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Sample records for antibody expressing pea

  1. Antibody expressing pea seeds as fodder for prevention of gastrointestinal parasitic infections in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Jana; Saalbach, Isolde; Jahn, Doreen; Giersberg, Martin; Haehnel, Sigrun; Wedel, Julia; Macek, Jeanette; Zoufal, Karen; Glünder, Gerhard; Falkenburg, Dieter; Kipriyanov, Sergey M

    2009-01-01

    Background Coccidiosis caused by protozoans of genus Eimeria is a chicken parasitic disease of great economical importance. Conventional disease control strategies depend on vaccination and prophylactic use of anticoccidial drugs. Alternative solution to prevent and treat coccidiosis could be provided by passive immunization using orally delivered neutralizing antibodies. We investigated the possibility to mitigate the parasitic infection by feeding poultry with antibody expressing transgenic crop seeds. Results Using the phage display antibody library, we generated a panel of anti-Eimeria scFv antibody fragments with high sporozoite-neutralizing activity. These antibodies were expressed either transiently in agrobacteria-infiltrated tobacco leaves or stably in seeds of transgenic pea plants. Comparison of the scFv antibodies purified either from tobacco leaves or from the pea seeds demonstrated no difference in their antigen-binding activity and molecular form compositions. Force-feeding experiments demonstrated that oral delivery of flour prepared from the transgenic pea seeds had higher parasite neutralizing activity in vivo than the purified antibody fragments isolated from tobacco. The pea seed content was found to protect antibodies against degradation by gastrointestinal proteases (>100-fold gain in stability). Ad libitum feeding of chickens demonstrated that the transgenic seeds were well consumed and not shunned. Furthermore, feeding poultry with shred prepared from the antibody expressing pea seeds led to significant mitigation of infection caused both by high and low challenge doses of Eimeria oocysts. Conclusion The results suggest that our strategy offers a general approach to control parasitic infections in production animals using cost-effective antibody expression in crop seeds affordable for the animal health market. PMID:19747368

  2. Pea dehydrins: identification, characterisation and expression.

    PubMed

    Roberton, M; Chandler, P M

    1992-09-01

    An antiserum raised against dehydrin from maize (Zea mays) recognised several polypeptides in extracts of pea (Pisum sativum) cotyledons. A cDNA expression library was prepared from mRNA of developing cotyledons, screened with the antiserum and positive clones were purified and characterised. The nucleotide sequence of one such clone, pPsB12, contained an open reading frame which would encode a polypeptide with regions of significant amino acid sequence similarity to dehydrins from other plant species. The deduced amino acid sequence of the pea dehydrin encoded by B12 is 197 amino acids in length, has a high glycine content (25.9%), lacks tryptophan and is highly hydrophilic. The polypeptide has an estimated molecular mass of 20.4 kDa and pI = 6.4. An in vitro synthesised product from the clone comigrates with one of the in vivo proteins recognised by the antiserum. A comparison of the pea dehydrin sequence with sequences from other species revealed conserved amino acid regions: an N-terminal DEYGNP and a lysine-rich block (KIKEKLPG), both of which are present in two copies. Unexpectedly, pea dehydrin lacks a stretch of serine residues which is conserved in other dehydrins. B12 mRNA and dehydrin proteins accumulated in dehydration-stressed seedlings, associated with elevated levels of endogenous abscisic acid (ABA). Applied ABA induced expression of dehydrins in unstressed seedlings. Dehydrin expression was rapidly reversed when seedlings were removed from the stress or from treatment with ABA and placed in water. During pea cotyledon development, dehydrin mRNA and proteins accumulated in mid to late embryogenesis. Dehydrin proteins were some of the most actively synthesised at about the time of maximum fresh weight and represent about 2% of protein in mature cotyledons.

  3. Transient protein expression in three Pisum sativum (green pea) varieties.

    PubMed

    Green, Brian J; Fujiki, Masaaki; Mett, Valentina; Kaczmarczyk, Jon; Shamloul, Moneim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Underkoffler, Susan; Yusibov, Vidadi; Mett, Vadim

    2009-02-01

    The expression of proteins in plants both transiently and via permanently transformed lines has been demonstrated by a number of groups. Transient plant expression systems, due to high expression levels and speed of production, show greater promise for the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals when compared to permanent transformants. Expression vectors based on a tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are the most commonly utilized and the primary plant used, Nicotiana benthamiana, has demonstrated the ability to express a wide range of proteins at levels amenable to purification. N. benthamiana has two limitations for its use; one is its relatively slow growth, and the other is its low biomass. To address these limitations we screened a number of legumes for transient protein expression. Using the alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) vectors, delivered via Agrobacterium, we were able to identify three Pisum sativum varieties that demonstrated protein expression transiently. Expression levels of 420 +/- 26.24 mg GFP/kgFW in the green pea variety speckled pea were achieved. We were also able to express three therapeutic proteins indicating promise for this system in the production of biopharmaceuticals.

  4. Enhancing Neoplasm Expression in Field Pea (Pisum sativum) via Intercropping and Its Significance to Pea Weevil (Bruchus pisorum) Management

    PubMed Central

    Teshome, Abel; Bryngelsson, Tomas; Mendesil, Esayas; Marttila, Salla; Geleta, Mulatu

    2016-01-01

    Neoplasm formation, a non-meristematic tissue growth on young field pea (Pisum sativum L.) pods is triggered in the absence of UV light and/or in response to oviposition by pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum L.). This trait is expressed in some genotypes [neoplastic (Np) genotypes] of P. sativum and has the capacity to obstruct pea weevil larval entry into developing seeds. In the present study, 26% of the tested accessions depicted the trait when grown under greenhouse conditions. However, UV light inhibits full expression of this trait and subsequently it is inconspicuous at the field level. In order to investigate UV light impact on the expression of neoplasm, particular Np genotypes were subjected to UV lamp light exposure in the greenhouse and sunlight at the field level. Under these different growing conditions, the highest mean percentage of Np pods was in the control chamber in the greenhouse (36%) whereas in single and double UV lamp chambers, the percentage dropped to 10 and 15%, respectively. Furthermore, when the same Np genotypes were grown in the field, the percentage of Np pods dropped significantly (7%). In order to enhance Np expression at the field level, intercropping of Np genotypes with sorghum was investigated. As result, the percentage of Np pods was threefold in intercropped Np genotypes as compared to those without intercropping. Therefore, intercropping Np genotypes with other crops such as sorghum and maize can facilitate neoplasm formation, which in turn can minimize the success rate of pea weevil larvae entry into developing seeds. Greenhouse artificial infestation experiments showed that pea weevil damage in Np genotypes is lower in comparison to wild type genotypes. Therefore, promoting Np formation under field conditions via intercropping can serve as part of an integrated pea weevil management strategy especially for small scale farming systems. PMID:27242855

  5. Enhancing Neoplasm Expression in Field Pea (Pisum sativum) via Intercropping and Its Significance to Pea Weevil (Bruchus pisorum) Management.

    PubMed

    Teshome, Abel; Bryngelsson, Tomas; Mendesil, Esayas; Marttila, Salla; Geleta, Mulatu

    2016-01-01

    Neoplasm formation, a non-meristematic tissue growth on young field pea (Pisum sativum L.) pods is triggered in the absence of UV light and/or in response to oviposition by pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum L.). This trait is expressed in some genotypes [neoplastic (Np) genotypes] of P. sativum and has the capacity to obstruct pea weevil larval entry into developing seeds. In the present study, 26% of the tested accessions depicted the trait when grown under greenhouse conditions. However, UV light inhibits full expression of this trait and subsequently it is inconspicuous at the field level. In order to investigate UV light impact on the expression of neoplasm, particular Np genotypes were subjected to UV lamp light exposure in the greenhouse and sunlight at the field level. Under these different growing conditions, the highest mean percentage of Np pods was in the control chamber in the greenhouse (36%) whereas in single and double UV lamp chambers, the percentage dropped to 10 and 15%, respectively. Furthermore, when the same Np genotypes were grown in the field, the percentage of Np pods dropped significantly (7%). In order to enhance Np expression at the field level, intercropping of Np genotypes with sorghum was investigated. As result, the percentage of Np pods was threefold in intercropped Np genotypes as compared to those without intercropping. Therefore, intercropping Np genotypes with other crops such as sorghum and maize can facilitate neoplasm formation, which in turn can minimize the success rate of pea weevil larvae entry into developing seeds. Greenhouse artificial infestation experiments showed that pea weevil damage in Np genotypes is lower in comparison to wild type genotypes. Therefore, promoting Np formation under field conditions via intercropping can serve as part of an integrated pea weevil management strategy especially for small scale farming systems.

  6. Pea3 expression is regulated by FGF signaling in developing retina

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kathryn Leigh; McGuire, Chris; Reh, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    FGF signaling has been implicated as an important regulator of retinal development. As a first step in characterizing potential downstream targets of FGF signaling in the retina, we have analyzed expression of Pea3, a member of the Pea3 class of Ets-domain transcription factors, in the developing eye. We find that Pea3 is expressed in the developing retina, and its transcription is regulated by FGF receptor activation. In addition, FGF signaling activates Cath5, a gene necessary for retinal ganglion cell differentiation. These results suggest that FGF signaling via MAPK up-regulates transcription factors that in turn control retinal ganglion cell differentiation. PMID:16273524

  7. Expression of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with "human-like" post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  8. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  9. Pea aphid infestation induces changes in flavonoids, antioxidative defence, soluble sugars and sugar transporter expression in leaves of pea seedlings.

    PubMed

    Morkunas, Iwona; Woźniak, Agnieszka; Formela, Magda; Mai, Van Chung; Marczak, Łukasz; Narożna, Dorota; Borowiak-Sobkowiak, Beata; Kühn, Christina; Grimm, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    The perception of aphid infestation induces highly coordinated and sequential defensive reactions in plants at the cellular and molecular levels. The aim of the study was to explore kinetics of induced antioxidative defence responses in leaf cells of Pisum sativum L.cv. Cysterski upon infestation of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum at varying population sizes, including accumulation of flavonoids, changes of carbon metabolism, and expression of nuclear genes involved in sugar transport. Within the first 96 h, after A. pisum infestation, flavonoid accumulation and increased peroxidase activity were observed in leaves. The level of pisatin increased after 48 h of infestation and reached a maximum at 96 h. At this time point, a higher concentration of flavonols was observed in the infested tissue than in the control. Additionally, strong post-infestation accumulation of chalcone synthase (CHS) and isoflavone synthase (IFS) transcription products was also found. The levels of sucrose and fructose in 24-h leaves infested by 10, 20, and 30 aphids were significantly lower than in the control. Moreover, in leaves infested by 30 aphids, the reduced sucrose level observed up to 48 h was accompanied by a considerable increase in the expression level of the PsSUT1 gene encoding the sucrose transporter. In conclusion, A. pisum infestation on pea leads to stimulation of metabolic pathways associated with defence.

  10. Expression studies of catalytic antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, H.D.; Patten, P.A.; Yang, P.L.

    1995-12-05

    We have examined the positive influence of human constant regions on the folding and bacterial expression of active soluble mouse immunoglobulin variable domains derived form a number of catalytic antibodies. Expression yields of eight hybridoma-and myeloma-derived chimeric Fab fragments are compared in both shake flasks and high-density fermentation. In addition the usefulness of this system for the generation of in vivo expression libraries is examined by constructing and expressing combinations of heavy and light chain variable regions that were not selected as a pair during an immune response. A mutagenesis study of one of the recombinant catalytic Fab fragments reveals that single amino acid substitutions can have dramatic effects on the expression yield. This system should be generally applicable to the production of Fab fragments of catalytic and other hybridoma-derived antibodies for crystallographic and structure-function studies. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Expression dynamics of the pea rbcS multigene family and organ distribution of the transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Fluhr, Robert; Moses, Phyllis; Morelli, Giorgio; Coruzzi, Gloria; Chua, Nam-Hai

    1986-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of two members (rbcS-3A and -3C) of the pea nuclear gene family encoding the small subunit (rbcS) of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase. Both rbcS-3A and -3C are interrupted by two introns located at the same positions as those of the other three pea rbcS genes. Compared with the other pea rbcS genes the rbcS-3C gene has the most divergent 5'- and 3'-flanking sequences while the rbcS-3A gene has a larger and highly divergent intron 1. All five pea rbcS genes are conserved in their coding regions but show considerable sequence differences in their 3'-untranslated portion. The 3' sequence divergence of the rbcS genes has allowed us to use S1 nuclease mapping procedures to compare their expression levels in different organs and during light induction. All the rbcS genes are differentially expressed in various organs of the pea plants; moreover, specific rbcS transcripts are under-represented in seeds and petals. In leaves there is a 10-fold difference between the highest and lowest specific rbcS transcript levels. By quantitating the distribution of rbcS transcripts during light, phytochrome and blue light induction of immature (etiolated), and mature (green), pea leaves, we show that the genes are differentially activated during leaf development. ImagesFig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 8. PMID:16453702

  12. Raised expression of the antiapoptotic protein ped/pea-15 increases susceptibility to chemically induced skin tumor development.

    PubMed

    Formisano, Pietro; Perruolo, Giuseppe; Libertini, Silvana; Santopietro, Stefania; Troncone, Giancarlo; Raciti, Gregory Alexander; Oriente, Francesco; Portella, Giuseppe; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco

    2005-10-27

    ped/pea-15 is a cytosolic protein performing a broad antiapoptotic function. We show that, upon DMBA/TPA-induced skin carcinogenesis, transgenic mice overexpressing ped/pea-15 (Tg(ped/pea-15)) display early development of papillomas and a four-fold increase in papilloma number compared to the nontransgenic littermates (P<0.001). The malignant conversion frequency was 24% for the Tg(ped/pea-15) mice and only 5% in controls (P<0.01). The isolated application of TPA, but not that of DMBA, was sufficient to reversibly upregulate ped/pea-15 in both untransformed skin and cultured keratinocytes. ped/pea-15 protein levels were also increased in DMBA/TPA-induced papillomas of both Tg(ped/pea-15) and control mice. Isolated TPA applications induced Caspase-3 activation and apoptosis in nontransformed mouse epidermal tissues. The induction of both Caspase-3 and apoptosis by TPA were four-fold inhibited in the skin of the Tg(ped/pea-15) compared to the nontransgenic mice, accompanied by a similarly sized reduction in TPA-induced JNK and p38 stimulation and by constitutive induction of cytoplasmic ERK activity in the transgenics. ped/pea-15 expression was stably increased in cell lines from DMBA/TPA-induced skin papillomas and carcinomas, paralleled by protection from TPA apoptosis. In the A5 spindle carcinoma cell line, antisense inhibition of ped/pea-15 expression simultaneously rescued sensitivity to TPA-induced Caspase-3 function and apoptosis. The antisense also reduced A5 cell ability to grow in semisolid media by 65% (P<0.001) and increased by three-fold tumor latency time (P<0.01). Thus, the expression levels of ped/pea-15 control Caspase-3 function and epidermal cell apoptosis in vivo and determine susceptibility to skin tumor development.

  13. Differential gene expression according to race and host plant in the pea aphid.

    PubMed

    Eyres, Isobel; Jaquiéry, Julie; Sugio, Akiko; Duvaux, Ludovic; Gharbi, Karim; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Legeai, Fabrice; Nelson, Michaela; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Smadja, Carole M; Butlin, Roger; Ferrari, Julia

    2016-09-01

    Host-race formation in phytophagous insects is thought to provide the opportunity for local adaptation and subsequent ecological speciation. Studying gene expression differences amongst host races may help to identify phenotypes under (or resulting from) divergent selection and their genetic, molecular and physiological bases. The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) comprises host races specializing on numerous plants in the Fabaceae and provides a unique system for examining the early stages of diversification along a gradient of genetic and associated adaptive divergence. In this study, we examine transcriptome-wide gene expression both in response to environment and across pea aphid races selected to cover the range of genetic divergence reported in this species complex. We identify changes in expression in response to host plant, indicating the importance of gene expression in aphid-plant interactions. Races can be distinguished on the basis of gene expression, and higher numbers of differentially expressed genes are apparent between more divergent races; these expression differences between host races may result from genetic drift and reproductive isolation and possibly divergent selection. Expression differences related to plant adaptation include a subset of chemosensory and salivary genes. Genes showing expression changes in response to host plant do not make up a large portion of between-race expression differences, providing confirmation of previous studies' findings that genes involved in expression differences between diverging populations or species are not necessarily those showing initial plasticity in the face of environmental change.

  14. Protein kinase B/Akt binds and phosphorylates PED/PEA-15, stabilizing its antiapoptotic action.

    PubMed

    Trencia, Alessandra; Perfetti, Anna; Cassese, Angela; Vigliotta, Giovanni; Miele, Claudia; Oriente, Francesco; Santopietro, Stefania; Giacco, Ferdinando; Condorelli, Gerolama; Formisano, Pietro; Beguinot, Francesco

    2003-07-01

    The antiapoptotic protein PED/PEA-15 features an Akt phosphorylation motif upstream from Ser(116). In vitro, recombinant PED/PEA-15 was phosphorylated by Akt with a stoichiometry close to 1. Based on Western blotting with specific phospho-Ser(116) PED/PEA-15 antibodies, Akt phosphorylation of PED/PEA-15 occurred mainly at Ser(116). In addition, a mutant of PED/PEA-15 featuring the substitution of Ser(116)-->Gly (PED(S116-->G)) showed 10-fold-decreased phosphorylation by Akt. In intact 293 cells, Akt also induced phosphorylation of PED/PEA-15 at Ser(116). Based on pull-down and coprecipitation assays, PED/PEA-15 specifically bound Akt, independently of Akt activity. Serum activation of Akt as well as BAD phosphorylation by Akt showed no difference in 293 cells transfected with PED/PEA-15 and in untransfected cells (which express no endogenous PED/PEA-15). However, the antiapoptotic action of PED/PEA-15 was almost twofold reduced in PED(S116-->G) compared to that in PED/PEA-15(WT) cells. PED/PEA-15 stability closely paralleled Akt activation by serum in 293 cells. In these cells, the nonphosphorylatable PED(S116-->G) mutant exhibited a degradation rate threefold greater than that observed with wild-type PED/PEA-15. In the U373MG glioma cells, blocking Akt also reduced PED/PEA-15 levels and induced sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand apoptosis. Thus, phosphorylation by Akt regulates the antiapoptotic function of PED/PEA-15 at least in part by controlling the stability of PED/PEA-15. In part, Akt survival signaling may be mediated by PED/PEA-15.

  15. Expression of small heat shock proteins from pea seedlings under gravity altered conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talalaev, Alexandr S.

    2005-08-01

    A goal of our study was to evaluate the stress gene expression in Pisum sativum seedlings exposed to altered gravity and temperature elevation. We investigate message for the two inducible forms of the cytosolic small heat shock proteins (sHsp), sHsp 17.7 and sHsp 18.1. Both proteins are able to enhance the refolding of chemically denatured proteins in an ATP- independent manner, in other words they can function as molecular chaperones. We studied sHsps expression in pea seedlings cells by Western blotting. Temperature elevation, as the positive control, significantly increased PsHsp 17.7 and PsHsp 18.1 expression. Expression of the housekeeping protein, actin was constant and comparable to unstressed controls for all treatments. We concluded that gravitational perturbations incurred by clinorotation did not change sHsp genes expression.

  16. Improving nutritional quality and fungal tolerance in soya bean and grass pea by expressing an oxalate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinay; Chattopadhyay, Arnab; Ghosh, Sumit; Irfan, Mohammad; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Chakraborty, Subhra; Datta, Asis

    2016-06-01

    Soya bean (Glycine max) and grass pea (Lathyrus sativus) seeds are important sources of dietary proteins; however, they also contain antinutritional metabolite oxalic acid (OA). Excess dietary intake of OA leads to nephrolithiasis due to the formation of calcium oxalate crystals in kidneys. Besides, OA is also a known precursor of β-N-oxalyl-L-α,β-diaminopropionic acid (β-ODAP), a neurotoxin found in grass pea. Here, we report the reduction in OA level in soya bean (up to 73%) and grass pea (up to 75%) seeds by constitutive and/or seed-specific expression of an oxalate-degrading enzyme, oxalate decarboxylase (FvOXDC) of Flammulina velutipes. In addition, β-ODAP level of grass pea seeds was also reduced up to 73%. Reduced OA content was interrelated with the associated increase in seeds micronutrients such as calcium, iron and zinc. Moreover, constitutive expression of FvOXDC led to improved tolerance to the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum that requires OA during host colonization. Importantly, FvOXDC-expressing soya bean and grass pea plants were similar to the wild type with respect to the morphology and photosynthetic rates, and seed protein pool remained unaltered as revealed by the comparative proteomic analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrated improved seed quality and tolerance to the fungal pathogen in two important legume crops, by the expression of an oxalate-degrading enzyme. © 2016 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Differential Expression of the S-Adenosyl-l-Methionine Synthase Genes during Pea Development1

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes; Carrasco, Pedro

    1998-01-01

    Two genes coding for S-adenosyl-l-methionine synthase (SAMS, EC 2.5.1.6) were previously isolated from pea (Pisum sativum) ovaries. Both SAMS genes were highly homologous throughout their coding regions but showed a certain degree of sequence divergence within the 5′ and the 3′ untranslated regions. These regions have been used as gene-specific probes to analyze the differential expression of SAMS1 and SAMS2 genes in pea plants. The ribonuclease protection assay revealed different expression patterns for each individual gene. SAMS1 was strongly expressed in nearly all tissues, especially in roots. SAMS2 expression was weaker, reaching its highest level at the apex. Following pollination, SAMS1 was specifically up-regulated, whereas SAMS2 was expressed constitutively. The up-regulation of SAMS1 during ovary development was also observed in unpollinated ovaries treated with auxins. In unpollinated ovaries an increase in SAMS1 expression was observed as a consequence of ethylene production associated with the emasculation process. In senescing ovaries both SAMS1 and SAMS2 genes showed increased expression. Ethylene treatment of unpollinated ovaries led to an increase in the SAMS1 mRNA level. However, SAMS2 expression remained unchangeable after ethylene treatment, indicating that SAMS2 induction during ovary senescence was not ethylene dependent. SAMS mRNAs were localized by in situ hybridization at the endocarp of developing fruits and in the ovules of senescing ovaries. Our results indicate that the transcriptional regulation of SAMS genes is developmentally controlled in a specific way for each gene. PMID:9625692

  18. PED/PEA-15 regulates glucose-induced insulin secretion by restraining potassium channel expression in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Miele, Claudia; Raciti, Gregory Alexander; Cassese, Angela; Romano, Chiara; Giacco, Ferdinando; Oriente, Francesco; Paturzo, Flora; Andreozzi, Francesco; Zabatta, Assunta; Troncone, Giancarlo; Bosch, Fatima; Pujol, Anna; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Formisano, Pietro; Beguinot, Francesco

    2007-03-01

    The phosphoprotein enriched in diabetes/phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes (ped/pea-15) gene is overexpressed in human diabetes and causes this abnormality in mice. Transgenic mice with beta-cell-specific overexpression of ped/pea-15 (beta-tg) exhibited decreased glucose tolerance but were not insulin resistant. However, they showed impaired insulin response to hyperglycemia. Islets from the beta-tg also exhibited little response to glucose. mRNAs encoding the Sur1 and Kir6.2 potassium channel subunits and their upstream regulator Foxa2 were specifically reduced in these islets. Overexpression of PED/PEA-15 inhibited the induction of the atypical protein kinase C (PKC)-zeta by glucose in mouse islets and in beta-cells of the MIN-6 and INS-1 lines. Rescue of PKC-zeta activity elicited recovery of the expression of the Sur1, Kir6.2, and Foxa2 genes and of glucose-induced insulin secretion in PED/PEA-15-overexpressing beta-cells. Islets from ped/pea-15-null mice exhibited a twofold increased activation of PKC-zeta by glucose; increased abundance of the Sur1, Kir6.2, and Foxa2 mRNAs; and enhanced glucose effect on insulin secretion. In conclusion, PED/PEA-15 is an endogenous regulator of glucose-induced insulin secretion, which restrains potassium channel expression in pancreatic beta-cells. Overexpression of PED/PEA-15 dysregulates beta-cell function and is sufficient to impair glucose tolerance in mice.

  19. Gibberellin 3-oxidase gene expression patterns influence gibberellin biosynthesis, growth, and development in pea.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, Dennis M; Wickramarathna, Aruna D; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Kurepin, Leonid V; Jin, Alena L; Good, Allen G; Pharis, Richard P

    2013-10-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are key modulators of plant growth and development. PsGA3ox1 (LE) encodes a GA 3β-hydroxylase that catalyzes the conversion of GA20 to biologically active GA1. To further clarify the role of GA3ox expression during pea (Pisum sativum) plant growth and development, we generated transgenic pea lines (in a lele background) with cauliflower mosaic virus-35S-driven expression of PsGA3ox1 (LE). PsGA3ox1 transgene expression led to higher GA1 concentrations in a tissue-specific and development-specific manner, altering GA biosynthesis and catabolism gene expression and plant phenotype. PsGA3ox1 transgenic plants had longer internodes, tendrils, and fruits, larger stipules, and displayed delayed flowering, increased apical meristem life, and altered vascular development relative to the null controls. Transgenic PsGA3ox1 overexpression lines were then compared with lines where endogenous PsGA3ox1 (LE) was introduced, by a series of backcrosses, into the same genetic background (BC LEle). Most notably, the BC LEle plants had substantially longer internodes containing much greater GA1 levels than the transgenic PsGA3ox1 plants. Induction of expression of the GA deactivation gene PsGA2ox1 appears to make an important contribution to limiting the increase of internode GA1 to modest levels for the transgenic lines. In contrast, PsGA3ox1 (LE) expression driven by its endogenous promoter was coordinated within the internode tissue to avoid feed-forward regulation of PsGA2ox1, resulting in much greater GA1 accumulation. These studies further our fundamental understanding of the regulation of GA biosynthesis and catabolism at the tissue and organ level and demonstrate that the timing/localization of GA3ox expression within an organ affects both GA homeostasis and GA1 levels, and thereby growth.

  20. Optimizing antibody expression: The nuts and bolts.

    PubMed

    Ayyar, B Vijayalakshmi; Arora, Sushrut; Ravi, Shiva Shankar

    2017-03-01

    Antibodies are extensively utilized entities in biomedical research, and in the development of diagnostics and therapeutics. Many of these applications require high amounts of antibodies. However, meeting this ever-increasing demand of antibodies in the global market is one of the outstanding challenges. The need to maintain a balance between demand and supply of antibodies has led the researchers to discover better means and methods for optimizing their expression. These strategies aim to increase the volumetric productivity of the antibodies along with the reduction of associated manufacturing costs. Recent years have witnessed major advances in recombinant protein technology, owing to the introduction of novel cloning strategies, gene manipulation techniques, and an array of cell and vector engineering techniques, together with the progress in fermentation technologies. These innovations were also highly beneficial for antibody expression. Antibody expression depends upon the complex interplay of multiple factors that may require fine tuning at diverse levels to achieve maximum yields. However, each antibody is unique and requires individual consideration and customization for optimizing the associated expression parameters. This review provides a comprehensive overview of several state-of-the-art approaches, such as host selection, strain engineering, codon optimization, gene optimization, vector modification and process optimization that are deemed suitable for enhancing antibody expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Expression of ribosomal genes in pea cotyledons at the initial stages of germination

    SciTech Connect

    Gumilevskaya, N.A.; Chumikhina, L.V.; Akhmatova, A.T.; Kretovich, V.L.

    1986-01-20

    The time of appearance of newly synthesized rRNAs and ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) in the ribosomes of pea cotyledons (Pisum sativum L.) during germination was investigated. The ribosomal fraction was isolated and analyzed according to the method of germination of the embryo in the presence of labeled precursors or after pulse labeling of the embryos at different stages of germination. For the identification of newly synthesized rRNAs in the ribosomes we estimated the relative stability of labeled RNAs to the action of RNase, the sedimentation rate, the ability to be methylated in vivo in the presence of (/sup 14/C)CH/sub 3/-methionine, and the localization in the subunits of dissociated ribosomes. The presence of newly synthesized r-proteins in the ribosomes was judged on the basis of the electrophoretic similarity in SDS-disc electrophoresis of labeled polypeptides of purified ribosome preparations and of genuine r-proteins, as well as according to the localization of labeled proteins in the subunits of the dissociated ribosomes. It was shown that the expression of the ribosomal genes in highly specialized cells of pea cotyledons that have completed their growth occurs at very early stages of germination.

  2. Evaluation of expression stability of candidate references genes among green and yellow pea cultivars (Pisum sativum L.) subjected to abiotic and biotic stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dry pea (Pisum sativum) is grown as human and animal feed throughout the world. Large yield losses in pea due to biotic and abiotic stresses compel an improved understanding of mechanisms of stress tolerance and genetic determinants conditioning these tolerances. The availability of stably expressed...

  3. GH3 expression and IAA-amide synthetase activity in pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings are regulated by light, plant hormones and auxinic herbicides.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Jakubowska, Anna

    2013-03-01

    The formation of auxin conjugates is one of the important regulatory mechanisms for modulating IAA action. Several auxin-responsive GH3 genes encode IAA-amide synthetases that are involved in the maintenance of hormonal homeostasis by conjugating excess IAA to amino acids. Recently, the data have revealed novel regulatory functions of several GH3 proteins in plant growth, organ development, fruit ripening, light signaling, abiotic stress tolerance and plant defense responses. Indole-3-acetyl-aspartate (IAA-Asp) synthetase catalyzing IAA conjugation to aspartic acid in immature seeds of pea (Pisum sativum L.) was purified and characterized during our previous investigations. In this study, we examined the effect of auxin and other plant hormones (ABA, GA, kinetin, JA, MeJA, SA), different light conditions (red, far-red, blue, white light), and auxinic herbicides (2,4-D, Dicamba, Picloram) on the expression of a putative GH3 gene and IAA-amide synthesizing activity in 10-d-old pea seedlings. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that the PsGH3-5 gene, weakly expressed in control sample, was visibly induced in response to all plant hormones, different light wavelengths and the auxinic herbicides tested. Protein A immunoprecipitation/gel blot analysis using anti-AtGH3.5 antibodies revealed a similar pattern of changes on the protein levels in response to all treatments. IAA-amide synthetase activity determined with aspartate as a substrate, not detectable in control seedlings, was positively affected by a majority of treatments. Based on these results, we suggest that PsGH3-5 may control the growth and development of pea plants in a way similar to the known GH3 genes from other plant species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of plant expression systems in antibody production for passive immunization.

    PubMed

    Virdi, Vikram; Depicker, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Passive immunization is a method to achieve immediate protection against infectious agents by administering pathogen-specific antibodies. It has proven to be lifesaving for many acute infections, and it is now also used for cancer treatment. Passive immunization therapies, however, are extremely expensive because they require large amounts of specific antibodies that are produced predominantly in mammalian expression systems. The cost for manufacturing plant-made antibodies is estimated to be comparatively low since plant production systems require relatively less capital investments. In addition, they are not prone to mammalian pathogens, which also eases downstream processing along with making it a safe expression system. Moreover, some of the recent developments in transient expression have enabled rapid, cGMP (current Good Manufacturing Practices) compliant manufacturing of antibodies. Whether lower production costs will be reflected in a lower market price for purified antibodies will be known when more plant-produced antibodies come to the market. Promisingly, the current molecular techniques in the field of in planta expression have enabled high-level production of a variety of antibodies in different plant organs, like roots/tubers/fruits, leaves and seeds, of a variety of plants, like potato, tobacco, maize, rice, tomato and pea, providing a very wide range of possible plant-based passive immunization therapies. For instance, the production of antibodies in edible tissues would allow for a unique, convenient, needle-less, oral passive immunization at the gastric mucosal surface. The technological advances, together with the innate capacity of plant tissues to assemble complex antibodies, will enable carving a niche in the antibody market. This non-exhaustive review aims to shed light on the role of plants as a flexible expression system for passive immunotherapy, which we envisage to progress alongside the conventional production platforms to manufacture

  5. Expression of the 12-oxophytodienoic acid 10,11-reductase gene in the compatible interaction between pea and fungal pathogen.

    PubMed

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Funato, Akiko; Tachiki, Tomoyuki; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Yamada, Tetsuji; Ichinose, Yuki

    2002-10-01

    Suppressors produced by Mycosphaerella pinodes are glycopeptides to block pea defense responses induced by elicitors. A clone, S64, was isolated as cDNA for suppressor-inducible gene from pea epicotyls. The treatment of pea epicotyls with suppressor alone induced an increase of S64 mRNA within 1 h, and it reached a maximum level at 3 h after treatment. The induction was not affected by application of the elicitor, indicating that the suppressor has a dominant action to regulate S64 gene expression. S64 was also induced by inoculation with a virulent pathogen, M. pinodes, but not by inoculation with a non-pathogen, Ascochyta rabiei, nor by treatment with fungal elicitor. The deduced structure of S64 showed high homology to 12-oxophytodienoic acid reductase (OPR) in Arabidopsis thaliana. A recombinant protein derived from S64 had OPR activity, suggesting compatibility-specific activation of the octadecanoid pathway in plants. Treatment with jasmonic acid (JA) or methyl jasmonic acid, end products of the octadecanoid pathway, inhibited the elicitor-induced accumulation of PAL mRNA in pea. These results indicate that the suppressor-induced S64 gene expression leads to the production of JA or related compounds, which might contribute to the establishment of compatibility by inhibiting the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway.

  6. Symbiosis-related pea genes modulate fungal and plant gene expression during the arbuscule stage of mycorrhiza with Glomus intraradices.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Elena; Seddas-Dozolme, Pascale M A; Arnould, Christine; Tollot, Marie; van Tuinen, Diederik; Borisov, Alexey; Gianinazzi, Silvio; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne

    2010-08-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhiza association results from a successful interaction between genomes of the plant and fungal symbiotic partners. In this study, we analyzed the effect of inactivation of late-stage symbiosis-related pea genes on symbiosis-associated fungal and plant molecular responses in order to gain insight into their role in the functional mycorrhizal association. The expression of a subset of ten fungal and eight plant genes, previously reported to be activated during mycorrhiza development, was compared in Glomus intraradices-inoculated wild-type and isogenic genotypes of pea mutated for the PsSym36, PsSym33, and PsSym40 genes where arbuscule formation is inhibited or fungal turnover modulated, respectively. Microdissection was used to corroborate arbuscule-related fungal gene expression. Molecular responses varied between pea genotypes and with fungal development. Most of the fungal genes were downregulated when arbuscule formation was defective, and several were upregulated with more rapid fungal development. Some of the plant genes were also affected by inactivation of the PsSym36, PsSym33, and PsSym40 loci, but in a more time-dependent way during root colonization by G. intraradices. Results indicate a role of the late-stage symbiosis-related pea genes not only in mycorrhiza development but also in the symbiotic functioning of arbuscule-containing cells.

  7. Light-regulated differential expression of pea chloroplast and cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-W; Hahn, T-R

    2003-02-01

    The light-regulated differential expression of pea chloroplast and cytosolic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases (FBPase) was investigated using enzyme activity assay, immunoblot, and Northern blot analyses. The enzyme activities of both chloroplast and cytosolic FBPases gradually increased under continuous white light illumination, although the increase in chloroplast FBPase was more drastic. Northern and immunoblot analyses also indicated that light stimulated the expression of both enzymes. Enzyme activity and the transcript levels of both enzymes gradually decreased under the dark treatment, although protein levels were unchanged for up to 24 h following the initiation of culture in the dark, indicating that reversible modifications of the enzymes may occur during the transition from light to dark (or the reverse). Light pulse experiments using blue (420 nm) and red/far-red (660/730 nm) light were carried out to analyze the photoreceptors related to the light-mediated expression of both enzymes. Expression of the chloroplast enzyme was very sensitive to red or far-red light pulses-it was induced by red light, but suppressed by far-red light pulses, as determined by enzyme activity, immunoblot, and Northern blot analyses, suggesting that red light signaling is involved in the control of chloroplast FBPase expression. However, cytosolic FBPase was virtually insensitive to blue or red/far-red light pulses in terms of enzyme activity, as determined by protein and transcript levels, indicating that cytosolic enzyme expression is not directly regulated by light signals. Instead, the expression of the cytosolic enzyme may be closely related to photosynthetic energy conversion accompanied by continuous white light irradiation.

  8. Vector-Mediated In Vivo Antibody Expression.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on a novel vaccine strategy known as vector-mediated antibody gene transfer, with a particular focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This strategy provides a solution to the problem of current vaccines that fail to generate neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 infection and AIDS. Antibody gene transfer allows for predetermination of antibody affinity and specificity prior to "immunization" and avoids the need for an active humoral immune response against the HIV envelope protein. This approach uses recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, which have been shown to transduce muscle with high efficiency and direct the long-term expression of a variety of transgenes, to deliver the gene encoding a broadly neutralizing antibody into the muscle. Following rAAV vector gene delivery, the broadly neutralizing antibodies are endogenously synthesized in myofibers and passively distributed to the circulatory system. This is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. Vector-mediated gene transfer studies in mice and monkeys with anti-HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-neutralizing antibodies demonstrated long-lasting neutralizing activity in serum with complete protection against intravenous challenge with virulent HIV and SIV. These results indicate that existing potent anti-HIV antibodies can be rapidly moved into the clinic. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV. The general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets such as hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis.

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation enhances insulin-stimulated glucose disposal by reducing ped/pea-15 gene expression in skeletal muscle cells: evidence for involvement of activator protein-1.

    PubMed

    Ungaro, Paola; Mirra, Paola; Oriente, Francesco; Nigro, Cecilia; Ciccarelli, Marco; Vastolo, Viviana; Longo, Michele; Perruolo, Giuseppe; Spinelli, Rosa; Formisano, Pietro; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco

    2012-12-14

    The gene network responsible for inflammation-induced insulin resistance remains enigmatic. In this study, we show that, in L6 cells, rosiglitazone- as well as pioglitazone-dependent activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) represses transcription of the ped/pea-15 gene, whose increased activity impairs glucose tolerance in mice and humans. Rosiglitazone enhanced insulin-induced glucose uptake in L6 cells expressing the endogenous ped/pea-15 gene but not in cells expressing ped/pea-15 under the control of an exogenous promoter. The ability of PPARγ to affect ped/pea-15 expression was also lost in cells and in C57BL/6J transgenic mice expressing ped/pea-15 under the control of an exogenous promoter, suggesting that ped/pea-15 repression may contribute to rosiglitazone action on glucose disposal. Indeed, high fat diet mice showed insulin resistance and increased ped/pea-15 levels, although these effects were reduced by rosiglitazone treatment. Both supershift and ChIP assays revealed the presence of the AP-1 component c-JUN at the PED/PEA-15 promoter upon 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate stimulation of the cells. In these experiments, rosiglitazone treatment reduced c-JUN presence at the PED/PEA-15 promoter. This effect was not associated with a decrease in c-JUN expression. In addition, c-jun silencing in L6 cells lowered ped/pea-15 expression and caused nonresponsiveness to rosiglitazone, although c-jun overexpression enhanced the binding to the ped/pea-15 promoter and blocked the rosiglitazone effect. These results indicate that PPARγ regulates ped/pea-15 transcription by inhibiting c-JUN binding at the ped/pea-15 promoter. Thus, ped/pea-15 is downstream of a major PPARγ-regulated inflammatory network. Repression of ped/pea-15 transcription might contribute to the PPARγ regulation of muscle sensitivity to insulin.

  10. Does pea lectin expressed transgenically in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) influence honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae?

    PubMed

    Lehrman, Anna

    2007-01-01

    The European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is important both for pollination and for honey production. Pollen is the major protein source for bees, which exposes them directly to changes in pollen quality e.g. through genetic engineering. In order to create a worst case scenario regarding pea lectin (PSL) expressed transgenically in oilseed rape anthers and pollen, the maximum amount of dried pollen that could be mixed in an artificial diet without negatively affecting larval performance (1.5% w/w) was fed to bee larvae. Pollen from two transgenic plant lines expressing PSL up to 1.2% of total soluble protein and pollen from one non-transgenic line was added to the same diet and used as a pollen control. When these three pollen diets and the control diet (without added pollen) were compared, no negative effect from the pollen of the transgenic plants could be detected on larval mortality, weight, or development time. An increased weight and a reduced developmental time were recorded for larvae on all diets containing pollen when compared to the diet without pollen.

  11. Magnesium chelatase subunit D from pea: characterization of the cDNA, heterologous expression of an enzymatically active protein and immunoassay of the native protein.

    PubMed

    Luo, M; Weinstein, J D; Walker, C J

    1999-12-01

    Mg-chelatase catalyzes the insertion of Mg into protoporphyrin and lies at the branchpoint of heme and (bacterio)chlorophyll synthesis. In prokaryotes, three genes--BchI, D and H--encode subunits for Mg-chelatase. In higher plants, homologous cDNAs for the I, D and H subunits have been characterized. Since the N-terminal half of the D subunit is homologous to the I subunit, the C-terminal portion of the pea D was used for antigen production. The antibody recognized the chloroplast D subunit and was used to demonstrate that this subunit associated with the membranes in the presence of MgCl2. The antibody immunoprecipitated the native protein and inhibited Mg-chelatase activity. Expression in Escherichia coli with a construct for the full-length protein (minus the putative transit peptide) resulted in induction of 24.5 kDa (major) and 89 kDa (minor) proteins which could only be solubilized in 6 M urea. However, when host cells were co-transformed with expression vectors for the full-length D subunit and for the 70 kDa HSP chaperonin protein, a substantial portion of the 89 kDa protein was expressed in a soluble form which was active in a Mg-chelatase reconstitution assay.

  12. Antifungal genes expressed in transgenic pea (Pisum sativum L.) do not affect root colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi.

    PubMed

    Kahlon, Jagroop Gill; Jacobsen, Hans-Jörg; Cahill, James F; Hall, Linda M

    2017-06-12

    Genetically modified crops have raised concerns about unintended consequences on non-target organisms including beneficial soil associates. Pea transformed with four antifungal genes 1-3 β glucanase, endochitinase, polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins, and stilbene synthase is currently under field-testing for efficacy against fungal diseases in Canada. Transgenes had lower expression in the roots than leaves in greenhouse experiment. To determine the impact of disease-tolerant pea or gene products on colonization by non-target arbuscular mycorrhizae and nodulation by rhizobium, a field trial was established. Transgene insertion, as single gene or stacked genes, did not alter root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus (AMF) or root nodulation by rhizobium inoculation in the field. We found no effect of transgenes on the plant growth and performance although, having a dual inoculant with both AMF and rhizobium yielded higher fresh weight shoot-to-root ratio in all the lines tested. This initial risk assessment of transgenic peas expressing antifungal genes showed no deleterious effect on non-target organisms.

  13. Gravistimulation changes expression of genes encoding putative carrier proteins of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, T.; Hitotsubashi, R.; Miyamoto, K.; Tanimoto, E.; Ueda, J.

    STS-95 space experiment has showed that auxin polar transport in etiolated epicotyls of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings is controlled by gravistimulation. In Arabidopsis thaliana auxin polar transport has considered to be regulated by efflux and influx carrier proteins in plasma membranes, AtPIN1 and AtAUX1, respectively. In order to know how gravistimuli control auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls at molecular levels, strenuous efforts have been made, resulting in successful isolation of full-length cDNAs of a putative auxin efflux and influx carriers, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1, respectively. Significantly high levels in homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 (accession no. AY222857, Chawla and DeMason, 2003) and AtPINs, and also among PsAUX1, AtAUX1 and their related genes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that PsPIN2 belonged to a subclade including AtPIN3, AtPIN4 relating to lateral transport of auxin, while PsPIN1 belonged to the same clade as AtPIN1 relating to auxin polar transport. In the present study, we examined the effects of gravistimuli on the expression of PsPINs and PsAUX1 in etiolated pea seedlings by northern blot analysis. Expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 in hook region of 3.5-d-old etiolated pea seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat increased as compared with that of the seedlings grown under 1 g conditions. On the other hand, that of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 in the 1st internode region under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat also increased, while that of PsPIN2 was affected little. These results suggest that expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 regulating polar/lateral transport of auxin is substantially under the control of gravity. A possible role of PsPINs and PsAUX1 of auxin polar transport in etiolated pea seedlings will also be discussed.

  14. Environment Exploration and Colonization Behavior of the Pea Aphid Associated with the Expression of the foraging Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tarès, Sophie; Arthaud, Laury; Amichot, Marcel; Robichon, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Aphids respond to specific environmental cues by producing alternative morphs, a phenomenon called polyphenism, but also by modulating their individual behavior even within the same morph. This complex plasticity allows a rapid adaptation of individuals to fluctuating environmental conditions, but the underlying genetic and molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. The foraging gene is known to be associated with behavior in various species and has been shown to mediate the behavioral shift induced by environmental changes in some insects. In this study, we investigated the function of this gene in the clonal forms of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum by identifying and cloning cDNA variants, as well as analyzing their expression levels in developmental morphs and behavioral variants. Our results indicate that the expression of foraging changes at key steps of the aphid development. This gene is also highly expressed in sedentary wingless adult morphs reared under crowded conditions, probably just before they start walking and foraging. The cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) enzyme activity measured in the behavioral variants correlates with the level of foraging expression. Altogether, our results suggest that foraging could act to promote the shift from a sedentary to an exploratory behavior, being thus involved in the behavioral plasticity of the pea aphid. PMID:23734236

  15. Gibberellin 3-oxidase Gene Expression Patterns Influence Gibberellin Biosynthesis, Growth, and Development in Pea1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Reinecke, Dennis M.; Wickramarathna, Aruna D.; Ozga, Jocelyn A.; Kurepin, Leonid V.; Jin, Alena L.; Good, Allen G.; Pharis, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are key modulators of plant growth and development. PsGA3ox1 (LE) encodes a GA 3β-hydroxylase that catalyzes the conversion of GA20 to biologically active GA1. To further clarify the role of GA3ox expression during pea (Pisum sativum) plant growth and development, we generated transgenic pea lines (in a lele background) with cauliflower mosaic virus-35S-driven expression of PsGA3ox1 (LE). PsGA3ox1 transgene expression led to higher GA1 concentrations in a tissue-specific and development-specific manner, altering GA biosynthesis and catabolism gene expression and plant phenotype. PsGA3ox1 transgenic plants had longer internodes, tendrils, and fruits, larger stipules, and displayed delayed flowering, increased apical meristem life, and altered vascular development relative to the null controls. Transgenic PsGA3ox1 overexpression lines were then compared with lines where endogenous PsGA3ox1 (LE) was introduced, by a series of backcrosses, into the same genetic background (BC LEle). Most notably, the BC LEle plants had substantially longer internodes containing much greater GA1 levels than the transgenic PsGA3ox1 plants. Induction of expression of the GA deactivation gene PsGA2ox1 appears to make an important contribution to limiting the increase of internode GA1 to modest levels for the transgenic lines. In contrast, PsGA3ox1 (LE) expression driven by its endogenous promoter was coordinated within the internode tissue to avoid feed-forward regulation of PsGA2ox1, resulting in much greater GA1 accumulation. These studies further our fundamental understanding of the regulation of GA biosynthesis and catabolism at the tissue and organ level and demonstrate that the timing/localization of GA3ox expression within an organ affects both GA homeostasis and GA1 levels, and thereby growth. PMID:23979969

  16. Analysis of transcription factors binding to the duplicated PEA1 and PEA3 sites that are required for polyomavirus mutant expression in PCC4 embryonic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nothias, J Y; Weinmann, R; Blangy, D; Melin, F

    1993-01-01

    Embryonic carcinoma (EC) cell lines, representative of early embryonic undifferentiated cells, are nonpermissive for polyomavirus (PyV) infection as a result of a blockade of viral DNA early transcription and replication. All enhancers of PyV mutants (Py EC-PCC4), selected for the ability to grow on PCC4 EC cells, display a duplication of PEA1 and PEA3 binding sites (sites 1 and 3). However, the Py EC-PCC4 rearrangement is complex and results in variable mutant enhancer activities. We demonstrate here that duplication of sites 1 and 3 is absolutely required for a cooperative cis activation of early Py EC-PCC4 mutant transcription in PCC4 EC cells. In addition, we detect in PCC4 EC cells significant amounts of site 1- and 3-binding proteins, which we characterize as related to the Fos/Jun and Ets protein families, respectively. Wild-type PyV restriction in PCC4 EC cells may be relieved by a cooperation between site 2- and 3-binding proteins that would thereby be activated. Since site 1- or 3-binding factors could be derepressed, we improved the analysis of UV cross-linked DNA-protein complexes and were able to detect a novel factor, called PEA1/2 (for PyV enhancer A site 1- and 2-binding factor). Its DNA binding sequence overlaps sites 1 and 2 (PEA2 binding site) and is not duplicated in the M1 mutant, which exhibits the highest Py EC-PCC4 enhancer activity. he suggest that PEA1/2 is also involved in the regulation of PyV enhancer activity by repressing the site 1-binding activity. Images PMID:8388487

  17. Localization of S-nitrosoglutathione and expression of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase in pea plants under cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Juan B; Corpas, Francisco J; Carreras, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Serrano, María; Esteban, Francisco J; Fernández-Ocaña, Ana; Chaki, Mounira; Romero-Puertas, María C; Valderrama, Raquel; Sandalio, Luisa M; del Río, Luis A

    2006-01-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is considered a natural nitric oxide (NO.) reservoir and a reactive nitrogen intermediate in animal cells, but little is known about this molecule and its metabolism in plant systems. In this work, using pea plants as a model system, the presence of GSNO in collenchyma cells was demonstrated by an immunohistochemical method. When pea plants were grown with a toxic Cd concentration (50 microM) the content of GSNO in collenchyma cells was drastically reduced. Determination of the nitric oxide (NO.) and gluthathione contents in leaves by confocal laser scanning microscopy and HPLC, respectively, showed a marked decrease of both compounds in plants treated with cadmium. The analysis of the S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) activity and its transcript expression in leaves showed a reduction of 31% by cadmium. These results indicate that GSNO is associated with a specific plant cell type, and this metabolite and its related catabolic activity, GSNOR, are both down-regulated under Cd stress.

  18. Effect of antifungal genes expressed in transgenic pea (Pisum sativum L.) on root colonization with Glomus intraradices.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Fathi; Noorian, Mojgan Sharifi; Jacobsen, Hans-Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi have always been a major problem in agriculture. One of the effective methods for controlling pathogen fungi to date is the introduction of resistance genes into the genome of crops. It is interesting to find out whether the induced resistance in crops will have a negative effect on non-target organisms such as root colonization with the AM fungi.   The objective of the present research was to study the influence of producing antifungal molecules by four transgenic pea (Pisum sativum L.) lines expressing PGIP gene from raspberry, VST-stilbene synthase from vine, a hybrid of PGIP/VST and bacterial Chitinase gene (Chit30) from Streptomyces olivaceoviridis respectively on the colonization potential of Glomus intraradices. Four different experiments were done in greenhouse and climate chamber, colonization was observed in all replications. The following parameters were used for evaluation: frequency of mycorrhization, the intensity of mycorrhization, the average presence of arbuscules within the colonized areas and the presence of arbuscules in the whole root system which showed insignificant difference between transgenic and non-transgenic plants. The root/shoot ratio exhibited different values according to the experiment condition. Compared with negative non-transgenic control all transgenic lines showed the ability to establish symbiosis and the different growth parameters had insignificant effect due to mycorrhization. The results of the present study proved that the introduced pathogen resistance genes did not affect the mycorrhization allocations in pea.

  19. Induction of a Pea Cell-Wall Invertase Gene by Wounding and Its Localized Expression in Phloem.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L.; Cohn, N. S.; Mitchell, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    A full-length cell-wall invertase cDNA obtained from pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings was cloned previously. The gene exhibits tissue-specific expression, and both its transcript and enzyme activities are abundant only in root tissues. Mechanical wounding dramatically induced the accumulation of the cell-wall invertase mRNA in detached or intact leaves, stems, and roots. In both detached and intact tissues mRNA started to accumulate 3 h after wounding and in detached tissues (except root tissues) was much stronger and lasted longer compared with that in intact pea plants. The induction of cell-wall invertase by wounding was not systemic, since no significant increase of transcript was found in the unwounded tissues remote from the site of wounding. Accumulation of this cell-wall invertase was induced by abscisic or jasmonic acid, and in situ hybridization studies show that this invertase mRNA is differentially localized in wounded plant tissue, being most abundant in the phloem. mRNA accumulation was limited mainly to the wounded area; no significant increase was detected in the unwounded portions of the wounded stem segments. The results suggest that, as part of the wounding response, this cell-wall invertase may provide energy through hexose availability to companion cells in the phloem. PMID:12226435

  20. Ectopic Expression of Maize Polyamine Oxidase and Pea Copper Amine Oxidase in the Cell Wall of Tobacco Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Giuseppina; de Pinto, Maria Concetta; Tavazza, Raffaela; Biondi, Stefania; Gobbi, Valentina; Ferrante, Paola; De Gara, Laura; Federico, Rodolfo; Angelini, Riccardo; Tavladoraki, Paraskevi

    2004-01-01

    To test the feasibility of altering polyamine levels by influencing their catabolic pathway, we obtained transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants constitutively expressing either maize (Zea mays) polyamine oxidase (MPAO) or pea (Pisum sativum) copper amine oxidase (PCuAO), two extracellular and H2O2-producing enzymes. Despite the high expression levels of the transgenes in the extracellular space, the amount of free polyamines in the homozygous transgenic plants was similar to that in the wild-type ones, suggesting either a tight regulation of polyamine levels or a different compartmentalization of the two recombinant proteins and the bulk amount of endogenous polyamines. Furthermore, no change in lignification levels and plant morphology was observed in the transgenic plants compared to untransformed plants, while a small but significant change in reactive oxygen species-scavenging capacity was verified. Both the MPAO and the PCuAO tobacco transgenic plants produced high amounts of H2O2 only in the presence of exogenously added enzyme substrates. These observations provided evidence for the limiting amount of freely available polyamines in the extracellular space in tobacco plants under physiological conditions, which was further confirmed for untransformed maize and pea plants. The amount of H2O2 produced by exogenously added polyamines in cell suspensions from the MPAO transgenic plants was sufficient to induce programmed cell death, which was sensitive to catalase treatment and required gene expression and caspase-like activity. The MPAO and PCuAO transgenic plants represent excellent tools to study polyamine secretion and conjugation in the extracellular space, as well as to determine when and how polyamine catabolism actually intervenes both in cell wall development and in response to stress. PMID:15064377

  1. Expression of small heat shock protein (sHSP) genes in the garden pea (Pisum sativum) under slow horizontal clinorotation.

    PubMed

    Talalaiev, Oleksandr; Korduym, Elizabeth

    2014-04-30

    Plant cells respond to stress conditions, such as high temperatures, by synthesizing small heat shock proteins (sHSPs). sHSPs are molecular chaperones that assist in protein folding and prevent irreversible protein aggregation. Although many sHSP genes are temperature-inducible, other variables, such as altered gravity, can induce significant changes in plant cell gene expression. Furthermore, not all subfamilies of sHSP genes share the same expression pattern. The objective of our research was to determine the effect of simulated microgravity (clinorotation) on the expression of sHSP gene subfamilies with different subcellular locations in etiolated pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings. sHSP gene expression levels were examined using quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR). qPCR results demonstrated that sHSP genes were constitutively expressed in seedlings. High temperatures increased the expression of sHSP genes by several thousand-fold. However, simulated microgravity did not have any significant effects on sHSP gene expression.

  2. Transgenic peas (Pisum sativum) expressing polygalacturonase inhibiting protein from raspberry (Rubus idaeus) and stilbene synthase from grape (Vitis vinifera).

    PubMed

    Richter, A; Jacobsen, H-J; de Kathen, A; de Lorenzo, G; Briviba, K; Hain, R; Ramsay, G; Kiesecker, H

    2006-11-01

    The pea (Pisum sativum L.) varieties Baroness (United Kingdome) and Baccara (France) were transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer with pGPTV binary vectors containing the bar gene in combination with two different antifungal genes coding for polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) from raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) driven by a double 35S promoter, or the stilbene synthase (Vst1) from grape (Vitis vinifera L.) driven by its own elicitor-inducible promoter. Transgenic lines were established and transgenes combined via conventional crossing. Resveratrol, produced by Vst1 transgenic plants, was detected using HPLC and the PGIP expression was determined in functional inhibition assays against fungal polygalacturonases. Stable inheritance of the antifungal genes in the transgenic plants was demonstrated.

  3. Expression and biological activity of the cystine knot bioinsecticide PA1b (Pea Albumin 1 Subunit b).

    PubMed

    Eyraud, Vanessa; Karaki, Lamis; Rahioui, Isabelle; Sivignon, Catherine; Da Silva, Pedro; Rahbé, Yvan; Royer, Corinne; Gressent, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The PA1b (Pea Albumin 1, subunit b) peptide is an entomotoxin extract from Legume seeds with lethal activity on several insect pests, such as mosquitoes, some aphids and cereal weevils. This 37 amino-acid cysteine-rich peptide has been, until now, obtained by biochemical purification or chemical synthesis. In this paper, we present our results for the transient production of the peptide in Nicotiana benthamiana by agro-infiltration, with a yield of about 35 µg/g of fresh leaves and maximum production 8 days after infiltration. PA1b is part of the PA1 gene which, after post-translational modifications, encodes two peptides (PA1b and PA1a). We show that transforming tobacco with the PA1b cDNA alone does not result in production of the toxin and, in fact, the entire cDNA is necessary, raising the question of the role of PA1a. We constructed a PA1-cassette, allowing for the quick "cut/paste" of different PA1b mutants within a conserved PA1 cDNA. This cassette enabled us to produce the six isoforms of PA1b which exist in pea seeds. Biological tests revealed that all the isoforms display similar activity, with the exception of one which is inactive. The lack of activity in this isoform led us to conclude that the amphiphilic nature of the peptide is necessary for activity. The possible applications of this expression system for other cysteine-rich biomolecules are discussed.

  4. Expression and Biological Activity of the Cystine Knot Bioinsecticide PA1b (Pea Albumin 1 Subunit b)

    PubMed Central

    Eyraud, Vanessa; Karaki, Lamis; Rahioui, Isabelle; Sivignon, Catherine; Da Silva, Pedro; Rahbé, Yvan; Royer, Corinne; Gressent, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The PA1b (Pea Albumin 1, subunit b) peptide is an entomotoxin extract from Legume seeds with lethal activity on several insect pests, such as mosquitoes, some aphids and cereal weevils. This 37 amino-acid cysteine-rich peptide has been, until now, obtained by biochemical purification or chemical synthesis. In this paper, we present our results for the transient production of the peptide in Nicotiana benthamiana by agro-infiltration, with a yield of about 35 µg/g of fresh leaves and maximum production 8 days after infiltration. PA1b is part of the PA1 gene which, after post-translational modifications, encodes two peptides (PA1b and PA1a). We show that transforming tobacco with the PA1b cDNA alone does not result in production of the toxin and, in fact, the entire cDNA is necessary, raising the question of the role of PA1a. We constructed a PA1-cassette, allowing for the quick “cut/paste” of different PA1b mutants within a conserved PA1 cDNA. This cassette enabled us to produce the six isoforms of PA1b which exist in pea seeds. Biological tests revealed that all the isoforms display similar activity, with the exception of one which is inactive. The lack of activity in this isoform led us to conclude that the amphiphilic nature of the peptide is necessary for activity. The possible applications of this expression system for other cysteine-rich biomolecules are discussed. PMID:24349099

  5. Developmental and seed aging mediated regulation of antioxidative genes and differential expression of proteins during pre- and post-germinative phases in pea.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhen; Liu, Lingwei; Gao, Feng; Rampitsch, Christof; Reinecke, Dennis M; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Ayele, Belay T

    2012-10-15

    Enzymatic antioxidant system plays an important role in maintaining seed vigor and regulating plant growth and development. It involves a number of enzymes that scavenge excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during seed aging and also modulate the level of these compounds during plant developmental processes. This study investigated the transcriptional regulation of enzymatic antioxidative capacity in pea during the pre- and post-germinative phases and in response to seed aging by analyzing the spatio-temporal expression of five antioxidative genes: PsAPX, PsSOD, PsGRcyt, PsGRcm and PsCAT. Transcripts of all these genes were found in mature dry seeds, embryo axes and cotyledons of germinating seeds, and cotyledons, roots and shoots of young seedlings. However, PsAPX and PsSOD were predominant and exhibited developmental regulation, suggesting that these genes play important roles in controlling the intracellular homeostasis of ROS for promoting cell elongation, and thereby embryo axis expansion and early seedling growth in pea. Accelerated aging of pea seeds led to reduction in seed viability and seedling growth, and this effect was correlated with substantial decrease in the transcriptional activation of the prominent antioxidative genes. Furthermore, our proteomic analysis indicated the association of seed aging with changes in the abundance of specific proteins, revealing additional mechanisms underlying seed aging in pea.

  6. [Features of Expression of the PsSst] and PsIgn1 Genes in Nodules of Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Symbiotic Mutants].

    PubMed

    Zhukova, V A; Rychagova, T S; Fedorina, Ya V; Pinaeva, A G; Andronova, E E; Borisova, A Yu; Tikhonovich, I A

    2016-04-01

    The sequences of the PsSst1 and PsIgn1 genes of pea (Pisum sativum L.) homologous to the symbiotic LjSST1 and LjIGN1 genes of Lotusjaponicus (Regel.) K. Larsen are determined. The expression level of PsSst1 and PsIgn1 genes is determined by real-time PCR in nodules of several symbiotic mutants and original lines of pea. Lines with increased (Sprint-2Fix⁻ (Pssym31)) and decreased (P61 (Pssym25)) expression level of both genes are revealed along with the lines characterized by changes in the expression level of only one of these genes. The revealed features of the PsSst1 and PsIgn1 expression allow us to expand the phenotypic characterization of pea symbiotic mutants. In addition, PsSst1 and PsIgn1 cDNA is sequenced in selected mutant lines, characterized by a decreased expression level of these genes in nodules, but no mutations are found.

  7. PED/PEA-15 modulates coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor expression and adenoviral infectivity via ERK-mediated signals in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Botta, Ginevra; Perruolo, Giuseppe; Libertini, Silvana; Cassese, Angela; Abagnale, Antonella; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro; Portella, Giuseppe

    2010-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive human brain tumor, and is highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy. Selectively replicating oncolytic viruses represent a novel approach for the treatment of neoplastic diseases. Coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) is the primary receptor for adenoviruses, and loss or reduction of CAR greatly decreases adenoviral entry. Understanding the mechanisms regulating CAR expression and localization will contribute to increase the efficacy of oncolytic adenoviruses. Two glioma cell lines (U343MG and U373MG) were infected with the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947. U373MG cells were more susceptible to cell death after viral infection, compared with U343MG cells. The enhanced sensitivity was paralleled by increased adenoviral entry and CAR mRNA and protein levels in U373MG cells. In addition, U373MG cells displayed a decreased ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2) nuclear-to-cytosolic ratio, compared with U343MG cells. Intracellular content of PED/PEA-15, an ERK1/2-interacting protein, was also augmented in these cells. Both ERK2 overexpression and genetic silencing of PED/PEA-15 by antisense oligonucleotides increased ERK nuclear accumulation and reduced CAR expression and adenoviral entry. Our data indicate that dl922-947 could represent an useful tool for the treatment of GBM and that PED/PEA-15 modulates CAR expression and adenoviral entry, by sequestering ERK1/2.

  8. Expression and assembly of a fully active antibody in algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayfield, Stephen P.; Franklin, Scott E.; Lerner, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    Although combinatorial antibody libraries have solved the problem of access to large immunological repertoires, efficient production of these complex molecules remains a problem. Here we demonstrate the efficient expression of a unique large single-chain (lsc) antibody in the chloroplast of the unicellular, green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We achieved high levels of protein accumulation by synthesizing the lsc gene in chloroplast codon bias and by driving expression of the chimeric gene using either of two C. reinhardtii chloroplast promoters and 5' and 3' RNA elements. This lsc antibody, directed against glycoprotein D of the herpes simplex virus, is produced in a soluble form by the alga and assembles into higher order complexes in vivo. Aside from dimerization by disulfide bond formation, the antibody undergoes no detectable posttranslational modification. We further demonstrate that accumulation of the antibody can be modulated by the specific growth regime used to culture the alga, and by the choice of 5' and 3' elements used to drive expression of the antibody gene. These results demonstrate the utility of alga as an expression platform for recombinant proteins, and describe a new type of single chain antibody containing the entire heavy chain protein, including the Fc domain.

  9. Virus-induced gene silencing of PEAM4 affects floral morphology by altering the expression pattern of PsSOC1a and PsPVP in pea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe-Hao; Jia, Fei-Fei; Hu, Jiang-Qin; Pang, Ji-Liang; Xu, Lei; Wang, Li-Lin

    2014-01-15

    pea-MADS4 (PEAM4) regulates floral morphology in Pisum sativum L., however, its molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a recently developed reverse genetic approach that facilities an easier and more rapid study of gene functions. In this study, the PEAM4 gene was effectively silenced by VIGS using a pea early browning virus (PEBV) in wild type pea JI992. The infected plants showed abnormal phenotypes, as the floral organs, especially the sepals and petals changed in both size and shape, which made the corolla less closed. The petals changed in morphology and internal symmetry with, the stamens reduced and carpel dehisced. Larger sepals and longer tendrils with small cauline leaves appeared, with some sepals turning into bracts, and secondary inflorescences with fused floral organs were formed, indicating a flower-to-inflorescence change. The infected plants also displayed a delayed and prolonged flowering time. The PEAM4-VIGS plants with altered floral morphology were similar to the pim (proliferating inflorescence meristem) mutant and also mimicked the phenotypes of ap1 mutants in Arabidopsis. The expression pattern of the homologous genes PsSOC1a and PsSVP, which were involved in flowering time and florescence morphological control downstream of PEAM4, were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR and mRNA in situ hybridization. PsSOC1a and PsSVP were ectopically expressed and enhanced in the floral meristems from PEAM4-silenced plants. Our data suggests that PEAM4 may have a similar molecular mechanism as AtAP1, which inhibits the expression of PsSOC1a and PsSVP in the floral meristem from the early stages of flower development. As such, in this way PEAM4 plays a crucial role in maintaining floral organ identity and flower development in pea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of CO2 Concentration on Carbonic Anhydrase and Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Expression in Pea.

    PubMed

    Majeau, N.; Coleman, J. R.

    1996-10-01

    The effect of external CO2 concentration on the expression of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was examined in pea (Pisum sativum cv Little Marvel) leaves. Enzyme activities and their transcript levels were reduced in plants grown at 1000 [mu]L/L CO2 compared with plants grown in ambient air. Growth at 160 [mu]L/L CO2 also appeared to reduce steady-state transcript levels for rbcS, the gene encoding the small subunit of Rubisco, and for ca, the gene encoding CA; however, rbcS transcripts were reduced to a greater extent at this concentration. Rubisco activity was slightly lower in plants grown at 160 [mu]L/L CO2, and CA activity was significantly higher than that observed in air-grown plants. Transfer of plants from 1000 [mu]L/L to air levels of CO2 resulted in a rapid increase in both ca and rbcS transcript abundance in fully expanded leaves, followed by an increase in enzyme activity. Plants transferred from air to high-CO2 concentrations appeared to modulate transcript abundance and enzyme activity less quickly. Foliar carbohydrate levels were also examined in plants grown continuously at high and ambient CO2, and following changes in growth conditions that rapidly altered ca and rbcS transcript abundance and enzyme activities.

  11. Codon engineering for improved antibody expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Carton, Jill M; Sauerwald, Tina; Hawley-Nelson, Pam; Morse, Barry; Peffer, Nancy; Beck, Heena; Lu, Jin; Cotty, Adam; Amegadzie, Bernard; Sweet, Ray

    2007-10-01

    While well established in bacterial hosts, the effect of coding sequence variation on protein expression in mammalian systems is poorly characterized outside of viral proteins or proteins from distant phylogenetic families. The potential impact is substantial given the extensive use of mammalian expression systems in research and manufacturing of protein biotherapeutics. We are studying the effect of codon engineering on expression of recombinant antibodies with an emphasis on developing manufacturing cell lines. CNTO 888, a human mAb specific for human MCP-1, was obtained by antibody phage display in collaboration with MorphoSys AG. The isolated DNA sequence of the antibody was biased towards bacterial codons, reflecting the engineering of the Fab library for phage display expression in Escherichia coli. We compared the expression of CNTO 888 containing the parental V-region sequences with two engineered coding variants. In the native codon exchanged (NCE) variant, the V-region codons were replaced with those used in naturally derived human antibody genes. In the human codon optimized (HCO) variant the V-region codons were those used at the highest frequency based on a human codon usage table. The antibody expression levels from stable transfections in mammalian host cells were measured. The HCO codon variant of CNTO 888 yielded the highest expressing cell lines and the highest average expression for the screened populations. This had a significant positive effect on the process to generate a CNTO 888 production cell line and indicates the potential to improve antibody expression in mammalian expression systems by codon engineering.

  12. Isolation of PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 from etiolated pea epicotyls and their expression on a three-dimensional clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Tomoki; Hitotsubashi, Reiko; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Tanimoto, Eiichi; Ueda, Junichi

    We isolated novel cDNAs containing the complete open reading frames of a putative auxin influx carrier, PsAUX1, and a putative auxin efflux carrier, PsPIN2, from etiolated pea epicotyls. High levels of homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 (Accession No. AY222857) and AtPINs. Phylogenetic analyses based on deduced amino acid sequences revealed that PsPIN2 belonged to a subclade including AtPIN3, AtPIN4 and AtPIN7, while PsPIN1 belonged to the same clade as AtPIN1. The results were similar for PsAUX1 and AtAUX1, where PsAUX1 belongs to the same subclade as AtAUX1 and CS-AUX1. Expression of PsPIN1, PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 in pea epicotyl segments was promoted upon incubation of the segments with auxin (indole-3-acetic acid). In 3.5-d-old etiolated pea seedlings, relatively high expression of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 was observed in the hook region, growing epicotyls and root tips as compared with those in mature regions of epicotyls and roots. Expression of PsPIN2 in roots was less than that in shoots. Simulated microgravity conditions on a three-dimensional clinostat remarkably increased gene expression of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 in the hook and the internodes of pea epicotyls, but the increase in PsPIN2 was less. In contrast, polar auxin transport of pea epicotyls was substantially suppressed under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3D clinostat, similar to data from a space experiment on STS-95. These results suggest that PsPINs and PsAUX1 are auxin-inducible genes, and that the expression of PsPINs and PsAUX1 genes is sensitive to gravistimulation.

  13. Mouse x pig chimeric antibodies expressed in Baculovirus retain the same properties of their parent antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jar, Ana M; Osorio, Fernando A; López, Osvaldo J

    2009-01-01

    The development of hybridoma and recombinant DNA technologies has made it possible to use antibodies against cancer, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases in humans. These advances in therapy, as well as immunoprophylaxis, could also make it possible to use these technologies in agricultural species of economic importance such as pigs. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an arterivirus causing very important economic losses to the industry. Passive transfer of antibodies obtained by biotechnology could be used in the future to complement or replace vaccination against this and other pig pathogens. To this end, we constructed and studied the properties of chimeric mouse x pig anti-PRRSV antibodies. We cloned the constant regions of gamma-1 and gamma-2 heavy chains and the lambda light chain of pig antibodies in frame with the variable regions of heavy and light chains of mouse monoclonal antibody ISU25C1, which has neutralizing activity against PRRSV. The coding regions for chimeric IgG1 and IgG2 were expressed in a baculovirus expression system. Both chimeric antibodies recognized PRRSV in ELISA as well as in a Western-blot format and, more importantly, were able to neutralize PRRSV in the same fashion as the parent mouse monoclonal antibody ISU25C1. In addition, we show that both pig IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies could bind complement component C1q, with IgG2 being more efficient than IgG1 in binding C1q. Expressing chimeric pig antibodies with protective capabilities offers a new alternative strategy for infectious disease control in domestic pigs.

  14. Leaf proteome analysis of transgenic plants expressing antiviral antibodies.

    PubMed

    Di Carli, Mariasole; Villani, Maria Elena; Renzone, Giovanni; Nardi, Luca; Pasquo, Alessandra; Franconi, Rosella; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Desiderio, Angiola

    2009-02-01

    The expression of exogenous antibodies in plant is an effective strategy to confer protection against viral infection or to produce molecules with pharmaceutical interest. However, the acceptance of the transgenic technology to obtain self-protecting plants depends on the assessment of their substantial equivalence compared to non-modified crops with an established history of safe use. In fact, the possibility exists that the introduction of transgenes in plants may alter expression of endogenous genes and/or normal production of metabolites. In this study, we investigated whether the expression in plant of recombinant antibodies directed against viral proteins may influence the host leaf proteome. Two transgenic plant models, generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, were analyzed for this purpose, namely, Lycopersicon esculentum cv. MicroTom and Nicotiana benthamiana, expressing recombinant antibodies against cucumber mosaic virus and tomato spotted wilt virus, respectively. To obtain a significant representation of plant proteomes, optimized extraction procedures have been devised for each plant species. The proteome repertoire of antibody-expressing and control plants was compared by 2-DE associated to DIGE technology. Among the 2000 spots detected within the gels, about 10 resulted differentially expressed in each transgenic model and were identified by MALDI-TOF PMF and muLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS procedures. Protein variations were restricted to a limited number of defined differences with an average ratio below 2.4. Most of the differentially expressed proteins were related to photosynthesis or defense function. The overall results suggest that the expression of recombinant antibodies in both systems does not significantly alter the leaf proteomic profile, contributing to assess the biosafety of resistant plants expressing antiviral antibodies.

  15. Expression of human antibodies in eukaryotic micro-algae.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, Stephen P; Franklin, Scott E

    2005-03-07

    Protein based therapeutics have enjoyed great success over the past decade. Unfortunately, with this clinical success comes a heavy price tag, owing to the inherently high costs of capitalization and production using mammalian cell fermentation. To address this problem, we have begun developing a system for the expression of recombinant proteins in the unicellular eukaryotic green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, leading to the production of human IgA single chain antibodies. The expression of human monoclonal antibodies in C. reinhardtii offers an attractive alternative to traditional mammalian based expression systems for several reasons, including an ability to rapidly obtain stable plastid and nuclear transformants, coupled with inherently low costs of capitalization and production.

  16. Ectopic expression of phloem motor protein pea forisome PsSEO-F1 enhances salinity stress tolerance in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vineet Kumar; Raikwar, Shailendra; Tuteja, Renu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-05-01

    PsSEOF-1 binds to calcium and its expression is upregulated by salinity treatment. PsSEOF - 1 -overexpressing transgenic tobacco showed enhanced salinity stress tolerance by maintaining cellular ion homeostasis and modulating ROS-scavenging pathway. Calcium (Ca(2+)) plays important role in growth, development and stress tolerance in plants. Cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis is achieved by the collective action of channels, pumps, antiporters and by Ca(2+) chelators present in the cell like calcium-binding proteins. Forisomes are ATP-independent mechanically active motor proteins known to function in wound sealing of injured sieve elements of phloem tissue. The Ca(2+)-binding activity of forisome and its role in abiotic stress signaling were largely unknown. Here we report the Ca(2+)-binding activity of pea forisome (PsSEO-F1) and its novel function in promoting salinity tolerance in transgenic tobacco. Native PsSEO-F1 promoter positively responded in salinity stress as confirmed using GUS reporter. Overexpression of PsSEO-F1 tobacco plants confers salinity tolerance by alleviating ionic toxicity and increased ROS scavenging activity which probably results in reduced membrane damage and improved yield under salinity stress. Evaluation of several physiological indices shows an increase in relative water content, electrolyte leakage, proline accumulation and chlorophyll content in transgenic lines as compared with null-segregant control. Expression of several genes involved in cellular homeostasis is perturbed by PsSEO-F1 overexpression. These findings suggest that PsSEO-F1 provides salinity tolerance through cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis which in turn modulates ROS machinery providing indirect link between Ca(2+) and ROS signaling under salinity-induced perturbation. PsSEO-F1 most likely functions in salinity stress tolerance by improving antioxidant machinery and mitigating ion toxicity in transgenic lines. This finding should make an important contribution in our better

  17. How-To-Do-It: Demonstrating the Anatomical Expression of Two Genes in the Garden Pea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawk, James A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a rapid staining technique for investigating the anatomical expression of two recessive genes. The demonstration is intended to stimulate students who are interested in the practical applications of genetics. (Author/SA)

  18. How-To-Do-It: Demonstrating the Anatomical Expression of Two Genes in the Garden Pea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawk, James A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a rapid staining technique for investigating the anatomical expression of two recessive genes. The demonstration is intended to stimulate students who are interested in the practical applications of genetics. (Author/SA)

  19. Expression of recombinant antibody (single chain antibody fragment) in transgenic plant Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi.

    PubMed

    Dobhal, S; Chaudhary, V K; Singh, A; Pandey, D; Kumar, A; Agrawal, S

    2013-12-01

    Plants offer an alternative inexpensive and convenient technology for large scale production of recombinant proteins especially recombinant antibodies (plantibodies). In this paper, we describe the expression of a model single chain antibody fragment (B6scFv) in transgenic tobacco. Four different gene constructs of B6scFv with different target signals for expression in different compartments of a tobacco plant cell with and without endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal were used. Agrobacterium mediated plant transformation of B6scFv gene was performed with tobacco leaf explants and the gene in regenerated plants was detected using histochemical GUS assay and PCR. The expression of B6scFv gene was detected by western blotting and the recombinant protein was purified from putative transgenic tobacco plants using metal affinity chromatography. The expression level of recombinant protein was determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The highest accumulation of protein was found up to 3.28 % of the total soluble protein (TSP) in plants expressing B6scFv 1003 targeted to the ER, and subsequently expression of 2.9 % of TSP in plants expressing B6scFv 1004 (with target to apoplast with ER retention signal). In contrast, lower expression of 0.78 and 0.58 % of TSP was found in plants expressing antibody fragment in cytosol and apoplast, without ER retention signal. The described method/system could be used in the future for diverse applications including expression of other recombinant molecules in plants for immunomodulation, obtaining pathogen resistance against plant pathogens, altering metabolic pathways and also for the expression of different antibodies of therapeutic and diagnostic uses.

  20. Optimizing antibody expression by using the naturally occurring framework diversity in a live bacterial antibody display system.

    PubMed

    Lombana, T Noelle; Dillon, Michael; Bevers, Jack; Spiess, Christoph

    2015-12-03

    Rapid identification of residues that influence antibody expression and thermostability is often needed to move promising therapeutics into the clinic. To establish a method that can assess small expression differences, we developed a Bacterial Antibody Display (BAD) system that overcomes previous limitations, enabling the use of full-length formats for antibody and antigen in a live cell setting. We designed a unique library of individual framework variants using natural diversity introduced by somatic hypermutation, and screened half-antibodies for increased expression using BAD. We successfully identify variants that dramatically improve expression yields and in vitro thermostability of two therapeutically relevant antibodies in E. coli and mammalian cells. While we study antibody expression, bacterial display can now be expanded to examine the processes of protein folding and translocation. Additionally, our natural library design strategy could be applied during antibody humanization and library design for in vitro display methods to maintain expression and formulation stability.

  1. Cytokinins and Expression of SWEET, SUT, CWINV and AAP Genes Increase as Pea Seeds Germinate

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Paula E.; Dhandapani, Pragatheswari; Novak, Ondrej; Song, Jiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Transporter genes and cytokinins are key targets for crop improvement. These genes are active during the development of the seed and its establishment as a strong sink. However, during germination, the seed transitions to being a source for the developing root and shoot. To determine if the sucrose transporter (SUT), amino acid permease (AAP), Sugar Will Eventually be Exported Transporter (SWEET), cell wall invertase (CWINV), cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT), activation (LOG) and degradation (CKX) gene family members are involved in both the sink and source activities of seeds, we used RT-qPCR to determine the expression of multiple gene family members, and LC-MS/MS to ascertain endogenous cytokinin levels in germinating Pisum sativum L. We show that genes that are actively expressed when the seed is a strong sink during its development, are also expressed when the seed is in the reverse role of being an active source during germination and early seedling growth. Cytokinins were detected in the imbibing seeds and were actively biosynthesised during germination. We conclude that, when the above gene family members are targeted for seed yield improvement, a downstream effect on subsequent seed germination or seedling vigour must be taken into consideration. PMID:27916945

  2. The expression of heat shock proteins 70 and 90 in pea seedlings under simulated microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeko, L.

    Microgravity is an abnormal and so stress factor for plants. Expression of known stress-related genes is appeared to implicate in the cell response to different kinds of stress. Heat shock proteins HSP70 and HSP90 are present in plant cells under the normal growth conditions and their quantity increases during stress. The effect of simulated microgravity on expression of HSP70 and HSP90 was studied in etiolated Pisum sativum seedlings grown on the horizontal clinostat (2 rpm) from seed germination for 3 days. Seedlings were also subjected to two other types of stressors: vertical clinorotatoin (2 rpm) and 2 h temperature elevation (40°C). HSPs' level was measured by ELISA. The quantity of both HSPs increased more than in three times in the seedlings on the horizontal clinostat in comparison with the stationary 1 g control. Vertical clinorotation also increased HSPs' level but less at about 20% than horizontal one. These effects were comparable with the influence of temperature elevation. The data presented suggest that simulated microgravity upregulate HSP70 and HSP90 expression. The increased HSPs' level might evidence the important functional role of these proteins in plant adaptation to microgravity. We are currently investigating the contribution of constitutive or inducible forms of the HSPs in this stress response.

  3. Bean alpha-amylase inhibitors in transgenic peas inhibit development of pea weevil larvae.

    PubMed

    de Sousa-Majer, Maria José; Hardie, Darryl C; Turner, Neil C; Higgins, Thomas J V

    2007-08-01

    This glasshouse study used an improved larval measurement procedure to evaluate the impact of transgenic pea, Pisum sativum L., seeds expressing a-amylase inhibitor (AI)-1 or -2 proteins on pea weevil, Bruchus pisorum L. Seeds of transgenic 'Laura' and 'Greenfeast' peas expressing alpha-(AI)-1 reduced pea weevil survival by 93-98%. Larval mortality occurred at an early instar. Conversely, in nontransgenic cultivars, approximately 98-99% of the pea weevils emerged as adults. By measuring the head capsule size, we determined that larvae died at the first to early third instar in alpha-(AI)-1 transgenic peas, indicating that this inhibitor is highly effective in controlling this insect. By contrast, transgenic Laura and 'Dundale' expressing alpha-(AI)-2 did not affect pea weevil survival, but they did delay larval development. After 77 d of development, the head capsule size indicated that the larvae were still at the third instar stage in transgenic alpha-(AI)-2 peas, whereas adult bruchids had developed in the nontransgenic peas.

  4. PEA-CLARITY: 3D molecular imaging of whole plant organs

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, William M.; Martin, Antony P.; Flynn, Jamie R.; Reed, Stephanie L.; White, Rosemary G.; Furbank, Robert T.; Grof, Christopher P. L.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the adaptation of the CLARITY technique to plant tissues with addition of enzymatic degradation to improve optical clearing and facilitate antibody probe penetration. Plant-Enzyme-Assisted (PEA)-CLARITY, has allowed deep optical visualisation of stains, expressed fluorescent proteins and IgG-antibodies in Tobacco and Arabidopsis leaves. Enzyme treatment enabled penetration of antibodies into whole tissues without the need for any sectioning of the material, thus facilitating protein localisation of intact tissue in 3D whilst retaining cellular structure. PMID:26328508

  5. Baculovirus expressed virus-like particles of Pea eation mosaic virus vary in size and encapsidate baculovirus mRNAs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV: family Luteoviridae) is transmitted in a persistent, circulative manner by aphids. We inserted cDNAs encoding the structural proteins of PEMV, the coat protein (CP) and coat protein-read through domain (CPRT) into the genome of the baculovirus Autographa californica m...

  6. Full-length de novo assembly of RNA-seq data in pea (Pisum sativum L.) provides a gene expression atlas and gives insights into root nodulation in this species.

    PubMed

    Alves-Carvalho, Susete; Aubert, Grégoire; Carrère, Sébastien; Cruaud, Corinne; Brochot, Anne-Lise; Jacquin, Françoise; Klein, Anthony; Martin, Chantal; Boucherot, Karen; Kreplak, Jonathan; da Silva, Corinne; Moreau, Sandra; Gamas, Pascal; Wincker, Patrick; Gouzy, Jérôme; Burstin, Judith

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies allow an almost exhaustive survey of the transcriptome, even in species with no available genome sequence. To produce a Unigene set representing most of the expressed genes of pea, 20 cDNA libraries produced from various plant tissues harvested at various developmental stages from plants grown under contrasting nitrogen conditions were sequenced. Around one billion reads and 100 Gb of sequence were de novo assembled. Following several steps of redundancy reduction, 46 099 contigs with N50 length of 1667 nt were identified. These constitute the 'Caméor' Unigene set. The high depth of sequencing allowed identification of rare transcripts and detected expression for approximately 80% of contigs in each library. The Unigene set is now available online (http://bios.dijon.inra.fr/FATAL/cgi/pscam.cgi), allowing (i) searches for pea orthologs of candidate genes based on gene sequences from other species, or based on annotation, (ii) determination of transcript expression patterns using various metrics, (iii) identification of uncharacterized genes with interesting patterns of expression, and (iv) comparison of gene ontology pathways between tissues. This resource has allowed identification of the pea orthologs of major nodulation genes characterized in recent years in model species, as a major step towards deciphering unresolved pea nodulation phenotypes. In addition to a remarkable conservation of the early transcriptome nodulation apparatus between pea and Medicago truncatula, some specific features were highlighted. The resource provides a reference for the pea exome, and will facilitate transcriptome and proteome approaches as well as SNP discovery in pea. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A novel lipid transfer protein from the pea Pisum sativum: isolation, recombinant expression, solution structure, antifungal activity, lipid binding, and allergenic properties.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, Ivan V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Finkina, Ekaterina I; Melnikova, Daria N; Rumynskiy, Eugene I; Arseniev, Alexander S; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V

    2016-04-30

    Plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) assemble a family of small (7-9 kDa) ubiquitous cationic proteins with an ability to bind and transport lipids as well as participate in various physiological processes including defense against phytopathogens. They also form one of the most clinically relevant classes of plant allergens. Nothing is known to date about correlation between lipid-binding and IgE-binding properties of LTPs. The garden pea Pisum sativum is widely consumed crop and important allergenic specie of the legume family. This work is aimed at isolation of a novel LTP from pea seeds and characterization of its structural, functional, and allergenic properties. Three novel lipid transfer proteins, designated as Ps-LTP1-3, were found in the garden pea Pisum sativum, their cDNA sequences were determined, and mRNA expression levels of all the three proteins were measured at different pea organs. Ps-LTP1 was isolated for the first time from the pea seeds, and its complete amino acid sequence was determined. The protein exhibits antifungal activity and is a membrane-active compound that causes a leakage from artificial liposomes. The protein binds various lipids including bioactive jasmonic acid. Spatial structure of the recombinant uniformly (13)C,(15)N-labelled Ps-LTP1 was solved by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. In solution the unliganded protein represents the mixture of two conformers (relative populations ~ 85:15) which are interconnected by exchange process with characteristic time ~ 100 ms. Hydrophobic residues of major conformer form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ~1000 Å(3)). The minor conformer probably corresponds to the protein with the partially collapsed internal cavity. For the first time conformational heterogeneity in solution was shown for an unliganded plant lipid transfer protein. Heat denaturation profile and simulated gastrointestinal digestion assay showed that Ps

  8. Gene Expression Analysis of Parthenogenetic Embryonic Development of the Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, Suggests That Aphid Parthenogenesis Evolved from Meiotic Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Dayalan G.; Abdelhady, Ahmed; Stern, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Aphids exhibit a form of phenotypic plasticity, called polyphenism, in which genetically identical females reproduce sexually during one part of the life cycle and asexually (via parthenogenesis) during the remainder of the life cycle. The molecular basis for aphid parthenogenesis is unknown. Cytological observations of aphid parthenogenesis suggest that asexual oogenesis evolved either through a modification of meiosis or from a mitotic process. As a test of these alternatives, we assessed the expression levels and expression patterns of canonical meiotic recombination and germline genes in the sexual and asexual ovaries of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. We observed expression of all meiosis genes in similar patterns in asexual and sexual ovaries, with the exception that some genes encoding Argonaute-family members were not expressed in sexual ovaries. In addition, we observed that asexual aphid tissues accumulated unspliced transcripts of Spo11, whereas sexual aphid tissues accumulated primarily spliced transcripts. In situ hybridization revealed Spo11 transcript in sexual germ cells and undetectable levels of Spo11 transcript in asexual germ cells. We also found that an obligately asexual strain of pea aphid produced little spliced Spo11 transcript. Together, these results suggest that parthenogenetic oogenesis evolved from a meiosis-like, and not a mitosis-like, process and that the aphid reproductive polyphenism may involve a modification of Spo11 gene activity. PMID:25501006

  9. Gene expression analysis of parthenogenetic embryonic development of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, suggests that aphid parthenogenesis evolved from meiotic oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Dayalan G; Abdelhady, Ahmed; Stern, David L

    2014-01-01

    Aphids exhibit a form of phenotypic plasticity, called polyphenism, in which genetically identical females reproduce sexually during one part of the life cycle and asexually (via parthenogenesis) during the remainder of the life cycle. The molecular basis for aphid parthenogenesis is unknown. Cytological observations of aphid parthenogenesis suggest that asexual oogenesis evolved either through a modification of meiosis or from a mitotic process. As a test of these alternatives, we assessed the expression levels and expression patterns of canonical meiotic recombination and germline genes in the sexual and asexual ovaries of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. We observed expression of all meiosis genes in similar patterns in asexual and sexual ovaries, with the exception that some genes encoding Argonaute-family members were not expressed in sexual ovaries. In addition, we observed that asexual aphid tissues accumulated unspliced transcripts of Spo11, whereas sexual aphid tissues accumulated primarily spliced transcripts. In situ hybridization revealed Spo11 transcript in sexual germ cells and undetectable levels of Spo11 transcript in asexual germ cells. We also found that an obligately asexual strain of pea aphid produced little spliced Spo11 transcript. Together, these results suggest that parthenogenetic oogenesis evolved from a meiosis-like, and not a mitosis-like, process and that the aphid reproductive polyphenism may involve a modification of Spo11 gene activity.

  10. Selection of Reference Genes for Expression Analysis Using Quantitative Real-Time PCR in the Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) (Hemiptera, Aphidiae)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xuguo

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate gene expression study and obtain accurate qRT-PCR analysis, normalization relative to stable expressed housekeeping genes is required. In this study, expression profiles of 11 candidate reference genes, including actin (Actin), elongation factor 1 α (EF1A), TATA-box-binding protein (TATA), ribosomal protein L12 (RPL12), β-tubulin (Tubulin), NADH dehydrogenase (NADH), vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (v-ATPase), succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB), 28S ribosomal RNA (28S), 16S ribosomal RNA (16S), and 18S ribosomal RNA (18S) from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, under different developmental stages and temperature conditions, were investigated. A total of four analytical tools, geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, and the ΔCt method, were used to evaluate the suitability of these genes as endogenous controls. According to RefFinder, a web-based software tool which integrates all four above-mentioned algorithms to compare and rank the reference genes, SDHB, 16S, and NADH were the three most stable house-keeping genes under different developmental stages and temperatures. This work is intended to establish a standardized qRT-PCR protocol in pea aphid and serves as a starting point for the genomics and functional genomics research in this emerging insect model. PMID:25423476

  11. Differential gene expression in C4 plants. Research proposal, February 1, 1982-January 31, 1983. [Pea plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cashmore, A. R.

    1981-11-01

    The topic of this research proposal is slightly different from that originally outlined. Specifically, instead of characterizing the genes encoding the small subunit of RuBP carboxylase and the chlorophyll a/b binding polypeptide from corn, these genes from pea are being characterized. The above polypeptides represent the major products of cytoplasmic protein synthesis in green leaves. CDNA clones encoding the above polypeptides were isolated and characterized. Both of these cDNA clones have now been sequenced, providing the amino acid sequences for the carboxylase small subunit and, for the first time, for the chlorophyll a/b binding polypeptide. Pea nuclear DNA was cloned into the lambda phage Charon 4, and cloned nuclear DNA sequences encoding the above polypeptides were isolated. Future work will be concerned with the structural and functional characterization of these nuclear genes.

  12. Turgor-responsive gene transcription and RNA levels increase rapidly when pea shoots are wilted. Sequence and expression of three inducible genes.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, F D; Jones, J T; Mullet, J E

    1990-07-01

    Reduction of turgor in pea shoots caused the accumulation of several poly(A) RNAs. cDNA clones derived from three different poly(A) RNAs which accumulate in wilted pea shoots were isolated, sequenced and expression of the corresponding genes examined. Clone 7a encoded a 289 amino acid protein. The C-terminal 180 amino acids of this protein were homologous to soybean nodulin-26. RNA hybridizing to cDNA 7a was abundant in roots, and induced in shoots by dehydration, heat shock and to a small extent by ABA. Hydropathic plots indicate that the protein encoded by cDNA 7a contains six potential membrane spanning domains similar to proteins which form ion channels. Clone 15a encoded a 363 amino acid protein with high homology to cysteine proteases. RNA hybridizing to cDNA 15a was more abundant in roots than shoots of control plants. Dehydration of pea shoots induced cDNA 15a mRNA levels whereas heat shock or ABA treatment did not. Clone 26g encoded a 508 amino acid protein with 30% residue identity to several aldehyde dehydrogenases. RNA hybridizing to cDNA 26g was induced by dehydration of shoots but not roots and heat shock and ABA did not modulate RNA levels. Levels of the three poly(A) RNAs increased 4-6-fold by 4 h after wilting and this increase was not altered by pretreatment of shoots with cycloheximide. When wilted shoots were rehydrated, RNA hybridizing to cDNA 26g declined to pre-stress levels within 2 h. Run-on transcription experiments using nuclei from pea shoots showed that transcription of the genes which encode the three poly(A) RNAs was induced within 30 min following reduction of shoot turgor. One of the genes showed a further increase in transcription by 4 h after dehydration whereas transcription of the other 2 genes declined. These results indicate that plant cells respond to changes in cell turgor by rapidly increasing transcription of several genes. Furthermore, the expression of the turgor-responsive genes varies with respect to the time course of

  13. Tissue-specific expressed antibody variable gene repertoires.

    PubMed

    Briney, Bryan S; Willis, Jordan R; Finn, Jessica A; McKinney, Brett A; Crowe, James E

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in genetic technologies allow deep analysis of the sequence diversity of immune repertoires, but little work has been reported on the architecture of immune repertoires in mucosal tissues. Antibodies are the key to prevention of infections at the mucosal surface, but it is currently unclear whether the B cell repertoire at mucosal surfaces reflects the dominant antibodies found in the systemic compartment or whether mucosal tissues harbor unique repertoires. We examined the expressed antibody variable gene repertoires from 10 different human tissues using RNA samples derived from a large number of individuals. The results revealed that mucosal tissues such as stomach, intestine and lung possess unique antibody gene repertoires that differed substantially from those found in lymphoid tissues or peripheral blood. Mutation frequency analysis of mucosal tissue repertoires revealed that they were highly mutated, with little evidence for the presence of naïve B cells, in contrast to blood. Mucosal tissue repertoires possessed longer heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 loops than lymphoid tissue repertoires. We also noted a large increase in frequency of both insertions and deletions in the small intestine antibody repertoire. These data suggest that mucosal immune repertoires are distinct in many ways from the systemic compartment.

  14. Expression of recombinant vaccines and antibodies in plants.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kisung

    2014-06-01

    Plants are able to perform post-translational maturations of therapeutic proteins required for their functional biological activity and suitable in vivo pharmacokinetics. Plants can be a low-cost, large-scale production platform of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins such as vaccines and antibodies. Plants, however, lack mechanisms of processing authentic human N-glycosylation, which imposes a major limitation in their use as an expression system for therapeutic glycoproducts. Efforts have been made to circumvent plant-specific N-glycosylation, as well as to supplement the plant's endogenous system with human glycosyltransferases for non-immunogenic and humanized N-glycan production. Herein we review studies on the potential of plants to serve as production systems for therapeutic and prophylactic biopharmaceuticals. We have especially focused on recombinant vaccines and antibodies and new expression strategies to overcome the existing problems associated with their production in plants.

  15. Downregulation of transferrin receptor surface expression by intracellular antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Jilin; Wu Sha; Zhao Xiaoping; Wang Min; Li Wenhan; Shen Xin; Liu Jing; Lei Ping; Zhu Huifen; Shen Guanxin . E-mail: guanxin_shen@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-03-23

    To deplete cellular iron uptake, and consequently inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells, we attempt to block surface expression of transferrin receptor (TfR) by intracellular antibody technology. We constructed two expression plasmids (scFv-HAK and scFv-HA) coding for intracellular single-chain antibody against TfR with or without endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal, respectively. Then they were transfected tumor cells MCF-7 by liposome. Applying RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscope experiments, we insure that scFv-HAK intrabody was successfully expressed and retained in ER contrasted to the secreted expression of scFv-HA. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed that the TfR surface expression was markedly decreased approximately 83.4 {+-} 2.5% in scFv-HAK transfected cells, while there was not significantly decrease in scFv-HA transfected cells. Further cell growth and apoptosis characteristics were evaluated by cell cycle analysis, nuclei staining and MTT assay. Results indicated that expression of scFv-HAK can dramatically induce cell cycle G1 phase arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells, and consequently significantly suppress proliferation of tumor cells compared with other control groups. For First time this study demonstrates the potential usage of anti-TfR scFv-intrabody as a growth inhibitor of TfR overexpressing tumors.

  16. EASE vectors for rapid stable expression of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, Teri L; Viaje, Aurora; Morris, Arvia E

    2003-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments have become an increasingly important source of therapeutic molecules in the biotechnology industry. Drug development strategies rely on screening large numbers of candidate molecules in search of an optimized drug candidate. This strategy requires efficient production of ten to a few hundred milligrams of candidate molecules for screening in bioassays and animal models. Typically, this amount of recombinant protein expression involves large numbers of transient transfections or cloning of a recombinant cell line. Both of these approaches are time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this report, we describe the application of an EASE vector system that is capable of generating stable pools of transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. These pooled populations of cells produce high quantities of antibody candidates without labor-intensive cloning in a 3-5 week time frame. When an optimal drug candidate has been selected, pools generated with EASE-containing vectors can also be used in subsequent cloning steps to make cell lines with improved expression levels. We demonstrate that EASE increases expression in nonamplified pools in addition to increasing amplification and viability of clonal cell lines generated with the EASE-containing vectors compared with pools and cell lines generated without EASE.

  17. Accumulation of lead in the roots of grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) plants triggers systemic variation in gene expression in the shoots.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Judicaëlle; Varrault, Gilles; Zuily-Fodil, Yasmine; Repellin, Anne

    2009-11-01

    The impact of lead nitrate (Pb(NO(3))(2); 0.5mM) on steady-state accumulation of messengers corresponding to stress responsive genes was studied in two local lines of 11-d grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) plants exposed for 96 h in a hydroponic system. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction technique was used with grass pea-specific primers designed from newly isolated partial cDNA. Increases in accumulation of glutathione reductase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase transcripts suggested that roots enhanced detoxification mechanisms involving glutathione. In the leaves where no lead was translocated, the pollutant indirectly triggered increases in expression of several genes. This process probably resulted from systemic signals originating from the roots where lead accumulated in large amounts, approximately 150 mg Pbg(-1) dry weight. A preventive and/or adaptive role for the signal is assumed, since it concerned genes implicated in reactive oxygen species scavenging (ascorbate peroxidase), protein protection (heat shock protein 70) and proteolysis (cysteine and aspartic proteases).

  18. Expansion of Genes Encoding piRNA-Associated Argonaute Proteins in the Pea Aphid: Diversification of Expression Profiles in Different Plastic Morphs

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsiao-ling; Tanguy, Sylvie; Rispe, Claude; Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Walsh, Tom; Gordon, Karl; Edwards, Owain; Tagu, Denis; Chang, Chun-che; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie

    2011-01-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are known to regulate transposon activity in germ cells of several animal models that propagate sexually. However, the role of piRNAs during asexual reproduction remains almost unknown. Aphids that can alternate sexual and asexual reproduction cycles in response to seasonal changes of photoperiod provide a unique opportunity to study piRNAs and the piRNA pathway in both reproductive modes. Taking advantage of the recently sequenced genome of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, we found an unusually large lineage-specific expansion of genes encoding the Piwi sub-clade of Argonaute proteins. In situ hybridisation showed differential expressions between the duplicated piwi copies: while Api-piwi2 and Api-piwi6 are “specialised” in germ cells their most closely related copy, respectively Api-piwi5 and Api-piwi3, are expressed in the somatic cells. The differential expression was also identified in duplicated ago3: Api-ago3a in germ cells and Api-ago3b in somatic cells. Moreover, analyses of expression profiles of the expanded piwi and ago3 genes by semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that expressions varied according to the reproductive types. These specific expression patterns suggest that expanded aphid piwi and ago3 genes have distinct roles in asexual and sexual reproduction. PMID:22162754

  19. Designing a HER2/neu promoter to drive α1,3galactosyltransferase expression for targeted anti-αGal antibody-mediated tumor cell killing

    PubMed Central

    Lanteri, Marion; Ollier, Laurence; Giordanengo, Valérie; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Our goal was to specifically render tumor cells susceptible to natural cytolytic anti-αGal antibodies by using a murine α1,3galactosyltransferase (mαGalT) transgene driven by a designed form of HER2/neu promoter (pNeu), the transcription of which is frequently observed to be above basal in breast tumors. Indeed, the αGalT activity that promotes Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc-R (αGal) epitope expression has been mutationally disrupted during the course of evolution, starting from Old World primates, and this has led to the counter-production of large amounts of cytotoxic anti-αGal antibodies in recent primates, including man. Method Expression of the endogenous c-erbB-2 gene was investigated in various cell lines by northern blotting. A mαGalT cDNA was constructed into pcDNA3 vector downstream of the original CMV promoter (pCMV/mαGalT) and various forms of pNeu were prepared by PCR amplification and inserted in the pCMV/mαGalT construct upstream of the mαGalT cDNA, in the place of the CMV promoter. These constructs were transferred into HEK-293 control and breast tumor cell lines. Stably transfected cells were analyzed by northern blotting for their expression of αGalT and c-erbB-2, and by flow cytometry for their binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated Griffonia simplicifolia/isolectin B4. Results We show that expression of the mαGalT was up- or down-modulated according to the level of endogenous pNeu activity and the particular form of constructed pNeu. Among several constructs, two particular forms of the promoter, pNeu250 containing the CCAAT box and the PEA3 motif adjacent to the TATAA box, and pNeu664, which has three additional PEA3 motifs upstream of the CCAAT box, were found to promote differential αGalT expression. Conclusion Our results strengthen current concepts about the crucial role played by the proximal PEA3 motif of pNeu, and may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the development of targeted transgene expression

  20. Expression and secretion of aequorin as a chimeric antibody by means of a mammalian expression vector.

    PubMed Central

    Casadei, J; Powell, M J; Kenten, J H

    1990-01-01

    A fusion protein has been expressed from the relevant genes in mammalian cells consisting of the photoprotein aequorin and an anti-4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenacetyl antibody gene. This chimeric antibody has allowed the development of a sensitive luminescent immunoassay. Initially the cDNA of the photoprotein aequorin from Aequorea victoria was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene was expressed as apoaequorin and, by using luciferin isolated from Renilla reniformis, its activity was found essentially identical to native aequorin. The aequorin gene was subcloned into a mammalian expression vector to produce a fusion protein directing secretion of apoaequorin; the aequorin gene was fused to the 3' terminus of an immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene that directed expression of an anti-4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenacetyl antibody. The gene fusion contained the variable region, the constant region domain 1, and part of domain 2 for the IgG2b mouse immunoglobulin, followed by the aequorin gene. Transfection of the chimeric gene into a cell line expressing the complementary lambda 1 light chain, J558L, allowed recovery of a chimeric antibody with binding specificity for the 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenacetyl group and the related 4-hydroxy-3-iodo-5-nitrophenacetyl hapten. The Ca2(+)-dependent bioluminescent activity of aequorin was also recovered. Images PMID:2315301

  1. Human liver catalase: cloning, expression and characterization of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jin, Li Hua; Kim, Dae Won; Eum, Won Sik; Yoon, Chang Sik; Jang, Sang Ho; Choi, Hee Soon; Choi, Soo Hyun; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, So Young; Jung, Mi Ryoung; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Won, Moo Ho; Lee, Hyeon Yong; Kang, Jung Hoon; Kwon, Oh-Shin; Cho, Sung-Woo; Lee, Kil Soo; Park, Jinseu; Choi, Soo Young

    2003-06-30

    We isolated a cDNA encoding liver catalase from a human liver cDNA library. The cDNA had a high degree of sequence similarity to the corresponding enzyme from other sources. It was expressed in E. coli using the pET15b vector. The protein produced was enzymatically active after purification, and its kinetic parameters closely resembled those of other mammalian catalases. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against the purified catalase; six antibodies recognizing different epitopes were obtained, one of which inhibited the enzyme. The cross reactions of the antibodies with brain catalases from human and other mammalian tissues were investigated, and all the immunoreactive bands obtained on Western blots had molecular masses of about 58 kDa. Similarly fractionated extracts of several mammalian cell lines all gave a single band of molecular mass 58 kDa. These results indicate that mammalian livers and human cell lines contain only one major type of immunologically reactive catalase, even though some of catalases have been previously reported to differ in certain properties.

  2. Expression of the Minor Isoform Pea Ferredoxin in Tobacco Alters Photosynthetic Electron Partitioning and Enhances Cyclic Electron Flow1[W

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Nicolás E.; Ceccoli, Romina D.; Vía, María V. Dalla; Voss, Ingo; Segretin, María E.; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando F.; Melzer, Michael; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Scheibe, Renate; Hanke, Guy T.

    2013-01-01

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are ferrosulfoproteins that function as low-potential electron carriers in plants. The Fd family is composed of several isoforms that share high sequence homology but differ in functional characteristics. In leaves, at least two isoforms conduct linear and cyclic photosynthetic electron transport around photosystem I, and mounting evidence suggests the existence of at least partial division of duties between these isoforms. To evaluate the contribution of different kinds of Fds to the control of electron fluxes along the photosynthetic electron transport chain, we overexpressed a minor pea (Pisum sativum) Fd isoform (PsFd1) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. The transplastomic OeFd1 plants exhibited variegated leaves and retarded growth and developmental rates. Photosynthetic studies of these plants indicated a reduction in carbon dioxide assimilation rates, photosystem II photochemistry, and linear electron flow. However, the plants showed an increase in nonphotochemical quenching, better control of excitation pressure at photosystem II, and no evidence of photoinhibition, implying a better dynamic regulation to remove excess energy from the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Finally, analysis of P700 redox status during illumination confirmed that the minor pea Fd isoform promotes enhanced cyclic flow around photosystem I. The two novel features of this work are: (1) that Fd levels achieved in transplastomic plants promote an alternative electron partitioning even under greenhouse light growth conditions, a situation that is exacerbated at higher light intensity measurements; and (2) that an alternative, minor Fd isoform has been overexpressed in plants, giving new evidence of labor division among Fd isoforms. PMID:23370717

  3. Expression of protein complexes and individual proteins upon transition of etioplasts to chloroplasts in pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Kanervo, Eira; Singh, Munna; Suorsa, Marjaana; Paakkarinen, Virpi; Aro, Eveliina; Battchikova, Natalia; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2008-03-01

    The protein complexes of pea (Pisum sativum L.) etioplasts, etio-chloroplasts and chloroplasts were examined using 2D Blue Native/SDS-PAGE. The most prominent protein complexes in etioplasts were the ATPase and the Clp and FtsH protease complexes which probably have a crucial role in the biogenesis of etioplasts and chloroplasts. Also the cytochrome b(6)f (Cyt b(6)f) complex was assembled in the etioplast membrane, as well as Rubisco, at least partially, in the stroma. These complexes are composed of proteins encoded by both the plastid and nuclear genomes, indicating that a functional cross-talk exists between pea etioplasts and the nucleus. In contrast, the proteins and protein complexes that bind chlorophyll, with the PetD subunit and the entire Cyt b(6)f complex as an exception, did not accumulate in etioplasts. Nevertheless, some PSII core components such as PsbE and the luminal oxygen-evolvong complex (OEC) proteins PsbO and PsbP accumulated efficiently in etioplasts. After 6 h de-etiolation, a complete PSII core complex appeared with 40% of the maximal photochemical efficiency, but a fully functional PSII was recorded only after 24 h illumination. Similarly, the core complex of PSI was assembled after 6 h illumination, whereas the PSI-light-harvesting complex I was stably assembled only in chloroplasts illuminated for 24 h. Moreover, a battery of proteins responsible for defense against oxidative stress accumulated particularly in etioplasts, including the stromal and thylakoidal forms of ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase and PsbS.

  4. Gibberellin (GA3) enhances cell wall invertase activity and mRNA levels in elongating dwarf pea (Pisum sativum) shoots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L. L.; Mitchell, J. P.; Cohn, N. S.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1993-01-01

    The invertase (EC 3.2.1.26) purified from cell walls of dwarf pea stems to homogeneity has a molecular mass of 64 kilodaltons (kD). Poly(A)+RNA was isolated from shoots of dwarf pea plants, and a cDNA library was constructed using lambda gt11 as an expression vector. The expression cDNA library was screened with polyclonal antibodies against pea cell wall invertase. One invertase cDNA clone was characterized as a full-length cDNA with 1,863 base pairs. Compared with other known invertases, one homologous region in the amino acid sequence was found. The conserved motif, Asn-Asp-Pro-Asn-Gly, is located near the N-terminal end of invertase. Northern blot analysis showed that the amount of invertase mRNA (1.86 kb) was rapidly induced to a maximal level 4 h after GA3 treatment, then gradually decreased to the control level. The mRNA level at 4 h in GA3-treated peas was fivefold higher than that of the control group. The maximal increase in activity of pea cell wall invertase elicited by GA3 occcured at 8 h after GA3 treatment. This invertase isoform was shown immunocytochemically to be localized in the cell walls, where a 10-fold higher accumulation occurred in GA3-treated tissue compared with control tissue. This study indicates that the expression of the pea shoot cell-wall invertase gene could be regulated by GA3 at transcriptional and/or translational levels.

  5. Gibberellin (GA3) enhances cell wall invertase activity and mRNA levels in elongating dwarf pea (Pisum sativum) shoots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L. L.; Mitchell, J. P.; Cohn, N. S.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1993-01-01

    The invertase (EC 3.2.1.26) purified from cell walls of dwarf pea stems to homogeneity has a molecular mass of 64 kilodaltons (kD). Poly(A)+RNA was isolated from shoots of dwarf pea plants, and a cDNA library was constructed using lambda gt11 as an expression vector. The expression cDNA library was screened with polyclonal antibodies against pea cell wall invertase. One invertase cDNA clone was characterized as a full-length cDNA with 1,863 base pairs. Compared with other known invertases, one homologous region in the amino acid sequence was found. The conserved motif, Asn-Asp-Pro-Asn-Gly, is located near the N-terminal end of invertase. Northern blot analysis showed that the amount of invertase mRNA (1.86 kb) was rapidly induced to a maximal level 4 h after GA3 treatment, then gradually decreased to the control level. The mRNA level at 4 h in GA3-treated peas was fivefold higher than that of the control group. The maximal increase in activity of pea cell wall invertase elicited by GA3 occcured at 8 h after GA3 treatment. This invertase isoform was shown immunocytochemically to be localized in the cell walls, where a 10-fold higher accumulation occurred in GA3-treated tissue compared with control tissue. This study indicates that the expression of the pea shoot cell-wall invertase gene could be regulated by GA3 at transcriptional and/or translational levels.

  6. Expression of PIN and AUX1 genes encoding putative carrier proteins for auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls [correction of epicotyles] under simulated microgravity conditions on a three-dimensional clinostat.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Tomoki; Hitotsubashi, Reiko; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Tanimoto, Eiichi; Ueda, Junichi

    2003-10-01

    Etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-dimensional clinostat showed automorphosis-like growth and development similar to that observed in true microgravity conditions in space. Application of inhibitors of auxin polar transport phenocopied automorphosis-like growth on 1 g conditions, suggesting that automorophosis is closely related to auxin polar transport. Strenuous efforts to know the relationships between automorphosis and auxin polar transport in pea seedlings at molecular bases resulted in successful identification of PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 encoding putative auxin efflux and influx carrier protein, respectively. Significantly high levels in homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 and AtPINs, and between PsAUX1 and AtAUX1. Expression of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 genes in etiolated pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were substantially affected, but that of PsPIN2 was not. Roles of these genes in auxin polar transport and automorphosis of etiolated pea seedlings are also described.

  7. Males without apparent alloimmunization could have HLA antibodies that recognize target HLA specificities expressed on cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, J; Nakajima, F; Kamada, H; Tadokoro, K; Nagai, T; Satake, M

    2017-05-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies, which are involved in the development of transfusion-related side effects such as transfusion-related lung injury, are sometimes found in males without a history of alloimmunization (eg, transplantation and transfusion). Whether HLA antibodies in male donors can interact with their target HLA specificities expressed on cells have not been completely investigated. The HLA antibodies detected in 7 male donors were characterized. Flow cytometry and immunocomplex capture fluorescence analysis were performed to evaluate the ability of these antibodies to bind with target HLA specificities expressed on cells. The association of these antibodies with complement was examined using anti-C1q antibody. Sustainability of HLA antibodies over time was compared in 26 male vs 57 female donors. The antibodies from all 7 donors recognized intact HLA molecules coated onto microbeads. The antibodies in 2 of 7 donors also recognized their target HLA specificities expressed on cells. Furthermore, the antibodies in one of these 2 donors showed HLA specificities that involved complement binding. Twenty-one of 26 initially positive male donors had turned negative for HLA antibody at least 1 year after their initial positive screening, whereas HLA antibody positivity was maintained for a long time in most female donors. Males without apparent alloimmunization could have HLA antibodies that recognize their target HLA specificities on cells and that could potentially modify molecular events in affected cells. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  9. Ascochyta blight of peas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Identification, taxonomy & nomenclature, epidemiology, symptoms, host ranges, and management are described for three fungal pathogens which collectively and individually cause Ascochyta blight of field pea (Pisum sativum): Ascochyta pisi, Ascochyta pinodes, and Ascochyta pinodella. The first two are...

  10. Peas (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Grant, Jan; Cooper, Pauline

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter we describe a robust method for transformation of peas that has been successfully used in our laboratory since 1992. Using immature pea seed collected from field- or greenhouse-grown plants, we have produced transgenic lines for over 30 genotypes including named pea cultivars and advanced breeding lines. This method uses immature cotyledons as the explant, and the transformation efficiency is in the range 0.2 to 13.5% of cotyledons producing at least one independently transformed line. Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains AGL1 and KYRT1 are the most successful in our procedure, and kanamycin, phosphinothricin, and hygromycin are reliable selectable markers. Potentially useful genes have been introduced for pest and disease resistance, altering quality traits, and investigating metabolic pathways and are being studied in transgenic pea lines.

  11. Biochemical and immunological characterization of pea nuclear intermediate filament proteins.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Sonal S D; Clark, Gregory B; Roux, Stanley J

    2004-04-01

    In immunoblot assays, at least three putative nuclear intermediate filament (NIF) proteins were detected in nuclear envelope-matrix (NEM) and lamin (L1) fractions of nuclei from plumules of dark-grown pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings. These NIF proteins had apparent molecular masses of ca. 65, 60, and 54 kDa (also referred to as p65, p60, and p54), and appeared as multiple isoelectric forms, with pIs ranging from ca. 4.8 to 6.0. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were raised to the 65-kDa NIF protein bands excised from gels after electrophoresis. These anti-pea antibodies were specifically cross-reactive with the pea nuclear p65, p60, and p54 proteins and also with chicken lamins. Sequence alignment of peptide fragments obtained from the 65- and 60-kDa pea NIF proteins showed similarity with animal intermediate filament proteins such as lamins and keratins and with certain plant proteins predicted to have long coiled-coil domains. These pea NIF proteins were further purified and enriched from the NEM fraction using methods similar to those used for isolating animal lamins. When negatively stained and viewed by transmission electron microscopy, the filaments in the pea lamin (L1) fraction appeared to be 6-12 nm in diameter. As assayed by immunofluorescence cytochemistry using a confocal laser-scanning microscope, fixed pea plumule cells displayed uniform as opposed to peripheral nuclear staining by several of the antibody preparations, both polyclonal and monoclonal. This report describes the biochemical and immunological properties of these pea NIF proteins.

  12. Comparative Transcriptomic Analyses of Vegetable and Grain Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Seed Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Zhang, Guwen; Xu, Shengchun; Mao, Weihua; Hu, Qizan; Gong, Yaming

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating pea seed developmental process is extremely important for pea breeding. In this study, we used high-throughput RNA-Seq and bioinformatics analyses to examine the changes in gene expression during seed development in vegetable pea and grain pea, and compare the gene expression profiles of these two pea types. RNA-Seq generated 18.7 G of raw data, which were then de novo assembled into 77,273 unigenes with a mean length of 930 bp. Our results illustrate that transcriptional control during pea seed development is a highly coordinated process. There were 459 and 801 genes differentially expressed at early and late seed maturation stages between vegetable pea and grain pea, respectively. Soluble sugar and starch metabolism related genes were significantly activated during the development of pea seeds coinciding with the onset of accumulation of sugar and starch in the seeds. A comparative analysis of genes involved in sugar and starch biosynthesis in vegetable pea (high seed soluble sugar and low starch) and grain pea (high seed starch and low soluble sugar) revealed that differential expression of related genes at late development stages results in a negative correlation between soluble sugar and starch biosynthetic flux in vegetable and grain pea seeds. RNA-Seq data was validated by using real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis for 30 randomly selected genes. To our knowledge, this work represents the first report of seed development transcriptomics in pea. The obtained results provide a foundation to support future efforts to unravel the underlying mechanisms that control the developmental biology of pea seeds, and serve as a valuable resource for improving pea breeding. PMID:26635856

  13. Expression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Neutralizing Antibody Fragments Using Human Vaginal Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Marcobal, Angela; Liu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Wenlei; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Jia, Letong; Lee, Peter P.; Fouts, Timothy R.; Parks, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Eradication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by vaccination with epitopes that produce broadly neutralizing antibodies is the ultimate goal for HIV prevention. However, generating appropriate immune responses has proven difficult. Expression of broadly neutralizing antibodies by vaginal colonizing lactobacilli provides an approach to passively target these antibodies to the mucosa. We tested the feasibility of expressing single-chain and single-domain antibodies (dAbs) in Lactobacillus to be used as a topical microbicide/live biotherapeutic. Lactobacilli provide an excellent platform to express anti-HIV proteins. Broadly neutralizing antibodies have been identified against epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope and have been made into active antibody fragments. We tested single-chain variable fragment m9 and dAb-m36 and its derivative m36.4 as prototype antibodies. We cloned and expressed the antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 in Lactobacillus jensenii-1153 and tested the expression levels and functionality. We made a recombinant L. jensenii 1153-1128 that expresses dAb-m36.4. All antibody fragments m9, m36, and m36.4 were expressed by lactobacilli. However, we noted the smaller m36/m36.4 were expressed to higher levels, ≥3 μg/ml. All L. jensenii-expressed antibody fragments bound to gp120/CD4 complex; Lactobacillus-produced m36.4 inhibited HIV-1BaL in a neutralization assay. Using a TZM-bl assay, we characterized the breadth of neutralization of the m36.4. Delivery of dAbs by Lactobacillus could provide passive transfer of these antibodies to the mucosa and longevity at the site of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:26950606

  14. Identification of the prothoracicotropic hormone (Ptth) coding gene and localization of its site of expression in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    Barberà, M; Martínez-Torres, D

    2017-10-01

    Insect hormones control essential aspects of physiology, behaviour and development in insects. The majority of insect hormones are peptide hormones that perform a highly diverse catalogue of functions. Prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) is a brain neuropeptide hormone whose main function is to stimulate the secretion of ecdysone (the moulting hormone) by the prothoracic glands in insect larvae thus playing a key role in the control of moulting and metamorphosis. Moreover, both PTTH release or blockade have been reported to act as a switch to terminate or initiate larval and pupal diapauses. In insects, diapause is a prevalent response often regulated by the photoperiod. It has been shown that PTTH participates as an output of the circadian clock and a role in photoperiodic processes is suggested in some insect species. Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) reproduce by cyclical parthenogenesis with a sexual phase, induced by short photoperiods, that leads to the production of diapausing eggs. With the availability of the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) genome, efforts to identify and characterize genes relevant to essential aspects of aphid biology have multiplied. In spite of its relevance, several genomic and transcriptomic studies on aphid neuropeptides failed to detect aphid PTTH amongst them. Here we report on the first identification of the aphid PTTH coding gene and the neuroanatomical localization of its expression in the aphid brain. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  15. Effect of CO{sub 2} concentration on carbonic anhydrase and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase expression in pea

    SciTech Connect

    Majeau, N.; Coleman, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    The effect of external CO{sub 2} concentration on the expression of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) was examined in pea (Pisum sativum cv Little Marvel) leaves. Enzyme activities and their transcript levels were reduced in plants grown at 1000 {mu}L/L CO{sub 2} compared with plants grown in ambient air. Growth at 160 {mu}L/L CO{sub 2} also appeared to reduce steady-state transcript levels for the rbcS, the gene encoding the small subunit of Rubisco, and for ca, the gene encoding CA; however, rbcS transcripts were reduced to a greater extent at this concentration. Rubisco activity was slightly lower in plants grown at 160 {mu}L/L CO{sub 2}, and CA activity was significantly higher than that observed in air-grown plants. Transfer of plants from 1000 {mu}L/L to air levels of CO{sub 2} resulted in a rapid increase in both ca and rbcS transcript abundance in fully expanded leaves, followed by an increase in enzyme activity. Plants transferred from air to high-CO{sub 2} concentrations appeared to modulate transcript abundance and enzyme activity less quickly. Foliar carbohydrate levels were also examined in plants grown continuously at high and ambient CO{sub 2}, and following changes in growth conditions that rapidly altered ca and rbcS transcript abundance and enzyme activities. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Design, expression and characterization of a single chain anti-CD20 antibody; a germline humanized antibody derived from Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, Vahideh; Farajnia, Safar; Hosseinpour Feizi, Mohammad Ali; Khavarinejad, Ramazan Ali

    2014-10-01

    CD20 is a B cell lineage specific surface antigen involved in various B cell malignancies. So far, several murine and chimeric antibodies have been produced against this antigen among which Rituximab is a commercially approved antibody widely used in treatment of cancers associated with CD20 overexpression. The current study reports the production and characterization of a humanized single chain version of Rituximab through CDR grafting method. For either heavy or light chain variable domains, a human antibody with the highest sequence homology to Rituximab was selected from human germline sequences and used as framework donors. Vernier zone residues in framework regions were replaced with those of Rituximab to retain the antigen binding affinity of parental antibody. The reactivity of humanized single chain antibody with CD20 was examined by ELISA and dot blot assays. The ability of antibody to suppress the growth of CD20 overexpressing Raji cells was tested by MTT assay. Analysis of reactivity with CD20 antigen revealed that the humanized single chain antibody reacted to the target antigen with high affinity. Proliferation inhibition assay showed that humanized scFv could suppress the proliferation of Raji cells efficiently in a dose-dependent manner. This successful production of a humanized scFv with the ability to inhibit growth of CD20-expressing cancer cell may provide a promising alternative strategy for CD20 targeted therapy.

  17. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Hehle, Verena K; Paul, Matthew J; Roberts, Victoria A; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Ma, Julian K-C

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformedNicotiana tabacum Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody light and heavy chain sequences. No strictly conserved target sequence was evident, although the peptide bonds that were susceptible to proteolysis were predominantly and consistently located within or near to the interdomain or solvent-exposed regions in the antibody structure. Amino acids surrounding identified cleavage sites were mutated in an attempt to increase resistance. Different Guy's 13 antibody heavy and light chain mutant combinations were expressed transiently inN. tabacumand demonstrated intensity shifts in the fragmentation pattern, resulting in alterations to the full-length antibody-to-fragment ratio. The work strengthens the understanding of proteolytic cleavage of antibodies expressed in plants and presents a novel approach to stabilize full-length antibody by site-directed mutagenesis.-Hehle, V. K., Paul, M. J., Roberts, V. A., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Ma, J. K.-C. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. © The Author(s).

  18. Regulation of the microRNA 200b (miRNA-200b) by transcriptional regulators PEA3 and ELK-1 protein affects expression of Pin1 protein to control anoikis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xusen; Zhang, Bailin; Gao, Jidong; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Zhihua

    2013-11-08

    MicroRNA (miRNA) 200s regulate E-cadherin by directly targeting ZEB1/ZEB2, which are transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin. Decreased expression of E-cadherin results in cancer cells losing interaction with the extracellular matrix and detaching from the primary tumor. Normally, cells will undergo anoikis after losing interaction with the extracellular matrix. Cancer cells must, therefore, possess the ability to resist anoikis during the process of metastasis. Here we show that miRNA-200b regulates anoikis by directly targeting the 3' UTR of Pin1 mRNA and regulating Pin1 expression at the translational level. We found that down-regulation of miRNA-200b promotes cancer cells survival during metastasis, and the homeless state of these cells resulted in decreased expression of miRNA-200b in the MCF-7 cell line. We also found that expression of miRNA-200b is down-regulated in human breast cancer during lymph node metastasis, which has a significant negative correlation with Pin1 expression. Two members of the ETS (E-26) family (PEA3 and ELK-1) regulate the expression of miRNA-200b. PEA3 promotes the expression of miRNA-200b, and ELK-1 is a transcriptional repressor of miRNA-200b. In addition, miRNA-200b regulates the activity of PEA3 and ELK-1 via the Pin1-pERK pathway and forms self-regulated feedback loops. This study characterizes the role of miRNA-200b in the regulation of anoikis and demonstrates the regulation of its own expression in the process of metastasis.

  19. cDNA cloning, primary structure and gene expression for H-protein, a component of the glycine-cleavage system (glycine decarboxylase) of pea (Pisum sativum) leaf mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Macherel, D; Lebrun, M; Gagnon, J; Neuburger, M; Douce, R

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized cDNA clones encoding the H-protein of the glycine-cleavage system of pea (Pisum sativum) leaf mitochondria. The deduced primary structure revealed that the 131-amino-acid polypeptide is cytoplasmically synthesized with a 34-amino-acid mitochondrial targeting peptide. The lipoate-binding site was assigned to be lysine-63, as deduced from a sequence comparison with several lipoate-bearing proteins. The expression of the gene encoding H-protein was shown to occur specifically in the leaf tissue, with light exerting an additional effect by increasing the mRNA levels severalfold. Two polyadenylation sites were found in the mRNA, and a single-copy gene encoding the H-protein was detected in pea genome. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2363710

  20. Expression of antibodies using single open reading frame (sORF) vector design

    PubMed Central

    Gion, Wendy R.; Davis-Taber, Rachel A.; Regier, Dean A.; Fung, Emma; Medina, Limary; Santora, Ling C.; Bose, Sahana; Ivanov, Alexander V.; Perilli-Palmer, Barbara A.; Chumsae, Chris M.; Matuck, Joseph G.; Kunes, Yune Z.; Carson, Gerald R.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient production of large quantities of therapeutic antibodies is becoming a major goal of the pharmaceutical industry. We developed a proprietary expression system using a polyprotein precursor-based approach to antibody expression in mammalian cells. In this approach, the coding regions for heavy and light chains are included within a single open reading frame (sORF) separated by an in-frame intein gene. A single mRNA and subsequent polypeptide are produced upon transient and stable transfection into HEK293 and CHO cells, respectively. Heavy and light chains are separated by the autocatalytic action of the intein and antibody processing proceeds to produce active, secreted antibody. Here, we report advances in sORF technology toward establishment of a viable manufacturing platform for therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells. Increasing expression levels and improving antibody processing by intein and signal peptide selection are discussed. PMID:23774760

  1. Antibodies against HLA-DP recognize broadly expressed epitopes.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Daimon P; Kafetzi, Maria L; Wood, Isabelle; Macaskill, Peter C; Milford, Edgar L; Guleria, Indira

    2016-12-01

    HLA matching and avoidance of pre-transplant donor-specific antibodies are important in selection of donors for solid organ transplant. Solid phase testing with single antigen beads allows resolution of antibody reactivity to the level of the allele. Single antigen bead testing results at a large transplant center were reviewed to identify selective reactivity patterns of anti-HLA antibodies. Many HLA-DP antibodies were identified in the context of other HLA antibodies, but some sera had antibodies against only HLA-DP. B cell flow crossmatch testing was positive for 2 out of 9 sera with HLA-DP antibodies. Many patterns of reactivity corresponded to epitopes in hypervariable regions C and F of DPB1, but some matched epitopes in other regions or DPA1. Through analysis of single antigen bead testing from a large number of patients, we report that anti-HLA-DP antibodies predominantly recognize broadly cross-reactive epitopes. The United Network for Organ Sharing has mandated HLA-DP typing on all deceased kidney donors, and HLA-DP epitopes should be considered as the major antigens for avoidance of pre-transplant donor-specific antibodies.

  2. Expression and biological characterization of an anti-CD20 biosimilar candidate antibody: a case study.

    PubMed

    Dorvignit, Denise; Palacios, Julio L; Merino, Maylin; Hernández, Tays; Sosa, Katya; Casaco, Angel; López-Requena, Alejandro; Mateo de Acosta, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The CD20 molecule is a non-glycosylated protein expressed mainly on the surface of B lymphocytes. In some pathogenic B cells, it shows an increased expression, thus becoming an attractive target for diagnosis and therapy. Rituximab is a chimeric antibody that specifically recognizes the human CD20 molecule. This antibody is indicated for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphomas and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In this work, we describe the stable expression and biological evaluation of an anti-CD20 biosimilar antibody. While rituximab is produced in fed-batch culture of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, our biosimilar antibody expression process consists of continuous culture of recombinant murine NS0 myeloma cells. The ability of the purified biosimilar antibody to recognize the CD20 molecule on human tumor cell lines, as well as on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from humans and primates, was demonstrated by flow cytometry. The biosimilar antibody induced complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptosis on human cell lines with high expression of CD20. In addition, this antibody depleted CD20-positive B lymphocytes from peripheral blood in monkeys. These results indicate that the biological properties of the biosimilar antibody compare favorably with those of the innovator product, and that it should be evaluated in future clinical trials.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to antigens in the peribacteroid membrane from Rhizobium-induced root nodules of pea cross-react with plasma membranes and Golgi bodies

    PubMed Central

    Brewin, N. J.; Robertson, J. G.; Wood, E. A.; Wells, B.; Larkins, A. P.; Galfre, G.; Butcher, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    Three rat hybridoma lines that produced monoclonal antibodies reacting with the peribacteroid membrane from Pisum sativum were isolated, and these all appeared to recognise the same antigenic structure. Using one of these monoclonal antibodies, AFRC MAC 64, electron microscopy of immunogold-stained thin sections of nodule tissue revealed that the antigen, present in the peribacteroid membrane, was also found in the plant plasma membranes and in the Golgi bodies, but not in the endoplasmic reticulum. When peribacteroid membrane proteins were separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and transferred to nitrocellulose by electro-blotting, it was found that MAC 64 bound to a series of protease-sensitive bands that migrated in the mol. wt. range 50-85 K. The epitope was sensitive to periodate oxidation and its structure may therefore involve the carbohydrate component of a membrane glycoprotein. We suggest that this structure originates in the Golgi apparatus and is subsequently transferred to the peribacteriod membranes and plasma membranes. The monoclonal antibody also reacted with peribacteroid membranes from nodules of Vicia and lupin, and with plasma membranes and Golgi membranes from uninfected plant cells, including root tip cells from onion (Allium cepa), indicating that the antigen is highly conserved in the plasma membranes of plant cells. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:15926221

  4. Vitamin D3 signalling in the brain enhances the function of phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes – 15 kD (PEA-15)

    PubMed Central

    Obradovic, Darja; Zanca, Ciro; Vogl, Annette; Trümbach, Dietrich; Deussing, Jan; Condorelli, Gerolama; Rein, Theo

    2009-01-01

    In spite of growing evidence linking vitamin D3 levels to mental health disorders, little is known about its direct targets in the brain. This study set out to investigate targets of vitamin D3 in a human brain stem cell line. We employed arrays with antibodies directed against more than 600 structural and signalling proteins, including phospho-variants. Over 180 proteins responded to vitamin D3, such as cyclin-dependent protein-serine kinase 1/2, epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase, protein kinase A, protein-serine kinase Bγ and protein-serine kinase Cα. PEA-15 (phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes-15 kD, also known as PED), known to be involved in various anti-proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects, was strongly up-regulated. In silico promoter analysis revealed conserved binding sites for vitamin D3 receptor, suggesting a strong vitamin D3 dependency of the PEA-15 promoter. PEA-15 up-regulation by vitamin D3 could be confirmed by Western blot in two different cell lines. Analysis of mRNA and protein phosphorylation status of PEA-15 suggests that increased PEA-15 promoter activity and increased protein stabilization contribute to the overall rise of PEA-15 protein. In a functional test of this novel pathway, we demonstrated that vitamin D3 was able to rescue cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis through regulation of the PEA-15 expression and function. Summarized, our study presents novel targets of vitamin D3 relevant for apoptosis and cell proliferation, and thus strongly supports a function of vitamin D3 in the brain that impacts on processes highly relevant for major neurological disorders. PMID:19382910

  5. Pea amyloplast DNA is qualitatively similar to pea chloroplast DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaynor, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Amyloplast DNA (apDNA), when subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases, yields patterns nearly identical to that of DNA from mature pea chloroplasts (ctDNA). Southern transfers of apDNA and ctDNA, probed with the large subunit (LS) gene of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), shows hybridization to the expected restriction fragments for both apDNA and ctDNA. However, Northern transfers of total RNA from chloroplasts and amyloplasts, probed again with the LS gene of Rubisco, shows that no detectable LS meggage is found in amyloplasts although LS expression in mature chloroplasts is high. Likewise, two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of etiolated gravisensitive pea tissue shows that both large and small subunits of Rubisco are conspicuously absent; however, in greening tissue these two constitute the major soluble proteins. These findings suggest that although the informational content of these two organelle types is equivalent, gene expression is quite different and is presumably under nuclear control.

  6. Pea amyloplast DNA is qualitatively similar to pea chloroplast DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaynor, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Amyloplast DNA (apDNA), when subjected to digestion with restriction endonucleases, yields patterns nearly identical to that of DNA from mature pea chloroplasts (ctDNA). Southern transfers of apDNA and ctDNA, probed with the large subunit (LS) gene of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), shows hybridization to the expected restriction fragments for both apDNA and ctDNA. However, Northern transfers of total RNA from chloroplasts and amyloplasts, probed again with the LS gene of Rubisco, shows that no detectable LS meggage is found in amyloplasts although LS expression in mature chloroplasts is high. Likewise, two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of etiolated gravisensitive pea tissue shows that both large and small subunits of Rubisco are conspicuously absent; however, in greening tissue these two constitute the major soluble proteins. These findings suggest that although the informational content of these two organelle types is equivalent, gene expression is quite different and is presumably under nuclear control.

  7. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody against CREPT, a novel protein highly expressed in tumors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Fangli; Wang, Ruoke; Zhang, Yanquan; Liu, Chunxiao; Wang, Yinyin; Hu, Jim; Zhang, Linqi; Chang, Zhijie

    2014-12-01

    CREPT (cell-cycle related and expression-elevated protein in tumor), a novel gene also called RPRD1B and C20ORF77, was recently identified to promote tumorigenesis through up-regulation of the expression of genes related to cell cycle. The previous study demonstrated that CREPT is highly expressed in a variety of tumors and enhances the expression of Cyclin D1 by promoting the formation of a chromatin loop. To study the correlation of CREPT expression with clinical factors in different tumors, we generated a monoclonal antibody (3E10) using purified recombinant human GST-CREPT protein as an antigen. In this study, we characterized the specificity of the monoclonal antibody and cloned the gene encoding the antibody for preparation of industrial production. Our results showed that the monoclonal antibody 3E10 was sensitive and specific to recognize human endogenous CREPT protein. We have mapped the epitope of the antibody and cloned the variable region sequence of the gene encoding the antibody. We confirmed that the cloned gene produced an equivalent antibody as that produced by the original hybridoma. This study provided a basis for large-scale production of the CREPT antibody, which will be useful for the study of the role of CREPT in different tumors.

  8. Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody Against CREPT, a Novel Protein Highly Expressed in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Fangli; Wang, Ruoke; Zhang, Yanquan; Liu, Chunxiao; Wang, Yinyin; Hu, Jim; Zhang, Linqi

    2014-01-01

    CREPT (cell-cycle related and expression-elevated protein in tumor), a novel gene also called RPRD1B and C20ORF77, was recently identified to promote tumorigenesis through up-regulation of the expression of genes related to cell cycle. The previous study demonstrated that CREPT is highly expressed in a variety of tumors and enhances the expression of Cyclin D1 by promoting the formation of a chromatin loop. To study the correlation of CREPT expression with clinical factors in different tumors, we generated a monoclonal antibody (3E10) using purified recombinant human GST-CREPT protein as an antigen. In this study, we characterized the specificity of the monoclonal antibody and cloned the gene encoding the antibody for preparation of industrial production. Our results showed that the monoclonal antibody 3E10 was sensitive and specific to recognize human endogenous CREPT protein. We have mapped the epitope of the antibody and cloned the variable region sequence of the gene encoding the antibody. We confirmed that the cloned gene produced an equivalent antibody as that produced by the original hybridoma. This study provided a basis for large-scale production of the CREPT antibody, which will be useful for the study of the role of CREPT in different tumors. PMID:25545209

  9. Expression of a functional single-chain antibody via Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, R K; Hurwitz, I; Matthews, S; Hoy, E; Kurapati, S; Crawford, C; Sundaram, P; Durvasula, R V

    2008-07-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics are effective against conditions ranging from acute infections to malignancy. They may prove crucial in combating bioterrorism and responding to drug-resistant and emerging pathogens. At present the cost of producing therapeutic monoclonal antibodies is between $1,000 to $6,000 per gram. The need to administer antibodies parenterally at frequent intervals further drives the cost of this treatment. Here we present an antibody delivery system, termed paratransgenesis, with the potential to overcome these limitations. The paratransgenic approach involves genetically transforming a commensal or symbiont bacterium to express foreign molecules that target pathogens. We describe transformation of Corynebacterium pseudodiptheriticum, a commensal bacterium found in the human respiratory tract, to express a murine single-chain antibody binding progesterone. The antibody was functional and bound specifically to progesterone in a concentration-dependent manner. This marker antibody system is the precursor to development of expression systems producing recombinant humanized single-chain antibodies. Studies are in progress evaluating fitness, transgene stablility, and pathogenecity of the genetically engineered C. pseudodiptheriticum. We anticipate developing a repertoire of expressed molecules targeting infectious agents and surface epitopes of pulmonary mass lesions. If expression systems for anti-pathogen molecules in C. pseudodiptheriticum and other respiratory commensal bacteria can be optimized, these bacteria have the potential for a range of therapeutic and prophylactic applications.

  10. Pea lectin receptor-like kinase promotes high salinity stress tolerance in bacteria and expresses in response to stress in planta.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Amita; Dang, Hung Quang; Vaid, Neha; Tuteja, Narendra

    2010-01-01

    The plant lectin receptor-like kinases (LecRLKs) are involved in various signaling pathways but their role in salinity stress tolerance has not heretofore been well described. Salinity stress negatively affects plant growth/productivity and threatens food security worldwide. Based on functional gene-mining assay, we have isolated 34 salinity tolerant genes out of one million Escherichia coli (SOLR) transformants containing pea cDNAs grown in 0.8 M NaCl. Sequence analysis of one of these revealed homology to LecRLK, which possesses N-myristilation and N-glycosylation sites thus corroborating the protein to be a glycoconjugate. The homology based computational modeling of the kinase domain suggested high degree of conservation with the protein already known to be stress responsive in plants. The NaCl tolerance provided by PsLecRLK to the above bacteria was further confirmed in E. coli (DH5alpha). In planta studies showed that the expression of PsLecRLK cDNA was significantly upregulated in response to NaCl as compared to K(+) and Li(+) ions, suggesting the Na(+) ion specific response. Transcript of the PsLecRLK gene accumulates mainly in roots and shoots. The purified 47 kDa recombinant PsLecRLK-KD (kinase domain) protein has been shown to phosphorylate general substrates like MBP and casein. This study not only suggests the conservation of the cellular response to high salinity stress across prokaryotes and plant kingdom but also provides impetus to develop novel concepts for better understanding of mechanism of stress tolerance in bacteria and plants. It also opens up new avenues for studying practical aspects of plant salinity tolerance for enhanced agricultural productivity.

  11. Antibodies Expressed by Intratumoral B Cells as the Basis for a Diagnostic Test for Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    expression, purification, and characterization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) cloned from intratumoral B lymphocytes (ITLs). While this work was...successful in identifying a mAb with preferential binding to tropomyosin 4, all cloned mAbs exhibited polyreactivity. This suggested that the isolated ITLs...our most recent efforts have focused on methods to permit the cloning and expression of recombinant antibodies specifically from oligoclonal ITLs. We

  12. A tool kit for rapid cloning and expression of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dodev, Tihomir S; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Gilbert, Amy E; Josephs, Debra H; Bowen, Holly; James, Louisa K; Bax, Heather J; Beavil, Rebecca; Pang, Marie O; Gould, Hannah J; Karagiannis, Sophia N; Beavil, Andrew J

    2014-07-30

    Over the last four decades, molecular cloning has evolved tremendously. Efficient products allowing assembly of multiple DNA fragments have become available. However, cost-effective tools for engineering antibodies of different specificities, isotypes and species are still needed for many research and clinical applications in academia. Here, we report a method for one-step assembly of antibody heavy- and light-chain DNAs into a single mammalian expression vector, starting from DNAs encoding the desired variable and constant regions, which allows antibodies of different isotypes and specificity to be rapidly generated. As a proof of principle we have cloned, expressed and characterized functional recombinant tumor-associated antigen-specific chimeric IgE/κ and IgG1/κ, as well as recombinant grass pollen allergen Phl p 7 specific fully human IgE/λ and IgG4/λ antibodies. This method utilizing the antibody expression vectors, available at Addgene, has many applications, including the potential to support simultaneous processing of antibody panels, to facilitate mechanistic studies of antigen-antibody interactions and to conduct early evaluations of antibody functions.

  13. A tool kit for rapid cloning and expression of recombinant antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Dodev, Tihomir S.; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Gilbert, Amy E.; Josephs, Debra H.; Bowen, Holly; James, Louisa K.; Bax, Heather J.; Beavil, Rebecca; Pang, Marie O.; Gould, Hannah J.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.; Beavil, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last four decades, molecular cloning has evolved tremendously. Efficient products allowing assembly of multiple DNA fragments have become available. However, cost-effective tools for engineering antibodies of different specificities, isotypes and species are still needed for many research and clinical applications in academia. Here, we report a method for one-step assembly of antibody heavy- and light-chain DNAs into a single mammalian expression vector, starting from DNAs encoding the desired variable and constant regions, which allows antibodies of different isotypes and specificity to be rapidly generated. As a proof of principle we have cloned, expressed and characterized functional recombinant tumor-associated antigen-specific chimeric IgE/κ and IgG1/κ, as well as recombinant grass pollen allergen Phl p 7 specific fully human IgE/λ and IgG4/λ antibodies. This method utilizing the antibody expression vectors, available at Addgene, has many applications, including the potential to support simultaneous processing of antibody panels, to facilitate mechanistic studies of antigen-antibody interactions and to conduct early evaluations of antibody functions. PMID:25073855

  14. Nicotinamide attenuates the decrease of astrocytic phosphoprotein PEA-15 in focal cerebral ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Koh, Phil-Ok

    2012-03-01

    Nicotinamide exerts neuroprotective effects against focal cerebral ischemic injury. Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes 15 (PEA-15) is prominently expressed in astrocytes that exert broad anti-apoptotic functions. This study investigated whether nicotinamide modulates PEA-15 and levels of two phosphorylated PEA-15 (Serine 104 and 116) in an animal model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced injury. Adult male rats were treated with vehicle or nicotinamide (500 mg/kg) 2 hr after the onset of MCAO and cerebral cortices were collected at 24 hr after MCAO. In a proteomic approach, MCAO induced decreases of PEA-15 levels, while nicotinamide treatment attenuated the injury-induced decrease in PEA-15. The results of Western blot analysis suggest that nicotinamide prevented injury-induced reduction in phospho-PEA-15 (Serine 104) and phospho-PEA-15 (Serine 116) levels. The phosphorylation of PEA-15 exerts anti-apoptotic functions, and reduction of PEA-15 phosphorylation leads to apoptotic cell death. These results suggest that nicotinamide exerts a neuroprotective effect by attenuating the injury-induced decreases of PEA-15 and phospho-PEA-15 (Ser 104 and Ser 116) proteins.

  15. Linkage Maps in Pea

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, THN.; Turner, L.; Hellens, R. P.; Lee, D.; Harker, C. L.; Enard, C.; Domoney, C.; Davies, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    We have analyzed segregation patterns of markers among the late generation progeny of several crosses of pea. From the patterns of association of these markers we have deduced linkage orders. Salient features of these linkages are discussed, as is the relationship between the data presented here and previously published genetic and cytogenetic data. PMID:1551583

  16. Pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pea belongs to the Leguminosae plant family, the third largest flowering plant family with 800 genera and over 18,000 species. Tribe Fabeae is considered one of the youngest groups in the legumes and Bayesian molecular clock and ancestral range analysis suggest a crown age of 23 – 16 Mya, in the mi...

  17. Expression of crossreactive idiotypes by human antibodies specific for the capsular polysaccharide of Hemophilus influenzae B.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, A H

    1988-01-01

    Human antibodies specific, for polyribosyl-ribitol-phosphate (PRP), the capsular polysaccharide of Hemophilus influenzae b, were studied using idiotypic analysis. Antisera were prepared against purified F(ab')2 anti-PRP from two unrelated adults, H.H. and P.T. After repeated absorption with IgG myeloma proteins and with PRP-absorbed normal human Ig and donor Ig, anti-idiotypic (anti-Id) sera were obtained that specifically reacted with anti-PRP antibodies. Anti-IdHH and anti-IdPT reciprocally crossreacted with H.H. and P.T. anti-PRP antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments, and also reacted with the serum anti-PRP antibodies from three additional adults unrelated to P.T. and H.H. Both anti-Id sera partially inhibited anti-PRP paratopes but not anti-tetanus toxoid paratopes. PRP did not inhibit anti-Id recognition of shared or crossreactive idiotypic (CRI) determinants. Naturally occurring and PRP immunization-induced anti-PRP antibodies expressed CRI. While CRI titer increased after immunization, the increase was usually less than the rise in total anti-PRP antibody. Quantitative differences in CRI expression were also apparent between natural and immunization-induced H.H. and P.T. anti-PRP antibodies as shown by their differential inhibitability by anti-Id. Our data demonstrate that anti-PRP antibodies from five unrelated adults express CRI determinants that are probably distant from the PRP combining site. Naturally occurring and immunization-induced anti-PRP antibodies share CRI and therefore appear to be clonally related, although immunization apparently induces the expression CRI-negative antibodies as well. These results, taken with previous studies showing restricted and identical anti-PRP isoelectric focusing spectrotypes in unrelated adults, suggest that some PRP-specific V domains are structurally conserved and probably germ-line encoded. PMID:3257499

  18. Hyperglycemia aggravates decreases of PEA-15 and its two phosphorylated forms in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    SUNG, Jin-Hee; KOH, Phil-Ok

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic health disorder and an important risk factor for stroke. Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes 15 (PEA-15) is a multifunctional protein modulating cell proliferation, survival, apoptosis and glucose metabolism. This study investigated whether diabetes modulates the expression of PEA-15 and two phosphorylated forms (Ser 104 and Ser 116) in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced brain injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administrated with streptozotocin (40 mg/kg) and were underwent right middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) 4 weeks after streptozotocin injection. Brain tissues were collected 24 hr after MCAO and stained using triphenyltetrazolium chloride. Western blot analysis was performed to elucidate the expression of PEA-15 and two phosphorylated forms (Ser 104 and Ser 116) in right cerebral cortex. Infarct volume during MCAO injury was severely increased in diabetic animals compared to non-diabetic animals. We identified the decrease in PEA-15 in animals that underwent MCAO using proteomic approach. PEA-15 expression during MCAO was strongly decreased in diabetic animals compared to non-diabetic animals. Western blots analysis confirmed that diabetes exacerbated the decrease in PEA-15 expression after MCAO. Moreover, decrease in expression of phospho-PEA-15 (Ser 104 and Ser 116) was greater in diabetic than in non-diabetic animals. These results suggested that a diabetic condition may aggravate brain damage through decreasing expression of PEA-15 and phospho-PEA-15 (Ser 104 and Ser 116) in ischemic brain injury. PMID:28216548

  19. Light regulation of the abundance of mRNA encoding a nucleolin-like protein localized in the nucleoli of pea nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Tong, C G; Reichler, S; Blumenthal, S; Balk, J; Hsieh, H L; Roux, S J

    1997-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a nucleolar protein was selected from a pea (Pisum sativum) plumule library, cloned, and sequenced. The translated sequence of the cDNA has significant percent identity to Xenopus laevis nucleolin (31%), the alfalfa (Medicago sativa) nucleolin homolog (66%), and the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) nucleolin homolog (NSR1) (28%). It also has sequence patterns in its primary structure that are characteristic of all nucleolins, including an N-terminal acidic motif, RNA recognition motifs, and a C-terminal Gly- and Arg-rich domain. By immunoblot analysis, the polyclonal antibodies used to select the cDNA bind selectively to a 90-kD protein in purified pea nuclei and nucleoli and to an 88-kD protein in extracts of Escherichia coli expressing the cDNA. In immunolocalization assays of pea plumule cells, the antibodies stained primarily a region surrounding the fibrillar center of nucleoli, where animal nucleolins are typically found. Southern analysis indicated that the pea nucleolin-like protein is encoded by a single gene, and northern analysis showed that the labeled cDNA binds to a single band of RNA, approximately the same size and the cDNA. After irradiation of etiolated pea seedlings by red light, the mRNA level in plumules decreased during the 1st hour and then increased to a peak of six times the 0-h level at 12 h. Far-red light reversed this effect of red light, and the mRNA accumulation from red/far-red light irradiation was equal to that found in the dark control. This indicates that phytochrome may regulate the expression of this gene. PMID:9193096

  20. Bisphosphorylated PEA-15 Sensitizes Ovarian Cancer Cells to Paclitaxel by Impairing the Microtubule-Destabilizing Effect of SCLIP

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xuemei; Bartholomeusz, Chandra; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Kazansky, Anna; Diao, Lixia; Baggerly, Keith A.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Ueno, Naoto T.

    2013-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a standard chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer. PEA-15 (phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes-15 kDa) regulates cell proliferation, autophagy, apoptosis, and glucose metabolism and also mediates AKT-dependent chemoresistance in breast cancer. PEA-15's functions are tightly regulated by its phosphorylation status at Ser104 and Ser116. However, the effect of PEA-15 phosphorylation status on chemosensitivity of cancer cells remains unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that PEA-15 phosphorylated at both Ser104 and Ser116 (pPEA-15) sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to paclitaxel. We first found that knockdown of PEA-15 in PEA-15-high-expressing HEY and OVTOKO ovarian cancer cells resulted in paclitaxel resistance, whereas re-expression of PEA-15 in these cells led to paclitaxel sensitization. We next found that SKOV3.ip1-DD cells (expressing phosphomimetic PEA-15) were more sensitive to paclitaxel than SKOV3.ip1-AA cells (expressing nonphosphorylatable PEA-15). Compared to SKOV3.ip1-vector and SKOV3.ip1-AA cells, SKOV3.ip1-DD cells displayed reduced cell viability, inhibited anchorage-independent growth, and augmented apoptosis when treated with paclitaxel. Furthermore, HEY and OVTOKO cells displayed enhanced paclitaxel sensitivity when transiently overexpressing phosphomimetic PEA-15 and reduced paclitaxel sensitivity when transiently overexpressing nonphosphorylatable PEA-15. These results indicate that pPEA-15 sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to paclitaxel. cDNA microarray analysis suggested that SCLIP (SCG10-like protein), a microtubule (MT)-destabilizing protein, is involved in pPEA-15-mediated chemosensitization. We found that reduced expression and possibly posttranslational modification of SCLIP following paclitaxel treatment impaired SCLIP's MT-destabilizing effect, thereby promoting induction of mitotic arrest and apoptosis by paclitaxel. Our findings highlight the importance of pPEA-15 as a promising target for improving the efficacy of

  1. Bisphosphorylated PEA-15 sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to paclitaxel by impairing the microtubule-destabilizing effect of SCLIP.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xuemei; Bartholomeusz, Chandra; Ahmed, Ahmed A; Kazansky, Anna; Diao, Lixia; Baggerly, Keith A; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Ueno, Naoto T

    2013-06-01

    Paclitaxel is a standard chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer. PEA-15 (phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes-15 kDa) regulates cell proliferation, autophagy, apoptosis, and glucose metabolism and also mediates AKT-dependent chemoresistance in breast cancer. The functions of PEA-15 are tightly regulated by its phosphorylation status at Ser104 and Ser116. However, the effect of PEA-15 phosphorylation status on chemosensitivity of cancer cells remains unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that PEA-15 phosphorylated at both Ser104 and Ser116 (pPEA-15) sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to paclitaxel. We first found that knockdown of PEA-15 in PEA-15-high expressing HEY and OVTOKO ovarian cancer cells resulted in paclitaxel resistance, whereas re-expression of PEA-15 in these cells led to paclitaxel sensitization. We next found that SKOV3.ip1-DD cells (expressing phosphomimetic PEA-15) were more sensitive to paclitaxel than SKOV3.ip1-AA cells (expressing nonphosphorylatable PEA-15). Compared with SKOV3.ip1-vector and SKOV3.ip1-AA cells, SKOV3.ip1-DD cells displayed reduced cell viability, inhibited anchorage-independent growth, and augmented apoptosis when treated with paclitaxel. Furthermore, HEY and OVTOKO cells displayed enhanced paclitaxel sensitivity when transiently overexpressing phosphomimetic PEA-15 and reduced paclitaxel sensitivity when transiently overexpressing nonphosphorylatable PEA-15. These results indicate that pPEA-15 sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to paclitaxel. cDNA microarray analysis suggested that SCLIP (SCG10-like protein), a microtubule-destabilizing protein, is involved in pPEA-15-mediated chemosensitization. We found that reduced expression and possibly posttranslational modification of SCLIP following paclitaxel treatment impaired the microtubule-destabilizing effect of SCLIP, thereby promoting induction of mitotic arrest and apoptosis by paclitaxel. Our findings highlight the importance of pPEA-15 as a promising target for improving

  2. Effect of antigen turnover rate and expression level on antibody penetration into tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Margaret E; Pawlowski, David; Wittrup, K Dane

    2008-07-01

    Poor tissue penetration is a significant obstacle to the development of successful antibody drugs for immunotherapy of solid tumors, and diverse alterations to the properties of antibody drugs have been made to improve penetration and homogeneity of exposure. However, in addition to properties of the antibody drug, mathematical models of antibody transport predict that the antigen expression level and turnover rate significantly influence penetration. As intrinsic antigen properties are likely to be difficult to modify, they may set inherent limits to penetration. Accordingly, in this study, we assess their contribution by evaluating the distance to which antibodies penetrate spheroids when these antigen properties are systematically varied. Additionally, the penetration profiles of antibodies against carcinoembryonic antigen and A33, two targets of clinical interest, are compared. The results agree well with the quantitative predictions of the model and show that localizing antibody to distal regions of tumors is best achieved by selecting slowly internalized targets that are not expressed above the level necessary for recruiting a toxic dose of therapeutic. Each antibody-bound antigen molecule that is turned over or present in excess incurs a real cost in terms of penetration depth-a limiting factor in the development of effective therapies for treating solid tumors.

  3. [Expression and purification of GST-CML28 fusion protein and preparation of its polyclonal antibody].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xia; Zhang, Bing; Bai, Xue-Ling; Liu, Long-Long; Zhang, Dong-Hua

    2012-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression of GST-CML28 in Escherichia Coli and to prepare its antibody. The constructed recombinant expression vectors CML28-pGEX-3X were transformed into Escherichia Coli BL21 under IPTG induction. The protein was abstracted from the transformers, and purified by a GSTrap FF column. The rabbits were immunized by the purified fusion protein to produce serum with anti-CML28 antibody. The serum was purified by chromatographic column stuffed with glutathione Sephamse 4B to get the antibody. The specific antibody against CML28 was further identified by ELISA, Western blot, immunohistochemistry and quantum dot luminescence. The results indicated that GST-CML28 fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and its specific polyclonal antibody was obtained. It is concluded that the anti-CML28 polyclonal antibodies with high titer and specificity are successfully prepared. These antibodies provide an useful experimental tool to profoundly research the physiological significance and biological function of the CML28 gene.

  4. Attraction of pea moth Cydia nigricana to pea flower volatiles.

    PubMed

    Thöming, Gunda; Knudsen, Geir K

    2014-04-01

    The pea moth Cydia nigricana causes major crop losses in pea (Pisum sativum) production. We investigated attraction of C. nigricana females to synthetic pea flower volatiles in a wind tunnel and in the field. We performed electroantennogram analysis on 27 previously identified pea plant volatiles, which confirmed antennal responses to nine of the compounds identified in pea flowers. A dose-dependent response was found to eight of the compounds. Various blends of the nine pea flower volatiles eliciting antennal responses were subsequently studied in a wind tunnel. A four-compound blend comprising hexan-1-ol, (E)-2-hexen-1-ol, (Z)-β-ocimene and (E)-β-ocimene was equally attractive to mated C. nigricana females as the full pea flower mimic blend. We conducted wind-tunnel tests on different blends of these four pea flower compounds mixed with a headspace sample of non-flowering pea plants. By considering the effects of such green leaf background odour, we were able to identify (Z)- and (E)-β-ocimene as fundamental for host location by the pea moths, and hexan-1-ol and (E)-2-hexen-1-ol as being of secondary importance in that context. In the field, the two isomers of β-ocimene resulted in trap catches similar to those obtained with the full pea flower mimic and the four-compound blend, which clearly demonstrated the prime significance of the β-ocimenes as attractants of C. nigricana. The high level of the trap catches of female C. nigricana noted in this first field experiment gives a first indication of the potential use of such artificial kairomones in pea moth control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Immunodiagnosis of Citrus leprosis virus C using a polyclonal antibody to an expressed putative coat protein.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Nandlal; Roy, Avijit; Guillermo, Leon M; Picton, D D; Wei, G; Nakhla, M K; Levy, L; Brlansky, R H

    2013-11-01

    Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C), a causal agent for citrus leprosis disease, is present in South and Central America and is a threat for introduction into the U.S. citrus industry. A specific, inexpensive and reliable antibody based detection system is needed for the rapid identification of CiLV-C. The CiLV-C is very labile and has not been purified in sufficient amount for antibody production. The p29 gene of CiLV-C genome that codes for the putative coat protein (PCP) was codon optimized for expression in Escherichia coli and synthesized in vitro. The optimized gene was sub-cloned into the bacterial expression vector pDEST17 and transferred into E. coli BL21AI competent cells. The expression of PCP containing N-terminal His-tag was optimized by induction with l-arabinose. Induced cells were disrupted by sonication and expressed PCP was purified by affinity chromatography using Ni-NTA agarose. The purified expressed PCP was then used as an immunogen for injections into rabbits to produce polyclonal antibody (PAb). The PAb specific to the expressed PCP was identified using Western blotting. The antibody was successfully used to detect CiLV-C in the symptomatic CiLV-C infected tissues using double antibody sandwich-enzyme-linked-immunosorbent (DAS-ELISA), indirect ELISA and dot-blot immunoassay (DBIA) formats.

  6. Estradiol attenuates down-regulation of PEA-15 and its two phosphorylated forms in ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Estradiol exerts a neuroprotective effect against focal cerebral ischemic injury through the inhibition of apoptotic signals. Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes 15 (PEA-15) is mainly expressed in brain that perform anti-apoptotic functions. This study investigated whether estradiol modulates the expression of PEA-15 and two phosphorylated forms of PEA-15 (Ser 104 and Ser 116) in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced injury and glutamate exposure-induced neuronal cell death. Adult female rats were ovariectomized to remove endogenous estradiol and treated with vehicle or estradiol prior to MCAO. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by MCAO and cerebral cortices were collected 24 h after MCAO. Western blot analysis indicated that estradiol prevents the MCAO-induced decrease in PEA-15, phospho-PEA-15 (Ser 104), phospho-PEA-15 (Ser 116). Glutamate exposure induced a reduction in PEA-15, phospho-PEA-15 (Ser 104), phospho-PEA-15 (Ser 116) in cultured neurons, whereas estradiol treatment attenuated the glutamate toxicity-induced decrease in the expression of these proteins. It has been known that phosphorylation of PEA-15 is an important step in carrying out its anti-apoptotic function. Thus, these findings suggest that the regulation of PEA-15 phosphorylation by estradiol contributes to the neuroprotective function of estradiol in ischemic brain injury. PMID:25806082

  7. Generation of transgenic plants expressing antibodies to the environmental pollutant microcystin-LR.

    PubMed

    Drake, Pascal M W; Barbi, Tommaso; Drever, Matthew R; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Porter, Andrew J R; Ma, Julian K-C

    2010-03-01

    We describe the engineering, regeneration, and characterization of transgenic tobacco plants expressing a recombinant antibody specific to microcystin-LR (MC-LR), the environmental toxin pollutant produced by species of cyanobacteria. The antibody was created by a genetic fusion of the antigen-binding regions of the microcystin-specific single-chain antibody, 3A8, with constant regions from the murine IgG1kappa, Guy's 13. IgG transgenes were controlled by a leader peptide that targets the transgene products to the secretory pathway and also allows for rhizosecretion. The antibody, extracted from the leaves or rhizosecreted into hydroponic medium by transgenic plants, was shown to have functional binding to MC-LR. Antibody yields in transgenic plant leaves reached a maximum of 64 microg/g leaf fresh weight (0.6% total soluble protein), and the rate of antibody rhizosecretion reached a maximum of 5 microg/g root dry weight/24 h. Rhizosecreted antibody bound to MC-LR in hydroponic medium, and transgenic plants grew more efficiently on medium containing MC-LR compared to wild-type controls. This proof of concept paves the way for applications to produce diagnostic antibodies to microcystin-LR, remove it from the environment by phytoremediation, or enhance yields in crops exposed to MC-LR.-Drake, P. M. W., Barbi, T., Drever, M. R., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Porter, A. J. R., Ma, J. K.-C. Generation of transgenic plants expressing antibodies to the environmental pollutant microcystin-LR.

  8. Femtosecond spectroscopy probes the folding quality of antibody fragments expressed as GFP fusions in the cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Didier, P.; Weiss, E.; Sibler, A.-P.; Philibert, P.; Martineau, P.; Bigot, J.-Y.; Guidoni, L.

    2008-02-22

    Time-resolved femtosecond spectroscopy can improve the application of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) as protein-folding reporters. The study of ultrafast excited-state dynamics (ESD) of GFP fused to single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody fragments, allowed us to define and measure an empirical parameter that only depends on the folding quality (FQ) of the fusion. This method has been applied to the analysis of genetic fusions expressed in the bacterial cytoplasm and allowed us to distinguish folded and thus functional antibody fragments (high FQ) with respect to misfolded antibody fragments. Moreover, these findings were strongly correlated to the behavior of the same scFvs expressed in animal cells. This method is based on the sensitivity of the ESD to the modifications in the tertiary structure of the GFP induced by the aggregation state of the fusion partner. This approach may be applicable to the study of the FQ of polypeptides over-expressed under reducing conditions.

  9. A positive role for PEA3 in HER2-mediated breast tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Myers, E; Hill, A D K; Kelly, G; McDermott, E W; O'Higgins, N J; Young, L S

    2006-01-01

    Overexpression of HER2 is associated with an adverse prognosis in breast cancer. Despite this, the mechanism of its transcriptional regulation remains poorly understood. PEA3, a MAP kinase (MAPK)-activated member of the Ets transcription factor family has been implicated in the transcriptional regulation of HER2. The direction of its modulation remains controversial. We assessed relative levels of PEA3 expression and DNA binding in primary breast cultures derived from patient tumours (n=18) in the presence of an activated MAPK pathway using Western blotting and shift analysis. Expression of PEA3 in breast tumours from patients of known HER2 status (n=107) was examined by immunohistochemistry. In primary breast cancer cell cultures, growth factors induced interaction between PEA3 and its DNA response element. Upregulation of PEA3 expression in the presence of growth factors associated with HER2 positivity and axillary lymph node metastasis (P=0.034 and 0.049, respectively). PEA3 expression in breast cancer tissue associated with reduced disease-free survival (P<0.001), Grade III tumours (P<0.0001) and axillary lymph node metastasis (P=0.026). Co-expression of PEA3 and HER2 significantly associated with rate of recurrence compared to patients who expressed HER2 alone (P=0.0039). These data support a positive role for PEA3 in HER2-mediated oncogenesis in breast cancer. PMID:17060941

  10. AAV-directed persistent expression of a gene encoding anti-nicotine antibody for smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Martin J; Rosenberg, Jonathan B; De, Bishnu P; Pagovich, Odelya E; Young, Colin N; Qiu, Jian-ping; Kaminsky, Stephen M; Hackett, Neil R; Worgall, Stefan; Janda, Kim D; Davisson, Robin L; Crystal, Ronald G

    2012-06-27

    Current strategies to help tobacco smokers quit have limited success as a result of the addictive properties of the nicotine in cigarette smoke. We hypothesized that a single administration of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vector expressing high levels of an anti-nicotine antibody would persistently prevent nicotine from reaching its receptors in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we constructed an AAVrh.10 vector that expressed a full-length, high-affinity, anti-nicotine antibody derived from the Fab fragment of the anti-nicotine monoclonal antibody NIC9D9 (AAVantiNic). In mice treated with this vector, blood concentrations of the anti-nicotine antibody were dose-dependent, and the antibody showed high specificity and affinity for nicotine. The antibody shielded the brain from systemically administered nicotine, reducing brain nicotine concentrations to 15% of those in naïve mice. The amount of nicotine sequestered in the serum of vector-treated mice was more than seven times greater than that in untreated mice, with 83% of serum nicotine bound to immunoglobulin G. Treatment with the AAVantiNic vector blocked nicotine-mediated alterations in arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and locomotor activity. In summary, a single administration of a gene transfer vector expressing a high-affinity anti-nicotine monoclonal antibody elicited persistent (18 weeks), high titers of an anti-nicotine antibody that obviated the physiologic effects of nicotine. If this degree of efficacy translates to humans, AAVantiNic could be an effective preventative therapy for nicotine addiction.

  11. Cloning, expression and polyclonal antibody preparation of the asialoglycoprotein receptor of Marmota himalayan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Huang, Huang; Zhang, Zhenghua; Wang, Baoju; Tian, Yongjun; Lu, Mengji; Yang, Dongliang

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this study is to express the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) H1 and H2 subunits of Marmota himalayan in vitro, and develop polyclonal antibodies against the recombinant proteins. RT-PCR was used to amplify ASGPR CRDH1 and CRDH2 from the liver tissue of Marmota himalayan. The products of amplification were subcloned into prokaryotic expression vector pRSET-B, and expressed in E.coli BL21(DE3)plysS. The recombinant proteins were purified using Ni-NTA spin column. The purified proteins were inoculated into BALB/c mice to develop polyclonal antibodies. The sensitivity and specificity of antibodies were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining (IHC). The polyclonal antibodies showed high sensitivity and specificity against both denaturated and native ASGPR proteins. We successfully amplified and expressed the ASGPR CRDs of Marmota himalayan. The nucleic sequences of ASGPR CRDH1 and CRDH2 of Marmota himalayan have been submitted to Genbank and the sequence ID are DQ 845465 and DQ845466, respectively. The proteins and antibodies prepared can be used for targeting gene therapy in a new animal model-Marmota Himalayan-for the research of infectious diseases of hepatitis viruses and liver cancer treatment.

  12. Marker antibody expression stratifies Crohn's disease into immunologically homogeneous subgroups with distinct clinical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliauskas, E; Kam, L; Karp, L; Gaiennie, J; Yang, H; Targan, S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) have been detected in a clinically distinct Crohn's disease subpopulation. Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA) have been demonstrated in the majority of patients with Crohn's disease.
AIMS—To examine the relationship between selective marker antibody expression in Crohn's disease and disease onset, location, and clinical behaviour patterns.
METHODS—Sera from 156 consecutive patients with established Crohn's disease were evaluated in a blinded fashion for the presence of ASCA and ANCA. Clinical profiles were generated by investigators blinded to immune marker status.
RESULTS—Using multiple regression analyses, higher ASCA levels were shown to be independently associated with early age of disease onset as well as both fibrostenosing and internal penetrating disease behaviours. Higher ANCA levels were associated with later age of onset and ulcerative colitis-like behaviour. Substratification of the Crohn's disease population using selective ANCA and ASCA expression (high levels of a single marker antibody): (1) distinguished homogeneous subgroups that manifested similar disease location and behaviours; and (2) identified patients with more aggressive small bowel disease.
CONCLUSIONS—The findings suggest that by taking into account the magnitude of the host immune response, Crohn's disease can now be stratified on an immunological basis into more homogeneous clinically distinct subgroups, characterised by greater uniformity among anatomical distribution of disease and disease behaviour.


Keywords: antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody; anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody; Crohn's disease; inflammatory bowel disease; ulcerative colitis PMID:10986208

  13. Iron as the Key Modulator of Hepcidin Expression in Erythroid Antibody-Mediated Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, J. C.; Garrido, P.; Ribeiro, S.; Rocha-Pereira, P.; Bronze-da-Rocha, E.; Belo, L.; Costa, E.; Reis, F.; Santos-Silva, A.

    2014-01-01

    Erythroid hypoplasia (EH) is a rare complication associated with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapies, due to development of anti-rHuEPO antibodies; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly clarified. Our aim was to manage a rat model of antibody-mediated EH induced by rHuEPO and study the impact on iron metabolism and erythropoiesis. Wistar rats treated during 9 weeks with a high rHuEPO dose (200 IU) developed EH, as shown by anemia, reduced erythroblasts, reticulocytopenia, and plasmatic anti-rHuEPO antibodies. Serum iron was increased and associated with mRNA overexpression of hepatic hepcidin and other iron regulatory mediators and downregulation of matriptase-2; overexpression of divalent metal transporter 1 and ferroportin was observed in duodenum and liver. Decreased EPO expression was observed in kidney and liver, while EPO receptor was overexpressed in liver. Endogenous EPO levels were normal, suggesting that anti-rHuEPO antibodies blunted EPO function. Our results suggest that anti-rHuEPO antibodies inhibit erythropoiesis causing anemia. This leads to a serum iron increase, which seems to stimulate hepcidin expression despite no evidence of inflammation, thus suggesting iron as the key modulator of hepcidin synthesis. These findings might contribute to improving new therapeutic strategies against rHuEPO resistance and/or development of antibody-mediated EH in patients under rHuEPO therapy. PMID:25580431

  14. Preparation of Polyclonal Antibody and Expression Analysis of GR in Tomato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yuanhong; Zhu, Benzhong; Luo, Yunbo; Chen, Xiangning; Zhang, Hongxing

    The fruit ripening of Green-ripe (Gr) mutant tomato was inhibited dramatically. To determine the expression patterns of Gr in tomato, we first produced the polyclonal antibody of Gr protein. RT-PCR was used to amplify the Gr gene from green ripe tomato fruit. And the PCR product was subcloned into prokaryotic protein expression vectors pET-30a to generate recombinant plasmid. The Gr protein was induced by IPTG in BL21 (DE3) and purified by Ni-NTA agarose column. The anti-Gr serum was produced by immunizing rabbits, and the titer of the anti-Gr serum was above 5000 by ELISA analysis. Purified by the DEAE-52 ion-column, the high purification level of anti-Gr polyclonal antibody was obtained. Furthermore, RT-CPR was used in the RNA level to demonstrate that the expression of Gr gene was specialized in some cultures of tomato. For example, the expressions of Gr were higher in seed, flower and green ripe fruit than others, and the expression level were reduced by exogenous ethylene treatment in the flower and green ripe fruit. Moreover, Polyclonal antibody of Gr was used to investigate the expression pattern of Gr in protein level by the Western blotting. Our results show that the expression level of Gr in protein level was complied with the expressions in RNA. So, we suggested that the regulation of Gr was transcriptional.

  15. Oligomer-targeting with a conformational antibody fragment promotes toxicity in Aβ-expressing flies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The self-assembly of Aβ peptides into a range of conformationally heterogeneous amyloid states represents a fundamental event in Alzheimer’s disease. Within these structures oligomeric intermediates are considered to be particularly pathogenic. To test this hypothesis we have used a conformational targeting approach where particular conformational states, such as oligomers or fibrils, are recognized in vivo by state-specific antibody fragments. Results We show that oligomer targeting with the KW1 antibody fragment, but not fibril targeting with the B10 antibody fragment, affects toxicity in Aβ-expressing Drosophila melanogaster. The effect of KW1 is observed to occur selectively with flies expressing Aβ(1–40) and not with those expressing Aβ(1–42) or the arctic variant of Aβ(1–42) This finding is consistent with the binding preference of KW1 for Aβ(1–40) oligomers that has been established in vitro. Strikingly, and in contrast to the previously demonstrated in vitro ability of this antibody fragment to block oligomeric toxicity in long-term potentiation measurements, KW1 promotes toxicity in the flies rather than preventing it. This result shows the crucial importance of the environment in determining the influence of antibody binding on the nature and consequences of the protein misfolding and aggregation. Conclusions While our data support to the pathological relevance of oligomers, they highlight the issues to be addressed when developing inhibitory strategies that aim to neutralize these states by means of antagonistic binding agents. PMID:24725347

  16. Spontaneous reversal of acquired autoimmune dysfibrinogenemia probably due to an antiidiotypic antibody directed to an interspecies cross-reactive idiotype expressed on antifibrinogen antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Arguelles, A

    1988-01-01

    A young man with a long history of abnormal bleeding was seen in January 1985. Coagulation tests showed dysfibrinogenemia and an antifibrinogen autoantibody was demonstrable in his serum. This antibody, when purified, was capable of inhibiting the polymerization of normal fibrin monomers, apparently through binding to the alpha fibrinogen chain. 6 mo later the patient was asymptomatic, coagulation tests were normal, and the antifibrinogen autoantibody was barely detectable. At this time, affinity-purified autologous and rabbit antifibrinogen antibodies were capable of absorbing an IgG kappa antibody from the patient's serum, which reacted indistinctly with both autologous and xenogeneic antifibrinogen antibodies in enzyme immunoassays. It has been concluded that the patient's dysfibrinogenemia was the result of an antifibrinogen autoantibody, and that later on an anti-idiotype antibody, which binds an interspecies cross-reactive idiotype expressed on anti-human fibrinogen antibodies, inhibited the production of the antifibrinogen autoantibody which led to the remission of the disorder. Images PMID:3262127

  17. Pea Chaperones under Centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talalaiev, Oleksandr

    2008-06-01

    Etiolated Pisum sativum seedlings were subjected to altered g-forces by centrifugation (3-14g). By using semiquantitative RT-PCR, we studied transcripts of pea genes coding for chaperones that are representatives of small heat shock proteins (sHsps) family. Four members from the different classes of sHsps: cytosolic Hsp17.7 and Hsp18.1 (class I and class II accordingly), chloroplast Hsp21 (class III) and endoplasmic reticulum Hsp22.7 (class IV) were investigated. We conclude that exposure to 3, 7, 10 and 14g for 1h did not affect the level of sHsp transcripts.

  18. [Cloning and expression of VLRB of Lampetra japonica and generation of the corresponding monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Wu, Fen-Fang; Ma, Ning; Chen, Li-Yong; Su, Peng; Li, Qing-Wei

    2012-04-01

    The agnathans (lampreys and hagfishes) are representatives of the jawless vertebrates. The receptor molecules of adaptive immune system in lampreys are different from the antigen receptors in mammal vertebrates. The unique receptor molecules of lampreys are known as variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR). There are three types of VLRs in lampreys, VLRA, VLRB, and VLRC. Multimeric antigen-specific VLRB antibodies are secreted by VLRB+ lymphocytes and constitute the major components of the humoral arm of the lamprey adaptive immune system. Oligomeric VLRB antibodies are composed of four or five disulfide-linked dimeric subunits, which are similar to IgM antibodies in structure and function. In this study, the conservative c-terminal of Lampetra japonica VLRB was cloned and expressed in BL21 E. coli. The recombinant VLRB protein was purified by Ni2+ affinity chromatography column. After Balb/c mice immunity, cell fusion, the positive clones were screened by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Finally, the hybridoma cells that produced specific anti-VLRB monoclonal antibodies were obtained. In order to get a large number of antibodies against VLRB, the hybridoma cells were injected into the abdominal cavity of Balb/c mice and the antibodies were purified by protein G sepharose. The results of ELISA indicated that the valence of anti-VLRB antibodies was 1:40000. Western blotting assay showed that the antibodies were able to detect both recombinant VLRB and secreted VLRB in lamprey sera. Flow cytometry analysis also revealed the existence of VLRB on the surface of lymphocytes. In summary, the anti-VLRB monoclonal antibodies provided a major tool for studying lamprey adaptive immune system.

  19. Integrative Expression System for Delivery of Antibody Fragments by Lactobacilli▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Martín, M. Cruz; Pant, Neha; Ladero, Victor; Günaydın, Gökçe; Andersen, Kasper Krogh; Álvarez, Beatriz; Martínez, Noelia; Alvarez, Miguel A.; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold

    2011-01-01

    A series of expression cassettes which mediate secretion or surface display of antibody fragments was stably integrated in the chromosome of Lactobacillus paracasei. L. paracasei producing surface-anchored variable domain of llama heavy chain (VHH) (ARP1) directed against rotavirus showed efficient binding to rotavirus and protection in the mouse model of rotavirus infection. PMID:21257814

  20. The level of HER2 expression is a predictor of antibody-HER2 trafficking behavior in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ram, Sripad; Kim, Dongyoung; Ober, Raimund J; Ward, E Sally

    2014-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase HER2 is known to play a central role in mitogenic signaling, motivating the development of targeted, HER2-specific therapies. However, despite the longstanding use of antibodies to target HER2, controversies remain concerning antibody/HER2 trafficking behavior in cancer cells. Understanding this behavior has direct relevance to the mechanism of action and effective design of such antibodies. In the current study, we analyzed the intracellular dynamics of trastuzumab, a marketed HER2-targeting antibody, in a panel of breast and prostate cancer cell lines that have a wide range of HER2 expression levels. Our results reveal distinct post-endocytic trafficking behavior of antibody-HER2 complexes in cells with different HER2 expression levels. In particular, HER2-overexpressing cells exhibit efficient HER2 recycling and limited reductions in HER2 levels upon antibody treatment, and consequently display a high level of antibody persistence on their plasma membrane. By contrast, in cells with low HER2 expression, trastuzumab treatment results in rapid antibody clearance from the plasma membrane combined with substantial decreases in HER2 levels and undetectable levels of recycling. A cell line with intermediate levels of HER2 expression exhibits both antibody recycling and clearance from the cell surface. Significantly, these analyses demonstrate that HER2 expression levels, rather than cell origin (breast or prostate), is a determinant of subcellular trafficking properties. Such studies have relevance to optimizing the design of antibodies to target HER2.

  1. Expression of two cross-reactive idiotypes on mouse antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, S

    1987-01-01

    Two cross-reactive anti-idiotype (Id) antibodies were previously prepared from sera of rabbits immunized with mouse monoclonal antibodies against bromelain-treated mouse erythrocytes (BrMRBC). Most of the anti-BrMRBC plaque-forming cells (PFC) were suppressed by either of the two anti-Id antibodies. The Id profiles of anti-BrMRBC PFC were almost identical among various cell populations in a strain, but different among various mouse strains. Mouse sera contained both of the Id-bearing immunoglobulins Ig, and a significant part of the Id-bearing Ig were eliminated by absorption with BrMRBC. Nude BALB/c mice were almost equal to normal BALB/c mice in the Id patterns of anti-BrMRBC PFC and in the concentrations of the Id-bearing Ig. The injections of anti-Id antibodies into suckling mice suppressed, specifically, the development of the B cells to produce the homologous Id-bearing Ig, but the injection of Id-bearing monoclonal antibodies barely affected Id expression. It is suggested that the two Id are encoded in germ-line genes of mice, and are expressed independently of each other and Id-anti-Id regulations by T cells or B cells. PMID:3327804

  2. Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes (PEA)-15: A potential therapeutic target in multiple disease states

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Fiona H.; Nixon, Graeme F.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes-15 (PEA-15) is a cytoplasmic protein that sits at an important junction in intracellular signalling and can regulate diverse cellular processes, such as proliferation and apoptosis, dependent upon stimulation. Regulation of these processes occurs by virtue of the unique interaction of PEA-15 with other signalling proteins. PEA-15 acts as a cytoplasmic tether for the mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) preventing nuclear localisation. In order to release ERK1/2, PEA-15 requires to be phosphorylated via several potential pathways. PEA-15 (and its phosphorylation state) therefore regulates many ERK1/2-dependent processes, including proliferation, via regulating ERK1/2 nuclear translocation. In addition, PEA-15 contains a death effector domain (DED) which allows interaction with other DED-containing proteins. PEA-15 can bind the DED-containing apoptotic adaptor molecule, Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD) which is also dependent on the phosphorylation status of PEA-15. PEA-15 binding of FADD can inhibit apoptosis as bound FADD cannot participate in the assembly of apoptotic signalling complexes. Through these protein–protein interactions, PEA-15-regulated cellular effects have now been investigated in a number of disease-related studies. Changes in PEA-15 expression and regulation have been observed in diabetes mellitus, cancer, neurological disorders and the cardiovascular system. These changes have been suggested to contribute to the pathology related to each of these disease states. As such, new therapeutic targets based around PEA-15 and its associated interactions are now being uncovered and could provide novel avenues for treatment strategies in multiple diseases. PMID:24657708

  3. Pituitary expression of CTLA-4 mediates hypophysitis secondary to administration of CTLA-4 blocking antibody.

    PubMed

    Iwama, Shintaro; De Remigis, Alessandra; Callahan, Margaret K; Slovin, Susan F; Wolchok, Jedd D; Caturegli, Patrizio

    2014-04-02

    Hypophysitis is a chronic inflammation of the pituitary gland of unknown (primary forms) or recognizable (secondary forms) etiology, such as the use of ipilimumab in cancer immunotherapy. Ipilimumab, which blocks the T cell inhibitory molecule CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4), induces hypophysitis in about 4% of patients through unknown mechanisms. We first established a model of secondary hypophysitis by repeated injections of a CTLA-4 blocking antibody into SJL/J or C57BL/6J mice, and showed that they developed lymphocytic infiltration of the pituitary gland and circulating pituitary antibodies. We next assessed the prevalence of pituitary antibodies in a cohort of 20 patients with advanced melanoma or prostate cancer, 7 with a clinical diagnosis of hypophysitis, before and after ipilimumab administration. Pituitary antibodies, negative at baseline, developed in the 7 patients with hypophysitis but not in the 13 without it; these antibodies predominantly recognized thyrotropin-, follicle-stimulating hormone-, and corticotropin-secreting cells. We then hypothesized that the injected CTLA-4 antibody could cause pituitary toxicity if bound to CTLA-4 antigen expressed "ectopically" on pituitary endocrine cells. Pituitary glands indeed expressed CTLA-4 at both RNA and protein levels, particularly in a subset of prolactin- and thyrotropin-secreting cells. Notably, these cells became the site of complement activation, featuring deposition of C3d and C4d components and an inflammatory cascade akin to that seen in type II hypersensitivity. In summary, the study offers a mechanism to explain the pituitary toxicity observed in patients receiving ipilimumab, and highlights the utility of measuring pituitary antibodies in this form of secondary hypophysitis.

  4. Induction of type I interferon secretion through recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing measles virus hemagglutinin stimulates antibody secretion in the presence of maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dhohyung; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Choi, Changsun; Petroff, Natasha; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Niewiesk, Stefan; Carsillo, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) vaccine effectively protects seronegative individuals against infection. However, inhibition of vaccine-induced seroconversion by maternal antibodies after vaccination remains a problem, as it leaves infants susceptible to MV infection. In cotton rats, passive transfer of MV-specific IgG mimics maternal antibodies and inhibits vaccine-induced seroconversion. Here, we report that immunization in the presence of passively transferred IgG inhibits the secretion of neutralizing antibodies but not the generation of MV-specific B cells. This finding suggested that MV-specific B cells require an additional stimulus to mature into antibody-secreting plasma cells. In order to provide such a stimulus, we generated a recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) expressing the MV hemagglutinin (NDV-H). In contrast to MV, NDV-H induced high levels of type I interferon in plasmacytoid dendritic cells and in lung tissue. In cotton rats immunized with NDV-H, neutralizing antibodies were also generated in the presence of passively transferred antibodies. In the latter case, however, the level and kinetics of antibody generation were reduced. In vitro, alpha interferon stimulated the activation of MV-specific B cells from MV-immune spleen cells. NDV infection (which induces alpha interferon) had the same effect, and stimulation could be abrogated by antibodies neutralizing alpha interferon, but not interleukin 6 (IL-6). In vivo, coapplication of UV-inactivated MV with NDV led to increased MV-specific antibody production in the presence and absence of passively transferred antibodies. These data indicate that MV-specific B cells are being generated after immunization in the presence of maternal antibodies and that the provision of alpha interferon as an additional signal leads to antibody secretion.

  5. Reconstruction and expression of chimeric anti-HBx antibody in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G; Liu, K D; Tang, Z Y; Chen, Y H; Wu, X F; Schroeder, C H

    1997-01-01

    The variable regions of murine monoclonal anti-HBx immunoglobulin and the constant region of human antibody were cloned by reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The heavy-chain and light-chain variable regions were connected and coexpressed with human constant region C-r3 and C-k3 in the reconstructed vector of E. coli. The products showed high specificity and binding ability with HBx. Which is closely associated with hepatocarcinogenesis. This makes it possible to humanize the mouse monoclonal antibodies and express the fusion protein in E.coli for potential radioimmunotherapy in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

  6. Rapid transcriptome characterization and parsing of sequences in a non-model host-pathogen interaction; pea-Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background White mold, caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, is one of the most important diseases of pea (Pisum sativum L.), however, little is known about the genetics and biochemistry of this interaction. Identification of genes underlying resistance in the host or pathogenicity and virulence factors in the pathogen will increase our knowledge of the pea-S. sclerotiorum interaction and facilitate the introgression of new resistance genes into commercial pea varieties. Although the S. sclerotiorum genome sequence is available, no pea genome is available, due in part to its large genome size (~3500 Mb) and extensive repeated motifs. Here we present an EST data set specific to the interaction between S. sclerotiorum and pea, and a method to distinguish pathogen and host sequences without a species-specific reference genome. Results 10,158 contigs were obtained by de novo assembly of 128,720 high-quality reads generated by 454 pyrosequencing of the pea-S. sclerotiorum interactome. A method based on the tBLASTx program was modified to distinguish pea and S. sclerotiorum ESTs. To test this strategy, a mixture of known ESTs (18,490 pea and 17,198 S. sclerotiorum ESTs) from public databases were pooled and parsed; the tBLASTx method successfully separated 90.1% of the artificial EST mix with 99.9% accuracy. The tBLASTx method successfully parsed 89.4% of the 454-derived EST contigs, as validated by PCR, into pea (6,299 contigs) and S. sclerotiorum (2,780 contigs) categories. Two thousand eight hundred and forty pea ESTs and 996 S. sclerotiorum ESTs were predicted to be expressed specifically during the pea-S. sclerotiorum interaction as determined by homology search against 81,449 pea ESTs (from flowers, leaves, cotyledons, epi- and hypocotyl, and etiolated and light treated etiolated seedlings) and 57,751 S. sclerotiorum ESTs (from mycelia at neutral pH, developing apothecia and developing sclerotia). Among those ESTs specifically expressed, 277 (9.8%) pea ESTs

  7. Rapid transcriptome characterization and parsing of sequences in a non-model host-pathogen interaction; pea-Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiaofeng; McPhee, Kevin E; Coram, Tristan E; Peever, Tobin L; Chilvers, Martin I

    2012-11-26

    White mold, caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, is one of the most important diseases of pea (Pisum sativum L.), however, little is known about the genetics and biochemistry of this interaction. Identification of genes underlying resistance in the host or pathogenicity and virulence factors in the pathogen will increase our knowledge of the pea-S. sclerotiorum interaction and facilitate the introgression of new resistance genes into commercial pea varieties. Although the S. sclerotiorum genome sequence is available, no pea genome is available, due in part to its large genome size (~3500 Mb) and extensive repeated motifs. Here we present an EST data set specific to the interaction between S. sclerotiorum and pea, and a method to distinguish pathogen and host sequences without a species-specific reference genome. 10,158 contigs were obtained by de novo assembly of 128,720 high-quality reads generated by 454 pyrosequencing of the pea-S. sclerotiorum interactome. A method based on the tBLASTx program was modified to distinguish pea and S. sclerotiorum ESTs. To test this strategy, a mixture of known ESTs (18,490 pea and 17,198 S. sclerotiorum ESTs) from public databases were pooled and parsed; the tBLASTx method successfully separated 90.1% of the artificial EST mix with 99.9% accuracy. The tBLASTx method successfully parsed 89.4% of the 454-derived EST contigs, as validated by PCR, into pea (6,299 contigs) and S. sclerotiorum (2,780 contigs) categories. Two thousand eight hundred and forty pea ESTs and 996 S. sclerotiorum ESTs were predicted to be expressed specifically during the pea-S. sclerotiorum interaction as determined by homology search against 81,449 pea ESTs (from flowers, leaves, cotyledons, epi- and hypocotyl, and etiolated and light treated etiolated seedlings) and 57,751 S. sclerotiorum ESTs (from mycelia at neutral pH, developing apothecia and developing sclerotia). Among those ESTs specifically expressed, 277 (9.8%) pea ESTs were predicted to be

  8. Production of Polyclonal Antibody against Grapevine fanleaf virus Movement Protein Expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Koolivand, Davoud; Bashir, Nemat Sokhandan; Behjatnia, Seyed Aliakbar; Joozani, Raziallah Jafari

    2016-01-01

    The genomic region of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) encoding the movement protein (MP) was cloned into pET21a and transformed into Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) to express the protein. Induction was made with a wide range of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) concentrations (1, 1.5, and 2 mM) each for duration of 4, 6, or 16 h. However, the highest expression level was achieved with 1 mM IPTG for 4 h. Identity of the expressed protein was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) followed by Western blotting. The expressed 41 kDa protein was purified under denaturing condition by affinity chromatography, reconfirmed by Western blotting and plate-trapped antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PTA-ELISA) before being used as a recombinant antigen to raise polyclonal antibodies in rabbits. Purified anti-GFLV MP immunoglobulines (IgGs) and conjugated IgGs detected the expressed MP and GFLV virions in infected grapevines when used in PTA-ELISA, double antibody sandwich-ELISA, and Western blotting. This is the first report on the production of anti-GFLV MP polyclonal antibodies and application for the virus detection. PMID:27721695

  9. Extracellular Expression in Aspergillus niger of an Antibody Fused to Leishmania sp. Antigens.

    PubMed

    Magaña-Ortíz, Denis; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2017-08-31

    Nucleoside hydrolase and sterol 24-c-methyltransferase, two antigenic proteins of Leishmania sp., were expressed in Aspergillus niger. Genetic transformation of conidia was achieved using underwater shock waves. scFv antibody addressed to DEC205, a receptor of dendritic cells, was fused to two proteins of Leishmania sp. Receptor 205 has a relevant role in the immune system in mammals; it can modulate T cell response to different antigens. Extracellular expression strategy of recombinant antibody was achieved using a fragment of native glucoamylase A (514 aa) as a carrier. Fermentations in shake flasks showed that the recombinant protein (104 kDa) was expressed and secreted only when maltose was used as carbon source; on the contrary, the expression was highly repressed in presence of xylose. Noteworthy, recombinant protein was secreted without glucoamylase-carrier and accumulation at intracellular level was not observed. The results presented here demonstrate the high value of Aspergillus niger as biotechnological platform for recombinant antibodies against Leishmania sp. at low cost. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report about the recombinant expression of antigenic proteins of Leishmania sp. in filamentous fungi. The protein obtained can be used to explore novel strategies to induce immunity against Leishmania sp. or it can be employed in diagnostic kits to detect this neglected disease.

  10. Conformational antibody binding to a native, cell-free expressed GPCR in block copolymer membranes.

    PubMed

    de Hoog, Hans-Peter M; Lin JieRong, Esther M; Banerjee, Sourabh; Décaillot, Fabien M; Nallani, Madhavan

    2014-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a key role in physiological processes and are attractive drug targets. Their biophysical characterization is, however, highly challenging because of their innate instability outside a stabilizing membrane and the difficulty of finding a suitable expression system. We here show the cell-free expression of a GPCR, CXCR4, and its direct embedding in diblock copolymer membranes. The polymer-stabilized CXCR4 is readily immobilized onto biosensor chips for label-free binding analysis. Kinetic characterization using a conformationally sensitive antibody shows the receptor to exist in the correctly folded conformation, showing binding behaviour that is commensurate with heterologously expressed CXCR4.

  11. Pea Xyloglucan and Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Takahisa; Marsden, Margery P. F.; Delmer, Deborah P.

    1987-01-01

    Since xyloglucan is believed to bind to cellulose microfibrils in the primary cell walls of higher plants and, when isolated from the walls, can also bind to cellulose in vitro, the binding mechanism of xyloglucan to cellulose was further investigated using radioiodinated pea xyloglucan. A time course for the binding showed that the radioiodinated xyloglucan continued to be bound for at least 4 hours at 40°C. Binding was inhibited above pH 6. Binding capacity was shown to vary for celluloses of different origin and was directly related to the relative surface area of the microfibrils. The binding of xyloglucan to cellulose was very specific and was not affected by the presence of a 10-fold excess of (1→2)-β-glucan, (1→3)-β-glucan, (1→6)-β-glucan, (1→3, 1→4)-β-glucan, arabinogalactan, or pectin. When xyloglucan (0.1%) was added to a cellulose-forming culture of Acetobacter xylinum, cellulose ribbon structure was partially disrupted indicating an association of xyloglucan with cellulose at the time of synthesis. Such a result suggests that the small size of primary wall microfibrils in higher plants may well be due to the binding of xyloglucan to cellulose during synthesis which prevents fasciation of small fibrils into larger bundles. Fluorescent xyloglucan was used to stain pea cell wall ghosts prepared to contain only the native xyloglucan:cellulose network or only cellulose. Ghosts containing only cellulose showed strong fluorescence when prepared before or after elongation; as predicted, the presence of native xyloglucan in the ghosts repressed binding of added fluorescent xyloglucan. Such ghosts, prepared after elongation when the ratio of native xyloglucan:cellulose is substantially reduced, still showed only faint fluorescence, indicating that microfibrils continue to be coated with xyloglucan throughout the growth period. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:16665254

  12. VH gene expression is restricted in anti-IgG antibodies from MRL autoimmune mice

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Antibodies directed against IgG and DNA are found in the sera of autoimmune MRL/Mp lpr/lpr mice. Little is known of the molecular mechanisms underlying expression of such autoantibodies. We have investigated the binding diversity and pattern of VH gene expression in a panel of murine anti-IgG antibodies. We constructed eight hybridoma clones secreting IgM antibodies that bound to mouse IgG by using spleen cells from MRL/Mp lpr/lpr mice varying in age from 4 to 15 wk; one clone was derived from a 32-wk-old MRL +/+ mouse. The monoclonal IgM products exhibited varying binding specificities for intact mouse IgG, fragments of mouse IgG [Fc, Fab, (Fab')2], and heterologous IgG. Two of these antibodies crossreacted with B and/or Z DNA. Probes from seven of eight identified mouse VH gene families (7183, S107, Q52, J558, J606, 36-60, and 3609) were hybridized under high-stringency conditions with cytoplasmic RNA blots from each clone. Six clones hybridized only with the probe from the five-member 36-60 family. The remaining three clones crosshybridized with the 36-60 probe and the probe from the 60 member J558 family, perhaps reflecting somatic mutation from the original germline VH gene resulting in recognition by a probe from another family, in addition to the probe from the original germline family. Our results indicate that spontaneous MRL lpr/lpr anti-IgG antibodies are encoded predominantly by the 36-60 VH gene family and imply a nonrandom selection of this VH gene family in the production of these antibodies. PMID:3093628

  13. ALK gene copy number gain and immunohistochemical expression status using three antibodies in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Sewha

    2016-03-17

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene aberrations-such as mutations, amplifications, and copy number gains-represent a major genetic predisposition to neuroblastoma (NB). This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between ALK gene copy number status, ALK protein expression, and clinicopathological parameters. We retrospectively retrieved 30 cases of poorly differentiated NB and constructed tissue microarrays (TMAs). ALK copy number changes were assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays, and ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing was performed using three different antibodies (ALK1, D5F3, and 5A4 clones). ALK amplification and copy number gain were observed in 10% (3/30) and 53.3% (16/30) of the cohort, respectively. There were positive correlations between ALK copy number and IHC positive rate in ALK1 and 5A4 antibodies (p= < 0.001 and 0.019, respectively). ALK1, D5F3, and 5A4 antibodies equally showed 100% sensitivity in detecting ALK amplification. However, the sensitivity for detecting copy number gain differed among the three antibodies, with 75% sensitivity in D5F3 and 0% sensitivity in ALK1. ALK-amplified NBs were correlated with synchronous MYCN amplification and chromosome 1p deletion. ALK IHC positivity was frequently observed in INSS stage IV and high-risk group patients. In conclusion, this study identified that an increase in the ALK copy number is a frequent genetic alteration in poorly differentiated NB. ALK-amplified NBs showed consistent ALK IHC positivity with all kinds of antibodies. In contrast, the detection performance of ALK copy number gain was antibody dependent, with the D5F3 antibody showing the best sensitivity.

  14. ALK Gene Copy Number Gain and Immunohistochemical Expression Status Using Three Antibodies in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Sewha

    2017-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase ( ALK) gene aberrations-such as mutations, amplifications, and copy number gains-represent a major genetic predisposition to neuroblastoma (NB). This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between ALK gene copy number status, ALK protein expression, and clinicopathological parameters. We retrospectively retrieved 30 cases of poorly differentiated NB and constructed tissue microarrays (TMAs). ALK copy number changes were assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays, and ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing was performed using three different antibodies (ALK1, D5F3, and 5A4 clones). ALK amplification and copy number gain were observed in 10% (3/30) and 53.3% (16/30) of the cohort, respectively. There were positive correlations between ALK copy number and IHC-positive rate in ALK1 and 5A4 antibodies ( P < 0.001 and P = 0.019, respectively). ALK1, D5F3, and 5A4 antibodies equally showed 100% sensitivity in detecting ALK amplification. However, the sensitivity for detecting copy number gain differed among the three antibodies, with 75% sensitivity in D5F3 and 0% sensitivity in ALK1. ALK-amplified NBs were correlated with synchronous MYCN amplification and chromosome 1p deletion. ALK IHC positivity was frequently observed in INSS stage IV and high-risk group patients. In conclusion, this study identified that an increase in the ALK copy number is a frequent genetic alteration in poorly differentiated NB. ALK-amplified NBs showed consistent ALK IHC positivity with all kinds of antibodies. In contrast, the detection performance of ALK copy number gain was antibody dependent, with the D5F3 antibody showing the best sensitivity.

  15. Immunotherapy for cancer: construction, expression and functional characterization of chimeric antibodies.

    PubMed

    Motmans, K; Thirion, S; Heyligen, H; Janssens, J; Raus, J; Vandevyver, C

    1996-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) are a potential key component for the treatment of cancer, because of their specificity and multiple effector functions. Hybridoma technology and progress in genetic engineering made it possible to customize antibody molecules, rendering them more suitable for selective application. A widely used technique is the construction of mouse-human hybrid molecules by recombinant DNA techniques. These so-called chimeric antibodies contain the murine variable (V) regions fused to the human constant (C) regions. In this report, a general approach is described for the production of chimeric antibodies. The gene segments encoding the murine variable heavy and light chain are isolated by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into expression vectors containing the human gamma 1 heavy chain gene and the human K light chain gene, respectively. Subsequently, these constructs are transfected into a non-Ig-producing murine hybridoma, eg SP2/0 cells. The in vitro study of the functional characteristics and biological properties of the thus obtained chimeric antibodies are discussed.

  16. PeaT1-induced systemic acquired resistance in tobacco follows salicylic acid-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yang, Xiufen; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua; Zeng, Hongmei; Mao, Jianjun; Gao, Qiufeng

    2011-04-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible defense mechanism which plays a central role in protecting plants from pathogen attack. A new elicitor, PeaT1 from Alternaria tenuissima, was expressed in Escherichia coil and characterized with systemic acquired resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). PeaT1-treated plants exhibited enhanced systemic resistance with a significant reduction in number and size of TMV lesions on wild tobacco leaves as compared with control. The quantitative analysis of TMV CP gene expression with real-time quantitative PCR showed there was reduction in TMV virus concentration after PeaT1 treatment. Similarly, peroxidase (POD) activity and lignin increased significantly after PeaT1 treatment. The real-time quantitative PCR revealed that PeaT1 also induced the systemic accumulation of pathogenesis-related gene, PR-1a and PR-1b which are the markers of systemic acquired resistance (SAR), NPR1 gene for salicylic acid (SA) signal transduction pathway and PAL gene for SA synthesis. The accumulation of SA and the failure in development of similar level of resistance as in wild type tobacco plants in PeaT1 treated nahG transgenic tobacco plants indicated that PeaT1-induced resistance depended on SA accumulation. The present work suggested that the molecular mechanism of PeaT1 inducing disease resistance in tobacco was likely through the systemic acquired resistance pathway mediated by salicylic acid and the NPR1 gene.

  17. Production and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies against RAI3 and its expression in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background RAI3 is an orphan G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that has been associated with malignancy and may play a role in the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Although its exact function in normal and malignant cells remains unclear and evidence supporting its role in oncogenesis is controversial, its abundant expression on the surface of cancer cells would make it an interesting target for the development of antibody-based therapeutics. To investigate the link with cancer and provide more evidence for its role, we carried out a systematic analysis of RAI3 expression in a large set of human breast cancer specimens. Methods We expressed recombinant human RAI3 in bacteria and reconstituted the purified protein in liposomes to raise monoclonal antibodies using classical hybridoma techniques. The specific binding activity of the antibodies was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), western blot and immunocytochemistry. We carried out a systematic immunohistochemical analysis of RAI3 expression in human invasive breast carcinomas (n = 147) and normal breast tissues (n = 44) using a tissue microarray. In addition, a cDNA dot blot hybridisation assay was used to investigate a set of matched normal and cancerous breast tissue specimens (n = 50) as well as lymph node metastases (n = 3) for RAI3 mRNA expression. Results The anti-RAI3 monoclonal antibodies bound to recombinant human RAI3 protein with high specificity and affinity, as shown by ELISA, western blot and ICC. The cDNA dot blot and immunohistochemical experiments showed that both RAI3 mRNA and RAI3 protein were abundantly expressed in human breast carcinoma. However, there was no association between RAI3 protein expression and prognosis based on overall and recurrence-free survival. Conclusion We have generated a novel, highly-specific monoclonal antibody that detects RAI3 in formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. This is the first study to report a systematic analysis of RAI3

  18. Effect of antibodies on the expression of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein gene.

    PubMed

    Jesuíno, B S; Casimiro, C; do Rosário, V E; Silveira, H

    2006-01-01

    Antibodies are known to play an important role in the control of malaria infection. However, they can modulate parasite development enhancing infection. The effect of anti-Plasmodium antibodies on the expression of circumsporozoite protein gene (csp) was investigated. Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 in vitro cultures were submitted to: i) anti- circumsporozoite protein monoclonal antibody (anti-CSP-mAb) [1microg/ml, 0.1microg/ml, 0.01microg/ml and 0.001microg/ml] and ii) purified IgG Fab fragment from a pool of malaria patients [1mg/ml and 1microg/ml]; and compared to control cultures. After 24h the number of ring infected erythrocytes was determined in order to calculate invasion efficacy. At 48h culture supernatant was collected, and the amount of circumsporozoite protein determined by ELISA, parasitaemia was calculated and cells were processed for RNA preparation. Expression of csp gene was quantified using Real time RT-PCR. There was an increase in parasite growth when treated with lower anti-CSP-mAb concentration, which was associated with lower csp expression, while 1mug/ml anti-CSP-mAb treatment presented a growth inhibitory effect accompanied by high csp expression.

  19. Effect of antibodies on the expression of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein gene

    PubMed Central

    Jesuíno, B S; Casimiro, C; do Rosário, V E; Silveira, H

    2006-01-01

    Antibodies are known to play an important role in the control of malaria infection. However, they can modulate parasite development enhancing infection. The effect of anti-Plasmodium antibodies on the expression of circumsporozoite protein gene (csp) was investigated. Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 in vitro cultures were submitted to: i) anti- circumsporozoite protein monoclonal antibody (anti-CSP-mAb) [1μg/ml, 0.1μg/ml, 0.01μg/ml and 0.001μg/ml] and ii) purified IgG Fab fragment from a pool of malaria patients [1mg/ml and 1μg/ml]; and compared to control cultures. After 24h the number of ring infected erythrocytes was determined in order to calculate invasion efficacy. At 48h culture supernatant was collected, and the amount of circumsporozoite protein determined by ELISA, parasitaemia was calculated and cells were processed for RNA preparation. Expression of csp gene was quantified using Real time RT-PCR. There was an increase in parasite growth when treated with lower anti-CSP-mAb concentration, which was associated with lower csp expression, while 1μg/ml anti-CSP-mAb treatment presented a growth inhibitory effect accompanied by high csp expression. PMID:16421624

  20. Plasmapheresis eliminates the negative impact of AAV antibodies on microdystrophin gene expression following vascular delivery.

    PubMed

    Chicoine, L G; Montgomery, C L; Bremer, W G; Shontz, K M; Griffin, D A; Heller, K N; Lewis, S; Malik, V; Grose, W E; Shilling, C J; Campbell, K J; Preston, T J; Coley, B D; Martin, P T; Walker, C M; Clark, K R; Sahenk, Z; Mendell, J R; Rodino-Klapac, L R

    2014-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a monogenic disease potentially treatable by gene replacement. Use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) will ultimately require a vascular approach to broadly transduce muscle cells. We tested the impact of preexisting AAV antibodies on microdystrophin expression following vascular delivery to nonhuman primates. Rhesus macaques were treated by isolated limb perfusion using a fluoroscopically guided catheter. In addition to serostatus stratification, the animals were placed into one of the three immune suppression groups: no immune suppression, prednisone, and triple immune suppression (prednisone, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil). The animals were analyzed for transgene expression at 3 or 6 months. Microdystrophin expression was visualized in AAV, rhesus serotype 74 sero-negative animals (mean: 48.0 ± 20.8%) that was attenuated in sero-positive animals (19.6 ± 18.7%). Immunosuppression did not affect transgene expression. Importantly, removal of AAV binding antibodies by plasmapheresis in AAV sero-positive animals resulted in high-level transduction (60.8 ± 18.0%), which is comparable with that of AAV sero-negative animals (53.7 ± 7.6%), whereas non-pheresed sero-positive animals demonstrated significantly lower transduction levels (10.1 ± 6.0%). These data support the hypothesis that removal of AAV binding antibodies by plasmapheresis permits successful and sustained gene transfer in the presence of preexisting immunity (natural infection) to AAV.

  1. Expression characteristics and specific antibody reactivity of diverse cathepsin F members of Paragonimus westermani.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chun-Seob; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Chung, Dong-Ll; Kim, Jeong-Geun; Kim, Jin-Taek; Kong, Yoon

    2015-02-01

    Paragonimiasis, caused by the lung fluke Paragonimus, is a major food-borne helminthic disease. Differential diagnosis of paragonimiasis from tuberculosis and other infectious granulomas in the lung is a prerequisite to proper management of patients. Cysteine proteases of Paragonimus westermani (PwCPs) invoke specific antibody responses against patient sera, while antibody capturing activity of different PwCPs has not been comparatively analyzed. In this study, we observed the expressional regulation of 11 species of different PwCPs (PwCP1-11). We expressed recombinant PwCPs and assessed diagnostic reliability employing sera from patients with P. westermani (n=138), other trematodiases (n=80), cestodiases (n=60) and pulmonary tuberculosis (n=20), and those of normal controls (n=20). PwCPs formed a monophyletic clade into cathepsin F and showed differential expression patterns along with developmental stages of worm. Bacterially expressed recombinant PwCPs (rPwCPs) exhibited variable sensitivity of 38.4-84.5% and specificity of 87.2-100% in diagnosing homologous infection. rPwCPs recognized specific antibodies of experimental cat sera as early as 3 or 6weeks after infection. Patient sera of fascioliasis, Schistosomiasis japonicum and clonorchiasis demonstrated weak cross-reactions. Our results demonstrate that diverse PwCPs of the cathepsin F family participate in inducing specific antibody responses. Most P. westermani cathepsin F, except for PwCP2 (AAF21461), which showed negligible antibody responses, might be applicable for paragonimiasis serodiagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antibodies to probe endogenous G protein-coupled receptor heteromer expression, regulation, and function

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ivone; Gupta, Achla; Bushlin, Ittai; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade an increasing number of studies have focused on the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to form heteromers and explored how receptor heteromerization modulates the binding, signaling and trafficking properties of individual receptors. Most of these studies were carried out in heterologous cells expressing epitope tagged receptors. Very little information is available about the in vivo physiological role of G protein-coupled receptor heteromers due to a lack of tools to detect their presence in endogenous tissue. Recent advances such as the generation of mouse models expressing fluorescently labeled receptors, of TAT based peptides that can disrupt a given heteromer pair, or of heteromer-selective antibodies that recognize the heteromer in endogenous tissue have begun to elucidate the physiological and pathological roles of receptor heteromers. In this review we have focused on heteromer-selective antibodies and describe how a subtractive immunization strategy can be successfully used to generate antibodies that selectively recognize a desired heteromer pair. We also describe the uses of these antibodies to detect the presence of heteromers, to study their properties in endogenous tissues, and to monitor changes in heteromer levels under pathological conditions. Together, these findings suggest that G protein-coupled receptor heteromers represent unique targets for the development of drugs with reduced side-effects. PMID:25520661

  3. [Targeted detecting HER2 expression with recombinant anti HER2 ScFv-GFP fusion antibody].

    PubMed

    Gao, Guohui; Chen, Chong; Yang, Yanmei; Yang, Han; Wang, Jindan; Zheng, Yi; Huang, Qidi; Hu, Xiaoqu

    2012-08-01

    To verify the reliability of targeted detecting HER2 positive cancer cells and clinical pathological tissue specimens with a recombinant anti HER2 single chain antibody in single chain Fv fragment (scFv) format, we have constructed the fusion variable regions of the ScFv specific for HER2/neu. labeled a green-fluorescent protein(GFP). The humanized recombinant Anti HER2 ScFv-GFP gene was inserted into pFast Bac HT A, and expressed in insect cells sf9. Then the recombinant fusion protein Anti HER2 ScFv-GFP was properly purified with Ni2+-NTA affinity chromatography from the infected sf9 cells used to test the specificity of the fusion antibody for HER2 positive cancer cells. Firstly, the purified antibody incubated with HER2 positive breast cancer cells SKBR3, BT474 and HER2 negative breast cancer cells MCF7 for 12 h/24 h/48 h at 37 degrees C, in order to confirm targeted detecting HER2 positive breast cancer cells by Laser Confocal Microscopy. Furthermore, the same clinical pathological tissue samples were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the fusion antibody Anti HER2 ScFv-GFP in the meanwhile. The data obtained indicated that the recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid pFast Bac HT A/Anti HER2 ScFv-GFP was constructed successfully In addition, obvious green fluorescent was observed in insect cells sf9. When the purified fusion antibody was incubated with different cancer cells, much more green fluorescent was observed on the surface of the HER2 positive cancer cells SKBR3 and BT474. In contrast, no green fluorescent on the surface of the HER2 negative cancer cells MCF7 was detected. The concentration of the purified fusion antibody was 115.5 microg/mL, of which protein relative molecular weight was 60 kDa. The analysis showed the purity was about 97% and the titer was about 1:64. The detection results of IHC and fusion antibody testing indicated the conformity. In summary, the study showed that the new fusion antibody Anti HER2 ScFv-GFP can test HER2

  4. Efficient expression of full-length antibodies in the cytoplasm of engineered bacteria.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael-Paul; Ke, Na; Lobstein, Julie; Peterson, Cristen; Szkodny, Alana; Mansell, Thomas J; Tuckey, Corinna; Riggs, Paul D; Colussi, Paul A; Noren, Christopher J; Taron, Christopher H; DeLisa, Matthew P; Berkmen, Mehmet

    2015-08-27

    Current methods for producing immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies in engineered cells often require refolding steps or secretion across one or more biological membranes. Here, we describe a robust expression platform for biosynthesis of full-length IgG antibodies in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm. Synthetic heavy and light chains, both lacking canonical export signals, are expressed in specially engineered E. coli strains that permit formation of stable disulfide bonds within the cytoplasm. IgGs with clinically relevant antigen- and effector-binding activities are readily produced in the E. coli cytoplasm by grafting antigen-specific variable heavy and light domains into a cytoplasmically stable framework and remodelling the fragment crystallizable domain with amino-acid substitutions that promote binding to Fcγ receptors. The resulting cytoplasmic IgGs—named 'cyclonals'—effectively bypass the potentially rate-limiting steps of membrane translocation and glycosylation.

  5. Epitope expression in nine commercial kits for the determination of anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies.

    PubMed

    Whitham, K; Patel, D; Ward, A M

    1999-01-01

    Anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies, from patients with autoimmune disease, bind predominantly to two neighbouring, non-identical, conformational domains referred to as domains A and B. In recent years a number of ELISA assays have been developed for the detection of anti-TPO antibodies, however, considerable variation between the different commercial assay kits has been documented in inter-laboratory surveys (UK NEQAS). This investigation assessed the differences between nine commercial ELISA assays currently available in the UK. The anti-TPO kits varied in terms of their imprecision and accuracy and in the density of coated antigen. Recombinant antigen containing kits demonstrated partial destruction of the B epitope, possibly due to the close proximity of both epitope regions in the recombinant molecule. None of the kits expressed only one epitope although there were differences in the degrees of expression of each epitope. Clinicians should be aware of the variability of the numbers generated, when interpreting test results.

  6. Efficient expression of full-length antibodies in the cytoplasm of engineered bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Michael-Paul; Ke, Na; Lobstein, Julie; Peterson, Cristen; Szkodny, Alana; Mansell, Thomas J.; Tuckey, Corinna; Riggs, Paul D.; Colussi, Paul A.; Noren, Christopher J.; Taron, Christopher H.; DeLisa, Matthew P.; Berkmen, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Current methods for producing immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies in engineered cells often require refolding steps or secretion across one or more biological membranes. Here, we describe a robust expression platform for biosynthesis of full-length IgG antibodies in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm. Synthetic heavy and light chains, both lacking canonical export signals, are expressed in specially engineered E. coli strains that permit formation of stable disulfide bonds within the cytoplasm. IgGs with clinically relevant antigen- and effector-binding activities are readily produced in the E. coli cytoplasm by grafting antigen-specific variable heavy and light domains into a cytoplasmically stable framework and remodelling the fragment crystallizable domain with amino-acid substitutions that promote binding to Fcγ receptors. The resulting cytoplasmic IgGs—named ‘cyclonals'—effectively bypass the potentially rate-limiting steps of membrane translocation and glycosylation. PMID:26311203

  7. A Bivalent, Chimeric Rabies Virus Expressing Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Induces Multifunctional Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dunkel, Amber; Shen, Shixue; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We previously showed that a matrix (M) gene-deleted rabies virus (RABV)-based vaccine (RABV-ΔM) is highly immunogenic and induces potent B cell responses in the context of RABV infection. We speculated that RABV-ΔM expressing HIV proteins would also induce potent B cell responses against HIV antigens. As a prerequisite to future studies in nonhuman primates, we completed immunogenicity studies in mice to confirm the ability of RABV-ΔM to induce polyfunctional B cell responses in the context of HIV. To that end, the envelope protein from the mac239 strain of SIV (SIVmac239Env) was cloned into RABV-ΔM, resulting in RABV-ΔM-Env. Infectious virus was recovered following standard methods and propagated on baby hamster kidney cells stably expressing RABV M [>107 focus forming units (ffu)/ml]. Western blot analysis of cell lysates or of purified virions confirmed Env expression on the surface of infected cells and within virus particles, respectively. Positive neutralization activity against a neutralization-sensitive SIV strain and to a lesser extent against a neutralization-resistant SIV strain was detected in mice after a single intramuscular inoculation with RABV-ΔM-Env. The quality, but not quantity, of the antibody response was enhanced via boosting with recombinant gp130 or RABV-ΔM-Env as measured by an increase in antibody avidity and a skewing toward a Th1-type antibody response. We also show that an intradermal inoculation induces higher antibodies than an intramuscular or intranasal inoculation. An intradermal inoculation of RABV-ΔM-Env followed by a boost inoculation with recombinant gp130 produced anti-SIV antibodies with neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibody (nNAb) effector functions. Together, RABV-ΔM-Env induces B cells to secrete antibodies against SIV with the potential to clear both “free” and cell-associated virus. Strategies capable of eliciting both NAbs as well as nNAbs might help to improve the efficacy of HIV-1 vaccines

  8. 7 CFR 457.140 - Dry pea crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... crop. Dry peas. Peas (Pisum sativum L.), Austrian Peas (Pisum sativum spp arvense), Lentils (Lens... with grading under the United States Standards for Whole Dry Peas, Split Peas and Lentils will not be... example, if damaged smooth green and yellow pea acreage is replanted to lentils, the price election and...

  9. 7 CFR 457.140 - Dry pea crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... crop. Dry peas. Peas (Pisum sativum L.), Austrian Peas (Pisum sativum spp arvense), Lentils (Lens... with grading under the United States Standards for Whole Dry Peas, Split Peas and Lentils will not be... example, if damaged smooth green and yellow pea acreage is replanted to lentils, the price election and...

  10. 78 FR 68410 - United States Standards for Whole Dry Peas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... Lentil Handbook, which is available on GIPSA's public Web site at: http://www.gipsa.usda.gov/Publications... under the AMA include those for rice, whole dry peas, split peas, feed peas, lentils and beans. The U.S. standards for whole dry peas, split peas, feed peas, lentils and beans no longer appear in the Code of...

  11. 7 CFR 457.140 - Dry pea crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... crop. Dry peas. Peas (Pisum sativum L.), Austrian Peas (Pisum sativum spp arvense), Lentils (Lens... with grading under the United States Standards for Whole Dry Peas, Split Peas and Lentils will not be... example, if damaged smooth green and yellow pea acreage is replanted to lentils, the price election and...

  12. Construction and expression of single-chain Fv antibody against human bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, L Z; Xiao, S; Huang, H L; Gu, Z; Gu, F L; Guo, Y L

    1996-01-01

    We designed two sets of oligonucleotide primers to amplify the immunoglobulin heavy- and light-chain variable-region genes from genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The genomic DNA was extracted from hybridoma BDI-1 cells, which secreted a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against human bladder carcinoma. The primers contained special restriction sites that allowed the variable-region genes to be easily cloned for sequencing and expression. The recombinants were sequenced by Sanger's method. It was proved that the full lengths of the VH and VK genes were 366 and 324 bp, respectively. Compared with other published sequences, the VH gene was a member of mouse heavy-chain VH subgroup II and originated from the rearrangement of VH, Dsp2.2 and JH4. The VK gene was VK subgroup IV and from VK and JK4. The VH and VK genes was inserted expression vector pWAI80. By inducement, the ScFv antibodies were expressed and secreted from Escherichia coli. Binding activities against the bladder carcinoma cells were detected. We suggest that ScFv antibody recognized the antigen specifically.

  13. A humanized antibody for imaging immune checkpoint ligand PD-L1 expression in tumors.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Samit; Lesniak, Wojciech G; Gabrielson, Matthew; Lisok, Ala; Wharram, Bryan; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Azad, Babak Behnam; Pomper, Martin G; Nimmagadda, Sridhar

    2016-03-01

    Antibodies targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint lead to tumor regression and improved survival in several cancers. PD-L1 expression in tumors may be predictive of response to checkpoint blockade therapy. Because tissue samples might not always be available to guide therapy, we developed and evaluated a humanized antibody for non-invasive imaging of PD-L1 expression in tumors. Radiolabeled [111In]PD-L1-mAb and near-infrared dye conjugated NIR-PD-L1-mAb imaging agents were developed using the mouse and human cross-reactive PD-L1 antibody MPDL3280A. We tested specificity of [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb in cell lines and in tumors with varying levels of PD-L1 expression. We performed SPECT/CT imaging, biodistribution and blocking studies in NSG mice bearing tumors with constitutive PD-L1 expression (CHO-PDL1) and in controls (CHO). Results were confirmed in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) (MDAMB231 and SUM149) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (H2444 and H1155) xenografts with varying levels of PD-L1 expression. There was specific binding of [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb to tumor cells in vitro, correlating with PD-L1 expression levels. In mice bearing subcutaneous and orthotopic tumors, there was specific and persistent high accumulation of signal intensity in PD-L1 positive tumors (CHO-PDL1, MDAMB231, H2444) but not in controls. These results demonstrate that [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb can detect graded levels of PD-L1 expression in human tumor xenografts in vivo. As a humanized antibody, these findings suggest clinical translation of radiolabeled versions of MPDL3280A for imaging. Specificity of NIR-PD-L1-mAb indicates the potential for optical imaging of PD-L1 expression in tumors in relevant pre-clinical as well as clinical settings.

  14. 78 FR 63160 - United States Standards for Feed Peas, Split Peas, and Lentils

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... Peas, and Lentils AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration, USDA ACTION: Notice... Peas, and Lentils under the Agriculture Marketing Act (AMA) of 1946. To ensure that the standards and... current U.S. Standards for Feed Peas, Split Peas, and Lentils are meeting the needs in today's marketing...

  15. Human lymphocyte markers defined by antibodies derived from somatic cell hybrids. II. A hybridoma secreting antibody against an antigen expressed by human B and null lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Beckman, I G; Bradley, J; Brooks, D A; Kupa, A; McNamara, P J; Thomas, M E; Zola, H

    1980-06-01

    A hybridoma (FMC4) has been derived which secretes antibody showing selective reaction with human B lymphocytes, monocytes and some null lymphocytes. Few, if any, T lymphocytes in normal blood are stained, although stimulation of lymphocytes with PHA leads to an increase in the proportion of cells reacting with the hybridoma antibody. The antibody reacts with B and null lymphoblastoid cell lines but not with T cell lines. B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells but not T-CLLs are stained and null-type acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells but not T-type ALL also react. Normal blood myeloid cells do not react with FMC4 supernatant whilst some myeloid leukaemias do. The expression of the antigen reacting with FMC4 supernatant suggests that FMC4 may secrete an antibody against the human equivalent of the Ia antigen.

  16. Human lymphocyte markers defined by antibodies derived from somatic cell hybrids. II. A hybridoma secreting antibody against an antigen expressed by human B and null lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Beckman, I G; Bradley, J; Brooks, D A; Kupa, A; McNamara, P J; Thomas, M E; Zola, H

    1980-01-01

    A hybridoma (FMC4) has been derived which secretes antibody showing selective reaction with human B lymphocytes, monocytes and some null lymphocytes. Few, if any, T lymphocytes in normal blood are stained, although stimulation of lymphocytes with PHA leads to an increase in the proportion of cells reacting with the hybridoma antibody. The antibody reacts with B and null lymphoblastoid cell lines but not with T cell lines. B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells but not T-CLLs are stained and null-type acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells but not T-type ALL also react. Normal blood myeloid cells do not react with FMC4 supernatant whilst some myeloid leukaemias do. The expression of the antigen reacting with FMC4 supernatant suggests that FMC4 may secrete an antibody against the human equivalent of the Ia antigen. PMID:6968260

  17. Global selection of Plasmodium falciparum virulence antigen expression by host antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Abdirahman I.; Warimwe, George M.; Muthui, Michelle K.; Kivisi, Cheryl A.; Kiragu, Esther W.; Fegan, Gregory W.; Bull, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Parasite proteins called PfEMP1 that are inserted on the surface of infected erythrocytes, play a key role in the severe pathology associated with infection by the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite. These proteins mediate binding of infected cells to the endothelial lining of blood vessels as a strategy to avoid clearance by the spleen and are major targets of naturally acquired immunity. PfEMP1 is encoded by a large multi-gene family called var. Mutually-exclusive transcriptional switching between var genes allows parasites to escape host antibodies. This study examined in detail the patterns of expression of var in a well-characterized sample of parasites from Kenyan Children. Instead of observing clear inverse relationships between the expression of broad sub-classes of PfEMP1, we found that expression of different PfEMP1 groups vary relatively independently. Parasite adaptation to host antibodies also appears to involve a general reduction in detectable var gene expression. We suggest that parasites switch both between different PfEMP1 variants and between high and low expression states. Such a strategy could provide a means of avoiding immunological detection and promoting survival under high levels of host immunity. PMID:26804201

  18. EXPRESSION OF CYP4F2 IN HUMAN LIVER AND KIDNEY: ASSESSMENT USING TARGETED PEPTIDE ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Hirani, Vandana; Yarovoy, Anton; Kozeska, Anita; Magnusson, Ronald P.; Lasker, Jerome M.

    2008-01-01

    P450 enzymes comprising the human CYP4F gene subfamily are catalysts of eicosanoid (e.g., 20-HETE and leukotriene B4) formation and degradation, although the role that individual CYP4F proteins play in these metabolic processes is not well defined. Thus, we developed antibodies to assess the tissue-specific expression and function of CYP4F2, one of four CYP4F P450s found in human liver and kidney. Peptide antibodies elicited in rabbits to CYP4F2 amino acid residues 61–74 (WGHQGMVNPTEEG) and 65–77 (GMVNPTEEGMRVL) recognized on immunoblots only CYP4F2 and not CYP4F3b, CYP4F11 or CYP4F12. Immunoquantitation with anti-CYP4F2 peptide IgG showed highly-variable CYP4F2 expression in liver (16.4 ± 18.6 pmol/mg microsomal protein; n = 29) and kidney cortex (3.9 ± 3.8 pmol/mg; n = 10), with two subjects lacking the hepatic or renal enzyme entirely. CYP4F2 content in liver microsomes was significantly correlated (r ≥ 0.63; p < 0.05) with leukotriene B4 and arachidonate ω-hydroxylase activities, which are both CYP4F2-catalyzed. Our study provides the first example of a peptide antibody that recognizes a single CYP4F P450 expressed in human liver and kidney, namely CYP4F2. Immunoquantitation and correlation analyses performed with this antibody suggest that CYP4F2 functions as a predominant LTB4 and arachidonate ω-hydroxylase in human liver. PMID:18662666

  19. Site-specific proteolytic degradation of IgG monoclonal antibodies expressed in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Hehle, Verena K; Lombardi, Raffaele; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Paul, Mathew J; Di Micco, Patrizio; Morea, Veronica; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello; Ma, Julian K-C

    2015-02-01

    Plants are promising hosts for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). However, proteolytic degradation of antibodies produced both in stable transgenic plants and using transient expression systems is still a major issue for efficient high-yield recombinant protein accumulation. In this work, we have performed a detailed study of the degradation profiles of two human IgG1 mAbs produced in plants: an anti-HIV mAb 2G12 and a tumour-targeting mAb H10. Even though they use different light chains (κ and λ, respectively), the fragmentation pattern of both antibodies was similar. The majority of Ig fragments result from proteolytic degradation, but there are only a limited number of plant proteolytic cleavage events in the immunoglobulin light and heavy chains. All of the cleavage sites identified were in the proximity of interdomain regions and occurred at each interdomain site, with the exception of the VL /CL interface in mAb H10 λ light chain. Cleavage site sequences were analysed, and residue patterns characteristic of proteolytic enzymes substrates were identified. The results of this work help to define common degradation events in plant-produced mAbs and raise the possibility of predicting antibody degradation patterns 'a priori' and designing novel stabilization strategies by site-specific mutagenesis.

  20. Fast track antibody V-gene rescue, recombinant expression in plants and characterization of a PfMSP4-specific antibody.

    PubMed

    Kapelski, Stephanie; Boes, Alexander; Spiegel, Holger; de Almeida, Melanie; Klockenbring, Torsten; Reimann, Andreas; Fischer, Rainer; Barth, Stefan; Fendel, Rolf

    2015-02-05

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are essential tools in biological research, diagnosis and therapy, and are conventionally produced in murine hybridoma cell lines. Professional applications of mAbs depend on the steady supply of material. Because hybridoma cultures can stop producing the antibody or even die, preservation of the unique epitope specificity of mAbs by rescue of the sequences encoding the antibody variable domains (V regions) is important. The availability of these sequences enables not only the recombinant expression of the original antibody for further applications, but opens the road for antibody engineering towards innovative diagnostic or therapeutic applications. A time- and cost-efficient production system enabling the detailed analysis of the antibodies is an essential requirement in this context. Sequences were rescued from three hybridoma cell lines, subjected to sequence analysis, subcloned into binary expression vectors and recombinantly expressed as chimeric mAb (constant regions of human IgG1:k1) in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. The properties of the recombinant and the murine mAbs were compared using competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. The recognition of native PfMSP4 by the recombinant mAb was analysed by immunofluorescence staining of Pf 3D7A schizonts and by western blot analysis of merozoite extract. The rescued sequences of all three hybridoma cell lines were identical. The recombinant mAb was successfully expressed as IgG in plants at moderate levels (45 mg/kg fresh leaf weight). Preservation of the original epitope was demonstrated in a competition ELISA, using recombinant mAb and the three murine mAbs. EGF_PfMSP4-specific affinities were determined by SPR spectroscopy to 8 nM and 10 nM for the murine or recombinant mAb, respectively. Binding to parasite PfMSP4 was confirmed in an immunofluorescence assay showing a characteristic staining pattern and by western blot

  1. 21 CFR 158.170 - Frozen peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Millimeters Inch Extra small Up to 7.5 0.295 Very small Up to 8.2 .32 Small Up to 8.75 .34 Medium Up to 10.2... peas, i.e., yellow or white but edible peas; (ii) Not more than 10 percent by weight blemished peas, i... cotyledons and loose skins, but excluding entire intact peas with skins detached; (v) Not more than...

  2. 29 CFR 780.139 - Pea vining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pea vining. 780.139 Section 780.139 Labor Regulations... âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.139 Pea vining. Vining employees of a pea vinery located on a farm, who vine only the peas grown on that particular farm, are engaged in agriculture. If they...

  3. 29 CFR 780.139 - Pea vining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pea vining. 780.139 Section 780.139 Labor Regulations... âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.139 Pea vining. Vining employees of a pea vinery located on a farm, who vine only the peas grown on that particular farm, are engaged in agriculture. If they...

  4. 29 CFR 780.139 - Pea vining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pea vining. 780.139 Section 780.139 Labor Regulations... âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.139 Pea vining. Vining employees of a pea vinery located on a farm, who vine only the peas grown on that particular farm, are engaged in agriculture. If they...

  5. 29 CFR 780.139 - Pea vining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pea vining. 780.139 Section 780.139 Labor Regulations... âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.139 Pea vining. Vining employees of a pea vinery located on a farm, who vine only the peas grown on that particular farm, are engaged in agriculture. If they...

  6. 29 CFR 780.139 - Pea vining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pea vining. 780.139 Section 780.139 Labor Regulations... âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.139 Pea vining. Vining employees of a pea vinery located on a farm, who vine only the peas grown on that particular farm, are engaged in agriculture. If they...

  7. Non-viral adeno-associated virus-based platform for stable expression of antibody combination therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wilmes, Gwendolyn M; Carey, Kimberly L; Hicks, Stuart W; Russell, Hugh H; Stevenson, Jesse A; Kocjan, Paulina; Lutz, Stephen R; Quesenberry, Rachel S; Shulga-Morskoy, Sergey V; Lewis, Megan E; Clark, Ethan; Medik, Violetta; Cooper, Anthony B; Reczek, Elizabeth E

    2014-01-01

    Antibody combination therapeutics (ACTs) are polyvalent biopharmaceuticals that are uniquely suited for the control of complex diseases, including antibiotic resistant infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancers. However, ACTs also represent a distinct manufacturing challenge because the independent manufacture and subsequent mixing of monoclonal antibodies quickly becomes cost prohibitive as more complex mixtures are envisioned. We have developed a virus-free recombinant protein expression platform based on adeno-associated viral (AAV) elements that is capable of rapid and consistent production of complex antibody mixtures in a single batch format. Using both multiplexed immunoassays and cation exchange (CIEX) chromatography, cell culture supernatants generated using our system were assessed for stability of expression and ratios of the component antibodies over time. Cultures expressing combinations of three to ten antibodies maintained consistent expression levels and stable ratios of component antibodies for at least 60 days. Cultures showed remarkable reproducibility following cell banking, and AAV-based cultures showed higher stability and productivity than non-AAV based cultures. Therefore, this non-viral AAV-based expression platform represents a predictable, reproducible, quick and cost effective method to manufacture or quickly produce for preclinical testing recombinant antibody combination therapies and other recombinant protein mixtures. PMID:24758837

  8. Persistent expression of biologically active anti-HER2 antibody by AAVrh.10-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Qiu, J; Wang, R; Krause, A; Boyer, J L; Hackett, N R; Crystal, R G

    2010-08-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin) is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against an extracellular region of the human epidermal growth-factor receptor type 2 (HER2) protein. We hypothesized that a single adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated genetic delivery of an anti-HER2 antibody should be effective in mediating long-term production of anti-HER2 and in suppressing the growth of human tumors in a xenograft model in nude mice. The adeno-associated virus gene transfer vector AAVrh.10alphaHER2 was constructed based on a non-human primate AAV serotype rh.10 to express the complementary DNAs for the heavy and light chains of mAb 4D5, the murine precursor to trastuzumab. The data show that genetically transferred anti-HER2 selectively bound human HER2 protein and suppressed the proliferation of HER2(+) tumor cell lines. A single administration of AAVrh.10alphaHER2 provided long-term therapeutic levels of anti-HER2 antibody expression without inducing an anti-idiotype response, suppressed the growth of HER2(+) tumors and increased the survival of tumor bearing mice. In the context that trastuzumab therapy requires frequent and repeated administration, this strategy might be developed as an alternate platform for delivery of anti-HER2 therapy.

  9. 21 CFR 158.170 - Frozen peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen peas. 158.170 Section 158.170 Food and... CONSUMPTION FROZEN VEGETABLES Requirements for Specific Standardized Frozen Vegetables § 158.170 Frozen peas. (a) Identity—(1) Product definition. Frozen peas is the food in “package” form as that term...

  10. Production of cocktail of polyclonal antibodies using bacterial expressed recombinant protein for multiple virus detection.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Reetika; Mandal, Bikash; Paul, Prabir Kumar; Chigurupati, Phaneendra; Jain, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Cocktail of polyclonal antibodies (PAb) were produced that will help in multiple virus detection and overcome the limitation of individual virus purification, protein expression and purification as well as immunization in multiple rabbits. A dual fusion construct was developed using conserved coat protein (CP) sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) in an expression vector, pET-28a(+). The fusion protein (∼40kDa) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Likewise, a triple fusion construct was developed by fusing conserved CP sequences of CMV and PRSV with conserved nucleocapsid protein (N) sequence of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) and expressed as a fusion protein (∼50kDa) in pET-28a(+). PAb made separately to each of these three viruses recognized the double and triple fusion proteins in Western blot indicating retention of desired epitopes for binding with target antibodies. The fusion proteins (∼40kDa and ∼50kDa) were used to produce cocktail of PAb by immunizing rabbits, which simultaneously detected natural infection of CMV and PRSV or CMV, PRSV and GBNV in Cucurbitaceous, Solanaceous and other hosts in DAC-ELISA. This is the first report on production of a cocktail of PAb to recombinant fusion protein of two or three distinct viruses.

  11. Restricted light chain subgroup expression on human rheumatoid factor paraproteins determined by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Mageed, R A; Walker, M R; Jefferis, R

    1986-01-01

    Two hybridoma antibodies specific for determinants on the V kappa light chain subgroup have been produced and characterized. Antibodies C7 and B12 reacted with distinct V kappa epitopes irrespective of association with heavy chain class or subclass. Epitopes recognized by C7 and B12 were expressed on the light chain of IgG, IgA, and IgM and Bence-Jones paraproteins from the V kappa subgroup. However, a preferential association of both epitopes with IgM RF paraproteins was demonstrated. Hybridomas C7 and B12 reacted with 12/12 and 10/12 IgM RF paraproteins, respectively, but only with 3/6 IgM paraproteins, with no RF activity. Both epitopes C7 and B12, were immunodominant and conformation dependent, being detected by HA, HAI and ELISA on intact light chain but not isolated VK. PMID:2432001

  12. Molecular characterization of antibodies bearing Id-460. II. Molecular basis for Id-460 expression

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Id-460+ immunoglobulins can be induced in vivo by immunization with dinitrophenyl (DNP) or P. pneumotropica and form two nonoverlapping groups of antibodies with respect to antigen binding specificity. In this study, using Id-460+ antibodies of differing antigen binding specificities, we compared on the molecular genetic level the five gene segment combinations (VH, DH, JH, VL, and JL) that encode the variable regions of these idiotype-positive immunoglobulins. The Id-460 determinant appears to be a conformational or combinatorial determinant encoded by VH460 and VK1 crosshybridizing genes. DH, JH, and JK gene segments appear to have no measurable effect upon expression of Id-460. Finally, antigen binding specificity does not appear to simply localize to any particular gene segment but may in part be the result of somatic mutation and/or VDJH junctional sequences, whose length correlates roughly with antigen binding specificity. PMID:3932578

  13. Pea Xyloglucan and Cellulose 1

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Takahisa; Polonenko, Daniel R.; Camirand, Anne; Maclachlan, Gordon

    1986-01-01

    The synthesis and assembly of xyloglucan were examined during early stages of wall regeneration by protoplasts isolated from growing regions of etiolated peas. During early stages of cultivation, fluorescence microscopy showed that the protoplast surface bound Calcofluor and ammonium salt of 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid and, in time, it also bound fluorescent fucose-binding lectin. Based on chemical analysis, 1,3-β-glucan was the main polysaccharide formed by protoplasts and xyloglucan and cellulose were minor wall components. Binding between cellulose and xyloglucan was not as strong as that in tissues of intact pea plants, i.e. mild alkali could dissolve most xyloglucan from the protoplast. However, the addition of exogenous pea xyloglucan into the culture medium stimulated the deposition of new polysaccharides into the protoplast wall and enhanced the close association of newly formed xyloglucan with cellulose. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:16665011

  14. Expression, purification of IL-38 in Escherichia coli and production of polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhonglan; Chen, Zhenyu; Huang, Nongyu; Teng, Xiu; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Zhen; Wei, Xiaoqiong; Qin, Ke; Liu, Xiao; Wu, Xueping; Tang, Huan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Cui, Kaijun; Li, Jiong

    2015-03-01

    Members of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) family play important roles in inflammation and host defense against pathogens. Here, we describe a novel member of the IL-1 family, interleukin-38 (IL-38, IL-1F10, or IL-1HY2), which was discovered in 2001. Although the functional role of IL-38 remains unclear, recent reports show that IL-38 binds to the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R) which is also targeted by the IL-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36Ra). Consequently, these two molecules have similar effects on immune cells. Here, we describe the expression of soluble and active recombinant IL-38 in Escherichia coli (E. coli). The IL-38 gene sequence was optimized for expression in E. coli and then cloned into a pEHISTEV expression vector, which has an N-terminal 6-His affinity tag under control of the T7 lac strong promoter. Optimization of culture conditions allowed induction of the recombinant fusion protein with 0.1 mM isopropyl β-D-1-thio galactoside (IPTG) at 37°C for 4h. The recombinant fusion protein was purified using an Ni affinity column and was further digested with TEV protease; the cleaved protein was purified by molecular-exclusion chromatography. Next, we measured IL-38 binding ability using functional ELISA. The purified proteins were used to immunize a New Zealand white rabbit four times to enable the production of polyclonal antibodies. The specificity of the prepared polyclonal antibodies was determined using Western blot, and the results showed they have high specificity against IL-38. Here, we describe the development of an effective and reliable method to express and purify IL-38 and anti-IL-38 antibodies. This will enable the function and structure of IL-38 to be determined.

  15. Characterization of proanthocyanidin metabolism in pea (Pisum sativum) seeds.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Kiva; Jin, Alena L; Nguyen, Trinh-Don; Reinecke, Dennis M; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Ro, Dae-Kyun

    2014-09-16

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) accumulate in the seeds, fruits and leaves of various plant species including the seed coats of pea (Pisum sativum), an important food crop. PAs have been implicated in human health, but molecular and biochemical characterization of pea PA biosynthesis has not been established to date, and detailed pea PA chemical composition has not been extensively studied. PAs were localized to the ground parenchyma and epidermal cells of pea seed coats. Chemical analyses of PAs from seeds of three pea cultivars demonstrated cultivar variation in PA composition. 'Courier' and 'Solido' PAs were primarily prodelphinidin-types, whereas the PAs from 'LAN3017' were mainly the procyanidin-type. The mean degree of polymerization of 'LAN3017' PAs was also higher than those from 'Courier' and 'Solido'. Next-generation sequencing of 'Courier' seed coat cDNA produced a seed coat-specific transcriptome. Three cDNAs encoding anthocyanidin reductase (PsANR), leucoanthocyanidin reductase (PsLAR), and dihydroflavonol reductase (PsDFR) were isolated. PsANR and PsLAR transcripts were most abundant earlier in seed coat development. This was followed by maximum PA accumulation in the seed coat. Recombinant PsANR enzyme efficiently synthesized all three cis-flavan-3-ols (gallocatechin, catechin, and afzalechin) with satisfactory kinetic properties. The synthesis rate of trans-flavan-3-ol by co-incubation of PsLAR and PsDFR was comparable to cis-flavan-3-ol synthesis rate by PsANR. Despite the competent PsLAR activity in vitro, expression of PsLAR driven by the Arabidopsis ANR promoter in wild-type and anr knock-out Arabidopsis backgrounds did not result in PA synthesis. Significant variation in seed coat PA composition was found within the pea cultivars, making pea an ideal system to explore PA biosynthesis. PsANR and PsLAR transcript profiles, PA localization, and PA accumulation patterns suggest that a pool of PA subunits are produced in specific seed coat cells early in

  16. [Prokaryotic expression and antibody preparation of human GALNT3-sol protein].

    PubMed

    Kong, Yun; Gao, Hai-tao; Li, Shu-fang; Wang, Peng; Gu, Li

    2011-10-01

    In order to detect the expression of GALNT3 in various tumor tissues, the prokaryotic expression vector of human GALNT3-sol (a truncation of GALNT3 being deleted of the hydrophobic trans-membrane domain) was constructed, and then the recombinant GALNT3-sol protein was expressed and purified from E.coli, followed by the preparation of polyclonal antibody against GALNT3-sol and characterization of its properties. The human cDNA of GALNT3-sol (1 755 bp)was amplified from MKN45 cell line and cloned into expression vector pET5b/GALNT3-sol, then transformed into E.coli BL21(DE3), in which the GALNT3-sol protein was induced by IPTG and then purified by Electrophoresis.Mice were immunized with the purified protein and the anti-serum was collected at different time intervals.Properties of the anti-serum were further detected by ELISA and Western blot. The prokaryotic expression vector of pET15b/GALNT3-sol was constructed successfully.Human GALNT3-sol protein was expressed in E.coli after IPTG induction.The titer of the obtained anti-serum reached 1:25 600, and its specificity was proved by Western blot. Human GALNT3-sol protein can be successfully expressed in E.coli, and the specific anti-human GALNT3-sol antibody can be obtained by immunization of mice, which makes it possible to further investigate the role of GALNT3 in the progression of various tumors.

  17. Identification of a new pea gene, PsNlec1, encoding a lectin-like glycoprotein isolated from the symbiosomes of root nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Kardailsky, I V; Sherrier, D J; Brewin, N J

    1996-01-01

    A 27-kD glycoprotein antigen recognized by monoclonal antibody MAC266 was purified from isolated symbiosomes derived from pea (Pisum sativum) root nodules containing Rhizobium. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was obtained, and the corresponding cDNA clone was isolated by a polymerase chain reaction-based strategy. The clone contained a single open reading frame, and the gene was termed PsNlec1. Phylogenetic analysis of 31 legume sequences showed that the PsNlec1 protein is related to the legume lectin family but belongs to a subgroup that is very different from pea seed lectin. Expression of the PsNlec1 transcript was much stronger in nodules than in other parts of the plant. It was found in both infected and uninfected cells in the central tissue of the nodule and in the stele of the root near the attachment point of the nodule. When uninfected pea seedlings were grown on medium containing nitrate, weak transcription of PsNlec1 was observed in the root system. The identification of PsNlec1 inside the symbiosome is consistent with the observation that legume lectins are generally vacuolar proteins that may serve as transient storage components. PMID:8685275

  18. Intracellular Reprogramming of Expression, Glycosylation, and Function of a Plant-Derived Antiviral Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Young-Kwan; So, Yang-Kang; Ryu, Jae-Sung; Oh, Seung-Han; Han, Yeon-Soo; Ko, Kinarm; Choo, Young-Kug; Park, Sung-Joo; Brodzik, Robert; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Oh, Doo-Byoung; Hwang, Kyung-A; Koprowski, Hilary; Lee, Yong Seong; Ko, Kisung

    2013-01-01

    Plant genetic engineering, which has led to the production of plant-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbPs), provides a safe and economically effective alternative to conventional antibody expression methods. In this study, the expression levels and biological properties of the anti-rabies virus mAbP SO57 with or without an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-retention peptide signal (Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu; KDEL) in transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum) were analyzed. The expression levels of mAbP SO57 with KDEL (mAbPK) were significantly higher than those of mAbP SO57 without KDEL (mAbP) regardless of the transcription level. The Fc domains of both purified mAbP and mAbPK and hybridoma-derived mAb (mAbH) had similar levels of binding activity to the FcγRI receptor (CD64). The mAbPK had glycan profiles of both oligomannose (OM) type (91.7%) and Golgi type (8.3%), whereas the mAbP had mainly Golgi type glycans (96.8%) similar to those seen with mAbH. Confocal analysis showed that the mAbPK was co-localized to ER-tracker signal and cellular areas surrounding the nucleus indicating accumulation of the mAbP with KDEL in the ER. Both mAbP and mAbPK disappeared with similar trends to mAbH in BALB/c mice. In addition, mAbPK was as effective as mAbH at neutralizing the activity of the rabies virus CVS-11. These results suggest that the ER localization of the recombinant mAbP by KDEL reprograms OM glycosylation and enhances the production of the functional antivirus therapeutic antibody in the plant. PMID:23967055

  19. Generation of monoclonal antibodies specific for cell surface molecules expressed on early mouse endoderm.

    PubMed

    Gadue, Paul; Gouon-Evans, Valerie; Cheng, Xin; Wandzioch, Ewa; Zaret, Kenneth S; Grompe, Markus; Streeter, Philip R; Keller, Gordon M

    2009-09-01

    The development of functional cell populations such as hepatocytes and pancreatic beta cells from embryonic stem cell (ESC) is dependent on the efficient induction of definitive endoderm early in the differentiation process. To monitor definitive endoderm formation in mouse ESC differentiation cultures in a quantitative fashion, we generated a reporter cell line that expresses human CD25 from the Foxa3 locus and human CD4 from the Foxa2 locus. Induction of these reporter ESCs with high concentrations of activin A led to the development of a CD25-Foxa3+CD4-Foxa2+ population within 4-5 days of culture. Isolation and characterization of this population showed that it consists predominantly of definitive endoderm that is able to undergo hepatic specification under the appropriate conditions. To develop reagents that can be used for studies on endoderm development from unmanipulated ESCs, from induced pluripotent stem cells, and from the mouse embryo, we generated monoclonal antibodies against the CD25-Foxa3+CD4-Foxa2+ population. With this approach, we identified two antibodies that react specifically with endoderm from ESC cultures and from the early embryo. The specificity of these antibodies enables one to quantitatively monitor endoderm development in ESC differentiation cultures, to study endoderm formation in the embryo, and to isolate pure populations of culture- or embryo-derived endodermal cells.

  20. Targeting Pan-Resistant Bacteria With Antibodies to a Broadly Conserved Surface Polysaccharide Expressed During Infection

    PubMed Central

    Skurnik, David; Davis, Michael R.; Benedetti, Dennis; Moravec, Katie L.; Cywes-Bentley, Colette; Roux, Damien; Traficante, David C.; Walsh, Rebecca L.; Maira-Litràn, Tomas; Cassidy, Sara K.; Hermos, Christina R.; Martin, Thomas R.; Thakkallapalli, Erin L.; Vargas, Sara O.; McAdam, Alexander J.; Lieberman, Tami D.; Kishony, Roy; LiPuma, John J.; Pier, Gerald B.; Goldberg, Joanna B.; Priebe, Gregory P.

    2012-01-01

    Background New therapeutic targets for antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens are desperately needed. The bacterial surface polysaccharide poly-β-(1-6)-N-acetyl-glucosamine (PNAG) mediates biofilm formation by some bacterial species, and antibodies to PNAG can confer protective immunity. By analyzing sequenced genomes, we found that potentially multidrug-resistant bacterial species such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) may be able to produce PNAG. Among patients with cystic fibrosis patients, highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the BCC have emerged as problematic pathogens, providing an impetus to study the potential of PNAG to be targeted for immunotherapy against pan-resistant bacterial pathogens. Methods The presence of PNAG on BCC was assessed using a combination of bacterial genetics, microscopy, and immunochemical approaches. Antibodies to PNAG were tested using opsonophagocytic assays and for protective efficacy against lethal peritonitis in mice. Results PNAG is expressed in vitro and in vivo by the BCC, and cystic fibrosis patients infected by the BCC species B. dolosa mounted a PNAG-specific opsonophagocytic antibody response. Antisera to PNAG mediated opsonophagocytic killing of BCC and were protective against lethal BCC peritonitis even during coinfection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions Our findings raise potential new therapeutic options against PNAG-producing bacteria, including even pan-resistant pathogens. PMID:22448004

  1. A Comparative Antibody Analysis of Pannexin1 Expression in Four Rat Brain Regions Reveals Varying Subcellular Localizations

    PubMed Central

    Cone, Angela C.; Ambrosi, Cinzia; Scemes, Eliana; Martone, Maryann E.; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2012-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels release cytosolic ATP in response to signaling pathways. Panx1 is highly expressed in the central nervous system. We used four antibodies with different Panx1 anti-peptide epitopes to analyze four regions of rat brain. These antibodies labeled the same bands in Western blots and had highly similar patterns of immunofluorescence in tissue culture cells expressing Panx1, but Western blots of brain lysates from Panx1 knockout and control mice showed different banding patterns. Localizations of Panx1 in brain slices were generated using automated wide field mosaic confocal microscopy for imaging large regions of interest while retaining maximum resolution for examining cell populations and compartments. We compared Panx1 expression over the cerebellum, hippocampus with adjacent cortex, thalamus, and olfactory bulb. While Panx1 localizes to the same neuronal cell types, subcellular localizations differ. Two antibodies with epitopes against the intracellular loop and one against the carboxy terminus preferentially labeled cell bodies, while an antibody raised against an N-terminal peptide highlighted neuronal processes more than cell bodies. These labeling patterns may be a reflection of different cellular and subcellular localizations of full-length and/or modified Panx1 channels where each antibody is highlighting unique or differentially accessible Panx1 populations. However, we cannot rule out that one or more of these antibodies have specificity issues. All data associated with experiments from these four antibodies are presented in a manner that allows them to be compared and our claims thoroughly evaluated, rather than eliminating results that were questionable. Each antibody is given a unique identifier through the NIF Antibody Registry that can be used to track usage of individual antibodies across papers and all image and metadata are made available in the public repository, the Cell Centered Database, for on-line viewing, and

  2. Immune deficiency enhances expression of recombinant human antibody in mice after nonviral in vivo gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Kitaguchi, Kohji; Toda, Mikako; Takekoshi, Masataka; Maeda, Fumiko; Muramatsu, Tatsuo; Murai, Atsushi

    2005-10-01

    A cDNA encoding human antibody against hepatitis B virus was expressed in normal and severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mice to clarify whether or not host immune status affects circulating levels of the recombinant human antibody (RhAb) after nonviral in vivo gene transfer. For transferring genes, either electroporation (EP) or hydrodynamics-based transfection (HD) was employed. The former was applied to the leg muscle to express the gene, while the latter primarily targeted foreign gene expression in the liver. The expressed RhAb was secreted into the blood circulation, and its existence was assayed by ELISA. Prior to the investigation of host immune status, suitable forms of plasmid expression vectors and types of electrodes were determined in normal mice. Results showed that the vector encoding both the light and heavy chains driven by the CMV promoter had the highest plasma RhAb concentrations, and a pair of pincette-type electrodes conferred the best performance. In both EP and HD, the SCID state showed an increased and prolonged RhAb production in the blood circulation due probably to suppressed recognition of RhAb as a foreign protein to the host animal. The difference in gene transfer methods demonstrated a characteristic pattern: an early and sharp rise followed by a relatively rapid decrease in HD, in contrast to a gradual rise followed by a plateau level maintained in EP. As a result, with the same amount of gene transferred, the plasma RhAb concentrations for the first 7 or 8 weeks were higher in HD than EP, while the reverse was true for the latter period. Multiple gene transfer contributed to maintaining and prolonging high RhAb concentrations in plasma by both methods with similar characteristic patterns accompanying the respective gene transfer method. These results suggest the importance of host immunological potency for maintaining plasma RhAb concentrations if these gene transfer technologies are used for clinical and therapeutic purposes.

  3. Analysis of HPV-1 E4 gene expression using epitope-defined antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Doorbar, J; Evans, H S; Coneron, I; Crawford, L V; Gallimore, P H

    1988-01-01

    Six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been raised against the E4 proteins of HPV-1. Five of these were found to recognize denaturation-resistant epitopes as determined by Western blotting--and their binding sites were identified by determining their reactivity against a panel of bacterial E4--beta-galactosidase fusion proteins which contained progressive deletions at the C-terminal end of the E4 region. The five mAbs were found to bind to four distinct sites. By using these epitope-defined mAbs, along with anti-peptide antibodies raised against putative N- and C-terminal E4 sequences, we have determined the relationships between the eight distinct polypeptides (mol. wt 10/11 kd, 16/17 kd, 21/23 kd and 32/34 kd) previously shown to be expressed from the E4 gene of HPV-1 in productively infected papillomas. The 17 kd E4 polypeptide appears to be the product of a spliced mRNA encoding five amino acids from open reading frame (ORF) E1 joined onto 120 from the E4 ORF. The 16 kd and 10/11 kd proteins, which may be derived from this, lack sequences (approximately 15 and 70 amino acids respectively) encoded by the 5' end of the E4 gene. The 32/34 kd proteins were detected by all antibodies which reacted with the 16/17 kd polypeptides, suggesting that they represent dimers of the latter species. The 21/23 kd polypeptides, however, do not appear to be simple dimers of the 10/11 kd protein as previously predicted, and reacted with antibodies whose epitopes mapped in the N-terminal half of the E4 protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:2456213

  4. Structure of idiotopes associated with antiphenylarsonate antibodies expressing an intrastrain crossreactive idiotype

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have explored the structural basis of idiotopes associated with the major idiotype (CRIA) of A/J anti-p-azobenzenearsonate antibodies, with emphasis on the regions of contact with anti-idiotypic antibody. The analysis was facilitated by a recent description of the three- demensional structure of the Fab portion of a CRIA-related antibody molecule. Direct binding measurements failed to reveal idiotopes associated exclusively with the L chain. However, the L chain participated in the formation of approximately 80% of the idiotopes recognized by polyclonal anti-Id. This indicates that multiple complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) participate in the formation of idiotopes. The affinity of anti-Id for CDRs on L chains must be appreciable but insufficient to permit direct binding (i.e., less than approximately 10(4) M-1). Approximately 20-35% of polyclonal anti-Id reacted with high affinity with H chains recombined with non-CRIA- related L chains. This interaction was found to involve the D region as well as one or both CDRs in the VH segment, again indicating the contribution of multiple CDRs. It is suggested that a typical idiotope may be similar in size to that of protein epitopes whose three- dimensional structures are known; such epitopes comprise a substantial fraction of the surface area occupied by the CDRs of an antibody. The expression of an idiotope recognized by the mAb AD8, which interacts with the VH segment, was found to be unaffected by major changes in the neighboring D and VL regions. This observation is relevant to efforts to predict three-dimensional structure from the amino acid sequence of CRIA+ molecules. PMID:2507724

  5. Obtaining anti-type 1 melatonin receptor antibodies by immunization with melatonin receptor-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Nelia; Wijkhuisen, Anne; Savatier, Alexandra; Moulharat, Natacha; Ferry, Gilles; Léonetti, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies (Abs) specific to cell-surface receptors are attractive tools for studying the physiological role of such receptors or for controlling their activity. We sought to obtain such antibodies against the type 1 receptor for melatonin (MT1). For this, we injected mice with CHO cells transfected with a plasmid encoding human MT1 (CHO-MT1-h), in the presence or absence of an adjuvant mixture containing Alum and CpG1018. As we previously observed that the immune response to a protein antigen is increased when it is coupled to a fusion protein, called ZZTat101, we also investigated if the association of ZZTat101 with CHO-MT1-h cells provides an immunogenic advantage. We measured similar levels of anti-CHO and anti-MT1-h Ab responses in animals injected with either CHO-MT1-h cells or ZZTat101/CHO-MT1-h cells, with or without adjuvant, indicating that neither the adjuvant mixture nor ZZTat101 increased the anti-cell immune response. Then, we investigated whether the antisera also recognized murine MT1 (MT1-m). Using cloned CHO cells transfected with a plasmid encoding MT1-m, we found that antisera raised against CHO-MT1-h cells also bound the mouse receptor. Altogether our studies indicate that immunizing approaches based on MT1-h-expressing CHO cells allow the production of polyclonal antibodies against MT1 receptors of different origins. This paves the way to preparation of MT1-specific monoclonal antibodies.

  6. A single-domain antibody-linked Fab bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab has potent cytotoxicity against Her2-expressing tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Aifen; Xing, Jieyu; Li, Li; Zhou, Changhua; Dong, Bin; He, Ping; Li, Qing; Wang, Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Her2, which is frequently overexpressed in breast cancer, is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer therapy. Anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, has achieved significant clinical benefits in metastatic breast cancer. In this study, we describe a novel bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab targeting Her2 by linking a single domain anti-CD16 VHH to the trastuzumab Fab. The Her2-S-Fab antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, and drive potent cancer cell killing in HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. In xenograft model, the Her2-S-Fab suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our results suggest that the bispecific Her2-S-Fab may provide a valid alternative to Her2 positive cancer therapy.

  7. Expression of POTE protein in human testis detected by novel monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ise, Tomoko; Das, Sudipto; Nagata, Satoshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Lee, Yoomi; Onda, Masanori; Anver, Miriam R.; Pastan, Ira

    2008-01-25

    The POTE gene family is composed of 13 highly homologous paralogs preferentially expressed in prostate, ovary, testis, and placenta. We produced 10 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against three representative POTE paralogs: POTE-21, POTE-2{gamma}C, and POTE-22. One reacted with all three paralogs, six MAbs reacted with POTE-2{gamma}C and POTE-22, and three MAbs were specific to POTE-21. Epitopes of all 10 MAbs were located in the cysteine-rich repeats (CRRs) motifs located at the N-terminus of each POTE paralog. Testing the reactivity of each MAb with 12 different CRRs revealed slight differences among the antigenic determinants, which accounts for differences in cross-reactivity. Using MAbs HP8 and PG5 we were able to detect a POTE-actin fusion protein in human testis by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blotting. By immunohistochemistry we demonstrated that the POTE protein is expressed in primary spermatocytes, implying a role in spermatogenesis.

  8. Expression of POTE protein in human testis detected by novel monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ise, Tomoko; Das, Sudipto; Nagata, Satoshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Lee, Yoomi; Onda, Masanori; Anver, Miriam R; Bera, Tapan K; Pastan, Ira

    2008-01-25

    The POTE gene family is composed of 13 highly homologous paralogs preferentially expressed in prostate, ovary, testis, and placenta. We produced 10 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against three representative POTE paralogs: POTE-21, POTE-2gammaC, and POTE-22. One reacted with all three paralogs, six MAbs reacted with POTE-2gammaC and POTE-22, and three MAbs were specific to POTE-21. Epitopes of all 10 MAbs were located in the cysteine-rich repeats (CRRs) motifs located at the N-terminus of each POTE paralog. Testing the reactivity of each MAb with 12 different CRRs revealed slight differences among the antigenic determinants, which accounts for differences in cross-reactivity. Using MAbs HP8 and PG5 we were able to detect a POTE-actin fusion protein in human testis by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blotting. By immunohistochemistry we demonstrated that the POTE protein is expressed in primary spermatocytes, implying a role in spermatogenesis.

  9. Expression of POTE protein in human testis detected by novel monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ise, Tomoko; Das, Sudipto; Nagata, Satoshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Lee, Yoomi; Onda, Masanori; Anver, Miriam R.; Bera, Tapan K.; Pastan, Ira

    2008-01-01

    The POTE gene family is composed of 13 highly homologous paralogs preferentially expressed in prostate, ovary, testis and placenta. We produced 10 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against 3 representative POTE paralogs: POTE-21, POTE-2γC and POTE-22. One reacted with all 3 paralogs, 6 MAbs reacted with POTE-2γC and POTE-22, and 3 MAbs were specific to POTE-21. Epitopes of all 10 MAbs were located in the cysteine-rich repeats (CRRs) motifs located at the N-terminus of each POTE paralog. Testing the reactivity of each MAb with 12 different CRRs revealed slight differences among the antigenic determinants, which accounts for differences in cross-reactivity. Using MAbs HP8 and PG5 we were able to detect a POTE-actin fusion protein in human testis by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blotting. By immunohistochemistry we demonstrated that the POTE protein is expressed in primary spermatocytes, implying a role in spermatogenesis. PMID:17996727

  10. Pediatric measles vaccine expressing a dengue tetravalent antigen elicits neutralizing antibodies against all four dengue viruses.

    PubMed

    Brandler, Samantha; Ruffie, Claude; Najburg, Valérie; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Bedouelle, Hughes; Desprès, Philippe; Tangy, Frédéric

    2010-09-24

    Dengue disease is an increasing global health problem that threatens one-third of the world's population. To control this emerging arbovirus, an efficient preventive vaccine is still needed. Because four serotypes of dengue virus (DV) coexist and antibody-dependent enhanced infection may occur, most strategies developed so far rely on the administration of tetravalent formulations of four live attenuated or chimeric viruses. Here, we evaluated a new strategy based on the expression of a single minimal tetravalent DV antigen by a single replicating viral vector derived from pediatric live-attenuated measles vaccine (MV). We generated a recombinant MV vector expressing a DV construct composed of the four envelope domain III (EDIII) from the four DV serotypes fused with the ectodomain of the membrane protein (ectoM). After two injections in mice susceptible to MV infection, the recombinant vector induced neutralizing antibodies against the four serotypes of dengue virus. When immunized mice were further inoculated with live DV from each serotype, a strong memory neutralizing response was raised against all four serotypes. A combined measles-dengue vaccine might be attractive to immunize infants against both diseases where they co-exist.

  11. Strategic deployment of CHO expression platforms to deliver Pfizer's Monoclonal Antibody Portfolio.

    PubMed

    Scarcelli, John J; Shang, Tanya Q; Iskra, Tim; Allen, Martin J; Zhang, Lin

    2017-05-08

    Development of stable cell lines for expression of large-molecule therapeutics represents a significant portion of the time and effort required to advance a molecule to enabling regulatory toxicology studies and clinical evaluation. Our development strategy employs two different approaches for cell line development based on the needs of a particular project: a random integration approach for projects where high-level expression is critical, and a site-specific integration approach for projects in which speed and reduced employee time spend is a necessity. Here we describe both our random integration and site-specific integration platforms and their applications in support of monoclonal antibody development and production. We also compare product quality attributes of monoclonal antibodies produced with a nonclonal cell pool or clonal cell lines derived from the two platforms. Our data suggests that material source (pools vs. clones) does not significantly alter the examined product quality attributes. Our current practice is to leverage this observation with our site-specific integration platform, where material generated from cell pools is used for an early molecular assessment of a given candidate to make informed decisions around development strategy. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  12. PVY-resistant transgenic potato plants expressing an anti-NIa protein scFv antibody.

    PubMed

    Gargouri-Bouzid, Radhia; Jaoua, Leïla; Rouis, Souad; Saïdi, Mohamed Najib; Bouaziz, Donia; Ellouz, Radhouane

    2006-06-01

    A synthetic gene encoding a single chain Fv fragment of an antibody directed against the nuclear inclusion a (NIa) protein of potato virus Y (PVY) was used to transform two commercial potato cultivars (Claustar and BF15). The NIa protease forms the nuclear inclusion body A and acts as the major protease in the cleavage of the viral polyprotein into functional proteins. Immunoblot analysis showed that most of the resulting transgenic plants accumulate high levels of the transgenic protein. Furthermore, a majority of the selected transgenic lines showed an efficient and complete protection against the challenge virus after mechanical inoculation with PVYO strain. Two transgenic lines showed an incomplete resistance with delayed appearance of symptoms accompanied by low virus titers, whereas one line developed symptoms during the first days after inoculation but recovered rapidly, leading to a low virus accumulation rate. These results confirm that expression of scFv antibody is able to inhibit a crucial step in the virus multiplication, such as polyprotein cleavage is a powerful strategy for engineered virus resistance. It can lead to a complete resistance that was not obtained previously by expression of scFv directed against the viral coat protein.

  13. Cloning and expression of functional single-chain Fv antibodies directed against NIa and coat proteins of potato virus Y.

    PubMed

    Rouis, Souad; Lafaye, Pierre; Jaoua-Aydi, Leila; Sghaier, Zidani; Ayadi, Hammadi; Gargouri-Bouzid, Radhia

    2006-10-01

    Three single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies recognizing the nuclear inclusion a (NIa) and capsid proteins of potato virus Y were obtained from two mouse derived hybridoma clones secreting, respectively, an anti-NIa (22-1) and an anti-coat protein (136-13) monoclonal antibodies. The first monoclonal antibody was able to inhibit in vitro the PVY polyprotein cleavage by blocking the NIa protease activity. The amplified scFv cDNAs were first inserted into the TOPO vector and then sequenced. Several recombinant E. coli clones carrying the accurate scFv sequences were selected and the corresponding cDNAs were subcloned in pHEN phagemid and transferred in E. coli strain. The expressed scFv fragments showed an antibody activity that recognized the viral target proteins in infected tissues. Their activity was comparable to the parental monoclonal antibodies.

  14. Genetically Modified α-Amylase Inhibitor Peas Are Not Specifically Allergenic in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dekan, Gerhard; Moore, Andrew E.; Higgins, T. J. V.; Epstein, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    Weevils can devastate food legumes in developing countries, but genetically modified peas (Pisum sativum), chickpeas and cowpeas expressing the gene for alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 (αAI) from the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) are completely protected from weevil destruction. αAI is seed-specific, accumulated at high levels and undergoes post-translational modification as it traverses the seed endomembrane system. This modification was thought to be responsible for the reported allergenicity in mice of the transgenic pea but not the bean. Here, we observed that transgenic αAI peas, chickpeas and cowpeas as well as non-transgenic beans were all allergenic in BALB/c mice. Even consuming non-transgenic peas lacking αAI led to an anti-αAI response due to a cross-reactive response to pea lectin. Our data demonstrate that αAI transgenic peas are not more allergenic than beans or non-transgenic peas in mice. This study illustrates the importance of repeat experiments in independent laboratories and the potential for unexpected cross-reactive allergic responses upon consumption of plant products in mice. PMID:23326368

  15. Genetically modified α-amylase inhibitor peas are not specifically allergenic in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rui-Yun; Reiner, Daniela; Dekan, Gerhard; Moore, Andrew E; Higgins, T J V; Epstein, Michelle M

    2013-01-01

    Weevils can devastate food legumes in developing countries, but genetically modified peas (Pisum sativum), chickpeas and cowpeas expressing the gene for alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 (αAI) from the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) are completely protected from weevil destruction. αAI is seed-specific, accumulated at high levels and undergoes post-translational modification as it traverses the seed endomembrane system. This modification was thought to be responsible for the reported allergenicity in mice of the transgenic pea but not the bean. Here, we observed that transgenic αAI peas, chickpeas and cowpeas as well as non-transgenic beans were all allergenic in BALB/c mice. Even consuming non-transgenic peas lacking αAI led to an anti-αAI response due to a cross-reactive response to pea lectin. Our data demonstrate that αAI transgenic peas are not more allergenic than beans or non-transgenic peas in mice. This study illustrates the importance of repeat experiments in independent laboratories and the potential for unexpected cross-reactive allergic responses upon consumption of plant products in mice.

  16. Modular protein expression by RNA trans-splicing enables flexible expression of antibody formats in mammalian cells from a dual-host phage display vector.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yonglei; Tesar, Devin; Hötzel, Isidro

    2015-10-01

    A recently described dual-host phage display vector that allows expression of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in mammalian cells bypasses the need for subcloning of phage display clone inserts to mammalian vectors for IgG expression in large antibody discovery and optimization campaigns. However, antibody discovery and optimization campaigns usually need different antibody formats for screening, requiring reformatting of the clones in the dual-host phage display vector to an alternative vector. We developed a modular protein expression system mediated by RNA trans-splicing to enable the expression of different antibody formats from the same phage display vector. The heavy-chain region encoded by the phage display vector is directly and precisely fused to different downstream heavy-chain sequences encoded by complementing plasmids simply by joining exons in different pre-mRNAs by trans-splicing. The modular expression system can be used to efficiently express structurally correct IgG and Fab fragments or other antibody formats from the same phage display clone in mammalian cells without clone reformatting.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Bujak, Emil; Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  18. Naturally occurring anti-glycan antibodies binding to Globo H-expressing cells identify ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Pochechueva, Tatiana; Alam, Shahidul; Schötzau, Andreas; Chinarev, Alexander; Bovin, Nicolai V; Hacker, Neville F; Jacob, Francis; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2017-02-10

    Glycosphingolipids are important compounds of the plasma membrane of mammalian cells and a number of them have been associated with malignant transformation and progression, reinforcing tumour aggressiveness and metastasis. Here we investigated the levels of naturally occurring anti-glycan antibodies to Globo H in blood plasma obtained from high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients (SOC) and women without gynaecological malignancies (control) using suspension glycan array technology employing chemically synthesized glycans as antibody targets. We found that anti-human Globo H IgG antibodies were able to significantly discriminate SOC from controls (P < 0.05). A combination with the clinically used tumour marker CA125 increased the diagnostic performance (AUC 0.8711). We next compared suspension array with standard flow cytometry in plasma samples and found that the level of anti-Globo H antibodies highly correlated (r = 0.992). The incubation of plasma-derived anti-glycan antibodies with chemically synthesized (presented on fluorescence microspheres) and native Globo H (expressed on Globo H-positive cell lines) revealed strong reactivity of naturally occurring human anti-Globo H antibodies towards its antigen expressed on ovarian cancer cells. Our data demonstrate that human plasma-derived antibodies to Globo H as well as the presence of the antigen might be considered as therapeutic option in ovarian cancer.

  19. Bean α-amylase inhibitor 1 in transgenic peas (Pisum sativum) provides complete protection from pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum) under field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Roger L.; Schroeder, Hart E.; Bateman, Kaye S.; Chrispeels, Maarten J.; Armstrong, Eric; Higgins, Thomas J. V.

    2000-01-01

    Two α-amylase inhibitors, called αAI-1 and αAI-2, that share 78% amino acid sequence identity and have a differential specificity toward mammalian and insect α-amylases are present in different accessions of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Using greenhouse-grown transgenic peas (Pisum sativum), we have shown previously that expression of αAI-1 in pea seeds can provide complete protection against the pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum). Here, we report that αAI-1 also protects peas from the weevil under field conditions. The high degree of protection is explained by our finding that αAI-1 inhibits pea bruchid α-amylase by 80% over a broad pH range (pH 4.5–6.5). αAI-2, on the other hand, is a much less effective inhibitor of pea bruchid α-amylase, inhibiting the enzyme by only 40%, and only in the pH 4.0–4.5 range. Nevertheless, this inhibitor was still partially effective in protecting field-grown transgenic peas against pea weevils. The primary effect of αAI-2 appeared to be a delay in the maturation of the larvae. This contrasts with the effect of αAI-1, which results in larval mortality at the first or second instar. These results are discussed in relationship to the use of amylase inhibitors with different specificities to bring about protection of crops from their insect pests or to decrease insect pest populations below the economic injury level. PMID:10759552

  20. Yellow pea fiber improves glycemia and reduces Clostridium leptum in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Eslinger, Amanda J; Eller, Lindsay K; Reimer, Raylene A

    2014-08-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the impact of functional fibers on gut microbiota and metabolic health, but some less well-studied fibers and/or fractions of foods known to be high in fiber still warrant examination. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of yellow pea-derived fractions varying in fiber and protein content on metabolic parameters and gut microbiota in diet-induced obese rats. We hypothesized that the yellow pea fiber (PF) fraction would improve glycemia and alter gut microbiota. Rats were randomized to 1 of 5 isoenergetic dietary treatments for 6 weeks: (1) control; (2) oligofructose (OFS); (3) yellow PF; (4) yellow pea flour (PFL); or (5) yellow pea starch (PS). Glycemia, plasma gut hormones, body composition, hepatic triglyceride content, gut microbiota, and messenger RNA expression of genes related to hepatic fat metabolism were examined. Pea flour attenuated weight gain compared with control, PF, and PS (P < .05). Pea flour, PS, and OFS had significantly lower final percent body fat compared with control. Oligofructose but not the pea fraction diets reduced food intake compared with control (P < .05). Pea fiber resulted in lower fasting glucose and glucose area under the curve compared with control. Changes in gut microbiota were fraction specific and included a decrease in Firmicutes (percent) for OFS, PF, and PFL compared with control (P < .05). The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was reduced with OFS, PF, and PFL when compared with PS (P < .05). Taken together, this work suggests that yellow pea-derived fractions are able to distinctly modulate metabolic parameters and gut microbiota in obese rats.

  1. Intracellular Expression of a Single Domain Antibody Reduces Cytotoxicity of 15-Acetyldeoxynivalenol in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Patrick J.; Saeed, Hanaa; Hermans, Anne; Gleddie, Steve C.; Hussack, Greg; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi; Seguin, Charles; Savard, Marc E.; MacKenzie, C. Roger; Hall, J. Christopher

    2009-01-01

    15-Acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-AcDON) is a low molecular weight sesquiterpenoid trichothecene mycotoxin associated with Fusarium ear rot of maize and Fusarium head blight of small grain cereals. The accumulation of mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) and 15-AcDON within harvested grain is subject to stringent regulation as both toxins pose dietary health risks to humans and animals. These toxins inhibit peptidyltransferase activity, which in turn limits eukaryotic protein synthesis. To assess the ability of intracellular antibodies (intrabodies) to modulate mycotoxin-specific cytotoxocity, a gene encoding a camelid single domain antibody fragment (VHH) with specificity and affinity for 15-AcDON was expressed in the methylotropic yeast Pichia pastoris. Cytotoxicity and VHH immunomodulation were assessed by continuous measurement of cellular growth. At equivalent doses, 15-AcDON was significantly more toxic to wild-type P. pastoris than was DON. In turn, DON was orders of magnitude more toxic than 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol. Intracellular expression of a mycotoxin-specific VHH within P. pastoris conveyed significant (p = 0.01) resistance to 15-AcDON cytotoxicity at doses ranging from 20 to 100 μg·ml−1. We also documented a biochemical transformation of DON to 15-AcDON to account for the attenuation of DON cytotoxicity at 100 and 200 μg·ml−1. The proof of concept established within this eukaryotic system suggests that in planta VHH expression may lead to enhanced tolerance to mycotoxins and thereby limit Fusarium infection of commercial agricultural crops. PMID:19783651

  2. Enhanced expression and purification of camelid single domain VHH antibodies from classical inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Maristella; Scotti, Claudia

    2017-08-01

    Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) are small antigen-binding domains derived from naturally occurring, heavy chain-only immunoglobulins isolated from camelid and sharks. They maintain the same binding capability of full-length IgGs but with improved thermal stability and permeability, which justifies their scientific, medical and industrial interest. Several described recombinant forms of sdAbs have been produced in different hosts and with different strategies. Here we present an optimized method for a time-saving, high yield production and extraction of a poly-histidine-tagged sdAb from Escherichia coli classical inclusion bodies. Protein expression and extraction were attempted using 4 different methods (e.g. autoinducing or IPTG-induced soluble expression, non-classical and classical inclusion bodies). The best method resulted to be expression in classical inclusion bodies and urea-mediated protein extraction which yielded 60-70 mg/l bacterial culture. The method we here describe can be of general interest for an enhanced and efficient heterologous expression of sdAbs for research and industrial purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Gene Expression Profiling for the Identification and Classification of Antibody-Mediated Heart Rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Duong Van Huyen, Jean Paul; Hidalgo, Luis; Reeve, Jeff; Racapé, Maud; Aubert, Olivier; Venner, Jeffery M; Falmuski, Konrad; Bories, Marie Cécile; Beuscart, Thibaut; Guillemain, Romain; François, Arnaud; Pattier, Sabine; Toquet, Claire; Gay, Arnaud; Rouvier, Philippe; Varnous, Shaida; Leprince, Pascal; Empana, Jean Philippe; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Bruneval, Patrick; Jouven, Xavier; Halloran, Philip F

    2017-03-07

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) contributes to heart allograft loss. However, an important knowledge gap remains in terms of the pathophysiology of AMR and how detection of immune activity, injury degree, and stage could be improved by intragraft gene expression profiling. We prospectively monitored 617 heart transplant recipients referred from 4 French transplant centers (January 1, 2006-January 1, 2011) for AMR. We compared patients with AMR (n=55) with a matched control group of 55 patients without AMR. We characterized all patients using histopathology (ISHLT [International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation] 2013 grades), immunostaining, and circulating anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies at the time of biopsy, together with systematic gene expression assessments of the allograft tissue, using microarrays. Effector cells were evaluated with in vitro human cell cultures. We studied a validation cohort of 98 heart recipients transplanted in Edmonton, AB, Canada, including 27 cases of AMR and 71 controls. A total of 240 heart transplant endomyocardial biopsies were assessed. AMR showed a distinct pattern of injury characterized by endothelial activation with microcirculatory inflammation by monocytes/macrophages and natural killer (NK) cells. We also observed selective changes in endothelial/angiogenesis and NK cell transcripts, including CD16A signaling and interferon-γ-inducible genes. The AMR-selective gene sets accurately discriminated patients with AMR from those without and included NK transcripts (area under the curve=0.87), endothelial activation transcripts (area under the curve=0.80), macrophage transcripts (area under the curve=0.86), and interferon-γ transcripts (area under the curve=0.84; P<0.0001 for all comparisons). These 4 gene sets showed increased expression with increasing pathological AMR (pAMR) International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation grade (P<0.001) and association with donor-specific antibody levels. The

  4. Evidence against the involvement of ionically bound cell wall proteins in pea epicotyl growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melan, M. A.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Ionically bound cell wall proteins were extracted from 7 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) epicotyls with 3 molar LiCl. Polyclonal antiserum was raised in rabbits against the cell wall proteins. Growth assays showed that treatment of growing region segments (5-7 millimeters) of peas with either dialyzed serum, serum globulin fraction, affinity purified immunoglobulin, or papain-cleaved antibody fragments had no effect on growth. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed antibody binding to cell walls and penetration of the antibodies into the tissues. Western blot analysis, immunoassay results, and affinity chromatography utilizing Sepharose-bound antibodies confirmed recognition of the protein preparation by the antibodies. Experiments employing in vitro extension as a screening measure indicated no effect upon extension by antibodies, by 50 millimolar LiCl perfusion of the apoplast or by 3 molar LiCl extraction. Addition of cell wall protein to protease pretreated segments did not restore extension nor did addition of cell wall protein to untreated segments increase extension. It is concluded that, although evidence suggests that protein is responsible for the process of extension, the class(es) of proteins which are extracted from pea cell walls with 3 molar LiCl are probably not involved in this process.

  5. Evidence against the involvement of ionically bound cell wall proteins in pea epicotyl growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melan, M. A.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Ionically bound cell wall proteins were extracted from 7 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) epicotyls with 3 molar LiCl. Polyclonal antiserum was raised in rabbits against the cell wall proteins. Growth assays showed that treatment of growing region segments (5-7 millimeters) of peas with either dialyzed serum, serum globulin fraction, affinity purified immunoglobulin, or papain-cleaved antibody fragments had no effect on growth. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed antibody binding to cell walls and penetration of the antibodies into the tissues. Western blot analysis, immunoassay results, and affinity chromatography utilizing Sepharose-bound antibodies confirmed recognition of the protein preparation by the antibodies. Experiments employing in vitro extension as a screening measure indicated no effect upon extension by antibodies, by 50 millimolar LiCl perfusion of the apoplast or by 3 molar LiCl extraction. Addition of cell wall protein to protease pretreated segments did not restore extension nor did addition of cell wall protein to untreated segments increase extension. It is concluded that, although evidence suggests that protein is responsible for the process of extension, the class(es) of proteins which are extracted from pea cell walls with 3 molar LiCl are probably not involved in this process.

  6. Evidence against the involvement of ionically bound cell wall proteins in pea epicotyl growth.

    PubMed

    Melan, M A; Cosgrove, D J

    1988-01-01

    Ionically bound cell wall proteins were extracted from 7 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) epicotyls with 3 molar LiCl. Polyclonal antiserum was raised in rabbits against the cell wall proteins. Growth assays showed that treatment of growing region segments (5-7 millimeters) of peas with either dialyzed serum, serum globulin fraction, affinity purified immunoglobulin, or papain-cleaved antibody fragments had no effect on growth. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed antibody binding to cell walls and penetration of the antibodies into the tissues. Western blot analysis, immunoassay results, and affinity chromatography utilizing Sepharose-bound antibodies confirmed recognition of the protein preparation by the antibodies. Experiments employing in vitro extension as a screening measure indicated no effect upon extension by antibodies, by 50 millimolar LiCl perfusion of the apoplast or by 3 molar LiCl extraction. Addition of cell wall protein to protease pretreated segments did not restore extension nor did addition of cell wall protein to untreated segments increase extension. It is concluded that, although evidence suggests that protein is responsible for the process of extension, the class(es) of proteins which are extracted from pea cell walls with 3 molar LiCl are probably not involved in this process.

  7. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  8. Clinical significance of serum anti-p53 antibody expression following curative surgery for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Kensuke; Ishida, Hideyuki; Kuwabara, Koki; Amano, Kunihiko; Chika, Noriyasu; Okada, Norimichi; Ohsawa, Tomonori; Kumagai, Youichi; Ishibashi, Keiichiro

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of serum anti-p53 antibody (Ap53Ab) measurement for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC), and the clinical significance of the association between Ap53Ab expression and survival rate. Ap53Ab, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9 were measured by ELISA in 674 CRC patients and 115 healthy volunteers (control group). The half-life time of Ap53Ab and CEA was calculated. The association between positive Ap53Ab expression and clinicopathological characteristics, including survival rate, was analyzed. Of the 674 CRC patients, 195 (28.9%) were positive for Ap53Ab expression, while the positive rates of CEA and CA19-9 level were 39.9 and 16.9%, respectively. Positivity for Ap53Ab alone was observed in 94 patients (13.9%), whereas the positivity rate of any markers examined was 58.7%. The mean half-life of Ap53Ab and CEA was 30.7 and 11.3 days, respectively. Positive expression of Ap53Ab was significantly associated with the depth of tumor invasion (P<0.001), lymph node metastasis (P=0.024), stage (P<0.001) and CEA level (P=0.005). No significant correlation between Ap53Ab expression and poor survival rate was observed. The positive rate of Ap53Ab was higher compared with that of CEA and CA19-9 in early-stage CRC. The combination of these markers improved the diagnostic yield of CRC up to ~60%. Furthermore, Ap53Ab expression was associated with lymph node metastasis, but not with shorter survival. These results indicated that the measurement of Ap53Ab may contribute to increased rate of detection of CRC, particularly in patients with early-stage disease, in clinical practice.

  9. Cleavage efficient 2A peptides for high level monoclonal antibody expression in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Chng, Jake; Wang, Tianhua; Nian, Rui; Lau, Ally; Hoi, Kong Meng; Ho, Steven C L; Gagnon, Peter; Bi, Xuezhi; Yang, Yuansheng

    2015-01-01

    Linking the heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) genes required for monoclonal antibodies (mAb) production on a single cassette using 2A peptides allows control of LC and HC ratio and reduces non-expressing cells. Four 2A peptides derived from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (F2A), equine rhinitis A virus (E2A), porcine teschovirus-1 (P2A) and Thosea asigna virus (T2A), respectively, were compared for expression of 3 biosimilar IgG1 mAbs in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. HC and LC were linked by different 2A peptides both in the absence and presence of GSG linkers. Insertion of a furin recognition site upstream of 2A allowed removal of 2A residues that would otherwise be attached to the HC. Different 2A peptides exhibited different cleavage efficiencies that correlated to the mAb expression level. The relative cleavage efficiency of each 2A peptide remains similar for expression of different IgG1 mAbs in different CHO cells. While complete cleavage was not observed for any of the 2A peptides, GSG linkers did enhance the cleavage efficiency and thus the mAb expression level. T2A with the GSG linker (GT2A) exhibited the highest cleavage efficiency and mAb expression level. Stably amplified CHO DG44 pools generated using GT2A had titers 357, 416 and 600 mg/L for the 3 mAbs in shake flask batch cultures. Incomplete cleavage likely resulted in incorrectly processed mAb species and aggregates, which were removed with a chromatin-directed clarification method and protein A purification. The vector and methods presented provide an easy process beneficial for both mAb development and manufacturing.

  10. FX knockout CHO hosts can express desired ratios of fucosylated or afucosylated antibodies with high titers and comparable product quality.

    PubMed

    Louie, Salina; Haley, Benjamin; Marshall, Brett; Heidersbach, Amy; Yim, Mandy; Brozynski, Martina; Tang, Danming; Lam, Cynthia; Petryniak, Bronislawa; Shaw, David; Shim, Jeongsup; Miller, Aaron; Lowe, John B; Snedecor, Brad; Misaghi, Shahram

    2017-03-01

    During antibody dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) the target cells are killed by monocytes and natural killer cells. ADCC is enhanced when the antibody heavy chain's core N-linked glycan lacks the fucose molecule(s). Several strategies have been utilized to generate fully afucosylated antibodies. A commonly used and efficient approach has been knocking out the FUT8 gene of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) host cells, which results in expression of antibody molecules with fully afucosylated glycans. However, a major drawback of the FUT8-KO host is the requirement for undertaking two separate cell line development (CLD) efforts in order to obtain both primarily fucosylated and fully afucosylated antibody species for comparative studies in vitro and in vivo. Even more challenging is obtaining primarily fucosylated and FUT8-KO clones with similar enough product quality attributes to ensure that any observed ADCC advantage(s) can be strictly attributed to afucosylation. Here, we report generation and use of a FX knockout (FXKO) CHO host cell line that is capable of expressing antibody molecules with either primarily fucosylated or fully afucosylated glycan profiles with otherwise similar product quality attributes, depending on addition of fucose to the cell culture media. Hence, the FXKO host not only obviates the requirement for undertaking two separate CLD efforts, but it also averts the need for screening many colonies to identify clones with comparable product qualities. Finally, FXKO clones can express antibodies with the desired ratio of primarily fucosylated to afucosylated glycans when fucose is titrated into the production media, to allow achieving intended levels of FcγRIII-binding and ADCC for an antibody. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 632-644. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Use of expression mutants and monoclonal antibodies to map the erythrocyte Ca2+ pump.

    PubMed

    Adamo, H P; Caride, A J; Penniston, J T

    1992-07-15

    Deletion and truncation mutants of the human erythrocyte Ca2+ pump (hPMCA4b) were expressed in COS-1 cells. The reactivity patterns of these mutants with seven monoclonal antibodies were examined. Of the seven, six (JA9, JA3, 1G4, 4A4, 3E10 and 5F10) react from the cytoplasmic side. JA9 and JA3 reacted near the NH2 terminus and the COOH terminus of the molecule, respectively. 5F10 and 3E10 recognized portions of the large hydrophilic region in the middle of the protein. The epitopes of 1G4 and 4A4 were discontinuous and included residues from the long hydrophilic domain and residues between the proposed transmembrane domains M2 and M3. Antibody 1B10, which reacts from the extracellular side, recognized the COOH-terminal half of the molecule. These results show that the NH2 terminus, the COOH terminus, the region between M2 and M3, and the large hydrophilic region are all on the cytoplasmic side. This means that there are an even number of membrane crossings in both the NH2-terminal and the COOH-terminal halves. Between residues 75 and 300 there must be at least two membrane crossings, and there are at least two membrane crossings in the COOH-terminal half of the molecule.

  12. Expression of basal cell marker revealed by RAM11 antibody during epithelial regeneration in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lis, Grzegorz J; Jasek, Ewa; Litwin, Jan A; Gajda, Mariusz; Zarzecka, Joanna; Cichocki, Tadeusz

    2010-01-01

    RAM11 is a mouse monoclonal anti-rabbit macrophage antibody recognizing connective tissue and vascular macrophages. Our previous report showed that RAM11 reacted with basal cells of stratified squamous epithelia of rabbit skin, oral mucosa and esophagus. The aim of the present study was to follow the appearance of RAM11 immunoreactivity in basal cells of regenerating oral epithelium in rabbits. No RAM11 immunostaining was observed in the regenerating epithelium examined on days 1 and 3 of wound healing. A weak immunofluorescence first appeared on day 7 in single basal cells and 32% of RAM11- positive basal cells were observed on day 14. These findings indicate that expression of the antigen recognized by RAM11 antibody is a transient event in the differentiation of oral keratinocytes which not always occurs during epithelial repair, although it is a constant feature of epithelial turnover in mature epithelium. Therefore this antigen can be regarded as basal cell marker only in mature stratified squamous epithelia.

  13. Characterization of mechanical properties of transgenic tobacco roots expressing a recombinant monoclonal antibody against tooth decay.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sally; Liu, Wei; Ma, Julian K-C; Thomas, Colin R; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli

    2008-07-01

    In this article, we describe a new approach that allows the determination of the magnitude of force required to break single plant roots. Roots were taken from transgenic tobacco plants, expressing a secreted monoclonal antibody. They were divided into four key developmental stages. A novel micromanipulation technique was used to pull to breakage, single tobacco roots in buffer in order to determine their breaking force. A characteristic uniform step-wise increase in the force up to a peak force for breakage was observed. The mean breaking force and mean work done were 101mN and 97microJ per root respectively. However, there was a significant increase in breaking force from the youngest white roots to the oldest, dark red-brown roots. We speculate that this was due to increasing lignin deposition with root stage of development (shown by phloroglucinol staining). No significant differences between fresh root mass, original root length, or mean root diameter for any of the root categories were found, displaying their uniformity, which would be beneficial for bioprocessing. In addition, no significant difference in antibody yield from the different root categories was found. These data show that it is possible to characterise the force requirements for root breakage and should assist in the optimisation of recombinant protein extraction from these roots. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Highly efficient production of VHH antibody fragments in Brevibacillus choshinensis expression system.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Makoto; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Onishi, Hiromasa; Ueno, Yohei; Hanagata, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Nobuo; Kiyose, Norihiko; Ito, Yuji; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Miyauchi, Akira; Tokunaga, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Anti-IZUMO1PFF VHH (variable domain of camelid heavy chain antibody) clones, N6 and N15, from immunized alpaca (Lama pacos) phage library were efficiently expressed and their VHH products were secreted into the culture medium of Brevibacillus choshinensis HPD31-SP3, e.g., at a level of 26-95mg in 100ml conventional flask culture. With a 3-L scale fed-batch culture for 65h, the N15 VHH protein with C-terminal His-tag was produced at ∼3g/l culture medium. The N6 and N15 proteins were easily purified to apparent homogeneity by cation exchange and Ni-affinity chromatographies. Both proteins showed specific antigen-binding activity by ELISA and high antigen binding affinity, KD=6.0-8.6nM, by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Size exclusion chromatography-multi-angle laser light scattering analysis revealed that N6 and N15 proteins purified were exclusively monomeric form in phosphate buffered saline. CD spectrum showed beta-sheet rich structure, consistent with a typical antibody structure and also suggested aromatic-aromatic interactions, as indicated by a positive peak at 232nm. Thermal melting analysis of the N15 protein with C-terminal His-tag demonstrated a clear thermal transition with a Tm at 67°C. The heat-denatured sample recovered antigen binding activity upon cooling, indicating a reversible denaturation.

  15. Cowpea mosaic virus-based systems for the expression of antigens and antibodies in plants.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Frank; Liu, Li; Lomonossoff, George P

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of Cowpea mosaic virus-based vectors for the production of foreign proteins such as antigens and antibodies in plants. The systems include vectors based on both full-length and deleted versions of RNA-2. In both cases, the modified RNA-2 is replicated by coinoculation with RNA-1. The constructs based on full-length RNA-2 retain the ability to spread systemically throughout an inoculated plant and the infection can be passaged. The vector based on a deleted version of RNA-2 can stably incorporate larger inserts but lacks the ability to move systemically. However, it has the added advantage of biocontainment. In both cases, vector constructs modified to contain a foreign gene of interest can be delivered by agroinfiltration to obtain transient expression of the foreign protein. If required, the same constructs can also be used for stable nuclear transformation. Both types of vector have proved effective for the production in plants of a diverse range of proteins including antigens and antibodies.

  16. Antibody Reactivity of B Cells in Lupus Patients with Increased Disease Activity and ARID3a Expression.

    PubMed

    Ward, Julie M; James, Judith A; Zhao, Yan D; Webb, Carol F

    2015-12-01

    Earlier studies showed that the DNA-binding protein, Bright/ARID3a bound to a subset of human and mouse immunoglobulin heavy chain promoters where it enhanced expression. Indeed, mice with transgenic expression of ARID3a in all B lymphocytes have expanded MZ B cells and produce anti-nuclear antibodies (ANAs). Consistent with our findings in mice, we observed that human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients had expanded numbers of peripheral blood ARID3a(+) B cells that were associated with increased disease activity (p = 0.0038). We hypothesized that ARID3a(+) naïve B cells would eventually produce autoantibodies, explaining associations between ARID3a expression and disease activity in lupus. Unlike healthy controls, ARID3a was expressed in the naïve B cell population in SLE patients, and we hypothesized that these might represent expansions of autoreactive cells. Therefore, monoclonal antibodies were generated from single-sorted naïve B cells derived from patients with normal (ARID3a(N)) and high (ARID3a(H)) numbers of ARID3a(+) B cells. We found that ARID3a expression did not correlate with autoantibody expression. Furthermore, measures of antigen specificities of autoreactive antibodies did not reveal skewing toward particular proteins. These data suggest that the association of increased disease activity in SLE with numbers of ARID3a(+) B lymphocytes may be mediated by an antibody-independent mechanism.

  17. Antibody Reactivity of B Cells in Lupus Patients with Increased Disease Activity and ARID3a Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Julie M.; James, Judith A.; Zhao, Yan D.; Webb, Carol F.

    2016-01-01

    Earlier studies showed that the DNA-binding protein, Bright/ARID3a bound to a subset of human and mouse immunoglobulin heavy chain promoters where it enhanced expression. Indeed, mice with transgenic expression of ARID3a in all B lymphocytes have expanded MZ B cells and produce anti-nuclear antibodies (ANAs). Consistent with our findings in mice, we observed that human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients had expanded numbers of peripheral blood ARID3a+ B cells that were associated with increased disease activity (p = 0.0038). We hypothesized that ARID3a+ naïve B cells would eventually produce autoantibodies, explaining associations between ARID3a expression and disease activity in lupus. Unlike healthy controls, ARID3a was expressed in the naïve B cell population in SLE patients, and we hypothesized that these might represent expansions of autoreactive cells. Therefore, monoclonal antibodies were generated from single-sorted naïve B cells derived from patients with normal (ARID3aN) and high (ARID3aH) numbers of ARID3a+ B cells. We found that ARID3a expression did not correlate with autoantibody expression. Furthermore, measures of antigen specificities of autoreactive antibodies did not reveal skewing toward particular proteins. These data suggest that the association of increased disease activity in SLE with numbers of ARID3a+ B lymphocytes may be mediated by an antibody-independent mechanism. PMID:28580178

  18. TTF1 expression in normal lung neuroendocrine cells and related tumors: immunohistochemical study comparing two different monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Stefano; Chiaravalli, Anna Maria; Placidi, Claudia; Papanikolaou, Nikolaos; Cerati, Michele; Capella, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF1) regulates lung morphogenesis and differentiation, and its immunohistochemical expression is used for identifying lung neoplasms. The 8G7G3/1 antibody has been used in previous studies, but a different and more sensitive anti-TTF1 antibody, named SPT24, has become commercially available. Since the immunohistochemical expression of TTF1 in normal lung neuroendocrine (NE) cells has not been previously investigated and its utility in the diagnosis of lung NE tumors is a controversial issue, we studied the TTF1 expression in normal adult and fetal lungs, in 83 pulmonary NE neoplasms, in 131 non-lung NE tumors and in 36 metastases from these neoplasms using these two antibodies. A TTF1 immunoreactivity was demonstrated in normal fetal and adult NE cells when using the SPT24 clone. Conversely, using the 8G7G3/1 antibody, only rare fetal neuroendocrine cells were TTF1 positive while adult NE cells were negative. The SPT24 clone identified TTF1 expression in more carcinoids, most of them peripherally located, and poorly differentiated NE carcinomas than the 8G7G3/1 clone. Non-pulmonary well-differentiated NE tumors were negative for both antibodies. Among the 45 non-pulmonary poorly differentiated NE carcinomas 11% were positive for 8G7G3/1 and 18% for SPT24. TTF1 expression in metastases perfectly reflected that detected in the related primary tumors. Our results indicate that the SPT24 antibody is more sensitive than the 8G7G3/1 clone for labeling lung carcinoids and it appears particularly useful in detecting peripheral neoplasms. In addition, the expression of TTF1 in normal NE cells suggests a possible role for the transcription factor in their development and differentiation.

  19. Omi/HtrA2 promotes cell death by binding and degrading the anti-apoptotic protein ped/pea-15.

    PubMed

    Trencia, Alessandra; Fiory, Francesca; Maitan, Maria Alessandra; Vito, Pasquale; Barbagallo, Alessia Paola Maria; Perfetti, Anna; Miele, Claudia; Ungaro, Paola; Oriente, Francesco; Cilenti, Lucia; Zervos, Antonis S; Formisano, Pietro; Beguinot, Francesco

    2004-11-05

    ped/pea-15 is a ubiquitously expressed 15-kDa protein featuring a broad anti-apoptotic function. In a yeast two-hybrid screen, the pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 mitochondrial serine protease was identified as a specific interactor of the ped/pea-15 death effector domain. Omi/HtrA2 also bound recombinant ped/pea-15 in vitro and co-precipitated with ped/pea-15 in 293 and HeLa cell extracts. In these cells, the binding of Omi/HtrA2 to ped/pea-15 was induced by UVC exposure and followed the mitochondrial release of Omi/HtrA2 into the cytoplasm. Upon UVC exposure, cellular ped/pea-15 protein expression levels decreased. This effect was prevented by the ucf-101 specific inhibitor of the Omi/HtrA2 proteolytic activity, in a dose-dependent fashion. In vitro incubation of ped/pea-15 with Omi/HtrA2 resulted in ped/pea-15 degradation. In intact cells, the inhibitory action of ped/pea-15 on UVC-induced apoptosis progressively declined at increasing Omi/HtrA2 expression. This further effect of Omi/HtrA2 was also inhibited by ucf-101. In addition, ped/pea-15 expression blocked Omi/HtrA2 co-precipitation with the caspase inhibitor protein XIAP and caspase 3 activation. Thus, in part, apoptosis following Omi/HtrA2 mitochondrial release is mediated by reduction in ped/pea-15 cellular levels. The ability of Omi/HtrA2 to relieve XIAP inhibition on caspases is modulated by the relative levels of Omi/HtrA2 and ped/pea-15.

  20. The role of the ETS gene PEA3 in the development of motor and sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Ladle, David R; Frank, Eric

    2002-12-01

    The ETS family of transcription factors includes two members, ER81 and PEA3, which are expressed in groups of sensory and motor neurons supplying individual muscles. To investigate a possible role of these genes in determining sensory and/or motor neuron phenotype, we studied mice in which each of these genes was deleted. In contrast to the deletion of ER81, which blocks the formation of projections from muscle sensory neurons to motor neurons in the spinal cord, deletion of PEA3 causes no obvious effects on sensory neurons or on their synaptic connections with motor neurons. PEA3 does play a major role in the formation of some brachial motoneurons however. Motoneurons innervating the cutaneous maximus muscle, which are normally PEA3(+), fail to develop normally so that postnatally the muscle is innervated by few motoneurons and is severely atrophic. Other studies suggest that these motoneurons initially appear during development but fail to contact their normal muscle targets.

  1. Immunolocalization of pectic polysaccharides during abscission in pea seeds (Pisum sativum L.) and in abscission less def pea mutant seeds.

    PubMed

    Lee, YeonKyeong; Ayeh, Kwadwo Owusu; Ambrose, Mike; Hvoslef-Eide, Anne Kathrine

    2016-08-31

    In pea seeds (Pisum sativum L.), the presence of the Def locus determines abscission event between its funicle and the seed coat. Cell wall remodeling is a necessary condition for abscission of pea seed. The changes in cell wall components in wild type (WT) pea seed with Def loci showing seed abscission and in abscission less def mutant peas were studied to identify the factors determining abscission and non-abscission event. Changes in pectic polysaccharides components were investigated in WT and def mutant pea seeds using immunolabeling techniques. Pectic monoclonal antibodies (1 → 4)-β-D-galactan (LM5), (1 → 5)-α-L-arabinan(LM6), partially de-methyl esterified homogalacturonan (HG) (JIM5) and methyl esterified HG (JIM7) were used for this study. Prior to abscission zone (AZ) development, galactan and arabinan reduced in the predestined AZ of the pea seed and disappeared during the abscission process. The AZ cells had partially de-methyl esterified HG while other areas had highly methyl esterified HG. A strong JIM5 labeling in the def mutant may be related to cell wall rigidity in the mature def mutants. In addition, the appearance of pectic epitopes in two F3 populations resulting from cross between WT and def mutant parents was studied. As a result, we identified that homozygous dominant lines (Def/Def) showing abscission and homozygous recessive lines (def/def) showing non-abscission had similar immunolabeling pattern to their parents. However, the heterogeneous lines (Def/def) showed various immunolabeling pattern and the segregation pattern of the Def locus. Through the study of the complexity and variability of pectins in plant cell walls as well as understanding the segregation patterns of the Def locus using immunolabeling techniques, we conclude that cell wall remodeling occurs in the abscission process and de-methyl esterification may play a role in the non-abscission event in def mutant. Overall, this study contributes new insights into

  2. Strigolactones promote nodulation in pea.

    PubMed

    Foo, Eloise; Davies, Noel W

    2011-11-01

    Strigolactones are recently defined plant hormones with roles in mycorrhizal symbiosis and shoot and root architecture. Their potential role in controlling nodulation, the related symbiosis between legumes and Rhizobium bacteria, was explored using the strigolactone-deficient rms1 mutant in pea (Pisum sativum L.). This work indicates that endogenous strigolactones are positive regulators of nodulation in pea, required for optimal nodule number but not for nodule formation per se. rms1 mutant root exudates and root tissue are almost completely deficient in strigolactones, and rms1 mutant plants have approximately 40% fewer nodules than wild-type plants. Treatment with the synthetic strigolactone GR24 elevated nodule number in wild-type pea plants and also elevated nodule number in rms1 mutant plants to a level similar to that seen in untreated wild-type plants. Grafting studies revealed that nodule number and strigolactone levels in root tissue of rms1 roots were unaffected by grafting to wild-type scions indicating that strigolactones in the root, but not shoot-derived factors, regulate nodule number and provide the first direct evidence that the shoot does not make a major contribution to root strigolactone levels.

  3. Expression of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies mediated by recombinant adeno-associated virus 8 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongjiao; Fu, Lu; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Guan, Shanshan; Kuai, Ziyu; Kong, Wei; Shi, Yuhua; Shan, Yaming

    2016-12-01

    Despite unremitting efforts since the discovery of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), an effective vaccine has not been generated. Viral vector-mediated transfer for expression of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAbs) is an attractive strategy. In this study, a recombinant adeno-associated virus 8 (rAAV8) vector was used to encode full-length antibodies against HIV-1 in 293T cells and Balb/c mice after gene transfer. The 10E8 or NIH45-46 BnAb was expressed from a single open reading frame by linking the heavy and light chains with a furin cleavage and a 2A self-processing peptide (F2A). The results showed that the BnAbs could be expressed in the 293T cell culture medium. A single intramuscular injection of rAAV8 led to long-term expression of BnAbs in Balb/c mice. The expressed antibodies in the supernatant of 293T cells and in Balb/c mice showed neutralization effects against HIV-1 pseudoviruses. Combined immunization of rAAV8 expressing 10E8 and rAAV8 expressing NIH45-46 in Balb/c mice could increase these neutralization effects on strains of HIV-1 sensitive to 10E8 or NIH45-46 antibody compared with a single injection of rAAV8 expressing either antibody alone. Therefore, the combined immunization may be a potential vaccine approach against HIV-1.

  4. [Targeted Delivery of Quantum Dots to HER2-Expressing Tumor Using Recombinant Antibodies].

    PubMed

    Balalaeva, I V; Zdobnova, T A; Sokolova, E A; Deyev, S M

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of semiconductor quantum dots (Q Ds) to tumors overexpressing HER2 cancer marker has been. demonstrated on immunocompromised mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts. To obtain targeted QDs complexes we applied the approach based on the use of protein adaptor system, RNAase barnase and its inhibitor barstar. Specific binding to target cancer marker was achieved through bivalent fusion protein containing two fragments of4D5scFv recombinant antibody and a fragment of barnase. QDs were conjugated to barstar, and final assembly of targeted complexes was obtained through non-covalent specific interaction of barstar, attached to QD, and barnase, that is part of the recombinant targeting protein. The efficient delivery of QDs to HER2-expressing tumor demonstrates the possibilities and prospects of the approach for targeted delivery of nanoparticles to cancer cells in vivo as the way to improve the efficiency of diagnosis and promote development of therapies based on the use of nanoparticles.

  5. Reduction of malaria transmission by transgenic mosquitoes expressing an antisporozoite antibody in their salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Sumitani, M; Kasashima, K; Yamamoto, D S; Yagi, K; Yuda, M; Matsuoka, H; Yoshida, S

    2013-02-01

    We have previously developed a robust salivary gland-specific expression system in transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. To establish transgenic mosquito lines refractory to Plasmodium falciparum using this system, we generated a transgenic mosquito harbouring the gene encoding an anti-P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP) single-chain antibody (scFv) fused to DsRed in a secretory form (mDsRed-2A10 scFv). Fluorescence microscopy showed that the mDsRed-2A10 scFv was localized in the secretory cavities and ducts of the salivary glands in a secreted form. To evaluate P. falciparum transmission-blocking in a rodent malaria model, a transgenic Plasmodium berghei line expressing PfCSP in place of PbCSP (PfCSP/Pb) was constructed. The PfCSP/Pb parasites were able to bind to the mDsRed-2A10 scFv in the salivary glands of the transgenic mosquitoes. Importantly, the infectivity of the transgenic mosquitoes to mice was strongly impaired, indicating that the parasites had been inactivated. These results suggest that salivary gland-specific expression of antisporozoite molecules could be a promising strategy for blocking malaria transmission to humans.

  6. Superficial dsg2 expression limits epidermal blister formation mediated by pemphigus foliaceus antibodies and exfoliative toxins.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Donna; Hu, Ying; Medhat, Walid; Dowling, Alicia; Mahoney, My G

    2010-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion mediated by desmosomes is crucial for maintaining proper epidermal structure and function, as evidenced by several severe and potentially fatal skin disorders involving impairment of desmosomal proteins. Pemphigus foliaceus (PF) and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) are subcorneal blistering diseases resulting from loss of function of the desmosomal cadherin, desmoglein 1 (Dsg1). To further study the pathomechanism of these diseases and to assess the adhesive properties of Dsg2, we employed a recently established transgenic (Tg) mouse model expressing Dsg2 in the superficial epidermis. Neonatal Tg and wild type (WT) mice were injected with purified ETA or PF Ig. We showed that ectopic expression of Dsg2 reduced the extent of blister formation in response to both ETA and PF Ig. In response to PF Ig, we observed either a dramatic loss or a reorganization of Dsg1-alpha, Dsg1-beta, and, to a lesser extent, Dsg1-gamma, in WT mice. The Inv-Dsg2 Tg mice showed enhanced retention of Dsg1 at the cell-cell border. Collectively, our data support the role for Dsg2 in cell adhesion and suggest that ectopic superficial expression of Dsg2 can increase membrane preservation of Dsg1 and limit epidermal blister formation mediated by PF antibodies and exfoliative toxins.

  7. Superficial Dsg2 Expression Limits Epidermal Blister Formation Mediated by Pemphigus Foliaceus Antibodies and Exfoliative Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Donna; Hu, Ying; Medhat, Walid; Dowling, Alicia; Mahoney, Mỹ G.

    2010-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion mediated by desmosomes is crucial for maintaining proper epidermal structure and function, as evidenced by several severe and potentially fatal skin disorders involving impairment of desmosomal proteins. Pemphigus foliaceus (PF) and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) are subcorneal blistering diseases resulting from loss of function of the desmosomal cadherin, desmoglein 1 (Dsg1). To further study the pathomechanism of these diseases and to assess the adhesive properties of Dsg2, we employed a recently established transgenic (Tg) mouse model expressing Dsg2 in the superficial epidermis. Neonatal Tg and wild type (WT) mice were injected with purified ETA or PF Ig. We showed that ectopic expression of Dsg2 reduced the extent of blister formation in response to both ETA and PF Ig. In response to PF Ig, we observed either a dramatic loss or a reorganization of Dsg1-α, Dsg1-β, and, to a lesser extent, Dsg1-γ, in WT mice. The Inv-Dsg2 Tg mice showed enhanced retention of Dsg1 at the cell-cell border. Collectively, our data support the role for Dsg2 in cell adhesion and suggest that ectopic superficial expression of Dsg2 can increase membrane preservation of Dsg1 and limit epidermal blister formation mediated by PF antibodies and exfoliative toxins. PMID:20631906

  8. Influence of protein expression system on elicitation of IgE antibody responses: experience with lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    Almond, Rachael J; Flanagan, Brian F; Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2012-11-15

    With increased interest in genetically modified (GM) crop plants there is an important need to understand the properties that contribute to the ability of such novel proteins to provoke immune and/or allergic responses. One characteristic that may be relevant is glycosylation, particularly as novel expression systems (e.g. bacterial to plant) will impact on the protein glycoprofile. The allergenicity (IgE inducing) and immunogenicity (IgG inducing) properties of wild type native human lactoferrin (NLF) from human milk (hm) and neutrophil granules (n) and a recombinant molecule produced in rice (RLF) have been assessed. These forms of lactoferrin have identical amino acid sequences, but different glycosylation patterns: hmNLF and nNLF have complex glycoprofiles including Lewis (Le)(x) structures, with particularly high levels of Le(x) expressed by nNLF, whereas RLF is simpler and rich in mannose residues. Antibody responses induced in BALB/c strain mice by intraperitoneal exposure to the different forms of lactoferrin were characterised. Immunisation with both forms of NLF stimulated substantial IgG and IgE antibody responses. In contrast, the recombinant molecule was considerably less immunogenic and failed to stimulate detectable IgE, irrespective of endotoxin and iron content. The glycans did not contribute to epitope formation, with equivalent IgE and IgG binding recorded for high titre anti-NLF antisera regardless of whether the immunising NLF or the recombinant molecule were used substrates in the analyses. These data demonstrate that differential glycosylation profiles can have a profound impact on protein allergenicity and immunogenicity, with mannose and Le(x) exhibiting opposing effects. These results have clear relevance for characterising the allergenic hazards of novel proteins in GM crops.

  9. Many commercially available antibodies for detection of CHOP expression as a marker of endoplasmic reticulum stress fail specificity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Haataja, Leena; Gurlo, Tatyana; Huang, Chang-Jiang; Butler, Peter C

    2008-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress contributes to beta cell death in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). ER stress is characterized by increased level of ER stress markers such as C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Activation of CHOP leads to its translocation into the nucleus, where it induces cell death. We previously reported nuclear CHOP in pancreatic sections from T2DM, but not T1DM, and in human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) transgenic rodent pancreatic sections. These studies underscore the importance of studying nuclear CHOP. We have observed inconsistency in the detection of CHOP antibodies reported in the literature and also in our own experiments. To investigate the specificity of CHOP antibodies, we first induced ER stress by tunicamycin in rat insulinoma (INS) cells and prepared nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Then we examined CHOP expression by Western blotting and immunocytochemistry using seven commercially available CHOP antibodies in INS cells and human IAPP (h-IAPP) transgenic rodent pancreatic tissue. These studies show that three commercially available CHOP antibodies out of seven tested were non-specific. In conclusion, we give recommendations for CHOP antibody selection and methods to verify CHOP antibody specificity. Also, we propose that the authors report the catalog and lot numbers of the CHOP antibodies used.

  10. Anchored periplasmic expression, a versatile technology for the isolation of high-affinity antibodies from Escherichia coli-expressed libraries

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Barrett R.; Georgiou, George; Hayhurst, Andrew; Jeong, Ki Jun; Iverson, Brent L.; Rogers, Geoffrey K.

    2004-01-01

    Anchored periplasmic expression (APEx) is a technology for the isolation of ligand-binding proteins from combinatorial libraries anchored on the periplasmic face of the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. After disruption of the outer membrane by Tris-EDTA-lysozyme, the inner-membrane-anchored proteins readily bind fluorescently labeled ligands as large as 240 kDa. Fluorescently labeled cells are isolated by flow cytometry, and the DNA of isolated clones is rescued by PCR. By using two rounds of APEx, the affinity of a neutralizing antibody to the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen was improved >200-fold, exhibiting a final KD of 21 pM. This approach has several technical advantages compared with previous library screening technologies, including the unique ability to screen for ligand-binding proteins that bind endogenously expressed ligands fused to a short-lived GFP. Further, APEx is able to display proteins either as an N-terminal fusion to a six-residue sequence derived from the native E. coli lipoprotein NlpA, or as a C-terminal fusion to the phage gene three minor coat protein of M13. The latter fusions allow hybrid phage display/APEx strategies without the need for further subcloning. PMID:15197275

  11. Diversity of Helicobacter pylori isolates in expression of antigens and induction of antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ren-Xian; Luo, Dong-Jiao; Sun, Ai-Hua; Yan, Jie

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To obtain evidence for selection of antigens used in genetically engineered vaccine against Helicobacter pylori (H pylori). METHODS: Enzyme linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) was established on the basis of recombinant protein antigens rUreB, rHpaA, rVacA, rCagA1, rNapA, rFlaA and rFlaB of H pylori to detect expression rates of the antigens in bacterial isolates as well as positive rates of the antibodies in sera from H pylori-infected patients. PCR was applied to the detection of carrying rates of the genes encoding antigens in the isolates. RESULTS: The outputs of rUreB, rHpaA, rVacA, rCagA1, rNapA, rFlaA and rFlaB were approximately 35%, 32%, 15%, 23%, 56%, 25% and 20% of the total bacterial proteins, respectively. One hundred and fifty-one strains of H pylori were isolated from 347 biopsy specimens of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer or gastric adenocarcinoma, with a positive rate of 43.5%. All of the isolates expressed UreB, HpaA, FlaA and FlaB while 52.3%, 92.1% and 93.4% of the isolates expressed VacA, CagA and NapA, respectively. In the sera of 151 H pylori-infected patients, the positive rates of IgG antibodies against UreB, HpaA, VacA, CagA, NapA, FlaA and FlaB were 100%, 87.4%, 43%, 71.5%, 89.4%, 84.8% and 79.5%, respectively. Furthermore, the expression frequencies of VacA and NapA were found to be relative to the severity of gastric diseases (P = 0.016 and P < 0.0001, respectively). CONCLUSION: UreB antigen is the top option of developing genetically engineered vaccine against H pylori followed by NapA or HpaA. PMID:18720546

  12. In vitro inhibition of ETEC K88 adhesion by pea hulls and of LT enterotoxin binding by faba bean hulls.

    PubMed

    Becker, P M; van der Meulen, J; Jansman, A J M; van Wikselaar, P G

    2012-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing K88 (F4) adhesins are associated with post-weaning diarrhoea in piglets. Different grain fractions from pea (Pisum sativum) and faba bean (Vicia faba) were tested in vitro for their capacity to counteract aetiological factors, which contribute to the development of diarrhoea. In detail, adhesion of E. coli O149:K91:K88ac (ETEC K88ac) to grain legume products, intended to impair the colonization of the host, was studied as well as interference with receptor binding of the pathogen's heat-labile enterotoxin LT, intended to reduce toxin-inflicted gut cell damage. When comparing different pea and faba bean products tested for their binding capacity of ETEC K88ac, especially pea hulls, but also whole pea meal, starch-enriched and protein-enriched pea meal, and digestion-resistant pea hull and meal fractions showed a higher binding of ETEC K88ac than faba bean products. In contrast to the ETEC K88ac adhesion results, bean hulls proved more effective than pea hulls in preventing GM1 receptor binding of LT. Previous small intestinal segment perfusion experiments we performed with ETEC K88ac-challenged piglets indicated that both pea and bean hulls have the potential for successful application in diarrhoea prophylaxis and treatment, which is in agreement with and refined by our detection of their different modes of functioning.

  13. [Molecular cloning, prokaryotic expression and double-antibody sandwich ELISA development of 17β-hsd10 in mouse].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuanzhi; Niu, Yingying; Chen, Yuan'an; Wu, Cheng; Yu, Yuanhua

    2014-11-01

    We expressed 17-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase10 (17β-hsd10) recombinant protein, prepared anti-17β- hsd10 polyclonal antibodies and established sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test for detection of 17β-hsd10. RT-PCR was used to get the gene of 17β-hsd10 of mouse liver, and a prokaryotic protein expression system pET 15b-17β-hsd10/Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) which induced with isopropyl-1-thio-β-galactopyranoside (IPTG) for recombinant protein expression was constructed subsequently. The target protein purified using His-Binding-resin column was used to immunize BALB/c mice and rabbits, serum total IgGs from immunized animals were purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation method. We established a Double-antibody Sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay about 17β-hsd10 using the two antibodies we prepared. We got the concentration of 1.5 mg/mL of 17β-hsd10 protein with molecular weight of 29.5 kDa, and polyclonal antibodies from mouse and rabbit with the tite 1.25 x 10(4) and 2.5 x 10(4) respectively. The concentration of 0.1 g/mL of 17β-hsd10 can be detected by the Double-antibody Sandwich ELISA we established, and the assay was sensitive and specific. It can be widely used in clinical and experimental study.

  14. DNA vaccine expressing the mimotope of GD2 ganglioside induces protective GD2 cross-reactive antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Bolesta, Elizabeth; Kowalczyk, Aleksandra; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Rotkiewicz, Piotr; Bambach, Barbara; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Horwacik, Irena; Kolinski, Andrzej; Rokita, Hanna; Brecher, Martin; Wang, Xinhui; Ferrone, Soldano; Kozbor, Danuta

    2005-04-15

    The GD2 ganglioside expressed on neuroectodermally derived tumors, including neuroblastoma and melanoma, is weakly immunogenic in tumor-bearing patients and induces predominantly immunoglobulin (Ig)-M antibody responses in the immunized host. Here, we investigated whether interconversion of GD2 into a peptide mimetic form would induce GD2 cross-reactive IgG antibody responses in mice. Screening of the X(15) phage display peptide library with the anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 14G2a led to isolation of mimetic peptide 47, which inhibited the binding of 14G2a antibody to GD2-positive tumor cells. The peptide was also recognized by GD2-specific serum antibodies from a patient with neuroblastoma, suggesting that it bears an internal image of GD2 ganglioside expressed on the tumor cells. The molecular basis for antigenicity of the GD2 mimetic peptide, established by molecular modeling and mutagenesis studies, led to the generation of a 47-LDA mutant with an increased mimicry to GD2. Immunization of mice with peptide 47-LDA-encoded plasmid DNA elicited GD2 cross-reactive IgG antibody responses, which were increased on subsequent boost with GD2 ganglioside. The vaccine-induced antibodies recognized GD2-positive tumor cells, mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity, and exhibited protection against s.c. human GD2-positive melanoma growth in the severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model. The results from our studies provide insights into approaches for boosting GD2 cross-reactive IgG antibody responses by minigene vaccination with a protective epitope of GD2 ganglioside.

  15. Western blot analysis of BK channel β1-subunit expression should be interpreted cautiously when using commercially available antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Yogesh; Fernandes, Roxanne; Kadrofske, Mark M; Lockwood, Lizbeth R; Galligan, James J; Xu, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels consist of pore-forming α- and accessory β-subunits. There are four β-subunit subtypes (β1-β4), BK β1-subunit is specific for smooth muscle cells (SMC). Reduced BK β1-subunit expression is associated with SMC dysfunction in animal models of human disease, because downregulation of BK β1-subunit reduces channel activity and increases SMC contractility. Several anti-BK β1-subunit antibodies are commercially available; however, the specificity of most antibodies has not been tested or confirmed in the tissues from BK β1-subunit knockout (KO) mice. In this study, we tested the specificity and sensitivity of six commercially available antibodies from five manufacturers. We performed western blot analysis on BK β1-subunit enriched tissues (mesenteric arteries and colons) and non-SM tissue (cortex of kidney) from wild-type (WT) and BK β1-KO mice. We found that antibodies either detected protein bands of the appropriate molecular weight in tissues from both WT and BK β1-KO mice or failed to detect protein bands at the appropriate molecular weight in tissues from WT mice, suggesting that these antibodies may lack specificity for the BK β1-subunit. The absence of BK β1-subunit mRNA expression in arteries, colons, and kidneys from BK β1-KO mice was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. We conclude that these commercially available antibodies might not be reliable tools for studying BK β1-subunit expression in murine tissues under the denaturing conditions that we have used. Data obtained using commercially available antibodies should be interpreted cautiously. Our studies underscore the importance of proper negative controls in western blot analyses. © 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  16. Immunological and biochemical evidence for nuclear localization of annexin in peas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    Immunofluorescent localization of annexins using an anti-pea annexin polyclonal antibody (anti-p35) in pea (Pisum sativum) leaf and stem epidermal peels showed staining of the nuclei and the cell periphery. Nuclear staining was also seen in cell teases prepared from pea plumules. The amount of nuclear stain was reduced both by fixation time and by dehydration and organic solvent treatment. Observation with confocal microscopy demonstrated that the anti-p35 stain was diffusely distributed throughout the nuclear structure. Immunoblots of purified nuclei, nuclear envelope matrix, nucleolar, and chromatin fractions showed a cross-reactive protein band of 35 kDa. These data are the first to show annexins localized in plant cell nuclei where they may play a role in nuclear function.

  17. Immunological and biochemical evidence for nuclear localization of annexin in peas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    Immunofluorescent localization of annexins using an anti-pea annexin polyclonal antibody (anti-p35) in pea (Pisum sativum) leaf and stem epidermal peels showed staining of the nuclei and the cell periphery. Nuclear staining was also seen in cell teases prepared from pea plumules. The amount of nuclear stain was reduced both by fixation time and by dehydration and organic solvent treatment. Observation with confocal microscopy demonstrated that the anti-p35 stain was diffusely distributed throughout the nuclear structure. Immunoblots of purified nuclei, nuclear envelope matrix, nucleolar, and chromatin fractions showed a cross-reactive protein band of 35 kDa. These data are the first to show annexins localized in plant cell nuclei where they may play a role in nuclear function.

  18. AQUAPORIN-4 Mz ISOFORM: BRAIN EXPRESSION, SUPRAMOLECULAR ASSEMBLY AND NEUROMYELITIS OPTICA ANTIBODY BINDING

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Andrea; Crane, Jonathan M.; Verkman, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is expressed in astrocytes throughout brain and spinal cord. Two major AQP4 isoforms are expressed, M1 and M23, having different translation initiation sites. A longer isoform (Mz) has been reported in rat with translation initiation 126-bp upstream from that of M1. By immunoblot analysis of SDS and native gels probed with a C-terminus anti-AQP4 antibody, Mz was detected in rat brain as a distinct band of size ~39 kDa. Mz was absent in human and mouse brain because of in-frame stop codons. The ability of rat Mz to form orthogonal arrays of particles (OAPs) was investigated by single particle tracking and native gel electrophoresis. We found that Mz, like M1, diffused rapidly in the cell plasma membrane and did not form OAPs. However, when coexpressed with M23, Mz associated in OAPs by forming heterotetramers with M23. Unexpectedly, Mz-expressing cells bound neuromyelitis optica autoantibodies (NMO-IgG) poorly, <5-fold compared to M1-expressing cells. Truncation analysis suggested that the poor NMO-IgG binding to Mz involves residues 31–41 upstream of Met-1. We conclude that Mz AQP4 is: (a) present at low level in rat but not human or mouse brain; (b) unable to form OAPs on its own but able to associate with M23 AQP4 in heterotetramers; and (c) largely unable to bind NMO-IgG because of N-terminus effects on the structure of the AQP4 / NMO-IgG binding site. PMID:21491501

  19. Redistribution of annexin in gravistimulated pea plumules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Rafati, D. S.; Bolton, R. J.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    We used immunocytochemistry to investigate the effects of gravistimulation on annexin localization in etiolated pea plumule shoots. In longitudinal sections, an asymmetric annexin immunostaining pattern was observed in a defined group of cells located just basipetal to apical meristems at the main shoot apex and at all of the axillary buds, an area classically referred to as the leaf gap. The pattern was observed using both protein-A-purified anti-annexin and affinity-purified anti-annexin antibodies for the immunostaining. A subset of the cells with the annexin staining also showed an unusually high level of periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining in their cell walls. Prior to gravistimulation, the highest concentration of annexin was oriented toward the direction of gravity along the apical end of these immunostained cells. In contrast, both at 15 and 30 min after gravistimulation, the annexin immunostain became more evenly distributed all around the cell and more distinctly cell peripheral. The asymmetry along the lower wall of these cells was no longer evident. In accord with current models of annexin action, we interpret the results to indicate that annexin-mediated secretion in the leaf gap area is preferentially toward the apical meristem prior to gravistimulation, and that gravistimulation results in a redirection of this secretion. These data are to our knowledge the first to show a correlation between the vector of gravity and the distribution of annexins in the cells of flowering plants. c 2000 Editions scientifiques et medicales Elsevier SAS.

  20. Redistribution of annexin in gravistimulated pea plumules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Rafati, D. S.; Bolton, R. J.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    We used immunocytochemistry to investigate the effects of gravistimulation on annexin localization in etiolated pea plumule shoots. In longitudinal sections, an asymmetric annexin immunostaining pattern was observed in a defined group of cells located just basipetal to apical meristems at the main shoot apex and at all of the axillary buds, an area classically referred to as the leaf gap. The pattern was observed using both protein-A-purified anti-annexin and affinity-purified anti-annexin antibodies for the immunostaining. A subset of the cells with the annexin staining also showed an unusually high level of periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining in their cell walls. Prior to gravistimulation, the highest concentration of annexin was oriented toward the direction of gravity along the apical end of these immunostained cells. In contrast, both at 15 and 30 min after gravistimulation, the annexin immunostain became more evenly distributed all around the cell and more distinctly cell peripheral. The asymmetry along the lower wall of these cells was no longer evident. In accord with current models of annexin action, we interpret the results to indicate that annexin-mediated secretion in the leaf gap area is preferentially toward the apical meristem prior to gravistimulation, and that gravistimulation results in a redirection of this secretion. These data are to our knowledge the first to show a correlation between the vector of gravity and the distribution of annexins in the cells of flowering plants. c 2000 Editions scientifiques et medicales Elsevier SAS.

  1. Rapid high-throughput cloning and stable expression of antibodies in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Spidel, Jared L; Vaessen, Benjamin; Chan, Yin Yin; Grasso, Luigi; Kline, J Bradford

    2016-12-01

    Single-cell based amplification of immunoglobulin variable regions is a rapid and powerful technique for cloning antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for purposes ranging from general laboratory reagents to therapeutic drugs. From the initial screening process involving small quantities of hundreds or thousands of mAbs through in vitro characterization and subsequent in vivo experiments requiring large quantities of only a few, having a robust system for generating mAbs from cloning through stable cell line generation is essential. A protocol was developed to decrease the time, cost, and effort required by traditional cloning and expression methods by eliminating bottlenecks in these processes. Removing the clonal selection steps from the cloning process using a highly efficient ligation-independent protocol and from the stable cell line process by utilizing bicistronic plasmids to generate stable semi-clonal cell pools facilitated an increased throughput of the entire process from plasmid assembly through transient transfections and selection of stable semi-clonal cell pools. Furthermore, the time required by a single individual to clone, express, and select stable cell pools in a high-throughput format was reduced from 4 to 6months to only 4 to 6weeks. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The major nucleoside triphosphatase in pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei and in rat liver nuclei share common epitopes also present in nuclear lamins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, C. G.; Dauwalder, M.; Clawson, G. A.; Hatem, C. L.; Roux, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    The major nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) activities in mammalian and pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei are associated with enzymes that are very similar both biochemically and immunochemically. The major NTPase from rat liver nuclei appears to be a 46-kD enzyme that represents the N-terminal portion of lamins A and C, two lamina proteins that apparently arise from the same gene by alternate splicing. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) G2, raised to human lamin C, both immunoprecipitates the major (47 kD) NTPase in pea nuclei and recognizes it in western blot analyses. A polyclonal antibody preparation raised to the 47-kD pea NTPase (pc480) reacts with the same lamin bands that are recognized by MAb G2 in mammalian nuclei. The pc480 antibodies also bind to the same lamin-like bands in pea nuclear envelope-matrix preparations that are recognized by G2 and three other MAbs known to bind to mammalian lamins. In immunofluorescence assays, pc480 and anti-lamin antibodies stain both cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens in plant cells, with slightly enhanced staining along the periphery of the nuclei. These results indicate that the pea and rat liver NTPases are structurally similar and that, in pea nuclei as in rat liver nuclei, the major NTPase is probably derived from a lamin precursor by proteolysis.

  3. The major nucleoside triphosphatase in pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei and in rat liver nuclei share common epitopes also present in nuclear lamins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, C. G.; Dauwalder, M.; Clawson, G. A.; Hatem, C. L.; Roux, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    The major nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) activities in mammalian and pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei are associated with enzymes that are very similar both biochemically and immunochemically. The major NTPase from rat liver nuclei appears to be a 46-kD enzyme that represents the N-terminal portion of lamins A and C, two lamina proteins that apparently arise from the same gene by alternate splicing. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) G2, raised to human lamin C, both immunoprecipitates the major (47 kD) NTPase in pea nuclei and recognizes it in western blot analyses. A polyclonal antibody preparation raised to the 47-kD pea NTPase (pc480) reacts with the same lamin bands that are recognized by MAb G2 in mammalian nuclei. The pc480 antibodies also bind to the same lamin-like bands in pea nuclear envelope-matrix preparations that are recognized by G2 and three other MAbs known to bind to mammalian lamins. In immunofluorescence assays, pc480 and anti-lamin antibodies stain both cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens in plant cells, with slightly enhanced staining along the periphery of the nuclei. These results indicate that the pea and rat liver NTPases are structurally similar and that, in pea nuclei as in rat liver nuclei, the major NTPase is probably derived from a lamin precursor by proteolysis.

  4. Yield potential of pigeon pea cultivars

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Yield potential of twelve vegetable pigeon pea (Cajanus cajun) cultivars was evaluated at two locations in eastern Kenya during 2012 and 2013 cropping years. Pigeon pea pod numbers, seeds per pod, seed mass, grain yield and shelling percentage were quantified in three replicated plots, arranged in a...

  5. Growth parameters of vegetable pigeon pea cultivars

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pigeon pea is an important crop in the dry regions of eastern Kenya, due to its drought tolerance and high protein content; however, farmer’s yield is limiting. Ojwang et al. (HortTech Vol 26 (1), 2016) evaluated twelve pigeon pea cultivars for flowering, plant height, branches, pod length and yield...

  6. 21 CFR 155.170 - Canned peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned peas. 155.170 Section 155.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned peas is the food prepared from fresh or frozen succulent seeds of...

  7. 21 CFR 155.170 - Canned peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canned peas. 155.170 Section 155.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned peas is the food prepared from fresh or frozen succulent seeds of...

  8. Targeting vaccinia virus-expressed secretory beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin to the cell surface induces antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, J; Singh, O; Chakrabarti, S; Talwar, G P

    1995-01-01

    We carried out experiments designed to study the effect of a protein's localization on its immunogenicity. A novel cell-surface protein was generated from a small, glycosylated secretory protein. The DNA sequence encoding the entire precursor of the human chorionic gonadotropin beta (beta hCG) subunit was fused in the correct reading frame to the DNA sequence encoding the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. This chimeric gene was introduced into the vaccinia virus genome to generate a recombinant virus. The recombinant virus, when used to infect animal cells, expressed a 135-amino-acid beta hCG subunit anchored in cellular membranes by the 48 carboxy-terminal amino acids of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. The immunogenicity of this recombinant virus with respect to its ability to generate anti-hCG antibodies was compared with that of a second recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the native secretory form of beta hCG. All animals immunized with the vaccinia virus expressing beta hCG on the cell surface elicited high titers of anti-hCG antibodies. Even after a single immunization with the recombinant vaccinia virus, the anti-hCG antibody titers persisted for a long period of time (more than 6 months). None of the animals immunized with vaccinia virus expressing the native secretory form of beta hCG showed any hCG-specific antibody response. PMID:7591154

  9. Monoclonal antibodies reveal multiple forms of expression of human microsomal epoxide hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hongying; Takagi, Akira; Kayano, Hidekazu; Koyama, Isamu; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2012-04-01

    In a previous study, we developed five kinds of monoclonal antibodies against different portions of human mEH: three, anti-N-terminal; one, anti-C-terminal; one, anti-conformational epitope. Using them, we stained the intact and the permeabilized human cells of various kinds and performed flow cytometric analysis. Primary hepatocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) showed remarkable differences. On the surface, hepatocytes exhibited 4 out of 5 epitopes whereas PBMC did not show any of the epitopes. mEH was detected inside both cell types, but the most prominent expression was observed for the conformational epitope in the hepatocytes and the two N-terminal epitopes in PBMC. These differences were also observed between hepatocyte-derived cell lines and mononuclear cell-derived cell lines. In addition, among each group, there were several differences which may be related to the cultivation, the degree of differentiation, or the original cell subsets. We also noted that two glioblastoma cell lines reveal marked expression of the conformational epitope on the surface which seemed to correlate with the brain tumor-associated antigen reported elsewhere. Several cell lines also underwent selective permeabilization before flow cytometric analysis, and we noticed that the topological orientation of mEH on the ER membrane in those cells was in accordance with the previous report. However, the orientation on the cell surface was inconsistent with the report and had a great variation between the cells. These findings show the multiple mode of expression of mEH which may be possibly related to the multiple roles that mEH plays in different cells. -- Highlights: ► We examine expression of five mEH epitopes in human cells. ► Remarkable differences exist between hepatocytes and PBMC. ► mEH expression in cell lines differs depending on several factors. ► Some glioblastoma cell lines reveal marked surface expression of mEH. ► Topology of mEH on the cell

  10. Discrete forms of amylose are synthesized by isoforms of GBSSI in pea.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Anne; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Suurs, Luc C J M; Visser, Richard G F; Zeeman, Sam; Smith, Alison; Martin, Cathie

    2002-08-01

    Amyloses with distinct molecular masses are found in the starch of pea embryos compared with the starch of pea leaves. In pea embryos, a granule-bound starch synthase protein (GBSSIa) is required for the synthesis of a significant portion of the amylose. However, this protein seems to be insignificant in the synthesis of amylose in pea leaves. cDNA clones encoding a second isoform of GBSSI, GBSSIb, have been isolated from pea leaves. Comparison of GBSSIa and GBSSIb activities shows them to have distinct properties. These differences have been confirmed by the expression of GBSSIa and GBSSIb in the amylose-free mutant of potato. GBSSIa and GBSSIb make distinct forms of amylose that differ in their molecular mass. These differences in product specificity, coupled with differences in the tissues in which GBSSIa and GBSSIb are most active, explain the distinct forms of amylose found in different tissues of pea. The shorter form of amylose formed by GBSSIa confers less susceptibility to the retrogradation of starch pastes than the amylose formed by GBSSIb. The product specificity of GBSSIa could provide beneficial attributes to starches for food and nonfood uses.

  11. Immunity and other defenses in pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent genomic analyses of arthropod defense mechanisms suggest conservation of key elements underlying responses to pathogens, parasites and stresses. At the center of pathogen-induced immune responses are signaling pathways triggered by the recognition of fungal, bacterial and viral signatures. These pathways result in the production of response molecules, such as antimicrobial peptides and lysozymes, which degrade or destroy invaders. Using the recently sequenced genome of the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum), we conducted the first extensive annotation of the immune and stress gene repertoire of a hemipterous insect, which is phylogenetically distantly related to previously characterized insects models. Results Strikingly, pea aphids appear to be missing genes present in insect genomes characterized to date and thought critical for recognition, signaling and killing of microbes. In line with results of gene annotation, experimental analyses designed to characterize immune response through the isolation of RNA transcripts and proteins from immune-challenged pea aphids uncovered few immune-related products. Gene expression studies, however, indicated some expression of immune and stress-related genes. Conclusions The absence of genes suspected to be essential for the insect immune response suggests that the traditional view of insect immunity may not be as broadly applicable as once thought. The limitations of the aphid immune system may be representative of a broad range of insects, or may be aphid specific. We suggest that several aspects of the aphid life style, such as their association with microbial symbionts, could facilitate survival without strong immune protection. PMID:20178569

  12. Preparation of Polyclonal Antibody Specific for BRD7 and Detection of Its Expression Pattern in the Human Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huaying; Li, Xiaoling; Niu, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Liming; Zhou, Ming; Huang, He; He, Jiajin; Zhang, Wenling; Xiao, Lan; Tang, Yunlian; Wang, Li; Li, Guiyuan

    2008-01-01

    BRD7 is a novel bromodomain gene. It plays critical role in cell growth, cell cycle progression, and signal-dependent gene expression. Overexpression of the BRD7 gene in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells is effective to inhibit cell growth and cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. However, little is known about its bio-functions because of the unavailability of a specific BRD7 antibody. In this study, for the first time, we generated a highly specific BRD7 antibody. It is able to specifically recognize recombinant GST-BRD7N protein with a molecular mass of 65 kDa and recognize BRD7-Myc and endogenously expressed BRD7 protein with an approximate molecular mass of 75 kDa, which corresponds well with the calculated molecular mass of the BRD7 protein. More importantly, with these antisera, we analyzed BRD7 distribution in the human fetus by Western blot and immunohistochemistry assays. Obvious nuclear expression of BRD7 protein presents in human cerebellum, pancreas, intestines, liver, and kidney. Cardiomyocyte shows high cytoplasm expression of the BRD7 protein. Weak nuclear expression of the BRD7 protein is found in human cerebrum, lung, and stomach. These data may help to further study the cellular role of the BRD7 gene. In particular, the prepared BRD7 antibody will be helpful for studying the bio-functions of endogenously expressed BRD7 protein. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:531–538, 2008) PMID:18071067

  13. Plant-based strategies aimed at expressing HIV antigens and neutralizing antibodies at high levels. Nef as a case study.

    PubMed

    Marusic, Carla; Vitale, Alessandro; Pedrazzini, Emanuela; Donini, Marcello; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Bock, Ralph; Dix, Philip J; McCabe, Matthew S; Bellucci, Michele; Benvenuto, Eugenio

    2009-08-01

    The first evidence that plants represent a valid, safe and cost-effective alternative to traditional expression systems for large-scale production of antigens and antibodies was described more than 10 years ago. Since then, considerable improvements have been made to increase the yield of plant-produced proteins. These include the use of signal sequences to target proteins to different cellular compartments, plastid transformation to achieve high transgene dosage, codon usage optimization to boost gene expression, and protein fusions to improve recombinant protein stability and accumulation. Thus, several HIV/SIV antigens and neutralizing anti-HIV antibodies have recently been successfully expressed in plants by stable nuclear or plastid transformation, and by transient expression systems based on plant virus vectors or Agrobacterium-mediated infection. The current article gives an overview of plant expressed HIV antigens and antibodies and provides an account of the use of different strategies aimed at increasing the expression of the accessory multifunctional HIV-1 Nef protein in transgenic plants.

  14. Rapid High-Level Production of Functional HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies in Transient Plant Expression Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Yvonne; Sack, Markus; Montefiori, David; Forthal, Donald; Mao, Lingjun; -Abanto, Segundo Hernandez; Urban, Lori; Landucci, Gary; Fischer, Rainer; Jiang, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy using anti-HIV broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has shown promise as an HIV treatment, reducing mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) in non-human primates and decreasing viral rebound in patients who ceased receiving anti-viral drugs. In addition, a cocktail of potent mAbs may be useful as mucosal microbicides and provide an effective therapy for post-exposure prophylaxis. However, even highly neutralizing HIV mAbs used today may lose their effectiveness if resistance occurs, requiring the rapid production of new or engineered mAbs on an ongoing basis in order to counteract the viral resistance or the spread of a certain HIV-1 clade in a particular region or patient. Plant-based expression systems are fast, inexpensive and scalable and are becoming increasingly popular for the production of proteins and monoclonal antibodies. In the present study, Agrobacterium-mediated transient transfection of plants, utilizing two species of Nicotiana, have been tested to rapidly produce high levels of an HIV 89.6PΔ140env and several well-studied anti-HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (b12, 2G12, 2F5, 4E10, m43, VRC01) or a single chain antibody construct (m9), for evaluation in cell-based viral inhibition assays. The protein-A purified plant-derived antibodies were intact, efficiently bound HIV envelope, and were equivalent to, or in one case better than, their counterparts produced in mammalian CHO or HEK-293 cells in both neutralization and antibody dependent viral inhibition assays. These data indicate that transient plant-based transient expression systems are very adaptable and could rapidly generate high levels of newly identified functional recombinant HIV neutralizing antibodies when required. In addition, they warrant detailed cost-benefit analysis of prolonged incubation in plants to further increase mAb production. PMID:23533588

  15. Nodulation, Nitrogen Fixation, and Hydrogen Oxidation by Pigeon Pea Bradyrhizobium spp. in Symbiotic Association with Pigeon Pea, Cowpea, and Soybean †

    PubMed Central

    Nautiyal, C. S.; Hegde, S. V.; van Berkum, P.

    1988-01-01

    The pigeon pea strains of Bradyrhizobium CC-1, CC-8, UASGR(S), and F4 were evaluated for nodulation, effectiveness for N2 fixation, and H2 oxidation with homologous and nonhomologous host plants. Strain CC-1 nodulated Macroptilium atropurpureum, Vigna unguiculata, Glycine max, and G. soja but did not nodulate Pisum sativum, Phaseolus vulgaris, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Trifolium repens. Strain F4 nodulated G. max cv. Peking and PI 434937 (Malayan), but the symbioses formed were poor. Similarly, G. max cv. Peking, cv. Bragg, PI 434937, PR 13-28-2-8-7, and HM-1 were nodulated by strain CC-1, and symbioses were also poor. G. max cv. Williams and cv. Clark were not nodulated. H2 uptake activity was expressed with pigeon pea and cowpea, but not with soybean. G. max cv. Bragg grown in Bangalore, India, in local soil not previously exposed to Bradyrhizobium japonicum formed nodules with indigenous Bradyrhizobium spp. Six randomly chosen isolates, each originating from a different nodule, formed effective symbioses with pigeon pea host ICPL-407, nodulated PR 13-28-2-8-7 soybean forming moderately effective symbioses, and did not nodulate Williams soybean. These results indicate the six isolates to be pigeon pea strains although they originated from soybean nodules. Host-determined nodulation of soybean by pigeon pea Bradyrhizobium spp. may depend upon the ancestral backgrounds of the cultivars. The poor symbioses formed by the pigeon pea strains with soybean indicate that this crop should be inoculated with B. japonicum for its cultivation in soils containing only pigeon pea Bradyrhizobium spp. PMID:16347542

  16. Radiotherapy of CD19 expressing Daudi tumors in nude mice with Yttrium-90-labeled anti-CD19 antibody.

    PubMed

    Vallera, Daniel A; Elson, Michael; Brechbiel, Martin W; Dusenbery, Kathryn E; Burns, Linda J; Jaszcz, Waclaw B; Ramsay, Norma K; Panoskaltsis-Mortar, Angela; Kuroki, David W; Wagner, John E; Vitetta, Ellen S; Kersey, John H

    2004-02-01

    Studies were performed to determine the suitability of using two different anti-CD19 monoclonal antibodies to deliver the high energy beta-particle emitting isotope 90Y to B-cell lymphoma grown as flank tumors in athymic nude mice. The antibodies BU12 and HD37, both of the IgG1 subclass, recognize CD19, an internalizing B-lineage-specific membrane glycoprotein and member of the Ig supergene family. The antibodies were readily labeled with 90Y using the highly stable chelate, 1B4M-MX-DTPA. The radioimmunoconjugates selectively bound to the CD19 expressing B cell line Daudi, but not to CD19 negative control cells. Significantly more 90Y anti-CD19 bound to Daudi tumors growing in nude mice than did a control non-binding antibody (p = 0.001). The biodistribution data correlated with an anti-tumor effect. Anti-tumor activity was dose dependent and the best results were observed in mice receiving a single dose of approximately 300 uCi. The anti-CD19 antibody had significantly better anti-tumor activity as compared to a control 90Y-labeled antibody and most mice survived over 119 days with no evidence of tumor (p < 0.003). Histology studies showed no significant injury to the kidney, liver, or small intestine. Because radiolabeled anti-CD19 antibody can be used to deliver radiation selectively to lymphohematopoietic tissue, these data support the use of 90Y anti-CD19 antibodies in treating B-cell malignancies.

  17. Effect of the combinations between pea proteins and soluble fibres on cholesterolaemia and cholesterol metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Parolini, Cinzia; Manzini, Stefano; Busnelli, Marco; Rigamonti, Elena; Marchesi, Marta; Diani, Erika; Sirtori, Cesare R; Chiesa, Giulia

    2013-10-01

    Many functional foods and dietary supplements have been reported to be beneficial for the management of dyslipidaemia, one of the major risk factors for CVD. Soluble fibres and legume proteins are known to be a safe and practical approach for cholesterol reduction. The present study aimed at investigating the hypocholesterolaemic effect of the combinations of these bioactive vegetable ingredients and their possible effects on the expression of genes regulating cholesterol homeostasis. A total of six groups of twelve rats each were fed, for 28 d, Nath's hypercholesterolaemic diets, differing in protein and fibre sources, being, respectively, casein and cellulose (control), pea proteins and cellulose (pea), casein and oat fibres (oat), casein and apple pectin (pectin), pea proteins and oat fibres (pea+oat) and pea proteins and apple pectin (pea+pectin). Administration of each vegetable-containing diet was associated with lower total cholesterol concentrations compared with the control. The combinations (pea+oat and pea+pectin) were more efficacious than fibres alone in modulating cholesterolaemia ( - 53 and - 54%, respectively, at 28 d; P< 0·005). In rats fed the diets containing oat fibres or apple pectin, alone or in combination with pea proteins, a lower hepatic cholesterol content (P< 0·005) and higher hepatic mRNA concentrations of CYP7A1 and NTCP were found when compared with the control rats (P< 0·05). In summary, the dietary combinations of pea proteins and oat fibres or apple pectin are extremely effective in lowering plasma cholesterol concentrations in rats and affect cellular cholesterol homeostasis by up-regulating genes involved in hepatic cholesterol turnover.

  18. 7 CFR 457.137 - Green pea crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Green peas genetically developed to be eaten without shelling (e.g., snap peas, snow peas, and Chinese... peas genetically developed to be shelled prior to eating, canning or freezing. 2. Unit Division (a) For..., either of which causes the acreage to be bypassed. (2) Fire; (3) Insects, but not damage due to...

  19. 21 CFR 155.172 - Canned dry peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned dry peas. 155.172 Section 155.172 Food and... peas. (a) Identity. Canned dry peas conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label declaration of ingredients, prescribed for canned peas by § 155.170(a...

  20. 21 CFR 155.172 - Canned dry peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canned dry peas. 155.172 Section 155.172 Food and... peas. (a) Identity. Canned dry peas conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label declaration of ingredients, prescribed for canned peas by § 155.170(a...

  1. 21 CFR 155.172 - Canned dry peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Canned dry peas. 155.172 Section 155.172 Food and... peas. (a) Identity. Canned dry peas conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label declaration of ingredients, prescribed for canned peas by § 155.170(a...

  2. 21 CFR 155.172 - Canned dry peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned dry peas. 155.172 Section 155.172 Food and... peas. (a) Identity. Canned dry peas conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label declaration of ingredients, prescribed for canned peas by § 155.170(a...

  3. 21 CFR 155.172 - Canned dry peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canned dry peas. 155.172 Section 155.172 Food and... peas. (a) Identity. Canned dry peas conforms to the definition and standard of identity, and is subject to the requirements for label declaration of ingredients, prescribed for canned peas by § 155.170(a...

  4. [The expression of humanized Fab fragment of the anti-HBsAg antibody in methylotropic yeast Pichia pastoris].

    PubMed

    Deng, Ning; Su, Kuan-Yuan; Wang, Xun-Zhang; Long, Qing-Xin; Yang, Lin; Yu, Zhou-Yao

    2002-09-01

    Using of two-step integrating technology, transducted the H and L chain gene of humanized Fab fragment of anti-HB-sAg antibody into the genome of methylotropic yeast P. pastoris. Constructed a engineering yeast to produce humanized Fab fragment of the anti-HBsAg antibody. The Fab fragment was efficiently secreted into the medium at a concentration of 50-80 mg/L. The Fab fragment was purified from culturing supernatant of the recombinant yeas by affinity chromatography. The ELISA analysis showed the high affinity of the expressed humanized Fab fragment to the HBsAg.

  5. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies from single human B cells by single cell RT-PCR and expression vector cloning.

    PubMed

    Tiller, Thomas; Meffre, Eric; Yurasov, Sergey; Tsuiji, Makoto; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Wardemann, Hedda

    2008-01-01

    We have developed an efficient strategy that combines immunoglobulin (Ig) gene repertoire analysis and Ig reactivity profiling at the single cell level. Based on surface marker expression individual cells at different stages of human B cell development are isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. For each cell Ig heavy and corresponding Ig light chain gene transcripts are amplified by nested RT-PCR and cloned into eukaryotic expression vectors to produce monoclonal human antibodies of the same specificity in vitro. All reactions are performed in 96-well plates and allow cloning of large numbers of Ig genes. The recombinant antibodies are tested for reactivity with diverse self- and non-self antigens and the reactivity profile can be directly linked to the complete Ig heavy and Ig light chain gene sequence information that is obtained as part of the cloning strategy. In summary, our method to clone and express human monoclonal antibodies is unbiased, highly efficient, requires only small cell numbers and the recombinant antibodies allow direct conclusions on the frequency of specific human B cells in a diverse repertoire.

  6. Data on enhanced expression and purification of camelid single domain antibodies from Escherichia coli classical inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Maristella; Scotti, Claudia

    2017-06-01

    Heterologous expression of high amounts of recombinant proteins is a milestone for research and industrial purposes. Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) are heavy-chain only antibody fragments with applications in the biotechnological, medical and industrial fields. The simple nature and small size of sdAbs allows for efficient expression of the soluble molecule in different hosts. However, in some cases, it results in low functional protein yield. To overcome this limitation, expression of a 6xHistag sdAb was attempted in different conditions in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells. Data showed that high amount of sdAb can be expressed in E. coli classical inclusion bodies, efficiently extracted by urea in a short-time, and properly purified by metal ion affinity chromatography. These data originate from the research article "Enhanced expression and purification of camelid single domain VHH antibodies from classical inclusion bodies" Maggi and Scotti (2017) [1] (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pep.2017.02.007).

  7. Idiotype connectance in the immune system. I. Expression of a cross- reactive idiotype on induced anti-p-azophenylarsonate antibodies and on endogenous antibodies not specific for arsonate

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    A new cross-reactive idiotope family (CRIAD8) is described that contains subpopulations of antibodies binding to different epitopes. One subpopulation occurs naturally in normal sera from strain A mice, is found mainly on IgG2 and IgG3 subclasses, does not bind p- azobenzenearsonate (ABA)+, does not express CRI5Ci, and can be selectively stimulated by low doses of antiidiotype antibody (AD8). The second subpopulation is not found in normal serum, binds ABA, is found on all IgG subclasses, expresses CRI5Ci, and is selectively stimulated by ABA-conjugated proteins. Since CRIAD8 was found on both subpopulations of antibody, and since each subpopulation could be selectively expanded, it was possible to study the effect that expansion of the ABA- CRIAD8+ set had on subsequent responses elicited by ABA-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) in the ABA+ CRIAD8+ set. In these experiments, prior immunization with AD8 restricted the subsequent response of the ABA+ CRIAD8+ set to ABA-KLH. Furthermore, only those doses of AD8 that stimulated the ABA-CRIAD8+ set reduced the responsiveness of the ABA+ CRIAD8+ set to ABA-KLH, suggesting that the two phenomena are causally related. These findings argue that CRIAD8 correlates well with a regulatory idiotope and that immune responses by lymphocyte clones that have different antigen-binding specificities can affect one another as a result of their sharing such an idiotope. These results strongly favor a network organization of the immune system. PMID:6403653

  8. Recombinant proteinase 3 produced in different expression systems: recognition by anti-PR3 antibodies.

    PubMed

    van der Geld, Y M; Oost-Kort, W; Limburg, P C; Specks, U; Kallenberg, C G

    2000-10-20

    all anti-PR3 mAbs. In conclusion, rPR3 expressed in insect cells, HMC-1 and 293 cells is recognized by anti-PR3 antibodies, whereas conformational epitopes recognized by anti-PR3 mAbs and PR3-ANCA are not well preserved on rPR3 expressed in E. coli or P. pastoris.

  9. Pea-derived vaccines demonstrate high immunogenicity and protection in rabbits against rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus.

    PubMed

    Mikschofsky, Heike; Schirrmeier, Horst; Keil, Günther M; Lange, Bodo; Polowick, Patricia L; Keller, Wilf; Broer, Inge

    2009-08-01

    Vaccines against rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) are commercially produced in experimentally infected rabbits. A genetically engineered and manufactured version of the major structural protein of RHDV (VP60) is considered to be an alternative approach for vaccine production. Plants have the potential to become an excellent recombinant production system, but the low expression level and insufficient immunogenic potency of plant-derived VP60 still hamper its practical use. In this study, we analysed the expression of a novel multimeric VP60-based antigen in four different plant species, including Nicotiana tabacum L., Solanum tuberosum L., Brassica napus L. and Pisum sativum L. Significant differences were detected in the expression patterns of the novel fusion antigen cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)::VP60 (ctbvp60(SEKDEL)) at the mRNA and protein levels. Pentameric CTB::VP60 molecules were only detected in N. tabacum and P. sativum, and displayed equal levels of CTB, at approximately 0.01% of total soluble protein (TSP), and traces of detectable VP60. However, strong enhancement of the CTB protein content via self-fertilization was only observed in P. sativum, where it reached up to 0.7% of TSP. In rabbits, a strong decrease in the protective vaccine dose required from 48-400 microg potato-derived VP60 [Castanon, S., Marin, M.S., Martin-Alonso, J.M., Boga, J.A., Casais, R., Humara, J.M., Ordas, R.J. and Parra, F. (1999) Immunization with potato plants expressing VP60 protein protects against rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus. J. Virol. 73, 4452-4455; Castanon, S., Martin-Alonso, J.M., Marin, M.S., Boga, J.A., Alonso, P., Parra, F. and Ordas, R.J. (2002) The effect of the promoter on expression of VP60 gene from rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus in potato plants. Plant Sci. 162, 87-95] to 0.56-0.28 microg antigenic VP60 (measured with VP60 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) of crude CTB::VP60 pea extracts was demonstrated. Rabbits immunized with pea-derived CTB

  10. Expressing anti-HIV VRC01 antibody using the murine IgG1 secretion signal in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Aw, Rochelle; McKay, Paul F; Shattock, Robin J; Polizzi, Karen M

    2017-12-01

    The use of the recombinant expression platform Pichia pastoris to produce pharmaceutically important proteins has been investigated over the past 30 years. Compared to mammalian cultures, expression in P. pastoris is cheaper and faster, potentially leading to decreased costs and process development times. Product yields depend on a number of factors including the secretion signal chosen for expression, which can influence the host cell response to recombinant protein production. VRC01, a broadly neutralising anti-HIV antibody, was expressed in P. pastoris, using the methanol inducible AOX1 promoter for both the heavy and light chains. Titre reached up to 3.05 μg mL(-1) in small scale expression. VRC01 was expressed using both the α-mating factor signal peptide from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the murine IgG1 signal peptide. Surprisingly, using the murine IgG1 signal peptide resulted in higher yield of antibody capable of binding gp140 antigen. Furthermore, we evaluated levels of secretory stress compared to the untransformed wild-type strain and show a reduced level of secretory stress in the murine IgG1 signal peptide strains versus those containing the α-MF signal peptide. As bottlenecks in the secretory pathway are often the limiting factor in protein secretion, reduced levels of secretory stress and the higher yield of functional antibody suggest the murine IgG1 signal peptide may lead to better protein folding and secretion. This work indicates the possibilities for utilising the murine IgG1 signal peptide for a range of antibodies, resulting in high yields and reduced cellular stress.

  11. Generation and characterization of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against baculo-expressed HPV 16 VLPs.

    PubMed

    Vidyasagar, P; Sridevi, V N; Rajan, S; Praveen, A; Srikanth, A; Abhinay, G; Siva Kumar, V; Verma, R R; Rajendra, L

    2014-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the well-known second most cause of cervical cancer in women worldwide. According to the WHO survey, 70% of the total cervical cancers are associated with types HPV 16 and 18. Presently used prophylactic vaccine for HPV contains mainly capsid protein of L1 virus like particles (VLPs). Correct folding of VLPs and display of neutralizing epitopes are the major constraint for VLP-based vaccines. Further, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) play a vital role in developing therapeutics and diagnostics. mAbs are also useful for the demonstration of VLP conformation, virus typing and product process assessment as well. In the present study, we have explored the usefulness of mAbs generated against sf-9 expressed HPV 16 VLPs demonstrated as type-specific and conformational dependent against HPV 16 VLPs by ELISA. High affinity and high pseudovirion neutralization titer of mAbs indicated their potential for the development of prophylactic vaccines for HPV. Also, the type-specific and conformational reactivity of the mAbs to HPV 16 VLPs in sf-9 cells by immunofluorescence assay proved their diagnostic potential.

  12. Candida albicans HWP1 gene expression and host antibody responses in colonization and disease.

    PubMed

    Naglik, Julian R; Fostira, Florentia; Ruprai, Jasmeet; Staab, Janet F; Challacombe, Stephen J; Sundstrom, Paula

    2006-10-01

    In vivo expression of the developmentally regulated Candida albicans hyphal wall protein 1 (HWP1) gene was analysed in human subjects who were culture positive for C. albicans and had oral symptoms (n=40) or were asymptomatic (n=29), or had vaginal symptoms (n=40) or were asymptomatic (n=29). HWP1 mRNA was present regardless of symptoms, implicating hyphal and possibly pseudohyphal forms in mucosal carriage as well as disease. As expected, in control subjects without oral symptoms (n=10) and without vaginal symptoms (n=10) who were culture negative in oral and vaginal samples, HWP1 mRNA was not detected. However, exposure to Hwp1 in healthy culture-negative controls, as well as in oral candidiasis and asymptomatic mucosal infections, was shown by the existence of local salivary and systemic adaptive antibody responses to Hwp1. The results are consistent with a role for Hwp1 in gastrointestinal colonization as well as in mucosal symptomatic and asymptomatic infections. Overall, Hwp1 and hyphal growth forms appear to be important factors in benign and invasive interactions of C. albicans with human hosts.

  13. Polymorphic expression of a human superficial bladder tumor antigen defined by mouse monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Fradet, Y; Islam, N; Boucher, L; Parent-Vaugeois, C; Tardif, M

    1987-01-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which define a highly restricted antigen, were obtained by simultaneous immunizations with superficial papillary bladder tumor cells and mouse polyclonal serum against normal urothelium. The antigen was detected by the avidin/biotin/peroxidase method in 30/44 superficial bladder tumors (68%) but in only 4/27 infiltrating urothelial cancers (with much less intensity). No normal adult or fetal tissues tested expressed the antigen, including normal urothelium from 40 individuals, 13 of whom had a bladder tumor positive for the antigen. Only 1 of 45 nonbladder tumors showed some reactivity with one of the three mAbs. Serological tests on a large panel of human cancer cell lines and normal cultured cells were negative. The antigen is highly stable and well preserved on paraffin-embedded tissues. Electrophoretic transfer blot experiments with fresh tumor extracts showed that all three mAbs react with a determinant on a component of 300,000 Mr (pI 9.5) and 62,000 Mr (pI 6.5). The antigen shows polymorphic expression at the cellular level on tissue sections and also at a molecular level on immunoblots where the two bands are differentially detected on extracts of a series of tumors but are not visualized on normal urothelium extracts. The characteristics of this antigenic system suggest that it may provide some insights about the biology of bladder cancer. Specific detection of the antigen on 70% of superficial bladder tumors with normal cytology may be useful for their diagnosis and follow-up. Images PMID:3313389

  14. Spatiotemporal Expression Patterns and Antibody Reactivity of Taeniidae Endophilin B1

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chun-Seob; Bae, Young-An; Kim, Seon-Hee; Kim, Jeong-Geun; Yu, Jae-Ran; Yang, Hyun-Jong; Eom, Keeseon S.; Wang, Hu; Kang, Insug; Yang, Yichao

    2016-01-01

    Larval Taeniidae, such as metacestodes of Taenia solium, Echinococcus granulosus, and Echinococcus multilocularis, produce chronic and fatal helminthic diseases. Proper identification of these zoonotic cestodiases is often challenging and is hampered in some clinical settings. Endophilin B1 plays critical roles in the maintenance of membrane contours and endocytosis. We isolated proteins homologous to endophilin B1 from T. solium, Taenia saginata, and Taenia asiatica. The three Taeniidae endophilin B1 proteins shared 92.9 to 96.6% sequence identity. They harbored a Bin1/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain and residues for a dimeric interface but lacked a SRC homology 3 (SH3) domain. Endophilin B1 showed a unique immunological profile and was abundantly expressed in the tegumental syncytium of Taeniidae metacestodes and adults. Bacterially expressed recombinant T. solium endophilin B1 (rTsMEndoB1) demonstrated a sensitivity of 79.7% (345/433 cases) for serodiagnosis of larval Taeniidae infections. The protein showed strong immune recognition patterns against sera from patients with chronic neurocysticercosis, cystic echinococcosis, or advanced-stage alveolar echinococcosis. Adult Taeniidae infections exhibited moderate degrees of positive antibody responses (65.7% [23/35 samples]). rTsMEndoB1 showed some cross-reactivity with sera from patients infected with Diphyllobothriidae (23.6% [25/106 samples]) but not with sera from patients with other parasitic diseases or normal controls. The specificity was 91.7% (256/301 samples). The positive and negative predictive values were 93.6% and 73.4%, respectively. Our results demonstrate that Taeniidae endophilin B1 may be involved in the control of membrane dynamics, thus contributing to shaping and maintaining the tegumental curvature. rTsMEndoB1 may be useful for large-scale screening, as well as for individual diagnosis and follow-up surveillance of Taeniidae infections. PMID:27487955

  15. Gene discovery in Eimeria tenella by immunoscreening cDNA expression libraries of sporozoites and schizonts with chicken intestinal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Réfega, Susana; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Bourdieu, Christiane; Péry, Pierre; Labbé, Marie

    2003-04-02

    Specific antibodies were produced ex vivo from intestinal culture of Eimeria tenella infected chickens. The specificity of these intestinal antibodies was tested against different parasite stages. These antibodies were used to immunoscreen first generation schizont and sporozoite cDNA libraries permitting the identification of new E. tenella antigens. We obtained a total of 119 cDNA clones which were subjected to sequence analysis. The sequences coding for the proteins inducing local immune responses were compared with nucleotide or protein databases and with expressed sequence tags (ESTs) databases. We identified new Eimeria genes coding for heat shock proteins, a ribosomal protein, a pyruvate kinase and a pyridoxine kinase. Specific features of other sequences are discussed.

  16. Reduced thymic expression of ErbB receptors without auto-antibodies against synaptic ErbB in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Vrolix, Kathleen; Niks, Erik H; Le Panse, Rozen; van Ostaijen-Ten Dam, Monique M; Muris, Anne-Hilde; Jol-van der Zijde, Cornelia M; van Tol, Maarten J D; Losen, Mario; Molenaar, Peter C; van Zoelen, Everardus J J; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; De Baets, Marc H; Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar

    2011-03-01

    In myasthenia gravis (MG), the neuromuscular transmission is impaired mainly by auto-antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) or MuSK. In about 5% of the MG patients, however, the auto-antigen is still unknown. We investigated whether these idiopathic MG patients (iMG) have auto-antibodies against ErbB proteins, which influence the AChR density at the NMJ. Our results show reduced mRNA expression levels of ErbB4 in thymus tissue of iMG patients compared to AChR-MG and non-MG patients, but we could not detect anti-ErbB antibodies in sera of iMG patients. Therefore, our results do not support a role for ErbB receptors as auto-antigens in iMG patients.

  17. Expression and production of llama variable heavy-chain antibody fragments (V(HH)s) by Aspergillus awamori.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Vivi; Gouka, Robin J; van den Hondel, Cees A M J J; Verrips, C Theo; Lokman, B Christien

    2005-01-01

    We report the expression and production of llama variable heavy-chain antibody fragments (V(HH)s) by Aspergillus awamori. Fragments encoding V(HH)s were cloned in a suitable Aspergillus expression vector and transformants secreting V(HH) fragments were analysed for integrated gene copy-numbers, mRNA levels and protein production. Functional V(HH)s were detected in the culture medium, indicating the feasibility of producing this type of protein in a fungal expression system. Secreted V(HH)s were subjected to (extracellular) degradation, which could be partially prevented by the addition of BSA to the culture medium.

  18. Protective Effects of Ultramicronized Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA-um) in Myocardial Ischaemia and Reperfusion Injury in VIVO.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Rosanna; Cordaro, Marika; Crupi, Rosalia; Siracusa, Rosalba; Campolo, Michela; Bruschetta, Giuseppe; Fusco, Roberta; Pugliatti, Pietro; Esposito, Emanuela; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    Myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death, occurs after prolonged ischemia of the coronary arteries. Restore blood flow is the first intervention help against heart attack. However, reperfusion of the arteries leads to ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/R). The fatty acid amide palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous compound widely present in living organisms, with analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study evaluated the effect of ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide (PEA-um) treatment on the inflammatory process associated with myocardial I/R. Myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury was induced by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery for 30 min followed by 2 h of reperfusion. PEA-um, was administered (10 mg/kg) 15 min after ischemia and 1 h after reperfusion. In this study, we demonstrated that PEA-um treatment reduces myocardial tissue injury, neutrophil infiltration, adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, P-selectin) expression, proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) production, nitrotyrosine and PAR formation, nuclear factor kB expression, and apoptosis (Fas-L, Bcl-2) activation. In addition to study whether the protective effect of PEA-um on myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury is also related to the activation of PPAR-α, in a separate set of experiments it has been performed myocardial I/R in PPARα mice. Genetic ablation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α in PPAR-αKO mice exacerbated Myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury when compared with PPAR-αWT mice. PEA-um induced cardioprotection in PPAR-α wild-type mice, but the same effect cannot be observed in PPAR-αKO mice. Our results have clearly shown a modulation of the inflammatory process, associated with myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury, following administration of PEA-um.

  19. Prokaryotic expression and polyclonal antibody preparation of a novel Rab-like protein mRabL5.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Guo, Shi-Ying; Pan, Fei-Yan; Geng, Hui-Xia; Gong, Yi; Lou, Dan; Shu, Yong-Qian; Li, Chao-Jun

    2007-05-01

    Rab GTPases, which belong to the Ras superfamily, represent a group of small molecular weight GTP binding proteins that are involved in various steps along the exocytic and endocytic pathways. We first identified mRabL5 (GenBank Accession No. NP_080349), a novel Mus musculus Rab-like protein, present as a Golgi-associated protein. Here we presented the results of the cloning, prokaryotic expression, purification, and polyclonal antibody production of the novel Rab-like protein. In order to obtain a specific antibody against mRabL5, we prepared two GST fusion proteins, full-length mRabL5 GST fusion protein and mRabL5 C terminus GST fusion protein, to immunize rabbits. Western blot analysis showed that both antibodies prepared against full length of mRabL5 and its C terminus, respectively, can recognize mRabL5 protein. Immunofluorescence of mRabL5 in NIH3T3 cells using the two antibodies showed its perinuclear clustering distribution pattern. The polyclonal antibodies preparation against mRabL5 provided a good tool for us to study the functional involvement of mRabL5.

  20. Expression and purification of swine RAG2 in E. coli for production of porcine RAG2 polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yu-Bei; Yang, Wen-Tao; Huang, Ke-Yan; Chen, Hong-Liang; Shonyela, Seria-Masole; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qiong; Feng, Bo; Zhou, You; Zhi, Shu-Li; Jiang, Yan-Long; Wang, Jian-Zhong; Huang, Hai-Bin; Shi, Chun-Wei; Yang, Gui-Lian; Wang, Chun-Feng

    2017-08-01

    Recombination activating gene 2 (RAG2) is necessary for immature B cell differentiation. Antibodies to human and rabbit RAG2 are currently commercially available, but antibodies to swine RAG remain unavailable to date. In this study, the swine RAG2 genes sequence was synthesized and then cloned into a pET-28a vector. The recombinant fusion protein was successfully expressed in E. coli, purified through nickel column chromatography, and further digested with Tobacco Etch Virus protease. The cleaved protein was purified by molecular-exclusion chromatography and named pRAG2. We used pRAG2 to immunize rabbits, collected the serum and purified rabbit anti-pRAG2 polyclonal antibodies. The rabbit anti-pRAG2 polyclonal antibodies were tested via immunofluorescence on eukaryotic cells overexpressing pRAG2 and also able to recognize pig natural RAG2 and human RAG2 protein in western blotting. These results indicated that the prepared rabbit anti-pRAG2 polyclonal antibodies may serve as a tool to detect immature B cell differentiation of swine.

  1. Method of rapid production of hybridomas expressing monoclonal antibodies on the cell surface

    DOEpatents

    Meagher, Richard B.; Laterza, Vince

    2006-12-12

    The present invention relates to genetically altered hybridomas, myelomas and B cells. The invention also relates to utilizing genetically altered hybridomas, myelomas and B cells in methods of making monoclonal antibodies. The present invention also provides populations of hybridomas and B cells that can be utilized to make a monoclonal antibody of interest.

  2. Engineering production of functional scFv antibody in E. coli by co-expressing the molecule chaperone Skp

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongzhi; Xiang, Shuangshuang; Feng, Youjun; Srinivas, Swaminath; Zhang, Yonghui; Lin, Mingshen; Wang, Shihua

    2013-01-01

    Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) is a class of engineered antibodies generated by the fusion of the heavy (VH) and light chains (VL) of immunoglobulins through a short polypeptide linker. ScFv play a critical role in therapy and diagnosis of human diseases, and may in fact also be developed into a potential diagnostic and/or therapeutic agent. However, the fact that current scFv antibodies have poor stability, low solubility, and affinity, seriously limits their diagnostic and clinical implication. Here we have developed four different expression vectors, and evaluated their abilities to express a soluble scFv protein. The solubility and binding activity of the purified proteins were determined using both SDS-PAGE and ELISA. Amongst the four purified proteins, the Skp co-expressed scFv showed the highest solubility, and the binding activity to antigen TLH was 3-4 fold higher than the other three purified scFv. In fact, this scFv is specific for TLH and does not cross-react with other TLH-associated proteins and could be used to detect TLH directly in real samples. These results suggest that the pACYC-Duet-skp co-expression vector might be a useful tool for the production of soluble and functional scFv antibody. PMID:24224158

  3. The Cloning and Expression of Human Monoclonal Antibodies: Implications for Allergen Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    James, Louisa K

    2016-02-01

    Allergic responses are dependent on the highly specific effector functions of IgE antibodies. Conversely, antibodies that block the activity of IgE can mediate tolerance to allergen. Technologies that harness the unparalleled specificity of antibody responses have revolutionized the way that we diagnose and treat human disease. This area of research continues to advance at a rapid pace and has had a significant impact on our understanding of allergic disease. This review will present an overview of humoral responses and provide an up-to-date summary of technologies used in the generation of human monoclonal antibodies. The impact that monoclonal antibodies have on allergic disease will be discussed, with a particular focus on allergen immunotherapy, which remains the only form of treatment that can modulate the underlying immune mechanisms and induce long-term clinical tolerance.

  4. Restricted expression of an early myeloid and monocytic cell surface antigen defined by monoclonal antibody M195.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, M; Scheinberg, D A; Cordon-Cardo, C; Huie, D; Clarkson, B D; Old, L J

    1989-05-01

    A mouse monoclonal IgG2a antibody, M195, with reactivity restricted to early myeloid cells, acute non-lymphoid leukemia cells (ANLL), and monocytic cells is described. The antibody was derived from a mouse immunized with live human leukemic myeloblasts. Specificity of binding of mAb M195 was determined by protein-A red blood cell rosetting assays, immunoabsorption, radioimmunoassays with iodine-125 labeled M195 IgG and F(Ab)'2, and complement cytotoxicity with live human cells and cell lines representing a broad range of lineages and tissues. Antigen expression was restricted to myeloid and monocytic leukemia cell lines and a fraction of mature adherent monocytes. Mature myeloid cells, T and B cells, erythrocytes, and platelets were negative. The antigen was not expressed on adult human tissues in immunoperoxidase and immunofluorescence assays. Blocking antigen was not found in the serum of patients with ANLL. Ten thousand sites per cell were expressed on myeloid or monocytic leukemia cell lines and 5000 sites per cell on mature monocytes. M195 IgG bound to its antigen target with an avidity of 3 x 10(9) liters/mol and induced rapid modulation of the antigen. M195 IgG was able to effectively kill cells with rabbit or guinea pig complement, but not human complement. The antibody did not mediate antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The molecular nature of the target antigen remains unknown but it appears to be carried on the CD33 protein p67. Because of its restricted distribution on myelomonocytic cells, mAb M195 may be useful in studying myeloid differentiation, in the clinical diagnosis of ANLL, in purging of bone marrow of ANLL, and/or in monoclonal antibody therapy in vivo.

  5. CHO expression of a novel human recombinant IgG1 anti-RhD antibody isolated by phage display.

    PubMed

    Miescher, S; Zahn-Zabal, M; De Jesus, M; Moudry, R; Fisch, I; Vogel, M; Kobr, M; Imboden, M A; Kragten, E; Bichler, J; Mermod, N; Stadler, B M; Amstutz, H; Wurm, F

    2000-10-01

    Replacement of the hyperimmune anti-Rhesus (Rh) D immunoglobulin, currently used to prevent haemolytic disease of the newborn, by fully recombinant human anti-RhD antibodies would solve the current logistic problems associated with supply and demand. The combination of phage display repertoire cloning with precise selection procedures enables isolation of specific genes that can then be inserted into mammalian expression systems allowing production of large quantities of recombinant human proteins. With the aim of selecting high-affinity anti-RhD antibodies, two human Fab libraries were constructed from a hyperimmune donor. Use of a new phage panning procedure involving bromelin-treated red blood cells enabled the isolation of two high-affinity Fab-expressing phage clones. LD-6-3 and LD-6-33, specific for RhD. These showed a novel reaction pattern by recognizing the D variants D(III), D(IVa), D(IVb), D(Va), D(VI) types I and II. D(VII), Rh33 and DFR. Full-length immunoglobulin molecules were constructed by cloning the variable regions into expression vectors containing genomic DNA encoding the immunoglobulin constant regions. We describe the first, stable, suspension growth-adapted Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line producing a high affinity recombinant human IgG1 anti-RhD antibody adapted to pilot-scale production. Evaluation of the Fc region of this recombinant antibody by either chemiluminescence or antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays demonstrated macrophage activation and lysis of red blood cells by human lymphocytes. A consistent source of recombinant human anti-RhD immunoglobulin produced by CHO cells is expected to meet the stringent safety and regulatory requirements for prophylactic application.

  6. Transgenic expression in citrus of single-chain antibody fragments specific to Citrus tristeza virus confers virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Magdalena; Esteban, Olga; Gil, Maite; Gorris, M Teresa; Martínez, M Carmen; Peña, Leandro; Cambra, Mariano

    2010-12-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes one of the most destructive viral diseases of citrus worldwide. Generation of resistant citrus genotypes through genetic engineering could be a good alternative to control CTV. To study whether production of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies in citrus could interfere and immunomodulate CTV infection, transgenic Mexican lime plants expressing two different scFv constructs, separately and simultaneously, were generated. These constructs derived from the well-referenced monoclonal antibodies 3DF1 and 3CA5, specific against CTV p25 major coat protein, whose mixture is able to detect all CTV isolates characterized so far. ScFv accumulation levels were low and could be readily detected just in four transgenic lines. Twelve homogeneous and vigorous lines were propagated and CTV-challenged by graft inoculation with an aggressive CTV strain. A clear protective effect was observed in most transgenic lines, which showed resistance in up to 40-60% of propagations. Besides, both a delay in symptom appearance and attenuation of symptom intensity were observed in infected transgenic plants compared with control plants. This effect was more evident in lines carrying the 3DF1scFv transgene, being probably related to the biological functions of the epitope recognized by this antibody. This is the first report describing successful protection against a pathogen in woody transgenic plants by ectopic expression of scFv recombinant antibodies.

  7. Production of bispecific antibodies in “knobs-into-holes” using a cell-free expression system

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yiren; Lee, John; Tran, Cuong; Heibeck, Tyler H; Wang, Willie D; Yang, Junhao; Stafford, Ryan L; Steiner, Alexander R; Sato, Aaron K; Hallam, Trevor J; Yin, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies have emerged in recent years as a promising field of research for therapies in oncology, inflammable diseases, and infectious diseases. Their capability of dual target recognition allows for novel therapeutic hypothesis to be tested, where traditional mono-specific antibodies would lack the needed mode of target engagement. Among extremely diverse architectures of bispecific antibodies, knobs-into-holes (KIHs) technology, which involves engineering CH3 domains to create either a “knob” or a “hole” in each heavy chain to promote heterodimerization, has been widely applied. Here, we describe the use of a cell-free expression system (Xpress CF) to produce KIH bispecific antibodies in multiple scaffolds, including 2-armed heterodimeric scFv-KIH and one-armed asymmetric BiTE-KIH with tandem scFv. Efficient KIH production can be achieved by manipulating the plasmid ratio between knob and hole, and further improved by addition of prefabricated knob or hole. These studies demonstrate the versatility of Xpress CF in KIH production and provide valuable insights into KIH construct design for better assembly and expression titer. PMID:25427258

  8. Recombinant Pvs48/45 antigen expressed in E. coli generates antibodies that block malaria transmission in Anopheles albimanus mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Vallejo, Andrés F; Rubiano, Kelly; Solarte, Yezid; Marin, Catherin; Castellanos, Angélica; Céspedes, Nora; Herrera, Sócrates

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of malaria parasites from humans to Anopheles mosquitoes can be inhibited by specific antibodies elicited during malaria infection, which target surface Plasmodium gametocyte/gamete proteins. Some of these proteins may have potential for vaccine development. Pvs48/45 is a P. vivax gametocyte surface antigen orthologous to Pfs48/45, which may play a role during parasite fertilization and thus has potential for transmission blocking (TB) activity. Here we describe the expression of a recombinant Pvs48/45 protein expressed in Escherichia coli as a ∼60kDa construct which we tested for antigenicity using human sera and for its immunogenicity and transmission blocking activity of specific anti-mouse and anti-monkey Pvs48/45 antibodies. The protein reacted with sera of individuals from malaria-endemic areas and in addition induced specific IgG antibody responses in BALB/c mice and Aotus l. griseimembra monkeys. Sera from both immunized animal species recognized native P. vivax protein in Western blot (WB) and immunofluorescence assays. Moreover, sera from immunized mice and monkeys produced significant inhibition of parasite transmission to An. Albimanus mosquitoes as shown by membrane feeding assays. Results indicate the presence of reactive epitopes in the Pvs48/45 recombinant product that induce antibodies with TB activity. Further testing of this protein is ongoing to determine its vaccine potential.

  9. Recombinant Pvs48/45 Antigen Expressed in E. coli Generates Antibodies that Block Malaria Transmission in Anopheles albimanus Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Vallejo, Andrés F.; Rubiano, Kelly; Solarte, Yezid; Marin, Catherin; Castellanos, Angélica; Céspedes, Nora; Herrera, Sócrates

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of malaria parasites from humans to Anopheles mosquitoes can be inhibited by specific antibodies elicited during malaria infection, which target surface Plasmodium gametocyte/gamete proteins. Some of these proteins may have potential for vaccine development. Pvs48/45 is a P. vivax gametocyte surface antigen orthologous to Pfs48/45, which may play a role during parasite fertilization and thus has potential for transmission blocking (TB) activity. Here we describe the expression of a recombinant Pvs48/45 protein expressed in Escherichia coli as a ∼60kDa construct which we tested for antigenicity using human sera and for its immunogenicity and transmission blocking activity of specific anti-mouse and anti-monkey Pvs48/45 antibodies. The protein reacted with sera of individuals from malaria-endemic areas and in addition induced specific IgG antibody responses in BALB/c mice and Aotus l. griseimembra monkeys. Sera from both immunized animal species recognized native P. vivax protein in Western blot (WB) and immunofluorescence assays. Moreover, sera from immunized mice and monkeys produced significant inhibition of parasite transmission to An. Albimanus mosquitoes as shown by membrane feeding assays. Results indicate the presence of reactive epitopes in the Pvs48/45 recombinant product that induce antibodies with TB activity. Further testing of this protein is ongoing to determine its vaccine potential. PMID:25775466

  10. Understanding the role of H(2)O(2) during pea seed germination: a combined proteomic and hormone profiling approach.

    PubMed

    Barba-Espín, Gregorio; Diaz-Vivancos, Pedro; Job, Dominique; Belghazi, Maya; Job, Claudette; Hernández, José Antonio

    2011-11-01

    In a previous publication, we showed that the treatment of pea seeds in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) increased germination performance as well as seedling growth. To gain insight into the mechanisms responsible for this behaviour, we have analysed the effect of treating mature pea seeds in the presence of 20 mm H(2)O(2) on several oxidative features such as protein carbonylation, endogenous H(2)O(2) and lipid peroxidation levels. We report that H(2)O(2) treatment of the pea seeds increased their endogenous H(2)O(2) content and caused carbonylation of storage proteins and of several metabolic enzymes. Under the same conditions, we also monitored the expression of two MAPK genes known to be activated by H(2)O(2) in adult pea plants. The expression of one of them, PsMAPK2, largely increased upon pea seed imbibition in H(2)O(2) , whereas no change could be observed in expression of the other, PsMAPK3. The levels of several phytohormones such as 1-aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid, indole-3-acetic acid and zeatin appeared to correlate with the measured oxidative indicators and with the expression of PsMAPK2. Globally, our results suggest a key role of H(2)O(2) in the coordination of pea seed germination, acting as a priming factor that involves specific changes at the proteome, transcriptome and hormonal levels. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Expression, purification, and characterization of anti-plumbagin single-chain variable fragment antibody in Sf9 insect cell.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Seiichi; Taura, Futoshi; Tsuchihashi, Ryota; Putalun, Waraporn; Kinjo, Junei; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2010-12-01

    Plumbagin (PL; 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1, 4-naphthoquinone) is an important secondary metabolite, mainly produced in the Plumbago zeylanica L. (Plumbaginaceae). A single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, fusion of the variable regions of the heavy chain and light chain of immunoglobulin against PL (PL-scFv) was expressed by Bac-to-Bac Baculovirus Expression System using Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells and characterized to investigate potential use of PL-scFv as a tool for plant immunomodulation. Functional PL-scFv expressed in the Sf9 insect cells were purified using cation exchange chromatography followed by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC). The yields of the purified PL-scFv in the culture supernatant and Sf9 insect cells were 2.0 mg and 5.2 mg per 1 liter of Sf9 culture medium, respectively. Recombinant purified PL-scFv was then characterized by the indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cross-reactivity and sensitivity of PL-scFv expressed in Sf9 insect cells were compared with PL-scFv expressed in Escherichia coli and its parental anti-plumbagin monoclonal antibody (MAb 3A3) secreted from hybridoma cells. Intriguingly, the specificity of the PL-scFv expressed in Sf9 insect cells was found to be different from that expressed in E. coli and parental MAb 3A3, although the detectable level (0.2-25 μg/mL) was the same in ELISA using each antibody. Even more interestingly, the characteristics of PL-scFv, which have wide cross-reactivity against 1,4-napththoquinone, suggest its potential use as a tool for plant immunomodulation not only for breeding Plumbaginacea family containing PL but also for breeding other medicinal plants containing bioactive naphthoquinones.

  12. Antibody formation and mannose-6-phosphate receptor expression impact the efficacy of muscle-specific transgene expression in murine Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Yi, Haiqing; Kemper, Alex; Thurberg, Beth L; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2010-11-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders such as Pompe disease can be more effectively treated, if immune tolerance to enzyme or gene replacement therapy can be achieved. Alternatively, immune responses against acid α-glucosidase (GAA) might be evaded in Pompe disease through muscle-specific expression of GAA with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. An AAV vector containing the MHCK7 regulatory cassette to drive muscle-specific GAA expression was administered to GAA knockout (KO) mice, immune tolerant GAA-KO mice and mannose-6-phosphate deficient GAA-KO mice. GAA activity and glycogen content were analyzed in striated muscle to determine biochemical efficacy. The biochemical efficacy from GAA expression was slightly reduced in GAA-KO mice, as demonstrated by higher residual glycogen content in skeletal muscles. Next, immune tolerance to GAA was induced in GAA-KO mice by co-administration of a second AAV vector encoding liver-specific GAA along with the AAV vector encoding muscle-specific GAA. Antibody formation was prevented by liver-specific GAA, and the biochemical efficacy of GAA expression was improved in the absence of antibodies, as demonstrated by significantly reduced glycogen content in the diaphragm. Efficacy was reduced in old GAA-KO mice despite the absence of antibodies. The greatest impact upon gene therapy was observed in GAA-KO mice lacking the mannose-6-phosphate receptor in muscle. The clearance of stored glycogen was markedly impaired despite high GAA expression in receptor-deficient Pompe disease mice. Overall, antibody formation had a subtle effect upon efficacy, whereas the absence of mannose-6-phosphate receptors markedly impaired muscle-targeted gene therapy in murine Pompe disease. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Antibody formation and mannose-6-phosphate receptor expression impact the efficacy of muscle-specific transgene expression in murine Pompe disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Yi, Haiqing; Kemper, Alex; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lysosomal storage disorders such as Pompe disease can be more effectively treated, if immune tolerance to enzyme or gene replacement therapy can be achieved. Alternatively, immune responses against acid α-glucosidase (GAA) might be evaded in Pompe disease through muscle-specific expression of GAA with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. METHODS An AAV vector containing the MHCK7 regulatory cassette to drive muscle-specific GAA expression was administered to GAA knockout (KO) mice, immune tolerant GAA-KO mice, and mannose-6-phosphate deficient GAA-KO mice. GAA activity and glycogen content were analyzed in striated muscle to determine biochemical efficacy. RESULTS The biochemical efficacy from GAA expression was slightly reduced in GAA-KO mice, as demonstrated by higher residual glycogen content in skeletal muscles. Next immune tolerance to GAA was induced in GAA-KO mice by co-administration of a second AAV vector encoding liver-specific GAA along with the AAV vector encoding muscle-specific GAA. Antibody formation was prevented by liver-specific GAA, and the biochemical efficacy of GAA expression was improved in absence of antibodies as evidenced by significantly reduced glycogen content in the diaphragm. Efficacy was reduced in old GAA-KO mice despite the absence of antibodies. The greatest impact upon gene therapy was observed in GAA-KO mice lacking the mannose-6-phosphate receptor in muscle. The clearance of stored glycogen was markedly impaired despite high GAA expression in receptor-deficient Pompe disease mice. CONCLUSIONS Overall, antibody formation had a subtle effect upon efficacy, while the absence of mannose-6-phosphate receptors markedly impaired muscle-targeted gene therapy in murine Pompe disease. PMID:20967919

  14. First report of occurrence of two viruses on pea field in Iran.

    PubMed

    Esfandiari, N; Kohi Habibi, M; Mosahebi, G H; Mozafari, J

    2005-01-01

    An intensive survey was conducted to identify virus diseases affecting pea crops in Tehran province of Iran. A total of 270 pea samples were collected randomly from pea fields. samples were tested by Double Antibody Sandwich Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (DAS-ELISA) using polyclonal antisera prepared against PSBMV (AS-0129, DSMZ, Braunschweig, Germany) and TSWV (AS-0580, DSMZ, Braunschweig, Germany). Virus disease incidence in pea samples was followed by PSBMV (33%) TSWV (24.4%) and PSBMV+TSWV (17.77). The positive samples with PSBMV were extracted in 0.05M phosphate buffer pH 6.5-7 containing 2% pvp and inoculated on Pisum sativum, Vicia faba, Chenopodium quinoa, Chenopodium amaranticolor. That produced in Pisum sativum; leaflets roll downwards, shoots curl, internodes shorten and plants are rosetted. Early infections reduce flower and fruit formation or eliminate their development. Broad bean has symptoms accompanied by a certain margin rolling and leaflet distortion. In Chenopodium amaranticolor necrotic local lesions and Chenopodium quinoa chlorotic local lesions had produced. The positive samples with TSWV were extracted in 0.01 M phosphate buffer containing 1% Na2 SO3 and inoculated on Petunia hybrida, Pisum sativum. TSWV causes several symptoms in infected peas, including brown leaf petiole and stem coloration, leaflet spotting, vein necrosis. In petunia hybrida after approximately 5 days showed local necrotic lesion. Biological purification in TSWV with chlorotic local lesions in Petunia hybrida and in PSBMV; chlorotic local lesions in Chenopodium quinoa were done. In PSBMV, back inoculated on Pisum sativum and Vicia faba also tested with DAS-ELISA. RT-PCR confirmed the results. This is the first report of PSBMV and TSWV naturally infecting pea in Iran.

  15. Analysis of the human tissue-specific expression by genome-wide integration of transcriptomics and antibody-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Oksvold, Per; Kampf, Caroline; Djureinovic, Dijana; Odeberg, Jacob; Habuka, Masato; Tahmasebpoor, Simin; Danielsson, Angelika; Edlund, Karolina; Asplund, Anna; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Lundberg, Emma; Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili; Skogs, Marie; Takanen, Jenny Ottosson; Berling, Holger; Tegel, Hanna; Mulder, Jan; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M; Lindskog, Cecilia; Danielsson, Frida; Mardinoglu, Adil; Sivertsson, Asa; von Feilitzen, Kalle; Forsberg, Mattias; Zwahlen, Martin; Olsson, IngMarie; Navani, Sanjay; Huss, Mikael; Nielsen, Jens; Ponten, Fredrik; Uhlén, Mathias

    2014-02-01

    Global classification of the human proteins with regards to spatial expression patterns across organs and tissues is important for studies of human biology and disease. Here, we used a quantitative transcriptomics analysis (RNA-Seq) to classify the tissue-specific expression of genes across a representative set of all major human organs and tissues and combined this analysis with antibody-based profiling of the same tissues. To present the data, we launch a new version of the Human Protein Atlas that integrates RNA and protein expression data corresponding to ∼80% of the human protein-coding genes with access to the primary data for both the RNA and the protein analysis on an individual gene level. We present a classification of all human protein-coding genes with regards to tissue-specificity and spatial expression pattern. The integrative human expression map can be used as a starting point to explore the molecular constituents of the human body.

  16. Differential transgene expression patterns in Alzheimer mouse models revealed by novel human amyloid precursor protein-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Höfling, Corinna; Morawski, Markus; Zeitschel, Ulrike; Zanier, Elisa R; Moschke, Katrin; Serdaroglu, Alperen; Canneva, Fabio; von Hörsten, Stephan; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Forloni, Gianluigi; Jäger, Carsten; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Roßner, Steffen; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is histopathologically characterized by neurodegeneration, the formation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular Aβ deposits that derive from proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). As rodents do not normally develop Aβ pathology, various transgenic animal models of AD were designed to overexpress human APP with mutations favouring its amyloidogenic processing. However, these mouse models display tremendous differences in the spatial and temporal appearance of Aβ deposits, synaptic dysfunction, neurodegeneration and the manifestation of learning deficits which may be caused by age-related and brain region-specific differences in APP transgene levels. Consequentially, a comparative temporal and regional analysis of the pathological effects of Aβ in mouse brains is difficult complicating the validation of therapeutic AD treatment strategies in different mouse models. To date, no antibodies are available that properly discriminate endogenous rodent and transgenic human APP in brains of APP-transgenic animals. Here, we developed and characterized rat monoclonal antibodies by immunohistochemistry and Western blot that detect human but not murine APP in brains of three APP-transgenic mouse and one APP-transgenic rat model. We observed remarkable differences in expression levels and brain region-specific expression of human APP among the investigated transgenic mouse lines. This may explain the differences between APP-transgenic models mentioned above. Furthermore, we provide compelling evidence that our new antibodies specifically detect endogenous human APP in immunocytochemistry, FACS and immunoprecipitation. Hence, we propose these antibodies as standard tool for monitoring expression of endogenous or transfected APP in human cells and APP expression in transgenic animals. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. A monoclonal antibody based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of phenylethanolamine A in tissue of swine.

    PubMed

    Li, Yansong; Lu, Shiying; Liu, Zengshan; Sun, Lihui; Guo, Junfei; Hu, Pan; Zhang, Junhui; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yang; Ren, Honglin; Meng, Xingyu; Zhou, Yu

    2015-01-15

    Phenylethanolamine A (PEA) is a phenethanolamine member of the family of β-adrenergic agonists compounds illegally used as feed additives for growth promotion. In this study, PEA was covalently linked to carrier protein cationized bovine serum albumin (cBSA) and egg albumin (OVA). A monoclonal antibody specific for PEA was produced and characteristics of monoclonal antibody (McAb) were studied. Based on the McAb, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of PEA was developed, which showed an IC50 value of 6.25 ng mL(-1) and a detection limit of 0.19 ng mL(-1). The average recovery of PEA from spiked samples was 103.4%, which demonstrated that the matrices of meat where PEA may be found do not interfere with the assay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional conservation of PISTILLATA activity in a pea homolog lacking the PI motif.

    PubMed

    Berbel, Ana; Navarro, Cristina; Ferrándiz, Cristina; Cañas, Luis Antonio; Beltrán, José-Pío; Madueño, Francisco

    2005-09-01

    Current understanding of floral development is mainly based on what we know from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and Antirrhinum majus. However, we can learn more by comparing developmental mechanisms that may explain morphological differences between species. A good example comes from the analysis of genes controlling flower development in pea (Pisum sativum), a plant with more complex leaves and inflorescences than Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum, and a different floral ontogeny. The analysis of UNIFOLIATA (UNI) and STAMINA PISTILLOIDA (STP), the pea orthologs of LEAFY and UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS, has revealed a common link in the regulation of flower and leaf development not apparent in Arabidopsis. While the Arabidopsis genes mainly behave as key regulators of flower development, where they control the expression of B-function genes, UNI and STP also contribute to the development of the pea compound leaf. Here, we describe the characterization of P. sativum PISTILLATA (PsPI), a pea MADS-box gene homologous to B-function genes like PI and GLOBOSA (GLO), from Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum, respectively. PsPI encodes for an atypical PI-type polypeptide that lacks the highly conserved C-terminal PI motif. Nevertheless, constitutive expression of PsPI in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Arabidopsis shows that it can specifically replace the function of PI, being able to complement the strong pi-1 mutant. Accordingly, PsPI expression in pea flowers, which is dependent on STP, is identical to PI and GLO. Interestingly, PsPI is also transiently expressed in young leaves, suggesting a role of PsPI in pea leaf development, a possibility that fits with the established role of UNI and STP in the control of this process.

  19. Glycosylation patterns of HIV-1 gp120 depend on the type of expressing cells and affect antibody recognition.

    PubMed

    Raska, Milan; Takahashi, Kazuo; Czernekova, Lydie; Zachova, Katerina; Hall, Stacy; Moldoveanu, Zina; Elliott, Matt C; Wilson, Landon; Brown, Rhubell; Jancova, Dagmar; Barnes, Stephen; Vrbkova, Jana; Tomana, Milan; Smith, Phillip D; Mestecky, Jiri; Renfrow, Matthew B; Novak, Jan

    2010-07-02

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry is mediated by the interaction between a variably glycosylated envelope glycoprotein (gp120) and host-cell receptors. Approximately half of the molecular mass of gp120 is contributed by N-glycans, which serve as potential epitopes and may shield gp120 from immune recognition. The role of gp120 glycans in the host immune response to HIV-1 has not been comprehensively studied at the molecular level. We developed a new approach to characterize cell-specific gp120 glycosylation, the regulation of glycosylation, and the effect of variable glycosylation on antibody reactivity. A model oligomeric gp120 was expressed in different cell types, including cell lines that represent host-infected cells or cells used to produce gp120 for vaccination purposes. N-Glycosylation of gp120 varied, depending on the cell type used for its expression and the metabolic manipulation during expression. The resultant glycosylation included changes in the ratio of high-mannose to complex N-glycans, terminal decoration, and branching. Differential glycosylation of gp120 affected envelope recognition by polyclonal antibodies from the sera of HIV-1-infected subjects. These results indicate that gp120 glycans contribute to antibody reactivity and should be considered in HIV-1 vaccine design.

  20. The anti-inflammatory effects of palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) on endotoxin-induced uveitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Impellizzeri, Daniela; Ahmad, Akbar; Bruschetta, Giuseppe; Di Paola, Rosanna; Crupi, Rosalia; Paterniti, Irene; Esposito, Emanuela; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2015-08-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), an endogenous fatty acid amide belonging to the family of the N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), in rats subjected to endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU). EIU was induced in male rats by a single footpad injection of 200μg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). PEA was administered intraperitoneally at 1h before and 7h after injection of LPS. Another group of animals was treated with vehicle. Dexamethasone (DEX) was administered as a positive control. Rats were sacrificed 16h after injection and the eyes tissues were collected for histology, immunohistochemical and western blot analyses. The histological evaluation of the iris-ciliary body showed an increase of neutrophilic infiltration and nuclear modification of vessel of endothelial cells. PEA treatment decreased the inflammatory cell infiltration and improved histological damage of eye tissues. In addition, PEA treatment reduced pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) levels, protein extravasion and lipid peroxidation. Immunohistochemical analysis for intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and nitrotyrosine showed a positive staining from LPS-injected rats. The degree of staining for ICAM-1 and nitrotyrosine was significantly reduced in eye sections from LPS-injected rats treated with PEA. In addition, an increase of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nuclear factor (NF-κB) was also evaluated in inflammed ocular tissues by western blot. PEA strongly inhibited iNOS expression and nuclear NF-κB translocation. Thus, in this study we demonstrated that PEA reduces the degree of ocular inflammation in a rat model of EIU.

  1. A novel multipurpose monoclonal antibody for evaluating human c-MET expression in preclinical and clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Beatrice S.; Zhao, Ping; Resau, James; Cottingham, Sandra; Gherardi, Ermanno; Xu, Eric; Berghuis, Bree; Daugherty, Jennifer; Grabinski, Tessa; Toro, Jose; Giambernardi, Troy; Skinner, R. Scot; Gross, Milton; Hudson, Eric; Kort, Eric; Lengyel, Ernst; Ventura, Aviva; Xie, Qian; Hay, Rick; Woude, George Vande; Cao, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The inappropriate expression of the c-MET cell surface receptor in many human solid tumors necessitates the development of companion diagnostics to identify those patients who could benefit from c-MET targeted therapies. Tumor tissues are formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) for histopathological evaluation, making the development of an antibody against c-MET that accurately and reproducibly detects the protein in FFPE samples an urgent need. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, designated MET4, from a panel of MET-avid monoclonal antibodies, based on its specific staining pattern in FFPE preparations of normal human prostate tissues. The accuracy of MET4 immunohistochemistry (MET4-IHC) was assessed by comparing MET4-IHC in FFPE cell pellets with immunoblotting analysis. The technical reproducibility of MET4-IHC possessed a percentage coefficient of variability (%CV) of 6.25% in intra-assay and inter-assay testing. Comparison with other commercial c-MET antibody detection reagents demonstrated equal specificity and increased sensitivity for c-MET detection in prostate tissues. In two cohorts of ovarian cancers and gliomas, MET4 reacted with ovarian cancers of all histological subtypes (strong staining in 25%) and with 63% of gliomas. In addition, MET4 bound c-Met on the surfaces of cultured human cancer cells and tumor xenografts. In summary, the MET4 monoclonal antibody accurately and reproducibly measures c-MET expression by IHC in FFPE tissues and can be used for molecular imaging in-vivo. These properties encourage further development of MET4 as a multipurpose molecular diagnostics reagent to help to guide appropriate selection of patients being considered for treatment with c-MET-antagonistic drugs. PMID:18815565

  2. Expression of a single-chain variable-fragment antibody against a Fusarium virguliforme toxin peptide enhances tolerance to sudden death syndrome in transgenic soybean plants.

    PubMed

    Brar, Hargeet K; Bhattacharyya, Madan K

    2012-06-01

    Plants do not produce antibodies. However, plants can correctly assemble functional antibody molecules encoded by mammalian antibody genes. Many plant diseases are caused by pathogen toxins. One such disease is the soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS). SDS is a serious disease caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium virguliforme. The pathogen, however, has never been isolated from diseased foliar tissues. Thus, one or more toxins produced by the pathogen have been considered to cause foliar SDS. One of these possible toxins, FvTox1, was recently identified. We investigated whether expression of anti-FvTox1 single-chain variable-fragment (scFv) antibody in transgenic soybean can confer resistance to foliar SDS. We have created two scFv antibody genes, Anti-FvTox1-1 and Anti-FvTox1-2, encoding anti-FvTox1 scFv antibodies from RNAs of a hybridoma cell line that expresses mouse monoclonal anti-FvTox1 7E8 antibody. Both anti-FvTox1 scFv antibodies interacted with an antigenic site of FvTox1 that binds to mouse monoclonal anti-FvTox1 7E8 antibody. Binding of FvTox1 by the anti-FvTox1 scFv antibodies, expressed in either Escherichia coli or transgenic soybean roots, was initially verified on nitrocellulose membranes. Expression of anti-FvTox1-1 in stable transgenic soybean plants resulted in enhanced foliar SDS resistance compared with that in nontransgenic control plants. Our results suggest that i) FvTox1 is an important pathogenicity factor for foliar SDS development and ii) expression of scFv antibodies against pathogen toxins could be a suitable biotechnology approach for protecting crop plants from toxin-induced diseases.

  3. Phosphoprotein Enriched in Astrocytes 15 kDa (PEA-15) Reprograms Growth Factor Signaling by Inhibiting Threonine Phosphorylation of Fibroblast Receptor Substrate 2α

    PubMed Central

    Haling, Jacob R.; Wang, Fen

    2010-01-01

    Changes in cellular expression of phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes of 15 kDa (PEA-15) are linked to insulin resistance, tumor cell invasion, and cellular senescence; these changes alter the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. Here, we define the mechanism whereby increased PEA-15 expression promotes and sustains ERK1/2 activation. PEA-15 binding prevented ERK1/2 membrane recruitment and threonine phosphorylation of fibroblast receptor substrate 2α (FRS2α), a key link in fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor activation of ERK1/2. This reduced threonine phosphorylation led to increased FGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of FRS2α, thereby enhancing downstream signaling. Conversely, short hairpin RNA-mediated depletion of endogenous PEA-15 led to reduced FRS2α tyrosine phosphorylation. Thus, PEA-15 interrupts a negative feedback loop that terminates growth factor receptor signaling downstream of FRS2α. This is the dominant mechanism by which PEA-15 activates ERK1/2 because genetic deletion of FRS2α blocked the capacity of PEA-15 to activate the MAP kinase pathway. Thus, PEA-15 prevents ERK1/2 localization to the plasma membrane, thereby inhibiting ERK1/2-dependent threonine phosphorylation of FRS2α to promote activation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:20032303

  4. Transient and stable CHO expression, purification and characterization of novel hetero-dimeric bispecific IgG antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rajendra, Yashas; Peery, Robert B; Hougland, Maria D; Barnard, Gavin C; Wu, Xiufeng; Fitchett, Jonathan R; Bacica, Michael; Demarest, Stephen J

    2016-12-15

    IgG bispecific antibodies (BsAbs) represent one of the preferred formats for bispecific antibody therapeutics due to their native-like IgG properties and their monovalent binding to each target. Most reported studies utilized transient expression in HEK293 cells to produce BsAbs. However, the expression of biotherapeutic molecules using stable CHO cell lines is commonly used for biopharmaceutical manufacturing. Unfortunately, limited information is available in the scientific literature on the expression of BsAbs in CHO cell lines. In this study we describe an alternative approach to express the multiple components of IgG BsAbs using a single plasmid vector (quad vector). This single plasmid vector contains both heavy chain genes and both light chain genes required for the expression and assembly of the IgG BsAb, along with a selectable marker. We expressed, purified, and characterized four different IgG BsAbs or "hetero-mAbs" using transient CHO expression and stable CHO minipools. Transient CHO titers ranged from 90 to 160 mg/L. Stable CHO titers ranged from 0.4 to 2.3 g/L. Following a simple Protein A purification step, the percentage of correctly paired BsAbs ranged from 74% to 98% as determined by mass spectrometry. We also found that information generated from transient CHO expression was similar to information generated using stable CHO minipools. In conclusion, the quad vector approach represents a simple, but effective, alternative approach for the generation of IgG BsAbs in both transient CHO and stable CHO expression systems. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2016.

  5. Deciphering common and specific transcriptional immune responses in pea towards the oomycete pathogens Aphanomyces euteiches and Phytophthora pisi.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Sara; Elfstrand, Malin; Heyman, Fredrik; Funck Jensen, Dan; Karlsson, Magnus

    2015-08-21

    Root rot caused by Aphanomyces euteiches is one of the most destructive pea diseases while a distantly related species P. pisi has been recently described as the agent of pea and faba bean root rot. These two oomycete pathogens with different pathogenicity factor repertories have both evolved specific mechanisms to infect pea. However, little is known about the genes and mechanisms of defence against these pathogens in pea. In the present study, the transcriptomic response of pea to these two pathogens was investigated at two time points during early phase of infection using a Medicago truncatula microarray. Of the 37,976 genes analysed, 574 and 817 were differentially expressed in response to A. euteiches at 6 hpi and 20 hpi, respectively, while 544 and 611 genes were differentially regulated against P. pisi at 6 hpi and 20 hpi, respectively. Differentially expressed genes associated with plant immunity responses were involved in cell wall reinforcement, hormonal signalling and phenylpropanoid metabolism. Activation of cell wall modification, regulation of jasmonic acid biosynthesis and induction of ethylene signalling pathway were among the common transcriptional responses to both of these oomycetes. However, induction of chalcone synthesis and the auxin pathway were specific transcriptional changes against A. euteiches. Our results demonstrate a global view of differentially expressed pea genes during compatible interactions with P. pisi and A. euteiches at an early phase of infection. The results suggest that distinct signalling pathways are triggered in pea by these two pathogens that lead to common and specific immune mechanisms in response to these two oomycetes. The generated knowledge may eventually be used in breeding pea varieties with resistance against root rot disease.

  6. Neuroantibodies: molecular cloning of a monoclonal antibody against substance P for expression in the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Piccioli, P; Ruberti, F; Biocca, S; Di Luzio, A; Werge, T M; Bradbury, A; Cattaneo, A

    1991-01-01

    We present a strategy to study functional and/or developmental processes occurring in the nervous system, as well as in other systems, of mice. This strategy is based on the local expression of specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) by cells of the nervous system. As an application of this strategy, we report the cloning of the anti-substance P rat mAb NC1/34HL. Functional substance P-binding antibodies were reconstituted from the cloned variable domains by using vectors for expression in myeloma cells. With these and other vectors a general system for the cloning and expression of mAbs under a series of promoters (of the rat VGF8a gene, the neurofilament light-chain gene, and the methallothionein gene) has been created. The activity of these plasmids was confirmed by expressing the recombinant NC1/34HL mAb in GH3 pituitary cells, PC12 pheochromocytoma cells, and COS cells. DNA from the described constructs can be used to target the expression of the NC1/34HL mAb to the central nervous system of transgenic mice. This procedure will allow us to perturb substance P activity in a controlled way in order to dissect its multiple roles. Images PMID:1712102

  7. [The expression of antigens, detectable with ICO-series monoclonal antibodies, on the surfaces of cells forming granulocyte and macrophage colonies in semiliquid agar].

    PubMed

    Savel'eva, E V; Kharlamova, L A; Baryshnikov, A Iu; Agafonov, V A; Tupitsyn, N N

    1989-01-01

    The expression of antigens on granulocyte-macrophagal colony-forming cells of patients with nonhematological diseases was studied. Treatment of bone marrow cells with murine monoclonal antibodies ICO-1 and ICO-11 led to statistically significant inhibition of the number of growing colonies. Monoclonal antibodies ICO-02, ICO-10, ICO-GM-1 and ICO-G-2 had no such effect.

  8. Dendritic cells and follicular dendritic cells express a novel ligand for CD38 which influences their maturation and antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    Wykes, Michelle N; Beattie, Lynette; MacPherson, Gordon G; Hart, Derek N

    2004-01-01

    CD38 is a cell surface molecule with ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity, which is predominantly expressed on lymphoid and myeloid cells. CD38 has a significant role in B-cell function as some anti-CD38 antibodies can deliver potent growth and differentiation signals, but the ligand that delivers this signal in mice is unknown. We used a chimeric protein of mouse CD38 and human immunogobulin G (IgG) (CD38-Ig) to identify a novel ligand for murine CD38 (CD38L) on networks of follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) as well as dendritic cells (DCs) in the spleen. Flow-cytometry found that all DC subsets expressed cytoplasmic CD38L but only fresh ex vivo CD11c+ CD11b− DCs had cell surface CD38L. Anti-CD38 antibody blocked the binding of CD38-Ig to CD38L, confirming the specificity of detection. CD38-Ig immuno-precipitated ligands of 66 and 130 kDa. Functional studies found that CD38-Ig along with anti-CD40 and anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antibody provided maturation signals to DCs in vitro. When CD38-Ig was administered in vivo with antigen, IgG2a responses were significantly reduced, suggesting that B and T cells expressing CD38 may modulate the isotype of antibodies produced through interaction with CD38L on DCs. CD38-Ig also expanded FDC networks when administered in vivo. In conclusion, this study has identified a novel ligand for CD38 which has a role in functional interactions between lymphocytes and DCs or FDCs. PMID:15500618

  9. Immunization with recombinantly expressed glycan antigens from Schistosoma mansoni induces glycan-specific antibodies against the parasite

    PubMed Central

    Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Luyai, Anthony E; Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Mandalasi, Msano; Mickum, Megan; Smith, David F; Nyame, A Kwame; Cummings, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by infection with parasitic helminths of Schistosoma spp. is a major global health problem due to inadequate treatment and lack of a vaccine. The immune response to schistosomes includes glycan antigens, which could be valuable diagnostic markers and vaccine targets. However, no precedent exists for how to design vaccines targeting eukaryotic glycoconjugates. The di- and tri-saccharide motifs LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4GlcNAc; LDN) and fucosylated LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc; LDNF) are the basis for several important schistosome glycan antigens. They occur in monomeric form or as repeating units (poly-LDNF) and as part of a variety of different glycoconjugates. Because chemical synthesis and conjugation of such antigens is exceedingly difficult, we sought to develop a recombinant expression system for parasite glycans. We hypothesized that presentation of parasite glycans on the cell surface would induce glycan-specific antibodies. We generated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) Lec8 cell lines expressing poly-LDN (L8-GT) and poly-LDNF (L8-GTFT) abundantly on their membrane glycoproteins. Sera from Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice were highly cross-reactive with the cells and with cell-surface N-glycans. Immunizing mice with L8-GT and L8-GTFT cells induced glycan-specific antibodies. The L8-GTFT cells induced a sustained booster response, with antibodies that bound to S. mansoni lysates and recapitulated the exquisite specificity of the anti-parasite response for particular presentations of LDNF antigen. In summary, this recombinant expression system promotes successful generation of antibodies to the glycans of S. mansoni, and it can be adapted to study the role of glycan antigens and anti-glycan immune responses in many other infections and pathologies. PMID:24727440

  10. Immunization with recombinantly expressed glycan antigens from Schistosoma mansoni induces glycan-specific antibodies against the parasite.

    PubMed

    Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Luyai, Anthony E; Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Mandalasi, Msano; Mickum, Megan; Smith, David F; Nyame, A Kwame; Cummings, Richard D

    2014-07-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by infection with parasitic helminths of Schistosoma spp. is a major global health problem due to inadequate treatment and lack of a vaccine. The immune response to schistosomes includes glycan antigens, which could be valuable diagnostic markers and vaccine targets. However, no precedent exists for how to design vaccines targeting eukaryotic glycoconjugates. The di- and tri-saccharide motifs LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4GlcNAc; LDN) and fucosylated LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc; LDNF) are the basis for several important schistosome glycan antigens. They occur in monomeric form or as repeating units (poly-LDNF) and as part of a variety of different glycoconjugates. Because chemical synthesis and conjugation of such antigens is exceedingly difficult, we sought to develop a recombinant expression system for parasite glycans. We hypothesized that presentation of parasite glycans on the cell surface would induce glycan-specific antibodies. We generated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) Lec8 cell lines expressing poly-LDN (L8-GT) and poly-LDNF (L8-GTFT) abundantly on their membrane glycoproteins. Sera from Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice were highly cross-reactive with the cells and with cell-surface N-glycans. Immunizing mice with L8-GT and L8-GTFT cells induced glycan-specific antibodies. The L8-GTFT cells induced a sustained booster response, with antibodies that bound to S. mansoni lysates and recapitulated the exquisite specificity of the anti-parasite response for particular presentations of LDNF antigen. In summary, this recombinant expression system promotes successful generation of antibodies to the glycans of S. mansoni, and it can be adapted to study the role of glycan antigens and anti-glycan immune responses in many other infections and pathologies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Finding linked markers to En for efficient selection of pea enation Mosaic Virus resistance in pea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) causes an important disease of cool season food legumes, resulting in significant yield loss worldwide. The present investigation was carried out to study the inheritance and identify the molecular markers linked with the PEMV resistance gene (En) in field pea (Pisum ...

  12. Peas in a Pod: Environment and Ionization in Green Pea Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Heather; Jaskot, Anne; Drew, Patrick; Pare, Dylan; Griffin, Jon; Petersen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Green Peas are extreme, highly ionized, starburst galaxies with strong [OIII] 5007 emission. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we present statistics on the environment of Green Peas and investigate its effects on their ionized gas properties. Although most dwarf starburst galaxies are in low-density environments, we identify a sample of Green Peas in dense environments. Emission line observations with the WIYN 0.9-meter telescope at Kitt Peak reveal that one cluster Green Pea is more highly ionized in the direction of the cluster center. Ram pressure stripping likely generates this ionization gradient. We explore the role of the environment in enhancing star formation rates and ionization, and we compare the nebular properties of Green Peas in high-density environments to those in low-density environments.

  13. DIFFERENTIATION AND FUNCTIONAL EXPRESSION OF POTENTIAL ANTIBODY-PRODUCING CELLS IN THE PRESENCE OF CHLORAMPHENICOL

    PubMed Central

    Schoenberg, Melvin D.; Moore, Richard D.; Weisberger, Austin S.

    1967-01-01

    Rabbits were immunized with diphtheria toxoid combined with complete Freund's adjuvant. Half of the animals were started on intramuscular injections of chloramphenicol 24 hr before the injection of the antigens. There was a general depression of protein synthesis in the immune system in the presence of chloramphenicol, but a greater effect on the synthesis of antibody than on the synthesis of proteins necessary for reproduction and maturation. In contrast to the finding of antibody in cells of the spleen and in the circulation of the control animals, those animals receiving chloramphenicol did not have measurable circulating antibody, and their spleens contained only a few cells with intracytoplasmic antibody late in the course of the experiment. Cytologically there was maturation of potential antibody-producing cells in the red pulp and nonfollicular white pulp of the spleen while the animals were receiving chloramphenicol. These cells developed more slowly, and were fewer and smaller than those of the control animals. They had numerous small, electron-opaque particles in their cytoplasm early in development. Ribosomes were synthesized, though fewer in number. The endoplasmic reticulum formed more slowly. PMID:10976231

  14. The present state of the art in expression, production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, Christopher L

    2016-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb's) have become one the most powerful therapeutic and diagnostic tools in modern medicine. Some estimates target the worldwide market of MAb's on the order of $125 billion in the next four years. Recent advances in molecular biology, immunology, and development of robust production platforms will drive the development of more MAb's suitable to treat an ever increasing number of disease states. This circumstance combined with the fact that many of the original antibody therapies from the 1980 s and 1990 s will soon be coming off patent will attract a great deal of investment in the development of larger industrial facilities to increase monoclonal antibody to meet increasing demand. In this review, the present state of the science that underlies the development of new antibodies therapies in Chinese hamster ovary cells combined with a description of the present challenges facing the industry in terms of the limitations of output and compliance with current good manufacturing practices and FDA regulations. Also addressed are future challenges to overcome production bottlenecks, description of critical quality control attributes particular to antibodies, and detailed treatment of scale-up considerations.

  15. Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Expression of Methamphetamine Antibody Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Hyperactivity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Wu, Kuo-Jen; Wu, Kuang-Lun; Wu, Kun-Lieh; Tsai, Ho-Min; Chen, Mao-Liang; Chen, Yi-Wei; Hsieh, Wei; Lin, Chun-Ming; Wang, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is one of the most frequently abused drugs worldwide. Recent studies have indicated that antibodies with high affinity for Meth reduce its pharmacological effects. The purpose of this study was to develop a technique for virus-based passive immunization against Meth effects. We generated a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype-8 vector (AAV-MethAb) carrying the gene for a Meth-specific monoclonal antibody (MethAb). Infection of 293 cells with AAV-MethAb resulted in the expression and secretion of antibodies which bind to Meth. The viral vector was then examined in adult ICR mice. Systemic administration of AAV-MethAb resulted in long-term expression of MethAb in the serum for up to 29 weeks. Serum collected from the animals receiving AAV-MethAb retained a high specificity for (+)-Meth. Animals were challenged with Meth five weeks after viral injection. Meth levels in the brain and serum were reduced while Meth-induced locomotor activity was significantly attenuated. In conclusion, AAV-MethAb administration effectively depletes Meth from brain and serum while reducing the behavioral response to Meth, and thus is a potential therapeutic approach for Meth abuse. PMID:28387350

  16. Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Expression of Methamphetamine Antibody Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Hyperactivity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Wu, Kuo-Jen; Wu, Kuang-Lun; Wu, Kun-Lieh; Tsai, Ho-Min; Chen, Mao-Liang; Chen, Yi-Wei; Hsieh, Wei; Lin, Chun-Ming; Wang, Yun

    2017-04-07

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is one of the most frequently abused drugs worldwide. Recent studies have indicated that antibodies with high affinity for Meth reduce its pharmacological effects. The purpose of this study was to develop a technique for virus-based passive immunization against Meth effects. We generated a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype-8 vector (AAV-MethAb) carrying the gene for a Meth-specific monoclonal antibody (MethAb). Infection of 293 cells with AAV-MethAb resulted in the expression and secretion of antibodies which bind to Meth. The viral vector was then examined in adult ICR mice. Systemic administration of AAV-MethAb resulted in long-term expression of MethAb in the serum for up to 29 weeks. Serum collected from the animals receiving AAV-MethAb retained a high specificity for (+)-Meth. Animals were challenged with Meth five weeks after viral injection. Meth levels in the brain and serum were reduced while Meth-induced locomotor activity was significantly attenuated. In conclusion, AAV-MethAb administration effectively depletes Meth from brain and serum while reducing the behavioral response to Meth, and thus is a potential therapeutic approach for Meth abuse.

  17. AAVrh.10-Mediated Expression of an Anti-Cocaine Antibody Mediates Persistent Passive Immunization That Suppresses Cocaine-Induced Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Jonathan B.; Hicks, Martin J.; De, Bishnu P.; Pagovich, Odelya; Frenk, Esther; Janda, Kim D.; Wee, Sunmee; Koob, George F.; Hackett, Neil R.; Kaminsky, Stephen M.; Worgall, Stefan; Tignor, Nicole; Mezey, Jason G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cocaine addiction is a major problem affecting all societal and economic classes for which there is no effective therapy. We hypothesized an effective anti-cocaine vaccine could be developed by using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vector as the delivery vehicle to persistently express an anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody in vivo, which would sequester cocaine in the blood, preventing access to cognate receptors in the brain. To accomplish this, we constructed AAVrh.10antiCoc.Mab, an AAVrh.10 gene transfer vector expressing the heavy and light chains of the high affinity anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody GNC92H2. Intravenous administration of AAVrh.10antiCoc.Mab to mice mediated high, persistent serum levels of high-affinity, cocaine-specific antibodies that sequestered intravenously administered cocaine in the blood. With repeated intravenous cocaine challenge, naive mice exhibited hyperactivity, while the AAVrh.10antiCoc.Mab-vaccinated mice were completely resistant to the cocaine. These observations demonstrate a novel strategy for cocaine addiction by requiring only a single administration of an AAV vector mediating persistent, systemic anti-cocaine passive immunity. PMID:22486244

  18. Aberrant expression of the embryonic transcription factor brachyury in human tumors detected with a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Duane H; Fernando, Romaine I; Schlom, Jeffrey; Palena, Claudia

    2015-03-10

    The embryonic transcription factor brachyury is overexpressed in a variety of human tumors, including lung, breast, colon and prostate carcinomas, chordomas and hemangioblastomas. In human carcinoma cells, overexpression of brachyury associates with the occurrence of the phenomenon of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), acquisition of metastatic propensity and resistance to a variety of anti-cancer therapeutics. Brachyury is preferentially expressed in human tumors vs. normal adult tissues, and high levels of this molecule associate with poor prognosis in patients with lung, colon and prostate carcinomas, and in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen. Brachyury is immunogenic in humans and vaccines against this novel oncotarget are currently undergoing clinical investigation. While our group and others have employed various anti-brachyury antibodies to interrogate the above findings, we report here on the development and thorough characterization of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody (MAb 54-1) that reacts with distinct high affinity and specificity with human brachyury. MAb 54-1 was successfully used in ELISA, western blot, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry assays to evaluate expression of brachyury in various human tumor cell lines and tissues. We propose the use of this antibody to assist in research studies of EMT and in prognostic studies for a range of human tumors.

  19. Decreased SMG7 expression associates with lupus-risk variants and elevated antinuclear antibody production.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yun; Zhao, Jian; Sakurai, Daisuke; Sestak, Andrea L; Osadchiy, Vadim; Langefeld, Carl D; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kelly, Jennifer A; James, Judith A; Petri, Michelle A; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Alarcón, Graciela S; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Criswell, Lindsey A; Freedman, Barry I; Kamen, Diane L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Jacob, Chaim O; Merrill, Joan T; Gaffney, Patrick M; Sivils, Kathy Moser; Niewold, Timothy B; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Reveille, John D; Scofield, R Hal; Stevens, Anne M; Boackle, Susan A; Vilá, Luis M; Sohn, I I Woong; Lee, Seung; Chang, Deh-Ming; Song, Yeong Wook; Vyse, Timothy J; Harley, John B; Brown, Elizabeth E; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P; Cantor, Rita M; Hahn, Bevra H; Grossman, Jennifer M; Tsao, Betty P

    2016-11-01

    Following up the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identification of NMNAT2 at rs2022013, we fine-mapped its 150 kb flanking regions containing NMNAT2 and SMG7 in a 15 292 case-control multi-ancestry population and tested functions of identified variants. We performed genotyping using custom array, imputation by IMPUTE 2.1.2 and allele specific functions using quantitative real-time PCR and luciferase reporter transfections. SLE peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were cultured with small interfering RNAs to measure antinuclear antibody (ANA) and cyto/chemokine levels in supernatants using ELISA. We confirmed association at NMNAT2 in European American (EA) and Amerindian/Hispanic ancestries, and identified independent signal at SMG7 tagged by rs2702178 in EA only (p=2.4×10(-8), OR=1.23 (95% CI 1.14 to 1.32)). In complete linkage disequilibrium with rs2702178, rs2275675 in the promoter region robustly associated with SMG7 mRNA levels in multiple expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) datasets. Its risk allele was dose-dependently associated with decreased SMG7 mRNA levels in PBMCs of 86 patients with SLE and 119 controls (p=1.1×10(-3) and 6.8×10(-8), respectively) and conferred reduced transcription activity in transfected HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney cell line) and Raji cells (p=0.0035 and 0.0037, respectively). As a critical component in the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway, SMG7 could regulate autoantigens including ribonucleoprotein (RNP) and Smith (Sm). We showed SMG7 mRNA levels in PBMCs correlated inversely with ANA titres of patients with SLE (r=-0.31, p=0.01), and SMG7 knockdown increased levels of ANA IgG and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 19 in SLE PBMCs (p=2.0×10(-5) and 2.0×10(-4), respectively). We confirmed NMNAT2 and identified independent SMG7 association with SLE. The inverse relationship between levels of the risk allele-associated SMG7 mRNAs and ANA suggested the novel contribution

  20. Arthropod diversity in peas with normal or reduced waxy bloom

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Gary C.; Rutledge, Claire E.; Biggam, Russell C.; Eigenbrode, Sanford D.

    2004-01-01

    Crop traits can alter economically important interactions between plants, pests, and biological control agents. For example, a reduced waxy bloom on the surface of pea plants alters interactions between pea aphids and their natural enemies. In this study, we assess whether the effect of wax reduction extends beyond the 2 or 3 arthropod species closely associated with the plants and into the structure of the broader arthropod community of over 200 taxa at our site. We sampled arthropods on lines of peas with normal and reduced wax in Latah Co., Idaho using pitfall traps within randomly assigned pairs of 5 × 5 meter plots. During the 1998 and 1999 growing seasons, we collected 12,113 individual arthropods from 221 unambiguously identified morphospecies. The number of individuals collected from each morphospecies responded idiosyncratically to the reduced wax peas. To test whether arthropod community structure differed between the collections from plots having peas with normal or reduced wax, we performed a randomization test. The collection from peas with reduced wax had higher species evenness and thus higher community diversity despite having lower species richness. Our results demonstrate the potential of a single plant trait, epicuticular wax, to affect a community of arthropods. Two pests of peas had opposite responses to peas with reduced wax. The number of pea aphids collected was greater from peas with normal wax peas than those with reduced wax. In contrast, the number of pea leaf weevils collected was greater from peas with reduced wax. PMID:15861234

  1. Pea DNA Topoisomerase I Is Phosphorylated and Stimulated by Casein Kinase 2 and Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Tuteja, Narendra; Reddy, Malireddy Kodandarami; Mudgil, Yashwanti; Yadav, Badam Singh; Chandok, Meena Rani; Sopory, Sudhir Kumar

    2003-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase I catalyzes the relaxation of superhelical DNA tension and is vital for DNA metabolism; therefore, it is essential for growth and development of plants. Here, we have studied the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of topoisomerase I from pea (Pisum sativum). The purified enzyme did not show autophosphorylation but was phosphorylated in an Mg2+-dependent manner by endogenous protein kinases present in pea nuclear extracts. This phosphorylation was abolished with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase and lambda phosphatase. It was also phosphorylated by exogenous casein kinase 2 (CK2), protein kinase C (PKC; from animal sources), and an endogenous pea protein, which was purified using a novel phorbol myristate acetate affinity chromatography method. All of these phosphorylations were inhibited by heparin (inhibitor of CK2) and calphostin (inhibitor of PKC), suggesting that pea topoisomerase I is a bona fide substrate for these kinases. Spermine and spermidine had no effect on the CK2-mediated phosphorylation, suggesting that it is polyamine independent. Phospho-amino acid analysis showed that only serine residues were phosphorylated, which was further confirmed using antiphosphoserine antibody. The topoisomerase I activity increased after phosphorylation with exogenous CK2 and PKC. This study shows that these kinases may contribute to the physiological regulation of DNA topoisomerase I activity and overall DNA metabolism in plants. PMID:12913165

  2. Development of PEA-15 using a potent non-viral vector for therapeutic application in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xinhua; Tang, Hailin; Pengliu; Kong, Yanan; Wu, Minqing; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Yang, Lu; Gao, Jie; Wei, Weidong; Lee, Jangsoon; Bartholomeusz, Chandra; Ueno, Naoto T; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-01-28

    Advanced breast cancer requires systemic treatment, therefore developing an efficient and safe strategy is urgently needed. To ensure the success of target therapy, we have developed a breast cancer-specific construct (T-VISA) composed of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT; T) promoter and a versatile transgene amplification vector VISA (VP16-GAL4-WPRE integrated systemic amplifier) to target PEA-15 (phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes) in advanced breast tumors. PEA-15 contains a death effector domain that sequesters extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the cytoplasm, thereby inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. T-VISA-PEA-15 was found to be highly specific, selectively express PEA-15 in breast cancer cells, and induce cancer-cell killing in vitro and in vivo without affecting normal cells. Moreover, intravenous treatment with T-VISA-PEA-15 coupled with liposome nanoparticles attenuated tumor growth and prolonged survival in mice bearing advanced breast tumors. Importantly, there was virtually no severe toxicity when PEA-15 is expressed by our T-VISA system compared with cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. Thus, our findings demonstrate an effective cancer-targeted therapy that is worthy of development in clinical trials eradicating advanced breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetically engineered red cells expressing single domain camelid antibodies confer long-term protection against botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nai-Jia; Pishesha, Novalia; Mukherjee, Jean; Zhang, Sicai; Deshycka, Rhogerry; Sudaryo, Valentino; Dong, Min; Shoemaker, Charles B; Lodish, Harvey F

    2017-09-04

    A short half-life in the circulation limits the application of therapeutics such as single-domain antibodies (VHHs). We utilize red blood cells to prolong the circulatory half-life of VHHs. Here we present VHHs against botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) on the surface of red blood cells by expressing chimeric proteins of VHHs with Glycophorin A or Kell. Mice whose red blood cells carry the chimeric proteins exhibit resistance to 10,000 times the lethal dose (LD50) of BoNT/A, and transfusion of these red blood cells into naive mice affords protection for up to 28 days. We further utilize an improved CD34+ culture system to engineer human red blood cells that express these chimeric proteins. Mice transfused with these red blood cells are resistant to highly lethal doses of BoNT/A. We demonstrate that engineered red blood cells expressing VHHs can provide prolonged prophylactic protection against bacterial toxins without inducing inhibitory immune responses and illustrates the potentially broad translatability of our strategy for therapeutic applications.The therapeutic use of single-chain antibodies (VHHs) is limited by their short half-life in the circulation. Here the authors engineer mouse and human red blood cells to express VHHs against botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) on their surface and show that an infusion of these cells into mice confers long lasting protection against a high dose of BoNT/A.

  4. Administration of palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) protects the neurovascular unit and reduces secondary injury after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Akbar; Crupi, Rosalia; Impellizzeri, Daniela; Campolo, Michela; Marino, Angela; Esposito, Emanuela; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2012-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of preventable death and morbidity in young adults. This complex condition is characterized by significant blood brain barrier leakage that stems from cerebral ischemia, inflammation, and redox imbalances in the traumatic penumbra of the injured brain. Recovery of function after TBI is partly through neuronal plasticity. In order to test whether treatments that enhance plasticity might improve functional recovery, a controlled cortical impact (CCI) in adult mice, as a model of TBI, in which a controlled cortical impactor produced full thickness lesions of the forelimb region of the sensorimotor cortex, was performed. Once trauma has occurred, combating these exacerbations is the keystone of an effective TBI therapy. The endogenous fatty acid palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is one of the members of N-acyl-ethanolamines family that maintain not only redox balance but also inhibit the mechanisms of secondary injury. Therefore, we tested whether PEA shows efficacy in a mice model of experimental TBI. PEA treatment is able to reduced edema and brain infractions as evidenced by decreased 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining across brain sections. PEA-mediated improvements in tissues histology shown by reduction of lesion size and improvement in apoptosis level further support the efficacy of PEA therapy. The PEA treatment blocked infiltration of astrocytes and restored CCI-mediated reduced expression of PAR, nitrotyrosine, iNOS, chymase, tryptase, CD11b and GFAP. PEA inhibited the TBI-mediated decrease in the expression of pJNK and NF-κB. PEA-treated injured animals improved neurobehavioral functions as evaluated by behavioral tests.

  5. Expression of CR2/EBV receptors on human thymocytes detected by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tsoukas, C D; Lambris, J D

    1988-08-01

    The biologic effects of the third component of complement, C3, are mediated via receptors which specifically bind the enzymatic degradation products resulting from the cleavage of C3. One of the products, C3d, has been associated with binding to the second complement receptor CR2 (CD21). This receptor, which is identical to the receptor for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), has been primarily found on cells of the B lineage, but not on mature T cells or other cells of erythroid or myeloid lineages. In the present investigation, we report the presence of CR2 on human thymocytes. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis employing monoclonal anti-CR2 antibodies revealed a range of thymocyte reactivity from 15% to 63% in thirteen experiments using cells of different donors. Reactivity was always greater with the monoclonal anti-CR2 (CD21) antibody HB-5 than with two other antibodies which recognize distinct epitopes on the CR2 molecule. Two-color immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the brightest of the HB-5-stained thymocytes also reacted with the monoclonal anti-CD1 antibody T6 (immature thymocyte marker) while some of the duller HB-5-staining cells reacted with the monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody Leu-4 (mature thymocyte marker). Immunoprecipitation of CR2 on thymocytes with antibody HB-5 and polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis revealed a protein of 145 kDa molecular mass which is consistent with the size of CR2 found on B lymphocytes. These findings raise several questions regarding the biologic role of CR2-EBV receptor on cells of the T lineage.

  6. An integrated approach to identify normal tissue expression of targets for antibody-drug conjugates: case study of TENB2

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, C Andrew; Mundo, Eduardo E; Firestein, Ron; Zhang, Crystal; Mao, Weiguang; Gill, Herman; Young, Cynthia; Ljumanovic, Nina; Stainton, Shannon; Ulufatu, Sheila; Fourie, Aimee; Kozak, Katherine R; Fuji, Reina; Polakis, Paul; Khawli, Leslie A; Lin, Kedan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The success of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) depends on the therapeutic window rendered by the differential expression between normal and pathological tissues. The ability to identify and visualize target expression in normal tissues could reveal causes for target-mediated clearance observed in pharmacokinetic characterization. TENB2 is a prostate cancer target associated with the progression of poorly differentiated and androgen-independent tumour types, and ADCs specific for TENB2 are candidate therapeutics. The objective of this study was to locate antigen expression of TENB2 in normal tissues, thereby elucidating the underlying causes of target-mediated clearance. Experimental Approach A series of pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and mass balance studies were conducted in mice using a radiolabelled anti-TENB2 ADC. These data were complemented by non-invasive single photon emission computed tomography – X-ray computed tomography imaging and immunohistochemistry. Key Results The intestines were identified as a saturable and specific antigen sink that contributes, at least in part, to the rapid target-mediated clearance of the anti-TENB2 antibody and its drug conjugate in rodents. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrated the selective disposition of the ADC in a tumoural environment in vivo using the LuCaP 77 transplant mouse model. High tumour uptake was observed despite the presence of the antigen sink, and antigen specificity was confirmed by antigen blockade. Conclusions and Implications Our findings provide the anatomical location and biological interpretation of target-mediated clearance of anti-TENB2 antibodies and corresponding drug conjugates. Further investigations may be beneficial in addressing the relative contributions to ADC disposition from antigen expression in both normal and pathological tissues. PMID:22889168

  7. An integrated approach to identify normal tissue expression of targets for antibody-drug conjugates: case study of TENB2.

    PubMed

    Boswell, C Andrew; Mundo, Eduardo E; Firestein, Ron; Zhang, Crystal; Mao, Weiguang; Gill, Herman; Young, Cynthia; Ljumanovic, Nina; Stainton, Shannon; Ulufatu, Sheila; Fourie, Aimee; Kozak, Katherine R; Fuji, Reina; Polakis, Paul; Khawli, Leslie A; Lin, Kedan

    2013-01-01

    The success of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) depends on the therapeutic window rendered by the differential expression between normal and pathological tissues. The ability to identify and visualize target expression in normal tissues could reveal causes for target-mediated clearance observed in pharmacokinetic characterization. TENB2 is a prostate cancer target associated with the progression of poorly differentiated and androgen-independent tumour types, and ADCs specific for TENB2 are candidate therapeutics. The objective of this study was to locate antigen expression of TENB2 in normal tissues, thereby elucidating the underlying causes of target-mediated clearance. A series of pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and mass balance studies were conducted in mice using a radiolabelled anti-TENB2 ADC. These data were complemented by non-invasive single photon emission computed tomography - X-ray computed tomography imaging and immunohistochemistry. The intestines were identified as a saturable and specific antigen sink that contributes, at least in part, to the rapid target-mediated clearance of the anti-TENB2 antibody and its drug conjugate in rodents. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrated the selective disposition of the ADC in a tumoural environment in vivo using the LuCaP 77 transplant mouse model. High tumour uptake was observed despite the presence of the antigen sink, and antigen specificity was confirmed by antigen blockade. Our findings provide the anatomical location and biological interpretation of target-mediated clearance of anti-TENB2 antibodies and corresponding drug conjugates. Further investigations may be beneficial in addressing the relative contributions to ADC disposition from antigen expression in both normal and pathological tissues. © 2012 Genentech, Inc.. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Chaperone-Assisted Soluble Expression of a Humanized Anti-EGFR ScFv Antibody in E. Coli

    PubMed Central

    Veisi, Kamal; Farajnia, Safar; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Khoram Khorshid, Hamid Reza; Samadi, Nasser; Ahdi Khosroshahi, Shiva; Zarei Jaliani, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Formation of inclusion bodies is a considerable obstacle threatening the advantages of E. coli expression system to serve as the most common and easiest system in recombinant protein production. To solve this problem, several strategies have been proposed among which application of molecular chaperones is of remarkable consideration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of molecular chaperones on soluble expression of aggregation-prone humanized single chain antibody. Methods: To increase the solubility of a humanized single chain antibody (hscFv), different chaperone plasmids including PG-tf2 (GroES- GroEL- tig), ptf16 (tig) and pGro7 (GroES- GroEL) were co-expressed in BL21 cells containing pET-22b- hscFv construct. The solubility of recombinant hscFv was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. After purification of soluble hscFv by Ni-NTA column, the biological activity and cytotoxicity of the recombinant protein were tested by ELISA and MTT assay, respectively. Results: SDS-PAGE analysis of the hscFv revealed that chaperone utility remarkably increased (up to 50%) the solubility of the protein. ELISA test and MTT assay analyses also confirmed the biological activity of the gained hscFv in reaction with A431 cells (OD value: 2.6) and inhibition of their proliferation, respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that co-expression of chaperones with hscFv leads to remarkable increase in the solubility of the recombinant hscFv, which could be of great consideration for large scale production of recombinant single chain antibodies. PMID:26793607

  9. Expression of deleted, atoxic atypical recombinant beta2 toxin in a baculovirus system and production of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Serroni, Anna; Magistrali, Chiara Francesca; Pezzotti, Giovanni; Bano, Luca; Pellegrini, Martina; Severi, Giulio; Di Pancrazio, Chiara; Luciani, Mirella; Tittarelli, Manuela; Tofani, Silvia; De Giuseppe, Antonio

    2017-05-25

    Clostridium perfringens is an important animal and human pathogen that can produce more than 16 different major and minor toxins. The beta-2 minor toxin (CPB2), comprising atypical and consensus variants, appears to be involved in both human and animal enterotoxaemia syndrome. The exact role of CPB2 in pathogenesis is poorly investigated, and its mechanism of action at the molecular level is still unknown because of the lack of specific reagents such as monoclonal antibodies against the CPB2 protein and/or the availability of a highly purified antigen. Previous studies have reported that purified wild-type or recombinant CPB2 toxin, expressed in a heterologous system, presented cytotoxic effects on human intestinal cell lines. Undoubtedly, for this reason, to date, these purified proteins have not yet been used for the production of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Recently, monoclonal antibodies against CPB2 were generated using peptides designed on predicted antigenic epitopes of this toxin. In this paper we report, for the first time, the expression in a baculovirus system of a deleted recombinant C-terminal 6xHis-tagged atypical CPB2 toxin (rCPB2Δ1-25-His6) lacking the 25 amino acids (aa) of the N-terminal putative signal sequence. A high level of purified recombinant rCPB2Δ1-25-His6 was obtained after purification by Ni(2+) affinity chromatography. The purified product showed no in vitro and in vivo toxicity. Polyclonal antibodies and twenty hybridoma-secreting Mabs were generated using purified rCPB2Δ1-25-His6. Finally, the reactivity and specificity of the new antibodies were tested against both recombinant and wild-type CPB2 toxins. The high-throughput of purified atoxic recombinant CPB2 produced in insect cells, allowed to obtain monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. The availability of these molecules could contribute to develop immunoenzymatic methods and/or to perform studies about the biological activity of CPB2 toxin.

  10. The Pea Gene LH Encodes ent-Kaurene Oxidase1

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Sandra E.; Smith, Jennifer J.; Helliwell, Chris A.; Poole, Andrew T.; Reid, James B.

    2004-01-01

    The pea (Pisum sativum) homolog, PsKO1, of the Arabidopsis GA3 gene was isolated. It codes for a cytochrome P450 from the CYP701A subfamily and has ent-kaurene oxidase (KO) activity, catalyzing the three step oxidation of ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid in the gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic pathway when expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). PsKO1 is encoded by the LH gene because in three independent mutant alleles, lh-1, lh-2, and lh-3, PsKO1 has altered sequence, and the lh-1 allele, when expressed in yeast, failed to metabolize ent-kaurene. The lh mutants of pea are GA deficient and have reduced internode elongation and root growth. One mutant (lh-2) also causes a large increase in seed abortion. PsKO1 (LH) is expressed in all tissues examined, including stems, roots, and seeds, and appears to be a single-copy gene. Differences in sensitivity to the GA synthesis inhibitor, paclobutrazol, between the mutants appear to result from the distinct nature of the genetic lesions. These differences may also explain the tissue-specific differences between the mutants. PMID:14988475

  11. The pea gene LH encodes ent-kaurene oxidase.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sandra E; Smith, Jennifer J; Helliwell, Chris A; Poole, Andrew T; Reid, James B

    2004-03-01

    The pea (Pisum sativum) homolog, PsKO1, of the Arabidopsis GA3 gene was isolated. It codes for a cytochrome P450 from the CYP701A subfamily and has ent-kaurene oxidase (KO) activity, catalyzing the three step oxidation of ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid in the gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic pathway when expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). PsKO1 is encoded by the LH gene because in three independent mutant alleles, lh-1, lh-2, and lh-3, PsKO1 has altered sequence, and the lh-1 allele, when expressed in yeast, failed to metabolize ent-kaurene. The lh mutants of pea are GA deficient and have reduced internode elongation and root growth. One mutant (lh-2) also causes a large increase in seed abortion. PsKO1 (LH) is expressed in all tissues examined, including stems, roots, and seeds, and appears to be a single-copy gene. Differences in sensitivity to the GA synthesis inhibitor, paclobutrazol, between the mutants appear to result from the distinct nature of the genetic lesions. These differences may also explain the tissue-specific differences between the mutants.

  12. Characterization of a novel bispecific antibody that mediates Fcgamma receptor type I-dependent killing of tumor-associated glycoprotein-72-expressing tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Russoniello, C; Somasundaram, C; Schlom, J; Deo, Y M; Keler, T

    1998-09-01

    A bispecific antibody was made by chemical conjugation of Fab' fragments from humanized antibodies specific for tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) and high-affinity immunoglobulin receptor, FcgammaA receptor type I (FcgammaRI). The purified anti-TAG-72 x anti-FcgammaRI (HCC49xH22) bispecific antibody had an approximate Mr of 111,000, consistent with a F(ab')2, and bound specifically to KLEB and LS174T tumor cell lines, which express the TAG-72 tumor antigen. Furthermore, HCC49x H22 was shown to simultaneously bind to KLEB cells and a soluble FcgammaRI fusion protein, demonstrating the bifunctional nature of the molecule. Using IFN-gamma-treated monocytes as effector cells, concentrations of the bispecific antibody in the range of 1-10,000 ng/ml mediated specific lysis of TAG-72-positive tumor cells. In contrast, the bispecific antibody did not promote antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of a cell line that was negative for TAG-72 antigen. Importantly, the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activity of the bispecific antibody was significantly greater than that of the monoclonal antibody HCC49. These in vitro data indicate that the humanized bispecific antibody HCC49xH22 has the appropriate specificity and functional activity for further evaluation as potential immunotherapy for TAG-72-positive malignancies.

  13. A stable cytosolic expression of VH antibody fragment directed against PVY NIa protein in transgenic potato plant confers partial protection against the virus.

    PubMed

    Bouaziz, Donia; Ayadi, Malika; Bidani, Amira; Rouis, Souad; Nouri-Ellouz, Oumèma; Jellouli, Raïda; Drira, Noureddine; Gargouri-Bouzid, Radhia

    2009-04-01

    The expression of recombinant antibodies in transgenic plants has been proved to be an efficient approach for large-scale production. However, the stability of these molecules and their accumulation level depend on their molecular properties and cellular targeting. The expression of single-domain antibody fragment (VH) can be advantageous since it offers small length, high expression, solubility and stability. It can therefore be preferred to other antibody derivatives avoiding the expression difficulties related to immunoglobulin domain folding via the formation of disulfide bridge. This report describes the production of transgenic potato plants expressing a VH antibody directed against the NIa protease of potato virus Y. The antibody was driven by the constitutive CaMV 35S RNA promoter. The expression cassette was transferred into potato plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation. All transgenic lines showed detectable levels of VH protein confirming the efficient translation and stability of this protein. The cellular localisation of the VH antibody was investigated. Transgenic and control plants were transferred in the greenhouse and mechanically inoculated by PVY(o) suspension. Some of the transgenic lines showed delayed symptoms at the first period post inoculation and then displayed a recovery phenomenon while the virions were still detected in the leaves.

  14. [Preparation of anti-B7-H4 monoclonal antibody to investigate B7-H4 expression in pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Hong, Bo; Qian, Yun; Yao, Hang-Ping

    2013-09-01

    To prepare a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against extracellular domain of B7-H4 and to investigate the expression of B7-H4 in pancreatic cancer tissue with the prepared mAb. Balb/c mice were immunized with 3T3-B7-H4 cells and the splenic cells of the immunized mice were fused with Sp2/0 myeloma cells by conventional hybridoma techniques. An indirect ELISA method using 3T3-B7-H4 lysate as antigen was established to screen antibody-producing hybridoma cell lines. Western blott, immunoprecipitation (IP), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were applied to characterize the mAb. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect the expression of B7-H4 in human pancreatic cancer tissue. The correlation of B3-H4 expressions and pathological features of pancreatic cancer was analyzed. A hybridoma cell line secreting mAb against B7-H4 was obtained. The subclass of this mAb was IgM, and the light chain was Kappa. Western blot and IP showed that the mAb specifically recognized B7-H4. IHC staining revealed that the mAb stained in a predominantly diffuse plasmalemmal or cytoplasmic pattern when applied to certain tumor tissues. The B7-H4 was diffusely expressed in the cytoplasma and/or membrane of pancreatic cancer tissue, which was much higher than that expressed in normal pancreatic tissue (4.00 ± 1.44 compared with 1.12 ± 0.78, P ± 0.01). The expression of B7-H4 was higher in pancreatic cancer tissues with higher pathological grade or with lymph node metastasis as compared with that in pancreatic cancer tissues with lower grade or with no lymph mode metastasis (6.10 ± 0.72 compared with 3.55 ± 1.12,P<0.01: 6.14 ± 0.66 compared with 3.70 ± 1.25,P<0.01). The expression level of B7-H4 was not related to patients'age and gender. Monoclonal antibody against B7-H4 with high activity and specificity has been prepared successfully. The expression of B7-H4 in pancreatic cancer tissue is up-regulated,which is closely related to the tumor grade and lymph node metastasis in pancreatic

  15. Immunofluorescence detection of pea protein in meat products.

    PubMed

    Petrášová, Michaela; Pospiech, Matej; Tremlová, Bohuslava; Javůrková, Zdeňka

    2016-08-01

    In this study we developed an immunofluorescence method to detect pea protein in meat products. Pea protein has a high nutritional value but in sensitive individuals it may be responsible for causing allergic reactions. We produced model meat products with various additions of pea protein and flour; the detection limit (LOD) of the method for pea flour was 0.5% addition, and for pea protein it was 0.001% addition. The repeatabilities and reproducibilities for samples both positive and negative for pea protein were all 100%. In a blind test with model products and commercial samples, there was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) between the declared concentrations of pea protein and flour and the immunofluorescence method results. Sensitivity was 1.06 and specificity was 1.00. These results show that the immunofluorescence method is suitable for the detection of pea protein in meat products.

  16. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ISLAND. REMAINS OF SEA WALL VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND AND RIGHT OF IMAGE - Fort Delaware, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  17. 1. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ISLAND. REMAINS OF SEA WALL VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND AND RIGHT OF IMAGE. - Fort Delaware, Sea Wall, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  18. PED/PEA-15 interacts with the 67 kD laminin receptor and regulates cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Formisano, Pietro; Ragno, Pia; Pesapane, Ada; Alfano, Daniela; Alberobello, Anna Teresa; Rea, Vincenza Elena Anna; Giusto, Raffaella; Rossi, Francesca W; Beguinot, Francesco; Rossi, Guido; Montuori, Nunzia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Phosphoprotein enriched in diabetes/phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes-15 kD (PED/PEA-15) is an anti-apoptotic protein whose expression is increased in several human cancers. In addition to apoptosis, PED/PEA-15 is involved in the regulation of other major cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and glucose metabolism. To further understand the functions of this protein, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening using PED/PEA-15 as a bait and identified the 67 kD high-affinity laminin receptor (67LR) as an interacting partner. 67 kD laminin receptor is a non-integrin cell-surface receptor for the extracellular matrix (ECM), derived from the dimerization of a 37 kD cytosolic precursor (37LRP). The 67LR is highly expressed in human cancers and widely recognized as a molecular marker of metastatic aggressiveness. The molecular interaction of PED/PEA-15 with 67LR was confirmed by pull-down experiments with recombinant His-tagged 37LRP on lysates of PED/PEA-15 transfected HEK-293 cells. Further, overexpressed or endogenous PED/PEA-15 was co-immunoprecipitated with 67LR in PED/PEA-15-transfected HEK-293 cells and in U-373 glioblastoma cells, respectively. PED/PEA-15 overexpression significantly increased 67LR-mediated HEK-293 cell adhesion and migration to laminin that, in turn, determined PED/PEA-15 phosphorylation both in Ser-104 and Ser-116, thus enabling cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. PED/PEA-15 ability to induce cell responses to ECM-derived signals through interaction with 67LR may be of crucial importance for tumour cell survival in a poor microenvironment, thus favouring the metastatic spread and colonization. PMID:21895963

  19. Transfected Cell Microarrays for the Expression of Membrane-Displayed Single-Chain Antibodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Appli- cations of single-chain variable fragment antibodies in therapeutics and diagnostics. Biotechnology Adv 27, 502–520. 6. Denzin , L. K...4-20. J Biol Chem 266, 14095–14103. Transfected Cell Microarrays 137 7. Denzin , L. K., Gulliver, G. A., Voss, E. W., Jr. (1993) Mutational analysis of

  20. Distinct expression profiles of Notch-1 protein in human solid tumors: Implications for development of targeted therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Burns, Janine A; Cheney, Carol A; Zhang, Ningyan; Vitelli, Salvatore; Wang, Fubao; Bett, Andrew; Chastain, Michael; Audoly, Laurent P; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Biological therapies, such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target tumor-associated antigens have been considered an effective therapeutic approach in oncology. In considering Notch-1 receptor as a potential target, we performed immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays to determine 1) whether the receptor is overexpressed in tumor cells as compared to their corresponding normal tissues and 2) the clinical significance of its expression levels in human breast, colorectal, lung and prostate cancers. We found that the expression of Notch-1 protein was overexpressed in primary colorectal adenocarcinoma and nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), but not in primary ductal breast carcinoma or prostate adenocarcinoma. Further analysis revealed that higher levels of Notch-1 protein expression were significantly associated with poorer differentiation of breast and prostate tumors. Strikingly, for NSCLC, the expression levels of Notch-1 protein were found to be inversely correlated with tumor differentiation and progression. For colorectal tumors, however, no correlation of Notch-1 protein expression was found with any tumor clinicopathological parameters, in spite of its overexpression in tumor cells. Our data demonstrated the complexity of Notch-1 protein expression in human solid tumors and further supported the notion that the roles of Notch-1 expression in tumorigenesis are highly context-dependent. The findings could provide the basis for development of distinct therapeutic strategies of Notch-1 mAbs for its applications in the treatment of suitable types of human cancers. PMID:20631820

  1. Adenoviral Gene Transfer of PLD1-D4 Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Mice by Disrupting Phospholipase D1 Interaction with PED/PEA-15

    PubMed Central

    Fiory, Francesca; Nigro, Cecilia; Ulianich, Luca; Castanò, Ilenia; D’Esposito, Vittoria; Terracciano, Daniela; Pastore, Lucio; Formisano, Pietro; Beguinot, Francesco; Miele, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Over-expression of phosphoprotein enriched in diabetes/phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes (PED/PEA-15) causes insulin resistance by interacting with the D4 domain of phospholipase D1 (PLD1). Indeed, the disruption of this association restores insulin sensitivity in cultured cells over-expressing PED/PEA-15. Whether the displacement of PLD1 from PED/PEA-15 improves insulin sensitivity in vivo has not been explored yet. In this work we show that treatment with a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the human D4 cDNA (Ad-D4) restores normal glucose homeostasis in transgenic mice overexpressing PED/PEA-15 (Tg ped/pea-15) by improving both insulin sensitivity and secretion. In skeletal muscle of these mice, D4 over-expression inhibited PED/PEA-15-PLD1 interaction, decreased Protein Kinase C alpha activation and restored insulin induced Protein Kinase C zeta activation, leading to amelioration of insulin-dependent glucose uptake. Interestingly, Ad-D4 administration improved insulin sensitivity also in high-fat diet treated obese C57Bl/6 mice. We conclude that PED/PEA-15-PLD1 interaction may represent a novel target for interventions aiming at improving glucose tolerance. PMID:23585839

  2. Pea weevil damage and chemical characteristics of pea cultivars determining their resistance to Bruchus pisorum L.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, I

    2016-04-01

    Bruchus pisorum (L.) is one of the most intractable pest problems of cultivated pea in Europe. Development of resistant cultivars is very important to environmental protection and would solve this problem to a great extent. Therefore, the resistance of five spring pea cultivars was studied to B. pisorum: Glyans, Modus; Kamerton and Svit and Pleven 4 based on the weevil damage and chemical composition of seeds. The seeds were classified as three types: healthy seeds (type one), damaged seeds with parasitoid emergence holes (type two) and damaged seeds with bruchid emergence holes (type three). From visibly damaged pea seeds by pea weevil B. pisorum was isolated the parasitoid Triaspis thoracica Curtis (Hymenoptera, Braconidae). Modus, followed by Glyans was outlined as resistant cultivars against the pea weevil. They had the lowest total damaged seed degree, loss in weight of damaged seeds (type two and type three) and values of susceptibility coefficients. A strong negative relationship (r = -0.838) between the weight of type one seeds and the proportion of type three seeds was found. Cultivars with lower protein and phosphorus (P) content had a lower level of damage. The crude protein, crude fiber and P content in damaged seeds significantly or no significantly were increased as compared with the healthy seeds due to weevil damage. The P content had the highest significant influence on pea weevil infestation. Use of chemical markers for resistance to the creation of new pea cultivars can be effective method for defense and control against B. pisorum.

  3. Recombinant expression of a novel human transcriptional repressor HMBOX1 and preparation of anti-HMBOX1 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jun; Wu, Longyan; Zhang, Cai; Zheng, Xiaodong; Tian, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian

    2009-08-01

    HMBOX1 was a novel transcription factor possibly involving in function of pancreas and cytotoxicity of NK cells. For function determination, recombinant human HMBOX1 protein was obtained and purified, and the monoclonal antibodies against HMBOX1 were prepared. The full-length cDNA fragment encoding HMBOX1 was amplified from NK-92 cells and inserted into prokaryotic expression vector pET22b. The pET22b-HMBOX1-6his vector was then transformed into E. coli Rosetta (DE3) and induced by 1 mM IPTG for 4 h at 37 degrees Celsius. The fusion HMBOX1 protein was mainly expressed in inclusion bodies, which was purified and refolded using Ni2+-affinity chromatography. With the purified fusion HMBOX1 protein as antigen, monoclonal antibodies against HMBOX1 were generated, providing a potentially useful tool for further study in HMBOX1 functions. Using these anti-HMBOX1 mAbs, we identified that HMBOX1 is located in both cytoplasm and nucleus and could be detected in 10 human normal tissues, including cerebrum, pancreas, kidney and liver tissues. Moreover, the expression in hepatic carcinoma was significantly lower than that in adjacent tissues.

  4. One-step expression and purification of single-chain variable antibody fragment using an improved hexahistidine tag phagemid vector.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Chan, Yin-Wah; Lee, Susanna Sau-Tuen; Cheung, Wing-Tai

    2009-12-01

    Millions of candidate clones are commonly obtained following rounds of phage-displayed antibody library panning, and expression of those selected single-chain variable fragment (scFv) is required for secondary functional screening to identify positive clones. Large scale functional screening is often hampered by the time-consuming and labor-intensive subcloning of those candidate scFv clones into a bacterial expression vector carrying an affinity tag for scFv purification and detection. To overcome the limitations and to develop a multiplex approach, an improved hexahistidine tag phagemid vector was constructed for one-step scFv expression and purification. By using hexahistidine as an affinity tag, soluble scFvs can be rapidly and cost-effectively captured from Escherichia coli periplasmic extracts. For proof-of-concept, feasibility of the improved phagemid vector was examined against two scFvs, L17E4d targeting a cell surface antigen and L18Hh5 recognizing a monoclonal antibody (mAb). Using 1 ml of Ni-NTA agarose, 0.2-0.5 mg of soluble scFv was obtained from 1 L of bacteria culture, and the purified scFvs bound specifically to their target antigens with high affinity. Moreover, using two randomly selected hapten-specific scFv phage clones, it was demonstrated that the display of scFvs on phage surface was not affected by the hexahistidine affinity tag. These results suggest the improved phagemid vector allows the shuttle of phage-displayed antibody library panning and functional scFv production. Importantly, the improved phagemid vector can be easily adapted for multiplex screening.

  5. Potential alternative hosts for a powdery mildew on pea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Powdery mildew of pea (Pisum sativum) is an important disease in the field and in the greenhouse. The most widely documented powdery mildew on pea is Erysiphe pisi, but E. trifolii and E. baeumleri have also been reported. From greenhouse-grown peas, we obtained powdery mildew samples with rDNA ITS ...

  6. Pea Disease Diagnostic Series- Rhizoctonia seed, seedling and root rot

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pea disease diagnostic cards that growers can carry with them into the field that are water resistant and durable which can be used to identify the signs and symptoms of major pea pathogens were developed. Color photographs of major fungal, bacterial, and viral pathogens on peas and a brief descript...

  7. The Influence of Lead on Generation of Signalling Molecules and Accumulation of Flavonoids in Pea Seedlings in Response to Pea Aphid Infestation.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Agnieszka; Drzewiecka, Kinga; Kęsy, Jacek; Marczak, Łukasz; Narożna, Dorota; Grobela, Marcin; Motała, Rafał; Bocianowski, Jan; Morkunas, Iwona

    2017-08-24

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an abiotic factor, i.e., lead at various concentrations (low causing a hormesis effect and causing high toxicity effects), on the generation of signalling molecules in pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Cysterski) seedlings and then during infestation by the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris). The second objective was to verify whether the presence of lead in pea seedling organs and induction of signalling pathways dependent on the concentration of this metal trigger defense responses to A. pisum. Therefore, the profile of flavonoids and expression levels of genes encoding enzymes of the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway (phenylalanine ammonialyase and chalcone synthase) were determined. A significant accumulation of total salicylic acid (TSA) and abscisic acid (ABA) was recorded in the roots and leaves of pea seedlings growing on lead-supplemented medium and next during infestation by aphids. Increased generation of these phytohormones strongly enhanced the biosynthesis of flavonoids, including a phytoalexin, pisatin. This research provides insights into the cross-talk between the abiotic (lead) and biotic factor (aphid infestation) on the level of the generation of signalling molecules and their role in the induction of flavonoid biosynthesis.

  8. Enhancement of antibody fragment secretion into the Escherichia coli periplasm by co-expression with the peptidyl prolyl isomerase, FkpA, in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Levy, Raphael; Ahluwalia, Kiran; Bohmann, David J; Giang, Hoa M; Schwimmer, Lauren J; Issafras, Hassan; Reddy, Nithin B; Chan, Chung; Horwitz, Arnold H; Takeuchi, Toshihiko

    2013-08-30

    Improper protein folding or aggregation can frequently be responsible for low expression and poor functional activity of antibody fragments secreted into the Escherichia coli periplasm. Expression issues also can affect selection of antibody candidates from phage libraries, since antibody fragments displayed on phage also are secreted into the E. coli periplasm. To improve secretion of properly folded antibody fragments into the periplasm, we have developed a novel approach that involves co-expressing the antibody fragments with the peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase, FkpA, lacking its signal sequence (cytFkpA) which consequently is expressed in the E. coli cytosol. Cytoplasmic expression of cytFkpA improved secretion of functional Fab fragments into the periplasm, exceeding even the benefits from co-expressing Fab fragments with native, FkpA localized in the periplasm. In addition, panning and subsequent screening of large Fab and scFv naïve phage libraries in the presence of cytFkpA significantly increased the number of unique clones selected, as well as their functional expression levels and diversity.

  9. Expression of an anti-botulinum toxin A neutralizing single-chain Fv recombinant antibody in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Almquist, Kurt C; McLean, Michael D; Niu, Yongqing; Byrne, Greg; Olea-Popelka, Fernando C; Murrant, Coral; Barclay, Jack; Hall, J Christopher

    2006-03-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most poisonous substances known and are thus classified as high-risk threats for use as bioterror agents. To examine the potential of transgenic plants as bioreactors for the production of BoNT antidotes, we transformed tobacco with an optimized, synthetic gene encoding a botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) neutralizing single-chain Fv (scFv) recombinant antibody fragment. In vitro mouse muscle twitch assays demonstrated the functional utility of this scFv extracted from tobacco for neutralizing the paralytic effects of BoNT/A at neuromuscular junctions. Based on the efficiency of the scFv capture process and the dose required to antidote a human being, 1-2 ha of this tobacco could yield up to 4 kg of scFv, which would be enough to contribute to the manufacture of 1,000,000 therapeutic doses of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) cocktail capable of neutralizing the effects of BoNT poisoning. Transgenic plants could provide an inexpensive production platform for expression of multiple mAbs toward the creation of polyclonal therapies (i.e. pooled mAbs) as the next improvement in recombinant antibody therapy.

  10. Resistance to influenza A virus infection in transformed cell lines expressing an anti-PB2 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yoshikazu; Ozaki, Kinuyo; Maeda, Masahiro; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Takakuwa, Hiroki; Otsuki, Koichi; Kida, Hiroshi; Ono, Etsuro

    2013-11-01

    The polymerase basic 2 (PB2) protein is one of four proteins that make up the influenza A virus replication complex, which is responsible for viral gene transcription and replication. To assess the antiviral potential of an anti-PB2 monoclonal antibody that inhibits RNA transcription of influenza A viruses, Mardin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were transformed with two transgenes that encode the light and heavy chains of the monoclonal antibody. The transformed cell lines expressing this monoclonal antibody displayed resistance to several subtypes of influenza A virus infection. In the transformed cell lines infected with influenza A virus, the level of viral RNA transcription was decreased and the effective nuclear transportation of the PB2 protein was also inhibited. These results demonstrate that the anti-PB2 intrabody is potentially able to interfere with the effective nuclear transportation of PB2 protein, resulting in the observed resistance to influenza A virus infection in vitro. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. CHO-S antibody titers >1 gram/liter using flow electroporation-mediated transient gene expression followed by rapid migration to high-yield stable cell lines.

    PubMed

    Steger, Krista; Brady, James; Wang, Weili; Duskin, Meg; Donato, Karen; Peshwa, Madhusudan

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, researchers have turned to transient gene expression (TGE) as an alternative to CHO stable cell line generation for early-stage antibody development. Despite advances in transfection methods and culture optimization, the majority of CHO-based TGE systems produce insufficient antibody titers for extensive use within biotherapeutic development pipelines. Flow electroporation using the MaxCyte STX Scalable Transfection System is a highly efficient, scalable means of CHO-based TGE for gram-level production of antibodies without the need for specialized expression vectors or genetically engineered CHO cell lines. CHO cell flow electroporation is easily scaled from milligram to multigram quantities without protocol reoptimization while maintaining transfection performance and antibody productivity. In this article, data are presented that demonstrate the reproducibility, scalability, and antibody production capabilities of CHO-based TGE using the MaxCyte STX. Data show optimization of posttransfection parameters such as cell density, media composition, and feed strategy that result in secreted antibody titers >1 g/L and production of multiple grams of antibody within 2 weeks of a single CHO-S cell transfection. In addition, data are presented to demonstrate the application of scalable electroporation for the rapid generation of high-yield stable CHO cell lines to bridge the gap between early- and late-stage antibody development activities.

  12. Functional expression of single-chain Fv antibody in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli by thioredoxin fusion and co-expression of molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Hiroyuki; Kumada, Yoichi; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2010-04-01

    The production of a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody against bovine ribonuclease A in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli trxB/gor double mutant was investigated. Previous reports have shown that the thioredoxin (Trx) protein fusion strategy is useful for the correct folding of scFvs and that the expression of functional scFvs is increased by co-expression of molecular chaperones. In the present study, we examined the effects of the combination of Trx fusion and molecular chaperone co-expression on the production of a functional scFv. A Trx-fused scFv was obtained in the oxidizing cytoplasm, and co-expression of GroELS and trigger factor had the greatest effect, resulting in a 2.8-fold increase in specific productivity. By contrast, the molecular chaperone DnaKJE had no effect. Moreover, co-expression of DnaKJE with GroELS negated the effects of GroELS. Trx-scFv was purified using a bovine ribonuclease A-coupled Sepharose column, and 2.7 mg/L of purified protein was obtained. Soluble Trx-scFv, expressed and purified as described above, exhibited pH-dependent binding similar to that of the parental full-length antibody. In addition, approximately 80% of the initial binding activity was retained after incubation at 37 degrees C for 2 weeks, indicating that the Trx-scFv fusion protein is quite stable. This strategy might be useful for the preparation of other recombinant scFvs. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimization of ELISA Conditions to Quantify Colorectal Cancer Antigen-Antibody Complex Protein (GA733-FcK) Expressed in Transgenic Plant

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Junsik; Lee, Kyung Jin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to optimize ELISA conditions to quantify the colorectal cancer antigen GA733 linked to the Fc antibody fragment fused to KDEL, an ER retention motif (GA733-FcK) expressed in transgenic plant. Variable conditions of capture antibody, blocking buffer, and detection antibody for ELISA were optimized with application of leaf extracts from transgenic plant expressing GA733-FcK. In detection antibody, anti-EpCAM/CD362 IgG recognizing the GA733 did not detect any GA733-FcK whereas anti-human Fc IgG recognizing the human Fc existed in plant leaf extracts. For blocking buffer conditions, 3% BSA buffer clearly blocked the plate, compared to the 5% skim-milk buffer. For capture antibody, monoclonal antibody (MAb) CO17-1A was applied to coat the plate with different amounts (1, 0.5, and 0.25 μg/well). Among the amounts of the capture antibody, 1 and 0.5 μg/well (capture antibody) showed similar absorbance, whereas 0.25 μg/well of the capture antibody showed significantly less absorbance. Taken together, the optimized conditions to quantify plant-derived GA733-FcK were 0.5 μg/well of MAb CO17-1A per well for the capture antibody, 3% BSA for blocking buffer, and anti-human Fc conjugated HRP. To confirm the optimized ELISA conditions, correlation analysis was conducted between the quantified amount of GA733-FcK in ELISA and its protein density values of different leaf samples in Western blot. The co-efficient value R2 between the ELISA quantified value and protein density was 0.85 (p<0.01), which indicates that the optimized ELISA conditions feasibly provides quantitative information of GA733-FcK expression in transgenic plant. PMID:24555929

  14. Stamina pistilloida, the Pea ortholog of Fim and UFO, is required for normal development of flowers, inflorescences, and leaves.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S; Hofer, J; Murfet, I

    2001-01-01

    Isolation and characterization of two severe alleles at the Stamina pistilloida (Stp) locus reveals that Stp is involved in a wide range of developmental processes in the garden pea. The most severe allele, stp-4, results in flowers consisting almost entirely of sepals and carpels. Production of ectopic secondary flowers in stp-4 plants suggests that Stp is involved in specifying floral meristem identity in pea. The stp mutations also reduce the complexity of the compound pea leaf, and primary inflorescences often terminate prematurely in an aberrant sepaloid flower. In addition, stp mutants were shorter than their wild-type siblings due to a reduction in cell number in their internodes. Fewer cells were also found in the epidermis of the leaf rachis of stp mutants. Examination of the effects of stp-4 in double mutant combinations with af, tl, det, and veg2-2-mutations known to influence leaf, inflorescence, and flower development in pea-suggests that Stp function is independent of these genes. A synergistic interaction between weak mutant alleles at Stp and Uni indicated that these two genes act together, possibly to regulate primordial growth. Molecular analysis revealed that Stp is the pea homolog of the Antirrhinum gene Fimbriata (Fim) and of UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) from Arabidopsis. Differences between Fim/UFO and Stp mutant phenotypes and expression patterns suggest that expansion of Stp activity into the leaf was an important step during evolution of the compound leaf in the garden pea.

  15. Improvement of pea biomass and seed productivity by simultaneous increase of phloem and embryo loading with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhi; Garneau, Matthew G; Majumdar, Rajtilak; Grant, Jan; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2015-01-01

    The development of sink organs such as fruits and seeds strongly depends on the amount of nitrogen that is moved within the phloem from photosynthetic-active source leaves to the reproductive sinks. In many plant species nitrogen is transported as amino acids. In pea (Pisum sativum L.), source to sink partitioning of amino acids requires at least two active transport events mediated by plasma membrane-localized proteins, and these are: (i) amino acid phloem loading; and (ii) import of amino acids into the seed cotyledons via epidermal transfer cells. As each of these transport steps might potentially be limiting to efficient nitrogen delivery to the pea embryo, we manipulated both simultaneously. Additional copies of the pea amino acid permease PsAAP1 were introduced into the pea genome and expression of the transporter was targeted to the sieve element-companion cell complexes of the leaf phloem and to the epidermis of the seed cotyledons. The transgenic pea plants showed increased phloem loading and embryo loading of amino acids resulting in improved long distance transport of nitrogen, sink development and seed protein accumulation. Analyses of root and leaf tissues further revealed that genetic manipulation positively affected root nitrogen uptake, as well as primary source and sink metabolism. Overall, the results suggest that amino acid phloem loading exerts regulatory control over pea biomass production and seed yield, and that import of amino acids into the cotyledons limits seed protein levels. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Expression of human protein S100A7 (psoriasin), preparation of antibody and application to human larynx squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Up-regulation of S100A7 (Psoriasin), a small calcium-binding protein, is associated with the development of several types of carcinomas, but its function and possibility to serve as a diagnostic or prognostic marker have not been fully defined. In order to prepare antibodies to the protein for immunohistochemical studies we produced the recombinant S100A7 protein in E. coli. mRNA extracted from human tracheal tumor tissue which was amplified by RT-PCR to provide the region coding for the S100A7 gene. The amplified fragment was cloned in the vector pCR2.1-TOPO and sub-cloned in the expression vector pAE. The protein rS100A7 (His-tag) was expressed in E. coli BL21::DE3, purified by affinity chromatography on an Ni-NTA column, recovered in the 2.0 to 3.5 mg/mL range in culture medium, and used to produce a rabbit polyclonal antibody anti-rS100A7 protein. The profile of this polyclonal antibody was evaluated in a tissue microarray. Results The rS100A7 (His-tag) protein was homogeneous by SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry and was used to produce an anti-recombinant S100A7 (His-tag) rabbit serum (polyclonal antibody anti-rS100A7). The molecular weight of rS100A7 (His-tag) protein determined by linear MALDI-TOF-MS was 12,655.91 Da. The theoretical mass calculated for the nonapeptide attached to the amino terminus is 12,653.26 Da (delta 2.65 Da). Immunostaining with the polyclonal anti-rS100A7 protein generated showed reactivity with little or no background staining in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells, detecting S100A7 both in nucleus and cytoplasm. Lower levels of S100A7 were detected in non-neoplastic tissue. Conclusions The polyclonal anti-rS100A7 antibody generated here yielded a good signal-to-noise contrast and should be useful for immunohistochemical detection of S100A7 protein. Its potential use for other epithelial lesions besides human larynx squamous cell carcinoma and non-neoplastic larynx should be explored in future. PMID:22082027

  17. A Novel PET Imaging Using 64Cu-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody against Mesothelin Commonly Expressed on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuko; Sasaki, Takanori; Takenaka, Fumiaki; Yakushiji, Hiromasa; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Kishi, Yoshiro; Kita, Shoichi; Shen, Lianhua; Kumon, Hiromi; Matsuura, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Mesothelin (MSLN) is a 40-kDa cell differentiation-associated glycoprotein appearing with carcinogenesis and is highly expressed in many human cancers, including the majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas, ovarian cancers, and mesotheliomas, while its expression in normal tissue is limited to mesothelial cells lining the pleura, pericardium, and peritoneum. Clone 11-25 is a murine hybridoma secreting monoclonal antibody (mAb) against human MSLN. In this study, we applied the 11-25 mAb to in vivo imaging to detect MSLN-expressing tumors. In in vitro and ex vivo immunochemical studies, we demonstrated specificity of 11-25 mAb to membranous MSLN expressed on several pancreatic cancer cells. We showed the accumulation of Alexa Fluor 750-labeled 11-25 mAb in MSLN-expressing tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice. Then, 11-25 mAb was labeled with 64Cu via a chelating agent DOTA and was used in both in vitro cell binding assay and in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in the tumor-bearing mice. We confirmed that 64Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb highly accumulated in MSLN-expressing tumors as compared to MSLN-negative ones. The 64Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb is potentially useful as a PET probe capable of being used for wide range of tumors, rather than 18F-FDG that occasionally provides nonspecific accumulation into the inflammatory lesions. PMID:25883990

  18. Enforced BCL2 expression in B-lymphoid cells prolongs antibody responses and elicits autoimmune disease.

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, A; Whittingham, S; Vaux, D L; Bath, M L; Adams, J M; Cory, S; Harris, A W

    1991-01-01

    The biological functions of the BCL2 gene were investigated in transgenic mice harboring human BCL2 cDNA under the control of an immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer (E mu). Mice of a representative transgenic strain, E mu-bcl-2-22, had a great excess of B lymphocytes, immunoglobulin-secreting cells, and serum immunoglobulins, attributable to increased longevity of B-lineage cells. Pre-B and plasma cells as well as B cells exhibited prolonged survival in culture. Immunized animals produced an amplified and protracted antibody response. Within the first year of life, most mice spontaneously produced antibodies to nuclear antigens, and 60% developed kidney disease, diagnosed as immune complex glomerulonephritis. Thus E mu-bcl-2-22 mice constitute a transgenic model for a systemic autoimmune disease resembling the human disorder systemic lupus erythematosus. Images PMID:1924327

  19. Differential expression of anti-glycan antibodies in schistosome-infected humans, rhesus monkeys and mice

    PubMed Central

    Luyai, Anthony E; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Mickum, Megan L; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Nyame, A Kwame; Wilkins, Patricia; Rivera-Marrero, Carlos A; Smith, David F; Van Die, Irma; Secor, W Evan; Cummings, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a debilitating parasitic disease of humans, endemic in tropical areas, for which no vaccine is available. Evidence points to glycan antigens as being important in immune responses to infection. Here we describe our studies on the comparative humoral immune responses to defined schistosome-type glycan epitopes in Schistosoma mansoni-infected humans, rhesus monkeys and mice. Rhesus anti-glycan responses over the course of infection were screened on a defined glycan microarray comprising semi-synthetic glycopeptides terminating with schistosome-associated or control mammalian-type glycan epitopes, as well as a defined glycan microarray of mammalian-type glycans representing over 400 glycan structures. Infected rhesus monkeys generated a high immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response to the core xylose/core α3 fucose epitope of N-glycans, which peaked at 8–11 weeks post infection, coinciding with maximal ability to kill schistosomula in vitro. By contrast, infected humans generated low antibody levels to this epitope. At 18 months following praziquantel therapy to eliminate the parasite, antibody levels were negligible. Mice chronically infected with S. mansoni generated high levels of anti-fucosylated LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1, 4(Fucα1, 3)GlcNAc) IgM antibodies, but lacked a robust response to the core xylose/core α3 fucose N-glycan antigens compared with other species studied, and their sera demonstrated an intermediate level of schistosomula killing in vitro. These differential responses to parasite glycan antigens may be related to the ability of rhesus monkeys to self-cure in contrast to the chronic infection seen in humans and mice. Our results validate defined glycan microarrays as a useful technology to evaluate diagnostic and vaccine antigens for schistosomiasis and perhaps other infections. PMID:24727442

  20. Systematic screening of soluble expression of antibody fragments in the cytoplasm of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Gaciarz, Anna; Veijola, Johanna; Uchida, Yuko; Saaranen, Mirva J; Wang, Chunguang; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Ruddock, Lloyd W

    2016-01-25

    Disulfide bonds are the most common structural, post-translational modification found in proteins. Antibodies contain up to 25 disulfide bonds depending on type, with scFv fragments containing two disulfides and Fab fragments containing five or six disulfide bonds. The production of antibody fragments that contain native disulfide bonds can be challenging, especially on a large scale. The protein needs to be targeted to prokaryotic periplasm or the eukaryotic endoplasmic reticulum. These compartments are specialised for disulfide bond formation, but both compartments have limitations. Here we show that the introduction into the cytoplasm of a catalyst of disulfide bond formation and a catalyst of disulfide bond isomerization allows the efficient formation of natively folded scFv and Fab antibody fragments in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli with intact reducing pathways. Eleven scFv and eleven Fab fragments were screened and ten of each were obtained in yields of >5 mg/L from deep-well plates. Production of eight of the scFv and all ten of the Fab showed a strong dependence on the addition of the folding factors. Yields of purified scFv of up to 240 mg/L and yields of purified Fab fragments of up to 42 mg/L were obtained. Purified fragments showed circular dichroism spectra consistent with being natively folded and were biologically active. Our results show that the efficient production of soluble, biologically active scFv and Fab antibody fragments in the cytoplasm of E. coli is not only possible, but facile. The required components can be easily transferred between different E. coli strains.

  1. Genetic variation in pea seed globulin composition.

    PubMed

    Tzitzikas, Emmanouil N; Vincken, Jean-Paul; de Groot, Jolan; Gruppen, Harry; Visser, Richard G F

    2006-01-25

    A quantitative characterization of seeds from 59 pea (Pisum sativum L.) lines and relative taxa with various external characteristics and wide geographical origin was performed to explore the genetic variation of pea concerning its starch and protein contents and globulin composition. Pea lines, which produce round, wrinkled, flat, and round-dimpled seeds, have starch as the major reserve, with an average content of 46%. Protein content varied from 13.7 to 30.7% of the seed dry matter, with an overall average of 22.3%. Densitometric quantification of the individual globulins (legumin, vicilin, convicilin, and globulin-related proteins) based on SDS-PAGE gels showed no lines lacking any particular globulin. Among the lines tested, variation was shown in both their total globulins content and their globulin composition. The total globulin content ranged from 49.2 to 81.8% of the total pea protein extract (TPPE). Legumin content varied between 5.9 and 24.5% of the TPPE. Vicilin was the most abundant protein of pea, and its content varied between 26.3 and 52.0% of the TPPE. Both processed and nonprocessed vicilins occurred. The processed vicilin was the predominant one, with values between 17.8 and 40.8%, whereas the nonprocessed ones constituted between 3.1 and 13.5% of the TPPE. Convicilin was the least abundant globulin, and its content ranged from 3.9 to 8.3%. Finally, the globulin-related proteins were present in amounts ranging from 2.8 to 17.3%. They were less abundant in comparison with legumin and vicilin, but they showed the largest relative variation of the four globulin classes. Correlations between the different external characteristics and globulin composition were determined. Comparison with soybean showed that pea lines show more variety in the abundance of globulin proteins, enabling a wider range of food application.

  2. PED/PEA-15 Inhibits Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Ins-1E Pancreatic Beta-Cells via PLD-1

    PubMed Central

    Raciti, Gregory Alexander; Zatterale, Federica; Nigro, Cecilia; Mirra, Paola; Falco, Roberta; Ulianich, Luca; Di Jeso, Bruno; Formisano, Pietro; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The small scaffold protein PED/PEA-15 is involved in several different physiologic and pathologic processes, such as cell proliferation and survival, diabetes and cancer. PED/PEA-15 exerts an anti-apoptotic function due to its ability to interfere with both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in different cell types. Recent evidence shows that mice overexpressing PED/PEA-15 present larger pancreatic islets and increased beta-cells mass. In the present work we investigated PED/PEA-15 role in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Ins-1E beta-cells. In pancreatic islets isolated from TgPED/PEA-15 mice hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA fragmentation was lower compared to WT islets. TUNEL analysis showed that PED/PEA-15 overexpression increases the viability of Ins-1E beta-cells and enhances their resistance to apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide exposure. The activity of caspase-3 and the cleavage of PARP-1 were markedly reduced in Ins-1E cells overexpressing PED/PEA-15 (Ins-1EPED/PEA-15). In parallel, we observed a decrease of the mRNA levels of pro-apoptotic genes Bcl-xS and Bad. In contrast, the expression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-xL was enhanced. Accordingly, DNA fragmentation was higher in control cells compared to Ins-1EPED/PEA-15 cells. Interestingly, the preincubation with propranolol, an inhibitor of the pathway of PLD-1, a known interactor of PED/PEA-15, responsible for its deleterious effects on glucose tolerance, abolishes the antiapoptotic effects of PED/PEA-15 overexpression in Ins-1E beta-cells. The same results have been obtained by inhibiting PED/PEA-15 interaction with PLD-1 in Ins-1EPED/PEA-15. These results show that PED/PEA-15 overexpression is sufficient to block hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Ins-1E cells through a PLD-1 mediated mechanism. PMID:25489735

  3. Evidence that QTL may be involved in a tolerance response to Pea enation mosaic virus in pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) is a serious disease of fresh market and dry pea in the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S. The En gene confers resistance to PEMV in pea, however a limited number of available cultivars contain the gene, and sources of tolerance have not been reported. In 2007, ad...

  4. Expression Cloning and Production of Human Heavy-Chain-Only Antibodies from Murine Transgenic Plasma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Drabek, Dubravka; Janssens, Rick; de Boer, Ernie; Rademaker, Rik; Kloess, Johannes; Skehel, John; Grosveld, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Several technologies have been developed to isolate human antibodies against different target antigens as a source of potential therapeutics, including hybridoma technology, phage and yeast display systems. For conventional antibodies, this involves either random pairing of VH and variable light (VL) domains in combinatorial display libraries or isolation of cognate pairs of VH and VL domains from human B cells or from transgenic mice carrying human immunoglobulin loci followed by single-cell sorting, single-cell RT-PCR, and bulk cloning of isolated natural VH–VL pairs. Heavy-chain-only antibodies (HCAbs) that naturally occur in camelids require only heavy immunoglobulin chain cloning. Here, we present an automatable novel, high-throughput technology for rapid direct cloning and production of fully human HCAbs from sorted population of transgenic mouse plasma cells carrying a human HCAb locus. Utility of the technique is demonstrated by isolation of diverse sets of sequence unique, soluble, high-affinity influenza A strain X-31 hemagglutinin-specific HCAbs. PMID:28066429

  5. c-Kit expression in desmoid fibromatosis. Comparative immunohistochemical evaluation of two commercial antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lucas, David R; al-Abbadi, Mousa; Tabaczka, Pamela; Hamre, Merlin R; Weaver, Donald W; Mott, Michael J

    2003-03-01

    To determine the frequency of c-Kit staining in desmoids and optimize an assay for clinical use, we stained 19 desmoids from various sites at various dilutions with 2 commonly used rabbit polyclonal, anti-c-Kit antibodies (A4502, DAKO, Carpinteria, CA; C-19, Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Santa Cruz, CA), with and without heat-induced epitope retrieval (HIER) in citrate buffer. Approdpriate external and internal control samples were evaluated for each test condition. At dilutions of 1:50 both antibodies stained substantial numbers of desmoids: with/without HIER, A4502, 89%/63%; C-19, 37%/74%. The staining was cytoplasmic without cell membrane accentuation. However, background stromal staining and nonspecific staining of endothelium and smooth and striated muscle were problematic with both antibodies at 1:50. At higher dilutions, C-19 stained no desmoid; however, diminished staining of external and internal control samples made it unreliable. A4502 similarly stained many fewer desmoids at higher dilutions. However, it retained strong staining of both external and internal control samples and showed much less nonspecific staining. Best results were achieved at 1:250 without HIER; only weak focal staining was present in 1 desmoid. With a simple immunohistochemical method optimized for clinical use, desmoid can be regarded as a c-Kit-negative tumor.

  6. Monoclonal antibody-escape variant of dengue virus serotype 1: Genetic composition and envelope protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chem, Y K; Chua, K B; Malik, Y; Voon, K

    2015-06-01

    Monoclonal antibody-escape variant of dengue virus type 1 (MabEV DEN-1) was discovered and isolated in an outbreak of dengue in Klang Valley, Malaysia from December 2004 to March 2005. This study was done to investigate whether DEN152 (an isolate of MabEV DEN-1) is a product of recombination event or not. In addition, the non-synonymous mutations that correlate with the monoclonal antibody-escape variant were determined in this study. The genomes of DEN152 and two new DEN-1 isolates, DENB04 and DENK154 were completely sequenced, aligned, and compared. Phylogenetic tree was plotted and the recombination event on DEN152 was investigated. DEN152 is sub-grouped under genotype I and is closely related genetically to a DEN-1 isolated in Japan in 2004. DEN152 is not a recombinant product of any parental strains. Four amino acid substitutions were unique only to DEN 152. These amino acid substitutions were (Ser)[326](Leu), (Ser)[340](Leu) at the deduced E protein, (Ile)[250](Thr) at NS1 protein, and (Thr)[41](Ser) at NS5 protein. Thus, DEN152 is an isolate of the emerging monoclonal antibody-escape variant DEN-1 that escaped diagnostic laboratory detection.

  7. Remediation of cadmium toxicity in field peas (Pisum sativum L.) through exogenous silicon.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Farhadur; Ghosal, Anubrata; Alam, Mohammad Firoz; Kabir, Ahmad Humayan

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an important phytotoxic element causing health hazards. This work investigates whether and how silicon (Si) influences the alleviation of Cd toxicity in field peas at biochemical and molecular level. The addition of Si in Cd-stressed plants noticeably increased growth and development as well as total protein and membrane stability of Cd-stressed plants, suggesting that Si does have critical roles in Cd detoxification in peas. Furthermore, Si supplementation in Cd-stressed plants showed simultaneous significant increase and decrease of Cd and Fe in roots and shoots, respectively, compared with Cd-stressed plants. At molecular level, GSH1 (phytochelatin precursor) and MTA (metallothionein) transcripts predominantly expressed in roots and strongly induced due to Si supplementation in Cd-stressed plants compared with Cd-free conditions, suggesting that these chelating agents may bind to Cd leading to vacuolar sequestration in roots. Furthermore, pea Fe transporter (RIT1) showed downregulation in shoots when plants were treated with Si along with Cd compared with Cd-treated conditions. It is consistent with the physiological observations and supports the conclusion that alleviation of Cd toxicity in pea plants might be associated with Cd sequestration in roots and reduced Cd translocation in shoots through the regulation of Fe transport. Furthermore, increased CAT, POD, SOD and GR activity along with elevated S-metabolites (cysteine, methionine, glutathione) implies the active involvement of ROS scavenging and plays, at least in part, to the Si-mediated alleviation of Cd toxicity in pea. The study provides first mechanistic evidence on the beneficial effect of Si on Cd toxicity in pea plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional expression of a single-chain antibody to ErbB-2 in plants and cell-free systems

    PubMed Central

    Galeffi, Patrizia; Lombardi, Alessio; Pietraforte, Immacolata; Novelli, Flavia; Di Donato, Monica; Sperandei, Maria; Tornambé, Andrea; Fraioli, Rocco; Martayan, Aline; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Benevolo, Maria; Mottolese, Marcella; Ylera, Francisco; Cantale, Cristina; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2006-01-01

    Background Aberrant signaling by ErbB-2 (HER 2, Neu), a member of the human Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) receptor family, is associated with an aggressive clinical behaviour of carcinomas, particularly breast tumors. Antibodies targeting the ErbB-2 pathway are a preferred therapeutic option for patients with advanced breast cancer, but a worldwide deficit in the manufacturing capacities of mammalian cell bioreactors is foreseen. Methods Herein, we describe a multi-platform approach for the production of recombinant Single chain Fragments of antibody variable regions (ScFvs) to ErbB-2 that involves their functional expression in (a) bacteria, (b) transient as well as stable transgenic tobacco plants, and (c) a newly developed cell-free transcription-translation system. Results An ScFv (ScFv800E6) was selected by cloning immunoglobulin sequences from murine hybridomas, and was expressed and fully functional in all the expression platforms, thereby representing the first ScFv to ErbB-2 produced in hosts other than bacteria and yeast. ScFv800E6 was optimized with respect to redox synthesis conditions. Different tags were introduced flanking the ScFv800E6 backbone, with and without spacer arms, including a novel Strep II tag that outperforms conventional streptavidin-based detection systems. ScFv800E6 was resistant to standard chemical radiolabeling procedures (i.e. Chloramine T), displayed a binding ability extremely similar to that of the parental monovalent Fab' fragment, as well as a flow cytometry performance and an equilibrium binding affinity (Ka approximately 2 × 108 M-1) only slightly lower than those of the parental bivalent antibody, suggesting that its binding site is conserved as compared to that of the parental antibody molecule. ScFv800E6 was found to be compatible with routine reagents for immunohistochemical staining. Conclusion ScFv800E6 is a useful reagent for in vitro biochemical and immunodiagnostic applications in oncology, and a candidate for

  9. High CD21 expression inhibits internalization of anti-CD19 antibodies and cytotoxicity of an anti-CD19-drug conjugate

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Gladys S; Chan, Pamela; Elliott, J Michael; Chang, Wesley S; Koeppen, Hartmut; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Scales, Suzie J

    2008-01-01

    CD19 and CD21 (CR2) are co-receptors found on B-cells and various B-cell lymphomas, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma. To evaluate their suitability as targets for therapy of such lymphomas using internalization-dependent antibody-drug conjugates [such as antibody-4-(N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate, (N2′-deacetyl-N2′-(3-mercapto-1-oxopropyl)-maytansine) (MCC-DM1) conjugates, which require lysosomal degradation of the antibody moiety for efficacy], we examined uptake of antibodies to CD19 and CD21 in a panel of B-cell lines. Anti-CD21 antibodies were not sufficiently internalized even in the highest CD21-expressing Raji cells, resulting in lack of efficacy with anti-CD21-MCC-DM1 conjugates. Anti-CD19 antibody uptake was variable, and was unexpectedly negatively correlated with CD21 expression. Thus, high CD21-expressing Raji, ARH77 and primary B-cells only very slowly internalized anti-CD19 antibodies, while CD21-negative or low expressing cells, including Ramos and Daudi, rapidly internalized these antibodies in clathrin-coated vesicles followed by lysosomal delivery. Anti-CD19-MCC-DM1 caused greater cytotoxicity in the faster anti-CD19-internalizing cell lines, implying that the rate of lysosomal delivery and subsequent drug release is important. Furthermore, transfection of Ramos cells with CD21 impeded anti-CD19 uptake and decreased anti-CD19-MCC-DM1 efficacy, suggesting that CD21-negative tumours should respond better to such anti-CD19 conjugates. This may have possible clinical implications, as anti-CD21 immunohistochemistry revealed only approximately 30% of 54 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients lack CD21 expression. PMID:17991300

  10. Production of different glycosylation variants of the tumour-targeting mAb H10 in Nicotiana benthamiana: influence on expression yield and antibody degradation.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Raffaele; Donini, Marcello; Villani, Maria Elena; Brunetti, Patrizia; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Paul, Matthew; Ma, Julian K-C; Benvenuto, Eugenio

    2012-10-01

    We previously described the expression of a tumour-targeting antibody (mAb H10) in Nicotiana benthamiana by vacuum-agro-infiltration and the remarkable yields of highly pure protein achieved. The objective of the present work was to investigate different strategies for transient overexpression of the mAb H10 in which glycan configuration was modulated and assess how these strategies affect the accumulation yield and stability of the antibody. To this aim, three procedures have been assayed: (1) Site-directed mutagenesis to abolish the glycosylation site; (2) endoplasmic reticulum retention (C-terminal SEKDEL fusion) to ensure predominantly high-mannose type glycans; and (3) expression in a N. benthamiana RNAi down-regulated line in which β1,2-xylosyltransferase and α1,3-fucosyltransferase gene expression is silenced. The three antibody variants (H10-Mut) (H10-SEKDEL) (H10(XylT/FucT)) were transiently expressed, purified and characterised for their glycosylation profile, expression/purification yield and antibody degradation pattern. Glycosylation analysis of H10(XylT/FucT) demonstrated the absence of plant complex-type sugars, while H10-SEKDEL, although substantially retained in the ER, revealed the presence of β1,2-xylose and α1,3-fucose residues, indicating a partial escape from the ER retrieval system. Antibody accumulation and purification yields were not enhanced by ER retention. All H10 antibody glyco-forms revealed greater degradation compared to the original, resulting mostly in the formation of Fab fragments. In the case of aglycosylated H10-Mut, more than 95% of the heavy chain was cleaved, confirming the pivotal role of the sugar moiety in protein stability. Identification of possible 'fragile' sites in the H10 antibody hinge region could be of general interest for the development of new strategies to reduce antibody degradation and increase the yield of intact IgGs in plants.

  11. [The expression of human IL-37 in E.coli and preparation and characterization of mouse anti-IL-37 antibody].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fuqian; He, Suhui; He, Lingge; Lin, Miaofen; Wang, Sen; Chen, Zhangquan

    2014-05-01

    To construct a prokaryotic expression system for interleukin-37 (IL-37) and prepare its polyclonal antibody. The gene encoding mature interleukin-37 (IL-37m) was amplified by PCR and subcloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET28a. Then the recombinant plasmid pET28a/IL-37m was transformed into E.coli Rosetta and expressed under IPTG induction. The recombinant IL-37m was purified through Ni²⁺;-NT agarose gel column and the purified recombinant IL-37m was used as immunogen to immunize the BALB/c mouse. The titer and specificity of the mouse anti-IL-37 antibody were analyzed by ELISA, Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. The recombinant IL-37 was successfully expressed and purified, and the mouse anit-IL-37 antibody was successfully prepared. ELISA showed that the titer of the antiserum was 1:128 000. Western blot analysis revealed that the antibody reacted with IL-37 specifically. Immunohistochemical staining detection manifested the antibody could recognize the native IL-37. The mouse anti-IL-37 antibody with high titer and specificity was successfully prepared.

  12. Reevaluation of sst₁ somatostatin receptor expression in human normal and neoplastic tissues using the novel rabbit monoclonal antibody UMB-7.

    PubMed

    Lupp, Amelie; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan

    2013-05-10

    The somatostatin receptor 1 (sst1) is widely distributed throughout the body and is also present in neoplastic tissues. However, little is known about its precise tissue distribution, regulation and function, which may in part be due to the lack of specific monoclonal anti-sst1 antibodies. We have characterized the novel rabbit monoclonal anti-human sst1 antibody UMB-7 using sst1-expressing cells and human pituitary samples. The antibody was then used for immunohistochemical staining of a large panel of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human tissues. Western blot analyses of BON-1 cells and human pituitary revealed a broad band migrating at a molecular weight of 45,000-60,000. After enzymatic deglycosylation the size of this band decreased to a molecular weight of 45,000. UMB-7 yielded an efficient immunostaining of distinct cell populations in the human tissue samples with a predominance of plasma membrane staining, which was completely abolished by preadsorption of UMB-7 with its immunizing peptide. The sst1 receptor was detected in anterior pituitary, pancreatic islets, distal tubules, enteric ganglion cells and nerve fibers, chief cells of the gastric mucosa, macrophages and mast cells. In addition, sst1 was observed in pituitary adenomas, gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors and pheochromocytoma as well as in pancreatic adenocarcinomas, gastric carcinomas, urinary bladder carcinomas and sarcomas. UMB-7 may prove of great value in the identification of sst1-expressing tumors during routine histopathological examinations. This may open up new routes for diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Developing antibodies from cholinesterase derived from prokaryotic expression and testing their feasibility for detecting immunogen content in Daphnia magna *

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-cui; Yuan, Bing-qiang; Li, Shao-nan

    2016-01-01

    To yield cholinesterase (ChE) from prokaryotic expression, the ChE gene that belongs to Daphnia magna was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using forward primer 5'-CCCYGGNGCSAT GATGTG-3' and reverse primer 5'-GYAAGTTRGCCCAATATCT-3'. To express the gene, one sequence of the amplified DNA, which was able to encode a putative protein containing two conserved carboxylesterase domains, was connected to the prokaryotic expression vector PET-29a(+). The recombinant vector was transformed into Escherichia coil BL21 (DE3). Protein expression was induced by isopropy-D-thiogalactoside. The expressed ChE was used as an immunogen to immunize BALB/c mice. The obtained antibodies were tested for their specificity towards crude enzymes from species such as Alona milleri, Macrobrachium nipponense, Bombyx mori, Chironomus kiiensis, Apis mellifera, Eisenia foetida, Brachydanio rerio, and Xenopus laevis. Results indicated that the antibodies had specificity suitable for detecting ChE in Daphnia magna. A type of indirect and non-competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IN-ELISA) was used to test the immunoreactive content of ChE (ChE-IR) in Daphina magna. The detection limit of the IN-ELISA was found to be 14.5 ng/ml at an antiserum dilution of 1:22 000. Results from tests on Daphnia magna exposed to sublethal concentrations of triazophos indicated a maximal induction of 57.2% in terms of ChE-IR on the second day after the animals were exposed to a concentration of 2.10 μg/L triazophos. Testing on animals acclimatized to a temperature of 16 °C indicated that ChE-IR was induced by 16.9% compared with the ChE-IR content detected at 21 °C, and the rate of induction was 25.6% at 10 °C. The IN-ELISA was also used to test the stability of ChE-IR in collected samples. Repeated freezing and thawing had no influence on the outcome of the test. All these results suggest that the polyclonal antibodies developed against the recombinant ChE are as

  14. Developing antibodies from cholinesterase derived from prokaryotic expression and testing their feasibility for detecting immunogen content in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-cui; Yuan, Bing-qiang; Li, Shao-nan

    2016-02-01

    To yield cholinesterase (ChE) from prokaryotic expression, the ChE gene that belongs to Daphnia magna was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using forward primer 5'-CCCYGGNGCSAT GATGTG-3' and reverse primer 5'-GYAAGTTRGCCCAATATCT-3'. To express the gene, one sequence of the amplified DNA, which was able to encode a putative protein containing two conserved carboxylesterase domains, was connected to the prokaryotic expression vector PET-29a(+). The recombinant vector was transformed into Escherichia coil BL21 (DE3). Protein expression was induced by isopropy-D-thiogalactoside. The expressed ChE was used as an immunogen to immunize BALB/c mice. The obtained antibodies were tested for their specificity towards crude enzymes from species such as Alona milleri, Macrobrachium nipponense, Bombyx mori, Chironomus kiiensis, Apis mellifera, Eisenia foetida, Brachydanio rerio, and Xenopus laevis. Results indicated that the antibodies had specificity suitable for detecting ChE in Daphnia magna. A type of indirect and non-competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IN-ELISA) was used to test the immunoreactive content of ChE (ChE-IR) in Daphina magna. The detection limit of the IN-ELISA was found to be 14.5 ng/ml at an antiserum dilution of 1:22 000. Results from tests on Daphnia magna exposed to sublethal concentrations of triazophos indicated a maximal induction of 57.2% in terms of ChE-IR on the second day after the animals were exposed to a concentration of 2.10 μg/L triazophos. Testing on animals acclimatized to a temperature of 16 °C indicated that ChE-IR was induced by 16.9% compared with the ChE-IR content detected at 21 °C, and the rate of induction was 25.6% at 10 °C. The IN-ELISA was also used to test the stability of ChE-IR in collected samples. Repeated freezing and thawing had no influence on the outcome of the test. All these results suggest that the polyclonal antibodies developed against the recombinant ChE are as

  15. A neutralization test for specific detection of Nipah virus antibodies using pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus expressing green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Akira; Marsh, Glenn A; McEachern, Jennifer A; Okutani, Akiko; Hotta, Kozue; Bazartseren, Boldbaatar; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Broder, Christopher C; Yamada, Akio; Inoue, Satoshi; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2009-09-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a new zoonotic paramyxovirus that emerged in 1998 and is now classified in the genus Henipavirus along with the closely related Hendra virus (HeV). NiV is highly pathogenic in several vertebrate species including humans, and the lack of available vaccines or specific treatment restricts it to biosafety level 4 (BSL4) containment. A serum neutralization test was developed for measuring NiV neutralizing antibodies under BSL2 conditions using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and bearing the F and G proteins of NiV (VSV-NiV-GFP). The neutralization titers were obtained by counting GFP-expressing cells or by measuring fluorescence. The performance of this new assay was compared against the conventional test using live NiV with panels of sera from several mammalian species, including sera from NiV outbreaks, experimental infections, as well as HeV-specific sera. The results obtained with the VSV-NiV-GFP based test correlated with those obtained using live NiV. Using a 50% reduction in VSV-NiV-GFP infected cells as the cut-off for neutralization, this new assay demonstrated its potential as an effective tool for detecting NiV neutralizing antibodies under BSL2 containment with greater speed, sensitivity and safety as compared to the conventional NiV serum neutralization test.

  16. A lytic monoclonal antibody to Trypanosoma cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes which recognizes an epitope expressed in tissues affected in Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Zwirner, N W; Malchiodi, E L; Chiaramonte, M G; Fossati, C A

    1994-01-01

    It has been suggested that molecular mimicry between the antigens of Trypanosoma cruzi and the host could have a role in the onset of the chronic stage of Chagas' disease. In this article, we report on a monoclonal antibody (MAb), CAK20.12 (immunoglobulin G2b), which reacts with a polypeptidic epitope of a 150-kDa antigen expressed on the surface of several strains of T. cruzi. This MAb also causes lysis of bloodstream trypomastigotes. Serum samples from 30 of 30 patients with chronic and 11 of 13 patients with acute Chagas' disease present specific antibodies to this antigen. MAb CAK20.12 reacts, by indirect immunofluorescence, with human and syngeneic murine striated muscle tissue, with the smooth muscle layer of cardiac arteries, with the lamina muscularis mucosae and the external striated muscle layer of the esophagus, and with the smooth muscle cells of the colon from normal syngeneic mice. Reactivity with the small intestine was very weak, and no reactivity with ventricle or atrium tissue was detected. Adsorption with an antigenic fraction from normal murine striated muscle or from T. cruzi epimastigotes confirmed that MAb CAK20.12 recognizes a common epitope present in parasites and host tissues. MAb CAK20.12, lytic for the infective form of T. cruzi, recognizes an epitope expressed in striated and smooth muscle cells of the host tissues affected in the chronic stage of Chagas' disease. Images PMID:7514576

  17. Registration of Pea Germplasm Partially Resistant to Aphanomyces Root Rot for Breeding Fresh or Freezer Pea and Dry Pea Types

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seven F8 derived breeding lines, 846-07, 847-08, 847-22, 847-45, 847-50, 847-53 and 847-68, of green pea (Pisum sativum, L.) were selected from a recombinant inbred line population that was developed by the USDA ARS in 2002. These lines are unique as they combine high levels of tolerance to Aphanom...

  18. Pea VEGETATIVE2 Is an FD Homolog That Is Essential for Flowering and Compound Inflorescence Development.

    PubMed

    Sussmilch, Frances C; Berbel, Ana; Hecht, Valérie; Vander Schoor, Jacqueline K; Ferrándiz, Cristina; Madueño, Francisco; Weller, James L

    2015-04-01

    As knowledge of the gene networks regulating inflorescence development in Arabidopsis thaliana improves, the current challenge is to characterize this system in different groups of crop species with different inflorescence architecture. Pea (Pisum sativum) has served as a model for development of the compound raceme, characteristic of many legume species, and in this study, we characterize the pea VEGETATIVE2 (VEG2) locus, showing that it is critical for regulation of flowering and inflorescence development and identifying it as a homolog of the bZIP transcription factor FD. Through detailed phenotypic characterizations of veg2 mutants, expression analyses, and the use of protein-protein interaction assays, we find that VEG2 has important roles during each stage of development of the pea compound inflorescence. Our results suggest that VEG2 acts in conjunction with multiple FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) proteins to regulate expression of downstream target genes, including TERMINAL FLOWER1, LEAFY, and MADS box homologs, and to facilitate cross-regulation within the FT gene family. These findings further extend our understanding of the mechanisms underlying compound inflorescence development in pea and may have wider implications for future manipulation of inflorescence architecture in related legume crop species. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  19. Pea VEGETATIVE2 Is an FD Homolog That Is Essential for Flowering and Compound Inflorescence Development

    PubMed Central

    Sussmilch, Frances C.; Berbel, Ana; Hecht, Valérie; Vander Schoor, Jacqueline K.; Ferrándiz, Cristina; Madueño, Francisco; Weller, James L.

    2015-01-01

    As knowledge of the gene networks regulating inflorescence development in Arabidopsis thaliana improves, the current challenge is to characterize this system in different groups of crop species with different inflorescence architecture. Pea (Pisum sativum) has served as a model for development of the compound raceme, characteristic of many legume species, and in this study, we characterize the pea VEGETATIVE2 (VEG2) locus, showing that it is critical for regulation of flowering and inflorescence development and identifying it as a homolog of the bZIP transcription factor FD. Through detailed phenotypic characterizations of veg2 mutants, expression analyses, and the use of protein-protein interaction assays, we find that VEG2 has important roles during each stage of development of the pea compound inflorescence. Our results suggest that VEG2 acts in conjunction with multiple FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) proteins to regulate expression of downstream target genes, including TERMINAL FLOWER1, LEAFY, and MADS box homologs, and to facilitate cross-regulation within the FT gene family. These findings further extend our understanding of the mechanisms underlying compound inflorescence development in pea and may have wider implications for future manipulation of inflorescence architecture in related legume crop species. PMID:25804541

  20. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A.; Byrne, Barry J.; Herzog, Roland W.; Daniell, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Summary Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 μg) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 μg rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 μg per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation. PMID:26053072

  1. [Expression of prn gene of Bordetella bronchiseptica and development of a recombinant protein-based indirect ELISA for antibodies detection].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhanqin; Xue, Yun; Wu, Bin; Tang, Xibiao; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Zengqiang; Hu, Ruiming; Zhang, Jianmin; Duan, Longchuan

    2008-03-01

    We developed an indirect ELISA method for detecting Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bb) pertactin antibodies based on the recombinant pertactin protein expressed in Escherichia coli (DE3) strain. The prn gene encoding Bb pertactin was fused to the downstream of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of pGEX-KG expression vector, resulting in the fusion expression plasmid pGEX-prn. SDS-PAGE showed that the GST-PRN fusion protein was expressed in high level in BL21 carrying pGEX-prn. The strong reactivity of the GST-PRN fusion protein, specifically with antiserum against porcine Bordetellosis caused by Bb HH0809, was identified by Western blot. The recombinant protein fragment of rPRN was purified from the GST-PRN fusion protein digested by protease thrombin with the purity of 93.1%. The rPRN-based indirect ELISA was developed for detecting antibodies against PRN. The ELISA could detect positive samples in experimentally infected pigs fourteen days post inoculation and the degree of sensitivity was over 4 times higher than the latex agglutination test with the coating antigen of killed Bb. Thirty-two point seven percent of positive samples were detected in 1,229 clinical samples while no false positive results were found in detecting 7 antisera against porcine bacterial diseases. Sera samples from two bordetellosis-positive pig fields were tested by the indirect ELISA method and the results indicated that pigs were infected by Bb during the nursery periods. The assay showed excellent specificity, sensitivity and reduplication, and can be useful for epidemiological survey and clinical diagnosis of swine bordetellosis.

  2. Anti-Nuclear Antibody Production and Autoimmunity in Transgenic Mice that Over-Express the Transcription Factor Bright

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Malini; Nixon, Jamee C.; Maier, Shannon; Workman, Jennifer; Farris, A. Darise; Webb, Carol F.

    2009-01-01

    The B cell-restricted transcription factor, Bright, up-regulates immunoglobulin heavy chain transcription three- to seven-fold in activated B cells in vitro. Bright function is dependent upon both active Bruton’s tyrosine kinase and its substrate, the transcription factor, TFII-I. In mouse and human B lymphocytes, Bright transcription is down regulated in mature B cells, and its expression is tightly regulated during B cell differentiation. To determine how Bright expression affects B cell development, transgenic mice were generated that express Bright constitutively in all B lineage cells. These mice exhibited increases in total B220+ B lymphocyte lineage cells in the bone marrow, but the relative percentages of the individual subpopulations were not altered. Splenic immature transitional B cells were significantly expanded both in total cell numbers and as increased percentages of cells relative to other B cell subpopulations. Serum immunoglobulin levels, particularly IgG isotypes, were increased slightly in the Bright transgenic mice compared to littermate controls. However, immunization studies suggest that responses to all foreign antigens were not increased globally. Moreover, four week-old Bright transgenic mice produced anti-nuclear antibodies. Older animals developed antibody deposits in the kidney glomeruli, but did not succumb to further autoimmune sequelae. These data indicate that enhanced Bright expression results in failure to maintain B cell tolerance and suggest a previously unappreciated role for Bright regulation in immature B cells. Bright is the first B cell-restricted transcription factor demonstrated to induce autoimmunity. Therefore, the Bright transgenics provide a novel model system for future analyses of B cell autoreactivity. PMID:17312145

  3. Pregnancy-specific glycoprotein expression in normal gastrointestinal tract and in tumors detected with novel monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Houston, Aileen; Williams, John M; Rovis, Tihana Lenac; Shanley, Daniel K; O'Riordan, Ronan T; Kiely, Patrick A; Ball, Melanie; Barry, Orla P; Kelly, Jacquie; Fanning, Aine; MacSharry, John; Mandelboim, Ofer; Singer, Bernhard B; Jonjic, Stipan; Moore, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs) are immunoglobulin superfamily members related to the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) family and are encoded by 10 genes in the human. They are secreted at high levels by placental syncytiotrophoblast into maternal blood during pregnancy, and are implicated in immunoregulation, thromboregulation, and angiogenesis. To determine whether PSGs are expressed in tumors, we characterized 16 novel monoclonal antibodies to human PSG1 and used 2 that do not cross-react with CEACAMs to study PSG expression in tumors and in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract using tissue arrays and immunohistochemistry. Staining was frequently observed in primary squamous cell carcinomas and colonic adenocarcinomas and was correlated with the degree of tumor differentiation, being largely absent from metastatic samples. Staining was also observed in normal oesophageal and colonic epithelium. PSG expression in the human and mouse GI tract was confirmed using quantitative RT-PCR. However, mRNA expression was several orders of magnitude lower in the GI tract compared to placenta. Our results identify a non-placental site of PSG expression in the gut and associated tumors, with implications for determining whether PSGs have a role in tumor progression, and utility as tumor biomarkers.

  4. Cold stress equally enhances in vivo pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression in chicken lines divergently selected for antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Hangalapura, Basavarajappa N; Kaiser, Michael G; Poel, Jan J van der; Parmentier, Henk K; Lamont, Susan J

    2006-01-01

    The effects of cold stress, immunization and genetic selection on the expression of mRNA for cytokine genes in poultry have not been completely elucidated. Therefore, in the present experiment, using real-time quantitative RT-PCR, we evaluated the effect of cold stress and immunization with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) on expression of mRNA for pro-inflammatory (interleukin-1beta [IL-1beta], IL-6, IL-12beta), Th(1) (IFN-gamma and IL-2), and Th(2) (IL-4 and IL-10) cytokine genes in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) of chicken lines divergently selected for either high or low antibody responses. Irrespective of the duration, cold stress enhanced expression of mRNA for IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-12beta and IL-4 cytokine genes in both selection lines. These results indicate that cold stress stimulates both the innate and parts of the adaptive cellular immune system. Immunization with CFA resulted in higher expression of mRNA for pro-inflammatory cytokines and lower expression of mRNA for both Th(1) and Th(2) cytokines.

  5. Two monoclonal antibodies raised against different epitopes of chloroplast fructose-1. 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase)

    SciTech Connect

    Hermoso, R.; Fonolla, J.; Lopez-Gorge, J. ); Ruiz-Cabello, F.; Garrido, F. )

    1990-05-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (GR-BP5 and GR-BP8) were obtained by fusion of spleen cells of mice immunized against pea photosynthetic FBPase with cells of myeloma NSI. Both mAbs showed by double immunodiffusion a {chi} light chain, and the GR-BP8 secreted an IgM. By Western-blotting and immunoprecipitation of the in vivo labelled pea FBPase, GR-BP5 and GR-BP8 showed specificity for the chloroplast enzyme. Competition binding of the {sup 125}I-labelled mAbs against pea FBPase showed specific binding sites to different epitopes of the enzyme molecule. Cross reaction assays between both monoclonal antibodies and pea and spinach chloroplast FBPases showed a 90-100% homology in the corresponding epitopes of both enzymes. Preliminary assays showed a moderate inhibition of FBPase by GR-BP5 monoclonal antibody, but a weak enhancement by the GR-BP8 monoclonal one.

  6. Review of the health benefits of peas (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Dahl, Wendy J; Foster, Lauren M; Tyler, Robert T

    2012-08-01

    Pulses, including peas, have long been important components of the human diet due to their content of starch, protein and other nutrients. More recently, the health benefits other than nutrition associated with pulse consumption have attracted much interest. The focus of the present review paper is the demonstrated and potential health benefits associated with the consumption of peas, Pisum sativum L., specifically green and yellow cotyledon dry peas, also known as smooth peas or field peas. These health benefits derive mainly from the concentration and properties of starch, protein, fibre, vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals in peas. Fibre from the seed coat and the cell walls of the cotyledon contributes to gastrointestinal function and health, and reduces the digestibility of starch in peas. The intermediate amylose content of pea starch also contributes to its lower glycaemic index and reduced starch digestibility. Pea protein, when hydrolysed, may yield peptides with bioactivities, including angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor activity and antioxidant activity. The vitamin and mineral contents of peas may play important roles in the prevention of deficiency-related diseases, specifically those related to deficiencies of Se or folate. Peas contain a variety of phytochemicals once thought of only as antinutritive factors. These include polyphenolics, in coloured seed coat types in particular, which may have antioxidant and anticarcinogenic activity, saponins which may exhibit hypocholesterolaemic and anticarcinogenic activity, and galactose oligosaccharides which may exert beneficial prebiotic effects in the large intestine.

  7. A single point in protein trafficking by Plasmodium falciparum determines the expression of major antigens on the surface of infected erythrocytes targeted by human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jo-Anne; Howell, Katherine B; Langer, Christine; Maier, Alexander G; Hasang, Wina; Rogerson, Stephen J; Petter, Michaela; Chesson, Joanne; Stanisic, Danielle I; Duffy, Michael F; Cooke, Brian M; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Bull, Peter C; Marsh, Kevin; Fowkes, Freya J I; Beeson, James G

    2016-11-01

    Antibodies to blood-stage antigens of Plasmodium falciparum play a pivotal role in human immunity to malaria. During parasite development, multiple proteins are trafficked from the intracellular parasite to the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs). However, the relative importance of different proteins as targets of acquired antibodies, and key pathways involved in trafficking major antigens remain to be clearly defined. We quantified antibodies to surface antigens among children, adults, and pregnant women from different malaria-exposed regions. We quantified the importance of antigens as antibody targets using genetically engineered P. falciparum with modified surface antigen expression. Genetic deletion of the trafficking protein skeleton-binding protein-1 (SBP1), which is involved in trafficking the surface antigen PfEMP1, led to a dramatic reduction in antibody recognition of IEs and the ability of human antibodies to promote opsonic phagocytosis of IEs, a key mechanism of parasite clearance. The great majority of antibody epitopes on the IE surface were SBP1-dependent. This was demonstrated using parasite isolates with different genetic or phenotypic backgrounds, and among antibodies from children, adults, and pregnant women in different populations. Comparisons of antibody reactivity to parasite isolates with SBP1 deletion or inhibited PfEMP1 expression suggest that PfEMP1 is the dominant target of acquired human antibodies, and that other P. falciparum IE surface proteins are minor targets. These results establish SBP1 as part of a critical pathway for the trafficking of major surface antigens targeted by human immunity, and have key implications for vaccine development, and quantifying immunity in populations.

  8. DNA vaccines expressing soluble CD4-envelope proteins fused to C3d elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Joseph F.; Green, Thomas D.; Ross, Ted M. . E-mail: tmr15@pitt.edu

    2004-10-25

    DNA vaccines expressing the envelope (Env) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been relatively ineffective at generating high-titer, long-lasting, neutralizing antibodies in a variety of animal models. In this study, DNA vaccines were constructed to express a fusion protein of the soluble human CD4 (sCD4) and the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope. To enhance the immunogenicity of the expressed fusion protein, three copies of the murine C3d (mC3d{sub 3}) were added to the carboxyl terminus of the complex. Monoclonal antibodies that recognize CD4-induced epitopes on gp120 efficiently bound to sCD4-gp120 or sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3}. In addition, both sCD4-gp120 and sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} bound to cells expressing appropriate coreceptors in the absence of cell surface hCD4. Mice (BALB/c) vaccinated with DNA vaccines expressing either gp120-mC3d{sub 3} or sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} elicited antibodies that neutralized homologous virus infection. However, the use of sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3}-DNA elicited the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies that persisted after depletion of anti-hCD4 antibodies. Interestingly, only mice vaccinated with DNA expressing sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} had antibodies that elicited cross-protective neutralizing antibodies. The fusion of sCD4 to the HIV-1 envelope exposes neutralizing epitopes that elicit broad protective immunity when the fusion complex is coupled with the molecular adjuvant, C3d.

  9. Negative regulation of HLA-DR expression on endothelial cells by anti-blood group A/B antibody ligation and mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kenta; Miwa, Yuko; Uchida, Kazuharu; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    2017-02-01

    Donor-specific antibody (DSA), particularly against HLA class II, is a major cause of chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) after transplantation, although ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation has recently demonstrated favorable graft outcomes. The condition of no injury even in the presence of anti-donor antibody has been referred to as "accommodation", which would be one of the key factors for successful long-term graft survival. The purpose of this study was to analyze the beneficial effect of anti-blood group A/B antibody ligation on endothelial cells against HLA-DR antibody-mediated, complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). Blood group A/B-expressing endothelial cells EA.hy926 or Human Umbilical Vein Endothelia Cells (HUVEC) were incubated with IFNγ in the presence or absence of anti-blood group A/B antibody or mTOR inhibitor (mTOR-i) for 48h. The effects on signaling pathway, HLA expression, complement regulatory factors, and CDC were investigated. Expression of HLA-DR on EA.hy926 or HUVEC were successfully elicited by IFNγ treatment, although little or no expression was observed in quiescent cells. Pre-incubation with anti-blood group A/B antibody had resistance to HLA-DR antibody-mediated CDC against IFNγ-treated cells in a concentration-dependent manner. This finding was ascribed to decreased expression of HLA-DR by post-translational regulation and increased expression of CD55/59, which was related to ERK and mTOR pathway inhibition. mTOR-i also inhibited HLA-DR expression by itself. Furthermore, the combination of mTOR-I and anti-blood group A/B ligation had an additive effect in preventing HLA-DR antibody-mediated CDC. Anti-blood group A/B antibody might play a preventive role in CAMR. Inhibition of the ERK and mTOR pathways may contribute to the development of a novel treatment in the maintenance period after transplantation.

  10. Immunodetection of Triticum mosaic virus by DAS- and DAC-ELISA using antibodies produced against coat protein expressed in Escherichia coli: potential for high-throughput diagnostic methods.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Sarath, Gautam; Seifers, Dallas; French, Roy

    2013-04-01

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), an economically important virus infecting wheat in the Great Plains region of the USA, is the type species of the Poacevirus genus in the family Potyviridae. Sensitive and high-throughput serology-based detection methods are crucial for the management of TriMV and germplasm screening in wheat breeding programs. In this study, TriMV coat protein (CP) was expressed in Escherichia coli, and polyclonal antibodies were generated against purified soluble native form recombinant CP (rCP) in rabbits. Specificity and sensitivity of resulting antibodies were tested in Western immuno-blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). In direct antigen coating (DAC)-ELISA, antibodies reacted specifically, beyond 1:20,000 dilution with TriMV in crude sap, but not with healthy extracts, and antiserum at a 1:10,000 dilution detected TriMV in crude sap up to 1:4860 dilution. Notably, rabbit anti-TriMV IgG and anti-TriMV IgG-alkaline phosphatase conjugate reacted positively with native virions in crude sap in a double antibody sandwich-ELISA, suggesting that these antibodies can be used as coating antibodies which is crucial for any 'sandwich' type of assays. Finally, the recombinant antibodies reacted positively in ELISA with representative TriMV isolates collected from fields, suggesting that antibodies generated against rCP can be used for sensitive, large-scale, and broad-spectrum detection of TriMV.

  11. CEI-PEA Alert, Summer 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Educational Innovation - Public Education Association, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The "CEI-PEA Alert" is an advocacy newsletter that deals with topics of interest to all concerned with the New York City public schools. This issue includes: (1) Practical Skills & High Academic Standards: Career Technical Education; (2) Parents: Help Your Children Gain "Soft Skills" for the Workforce; (3) Culinary Arts…

  12. Iron bioavailability in low phytate pea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds have high nutritional value but also contain potential anti-nutritional factors, such as phytate and polyphenols. Phytate can store up to 80% of the phosphorus in seeds. In the seed and during digestion it can complex minerals such as iron and zinc and make them un...

  13. Actin and Myosin in Pea Tendrils 1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yong-Ze; Yen, Lung-Fei

    1989-01-01

    We demonstrate here the presence of actin and myosin in pea (Pisum sativum L.) tendrils. The molecular weight of tendril actin is 43,000, the same as rabbit skeletal muscle actin. The native molecular weight of tendril myosin is about 440,000. Tendril myosin is composed of two heavy chains of molecular weight approximately 165,000 and four (two pairs) light chains of 17,000 and 15,000. At high ionic strength, the ATPase activity of pea tendril myosin is activated by K+-EDTA and Ca2+ and is inhibited by Mg2+. At low ionic strength, the Mg2+-ATPase activity of pea tendril myosin is activated by rabbit skeletal muscle F-actin. Superprecipitation occurred after incubation at room temperature when ATP was added to the crude actomyosin extract. It is suggested that the interaction of actin and myosin may play a role in the coiling movement of pea tendril. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:16666586

  14. CEI-PEA Alert, Fall 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Educational Innovation - Public Education Association, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The "CEI-PEA Alert" is an advocacy newsletter that deals with topics of interest to all concerned with the New York City public schools. This issue includes: (1) Chancellor Joel I. Klein Announces New Accountability System for NYC Schools; (2) Students Achieve Record-High Scores!; (3) Use Data to Help Your Child Improve Performance; (4)…

  15. Pea disease diagnostic series - White mold

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    White mold is a serious disease of pea worldwide, and it is caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Water soaked lesions and white mycelial growth may occur on leaves, stems and pods, and are characteristics of the disease. The pathogen may form black fruiting bodies called sclerotia on infec...

  16. 21 CFR 158.170 - Frozen peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... than 15 percent by count of the peas may sink in a solution containing 16 percent salt by weight... determination. (i) Extracting solutions: (a) One hundred parts of ethanol denatured with five parts of methanol volume to volume (formula 3A denatured alcohol), or (b) A mixture of 95 parts of formula 3A...

  17. 21 CFR 158.170 - Frozen peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... percent by weight, or more than 12 sq cm (2 sq in) in area, extraneous vegetable material, i.e., vine or.... With cloth wipe surplus water from lower screen surface. Weigh 250 g. of peas into high-speed blender.... From this weight deduct weight of dish, cover, and paper. Calculate percent by weight of alcohol...

  18. 21 CFR 155.170 - Canned peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... hydrogen ion concentration. (xiii) Seasonings and garnishes: (a) Pieces of green or red peppers or mixtures... designation “green.” The term “early,” “June,” or “early June” shall precede or follow the name in the case of... characteristics. Where the peas are of sweet green wrinkled varieties or hybrids having similar characteristics...

  19. 21 CFR 155.170 - Canned peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned peas is the food prepared from fresh or frozen succulent seeds of... drained weight of the finished food. (b) Lemon juice or concentrated lemon juice. (c) Mint leaves. (d... following shall be included as part of the name or in close proximity to the name of the food: (a)...

  20. 21 CFR 155.170 - Canned peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned peas is the food prepared from fresh or frozen succulent seeds of... drained weight of the finished food. (b) Lemon juice or concentrated lemon juice. (c) Mint leaves. (d... following shall be included as part of the name or in close proximity to the name of the food: (a)...

  1. Transcriptional profiling of the pea shoot apical meristem reveals processes underlying its function and maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chui E; Bhalla, Prem L; Ottenhof, Harald; Singh, Mohan B

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite the importance of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) in plant development and organ formation, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling its function is limited. Genomic tools have the potential to unravel the molecular mysteries of the SAM, and legume systems are increasingly being used in plant-development studies owing to their unique characteristics such as nitrogen fixation, secondary metabolism, and pod development. Garden pea (Pisum sativum) is a well-established classic model species for genetics studies that has been used since the Mendel era. In addition, the availability of a plethora of developmental mutants makes pea an ideal crop legume for genomics studies. This study aims to utilise genomics tools in isolating genes that play potential roles in the regulation of SAM activity. Results In order to identify genes that are differentially expressed in the SAM, we generated 2735 ESTs from three cDNA libraries derived from freshly micro-dissected SAMs from 10-day-old garden peas (Pisum sativum cv Torsdag). Custom-designed oligonucleotide arrays were used to compare the transcriptional profiles of pea SAMs and non-meristematic tissues. A total of 184 and 175 transcripts were significantly up- or down-regulated in the pea SAM, respectively. As expected, close to 61% of the transcripts down-regulated in the SAM were found in the public database, whereas sequences from the same source only comprised 12% of the genes that were expressed at higher levels in the SAM. This highlights the under-representation of transcripts from the meristematic tissues in the current public pea protein database, and demonstrates the utility of our SAM EST collection as an essential genetic resource for revealing further information on the regulation of this developmental process. In addition to unknowns, many of the up-regulated transcripts are known to encode products associated with cell division and proliferation, epigenetic regulation, auxin

  2. [Construction of a recombinant baculovirus transfer vector with two promoters expressing the anti-human CD28 chimeric antibody by using TP-PCR method].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Chen, Yong-Jing; Qiu, Yu-Hua; Zheng, Feng-Feng; Zhu, Jiang

    2005-09-01

    CD28, a cell surface glycoprotein, predominantly expressed on T cells, belongs to the Ig superfamily and provides critical co-stimulatory signals. The data which have published indicate that the monoclonal antibody against CD28 can decrease curative effects when it was applied in vivo for a long time. In order to avoid the human-anti-mouse action, anti-CD28 mAb must be humanized before it can be used in clinical study. Chimeric antibody, consisting of variable regions of mouse antibody and the constant regions of human IgG1, is often chosen by designers in generating humanized antibody. In this study, to prepare the anti-human CD28 chimeric antibody, the genes coding variable regions of anti-CD28 mAb and the constant regions of human IgG1 were cloned by PCR method. Then, the target genes were assembled by TP-PCR, a novel method developed for fusing genes without designing endonuclease sites at the both end of the target genes, and inserted into the baculovirus transfer vector pAcUW3 respectively. Thus, the recombinant baculovirus transfer vector with two strong promoters, ph and p10 was successfully constructed, which can express two different foreign genes at the same time. The recombinant vector was identified by the methods of restriction digesting, electrophoresis, PCR amplification and further verified by DNA sequence analysis. This work will contribute to expressing the chimeric CD28 antibody in insect cells.

  3. ADCT-301, a Pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) Dimer-Containing Antibody-Drug Conjugate (ADC) Targeting CD25-Expressing Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Michael J; Zammarchi, Francesca; Tyrer, Peter C; Akarca, Ayse U; Janghra, Narinder; Britten, Charles E; Havenith, Carin E G; Levy, Jean-Noel; Tiberghien, Arnaud; Masterson, Luke A; Barry, Conor; D'Hooge, Francois; Marafioti, Teresa; Parren, Paul W H I; Williams, David G; Howard, Philip W; van Berkel, Patrick H; Hartley, John A

    2016-11-01

    Despite the many advances in the treatment of hematologic malignancies over the past decade, outcomes in refractory lymphomas remain poor. One potential strategy in this patient population is the specific targeting of IL2R-α (CD25), which is overexpressed on many lymphoma and leukemic cells, using antibody-drug conjugates (ADC). ADCT-301 is an ADC composed of human IgG1 HuMax-TAC against CD25, stochastically conjugated through a dipeptide cleavable linker to a pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) dimer warhead with a drug-antibody ratio (DAR) of 2.3. ADCT-301 binds human CD25 with picomolar affinity. ADCT-301 has highly potent and selective cytotoxicity against a panel of CD25-expressing human lymphoma cell lines. Once internalized, the released warhead binds in the DNA minor groove and exerts its potent cytotoxic action via the formation of DNA interstrand cross-links. A strong correlation between loss of viability and DNA cross-link formation is demonstrated. DNA damage persists, resulting in phosphorylation of histone H2AX, cell-cycle arrest in G2-M, and apoptosis. Bystander killing of CD25-negative cells by ADCT-301 is also observed. In vivo, a single dose of ADCT-301 results in dose-dependent and targeted antitumor activity against both subcutaneous and disseminated CD25-positive lymphoma models. In xenografts of Karpas 299, which expressed both CD25 and CD30, marked superiority over brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris) is observed. Dose-dependent increases in DNA cross-linking, γ-H2AX, and PBD payload staining were observed in tumors in vivo indicating a role as relevant pharmacodynamic assays. Together, these data support the clinical testing of this novel ADC in patients with CD25-expressing tumors. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(11); 2709-21. ©2016 AACR.

  4. Rapid high-yield expression of full-size IgG antibodies in plants coinfected with noncompeting viral vectors.

    PubMed

    Giritch, Anatoli; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Engler, Carola; van Eldik, Gerben; Botterman, Johan; Klimyuk, Victor; Gleba, Yuri

    2006-10-03

    Plant viral vectors allow expression of heterologous proteins at high yields, but so far, they have been unable to express heterooligomeric proteins efficiently. We describe here a rapid and indefinitely scalable process for high-level expression of functional full-size mAbs of the IgG class in plants. The process relies on synchronous coinfection and coreplication of two viral vectors, each expressing a separate antibody chain. The two vectors are derived from two different plant viruses that were found to be noncompeting. Unlike vectors derived from the same virus, noncompeting vectors effectively coexpress the heavy and light chains in the same cell throughout the plant body, resulting in yields of up to 0.5 g of assembled mAbs per kg of fresh-leaf biomass. This technology allows production of gram quantities of mAbs for research purposes in just several days, and the same protocol can be used on an industrial scale in situations requiring rapid response, such as pandemic or terrorism events.

  5. 7 CFR 319.56-45 - Shelled garden peas from Kenya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shelled garden peas from Kenya. 319.56-45 Section 319... Shelled garden peas from Kenya. Garden peas (Pisum sativum) may be imported into the continental United... provisions of this subpart: (a) The peas must be shelled from the pod. (b) The peas must be washed in...

  6. 7 CFR 319.56-45 - Shelled garden peas from Kenya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled garden peas from Kenya. 319.56-45 Section 319... Shelled garden peas from Kenya. Garden peas (Pisum sativum) may be imported into the continental United... provisions of this subpart: (a) The peas must be shelled from the pod. (b) The peas must be washed in...

  7. 7 CFR 319.56-45 - Shelled garden peas from Kenya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled garden peas from Kenya. 319.56-45 Section 319... Shelled garden peas from Kenya. Garden peas (Pisum sativum) may be imported into the continental United... provisions of this subpart: (a) The peas must be shelled from the pod. (b) The peas must be washed in...

  8. 7 CFR 319.56-45 - Shelled garden peas from Kenya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled garden peas from Kenya. 319.56-45 Section 319... Shelled garden peas from Kenya. Garden peas (Pisum sativum) may be imported into the continental United... provisions of this subpart: (a) The peas must be shelled from the pod. (b) The peas must be washed in...

  9. 7 CFR 319.56-45 - Shelled garden peas from Kenya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shelled garden peas from Kenya. 319.56-45 Section 319... Shelled garden peas from Kenya. Garden peas (Pisum sativum) may be imported into the continental United... provisions of this subpart: (a) The peas must be shelled from the pod. (b) The peas must be washed...

  10. [Recombinant expression of hantaan virus protein N with application of Western-blot in detecting anti-hantavirus antibody].

    PubMed

    Yao, P P; Xu, F; Sun, Y S; Yang, Z R; Zhang, Y; Yue, M; Zhu, H P

    2017-04-10

    Objective: S gene of hantavirus(HV) was expressed in insect cells by genetic engineering technology. The expression product of S gene was used as antigen to detect anti-HV specific antibody IgG in serum. Methods: Gene encoding NP of the strain HV-Z10 was amplified by PCR and then its eukaryotic expression system rBAC-Z10S-TN was constructed by using the routine genetic engineering method. SDS-PAGE was applied to measure the expression of rNP.Ion-exchange plus Ni-NTA-affinity chromatography was performed to purify the recombinant product. Indirect immuno-fluorescence assay (IFA) was used to determine the specific immune-reactivity of rNP. WB assay was established to detect the serum samples from 95 confirmed HFRS patients. Parameters related to the outcomes of detection were compared with the routine HV-IgG IFA method. Results: rBAC-Z10S-TN was able to express rNP with high efficiency. The purified rNP only showed a single protein fragment in the gel after SDS-PAGE. HV IgG could efficiently recognize rNP and hybridize with the recombinant protein. 97.67% of the serum samples from the HFRS patients were positive confirmed by WB. Conclusions: We successfully constructed a high efficient prokaryotic expression system of NP encoding gene from hantavirus strain HV-Z10. WB assay which was established in this study could be used as a new serological test for HFRS diagnosis, thanks to the simplicity, safety, sensitivity and specificity of this method.

  11. Characterization of two distinct antigens expressed on either resting or activated human B cells as defined by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kokai, Y; Ishii, Y; Kikuchi, K

    1986-01-01

    Two antigen systems (L29 & L30) expressed on two distinct human B cell subpopulations were identified by using BL1-4D6 and TB3-7D5 monoclonal antibodies, respectively. L29 was expressed on approximately one-third of B cells in human lymphoid tissues. These B cells associated with L29 were large activated B cells located in the germinal centres of lymphoid follicles. L30, on the other hand, existed on approximately two-thirds of B cells mainly located in the mantle zone of lymphoid follicles, most of which also expressed IgM and IgD on their cell membrane. In addition, L30 was shared on mature granulocytes. With the use of polyclonal activators such as pokeweek mitogen (PWM) and protein A-bearing staphylococci (SAC), L29 antigen was inducible on PWM- or SAC-stimulated B cells in correspondence with the emergence of Tac and T10 antigens of these B cells. In contrast, L30 antigen on the B cells stimulated by the polyclonal activators was decreased in its expression and was finally lost from these B cells. Although none of L29 and L30 was expressed on normal, non-activated human thymus and peripheral T cells, L29 but not L30 was expressed on concanavalin A-activated T cells. Immunochemical studies showed that L30 consist of a single polypeptide with mol. wt of 40,000. L29 antigen is presently under study. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:3527505

  12. Differential expression of cellular prion protein in mouse brain as detected with multiple anti-PrP monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Liu, T; Zwingman, T; Li, R; Pan, T; Wong, B S; Petersen, R B; Gambetti, P; Herrup, K; Sy, M S

    2001-03-30

    The normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) plays an essential role in the development of prion diseases. Indirect evidence has suggested that different PrP(C) glycoforms may be expressed in different brain regions and perform distinct functions. However, due to a lack of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) that are specific for mouse PrP(C), the expression of PrP(C) in the mouse brain has not been studied in great detail. We used Mabs specific for either the N-terminus or the C-terminus of the mouse PrP(C) to study its expression in the mouse brain by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Immunoblotting studies demonstrated that the expression of PrP(C) differed quantitatively as well as qualitatively in different regions of the brain. The anti-C-terminus Mabs reacted with all three molecular weight bands of PrP(C); the anti-N-terminus Mabs only reacted with the 39-42 kDa PrP(C). The results from immunohistochemical staining revealed the spatial distribution of PrP(C) in the mouse brain, which were consistent with that from immunoblotting. Although expression of PrP(C) has been reported to be required for long-term survival of Purkinje cells, we were unable to detect PrP(C) in the Purkinje cell layer in the cerebellum with multiple anti-PrP Mabs. Our findings suggest that PrP(C) variants, i.e. various glycoforms and truncated forms, might be specifically expressed in different regions of mouse brain and might have different functions.

  13. Uptake of 111In-labeled fully human monoclonal antibody TSP-A18 reflects transferrin receptor expression in normal organs and tissues of mice.

    PubMed

    Sugyo, Aya; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sudo, Hitomi; Nomura, Fumiko; Satoh, Hirokazu; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Kurosawa, Gene; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Saga, Tsuneo

    2017-03-01

    Transferrin receptor (TfR) is an attractive molecule for targeted therapy of cancer. Various TfR-targeted therapeutic agents such as anti-TfR antibodies conjugated with anticancer agents have been developed. An antibody that recognizes both human and murine TfR is needed to predict the toxicity of antibody-based agents before clinical trials, there is no such antibody to date. In this study, a new fully human monoclonal antibody TSP-A18 that recognizes both human and murine TfR was developed and the correlation analysis of the radiolabeled antibody uptake and TfR expression in two murine strains was conducted. TSP-A18 was selected using extracellular portions of human and murine TfR from a human antibody library. The cross-reactivity of TSP-A18 with human and murine cells was confirmed by flow cytometry. Cell binding and competitive inhibition assays with [111In]TSP-A18 showed that TSP-A18 bound highly to TfR-expressing MIAPaCa-2 cells with high affinity. Biodistribution studies of [111In]TSP-A18 and [67Ga]citrate (a transferrin-mediated imaging probe) were conducted in C57BL/6J and BALB/c-nu/nu mice. [111In]TSP-A18 was accumulated highly in the spleen and bone containing marrow component of both strains, whereas high [67Ga]citrate uptake was only observed in bone containing marrow component and not in the spleen. Western blotting indicated the spleen showed the strongest TfR expression compared with other organs in both strains. There was significant correlation between [111In]TSP-A18 uptake and TfR protein expression in both strains, whereas there was significant correlation of [67Ga]citrate uptake with TfR expression only in C57BL/6J. These findings suggest that the difference in TfR expression between murine strains should be carefully considered when testing for the toxicity of anti-TfR antibody in mice and the uptake of anti-TfR antibody could reflect tissue TfR expression more accurately compared with that of transferrin-mediated imaging probe such as [67Ga]citrate.

  14. PEA-15 facilitates EGFR dephosphorylation via ERK sequestration at increased ER-PM contacts in TNBC cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Miyoung; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Yang, Eun Gyeong; Jeon, Hyesung; Song, Hyun Kyu

    2015-04-13

    Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes of 15 kDa (PEA-15) is known to sequester extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the cytoplasm, inhibiting tumorigenesis of human breast cancer cells. Here, we describe how PEA-15 expression affects the dephosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) through endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) contacts in MDA-MB-468, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. The increased intracellular calcium concentration resulting from increased cytoplasmic phosphorylated ERK facilitates movement of ER-anchored calcium sensors to the PM. The driving force of trans-localization of calcium-dependent proteins enhances the contact between the activated EGFR and ER-localized phosphatase, PTP1B. Consequently, our findings suggest a mechanism underneath the facilitation of EGFR dephosphorylation by cytoplasmic PEA-15 expression inside TNBC cells, which may be one of the dynamic mechanisms for down-regulation of activated EGFR in cancer cells.

  15. Experimental and In Silico Modelling Analyses of the Gene Expression Pathway for Recombinant Antibody and By-Product Production in NS0 Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Emma J.; Chiverton, Lesley M.; Spurgeon, Sarah K.; Martin, Elaine B.; Montague, Gary A.; Smales, C. Mark; von der Haar, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are commercially important, high value biotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of a variety of diseases. These complex molecules consist of two heavy chain and two light chain polypeptides covalently linked by disulphide bonds. They are usually expressed as recombinant proteins from cultured mammalian cells, which are capable of correctly modifying, folding and assembling the polypeptide chains into the native quaternary structure. Such recombinant cell lines often vary in the amounts of product produced and in the heterogeneity of the secreted products. The biological mechanisms of this variation are not fully defined. Here we have utilised experimental and modelling strategies to characterise and define the biology underpinning product heterogeneity in cell lines exhibiting varying antibody expression levels, and then experimentally validated these models. In undertaking these studies we applied and validated biochemical (rate-constant based) and engineering (nonlinear) models of antibody expression to experimental data from four NS0 cell lines with different IgG4 secretion rates. The models predict that export of the full antibody and its fragments are intrinsically linked, and cannot therefore be manipulated individually at the level of the secretory machinery. Instead, the models highlight strategies for the manipulation at the precursor species level to increase recombinant protein yields in both high and low producing cell lines. The models also highlight cell line specific limitations in the antibody expression pathway. PMID:23071804

  16. [Cloning and expression of novel swine gene BCL-G(L) in E.coli and preparation of its polyclonal antibody in guinea pigs].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng-Fei; Cao, Jin-Suo; Liu, Chao; Zhao, Hai-Ping; Zhang, De-Li

    2010-12-01

    In order to express a novel gene named as BCL-G(L); of swine in E.coli and prepare its polyclonal antibody. The contig sequence of the gene was predicted and in silicon cloned by blasting the human BCL-G(L); in swine ESTs database in NCBI. The cloning sequence was obtained by RT-PCR from swine spleen. The cloning sequence was identified by sequencing and compared with the contig sequence. Then the gene was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector pET-32a to construct a recombinant plasmid named as pET32a-BCL-G(L);. The fusion protein pET32a-BCL-G(L); was expressed in E.coli BL21 and purified using a His-tag fusion protein purification kit. Then guinea pigs were immunized with the purified protein to get the specific polyclonal antibody. The titer of the antibody was 1:800 detected by ELISA. The protein BCL-G(L); can be specifically detected by western blot assay using the polyclonal antibody. The novel swine gene BCL-G(L); was cloned and expressed in E.coli and its polyclonal antibody was prepared successfully.

  17. Experimental and in silico modelling analyses of the gene expression pathway for recombinant antibody and by-product production in NS0 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mead, Emma J; Chiverton, Lesley M; Spurgeon, Sarah K; Martin, Elaine B; Montague, Gary A; Smales, C Mark; von der Haar, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are commercially important, high value biotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of a variety of diseases. These complex molecules consist of two heavy chain and two light chain polypeptides covalently linked by disulphide bonds. They are usually expressed as recombinant proteins from cultured mammalian cells, which are capable of correctly modifying, folding and assembling the polypeptide chains into the native quaternary structure. Such recombinant cell lines often vary in the amounts of product produced and in the heterogeneity of the secreted products. The biological mechanisms of this variation are not fully defined. Here we have utilised experimental and modelling strategies to characterise and define the biology underpinning product heterogeneity in cell lines exhibiting varying antibody expression levels, and then experimentally validated these models. In undertaking these studies we applied and validated biochemical (rate-constant based) and engineering (nonlinear) models of antibody expression to experimental data from four NS0 cell lines with different IgG4 secretion rates. The models predict that export of the full antibody and its fragments are intrinsically linked, and cannot therefore be manipulated individually at the level of the secretory machinery. Instead, the models highlight strategies for the manipulation at the precursor species level to increase recombinant protein yields in both high and low producing cell lines. The models also highlight cell line specific limitations in the antibody expression pathway.

  18. The Effects of Light and Temperature on Biotin Synthesis in Pea Sprouts.

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, Shin; Ohnuki, Risa; Moriki, Aoi; Abe, Megumi; Ishiguro, Mariko; Sone, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Biotin is an essential micronutrient, and is a cofactor for several carboxylases that are involved in the metabolism of glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids. Because plant cells can synthesize their own biotin, a wide variety of plant-based foods contains significant amounts of biotin; however, the influence of environmental conditions on the biotin content in plants remains largely unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of different cultivation conditions on the biotin content and biotin synthesis in pea sprouts (Pisum sativum). In the experiment, the pea sprouts were removed from their cotyledons and cultivated by hydroponics under five different lighting and temperature conditions (control [25ºC, 12-h light/12-h dark cycle], low light [25ºC, 4-h light/20-h dark cycle], dark [25ºC, 24 h dark], low temperature [12ºC, 12-h light/12-h dark cycle], and cold [6ºC, 12-h light/12-h dark cycle]) for 10 d. Compared to the biotin content of pea sprouts under the control conditions, the biotin contents of pea sprouts under the low-light, dark, and cold conditions had significantly decreased. The dark group showed the lowest biotin content among the groups. Expression of the biotin synthase gene (bio2) was also significantly decreased under the dark and cold conditions compared to the control condition, in a manner similar to that observed for the biotin content. No significant differences in the adenosine triphosphate content were observed among the groups. These results indicate that environmental conditions such as light and temperature modulate the biotin content of pea plant tissues by regulating the expression of biotin synthase.

  19. A comparative indirect ELISA for the detection of henipavirus antibodies based on a recombinant nucleocapsid protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Ming; Yu, Meng; Morrissy, Chris; Zhao, Yong-Gang; Meehan, Greer; Sun, Ying-Xue; Wang, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Lin-Fa; Wang, Zhi-Liang

    2006-09-01

    The indirect ELISA is a simple and useful method for detection of pathogen-specific antibodies in animal sera. However, non-specific or background binding is often a problem, especially when recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli are used. In this study, a comparative indirect ELISA in which the total reactivity and the background binding were determined simultaneously on the same ELISA plate was reported. The background was determined by incubation of the test sera with excess free antigen to block specific binding. The sample was considered positive only when its total reactivity reading was higher than a pre-determined cut-off value and the ratio of the total reactivity to the background reading was more than 2.0. Using this approach, an antibody assay for henipaviruses using a recombinant Nipah virus nucleocapsid protein expressed in E. coli was developed. A total of 919 negative serum samples were tested in this assay and the specificity was 95.8%. In addition, eight positive experimental serum samples all tested positive. The use of recombinant protein as the ELISA antigen, instead of inactivated virus antigens, will be of significant advantage for countries where there is no facility of Biosafety level 4 to handle this group of zoonotic viruses.

  20. Expression of Human Skin-Specific Genes Defined by Transcriptomics and Antibody-Based Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D.; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M.; Danielsson, Angelika; Edlund, Karolina; Uhlén, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    To increase our understanding of skin, it is important to define the molecular constituents of the cell types and epidermal layers that signify normal skin. We have combined a genome-wide transcriptomics analysis, using deep sequencing of mRNA from skin biopsies, with immunohistochemistry-based protein profiling to characterize the landscape of gene and protein expression in normal human skin. The transcriptomics and protein expression data of skin were compared to 26 (RNA) and 44 (protein) other normal tissue types. All 20,050 putative protein-coding genes were classified into categories based on patterns of expression. We found that 417 genes showed elevated expression in skin, with 106 genes expressed at least five-fold higher than that in other tissues. The 106 genes categorized as skin enriched encoded for well-known proteins involved in epidermal differentiation and proteins with unknown functions and expression patterns in skin, including the C1orf68 protein, which showed the highest relative enrichment in skin. In conclusion, we have applied a genome-wide analysis to identify the human skin-specific proteome and map the precise localization of the corresponding proteins in different compartments of the skin, to facilitate further functional studies to explore the molecular repertoire of normal skin and to identify biomarkers related to various skin diseases. PMID:25411189

  1. Profile and Functional Properties of Seed Proteins from Six Pea (Pisum sativum) Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Barac, Miroljub; Cabrilo, Slavica; Pesic, Mirjana; Stanojevic, Sladjana; Zilic, Sladjana; Macej, Ognjen; Ristic, Nikola

    2010-01-01

    Extractability, extractable protein compositions, technological-functional properties of pea (Pisum sativum) proteins from six genotypes grown in Serbia were investigated. Also, the relationship between these characteristics was presented. Investigated genotypes showed significant differences in storage protein content, composition and extractability. The ratio of vicilin:legumin concentrations, as well as the ratio of vicilin + convicilin: Legumin concentrations were positively correlated with extractability. Our data suggest that the higher level of vicilin and/or a lower level of legumin have a positive influence on protein extractability. The emulsion activity index (EAI) was strongly and positively correlated with the solubility, while no significant correlation was found between emulsion stability (ESI) and solubility, nor between foaming properties and solubility. No association was evident between ESI and EAI. A moderate positive correlation between emulsion stability and foam capacity was observed. Proteins from the investigated genotypes expressed significantly different emulsifying properties and foam capacity at different pH values, whereas low foam stability was detected. It appears that genotype has considerable influence on content, composition and technological-functional properties of pea bean proteins. This fact can be very useful for food scientists in efforts to improve the quality of peas and pea protein products. PMID:21614186

  2. Role of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus Coat Protein in the Host Plant and Aphid Vector.

    PubMed

    Doumayrou, Juliette; Sheber, Melissa; Bonning, Bryony C; Miller, W Allen

    2016-11-18

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in plant virus-vector interactions is essential for the development of effective control measures for aphid-vectored epidemic plant diseases. The coat proteins (CP) are the main component of the viral capsids, and they are implicated in practically every stage of the viral infection cycle. Pea enation mosaic virus 1 (PEMV1, Enamovirus, Luteoviridae) and Pea enation mosaic virus 2 (PEMV2, Umbravirus, Tombusviridae) are two RNA viruses in an obligate symbiosis causing the pea enation mosaic disease. Sixteen mutant viruses were generated with mutations in different domains of the CP to evaluate the role of specific amino acids in viral replication, virion assembly, long-distance movement in Pisum sativum, and aphid transmission. Twelve mutant viruses were unable to assemble but were able to replicate in inoculated leaves, move long-distance, and express the CP in newly infected leaves. Four mutant viruses produced virions, but three were not transmissible by the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Three-dimensional modeling of the PEMV CP, combined with biological assays for virion assembly and aphid transmission, allowed for a model of the assembly of PEMV coat protein subunits.

  3. Tendril-less Regulates Tendril Formation in Pea Leaves[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Julie; Turner, Lynda; Moreau, Carol; Ambrose, Mike; Isaac, Peter; Butcher, Susan; Weller, James; Dupin, Adeline; Dalmais, Marion; Le Signor, Christine; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Ellis, Noel

    2009-01-01

    Tendrils are contact-sensitive, filamentous organs that permit climbing plants to tether to their taller neighbors. Tendrilled legume species are grown as field crops, where the tendrils contribute to the physical support of the crop prior to harvest. The homeotic tendril-less (tl) mutation in garden pea (Pisum sativum), identified almost a century ago, transforms tendrils into leaflets. In this study, we used a systematic marker screen of fast neutron–generated tl deletion mutants to identify Tl as a Class I homeodomain leucine zipper (HDZIP) transcription factor. We confirmed the tendril-less phenotype as loss of function by targeting induced local lesions in genomes (TILLING) in garden pea and by analysis of the tendril-less phenotype of the t mutant in sweet pea (Lathyrus odoratus). The conversion of tendrils into leaflets in both mutants demonstrates that the pea tendril is a modified leaflet, inhibited from completing laminar development by Tl. We provide evidence to show that lamina inhibition requires Unifoliata/LEAFY-mediated Tl expression in organs emerging in the distal region of the leaf primordium. Phylogenetic analyses show that Tl is an unusual Class I HDZIP protein and that tendrils evolved either once or twice in Papilionoid legumes. We suggest that tendrils arose in the Fabeae clade of Papilionoid legumes through acquisition of the Tl gene. PMID:19208900

  4. Role of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus Coat Protein in the Host Plant and Aphid Vector

    PubMed Central

    Doumayrou, Juliette; Sheber, Melissa; Bonning, Bryony C.; Miller, W. Allen

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in plant virus–vector interactions is essential for the development of effective control measures for aphid-vectored epidemic plant diseases. The coat proteins (CP) are the main component of the viral capsids, and they are implicated in practically every stage of the viral infection cycle. Pea enation mosaic virus 1 (PEMV1, Enamovirus, Luteoviridae) and Pea enation mosaic virus 2 (PEMV2, Umbravirus, Tombusviridae) are two RNA viruses in an obligate symbiosis causing the pea enation mosaic disease. Sixteen mutant viruses were generated with mutations in different domains of the CP to evaluate the role of specific amino acids in viral replication, virion assembly, long-distance movement in Pisum sativum, and aphid transmission. Twelve mutant viruses were unable to assemble but were able to replicate in inoculated leaves, move long-distance, and express the CP in newly infected leaves. Four mutant viruses produced virions, but three were not transmissible by the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Three-dimensional modeling of the PEMV CP, combined with biological assays for virion assembly and aphid transmission, allowed for a model of the assembly of PEMV coat protein subunits. PMID:27869713

  5. Development of a Novel Antibody-Drug Conjugate for the Potential Treatment of Ovarian, Lung, and Renal Cell Carcinoma Expressing TIM-1.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lawrence J; Vitale, Laura; O'Neill, Thomas; Dolnick, Ree Y; Wallace, Paul K; Minderman, Hans; Gergel, Lauren E; Forsberg, Eric M; Boyer, James M; Storey, James R; Pilsmaker, Catherine D; Hammond, Russell A; Widger, Jenifer; Sundarapandiyan, Karuna; Crocker, Andrea; Marsh, Henry C; Keler, Tibor

    2016-12-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) is a type I transmembrane protein that was originally described as kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1) due to its elevated expression in kidney and urine after renal injury. TIM-1 expression is also upregulated in several human cancers, most notably in renal and ovarian carcinomas, but has very restricted expression in healthy tissues, thus representing a promising target for antibody-mediated therapy. To this end, we have developed a fully human monoclonal IgG1 antibody specific for the extracellular domain of TIM-1. This antibody was shown to bind purified recombinant chimeric TIM-1-Fc protein and TIM-1 expressed on a variety of transformed cell lines, including Caki-1 (human renal clear cell carcinoma), IGROV-1 (human ovarian adenocarcinoma), and A549 (human lung carcinoma). Internalization studies using confocal microscopy revealed the antibody was rapidly internalized by cells in vitro, and internalization was confirmed by quantitative imaging flow cytometry. An antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) was produced with the anti-TIM-1 antibody covalently linked to the potent cytotoxin, monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE), and designated CDX-014. The ADC was shown to exhibit in vitro cytostatic or cytotoxic activity against a variety of TIM-1-expressing cell lines, but not on TIM-1-negative cell lines. Using the Caki-1, IGROV-1, and A549 xenograft mouse models, CDX-014 showed significant antitumor activity in a clinically relevant dose range. Safety evaluation in nonhuman primates has demonstrated a good profile and led to the initiation of clinical studies of CDX-014 in renal cell carcinoma and potentially other TIM-1-expressing tumors. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2946-54. ©2016 AACR.

  6. Plant waxy bloom on peas affects infection of pea aphids by Pandora neoaphidis.

    PubMed

    Duetting, Patrick S; Ding, Hongjian; Neufeld, Jeffrey; Eigenbrode, Sanford D

    2003-11-01

    This study examined the effects of the surface wax bloom of pea plants, Pisum sativum, on infection of pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum, by the fungal pathogen Pandora neoaphidis. In prior field surveys, a higher proportion of P. neoaphidis-killed pea aphids (cadavers) had been observed on a pea line with reduced wax bloom, as compared with a sister line with normal surface wax bloom. Laboratory bioassays were conducted in order to examine the mechanisms. After plants of each line infested with aphids were exposed to similar densities of conidia, the rate of accumulation of cadavers on the reduced wax line was significantly greater than on the normal wax bloom line; at the end of the experiment (13d), the proportion of aphid cadavers on the reduced wax line was approximately four times that on the normal wax bloom line. When plants were exposed to conidia first and then infested with aphids, the rate of accumulation of cadavers was slightly but significantly greater on the reduced wax line, and infection at the end of the experiment (16d) did not differ between the lines. When aphids were exposed first and then released onto the plants, no differences in the proportion of aphid cadavers were observed between the pea lines. Greater infection of pea aphid on reduced wax peas appears to depend upon plants being exposed to inoculum while aphids are settled in typical feeding positions on the plant. Additional experiments demonstrated increased adhesion and germination by P. neoaphidis conidia to leaf surfaces of the reduced wax line as compared with normal wax line, and this could help explain the higher infection rate by P. neoaphidis on the reduced wax line. In bioassays using surface waxes extracted from the two lines, there was no effect of wax source on germination of P. neoaphidis conidia.

  7. Expression and regulation of two idiotype families and subsets within an idiotype family among BALB/c antibodies against p-azophenylarsonate

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.R.

    1984-06-01

    The expression and regulation of the two different iodiotype (id) families associated with the anti-p-azophenylarsonate (Ar) antibodies of BALB/c mice examined. Both families (5AF6 and 3C6) represented cross-reactive idiotypes (CRI) expressed in the anti-Ar of most individual BALB/c mice. In response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin-Ar, an average of about 28% of BALB/c anti-Ar had 5AF6 family idiotopes, while 3C6 family was expressed on about 16% of BALBc anti-Ar antibodies. Suppression induced by anti-idiotype treatment against one family did not suppress the expression of the other family suggesting that the two families were regulated independently. However, the relative expression of one family could influence the expression of the other, because depression of the 5AF6 family tended to increase the expression of the 3C6 family of anti-Ar. Analysis of the 5AF6 family showed that a majority of BALB/c mice produced antibodies heating most or all of the idiotopes associated with the family, but that a subset of about 35% of the antibodies synthesized lacked idiotopes associated with a monoclonal anti-Ar member of this family, 2.4. Treatment of mice with anti-idiotypes prepared against two different monoclonal anti-Ar of the 5AF6 family produced different effects: one enhanced while the other suppressed idiotype expression, suggesting that there are differences in the idiotopes associated with these two regulatory pathways. Additionally, results indicated that subsets of antibodies within the 5AF6 idiotype family could be regulated independently of each other.

  8. Replication Competent Molecular Clones of HIV-1 Expressing Renilla Luciferase Facilitate the Analysis of Antibody Inhibition in PBMC

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Tara G.; Ding, Haitao; Yuan, Xing; Wei, Qing; Smith, Kendra S.; Conway, Joan A.; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Brown, Bruce; Polonis, Victoria; West, John T.; Montefiori, David C.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Effective vaccine development for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will require assays that ascertain the capacity of vaccine immunogens to elicit neutralizing antibodies (NAb) to diverse HIV-1 strains. To facilitate NAb assessment in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based assays, we developed an assay-adaptable platform based on a Renilla luciferase (LucR) expressing HIV-1 proviral backbone. LucR was inserted into pNL4-3 DNA, preserving all viral open reading frames. The proviral genome was engineered to facilitate expression of diverse HIV-1 env sequences, allowing analysis in an isogenic background. The resulting Env-IMC-LucR viruses are infectious, and LucR is stably expressed over multiple replications in PBMC. HIV-1 neutralization, targeting TZM-bl cells, was highly correlative comparing virus (LucR) and cell (firefly luciferase) readouts. In PBMC, NAb activity can be analyzed either within a single or multiple cycles of replication. These results represent advancement toward a standardizable PBMC-based neutralization assay for assessing HIV-1 vaccine immunogen efficacy. PMID:20863545

  9. In vitro expression, monoclonal antibody and bioactivity for capsid protein of porcine circovirus type II without nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji-Yong; Shang, Shao-Bin; Gong, Hui; Chen, Qing-Xin; Wu, Jian-Xiang; Shen, Hui-Gang; Chen, Ting-Fei; Guo, Jun-Qing

    2005-08-04

    We expressed firstly the Capsid protein gene defecting the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of Porcine circovirus type II (PCV2) in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (rGST-dCap protein). The purified rGST-dCap protein and the recombinant NLS-defected Cap protein of PCV2 (rdCap protein) from the purified rGST-dCap protein reacted specifically with swine antiserum to PCV2. Furthermore, the obtained monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to rdCap protein were shown to bind to PCV2 particles replicated in PK15 cell and capsid protein (Cap protein) of PCV2 expressed in PK15 cells, respectively. mAbs to rdCap protein also revealed the neutralizing ability to PCV2 particles. These results demonstrated that rGST-dCap protein expressed in E. coli was folded correctly or at least partly, and mAbs to rdCap protein possessed the binding epitopes of PCV2 particles whereas mAbs 4C4 and 3F6 to rdCap protein remained the neutralization epitope of PCV2 particle, showing a possibility of neutralizing mAb to rdCap protein as an immnuotherapeutic agent and a potential of rGST-dCap protein as a vaccine antigen or serodiagnostic reagent.

  10. Familial expression of anti-Saccharomyces