good model predictions are obtained when the solution pH is far below the isoelectric point (pI) of the mAb. However, peculiar effects arise when the solution pH is increased toward the mAb pI, and possible explanations are discussed.

  20. Reversible cluster formation in concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Zarraga, Isidro; Wagner, Norm; Liu, Yun

    2015-03-01

    Protein cluster formation in solution is of fundamental interest for both academic research and industrial applications. Recently, industrial scientists are also exploring the effect of reversible cluster formation on biopharmaceutical processing and delivery. However, despite of its importance, the understanding of protein clusters at concentrated solutions remains scientifically very challenging. Using the neutron spin echo technique to study the short time dynamics of proteins in solutions, we have recently systematically studied cluster formation in a few monoclonal antibody (mAb) solutions and their relation with solution viscosity. We show that the existence of anisotropic attraction can cause the formation of finite sized clusters, which increases the solution viscosity. Interestingly, once clusters form at relatively low concentrations, the average size of clusters in solutions remains almost constant over a wide range of concentrations similar to that of micelle formation. For a different mAb we have also investigated, the attraction is mostly induced by hydrophobic patches. As a result, these mAbs form large clusters with loosely linked proteins. In both cases, the formation of clusters all increases the solution viscosity substantially. However, due to different physics origins of cluster formation, solutions viscosities for these two different types of mAbs need to be controlled by different ways.

  1. Feasibility of antibody-poly(glutamic acid) complexes: preparation of high-concentration antibody formulations and their pharmaceutical properties.

    PubMed

    Izaki, Shunsuke; Kurinomaru, Takaaki; Maruyama, Takuya; Uchida, Takayuki; Handa, Kenji; Kimoto, Tomoaki; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2015-06-01

    Development of high-concentration antibody formulations for subcutaneous administration remains challenging. Recently, a precipitation-redissolution method was proposed to prepare suspensions or precipitates of salt-dissociable protein-poly(amino acid) complexes. To elucidate the utility of this method for protein therapy, we investigated the feasibility of a precipitation-redissolution method using poly(amino acid) for high-concentration antibody formulation. Omalizumab and adalimumab formulations of 150 mg/mL could be prepared using poly-l-glutamic acid (polyE) from low-concentration stock solutions. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, circular dichroism, and size-exclusion chromatography revealed that the formation of antibody-polyE complex and precipitation-redissolution process did not significantly affect the immunoreactivity or secondary structure of the antibodies. The precipitation-redissolution method was less time-consuming and more effective than lyophilization-redissolution, evaporation-redissolution, and ultrafiltration from the viewpoint of final yield. Scalability was confirmed from 400 μL to 1.0 L. The general toxicity and pharmacokinetic profiles of the antibody-polyE complex formulations were similar to those of conventional antibody formulations. These results suggested that the precipitation-redissolution method using poly(amino acid) has great potential as a concentration method for antibody formulation and medicinal use.

  2. 15th International Conference on Human Antibodies and Hybridomas. 14-16 April 2010, Tiara Park Atlantico Hotel, Porto, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Kotlan, Beatrix

    2010-11-01

    Antibodies and antibody conjugates are currently one of the largest classes of new drug entities under development. These versatile molecules are being investigated for the treatment of many pathological conditions, such as cancer and infectious, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Antibodies can exert biological effects as naked antibodies by themselves, or can be used as delivery agents conjugated with various drugs (e.g., immunoconjugates) and as tools of multistep targeting. Site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents has been the ultimate goal of the pharmaceutical industry, as it has the potential to maximize drug efficiency while minimizing side effects. Antibodies have much potential for this objective. Thus, it is useful to summarize some of the main strategies currently being employed for the development of these diverse therapeutic molecules and to highlight the recent novelties in the field. These goals were the focus of the 15th International Conference on Human Antibodies and Hybridomas, held during 14-16 April 2010 in Porto, Portugal.

  3. Combined active and passive immunization against nicotine: minimizing monoclonal antibody requirements using a target antibody concentration strategy.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Katherine E; Harris, Andrew C; LeSage, Mark G; Keyler, Dan E; Burroughs, Danielle; Earley, Cathy; Pentel, Paul R

    2011-11-01

    Nicotine vaccines have shown preliminary evidence of efficacy for enhancing smoking cessation rates, but the serum nicotine-specific antibody (NicAb) concentrations produced are highly variable and many subjects do not develop effective levels. As an alternative to vaccination, passive immunization with nicotine-specific monoclonal antibodies could produce more uniform serum NicAb concentrations, but its use is limited by their high cost and shorter elimination half-life. This study investigated supplementing vaccination with monoclonal antibodies in a targeted fashion to increase vaccine efficacy while minimizing the required monoclonal antibody dose. Rats were vaccinated and then given individualized supplemental doses of the nicotine-specific monoclonal antibody Nic311 to achieve a target total serum NicAb concentration known to be effective for blocking locomotor sensitization (LMS) to nicotine. Rats received vaccine, Nic311, both, or neither, followed by 0.3 mg/kg nicotine s.c. for 10 days to produce LMS. Combination immunotherapy completely blocked the development of LMS, while monotherapy with vaccine or Nic311 alone was only minimally effective. Lower brain nicotine levels were associated with reduced locomotor activity averaged over days 7-10. Despite its greater efficacy, combination immunotherapy did not reduce the variability in the resulting total serum NicAb concentrations. Variability in total serum NicAb concentrations was contributed to by both vaccine-generated antibody and by Nic311. These data show that combination immunotherapy, using a Nic311 dose that is by itself only minimally effective, can substantially enhance nicotine vaccine efficacy. However, variability in serum NicAb levels with combination immunotherapy may make translation of this approach challenging.

  4. Pseudocatalytic Antiaggregation Activity of Antibodies: Immunoglobulins can Influence α-Synuclein Aggregation at Substoichiometric Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Breydo, Leonid; Morgan, Dave; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-04-01

    Protein aggregation is involved in a variety of diseases. Alteration of the aggregation pathway, either to produce less toxic structures or to increase aggregate clearance, is a promising therapeutic route. Both active and passive immunization has been used for this purpose. However, the mechanism of action of antibodies on protein aggregates is not completely clear especially given poor ability of antibodies to cross blood-brain barrier. Here, we have shown that antibodies can interfere with protein aggregation at substoichiometric concentrations (as low as 1:1000 antibody to protein ratio). This is an indication that antibodies interact with aggregation intermediates in chaperone-like manner altering the aggregation pathways at very low antibody levels. This observation supports earlier suggestions that antibodies can inhibit aggregation by interaction with low abundance aggregation intermediates.

  5. Solar-hydrogen generation and solar concentration (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinello, Enrico; Modestino, Miguel A.; Schüttauf, Jan-Willem; Lambelet, David; Delfino, Antonio; Dominé, Didier; Faes, Antonin; Despeisse, Matthieu; Bailat, Julien; Psaltis, Demetri; Fernandez Rivas, David; Ballif, Christophe; Moser, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    We successfully demonstrated and reported the highest solar-to-hydrogen efficiency with crystalline silicon cells and Earth-abundant electrocatalysts under unconcentrated solar radiation. The combination of hetero-junction silicon cells and a 3D printed Platinum/Iridium-Oxide electrolyzer has been proven to work continuously for more than 24 hours in neutral environment, with a stable 13.5% solar-to-fuel efficiency. Since the hydrogen economy is expected to expand to a global scale, we demonstrated the same efficiency with an Earth-abundant electrolyzer based on Nickel in a basic medium. In both cases, electrolyzer and photovoltaic cells have been specifically sized for their characteristic curves to intersect at a stable operating point. This is foreseen to guarantee constant operation over the device lifetime without performance degradation. The next step is to lower the production cost of hydrogen by making use of medium range solar concentration. It permits to limit the photoabsorbing area, shown to be the cost-driver component. We have recently modeled a self-tracking solar concentrator, able to capture sunlight within the acceptance angle range +/-45°, implementing 3 custom lenses. The design allows a fully static device, avoiding the external tracker that was necessary in a previously demonstrated +/-16° angular range concentrator. We will show two self-tracking methods. The first one relies on thermal expansion whereas the second method relies on microfluidics.

  6. Reversible self-association increases the viscosity of a concentrated monoclonal antibody in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Nguyen, Mary D H; Andya, James D; Shire, Steven J

    2005-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of reversible protein self-association on the viscosity of concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions. The viscosities of the monoclonal antibody solutions were measured by either a capillary viscometer or a cone-plate rheometer at different protein concentrations, pH, and ionic strength. Soluble aggregates were determined by size exclusion chromatography, light scattering, and analytical ultracentrifugation. Self-association of protein at high protein concentration was monitored by sedimentation equilibrium analysis using a preparative ultracentrifuge and a microfractionator. The viscosity of one of the monoclonal antibodies investigated is highly dependent on protein concentration, pH, and ionic strength of buffer and charged excipients. This antibody shows the highest viscosity near its pI at low ionic strength conditions. Sedimentation equilibrium analysis suggests that this antibody tends to reversibly self-associate at high protein concentration. The self-association appears to be quite weak and is not detectable by sedimentation velocity and size exclusion chromatography at low protein concentration. There are no significant differences in the amounts of non-dissociable soluble aggregates formed between low viscosity and high viscosity samples. These results suggest that the reversible multivalent self-association of this protein appears to be mediated mainly by electrostatic interactions of charged residues and results in unusually high viscosity of this monoclonal antibody in solution at low ionic strength conditions.

  7. Specific concentration of antilymphocyte antibodies in the serum cryoprecipitates of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Winfield, J B; Winchester, R J; Wernet, P; Kunkel, H G

    1975-01-01

    Antibodies to surface determinants of human lymphocytes, recognized both by cytotoxicity of fluorescent antibody analysis, were shown to be specifically enriched over the serum levels in cryoprecipitates from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The antilymphocyte antibody was shown to be cold reactive and was exclusively IgM. It was distinct from IgM anti-IgG, which was also variably concentrated in the cryoprecipitates. The question whether the antilymphocyte antibodies appear in the cryoprecipitates as complexes because of interaction with surface membrane antigens, or simply because of cold reactive properties, remains to be determined. The possible clinical relevance of the cryoprecipitation of these antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus is discussed. PMID:1081927

  8. Direct detection of antibody concentration and affinity in human serum using microscale thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lippok, Svenja; Seidel, Susanne A I; Duhr, Stefan; Uhland, Kerstin; Holthoff, Hans-Peter; Jenne, Dieter; Braun, Dieter

    2012-04-17

    The direct quantification of both the binding affinity and absolute concentration of disease-related biomarkers in biological fluids is particularly beneficial for differential diagnosis and therapy monitoring. Here, we extend microscale thermophoresis to target immunological questions. Optically generated thermal gradients were used to deplete fluorescently marked antigens in 2- and 10-fold-diluted human serum. We devised and validated an autocompetitive strategy to independently fit the concentration and dissociation constant of autoimmune antibodies against the cardiac β1-adrenergic receptor related to dilated cardiomyopathy. As an artificial antigen, the peptide COR1 was designed to mimic the second extracellular receptor loop. Thermophoresis resolved antibody concentrations from 2 to 200 nM and measured the dissociation constant as 75 nM. The approach quantifies antibody binding in its native serum environment within microliter volumes and without any surface attachments. The simplicity of the mix and probe protocol minimizes systematic errors, making thermophoresis a promising detection method for personalized medicine.

  9. Chemical Structure and Concentration of Intratumor Catabolites Determine Efficacy of Antibody Drug Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shang-Fan; Ma, Yong; Xu, Keyang; Dragovich, Peter S.; Pillow, Thomas H.; Liu, Luna; Del Rosario, Geoffrey; He, Jintang; Pei, Zhonghua; Sadowsky, Jack D.; Erickson, Hans K.; Hop, Cornelis E. C. A.; Khojasteh, S. Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent technological advances in quantifying antibody drug conjugate (ADC) species, such as total antibody, conjugated antibody, conjugated drug, and payload drug in circulation, the correlation of their exposures with the efficacy of ADC outcomes in vivo remains challenging. Here, the chemical structures and concentrations of intratumor catabolites were investigated to better understand the drivers of ADC in vivo efficacy. Anti-CD22 disulfide-linked pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD-dimer) conjugates containing methyl- and cyclobutyl-substituted disulfide linkers exhibited strong efficacy in a WSU-DLCL2 xenograft mouse model, whereas an ADC derived from a cyclopropyl linker was inactive. Total ADC antibody concentrations and drug-to-antibody ratios (DAR) in circulation were similar between the cyclobutyl-containing ADC and the cyclopropyl-containing ADC; however, the former afforded the release of the PBD-dimer payload in the tumor, but the latter only generated a nonimmolating thiol-containing catabolite that did not bind to DNA. These results suggest that intratumor catabolite analysis rather than systemic pharmacokinetic analysis may be used to better explain and predict ADC in vivo efficacy. These are good examples to demonstrate that the chemical nature and concentration of intratumor catabolites depend on the linker type used for drug conjugation, and the potency of the released drug moiety ultimately determines the ADC in vivo efficacy. PMID:27417182

  10. Intragastric immunization with recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing flagellar antigen confers antibody-independent protective immunity against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Kajikawa, Akinobu; Satoh, Eiichi; Leer, Rob J; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Igimi, Shizunobu

    2007-05-04

    A recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing a flagellar antigen from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was constructed and evaluated as a mucosal vaccine. Intragastric immunization of the recombinant strain conferred protective immunity against Salmonella infection in mice. This immunization did not result in antigen-specific antibody in either feces or sera but induced the release of IFN-gamma on restimulation of primed lymphocytes ex vivo. The results suggested that the protective efficacy provided by flagellin-expressing L. casei is mainly attributable to cell-mediated immune responses. In addition, an adjuvant-type effect of the antigen delivery system with L. casei was also observed.

  11. Selective concentration of IgD class-specific antibodies in human milk.

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, S D; Zehr, B D; Insel, R A

    1990-01-01

    The participation of human IgD class antibody in local immune responses of breast tissue was studied by analysing the sera-to-milk ratios of total IgD, IgM, IgA, IgG isotypes and albumin found in matched samples, and by analysing the sera-to-milk (S/M) ratios of IgD, IgM, IgA, IgG antibodies against Haemophilus influenzae capsular polysaccharide (PRP), phosphorylcholine, tetanus and in some cases diphtheria antigens. The study group consisted of eight women immunized during pregnancy with PRP, and control, unimmunized women. Albumin, and total IgG showed high S/M ratios. IgA had a low S/M ratio as expected, consistent with reports that IgA is locally concentrated. Total IgD and IgM isotype ratio values were intermediate between IgG and IgA suggesting they were selectively concentrated in breast fluids due to local production or transport mechanisms, or both. Ratios for specific antibodies of IgA and IgM isotypes and for total IgA and IgM isotype showed parallel data. Among the IgD antibodies, those specific for PRP and phosphorylcholine suggested a higher degree of selective concentration as compared with tetanus antigen. In the group of unimmunized women, although selective concentration of total IgD was observed, specific antibody studies were inconclusive due to the low milk IgD antibody levels encountered. The results indicate that IgD (and also IgM) may participate in local immune responses of human breast tissues and fluids; possibly influenced by the nature of the antigen, the state of immunization and the hormonal environment (pregnancy). PMID:2357855

  12. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  13. Antibody treatment against pulmonary exposure to abrin confers significantly higher levels of protection than treatment against ricin intoxication.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Tamar; Gal, Yoav; Elhanany, Eitan; Sapoznikov, Anita; Falach, Reut; Mazor, Ohad; Kronman, Chanoch

    2015-09-02

    Abrin, a potent plant-derived toxin bearing strong resemblance to ricin, irreversibly inactivates ribosomes by site-specific depurination, thereby precipitating cessation of protein synthesis in cells. Due to its high availability and ease of preparation, abrin is considered a biological threat, especially in context of bioterror warfare. To date, there is no established therapeutic countermeasure against abrin intoxication. In the present study, we examined the progress of pulmonary abrin intoxication in mice, evaluated the protective effect of antibody-based post-exposure therapy, and compared these findings to those observed for ricin intoxication and therapy. Salient features of abrin intoxication were found to be similar to those of ricin and include massive recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs, high levels of pro-inflammatory markers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and damage of the alveolar-capillary barrier. In contrast, the protective effect of anti-abrin antibody treatment was found to differ significantly from that of anti-ricin treatment. While anti-ricin treatment efficiency was quite limited even at 24h post-exposure (34% protection), administration of polyclonal anti-abrin antibodies even as late as 72h post-exposure, conferred exceedingly high-level protection (>70%). While both anti-toxin antibody treatments caused neutrophil and macrophage levels in the lungs to revert to normal, only anti-abrin treatment brought about a significant decline in the pulmonary levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. The differential ability of the anti-toxin treatments to dampen inflammation caused by the two similar toxins, abrin and ricin, could explain the radically different levels of protection achieved following antibody treatment.

  14. The osmotic pressure of highly concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions: effect of solution conditions.

    PubMed

    Binabaji, Elaheh; Rao, Suma; Zydney, Andrew L

    2014-03-01

    The behavior of monoclonal antibodies at high concentrations is important in downstream processing, drug formulation, and drug delivery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the osmotic pressure of a highly purified monoclonal antibody at concentrations up to 250 g/L over a range of pH and ionic strength, and in the presence of specific excipients, using membrane osmometry. Independent measurements of the second virial coefficient were obtained using self-interaction chromatography, and the net protein charge was evaluated using electrophoretic light scattering. The osmotic pressure at pH 5 and low ionic strength was >50 kPa for antibody concentrations above 200 g/L. The second virial coefficients determined from the oncotic pressure (after subtracting the Donnan contribution) were in good qualitative agreement with those determined by self-interaction chromatography. The second virial coefficient decreased with increasing ionic strength and increasing pH due to the reduction in intermolecular electrostatic repulsion. The third virial coefficient was negative under all conditions, suggesting that multi-body interactions in this system are attractive. The virial coefficients were essentially unaffected by addition of sucrose or proline. These results have important implications for the analysis of protein-protein interactions in downstream processing at high protein concentrations.

  15. Solubility Challenges in High Concentration Monoclonal Antibody Formulations: Relationship with Amino Acid Sequence and Intermolecular Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pindrus, Mariya; Shire, Steven J; Kelley, Robert F; Demeule, Barthélemy; Wong, Rita; Xu, Yiren; Yadav, Sandeep

    2015-11-02

    The purpose of this work was to elucidate the molecular interactions leading to monoclonal antibody self-association and precipitation and utilize biophysical measurements to predict solubility behavior at high protein concentration. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAb-G and mAb-R) binding to overlapping epitopes were investigated. Precipitation of mAb-G solutions was most prominent at high ionic strength conditions and demonstrated strong dependence on ionic strength, as well as slight dependence on solution pH. At similar conditions no precipitation was observed for mAb-R solutions. Intermolecular interactions (interaction parameter, kD) related well with high concentration solubility behavior of both antibodies. Upon increasing buffer ionic strength, interactions of mAb-R tended to weaken, while those of mAb-G became more attractive. To investigate the role of amino acid sequence on precipitation behavior, mutants were designed by substituting the CDR of mAb-R into the mAb-G framework (GM-1) or deleting two hydrophobic residues in the CDR of mAb-G (GM-2). No precipitation was observed at high ionic strength for either mutant. The molecular interactions of mutants were similar in magnitude to those of mAb-R. The results suggest that presence of hydrophobic groups in the CDR of mAb-G may be responsible for compromising its solubility at high ionic strength conditions since deleting these residues mitigated the solubility issue.

  16. Anti-VSG antibodies induce an increase in Trypanosoma evansi intracellular Ca2+ concentration.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, M; Uzcanga, G L; Pacheco, R; Rojas, H; Carrasquel, L M; García-Marchan, Y; Serrano-Martín, X; Benaím, G; Bubis, J; Mijares, A

    2008-09-01

    Trypanosoma evansi and Trypanosoma vivax have shown a very high immunological cross-reactivity. Anti-T. vivax antibodies were used to monitor changes in the T. evansi intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) by fluorometric ratio imaging from single parasites. A short-time exposure of T. evansi parasites to sera from T. vivax-infected bovines induced an increase in [Ca2+]i, which generated their complete lysis. The parasite [Ca2+]i boost was reduced but not eliminated in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ or following serum decomplementation. Decomplemented anti-T. evansi VSG antibodies also produced an increase in the parasite [Ca2+]i, in the presence of extracellular Ca2+. Furthermore, this Ca2+ signal was reduced following blockage with Ni2+ or in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that this response was a combination of an influx of Ca2+ throughout membrane channels and a release of this ion from intracellular stores. The observed Ca2+ signal was specific since (i) it was completely eliminated following pre-incubation of the anti-VSG antibodies with the purified soluble VSG, and (ii) affinity-purified anti-VSG antibodies also generated an increase in [Ca2+]i by measurements on single cells or parasite populations. We also showed that an increase of the T. evansi [Ca2+]i by the calcium A-23187 ionophore led to VSG release from the parasite surface. In addition, in vivo immunofluorescence labelling revealed that anti-VSG antibodies induced the formation of raft patches of VSG on the parasite surface. This is the first study to identify a ligand that is coupled to calcium flux in salivarian trypanosomes.

  17. Liquid high concentration IgG1 antibody formulations by precipitation.

    PubMed

    Matheus, Susanne; Friess, Wolfgang; Schwartz, Daniel; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2009-09-01

    A manufacturing approach for liquid high concentration antibody formulations based on precipitation and subsequent re-dissolution was investigated. IgG1 antibody solutions were concentrated from 20 to 100 mg/mL by intermediate precipitation, with a recovery exceeding 95%, retention of the native secondary structure and binding activity as well as adequate stability. Quantitative, reproducible precipitation was performed using 1.45 M ammonium sulphate (pH 5.5 and 8.0), 0.67 M sodium citrate (pH 8.0) and 9% (w/v) PEG 4000 (pH 5.5 and 8.0). Scalability was confirmed from 1 to 100 mL. The concentrations achievable in the re-dissolution step were less affected by the re-dissolution medium, but limited by the residual precipitant. Both, improved removal of remaining precipitant liquid and larger precipitation scales were successful in increasing the final protein concentration. SEC and turbidity analysis directly after re-dissolution indicated that similar protein qualities were obtained, independent from the precipitant used. However, increased aggregate formation was observed after short term storage of the precipitated protein particles at either 2-8 degrees C or ambient temperature. An accelerated mechanical and thermal stability program verified comparable stability of the re-dissolved liquid 100 mg/mL formulations produced by intermediate precipitation to a control formulation obtained by standard ultrafiltration.

  18. Higher Plasma Concentration of Food-Specific Antibodies in Persons with Autistic Disorder in Comparison to Their Siblings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trajkovski, Vladimir; Petlichkovski, Aleksandar; Efinska-Mladenovska, Olivija; Trajkov, Dejan; Arsov, Todor; Strezova, Ana; Ajdinski, Ljubomir; Spiroski, Mirko

    2008-01-01

    Specific IgA, IgG, and IgE antibodies to food antigens in 35 participants with autistic disorder and 21 of their siblings in the Republic of Macedonia were examined. Statistically significant higher plasma concentration of IgA antibodies against alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, casein, and gliadin were found in the children with autistic…

  19. Human recombinant antimannan immunoglobulin G1 antibody confers resistance to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mason X; Bohlman, M Charlotte; Itatani, Carol; Burton, Dennis R; Parren, Paul W H I; St Jeor, Stephen C; Kozel, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Mannan is a major cell wall component found in Candida species. Natural antimannan antibody is present in sera from most normal adults, but its role in host resistance to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis is unknown. The purpose of this study was to develop recombinant human antimannan antibody and to study its protective function. A phage Fab display combinatorial library containing Fab genes from bone marrow lymphocytes was screened with Candida albicans yeast cells and chemically purified mannan. One antimannan Fab, termed M1, was converted to a full-length immunoglobulin G1 antibody, M1g1, and M1g1 was produced in CHO cells. The M1g1 epitope was found in C. albicans serotypes A and B, Candida tropicalis, Candida guilliermondii, Candida glabrata, and Candida parapsilosis. Its expression was active at both 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C and uniform over the cell surface. BALB/c mice passively immunized with M1g1 were more resistant than control mice to a lethal hematogenous infection by C. albicans, as evidenced by extension of survival in an M1g1 dose-dependent manner (P, 0.08 to <0.001) and by reduction in number of infection foci and their size in the kidney. In vitro studies found that M1g1 promoted phagocytosis and phagocytic killing of C. albicans yeast cells by mouse peritoneal macrophages and was required for activation of the mouse complement cascade. Thus, human antimannan antibody may have a protective role in host resistance to systemic candidiasis.

  20. Single-dose live-attenuated Nipah virus vaccines confer complete protection by eliciting antibodies directed against surface glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    DeBuysscher, Blair L.; Scott, Dana; Marzi, Andrea; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Background Nipah virus (NiV), a zoonotic pathogen causing severe respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans, emerged in Malaysia in 1998 with subsequent outbreaks on an almost annual basis since 2001 in parts of the Indian subcontinent. The high case fatality rate, human-to-human transmission, wide-ranging reservoir distribution and lack of licensed intervention options are making NiV a serious regional and potential global public health problem. The objective of this study was to develop a fast-acting, single-dose NiV vaccine that could be implemented in a ring vaccination approach during outbreaks. Methods In this study we have designed new live-attenuated vaccine vectors based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis viruses (rVSV) expressing NiV glycoproteins (G or F) or nucleoprotein (N) and evaluated their protective efficacy in Syrian hamsters, an established NiV animal disease model. We further characterized the humoral immune response to vaccination in hamsters using ELISA and neutralization assays and performed serum transfer studies. Results Vaccination of Syrian hamsters with a single dose of the rVSV vaccine vectors resulted in strong humoral immune responses with neutralizing activities found only in those animals vaccinated with rVSV expressing NiV G or F proteins. Vaccinated animals with neutralizing antibody responses were completely protected from lethal NiV disease, whereas animals vaccinated with rVSV expressing NiV N showed only partial protection. Protection of NiV G or F vaccinated animals was conferred by antibodies, most likely the neutralizing fraction, as demonstrated by serum transfer studies. Protection of N-vaccinated hamsters was not antibody-dependent indicating a role of adaptive cellular responses for protection. Conclusions The rVSV vectors expressing Nipah virus G or F are prime candidates for new ‘emergency vaccines’ to be utilized for NiV outbreak management. PMID:24631094

  1. Naturally selected hepatitis C virus polymorphisms confer broad neutralizing antibody resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Justin R.; Wasilewski, Lisa N.; Snider, Anna E.; El-Diwany, Ramy; Osburn, William O.; Keck, Zhenyong; Foung, Steven K.H.; Ray, Stuart C.

    2014-01-01

    For hepatitis C virus (HCV) and other highly variable viruses, broadly neutralizing mAbs are an important guide for vaccine development. The development of resistance to anti-HCV mAbs is poorly understood, in part due to a lack of neutralization testing against diverse, representative panels of HCV variants. Here, we developed a neutralization panel expressing diverse, naturally occurring HCV envelopes (E1E2s) and used this panel to characterize neutralizing breadth and resistance mechanisms of 18 previously described broadly neutralizing anti-HCV human mAbs. The observed mAb resistance could not be attributed to polymorphisms in E1E2 at known mAb-binding residues. Additionally, hierarchical clustering analysis of neutralization resistance patterns revealed relationships between mAbs that were not predicted by prior epitope mapping, identifying 3 distinct neutralization clusters. Using this clustering analysis and envelope sequence data, we identified polymorphisms in E2 that confer resistance to multiple broadly neutralizing mAbs. These polymorphisms, which are not at mAb contact residues, also conferred resistance to neutralization by plasma from HCV-infected subjects. Together, our method of neutralization clustering with sequence analysis reveals that polymorphisms at noncontact residues may be a major immune evasion mechanism for HCV, facilitating viral persistence and presenting a challenge for HCV vaccine development. PMID:25500884

  2. Concentrations of antibodies against β-amyloid 40/42 monomer and oligomers in Chinese intravenous immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shengliang; Zeng, Renyong; Jiang, Peng; Hou, Mingxia; Liu, Fengjuan; Wang, Zongkui; Du, Xi; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Yunhua; Cao, Haijun; Ma, Li; Li, Changqing

    2017-02-17

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) preparations are being investigated as a potential agent for treatment or prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Antibodies towards soluble β-amyloid (Aβ) contained in IVIg were considered to be the major component contributing to the beneficial effect of the preparations in pilot studies. This study compared the antibody concentrations against Aβ in Octagam(®) IVIg (Octapharma) and 9 IVIg preparations from different Chinese manufacturers by ELISA, using Aβ40 monomer, Aβ40 soluble oligomers, Aβ42 monomer and Aβ42 soluble oligomers as the antigens. The results showed that each preparation contained different antibody levels against the four Aβ forms. The median values of the four antibody concentrations in Chinese IVIg preparations were 16.53, 8.47, 24.36 and 33.25μg/mL, which were remarkably higher than that in Octagam(®) IVIg (1.66, 2.07, 4.61 and 4.64μg/mL). Moreover, the anti-Aβ42 oligomer antibody levels in almost all IVIg preparations were higher than the anti-Aβ42 monomer antibody, and the concentrations of anti-Aβ42 antibodies in most of the IVIg preparations were significantly higher than that of anti-Aβ40 antibodies. These findings will contribute to an increased understanding of the uniqueness of Chinese IVIg preparations, and could provide support for a trial of a Chinese IVIg product in AD patients.

  3. The relationship between infliximab concentrations, antibodies to infliximab and disease activity in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Vande Casteele, Niels; Khanna, Reena; Levesque, Barrett G; Stitt, Larry; Zou, G Y; Singh, Sharat; Lockton, Steve; Hauenstein, Scott; Ohrmund, Linda; Greenberg, Gordon R; Rutgeerts, Paul J; Gils, Ann; Sandborn, William J; Vermeire, Séverine; Feagan, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although low infliximab trough concentrations and antibodies to infliximab (ATI) are associated with poor outcomes in patients with Crohn's disease (CD), the clinical relevance of ATI in patients with adequate infliximab concentrations is uncertain. We evaluated this question using an assay sensitive for identification of ATI in the presence of infliximab. Design In an observational study, 1487 trough serum samples from 483 patients with CD who participated in four clinical studies of maintenance infliximab therapy were analysed using a fluid phase mobility shift assay. Infliximab and ATI concentrations most discriminant for remission, defined as a C-reactive protein concentration of ≤5 mg/L, were determined by receiver operating characteristic curves. A multivariable regression model evaluated these factors as independent predictors of remission. Results Based upon analysis of 1487 samples, 77.1% of patients had detectable and 22.9% had undetectable infliximab concentrations, of which 9.5% and 71.8%, respectively, were positive for ATI. An infliximab concentration of >2.79 μg/mL (area under the curve (AUC)=0.681; 95% CI 0.632 to 0.731) and ATI concentration of <3.15 U/mL (AUC=0.632; 95% CI 0.589 to 0.676) were associated with remission. Multivariable analysis showed that concentrations of both infliximab trough (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.3 to 2.5; p<0.001) and ATI (OR 0.57; 95% CI 0.39 to 0.81; p=0.002) were independent predictors of remission. Conclusions The development of ATI increases the probability of active disease even at low concentrations and in the presence of a therapeutic concentration of drug during infliximab maintenance therapy. Evaluation of strategies to prevent ATI formation, including therapeutic drug monitoring with selective infliximab dose intensification, is needed. PMID:25336114

  4. Pasteurized, monoclonal antibody factor VIII concentrate: establishing a new standard for purity and viral safety of plasma-derived concentrates.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J C

    2000-03-01

    A factor VIII concentrate (Monoclate-P) manufactured using a combination of pasteurization and immunoaffinity chromatography has been chosen to compare and contrast manufacturing aspects of plasma-derived factor VIII concentrates. Pasteurization is a virucidal method with a long safety record in clinical practice, while immuno-affinity chromatography selectively isolates and purifies the procoagulant protein of factor VIII, and partitions potential viral contaminants and nonessential proteins to the unbound fraction. The complete Monoclate-P production process reduces human immunodeficiency virus by > or = 10.5 log10, Sindbis (a model for hepatitis C virus) by > or = 6.5 log10, and murine encephalomyocarditis virus (a non-enveloped model virus) by 7.1 log10. The viral safety of Monoclate-P has been further demonstrated in clinical studies in patients not previously treated with blood or plasma-derived products. Additionally, the manufacture of Monoclate-P includes careful donor screening and plasma testing for antibodies to syphilis and human immunodeficiency, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C viruses to enhance source plasma safety. Combined with donor selection and plasma testing, multiple viral reduction steps effectively eliminate both lipid-enveloped viruses (e.g. human immunodeficiency, hepatitis B and C) and non-lipid-enveloped viruses (e.g. hepatitis A). In addition, polymerase chain reaction-based nucleic acid detection tests for hepatitis B and C viruses and for human immunodeficiency virus-1 have been introduced as part of an investigational new drug mechanism.

  5. Concentrated polymer brush-modified silica particle coating confers biofouling-resistance on modified materials.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Chiaki; Qiu, Jun; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Huang, Chih-Feng; Gelling, Onko-Jan; van den Bosch, Edith

    2017-01-01

    Biofouling, an undesired adsorption of biological material to otherwise inert surfaces, is detrimental in medical, pharmaceutical, and other sectors. Concentrated polymer brushes (CPB) confer non-biofouling properties on modified surfaces but are cumbersome to fabricate. Here, a simple and versatile method of fabricating non-biofouling coatings for various substrates was developed using CPB-modified silica nanoparticles (SiPs). Concentrated poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (PPEGMA) brushes were grafted on SiPs by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. CPB-SiPs were spin-coated onto silicon wafers or quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor chips with phenyl azido cross-linkers. SiP cross-linking was then performed by ultra violet irradiation for 20s, or by heating at 120°C for 12h. Protein adsorption to coatings was studied by QCM approach and human umbilical vein endothelial cell adhesion to coatings was examined. SiP to cross-linker weight ratios were varied from 2.0/0.5 to 9.0/0.5 (wt/wt%) and the coatings almost completely suppressed protein adsorption and cell adhesion to treated surfaces. The coating was also applied to polymeric films, rendering these materials biofouling-resistant.

  6. Observation of small cluster formation in concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions and its implications to solution viscosity.

    PubMed

    Yearley, Eric J; Godfrin, Paul D; Perevozchikova, Tatiana; Zhang, Hailiang; Falus, Peter; Porcar, Lionel; Nagao, Michihiro; Curtis, Joseph E; Gawande, Pradad; Taing, Rosalynn; Zarraga, Isidro E; Wagner, Norman J; Liu, Yun

    2014-04-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a major class of biopharmaceuticals. It is hypothesized that some concentrated mAb solutions exhibit formation of a solution phase consisting of reversibly self-associated aggregates (or reversible clusters), which is speculated to be responsible for their distinct solution properties. Here, we report direct observation of reversible clusters in concentrated solutions of mAbs using neutron spin echo. Specifically, a stable mAb solution is studied across a transition from dispersed monomers in dilute solution to clustered states at more concentrated conditions, where clusters of a preferred size are observed. Once mAb clusters have formed, their size, in contrast to that observed in typical globular protein solutions, is observed to remain nearly constant over a wide range of concentrations. Our results not only conclusively establish a clear relationship between the undesirable high viscosity of some mAb solutions and the formation of reversible clusters with extended open structures, but also directly observe self-assembled mAb protein clusters of preferred small finite size similar to that in micelle formation that dominate the properties of concentrated mAb solutions.

  7. Smartphone dongle for simultaneous measurement of hemoglobin concentration and detection of HIV antibodies.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tiffany; Patnaik, Ritish; Kuhlmann, Kevin; Rai, Alex J; Sia, Samuel K

    2015-09-07

    It is traditionally difficult to incorporate two classes of diagnostic tests into a single platform. In this work, we demonstrate a microfluidic-based smartphone dongle that simultaneously measures concentration of hemoglobin and detects HIV antibodies. Specifically, we demonstrate how a previously published immunoassay device, which measured optical density of silver precipitation on gold colloids, can be expanded to quantitatively measure hemoglobin concentration via a colorimetric assay. By lysing whole blood components with CHAPS detergent, we achieved highly reproducible measurement of hemoglobin concentration with the device. We tested this dual test on 38 patient samples from Columbia University Medical Center. Compared with the Hemocue Hb 201+ analyzer, hemoglobin concentrations from our device were accurate within 1.2 g dL(-1), while the HIV immunoassay (in the presence of CHAPS detergent) showed 95% sensitivity and 95% specificity, comparable to our previous studies. This work demonstrates the feasibility of integrating two classes of diagnostic tests (a colorimetric-based quantitative measurement and an immunoassay based on silver precipitation on gold colloids) into a low-cost, fast, and low-power dongle that works with smartphones, and creates a novel dual panel with clinical utility for antenatal-care settings.

  8. The usage of phage mini-antibodies as a means of detecting ferritin concentration in animal blood serum.

    PubMed

    Staroverov, Sergey A; Volkov, Alexei A; Fomin, Alexander S; Laskavuy, Vladislav N; Mezhennyy, Pavel V; Kozlov, Sergey V; Larionov, Sergey V; Fedorov, Michael V; Dykman, Lev A; Guliy, Olga I

    2015-01-01

    Mini-antibodies that have specific ferritin response have been produced for the first time using sheep's phage libraries (Griffin.1, Medical Research Council, Cambridge, UK). Produced phage antibodies were used for the first time for the development of diagnostic test kits for ferritin detection in the blood of cattle. The immunodot assay with secondary biospecific labeling is suggested as means of ferritin detection in cow blood serum (antiferritin phage antibodies and rabbit antiphage antibodies conjugated with different labels). Сolloidal gold, gold nanoshells, and horse reddish peroxidase used as labels have shown a similar response while detecting concentration of ferritin (0.2 mg/mL). It is shown that the method of solid-phase immunoassay with a visual view of the results allows determination of the minimum concentration of ferritin in the blood of cows at 0.225 g/mL.

  9. Vaccination schedules to raise antibody concentrations against epsilon-toxin of Clostridium perfringens in ewes and their triplet lambs.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, C; Hogue, D E; Thonney, M L

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this experiment was to compare vaccination schedules for ewes and their lambs to raise antibody concentrations to epsilon-toxin of Clostridium perfringens, the causative agent of enterotoxemia. Half of 200 Finnsheep x Dorset ewes were vaccinated with C. perfringens type D toxoid vaccine 3 wk before lambing. Serum samples were obtained from 20 ewes that were to be vaccinated and 20 ewes that would remain unvaccinated before treatment and at wk 2, 1, and 0 before the start of lambing. Antibody concentrations in sera of unvaccinated ewes remained at 2 IU/mL, but they peaked in vaccinated ewes at 15 IU/mL by wk 1 before lambing. Lambs from each of the first 13 and the first 14 sets of triplets from vaccinated and unvaccinated ewes, respectively, received one of three vaccination treatments: no vaccine (control), vaccination on d 1 and 21 of age, or vaccination on d 21 and 42 of age. Antibody concentrations declined in sera of vaccinated ewes from 8.5 IU/mL immediately after lambing to 3 IU/mL 12 wk later. Vaccination of lambs did not increase sera antibody concentration. However, prepartum vaccination of ewes significantly increased lamb antibody concentrations (19 IU/mL) compared with lambs reared by unvaccinated ewes (2 IU/mL). Vaccination of ewes resulted in lambs with higher antibody concentrations until wk 10 postpartum. Concentrations declined to .6 IU/mL in all lambs at 12 wk. Because concentrations of .2 IU/mL may be protective, these results indicate that vaccination of ewes before lambing imparts passive protection in lambs to 12 wk of age, whereas vaccination of young lambs provides no added protection.

  10. The enhancement of antibody concentration and achievement of high cell density CHO cell cultivation by adding nucleoside.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Takuya; Wada, Ryuta; Omasa, Takeshi

    2017-03-02

    Recently, with the dramatic increase in demand for therapeutic antibodies, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture systems have made significant progress in recombinant antibody production. Over the past two decades, recombinant antibody productivity has been improved by more than 100-fold. Medium optimization has been identified as an important key approach for increasing product concentrations. In this study, we evaluated the effects of deoxyuridine addition to fed-batch cultures of antibody-expressing CHO cell lines. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of combined addition of deoxyuridine, thymidine, and deoxycytidine. Our results suggest that addition of these pyrimidine nucleosides can increase CHO cell growth, with no significant change in the specific production rate. As a result of the increased cell growth, the antibody concentration was elevated and we were able to achieve more than 9 g/L during 16 days of culture. Similar effects of nucleoside addition were observed in fed-batch cultures of a Fab fragment-expressing CHO cell line, and the final Fab fragment concentration was more than 4 g/L. This nucleoside addition strategy could be a powerful platform for efficient antibody production.

  11. Opalescence in monoclonal antibody solutions and its correlation with intermolecular interactions in dilute and concentrated solutions.

    PubMed

    Raut, Ashlesha S; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2015-04-01

    Opalescence indicates physical instability of a formulation because of the presence of aggregates or liquid-liquid phase separation in solution and has been reported for monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulations. Increased solution opalescence can be attributed to attractive protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Techniques including light scattering, AUC, or membrane osmometry are routinely employed to measure PPIs in dilute solutions, whereas opalescence is seen at relatively higher concentrations, where both long- and short-range forces contribute to overall PPIs. The mAb molecule studied here shows a unique property of high opalescence because of liquid-liquid phase separation. In this study, opalescence measurements are correlated to PPIs measured in diluted and concentrated solutions using light scattering (kD ) and high-frequency rheology (G'), respectively. Charges on the molecules were calculated using zeta potential measurements. Results indicate that high opalescence and phase separation are a result of the attractive interactions in solution; however, the presence of attractive interactions do not always imply phase separation. Temperature dependence of opalescence suggests that thermodynamic contribution to opalescence is significant and Tcloud can be utilized as a potential tool to assess attractive interactions in solution.

  12. Liquid-liquid phase separation of a monoclonal antibody at low ionic strength: Influence of anion charge and concentration.

    PubMed

    Reiche, Katharina; Hartl, Josef; Blume, Alfred; Garidel, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) of a monoclonal antibody solution was investigated at low ionic strength in the presence of oligovalent anions, such as citrate, trimellitate, pyromellitate and mellitate. Phase separation was observed at the isoelectric point of the antibody at pH8.7 as well as in more acidic pH regions in the presence of the tested oligovalent ions. This can be attributed to charge neutralization via binding of the oligovalent anions to the positively charged antibody. The influence of the anion concentration on liquid-liquid phase separation with respect to the net charge of the antibody was examined. Similarities to the formation of a complex coacervate were shown to apply. These findings enable us to understand the usage of excipients to rationally induce or avoid liquid-liquid phase separation at low ionic strength. Furthermore we present a method to directly examine the competition of different ions for the solvation shell, called buffer equilibration.

  13. Surface plasmon resonance detection using antibody-linked magnetic nanoparticles for analyte capture, purification, concentration, and signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Soelberg, Scott D; Stevens, Richard C; Limaye, Ajit P; Furlong, Clement E

    2009-03-15

    Rapid, sensitive, and accurate detection of analytes present in low concentrations in complex matrixes is a critical challenge. One issue that affects many biosensor protocols is the number and nature of the interferences present in complex matrixes such as plasma, urine, stool, and environmental samples, resulting in loss of sensitivity and specificity. We have developed a method for rapid purification, concentration, and detection of target analytes from complex matrixes using antibody-coated superparamagnetic nanobeads (immunomagnetic beads, or IMBs). The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection signal from staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) was dramatically increased when the IMBs were used as detection amplifiers. When SEB detection included a 10-fold concentration/purification IMB protocol, a substantial increase in detection sensitivity was observed. This procedure was used to successfully purify and concentrate SEB from serum and stool samples, then amplify the SPR detection signal. SEB at a concentration of 100 pg/mL was easily detected in both buffer and stool samples using this procedure. The IMB protocol also served to verify the analyte detection by using two different anti-SEB antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies attached to the magnetic nanobeads and rabbit polyclonal antibodies on the SPR sensor surface. Multiple detections of SEB in stool were performed using the same sensor surface by regenerating the sensor surfaces with a pH 2.2 buffer wash.

  14. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) Detection Using Antibody-Linked Magnetic Nanoparticles for Analyte Capture, Purification, Concentration and Signal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Soelberg, Scott D.; Stevens, Richard C.; Limaye, Ajit P.; Furlong, Clement E.

    2009-01-01

    Rapid, sensitive and accurate detection of analytes present in low concentrations in complex matrices is a critical challenge. One issue that affects many biosensor protocols is the number and nature of the interferents present in complex matrices such as plasma, urine, stool and environmental samples, resulting in loss of sensitivity and specificity. We have developed a method for rapid purification, concentration and detection of target analytes from complex matrices using antibody-coated superparamagnetic nanobeads (immunomagnetic beads, or IMBs). The SPR detection signal from Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) was dramatically increased when the IMBs were used as detection amplifiers. When SEB detection included a 10-fold concentration/purification IMB protocol, a substantial increase in detection sensitivity was observed. This procedure was used to successfully purify and concentrate SEB from serum and stool samples, then amplify the SPR detection signal. SEB at a concentration of 100 picograms/mL was easily detected in both buffer and stool samples using this procedure. The IMB protocol also served to verify the analyte detection by using two different anti-SEB antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies attached to the magnetic nanobeads and rabbit polyclonal antibodies on the SPR sensor surface. Multiple detections of SEB in stool were performed using the same sensor surface by regenerating the sensor surfaces with a pH 2.2 buffer wash. PMID:19215065

  15. [Influence of high concentration of antibodies to NGF during early embryogenesis on formation of mice behavior in postnatal period].

    PubMed

    Rodionov, A N; Lobanov, A V; Morozov, S G; Sidiakin, A A; Anikina, O M; Gribova, I E; Rybakov, A S; Protsenko, A N; Murashev, A N; Kliushnik, T P

    2012-01-01

    In this work the influence of high concentration of antibodies to NGF on mouse's progeny has been investigated. During immunization with NGF the highest concentrations of antibodies were created in the first and third days of pregnancy (in different groups of animals). The dependence of abnormalities of mice postnatal development on level of antibodies to NGF at different stages of early embryogenesis has been established. Increasing of abnormalities in the formation of early behavioral acts and more clinically apparent anomalies in the somatic maturation in case of maximum of antibodies on day I of pregnancy has been showed. Immune responses to NGF during early embryogenesis of mice cause lag in the formation of behavioral acts. The latter are characterized by difficulties in sensor-motor coordination of the limbs and more clinically apparent in mice with a maximum of antibodies on day 1 of embryonic development. Infantilism in developing of contacts between progeny and mothers detected in mice with immune reactions may be a sign of serious mental dysontogenesis. The accelerated development of working memory established in mice with immune response to NGF requires further study of the development of cognitive abilities in these animals. The obtained results illustrate the important regulatory role of NGF at the early stages of development of the nervous system.

  16. Serum pepsinogen I and II concentrations and IgG antibody to Helicobacter pylori in dyspeptic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Biasco, G; Paganelli, G M; Vaira, D; Holton, J; Di Febo, G; Brillanti, S; Miglioli, M; Barbara, L; Samloff, I M

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the association between histologically confirmed gastritis, carriage of Helicobacter pylori and pepsinogen (PG) I and PG II concentrations. METHODS--Prospective study of 81 dyspeptic patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was made. The extent of gastric mucosal inflammation and the presence of H pylori was determined, and serology to evaluate PG I and II concentrations and IgG titres to H pylori was carried out. RESULTS--The presence of H pylori was strongly correlated with high IgG antibody titres to H pylori and gastritis. Patients who were H pylori positive had significantly higher PG I and PG II concentrations and a significantly lower PG I:PG II ratio than patients who were negative for H pylori. In 13 patients with duodenal ulcer and H pylori positive gastritis serum PG I concentrations were significantly higher than in H pylori positive patients without duodenal ulcer. Significant correlations were found between the age of patients and serum PG II, the PG I:PG II ratio, IgG antibodies to H pylori, the severity of body gastritis and H pylori infection, and between the degree of gastritis in the body of the stomach and the PG II concentration. CONCLUSIONS--Serum PG I and II concentrations, together with a fall in the PG I:PG II ratio, could be used as predictors of H pylori infection as well as serum IgG antibody response to H pylori. PMID:8227432

  17. Age related variations of serum concentrations of normally occurring IgG antibodies to Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed Central

    Zarén, E; Schwan, A; Frenckner, B

    1987-01-01

    In studies using indirect immunofluorescence IgG antibodies to Clostridium perfringens were found in sera from healthy adults. Sera from 236 healthy children were examined. The normally occurring IgG antibodies to C perfringens were found to have an age related variation. Preliminary data suggest that they are not correlated to C perfringens alpha toxin. The antigen(s) against which the antibodies are directed is/are probably part of the cell wall, but its/their exact nature is not known. PMID:2881950

  18. Use of anti-Aedes aegypti salivary extract antibody concentration to correlate risk of vector exposure and dengue transmission risk in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Cardenas, Jenny C; Cardenas, Lucio D; Christofferson, Rebecca C; Chisenhall, Daniel M; Wesson, Dawn M; McCracken, Michael K; Carvajal, Daisy; Mores, Christopher N

    2013-01-01

    Norte de Santander is a region in Colombia with a high incidence of dengue virus (DENV). In this study, we examined the serum concentration of anti-Aedes salivary gland extract (SGE) antibodies as a biomarker of DENV infection and transmission, and assessed the duration of anti-SGE antibody concentration after exposure to the vector ceased. We also determined whether SGE antibody concentration could differentiate between positive and negative DENV infected individuals and whether there are differences in exposure for each DENV serotype. We observed a significant decrease in the concentration of IgG antibodies at least 40 days after returning to an "Ae. aegypti-free" area. In addition, we found significantly higher anti-SGE IgG concentrations in DENV positive patients with some difference in exposure to mosquito bites among DENV serotypes. We conclude that the concentration of IgG antibodies against SGE is an accurate indicator of risk of dengue virus transmission and disease presence.

  19. Protooncogene bcl-2 gene transfer abrogates Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated apoptosis of human malignant glioma cells and confers resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs and therapeutic irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Weller, M; Malipiero, U; Aguzzi, A; Reed, J C; Fontana, A

    1995-01-01

    The majority of human malignant glioma cells express Fas/APO-1 and are susceptible to Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated apoptosis in vitro. The sensitivity of Fas/APO-1-positive glioma cell lines to Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated killing correlates inversely with the constitutive expression of the antiapoptotic protooncogene bcl-2. Here we report that BCL-2 protein expression of human glial tumors in vivo correlates with malignant transformation in that BCL-2 immunoreactive glioma cells were more abundant in WHO grade III/IV gliomas than in grade I/II gliomas. Fas/APO-1 antibody-sensitive human glioma cell lines stably transfected with a murine bcl-2 cDNA acquired resistance to Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated apoptosis. Forced expression of bcl-2 also attenuated TNF alpha-mediated cytotoxicity of glioma cell lines in the presence of actinomycin D and cycloheximide and conferred partial protection from irradiation and the cancer chemotherapy drugs, cisplatin and BCNU. Preexposure of the glioma cell lines to the cytokines, IFN gamma and TNF alpha, which sensitize for Fas/APO-1-dependent killing, partially overcame bcl-2-mediated rescue from apoptosis, suggesting that multimodality immunotherapy involving cytokines and Fas/APO-1 targeting might eventually provide a promising approach to the treatment of human malignant gliomas. Images PMID:7539458

  20. Deconvolution of antibody affinities and concentrations by non-linear regression analysis of competitive ELISA data.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Bobrovnik, S. A.; Biosciences Division; Palladin Inst. Biochemistry

    2007-12-01

    Physiological responses of the adaptive immune system are polyclonal in nature whether induced by a naturally occurring infection, by vaccination to prevent infection or, in the case of animals, by challenge with antigen to generate reagents of research or commercial significance. The composition of the polyclonal responses is distinct to each individual or animal and changes over time. Differences exist in the affinities of the constituents and their relative proportion of the responsive population. In addition, some of the antibodies bind to different sites on the antigen, whereas other pairs of antibodies are sterically restricted from concurrent interaction with the antigen. Even if generation of a monoclonal antibody is the ultimate goal of a project, the quality of the resulting reagent is ultimately related to the characteristics of the initial immune response. It is probably impossible to quantitatively parse the composition of a polyclonal response to antigen. However, molecular regression allows further parameterization of a polyclonal antiserum in the context of certain simplifying assumptions. The antiserum is described as consisting of two competing populations of high- and low-affinity and unknown relative proportions. This simple model allows the quantitative determination of representative affinities and proportions. These parameters may be of use in evaluating responses to vaccines, to evaluating continuity of antibody production whether in vaccine recipients or animals used for the production of antisera, or in optimizing selection of donors for the production of monoclonal antibodies.

  1. Utility of measuring serum concentrations of anti-TNF agents and anti-drug antibodies in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Iván; Chaparro, María; Bermejo, Fernando; Gisbert, Javier P

    2011-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is a cytokine with a critical role in the pathogenesis of some chronic inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases. Anti-TNF agents, which neutralize the biological activity of TNFα, are widely used among the different therapeutic options for the treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. These drugs are very useful in clinical practice, but some patients experience lack and loss of response during the treatment. Drug serum concentration, antibodies against anti-TNF agents, clearance of the drug, formation of immune complexes, a more severe disease and probably other unknown factors can influence the treatment's efficacy. Nowadays, the management of patients with lack or loss of response is empirical. The measurement of drug concentrations and antibodies against anti-TNF agents might be useful for improving the selection of patients that will benefit from the maintenance treatment. In clinical practice, these methods may help us decide which strategy will be used in cases of loss of response: treatment intensification, shortening the infusion interval, increasing the dose, switching to another anti-TNF agent or to a drug with another mechanism of action. The optimal strategy in the future may be comprised of an early detection of loss of response to the treatment by assessing clinical symptoms and finding evidence of activity of the disease on endoscopic or radiological examinations when necessary, as well as a better management of anti-TNF treatment aided by measuring the serum concentration of the drug and antibodies against the drug.

  2. High Concentrations of Measles Neutralizing Antibodies and High-Avidity Measles IgG Accurately Identify Measles Reinfection Cases

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Jennifer S.; Hickman, Carole J.; Mercader, Sara; Redd, Susan; McNall, Rebecca J.; Williams, Nobia; McGrew, Marcia; Walls, M. Laura; Rota, Paul A.; Bellini, William J.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, approximately 9% of the measles cases reported from 2012 to 2014 occurred in vaccinated individuals. Laboratory confirmation of measles in vaccinated individuals is challenging since IgM assays can give inconclusive results. Although a positive reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay result from an appropriately timed specimen can provide confirmation, negative results may not rule out a highly suspicious case. Detection of high-avidity measles IgG in serum samples provides laboratory evidence of a past immunologic response to measles from natural infection or immunization. High concentrations of measles neutralizing antibody have been observed by plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) assays among confirmed measles cases with high-avidity IgG, referred to here as reinfection cases (RICs). In this study, we evaluated the utility of measuring levels of measles neutralizing antibody to distinguish RICs from noncases by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Single and paired serum samples with high-avidity measles IgG from suspected measles cases submitted to the CDC for routine surveillance were used for the analysis. The RICs were confirmed by a 4-fold rise in PRN titer or by RT-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay, while the noncases were negative by both assays. Discrimination accuracy was high with serum samples collected ≥3 days after rash onset (area under the curve, 0.953; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.854 to 0.993). Measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml identified RICs with 90% sensitivity (95% CI, 74 to 98%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 82 to 100%). Therefore, when serological or RT-qPCR results are unavailable or inconclusive, suspected measles cases with high-avidity measles IgG can be confirmed as RICs by measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml. PMID:27335386

  3. Antibodies to parvovirus, distemper virus and adenovirus conferred to household dogs using commercial combination vaccines containing Leptospira bacterin.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, M; Namikawa, K; Maruo, T; Lynch, J; Sahara, H

    2010-12-11

    To examine how the inclusion (+) or exclusion (-) of inactivated Leptospira antigens in a vaccine for canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine adenovirus type 2 (CAdV-2) affects antibody titres to CPV-2, CDV and CAdV-1 antigens, household dogs were vaccinated with commercially available vaccines from one of three manufacturers. CPV-2, CDV and CAdV-1 antibody titres were measured 11 to 13 months later and compared within three different age groups and three different bodyweight groups. There were significant differences between CPV-2 antibody titres in dogs vaccinated with (+) vaccine and those vaccinated with (-) vaccine for two products in the two-year-old group and for one product in the greater than seven-year-old group; no significant differences were seen that could be attributed to bodyweight. No differences in CDV antibody titres were observed within age groups, but a significant difference was seen in the 11 to 20 kg weight group for one product. Significant differences in CAdV-1 antibody titres were seen for one product in both the two-year-old group and the ≤10 kg weight group.

  4. Domain based assays of individual antibody concentrations in an oligoclonal combination targeting a single protein

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Q.; Li, M.; Silberg, M.A.; Conrad, F.; Bettencourt, J.; To, R.; Huang, C.; Ma, J.; Meyer, K.; Shimizu, R.; Cao, L.; Tomic, M.T.; Marks, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitation of individual mAbs within a combined antibody drug product is required for preclinical and clinical drug development including pharmacokinetics (PK), toxicology, stability and biochemical characterization studies of such drugs. We have developed an antitoxin (XOMA 3AB) consisting of three recombinant monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that potently neutralizes the known subtypes of type A botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT/A). The three mAbs bind non-overlapping BoNT/A epitopes with high affinity. XOMA3AB is being developed as a treatment for botulism resulting from BoNT/A. To develop antibody-specific assays, we cloned, expressed, and purified BoNT/A domains from E. coli. Each mAb bound only to its specific domain with affinity comparable to the binding to holotoxin. MAb specific domains were used to develop an ELISA for characterization of the integrity and binding activity of the three mAbs in the drug product. An electrochemiluminescence bridging assay was also developed that is robust to interference from components in serum and we demonstrate that it can be used for PK assays. This type of antigen engineering to generate mAb-specific domains is a general method allowing quantitation and characterization of individual mAbs in a mAb cocktail that bind the same protein and is superior to anti-idiotype approaches. PMID:22037290

  5. Pharmacological concentrations of rFVIIa restore hemostasis independent of tissue factor in antibody-induced hemophilia mice

    PubMed Central

    KESHAVA, S.; SUNDARAM, J.; RAJULAPATI, A.; PENDURTHI, U.R.; RAO, L.V.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) has been used widely for treating hemophilia patients with inhibitory autoantibodies against factor VIII or IX. Its mechanism of action is not entirely known. A majority of in vitro studies suggested that pharmacological concentrations of rFVIIa restore hemostasis in hemophilia in a phospholipid-dependent mechanism, independent of tissue factor (TF). However, a few studies suggested that a TF-dependent mechanism plays a primary role in rFVIIa correction of bleeding in hemophilia patients. Here, we investigated the potential contribution of TF in rFVIIa-induced hemostasis in hemophilia employing a model system of FVIII antibody-induced hemophilia in TF transgenic mice. Methods Mice expressing low levels of human TF (LTF mice), relatively high levels of human TF (HTF mice) or wild-type mice (WT mice) were administered with neutralizing anti-FVIII antibodies to induce hemophilia in these mice. The mice were then treated with varying concentrations of rFVIIa. rFVIIa-induced hemostasis was evaluated with the saphenous vein bleeding model. Results Administration of FVIII inhibitory antibodies induced the hemophilic bleeding phenotype in all three genotypes. rFVIIa administration rescued the bleeding phenotype in all three genotypes. No significant differences were observed in rFVIIa-induced correction in the bleeding of LTF and HTF mice administered with FVIII antibodies. Conclusions Our results provide strong evidence supporting that the hemostatic effect of pharmacological doses of rFVIIa stems from a TF-independent mechanism. PMID:26727350

  6. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  7. Applying photoacoustics to quantification of melanin concentration in retinal pigment epithelium (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xiao; Zhang, Hao F.; Liu, Wenzhong

    2016-03-01

    The melanin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) protects retina and other ocular tissues by photo-screening and acting as antioxidant and free radical scavenger. It helps maintain normal visual functions since human eye is subjected to lifelong high oxygen stress and photon exposure. Loss of the RPE melanin weakens the protection mechanism and jeopardizes ocular health. Local decrease in the RPE melanin concentration is believed to be both a cause and a sign of early-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading blinding disease in developed world. Current technology cannot quantitatively measure the RPE melanin concentration which might be a promising marker in early AMD screening. Photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM), as an emerging optical absorption-based imaging technology, can potentially be applied to measure the RPE melanin concentration if the dependence of the detectable photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitudes on the RPE melanin concentrations is verified. In this study, we tested the feasibility of using PA signal ratio from RPE melanin and the nearby retinal blood vessels as an indicator of the RPE melanin variation. A novel whole eye optical model was designed and Monte Carlo modeling of light (MCML) was employed. We examined the influences on quantification from PAOM axial resolution, the depth and diameter of the retinal blood vessel, and the RPE thickness. The results show that the scheme is robust to individual histological and illumination variations. This study suggests that PAOM is capable of quantitatively measuring the RPE melanin concentration in vivo.

  8. Cow-level association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis antibody seropositivity: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sorge, U S; Molitor, T; Linn, J; Gallaher, D; Wells, S W

    2013-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with various human diseases. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the cow-level association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration and Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) seropositivity of dairy cows, adjusting for diet, breed, hair coat color, stage of lactation, reproductive status, and cow age. The sera of 80 MAP antibody ELISA-positive and 80 test-negative herd mates from 5 Minnesota dairy herds were analyzed for 25(OH)D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)(2)D]. The cows' age, production records, and hair coat color were recorded. Additionally, feed samples were obtained and analyzed for vitamin D(2) and vitamin D(3) content. A linear mixed model was used to identify potential predictors for serum 25(OH)D concentration, accounting for herd of origin. The majority of rations analyzed had over 22,000 IU of vitamin D/day (maximum: 52,000 I U/d) and the study cows' average serum 25(OH)D concentration was 62.5 ± 13.8 ng/mL. Serum ELISA-positive cows had, on average, 5.3 ng/mL lower 25(OH)D serum levels than test-negative herd mates. The reproductive status of cows was also associated with the 25(OH)D levels, with fresh cows having the lowest serum concentration. In this cross-sectional study, a temporal or causal association between MAP antibody ELISA status and serum 25(OH)D concentration could not be evaluated. In addition, the high levels of vitamin D in the rations of participating farms and the average 25(OH)D serum concentration suggest that additional supplementation with vitamin D in the ration is likely to be ineffective.

  9. Live simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine correlate of protection: local antibody production and concentration on the path of virus entry.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingsheng; Zeng, Ming; Duan, Lijie; Voss, James E; Smith, Anthony J; Pambuccian, Stefan; Shang, Liang; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Southern, Peter J; Reilly, Cavan S; Skinner, Pamela J; Zupancic, Mary L; Carlis, John V; Piatak, Michael; Waterman, Diane; Reeves, R Keith; Masek-Hammerman, Katherine; Derdeyn, Cynthia A; Alpert, Michael D; Evans, David T; Kohler, Heinz; Müller, Sybille; Robinson, James; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Burton, Dennis R; Johnson, R Paul; Haase, Ashley T

    2014-09-15

    We sought design principles for a vaccine to prevent HIV transmission to women by identifying correlates of protection conferred by a highly effective live attenuated SIV vaccine in the rhesus macaque animal model. We show that SIVmac239Δnef vaccination recruits plasma cells and induces ectopic lymphoid follicle formation beneath the mucosal epithelium in the rhesus macaque female reproductive tract. The plasma cells and ectopic follicles produce IgG Abs reactive with viral envelope glycoprotein gp41 trimers, and these Abs are concentrated on the path of virus entry by the neonatal FcR in cervical reserve epithelium and in vaginal epithelium. This local Ab production and delivery system correlated spatially and temporally with the maturation of local protection against high-dose pathogenic SIV vaginal challenge. Thus, designing vaccines to elicit production and concentration of Abs at mucosal frontlines could aid in the development of an effective vaccine to protect women against HIV-1.

  10. Local distribution and concentration of intravenously injected sup 131 I-9. 2. 27 monoclonal antibody in human malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Del Vecchio, S.; Reynolds, J.C.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Blasberg, R.G.; Neumann, R.D.; Lotze, M.T.; Bryant, G.J.; Farkas, R.J.; Larson, S.M. )

    1989-05-15

    Regional measurements of {sup 131}I-9.2.27 distribution in human melanoma tumors were obtained using quantitative autoradiography. Tumors were removed from patients 72-96 h after they had received an i.v. injection of 9.15 mCi (100 mg) of {sup 131}I-9.2.27. The autoradiographic images showed that the radioactivity reaching the tumor was heterogeneously distributed. Areas of relative high and low uptake were selected in each tumor. Regions of high activity contained from 51 to 1371 nCi/g, while areas with low uptake had radioactivity ranging from 12 to 487 nCi/g. The reliability of the autoradiographic measurements was demonstrated by the strong positive correlation with direct tissue sample counting (r = 0.994 P less than 0.001). Since comparative immunocytochemistry showed a homogeneous and diffuse staining of target antigen on viable tumor cells, variability of monoclonal antibody uptake within individual tumors was not primarily due to heterogeneity of antigen expression in these cases. However, antigen levels accounted for some of the variation from tumor to tumor. When immunoperoxidase staining was repeated on adjacent sections without the addition of 9.2.27, it confirmed the nonuniform distribution of monoclonal antibody found at autoradiography. Thus, quantitative autoradiography gives information about the distribution and the local concentration of radioactive antibody in tumors allowing calculation of the radiation dose delivered to small regions within tumors.

  11. Resistance to neutralization by broadly reactive antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 glycoprotein conferred by a gp41 amino acid change.

    PubMed Central

    Thali, M; Charles, M; Furman, C; Cavacini, L; Posner, M; Robinson, J; Sodroski, J

    1994-01-01

    A neutralization-resistant variant of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that emerged during in vitro propagation of the virus in the presence of neutralizing serum from an infected individual has been described. A threonine-for-alanine substitution at position 582 in the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein of the variant virus was responsible for the neutralization-resistant phenotype (M.S. Reitz, Jr., C. Wilson, C. Naugle, R. C. Gallo, and M. Robert-Guroff, Cell 54:57-63, 1988). The mutant virus also exhibited reduced sensitivity to neutralization by 30% of HIV-1-positive sera that neutralized the parental virus, suggesting that a significant fraction of the neutralizing activity within these sera can be affected by the amino acid change in gp41 (C. Wilson, M. S. Reitz, Jr., K. Aldrich, P. J. Klasse, J. Blomberg, R. C. Gallo, and M. Robert-Guroff, J. Virol. 64:3240-3248, 1990). It is shown here that the change of alanine 582 to threonine specifically confers resistance to neutralizing by antibodies directed against both groups of discontinuous, conserved epitopes related to the CD4 binding site on the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein. Only minor differences in binding of these antibodies to wild-type and mutant envelope glycoproteins were observed. Thus, the antigenic structure of gp120 can be subtly affected by an amino acid change in gp41, with important consequences for sensitivity to neutralization. Images PMID:7507184

  12. Relative EBV antibody concentrations and cost of standard IVIG and CMV-IVIG for PTLD prophylaxis in solid organ transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Avila, L; Garner, O B; Cherry, J D

    2014-09-01

    Some centers prefer CMV-IVIG over IVIG for the prophylaxis of EBV-related PTLD in solid organ transplant patients. Our objective was to compare the relative dose-related EBV ELISA antibody concentrations and cost of standard IVIG and CMV-IVIG. The concentration of EBV IgG to VCA was analyzed via ELISA in four lots of IVIG and four lots of CMV-IVIG. Relative EBV ELISA antibody concentrations and cost were compared assuming an IVIG dose of 0.5 gm/kg and CMV-IVIG dose of 0.15 gm/kg in a 50-kg patient. The price of IVIG was $70/gm and CMV-IVIG $430/gm. IVIG contains the same EBV antibody concentrations (20 790 ELISA antibody units/mL) than CMV-IVIG (17 430 ELISA antibody units/mL, p > 0.2) in the four lots of each product sampled. When factoring in the dosing scheme for a 50-kg patient, IVIG contains two times more EBV antibody than CMV-IVIG. Yet, CMV-IVIG is 1.8 times more expensive than IVIG ($3225 vs. $1750). In the four lots of each product sampled, IVIG contains more EBV antibodies and costs less than CMV-IVIG when factoring in the dosing scheme. Studies are needed to determine whether there is clinical efficacy of immunoglobulin products for EBV-related PTLD prophylaxis.

  13. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  14. Aggregation of concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions studied by rheology and neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Pathak, Jai; Colby, Ralph

    2013-03-01

    Protein solutions are studied using rheology and scattering techniques to investigate aggregation. Here we present a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that aggregates after incubation at 40 °C (below its unfolding temperature), with a decrease in monomer purity of 6% in 10 days. The mAb solution contains surfactant and behaves as a Newtonian fluid when reconstituted into solution from the lyophilized form (before incubation at 40 °C). In contrast, mAb solutions incubated at 40 °C for 1 month exhibit shear yielding in torsional bulk rheometers. Interfacial rheology reveals that interfacial properties are controlled by the surfactant, producing a negligible surface contribution to the bulk yield stress. These results provide evidence that protein aggregates formed in the bulk are responsible for the yield stress. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements show an increase in intensity at low wavevectors (q < 4*10-2 nm-1) that we attribute to protein aggregation, and is not observed in solutions stored at 4 °C for 3 days before the measurement. This work suggests a correlation between the aggregated state of the protein (stability) and the yield stress from rheology. Research funded by MedImmune

  15. Use of Anti-Aedes aegypti Salivary Extract Antibody Concentration to Correlate Risk of Vector Exposure and Dengue Transmission Risk in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Cardenas, Jenny C.; Cardenas, Lucio D.; Christofferson, Rebecca C.; Chisenhall, Daniel M.; Wesson, Dawn M.; McCracken, Michael K.; Carvajal, Daisy; Mores, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    Norte de Santander is a region in Colombia with a high incidence of dengue virus (DENV). In this study, we examined the serum concentration of anti-Aedes salivary gland extract (SGE) antibodies as a biomarker of DENV infection and transmission, and assessed the duration of anti-SGE antibody concentration after exposure to the vector ceased. We also determined whether SGE antibody concentration could differentiate between positive and negative DENV infected individuals and whether there are differences in exposure for each DENV serotype. We observed a significant decrease in the concentration of IgG antibodies at least 40 days after returning to an “Ae. aegypti-free” area. In addition, we found significantly higher anti-SGE IgG concentrations in DENV positive patients with some difference in exposure to mosquito bites among DENV serotypes. We conclude that the concentration of IgG antibodies against SGE is an accurate indicator of risk of dengue virus transmission and disease presence. PMID:24312537

  16. Development of an antibody-based, modular biosensor for 129Xe NMR molecular imaging of cells at nanomolar concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Honor M.; Witte, Christopher; Rossella, Federica; Klippel, Stefan; Freund, Christian; Schröder, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is seriously limited when aiming for visualization of targeted contrast agents. Images are reconstructed from the weak diamagnetic properties of the sample and require an abundant molecule like water as the reporter. Micromolar to millimolar concentrations of conventional contrast agents are needed to generate image contrast, thus excluding many molecular markers as potential targets. To address this limitation, we developed and characterized a functional xenon NMR biosensor that can identify a specific cell surface marker by targeted 129Xe MRI. Cells expressing the cell surface protein CD14 can be spatially distinguished from control cells with incorporation of as little as 20 nM of the xenon MRI readout unit, cryptophane-A. Cryptophane-A serves as a chemical host for hyperpolarized nuclei and facilitates the sensitivity enhancement achieved by xenon MRI. Although this paper describes the application of a CD14-specific biosensor, the construct has been designed in a versatile, modular fashion. This allows for quick and easy adaptation of the biosensor to any cell surface target for which there is a specific antibody. In addition, the modular design facilitates the creation of a multifunctional probe that incorporates readout modules for different detection methods, such as fluorescence, to complement the primary MRI readout. This modular antibody-based approach not only offers a practical technique with which to screen targets, but one which can be readily applied as the xenon MRI field moves closer to molecular imaging applications in vivo. PMID:25071165

  17. Kinetic analysis of IgM monoclonal antibodies for determination of dengue sample concentration using SPR technique.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, Peyman; Wei, Qin; Jie, Zhang; Ghomeishi, Mostafa; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Mahamd Adikan, Faisal Rafiq

    2016-08-17

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing is recently emerging as a valuable technique for measuring the binding constants, association and dissociation rate constants, and stoichimetry for a binding interaction kinetics in a number of emerging biological areas. This technique can be applied to the study of immune system diseases in order to contribute to improved understanding and evaluation of binding parameters for a variety of interactions between antigens and antibodies biochemically and clinically. Since the binding constants determination of an anti-protein dengue antibody (Ab) to a protein dengue antigen (Ag) is mostly complicated, the SPR technique aids a determination of binding parameters directly for a variety of particular dengue Ag_Ab interactions in the real-time. The study highlights the doctrine of real-time dengue Ag_Ab interaction kinetics as well as to determine the binding parameters that is performed with SPR technique. In addition, this article presents a precise prediction as a reference curve for determination of dengue sample concentration.

  18. A Nucleic-Acid Hydrolyzing Single Chain Antibody Confers Resistance to DNA Virus Infection in HeLa Cells and C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gunsup; Yu, Jaelim; Cho, Seungchan; Byun, Sung-June; Kim, Dae Hyun; Lee, Taek-Kyun; Kwon, Myung-Hee; Lee, Sukchan

    2014-01-01

    Viral protein neutralizing antibodies have been developed but they are limited only to the targeted virus and are often susceptible to antigenic drift. Here, we present an alternative strategy for creating virus-resistant cells and animals by ectopic expression of a nucleic acid hydrolyzing catalytic 3D8 single chain variable fragment (scFv), which has both DNase and RNase activities. HeLa cells (SCH7072) expressing 3D8 scFv acquired significant resistance to DNA viruses. Virus challenging with Herpes simplex virus (HSV) in 3D8 scFv transgenic cells and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay based on direct DNA cleavage analysis revealed that the induced resistance in HeLa cells was acquired by the nucleic acid hydrolyzing catalytic activity of 3D8 scFv. In addition, pseudorabies virus (PRV) infection in WT C57BL/6 mice was lethal, whereas transgenic mice (STG90) that expressed high levels of 3D8 scFv mRNA in liver, muscle, and brain showed a 56% survival rate 5 days after PRV intramuscular infection. The antiviral effects against DNA viruses conferred by 3D8 scFv expression in HeLa cells as well as an in vivo mouse system can be attributed to the nuclease activity that inhibits viral genome DNA replication in the nucleus and/or viral mRNA translation in the cytoplasm. Our results demonstrate that the nucleic-acid hydrolyzing activity of 3D8 scFv confers viral resistance to DNA viruses in vitro in HeLa cells and in an in vivo mouse system. PMID:24968358

  19. Stability of buffer-free freeze-dried formulations: A feasibility study of a monoclonal antibody at high protein concentrations.

    PubMed

    Garidel, Patrick; Pevestorf, Benjamin; Bahrenburg, Sven

    2015-11-01

    We studied the stability of freeze-dried therapeutic protein formulations over a range of initial concentrations (from 40 to 160 mg/mL) and employed a variety of formulation strategies (including buffer-free freeze dried formulations, or BF-FDF). Highly concentrated, buffer-free liquid formulations of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been shown to be a viable alternative to conventionally buffered preparations. We considered whether it is feasible to use the buffer-free strategy in freeze-dried formulations, as an answer to some of the known drawbacks of conventional buffers. We therefore conducted an accelerated stability study (24 weeks at 40 °C) to assess the feasibility of stabilizing freeze-dried formulations without "classical" buffer components. Factors monitored included pH stability, protein integrity, and protein aggregation. Because the protein solutions are inherently self-buffering, and the system's buffer capacity scales with protein concentration, we included highly concentrated buffer-free freeze-dried formulations in the study. The tested formulations ranged from "fully formulated" (containing both conventional buffer and disaccharide stabilizers) to "buffer-free" (including formulations with only disaccharide lyoprotectant stabilizers) to "excipient-free" (with neither added buffers nor stabilizers). We evaluated the impacts of varying concentrations, buffering schemes, pHs, and lyoprotectant additives. At the end of 24 weeks, no change in pH was observed in any of the buffer-free formulations. Unbuffered formulations were found to have shorter reconstitution times and lower opalescence than buffered formulations. Protein stability was assessed by visual inspection, sub-visible particle analysis, protein monomer content, charge variants analysis, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. All of these measures found the stability of buffer-free formulations that included a disaccharide stabilizer comparable to buffer

  20. Extra-epitopic hepatitis C virus polymorphisms confer resistance to broadly neutralizing antibodies by modulating binding to scavenger receptor B1

    PubMed Central

    El-Diwany, Ramy; Mankowski, Madeleine C.; Wasilewski, Lisa N.; Brady, Jillian K.; Snider, Anna E.; Osburn, William O.; Murrell, Ben; Ray, Stuart C.

    2017-01-01

    Broadly-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) may guide vaccine development for highly variable viruses including hepatitis C virus (HCV), since they target conserved viral epitopes that could serve as vaccine antigens. However, HCV resistance to bNAbs could reduce the efficacy of a vaccine. HC33.4 and AR4A are two of the most potent anti-HCV human bNAbs characterized to date, binding to highly conserved epitopes near the amino- and carboxy-terminus of HCV envelope (E2) protein, respectively. Given their distinct epitopes, it was surprising that these bNAbs showed similar neutralization profiles across a panel of natural HCV isolates, suggesting that some viral polymorphisms may confer resistance to both bNAbs. To investigate this resistance, we developed a large, diverse panel of natural HCV envelope variants and a novel computational method to identify bNAb resistance polymorphisms in envelope proteins (E1 and E2). By measuring neutralization of a panel of HCV pseudoparticles by 10 μg/mL of each bNAb, we identified E1E2 variants with resistance to one or both bNAbs, despite 100% conservation of the AR4A binding epitope across the panel. We discovered polymorphisms outside of either binding epitope that modulate resistance to both bNAbs by altering E2 binding to the HCV co-receptor, scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1). This study is focused on a mode of neutralization escape not addressed by conventional analysis of epitope conservation, highlighting the contribution of extra-epitopic polymorphisms to bNAb resistance and presenting a novel mechanism by which HCV might persist even in the face of an antibody response targeting multiple conserved epitopes. PMID:28235087

  1. Nasal Immunization Confers High Avidity Neutralizing Antibody Response and Immunity to Primary and Recurrent Genital Herpes in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Josefine; Zhang, Yuan; Olafsdottir, Thorunn A.; Thörn, Karolina; Cairns, Tina M.; Wegmann, Frank; Sattentau, Quentin J.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Harandi, Ali M.

    2016-01-01

    Genital herpes is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections in both the developing and developed world. Following infection, individuals experience life-long latency associated with sporadic ulcerative outbreaks. Despite many efforts, no vaccine has yet been licensed for human use. Herein, we demonstrated that nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 gD envelope protein mounts significant protection to primary infection as well as the establishment of latency and recurrent genital herpes in guinea pigs. Nasal immunization was shown to elicit specific T cell proliferative and IFN-γ responses as well as systemic and vaginal gD-specific IgG antibody (Ab) responses. Furthermore, systemic IgG Abs displayed potent HSV-2 neutralizing properties and high avidity. By employing a competitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis combined with a battery of known gD-specific neutralizing monoclonal Abs (MAbs), we showed that nasal immunization generated IgG Abs directed to two major discontinuous neutralizing epitopes of gD. These results highlight the potential of nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 envelope protein for induction of protective immunity to primary and recurrent genital herpes. PMID:28082979

  2. Nasal Immunization Confers High Avidity Neutralizing Antibody Response and Immunity to Primary and Recurrent Genital Herpes in Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Persson, Josefine; Zhang, Yuan; Olafsdottir, Thorunn A; Thörn, Karolina; Cairns, Tina M; Wegmann, Frank; Sattentau, Quentin J; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Harandi, Ali M

    2016-01-01

    Genital herpes is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections in both the developing and developed world. Following infection, individuals experience life-long latency associated with sporadic ulcerative outbreaks. Despite many efforts, no vaccine has yet been licensed for human use. Herein, we demonstrated that nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 gD envelope protein mounts significant protection to primary infection as well as the establishment of latency and recurrent genital herpes in guinea pigs. Nasal immunization was shown to elicit specific T cell proliferative and IFN-γ responses as well as systemic and vaginal gD-specific IgG antibody (Ab) responses. Furthermore, systemic IgG Abs displayed potent HSV-2 neutralizing properties and high avidity. By employing a competitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis combined with a battery of known gD-specific neutralizing monoclonal Abs (MAbs), we showed that nasal immunization generated IgG Abs directed to two major discontinuous neutralizing epitopes of gD. These results highlight the potential of nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 envelope protein for induction of protective immunity to primary and recurrent genital herpes.

  3. Symptoms, spirometry, and serum antibody concentrations among compost workers exposed to organic dust.

    PubMed

    van Kampen, Vera; Deckert, Anja; Hoffmeyer, Frank; Taeger, Dirk; Brinkmann, Elmar; Brüning, Thomas; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Bünger, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Work-related symptoms and diseases of 190 currently exposed compost workers, 59 former compost workers, and 38 nonexposed control subjects were investigated in a cross-sectional study. Using a standardized questionnaire, participants were asked for work-related symptoms, exposures to bioaerosols, atopic diseases, and smoking habits. The subjects underwent a physical examination and a lung function test. In addition, total immunoglobulin (Ig) E, IgE specific to environmental allergens and moulds, and IgG specific to molds and actinomycetes were quantified. Compared to controls, compost workers suffered more often from cough and irritation of the eyes in terms of mucosal membrane irritation (MMI). Former compost workers reported similar work-related complaints, but most MMI symptoms had improved after termination of bioaerosol exposure. In contrast, cough and dyspnea persisted, indicating a chronic process. Lung function parameters of compost workers were within the reference ranges. Nevertheless, forced vital capacity (FVC) was significantly lower than for controls. Specific IgE to environmental allergens and molds was positive in 25.3% and 7.4%, respectively, of currently exposed compost workers. There were no marked differences in IgE and IgG concentrations among the three groups. Compost workers suffered with a higher frequency from cough and MMI symptoms. The findings that MMI symptoms improved in former compost workers after leaving the job confirmed the association with bioaerosol exposure. Further, the reduced FVC may be produced by this exposure. There was no higher frequency of mold sensitization in the group of compost workers compared to controls, which may be an indication of a healthy worker survivor effect.

  4. On the role of salt type and concentration on the stability behavior of a monoclonal antibody solution.

    PubMed

    Arosio, Paolo; Jaquet, Baptiste; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2012-07-01

    Protein-salt interactions regulate protein solubility and stability and in particular several protein related processes, such as salting-out and aggregation. Using an IgG2 monoclonal antibody as a model multi-domain therapeutic protein, we have investigated the salt effect on the reversible formation of protein clusters with small aggregation number. The oligomer formation has been quantified by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). It is found that the salt effect is strongly ion specific and pH dependent. In particular, at pH 3.0 only anions affect the aggregation propensity, while at pH 4.0 both anions and cations influence the aggregation rate. The ranking of the anion effect follows the Hofmeister series with the only exception of sulfate, while that of the cation effect does not. In addition, a maximum of the aggregation propensity as a function of salt concentration is observed (i.e., presence of re-stabilization). By correlating the aggregation kinetics to the experimental investigation of protein structure and surface energy, it is shown that changes in pH and salt concentration induce aggregation not only through charge screening and various solvation forces, but also through the formation of protein intermediates characterized by partially ordered structures and certain degrees of hydrophobicity. The complex interaction between the solvation forces and such protein secondary structures induced by salts explains the observed experimental results relative to re-stabilization at large salt concentrations, ion specificity and the peculiar behavior of the sulfate anion.

  5. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of human α-defensin potentiate neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 gp41 pre-hairpin intermediates in the presence of serum.

    PubMed

    Demirkhanyan, Lusine; Marin, Mariana; Lu, Wuyuan; Melikyan, Gregory B

    2013-01-01

    Human defensins are at the forefront of the host responses to HIV and other pathogens in mucosal tissues. However, their ability to inactivate HIV in the bloodstream has been questioned due to the antagonistic effect of serum. In this study, we have examined the effect of sub-inhibitory concentrations of human α-defensin HNP-1 on the kinetics of early steps of fusion between HIV-1 and target cells in the presence of serum. Direct measurements of HIV-cell fusion using an enzymatic assay revealed that, in spite of the modest effect on the extent of fusion, HNP-1 prolonged the exposure of functionally important transitional epitopes of HIV-1 gp41 on the cell surface. The increased lifetime of gp41 intermediates in the presence of defensin was caused by a delay in the post-coreceptor binding steps of HIV-1 entry that correlated with the marked enhancement of the virus' sensitivity to neutralizing anti-gp41 antibodies. By contrast, the activity of antibodies to gp120 was not affected. HNP-1 appeared to specifically potentiate antibodies and peptides targeting the first heptad repeat domain of gp41, while its effect on inhibitors and antibodies to other gp41 domains was less prominent. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of HNP-1 also promoted inhibition of HIV-1 entry into peripheral blood mononuclear cells by antibodies and, more importantly, by HIV-1 immune serum. Our findings demonstrate that: (i) sub-inhibitory doses of HNP-1 potently enhance the activity of a number of anti-gp41 antibodies and peptide inhibitors, apparently by prolonging the lifetime of gp41 intermediates; and (ii) the efficiency of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors and neutralizing antibodies is kinetically restricted. This study thus reveals an important role of α-defensin in enhancing adaptive immune responses to HIV-1 infection and suggests future strategies to augment these responses.

  6. Glycans Flanking the Hypervariable Connecting Peptide between the A and B Strands of the V1/V2 Domain of HIV-1 gp120 Confer Resistance to Antibodies That Neutralize CRF01_AE Viruses

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Sara M.; Sutthent, Ruengpung; Phung, Pham; Mesa, Kathryn A.; Frigon, Normand L.; To, Briana; Horthongkham, Navin; Limoli, Kay; Wrin, Terri; Berman, Phillip W.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance to neutralizing antibodies is critical for the development of vaccines designed to prevent HIV infection. In this study, we used a genetic approach to characterize naturally occurring polymorphisms in the HIV envelope protein that conferred neutralization sensitivity or resistance. Libraries of closely related envelope genes, derived from virus quasi-species, were constructed from individuals infected with CRF01_AE viruses. The libraries were screened with plasma containing broadly neutralizing antibodies, and neutralization sensitive and resistant variants were selected for sequence analysis. In vitro mutagenesis allowed us to identify single amino acid changes in three individuals that conferred resistance to neutralization by these antibodies. All three mutations created N-linked glycosylation sites (two at N136 and one at N149) proximal to the hypervariable connecting peptide between the C-terminus of the A strand and the N-terminus of the B strand in the four-stranded V1/V2 domain β-sheet structure. Although N136 has previously been implicated in the binding of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, this glycosylation site appears to inhibit the binding of neutralizing antibodies in plasma from HIV-1 infected subjects. Previous studies have reported that the length of the V1/V2 domain in transmitted founder viruses is shorter and possesses fewer glycosylation sites compared to viruses isolated from chronic infections. Our results suggest that vaccine immunogens based on recombinant envelope proteins from clade CRF01_AE viruses might be improved by inclusion of envelope proteins that lack these glycosylation sites. This strategy might improve the efficacy of the vaccines used in the partially successful RV144 HIV vaccine trial, where the two CRF01_AE immunogens (derived from the A244 and TH023 isolates) both possessed glycosylation sites at N136 and N149. PMID:25793890

  7. Glycans flanking the hypervariable connecting peptide between the A and B strands of the V1/V2 domain of HIV-1 gp120 confer resistance to antibodies that neutralize CRF01_AE viruses.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Sara M; Sutthent, Ruengpung; Phung, Pham; Mesa, Kathryn A; Frigon, Normand L; To, Briana; Horthongkham, Navin; Limoli, Kay; Wrin, Terri; Berman, Phillip W

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance to neutralizing antibodies is critical for the development of vaccines designed to prevent HIV infection. In this study, we used a genetic approach to characterize naturally occurring polymorphisms in the HIV envelope protein that conferred neutralization sensitivity or resistance. Libraries of closely related envelope genes, derived from virus quasi-species, were constructed from individuals infected with CRF01_AE viruses. The libraries were screened with plasma containing broadly neutralizing antibodies, and neutralization sensitive and resistant variants were selected for sequence analysis. In vitro mutagenesis allowed us to identify single amino acid changes in three individuals that conferred resistance to neutralization by these antibodies. All three mutations created N-linked glycosylation sites (two at N136 and one at N149) proximal to the hypervariable connecting peptide between the C-terminus of the A strand and the N-terminus of the B strand in the four-stranded V1/V2 domain β-sheet structure. Although N136 has previously been implicated in the binding of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, this glycosylation site appears to inhibit the binding of neutralizing antibodies in plasma from HIV-1 infected subjects. Previous studies have reported that the length of the V1/V2 domain in transmitted founder viruses is shorter and possesses fewer glycosylation sites compared to viruses isolated from chronic infections. Our results suggest that vaccine immunogens based on recombinant envelope proteins from clade CRF01_AE viruses might be improved by inclusion of envelope proteins that lack these glycosylation sites. This strategy might improve the efficacy of the vaccines used in the partially successful RV144 HIV vaccine trial, where the two CRF01_AE immunogens (derived from the A244 and TH023 isolates) both possessed glycosylation sites at N136 and N149.

  8. Detection of aqueous VEGF concentrations before and after intravitreal injection of anti-VEGF antibody using low-volume sampling paper-based ELISA.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Min-Yen; Hung, Yu-Chien; Hwang, De-Kuang; Lin, Shang-Chi; Lin, Keng-Hung; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Choi, Hin-Yeung; Wang, Yu-Ping; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2016-10-11

    Intraocular vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels play an important role in the pathogenesis of blindness-related diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here, we aimed to develop a paper-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (P-ELISA) to analyze the suppression of aqueous VEGF concentrations following intravitreal injection (IVI) of anti-VEGF antibody (bevacizumab or ranibizumab). A total of 25 eyes with wet AMD, one with myopic neovascularization, and one with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy were enrolled in this study. The limit of detection using P-ELISA was 0.03 pg/mL. Forty-six consecutive samples of aqueous humor were acquired. From all samples, 66.67% (10/15) achieved complete VEGF suppression (below the detection limit) within 5 weeks of receiving IVI of anti-VEGF antibody. Only 13.33% of samples (2/15) achieved complete VEGF suppression 5 weeks after receiving treatment. In some patients, elevated VEGF was still detected 5 weeks after receipt of anti-VEGF antibody, and all samples (10/10) were found to have elevated VEGF levels 49 days after treatment. Thus, we suggest that monthly IVI of anti-VEGF antibody may be required to ensure durable VEGF inhibition. Ultrasensitive P-ELISA can detect elevated VEGF at an earlier time point and may facilitate decision-making regarding appropriate treatment strategies.

  9. Detection of aqueous VEGF concentrations before and after intravitreal injection of anti-VEGF antibody using low-volume sampling paper-based ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Min-Yen; Hung, Yu-Chien; Hwang, De-Kuang; Lin, Shang-Chi; Lin, Keng-Hung; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Choi, Hin-Yeung; Wang, Yu-Ping; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2016-01-01

    Intraocular vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels play an important role in the pathogenesis of blindness-related diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here, we aimed to develop a paper-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (P-ELISA) to analyze the suppression of aqueous VEGF concentrations following intravitreal injection (IVI) of anti-VEGF antibody (bevacizumab or ranibizumab). A total of 25 eyes with wet AMD, one with myopic neovascularization, and one with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy were enrolled in this study. The limit of detection using P-ELISA was 0.03 pg/mL. Forty-six consecutive samples of aqueous humor were acquired. From all samples, 66.67% (10/15) achieved complete VEGF suppression (below the detection limit) within 5 weeks of receiving IVI of anti-VEGF antibody. Only 13.33% of samples (2/15) achieved complete VEGF suppression 5 weeks after receiving treatment. In some patients, elevated VEGF was still detected 5 weeks after receipt of anti-VEGF antibody, and all samples (10/10) were found to have elevated VEGF levels 49 days after treatment. Thus, we suggest that monthly IVI of anti-VEGF antibody may be required to ensure durable VEGF inhibition. Ultrasensitive P-ELISA can detect elevated VEGF at an earlier time point and may facilitate decision-making regarding appropriate treatment strategies. PMID:27725716

  10. Recombinant NDV expressing cytokines or fliC confers a quick immune response against NDV challenge and resistance to maternal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyuan; Liu, Yunye; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Shenglong; Xu, Pengfei; Yin, Jiechao; Ren, Guiping; Liu, Jingli; Li, Deshan

    2016-11-30

    Currently, there are two major bottleneck problems which seriously affect prevention of the Newcastle disease (ND): interference of maternal antibody on NDV vaccination and slow production of neutralization antibody. To overcome these problems, in present study, four rNDV vaccine strains expressing bio-adjuvants chIL2, chIL15, chGM-CSF or fliC gene were constructed and rescued using reverse genetics approach. The HI antibody titers of SPF birds immunized with rNDV reached to 5.5log2, 4.7log2, 6.5log2 and 5.8log2, respectively at the 8th day post immunization, while the antibody titers of the parental virus and control were 3.3log2 and 1log2, respectively. The immunized chickens were challenged by 10(4)ELD50 dose of the virulent NDV BJ strains at the 7th day post immunization. The protection rate of the four rNDVs bio-adjuvant groups was 100%, while the protection rate of the parental group was 80%. We also examined the anti-maternal antibody activity of these adjuvant vaccines by detection HI titer after vaccination of chickens with high (8.4log2) or low (5log2) maternal antibody levels. In chicken flock with higher maternal antibody, parental strain could not resist the influence of the maternal antibody and induce any notable change of HI antibody kinetics. However, both rClon30-chGM-CSF and rClon30-flic were able to resist the influence of the maternal antibody and maintained the HI antibody above the protection level during the 14day's experiment. In chicken flock with lower maternal antibody, the parental rclone30 strain could not induce HI titer to the protection level until the 14th day, but both rClon30-GM-CSF and clone30-fliC raised the HI antibody to above the protection level at the 7th day post vaccination.

  11. A stable cytosolic expression of VH antibody fragment directed against PVY NIa protein in transgenic potato plant confers partial protection against the virus.

    PubMed

    Bouaziz, Donia; Ayadi, Malika; Bidani, Amira; Rouis, Souad; Nouri-Ellouz, Oumèma; Jellouli, Raïda; Drira, Noureddine; Gargouri-Bouzid, Radhia

    2009-04-01

    The expression of recombinant antibodies in transgenic plants has been proved to be an efficient approach for large-scale production. However, the stability of these molecules and their accumulation level depend on their molecular properties and cellular targeting. The expression of single-domain antibody fragment (VH) can be advantageous since it offers small length, high expression, solubility and stability. It can therefore be preferred to other antibody derivatives avoiding the expression difficulties related to immunoglobulin domain folding via the formation of disulfide bridge. This report describes the production of transgenic potato plants expressing a VH antibody directed against the NIa protease of potato virus Y. The antibody was driven by the constitutive CaMV 35S RNA promoter. The expression cassette was transferred into potato plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation. All transgenic lines showed detectable levels of VH protein confirming the efficient translation and stability of this protein. The cellular localisation of the VH antibody was investigated. Transgenic and control plants were transferred in the greenhouse and mechanically inoculated by PVY(o) suspension. Some of the transgenic lines showed delayed symptoms at the first period post inoculation and then displayed a recovery phenomenon while the virions were still detected in the leaves.

  12. Identification of regulated genes conferring resistance to high concentrations of glyphosate in a new strain of Enterobacter.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yun-Yan; Gai, Jun-Yi; Zhao, Tuan-Jie

    2013-12-01

    Glyphosate is a widely used herbicide that inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) activity. Most plants and microbes are sensitive to glyphosate. However, transgenic-resistant crops that contain a modified epsps obtained from the resistant microbes have been commercially successful and therefore, new resistance genes and their adaptive regulatory mechanisms are of great interest. In this study, a soil-borne, glyphosate-resistant bacterium was selected and identified as Enterobacter. The EPSPS in this strain was found to have been altered to a resistant one. A total of 42 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the glyphosate were screened using microarray techniques. Under treatment, argF, sdhA, ivbL, rrfA-H were downregulated, whereas the transcripts of speA, osmY, pflB, ahpC, fusA, deoA, uxaC, rpoD and a few ribosomal protein genes were upregulated. Data were verified by quantitative real-time PCR on selected genes. All transcriptional changes appeared to protect the bacteria from glyphosate and associated osmotic, acidic and oxidative stresses. Many DEGs may have the potential to confer resistance to glyphosate alone, and some may be closely related to the shikimate pathway, reflecting the complex gene interaction network for glyphosate resistance.

  13. Numerical analysis on using compound parabolic couplers for direct transmission of concentrated solar radiation via optical fibre (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahou, Maryam; Andrews, John; Rosengarten, Gary

    2016-09-01

    A challenge in high-temperature solar thermal applications is transfer of concentrated solar radiation to the load with minimum energy loss. The use of a solar concentrator in conjunction with optical fibres has potential advantages in terms of transmission efficiency, technical feasibility and cost-effectiveness compared to a conventional heat transfer system employing heat exchangers and a heat transfer fluid. For transferring higher levels of concentrated flux it is necessary to employ multiple optical fibres or fibre bundles. However, the losses at the incident plane of a bundle due to absorption by the epoxy and cladding between the individual fibres in a bundle are substantial, typically over 60% of the overall transmission loss. The optical transmission of the system can thus be enhanced by employing a coupler between the concentrated solar radiation and the entrance to the bundle that reflects all incident light into the cores of individual fibres rather than allowing it to strike the interstitial spaces between the cores. This paper describes the design for such couplers based on multiple compound parabolic (CP) reflectors each with its exit aperture coinciding with the core of an individual fibre within the bundle. The proposed design employs external reflection from a machined metallic aluminium surface. This CP arrangement has the additional benefit of increasing the concentration ratio of the primary solar concentrator used. Simulation modeling using LightTools is conducted into a parabolic Cassegrain solar concentrator employing these CP couplers prior to a fibre bundle. The dependence of overall transmission and total optical efficiency of the system over lengths of the bundle up to 100 m are investigated quantitatively. In addition, the influence on transmission of the angular distribution of radiation intensity at the aperture of the couplers is studied.

  14. Randomized Cross-Sectional Study to Compare HIV-1 Specific Antibody and Cytokine Concentrations in Female Genital Secretions Obtained by Menstrual Cup and Cervicovaginal Lavage

    PubMed Central

    Archary, Derseree; Liebenberg, Lenine J.; Werner, Lise; Tulsi, Sahil; Majola, Nelisile; Naicker, Nivashnee; Dlamini, Sarah; Hope, Thomas J.; Samsunder, Natasha; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Morris, Lynn; Passmore, Jo-Ann S.; Garrett, Nigel J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Optimizing methods for genital specimen collection to accurately characterize mucosal immune responses is a priority for the HIV prevention field. The menstrual cup (MC) has been proposed as an alternative to other methods including cervicovaginal lavage (CVL), but no study has yet formally compared these two methods. Methods Forty HIV-infected, antiretroviral therapy-naïve women from the CAPRISA 002 acute HIV infection cohort study were randomized to have genital fluid collected using the MC with subsequent CVL, or by CVL alone. Qualitative data, which assessed levels of comfort and acceptability of MC using a 5-point Likert scale, was collected. Luminex multiplex assays were used to measure HIV-specific IgG against multiple gene products and 48 cytokines. Results The majority (94%) of participants indicated that insertion, wearing and removal of the MC was comfortable. Nineteen MCs with 18 matching, subsequent CVLs and 20 randomized CVLs were available for analysis. Mucosal IgG responses against four HIV-antigens were detected in 99% of MCs compared to only 80% of randomized CVLs (p = 0.029). Higher specific antibody activity and total antibodies were observed in MCs compared to CVL (all p<0.001). In MCs, 42/48 (88%) cytokines were in the detectable range in all participants compared to 27/48 (54%) in CVL (p<0.001). Concentrations of 22/41 cytokines (53.7%) were significantly higher in fluid collected by MC. Both total IgG (r = 0.63; p = 0.005) and cytokine concentrations (r = 0.90; p<0.001) correlated strongly between MC and corresponding post-MC CVL. Conclusions MC sampling improves the detection of mucosal cytokines and antibodies, particularly those present at low concentrations. MC may therefore represent an ideal tool to assess immunological parameters in genital secretions, without interfering with concurrent collection of conventional CVL samples. PMID:26147923

  15. Measurement of cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood: HPLC and radioimmunoassay with a specific monoclonal antibody and /sup 3/H- or /sup 125/I-labeled ligand compared

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, B.A.; Daft, M.C.; Koenig, J.W.; Flye, M.W.; Turk, J.W.; Scott, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    We compared cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood as measured by HPLC and by RIA with a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine with /sup 3/H- or /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporine ligand. The /sup 3/H-RIA kit slightly underestimated cyclosporine concentrations (greater than 600 micrograms/L) in comparison with HPLC. Over a wide range of concentrations, cyclosporine measured with the /sup 125/I-RIA kit correlated well with HPLC (slope = 0.99, n = 301, r = 0.98), observed for samples from recipients of kidney, heart, or liver allografts (respective slopes: 1.01, 0.93, and 1.00). The /sup 125/I-RIA standard curve was linear to 1000 micrograms of cyclosporine per liter. Inter- and intra-assay CVs for /sup 125/I-RIA measurements of cyclosporine were less than or equal to 7%. Evidently, the /sup 125/I-RIA kit involving a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine is equivalent to the HPLC assay and can replace it for therapeutic drug monitoring of cyclosporine therapy.

  16. Application of photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence to detection of low serum concentrations of human IgE antibodies specific for a purified cat allergen (Fel D1).

    PubMed

    Tan, Yafang; Halsey, John F; Tang, Tiantian; Wetering, Scott Vande; Taine, Elaine; Cleve, Mark Van; Cunningham, Brian T

    2016-03-15

    We demonstrate the detection of low concentrations of allergen-specific Immunoglobulin E (IgE) in human sera using a Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence (PCEF) microarray platform. The Photonic Crystal (PC) surface, designed to provide optical resonances for the excitation wavelength and emission wavelength of Cy5, was used to amplify the fluorescence signal intensity measured from a multiplexed allergen microarray. Surface-based sandwich immunoassays were used to detect and quantify specific IgE antibodies against a highly purified cat allergen (Fel d1). A comparison of the lowest detectable concentration of IgE measured by the PC microarray system and a commercially available clinical analyzer demonstrated that the PCEF microarray system provides higher sensitivity. The PCEF system was able to detect low concentrations of specific IgE (~0.02 kU/L), which is 5-17-fold more sensitive than the commercially available FDA-approved analyzers. In preliminary experiments using multi-allergen arrays, we demonstrate selective simultaneous detection of IgE antibodies to multiple allergens.

  17. Application of Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence to Detection of Low Serum Concentrations of Human IgE Antibodies Specific for a Purified Cat Allergen (Fel d1)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yafang; Halsey, John F.; Tang, Tiantian; Wetering, Scott Vande; Taine, Elaine; Van Cleve, Mark; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the detection of low concentrations of allergen-specific Immunoglobulin E (IgE) in human sera using a Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence (PCEF) microarray platform. The Photonic Crystal (PC) surface, designed to provide optical resonances for the excitation wavelength and emission wavelength of Cy5, was used to amplify the fluorescence signal intensity measured from a multiplexed allergen microarray. Surface-based sandwich immunoassays were used to detect and quantify specific IgE antibodies against a highly purified cat allergen (Fel d1). A comparison of the lowest detectable concentration of IgE measured by the PC microarray system and a commercially available clinical analyzer demonstrated that the PCEF microarray system provides higher sensitivity. The PCEF system was able to detect low concentrations of specific IgE (~0.02 kU/L), which is 5 to 17 -fold more sensitive than the commercially available FDA-approved analyzers. In preliminary experiments using multi-allergen arrays, we demonstrate selective simultaneous detection of IgE antibodies to multiple allergens. PMID:26406461

  18. Viscosity measurements of antibody solutions by photon correlation spectroscopy: an indirect approach - limitations and applicability for high-concentration liquid protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Michael; Reiche, Katharina; Blume, Alfred; Garidel, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) is compared with classic rheological measurements using the cone-and-plate technique for the determination of the viscosity of protein solutions. The potential advantages using PCS are small sample volume and fast determination of zero-shear viscosity. The present study assesses potentials and limitations of the applicability of this method for the determination of viscosity of antibody solutions in protein science development. The principle of the assay is based on the determination of the apparent hydrodynamic radius of commercial available latex beads of known size added to protein solutions. Using the Stokes-Einstein equation, the hydrodynamic radius can be converted to viscosity. Several latex particle sizes and concentrations were evaluated and the assay optimized. The PCS assay for viscosity determination was tested using water/glycerol-mixtures, where the viscosity was measured with rheometer using the cone-and-plate method and also compared with published data. Different protein solutions of bovine serum albumin, lysozyme and monoclonal antibodies were then used and the PCS results were compared with viscosity data obtained by the cone-and-plate method. It could be shown that the PCS assay has limitations for the determination of the viscosity of protein solutions, especially monoclonal antibodies. The main reason is due to protein-latex bead interactions leading to the formation of larger aggregates. The use of surface modification of the latex beads can in principle prevent this interaction.

  19. Monitoring of laying capacity, immunoglobulin Y concentration, and antibody titer development in chickens immunized with ricin and botulinum toxins over a two-year period.

    PubMed

    Pauly, D; Dorner, M; Zhang, X; Hlinak, A; Dorner, B; Schade, R

    2009-02-01

    One of the key benefits in using chickens for immunization is the high yield of antibodies obtainable. It is known that egg production decreases over time, while animal maintenance costs remain stable. It would, however, be desirable to keep hens as long as possible to obtain maximal amounts of antibodies. To identify a suitable length of time that animals can be kept and to optimize the cost:yield ratio, we monitored the number of eggs laid, the total amount of chicken IgY, and the specific antibody titer from individually prepared eggs over a 2-yr period. The plant toxin ricin and the Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins type A and B were used to immunize 4 chickens. The number of eggs laid in 2 yr was approximately 600 per hen (about 80% of the maximum egg number), yielding about 20 to 40 g of total IgY per hen. A stable antibody titer of 1:100,000 to 1:1,000,000, as measured by ELISA, was obtained following up to 11 injections of 10 to 20 microg of immobilized native toxin. Laying capacities were found to decrease, on average, from 7 eggs/wk at the point of first immunization to 2 eggs/wk after more than 2 yr. In parallel, the yield of total and specific IgY increased over time, so that the antibody recovery remained high, even after prolonged immunization times. Using purified IgY preparations, classical immunological assays such as ELISA and Western blotting were performed. Furthermore, the IgY showed neutralizing capacity when used to block the functional activity of the toxins both in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of the total IgY content over time demonstrated a complex biological oscillation (and the antigen-specific titer), with a shorter time period of around 7 d (circaseptan rhythm). In summary, we successfully immunized chickens with ricin and botulinum neurotoxins and monitored laying capacity, IgY concentration, and specific antibody titer over an extended period of 2 yr.

  20. Neutralization of Diverse Human Cytomegalovirus Strains Conferred by Antibodies Targeting Viral gH/gL/pUL128-131 Pentameric Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sha; Li, Fengsheng; Troutman, Matthew C.; Freed, Daniel C.; Tang, Aimin; Loughney, John W.; Wang, I-Ming; Vlasak, Josef; Nickle, David C.; Rustandi, Richard R.; Hamm, Melissa; DePhillips, Pete A.; Zhang, Ningyan; McLellan, Jason S.; Zhu, Hua; Adler, Stuart P.; McVoy, Michael A.; An, Zhiqiang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the leading cause of congenital viral infection, and developing a prophylactic vaccine is of high priority to public health. We recently reported a replication-defective human cytomegalovirus with restored pentameric complex glycoprotein H (gH)/gL/pUL128-131 for prevention of congenital HCMV infection. While the quantity of vaccine-induced antibody responses can be measured in a viral neutralization assay, assessing the quality of such responses, including the ability of vaccine-induced antibodies to cross-neutralize the field strains of HCMV, remains a challenge. In this study, with a panel of neutralizing antibodies from three healthy human donors with natural HCMV infection or a vaccinated animal, we mapped eight sites on the dominant virus-neutralizing antigen—the pentameric complex of glycoprotein H (gH), gL, and pUL128, pUL130, and pUL131. By evaluating the site-specific antibodies in vaccine immune sera, we demonstrated that vaccination elicited functional antiviral antibodies to multiple neutralizing sites in rhesus macaques, with quality attributes comparable to those of CMV hyperimmune globulin. Furthermore, these immune sera showed antiviral activities against a panel of genetically distinct HCMV clinical isolates. These results highlighted the importance of understanding the quality of vaccine-induced antibody responses, which includes not only the neutralizing potency in key cell types but also the ability to protect against the genetically diverse field strains. IMPORTANCE HCMV is the leading cause of congenital viral infection, and development of a preventive vaccine is a high public health priority. To understand the strain coverage of vaccine-induced immune responses in comparison with natural immunity, we used a panel of broadly neutralizing antibodies to identify the immunogenic sites of a dominant viral antigen—the pentameric complex. We further demonstrated that following vaccination of a replication

  1. The Impact of Routine HTLV-III Antibody Testing on Public Health. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference Statement, Vol. 6, No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    A policy statement by a group of experts on screening blood donations for contamination by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), is presented in this document. This document provides policy recommendations formed by a consensus conference sponsored by the National Institutes of Health…

  2. Mutations located on both F1 and F2 subunits of the Newcastle disease virus fusion protein confer resistance to neutralization with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Neyt, C; Geliebter, J; Slaoui, M; Morales, D; Meulemans, G; Burny, A

    1989-01-01

    The fusion gene sequence of six Newcastle disease virus escape mutants revealed that residues important for the integrity of antigenic site 1 and antigenic site 2 were located, respectively, on the F2 subunit and within the cysteine-rich domain of the F1 subunit. We further report the antibody-binding capacity of these mutants. PMID:2463386

  3. Site-specific antibody-liposome conjugation through copper-free click chemistry: a molecular biology approach for targeted photodynamic therapy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaid, Girgis; Wang, Yucheng; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Broekgaarden, Mans; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Hui, James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Nanocarriers, such as liposomes, have the ability to potentiate photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment regimens by the encapsulation of high payloads of photosensitizers and enhance their passive delivery to tumors through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. By conjugating targeting moieties to the surface of the liposomal nanoconstructs, cellular selectivity is imparted on them and PDT-based therapies can be performed with significantly higher dose tolerances, as off-target toxicity is simultaneously reduced.1 However, the maximal benefits of conventional targeted nanocarriers, including liposomes, are hindered by practical limitations including chemical instability, non-selective conjugation chemistry, poor control over ligand orientation, and loss of ligand functionality following conjugation, amongst others.2 We have developed a robust, physically and chemically stable liposomal nanoplatform containing benzoporphyrin derivative photosensitizer molecules within the phospholipid bilayer and an optimized surface density of strained cyclooctyne moieties for `click' conjugation to azido-functionalized antibodies.3 The clinical chimeric anti-EGFR antibody Cetuximab is site-specifically photocrosslinked to a recombinant bioengineered that recognizes the antibody's Fc region, containing a terminal azide.4 The copper-free click conjugation of the bioengineered Cetuximab derivative to the optimized photosensitizing liposome provides exceptional control over the antibody's optimal orientation for cellular antigen binding. Importantly, the reaction occurs rapidly under physiological conditions, bioorthogonally (selectively in the presence of other biomolecules) and without the need for toxic copper catalysis.3 Such state-of-the-art conjugation strategies push the boundaries of targeted photodynamic therapy beyond the limitations of traditional chemical coupling techniques to produce more robust and effective targeted therapeutics with applications beyond

  4. [LEVELS OF SERUM ANTIBODIES TO ENTEROBACTERIAL LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP WITH CONCENTRATION OF C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Gordienko, A I

    2015-01-01

    We examined patients with type 1 (DM 1) and type 2 (DM 2) diabetes mellitus. The concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood and levels of serum antibodies to different classes of enterobacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were determined by ELISA. Using cluster analysis it was shown that in 40.8% DM-1 patients the increased concentration of CRP is associated with a decrease in the levels of serum anti-LPS-IgA, anti-LPS-IgM and anti-LPS-IgG. In 56.7% of DM-2 patients with increased concentration of CRP levels of serum anti-LPS-IgA and anti-LPS-IgM were not significantly different from the normal values, but the levels of serum anti-LPS-IgG were significantly increased. Activation of inflammation and increase of concentration of the CRP in the blood of DM-2 patients is accompanied by a significant increase in the levels of serum anti-LPS-A and anti-LPS-G, as well as the tendency to reduce the levels of anti-LPS-IgM. The results of this study suggest an association between low intensity inflammation and immune response to enterobacterial LPS in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus.

  5. Concentrations of Immunoglobulin G Antibodies Against Pertussis Toxin Does Not Decrease Over a Long Period of Time in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Yumi; Ohtani, Yoshio; Jinta, Torahiko; Fujie, Toshihide; Miyazaki, Yasunari; Inase, Naohiko; Saito, Ryoichi; Akaza, Miho; Sasano, Tetsuo; Sumi, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Adult patients with pertussis rarely show typical symptoms, such as paroxysmal coughing, inspiratory “whoop”, or post-tussive vomiting. While a culture is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis, the sensitivity is very low. Therefore, the diagnosis of pertussis in adults in clinical practice is mostly based on single-sample serology using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the pertussis toxin antigen. Various cut-off values for the anti-pertussis toxin IgG (PT-IgG) have been proposed. It has been reported that concentrations of PT-IgG fall below the defined cut-off about 4.5 months after infection on average, and within 1 year in most patients. We investigated the distribution and time course of the PT-IgG levels. Methods The data were collected from the medical records. Patients The study retrospectively identified subjects who had visited Ikebukuro Otani Clinic, which is a specialized clinic for patients with cough. We retrospectively reviewed 406 patients with PT-IgG measurements to investigate the age distribution of PT-IgG levels. The changes in PT-IgG levels over time were assessed in the 205 patients who had more than one PT-IgG measurement. Results PT-IgG levels were ≥100 EU/mL in more than 15% of subjects. The PT-IgG levels of a few subjects had diminished over a long period of time. Conclusion A PT-IgG level greater than the defined cut-off value simply indicates past infection or immunization in most subjects. As such, a single measurement of PT-IgG using the cut-off values might lead to overdiagnosis of pertussis. Further data collection and analysis are required. PMID:27853066

  6. Viscosity-Lowering Effect of Amino Acids and Salts on Highly Concentrated Solutions of Two IgG1 Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujing; Zhang, Ning; Hu, Tao; Dai, Weiguo; Feng, Xiuying; Zhang, Xinyi; Qian, Feng

    2015-12-07

    Monoclonal antibodies display complicated solution properties in highly concentrated (>100 mg/mL) formulations, such as high viscosity, high aggregation propensity, and low stability, among others, originating from protein-protein interactions within the colloidal protein solution. These properties severely hinder the successful development of high-concentration mAb solution for subcutaneous injection. We hereby investigated the effects of several small-molecule excipients with diverse biophysical-chemical properties on the viscosity, aggregation propensity, and stability on two model IgG1 (JM1 and JM2) mAb formulations. These excipients include nine amino acids or their salt forms (Ala, Pro, Val, Gly, Ser, HisHCl, LysHCl, ArgHCl, and NaGlu), four representative salts (NaCl, NaAc, Na2SO4, and NH4Cl), and two chaotropic reagents (urea and GdnHCl). With only salts or amino acids in their salt-forms, significant decrease in viscosity was observed for JM1 (by up to 30-40%) and JM2 (by up to 50-80%) formulations, suggesting charge-charge interaction between the mAbs dictates the high viscosity of these mAbs formulations. Most of these viscosity-lowering excipients did not induce substantial protein aggregation or changes in the secondary structure of the mAbs, as evidenced by HPLC-SEC, DSC, and FT-IR analysis, even in the absence of common protein stabilizers such as sugars and surfactants. Therefore, amino acids in their salt-forms and several common salts, such as ArgHCl, HisHCl, LysHCl, NaCl, Na2SO4, and NaAc, could potentially serve as viscosity-lowering excipients during high-concentration mAb formulation development.

  7. Serum pharmacokinetics and cerebrospinal fluid concentration analysis of the new IgG4 monoclonal antibody GNbAC1 to treat multiple sclerosis: A Phase 1 study

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, François; Vidal, Virginie; Bernard, Corinne; Kromminga, Arno; Lang, Alois B.; Porchet, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT GNbAC1 is a humanized IgG4 monoclonal antibody antagonist of Mulitple Sclerosis Retrovirus Envelope (MSRV-Env), a protein that could play a critical role in multiple sclerosis. This randomized placebo-controlled dose-escalation study evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics of GNbAC1 in 21 healthy volunteers after single intravenous infusion at doses of 6, 18 and 36 mg/kg. Lumbar punctures were performed at days 2, 15 or 29 to measure GNbAC1 concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). GNbAC1 was well tolerated. Serum data show a dose-linear pharmacokinetics. A mean CSF/serum ratio of 0.12% was observed at Day 2, increasing to 0.39% at Day 15 and 0.42% at Day 29. Linear regression analysis shows a relationship between GNbAC1 CSF/serum ratio and albumin CSF/serum ratio and a relationship at the limit of statistical significance with the timing of CSF sampling. PMID:27030142

  8. Prediction of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Effectiveness against Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Using Opsonophagocytic Activity and Antibody Concentrations Determined by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay with 22F Adsorption ▿

    PubMed Central

    Schuerman, L.; Wysocki, J.; Tejedor, J. C.; Knuf, M.; Kim, K.-H.; Poolman, J.

    2011-01-01

    We compared the abilities of two serological readouts, antipolysaccharide IgG antibody concentrations and opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) titers, to predict the clinical effectiveness of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vCRM) against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). We also assessed the accuracy of the previously established thresholds for GlaxoSmithKline's enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with 22F adsorption (22F-ELISA) (≥0.2 μg/ml) and OPA assay (titer, ≥8) in predicting effectiveness. We showed that following a 3-dose 7vCRM primary vaccination, the serological response rates as determined using thresholds of ≥0.2 μg/ml IgG and an OPA titer of ≥8 corresponded well with overall effectiveness against IPD. In addition, the OPA assay seemed to better predict serotype-specific effectiveness than enzyme-linked immunoassay. Finally, when applied to post-dose-2 immune responses, both thresholds also corresponded well with the overall IPD effectiveness following a 2-dose 7vCRM primary vaccination. These results support the importance of the OPA assay in evaluating immune responses to pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. PMID:21994351

  9. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003529.htm Antimitochondrial antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. ...

  10. Effect of α7n-Acetylcholine Receptor Activation and Antibodies to TNF-α on Mortality of Mice and Concentration of Proinflammatory Cytokines During Early Stage of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zabrodskii, P F; Gromov, M S; Maslyakov, V V

    2015-10-01

    Experiments on random-bred albino mice showed that activation α7n-acetylcholine receptors with anabasine (0.5 LD50) and the use of antibodies to TNF-α (1 mg/kg) 2 h before sepsis modeling significantly reduces mortality of mice from experimental sepsis (intraperitoneal injection of E. coli) due to a decrease in the blood concentration of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. After combined administration of anti-TNF-α antibodies and anabasine, an additive effect was observed.

  11. Inhibin immunoneutralization by antibodies raised against synthetic peptide sequences of inhibin alpha subunit: effects on gonadotrophin concentrations and ovulation rate in sheep.

    PubMed

    Wrathall, J H; McLeod, B J; Glencross, R G; Beard, A J; Knight, P G

    1990-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to explore the effectiveness of synthetic peptide-based vaccines for active and passive autoimmunization of sheep against inhibin. In the first experiment, adult Romney ewes (n = 20) were actively immunized against a synthetically produced peptide that corresponded to the N-terminus of the alpha-subunit of bovine inhibin (bI alpha(1-29)-Tyr30). This peptide was conjugated to tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) to increase its antigenic properties. Control groups comprised non-immunized (n = 10) and PPD-immunized (n = 10) ewes. Primary immunization (400 micrograms conjugate/ewe) was followed by two booster immunizations (200 micrograms conjugate/ewe), given 5 and 8 weeks later. Following synchronization of oestrus using progestagen sponges, ovulation rates were assessed by laparoscopy. Weekly blood samples were taken throughout the experiment. All inhibin-immunized ewes produced antibodies which bound 125I-labelled bovine inhibin (Mr 32,000), and ovulation rate in inhibin-immunized ewes (2.15 +/- 0.22; mean +/- S.E.M.) was significantly (P less than 0.01) greater than in both non-immunized (0.90 +/- 0.23) and PPD-immunized (1.20 +/- 0.13) control groups. Immunization against the peptide, but not against PPD alone, resulted in a modest rise in plasma FSH, with mean levels after the second boost being significantly (P less than 0.025) higher (22%) than those before immunization. Moreover, when blood samples were taken (2-h intervals) from randomly selected groups of control (n = 7) and inhibin-immunized (n = 7) ewes for an 84-h period following withdrawal of progestagen sponges, the mean plasma concentration of FSH during the 48 h immediately before the preovulatory LH surge was 37% greater (P less than 0.025) in immunized than in control animals. However, more frequent blood sampling (every 15 min for 12 h) during follicular and mid-luteal phases of the oestrous cycle revealed no significant differences between treatment groups

  12. Antibody engineering and therapeutics, The Annual Meeting of the Antibody Society: December 8-12, 2013, Huntington Beach, CA.

    PubMed

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul W H I; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates.

  13. Cerebral distribution of immunoconjugate after treatment for neoplastic meningitis using an intrathecal radiolabeled monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, J.C.; Moss, T.; Moseley, R.P.; Maxwell, R.; Coakham, H.B. )

    1989-08-01

    A detailed autopsy and autoradiographic study was performed after the death of a patient undergoing intrathecal, antibody-guided irradiation for carcinomatous meningitis. The results demonstrated tumor cells infiltrating the surface meninges and a severe astrocytic reaction associated with oedema in the periventricular and brain stem subpial white matter. This was not seen in cortical or other gray matter structures. Autoradiographic examination correlated well, demonstrating isotope within the oedematous areas of the white matter in addition to the expected concentration in the leptomeningeal layers. These findings are discussed in the context of antibody binding to tumor tissue and the possible benefits conferred in the treatment of infiltrating tumor cells.

  14. Antibody Gene Transfer for HIV Immunoprophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Balazs, Alejandro B.; West, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody gene transfer, which involves the delivery of genes that encode potent, broadly neutralizing anti-HIV antibodies, is a promising new strategy to prevent HIV infection. A satellite symposium at the AIDS Vaccine 2012 conference brought together many of the groups working in this field. PMID:23238748

  15. Antibody gene transfer for HIV immunoprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Balazs, Alejandro B; West, Anthony P

    2013-01-01

    Antibody gene transfer, which involves the delivery of genes that encode potent, broadly neutralizing antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is a promising new strategy for preventing HIV infection. A satellite symposium at the AIDS Vaccine 2012 conference brought together many of the groups working in this field.

  16. Conference Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    Since the first IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (Paris, March 2002) and the Second Conference (Rio de Janeiro, May 2005), progress has continued in most countries and world regions to attract girls to physics and advance women into leadership roles, and many working groups have formed. The Third Conference (Seoul, October 2008), with 283 attendees from 57 countries, was dedicated to celebrating the physics achievements of women throughout the world, networking toward new international collaborations, building each participant's capacity for career success, and aiding the formation of active regional working groups to advance women in physics. Despite the progress, women remain a small minority of the physics community in most countries.

  17. Summary of 1990 Code Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.K.; Chan, Kwok-Chi D.

    1990-01-01

    The Conference on Codes and the Linear Accelerator Community was held in Los Alamos in January 1990, and had approximately 100 participants. This conference was the second in a series which has as its goal the exchange of information about codes and code practices among those writing and actually using these codes for the design and analysis of linear accelerators and their components. The first conference was held in San Diego in January 1988, and concentrated on beam dynamics codes and Maxwell solvers. This most recent conference concentrated on 3-D codes and techniques to handle the large amounts of data required for three-dimensional problems. In addition to descriptions of codes, their algorithms and implementations, there were a number of paper describing the use of many of the codes. Proceedings of both these conferences are available. 3 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  19. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  20. Differences in modifications of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration and 86Rb+ influx in human neoplastic B cells by antibodies to mu- relative to delta-Ig heavy chains.

    PubMed Central

    Heikkilä, R; Ruud, E; Funderud, S; Godal, T

    1985-01-01

    Cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration and influx of 86Rb+ (K+ analogue) were determined during the first minutes after stimulation of neoplastic human B cells and B cell lines by antibodies to surface Ig. The Ca2+ concentration increased in the great majority of samples (41 of 48). All of four B cell lines also responded, providing formal evidence that accessory cells are not required for this early, surface Ig-mediated event. Antibodies to delta as well as mu, heavy chains (anti-delta and anti-mu) could induce both Ca2+ and 86Rb+ responses. 86Rb+ responders were found within the group of Ca2+ responders, but no quantitative relation was observed between the two responses. In cells expressing both sIgM and sIgD, antibodies to delta heavy chains were more potent than those to mu heavy chains in inducing Ca2+ responses, whereas the opposite pattern was seen with regard to 86Rb+ responses. These results demonstrate that sIgM and sIgD can deliver different biochemical signals to the cell. PMID:3921300

  1. Accuracy of a point-of-care ELISA test kit for predicting the presence of protective canine parvovirus and canine distemper virus antibody concentrations in dogs.

    PubMed

    Litster, A L; Pressler, B; Volpe, A; Dubovi, E

    2012-08-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) are highly infectious and often fatal diseases with worldwide distributions, and are important population management considerations in animal shelters. A point-of-care ELISA test kit is available to detect serum antibodies to CPV and CDV, and presumptively to predict protective status. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the test compared to CPV hemagglutination inhibition titers and CDV serum neutralization titers determined by a reference laboratory, using sera collected from dogs housed at animal shelters. The ELISA test was used under both field and laboratory conditions and duplicate specimens were processed using an extra wash step. The test kit yielded accurate results (CPV: sensitivity 92.3%, specificity 93.5%; CDV: sensitivity 75.7%, specificity 91.8%) under field conditions. CDV sensitivity was improved by performing the test under laboratory conditions and using an optical density (OD) meter (laboratory performed 94.0%; OD 88.1%). Point-of-care ELISA testing for serum CPV and CDV antibody titers was demonstrated to be a useful tool for determining antibody status when making decisions regarding the need for CPV and/or CDV vaccination and also in animal shelters for population management.

  2. Absolute quantification of the total and antidrug antibody-bound concentrations of recombinant human α-glucosidase in human plasma using protein G extraction and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Bronsema, Kees J; Bischoff, Rainer; Pijnappel, W W M Pim; van der Ploeg, Ans T; van de Merbel, Nico C

    2015-04-21

    The administration of protein-based pharmaceuticals can cause the in vivo formation of antidrug antibodies (ADAs), which may reduce the efficacy of the therapy by binding to the protein drug. An accurate determination of the total and ADA-bound concentrations of the drug gives information on the extent of this immune response and its consequences and may help develop improved therapeutic regimens. We present an absolute quantitative method to differentiate between total, free, and ADA-bound drug for recombinant human alpha acid glucosidase (rhGAA) in plasma from patients suffering from Pompe's disease. LC-MS/MS quantification of a signature peptide after trypsin digestion of plasma samples before and after an extraction of the total IgG content of plasma with protein G coated beads was used to determine the total and the ADA-bound fractions of rhGAA in samples from Pompe patients after enzyme infusion. The methods for total and ADA-bound rhGAA allow quantitation of the drug in the range of 0.5 to 500 μg/mL using 20 μL of plasma and met the regular bioanalytical validation requirements, both in the absence and presence of high levels of anti-rhGAA antibodies. This demonstrates that the ADA-bound rhGAA fraction can be accurately and precisely determined and is not influenced by sample dilution, repeated freezing and thawing, or extended benchtop or frozen storage. In samples from a patient with a reduced response to therapy due to ADAs, high ADA-bound concentrations of rhGAA were found, while in the samples from a patient lacking ADAs, no significant ADA-bound concentrations were found. Since protein G captures the complete IgG content of plasma, including all antidrug antibodies, the described extraction approach is universally applicable for the quantification of ADA-bound concentrations of all non-IgG-based biopharmaceuticals.

  3. Conference Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillett, Wade

    2016-01-01

    The following is an exploration of the spatial configurations (and their implications) within a typical panel session at an academic conference. The presenter initially takes up different roles and hyperbolically describes some possible messages that the spatial arrangement sends. Eventually, the presenter engages the audience members in atypical…

  4. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society December 7-10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Carter, Paul J; Melis, Joost P M

    2016-01-01

    The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6-10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on "Antibodies to watch" in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries.

  5. The making of bispecific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT During the past two decades we have seen a phenomenal evolution of bispecific antibodies for therapeutic applications. The ‘zoo’ of bispecific antibodies is populated by many different species, comprising around 100 different formats, including small molecules composed solely of the antigen-binding sites of two antibodies, molecules with an IgG structure, and large complex molecules composed of different antigen-binding moieties often combined with dimerization modules. The application of sophisticated molecular design and genetic engineering has solved many of the technical problems associated with the formation of bispecific antibodies such as stability, solubility and other parameters that confer drug properties. These parameters may be summarized under the term ‘developability’. In addition, different ‘target product profiles’, i.e., desired features of the bispecific antibody to be generated, mandates the need for access to a diverse panel of formats. These may vary in size, arrangement, valencies, flexibility and geometry of their binding modules, as well as in their distribution and pharmacokinetic properties. There is not ‘one best format’ for generating bispecific antibodies, and no single format is suitable for all, or even most of, the desired applications. Instead, the bispecific formats collectively serve as a valuable source of diversity that can be applied to the development of therapeutics for various indications. Here, a comprehensive overview of the different bispecific antibody formats is provided. PMID:28071970

  6. High Concentrations of Angiopoietin-Like Protein 4 Detected in Serum from Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Be Explained by Non-Specific Antibody Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Makoveichuk, Elena; Ruge, Toralph; Nilsson, Solveig; Södergren, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is suggested to be a master regulator of plasma triglyceride metabolism. Our aim was to study whether the previously reported high levels of ANGPTL4 detected in serum from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by ELISA was due to any specific molecular form of this protein (oligomers, monomers or fragments). ANGPTL4 levels were first determined in serum from 68 RA patients and 43 age and sex matched control subjects and the mean values differed by a factor of 5.0. Then, ANGPTL4 was analyzed after size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of serum samples. With serum from one of the RA patients with high levels of ANGPTL4, the dominant reactivity was found in fractions corresponding to high-molecular weight proteins. In addition, a minor peak of reactivity eluting late from the column was found both in the patient and in controls. By the use of HeteroBlock®, and by careful selection of antibodies, we documented non-specific reactions for ANGPTL4 in 39% of samples from the RA patients, most likely due to cross-reactivity of the antibodies with rheumatoid factor (RF). The corresponding figure for control subjects was 6.3%. After corrections for non-specific reactions, the mean level of ANGPTL4 in serum from RA patients was still significantly higher than in control individuals (mean levels were 101±62 and 67±39 ng/ml respectively, P = 0.02). We re-analyzed samples from our previously published studies on ANGPL4 levels in patients on hemodialysis and patients with diabetes type 2. These samples did not show false positive reactions. The levels of ANGPTL4 were comparable to those detected previously. PMID:28107351

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies against Pectin

    PubMed Central

    Liners, Françoise; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Didembourg, Christian; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been produced that recognize a conformation of homopolygalacturonic acid (pectic acid) induced by an optimum concentration of calcium and sodium of about 1 and 150 millinormal, respectively. The epitope recognized is probably part of the dimers of pectin chains associated according to the `egg box' model. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667195

  8. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Geskin, Larisa J

    2015-10-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized cancer therapy. Approaches targeting specific cellular targets on the malignant cells and in tumor microenvironment have been proved to be successful in hematologic malignancies, including cutaneous lymphomas. mAb-based therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma has demonstrated high response rates and a favorable toxicity profile in clinical trials. Several antibodies and antibody-based conjugates are approved for use in clinical practice, and many more are in ongoing and planned clinical trials. In addition, these safe and effective drugs can be used as pillars for sequential therapies in a rational stepwise manner.

  9. Conferences revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, Jonathan

    2008-08-01

    Way back in the mid-1990s, as a young PhD student, I wrote a Lateral Thoughts article about my first experience of an academic conference (Physics World 1994 October p80). It was a peach of a trip - most of the lab decamped to Grenoble for a week of great weather, beautiful scenery and, of course, the physics. A whole new community was there for me to see in action, and the internationality of it all helped us to forget about England's non-appearance in the 1994 World Cup finals.

  10. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-zhe; Coljee, Vincent W.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  11. Localization of a domain in the FimH adhesin of Escherichia coli type 1 fimbriae capable of receptor recognition and use of a domain-specific antibody to confer protection against experimental urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Thankavel, K; Madison, B; Ikeda, T; Malaviya, R; Shah, A H; Arumugam, P M; Abraham, S N

    1997-01-01

    The FimH subunit of type 1-fimbriated Escherichia coli has been implicated as an important determinant of bacterial adherence and colonization of the urinary tract. Here, we sought to localize the functionally important domain(s) within the FimH molecule and to determine if antibodies against this domain would block adherence of type 1-fimbriated E. coli to the bladder mucosa in situ and in vivo in an established mouse model of cystitis. We generated translational fusion proteins of disparate regions of the FimH molecule with an affinity tag MalE, and tested each of the fusion products in vitro for functional activity. The minimum region responsible for binding mouse bladder epithelial cells and a soluble mannoprotein, horseradish peroxidase, was contained within residues 1-100 of the FimH molecule. We validated and extended these findings by demonstrating that antibodies directed at the putative binding region of FimH or at synthetic peptides corresponding to epitopes within the binding domain could specifically block type 1 fimbriae-mediated bacterial adherence to bladder epithelial cells in situ and yeast cells in vitro. Next, we compared the ability of mice passively immunized intraperitoneally with antisera raised against residues 1-25 and 253-264 of FimH or 1-13 of FimA to resist bladder colonization in vivo after intravesicular challenge with type 1-fimbriated E. coli. Only the antibody directed at the putative binding region of FimH (anti- s-FimH1-25) significantly reduced E. coli bladder infections in the experimental mouse model of urinary tract infections. Similar results were obtained when the mice were actively immunized with synthetic peptides corresponding to residues 1-25 and 253-264 of FimH or 1-13 of FimA. The mechanism of protection was attributed, at least in part, to inhibition of bacterial adherence to the bladder surface by s-FimH1-25-specific antibody molecules that had filtered through the kidneys into the urine. The level of Fim

  12. [Determination of plasma concentrations of antioxidants, antibodies against oxidized LDL, and homocysteine in a population sample from Liège].

    PubMed

    Pincemail, J; Siquet, J; Chapelle, J P; Cheramy-Bien, J P; Paulissen, G; Chantillon, A M; Christiaens, G; Gielen, J; Limet, R; Defraigne, J O

    2000-01-01

    A large number of epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. In this way, following reference values in plasmatic antioxidants have been determined in a group of 123 blood donors (94 males, 29 females; age: 21-64 years) living in the surroundings of Liege, Belgium: vitamin A (1.5-3.62 mmol/l), vitamin C (3.68-75.21 mmol/l), vitamin E (16.98-46.46 mmol/l), ratio vitamin E/cholesterol (3.92-8.32 mmol/mmol), selenium (0.66-1.26 mmol/l), sulphydryl proteins (216-556 mmol/l), uric acid (174-477 mmol/l), superoxide dismutase (542-852 IU/g hemoglobine), glutathion peroxidase (39.55-91.83 IU/g hemoglobine). Only a few number of subjects were found with values corresponding to high risk of deficiency in antioxidants although low values in vitamin C (< 11.35 mmol/l) and in selenium (< 0.75 mmol/l) were respectively observed in 5.69 and 10.5% of our subjects. Autoantibodies against oxidized LDL, as marker of oxidative stress, and homocysteine, as a risk factor of atherosclerosis involved in the development of oxidative stress, have also been investigated. Approximatively 40% of the population presented values higher than the superior limit mean value (20.3% > 650 IU/l in autoantibodies and 19.5% > 15.2 mmol/l in homocysteine) that are, however, not correlated with age or low levels in antioxidants. The effect of smoking (25% of the population) contributed to significantly decrease vitamin C, selenium and glutathion peroxidase concentrations by 31.9 and 13% when compared to nonsmokers. Intake of 1 to 4 fruits per day resulted in a significant increase of 56.9% in vitamin C when compared to nonconsumers (26.8% of the population). In contrast, homocysteine concentrations were significantly decreased by 21.4% in fruits consumers. Thank to the development of methods allowing the routine dosage of all these parameters, general practitioners can now easily establish the oxidative stress

  13. Endogenous Antibodies for Tumor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Barrie S.; Honeyman, Joshua N.; Darcy, David G.; Smith, Peter T.; Williams, Andrew R.; Lim, Irene Isabel P.; Johnson, Linda K.; Gönen, Mithat; Simon, Joel S.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer immunology has provided diagnostic and therapeutic instruments through serum autoantibody biomarkers and exogenous monoclonal antibodies. While some endogenous antibodies are found within or surrounding transformed tissue, the extent to which this exists has not been entirely characterized. We find that in transgenic and xenograft mouse models of cancer, endogenous gamma immunoglobulin (IgG) is present at higher concentration in malignantly transformed organs compared to non-transformed organs in the same mouse or organs of cognate wild-type mice. The enrichment of endogenous antibodies within the malignant tissue provides a potential means of identifying and tracking malignant cells in vivo as they mutate and diversify. Exploiting these antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is possible through the use of agents that bind endogenous antibodies. PMID:24875800

  14. Complete mapping of viral escape from neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Scott E.

    2017-01-01

    Identifying viral mutations that confer escape from antibodies is crucial for understanding the interplay between immunity and viral evolution. We describe a high-throughput approach to quantify the selection that monoclonal antibodies exert on all single amino-acid mutations to a viral protein. This approach, mutational antigenic profiling, involves creating all replication-competent protein variants of a virus, selecting with antibody, and using deep sequencing to identify enriched mutations. We use mutational antigenic profiling to comprehensively identify mutations that enable influenza virus to escape four monoclonal antibodies targeting hemagglutinin, and validate key findings with neutralization assays. We find remarkable mutation-level idiosyncrasy in antibody escape: for instance, at a single residue targeted by two antibodies, some mutations escape both antibodies while other mutations escape only one or the other. Because mutational antigenic profiling rapidly maps all mutations selected by an antibody, it is useful for elucidating immune specificities and interpreting the antigenic consequences of viral genetic variation. PMID:28288189

  15. The Red Pen Revisited: Teaching Composition through Student Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fassler, Barbara

    1978-01-01

    Private conferences with students allow the composition teacher to give more feedback, increase teacher concentration and pace, demystify the evaluation process, and facilitate teacher/student interaction. (DD)

  16. Vaccination of mice with a modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus expressing the African horse sickness virus (AHSV) capsid protein VP2 induces virus neutralising antibodies that confer protection against AHSV upon passive immunisation.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Pinilla, Eva; de la Poza, Francisco; Gubbins, Simon; Mertens, Peter Paul Clement; Ortego, Javier; Castillo-Olivares, Javier

    2014-02-13

    In previous studies we showed that a recombinant Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus expressing the protein VP2 of AHSV serotype 4 (MVA-VP2) induced virus neutralising antibodies in horses and protected interferon alpha receptor gene knock-out mice (IFNAR-/-) against challenge. We continued these studies and determined, in the IFNAR-/- mouse model, whether the antibody responses induced by MVA-VP2 vaccination play a key role in protection against AHSV. Thus, groups of mice were vaccinated with wild type MVA (MVA-wt) or MVA-VP2 and the antisera from these mice were used in a passive immunisation experiment. Donor antisera from (a) MVA-wt; (b) MVA-VP2 vaccinated; or (c) MVA-VP2 vaccinated and AHSV infected mice, were transferred to AHSV non-immune recipient mice. The recipients were challenged with virulent AHSV together with MVA-VP2 vaccinated and MVA-wt vaccinated control animals and the levels of protection against AHSV-4 were compared between all these groups. The results showed that following AHSV challenge, mice that were passively immunised with MVA-VP2 vaccinated antisera were highly protected against AHSV disease and had lower levels of viraemia than recipients of MVA-wt antisera. Our study indicates that MVA-VP2 vaccination induces a highly protective humoral immune response against AHSV.

  17. Antibody response in sheep following immunization with Streptococcus bovis in different adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Shu, Q; Bir, S H; Gill, H S; Duan, E; Xu, Y; Hiliard; Rowe, J B

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that immunization with Streptococcus bovis using Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) may confer protection against lactic acidosis in sheep. The major objective of this study was to compare the antibody responses to S. bovis in a practically acceptable adjuvant (Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA); QuilA; dextran sulphate (Dex); Imject Alum; or Gerbu) and in FCA. Thirty-five sheep were randomly allocated to 7 treatment groups. Six groups were immunized with S. bovis in an adjuvant; the other group served as the non-immunization control. The primary immunization was administered intramuscularly on day 0. followed by a booster injection on day 28. Immunization with FCA induced the highest saliva and serum antibody responses. The saliva antibody concentrations in the FIA and QuilA groups were significantly higher than those in the Alum, Dex and Gerbu groups (p < 0.01). The serum antibody concentration in the FIA group was significantly higher than those in the QuilA, Alum. Dex and Gerbu groups (p < 0.01). Immunization enhanced the antibody level in faeces (p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between the different adjuvant groups (p > 0.05). Seven and 14 days following booster immunization, the saliva antibody levels induced by QuilA and/or FIA were comparable with the level stimulated by FCA (p > 0.05). There was a strongly positive correlation (R2 = 0.770, p < 0.01) between the antibody concentrations in salival and serum. Compared with the controls, a higher faecal dry matter content was observed in the animals immunized with either FCA or QuilA. The change in faecal dry matter content was positively associated with the faecal antibody concentration (R2 = 0.441, p < 0.05). These results indicate that FIA and QuilA were effective at inducing high levels of antibody responses to S. bovis, and suggest that either Freund's incomplete adjuvant or QuilA may be useful for preparing a practically acceptable vaccine against lactic

  18. Reagents for astatination of biomolecules. 6. An intact antibody conjugated with a maleimido-closo-decaborate(2-) reagent via sulfhydryl groups had considerably higher kidney concentrations than the same antibody conjugated with an isothiocyanato-closo-decaborate(2-) reagent via lysine amines.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, D Scott; Chyan, Ming-Kuan; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Chen, Yun; Hamlin, Donald K; Santos, Erlinda B; Kornblit, Brian T; Sandmaier, Brenda M

    2012-03-21

    We are investigating the use of an (211)At-labeled anti-CD45 monoclonal antibody (mAb) as a replacement of total body irradiation in conditioning regimens designed to decrease the toxicity of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). As part of that investigation, dose-escalation studies were conducted in dogs using (211)At-labeled anticanine CD45 mAb, CA12.10C12, conjugated with a maleimido-closo-decaborate(2-) derivative, 4. Unacceptable renal toxicity was noted in the dogs receiving doses in the 0.27-0.62 mCi/kg range. This result was not anticipated, as no toxicity had been noted in prior biodistribution and toxicity studies conducted in mice. Studies were conducted to understand the cause of the renal toxicity and to find a way to circumvent it. A dog biodistribution study was conducted with (123)I-labeled CA12.10C12 that had been conjugated with 4. The biodistribution data showed that 10-fold higher kidney concentrations were obtained with the maleimido-conjugate than had been obtained in a previous biodistribution study with (123)I-labeled CA12.10C12 conjugated with an amine-reactive phenylisothiocyanato-CHX-A″ derivative. The difference in kidney concentrations observed in dogs for the two conjugation approaches led to an investigation of the reagents. SE-HPLC analyses showed that the purity of the CA12.10C12 conjugated via reduced disulfides was lower than that obtained with amine-reactive conjugation reagents, and nonreducing SDS-PAGE analyses indicated protein fragments were present in the disulfide reduced conjugate. Although we had previously prepared closo-decaborate(2-) derivatives with amine-reactive functional groups (e.g., 6 and 8), a new, easily synthesized, amine-reactive (phenylisothiocyanate) derivative, 10, was prepared for use in the current studies. A biodistribution was conducted with coadministered (125)I- and (211)At-labeled CA12.10C10 conjugated with 10. In that study, lower kidney concentrations were obtained for both radionuclides

  19. Viscosity of high concentration protein formulations of monoclonal antibodies of the IgG1 and IgG4 subclass - prediction of viscosity through protein-protein interaction measurements.

    PubMed

    Neergaard, Martin S; Kalonia, Devendra S; Parshad, Henrik; Nielsen, Anders D; Møller, Eva H; van de Weert, Marco

    2013-06-14

    The purpose of this work was to explore the relation between protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and solution viscosity at high protein concentration using three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), two of the IgG4 subclass and one of the IgG1 subclass. A range of methods was used to quantify the PPI either at low concentration (interaction parameter (kD) obtained from dynamic light scattering, DLS) or at high concentration (solution storage modulus (G') from ultrasonic shear rheology). We also developed a novel method for the determination of PPI using the apparent radius of the protein at either low or high protein concentration determined using DLS. The PPI measurements were correlated with solution viscosity (measured by DLS using polystyrene nanospheres and ultrasonic shear rheology) as a function of pH (4-9) and ionic strength (10, 50 and 150 mM). Our measurements showed that the highest solution viscosity was observed under conditions with the most negative kD, the highest apparent radius and the lowest net charge. An increase in ionic strength resulted in a change in the nature of the PPI at low pH from repulsive to attractive. In the neutral to alkaline pH region the mAbs behaved differently with respect to increase in ionic strength. Two mAbs (A and B) showed little or no effect of increasing ionic strength, whereas mAb-C showed a remarkable decrease in attractive PPI and viscosity. Previous studies have mainly investigated mAbs of the IgG₁ and IgG₂ subclass. We show here, for the first time, that mAbs of the IgG₄ subclass behave similar as the other subclasses. By comparison of the three tested mAbs with mAbs investigated in other studies a clear linear trend emerges between the pH of strongest attractive PPI and highest solution viscosity. The determination of PPI using either kD or apparent radius is thus a useful prediction tool in the determination of solution conditions that favors low solution viscosity at high protein concentration of

  20. Antibody engineering & therapeutics, the annual meeting of the antibody society December 7–10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA

    PubMed Central

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M.; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Carter, Paul J.; Melis, Joost P.M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6–10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on “Antibodies to watch” in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  1. Enhanced Potency of a Broadly Neutralizing HIV-1 Antibody In Vitro Improves Protection against Lentiviral Infection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Kwon, Young Do; Ko, Sung-Youl; Pegu, Amarendra; Louder, Mark K.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Wu, Xueling; Zhu, Jiang; Boyington, Jeffrey C.; Chen, Xuejun; Shi, Wei; Yang, Zhi-yong; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Soto, Cinque; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhou, Tongqing; Todd, John-Paul; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Eudailey, Joshua; Roberts, Kyle E.; Donald, Bruce R.; Bailer, Robert T.; Ledgerwood, Julie; Mullikin, James C.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Koup, Richard A.; Graham, Barney S.; Nason, Martha C.; Connors, Mark; Haynes, Barton F.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Roederer, Mario; Kwong, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    protein was used to engineer a next-generation antibody with 5- to 8-fold increased potency in vitro. When administered to nonhuman primates, this antibody conferred protection at a 5-fold lower concentration than the original antibody. Our studies demonstrate an important correlation between in vitro assays used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of antibodies and their in vivo effectiveness. PMID:25142607

  2. Antibodies against the majority subunit of Type IV pili disperse nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms in a LuxS-dependent manner and confer therapeutic resolution of experimental otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Laura A.; Jurcisek, Joseph A.; Ward, Michael O.; Jordan, Zachary B.; Goodman, Steven D.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite resulting in a similar overall outcome, unlike antibodies directed against the DNABII protein, integration host factor (IHF), which induce catastrophic structural collapse of biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), those directed against a recombinant soluble form of PilA [the majority subunit of Type IV pili (Tfp) produced by NTHI], mediated gradual ‘top-down’ dispersal of NTHI from biofilms. This dispersal occurred via a mechanism that was dependent upon expression of both PilA (and by inference, Tfp) and production of AI-2 quorum signaling molecules by LuxS. The addition of rsPilA to a biofilm-targeted therapeutic vaccine formulation comprised of IHF plus the powerful adjuvant dmLT, and delivered via a non-invasive transcutaneous immunization route, induced an immune response that targeted two important determinants essential for biofilm formation by NTHI. This resulted in significantly earlier eradication of NTHI from both planktonic and adherent populations in the middle ear, disruption of mucosal biofilms already resident within middle ears prior to immunization, and rapid resolution of signs of disease in an animal model of experimental otitis media. These data support continued development of this novel combinatorial immunization approach for resolution and/or prevention of multiple diseases of the respiratory tract caused by NTHI. PMID:25597921

  3. Antibodies against the majority subunit of type IV Pili disperse nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms in a LuxS-dependent manner and confer therapeutic resolution of experimental otitis media.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Laura A; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Ward, Michael O; Jordan, Zachary B; Goodman, Steven D; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2015-04-01

    Despite resulting in a similar overall outcome, unlike antibodies directed against the DNABII protein, integration host factor (IHF), which induce catastrophic structural collapse of biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), those directed against a recombinant soluble form of PilA [the majority subunit of Type IV pili (Tfp) produced by NTHI], mediated gradual 'top-down' dispersal of NTHI from biofilms. This dispersal occurred via a mechanism that was dependent upon expression of both PilA (and by inference, Tfp) and production of AI-2 quorum signaling molecules by LuxS. The addition of rsPilA to a biofilm-targeted therapeutic vaccine formulation comprised of IHF plus the powerful adjuvant dmLT and delivered via a noninvasive transcutaneous immunization route induced an immune response that targeted two important determinants essential for biofilm formation by NTHI. This resulted in significantly earlier eradication of NTHI from both planktonic and adherent populations in the middle ear, disruption of mucosal biofilms already resident within middle ears prior to immunization and rapid resolution of signs of disease in an animal model of experimental otitis media. These data support continued development of this novel combinatorial immunization approach for resolution and/or prevention of multiple diseases of the respiratory tract caused by NTHI.

  4. Factors determining antibody distribution in tumors.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Greg M; Schmidt, Michael M; Wittrup, K Dane

    2008-02-01

    The development of antibody therapies for cancer is increasing rapidly, primarily owing to their specificity. Antibody distribution in tumors is often extremely uneven, however, leading to some malignant cells being exposed to saturating concentrations of antibody, whereas others are completely untargeted. This is detrimental because large regions of cells escape therapy, whereas other regions might be exposed to suboptimal concentrations that promote a selection of resistant mutants. The distribution of antibody depends on a variety of factors, including dose, affinity, antigens per cell and molecular size. Because these parameters are often known or easily estimated, a quick calculation based on simple modeling considerations can predict the uniformity of targeting within a tumor. Such analyses should enable experimental researchers to identify in a straightforward way the limitations in achieving evenly distributed antibody, and design and test improved antibody therapeutics more rationally.

  5. Conference Abstracts: AEDS '82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Abstracts from nine selected papers presented at the 1982 Association for Educational Data Systems (AEDS) conference are provided. Copies of conference proceedings may be obtained for fifteen dollars from the Association. (MP)

  6. Engineered antibodies take center stage.

    PubMed

    Huston, J S; George, A J

    2001-01-01

    The start of the post-genomic era provides a useful juncture for reflection on the state of antibody engineering, which will be a critical technology for relating function and pathology to genomic sequence in biology and medicine. The phenomenal progress in deciphering the human genome has given significant impetus to the application of engineered antibodies in proteomics. Thus, advances in phage display antibody libraries can now help to define novel gene function and the measurement of abnormal protein expression in pathological states. Furthermore, intrabody and antibody engineering provide vehicles for the development of molecular medicines of the future. In addition to these new directions, antibody engineering has begun to show concrete success in its long-term efforts to develop targeted immunotherapies for cancer and other diseases. The cornerstones of clinical development are the detailed academic clinical trials that continue to push the boundaries of engineered antibodies into the real world. The field displays a healthy impatience for practical results, as research accelerates with concerted efforts to transfer preclinical insights into clinical trials. Growing private and governmental expenditures will lead to the rapid expansion of life-saving immunotherapeutic agents. The present review developed from our effort to report on the 11th Annual International Conference on Antibody Engineering (3-6 December 2000). This annual meeting is a forum for discussions on the latest advances in antibody engineering groups from around the world, and now includes the broader agenda of engineering in molecular immunology. In bringing scientists together to exchange ideas at this open forum, new collaborations and the threads of new discoveries are woven. For example, Professors Gerhard Wagner (Harvard Medical School), Dennis Burton (Scripps Research Institute), and Peter Hudson (CSIRO, Melbourne, Australia) gave exciting insights on structural immunobiology that had

  7. The General Conference Mennonites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    General Conference Mennonites and Old Order Amish are compared and contrasted in the areas of physical appearance, religious beliefs, formal education, methods of farming, and home settings. General Conference Mennonites and Amish differ in physical appearance and especially in dress. The General Conference Mennonite men and women dress the same…

  8. EDITORIAL: Conference program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-04-01

    Some of the papers and talks given at the conference have not been published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The attached PDF file lists the full conference program and indicates (with an asterisk) those papers or talks which are not present in this volume.

  9. Youth Conference Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brenda H.

    This handbook is designed to provide practical aid to those who have charge of the planning and organization of a youth conference, Defined as a conference to provide practical information as well as information about possible responsibilities, risks, and consequences of actions, related to the chosen conference topic. Suggestions are given for…

  10. Parent Conferences. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Roslyn; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents six workshop sessions on parent conferences: (1) "Parents' Perspectives on Conferencing" (R. Duffy); (2) "Three Way Conferences" (G. Zeller); (3) "Conferencing with Parents of Infants" (K. Albrecht); (4) "Conferencing with Parents of School-Agers" (L. G. Miller); (5) "Cross Cultural Conferences" (J. Gonzalez-Mena); and (6) "Working with…

  11. [Improved IgG Antibody Diagnostics of Feather Duvet Lung by an Antibody Screening Test].

    PubMed

    Sennekamp, J; Lehmann, E

    2015-11-01

    The underdiagnosed feather duvet lung, an extrinsic allergic alveolitis (hypersensitivity pneumonitis) caused by duck and goose feathers, can be more frequently diagnosed, if duck and goose feather antibodies are included in the panel of the routinely applied IgG antibody screening test. This does not necessarily require extending the screening test to include duck and goose feather antigens. By analysing 100 sera with duck and goose antibodies we found that the commonly used pigeon and budgerigar antibodies can also screen for feather duvet antibodies. All examined sera lacking pigeon and budgerigar antibodies also lacked clear-cut duck and goose feather antibodies. The examined sera with strong pigeon or budgerigar antibodies always also contained feather duvet antibodies. However, sera with medium or low concentrated pigeon or budgerigar antibodies are not always associated with feather duvet antibodies. In the light of these observations, we find that 71% of the duck and goose antibody analyses would be dispensable without essential loss of quality, if the results of screening for pigeon and budgerigar antibodies were incorporated into the procedure of a step-by- step diagnostics.

  12. Antibodies for immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Newman, D J

    2000-01-01

    What is an immunoassay without an antibody? Clearly the name provides the answer to this question; without antibodies there would be no immunoassays. An immunoassay is an analytical technique, quantitative or qualitative, that relies absolutely on the specificity and affinity of the interaction between epitope and paratope for generation of a detectable response. The actual detection of this binding interaction can be via one of literally hundreds of different signal transduction mechanisms, e.g., fluorimetry, chemiluminescence, agglutination (turbidimetry or nephelometry) enzyme reactions, and so forth (1 -4), but these are simply transducing systems for the primary binding interaction. Antibodies thus provide us with an exquisitely sensitive and specific analytical technology for detecting and quantifying epitopic structures. These structures include amino-acid derivatives, e.g., thyroid hormones, peptides, e.g., vasopressin, proteins, e.g., cytokines, as well as carbohydrate structures, e.g., CA-125. Immunoassay technology has developed to such an extent that it is probably the most versatile analytical tool available able to identify and quantify epitopic structures across the milli- to zeptomolar concentration ranges (2).

  13. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003352.htm Serum herpes simplex antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Serum herpes simplex antibodies is a blood test that looks for antibodies ...

  14. Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference.

    PubMed

    Lee, Violet; Liu, Ang; Groeber, Elizabeth; Moghaddam, Mehran; Schiller, James; Tweed, Joseph A; Walker, Gregory S

    2016-02-01

    Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference, Hyatt Regency Hotel, Cambridge, MA, USA, 14-16 September 2015 The Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis (APA) conference took place at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Cambridge, MA, on 14-16 September 2015. The 3-day conference affords pharmaceutical professionals, academic researchers and industry regulators the opportunity to collectively participate in meaningful and relevant discussions impacting the areas of pharmaceutical drug development. The APA conference was organized in three workshops encompassing the disciplines of regulated bioanalysis, discovery bioanalysis (encompassing new and emerging technologies) and biotransformation. The conference included a short course titled 'Bioanalytical considerations for the clinical development of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs)', an engaging poster session, several panel and round table discussions and over 50 diverse talks from leading industry and academic scientists.

  15. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics 2016: The Antibody Society's annual meeting, December 11-15, 2016, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Larrick, James W; Alfenito, Mark R; Scott, Jamie K; Parren, Paul W H I; Burton, Dennis R; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Lemere, Cynthia A; Messer, Anne; Huston, James S; Carter, Paul J; Veldman, Trudi; Chester, Kerry A; Schuurman, Janine; Adams, Gregory P; Reichert, Janice M

    Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the largest meeting devoted to antibody science and technology and the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in San Diego, CA on December 11-15, 2016. Each of 14 sessions will include six presentations by leading industry and academic experts. In this meeting preview, the session chairs discuss the relevance of their topics to current and future antibody therapeutics development. Session topics include bispecifics and designer polyclonal antibodies; antibodies for neurodegenerative diseases; the interface between passive and active immunotherapy; antibodies for non-cancer indications; novel antibody display, selection and screening technologies; novel checkpoint modulators / immuno-oncology; engineering antibodies for T-cell therapy; novel engineering strategies to enhance antibody functions; and the biological Impact of Fc receptor engagement. The meeting will open with keynote speakers Dennis R. Burton (The Scripps Research Institute), who will review progress toward a neutralizing antibody-based HIV vaccine; Olivera J. Finn, (University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine), who will discuss prophylactic cancer vaccines as a source of therapeutic antibodies; and Paul Richardson (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute), who will provide a clinical update on daratumumab for multiple myeloma. In a featured presentation, a representative of the World Health Organization's INN expert group will provide a perspective on antibody naming. "Antibodies to watch in 2017" and progress on The Antibody Society's 2016 initiatives will be presented during the Society's special session. In addition, two pre-conference workshops covering ways to accelerate antibody drugs to the clinic and the applications of next-generation sequencing in antibody discovery and engineering will be held on Sunday December 11, 2016.

  16. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics 2016: The Antibody Society's annual meeting, December 11–15, 2016, San Diego, CA

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, James W.; Alfenito, Mark R.; Scott, Jamie K.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Burton, Dennis R.; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Lemere, Cynthia A.; Messer, Anne; Huston, James S.; Carter, Paul J.; Veldman, Trudi; Chester, Kerry A.; Schuurman, Janine; Adams, Gregory P.; Reichert, Janice M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the largest meeting devoted to antibody science and technology and the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in San Diego, CA on December 11-15, 2016. Each of 14 sessions will include six presentations by leading industry and academic experts. In this meeting preview, the session chairs discuss the relevance of their topics to current and future antibody therapeutics development. Session topics include bispecifics and designer polyclonal antibodies; antibodies for neurodegenerative diseases; the interface between passive and active immunotherapy; antibodies for non-cancer indications; novel antibody display, selection and screening technologies; novel checkpoint modulators / immuno-oncology; engineering antibodies for T-cell therapy; novel engineering strategies to enhance antibody functions; and the biological Impact of Fc receptor engagement. The meeting will open with keynote speakers Dennis R. Burton (The Scripps Research Institute), who will review progress toward a neutralizing antibody-based HIV vaccine; Olivera J. Finn, (University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine), who will discuss prophylactic cancer vaccines as a source of therapeutic antibodies; and Paul Richardson (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute), who will provide a clinical update on daratumumab for multiple myeloma. In a featured presentation, a representative of the World Health Organization's INN expert group will provide a perspective on antibody naming. “Antibodies to watch in 2017” and progress on The Antibody Society's 2016 initiatives will be presented during the Society's special session. In addition, two pre-conference workshops covering ways to accelerate antibody drugs to the clinic and the applications of next-generation sequencing in antibody discovery and engineering will be held on Sunday December 11, 2016. PMID:27557809

  17. Antibody-based resistance to plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Schillberg, S; Zimmermann, S; Zhang, M Y; Fischer, R

    2001-01-01

    Plant diseases are a major threat to the world food supply, as up to 15% of production is lost to pathogens. In the past, disease control and the generation of resistant plant lines protected against viral, bacterial or fungal pathogens, was achieved using conventional breeding based on crossings, mutant screenings and backcrossing. Many approaches in this field have failed or the resistance obtained has been rapidly broken by the pathogens. Recent advances in molecular biotechnology have made it possible to obtain and to modify genes that are useful for generating disease resistant crops. Several strategies, including expression of pathogen-derived sequences or anti-pathogenic agents, have been developed to engineer improved pathogen resistance in transgenic plants. Antibody-based resistance is a novel strategy for generating transgenic plants resistant to pathogens. Decades ago it was shown that polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies can neutralize viruses, bacteria and selected fungi. This approach has been improved recently by the development of recombinant antibodies (rAbs). Crop resistance can be engineered by the expression of pathogen-specific antibodies, antibody fragments or antibody fusion proteins. The advantages of this approach are that rAbs can be engineered against almost any target molecule, and it has been demonstrated that expression of functional pathogen-specific rAbs in plants confers effective pathogen protection. The efficacy of antibody-based resistance was first shown for plant viruses and its application to other plant pathogens is becoming more established. However, successful use of antibodies to generate plant pathogen resistance relies on appropriate target selection, careful antibody design, efficient antibody expression, stability and targeting to appropriate cellular compartments.

  18. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  19. Report on the AIDS Vaccine 2008 Conference.

    PubMed

    Alter, Galit; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Pantophlet, Ralph; Rybicki, Ed P; Buonaguro, Luigi

    2009-03-01

    The "AIDS Vaccine 2008" Conference was held in Cape Town, South Africa (October 13 to 16, 2008) and organized, under the aegis of the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise, by Dr. Lynn Morris (Chair of the Conference) National Institute of Communicable Diseases; Dr. Koleka Mlisana from CAPRISA, University KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, Dr. Glenda Gray from Perinatal HIV Research Unit, University Witwatersrand, Johannesburg and Dr. Carolyn Williamson from Institute of Infectious Diseses. and Molecular Medicine, UCT, Cape Town (Co-Chairs of the Conference). Since the first AIDS Vaccine conference, organized in Paris in 2000, this was the first time it was held outside of the U.S. and Europe, and involved nearly 1,000 participants. Besides three Plenary Sessions with ten state-of-the-art plenary lectures and one Keynote Lecture given by Dr. A.S. Fauci (Director of NIAID, NIH, USA), the Conference was organized in nine oral sessions, four poster discussion groups covering a wide spectrum of scientific information relating to HIV vaccine research and development. Moreover three Symposia, two Special Sessions, one Roundtable as well as two Debates were held, the latter focusing on current controversial topics. The conference opening was memorable for a number of reasons: among these was the presence of South Africa's new Minister of Health, Barbara Hogan who, in her first speech in a major forum as a senior member of the SA Government, affirmed that HIV causes AIDS, and that the search for a vaccine is of paramount importance to SA and the rest of the world. A scientific summary of the Conference is reported in the present article, divided into four major topics: (1) vaccine concepts and design; (2) T-cell immunology and innate immunity; (3) B-cell immunology, neutralizing antibodies and mucosal immunology; and (4) clinical trials.

  20. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science.

  1. Conference report: formulating better medicines for children: 4th European Paediatric Formulation Initiative conference.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jennifer; Mills, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The fourth annual European Paediatric Formulation Initiative (EuPFI) conference on Formulating Better Medicines for Children was held on 19-20 September 2012 at the Institute of Molecular Genetics Congress Centre, Prague, Czech Republic. The 2-day conference concentrated on the latest advances, challenges and opportunities for developing medicinal products and administration devices for pediatric use, both from European and US perspectives. It was aimed specifically at providing exposure to emerging practical applications, and for illustrating remedies utilized by pediatric drug-development teams to overcome hurdles faced in developing medicines for pediatric patients. The conference format included plenary talks, focus sessions on each of the EuPFI work streams (extemporaneous preparations, excipients, pediatric administration devices, taste masking and taste assessment, age-appropriate formulations), case studies, soapbox sessions and a parallel poster display. This conference report summarizes the keynote lectures and also gives a flavor of other presentations and posters from the conference.

  2. Serum Concentrations of Antibodies against Outer Membrane Protein P6, Protein D, and T- and B-Cell Combined Antigenic Epitopes of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in Children and Adults of Different Ages.

    PubMed

    Hua, Chun-Zhen; Hu, Wei-Lin; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Li, Jian-Ping; Hong, Li-Quan; Yan, Jie

    2015-12-16

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is one of the most common etiologies of acute otitis media, rhinosinusitis, and pneumonia. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are the main focus in new vaccine development against NTHi, as the H. influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine does not cover noncapsulated NTHi. The OMPs P6 and protein D are the most promising candidate antigens for an NTHi vaccine, and low antibody levels against them in serum may be correlated with infection caused by NTHi. In the current study, we measured the antibody titers against P6, protein D, and their T- and B-cell combined peptide epitopes in healthy individuals of different ages. We found that children <1 month old had the lowest antibody levels against NTHi P6, protein D, and their T- and B-cell combined antigenic epitopes. Antibody titers increased at ages 1 to 6 months, peaked at 7 months to 3 years, and remained high at 4 to 6 years. The antibody titers started to decrease after 6 years and were the lowest in the 21- to 30-year group. The geometric mean titers (GMTs) of T- and B-cell combined antigenic epitopes in P6 and protein D were positively correlated with those of the protein antigens. Among 12 peptides tested, P6-61, P6-123, and protein D-167 epitopes were better recognized than others in human serum. These findings might contribute to the development of an effective serotype-independent vaccine for H. influenzae.

  3. 10 CFR 501.32 - Conferences (other than prepetition conferences).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conferences (other than prepetition conferences). 501.32... SANCTIONS Written Comments, Public Hearings and Conferences During Administrative Proceedings § 501.32 Conferences (other than prepetition conferences). (a) At any time following commencement of a...

  4. 47 CFR 1.248 - Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. 1... Hearing Proceedings Prehearing Procedures § 1.248 Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. (a) The... to appear at a specified time and place for a conference prior to a hearing, or to submit...

  5. Stepwise engineering of heterodimeric single domain camelid VHH antibodies that passively protect mice from ricin toxin.

    PubMed

    Vance, David J; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Mantis, Nicholas J; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2013-12-20

    In an effort to engineer countermeasures for the category B toxin ricin, we produced and characterized a collection of epitopic tagged, heavy chain-only antibody VH domains (VHHs) specific for the ricin enzymatic (RTA) and binding (RTB) subunits. Among the 20 unique ricin-specific VHHs we identified, six had toxin-neutralizing activity: five specific for RTA and one specific for RTB. Three neutralizing RTA-specific VHHs were each linked via a short peptide spacer to the sole neutralizing anti-RTB VHH to create VHH "heterodimers." As compared with equimolar concentrations of their respective monovalent monomers, all three VHH heterodimers had higher affinities for ricin and, in the case of heterodimer D10/B7, a 6-fold increase in in vitro toxin-neutralizing activity. When passively administered to mice at a 4:1 heterodimer:toxin ratio, D10/B7 conferred 100% survival in response to a 10 × LD50 ricin challenge, whereas a 2:1 heterodimer:toxin ratio conferred 20% survival. However, complete survival was achievable when the low dose of D10/B7 was combined with an IgG1 anti-epitopic tag monoclonal antibody, possibly because decorating the toxin with up to four IgGs promoted serum clearance. The two additional ricin-specific heterodimers, when tested in vivo, provided equal or greater passive protection than D10/B7, thereby warranting further investigation of all three heterodimers as possible therapeutics.

  6. Antibody-mediated resistance against plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Safarnejad, Mohammad Reza; Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Tabatabaie, Meisam; Twyman, Richard M; Schillberg, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Plant diseases have a significant impact on the yield and quality of crops. Many strategies have been developed to combat plant diseases, including the transfer of resistance genes to crops by conventional breeding. However, resistance genes can only be introgressed from sexually-compatible species, so breeders need alternative measures to introduce resistance traits from more distant sources. In this context, genetic engineering provides an opportunity to exploit diverse and novel forms of resistance, e.g. the use of recombinant antibodies targeting plant pathogens. Native antibodies, as a part of the vertebrate adaptive immune system, can bind to foreign antigens and eliminate them from the body. The ectopic expression of antibodies in plants can also interfere with pathogen activity to confer disease resistance. With sufficient knowledge of the pathogen life cycle, it is possible to counter any disease by designing expression constructs so that pathogen-specific antibodies accumulate at high levels in appropriate sub-cellular compartments. Although first developed to tackle plant viruses and still used predominantly for this purpose, antibodies have been targeted against a diverse range of pathogens as well as proteins involved in plant-pathogen interactions. Here we comprehensively review the development and implementation of antibody-mediated disease resistance in plants.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies and method for detecting dioxins and dibenzofurans

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Stanker, Larry H.; Watkins, Bruce E.; Bailey, Nina R.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions of matter are described which include five monoclonal antibodies that react with dioxins and dibenzofurans, and the five hybridomas that produce these monoclonal antibodies. In addition, a method for the use of these antibodies in a sensitive immunoassay for dioxins and dibenzofurans is given, which permits detection of these pollutants in samples at concentrations in the range of a few parts per billion.

  8. Demonstration of the role of cytophilic antibody in resistance to malaria parasites (Plasmodium berghei) in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Green, T J; Kreier, J P

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study of the nature of the immune response against Plasmodium berghei parasites by inbred rats. A macrophage-cytophilic antibody specific for malarial antigens was identified and characterized. Detection of the antibody on the macrophage surface was accomplished by the parasite adherence tests and by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique. Isolation and purification of the macrophage-cytophilic and opsonic antibodies from hyperimmune rat serum was accomplished by QAE-Sephadez A-50 elution chromatography, and of the macrophage-cytophilic antibody by adsorption with and elution from syngeneic macrophages as well. Characterization of the cytophilic antibody as immunoglobulin G1 was done by immunoelectrophoresis and by Ouchterlony-type double diffusion in gel. Passive protection tests in weanling inbred rats have demonstrated that the opsonizing antibody conferred some protection against P. berghei. The macrophage-cytophilic antibody, on the other hand, was not protective alone but acted synergistically with the opsonizing antibody. Images PMID:342408

  9. 76 FR 64083 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, November...

  10. Therapeutic assessment of SEED: a new engineered antibody platform designed to generate mono- and bispecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Muda, Marco; Gross, Alec W; Dawson, Jessica P; He, Chaomei; Kurosawa, Emmi; Schweickhardt, Rene; Dugas, Melanie; Soloviev, Maria; Bernhardt, Anna; Fischer, David; Wesolowski, John S; Kelton, Christie; Neuteboom, Berend; Hock, Bjoern

    2011-05-01

    The strand-exchange engineered domain (SEED) platform was designed to generate asymmetric and bispecific antibody-like molecules, a capability that expands therapeutic applications of natural antibodies. This new protein engineered platform is based on exchanging structurally related sequences of immunoglobulin within the conserved CH3 domains. Alternating sequences from human IgA and IgG in the SEED CH3 domains generate two asymmetric but complementary domains, designated AG and GA. The SEED design allows efficient generation of AG/GA heterodimers, while disfavoring homodimerization of AG and GA SEED CH3 domains. Using a clinically validated antibody (C225), we tested whether Fab derivatives constructed on the SEED platform retain desirable therapeutic antibody features such as in vitro and in vivo stability, favorable pharmacokinetics, ligand binding and effector functions including antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. In addition, we tested SEED with combinations of binder domains (scFv, VHH, Fab). Mono- and bivalent Fab-SEED fusions retain full binding affinity, have excellent biochemical and biophysical stability, and retain desirable antibody-like characteristics conferred by Fc domains. Furthermore, SEED is compatible with different combinations of Fab, scFv and VHH domains. Our assessment shows that the new SEED platform expands therapeutic applications of natural antibodies by generating heterodimeric Fc-analog proteins.

  11. Profiling antibodies to class II HLA in transplant patient sera.

    PubMed

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Lowe, Dave; Buchli, Rico; Daga, Sunil; Royer, Derek; Humphrey, Alisha; Cate, Steven; Osborn, Sean; Mojsilovic, Aleksandar; VanGundy, Rodney; Bardet, Wilfried; Duty, Andrew; Mojsilovic, Danijela; Jackson, Kenneth; Stastny, Peter; Briggs, David; Zehnder, Daniel; Higgins, Rob; Hildebrand, William

    2014-03-01

    Immunizing events including pregnancy, transfusions, and transplantation promote strong alloantibody responses to HLA. Such alloantibodies to HLA preclude organ transplantation, foster hyperacute rejection, and contribute to chronic transplant failure. Diagnostic antibody-screening assays detect alloreactive antibodies, yet key attributes including antibody concentration and isotype remain largely unexplored. The goal here was to provide a detailed profile of allogeneic antibodies to class II HLA. Methodologically, alloantibodies were purified from sensitized patient sera using an HLA-DR11 immunoaffinity column and subsequently categorized. Antibodies to DR11 were found to fix complement, exist at a median serum concentration of 2.3μg/mL, consist of all isotypes, and isotypes IgG2, IgM, and IgE were elevated. Because multimeric isotypes can confound diagnostic determinations of antibody concentration, IgM and IgA isotypes were removed and DR11-IgG tested alone. Despite removal of multimeric isotypes, patient-to-patient antibody concentrations did not correlate with MFI values. In conclusion, allogeneic antibody responses to DR11 are comprised of all antibody isotypes at differing proportions, these combined isotypes fix complement at nominal serum concentrations, and enhancements other than the removal of IgM and IgA multimeric isotypes may be required if MFI is to be used as a means of determining anti-HLA serum antibody concentrations in diagnostic clinical assays.

  12. The Learning Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to call attention to the fact that conferences for professionals rely on massive one-way communication and hence produce little learning for delegates--and to introduce an alternative, the "learning conference", that involves delegates in fun and productive learning processes.…

  13. ASE Annual Conference 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Roger

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the ASE Annual Conference 2010 which was held at Nottingham after a gap of 22 years. As always, the main conference was preceded by International Day, an important event for science educators from across the world. There were two strands to the programme: (1) "What works for me?"--sharing new ideas…

  14. Lyndon Johnson's Press Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen

    Because President Lyndon Johnson understood well the publicity value of the American news media, he sought to exploit them. He saw reporters as "torch bearers" for his programs and policies and used the presidential press conference chiefly for promotional purposes. Although he met with reporters often, his press conferences were usually…

  15. From Conference to Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Robert; Tenenberg, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Revising and extending conference articles for journal publication benefits both authors and readers. The new articles are more complete, and benefit from peer review, feedback from conference presentation, and greater editorial consistency. For those articles that are appropriate, we encourage authors to do this, and present two examples of such…

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONFERENCE ON METHODS IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HALLMAN, CLEMENS L.

    THIS STATEWIDE CONFERENCE, UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE INDIANA STATE ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGES, WAS CONCERNED WITH METHODS COURSES FOR PROSPECTIVE ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHERS. THE CONFERENCE MADE GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION, BUT CONCENTRATED ON THE EXISTING WEAKNESSES OF METHODS COURSES.…

  17. ICCK Conference Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, William H.

    2013-05-28

    The 7th International Conference on Chemical Kinetics (ICCK) was held July 10-14, 2011, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, MA, hosted by Prof. William H. Green of MIT's Chemical Engineering department. This cross-disciplinary meeting highlighted the importance of fundamental understanding of elementary reactions to the full range of chemical investigations. The specific conference focus was on elementary-step kinetics in both the gas phase and in condensed phase. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to discuss how the same reactive species and reaction motifs manifest under very different reaction conditions (e.g. atmospheric, aqueous, combustion, plasma, in nonaqueous solvents, on surfaces.). The conference featured special sessions on new/improved experimental techniques, improved models and data analysis for interpreting complicated kinetics, computational kinetics (especially rate estimates for large kinetic models), and a panel discussion on how the community should document/archive kinetic data. In the past, this conference had been limited to homogeneous gas-phase and liquid-phase systems. This conference included studies of heterogeneous kinetics which provide rate constants for, or insight into, elementary reaction steps. This Grant from DOE BES covered about half of the subsidies we provided to students and postdocs who attended the conference, by charging them reduced-rate registration fees. The complete list of subsidies provided are listed in Table 1 below. This DOE funding was essential to making the conference affordable to graduate students, and indeed the attendance at this conference was higher than at previous conferences in this series. Donations made by companies provided additional subsidies, leveraging the DOE funding. The conference was very effective in educating graduate students and important in fostering scientific interactions, particularly between scientists studying gas phase and liquid phase kinetics

  18. Informing Selection of Nanomaterial Concentrations for ToxCast In Vitro Testing using the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry Model - 3rd Annual International Conference on the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology (ICEIN) & EPA Nano Grantees Meeting (2011)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, little justification is provided for nanomaterial testing concentrations in in vitro assays. The in vitro concentrations typically used may be higher than those experienced by exposed humans. Selection of concentration levels for hazard evaluation based on real-world e...

  19. 2012 HIV Diagnostics Conference: the molecular diagnostics perspective.

    PubMed

    Branson, Bernard M; Pandori, Mark

    2013-04-01

    2012 HIV Diagnostic Conference Atlanta, GA, USA, 12-14 December 2012. This report highlights the presentations and discussions from the 2012 National HIV Diagnostic Conference held in Atlanta (GA, USA), on 12-14 December 2012. Reflecting changes in the evolving field of HIV diagnostics, the conference provided a forum for evaluating developments in molecular diagnostics and their role in HIV diagnosis. In 2010, the HIV Diagnostics Conference concluded with the proposal of a new diagnostic algorithm which included nucleic acid testing to resolve discordant screening and supplemental antibody test results. The 2012 meeting, picking up where the 2010 meeting left off, focused on scientific presentations that assessed this new algorithm and the role played by RNA testing and new developments in molecular diagnostics, including detection of total and integrated HIV-1 DNA, detection and quantification of HIV-2 RNA, and rapid formats for detection of HIV-1 RNA.

  20. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  1. Antibody Persistence and Immunologic Memory after Sequential Pneumococcal Conjugate and Polysaccharide Vaccination in HIV-Infected Children on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abzug, Mark J.; Song, Lin Ye; Levin, Myron J.; Nachman, Sharon A.; Borkowsky, William; Pelton, Stephen I.

    2013-01-01

    Background The capacity of pneumococcal vaccination to confer memory in HIV-infected children is critical for durable protection. Methods HIV-infected children 2–<19 years administered two doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and one dose of polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) on HAART were randomized four-five years later to receive a PCV7 or PPV booster. Total and high avidity antibodies to serotypes 1 (PPV) and 6B and 14 (PCV7 and PPV) were determined by ELISA. Memory was defined as persistence of ≥0.5 mcg/mL of serotype-specific antibody on day 0 or change from <0.5 mcg/mL to ≥0.5 mcg/mL between day 0 and week 1, or, ≥4-fold antibody rise between day 0 and week 1. Results Prior to boosting, four to five years after the previous PCV7-PCV7-PPV series, geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) were 0.46 mcg/mL (serotype 1), 1.31 mcg/mL (serotype 6B), and 1.47 mcg/mL (serotype 14), with concentrations ≥0.5 mcg/mL in 41% (serotype 1) to 82% (serotypes 6B and 14). Memory based on antibody concentration ≥0.5 mcg/mL before or 1 week after boosting with PCV7 or PPV was demonstrated in 42–61% for serotype 1 and 87–94% for serotypes 6B and 14, with lower rates based on day 0 to week 1 ≥4-fold antibody rise (serotype 1, 3–13%; serotype 6B, 13–31%; serotype 14, 29–53%). Antibody concentrations post-boosting were greater following PCV7 than PPV for serotypes 6B and 14. Ratios of highly avid to total antibody pre- and post-boosting were 0.5–0.8. Predictors of memory included higher CD4% (nadir before HAART and at P1024 and P1061s entry), CD19% (at P1024 and P1061s entry), and antibody response after the PCV7-PCV7-PPV primary series and lower viral load (at P1024 and P1061s entry) and age. Conclusions Protective antibody concentrations, high avidity, and booster responses to PCV7 or PPV indicative of memory were present four-five years after PCV7-PCV7-PPV in HIV-infected children on HAART. PMID:23954381

  2. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003552.htm Platelet-associated antibodies blood test To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a ...

  3. Lyme disease antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  4. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ... may use this test to help diagnose pernicious anemia. Pernicious anemia is a decrease in red blood ...

  5. Antibody gene transfer with adeno-associated viral vectors as a method for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Brady, Jacqueline M; Baltimore, David; Balazs, Alejandro B

    2017-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) show great promise in HIV prevention as they are capable of potently neutralizing a considerable breadth of genetically diverse strains. Passive transfer of monoclonal bNAb proteins can confer protection in animal models of HIV infection at modest concentrations, inspiring efforts to develop an HIV vaccine capable of eliciting bNAb responses. However, these antibodies demonstrate high degrees of somatic mutation and other unique characteristics that may hinder the ability of conventional approaches to consistently and effectively produce bNAb analogs. As an alternative strategy, we and others have proposed vector-mediated gene transfer to generate long-term, systemic production of bNAbs in the absence of immunization. Herein, we review the use of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors for delivery of HIV bNAbs and antibody-like proteins and summarize both the advantages and disadvantages of this strategy as a method for HIV prevention.

  6. Hepatitis B surface antibody purification with hepatitis B surface antibody imprinted poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-tyrosine methyl ester) particles.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Lokman; Say, Ridvon; Unal, Serhat; Denizli, Adil

    2009-01-15

    Hepatitis B surface antibody imprinted poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-tyrosine methyl ester) particles were prepared for the purification of hepatitis B surface antibody from human plasma. N-methacryloyl-L-tyrosine methyl ester was chosen as a complexing agent for hepatitis B surface antibodies. Hepatitis B surface antibody imprinted poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-tyrosine methyl ester) particles were characterized by surface area measurements, swelling test, scanning electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Ethylene glycol (1.0M) was used as desorption agent. Adsorption studies were performed from hepatitis B surface antibody and anti-hepatitis A antibody positive human plasma. Effects of antibody concentration, contact time, N-methacryloyl-L-tyrosine methyl ester content and temperature on the adsorption capacity were investigated. The amount of hepatitis B surface antibody adsorbed per unit mass increased with increasing hepatitis B surface antibody concentration, then reached saturation. Maximum hepatitis B surface antibody adsorption amount was 21.4 mIU/mg. Adsorption process reached the equilibrium in 60 min. Competitive adsorption of hepatitis B surface antibody, total anti-hepatitis A antibody and total immunoglobulin E was investigated for showing the selectivity. Hepatitis B surface antibody-imprinted particles could adsorb hepatitis B surface antibody 18.3 times more than anti-hepatitis A antibody and 2.2 times more than immunoglobulin E. It can be concluded that hepatitis B surface antibody-imprinted particles have significant selectivity for hepatitis B surface antibody.

  7. 48 CFR 6101.11 - Conferences; conference memorandum [Rule 11].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conferences; conference memorandum . 6101.11 Section 6101.11 Federal Acquisition Regulations System CIVILIAN BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS, GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT DISPUTE CASES 6101.11 Conferences; conference...

  8. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  9. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cell Antibody Screen Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; Blood Typing ; RBC Antibody Identification ; Type and Screen; Crossmatch All content on Lab Tests Online has been reviewed and approved by our Editorial Review Board . At a ... screen is used to screen an individual's blood for antibodies directed against red blood cell (RBC) ...

  10. The 1991 International Aerospace and Ground Conference on Lightning and Static Electricity, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The proceedings of the conference are reported. The conference focussed on lightning protection, detection, and forecasting. The conference was divided into 26 sessions based on research in lightning, static electricity, modeling, and mapping. These sessions spanned the spectrum from basic science to engineering, concentrating on lightning prediction and detection and on safety for ground facilities, aircraft, and aerospace vehicles.

  11. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  12. Antibody-controlled actuation of DNA-based molecular circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelen, Wouter; Meijer, Lenny H. H.; Somers, Bram; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Merkx, Maarten

    2017-02-01

    DNA-based molecular circuits allow autonomous signal processing, but their actuation has relied mostly on RNA/DNA-based inputs, limiting their application in synthetic biology, biomedicine and molecular diagnostics. Here we introduce a generic method to translate the presence of an antibody into a unique DNA strand, enabling the use of antibodies as specific inputs for DNA-based molecular computing. Our approach, antibody-templated strand exchange (ATSE), uses the characteristic bivalent architecture of antibodies to promote DNA-strand exchange reactions both thermodynamically and kinetically. Detailed characterization of the ATSE reaction allowed the establishment of a comprehensive model that describes the kinetics and thermodynamics of ATSE as a function of toehold length, antibody-epitope affinity and concentration. ATSE enables the introduction of complex signal processing in antibody-based diagnostics, as demonstrated here by constructing molecular circuits for multiplex antibody detection, integration of multiple antibody inputs using logic gates and actuation of enzymes and DNAzymes for signal amplification.

  13. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  14. The antibody-enzyme analogy. Characterization of antibodies to phosphopyridoxyltyrosine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Raso, V; Stollar, B D

    1975-02-11

    Stable analogs of the crucial Schiff base intermediate of enzymatic and nonenzymatic pyridoxal phosphate catalysis have been used as haptens for induction of specific antibodies. N-(5-phosphopyridoxyl)-3'-amino-L-tyrosine and its conformationally distinct cyclized derivative resemble the Schiff base formed upon mixing tyrosine with pyridoxal phosphate. These compounds were covalently coupled to a protein carrier via the 3'-amino group so as to confer a prescribed orientation, with the coenzyme region farthest removed from the carrier. A third antigen, with the phosphopyridoxyl group alone as the hapten, was prepared by linkage of pyridoxal phosphate directly to free amino groups on the carrier protein. Antibodies elicited for each determinant were purified by means of appropriate affinity columns. Antibody heterogeneity was observed in that different species could be separated from a given serum by sequential elution from the affinity columns with 1 M sodium phosphate buffers of pH 7.6, 5.2, 2.6 and 1.5. In assays of quantitative precipitation, inhibition of precipitation, equilibrium dialysis, and fluorescence quenching, antibodies to the phosphopyridoxyltyrosine haptens showed specificity for the phosphorylated form of the coenzyme and binding activity for both the coenzyme and tyrosine portions of the hapten. Antibodies to the phosphopyridoxyl groups alone did not display a similar reactivity toward the tyrosine portion of the complex haptens. The cyclic and noncyclic conformations of the hapten were serologically distinct, as antibody to each reacted preferentially with the homologous form.

  15. Insider conference tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennant, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Attending an educator conference and its associated exhibit hall can be a rewarding experience for your brain. But if you keep in mind these insider's tips, your feet, arms, stomach, and wallet will also thank you.

  16. Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

  17. Aircraft Engine Emissions. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conference on a aircraft engine emissions was held to present the results of recent and current work. Such diverse areas as components, controls, energy efficient engine designs, and noise and pollution reduction are discussed.

  18. Tackling conference carbon footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozier, Jim

    2016-12-01

    In reply to Margaret Harris's Lateral Thoughts article "Putting my foot down", which discussed the challenges of attending a conference with a physical disability (October p76) and a subsequent letter by Anna Wood (November p18).

  19. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  20. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  1. Coarse grained modeling of transport properties in monoclonal antibody solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James; Wang, Gang

    Monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives represent the fastest growing segment of the bio pharmaceutical industry. For many applications such as novel cancer therapies, high concentration, sub-cutaneous injections of these protein solutions are desired. However, depending on the peptide sequence within the antibody, such high concentration formulations can be too viscous to inject via human derived force alone. Understanding how heterogenous charge distribution and hydrophobicity within the antibodies leads to high viscosities is crucial to their future application. In this talk, we explore a coarse grained computational model of therapeutically relevant monoclonal antibodies that accounts for electrostatic, dispersion and hydrodynamic interactions between suspended antibodies to predict assembly and transport properties in concentrated antibody solutions. We explain the high viscosities observed in many experimental studies of the same biologics.

  2. Conference scene: DGVS spring conference 2009.

    PubMed

    Kolligs, Frank Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The 3rd annual DGVS Spring Conference of the German Society for Gastroenterology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Verdauungs- und Stoffwechselkrankheiten) was held at the Seminaris Campus Hotel in Berlin, Germany, on 8-9 May, 2009. The conference was organized by Roland Schmid and Matthias Ebert from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. The central theme of the meeting was 'translational gastrointestinal oncology: towards personalized medicine and individualized therapy'. The conference covered talks on markers for diagnosis, screening and surveillance of colorectal cancer, targets for molecular therapy, response prediction in clinical oncology, development and integration of molecular imaging in gastrointestinal oncology and translational research in clinical trial design. Owing to the broad array of topics and limitations of space, this article will focus on biomarkers, response prediction and the integration of biomarkers into clinical trials. Presentations mentioned in this summary were given by Matthias Ebert (Technical University of Munich, Germany), Esmeralda Heiden (Epigenomics, Berlin, Germany), Frank Kolligs (University of Munich, Germany), Florian Lordick (University of Heidelberg, Germany), Hans Jorgen Nielsen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Anke Reinacher-Schick (University of Bochum, Germany), Christoph Röcken (University of Berlin, Germany), Wolff Schmiegel (University of Bochum, Germany) and Thomas Seufferlein (University of Halle, Germany).

  3. Antibody Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Erik D; Smider, Vaughn V; Felding, Brunhilde H

    2016-01-01

    One of the newer classes of targeted cancer therapeutics is monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics are a successful and rapidly expanding drug class due to their high specificity, activity, favourable pharmacokinetics, and standardized manufacturing processes. Antibodies are capable of recruiting the immune system to attack cancer cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In an ideal scenario the initial tumor cell destruction induced by administration of a therapeutic antibody can result in uptake of tumor associated antigens by antigen-presenting cells, establishing a prolonged memory effect. Mechanisms of direct tumor cell killing by antibodies include antibody recognition of cell surface bound enzymes to neutralize enzyme activity and signaling, or induction of receptor agonist or antagonist activity. Both approaches result in cellular apoptosis. In another and very direct approach, antibodies are used to deliver drugs to target cells and cause cell death. Such antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) direct cytotoxic compounds to tumor cells, after selective binding to cell surface antigens, internalization, and intracellular drug release. Efficacy and safety of ADCs for cancer therapy has recently been greatly advanced based on innovative approaches for site-specific drug conjugation to the antibody structure. This technology enabled rational optimization of function and pharmacokinetics of the resulting conjugates, and is now beginning to yield therapeutics with defined, uniform molecular characteristics, and unprecedented promise to advance cancer treatment. PMID:27081677

  4. Nuclear Rocket Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center has a strong interest in nuclear rocket propulsion and provides active support of the graphite reactor program in such nonnuclear areas as cryogenics, two-phase flow, propellant heating, fluid systems, heat transfer, nozzle cooling, nozzle design, pumps, turbines, and startup and control problems. A parallel effort has also been expended to evaluate the engineering feasibility of a nuclear rocket reactor using tungsten-matrix fuel elements and water as the moderator. Both of these efforts have resulted in significant contributions to nuclear rocket technology. Many successful static firings of nuclear rockets have been made with graphite-core reactors. Sufficient information has also been accumulated to permit a reasonable Judgment as to the feasibility of the tungsten water-moderated reactor concept. We therefore consider that this technoIogy conference on the nuclear rocket work that has been sponsored by the Lewis Research Center is timely. The conference has been prepared by NASA personnel, but the information presented includes substantial contributions from both NASA and AEC contractors. The conference excludes from consideration the many possible mission requirements for nuclear rockets. Also excluded is the direct comparison of nuclear rocket types with each other or with other modes of propulsion. The graphite reactor support work presented on the first day of the conference was partly inspired through a close cooperative effort between the Cleveland extension of the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office (headed by Robert W. Schroeder) and the Lewis Research Center. Much of this effort was supervised by Mr. John C. Sanders, chairman for the first day of the conference, and by Mr. Hugh M. Henneberry. The tungsten water-moderated reactor concept was initiated at Lewis by Mr. Frank E. Rom and his coworkers. The supervision of the recent engineering studies has been shared by Mr. Samuel J. Kaufman, chairman for the second day of the

  5. Gamma Interferon Is Required for Optimal Antibody-Mediated Immunity against Genital Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Naglak, Elizabeth K.; Morrison, Sandra G.

    2016-01-01

    Defining the mechanisms of immunity conferred by the combination of antibody and CD4+ T cells is fundamental to designing an efficacious chlamydial vaccine. Using the Chlamydia muridarum genital infection model of mice, which replicates many features of human C. trachomatis infection and avoids the characteristic low virulence of C. trachomatis in the mouse, we previously demonstrated a significant role for antibody in immunity to chlamydial infection. We found that antibody alone was not protective. Instead, protection appeared to be conferred through an undefined antibody-cell interaction. Using gene knockout mice and in vivo cellular depletion methods, our data suggest that antibody-mediated protection is dependent on the activation of an effector cell population in genital tract tissues by CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, the CD4+ T cell-secreted cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was found to be a key component of the protective antibody response. The protective function of IFN-γ was not related to the immunoglobulin class or to the magnitude of the Chlamydia-specific antibody response or to recruitment of an effector cell population to genital tract tissue. Rather, IFN-γ appears to be necessary for activation of the effector cell population that functions in antibody-mediated chlamydial immunity. Our results confirm the central role of antibody in immunity to chlamydia reinfection and demonstrate a key function for IFN-γ in antibody-mediated protection. PMID:27600502

  6. Human papillomavirus vaccination induces neutralising antibodies in oral mucosal fluids

    PubMed Central

    Handisurya, A; Schellenbacher, C; Haitel, A; Senger, T; Kirnbauer, R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a major cause of cancers and papillomas of the anogenital and oropharyngeal tract. HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies in sera and cervicovaginal secretions and protects uninfected individuals from persistent anogenital infection and associated diseases caused by the vaccine-targeted HPV types. Whether immunisation can prevent oropharyngeal infection and diseases and whether neutralising antibodies represent the correlate of protection, is still unclear. Methods: We determined IgG and neutralising antibodies against low-risk HPV6 and high-risk HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids from healthy females (n=20) before and after quadrivalent HPV-vaccination and compared the results with non-vaccinated controls. Results: HPV-vaccination induced type-specific antibodies in sera and oral fluids of the vaccinees. Importantly, the antibodies in oral fluids were capable of neutralising HPV pseudovirions in vitro, indicating protection from infection. The increased neutralising antibody levels against HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids post-vaccination correlated significantly within an individual. Conclusions: We provide experimental proof that HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies to the vaccine-targeted types in oral fluids. Hence, immunisation may confer direct protection against type-specific HPV infection and associated diseases of the oropharyngeal tract. Measurement of antibodies in oral fluids represents a suitable tool to assess vaccine-induced protection within the mucosal milieu of the orophayrynx. PMID:26867163

  7. Antibodies in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs from one individual to another can incite the production of antibodies specific for foreign antigens, especially major histocompatibility antigens, in the graft. Antibodies specific for a graft provide an index of immunity and a potential trigger for injury and rejection. However, the index of immunity can sometimes miss antibody-mediated rejection and besides causing injury the antibodies against a graft can also protect a graft from injury by blocking immune recognition, called enhancement, regulating activation of complement, and inducing changes in the graft that resist damage. Reviewed here are potential limitations in the use of antibodies as an index of immunity and the ways antibodies cause and/or prevent injury. PMID:20807473

  8. Developing recombinant antibodies for biomarker detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Miller, Keith D.; Kagen, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have an essential role in biomarker validation and diagnostic assays. A barrier to pursuing these applications is the reliance on immunization and hybridomas to produce mAbs, which is time-consuming and may not yield the desired mAb. We recommend a process flow for affinity reagent production that utilizes combinatorial protein display systems (eg, yeast surface display or phage display) rather than hybridomas. These systems link a selectable phenotype-binding conferred by an antibody fragment-with a means for recovering the encoding gene. Recombinant libraries obtained from immunizations can produce high-affinity antibodies (<10 nM) more quickly than other methods. Non-immune libraries provide an alternate route when immunizations are not possible, or when suitable mAbs are not recovered from an immune library. Directed molecular evolution (DME) is an integral part of optimizing mAbs obtained from combinatorial protein display, but can also be used on hybridoma-derived mAbs. Variants can easily be obtained and screened to increase the affinity of the parent mAb (affinity maturation). We discuss examples where DME has been used to tailor affinity reagents to specific applications. Combinatorial protein display also provides an accessible method for identifying antibody pairs, which are necessary for sandwich-type diagnostic assays.

  9. Male Partner Risk Behaviors Are Associated With Reactive Rapid HIV Antibody Tests Among Pregnant Mexican Women: Implications for Prevention of Vertical and Sexual HIV Transmission in Concentrated HIV Epidemics.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Estela; Kendall, Tamil

    2015-01-01

    Mexico's policies on antenatal HIV testing are contradictory, and little is known about social and behavioral characteristics that increase pregnant Mexican women's risks of acquiring HIV. We analyzed the association between risk behaviors reported by pregnant women for themselves and their male partners, and women's rapid HIV antibody test results from a large national sample. Three quarters of pregnant women with a reactive test did not report risk behaviors for themselves and one third did not report risk behaviors for themselves or their male partners. In the retrospective case-control analysis, other than reporting multiple sexual partners, reactive pregnant women reported risk behaviors did not differ from nonreactive women's behaviors. However, reactive pregnant women were significantly more likely to have reported risk behaviors for male partners. Our findings support universal offer of antenatal HIV testing and suggest that HIV prevention for women should focus on reducing risk of HIV acquisition within stable relationships.

  10. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0381 TITLE: Antibodies Targeting EMT PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Vaughn Smider CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Scripps...REPORT DATE October 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Antibodies Targeting EMT 5a. CONTRACT ...ABSTRACT Monoclonal antibodies are drugs that can specifically bind targets present on tumor cells. The highly aggressive triple-negative subtype of

  11. Overcoming the susceptibility gap between maternal antibody disappearance and auto-antibody production.

    PubMed

    Yosipovich, Roni; Aizenshtein, Elina; Shadmon, Roy; Krispel, Simcha; Shuster, Efrat; Pitcovski, Jacob

    2015-01-09

    In the first 10-14 days of a chick's life, protection is conferred by maternal antibodies. Further broiler protection is achieved by active vaccination. However, the high level of maternal antibodies interferes with the induction of an effective immune response by vaccination at a young age. As a result, there is a gap between the reduction in protective maternal antibodies and elevation of self-produced antibodies following active vaccination. The major aim of this study was to test an approach consisting of passive and active vaccination to overcome this gap and to provide continuous resistance to infectious viral diseases during the broiler's growth period. Newcastle disease virus (NDV), which is one of the world's most prevalent infectious diseases of poultry, was tested as a model. Following subcutaneous injection of 18 hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) units of anti-NDV immunoglobulin Y per 1-day-old chick, protective log2 antibody titers above 4 could be detected to at least 17 days of age. The combination of passive immunization on day 1 of age with attenuated live vaccination on day 10 led to high protective titers throughout the entire growth period, up to 41 days of age. Moreover, the HI titers in the group of birds immunized with the combined vaccination were significantly more homogeneous than those in the group vaccinated only with live virus. Thus, full protection against NDV of all broilers in flock during their entire growth period was achieved by a vaccination regime that combines passive immunization and live vaccination.

  12. A Simple Model for Assessment of Anti-Toxin Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Skvortsov, Alex; Gray, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The toxins associated with infectious diseases are potential targets for inhibitors which have the potential for prophylactic or therapeutic use. Many antibodies have been generated for this purpose, and the objective of this study was to develop a simple mathematical model that may be used to evaluate the potential protective effect of antibodies. This model was used to evaluate the contributions of antibody affinity and concentration to reducing antibody-receptor complex formation and internalization. The model also enables prediction of the antibody kinetic constants and concentration required to provide a specified degree of protection. We hope that this model, once validated experimentally, will be a useful tool for in vitro selection of potentially protective antibodies for progression to in vivo evaluation. PMID:23862138

  13. 78 FR 27963 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice... the conference is to discuss policy issues related to the reliability of the Bulk-Power System. A more... Webcast. Anyone with Internet access who desires to listen to this event can do so by navigating to...

  14. Special Conference on Tumor Immunology and Immunotherapy: A New Chapter

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Katelyn T.; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Armstrong, Todd D.

    2015-01-01

    The overall objective of the fifth American Association for Cancer Research Special Conference on “Tumor Immunology and Immunotherapy: A New Chapter” organized by the Cancer Immunology Working Group was to highlight multidisciplinary approaches of immunotherapy and mechanisms related to the ability of immunotherapy to fight established tumors. With the FDA approval of sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab (anti-CTLA4; Bristol-Myers Squibb [BMS]), and the two anti-PD-1 antibodies, pembrolizumab (formerly MK-3475 or lambrolizumab; Merck) and nivolumab (BMS), immunotherapy has become a mainstream treatment option for some cancer. Many of the data presented at the conference and reviewed in this article showcase the progress made in determining the mechanistic reasons for the success of some treatments and the mechanisms associated with tolerance within the tumor microenvironment, both of which are potential targets for immunotherapy. In addition to combination and multimodal therapies, improvements in existing therapies will be needed to overcome the numerous ways that tumor-specific tolerance thwarts the immune system. This conference built upon the success of the 2012 conference, and focused on seven progressing and/or emerging areas that include: New combination therapies; Combination therapies and vaccine Improvement; Mechanisms of antibody therapy; Factors in the tumor microenvironment affecting the immune response; The microbiomes effect on cancer and immunotherapy; Metabolism in immunotherapy; and Adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:25968457

  15. Special Conference on Tumor Immunology and Immunotherapy: A New Chapter.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Katelyn T; Vonderheide, Robert H; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Armstrong, Todd D

    2015-05-12

    The overall objective of the fifth American Association for Cancer Research Special Conference, "Tumor Immunology and Immunotherapy: A New Chapter," organized by the Cancer Immunology Working Group, was to highlight multidisciplinary approaches of immunotherapy and mechanisms related to the ability of immunotherapy to fight established tumors. With the FDA approval of sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4; Bristol-Myers Squibb), and the two anti-PD-1 antibodies, pembrolizumab (formerly MK-3475 or lambrolizumab; Merck) and nivolumab (Bristol-Myers Squibb), immunotherapy has become a mainstream treatment option for some cancers. Many of the data presented at the conference and reviewed in this article showcase the progress made in determining the mechanistic reasons for the success of some treatments and the mechanisms associated with tolerance within the tumor microenvironment, both of which are potential targets for immunotherapy. In addition to combination and multimodal therapies, improvements in existing therapies will be needed to overcome the numerous ways that tumor-specific tolerance thwarts the immune system. This conference built upon the success of the 2012 conference and focused on seven progressing and/or emerging areas-new combination therapies, combination therapies and vaccine improvement, mechanisms of antibody therapy, factors in the tumor microenvironment affecting the immune response, the microbiomes effect on cancer and immunotherapy, metabolism in immunotherapy, and adoptive T-cell therapy. Cancer Immunol Res; 3(6); 1-8. ©2015 AACR.

  16. Base specific binding of deoxyguanylate and deoxycytidylate antibodies to double stranded DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, A; Jacob, T M

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies raised in rabbits against deoxyguanylate and deoxycytidylate bind to 3H-lambda double stranded DNA and the binding is base specific. The concentrations of antibody populations that bind to double stranded DNA are much less than those binding to denatured DNA. Due to their low concentrations, these antibodies were not detected in earlier studies. These antibodies are expected to be useful to probe the conformational flexibilities of double stranded DNAs. PMID:6217448

  17. Turbomachinery controls conference (TCC) 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The proceedings of the Turbomachinery Controls Conference 1995 are presented. Eleven papers were presented at the conference. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the nine papers for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. ARC Conference Showcases Telecommunications Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1996-01-01

    The Appalachian Regional Commission's 1996 Conference, "Building Blocks for Using Telecommunications and Information Technology," held in Binghamton, New York, focused on the role of telecommunications in Appalachia in education and training, telemedicine, business, and government. Highlights conference presentations on special…

  19. Expression of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with "human-like" post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  20. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  1. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  2. Affinity purification of antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  3. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  4. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  5. Applying phage antibodies to proteomics: selecting single chain Fv antibodies to antigens blotted on nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Marks, J D

    2000-11-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is a powerful tool for identification of proteins that differ between patients with qualitatively or quantitatively different disease states. Further characterization of these protein differences would be greatly facilitated by the availability of antibodies that could be used to detect and quantitate the temporo-spatial pattern and cellular and tissue location of the different proteins. To generate such antibodies, methods were developed which permit the successful selection of monoclonal phage antibodies from phage display libraries against antigens blotted from SDS-PAGE gels onto nitrocellulose. First, it was determined that nitrocellulose and PVDF membranes gave significantly lower levels of background phage binding than two other membranes studied. Next, it was determined that blocking with fish gelatin and binding in the presence of 0.5 M NaCl could reduce nonspecific binding 10,000-fold and result in enrichment ratios greater than 500-fold with antigen concentrations as low as 1 ng/mm(2). When optimized conditions were applied to phage antibody libraries, panels of monoclonal phage antibodies were generated against the proteins ErbB2 and bovine serum albumin electroblotted from SDS-PAGE gels onto nitrocellulose. Antibodies were obtained with as little as 10 to 1 ng of antigen, depending on whether the libraries displayed single or multiple copies of antibody per phage. The antibodies worked as reagents in both ELISA and Western blotting.

  6. Twitter use in physics conferences.

    PubMed

    Webb, Stephen

    An analysis of Twitter use in 116 conferences suggests that the service is used more extensively at PACS10 conferences (those devoted to the physics of elementary particles and fields) and PACS90 conferences (those devoted to geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics) than at conferences in other fields of physics. Furthermore, Twitter is used in a qualitatively different manner. A possible reason for these differences is discussed.

  7. Antibodies for biodefense

    PubMed Central

    Froude, Jeffrey W; Stiles, Bradley; Pelat, Thibaut

    2011-01-01

    Potential bioweapons are biological agents (bacteria, viruses and toxins) at risk of intentional dissemination. Biodefense, defined as development of therapeutics and vaccines against these agents, has seen an increase, particularly in the US, following the 2001 anthrax attack. This review focuses on recombinant antibodies and polyclonal antibodies for biodefense that have been accepted for clinical use. These antibodies aim to protect against primary potential bioweapons or category A agents as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, botulinum neurotoxins, smallpox virus and certain others causing viral hemorrhagic fevers) and certain category B agents. Potential for prophylactic use is presented, as well as frequent use of oligoclonal antibodies or synergistic effect with other molecules. Capacities and limitations of antibodies for use in biodefense are discussed, and are generally applicable to the field of infectious diseases. PMID:22123065

  8. Conference on Navajo Orthography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohannessian, Sirarpi; And Others

    This report on the Conference on Navajo Orthography, held in Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 2-3, 1969 constitutes a summary of the discussion and decisions of a meeting which was convened by the Center for Applied Linguistics under contract with the Bureau of Indian Affairs to agree on an orthography for the Navajo language. The immediate purpose…

  9. DEVELOP students attend conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Last month, Madeline Brozen and Jason Jones of the DEVELOP Program at John C. Stennis Space Center joined members from the program's national office at Langley Research Center to attend the Southern Growth Policies Board annual conference in Biloxi. Pictured are (l to r): Karen Allsbrook, Jonathan Gleason, Gov. Haley Barbour, Madeline Brozen, Lindsay Rogers and Tracey Silcox.

  10. Hydrogen Conference: Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1989-10-01

    Hydrogen is currently a major chemical/fuel with long-term energy system benefits that may impact the industry's physical and economic well-being. EPRI's recent hydrogen conference concluded that to be competitive, the production cost must take into account environmental and end-use efficiency benefits.

  11. The interparliamentary conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of information on environmental problems with global origins and consequences. The areas of major concern included the following: global climate change; deforestation and desertification; preservation of biological diversity; safeguarding oceans and water resources; population growth; destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer; and sustainable development.

  12. Conference summary - Personal views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lub, J.

    2016-05-01

    This is a collection of remarks on the three and a half days of the RR Lyrae 2015 Conference, limited only by my own lack of attention and understanding. I end with some personal recollections on my complete failure, even though doing the necessary calculations, to spot the importance and the possible application of Fourier amplitudes and phases of the RR Lyrae light curves.

  13. Government Quality Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Government Quality Conference was an attempt to bring together executive organizations and senior individuals in the Federal Government that have a desire to improve productivity. It was designed to provide an exchange of ideas based on experience, and to encourage individual management initiatives to tap the capabilities of Federal employees.

  14. 2002 NASPSA Conference Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Contains abstracts from the 2002 conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The publication is divided into three sections: the preconference workshop, "Effective Teaching Methods in the Classroom;" symposia (motor development, motor learning and control, and sport psychology); and free…

  15. Effective Parent Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Conferences with an upset parent, teacher, or student should be opportunities for schools to build relationships with the community and to foster a positive school culture. But in reality, they are often held because a problem has arisen and often end with stakeholders having a less-than-positive image of the school. Understanding the steps that…

  16. Conference Abstracts: AEDS '84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, William E.

    1985-01-01

    The Association of Educational Data Systems (AEDS) conference included 102 presentations. Abstracts of seven of these presentations are provided. Topic areas considered include LOGO, teaching probability through a computer game, writing effective computer assisted instructional materials, computer literacy, research on instructional…

  17. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  18. Microbicides 2006 conference

    PubMed Central

    Ramjee, Gita; Shattock, Robin; Delany, Sinead; McGowan, Ian; Morar, Neetha; Gottemoeller, Megan

    2006-01-01

    Current HIV/AIDS statistics show that women account for almost 60% of HIV infections in Sub-Saharan Africa. HIV prevention tools such as male and female condoms, abstinence and monogamy are not always feasible options for women due to various socio-economic and cultural factors. Microbicides are products designed to be inserted in the vagina or rectum prior to sex to prevent HIV acquisition. The biannual Microbicides conference took place in Cape Town, South Africa from 23–26 April 2006. The conference was held for the first time on the African continent, the region worst affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The conference brought together a record number of 1,300 scientists, researchers, policy makers, healthcare workers, communities and advocates. The conference provided an opportunity for an update on microbicide research and development as well as discussions around key issues such as ethics, acceptability, access and community involvement. This report discusses the current status of microbicide research and development, encompassing basic and clinical science, social and behavioural science, and community mobilisation and advocacy activities. PMID:17038196

  19. APPA 2011 Conference Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facilities Manager, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents highlights of APPA conference that was held on July 16-18, 2011. The highlights feature photos of 2011-2012 board of directors, outgoing senior regional representatives to the board, meritorious service award, APPA fellow, president's recognition and gavel exchange, and diamond business partner award.

  20. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineering Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presents the abstracts of 158 papers presented at the American Society for Engineering Education's annual conference at Knoxville, Tennessee, June 14-17, 1976. Included are engineering topics covering education, aerospace, agriculture, biomedicine, chemistry, computers, electricity, acoustics, environment, mechanics, and women. (SL)

  1. REGIONAL CONFERENCE SUMMARIES, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    AN AVERAGE OF 200 TEACHER EDUCATORS, STATE DIRECTORS, LAYMEN, AND REPRESENTATIVES OF VARIOUS AGENCIES ATTENDED EACH OF NINE REGIONAL CONFERENCES CONDUCTED THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES TO DISCUSS THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHANGES AND PROBLEMS IN PLANNING AND CONDUCTING VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. MAJOR SPEECHES PRESENTED…

  2. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, Evan

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  3. Conference Rules, Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Linda K.

    2008-01-01

    Most academic conferences are preceded by some effort to make the sessions different from the usual format, but the usual format overwhelmingly prevails. That is: Each panel discussion runs no longer than two hours, during which two, three, or four specialists stand at a lectern and talk. Sometimes they will read a prepared paper; sometimes they…

  4. Open Mind Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Alexander H.

    1995-01-01

    Open Mind, The Association for the achievement of diversity in higher education, met in conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico, between October 16 and 18, 1992. A number of workgroups met to discuss the goals, structure, and generally evaluate the Association and its achievements. A summary of the workgroup sessions and their minutes are included.

  5. A Conference of Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Printing House for the Blind, Louisville, KY. Dept. of Educational Research.

    Presented are the proceedings of the First Historic Helen Keller World Conference on Services to Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults, held in New York City in September, 1977 on the theme "The Deaf-Blind Person in the Community." Reports have the following titles and authors: "Definition, Demography, Causes and Prevention of Deaf-Blindness; Finding and…

  6. ALA Conference 2009: Chicago Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    There is joy among those who have the funds to go to Chicago for the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference, July 9-15. Every librarian knows there is nothing better than a Chicago gathering, with the city's wonderful haunts, museums, restaurants, and fine memories of past conferences. The conference program covers nearly every…

  7. Summary: A Very Timely Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2012-04-01

    The conference poster includes a very apt phrase that describes a primary motivation for this conference: Time discovers truth. This aphorism, attributed to Seneca, was certainly affirmed by the many exciting talks and discussions at this conference, in both formal and informal settings.

  8. Making Connections: Attending Professional Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherrstrom, Catherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Attending a professional conference is an effective way to explore and advance knowledge, skills, and careers. For graduate students, attending a conference is an effective way to explore academic fields and new professions. However, attending a professional conference requires precious resources--time and money--so the decision to attend, or not,…

  9. Vector-mediated antibody gene transfer for infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the emerging field of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer as an alternative vaccine for infectious disease, with a specific focus on HIV. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV-1; the general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets like hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. This approach is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. With vector-mediated gene transfer, the antibody gene is delivered to the host, via a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector; this in turn results in long-term endogenous antibody expression from the injected muscle that confers protective immunity. Vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can rapidly move existing, potent broadly cross-neutralizing HIV-1-specific antibodies into the clinic. The gene transfer products demonstrate a potency and breadth identical to the original product. This strategy eliminates the need for immunogen design and interaction with the adaptive immune system to generate protection, a strategy that so far has shown limited promise.

  10. Selection of Recombinant Human Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tomszak, Florian; Weber, Susanne; Zantow, Jonas; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of therapeutic antibodies the demand of recombinant human antibodies is steadily increasing. Traditionally, therapeutic antibodies were generated by immunization of rat or mice, the generation of hybridoma clones, cloning of the antibody genes and subsequent humanization and engineering of the lead candidates. In the last few years, techniques were developed that use transgenic animals with a human antibody gene repertoire. Here, modern recombinant DNA technologies can be combined with well established immunization and hybridoma technologies to generate already affinity maturated human antibodies. An alternative are in vitro technologies which enabled the generation of fully human antibodies from antibody gene libraries that even exceed the human antibody repertoire. Specific antibodies can be isolated from these libraries in a very short time and therefore reduce the development time of an antibody drug at a very early stage.In this review, we describe different technologies that are currently used for the in vitro and in vivo generation of human antibodies.

  11. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... name: Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; RBC Antibody Screen ; Blood Typing ; Type ... a positive RBC antibody screen or a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT) . It is used to identify ...

  12. Comparison of three tissue fixatives on the immunoreactivity of mammalian P-glycoprotein antibodies to teleost tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmer, M.J. |; Courtney, L.A.; Benson, W.H.

    1994-12-31

    Mammalian P-glycoprotein is a highly conserved integral membrane protein functioning as an energy dependent plasma membrane efflux pump which decreases the concentration of certain lipophilic aromatic compounds entering the cell by diffusion. Studies indicate that P-glycoprotein is capable of increased expression in response to certain chemical stressors and has demonstrated the ability to transport xenobiotic contaminants. Expression of a xenobiotic transporter in teleost species could play a significant role in conferring resistance to fish populations exposed to xenobiotic stressors and may serve as a potential indicator of species at risk to environmental contaminants. Past studies demonstrated a strong correlation between corresponding mammalian and teleost tissues showing immunoreactivity to specific mammalian P-glycoprotein antibodies. In this study, comparisons of staining pattern, intensity, and tissue specificity between Lillie`s, Bouin`s and Dietrich`s fixed tissues was determined in the sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus, using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) C219, C494 and JSB-1. Immunoreactivity of the mAbs was found to be fixative-dependent and results are presented illustrating the differential staining patterns and tissue specificity observed for each tissue, fixative, and antibody combination. These data indicate tissue fixation has a significant impact on P-glycoprotein immunoreactivity in teleost tissues and must be considered in the comparison and interpretation of results.

  13. Duration of protective antibodies and correlation with survival in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus following Streptococcus agalactiae vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pasnik, David J; Evans, Joyce J; Klesius, Phillip H

    2005-09-05

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major piscine pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality among numerous species of freshwater, estuarine and marine fishes. Considering the economic importance of fishes susceptible to S. agalactiae throughout the world, an efficacious S. agalactiae vaccine was developed using an extracellular product (ECP) fraction and formalin-killed whole cells of S. agalactiae. A vaccine study was conducted by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus in order to determine the duration of protection and its correlation to antibodies specific for this pathogen. After 47, 90 or 180 d post-vaccination (DPV), the fish were i.p. challenged with approximately 2.0 x 10(4) S. agalactiae colony-forming units (CFU) fish(-1) to determine the duration of protective immunity. The percent survival in control fish i.p.-injected with sterile TSB was 16,16, and 4% on 47, 90 and 180 DPV, respectively, while the percent survival for the vaccinated fish was 67, 62 and 49%, respectively. The specific mean antibody concentration of the vaccinated fish was significantly higher than that of the control fish, with significant correlation between the ELISA optical density (OD) and protection. These results indicate that the specific antibody has a correlation with protection following immunization with the S. agalactiae vaccine and that the vaccine can confer protection against S. agalactiae up to 180 DPV.

  14. Respiratory illness in conference participants following exposure to rug shampoo.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P A; Tauxe, R V; Winkler, W G; Levy, M E

    1983-01-01

    Persons participating in a conference in a major city motel experienced transient mild respiratory illness associated with their presence in the motel conference rooms. The illness was characterized by coughing, sneezing, sore throat, headache, eye irritation, and other symptoms of exposure to a respiratory irritant. Investigation incriminated a chemical shampoo used to clean the conference room rugs approximately one week earlier. Repeated cleaning of the rugs to remove excess cleaning compound eliminated the problem. Excessive application of the shampoo, coupled with a poorly ventilated environment, apparently produced a chemical concentration sufficient to cause clinical illness.

  15. CD4-Induced Antibodies Promote Association of the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein with CD4-Binding Site Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fellinger, Christoph H.; Prasad, Neha R.; Zhou, Amber S.; Kondur, Hema R.; Joshi, Vinita R.; Quinlan, Brian D.; Farzan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is a trimer of gp120/gp41 heterodimers that mediates viral entry. Env binds cellular CD4, an association which stabilizes a conformation favorable to its subsequent association with a coreceptor, typically CCR5 or CXCR4. The CD4- and coreceptor-binding sites serve as epitopes for two classes of HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies: CD4-binding site (CD4bs) and CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, respectively. Here we observed that, at a fixed total concentration, mixtures of the CD4i antibodies (E51 or 412d) and the CD4bs antibody VRC01 neutralized the HIV-1 isolates 89.6, ADA, SG3, and SA32 more efficiently than either antibody alone. We found that E51, and to a lesser extent 412d and 17b, promoted association of four CD4bs antibodies to the Env trimer but not to monomeric gp120. We further demonstrated that the binding of the sulfotyrosine-binding pocket by CCR5mim2-Ig was sufficient for promoting CD4bs antibody binding to Env. Interestingly, the relationship is not reciprocal: CD4bs antibodies were not as efficient as CD4-Ig at promoting E51 or 412d binding to Env trimer. Consistent with these observations, CD4-Ig, but none of the CD4bs antibodies tested, substantially increased HIV-1 infection of a CD4-negative, CCR5-positive cell line. We conclude that the ability of CD4i antibodies to promote VRC01 association with Env trimers accounts for the increase potency of VRC01 and CD4i antibody mixtures. Our data further suggest that potent CD4bs antibodies avoid inducing Env conformations that bind CD4i antibodies or CCR5. IMPORTANCE Potent HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies can prevent viral transmission and suppress an ongoing infection. Here we show that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which recognize the conserved coreceptor-binding site of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env), can increase the association of Env with potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize the CD4-binding site (CD4bs antibodies). We further show that

  16. 9 CFR 113.450 - General requirements for antibody products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... precise glycoprotein structure, produced by certain cells of the B lymphocyte lineage in response to... characterized by an abnormally low concentration of circulating maternal IgG. (b) Nomenclature. Antibody... “monoclonal” shall be used. Example: “Duck Virus Hepatitis Antibody, Duck Origin.” (2)...

  17. 9 CFR 113.450 - General requirements for antibody products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... precise glycoprotein structure, produced by certain cells of the B lymphocyte lineage in response to... characterized by an abnormally low concentration of circulating maternal IgG. (b) Nomenclature. Antibody... “monoclonal” shall be used. Example: “Duck Virus Hepatitis Antibody, Duck Origin.” (2)...

  18. 9 CFR 113.450 - General requirements for antibody products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... precise glycoprotein structure, produced by certain cells of the B lymphocyte lineage in response to... characterized by an abnormally low concentration of circulating maternal IgG. (b) Nomenclature. Antibody... “monoclonal” shall be used. Example: “Duck Virus Hepatitis Antibody, Duck Origin.” (2)...

  19. 9 CFR 113.450 - General requirements for antibody products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... precise glycoprotein structure, produced by certain cells of the B lymphocyte lineage in response to... characterized by an abnormally low concentration of circulating maternal IgG. (b) Nomenclature. Antibody... “monoclonal” shall be used. Example: “Duck Virus Hepatitis Antibody, Duck Origin.” (2)...

  20. 9 CFR 113.450 - General requirements for antibody products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... precise glycoprotein structure, produced by certain cells of the B lymphocyte lineage in response to... characterized by an abnormally low concentration of circulating maternal IgG. (b) Nomenclature. Antibody... “monoclonal” shall be used. Example: “Duck Virus Hepatitis Antibody, Duck Origin.” (2)...

  1. Effect of alirocumab, a monoclonal proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 antibody, on lipoprotein(a) concentrations (a pooled analysis of 150 mg every two weeks dosing from phase 2 trials).

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Daniel; Kereiakes, Dean J; McKenney, James M; Roth, Eli M; Hanotin, Corinne; Gipe, Daniel; Du, Yunling; Ferrand, Anne-Catherine; Ginsberg, Henry N; Stein, Evan A

    2014-09-01

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, with limited treatment options. This analysis evaluated the effect of a monoclonal antibody to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9, alirocumab 150 mg every 2 weeks (Q2W), on Lp(a) levels in pooled data from 3 double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase 2 studies of 8 or 12 weeks' duration conducted in patients with hypercholesterolemia on background lipid-lowering therapy (NCT01266876, NCT01288469, and NCT01288443). Data were available for 102 of 108 patients who received alirocumab 150 mg Q2W and 74 of 77 patients who received placebo. Alirocumab resulted in a significant reduction in Lp(a) from baseline compared with placebo (-30.3% vs -0.3%, p <0.0001). Median percentage Lp(a) reductions in the alirocumab group were of a similar magnitude across a range of baseline Lp(a) levels, resulting in greater absolute reductions in Lp(a) in patients with higher baseline levels. Regression analysis indicated that <5% of the variance in the reduction of Lp(a) was explained by the effect of alirocumab on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In conclusion, pooled data from 3 phase 2 trials demonstrate substantive reduction in Lp(a) with alirocumab 150 mg Q2W, including patients with baseline Lp(a) >50 mg/dl. Reductions in Lp(a) only weakly correlated with the magnitude of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering.

  2. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  3. Therapeutic antibody technology 97.

    PubMed

    Larrick, J W; Gavilondo, J

    1998-01-01

    Almost 200 antibody aficionados attended the Therapeutic Antibody Technology 97 meeting, held September 21-24, 1997 at the Holiday Inn, Union Square in the heart of San Francisco, CA. The meeting was sponsored by the Palo Alto Institute of Molecular Medicine and organized by James W. Larrick (PAIMM) and Dennis R. Burton (Scripps Research Institute). The meeting featured excellent discussions on many interesting talks and a number of poster presentations. It is likely that another meeting will be organized in 2 years, however in the meantime, an effort is underway to organize a 'Virtual Antibody Society' to be set up on the web server at Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, CA (Questions and comments on this project can be sent to: Jwlarrick@aol.com or Burton@scripps.edu). Richard Lerner (Scripps) gave the keynote address on 'Catalytic Antibodies', describing recent work with Carlos Barbas on so-called reactive immunization to generate a high activity aldolase catalytic antibody. This antibody, soon to be described in an article in Science, is the first commercially available catalytic antibody.

  4. Antibody discovery: sourcing of monoclonal antibody variable domains.

    PubMed

    Strohl, William R

    2014-03-01

    Historically, antibody variable domains for therapeutic antibodies have been sourced primarily from the mouse IgG repertoire, and typically either chimerized or humanized. More recently, human antibodies from transgenic mice producing human IgG, phage display libraries, and directly from human B lymphocytes have been used more broadly as sources of antibody variable domains for therapeutic antibodies. Of the total 36 antibodies approved by major maket regulatory agencies, the variable domain sequences of 26 originate from the mouse. Of these, four are marketed as murine antibodies (of which one is a mouse-rat hybrid IgG antibody), six are mouse-human chimeric antibodies, and 16 are humanized. Ten marketed antibodies have originated from human antibody genes, three isolated from phage libraries of human antibody genes and seven from transgenic mice producing human antibodies. Five antibodies currently in clinical trials have been sourced from camelids, as well as two from non-human primates, one from rat, and one from rabbit. Additional sources of antibody variable domains that may soon find their way into the clinic are potential antibodies from sharks and chickens. Finally, the various methods for retrieval of antibodies from humans, mouse and other sources, including various display technologies and amplification directly from B cells, are described.

  5. Immune deficiency enhances expression of recombinant human antibody in mice after nonviral in vivo gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Kitaguchi, Kohji; Toda, Mikako; Takekoshi, Masataka; Maeda, Fumiko; Muramatsu, Tatsuo; Murai, Atsushi

    2005-10-01

    A cDNA encoding human antibody against hepatitis B virus was expressed in normal and severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mice to clarify whether or not host immune status affects circulating levels of the recombinant human antibody (RhAb) after nonviral in vivo gene transfer. For transferring genes, either electroporation (EP) or hydrodynamics-based transfection (HD) was employed. The former was applied to the leg muscle to express the gene, while the latter primarily targeted foreign gene expression in the liver. The expressed RhAb was secreted into the blood circulation, and its existence was assayed by ELISA. Prior to the investigation of host immune status, suitable forms of plasmid expression vectors and types of electrodes were determined in normal mice. Results showed that the vector encoding both the light and heavy chains driven by the CMV promoter had the highest plasma RhAb concentrations, and a pair of pincette-type electrodes conferred the best performance. In both EP and HD, the SCID state showed an increased and prolonged RhAb production in the blood circulation due probably to suppressed recognition of RhAb as a foreign protein to the host animal. The difference in gene transfer methods demonstrated a characteristic pattern: an early and sharp rise followed by a relatively rapid decrease in HD, in contrast to a gradual rise followed by a plateau level maintained in EP. As a result, with the same amount of gene transferred, the plasma RhAb concentrations for the first 7 or 8 weeks were higher in HD than EP, while the reverse was true for the latter period. Multiple gene transfer contributed to maintaining and prolonging high RhAb concentrations in plasma by both methods with similar characteristic patterns accompanying the respective gene transfer method. These results suggest the importance of host immunological potency for maintaining plasma RhAb concentrations if these gene transfer technologies are used for clinical and therapeutic purposes.

  6. Serum thyroglobulin antibody levels within or near to the reference range may interfere with thyroglobulin measurement.

    PubMed

    Locsei, Zoltán; Szabolcs, István; Rácz, Károly; Kovács, Gábor L; Horváth, Dóra; Toldy, Erzsébet

    2012-01-01

    High concentration of thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) is a major limiting factor of thyroglobulin measurements in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. We investigated whether thyroglobulin antibody added to serum samples could interfere with the thyroglobulin assay. Thyroglobulin levels in serum samples with different concentrations of thyroglobulin were measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay before and after the addition of increasing concentrations of thyroglobulin antibody using the secondary calibrator solution of the thyroglobulin assay kit containing sheep thyroglobulin antibody to reach thyroglobulin antibody levels within or near to the reference range. Thyroglobulin and thyroglobulin antibody concentrations were also measured in 134 serum samples from 27 patients after thyroid ablation. There was a strong negative association (slope = -1.179) between thyroglobulin antibody and thyroglobulin concentrations in samples with added thyroglobulin antibody (beta = -0.86; P <0.001). Changes in thyroglobulin concentrations were described mathematically as loss of thyroglobulin% = -0.2408 x Ln(thyroglobulin antibody IU/ml) + 0.1944. Thyroglobulin concentrations were significantly lower than those calculated from experiments with added thyroglobulin antibody in 26/134 samples from patients after thyroid ablation. We conclude that if the same TgAb interference exists in the presence of naturally occurring human TgAb, our observation may prove to be useful during follow-up of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. However, further studies are needed to explore the clinical relevance of thyroglobulin antibody levels within or near to the reference range in monitoring these patients.

  7. A Recap of the Fourth Nationwide Vocational Education Dissemination Conference. The Proceedings (Columbus, Ohio, November 17-19, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Norman M., Comp.; Grieve, Shelley, Comp.

    These proceedings summarize the Fourth Nationwide Vocational Education Dissemination Conference that concentrated on the knowledge, tools, techniques, and topical areas needed by disseminators, linkers, and other change agents. Introductory materials are a conference overview, reflections on the conference, and the agenda. Brief summaries follow…

  8. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  9. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kutteh, William H; Hinote, Candace D

    2014-03-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) are acquired antibodies directed against negatively charged phospholipids. Obstetric antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is diagnosed in the presence of certain clinical features in conjunction with positive laboratory findings. Obstetric APS is one of the most commonly identified causes of recurrent pregnancy loss. Thus, obstetric APS is distinguished from APS in other organ systems where the most common manifestation is thrombosis. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms of action of aPLs have been described. This article discusses the diagnostic and obstetric challenges of obstetric APS, proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms of APS during pregnancy, and the management of women during and after pregnancy.

  10. Energy Conferences and Symposia; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, J.H.; Simpson, W.F. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Energy Conferences and Symposia, a monthly publication, was instituted to keep scientists, engineers, managers, and related energy professionals abreast of meetings sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and by other technical associations. Announcements cover conference, symposia, workshops, congresses, and other formal meetings pertaining to DOE programmatic interests. Complete meeting information, including title, sponsor, and contact, is presented in the main section, which is arranged alphabetically by subject area. Within a subject, citations are sorted by beginning data of the meeting. New listings are indicated by a bullet after the conference number and DOE-sponsored conferences are indicated by a star. Two indexes are provided for cross referencing conference information. The Chronological Index lists conference titles by dates and gives the subject area where complete information they may be found. The Location Index is alphabetically sorted by the city where the conference will be held.

  11. PREFACE: 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsson, Hans

    1982-01-01

    Invited Papers: The Physics of Hot Plasmas During the last decade a dramatic evolution of plasma physics has occurred. Not only have gigantic fusion plasma machines been planned, and are now being built, and elaborate spaceships and antenna systems been constructed to explore remote parts of the cosmos; new observations have revealed fascinating structures in space, ranging from pulsar plasmas under extreme conditions in very strong magnetic fields to large-scale magnetic field and electric current systems in cosmic plasmas. X-rays from very distant sources as well as radio-waves from the plasma in the magnetosphere and in the Aurora have recently been studied with new observational techniques. Ingenious laboratory experiments are continuously being carried out to exploit new fundamental processes in plasmas. These are of great interest for the basic understanding of plasmas and also have immediate consequences for applications, like plasma heating and diagnostics. The theoretical description of new plasma phenomena, and of the plasma state in general poses challenging problems, particularly in situations where high concentration of energy is located in the plasmas. Nonlinear wave analysis and turbulence theory have accordingly been extensively developed to describe in particular the collective plasma phenomena. New concepts have been envisaged like plasma solitons, which may be thought of as excitations of local concentrations of longitudinal plasma waves which turn out to be particularly stable. More and more sophisticated structures of nonlinear nature are being revealed by means of high capacity computer facilities. Simulation experiments allow for studies of chaotic behaviour of plasma particles. Related fields of activity form new trends in the development of plasma theory. The programme of the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics, which was held in Göteborg, Sweden, stressed the role of the Physics of Hot Plasmas. Studies of such plasmas are

  12. Epitope specificity plays a critical role in regulating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    He, Wenqian; Tan, Gene S; Mullarkey, Caitlin E; Lee, Amanda J; Lam, Mannie Man Wai; Krammer, Florian; Henry, Carole; Wilson, Patrick C; Ashkar, Ali A; Palese, Peter; Miller, Matthew S

    2016-10-18

    The generation of strain-specific neutralizing antibodies against influenza A virus is known to confer potent protection against homologous infections. The majority of these antibodies bind to the hemagglutinin (HA) head domain and function by blocking the receptor binding site, preventing infection of host cells. Recently, elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies which target the conserved HA stalk domain has become a promising "universal" influenza virus vaccine strategy. The ability of these antibodies to elicit Fc-dependent effector functions has emerged as an important mechanism through which protection is achieved in vivo. However, the way in which Fc-dependent effector functions are regulated by polyclonal influenza virus-binding antibody mixtures in vivo has never been defined. Here, we demonstrate that interactions among viral glycoprotein-binding antibodies of varying specificities regulate the magnitude of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity induction. We show that the mechanism responsible for this phenotype relies upon competition for binding to HA on the surface of infected cells and virus particles. Nonneutralizing antibodies were poor inducers and did not inhibit antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Interestingly, anti-neuraminidase antibodies weakly induced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and enhanced induction in the presence of HA stalk-binding antibodies in an additive manner. Our data demonstrate that antibody specificity plays an important role in the regulation of ADCC, and that cross-talk among antibodies of varying specificities determines the magnitude of Fc receptor-mediated effector functions.

  13. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  14. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  15. Mining human antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become drugs of choice for the management of an increasing number of human diseases. Human antibody repertoires provide a rich source for human mAbs. Here we review the characteristics of natural and non-natural human antibody repertoires and their mining with non-combinatorial and combinatorial strategies. In particular, we discuss the selection of human mAbs from naïve, immune, transgenic and synthetic human antibody repertoires using methods based on hybridoma technology, clonal expansion of peripheral B cells, single-cell PCR, phage display, yeast display and mammalian cell display. Our reliance on different strategies is shifting as we gain experience and refine methods to the efficient generation of human mAbs with superior pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:20505349

  16. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  17. SALT Science Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David; Schroeder, Anja

    2015-06-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) has seen great changes in the last years following the beginning of full time science operations in 2011. The three first generation instruments, namely the SALTICAM imager, the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) and its multiple modes and finally in 2014, the new High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS), have commissioned it. The SALT community now eagerly anticipate the installation and commissioning of the near-infrared arm of RSS, likely to commence in 2016. The the third "Science with SALT" conference was held at the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Study from 1-5 June 2015. The goals of this conference were to: -Present and discuss recent results from SALT observations; -Anticipate scientific programs that will be carried out with new SALT instrumentation such as RSS-NIR; -Provide a scientific environment in which to foster inter-institutional and inter-facility collaborations between scientists at the different SALT partners; -Provide an opportunity for students and postdocs to become more engaged in SALT science and operations; -Encourage the scientific strategic planning that will be necessary to insure an important role for SALT in an era of large astronomical facilities in the southern hemisphere such as MeerKAT, the SKA, LSST, and ALMA; -Consider options for future instrumentation and technical development of SALT; and, -Present, discuss, and engage in the SALT Collateral Benefits program led by SAAO. Conference proceedings editors: David Buckley and Anja Schroeder

  18. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  19. Antibody tumor penetration

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  20. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0382 TITLE: Antibodies Targeting EMT PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Brunhilde H Felding CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The... CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0382 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Vaughn Smider, Brunhilde Felding 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...14. ABSTRACT Monoclonal antibodies are drugs that can specifically bind targets present on tumor cells. The highly aggressive triple-negative subtype

  1. CONFERENCE NOTE: Forthcoming Conference on Frequency Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-04-01

    The Third Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology will be held 5 7 October 1981 at the Centre Paul Langevin, Aussois, Savoie, France. This Conference will follow the lines of its predecessors at Forêt Montmorency, Quebec, Canada in September 1971 and at Copper Mountain, Colorado, USA in July 1976. It is intended to serve as a discussion forum on recent progress and ideas relating to precision frequency standards, the associated metrology and the specific fields of applications. A tentative list of the topics to be covered is the following: Progress in the field of atomic/molecular frequency standards throughout the electromagnetic spectrum Current trends and discussion of the precision capabilities of new techniques (Ramsey fringes in optics, cooling of atoms and ions . . . ) System application (VLBI, navigation . . .) and scientific applications (relativity, geodesy . . .) of atomic/molecular frequency standards and needs in these fields Modern distant time and frequency comparisons Progress in frequency synthesis of microwave to visible frequencies, etc. Most of the talks will be by invitation. Time will be provided for discussion, as well as for presentation of selected late ideas and results. Those interested in the Symposium should communicate with: Dr C Audoin, Laboratoire de l'Horloge Atomique, Bât. 221, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France.

  2. Therapeutic antibody gene transfer: an active approach to passive immunity.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Joost M; Bleeker, Wim K; Parren, Paul W H I

    2004-09-01

    Advances in gene transfer approaches are enabling the possibility of applying therapeutic antibodies using DNA. In particular gene transfer in combination with electroporation is promising and can result in generating in vivo antibody concentrations in the low therapeutic range. However, several important problems need to be dealt with before antibody gene transfer can become a valuable supplement to the current therapies. As antibody production following gene transfer is difficult to control, the danger of inducing autoimmune conditions or uncontrollable side effects occurs in cases in which autologous antigens are targeted. It is suggested that the most promising area of application therefore appears to be infectious disease in which heterologous antigens are targeted and concerns for long-term antibody exposure are minimal. Finally, genes encoding fully human antibodies will enhance long-term expression and decrease problems linked to immunogenicity.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  4. Photovoltaic concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boes, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    A status report on photovoltaic (PV) concentrators technology is presented. The major topics covered are as follows: (1) current PV concentrator arrays; designs, performances, and costs; (2) current PV concentrator array components; cells and cell assemblies, optical concentrators, support structures, tracking, and drive; (3) design of PV concentrator arrays; and (4) array manufacturing technology.

  5. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The 44 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2015 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland in Sweden. It is the fourth time this conference has been held. The Wake Conference series started in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 it took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it is back where it started in Visby, where it takes place at Uppsala University Campus Gotland, June 9th-11th. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown tremendously in the past decade and it now comprises more than 3% of the global electrical power consumption. Today the wind power industry has a global annual turnover of more than 50 billion USD and an annual average growth rate of more than 20%. State-of-the-art wind turbines have rotor diameters of up to 150 m and 8 MW installed capacity. These turbines are often placed in large wind farms that have a total production capacity corresponding to that of a nuclear power plant. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global warming, the industry's growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. Modern wind turbines are today clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction results in decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of the vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of a wind farm. This conference is aimed

  6. [New antibodies in cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C; Knuth, A

    2004-09-22

    Since the development of hybridoma technology in 1975 monoclonal antibodies with pre-defined specificity can be produced. Only twenty years later did it become possible to make therapeutic use of monoclonal antibodies in oncology. To this end it was necessary to attach the antigen-binding site of a mouse antibody onto the scaffold of a human antibody molecule. Such chimeric or "humanized" antibodies may be used in passive immunotherapy without eliciting an immune response. Rituximab and trastuzumab are such humanized antibodies. They are used today routinely in the treatment of malignant lymphoma and breast cancer, respectively. These antibodies are usually used in combination with conventional cytostatic anticancer drugs.

  7. A double-sandwich ELISA for identification of monoclonal antibodies suitable for sandwich immunoassays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sandwich immunoassay (sIA) is an invaluable technique for concentrating, detecting, and quantifying target antigens. The two critical components required are a capture antibody and a detection antibody, each binding a different epitope on the target antigen. The specific antibodies incorporated...

  8. Antibody distribution and dosimetry in patients receiving radiolabelled antibody therapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Begent, R. H.; Ledermann, J. A.; Green, A. J.; Bagshawe, K. D.; Riggs, S. J.; Searle, F.; Keep, P. A.; Adam, T.; Dale, R. G.; Glaser, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of iodine-131 (131I) labelled antibody to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been studied in 16 patients with colorectal cancer. Levels of tumour and normal tissue radioactivity were measured by serial gamma-camera imaging and counting of blood and urine. Maximum concentrations were found in tumour 8 h after administration and varied up to 9-fold in different patients. Higher levels were found on average in tumour than in any other tissue. Liver, lung and blood were the other tissues in which antibody was concentrated relative to the rest of the body. Antibody cleared from all these tissues over 1 week. Second antibody directed against the antitumour (first) antibody was given 24 h after first antibody in order to accelerate clearance from the blood. This increased the tumour to blood ratio but had little effect on other tissues. Cumulative radiation dose to tumour and normal tissue was estimated. In patients with the most efficient localisation the tumour to body ratio was 20:1 and tumour to blood ratio 5:1. This may be sufficient for effective therapy of cancer in patients selected for efficient antibody localisation. The data may be used to estimate the effect of different therapeutic strategies. For instance, in the time after second antibody administration the average tumour to blood ratio of radiation dose was 11:1, suggesting that two phase systems in which the therapeutic modality is given after a good tumour to normal tissue ratio is obtained may be effective for the majority of patients. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2789951

  9. Human antibody technology and the development of antibodies against cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Ohlin, Mats; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2015-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a virus that causes chronic infections in a large set of the population. It may cause severe disease in immunocompromised individuals, is linked to immunosenescence and implied to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Modulation of the immune system's abilities to manage the virus represent a highly viable therapeutic option and passive immunotherapy with polyclonal antibody preparations is already in clinical use. Defined monoclonal antibodies offer many advantages over polyclonal antibodies purified from serum. Human CMV-specific monoclonal antibodies have consequently been thoroughly investigated with respect to their potential in the treatment of diseases caused by CMV. Recent advances in human antibody technology have substantially expanded the breadth of antibodies for such applications. This review summarizes the fundamental basis for treating CMV disease by use of antibodies, the basic technologies to be used to develop such antibodies, and relevant human antibody specificities available to target this virus.

  10. 76 FR 57746 - Conference on the International Conference on Harmonisation Q10 Pharmaceutical Quality System: A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Conference on the International Conference on Harmonisation... Systems and Processes for Pharmaceutical Manufacturing; Public Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA),...

  11. Control Center Technology Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Conference papers and presentations are compiled and cover evolving architectures and technologies applicable to flight control centers. Advances by NASA Centers and the aerospace industry are presented.

  12. SVC 2003 Technical Conference Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-07-01

    The 46th Annual Technical Conference of the Society of Vacuum Coaters was held in San Francisco May 2-8. All the world events apparently did not affect the attendance or the spirit of the attendees. The Conference was a huge success and very well attended. Many feel that it was the best Techcon yet. This year's Conference really raised the bar for the 47th Annual Technical Conference in Dallas next year. Congratulations go out to the program committee, board of directors, education committee, scholarship committee and Management Plus for a job well done. Excellent accommodations were provided by the San Francisco Marriott.

  13. Rural Energy Conference Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Witmer; Shannon Watson

    2008-12-31

    Alaska remains, even at the beginning of the 21st century, a place with many widely scattered, small, remote communities, well beyond the end of both the road system and the power grid. These communities have the highest energy costs of any place in the United States, despite the best efforts of the utilities that service them. This is due to the widespread dependence on diesel electric generators, which require small capital investments, but recent increases in crude oil prices have resulted in dramatic increases in the cost of power. In the enabling legislation for the Arctic Energy Office in 2001, specific inclusion was made for the study of ways of reducing the cost of electrical power in these remote communities. As part of this mandate, the University of Alaska has, in conjunction with the US Department of Energy, the Denali Commission and the Alaska Energy Authority, organized a series of rural energy conferences, held approximately every 18 months. The goal of these meeting was to bring together rural utility operators, rural community leaders, government agency representatives, equipment suppliers, and researchers from universities and national laboratories to discuss the current state of the art in rural power generation, to discuss current projects, including successes as well as near successes. Many of the conference presenters were from industry and not accustomed to writing technical papers, so the typical method of organizing a conference by requesting abstracts and publishing proceedings was not considered viable. Instead, the organizing committee solicited presentations from appropriate individuals, and requested that (if they were comfortable with computers) prepare Power point presentations that were collected and posted on the web. This has become a repository of many presentations, and may be the best single source of information about current projects in the state of Alaska.

  14. 5 CFR 185.120 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prehearing conferences. 185.120 Section... FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.120 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences... conference at a reasonable time in advance of the hearing. (c) The ALJ may use prehearing conferences...

  15. 7 CFR 1753.10 - Preconstruction conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preconstruction conference. 1753.10 Section 1753.10... conference. The borrower shall conduct a conference, attended by the borrower, contractor, and resident... participant with a copy of the conference results. The GFR shall be invited to attend this conference....

  16. 10 CFR 820.22 - Informal conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Informal conference. 820.22 Section 820.22 Energy... conference. The Director may convene an informal conference to discuss any situation that might be a... information. The Director may compel a person to attend the conference. This conference will not normally...

  17. 34 CFR 668.87 - Prehearing conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prehearing conference. 668.87 Section 668.87 Education... Proceedings § 668.87 Prehearing conference. (a) A hearing official may convene a prehearing conference if he or she thinks that the conference would be useful, or if the conference is requested by— (1)...

  18. 29 CFR 2570.40 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conferences. 2570.40 Section 2570.40 Labor Regulations... Transaction Exemption Applications § 2570.40 Conferences. (a) Any conference between the Department and an... conference will be held at the applicant's request. (b) An applicant is entitled to only one conference...

  19. The significance of anti-streptokinase antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, M; Pentecost, B L; Littler, W A; Stockley, R A

    1994-01-01

    Antibodies to streptokinase (SK) are widespread in the population, but reports of their effect on the action of SK are conflicting. Specific anti-SK IgG was purified from the sera of 10 patients, five with low titres of anti-SK IgG and five with high titres. The effect of increasing specific anti-SK IgG antibodies on the action of SK was evaluated in vitro using a fluorimetric assay for plasmin and by a fibrin plate lysis assay. The inhibition of SK by whole plasma from a further group of patients was also assessed by the fibrin plate assay. There was a positive correlation between the serum antibody concentration and the quantity of specific anti-SK eluted (r = 0.797; P < 0.005). The addition of specific anti-SK IgG caused a dose-related decrease in SK activity (fluorimetric assay r = -0.93; P = 0.02; fibrin plate assay r = -0.98; P < 0.001). The addition of patient plasma to the fibrin plate assay also resulted in decreased lysis, which was dependent upon antibody titre (r = -0.95; P < 0.0001). Significant in vitro reduction of the activity of SK by specific antibody was demonstrated, and this was similar with plasma containing comparable amounts of antibody. The findings suggest that treatment with SK would be unlikely to induce an effective thrombolytic state when antibody titres are high (such as those seen within 2 years of an initial dose of SK). PMID:8004811

  20. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ([bar p]) physics presented at the LEAP '92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, [bar N]N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, [bar N] annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy [bar p]'s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with [bar p] (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new [bar p] facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ([ge] 2 GeV/c).

  1. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ({bar p}) physics presented at the LEAP `92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, {bar N}N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, {bar N} annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy {bar p}`s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with {bar p} (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new {bar p} facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ({ge} 2 GeV/c).

  2. Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The mandated elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application verifications, compliant coatings including corrosion protection systems, and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards. The Executive Summary of this Conference is published as NASA CP-3297.

  3. Networks Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tasaki, Keiji K. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The papers included in these proceedings represent the most interesting and current topics being pursued by personnel at GSFC's Networks Division and supporting contractors involved in Space, Ground, and Deep Space Network (DSN) technical work. Although 29 papers are represented in the proceedings, only 12 were presented at the conference because of space and time limitations. The proceedings are organized according to five principal technical areas of interest to the Networks Division: Project Management; Network Operations; Network Control, Scheduling, and Monitoring; Modeling and Simulation; and Telecommunications Engineering.

  4. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen.

    PubMed

    Hart, Peter J; O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Siggins, Matthew K; Bobat, Saeeda; Kingsley, Robert A; Goulding, David A; Crump, John A; Reyburn, Hugh; Micoli, Francesca; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F; MacLennan, Calman A

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies.

  5. National Conference[s] on Career Education: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Joseph F.; And Others

    The report describes a series of conferences whose objective was to orient selected educational leaders to the implications of preparing educational personnel with a career education perspective. The first 32 pages of the report discuss project objectives and procedures, and detail participant profiles, pre- and post-conference career education…

  6. Polyreactive Antibodies: Function and Quantification.

    PubMed

    Gunti, Sreenivasulu; Notkins, Abner Louis

    2015-07-15

    Polyreactive antibodies, a major component of the natural antibody repertoire, bind with low affinity to a variety of structurally unrelated antigens. Many of these antibodies are germline or near germline in sequence. Little is known, however, about the function of these antibodies. In the present mini-review we show: (1) that the broad antibacterial activity of the natural antibody repertoire is largely due to polyreactive antibodies, which in the presence of complement lyse bacteria and enhance phagocytosis; (2) that polyreactive antibodies bind to UV- or human immunodeficiency virus-induced apoptotic cells and with complement enhance the phagocytosis of these cells by macrophages; and (3) that dinitrophenol can be used as a surrogate for quantitating the level of polyreactive antibodies in serum. We conclude that polyreactive antibodies protect the host against both foreign invaders and its own damaged/apoptotic cells.

  7. Antibody decoration of neurofilaments

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    We have decorated neurofilaments with antibodies against three polypeptides (designated here as H [mol wt = 195,000], 45[mol wt = 145,000], and 46[mol wt = 73,000]) in an effort to understand the arrangement of these polypeptides within neurofilaments. The three polypeptides were purified and antibodies were raised against each. The cross-reactivity of the antibodies suggested that each polypeptide contains both shared and unique antigenic determinants. The differential reactivities of each antibody preparation were enhanced by adsorption with the two heterologous polypeptides, and the resulting preparations were used to decorate purified neurofilaments, which were then negatively stained and examined in an electron microscope. The appearance of the antibody-decorated structures led to the following conclusions: All three polypeptides are physically associated with the same neurofilament. However, the disposition of H and 46 within a filament is different; 46 antigens appear to be associated with a "central core" of the filament, whereas H antigens compose a structure more loosely and peripherally attached to the central core and periodically arranged along its axis. The antibody-decorated H- containing structure assumes variable configurations; in some cases it appears asa bridge connecting two filaments; in other cases it appears as a helix wrapping the central core with a period of approximately 1,000 A and an apparent unit length of approximately 1.5 periods. These configurations suggest several functional implications, including the possibility that H is a component of the cross-bridges observed between filaments in situ. We also note that the central core-helix relationship could be used in the design of an intracellular transport motor. PMID:6788775

  8. 2008 Gordon Research Conference on Catalysis [Conference summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Soled, Stuart L.; Gray, Nancy Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The GRC on Catalysis is one of the most prestigious catalysis conferences as it brings together leading researchers from around the world to discuss their latest, most exciting work in catalysis. The 2008 conference will continue this tradition. The conference will cover a variety of themes including new catalytic materials, theoretical and experimental approaches to improve understanding of kinetics and transport phenomena, and state of the art nanoscale characterization probes to monitor active sites. The conference promotes interactions among established researchers and young scientists. It provides a venue for students to meet, talk to and learn from some of the world leading researchers in the area. It also gives them a platform for displaying their own work during the poster sessions. The informal nature of the meeting, excellent quality of the presentations and posters, and ability to meet many outstanding colleagues makes this an excellent conference.

  9. History of NAMES Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Lev

    2013-03-01

    -Russian International Centre was demonstrated. By the high standards of the reports presented, as well as by its overall organization, the second Seminar met the standards of an international conference. Reviews of state-of-the-art developments in materials science were given by leading scientists from Moscow and from the Lorraine region. The three days of the seminar were structured into four main themes: Functional Materials Coatings, Films and Surface Engineering Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies The Environment and three Round Table discussions: Defining practical means of carrying out Franco-Russian collaborations in technology transfer and innovation Materials science ARCUS: Lorraine-Russian collaboration in materials science and the environment 32 oral and 25 poster presentations within four sections were given by a total of 110 participants. NAMES 2007, the 3rd Franco-Russian Seminar on New Achievements in Materials and Environmental Sciences, took place in Metz, France on 7-9 November 2007. The conference highlights fundamentals and development of the five main themes connected to the Lorraine-Russia ARCUS project with possible extension to other topics. The five main subjects included in the ARCUS project are: Bulk-surface-interface material sciences Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies Environment and natural resources Plasma physics—ITER project Vibrational dynamics The first, second and third NAMES conferences were financially supported by the following organizations: Ambassade de France à Moscou Communauté Urbaine du Grand Nancy Région Lorraine Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine Université de Metz Université Henry Poincaré CNRS ANVAR Federal Agency on Science and Innovations of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation Moscow Committee on Science and Technologies Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys (Technological University) The 4th conference is supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of

  10. Calendar of Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-08-01

    8 - 18 August 1996 International Summer School on Plasma Physics and Technology La Jolla, CA, USA Contact: Mr V Stefan, Institute for Advanced Physics Studies, PO Box 2964, La Jolla, CA 92038, USA. Tel +1-619-456-5737. 26 - 30 August 1996 Joint Varenna - Lausanne International Workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 2 - 5 September 1996 EU - US Workshop on Transport in Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Further information: G Gorini, ISPP, 16 Via Celoria, I-20133 Milano, Italy. Tel +39-2-2392637, Fax +39-2-2392205, E-mail ggorini@mi.infn.it. Administrative contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 9 - 13 September 1996 International Conference on Plasma Physics Nagoya, Japan Contact: Conference Secretariat, c/o Prof. Hiromu Momota, National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya 464-01, Japan. Tel +81-52-789-4260, Fax +81-52-789-1037, E-mail icpp96@nifs.ac.jp. Abstract deadline: 31 March 1996. 16 - 20 September 1996 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology Lisbon, Portugal Contact: Professor Carlos Varandas, Centro de Fusão Nuclear, 1096 Lisboa Codex, Portugal. Fax +351-1-8417819, E-mail cvarandas@cfn.ist.utl.pt. General information will be available via WWW with URL http://www.cfn.ist.utl.pt. 25 - 29 September 1996 Summer University of Plasma Physics Garching, Germany Contact: Ms Ch Stahlberg, Max-Planck-Institut für PlasmaPhysik, Boltzmannstr 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany. Tel +49-89-3299-2232, Fax +49-89-3299-1001. 11 - 15 November 1996 38th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics, APS Denver, CO, USA Contact: Dr Richard Hazeltine, University of Texas

  11. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment, Expansion, and...

  12. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment, Expansion, and...

  13. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... STATES FOR ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment,...

  14. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment, Expansion, and...

  15. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  16. Conference Report: Improving College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, C. Douglas; Claxton, Charles S.

    The conference report includes an explanation of the conference plan, a description of the highlights, and descriptions of each session. Among the session topics are: faculty development; instructional improvement in the community college, with emphasis on developmental education; conditions that enhance learning; improving the lecture; evaluating…

  17. The Second National Conference Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chai, Carolyn

    In this summary of the 1978 National Conference on Asians in America and Asian Americans, conference proceedings, as well as papers and panel discussions, are briefly outlined. Workshops on foreign policy, immigration, Asian identity, education and employment, Indo-Chinese in the United States, teaching English to immigrants, racism and…

  18. Beating the Futures Conference Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, W. H. Clive

    1983-01-01

    Conference survival tips include: (1) noting the different kinds of speakers, their strengths and weaknesses; (2) discovering the reasons for often apparent cross-talk and misunderstanding; and (3) using the concept of futuring to gain ideas as to what can be done after the conference ends. (RM)

  19. SLA at 100: Conference Preview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstein, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    When School Library Association (SLA) convenes its annual conference in Washington, DC, June 14-17, 2009, the association will be celebrating its 100th birthday. This occasion allows for grand gestures--the SLA Salutes! Awards and Leadership Reception will be held in the Library of Congress's Great Hall. The conference also draws upon Washington…

  20. Vague Language in Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This study examined abstracts for a British Association for Applied Linguistics conference and a Sociolinguistics Symposium, to define the genre of conference abstracts in terms of vague language, specifically universal general nouns (e.g. people) and research general nouns (e.g. results), and to discover if the language used reflected the level…

  1. THE PREPLANNING TITLE VII CONFERENCE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KIEFFER, ROBERT DE

    THIS REPORT IS A TRANSCRIPT OF PROCEEDINGS OF A PLANNING CONFERENCE HELD AT BOULDER, COLORADO IN SEPTEMBER 1958 FOR THE PURPOSE OF DESIGNING A LARGER CONFERENCE IN APRIL 1960. SPECIFICALLY THIS WOULD DEAL WITH MORE EFFECTIVE UTILIZATION OF TELEVISION, RADIO, MOTION PICTURES AND RELATED MEDIA FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES IN THE MOUNTAIN PLAINS STATES…

  2. Conference Connections: Rewiring the Circuit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siemens, George; Tittenberger, Peter; Anderson, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Increased openness, two-way dialogue, and blurred distinctions between experts and amateurs have combined with numerous technology tools for dialogue, personal expression, networking, and community formation to "remake" conferences, influencing not only how attendees participate in but also how organizers host conferences today. (Contains 31…

  3. Student-Led Portfolio Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulson, F. Leon; Paulson, Pearl R.

    In at least one Oregon school system, student-led conferences have begun to replace traditional report cards. When conferences are well done, parents believe they have learned more about their child's learning and progress than they would through a traditional report card. There is an important additional benefit in that students can rise to the…

  4. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  5. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody against infective larvae of Brugia malayi.

    PubMed Central

    Parab, P B; Rajasekariah, G R; Chandrashekar, R; Alkan, S S; Braun, D G; Subrahmanyam, D

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were produced following immunization of mice with live infective larvae of Brugia malayi. One of these, 46.08.76, is an antibody that promotes adherence of mouse peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood leucocytes to the infective larvae of B. malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti, respectively, and kills them. Fresh normal serum, as a source of complement, augments this effect. The same monoclonal antibody conferred 89% protection to jirds (Meriones unguiculatus) against challenge infection of B. malayi stage-three larvae. This monoclonal antibody recognizes antigens of 80,000, 67,000, 52,000 and 36,000 MW proteins present among the antigens of larvae, as detected by an immunoblotting technique. The antibody also reacts with antigens of infective larvae of Litomosoides carinii, Dipetalonema viteae and B. pahangi, but to a smaller extent. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3384450

  6. Monoclonal antibodies against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Macario, A J; Conway de Macario, E

    1988-01-01

    Highlights are presented of most recent work in which monoclonal antibodies have been instrumental in the study of bacteria and their products. Topics summarized pertain to human and veterinary medicines, dentistry, phytopathology, ichthyology, and bacterial ecophysiology, differentiation, evolution and methanogenic biotechnology.

  7. Reshaping Antibody Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Ekiert, Damian C.; Ahmad, Insha; Yu, Wenli; Zhang, Yong; Bazirgan, Omar; Torkamani, Ali; Raudsepp, Terje; Mwangi, Waithaka; Criscitiello, Michael F.; Wilson, Ian A.; Schultz, Peter G.; Smider, Vaughn V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Unlike humans or mice, some species have limited genome encoded combinatorial diversity potential, yet mount a robust antibody response. Cows are unusual in having exceptionally long CDR H3 loops and few V-regions, but the mechanism for creating diversity is not understood. Deep sequencing revealed that ultralong CDR H3s contain a remarkable complexity of cysteines, suggesting that disulfide-bonded mini-domains may arise during repertoire development. Indeed, crystal structures of two cow antibodies reveal that these CDR H3s form a very unusual architecture composed of a β-strand “stalk” that supports a structurally diverse, disulfide-bonded, “knob” domain. Sequence analysis suggests that diversity arises from somatic hypermutation of an ultralong DH with a severe codon bias towards mutation to cysteine. These unusual antibodies can be elicited to recognize defined antigens through the knob domain. Thus, the bovine immune system produces an antibody repertoire composed of CDR H3s of unprecedented length that fold into a diversity of mini-domains generated through combinations of somatically generated disulfides. PMID:23746848

  8. Therapeutic antibody engineering

    PubMed Central

    Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Lugovskoy, Alexey A.

    2013-01-01

    It is an important event in any knowledge area when an authority in the field decides that it is time to share all accumulated knowledge and learnings by writing a text book. This does not occur often in the biopharmaceutical industry, likely due to both the highly dynamic environment with tight timelines and policies and procedures at many pharmaceutical companies that hamper knowledge sharing. To take on a task like this successfully, a strong drive combined with a desire and talent to teach, but also an accommodating and stimulating environment is required. Luckily for those interested in therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, Dr. William R. Strohl decided about two years ago that the time was right to write a book about the past, present and future of these fascinating molecules. Dr. Strohl’s great expertise and passion for biotechnology is evident from his life story and his strong academic and industry track record. Dr. Strohl pioneered natural product biotechnology, first in academia as a full professor of microbiology and biochemistry at Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio and later in industry while at Merck. Despite his notable advances in recombinant natural products, industry interest in this area waned and in 2001 Dr. Strohl sought new opportunities by entering the field of antibody therapeutics. He initiated antibody discovery through phage display at Merck, and then moved to Centocor Research and Development Inc. (now Janssen Biotech, Inc.) in 2008 to head Biologics Research, where he now directs the discovery of innovative therapeutic antibody candidates.

  9. PREFACE: Adapting to the Atmosphere Conference 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-04-01

    These proceedings, for the ''Adapting to the Atmosphere'' conference, Durham University, 2014, address the field of optical turbulence profiling of the Earth's atmosphere for astronomical observatory site selection, and the applications of Adaptive Optics and Optical Astronomical Instrumentation for small observatories as well as the future Extremely Large Telescope scales. This conference concentrated on the future of the community in an era of change. Optical turbulence profiling and remote sensing is required for the next generation of sophisticated adaptive optics systems and enables many of the proposed instruments and technologies which are necessary for the operation of large to extremely large telescopes. The successful design and operation of these complex systems demands an increasingly detailed understanding of the nature of atmospheric optical turbulence, as well as improvements in our ability to monitor and forecast its properties. This conference has the endorsement of the International Astronomical Union (working group on site testing instrumentation) and has received funding from the European Southern Observatory, the Thirty Meter Telescope and the Optical Infrared Co-ordination Network (OPTICON).

  10. The Art of Making Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headon, Denis R.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the nature and production of antibodies. Points out that the production of monoclonal antibodies blends the malignant with the beneficial to create a medical tool of exciting potential. (JN)

  11. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the presence ...

  12. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000547.htm Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining ...

  13. Humanized Antibodies for Antiviral Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Co, Man Sung; Deschamps, Marguerite; Whitley, Richard J.; Queen, Cary

    1991-04-01

    Antibody therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Murine monoclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce but are severely restricted for therapeutic use by their immunogenicity in humans. Production of human monoclonal antibodies has been problematic. Humanized antibodies can be generated by introducing the six hypervariable regions from the heavy and light chains of a murine antibody into a human framework sequence and combining it with human constant regions. We humanized, with the aid of computer modeling, two murine monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus gB and gD glycoproteins. The binding, virus neutralization, and cell protection results all indicate that both humanized antibodies have retained the binding activities and the biological properties of the murine monoclonal antibodies.

  14. Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The promotion of interaction among investigators of all oceanographic disciplines studying the eastern Pacific Ocean was the goal of the 1990 Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference (EPOC), held October 17-19 on the snow-covered slopes of Mt. Hood, Oreg. Thirty oceanographers representing all disciplines attended.Dick Barber, Duke University Marine Lab, Beaufort, N.C., chaired a session on the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, emphasizing issues related to biological activity. Steve Ramp of the Naval Postgraduate School in Montery, Calif., chaired a session on recent results from northern and central California experiments. On October 19, following an early morning earthquake, a business meeting and discussions regarding a collaboration in future experiments were held.

  15. Focusing antibody responses against distraction and loss in diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenshen; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup

    Pathogens are complex and evolving fast. They have developed full ranges of disguises to divert immune responses and often manage to escape recognition and thereby outpace natural immunity. A prominent example is the scarce and staggered development of broadly neutralizing antibodies against highly mutable viruses. It remains unclear under what evolutionary conditions these exceptional antibodies could emerge and dominate the response. To address this challenge, we construct an individual-based stochastic model of the Darwinian evolution of antibody-producing immune cells. We consider complexity of viral epitopes, vary seeding diversity of the immune cell population, and allow a time varying population size and extinction - new aspects essential for designing a realistic vaccine. We show that various temporal statistics of antigenic environments would select distinct evolutionary paths that lead to predominantly non-neutralizing, strain-specific or broadly neutralizing antibody responses. We suggest strategies to focus antibody responses on the targeted vulnerability of the virus and confer selective advantage to cross-reactive lineages. This implies a new step toward an effective vaccine against rapidly mutating complex pathogens. This work is supported by NIH.

  16. Thermodynamic mechanism for the evasion of antibody neutralization in flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Rodrigo A; Liu, Tong; Beasley, David W C; Barrett, Alan D T; Hilser, Vincent J; Lee, J Ching

    2014-07-23

    Mutations in the epitopes of antigenic proteins can confer viral resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. However, the fundamental properties that characterize epitope residues and how mutations affect antibody binding to alter virus susceptibility to neutralization remain largely unknown. To address these questions, we used an ensemble-based algorithm to characterize the effects of mutations on the thermodynamics of protein conformational fluctuations. We applied this method to the envelope protein domain III (ED3) of two medically important flaviviruses: West Nile and dengue 2. We determined an intimate relationship between the susceptibility of a residue to thermodynamic perturbations and epitope location. This relationship allows the successful identification of the primary epitopes in each ED3, despite their high sequence and structural similarity. Mutations that allow the ED3 to evade detection by the antibody either increase or decrease conformational fluctuations of the epitopes through local effects or long-range interactions. Spatially distant interactions originate in the redistribution of conformations of the ED3 ensembles, not through a mechanically connected array of contiguous amino acids. These results reconcile previous observations of evasion of neutralization by mutations at a distance from the epitopes. Finally, we established a quantitative correlation between subtle changes in the conformational fluctuations of the epitope and large defects in antibody binding affinity. This correlation suggests that mutations that allow viral growth, while reducing neutralization, do not generate significant structural changes and underscores the importance of protein fluctuations and long-range interactions in the mechanism of antibody-mediated neutralization resistance.

  17. Viral receptor-binding site antibodies with diverse germline origins

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Aaron G.; Therkelsen, Matthew D.; Stewart, Shaun; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony; Haynes, Barton F.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines for rapidly evolving pathogens will confer lasting immunity if they elicit antibodies recognizing conserved epitopes, such as a receptor-binding site (RBS). From characteristics of an influenza-virus RBS-directed antibody, we devised a signature motif to search for similar antibodies. We identified, from three vaccinees, over 100 candidates encoded by eleven different VH genes. Crystal structures show that antibodies in this class engage the hemagglutinin RBS and mimic binding of the receptor, sialic acid, by supplying a critical dipeptide on their projecting, heavy-chain third complementarity determining region. They share contacts with conserved, receptor-binding residues but contact different residues on the RBS periphery, limiting the likelihood of viral escape when several such antibodies are present. These data show that related modes of RBS recognition can arise from different germline origins and mature through diverse affinity maturation pathways. Immunogens focused on an RBS-directed response will thus have a broad range of B-cell targets. PMID:25959776

  18. Choriocarcinoma: blocking factor and monoclonal antibody iodine 131 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pattillo, R.A.; Khazaeli, M.B.; Ruckert, A.C.; Hussa, R.O.; Collier, B.D.; Beierwaltes, W.; Mattingly, R.F.

    1984-04-01

    Postoperative iodine 131 monoclonal antibody localization in metastatic choriocarcinoma was accomplished in this study. The monoclonal antibody was prepared to male choriocarcinoma which cross reacted with gestational choriocarcinoma. The antibody was raised against whole choriocarcinoma cells and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) cross reactivity was excluded. The purified antibody was iodinated with /sup 131/I and successfully imaged BeWo choriocarcinoma transplanted in nude mice; however, imaging of choriocarcinoma in a patient was verified only after resection. It is our belief that failure to sufficiently concentrate the antibody in the tumor before operation was due to blocking factor in the serum of the patient. Blocking factor and hCG dropped postoperatively. Blocking factor activity in 15 patients with metastatic trophoblastic disease was monitored and, like hCG, was found to be a sensitive indicator of the presence of disease. Its efficacy may be in the small number of patients without hCG but with persistent disease.

  19. ISMB Conference Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Teresa, Gaasterand; Martin, Vingron

    2011-07-01

    This special issue comprises the papers accepted for presentation at the 19th Annual International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology, joint with the 10th European Conference on Computational Biology, an official conference of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB; http://www.iscb.org). ISMB/ECCB 2011 (http://www.iscb.org/ismb2011/) will take place in Vienna, Austria, from July 17 through July 19, 2011; preceded during July 14–16 by eight 1- or 2- day Special Interest Group (SIG) meetings, three satellite meetings and nine half-day tutorials; and followed by two additional satellite meetings. The 48 papers in this volume were selected from 258 submitted papers. Submitted papers were assigned to 13 areas. Area Chairs led each topic area by selecting their area's program committee and overseeing the reviewing process. Many Area Chairs were new compared to 2010, and two completely new areas were added in 2011, ‘Data Visualization’ and ‘Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics’. Six papers for which Area Chairs were in conflict were reviewed under a ‘Conflicts Management’ section headed by the Proceedings Chairs; one such paper was accepted in ‘Bioimaging’. Areas, co-chairs and acceptance information are listed in Table 1. Compared to prior years, five mature topic areas had steady submissions, ‘Evolution and Comparative Genomics’, ‘Gene Regulation and Transcriptomics’, ‘Protein Structure and Function’, ‘Sequence Analysis’, ‘Text Mining’. Two areas newer to ISMB were underrepresented this year, ‘Bioimaging’ and ‘Disease Models and Epidemiology’. One area doubled, ‘Applied Bioinformatics’, renamed from last year's ‘Other Bioinformatics Applications’; and one tripled, ‘Protein Interactions and Molecular Networks’. Across the areas, 326 members of the bioinformatics community provided reviews. Most papers received three reviews and several received four or more. There was

  20. Computational Biology Support: RECOMB Conference Series (Conference Support)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Waterman

    2006-06-15

    This funding was support for student and postdoctoral attendance at the Annual Recomb Conference from 2001 to 2005. The RECOMB Conference series was founded in 1997 to provide a scientific forum for theoretical advances in computational biology and their applications in molecular biology and medicine. The conference series aims at attracting research contributions in all areas of computational molecular biology. Typical, but not exclusive, the topics of interest are: Genomics, Molecular sequence analysis, Recognition of genes and regulatory elements, Molecular evolution, Protein structure, Structural genomics, Gene Expression, Gene Networks, Drug Design, Combinatorial libraries, Computational proteomics, and Structural and functional genomics. The origins of the conference came from the mathematical and computational side of the field, and there remains to be a certain focus on computational advances. However, the effective use of computational techniques to biological innovation is also an important aspect of the conference. The conference had a growing number of attendees, topping 300 in recent years and often exceeding 500. The conference program includes between 30 and 40 contributed papers, that are selected by a international program committee with around 30 experts during a rigorous review process rivaling the editorial procedure for top-rate scientific journals. In previous years papers selection has been made from up to 130--200 submissions from well over a dozen countries. 10-page extended abstracts of the contributed papers are collected in a volume published by ACM Press and Springer, and are available at the conference. Full versions of a selection of the papers are published annually in a special issue of the Journal of Computational Biology devoted to the RECOMB Conference. A further point in the program is a lively poster session. From 120-300 posters have been presented each year at RECOMB 2000. One of the highlights of each RECOMB conference is a

  1. Conference Report: Power and Energy Society Annual Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorino, Naoto; Mori, Hiroyuki

    The 19th Power & Energy Society Annual Conference was held on September 24-26, 2008 at Hiroshima University. The total number of technical papers was 415 and 53 sessions (52 oral sessions and 1 poster session) were organized. A panel discussion, a special lecture, technical exhibitions and technical tours were also organized. All events were very well attended and the final enrollment attained to 954 registrations. The conference has been successfully closed by the great contribution of all participants. In this article, the outline of the conference is reported.

  2. Passive antibody therapy of Lassa fever in cynomolgus monkeys: importance of neutralizing antibody and Lassa virus strain.

    PubMed

    Jahrling, P B; Peters, C J

    1984-05-01

    Lassa virus-infected cynomolgus monkeys were passively immunized with immune plasma of primate or human origin to gain insight into criteria for plasma selection and administration to human Lassa fever patients. Protective efficacy was correlated with neutralizing antibody concentrations, expressed as a log10 neutralization index (LNI). Convalescent Lassa-immune monkey plasma was titrated for protective efficacy in monkeys by intravenous inoculation with dilutions of plasma on the day of subcutaneous Lassa virus inoculation (day 0) and again on days 3 and 6. Monkeys that received undiluted plasma (LNI = 4.1) (1 ml/kg per treatment) survived a lethal viral dose, whereas those given a 1:3 dilution (LNI = 2.6) of this same plasma (1 ml/kg per treatment) died. Protection was restored when the volume of the 1:3 plasma dilution was increased to 3 ml/kg per treatment. Plasma diluted 1:9 or more (LNI = 1.5 or less) delayed onset and suppressed the magnitude of viremia but failed to confer protection at 3 ml/kg per treatment. Immunological enhancement, defined as increased viremia or accelerated death, did not occur following inadequate treatment. Human convalescent plasma also protected recipient monkeys; reductions in mortality and viremia were accurately predicted by the LNI of the plasma. Plasma of Liberian origin neutralized a Liberian Lassa strain more effectively than a Sierra Leone strain in vitro (LNI = 2.8 and 1.6, respectively) and protected monkeys more effectively against the Liberian strain. Geographic origin is thus a factor in the selection of optimal plasma for treatment of human Lassa fever, since geographically matched plasma is more likely to contain adequate LNI titers against homologous Lassa virus strains.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Quantitative cumulative biodistribution of antibodies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Victor; Palma, Enzo; Tesar, Devin B; Mundo, Eduardo E; Bumbaca, Daniela; Torres, Elizabeth K; Reyes, Noe A; Shen, Ben Q; Fielder, Paul J; Prabhu, Saileta; Khawli, Leslie A; Boswell, C Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) plays an important and well-known role in antibody recycling in endothelial and hematopoietic cells and thus it influences the systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of immunoglobulin G (IgG). However, considerably less is known about FcRn’s role in the metabolism of IgG within individual tissues after intravenous administration. To elucidate the organ distribution and gain insight into the metabolism of humanized IgG1 antibodies with different binding affinities FcRn, comparative biodistribution studies in normal CD-1 mice were conducted. Here, we generated variants of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D-specific antibody (humanized anti-gD) with increased and decreased FcRn binding affinity by genetic engineering without affecting antigen specificity. These antibodies were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, purified and paired radiolabeled with iodine-125 and indium-111. Equal amounts of I-125-labeled and In-111-labeled antibodies were mixed and intravenously administered into mice at 5 mg/kg. This approach allowed us to measure both the real-time IgG uptake (I-125) and cumulative uptake of IgG and catabolites (In-111) in individual tissues up to 1 week post-injection. The PK and distribution of the wild-type IgG and the variant with enhanced binding for FcRn were largely similar to each other, but vastly different for the rapidly cleared low-FcRn-binding variant. Uptake in individual tissues varied across time, FcRn binding affinity, and radiolabeling method. The liver and spleen emerged as the most concentrated sites of IgG catabolism in the absence of FcRn protection. These data provide an increased understanding of FcRn’s role in antibody PK and catabolism at the tissue level. PMID:24572100

  4. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  5. Structure Activity Relationships of Monocyte Chemoattractant Proteins in Complex with a Blocking Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Reid,C.; Rushe, M.; Jarpe, M.; Van Vlijmen, H.; Dolinski, B.; Qian, F.; Cachero, T.; Cuervo, H.; Yanachkova, M.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant proteins (MCPs) are cytokines that direct immune cells bearing appropriate receptors to sites of inflammation or injury and are therefore attractive therapeutic targets for inhibitory molecules. 11K2 is a blocking mouse monoclonal antibody active against several human and murine MCPs. A 2.5 Angstroms structure of the Fab fragment of this antibody in complex with human MCP-1 has been solved. The Fab blocks CCR2 receptor binding to MCP-1 through an adjacent but distinct binding site. The orientation of the Fab indicates that a single MCP-1 dimer will bind two 11K2 antibodies. Several key residues on the antibody and on human MCPs were predicted to be involved in antibody selectivity. Mutational analysis of these residues confirms their involvement in the antibody- chemokine interaction. In addition to mutations that decreased or disrupted binding, one antibody mutation resulted in a 70-fold increase in affinity for human MCP-2. A key residue missing in human MCP-3, a chemokine not recognized by the antibody, was identified and engineering the preferred residue into the chemokine conferred binding to the antibody.

  6. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  7. The Teacher-Student Writing Conference: New Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiff, Peter M.

    Teacher-student writing conferences should provide students in composition classes with concentrated attention to their writing consonant with the teacher's in-class persona and instructional objectives. Some alternatives available to the instructor and the conferee include watching the teacher compose, sharing and revising journal entries,…

  8. The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference.

    PubMed

    Dellago, Christoph; Kahl, Gerhard; Likos, Christos N

    2012-07-18

    The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference (LMC8) was held at the Universität Wien from 6-10 September 2011. Initiated in 1990, the conferences of this series cover a broad range of highly interdisciplinary topics, ranging from simple liquids to soft matter and biophysical systems. The vast spectrum of scientific subjects presented and discussed at the LMC8 is reflected in the themes of the ten symposia: Ionic and quantum liquids, liquid metals Water, solutions and reaction dynamics Liquid crystals Polymers, polyelectrolytes, biopolymers Colloids Films, foams, surfactants, emulsions, aerosols Confined fluids, interfacial phenomena Supercooled liquids, glasses, gels Non-equilibrium systems, rheology, nanofluids Biofluids, active matter This special issue contains scientific papers, authored by participants of the LMC8, which provide a cross-section of the scientific activities in current liquid matter science, as discussed at the conference, and demonstrate the scientific as well as methodological progress made in this field over the past couple of years. The Eighth Liquid Matter Conference contents The Eighth Liquid Matter ConferenceChristoph Dellago, Gerhard Kahl and Christos N Likos Comparing light-induced colloidal quasicrystals with different rotational symmetriesMichael Schmiedeberg and Holger Stark Hydrogen bond network relaxation in aqueous polyelectrolyte solutions: the effect of temperatureS Sarti, D Truzzolillo and F Bordi Equilibrium concentration profiles and sedimentation kinetics of colloidal gels under gravitational stressS Buzzaccaro, E Secchi, G Brambilla, R Piazza and L Cipelletti The capillary interaction between two vertical cylindersHimantha Cooray, Pietro Cicuta and Dominic Vella Hydrodynamic and viscoelastic effects in polymer diffusionJ Farago, H Meyer, J Baschnagel and A N Semenov A density-functional theory study of microphase formation in binary Gaussian mixturesM Carta, D Pini, A Parola and L Reatto Microcanonical determination of the

  9. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed.

  10. Protection against measles virus-induced encephalitis by anti-mimotope antibodies: the role of antibody affinity.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, W; Obeid, O E; Steward, M W

    2000-06-20

    Synthetic peptides mimicking a conformational B-cell epitope (M2) of the measles virus fusion protein (MVF) were used for the immunization of BALB/c mice and the anti-peptide and anti-virus antibody titers induced were compared. Of the panel of tested peptides, a chimeric peptide consisting of two copies of a T-helper epitope (residues 288-302 of MVF) and one copy of the mimotope M2 (TTM2) and a multiple antigen peptide with eight copies of M2 (MAP-M2) induced the highest titers of anti-M2 and anti-MV antibodies. Furthermore, peptides TTM2 and MAP-M2 induced antibodies with highest affinity for the mimotope and highest avidity for measles virus. Immunization with the MAP-M2 construct induced high titers of high-affinity anti-M2 antibody despite the absence of a T-helper epitope, and lymphocyte proliferation data suggest that the addition of M2 to the MAP resulted in the generation of a structure capable of stimulating T-cell help. Sera with anti-M2 reactivity were pooled according to affinity values for binding to M2, and high- and low-affinity pools were tested for their ability to prevent MV-induced encephalitis in a mouse model. The high-affinity serum pool conferred protection in 100% of mice, whereas the lower affinity pool conferred protection to only 50% of animals. These results indicate the potential of mimotopes for use as synthetic peptide immunogens and highlight the importance of designing vaccines to induce antibodies of high affinity.

  11. PREFACE: The Irago Conference 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Adarsh; Okada, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    The Irago Conference 2012 - 360 degree outlook on critical scientific and technological challenges for a sustainable society Organized by the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology, the Irago Conference, held recently (15-16 November) in Aichi, Japan, aimed to enhance mutual understanding between scientists, engineers and policymakers. Over 180 participants tackled topics ranging from energy and natural resources to public health and disaster prevention. The 360-degree outlook of the conference impressed speakers and guests. ''This conference has been extremely informative,'' noted Robert Gellar from the University of Tokyo. ''A unique conference with experts from a range of backgrounds,'' agreed Uracha Ruktanonchai from the National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC) in Thailand. Similarly, G P Li, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California Irvine commented that he had been ''able to think the unthinkable'' as a range of topics came together. The conference was streamed live on Ustream to ensure that researchers from across the world could benefit from thought-provoking presentations examining global issues such as energy, disaster mitigation and nanotechnology. ''This was wonderful,'' said Oussama Khatib from Stanford University, ''A good recipe of speakers from such a range of backgrounds.'' Manuscripts submitted to the organizers were peer-reviewed, and the papers in this proceedings were accepted for Journal of Physics: Conference Series. In addition to the formal speaker programme, graduate-student sessions provided a platform for graduate students to describe their latest findings as oral presentations. A series of excursions to relevant locations, such as the Tahara megasolar region under construction and a local car-manufacturing factory, gave participants the opportunity to further consider practical applications of their research in industry

  12. Long-term anti-HBs antibody persistence and immune memory in children and adolescents who received routine childhood hepatitis B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Behre, Ulrich; Bleckmann, Gerhard; Crasta, Priya Diana; Leyssen, Maarten; Messier, Marc; Jacquet, Jeanne-Marie; Hardt, Karin

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents data from two studies that evaluated 5-y and 10-y persistence of antibodies against hepatitis B (HBV) surface antigen (anti-HBs) and immune response to an HBV vaccine challenge in children and adolescents who had received three doses of a HBV vaccine in infancy as part of routine clinical practice [NCT00519649/NCT00984139]. Anti-HBs antibody concentrations ≥ 10 mIU/ml persisted in 83.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 78.5–87.5) and 78.3% (95% CI: 73.1–83.0) of subjects aged 7–8 y and 12–13 y, respectively 5–10 y after infant vaccination. One month postchallenge dose, 98.2% (95% CI: 95.9–99.4) and 93.7% (95% CI: 90.2–96.2) of subjects in the two age groups, respectively had anti-HBs antibody concentrations ≥ 100 mIU/ml. Overall, 99.6% (95% CI: 98–100) and 97.2% (95% CI: 94.5–98.8) of subjects aged 7–8 y and 12–13 y mounted an anamnestic response to the HBV challenge dose, which was well-tolerated. Healthy children aged 7–8 y and adolescents aged 12–13 y received three doses of a monovalent pediatric HBV vaccine (10 μg of HBsAg) before 18 mo of age. Serum samples collected before and one month post-HBV vaccine challenge dose were tested for anti-HBs antibody concentrations. Safety assessments were made for the HBV vaccine challenge dose. A three-dose childhood HBV immunization regimen induced persistence of antibodies against HBV infection for 10 y, up to adolescence. This vaccination regimen also conferred long-term immune memory against HBV as evidenced by the strong anamnestic response to the HBV vaccine challenge, despite waning anti-HBs antibody levels.

  13. Shortened Engineered Human Antibody CH2 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Rui; Wang, Yanping; Feng, Yang; Zhao, Qi; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2011-01-01

    The immunoglobulin (Ig) constant CH2 domain is critical for antibody effector functions. Isolated CH2 domains are promising scaffolds for construction of libraries containing diverse binders that could also confer some effector functions. We have shown previously that an isolated human CH2 domain is relatively unstable to thermally induced unfolding, but its stability can be improved by engineering an additional disulfide bond (Gong, R., Vu, B. K., Feng, Y., Prieto, D. A., Dyba, M. A., Walsh, J. D., Prabakaran, P., Veenstra, T. D., Tarasov, S. G., Ishima, R., and Dimitrov, D. S. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 14203–14210). We have hypothesized that the stability of this engineered antibody domain could be further increased by removing unstructured residues. To test our hypothesis, we removed the seven N-terminal residues that are in a random coil as suggested by our analysis of the isolated CH2 crystal structure and NMR data. The resulting shortened engineered CH2 (m01s) was highly soluble, monomeric, and remarkably stable, with a melting temperature (Tm) of 82.6 °C, which is about 10 and 30 °C higher than those of the original stabilized CH2 (m01) and CH2, respectively. m01s and m01 were more resistant to protease digestion than CH2. A newly identified anti-CH2 antibody that recognizes a conformational epitope bound to m01s significantly better (>10-fold higher affinity) than to CH2 and slightly better than to m01. m01s bound to a recombinant soluble human neonatal Fc receptor at pH 6.0 more strongly than CH2. These data suggest that shortening the m01 N terminus significantly increases stability without disrupting its conformation and that our approach for increasing stability and decreasing size by removing unstructured regions may also apply to other proteins. PMID:21669873

  14. Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, C.C. Jr.; Harris, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference in Hampton, Virginia, December 6-8, 1994. This conference was the culmination of a 3-year program that was initiated by NASA late in 1990 to develop mechanics of textile composites in support of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology Program (ACT). The goal of the program was to develop mathematical models of textile preform materials and test methods to facilitate structural analysis and design. Participants in the program were from NASA, academia, and industry. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for articles from this conference.

  15. DOE Workshop at Tapia Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Valerie

    2015-02-19

    The DE-SC0013568 DOE Grant, in the amount of $11,822.79, was used to support five doctoral students from underrepresented groups to attend the 2015 Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing Conference, held February 18-21 in Boston, MA. Each scholarship was approximately $1200 to cover conference registration, travel, and lodging for the duration of the conference. The remaining $5,822.79 was used to support a DOE Breakfast Workshop during breakfast on Thursday, February 19. The Breakfast supported approximately 140 graduate students from underrepresented groups to learn about the different career opportunities at the different DOE National Laboratories.

  16. Antibody-mediated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, W.D.; Lipsztein, R.; Dalton, J.F.

    1985-05-01

    Antibodies that react with antigens on the surface of tumor cells but not normal cells have great potential for cancer detection and therapy. If radiolabeled without loss of immunologic specificity, such antibodies may be able to deliver cytoxic amounts of radiation. Target- cell specificity and a high extraction coefficient are necessary with any radionuclide in order to minimize normal tissue irradiation. Tumor- cell-retention time and the rate of catabolized radionuclide will also influence ultimate applicability. Among the unanswered questions for choosing a radionuclide is the choice of particle emitter. Although classic beta emitters have been used in a number of clinical situations, they have not had a major impact on disease outcome except in diseases of the thyroid. Unfortunately, Auger emitters such as iodine 125 are cytotoxic only when localized within close proximity to the genome. On the other hand, alpha emitters such as astatine 211 eliminate the need for subcellular sequestration but not cell-specific localization. 34 references.

  17. Antibody Therapy for Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Hamilton, Andrew J.; Guimarães, Allan J.

    2012-01-01

    The endemic human pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum is a major fungal pathogen with a broad variety of clinical presentations, ranging from mild, focal pulmonary disease to life-threatening systemic infections. Although azoles, such as itraconazole and voriconazole, and amphotericin B have significant activity against H. capsulatum, about 1 in 10 patients hospitalized due to histoplasmosis die. Hence, new approaches for managing disease are being sought. Over the past 10 years, studies have demonstrated that monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can modify the pathogenesis of histoplasmosis. Disease has been shown to be impacted by mAbs targeting either fungal cell surface proteins or host co-stimulatory molecules. This review will detail our current knowledge regarding the impact of antibody therapy on histoplasmosis. PMID:22347215

  18. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially.

  19. Fusion proteins comprising a Fusarium-specific antibody linked to antifungal peptides protect plants against a fungal pathogen.

    PubMed

    Peschen, Dieter; Li, He-Ping; Fischer, Rainer; Kreuzaler, Fritz; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2004-06-01

    In planta expression of recombinant antibodies recognizing pathogen-specific antigens has been proposed as a strategy for crop protection. We report the expression of fusion proteins comprising a Fusarium-specific recombinant antibody linked to one of three antifungal peptides (AFPs) as a method for protecting plants against fungal diseases. A chicken-derived single-chain antibody specific to antigens displayed on the Fusarium cell surface was isolated from a pooled immunocompetent phage display library. This recombinant antibody inhibited fungal growth in vitro when fused to any of the three AFPs. Expression of the fusion proteins in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants conferred high levels of protection against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. matthiolae, whereas plants expressing either the fungus-specific antibody or AFPs alone exhibited only moderate resistance. Our results demonstrate that antibody fusion proteins may be used as effective and versatile tools for the protection of crop plants against fungal infection.

  20. Antibody therapy for Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary P

    2014-01-01

    Ebola viruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates with fatality rates up to 90%, and are identified as biosafety level 4 pathogens and CDC Category A Agents of Bioterrorism. To date, there are no approved therapies and vaccines available to treat these infections. Antibody therapy was estimated to be an effective and powerful treatment strategy against infectious pathogens in the late 19th, early 20th centuries but has fallen short to meet expectations to widely combat infectious diseases. Passive immunization for Ebola virus was successful in 2012, after over 15 years of failed attempts leading to skepticism that the approach would ever be of potential benefit. Currently, monoclonal antibody (mAbs)-based therapies are the most efficient at reversing the progression of a lethal Ebola virus infection in nonhuman primates, which recapitulate the human disease with the highest similarity. Novel combinations of mAbs can even fully cure lethally infected animals after clinical symptoms and circulating virus have been detected, days into the infection. These new developments have reopened the door for using antibody-based therapies for filovirus infections. Furthermore, they are reigniting hope that these strategies will contribute to better control the spread of other infectious agents and provide new tools against infectious diseases. PMID:24503566

  1. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Xavier; Guilabert, Antonio; Font, Josep

    2006-07-29

    Much like other autoantibodies (eg, anti-double stranded DNA in systemic lupus erythematosus or antiglomerular basement membrane antibodies in Goodpasture's syndrome), antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) have provided doctors with a useful serological test to assist in diagnosis of small-vessel vasculitides, including Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, and their localised forms (eg, pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis). 85-95% of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis have serum ANCA. ANCA directed to either proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, yet the relevance of other ANCA remains unknown. Besides their diagnostic potential, ANCA might be valuable in disease monitoring. In addition, data seem to confirm the long-disputed pathogenic role of these antibodies. Present treatments for ANCA-associated vasculitis are not free from side-effects and as many as 50% of patients relapse within 5 years. Accurate understanding of the key pathogenic points of ANCA-associated vasculitis can undoubtedly provide a more rational therapeutic approach.

  2. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The Quark Matter 2006 conference was held on 14 20 November 2006 at the Shanghai Science Hall of the Shanghai Association of Sciences and Technology in Shanghai, China. It was the 19th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus Nucleus Collisions. The conference was organized jointly by SINAP (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)) and CCNU (Central China Normal University, Wuhan). Over 600 scientists from 32 countries in five continents attended the conference. This is the first time that China has hosted such a premier conference in the field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, an important event for the Chinese high energy nuclear physics community. About one half of the conference participants are junior scientists—a clear indication of the vigor and momentum for this field, in search of the fundamental nature of the nuclear matter at extreme conditions. Professor T D Lee, honorary chair of the conference and one of the founders of the quark matter research, delivered an opening address with his profound and philosophical remarks on the recent discovery of the nature of strongly-interacting quark-gluon-plasma (sQGP). Professor Hongjie Xu, director of SINAP, gave a welcome address to all participants on behalf of the two hosting institutions. Dr Peiwen Ji, deputy director of the Mathematics and Physics Division of the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), also addressed the conference participants and congratulated them on the opening of the conference. Professor Mianheng Jiang, vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), gave a concise introduction about the CAS as the premier research institution in China. He highlighted continued efforts at CAS to foster international collaborations between China and other nations. The Quark Matter 2006 conference is an example of such a successful collaboration between high energy nuclear physicists in China and other nations all over the world. The

  3. Anti-idiotypic antibodies induce neutralizing antibodies to bovine herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed Central

    Srikumaran, S; Onisk, D V; Borca, M V; Nataraj, C; Zamb, T J

    1990-01-01

    A neutralizing murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) of the IgG2a isotype (MM-113), specific for bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) glycoprotein gIV, was used to develop anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Id) in a calf. The bovine anti-Id were isolated from the serum of the immunized calf by affinity chromatography on an MM-113-Sepharose column, followed by repeated adsorption on a murine IgG2a column. The anti-Id thus obtained specifically reacted with MM-113, but not with isotype-matched controls. They also inhibited the binding of MM-113 to BHV-1 in a concentration-dependent manner. Mice immunized with the anti-Id produced neutralizing antibodies to BHV-1. The anti-Id bound to cells permissive to BHV-1 in a cell-binding radioimmunoassay (RIA). PMID:2165998

  4. Antibodies to mouse lung capillary endothelium.

    PubMed

    Rorvik, M C; Allison, D P; Hotchkiss, J A; Witschi, H P; Kennel, S J

    1988-07-01

    We are interested in developing monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) that recognize specific cell types in the lung of BALB/c mice. Normal mouse lung homogenate was used to immunize F344 rats and hybridomas were produced by fusion of rat spleen cells with mouse myeloma SP 2/0. Two hybridomas were selected which produced MoAbs active in immunohistochemistry of lung cells. MoAb 273-34A and 411-201B both show extensive peroxidase staining of capillary endothelial cells within alveolar walls of lungs at the light microscopic level. To demonstrate cell specificity, immunoelectron microscopy with gold-labeled antibody was performed. Lightly fixed lungs were frozen and thin-sectioned before staining with MoAb and 5-nm gold particles coupled to secondary antibody. Quantitative analyses of these cryosections show that both antibodies, used at optimal concentrations, are specific for binding to capillary endothelial cells. More than 95% of the gold particles are associated with capillary endothelial cells on the thin side of the alveolar wall. When capillaries adjoined thick septa containing interstitial cells, about two thirds of the gold particles were associated with endothelial cells and about one quarter with interstitial cells. These MoAbs should be useful in studying the role of endothelial cells in toxic lung injury.

  5. 17 CFR 201.221 - Prehearing conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prehearing conference. 201.221... Rules of Practice Initiation of Proceedings and Prehearing Rules § 201.221 Prehearing conference. (a) Purposes of conference. The purposes of a prehearing conference include, but are not limited to:...

  6. 49 CFR 511.21 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conferences. 511.21 Section 511.21...; Interlocutory Appeals; Summary Judgment; Settlement § 511.21 Prehearing conferences. (a) When held. (1) A prehearing conference shall be held in person or by conference telephone call, except in...

  7. 10 CFR 205.171 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conferences. 205.171 Section 205.171 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Conferences, Hearings, and Public Hearings § 205.171 Conferences. (a) The DOE in its discretion may direct that a conference be convened, on its own initiative...

  8. 24 CFR 26.39 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prehearing conferences. 26.39... § 26.39 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences as appropriate. (b) Upon the motion of any party or sua sponte, the ALJ may schedule a prehearing conference at...

  9. 14 CFR 302.414 - Prehearing conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prehearing conference. 302.414 Section 302... Prehearing conference. A prehearing conference may be held in an enforcement proceeding whenever the... prehearing conference is held, it shall be conducted in accordance with § 302.22....

  10. 20 CFR 498.206 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prehearing conferences. 498.206 Section 498... RECOMMENDED EXCLUSIONS § 498.206 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ will schedule at least one prehearing conference, and may schedule additional prehearing conferences as appropriate, upon reasonable notice to...

  11. 33 CFR 20.501 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conferences. 20.501 Section 20... PRACTICE, PROCEDURE, AND EVIDENCE FOR FORMAL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDINGS OF THE COAST GUARD Conferences and Settlements § 20.501 Conferences. (a) Any party may by motion request a conference. (b) The ALJ may direct...

  12. 47 CFR 1.956 - Settlement conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Settlement conferences. 1.956 Section 1.956... Applications and Proceedings Application Requirements and Procedures § 1.956 Settlement conferences. Parties... their attorneys to appear before it for a conference. (a) The purposes of such conferences are: (1)...

  13. 28 CFR 71.19 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prehearing conferences. 71.19 Section 71... § 71.19 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences as appropriate. (b) Upon the motion of any party, the ALJ shall schedule at least one prehearing conference at a...

  14. 42 CFR 3.512 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conferences. 3.512 Section 3.512 Public... ORGANIZATIONS AND PATIENT SAFETY WORK PRODUCT Enforcement Program § 3.512 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ must schedule at least one prehearing conference, and may schedule additional prehearing conferences...

  15. 27 CFR 70.418 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conferences. 70.418... Beer § 70.418 Conferences. Any person desiring a conference with TTB, relative to any matter arising in connection with such person's operations, will be accorded such a conference upon request. No...

  16. 2 CFR 801.1112 - Conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conference. 801.1112 Section 801.1112 Grants... Subpart for OMB Guidance at 2 CFR Part 180). § 801.1112 Conference. Upon receipt of a request for a conference, the official imposing the sanction shall arrange such a conference with the participant...

  17. 20 CFR 405.330 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prehearing conferences. 405.330 Section 405... INITIAL DISABILITY CLAIMS Administrative Law Judge Hearing § 405.330 Prehearing conferences. (a)(1) The... conference if he or she finds that such a conference would facilitate the hearing or the decision on...

  18. 10 CFR 1003.61 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conferences. 1003.61 Section 1003.61 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS Conferences and Hearings § 1003.61 Conferences. (a) The OHA in its discretion may direct that a conference be convened,...

  19. 10 CFR 1013.19 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prehearing conferences. 1013.19 Section 1013.19 Energy... conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences as appropriate. (b) Upon the motion of any party, the ALJ shall schedule at least one prehearing conference at a reasonable time in advance of...

  20. 20 CFR 405.366 - Posthearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Posthearing conferences. 405.366 Section 405... INITIAL DISABILITY CLAIMS Administrative Law Judge Hearing § 405.366 Posthearing conferences. (a) The... conference to facilitate the hearing decision. A posthearing conference normally will be held by...

  1. 22 CFR 521.19 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Prehearing conferences. 521.19 Section 521.19... § 521.19 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences as appropriate. (b) Upon the motion of any party, the ALJ shall schedule at least one prehearing conference at a...

  2. Utilisation of antibody microarrays for the selection of specific and informative antibodies from recombinant library binders of unknown quality.

    PubMed

    Kibat, Janek; Schirrmann, Thomas; Knape, Matthias J; Helmsing, Saskia; Meier, Doris; Hust, Michael; Schröder, Christoph; Bertinetti, Daniela; Winter, Gerhard; Pardes, Khalid; Funk, Mia; Vala, Andrea; Giese, Nathalia; Herberg, Friedrich W; Dübel, Stefan; Hoheisel, Jörg D

    2016-09-25

    Many diagnostic and therapeutic concepts require antibodies of high specificity. Recombinant binder libraries and related selection approaches allow the efficient isolation of antibodies against almost every target of interest. Nevertheless, it cannot be guaranteed that selected antibodies perform well and interact specifically enough with analytes unless an elaborate characterisation is performed. Here, we present an approach to shorten this process by combining the selection of suitable antibodies with the identification of informative target molecules by means of antibody microarrays, thereby reducing the effort of antibody characterisation by concentrating on relevant molecules. In a pilot scheme, a library of 456 single-chain variable fragment (scFv) binders to 134 antigens was used. They were arranged in a microarray format and incubated with the protein content of clinical tissue samples isolated from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and healthy pancreas, as well as recurrent and non-recurrent bladder tumours. We observed significant variation in the expression of the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase (CHFR) as well as the glutamate receptor interacting protein 2 (GRIP2), for example, always with more than one of the scFvs binding to these targets. Only the relevant antibodies were then characterised further on antigen microarrays and by surface plasmon resonance experiments so as to select the most specific and highest affinity antibodies. These binders were in turn used to confirm a microarray result by immunohistochemistry analysis.

  3. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  4. 2009 Community Involvement Training Conference

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A dynamic training conference that brings together more than 450 people from EPA and the Agency’s partners and stakeholders who plan and implement environmental community involvement, partnership, stewardship, outreach, and education programs.

  5. EPA Community Involvement Training Conferences

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A dynamic training conference that brings together more than 450 people from EPA and the Agency’s partners and stakeholders who plan and implement environmental community involvement, partnership, stewardship, outreach, and education programs.

  6. 2013 Community Involvement Training Conference

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A dynamic training conference that brings together more than 450 people from EPA and the Agency’s partners and stakeholders who plan and implement environmental community involvement, partnership, stewardship, outreach, and education programs.

  7. 2011 Community Involvement Training Conference

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A dynamic training conference that brings together more than 450 people from EPA and the Agency’s partners and stakeholders who plan and implement environmental community involvement, partnership, stewardship, outreach, and education programs.

  8. Climate Leadership Awards and Conference

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The fifth annual Climate Leadership Awards Dinner will be held on March 9, 2016 during the 2016 Climate Leadership Conference, and publicly recognize individuals and organizations for their outstanding leadership in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

  9. 2015 Community Involvement Training Conference

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A dynamic training conference that brings together more than 450 people from EPA and the Agency’s partners and stakeholders who plan and implement environmental community involvement, partnership, stewardship, outreach, and education programs.

  10. 2007 Community Involvement Training Conference

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A dynamic training conference that brings together more than 450 people from EPA and the Agency’s partners and stakeholders who plan and implement environmental community involvement, partnership, stewardship, outreach, and education programs.

  11. International Conference on Human Relations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Festinger , Sherif, Ex, Rohrer, Pinto, Singh, and Mailhiot. One outcome of the Conference was the formation of a working committee to establish an International Documentation and Information Center for the field of Human Relations.

  12. Quantitative Assessment of the Effects of Oxidants on Antigen-Antibody Binding In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuang; Wang, Guanyu; Xu, Naijin; Liu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We quantitatively assessed the influence of oxidants on antigen-antibody-binding activity. Methods. We used several immunological detection methods, including precipitation reactions, agglutination reactions, and enzyme immunoassays, to determine antibody activity. The oxidation-reduction potential was measured in order to determine total serum antioxidant capacity. Results. Certain concentrations of oxidants resulted in significant inhibition of antibody activity but had little influence on total serum antioxidant capacity. Conclusions. Oxidants had a significant influence on interactions between antigen and antibody, but minimal effect on the peptide of the antibody molecule. PMID:27313823

  13. High concentration plasma-reduced plateletapheresis concentrates.

    PubMed

    Perseghin, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    Single-donor hyperconcentrated plateletapheresis (dry-platelets) collection has been introduced in the 90's as a part of the newly developed multi-component collection strategy. This approach allowed to safely collect multiple components from a single apheresis donation, i.e. RBC, FFP and/or plateletpheresis units. Dry-platelets are usually resuspended in additive solution to maintain an adequate pH during the storage period until use. Some concern existed about possible higher degrees of platelet activation in dry-platelets units when compared to standard concentration (1.0-1.6 × 10(6)/μL platelets) units and its possible correlation with lower in vivo efficiency and/or survival of the former units. Several authors investigated this specific issue, and dry-platelets units proved to be equally effective than standard concentration plateletpheresis units in recipients. The use of dry-platelets units may reduce (i) the risk of passive infusion of naturally occurring ABO-related hemolytic antibodies when donor O platelets are given to group A, B, or AB recipient, (ii) the risk of TRALI when multiparous donors undergo plateletpheresis. Furthermore, dry-platelet collection may allow for an increased amount of FFP sent to industry. Finally, hyperconcentrated platelet units may be used for "niche" indications, such as intrauterine platelet transfusion or, in case of autologous dry-platelet collection, for further freezing for long term storage in selected patients within onco-hematological settings.

  14. Proceedings of the Fifth International Mobile Satellite Conference 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, T. (Compiler); Rigley, J. (Compiler); Anderson, Louise (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Satellite-based mobile communications systems provide voice and data communications to users over a vast geographic area. The users may communicate via mobile or hand-held terminals, which may also provide access to terrestrial communications services. While previous International Mobile Satellite Conferences have concentrated on technical advances and the increasing worldwide commercial activities, this conference focuses on the next generation of mobile satellite services. The approximately 80 papers included here cover sessions in the following areas: networking and protocols; code division multiple access technologies; demand, economics and technology issues; current and planned systems; propagation; terminal technology; modulation and coding advances; spacecraft technology; advanced systems; and applications and experiments.

  15. Eighteen Years of the Great Lakes Regional Counseling Psychology Conference: Revisiting the Need for Regional Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado-Romero, Edward A.; Bowman, Sharon L.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.

    2006-01-01

    The Great Lakes Regional Conference on Counseling Psychology is the only conference to continuously fulfill the 1987 mandate issued by Division 17 for regional counseling conferences. The rationale for regional conferences is reviewed, and the 18-year history of the Great Lakes Regional Conference is examined. The authors conclude by noting the…

  16. Concentrating collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    Selected specifications from sixteen concentrating collector manufacturers are tabulated. Eleven are linear parabolic trough collectors, and the others include slats, cylindrical trough, linear Fresnel lens, parabolic cylindrical Fresnel lens, and two point focus parabolic dish collectors. Also included is a brief discussion of the operating temperatures and other design considerations for concentrating collectors. (LEW)

  17. 9. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.

  18. NASA Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C. (Compiler); McCauley, D. E. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held July 14-16, 1998 at the Von Braun Center in Huntsville, AL. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications. It was the third NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approximately 125 investigations and 100 principal investigators in FY98, almost all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. The conference's purpose was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity in preparation for a NASA Research Announcement scheduled for release in late 1998 by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A tour of the Marshall Space Flight Center microgravity research facilities was held on July 16, 1998. This volume is comprised of the research reports submitted by the principal investigators after the conference.

  19. NASA Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szofran, Frank R. (Compiler); McCauley, D. (Compiler); Walker, C. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held June 10-11, 1996 at the Von Braun Civic Center in Huntsville, AL. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the second NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approximately 80 investigations and 69 principal investigators in FY96, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. The conference's purpose was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity in preparation for a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) scheduled for release in late 1996 by the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at NASA Headquarters. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A tour of the MSFC microgravity research facilities was held on June 12, 1996. This volume is comprised of the research reports submitted by the principal investigators after the conference and presentations made by various NASA microgravity science managers.

  20. PREFACE: XXI Fluid Mechanics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmyd, Janusz S.; Fornalik-Wajs, Elzbieta; Jaszczur, Marek

    2014-08-01

    This Conference Volume contains the papers presented at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) held at AGH - University of Science and Technology in Krakow, Poland, 15-18 June 2014, and accepted for Proceedings published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The Fluid Mechanics Conferences have been taking place every two years since 1974, a total of forty years. The 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) is being organized under the auspices of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Committee of Mechanics. The goal of this conference is to provide a forum for the exposure and exchange of ideas, methods and results in fluid mechanics. Conference topics include, but are not limited to Aerodynamics, Atmospheric Science, Bio-Fluids, Combustion and Reacting Flows, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Experimental Fluid Mechanics, Flow Machinery, General Fluid Dynamics, Hydromechanics, Heat and Fluid Flow, Measurement Techniques, Micro- and Nano- Flow, Multi-Phase Flow, Non-Newtonian Fluids, Rotating and Stratified Flows, Turbulence. Within the general subjects of this conference, the Professor Janusz W. Elsner Competition for the best fluid mechanics paper presented during the Conference is organized. Authors holding a M.Sc. or a Ph.D. degree and who are not older than 35 years of age may enter the Competition. Authors with a Ph.D. degree must present individual papers; authors with a M.Sc. degree may present papers with their supervisor as coauthor, including original results of experimental, numerical or analytic research. Six state-of-the-art keynote papers were delivered by world leading experts. All contributed papers were peer reviewed. Recommendations were received from the International Scientific Committee, reviewers and the advisory board. Accordingly, of the 163 eligible extended abstracts submitted, after a review process by the International Scientific Committee, 137 papers were selected for presentation at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference, 68

  1. Microbials for the production of monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    Spadiut, Oliver; Capone, Simona; Krainer, Florian; Glieder, Anton; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody fragments represent the most important biopharmaceutical products today. Because full length antibodies are glycosylated, mammalian cells, which allow human-like N-glycosylation, are currently used for their production. However, mammalian cells have several drawbacks when it comes to bioprocessing and scale-up, resulting in long processing times and elevated costs. By contrast, antibody fragments, that are not glycosylated but still exhibit antigen binding properties, can be produced in microbial organisms, which are easy to manipulate and cultivate. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the expression systems, strain engineering, and production processes for the three main microbials used in antibody and antibody fragment production, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, and Escherichia coli. PMID:24183828

  2. Monoclonal antibodies against type II rat brain protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Nakabayashi, C.H.; Huang, K.P.

    1987-05-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (8/1, 10/10, and 25/3) against rat brain type II protein kinase C (PKC) were used to carry out the immunochemical characterization of this kinase. These antibodies immunoprecipitated the type II PKC in a dose-dependent manner but did neither to type I nor type III isozyme. Purified type II PKC has a molecular weight of 82,000 and consists of heterogeneous isoelectric point species, all of which are cross reactive with these antibodies. Immunoblot analysis of the tryptic fragments from PKC revealed that all three antibodies recognized the 33-38-KDa fragments, the phospholipid/phorbol ester-binding domain, but not the 45-48-KDa fragments, the kinase catalytic domain. The immune complexes of the kinase and the antibodies retained the kinase activity which was dependent on Ca/sup 2 +/ and phosphatidylserine (PS) and further activated by diacylglycerol. With antibody 8/1, the apparent Km values of the kinase for Ca/sup 2 +/ and PS were not influenced. The initial rate and final extent of autophosphorylation were reduced. The concentration of PS required for half-maximal (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) binding was increased and the total PDBu binding was reduced. In the presence of optimum concentrations of Ca/sup 2 +/ and PS, the Kd of PDBu was unaffected by the antibody but the total binding was reduced. These results demonstrate that the PS/PDBu-binding domain contains the major epitope for the antibodies and the antibody mainly influences the PS/PDBu binding to the kinase.

  3. [Antiglycolipid antibody in inflammatory neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, S

    1995-12-01

    Antiglycolipid antibody is frequently detected in the acute phase sera from patients with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (Guillain-Barré syndrome, GBS). The titer is highest in the serum sample taken first after the neurological onset, and decreases with clinical improvement. Antiglycolipid antibody may play a role in the pathogenetic mechanism of GBS. GM1 and GD1b are the antigens most commonly recognized. Monoclonal anti-GD1b antibody specifically bound to the paranodal myelin of the peripheral nervous system. Serum anti-GD1b antibody may cause demyelinative neuropathy by binding to the paranodal myelin of the peripheral nervous system. Anti-GQ1b IgG antibody is specifically raised in almost all the sera from Fisher syndrome and GBS with ophthalmoplegia. Anti-GQ1b monoclonal antibody immunostained specifically the paranodal myelin of the extramedullary portion of oculomotor, trochlear and abducens nerves, but no such staining was observed in the other peripheral nerves. Anti-GQ1b antibody may cause conduction block in the cranial nerves innervating the muscles for extraocular movement by binding to the paranodal myelin of those nerves. Anti-GalNAc-GD1a antibody is detected in the patients with GBS with very low or inexcitable compound muscle action potentials. The sera from patients with GBS subsequent to mycoplasma infection had antigalactocerebroside antibody. Further study on antiglycolipid antibody is needed for understanding the pathogenetic mechanism of GBS.

  4. From rabbit antibody repertoires to rabbit monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Justus; Peng, Haiyong; Rader, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we explain why and how rabbit monoclonal antibodies have become outstanding reagents for laboratory research and increasingly for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Starting with the unique ontogeny of rabbit B cells that affords highly distinctive antibody repertoires rich in in vivo pruned binders of high diversity, affinity and specificity, we describe the generation of rabbit monoclonal antibodies by hybridoma technology, phage display and alternative methods, along with an account of successful humanization strategies. PMID:28336958

  5. Antibody microarrays for native toxin detection.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Victor C; Havenstrite, Karen L; Herr, Amy E

    2005-04-15

    We have developed antibody-based microarray techniques for the multiplexed detection of cholera toxin beta-subunit, diphtheria toxin, anthrax lethal factor and protective antigen, Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B, and tetanus toxin C fragment in spiked samples. Two detection schemes were investigated: (i) a direct assay in which fluorescently labeled toxins were captured directly by the antibody array and (ii) a competition assay that employed unlabeled toxins as reporters for the quantification of native toxin in solution. In the direct assay, fluorescence measured at each array element is correlated with labeled toxin concentration to yield baseline binding information (Langmuir isotherms and affinity constants). Extending from the direct assay, the competition assay yields information on the presence, identity, and concentration of toxins. A significant advantage of the competition assay over reported profiling assays is the minimal sample preparation required prior to analysis because the competition assay obviates the need to fluorescently label native proteins in the sample of interest. Sigmoidal calibration curves and detection limits were established for both assay formats. Although the sensitivity of the direct assay is superior to that of the competition assay, detection limits for unmodified toxins in the competition assay are comparable to values reported previously for sandwich-format immunoassays of antibodies arrayed on planar substrates. As a demonstration of the potential of the competition assay for unlabeled toxin detection, we conclude with a straightforward multiplexed assay for the differentiation and identification of both native S. aureus enterotoxin B and tetanus toxin C fragment in spiked dilute serum samples.

  6. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor α (IL5Rα) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 μg/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 μg/mL) in the presence of 0.78 μg/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function.

  7. Effect of antithyroid antibodies on ICSI outcome in antiphospholipid antibody-negative euthyroid women.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Meric; Alwaeely, Faiz; Cebi, Ziya; Berberoglugil, Munip; Batukan, Melike; Ulug, Murat; Arvas, Ayse; Camlıbel, Teksen

    2013-10-01

    Antithyroid antibodies (ATA) are found in 5-15% of women at reproductive age and are not necessarily accompanied with thyroid dysfunction. ATA are associated with adverse effects such as spontaneous miscarriage, recurrent miscarriages, preterm delivery and maternal post-partum thyroiditis in women with normal thyroid hormone concentrations. The role of ATA on the outcome of IVF cycles remains to be investigated. This study evaluated the impact of ATA on the outcome of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)-embryo transfer cycles in euthyroid women. A total of 253 women undergoing ICSI-embryo transfer cycles were prospectively enrolled in this study. Women positive for at least one of the thyroid antibodies, with normal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free T4 concentrations and negative for anticardiolipin antibodies and lupus anticoagulant were included. ICSI was performed for fertilization in all cycles. Of 253 women, 219 were ATA negative and 34 ATA positive. Implantation rates (19.1% versus 18.4%), miscarriage rates (9.0% versus 8.3%) and ongoing pregnancy rates (37.0% versus 32.4%) did not differ significantly between the ATA-positive group and the ATA-negative group, respectively. The presence of antithyroid antibodies in euthyroid and antiphospholipid antibody-negative women was not found to significantly affect the outcome of ICSI-embryo transfer cycles. Antithyroid antibodies (ATA) can interact with thyroid hormone receptors located on the human oocyte and impair the chance of fertilization and healthy pregnancy. They are found in 5-15% of women at reproductive age and are not necessarily accompanied with thyroid dysfunction. ATA have been reported to be associated with adverse effects such as spontaneous miscarriage, recurrent miscarriages, preterm delivery and maternal post-partum thyroiditis in women with normal thyroid hormone concentrations. The role of ATA on the outcome of IVF cycles remains to be investigated. The objective of our study was

  8. Signal enhancement of surface plasmon resonance based on gold nanoparticle-antibody complex for immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woochang; Oh, Byung-Keun; Kim, Yong-Wan; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2006-11-01

    In the immunoassay based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system, the signal enhancement was done by means of the conjugate of gold (Au) nanoparticle-antibody fragment. Antibody fragment was prepared for the improved immobilization based on Au-thiol interaction. Through the ellipsometric analysis on surface, the conjugation between Au and antibody fragment was performed in the oriented manner. The optimal fabrication conditions such as concentration and incubation time were determined for the constant size of the fabricated nanoparticle-antibody conjugate. Through the plot of SPR angle difference versus antigen concentration, the linear correlation was achieved, of which the detection limit was 100 fg/ml.

  9. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed.

  10. The use of antibodies labelled with dyes for fast and simple assay of some human proteins by immunofiltration technique.

    PubMed

    Szewczuk, A; Kuropatwa, M; Rapak, A

    1992-01-01

    Immunofiltration technique with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies for semi-quantitative assays of human albumin, chorionic gonadotropin, immunoglobulin G and transferrin was elaborated. An amount of antibody was immobolized in the form of 6 radially located small bars on a dry test filter made of glass microfibre sheet. The other amount of antibody, used in solution, was labelled with some dyes like commercial disperse dyes, colloidal elements, formazans and polypyrrole. Number of colour bars appearing on the test filter showed ranged of analyte concentration. Good results were obtained using antibodies labelled with colloidal gold, Disperse Red 11 and formazan from MTT. Assays with monoclonal antibodies were more sensitive than with polyclonal antibodies.

  11. Single-Chain Fragment Variable Antibody Piezoimmunosensors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhihong; Stryker, Gabrielle A.; Mernaugh, Ray L.; Yu, Lei; Yan, Heping; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a novel nonlabeled biosensor with high diagnostic potential for rapid and sensitive detection of antigens in complex biological samples. The biosensor comprises a piezoimmunosensor (PZ) displaying a specially constructed recombinant antibody on its surface. The recombinant single-chain fragment variable (scFv) antibody contained a cysteine within the linker amino acid sequence used to join the scFv variable heavy and light chains. The presence of cysteine induced the scFv construct to self-assemble as a densely packed rigid monolayer on the gold surface of a quartz crystal microbalance. scFv molecules in this self-assembled mono-layer (SAM) exhibited a defined orientation and high areal densities, with scFv-modified microbalance surfaces displaying 35 times as many variable antigen-binding sites per square centimeter as surfaces modified with whole antibody. Experimental data show that the scFv SAM PZ is superior to Fab fragment, Fab fragment containing a free sulfhydryl group (i.e., Fab-SH), and whole antibody PZs regarding sensitivity and specificity. Because of their small uniform size (MW ≈ 27000) and the ease with which they can be modified using genetic engineering, scFv’s have significant advantages over whole antibodies in microbalance biosensor systems. We demonstrate here that the use of scFv containing a cysteine within the scFv linker sequence (i.e., scFv-cys) for preparation of biosensor surfaces markedly increases the density of available antigen-binding sites, yielding a system that is highly selective, rapid, and capable of detecting low concentrations of antigens in complex samples. PMID:15679346

  12. Concentrating Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  13. Understanding antinuclear antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pertusi, R M; Rubin, B R

    1991-06-01

    The American College of Rheumatology (formerly the American Rheumatism Association) diagnostic criteria for connective tissue disorders frequently include positive antinuclear antibody (ANA) assays. Proper interpretation of these tests requires an understanding of the principles governing ANA assays. Assay results are reported in two ways: as titers and as descriptions of fluorescent patterns. A titer is a quantitative measure of ANAs in serum. Different patterns of immunofluorescence are associated with different subsets of collagen vascular disease. Positive results can occur in the absence of connective tissue disease. Accurate diagnosis of connective tissue disorders requires judicious use of ANA assays as well as skillful interpretation of the results.

  14. EDITORIAL: International MEMS Conference 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, Francis E. H.; Jianmin, Miao; Iliescu, Ciprian

    2006-04-01

    The International MEMS conference (iMEMS2006) organized by the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology and Nanyang Technological University aims to provide a platform for academicians, professionals and industrialists in various related fields from all over the world to share and learn from each other. Of great interest is the incorporation of the theme of life sciences application using MEMS. It is the desire of this conference to initiate collaboration and form network of cooperation. This has continued to be the objective of iMEMS since its inception in 1997. The technological advance of MEMS over the past few decades has been truly exciting in terms of development and applications. In order to participate in this rapid development, a conference involving delegates from within the MEMS community and outside the community is very meaningful and timely. With the receipt of over 200 articles, delegates related to MEMS field from all over the world will share their perspectives on topics such as MEMS/MST Design, MEMS Teaching and Education, MEMS/MST Packaging, MEMS/MST Fabrication, Microsystems Applications, System Integration, Wearable Devices, MEMSWear and BioMEMS. Invited speakers and delegates from outside the field have also been involved to provide challenges, especially in the life sciences field, for the MEMS community to potentially address. The proceedings of the conference will be published as an issue in the online Journal of Physics: Conference Series and this can reach a wider audience and will facilitate the reference and citation of the work presented in the conference. We wish to express our deep gratitude to the International Scientific Committee members and the organizing committee members for contributing to the success of this conference. We would like to thank all the delegates, speakers and sponsors from all over the world for presenting and sharing their perspectives on topics related to MEMS and the challenges that MEMS can

  15. Guinea-pig reaginic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R. A.; Hajos, Silvia E.

    1973-01-01

    The physicochemical and biological properties of purified guinea-pig reaginic antibody were studied. It is a labile protein different to γ1. Its antibody activity is completely destroyed by heating at 56° for 6 hours and by treatment with mercaptoethanol. The capacity to give PCA is decreased by repeated freezing and thawing. It is a bivalent antibody, haemagglutinating, does not fix complement and is capable of sensitizing guinea-pig skin for PCA reaction after a latent period of a week but not after 3 hours. Reaginic antibody appears on day 7–8 after the first inoculation and the higher levels (PCA reaction) are obtained at the eleventh to thirteenth days. After the fifteenth to seventeenth days the PCA is negative. The reaginic antibody does not pass the placenta. Higher levels of reaginic antibody were obtained when the guinea-pigs were inoculated with the antigen in saline with simultaneous inoculation, intraperitoneally, of killed Bordetella pertussis, phase I. PMID:4354828

  16. Leaf proteome analysis of transgenic plants expressing antiviral antibodies.

    PubMed

    Di Carli, Mariasole; Villani, Maria Elena; Renzone, Giovanni; Nardi, Luca; Pasquo, Alessandra; Franconi, Rosella; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Desiderio, Angiola

    2009-02-01

    The expression of exogenous antibodies in plant is an effective strategy to confer protection against viral infection or to produce molecules with pharmaceutical interest. However, the acceptance of the transgenic technology to obtain self-protecting plants depends on the assessment of their substantial equivalence compared to non-modified crops with an established history of safe use. In fact, the possibility exists that the introduction of transgenes in plants may alter expression of endogenous genes and/or normal production of metabolites. In this study, we investigated whether the expression in plant of recombinant antibodies directed against viral proteins may influence the host leaf proteome. Two transgenic plant models, generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, were analyzed for this purpose, namely, Lycopersicon esculentum cv. MicroTom and Nicotiana benthamiana, expressing recombinant antibodies against cucumber mosaic virus and tomato spotted wilt virus, respectively. To obtain a significant representation of plant proteomes, optimized extraction procedures have been devised for each plant species. The proteome repertoire of antibody-expressing and control plants was compared by 2-DE associated to DIGE technology. Among the 2000 spots detected within the gels, about 10 resulted differentially expressed in each transgenic model and were identified by MALDI-TOF PMF and muLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS procedures. Protein variations were restricted to a limited number of defined differences with an average ratio below 2.4. Most of the differentially expressed proteins were related to photosynthesis or defense function. The overall results suggest that the expression of recombinant antibodies in both systems does not significantly alter the leaf proteomic profile, contributing to assess the biosafety of resistant plants expressing antiviral antibodies.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Place, D A; Scidmore, N C; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    Murine hybridoma cell lines were developed which synthesized monoclonal antibodies against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibodies specific for an antigen(s) common to all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates tested but not detected on other gram-negative oral plaque microorganisms or other Actinobacillus species were identified. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each serotype group of A. actinomycetemcomitans which did not bind to other Actinobacillus species or oral plaque microorganisms were also identified. PMID:3356470

  18. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O. )

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miraldi, F. )

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.48 references.

  20. Serosurvey for polio antibodies.

    PubMed

    Biberi-Moroeanu, S; Munţiu, A; Stoiculescu, S

    1988-01-01

    From 1982 to 1988 a serological survey was performed on 573 subjects aged 3-80 years in order to evaluate the polio immunity level of the population. The presence of neutralizing antibodies was tested using the types 1, 2 and 3 Sabin vaccine strains as well as a wild strain of poliovirus type 1 isolated in France in 1978. According to their birth date, the subjects were assigned to 4 groups. The differences between the groups consisted in the different vaccination history of the subjects as well as in their different opportunities of having been in contact with the past epidemics of poliomyelitis. The results obtained indicate a satisfactory polio immunity level in all the 4 groups: seropositives, 96.7%-98.9% for type 2, 91.8%-98.2% for type 1 (Sabin vaccine strain), 89.3%-96.6% for type 3 and 84.2%-96.4% for type 1 wild strain. The highest immunity levels were found in group D (children with recorded history of complete polio vaccination) and in group A (unvaccinated people but contemporary with the past polio epidemics). A special comment is made with respect to 14 subjects showing satisfactory antibody titres for all the three types of Sabin-vaccine strains but who have proved to be seronegative (less than 4) for the wild type 1 poliovirus strain.

  1. [Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies].

    PubMed

    Sebastiani, G D

    2009-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are predominantly IgG autoantibodies directed against constituents of primary granules of neutrophils and monocytes lysosomes. Although several antigenic targets have been identified, those ANCA directed to proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, whereas the importance of other ANCA remains unknown. Both are strongly associated with small vessel vasculitides, the ANCA-associated vasculitides, which include Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome, and the localised forms of these diseases (eg, pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis). ANCA is a useful serological test to assist in diagnosis of small-vessel vasculitides. 85-95% of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis have serum ANCA. ANCA directed to either proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, yet the relevance of other ANCA remains unknown. Besides their diagnostic potential, ANCA might be valuable in disease monitoring. In addition, data seem to confirm the long-disputed pathogenic role of these antibodies. There is increasing evidence that myeloperoxidase-ANCA are directly involved in the pathogenesis of necrotizing vasculitis. This is less clear for proteinase 3-ANCA, markers for Wegener's granulomatosis. With respect to proteinase 3-ANCA, complementary proteinase 3, a peptide translated from the antisense DNA strand of proteinase 3 and homologous to several microbial peptides, may be involved in induction of proteinase 3-antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies.

  2. Antibody-controlled actuation of DNA-based molecular circuits

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, Wouter; Meijer, Lenny H. H.; Somers, Bram; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Merkx, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    DNA-based molecular circuits allow autonomous signal processing, but their actuation has relied mostly on RNA/DNA-based inputs, limiting their application in synthetic biology, biomedicine and molecular diagnostics. Here we introduce a generic method to translate the presence of an antibody into a unique DNA strand, enabling the use of antibodies as specific inputs for DNA-based molecular computing. Our approach, antibody-templated strand exchange (ATSE), uses the characteristic bivalent architecture of antibodies to promote DNA-strand exchange reactions both thermodynamically and kinetically. Detailed characterization of the ATSE reaction allowed the establishment of a comprehensive model that describes the kinetics and thermodynamics of ATSE as a function of toehold length, antibody–epitope affinity and concentration. ATSE enables the introduction of complex signal processing in antibody-based diagnostics, as demonstrated here by constructing molecular circuits for multiplex antibody detection, integration of multiple antibody inputs using logic gates and actuation of enzymes and DNAzymes for signal amplification. PMID:28211541

  3. Modelling effects of internalized antibody: a simple comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The modelling framework is proposed to study protection properties of antibodies to neutralize the effects of the plant toxin (ricin). The present study extends our previous work by including (i) the model of intracellular transport of toxin to the Endoplasmic Reticulum and (ii) the model of the internalised antibodies (when antibody is delivered directly into the cytosol). Method Simulation of the receptor-toxin-antibody interaction is implemented by solving the systems of PDEs (advection-diffusion models) or ODEs (rate models) for the underlying transport coupled with mass-action kinetics. Results As the main application of the enhanced framework we present a comparative study of two kinds (external and internalised) of antibodies. This comparison is based on calculation of the non-dimensional protection factor using the same set of parameters (geometry, binding constants, initial concentrations of species, and total initial amount of the antibody). Conclusion This research will provide a framework for consistent evaluation and comparison of different types of antibodies for toxicological applications. PMID:24521456

  4. Antibody Subclass Repertoire and Graft Outcome Following Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Hickey, Michelle J.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term outcomes in solid organ transplantation are constrained by the development of donor-specific alloantibodies (DSA) against human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and other targets, which elicit antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). However, antibody-mediated graft injury represents a broad continuum, from extensive complement activation and tissue damage compromising the function of the transplanted organ, to histological manifestations of endothelial cell injury and mononuclear cell infiltration but without concurrent allograft dysfunction. In addition, while transplant recipients with DSA as a whole fare worse than those without, a substantial minority of patients with DSA do not experience poorer graft outcome. Taken together, these observations suggest that not all DSA are equally pathogenic. Antibody effector functions are controlled by a number of factors, including antibody concentration, antigen availability, and antibody isotype/subclass. Antibody isotype is specified by many integrated signals, including the antigen itself as well as from antigen-presenting cells or helper T cells. To date, a number of studies have described the repertoire of IgG subclasses directed against HLA in pretransplant patients and evaluated the clinical impact of different DSA IgG subclasses on allograft outcome. This review will summarize what is known about the repertoire of antibodies to HLA and non-HLA targets in transplantation, focusing on the distribution of IgG subclasses, as well as the general biology, etiology, and mechanisms of injury of different humoral factors. PMID:27822209

  5. Effects of charge on antibody tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Boswell, C Andrew; Tesar, Devin B; Mukhyala, Kiran; Theil, Frank-Peter; Fielder, Paul J; Khawli, Leslie A

    2010-12-15

    Antibody pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are often governed by biological processes such as binding to antigens and other cognate receptors. Emphasis must also be placed, however, on fundamental physicochemical properties that define antibodies as complex macromolecules, including shape, size, hydrophobicity, and charge. Electrostatic interactions between anionic cell membranes and the predominantly positive surface charge of most antibodies can influence blood concentration and tissue disposition kinetics in a manner that is independent of antigen recognition. In this context, the deliberate modification of antibodies by chemical means has been exploited as a valuable preclinical research tool to investigate the relationship between net molecular charge and biological disposition. Findings from these exploratory investigations may be summarized as follows: (I) shifts in isoelectric point of approximately one pI unit or more can produce measurable changes in tissue distribution and kinetics, (II) increases in net positive charge generally result in increased tissue retention and increased blood clearance, and (III) decreases in net positive charge generally result in decreased tissue retention and increased whole body clearance. Understanding electrostatic interactions between antibodies and biological matrices holds relevance in biotechnology, especially with regard to the development of immunoconjugates. The guiding principles and knowledge gained from preclinical evaluation of chemically modified antibodies will be discussed and placed in the context of therapeutic antibodies that are currently marketed or under development, with a particular emphasis on pharmacokinetic and disposition properties.

  6. Data Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Orbital Research, Inc., developed, built, and tested three high-temperature components for use in the design of a data concentrator module in distributed turbine engine control. The concentrator receives analog and digital signals related to turbine engine control and communicates with a full authority digital engine control (FADEC) or high-level command processor. This data concentrator follows the Distributed Engine Controls Working Group (DECWG) roadmap for turbine engine distributed controls communication development that operates at temperatures at least up to 225 C. In Phase I, Orbital Research developed detailed specifications for each component needed for the system and defined the total system specifications. This entailed a combination of system design, compiling existing component specifications, laboratory testing, and simulation. The results showed the feasibility of the data concentrator. Phase II of this project focused on three key objectives. The first objective was to update the data concentrator design modifications from DECWG and prime contractors. Secondly, the project defined requirements for the three new high-temperature, application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs): one-time programmable (OTP), transient voltage suppression (TVS), and 3.3V. Finally, the project validated each design by testing over temperature and under load.

  7. ASM Conference on Prokaryotic Development

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, H. B.

    2005-07-13

    Support was provided by DOE for the 2nd ASM Conference on Prokaryotic Development. The final conference program and abstracts book is attached. The conference presentations are organized around topics that are central to the current research areas in prokaryotic development. The program starts with topics that involve relatively simple models systems and ends with systems that are more complex. The topics are: i) the cell cycle, ii) the cytoskeleton, iii) morphogenesis, iv) developmental transcription, v) signaling, vi) multicellularity, and vii) developmental diversity and symbiosis. The best-studied prokaryotic development model systems will be highlighted at the conference through research presentations by leaders in the field. Many of these systems are also model systems of relevance to the DOE mission including carbon sequestration (Bradyrizobium, Synechococcus), energy production (Anabaena, Rhodobacter) and bioremediation (Caulobacter, Mesorhizobium). In addition, many of the highlighted organisms have important practical applications; the actinomycetes and myxobacteria produce antimicrobials that are of commercial interest. It is certain that the cutting-edge science presented at the conference will be applicable to the large group of bacteria relevant to the DOE mission.

  8. World Food Conference: Issues and Preparation for Conference,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-01-17

    AD-AO&I 2-95 DEPARTMENT OF STATE WASHINGTON 0 C OFFICE OF EkeTERNA-TP F/6 2/1! I WORLD FOOD CONFERENCE: ISSUES AND PREPARtATION FOR CONFERENCE. (U) M...1,136 million tons, a fall of 40 million tons, ( 5 %) from the production of the proceeding year. Nevertheless an increase in world demand to 1,174...grains, as estimated by the USDA is likely to be 1,230 million tons,(only 5 % less than projected for 1980 by the FAO) and world demand, 1,232 million

  9. In vitro neutralization of prions with PrP(Sc)-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Taschuk, Ryan; Van der Merwe, Jacques; Marciniuk, Kristen; Potter, Andrew; Cashman, Neil; Griebel, Philip; Napper, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases reflect the misfolding of a self-protein (PrP(C)) into an infectious, pathological isomer (PrP(Sc)). By targeting epitopes uniquely exposed by misfolding, our group developed PrP(Sc)-specific vaccines to 3 disease specific epitopes (DSEs). Here, antibodies induced by individual DSE vaccines are evaluated for their capacity to neutralize prions in vitro. For both purified antibodies and immunoreactive sera, the PrP(Sc)-specific antibodies were equally effective in neutralizing prions. Further, there was no significant increase in neutralizing activity when multiple DSEs were targeted within an assay. At a low antibody concentration, the PrP(Sc)-specific antibodies matched the neutralization achieved by an antibody that may act via both PrP(C) and PrP(Sc). At higher doses, however, this pan-specific antibody was more effective, potentially due to a combined deactivation of PrP(Sc) and depletion of PrP(C).

  10. In vitro neutralization of prions with PrPSc-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Taschuk, Ryan; Van der Merwe, Jacques; Marciniuk, Kristen; Potter, Andrew; Cashman, Neil; Griebel, Philip; Napper, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prion diseases reflect the misfolding of a self-protein (PrPC) into an infectious, pathological isomer (PrPSc). By targeting epitopes uniquely exposed by misfolding, our group developed PrPSc-specific vaccines to 3 disease specific epitopes (DSEs). Here, antibodies induced by individual DSE vaccines are evaluated for their capacity to neutralize prions in vitro. For both purified antibodies and immunoreactive sera, the PrPSc-specific antibodies were equally effective in neutralizing prions. Further, there was no significant increase in neutralizing activity when multiple DSEs were targeted within an assay. At a low antibody concentration, the PrPSc-specific antibodies matched the neutralization achieved by an antibody that may act via both PrPC and PrPSc. At higher doses, however, this pan-specific antibody was more effective, potentially due to a combined deactivation of PrPSc and depletion of PrPC. PMID:26284508

  11. Creating Ordered Antibody Arrays with Antibody-Polymer Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xuehui; Obermeyer, Allie; Olsen, Bradley

    Antibodies are a category of functional proteins that play crucial roles in the immune system and have been widely applied in the area of cancer therapeutics, targeting delivery, signal detection, and sensors. Due to the extremely large size and lack of specific functional groups on the surface, it is challenging to functionalize antibodies and manipulate the ordered packing of antibodies in an array with high density and proper orientation, which is critical to achieve outstanding performance in materials. In this work, we demonstrate an efficient and facile approach for preparing antibody-polymer conjugates with two-step sequential ``click'' reaction to form antibody-polymer block copolymers. Highly ordered nanostructures are fabricated based on the principles of block copolymer self-assembly. The nanostructures are studied with both small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Lamellae with alternating antibody domain and polymer domain are observed with an overall domain size of ~50 nm. The nanostructure not only increases the packing density and promotes proper orientation of the antibody, but also provides possible channel to facilitate substrate transportation and improves the stability of the antibody.

  12. Comparative testing of monoclonal antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites for ELISA development*

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, R. A.; Zavala, F.; Charoenvit, Y.; Campbell, G. H.; Burkot, T. R.; Schneider, I.; Esser, K. M.; Beaudoin, R. L.; Andre, R. G.

    1987-01-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies developed against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites at four institutions were evaluated for use in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Four of the antibodies were eliminated because of their low sensitivity or requirement for high concentrations of capture antibody, while an additional four were rejected because they exhibited cross-reactivity with P. berghei sporozoites. Of the two remaining monoclonal antibodies, that designated 2A10 had the highest sensitivity, a requirement for lower concentrations of capture antibody, and had been tested successfully against sporozoites from a wider range of geographical areas than the others. Use of this monoclonal antibody in a standardized ELISA method gave a test ten times more sensitive than previously reported for P. falciparum sporozoites and its detection limit was less than 100 sporozoites per mosquito. PMID:3555879

  13. Design of a sensor for the blood AB0 group antibodies detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesov, D. V.; Kiselev, G. A.; Moiseev, M. A.; Kudrinskiy, A. A.; Yaminskiy, I. V.

    2012-02-01

    Control the content of the blood group antibodies in the plasma of the recipient is an important task in modern transplantation. In this paper we proposed to use micromechanical cantilever sensors for detection of the low concentrations of AB0 blood group antibodies in serum. The technique of chemical modification of cantilever surface to create the receptor layer was developed. The apparatus, which provides data acquisition from multiple microconsoles simultaneously was created. We carried out experiments by the detection in a solution the β antibodies with a concentration of 300 times less than the native content of antibodies in the blood. Change in surface stress due to formation of antigen-antibody complexes on the cantilever surface was 0.075 N/m. The resulting lateral strain, apparently, induced by repulsion between the complexes during the sorption of antibodies in layer of antigens, immobilized on the surface. The possibility of regeneration of sensory layer for repeated measurements was shown.

  14. Inaugural AGU Science Policy Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2012-01-01

    AGU will present its inaugural Science Policy Conference, 30 April to 3 May 2012, at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, located in downtown Washington, D. C. This conference will bring together leading scientists, policy makers, industry professionals, press, and other stakeholders to discuss natural hazards, natural resources, oceans, and Arctic science and the role these sciences play in serving communities. To bridge the science and policy fields, AGU plans to host this conference every 2 years and focus on the applications of Earth and space sciences to serve local and national communities. "Our nation faces a myriad of challenges such as the sustainability of our natural resources, current and future energy needs, and the ability to mitigate and adapt to natural and manmade hazards," said Michael McPhaden, president of AGU. "It is essential that policies to address these challenges be built on a solid foundation of credible scientific knowledge."

  15. Message from the Conference Chairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Sanjay; Perera, Unil

    2015-05-01

    We were very excited to host the 8th International Workshop on Quantum Structure Infrared Photodetectors (QSIP 2014), in picturesque Santa Fe, New Mexico from June 29th-July 3rd, 2014. This followed successful QSIP conferences at Dana Point (2000), Torino (2002), Kananaskis (2004), Kandy (2006), Yosimite (2009), Istanbul (2010) and Corsica (2012). The QSIP workshop is a high level scientific conference that aims to bring together scientists, engineers, industrial organizations, students and users in order to discuss recent advances, and to share the "State of the Art" in this field. QSIP conferences provide an international forum for attendees to present and discuss progress in infrared device physics and modeling, materials growth and processing issues, focal plane array development and characterization.

  16. 9th Caribbean Geological Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Gren

    The ninth in a series of Caribbean Geological Conferences, which are held every 3 or 4 years, took place in Santo Domingo, capital of the Dominican Republic, from the 15th to 26th of August 1980. The conference, which was sponsored by the government of the Dominican Republic and the Universidad Catolica Madre y Maestra, was preceded by 2 days of field trips and was opened by President Antonio Guzman on the evening of the 17th of August. Generous support was provided by Alcoa Exploration Co., Falconbridge Dominicana, and Rosario Dominicana.Geologists and geophysicists from 25 countries presented about 130 papers on a wide variety of topics ranging from geophysics to paleontology. While the whole Caribbean area was discussed, there was special emphasis on the northern Caribbean and Hispaniola, as befitted the site of the conference. The contribution of workers from the Dirección General de Mineriá was particularly notable.

  17. 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald (Editor); Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held June 25-26, 2002, at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. Organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Physical Sciences Research Division, NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and member institutions under the Cooperative Research in Biology and Materials Science (CORBAMS) agreement, the conference provided a forum to review the current research and activities in materials science, discuss the envisioned long-term goals, highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to the Physical Sciences Research Division, and inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity. An abstracts book was published and distributed at the conference to the approximately 240 people attending, who represented industry, academia, and other NASA Centers. This CD-ROM proceedings is comprised of the research reports submitted by the Principal Investigators in the Microgravity Materials Science program.

  18. Protective role of antibodies induced by Brucella melitensis B115 against B. melitensis and Brucella abortus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Adone, Rosanna; Francia, Massimiliano; Pistoia, Claudia; Petrucci, Paola; Pesciaroli, Michele; Pasquali, Paolo

    2012-06-08

    It has been demonstrated that antibodies specific for O-PS antigen of Brucella smooth strains are involved in the protective immunity of brucellosis. Since the rough strain Brucella melitensis B115 was able to protect mice against wild Brucella strains brucellosis despite the lack of anti-OPS antibodies, in this study we evaluated the biological significance of antibodies induced by this strain, directed to antigens other than O-PS, passively tranferred to untreated mice prior to infection with Brucella abortus 2308 and B. melitensis 16M virulent strains. The protective ability of specific antisera collected from mice vaccinated with B. melitensis B115, B. abortus RB51 and B. abortus S19 strains was compared. The results indicated that antibodies induced by B115 were able to confer a satisfactory protection, especially against B. abortus 2308, similar to that conferred by the antiserum S19, while the RB51 antiserum was ineffective. These findings suggest that antibodies induced by B115 could act as opsonins as well as antibodies anti-O-PS, thus triggering more efficient internalization and degradation of bacteria within phagocytes. This is the first study assessing the efficacy of antibodies directed to antigens other than O-PS in the course of brucellosis infection.

  19. Antibodies: Protective, destructive and regulatory role

    SciTech Connect

    Milgrom, F.; Abeyounis, C.J.; Albini, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers under 10 subject headings. The headings are: Production and Function of Antibodies, Protective Role of Antibodies, Antibodies to Foreign and Neoplastic Cells, Autoantibodies, Regulatory Mechanisms, Allergy, Immune Complexes, Antibodies in Pregnancy and Aging, Administration of Antibodies for Prevention and Therapy, and Abstracts of Poster Presentations.

  20. A new method for the evaluation of antibody affinity based on serial dilutions of studied antibody-antigen mixture.

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A

    2002-01-01

    A new method for the evaluation of the affinity of bivalent antibodies were suggested. This method is based on the previously published by the author the idea of using so-called coordinates of dilutions. It was shown that the suggested method allows to evaluate the affinity of antibodies with high accuracy using this simple approach. It is supposed that at some conditions the suggested method could have substantial advantages in comparison to the traditional methods. This method allows to analyze situations when antibodies are already in a mixture with antigen, for example in the bloodstream in the case of infections or autoimmune diseases. The method provides useful approach for the evaluation not only antibody affinity, but also the concentration of circulated antigen.

  1. Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, Clarence C. (Editor); Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference in Hampton, Virginia, December 6-8, 1994. This conference was the culmination of a 3-year program that was initiated by NASA late in 1990 to develop mechanics of textile composites in support of the NASA Advance Composites Technology Program (ACT). The goal of the program was to develop mathematical models of textile preform materials and test methods to facilitate structural analysis and design. Participants in the program were from NASA, academia, and industry.

  2. Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, C.C.; Harris, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference in Hampton, Virginia, December 6-8, 1994. This conference was the culmination of a 3-year program that was initiated by NASA late in 1990 to develop mechanics of textile composites in support of the NASA Advance Composites Technology Program (ACT). The goal of the program was to develop mathematical models of textile preform materials and test methods to facilitate structural analysis and design. Participants in the program were from NASA, academia, and industry. Separate abstracts were prepared for articles from this document.

  3. Chapman Conference on Rainfall Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V. K.

    The Chapman Conference on Rainfall Fields, sponsored by AGU, was the first of its kind; it was devoted to strengthening scientific interaction between the North American and Latin American geophysics communities. It was hosted by Universidad Simon Bolivar and Instituto Internacional de Estudios Avanzados, in Caracas, Venezuela, during March 24-27, 1986. A total of 36 scientists from Latin America, the United States, Canada, and Europe participated. The conference, which was convened by I. Rodriguez-Iturbe (Universidad Simon Bolivar) and V. K. Gupta (University of Mississippi, University), brought together hydrologists, meteorologists, and mathematicians/statisticians in the name of enhancing an interdisciplinary focus on rainfall research.

  4. First Stars III Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, B. W.; McKee, C. F.; Heger, A.; Abel, T.

    2008-03-01

    The understanding of the formation, life, and death of Population III stars, as well as the impact that these objects had on later generations of structure formation, is one of the foremost issues in modern cosmological research and has been an active area of research during the past several years. We summarize the results presented at "First Stars III," a conference sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics. This conference, the third in a series, took place in July 2007 at the La Fonda Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, U.S.A.

  5. Ethnic minority energy conference: report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The report of a 1977 energy conference sponsored by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People summarizes the basic concern that US energy policy was not addressing the importance of full employment or the impact of rising energy costs on the poor. Conference speakers spoke of the social and economic changes that are needed if minorities are to participate in the economics of the technological age. These include better educational opportunities and cooperation between civil rights groups and energy planners. Other topics were venture opportunities for minorities in energy-related fields and opportunities for minority advocacy and energy efficiency actions.

  6. Micromechanical antibody sensor

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Jacobson, K. Bruce; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    A sensor apparatus is provided using a microcantilevered spring element having a coating of a detector molecule such as an antibody or antigen. A sample containing a target molecule or substrate is provided to the coating. The spring element bends in response to the stress induced by the binding which occurs between the detector and target molecules. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers.

  7. New engineered antibodies against prions

    PubMed Central

    Škrlj, Nives; Dolinar, Marko

    2014-01-01

    A number of recently developed and approved therapeutic agents based on highly specific and potent antibodies have shown the potential of antibody therapy. As the next step, antibody-based therapeutics will be bioengineered in a way that they not only bind pathogenic targets but also address other issues, including drug targeting and delivery. For antibodies that are expected to act within brain tissue, like those that are directed against the pathogenic prion protein isoform, one of the major obstacles is the blood-brain barrier which prevents efficient transfer of the antibody, even of the engineered single-chain variants. We recently demonstrated that a specific prion-specific antibody construct which was injected into the murine tail vein can be efficiently transported into brain tissue. The novelty of the work was in that the cell penetrating peptide was used as a linker connecting both specificity-determining domains of the antibody peptide, thus eliminating the need for the standard flexible linker, composed of an arrangement of three consecutive (Gly4Ser) repeats. This paves the road toward improved bioengineered antibody variants that target brain antigens. PMID:23941991

  8. Conference Proceedings: Health Manpower Planning Conference. May, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hospital Educational and Research Foundation of Pennsylvania, Camp Hill.

    A two-day Health Manpower Planning Conference was held at State College, Pennsylvania, in 1971. The speakers represented a variety of organizations with responsibility for aspects of manpower planning and others not normally involved in planning. Program content was structured in such a way as to broaden the context within which manpower issues…

  9. Nineteenth annual actinide separations conference: Conference program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Bronson, M.

    1995-12-31

    This report contains the abstracts from the conference presentations. Sessions were divided into the following topics: Waste treatment; Spent fuel treatment; Issues and responses to Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board 94-1; Pyrochemical technologies; Disposition technologies; and Aqueous separation technologies.

  10. Inter Association Child Care Conference. Conference Proceedings 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, David, Ed.

    This publication of the proceedings of the Inter Association Child Care Conference includes a debate for and against professionalization in the field of child care. A section on meeting the treatment needs of children through educational preparation of child care practitioners discusses background factors, levels of education for practitioners,…

  11. Time course of antibodies against IgG and type II collagen in adjuvant arthritis. Role of mycobacteria administration in antibody production.

    PubMed

    Franch, A; Cassany, S; Castellote, C; Castell, M

    1994-02-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate, during the time course of adjuvant arthritis, the existence of antibodies directed to IgG (rheumatoid factor-like) and antibodies against type II collagen. In a second study, we also studied the relation between antibody production, arthritic process and mycobacteria administration. We have demonstrated the presence of antibodies to IgG and type II collagen by means of ELISA techniques. This reactivity appeared on day 7 post-induction, decreased later, and increased progressively from day 21 until last day studied (day 56 post-induction). We have also quantified antibodies against a soluble fraction of Mycobacterium butyricum, the inductor of the disease. Anti-mycobacteria antibodies appeared during the first seven days after induction, but from day 14, when systemic inflammation began, their levels suddenly increased. There is a positive correlation between anti-mycobacteria antibody levels and articular swelling. Anti-IgG and anti-collagen antibody production was not directly linked to arthritic process since these antibodies were synthesized when M. butyricum was administered intraperitoneally, which does not induce arthritis. Anti-mycobacteria antibody concentration was higher when arthritis induction by mycobacterial was successful than when it was unsuccessful.

  12. Antibody activity to type 1 and type 2 herpes simplex virus in human cervical mucus.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, B M; Skinner, G R

    1977-08-01

    Neutralizing antibody activity in cervical mucus to type 1 herpes virus was detected in 24 of 28 patients, and to type 2 herpes simplex virus in 18 of 24 patients. The neutralizing antibody activity resisted heat inactivation for 30 minutes at 56 degrees C, was independent of complement and followed first order kinetics. There was evidence of antibody against both virus types in immunoglobulin fractions IgG and IgA, the latter containing approximately threefold greater neutralizing antibody activity per unit of immunoglobulin concentration. Type 1 and type 2 neutralizing antibody activity showed a positive but weak correlation and type 2 neutralizing antibody activity showed a positive but weak correlation and a type-common immunoprecipitin was identified in all concentrated pooled mucus samples. However, type-specific neutralizing antibody against both virus types was identified in pooled mucus samples by heterologous absorption techniques. There was a relatively higher average type 2 neutralizing antibody activity in the mucus than in the serum and there was no correlation between serum and mucus antibody levels for either virus type. These observations support the concept of an independent local antibody system for herpes simplex virus in the uterine cervix.

  13. Information Technology for Training and Education (ITTE) Conference Proceedings (Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, February 4-8, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queensland Univ., Brisbane (Australia).

    This document contains the text of 37 papers presented at the international forum and conference on information Technology for Training and Education (ITTE). The conference focused attention on the contribution that information technology can make to training, retraining and education. In particular, the forum concentrated on the following: (1)…

  14. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed.

  15. A Good Day Out? Conferences and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Mary

    1993-01-01

    Attendance at conferences provides opportunities for developing listening, notetaking, and questioning skills as well as confidence and self-esteem. Planning conferences provides other experiential learning through such roles as entrepreneur, administrator, troubleshooter, and organizer. (SK)

  16. Conferences in Context: Status, Communication, and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, L. Wesley; Brinkerhoff, Merlin

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between managers and three variables are examined: time commitments of managers to staff conferences, status or rank of managers, and the quality of communicative exchange in conference settings. (Author/DEP)

  17. 7 CFR 1.167 - Conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... that conducting the conference by audio-visual telecommunication: (i) Is necessary to prevent prejudice... in the conference: (i) Is necessary to prevent prejudice to a party; (ii) Is necessary because of...

  18. 1995 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This book is a guide to the 1995 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference. It consists largely of abstracts of the oral and poster presentations that were to be made, and gives some general information about the conference and its schedule.

  19. 15 CFR 25.19 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Upon the motion of any party, the ALJ shall schedule at least one prehearing conference at a reasonable time in advance of the hearing. (c) The ALJ may use prehearing conferences to discuss the following:...

  20. 45 CFR 79.19 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the motion of any party, the ALJ shall schedule at least one prehearing conference at a reasonable time in advance of the hearing. (c) The ALJ may use prehearing conferences to discuss the following:...

  1. 48 CFR 242.503 - Postaward conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postaward conferences. 242.503 Section 242.503 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM... 242.503 Postaward conferences....

  2. 48 CFR 242.503 - Postaward conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Postaward conferences. 242.503 Section 242.503 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM... 242.503 Postaward conferences....

  3. 38 CFR 59.123 - Conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... recommend that a conference (such as a design development conference) be held in VA Central Office in Washington, DC, to provide an opportunity for the State and its architects to discuss requirements for...

  4. Technology Utilization Conference Series, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and results of a series of technology utilization conferences are presented. The conference series represents the development of a viable and successful means of encouraging the transfer of technology to the minority business community.

  5. IgE antibodies in toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Matowicka-Karna, Joanna; Kemona, Halina

    2014-05-15

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide infection caused by the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. At least a third of the world human population is infected with the parasite, making it one of the most successful parasitic infections. Primary maternal infection may cause health-threatening sequelae for the fetus, or even cause death of the uterus. Reactivation of a latent infection in immune deficiency conditions such as AIDS and organ transplantation can cause fatal toxoplasmic encephalitis. Toxoplasmosis is a major cause of chorioretinitis, especially in individuals with impaired immune systems. In the acute phase, directly after invading the body, T. gondii begins to multiply rapidly. In the majority of cases acquired toxoplasmosis is asymptomatic. In the second week of infection, specific IgM antibodies are present in the blood. IgE antibodies appear at the same time, slightly preceding specific IgA antibodies. The concentration of IgE can be one of the parameters used for diagnosing an infection with T. gondii. Laboratory diagnosis, i.e. IgE and serologic assays, plays the main role in the diagnosis of congenital infection and assists in the confirmatory diagnosis of toxoplasmic encephalitis and ocular toxoplasmosis. This article is a review of IgE in toxoplasmosis.

  6. RosettaAntibody: antibody variable region homology modeling server.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Aroop; Kim, Eric T; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2009-07-01

    The RosettaAntibody server (http://antibody.graylab.jhu.edu) predicts the structure of an antibody variable region given the amino-acid sequences of the respective light and heavy chains. In an initial stage, the server identifies and displays the most sequence homologous template structures for the light and heavy framework regions and each of the complementarity determining region (CDR) loops. Subsequently, the most homologous templates are assembled into a side-chain optimized crude model, and the server returns a picture and coordinate file. For users requesting a high-resolution model, the server executes the full RosettaAntibody protocol which additionally models the hyper-variable CDR H3 loop. The high-resolution protocol also relieves steric clashes by optimizing the CDR backbone torsion angles and by simultaneously perturbing the relative orientation of the light and heavy chains. RosettaAntibody generates 2000 independent structures, and the server returns pictures, coordinate files, and detailed scoring information for the 10 top-scoring models. The 10 models enable users to use rational judgment in choosing the best model or to use the set as an ensemble for further studies such as docking. The high-resolution models generated by RosettaAntibody have been used for the successful prediction of antibody-antigen complex structures.

  7. Solution Equilibrium Titration for High-Throughput Affinity Estimation of Unpurified Antibodies and Antibody Fragments.

    PubMed

    Della Ducata, Daniela; Jaehrling, Jan; Hänel, Cornelia; Satzger, Marion; Wolber, Meike; Ostendorp, Ralf; Pabst, Stefan; Brocks, Bodo

    2015-12-01

    The generation of therapeutic antibodies with extremely high affinities down to the low picomolar range is today feasible with state-of-the art recombinant technologies. However, reliable and efficient identification of lead candidates with the desired affinity from a pool of thousands of antibody clones remains a challenge. Here, we describe a high-throughput procedure that allows reliable affinity screening of unpurified immunoglobulin G or antibody fragments. The method is based on the principle of solution equilibrium titration (SET) using highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence as a readout system. Because the binding partners are not labeled, the resulting KD represents a sound approximation of the real affinity. For screening, diluted bacterial lysates or cell culture supernatants are equilibrated with four different concentrations of a soluble target molecule, and unbound antibodies are subsequently quantified on 384-well Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) plates coated with the respective antigen. For determination of KD values from the resulting titration curves, fit models deduced from the law of mass action for 1:1 and 2:1 binding modes are applied to assess hundreds of interactions simultaneously. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparing results from different screening campaigns from affinity optimization projects with results from detailed affinity characterization.

  8. A fully automated primary screening system for the discovery of therapeutic antibodies directly from B cells.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Simon; Howells, Louise; O'Dowd, Victoria; Starkie, Dale; Whale, Kevin; Saunders, Mark; Lee, David; Lightwood, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    For a therapeutic antibody to succeed, it must meet a range of potency, stability, and specificity criteria. Many of these characteristics are conferred by the amino acid sequence of the heavy and light chain variable regions and, for this reason, can be screened for during antibody selection. However, it is important to consider that antibodies satisfying all these criteria may be of low frequency in an immunized animal; for this reason, it is essential to have a mechanism that allows for efficient sampling of the immune repertoire. UCB's core antibody discovery platform combines high-throughput B cell culture screening and the identification and isolation of single, antigen-specific IgG-secreting B cells through a proprietary technique called the "fluorescent foci" method. Using state-of-the-art automation to facilitate primary screening, extremely efficient interrogation of the natural antibody repertoire is made possible; more than 1 billion immune B cells can now be screened to provide a useful starting point from which to identify the rare therapeutic antibody. This article will describe the design, construction, and commissioning of a bespoke automated screening platform and two examples of how it was used to screen for antibodies against two targets.

  9. Novel multispecific heterodimeric antibody format allowing modular assembly of variable domain fragments.

    PubMed

    Egan, Timothy J; Diem, Dania; Weldon, Richard; Neumann, Tessa; Meyer, Sebastian; Urech, David M

    2017-01-01

    Multispecific antibody formats provide a promising platform for the development of novel therapeutic concepts that could facilitate the generation of safer, more effective pharmaceuticals. However, the production and use of such antibody-based multispecifics is often made complicated by: 1) the instability of the antibody fragments of which they consist, 2) undesired inter-subunit associations, and 3) the need to include recombinant heterodimerization domains that confer distribution-impairing bulk or enhance immunogenicity. In this paper, we describe a broadly-applicable method for the stabilization of human or humanized antibody Fv fragments that entails replacing framework region IV of a Vκ1/VH3-consensus Fv framework with the corresponding germ-line sequence of a λ-type VL chain. We then used this stable Fv framework to generate a novel heterodimeric multispecific antibody format that assembles by cognate VL/VH associations between 2 split variable domains in the core of the complex. This format, termed multispecific antibody-based therapeutics by cognate heterodimerization (MATCH), can be applied to produce homogeneous and highly stable antibody-derived molecules that simultaneously bind 4 distinct antigens. The heterodimeric design of the MATCH format allows efficient in-format screening of binding domain combinations that result in maximal cooperative activity.

  10. Neutralizing antibody responses in acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C infection.

    PubMed

    Gray, E S; Moore, P L; Choge, I A; Decker, J M; Bibollet-Ruche, F; Li, H; Leseka, N; Treurnicht, F; Mlisana, K; Shaw, G M; Karim, S S Abdool; Williamson, C; Morris, L

    2007-06-01

    The study of the evolution and specificities of neutralizing antibodies during the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection may be important in the discovery of possible targets for vaccine design. In this study, we assessed the autologous and heterologous neutralization responses of 14 HIV-1 subtype C-infected individuals, using envelope clones obtained within the first 2 months postinfection. Our data show that potent but relatively strain-specific neutralizing antibodies develop within 3 to 12 months of HIV-1 infection. The magnitude of this response was associated with shorter V1-to-V5 envelope lengths and fewer glycosylation sites, particularly in the V1-V2 region. Anti-MPER antibodies were detected in 4 of 14 individuals within a year of infection, while antibodies to CD4-induced (CD4i) epitopes developed to high titers in 12 participants, in most cases before the development of autologous neutralizing antibodies. However, neither anti-MPER nor anti-CD4i antibody specificity conferred neutralization breadth. These data provide insights into the kinetics, potency, breadth, and epitope specificity of neutralizing antibody responses in acute HIV-1 subtype C infection.

  11. Novel multispecific heterodimeric antibody format allowing modular assembly of variable domain fragments

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Timothy J.; Diem, Dania; Weldon, Richard; Neumann, Tessa; Meyer, Sebastian; Urech, David M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multispecific antibody formats provide a promising platform for the development of novel therapeutic concepts that could facilitate the generation of safer, more effective pharmaceuticals. However, the production and use of such antibody-based multispecifics is often made complicated by: 1) the instability of the antibody fragments of which they consist, 2) undesired inter-subunit associations, and 3) the need to include recombinant heterodimerization domains that confer distribution-impairing bulk or enhance immunogenicity. In this paper, we describe a broadly-applicable method for the stabilization of human or humanized antibody Fv fragments that entails replacing framework region IV of a Vκ1/VH3-consensus Fv framework with the corresponding germ-line sequence of a λ-type VL chain. We then used this stable Fv framework to generate a novel heterodimeric multispecific antibody format that assembles by cognate VL/VH associations between 2 split variable domains in the core of the complex. This format, termed multispecific antibody-based therapeutics by cognate heterodimerization (MATCH), can be applied to produce homogeneous and highly stable antibody-derived molecules that simultaneously bind 4 distinct antigens. The heterodimeric design of the MATCH format allows efficient in-format screening of binding domain combinations that result in maximal cooperative activity. PMID:27786600

  12. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Rosenfeld, Ronit; Ariel, Naomi; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Zvi, Anat; Kronman, Chanoch; Ordentlich, Arie; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit) was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (koff < 1 × 10−7 s−1) that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication. PMID:26950154

  13. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates.

    PubMed

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Rosenfeld, Ronit; Ariel, Naomi; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Zvi, Anat; Kronman, Chanoch; Ordentlich, Arie; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-03-03

    Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit) was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (k(off )< 1 × 10(-7) s(-1)) that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication.

  14. Calcium-dependent antigen binding as a novel modality for antibody recycling by endosomal antigen dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hironiwa, N; Ishii, S; Kadono, S; Iwayanagi, Y; Mimoto, F; Habu, K; Igawa, T; Hattori, K

    2016-01-01

    The pH-dependent antigen binding antibody, termed a recycling antibody, has recently been reported as an attractive type of second-generation engineered therapeutic antibody. A recycling antibody can dissociate antigen in the acidic endosome, and thus bind to its antigen multiple times. As a consequence, a recycling antibody can neutralize large amounts of antigen in plasma. Because this approach relies on histidine residues to achieve pH-dependent antigen binding, which could limit the epitopes that can be targeted and affect the rate of antigen dissociation in the endosome, we explored an alternative approach for generating recycling antibodies. Since calcium ion concentration is known to be lower in endosome than in plasma, we hypothesized that an antibody with antigen-binding properties that are calcium-dependent could be used as recycling antibody. Here, we report a novel anti-interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibody, identified from a phage library that binds to IL-6R only in the presence of a calcium ion. Thermal dynamics and a crystal structure study revealed that the calcium ion binds to the heavy chain CDR3 region (HCDR3), which changes and possibly stabilizes the structure of HCDR3 to make it bind to antigen calcium dependently (PDB 5AZE). In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that this calcium-dependent antigen-binding antibody can dissociate its antigen in the endosome and accelerate antigen clearance from plasma, making it a novel approach for generating recycling antibody.

  15. Chimeric mouse-human IgG1 antibody that can mediate lysis of cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, A Y; Robinson, R R; Hellström, K E; Murray, E D; Chang, C P; Hellström, I

    1987-01-01

    A chimeric mouse-human antibody has been created that recognizes an antigen found on the surface of cells from many carcinomas. Immunoglobulin constant (C) domains of the mouse monoclonal antibody L6, C gamma 2a and C kappa, were substituted by the human C gamma 1 and C kappa by recombining cDNA modules encoding variable or C domains. The cDNA constructs were transfected into lymphoid cells for antibody production. The chimeric antibody and mouse L6 antibody bound to carcinoma cells with equal affinity and mediated complement-dependent cytolysis. In the presence of human effector cells, the chimeric antibody gave antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity at 100 times lower concentration than that needed for the mouse L6 antibody. The chimeric antibody, but not the mouse L6 antibody, is effective against a melanoma line expressing small amounts of the L6 antigen. The findings point to the usefulness of the chimeric antibody approach for obtaining agents with strong antitumor activity for possible therapeutic use in man. PMID:3106970

  16. Nonneutralizing functional antibodies: a new "old" paradigm for HIV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Ake, Julie; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Plotkin, Stanley A

    2014-08-01

    Animal and human data from various viral infections and vaccine studies suggest that nonneutralizing antibodies (nNAb) without neutralizing activity in vitro may play an important role in protection against viral infection in vivo. This was illustrated by the recent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RV144 vaccine efficacy trial, which demonstrated that HIV-specific IgG-mediated nNAb directed against the V2 loop of HIV type 1 envelope (Env) were inversely correlated with risk for HIV acquisition, while Env-specific plasma IgA-mediated antibodies were directly correlated with risk. However, tier 1 NAb in the subset of responders with a low level of plasma Env-specific IgA correlated with decreased risk. Nonhuman primate simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge studies suggest that Env-mediated antibodies are essential and sufficient for protection. A comparison of immune responses generated in human efficacy trials reveals subtle differences in the fine specificities of the antibody responses, in particular in HIV-specific IgG subclasses. The underlying mechanisms that may have contributed to protection against HIV acquisition in humans, although not fully understood, are possibly mediated by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and/or other nonneutralizing humoral effector functions, such as antibody-mediated phagocytosis. The presence of such functional nNAb in mucosal tissues and cervico-vaginal and rectal secretions challenges the paradigm that NAb are the predominant immune response conferring protection, although this does not negate the desirability of evoking neutralizing antibodies through vaccination. Instead, NAb and nNAb should be looked upon as complementary or synergistic humoral effector functions. Several HIV vaccine clinical trials to study these antibody responses in various prime-boost modalities in the systemic and mucosal compartments are ongoing. The induction of high

  17. Crystal Structures of a Quorum-Quenching Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Debler, E.W.; Kaufmann, G.F.; Kirchdoerfer, R.N.; Mee, J.M.; Janda, K.D.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Skaggs Inst. /WIRM, La Jolla

    2007-07-09

    A large number of Gram-negative bacteria employ N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signaling molecules in quorum sensing, which is a population density-dependent mechanism to coordinate gene expression. Antibody RS2-1G9 was elicited against a lactam mimetic of the N-acyl homoserine lactone and represents the only reported monoclonal antibody that recognizes the naturally-occuring N-acyl homoserine lactone with high affinity. Due to its high cross-reactivity, RS2-1G9 showed remarkable inhibition of quorum sensing signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common opportunistic pathogen in humans. The crystal structure of Fab RS2-1G9 in complex with a lactam analog revealed complete encapsulation of the polar lactam moiety in the antibody-combining site. This mode of recognition provides an elegant immunological solution for tight binding to an aliphatic, lipid-like ligand with a small head group lacking typical haptenic features, such as aromaticity or charge, which are often incorporated into hapten design to generate high-affinity antibodies. The ability of RS2-1G9 to discriminate between closely related AHLs is conferred by six hydrogen bonds to the ligand. Conversely, cross-reactivity of RS2-1G9 towards the lactone is likely to originate from conservation of these hydrogen bonds as well as an additional hydrogen bond to the oxygen of the lactone ring. A short, narrow tunnel exiting at the protein surface harbors a portion of the acyl chain and would not allow entry of the head group. The crystal structure of the antibody without its cognate lactam or lactone ligands revealed a considerably altered antibody-combining site with a closed binding pocket. Curiously, a completely buried ethylene glycol molecule mimics the lactam ring and, thus, serves as a surrogate ligand. The detailed structural delineation of this quorum-quenching antibody will aid further development of an antibody-based therapy against bacterial pathogens by interference with quorum sensing.

  18. Antibodies - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    NCI announces the release of monoclonal antipeptide antibodies from rabbit for distribution on the antibody portal. There are 60 recently added monoclonal antibodies, with 56 generated from mouse and 4 generated from rabbit.

  19. Radiolabeled antibodies in cancer. Oncology Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories through the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiolabeled antibodies--labeling and imaging techniques; Radiolabeled antibodies--carcinoembryonic antigen; Radiolabeled antibodies--alpha-fetoprotein; Radiolabeled antibodies--human chorionic gonadotropin; Radiolabeled antibodies--ferritin; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of colorectal tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of malignant melanoma; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of urogenital tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of thyroid tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--other clinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--selected preclinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--reviews.

  20. Does vaccination ensure protection? Assessing diphtheria and tetanus antibody levels in a population of healthy children

    PubMed Central

    Gowin, Ewelina; Wysocki, Jacek; Kałużna, Ewelina; Świątek-Kościelna, Bogna; Wysocka-Leszczyńska, Joanna; Michalak, Michał; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vaccination effectiveness is proven when the disease does not develop after a patient is exposed to the pathogen. In the case of rare diseases, vaccination effectiveness is assessed by monitoring specific antibody levels in the population. Such recurrent analyses allow the evaluation of vaccination programs. The primary schedule of diphtheria and tetanus vaccinations is similar in various countries, with differences mainly in the number and timing of booster doses. The aim of the study was to assess diphtheria and tetanus antibody concentrations in a population of healthy children. Diphtheria and tetanus antibody levels were analyzed in a group of 324 children aged 18 to 180 months. All children were vaccinated in accordance with the Polish vaccination schedule. Specific antibody concentrations greater than 0.1 IU/mL were considered protective against tetanus or diphtheria. Levels above 1.0 were considered to ensure long-term protection. Protective levels of diphtheria antibodies were found in 229 patients (70.46%), and of tetanus in 306 patients (94.15%). Statistically significant differences were found in tetanus antibody levels in different age groups. Mean concentrations and the percentage of children with high tetanus antibody titers increased with age. No similar correlation was found for diphtheria antibodies. High diphtheria antibody levels co-occurred in 72% of the children with high tetanus antibody levels; 95% of the children with low tetanus antibody levels had low levels of diphtheria antibodies. The percentage of children with protective diphtheria antibody levels is lower than that in the case of tetanus antibodies, both in Poland and abroad, but the high proportion of children without diphtheria protection in Poland is an exception. This is all the more puzzling when taking into account that Polish children are administered a total of 5 doses containing a high concentration of diphtheria toxoid, at intervals shorter than 5 years. The

  1. Antibodies to Phospholipids and Liposomes: Binding of Antibodies to Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    LIPOSOMES: BINDING OF ANTIBODIES TO CELLS 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) W.E. FOGLER , G. M. SWARTZ, AND C.R. ALVING 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE...Elsevier BBA 73693 Antibodies to phospholipids and liposomes: binding of antibodies to cells William E. Fogler *, Glenn M. Swartz, Jr. and Carl R. Alving...Immunol. 21. Research Associateship from the U.S. National 12863-86812Hall. T. and Esser, K. (1984) 3. Immunol. 132. 2059-2063 Research Council. 13 Fogler

  2. Apollo 11 Lunar Science Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Wendell

    1970-01-01

    Report of a conference called to discuss the findings of 142 scientists from their investigations of samples of lunar rock and soil brought back by the Apollo 11 mission. Significant findings reported include the age and composition of the lunar samples, and the absence of water and organic matter. Much discussed was the origin and structure of…

  3. Economic Downturn Limits Conference Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    Attendance is down at many academic and professional conferences in higher education this year, and next year's numbers are expected to be far worse, as campus budgets take further beatings. With many colleges limiting travel to professors or administrators who are speaking at events they are attending, will anyone be left in the audience? A new…

  4. The United Nations Water Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations and Water, 1977

    1977-01-01

    This Water Conference adapted a set of detailed action recommendations on various aspects of water resources development and management and decided that this set of recommendations would be known as the "Mar del Plata Action Plan." This article presents an abridged version of selected recommendations in the Action Plan. (Author/MA)

  5. NOLPE Conference Proceedings, November 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Organization on Legal Problems of Education, Topeka, KS.

    This booklet contains the texts of speeches given at the 1968 National Organization on Legal Problems of Education conference on school law. The topics covered in the speeches include student rights, dress codes, defacto segregation, education and religious freedom, doctoral dissertations in school law, master contracts, and teacher strikes. (JF)

  6. Ozone Conference II: Abstract Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    Ozone Conference II: Pre- and Post-Harvest Applications Two Years After Gras, was held September 27-28, 1999 in Tulare, California. This conference, sponsored by EPRI's Agricultural Technology Alliance and Southern California Edison's AgTAC facility, was coordinated and organized by the on-site ATA-AgTAC Regional Center. Approximately 175 people attended the day-and-a-half conference at AgTAC. During the Conference twenty-two presentations were given on ozone food processing and agricultural applications. Included in the presentations were topics on: (1) Ozone fumigation; (2) Ozone generation techniques; (3) System and design applications; (4) Prewater treatment requirements; (5) Poultry water reuse; (6) Soil treatments with ozone gas; and (7) Post-harvest aqueous and gaseous ozone research results. A live videoconference between Tulare and Washington, D.C. was held to discuss the regulators' view from inside the beltway. Attendees participated in two Roundtable Question and Answer sessions and visited fifteen exhibits and demonstrations. The attendees included university and governmental researchers, regulators, consultants and industry experts, technology developers and providers, and corporate and individual end-users. This report is comprised of the Abstracts of each presentation, biographical sketches for each speaker and a registration/attendees list.

  7. National Environmental Manpower Planning Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Career Center, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The national planning conference was held to acquaint State and local environmental agencies with available resources and Federal/State activities related to the development and utilization of an environmental workforce. The 200 participants and 48 speakers represented Federal, State, local, and private agencies as well as professional…

  8. Columbine Author Speaks at Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Andrea J.

    2004-01-01

    Brooks Brown, the author of No Easy Answers: The Truth Behind Death at Columbine High School, spoke at the 11th annual Reclaiming Youth International No Disposable Kids conference at Rushmore Plaza Holiday Inn. Brown, who worked with Michael Moore on his Academy Award winning documentary, "Bowling for Columbine," said the letters he…

  9. IEEE Conference Publications in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Karl E.

    1984-01-01

    Conclusions of surveys (63 libraries, OCLC database, University of Rhode Island users) assessing handling of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) conference publications indicate that most libraries fully catalog these publications using LC cataloging, and library patrons frequently require series access to publications. Eight…

  10. 2001 MAPLD International Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This CD contains the proceedings from the '2001 MAPLD International Conference', held on 11-13 September 2001 at Johns Hopkins University. Sessions included the following: (1) Applications: Military and Aerospace; (2) Design 1: Processors, Logic, and Programmable Devices; (3) Reliability: Devices and The Effects of the Radiation Environment; (4) Design 2: Systems; and (5) Design 3: Fault Tolerance.

  11. Thirteenth International Laser Radar Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    One hundred fifteen papers were presented in both oral and poster sessions. The topics of the conference sessions were: spaceborne lidar applications; extinction/visibility; differential absorption lidar; winds and tropospheric studies; middle atmosphere; clouds and multiple scattering; pollution studies; and new systems.

  12. What Good Are Conferences, Anyway?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietro, David C.

    1996-01-01

    According to Frederick Herzberg's studies of employee motivation, humans are driven by motivating factors that allow them to grow psychologically and hygiene factors that help them meet physical needs. Good education conferences can enhance both factors by helping principals refocus their energies, exchange ideas with trusted colleagues, and view…

  13. SLA's Conference Wrap-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Susan J., Comp.

    1987-01-01

    Encapsulates a wrap-up session on technical programs presented at the Special Libraries Association's June 1987 conference, including presentations in the areas of information technology, management, education, and international issues. Ethics, value, leadership, international issues, image, and risk are identified as major themes of the…

  14. 78 FR 23786 - Settlement Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... noticing a recent order convening a settlement conference between GameFly, Inc. and the Postal Service.... Introduction II. Background III. GameFly Motion, Postal Service Reply, and GameFly Response IV. Analysis V... Court's mandate, on March 7, 2013, GameFly, Inc. (GameFly) filed a motion requesting the Commission...

  15. Space Station Freedom Utilization Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The topics addressed in Space Station Freedom Utilization Conference are: (1) space station freedom overview and research capabilities; (2) space station freedom research plans and opportunities; (3) life sciences research on space station freedom; (4) technology research on space station freedom; (5) microgravity research and biotechnology on space station freedom; and (6) closing plenary.

  16. Salmonella porins induce a sustained, lifelong specific bactericidal antibody memory response

    PubMed Central

    Secundino, Ismael; López-Macías, Constantino; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Ríos-Sarabia, Nora; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Angel Villasis-Keever, Miguel; Becker, Ingeborg; Luis Puente, José; Calva, Edmundo; Isibasi, Armando

    2006-01-01

    We examined the ability of porins from Salmonella enterica serovar typhi to induce a long-term antibody response in BALB/c mice. These porins triggered a strong lifelong production of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody in the absence of exogenous adjuvant. Analysis of the IgG subclasses produced during this antibody response revealed the presence of the subclasses IgG2b, IgG1, IgG2a and weak IgG3. Despite the high homology of porins, the long-lasting anti-S. typhi porin sera did not cross-react with S. typhimurium. Notably, the antiporin sera showed a sustained lifelong bactericidal-binding activity to the wild-type S. typhi strain, whereas porin-specific antibody titres measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) decreased with time. Because our porin preparations contained the outer membrane proteins C and F (OmpC and OmpF), we evaluated the individual contribution of each porin to the long-lasting antibody response. OmpC and OmpF induced long-lasting antibody titres, measured by ELISA, which were sustained for 300 days. In contrast, although OmpC induced sustained high bactericidal antibody titres for 300 days, postimmunization, the bactericidal antibody titre induced by OmpF was not detected at day 180. These results indicate that OmpC is the main protein responsible for the antibody-mediated memory bactericidal response induced by porins. Taken together, our results show that porins are strong immunogens that confer lifelong specific bactericidal antibody responses in the absence of added adjuvant. PMID:16423041

  17. Induction of phospholipid-binding antibodies in mice and rabbits by immunization with human beta 2 glycoprotein 1 or anticardiolipin antibodies alone.

    PubMed Central

    Pierangeli, S S; Harris, E N

    1993-01-01

    Anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies are autoantibodies present in high concentrations in patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), a disorder of recurrent thrombosis and pregnancy loss. What induces aCL antibodies is uncertain, but a recent report suggested that immunization of mice with beta 2 glycoprotein 1 (beta 2 GP1) in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) resulted in aCL antibody production in the recipient mice. Since this observation might explain how autoantibodies might be induced by poor immunogens, such as phospholipids, we decided to explore the question further. In our first series of experiments, we found that aCL antibodies were induced in mice by beta 2GP1 mixed with adjuvants that did not contain lipids (Adju-Prime or aluminium hydroxide). This excluded the possibility that antibody induction occurred because beta 2GP1 formed complexes with lipids in FCA. We also found that aCL antibodies always appeared before anti-beta 2GP1 antibodies, excluding the possibility that aCL antibodies were directed to beta 2GP1 or were induced by formation of anti-idiotypic antibodies (to anti-beta 2GP1). In experiments, we found that immunization of mice with human IgG antibodies from patients with the APS (IgG-APS), also induced aCL antibodies. Immunization with pure bovine serum albumin (BSA) did not induce aCL antibodies. We propose that aCL antibodies are induced by proteins with high avidity for phospholipids. These proteins may be bound to phospholipids when introduced, or may bind circulating phospholipids, so transforming phospholipid molecules into immunogens. Similar mechanisms might explain autoantibody induction to other poor immunogens. PMID:8348755

  18. 22 CFR 224.19 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prehearing conferences. 224.19 Section 224.19 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 224.19 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences as...

  19. AFA Support for Research: Journals and Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sillars, Malcolm O.; Zarefsky, David

    2000-01-01

    Claims the American Forensic Association's (AFA) publications and conferences represent its principal commitment to research. Presents a review of the journals and conferences under AFA sponsorship. Reviews the strong commitment to research on the part of the AFA, particularly as it is manifested in the association's journal and in conferences.…

  20. Teacher Centering: A National Institute. Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tague, Linda Clark, Ed.; And Others

    This report is organized around six chapters: (1) "How This Institute Came About"; (2) "Agenda"; (3) "Teacher Centering in 1976: The Real Experience"; (4) "Description of Teacher Centers"; (5) "Conference Reactions"; and (6) "Conference Directory of Participants." The first chapter discusses the sponsors, and organizers of the conference. Chapter…