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Sample records for antibody microarray tube

  1. Surface chemistries for antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays promise to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The original technology for printing ELISA microarray chips and capturing antibodies on slides was derived from the DNA microarray field. However, due to the need to maintain antibody structure and function when immobilized, surface chemistries used for DNA microarrays are not always appropriate for ELISA microarrays. In order to identify better surface chemistries for antibody capture, a number of commercial companies and academic research groups have developed new slide types that could improve antibody function in microarray applications. In this review we compare and contrast the commercially available slide chemistries, as well as highlight some promising recent advances in the field.

  2. Evaluation of Surface Chemistries for Antibody Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; White, Amanda M.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-12-01

    Antibody microarrays are an emerging technology that promises to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The current technology for protein microarrays has been primarily derived from DNA microarrays and is not fully characterized for use with proteins. For example, there are a myriad of surface chemistries that are commercially available for antibody microarrays, but no rigorous studies that compare these different surfaces. Therefore, we have used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to analyze 16 different commercially available slide types. Full standard curves were generated for 24 different assays. We found that this approach provides a rigorous and quantitative system for comparing the different slide types based on spot size and morphology, slide noise, spot background, lower limit of detection, and reproducibility. These studies demonstrate that the properties of the slide surface affect the activity of immobilized antibodies and the quality of data produced. Although many slide types can produce useful data, glass slides coated with poly-L-lysine or aminosilane, with or without activation with a crosslinker, consistently produce superior results in the ELISA microarray analyses we performed.

  3. Optimizing scan parameters for antibody microarray experiments: accelerating robust systems diagnostics for life sciences.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qiang; Sivanandam, Thamil Mani

    2014-06-01

    Microarray experiments are a centerpiece of postgenomics life sciences and the current efforts to develop systems diagnostics for personalized medicine. The majority of antibody microarray experiments are fluorescence-based, which utilizes a scanner to convert target signals into image files for subsequent quantification. Certain scan parameters such as the laser power and photomultiplier tube gain (PMT) can influence the readout of fluorescent intensities and thus may affect data quantitation. To date, however, there is no consensus of how to determine the optimal settings of microarray scanners. Here we show that different settings of the laser power and PMT not only affect the signal intensities but also the accuracy of antibody microarray experiments. More importantly, we demonstrate an experimental approach using two fluorescent dyes to determine optimal settings of scan parameters for microarray experiments. These measures provide added quality control of microarray experiments, and thus help to improve the accuracy of quantitative outcome in microarray experiments in the above contexts.

  4. The use of antigen microarrays in antibody profiling.

    PubMed

    Papp, Krisztián; Prechl, József

    2012-01-01

    Technological advances in the field of microarray production and analysis lead to the development of protein microarrays. Of these, antigen microarrays are one particular format that allows the study of antigen-antibody interactions in a miniaturized and highly multiplexed fashion. Here, we describe the parallel detection of antibodies with different specificities in human serum, a procedure also called antibody profiling. Autoantigens printed on microarray slides are reacted with test sera and the bound antibodies are identified by fluorescently labeled secondary reagents. Reactivity patterns generated this way characterize individuals and can help design novel diagnostic tools.

  5. High-throughput allogeneic antibody detection using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jed; Sahaf, Bita; Perloff, Spenser; Schoenrock, Kelsi; Wu, Fang; Nakasone, Hideki; Coller, John; Miklos, David

    2016-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have traditionally been used to detect alloantibodies in patient plasma samples post hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT); however, protein microarrays have the potential to be multiplexed, more sensitive, and higher throughput than ELISAs. Here, we describe the development of a novel and sensitive microarray method for detection of allogeneic antibodies against minor histocompatibility antigens encoded on the Y chromosome, called HY antigens. Six microarray surfaces were tested for their ability to bind recombinant protein and peptide HY antigens. Significant allogeneic immune responses were determined in male patients with female donors by considering normal male donor responses as baseline. HY microarray results were also compared with our previous ELISA results. Our overall goal was to maximize antibody detection for both recombinant protein and peptide epitopes. For detection of HY antigens, the Epoxy (Schott) protein microarray surface was both most sensitive and reliable and has become the standard surface in our microarray platform. PMID:26902899

  6. Low-Cost Peptide Microarrays for Mapping Continuous Antibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    McBride, Ryan; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Law, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for understanding antibody specificity in antibody and vaccine research, pepscan assays provide a rapid method for mapping and profiling antibody responses to continuous epitopes. We have developed a relatively low-cost method to generate peptide microarray slides for studying antibody binding. Using a setup of an IntavisAG MultiPep RS peptide synthesizer, a Digilab MicroGrid II 600 microarray printer robot, and an InnoScan 1100 AL scanner, the method allows the interrogation of up to 1536 overlapping, alanine-scanning, and mutant peptides derived from the target antigens. Each peptide is tagged with a polyethylene glycol aminooxy terminus to improve peptide solubility, orientation, and conjugation efficiency to the slide surface. PMID:26490468

  7. Low-Cost Peptide Microarrays for Mapping Continuous Antibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    McBride, Ryan; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Law, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for understanding antibody specificity in antibody and vaccine research, pepscan assays provide a rapid method for mapping and profiling antibody responses to continuous epitopes. We have developed a relatively low-cost method to generate peptide microarray slides for studying antibody binding. Using a setup of an IntavisAG MultiPep RS peptide synthesizer, a Digilab MicroGrid II 600 microarray printer robot, and an InnoScan 1100 AL scanner, the method allows the interrogation of up to 1536 overlapping, alanine-scanning, and mutant peptides derived from the target antigens. Each peptide is tagged with a polyethylene glycol aminooxy terminus to improve peptide solubility, orientation, and conjugation efficiency to the slide surface.

  8. Microtiter plate-based antibody microarrays for bacteria and toxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research has focused on the development of rapid biosensor-based, high-throughput, and multiplexed detection of pathogenic bacteria in foods. Specifically, antibody microarrays in 96-well microtiter plates have been generated for the purpose of selective detection of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (...

  9. Novel microarrays for simultaneous serodiagnosis of multiple antiviral antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Ponnurengam Malliappan; Moritsugu, Nozomi; Obuse, Sei; Isoshima, Takashi; Tashiro, Hideo; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    We developed an automated diagnostic system for the detection of virus-specific immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs) that was based on a microarray platform. We compared efficacies of our automated system with conventional enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). Viruses were immobilized to microarrays using a radical cross-linking reaction that was induced by photo-irradiation. A new photoreactive polymer containing perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA) and poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate was prepared and coated on plates. Inactivated measles, rubella, mumps, Varicella-Zoster and recombinant Epstein-Barr viruse antigen were added to coated plates, and irradiated with ultraviolet light to facilitate immobilization. Virus-specific IgGs in healthy human sera were assayed using these prepared microarrays and the results obtained compared with those from conventional EIAs. We observed high correlation (0.79-0.96) in the results between the automated microarray technique and EIAs. The microarray-based assay was more rapid, involved less reagents and sample, and was easier to conduct compared with conventional EIA techniques. The automated microarray system was further improved by introducing reagent storage reservoirs inside the chamber, thereby conserving the use of expensive reagents and antibodies. We considered the microarray format to be suitable for rapid and multiple serological diagnoses of viral diseases that could be developed further for clinical applications. PMID:24367491

  10. Antibody microarrays as tools for biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta

    2011-01-01

    The cancer biomarkers field is being enriched by molecular profiling obtained by high-throughput approaches. Targeted antibody arrays are strongly contributing to the identification of protein cancer -biomarker candidates and functional proteomic analyses. Due to their versatility, novel technological and experimental design implementations are broadening the applications of antibody arrays. However, the cancer biomarker candidates delivered to date using this technology are still in their early developmental phase, requiring validation with high number of specimens focusing on specific clinical endpoints. Innovative strategies multiplexing protein measurements of protein extracts of cultured cells, tissue and body fluids using antibody arrays combined with appropriate validation approaches are enabling the -discovery of cancer-associated biomarkers. This review describes these strategies and cancer biomarker candidates reported to date that may assist in the diagnosis, surveillance, prognosis, and potentially for predictive and therapeutic purposes for patients affected with solid and hematological neoplasias.

  11. Antibody microarray profiling of human prostate cancer sera: antibody screening and identification of potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeremy C; Zhou, Heping; Kwekel, Joshua; Cavallo, Robert; Burke, Jocelyn; Butler, E Brian; Teh, Bin S; Haab, Brian B

    2003-01-01

    We developed a practical strategy for serum protein profiling using antibody microarrays and applied the method to the identification of potential biomarkers in prostate cancer serum. Protein abundances from 33 prostate cancer and 20 control serum samples were compared to abundances from a common reference pool using a two-color fluorescence assay. Robotically spotted microarrays containing 184 unique antibodies were prepared on two different substrates: polyacrylamide based hydrogels on glass and poly-1-lysine coated glass with a photoreactive cross-linking layer. The hydrogel substrate yielded an average six-fold higher signal-to-noise ratio than the other substrate, and detection of protein binding was possible from a greater number of antibodies using the hydrogels. A statistical filter based on the correlation of data from "reverse-labeled" experiment sets accurately predicted the agreement between the microarray measurements and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay measurements, showing that this parameter can serve to screen for antibodies that are functional on microarrays. Having defined a set of reliable microarray measurements, we identified five proteins (von Willebrand Factor, immunoglobulinM, Alpha1-antichymotrypsin, Villin and immunoglobulinG) that had significantly different levels between the prostate cancer samples and the controls. These developments enable the immediate use of high-density antibody and protein microarrays in biomarker discovery studies. PMID:12548634

  12. Immobilization strategies for single-chain antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Miller, Keith D.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Gonzalez, Rachel M.; Apiyo, David O.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Srinivastava, Sudhir; Kagan, Jacob; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2008-06-01

    Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays have great potential for validating biomarkers of disease. ELISA relies on robust affinity reagents that retain activity when immobilized or when labeled for detection. Single-chain antibodies (scFv) are affinity reagents that have greater potential for high-throughput production than traditional immunoglobin G (IgG). Unfortunately, scFv are typically less stabile than IgG and not always suitable for use in sandwich ELISAs. We therefore investigated different immobilization strategies and scFv structural modifications to see if we could develop a more robust scFv reagent. Two promising strategies that emerged from these studies: 1) the precapture of epitope-tagged scFv using an anti-epitope antibody and 2) the direct printing of a thioredoxin/scFv fusion protein on glass slides. The use of either strategy improved the stability of immobilized scFv and increased the sensitivity of the scFv ELISA microarray assays, although the anti-epitope precapture method had a risk of reagent transfer. Using the direct printing method, we show that anti-PSA scFv are highly specific when tested against 21 different IgG-based assays. Finally, the scFv microarray PSA assay gave comparable results (R2 = 0.95) to a commercial 96-well ELISA when tested using serum samples. Overall, these results suggest that minor modifications of the scFv protein structure are sufficiently to produce reagents that are suitable for use in multiplex assay systems.

  13. Exploration of high-density protein microarrays for antibody validation and autoimmunity profiling.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Mattsson, Cecilia; Andersson, Eni; Hellström, Cecilia; Uhlen, Mathias; Schwenk, Jochen M; Ayoglu, Burcu; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-09-25

    High-density protein microarrays of recombinant human protein fragments, representing 12,412 unique Ensembl Gene IDs, have here been produced and explored. These protein microarrays were used to analyse antibody off-target interactions, as well as for profiling the human autoantibody repertoire in plasma against the antigens represented by the protein fragments. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies produced within the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) were analysed on microarrays of three different sizes, ranging from 384 antigens to 21,120 antigens, for evaluation of the antibody validation criteria in the HPA. Plasma samples from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients were also screened in order to explore the feasibility of these arrays for broad-scale profiling of autoantibody reactivity. Furthermore, analysis on these near proteome-wide microarrays was complemented with analysis on HuProt™ Human Proteome protein microarrays. The HPA recombinant protein microarray with 21,120 antigens and the HuProt™ Human Proteome protein microarray are currently the largest protein microarray platforms available to date. The results on these arrays show that the Human Protein Atlas antibodies have few off-target interactions if the antibody validation criteria are kept stringent and demonstrate that the HPA-produced high-density recombinant protein fragment microarrays allow for a high-throughput analysis of plasma for identification of possible autoantibody targets in the context of various autoimmune conditions. PMID:26417875

  14. Flow-pattern Guided Fabrication of High-density Barcode Antibody Microarray.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Lisa S; Wang, Jun

    2016-01-06

    Antibody microarray as a well-developed technology is currently challenged by a few other established or emerging high-throughput technologies. In this report, we renovate the antibody microarray technology by using a novel approach for manufacturing and by introducing new features. The fabrication of our high-density antibody microarray is accomplished through perpendicularly oriented flow-patterning of single stranded DNAs and subsequent conversion mediated by DNA-antibody conjugates. This protocol outlines the critical steps in flow-patterning DNA, producing and purifying DNA-antibody conjugates, and assessing the quality of the fabricated microarray. The uniformity and sensitivity are comparable with conventional microarrays, while our microarray fabrication does not require the assistance of an array printer and can be performed in most research laboratories. The other major advantage is that the size of our microarray units is 10 times smaller than that of printed arrays, offering the unique capability of analyzing functional proteins from single cells when interfacing with generic microchip designs. This barcode technology can be widely employed in biomarker detection, cell signaling studies, tissue engineering, and a variety of clinical applications.

  15. Efficient monitoring of protein ubiquitylation levels using TUBEs-based microarrays.

    PubMed

    Serna, Sonia; Xolalpa, Wendy; Lang, Valérie; Aillet, Fabienne; England, Patrick; Reichardt, Niels; Rodriguez, Manuel S

    2016-08-01

    Analyzing protein ubiquitylation changes during physiological or pathological processes is challenging due to its high reversibility and dynamic turnover of modified targets. We have developed a protein microarray to assess endogenous ubiquitylation levels from cell cultures, employing tandem ubiquitin-binding entities (TUBEs) with three or four ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains as capture probes. Adriamycin (ADR)-stimulated MCF7 cells were used to differentiate protein ubiquitylation levels between cells that are sensitive or resistant to ADR treatment. We show that TUBEs-based microarrays can be used for the analysis of cellular processes regulated by ubiquitylation and for the detection of pathologies with aberrant ubiquitylation levels. PMID:27410252

  16. Efficient monitoring of protein ubiquitylation levels using TUBEs-based microarrays.

    PubMed

    Serna, Sonia; Xolalpa, Wendy; Lang, Valérie; Aillet, Fabienne; England, Patrick; Reichardt, Niels; Rodriguez, Manuel S

    2016-08-01

    Analyzing protein ubiquitylation changes during physiological or pathological processes is challenging due to its high reversibility and dynamic turnover of modified targets. We have developed a protein microarray to assess endogenous ubiquitylation levels from cell cultures, employing tandem ubiquitin-binding entities (TUBEs) with three or four ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains as capture probes. Adriamycin (ADR)-stimulated MCF7 cells were used to differentiate protein ubiquitylation levels between cells that are sensitive or resistant to ADR treatment. We show that TUBEs-based microarrays can be used for the analysis of cellular processes regulated by ubiquitylation and for the detection of pathologies with aberrant ubiquitylation levels.

  17. Detection of antibodies against avian influenza virus by protein microarray using nucleoprotein expressed in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuhui; Wang, Xiurong; Chen, Pucheng; Zeng, Xianying; Bao, Hongmei; Wang, Yunhe; Xu, Xiaolong; Jiang, Yongping; Chen, Hualan; Li, Guangxing

    2015-04-01

    Avian influenza (AI) is an infectious disease caused by avian influenza viruses (AIVs) which belong to the influenza virus A group. AI causes tremendous economic losses in poultry industry and pose great threatens to human health. Active serologic surveillance is necessary to prevent and control the spread of AI. In this study, a protein microarray using nucleoprotein (NP) of H5N1 AIV expressed in insect cells was developed to detect antibodies against AIV NP protein. The protein microarray was used to test Newcastle disease virus (NDV), infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), AIV positive and negative sera. The results indicated that the protein microarray could hybridize specifically with antibodies against AIV with strong signals and without cross-hybridization. Moreover, 76 field serum samples were detected by microarray, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and hemagglutination inhibition test (HI). The positive rate was 92.1% (70/76), 93.4% (71/76) and 89.4% (68/76) by protein microarray, ELISA and HI test, respectively. Compared with ELISA, the microarray showed 100% (20/20) agreement ratio in chicken and 98.2% (55/56) in ornamental bird. In conclusion, this method provides an alternative serological diagnosis for influenza antibody screening and will provide a basis for the development of protein microarrays that can be used to respectively detect antibodies of different AIV subtypes and other pathogens. PMID:25650059

  18. Monitoring Protein Kinase Expression and Phosphorylation in Cell Lysates with Antibody Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Shi, Xiaoqing; Pelech, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Fuelled by advances in our understanding of the human kinome and phosphoproteome and the increasing availability of pan- and phosphosite-specific antibodies, antibody microarrays have emerged as powerful tools for interrogating protein phosphorylation-mediated signaling systems in ex vivo studies. This economical platform permits ultra-sensitive, semiquantitative measurements of the levels of hundreds of protein kinases and their substrates along with their phosphorylation status simultaneously with minute amounts of specimens. Recent technological innovations in the design and fabrication of antibody microarrays and sample preparation have permitted further refinements of the technology to yield improvements in data quality. In this chapter, we describe a detailed protocol that we have developed for tracking the expression and phosphorylation of protein kinases and their substrates in crude cell lysate samples using a high-content antibody microarray.

  19. High-resolution Mapping of Linear Antibody Epitopes Using Ultrahigh-density Peptide Microarrays*

    PubMed Central

    Buus, Søren; Rockberg, Johan; Forsström, Björn; Nilsson, Peter; Uhlen, Mathias; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies empower numerous important scientific, clinical, diagnostic, and industrial applications. Ideally, the epitope(s) targeted by an antibody should be identified and characterized, thereby establishing antibody reactivity, highlighting possible cross-reactivities, and perhaps even warning against unwanted (e.g. autoimmune) reactivities. Antibodies target proteins as either conformational or linear epitopes. The latter are typically probed with peptides, but the cost of peptide screening programs tends to prohibit comprehensive specificity analysis. To perform high-throughput, high-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes, we have used ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays generating several hundred thousand different peptides per array. Using exhaustive length and substitution analysis, we have successfully examined the specificity of a panel of polyclonal antibodies raised against linear epitopes of the human proteome and obtained very detailed descriptions of the involved specificities. The epitopes identified ranged from 4 to 12 amino acids in size. In general, the antibodies were of exquisite specificity, frequently disallowing even single conservative substitutions. In several cases, multiple distinct epitopes could be identified for the same target protein, suggesting an efficient approach to the generation of paired antibodies. Two alternative epitope mapping approaches identified similar, although not necessarily identical, epitopes. These results show that ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays can be used for linear epitope mapping. With an upper theoretical limit of 2,000,000 individual peptides per array, these peptide microarrays may even be used for a systematic validation of antibodies at the proteomic level. PMID:22984286

  20. Evaluation of Solid Supports for Slide- and Well-Based Recombinant Antibody Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Gerdtsson, Anna S.; Dexlin-Mellby, Linda; Delfani, Payam; Berglund, Erica; Borrebaeck, Carl A. K.; Wingren, Christer

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays have emerged as an important tool within proteomics, enabling multiplexed protein expression profiling in both health and disease. The design and performance of antibody microarrays and how they are processed are dependent on several factors, of which the interplay between the antibodies and the solid surfaces plays a central role. In this study, we have taken on the first comprehensive view and evaluated the overall impact of solid surfaces on the recombinant antibody microarray design. The results clearly demonstrated the importance of the surface-antibody interaction and showed the effect of the solid supports on the printing process, the array format of planar arrays (slide- and well-based), the assay performance (spot features, reproducibility, specificity and sensitivity) and assay processing (degree of automation). In the end, two high-end recombinant antibody microarray technology platforms were designed, based on slide-based (black polymer) and well-based (clear polymer) arrays, paving the way for future large-scale protein expression profiling efforts. PMID:27600082

  1. Evaluation of Solid Supports for Slide- and Well-Based Recombinant Antibody Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Gerdtsson, Anna S.; Dexlin-Mellby, Linda; Delfani, Payam; Berglund, Erica; Borrebaeck, Carl A. K.; Wingren, Christer

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays have emerged as an important tool within proteomics, enabling multiplexed protein expression profiling in both health and disease. The design and performance of antibody microarrays and how they are processed are dependent on several factors, of which the interplay between the antibodies and the solid surfaces plays a central role. In this study, we have taken on the first comprehensive view and evaluated the overall impact of solid surfaces on the recombinant antibody microarray design. The results clearly demonstrated the importance of the surface-antibody interaction and showed the effect of the solid supports on the printing process, the array format of planar arrays (slide- and well-based), the assay performance (spot features, reproducibility, specificity and sensitivity) and assay processing (degree of automation). In the end, two high-end recombinant antibody microarray technology platforms were designed, based on slide-based (black polymer) and well-based (clear polymer) arrays, paving the way for future large-scale protein expression profiling efforts.

  2. Evaluation of Solid Supports for Slide- and Well-Based Recombinant Antibody Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Gerdtsson, Anna S; Dexlin-Mellby, Linda; Delfani, Payam; Berglund, Erica; Borrebaeck, Carl A K; Wingren, Christer

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays have emerged as an important tool within proteomics, enabling multiplexed protein expression profiling in both health and disease. The design and performance of antibody microarrays and how they are processed are dependent on several factors, of which the interplay between the antibodies and the solid surfaces plays a central role. In this study, we have taken on the first comprehensive view and evaluated the overall impact of solid surfaces on the recombinant antibody microarray design. The results clearly demonstrated the importance of the surface-antibody interaction and showed the effect of the solid supports on the printing process, the array format of planar arrays (slide- and well-based), the assay performance (spot features, reproducibility, specificity and sensitivity) and assay processing (degree of automation). In the end, two high-end recombinant antibody microarray technology platforms were designed, based on slide-based (black polymer) and well-based (clear polymer) arrays, paving the way for future large-scale protein expression profiling efforts. PMID:27600082

  3. Microarrays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are revolutionizing genetics by making it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands of DNA markers and to assess the expression (RNA transcripts) of all of the genes in the genome. Microarrays are slides the size of a postage stamp that contain millions of DNA sequences to which single-stranded DNA or RNA can hybridize. This…

  4. Technical Advances of the Recombinant Antibody Microarray Technology Platform for Clinical Immunoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Delfani, Payam; Dexlin Mellby, Linda; Nordström, Malin; Holmér, Andreas; Ohlsson, Mattias; Borrebaeck, Carl A. K.; Wingren, Christer

    2016-01-01

    In the quest for deciphering disease-associated biomarkers, high-performing tools for multiplexed protein expression profiling of crude clinical samples will be crucial. Affinity proteomics, mainly represented by antibody-based microarrays, have during recent years been established as a proteomic tool providing unique opportunities for parallelized protein expression profiling. But despite the progress, several main technical features and assay procedures remains to be (fully) resolved. Among these issues, the handling of protein microarray data, i.e. the biostatistics parts, is one of the key features to solve. In this study, we have therefore further optimized, validated, and standardized our in-house designed recombinant antibody microarray technology platform. To this end, we addressed the main remaining technical issues (e.g. antibody quality, array production, sample labelling, and selected assay conditions) and most importantly key biostatistics subjects (e.g. array data pre-processing and biomarker panel condensation). This represents one of the first antibody array studies in which these key biostatistics subjects have been studied in detail. Here, we thus present the next generation of the recombinant antibody microarray technology platform designed for clinical immunoproteomics. PMID:27414037

  5. Surface-activated microtiter-plate microarray for simultaneous CRP quantification and viral antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Viitala, Sari M; Jääskeläinen, Anne J; Kelo, Eira; Sirola, Helena; Moilanen, Kirsi; Suni, Jukka; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli; Närvänen, Ale

    2013-02-01

    Microarrays are widely used in high-throughput DNA and RNA hybridization tests and recently adopted to protein and small molecule interaction studies in basic research and diagnostics. Parallel detection of serum antibodies and antigens has several potential applications in epidemiologic research, vaccine development, and in the diagnosis of allergies, autoimmunity, and infectious diseases. This study demonstrates an immobilization method for immunoassay-based microarray in conventional 96-well polystyrene plates for a serologic diagnostic method combined with quantitative C-reactive protein (CRP) assay. A synthetic peptide (HIV-1), a recombinant protein (Puumala hantavirus nucleocapsid), and purified virus preparations (Sindbis and adenoviruses) were used as antigens for virus-specific antibody detection and monoclonal anti-CRP antibody for antigen detection. The microarray was based on conventional enzyme immunoassays and densitometry from photographed results. Peptide and recombinant antigens functioned well, while whole virus antigens gave discrepant results in 1 out of 23 samples from the reference method, tested with human sera with various antibody responses. The CRP results were in concordance in the concentration range 0.5-150 mg/L with 2 commercially available CRP assays: ReaScan rapid test (R(2) = 0.9975) and Cobas 6000 analyzer (R(2) =0.9595). The results indicate that microtiter plates provide a promising platform for further development of microarrays for parallel antibody and antigen detection. PMID:23219230

  6. Technical Advances of the Recombinant Antibody Microarray Technology Platform for Clinical Immunoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Delfani, Payam; Dexlin Mellby, Linda; Nordström, Malin; Holmér, Andreas; Ohlsson, Mattias; Borrebaeck, Carl A K; Wingren, Christer

    2016-01-01

    In the quest for deciphering disease-associated biomarkers, high-performing tools for multiplexed protein expression profiling of crude clinical samples will be crucial. Affinity proteomics, mainly represented by antibody-based microarrays, have during recent years been established as a proteomic tool providing unique opportunities for parallelized protein expression profiling. But despite the progress, several main technical features and assay procedures remains to be (fully) resolved. Among these issues, the handling of protein microarray data, i.e. the biostatistics parts, is one of the key features to solve. In this study, we have therefore further optimized, validated, and standardized our in-house designed recombinant antibody microarray technology platform. To this end, we addressed the main remaining technical issues (e.g. antibody quality, array production, sample labelling, and selected assay conditions) and most importantly key biostatistics subjects (e.g. array data pre-processing and biomarker panel condensation). This represents one of the first antibody array studies in which these key biostatistics subjects have been studied in detail. Here, we thus present the next generation of the recombinant antibody microarray technology platform designed for clinical immunoproteomics.

  7. Antibody Colocalization Microarray: A Scalable Technology for Multiplex Protein Analysis in Complex Samples*

    PubMed Central

    Pla-Roca, M.; Leulmi, R. F.; Tourekhanova, S.; Bergeron, S.; Laforte, V.; Moreau, E.; Gosline, S. J. C.; Bertos, N.; Hallett, M.; Park, M.; Juncker, D.

    2012-01-01

    DNA microarrays were rapidly scaled up from 256 to 6.5 million targets, and although antibody microarrays were proposed earlier, sensitive multiplex sandwich assays have only been scaled up to a few tens of targets. Cross-reactivity, arising because detection antibodies are mixed, is a known weakness of multiplex sandwich assays that is mitigated by lengthy optimization. Here, we introduce (1) vulnerability as a metric for assays. The vulnerability of multiplex sandwich assays to cross-reactivity increases quadratically with the number of targets, and together with experimental results, substantiates that scaling up of multiplex sandwich assays is unfeasible. We propose (2) a novel concept for multiplexing without mixing named antibody colocalization microarray (ACM). In ACMs, both capture and detection antibodies are physically colocalized by spotting to the same two-dimensional coordinate. Following spotting of the capture antibodies, the chip is removed from the arrayer, incubated with the sample, placed back onto the arrayer and then spotted with the detection antibodies. ACMs with up to 50 targets were produced, along with a binding curve for each protein. The ACM was validated by comparing it to ELISA and to a small-scale, conventional multiplex sandwich assay (MSA). Using ACMs, proteins in the serum of breast cancer patients and healthy controls were quantified, and six candidate biomarkers identified. Our results indicate that ACMs are sensitive, robust, and scalable. PMID:22171321

  8. Erratum: Colorectal Cancer Cell Surface Protein Profiling Using an Antibody Microarray and Fluorescence Multiplexing.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The author's email has been corrected in the publication of Colorectal Cancer Cell Surface Protein Profiling Using an Antibody Microarray and Fluorescence Multiplexing. There was an error with the author, Jerry Zhou's, email. The author's email has been updated to: j.zhou@uws.edu.au from: jzho7551@mail.usyd.edu.au. PMID:26167960

  9. Antibody microarray profiling of osteosarcoma cell serum for identifying potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zi-Qiang; Tang, Jin-Shan; Gang, Duan; Wang, Ming-Xing; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Lei, Zhou; Feng, Zhou; Fang, Ming-Liang; Yan, Lin

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify biomarkers in osteosarcoma (OS) cell serum by antibody microarray profiling, which may be used for OS diagnosis and therapy. An antibody microarray was used to detect the expression levels of cytokines in serum samples from 20 patients with OS and 20 healthy individuals. Significantly expressed cytokines in OS serum were selected when P<0.05 and fold change >2. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to validate the antibody microarray results. Finally, classification accuracy was calculated by cluster analysis. Twenty one cytokines were significantly upregulated in OS cell serum samples compared with control samples. Expression of interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor growth factor-β, growth-related oncogene, hepatocyte growth factor, chemokine ligand 16, Endoglin, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and platelet-derived growth factor-AA was validated by ELISAs. OS serum samples and control samples were distinguished by significantly expressed cytokines with an accuracy of 95%. The results demonstrated that expressed cytokines identified by antibody microarray may be used as biomarkers for OS diagnosis and therapy.

  10. Antibody microarray profiling of osteosarcoma cell serum for identifying potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zi-Qiang; Tang, Jin-Shan; Gang, Duan; Wang, Ming-Xing; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Lei, Zhou; Feng, Zhou; Fang, Ming-Liang; Yan, Lin

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify biomarkers in osteosarcoma (OS) cell serum by antibody microarray profiling, which may be used for OS diagnosis and therapy. An antibody microarray was used to detect the expression levels of cytokines in serum samples from 20 patients with OS and 20 healthy individuals. Significantly expressed cytokines in OS serum were selected when P<0.05 and fold change >2. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to validate the antibody microarray results. Finally, classification accuracy was calculated by cluster analysis. Twenty one cytokines were significantly upregulated in OS cell serum samples compared with control samples. Expression of interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor growth factor-β, growth-related oncogene, hepatocyte growth factor, chemokine ligand 16, Endoglin, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and platelet-derived growth factor-AA was validated by ELISAs. OS serum samples and control samples were distinguished by significantly expressed cytokines with an accuracy of 95%. The results demonstrated that expressed cytokines identified by antibody microarray may be used as biomarkers for OS diagnosis and therapy. PMID:25815525

  11. Cluster of differentiation antibody microarrays on plasma immersion ion implanted polycarbonate.

    PubMed

    Kosobrodova, E; Mohamed, A; Su, Y; Kondyurin, A; dos Remedios, C G; McKenzie, D R; Bilek, M M M

    2014-02-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) modifies the surface properties of polymers, enabling them to covalently immobilize proteins without using linker chemistry. We describe the use of PIII treated polycarbonate (PC) slides as a novel platform for producing microarrays of cluster of differentiation (CD) antibodies. We compare their performance to identical antibody microarrays printed on nitrocellulose-coated glass slides that are currently the industry standard. Populations of leukocytes are applied to the CD microarrays and unbound cells are removed revealing patterns of differentially immobilized cells that are detected in a simple label-free approach by scanning the slides with visible light. Intra-slide and inter-slide reproducibility, densities of bound cells, and limits of detection were determined. Compared to the nitrocellulose-coated glass slides, PIII treated PC slides have a lower background noise, better sensitivity, and comparable or better reproducibility. They require three-fold lower antibody concentrations to yield equivalent signal strength, resulting in significant reductions in production cost. The improved transparency of PIII treated PC in the near-UV and visible wavelengths combined with superior immobilization of biomolecules makes them an attractive platform for a wide range of microarray applications.

  12. A multivariate approach for high throughput pectin profiling by combining glycan microarrays with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sousa, António G; Ahl, Louise I; Pedersen, Henriette L; Fangel, Jonatan U; Sørensen, Susanne O; Willats, William G T

    2015-05-29

    Pectin-one of the most complex biomacromolecules in nature has been extensively studied using various techniques. This has been done so in an attempt to understand the chemical composition and conformation of pectin, whilst discovering and optimising new industrial applications of the polymer. For the last decade the emergence of glycan microarray technology has led to a growing capacity of acquiring simultaneous measurements related to various carbohydrate characteristics while generating large collections of data. Here we used a multivariate analysis approach in order to analyse a set of 359 pectin samples probed with 14 different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) regression were utilised to obtain the most optimal qualitative and quantitative information from the spotted microarrays. The potential use of microarray technology combined with chemometrics for the accurate determination of degree of methyl-esterification (DM) and degree of blockiness (DB) was assessed. PMID:25950120

  13. Development of an antigen microarray for high throughput monoclonal antibody selection

    PubMed Central

    Staudt, Nicole; Müller-Sienerth, Nicole; Wright, Gavin J.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are valuable laboratory reagents and are increasingly being exploited as therapeutics to treat a range of diseases. Selecting new monoclonal antibodies that are validated to work in particular applications, despite the availability of several different techniques, can be resource intensive with uncertain outcomes. To address this, we have developed an approach that enables early screening of hybridoma supernatants generated from an animal immunised with up to five different antigens followed by cloning of the antibody into a single expression plasmid. While this approach relieved the cellular cloning bottleneck and had the desirable ability to screen antibody function prior to cloning, the small volume of hybridoma supernatant available for screening limited the number of antigens for pooled immunisation. Here, we report the development of an antigen microarray that significantly reduces the volume of supernatant required for functional screening. This approach permits a significant increase in the number of antigens for parallel monoclonal antibody selection from a single animal. Finally, we show the successful use of a convenient small-scale transfection method to rapidly identify plasmids that encode functional cloned antibodies, addressing another bottleneck in this approach. In summary, we show that a hybrid approach of combining established hybridoma antibody technology with refined screening and antibody cloning methods can be used to select monoclonal antibodies of desired functional properties against many different antigens from a single immunised host. PMID:24472540

  14. Evaluating mixtures of 14 hygroscopic additives to improve antibody microarray performance.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Sébastien; Laforte, Veronique; Lo, Pik-Shan; Li, Huiyan; Juncker, David

    2015-11-01

    Microarrays allow the miniaturization and multiplexing of biological assays while only requiring minute amounts of samples. As a consequence of the small volumes used for spotting and the assays, evaporation often deteriorates the quality, reproducibility of spots, and the overall assay performance. Glycerol is commonly added to antibody microarray printing buffers to decrease evaporation; however, it often decreases the binding of antibodies to the surface, thereby negatively affecting assay sensitivity. Here, combinations of 14 hygroscopic chemicals were used as additives to printing buffers for contact-printed antibody microarrays on four different surface chemistries. The ability of the additives to suppress evaporation was quantified by measuring the residual buffer volume in open quill pins over time. The seven best additives were then printed either individually or as a 1:1 mixture of two additives, and the homogeneity, intensity, and reproducibility of both the spotted protein and of a fluorescently labeled analyte in an assay were quantified. Among the 28 combinations on the four slides, many were found to outperform glycerol, and the best additive mixtures were further evaluated by changing the ratio of the two additives. We observed that the optimal additive mixture was dependent on the slide chemistry, and that it was possible to increase the binding of antibodies to the surface threefold compared to 50 % glycerol, while decreasing whole-slide coefficient of variation to 5.9 %. For the two best slides, improvements were made for both the limit of detection (1.6× and 5.9×, respectively) and the quantification range (1.2× and 2.1×, respectively). The additive mixtures identified here thus help improve assay reproducibility and performance, and might be beneficial to all types of microarrays that suffer from evaporation of the printing buffers.

  15. An Integrated Peptide-Antigen Microarray on Plasmonic Gold Films for Sensitive Human Antibody Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jordan V.; Tabakman, Scott M.; Li, Yanguang; Gong, Ming; Hong, Guosong; Feng, Ju; Utz, Paul J.; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput screening for interactions of peptides with a variety of antibody targets could greatly facilitate proteomic analysis for epitope mapping, enzyme profiling, drug discovery and biomarker identification. Peptide microarrays are suited for such undertaking because of their high-throughput capability. However, existing peptide microarrays lack the sensitivity needed for detecting low abundance proteins or low affinity peptide-protein interactions. This work presents a new peptide microarray platform constructed on nanostructured plasmonic gold substrates capable of metal enhanced NIR fluorescence enhancement (NIR-FE) by hundreds of folds for screening peptide-antibody interactions with ultrahigh sensitivity. Further, an integrated histone peptide and whole antigen array is developed on the same plasmonic gold chip for profiling human antibodies in the sera of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, revealing that collectively a panel of biomarkers against unmodified and post-translationally modified histone peptides and several whole antigens allow more accurate differentiation of SLE patients from healthy individuals than profiling biomarkers against peptides or whole antigens alone. PMID:23923050

  16. Performance of a multiplexed serological microarray for the detection of antibodies against central nervous system pathogens.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, Anne J; Viitala, Sari M; Kurkela, Satu; Hepojoki, Satu; Sillanpää, Heidi; Kallio-Kokko, Hannimari; Bergström, Tomas; Suni, Jukka; Närvänen, Ale; Vapalahti, Olli; Vaheri, Antti

    2014-05-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infections have multiple potential causative agents for which simultaneous pathogen screening can provide a useful tool. This study evaluated a multiplexed microarray for the simultaneous detection of antibodies against CNS pathogens. The performance of selected microarray antigens for the detection of IgG antibodies against herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), varicella-zoster virus (VZV), adenovirus, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, was evaluated using serum sample panels tested with reference assays used in a routine diagnostic laboratory. The microarray sensitivity for HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV, adenovirus and M. pneumonia ranged from 77% to 100%, and the specificity ranged from 74% to 97%. Very variable sensitivities and specificities were found for borrelial antigens of three different VlsE protein IR(6) peptide variants (IR6p1, IR6p2, IR6p4) and three recombinant decorin binding proteins A (DbpA; DbpAIa, DbpA91, DbpAG40). For single antigens, good specificity was shown for antigens of IR6p4 and DbpAIa (96%), while DbpA91, IR6p1 and IR6p2 were moderately specific (88-92%). The analytical sensitivity of the microarray was dependent on the borrelial IgG concentration of the specimen. The overall performance and technical features of the platform showed that the platform supports both recombinant proteins, whole viruses and peptides as antigens. This study showed diagnostic potential for all six CNS pathogens, including Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, using glutaraldehyde based microarray, and further highlighted the importance of careful antigen selection and the requirement for the use of multiple borrelial antigens in order to increase specificity without a major lack of sensitivity.

  17. Regeneration of recombinant antigen microarrays for the automated monitoring of antibodies against zoonotic pathogens in swine sera.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Verena K; Kober, Catharina; Niessner, Reinhard; Seidel, Michael

    2015-01-23

    The ability to regenerate immobilized proteins like recombinant antigens (rAgs) on surfaces is an unsolved problem for flow-based immunoassays on microarray analysis systems. The regeneration on microarray chip surfaces is achieved by changing the protein structures and desorption of antibodies. Afterwards, reactivation of immobilized protein antigens is necessary for reconstitution processes. Any backfolding should be managed in a way that antibodies are able to detect the protein antigens in the next measurement cycle. The regeneration of rAg microarrays was examined for the first time on the MCR3 flow-based chemiluminescence (CL) microarray analysis platform. The aim was to reuse rAg microarray chips in order to reduce the screening effort and costs. An antibody capturing format was used to detect antibodies against zoonotic pathogens in sera of slaughtered pigs. Different denaturation and reactivation buffers were tested. Acidic glycine-SDS buffer (pH 2.5) and 8 M guanidinium hydrochloride showed the best results in respect of denaturation efficiencies. The highest CL signals after regeneration were achieved with a carbonate buffer containing 10 mM DTT and 0.1% BSA for reactivation. Antibodies against Yersinia spp. and hepatitis E virus (HEV) were detected in swine sera on one immunochip over 4 days and 25 measurement cycles. Each cycle took 10 min for detection and regeneration. By using the rAg microarray chip, a fast and automated screening of antibodies against pathogens in sera of slaughtered pigs would be possible for zoonosis monitoring.

  18. Generation and analyses of human synthetic antibody libraries and their application for protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Säll, Anna; Walle, Maria; Wingren, Christer; Müller, Susanne; Nyman, Tomas; Vala, Andrea; Ohlin, Mats; Borrebaeck, Carl A K; Persson, Helena

    2016-10-01

    Antibody-based proteomics offers distinct advantages in the analysis of complex samples for discovery and validation of biomarkers associated with disease. However, its large-scale implementation requires tools and technologies that allow development of suitable antibody or antibody fragments in a high-throughput manner. To address this we designed and constructed two human synthetic antibody fragment (scFv) libraries denoted HelL-11 and HelL-13. By the use of phage display technology, in total 466 unique scFv antibodies specific for 114 different antigens were generated. The specificities of these antibodies were analyzed in a variety of immunochemical assays and a subset was further evaluated for functionality in protein microarray applications. This high-throughput approach demonstrates the ability to rapidly generate a wealth of reagents not only for proteome research, but potentially also for diagnostics and therapeutics. In addition, this work provides a great example on how a synthetic approach can be used to optimize library designs. By having precise control of the diversity introduced into the antigen-binding sites, synthetic libraries offer increased understanding of how different diversity contributes to antibody binding reactivity and stability, thereby providing the key to future library optimization. PMID:27590051

  19. Antibody Microarray for E. coli O157:H7 and Shiga Toxin in Microtiter Plates.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Andrew G; Brewster, Jeffrey D; He, Yiping; Irwin, Peter L; Paoli, George C; Simons, Tawana; Tu, Shu-I; Uknalis, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Antibody microarray is a powerful analytical technique because of its inherent ability to simultaneously discriminate and measure numerous analytes, therefore making the technique conducive to both the multiplexed detection and identification of bacterial analytes (i.e., whole cells, as well as associated metabolites and/or toxins). We developed a sandwich fluorescent immunoassay combined with a high-throughput, multiwell plate microarray detection format. Inexpensive polystyrene plates were employed containing passively adsorbed, array-printed capture antibodies. During sample reaction, centrifugation was the only strategy found to significantly improve capture, and hence detection, of bacteria (pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7) to planar capture surfaces containing printed antibodies. Whereas several other sample incubation techniques (e.g., static vs. agitation) had minimal effect. Immobilized bacteria were labeled with a red-orange-fluorescent dye (Alexa Fluor 555) conjugated antibody to allow for quantitative detection of the captured bacteria with a laser scanner. Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1) could be simultaneously detected along with the cells, but none of the agitation techniques employed during incubation improved detection of the relatively small biomolecule. Under optimal conditions, the assay had demonstrated limits of detection of ~5.8 × 10⁵ cells/mL and 110 ng/mL for E. coli O157:H7 and Stx1, respectively, in a ~75 min total assay time. PMID:26690151

  20. CYANOCHIP: an antibody microarray for high-taxonomical-resolution cyanobacterial monitoring.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Yolanda; Quesada, Antonio; Gallardo-Carreño, Ignacio; Aguirre, Jacobo; Parro, Victor

    2015-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are Gram-negative photosynthetic prokaryotes that are widespread on Earth. Eutrophication and global warming make some aquatic ecosystems behave as bioreactors that trigger rapid and massive cyanobacterial growth with remarkable economic and health consequences. Rapid and efficient early warning systems are required to support decisions by water body authorities. We have produced 17 specific antibodies to the most frequent cyanobacterial strains blooming in freshwater ecosystems, some of which are toxin producers. A sandwich-type antibody microarray immunoassay (CYANOCHIP) was developed for the simultaneous testing of any of the 17 strains, or other closely related strains, in field samples from different habitats (water, rocks, and sediments). We titrated and tested all of the antibodies in succession using a fluorescent sandwich microarray immunoassay. Although most showed high specificity, we applied a deconvolution method based on graph theory to disentangle the few existing cross-reactions. The CYANOCHIP sensitivity ranged from 10(2) to 10(4) cells mL(-1), with most antibodies detecting approximately 10(2) cells mL(-1). We validated the system by testing multiple isolates and crude natural samples from freshwater reservoirs and rocks, both in the laboratory and by in situ testing in the field. The results demonstrated that CYANOCHIP is a valuable tool for the sensitive and reliable detection of cyanobacteria for early warning and research purposes.

  1. Antibody Microarray for E. coli O157:H7 and Shiga Toxin in Microtiter Plates

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Andrew G.; Brewster, Jeffrey D.; He, Yiping; Irwin, Peter L.; Paoli, George C.; Simons, Tawana; Tu, Shu-I; Uknalis, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Antibody microarray is a powerful analytical technique because of its inherent ability to simultaneously discriminate and measure numerous analytes, therefore making the technique conducive to both the multiplexed detection and identification of bacterial analytes (i.e., whole cells, as well as associated metabolites and/or toxins). We developed a sandwich fluorescent immunoassay combined with a high-throughput, multiwell plate microarray detection format. Inexpensive polystyrene plates were employed containing passively adsorbed, array-printed capture antibodies. During sample reaction, centrifugation was the only strategy found to significantly improve capture, and hence detection, of bacteria (pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7) to planar capture surfaces containing printed antibodies. Whereas several other sample incubation techniques (e.g., static vs. agitation) had minimal effect. Immobilized bacteria were labeled with a red-orange-fluorescent dye (Alexa Fluor 555) conjugated antibody to allow for quantitative detection of the captured bacteria with a laser scanner. Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1) could be simultaneously detected along with the cells, but none of the agitation techniques employed during incubation improved detection of the relatively small biomolecule. Under optimal conditions, the assay had demonstrated limits of detection of ~5.8 × 105 cells/mL and 110 ng/mL for E. coli O157:H7 and Stx1, respectively, in a ~75 min total assay time. PMID:26690151

  2. Serum antibody screening by surface plasmon resonance using a natural glycan microarray.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Arjen R; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M; Wuhrer, M

    2008-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based natural glycan microarray was developed for screening of interactions between glycans and carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBPs). The microarray contained 144 glycan samples and allowed the real-time and simultaneous screening for recognition by CBPs without the need of fluorescent labeling. Glycans were released from their natural source and coupled by reductive amination with the fluorescent labels 2-aminobenzamide (2AB) or anthranilic acid (AA) followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation making use of the fluorescent tag. The released and labeled glycans, in addition to fluorescently labeled synthetic glycans and (neo)glycoproteins, were printed on an epoxide-activated chip at fmol amounts. This resulted in covalent immobilization, with the epoxide groups forming covalent bonds to the secondary amine groups present on the fluorescent glycoconjugates. The generated SPR glycan array presented a subset of the glycan repertoire of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. In order to demonstrate the usefulness of the array in the simultaneous detection of glycan-specific serum antibodies, the anti-glycan antibody profiles from sera of S. mansoni-infected individuals as well as from non-endemic uninfected controls were recorded. The SPR screening was sensitive for differences between infection sera and control sera, and revealed antibody titers and antibody classes (IgG or IgM). All SPR analyses were performed with a single SPR array chip, which required regeneration and blocking of the chip before the application of a serum sample. Our results indicate that SPR-based arrays constructed from glycans of natural or synthetic origin, pure or as mixture, can be used for determining serum antibody profiles as possible markers for the infection status of an individual.

  3. Antibody microarray analyses of signal transduction protein expression and phosphorylation during porcine oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Pelech, Steven; Jelinkova, Lucie; Susor, Andrej; Zhang, Hong; Shi, Xiaoqing; Pavlok, Antonin; Kubelka, Michal; Kovarova, Hana

    2008-07-01

    Kinex antibody microarray analyses was used to investigate the regulation of 188 protein kinases, 24 protein phosphatases, and 170 other regulatory proteins during meiotic maturation of immature germinal vesicle (GV+) pig oocytes to maturing oocytes that had completed meiosis I (MI), and fully mature oocytes arrested at metaphase of meiosis II (MII). Increases in apparent protein levels of protein kinases accounted for most of the detected changes during the GV to MI transition, whereas reduced protein kinase levels and increased protein phosphorylation characterized the MI to MII transition. During the MI to MII period, many of the MI-associated increased levels of the proteins and phosphosites were completely or partially reversed. The regulation of these proteins were also examined in parallel during the meiotic maturation of bovine, frog, and sea star oocytes with the Kinex antibody microarray. Western blotting analyses confirmed altered expression levels of Bub1A, IRAK4, MST2, PP4C, and Rsk2, and the phosphorylation site changes in the kinases Erk5 (T218 + Y220), FAK (S722), GSK3-beta (Y216), MEK1 (S217 + S221) and PKR1 (T451), and nucleophosmin/B23 (S4) during pig oocyte maturation.

  4. Microarray screening of Guillain-Barré syndrome sera for antibodies to glycolipid complexes

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Susan K.; Kalna, Gabriela; Islam, Mohammad B.; Jahan, Israt; Mohammad, Quazi D.; Jacobs, Bart C.; Endtz, Hubert P.; Islam, Zhahirul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the patterns of autoantibodies to glycolipid complexes in a large cohort of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and control samples collected in Bangladesh using a newly developed microarray technique. Methods: Twelve commonly studied glycolipids and lipids, plus their 66 possible heteromeric complexes, totaling 78 antigens, were applied to polyvinylidene fluoride–coated slides using a microarray printer. Arrays were probed with 266 GBS and 579 control sera (2 μL per serum, diluted 1/50) and bound immunoglobulin G detected with secondary antibody. Scanned arrays were subjected to statistical analyses. Results: Measuring antibodies to single targets was 9% less sensitive than to heteromeric complex targets (49.2% vs 58.3%) without significantly affecting specificity (83.9%–85.0%). The optimal screening protocol for GBS sera comprised a panel of 10 glycolipids (4 single glycolipids GM1, GA1, GD1a, GQ1b, and their 6 heteromeric complexes), resulting in an overall assay sensitivity of 64.3% and specificity of 77.1%. Notable heteromeric targets were GM1:GD1a, GM1:GQ1b, and GA1:GD1a, in which exclusive binding to the complex was observed. Conclusions: Rationalizing the screening protocol to capture the enormous diversity of glycolipid complexes can be achieved by miniaturizing the screening platform to a microarray platform, and applying simple bioinformatics to determine optimal sensitivity and specificity of the targets. Glycolipid complexes are an important category of glycolipid antigens in autoimmune neuropathy cases that require specific analytical and bioinformatics methods for optimal detection. PMID:27790627

  5. Direct, Specific and Rapid Detection of Staphylococcal Proteins and Exotoxins Using a Multiplex Antibody Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Stieber, Bettina; Monecke, Stefan; Müller, Elke; Büchler, Joseph; Ehricht, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background S. aureus is a pathogen in humans and animals that harbors a wide variety of virulence factors and resistance genes. This bacterium can cause a wide range of mild to life-threatening diseases. In the latter case, fast diagnostic procedures are important. In routine diagnostic laboratories, several genotypic and phenotypic methods are available to identify S. aureus strains and determine their resistances. However, there is a demand for multiplex routine diagnostic tests to directly detect staphylococcal toxins and proteins. Methods In this study, an antibody microarray based assay was established and validated for the rapid detection of staphylococcal markers and exotoxins. The following targets were included: staphylococcal protein A, penicillin binding protein 2a, alpha- and beta-hemolysins, Panton Valentine leukocidin, toxic shock syndrome toxin, enterotoxins A and B as well as staphylokinase. All were detected simultaneously within a single experiment, starting from a clonal culture on standard media. The detection of bound proteins was performed using a new fluorescence reading device for microarrays. Results 110 reference strains and clinical isolates were analyzed using this assay, with a DNA microarray for genotypic characterization performed in parallel. The results showed a general high concordance of genotypic and phenotypic data. However, genotypic analysis found the hla gene present in all S. aureus isolates but its expression under given conditions depended on the clonal complex affiliation of the actual isolate. Conclusions The multiplex antibody assay described herein allowed a rapid and reliable detection of clinically relevant staphylococcal toxins as well as resistance- and species-specific markers. PMID:26624622

  6. High-throughput carbohydrate microarray profiling of 27 antibodies demonstrates widespread specificity problems.

    PubMed

    Manimala, Joseph C; Roach, Timothy A; Li, Zhitao; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C

    2007-08-01

    Progress toward understanding the biological roles of carbohydrates has been remarkably slow, and efforts to exploit this class of biopolymers as diagnostic and therapeutic targets have proven extremely challenging. Both basic and clinical research rely heavily on identifying and monitoring expression levels of carbohydrates. Over the last 30 years, the majority of expression information has been derived from antibody- and lectin-binding studies. Using a carbohydrate microarray containing 80 different glycans and glycoproteins, the specificities of 27 antiglycan antibodies were evaluated, including antibodies to histo-blood group A, B, and H antigens (81FR2.2, CLCP-19B, B389, 92FR-A2, B480, B460, B376, and B393), Lewis antigens (7LE, 15C02, 28, ZC-18C, 121SLE, CA199.02, PR.5C5, 2-25LE, BR55, T174, T218, F3, A70-C/C8, FR4A5, and K21), and other tumor-associated antigens (B389, 1A4, B1.1, and 5B5). In total, evaluation of over 2000 individual carbohydrate-protein interactions was carried out. More than half of the antibodies considered to be specific for their designated antigen were found to cross-react with other glycans. The cross-reactive glycans could be mistaken for the designated antigen in biopsy samples or other biological samples, leading to inaccurate conclusions. PMID:17483136

  7. Two-color, rolling-circle amplification on antibody microarrays for sensitive, multiplexed serum-protein measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heping; Bouwman, Kerri; Schotanus, Mark; Verweij, Cornelius; Marrero, Jorge A; Dillon, Deborah; Costa, Jose; Lizardi, Paul; Haab, Brian B

    2004-01-01

    The ability to conveniently and rapidly profile a diverse set of proteins has valuable applications. In a step toward further enabling such a capability, we developed the use of rolling-circle amplification (RCA) to measure the relative levels of proteins from two serum samples, labeled with biotin and digoxigenin, respectively, that have been captured on antibody microarrays. Two-color RCA produced fluorescence up to 30-fold higher than direct-labeling and indirect-detection methods using antibody microarrays prepared on both polyacrylamide-based hydrogels and nitrocellulose. Replicate RCA measurements of multiple proteins from sets of 24 serum samples were highly reproducible and accurate. In addition, RCA enabled reproducible measurements of distinct expression profiles from lower-abundance proteins that were not measurable using the other detection methods. Two-color RCA on antibody microarrays should allow the convenient acquisition of expression profiles from a great diversity of proteins for a variety of applications.

  8. Two-color, rolling-circle amplification on antibody microarrays for sensitive, multiplexed serum-protein measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heping; Bouwman, Kerri; Schotanus, Mark; Verweij, Cornelius; Marrero, Jorge A; Dillon, Deborah; Costa, Jose; Lizardi, Paul; Haab, Brian B

    2004-01-01

    The ability to conveniently and rapidly profile a diverse set of proteins has valuable applications. In a step toward further enabling such a capability, we developed the use of rolling-circle amplification (RCA) to measure the relative levels of proteins from two serum samples, labeled with biotin and digoxigenin, respectively, that have been captured on antibody microarrays. Two-color RCA produced fluorescence up to 30-fold higher than direct-labeling and indirect-detection methods using antibody microarrays prepared on both polyacrylamide-based hydrogels and nitrocellulose. Replicate RCA measurements of multiple proteins from sets of 24 serum samples were highly reproducible and accurate. In addition, RCA enabled reproducible measurements of distinct expression profiles from lower-abundance proteins that were not measurable using the other detection methods. Two-color RCA on antibody microarrays should allow the convenient acquisition of expression profiles from a great diversity of proteins for a variety of applications. PMID:15059261

  9. Assessing antibody microarrays for space missions: effect of long-term storage, gamma radiation, and temperature shifts on printed and fluorescently labeled antibodies.

    PubMed

    de Diego-Castilla, Graciela; Cruz-Gil, Patricia; Mateo-Martí, Eva; Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Rivas, Luis A; Parro, Víctor

    2011-10-01

    Antibody microarrays are becoming frequently used tools for analytical purposes. A key factor for optimal performance is the stability of the immobilized (capturing) antibodies as well as those that have been fluorescently labeled to achieve the immunological test (tracers). This is especially critical for long-distance transport, field testing, or planetary exploration. A number of different environmental stresses may affect the antibody integrity, such as dryness, sudden temperature shift cycles, or, as in the case of space science, exposure to large quantities of the highly penetrating gamma radiation. Here, we report on the effect of certain stabilizing solutions for long-term storage of printed antibody microarrays under different conditions. We tested the effect of gamma radiation on printed and freeze- or vacuum-dried fluorescent antibodies at working concentrations (tracer antibodies), as well as the effect of multiple cycles of sudden and prolonged temperature shifts on the stability of fluorescently labeled tracer antibody cocktails. Our results show that (i) antibody microarrays are stable at room temperature when printed on stabilizing spotting solutions for at least 6 months, (ii) lyophilized and vacuum-dried fluorescently labeled tracer antibodies are stable for more than 9 months of sudden temperature shift cycles (-20°C to 25°C and 50°C), and (iii) both printed and freeze- or vacuum-dried fluorescent tracer antibodies are stable after several-fold excess of the dose of gamma radiation expected during a mission to Mars. Although different antibodies may exhibit different susceptibilities, we conclude that, in general, antibodies are suitable for use in planetary exploration purposes if they are properly treated and stored with the use of stabilizing substances. PMID:22007740

  10. A protein microarray immunoassay for the serological evaluation of the antibody response in vertically transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Ardizzoni, A; Capuccini, B; Baschieri, M C; Orsi, C F; Rumpianesi, F; Peppoloni, S; Cermelli, C; Meacci, M; Crisanti, A; Steensgaard, P; Blasi, E

    2009-09-01

    The detection of specific serum antibodies is mainly achieved by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Here, we describe the setting up of a microarray-based serological assay to screen for IgG and IgM against vertically transmitted pathogens (Toxoplasma gondii, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, varicella zoster virus, Chlamydia trachomatis). The test, accommodated onto a restricted area of a microscope slide, consists of: (a) the immobilization of antigens and human IgG and IgM antibody dilution curves, laid down in an orderly manner; (b) addition of serum samples; (c) detection of antigen-serum antibodies complexes by indirect immunofluorescence. The IgG and IgM curves provide an internal calibration system for the interpolation of the signals from the single antigens. The test was optimized in terms of spotting conditions and processing protocol. The detection limit was 400 fg for the IgG assay and 40 fg for the IgM assay; the analytical specificity was >98%. The clinical sensitivity returned an average value of 78%, the clinical specificity was >96%, the predictive values were >73%, and the efficiency was >88%. The results obtained make this test a promising tool, suitable for introduction in the clinical diagnostic routine of vertically transmitted infections, in parallel (and in future as an alternative) to ELISA. PMID:19415353

  11. ProMAT Calibrator: A Tool for Reducing Experimental Bias in Antibody Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Daly, Don S.; White, A.; Servoss, Shannon; Tan, Ruimin; Collett, James R.

    2009-08-01

    Our research group has been developing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) microarray technology for the rapid and quantitative evaluation of biomarker panels. Studies using antibody microarrays are susceptible to systematic bias from the various steps in the experimental process, and these biases can mask biologically significant differences. For this reason, we have developed a calibration system that can identify and reduce systematic bias due to processing factors. Specifically, we developed a sandwich ELISA for green fluorescent protein (GFP) that is included on each chip. The GFP antigen is spiked into each biological sample or standard mixture and the resulting signal is used for calibration across chips. We developed ProMAT Calibrator, an open-source bioinformatics tool, for the rapid visualization and interpretation of the calibrator data and, if desired, data normalization. We demonstrate that data normalization using this system markedly reduces bias from processing factors. Equally useful, this calibrator system can help reveal the source of the bias, thereby facilitating the elimination of the underlying problem.

  12. Isolation of Microarray-Grade Total RNA, MicroRNA, and DNA from a Single PAXgene Blood RNA Tube

    PubMed Central

    Kruhøffer, Mogens; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Voss, Thorsten; Lindberg, Raija L.P.; Wyrich, Ralf; Thykjaer, Thomas; Orntoft, Torben F.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a procedure for isolation of microRNA and genomic DNA in addition to total RNA from whole blood stabilized in PAXgene Blood RNA tubes. The procedure is based on automatic extraction on a BioRobot MDx and includes isolation of DNA from a fraction of the stabilized blood and recovery of small RNA species that are otherwise lost. The procedure presented here is suitable for large-scale experiments and is amenable to further automation. Procured total RNA and DNA was tested using Affymetrix Expression and single-nucleotide polymorphism GeneChips, respectively, and isolated microRNA was tested using spotted locked nucleic acid-based microarrays. We conclude that the yield and quality of total RNA, microRNA, and DNA from a single PAXgene blood RNA tube is sufficient for downstream microarray analysis. PMID:17690207

  13. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    DOE PAGES

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth ofmore » IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.« less

  14. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.

  15. Determination of specific antibody responses to the six species of ebola and Marburg viruses by multiplexed protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Teddy; Natesan, Mohan; Warfield, Kelly; Aman, M Javad; Ulrich, Robert G

    2014-12-01

    Infectious hemorrhagic fevers caused by the Marburg and Ebola filoviruses result in human mortality rates of up to 90%, and there are no effective vaccines or therapeutics available for clinical use. The highly infectious and lethal nature of these viruses highlights the need for reliable and sensitive diagnostic methods. We assembled a protein microarray displaying nucleoprotein (NP), virion protein 40 (VP40), and glycoprotein (GP) antigens from isolates representing the six species of filoviruses for use as a surveillance and diagnostic platform. Using the microarrays, we examined serum antibody responses of rhesus macaques vaccinated with trivalent (GP, NP, and VP40) virus-like particles (VLP) prior to infection with the Marburg virus (MARV) (i.e., Marburg marburgvirus) or the Zaire virus (ZEBOV) (i.e., Zaire ebolavirus). The microarray-based assay detected a significant increase in antigen-specific IgG resulting from immunization, while a greater level of antibody responses resulted from challenge of the vaccinated animals with ZEBOV or MARV. Further, while antibody cross-reactivities were observed among NPs and VP40s of Ebola viruses, antibody recognition of GPs was very specific. The performance of mucin-like domain fragments of GP (GP mucin) expressed in Escherichia coli was compared to that of GP ectodomains produced in eukaryotic cells. Based on results with ZEBOV and MARV proteins, antibody recognition of GP mucins that were deficient in posttranslational modifications was comparable to that of the eukaryotic cell-expressed GP ectodomains in assay performance. We conclude that the described protein microarray may translate into a sensitive assay for diagnosis and serological surveillance of infections caused by multiple species of filoviruses.

  16. Analysis of Liquid Bead Microarray Antibody Assay Data for Epidemiologic Studies of Pathogen-Cancer Associations

    PubMed Central

    Colombara, Danny V.; Hughes, James P.; Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Hawes, Stephen E.; Galloway, Denise A.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Bostick, Roberd M.; Potter, John D.; Manhart, Lisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Liquid bead microarray antibody (LBMA) assays are used to assess pathogen-cancer associations. However, studies analyze LBMA data differently, limiting comparability. Methods We generated 10,000 Monte Carlo-type simulations of log-normal antibody distributions (exposure) with 200 cases and 200 controls (outcome). We estimated type I error rates, statistical power, and bias associated with t-tests, logistic regression with a linear exposure and with the exposure dichotomized at 200 units, 400 units, the mean among controls plus two standard deviations, and the value corresponding to the optimal sensitivity and specificity. We also applied these models, and data visualizations (kernel density plots, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, predicted probability plots, and Q-Q plots), to two empirical datasets to assess the consistency of the exposure-outcome relationship. Results All strategies had acceptable type I error rates (0.03≤P≤0.048), except for the dichotomization according to optimal sensitivity and specificity, which had a type I error rate of 0.27. Among the remaining methods, logistic regression with a linear predictor (Power=1.00) and t-tests (Power=1.00) had the highest power to detect a mean difference of 1.0 MFI (median fluorescence intensity) on the log scale and were unbiased. Dichotomization methods upwardly biased the risk estimates. Conclusion These results indicate that logistic regression with linear predictors and unpaired t-tests are superior to logistic regression with dichotomized predictors for assessing disease associations with LBMA data. Logistic regression with continuous linear predictors and t-tests are preferable to commonly used LBMA dichotomization methods. PMID:26071614

  17. Development and application of an antibody-based protein microarray to assess physiological stress in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos)

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Ruth I.; Cattet, Marc R. L.; Sarauer, Bryan L.; Nielsen, Scott E.; Boulanger, John; Stenhouse, Gordon B.; Janz, David M.

    2016-01-01

    A novel antibody-based protein microarray was developed that simultaneously determines expression of 31 stress-associated proteins in skin samples collected from free-ranging grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in Alberta, Canada. The microarray determines proteins belonging to four broad functional categories associated with stress physiology: hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis proteins, apoptosis/cell cycle proteins, cellular stress/proteotoxicity proteins and oxidative stress/inflammation proteins. Small skin samples (50–100 mg) were collected from captured bears using biopsy punches. Proteins were isolated and labelled with fluorescent dyes, with labelled protein homogenates loaded onto microarrays to hybridize with antibodies. Relative protein expression was determined by comparison with a pooled standard skin sample. The assay was sensitive, requiring 80 µg of protein per sample to be run in triplicate on the microarray. Intra-array and inter-array coefficients of variation for individual proteins were generally <10 and <15%, respectively. With one exception, there were no significant differences in protein expression among skin samples collected from the neck, forelimb, hindlimb and ear in a subsample of n = 4 bears. This suggests that remotely delivered biopsy darts could be used in future sampling. Using generalized linear mixed models, certain proteins within each functional category demonstrated altered expression with respect to differences in year, season, geographical sampling location within Alberta and bear biological parameters, suggesting that these general variables may influence expression of specific proteins in the microarray. Our goal is to apply the protein microarray as a conservation physiology tool that can detect, evaluate and monitor physiological stress in grizzly bears and other species at risk over time in response to environmental change. PMID:27293753

  18. Development and application of an antibody-based protein microarray to assess physiological stress in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos).

    PubMed

    Carlson, Ruth I; Cattet, Marc R L; Sarauer, Bryan L; Nielsen, Scott E; Boulanger, John; Stenhouse, Gordon B; Janz, David M

    2016-01-01

    A novel antibody-based protein microarray was developed that simultaneously determines expression of 31 stress-associated proteins in skin samples collected from free-ranging grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in Alberta, Canada. The microarray determines proteins belonging to four broad functional categories associated with stress physiology: hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis proteins, apoptosis/cell cycle proteins, cellular stress/proteotoxicity proteins and oxidative stress/inflammation proteins. Small skin samples (50-100 mg) were collected from captured bears using biopsy punches. Proteins were isolated and labelled with fluorescent dyes, with labelled protein homogenates loaded onto microarrays to hybridize with antibodies. Relative protein expression was determined by comparison with a pooled standard skin sample. The assay was sensitive, requiring 80 µg of protein per sample to be run in triplicate on the microarray. Intra-array and inter-array coefficients of variation for individual proteins were generally <10 and <15%, respectively. With one exception, there were no significant differences in protein expression among skin samples collected from the neck, forelimb, hindlimb and ear in a subsample of n = 4 bears. This suggests that remotely delivered biopsy darts could be used in future sampling. Using generalized linear mixed models, certain proteins within each functional category demonstrated altered expression with respect to differences in year, season, geographical sampling location within Alberta and bear biological parameters, suggesting that these general variables may influence expression of specific proteins in the microarray. Our goal is to apply the protein microarray as a conservation physiology tool that can detect, evaluate and monitor physiological stress in grizzly bears and other species at risk over time in response to environmental change.

  19. Development and application of an antibody-based protein microarray to assess physiological stress in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos).

    PubMed

    Carlson, Ruth I; Cattet, Marc R L; Sarauer, Bryan L; Nielsen, Scott E; Boulanger, John; Stenhouse, Gordon B; Janz, David M

    2016-01-01

    A novel antibody-based protein microarray was developed that simultaneously determines expression of 31 stress-associated proteins in skin samples collected from free-ranging grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in Alberta, Canada. The microarray determines proteins belonging to four broad functional categories associated with stress physiology: hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis proteins, apoptosis/cell cycle proteins, cellular stress/proteotoxicity proteins and oxidative stress/inflammation proteins. Small skin samples (50-100 mg) were collected from captured bears using biopsy punches. Proteins were isolated and labelled with fluorescent dyes, with labelled protein homogenates loaded onto microarrays to hybridize with antibodies. Relative protein expression was determined by comparison with a pooled standard skin sample. The assay was sensitive, requiring 80 µg of protein per sample to be run in triplicate on the microarray. Intra-array and inter-array coefficients of variation for individual proteins were generally <10 and <15%, respectively. With one exception, there were no significant differences in protein expression among skin samples collected from the neck, forelimb, hindlimb and ear in a subsample of n = 4 bears. This suggests that remotely delivered biopsy darts could be used in future sampling. Using generalized linear mixed models, certain proteins within each functional category demonstrated altered expression with respect to differences in year, season, geographical sampling location within Alberta and bear biological parameters, suggesting that these general variables may influence expression of specific proteins in the microarray. Our goal is to apply the protein microarray as a conservation physiology tool that can detect, evaluate and monitor physiological stress in grizzly bears and other species at risk over time in response to environmental change. PMID:27293753

  20. Protein Profiling Gastric Cancer and Neighboring Control Tissues Using High-Content Antibody Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Sill, Martin; Schröder, Christoph; Shen, Ying; Marzoq, Aseel; Komel, Radovan; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Nienhüser, Henrik; Schmidt, Thomas; Kastelic, Damjana

    2016-01-01

    In this study, protein profiling was performed on gastric cancer tissue samples in order to identify proteins that could be utilized for an effective diagnosis of this highly heterogeneous disease and as targets for therapeutic approaches. To this end, 16 pairs of postoperative gastric adenocarcinomas and adjacent non-cancerous control tissues were analyzed on microarrays that contain 813 antibodies targeting 724 proteins. Only 17 proteins were found to be differentially regulated, with much fewer molecules than the numbers usually identified in studies comparing tumor to healthy control tissues. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), S100 calcium binding protein A9 (S100A9), interleukin-10 (IL‐10) and mucin 6 (MUC6) exhibited the most profound variations. For an evaluation of the proteins’ capacity for discriminating gastric cancer, a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis was performed, yielding an accuracy (area under the curve) value of 89.2% for distinguishing tumor from non-tumorous tissue. For confirmation, immunohistological analyses were done on tissue slices prepared from another cohort of patients with gastric cancer. The utility of the 17 marker proteins, and particularly the four molecules with the highest specificity for gastric adenocarcinoma, is discussed for them to act as candidates for diagnosis, even in serum, and targets for therapeutic approaches. PMID:27600085

  1. Protein Profiling Gastric Cancer and Neighboring Control Tissues Using High-Content Antibody Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sill, Martin; Schröder, Christoph; Shen, Ying; Marzoq, Aseel; Komel, Radovan; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Nienhüser, Henrik; Schmidt, Thomas; Kastelic, Damjana

    2016-01-01

    In this study, protein profiling was performed on gastric cancer tissue samples in order to identify proteins that could be utilized for an effective diagnosis of this highly heterogeneous disease and as targets for therapeutic approaches. To this end, 16 pairs of postoperative gastric adenocarcinomas and adjacent non-cancerous control tissues were analyzed on microarrays that contain 813 antibodies targeting 724 proteins. Only 17 proteins were found to be differentially regulated, with much fewer molecules than the numbers usually identified in studies comparing tumor to healthy control tissues. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), S100 calcium binding protein A9 (S100A9), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and mucin 6 (MUC6) exhibited the most profound variations. For an evaluation of the proteins' capacity for discriminating gastric cancer, a Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis was performed, yielding an accuracy (area under the curve) value of 89.2% for distinguishing tumor from non-tumorous tissue. For confirmation, immunohistological analyses were done on tissue slices prepared from another cohort of patients with gastric cancer. The utility of the 17 marker proteins, and particularly the four molecules with the highest specificity for gastric adenocarcinoma, is discussed for them to act as candidates for diagnosis, even in serum, and targets for therapeutic approaches. PMID:27600085

  2. Genome-Scale Protein Microarray Comparison of Human Antibody Responses in Plasmodium vivax Relapse and Reinfection

    PubMed Central

    Chuquiyauri, Raul; Molina, Douglas M.; Moss, Eli L.; Wang, Ruobing; Gardner, Malcolm J.; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Torres, Sonia; Gilman, Robert H.; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Felgner, Philip; Liang, Xiaowu; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Large scale antibody responses in Plasmodium vivax malaria remains unexplored in the endemic setting. Protein microarray analysis of asexual-stage P. vivax was used to identify antigens recognized in sera from residents of hypoendemic Peruvian Amazon. Over 24 months, of 106 participants, 91 had two symptomatic P. vivax malaria episodes, 11 had three episodes, 3 had four episodes, and 1 had five episodes. Plasmodium vivax relapse was distinguished from reinfection by a merozoite surface protein-3α restriction fragment length polymorphism polymerase chain reaction (MSP3α PCR-RFLP) assay. Notably, P. vivax reinfection subjects did not have higher reactivity to the entire set of recognized P. vivax blood-stage antigens than relapse subjects, regardless of the number of malaria episodes. The most highly recognized P. vivax proteins were MSP 4, 7, 8, and 10 (PVX_003775, PVX_082650, PVX_097625, and PVX_114145); sexual-stage antigen s16 (PVX_000930); early transcribed membrane protein (PVX_090230); tryptophan-rich antigen (Pv-fam-a) (PVX_092995); apical merozoite antigen 1 (PVX_092275); and proteins of unknown function (PVX_081830, PVX_117680, PVX_118705, PVX_121935, PVX_097730, PVX_110935, PVX_115450, and PVX_082475). Genes encoding reactive proteins exhibited a significant enrichment of non-synonymous nucleotide variation, an observation suggesting immune selection. These data identify candidates for seroepidemiological tools to support malaria elimination efforts in P. vivax-endemic regions. PMID:26149860

  3. Chemically-blocked Antibody Microarray for Multiplexed High-throughput Profiling of Specific Protein Glycosylation in Complex Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chen; Wonsidler, Joshua L.; Li, Jianwei; Du, Yanming; Block, Timothy; Haab, Brian; Chen, Songming

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we describe an effective protocol for use in a multiplexed high-throughput antibody microarray with glycan binding protein detection that allows for the glycosylation profiling of specific proteins. Glycosylation of proteins is the most prevalent post-translational modification found on proteins, and leads diversified modifications of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of proteins. Because the glycosylation machinery is particularly susceptible to disease progression and malignant transformation, aberrant glycosylation has been recognized as early detection biomarkers for cancer and other diseases. However, current methods to study protein glycosylation typically are too complicated or expensive for use in most normal laboratory or clinical settings and a more practical method to study protein glycosylation is needed. The new protocol described in this study makes use of a chemically blocked antibody microarray with glycan-binding protein (GBP) detection and significantly reduces the time, cost, and lab equipment requirements needed to study protein glycosylation. In this method, multiple immobilized glycoprotein-specific antibodies are printed directly onto the microarray slides and the N-glycans on the antibodies are blocked. The blocked, immobilized glycoprotein-specific antibodies are able to capture and isolate glycoproteins from a complex sample that is applied directly onto the microarray slides. Glycan detection then can be performed by the application of biotinylated lectins and other GBPs to the microarray slide, while binding levels can be determined using Dylight 549-Streptavidin. Through the use of an antibody panel and probing with multiple biotinylated lectins, this method allows for an effective glycosylation profile of the different proteins found in a given human or animal sample to be developed. Introduction Glycosylation of protein, which is the most ubiquitous post-translational modification on proteins, modifies

  4. The SOLID (Signs Of LIfe Detector) instrument concept: an antibody microarray-based biosensor for life detection in astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parro, V.; Rivas, L. A.; Rodríguez-Manfredi, J. A.; Blanco, Y.; de Diego-Castilla, G.; Cruz-Gil, P.; Moreno-Paz, M.; García-Villadangos, M.; Compostizo, C.; Herrero, P. L.

    2009-04-01

    Immunosensors have been extensively used since many years for environmental monitoring. Different technological platforms allow new biosensor designs and implementations. We have reported (Rivas et al., 2008) a shotgun approach for antibody production for biomarker detection in astrobiology and environmental monitoring, the production of 150 new polyclonal antibodies against microbial strains and environmental extracts, and the construction and validation of an antibody microarray (LDCHIP200, for "Life Detector Chip") containing 200 different antibodies. We have successfully used the LDCHIP200 for the detection of biological polymers in extreme environments in different parts of the world (e.g., a deep South African mine, Antarctica's Dry valleys, Yellowstone, Iceland, and Rio Tinto). Clustering analysis associated similar immunopatterns to samples from apparently very different environments, indicating that they indeed share similar universal biomarkers. A redundancy in the number of antibodies against different target biomarkers apart of revealing the presence of certain biomolecules, it renders a sample-specific immuno-profile, an "immnuno-fingerprint", which may constitute by itself an indirect biosignature. We will present a case study of immunoprofiling different iron-sulfur as well as phylosilicates rich samples along the Rio Tinto river banks. Based on protein microarray technology, we designed and built the concept instrument called SOLID (for "Signs Of LIfe Detector"; Parro et al., 2005; 2008a, b; http://cab.inta.es/solid) for automatic in situ analysis of soil samples and molecular biomarkers detection. A field prototype, SOLID2, was successfully tested for the analysis of grinded core samples during the 2005 "MARTE" campaign of a Mars drilling simulation experiment by a sandwich microarray immunoassay (Parro et al., 2008b). We will show the new version of the instrument (SOLID3) which is able to perform both sandwich and competitive immunoassays. SOLID3

  5. Improved porous silicon (P-Si) microarray based PSA (prostate specific antigen) immunoassay by optimized surface density of the capture antibody

    PubMed Central

    Lee, SangWook; Kim, Soyoun; Malm, Johan; Jeong, Ok Chan; Lilja, Hans; Laurell, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Enriching the surface density of immobilized capture antibodies enhances the detection signal of antibody sandwich microarrays. In this study, we improved the detection sensitivity of our previously developed P-Si (porous silicon) antibody microarray by optimizing concentrations of the capturing antibody. We investigated immunoassays using a P-Si microarray at three different capture antibody (PSA - prostate specific antigen) concentrations, analyzing the influence of the antibody density on the assay detection sensitivity. The LOD (limit of detection) for PSA was 2.5ngmL−1, 80pgmL−1, and 800fgmL−1 when arraying the PSA antibody, H117 at the concentration 15µgmL−1, 35µgmL−1 and 154µgmL−1, respectively. We further investigated PSA spiked into human female serum in the range of 800fgmL−1 to 500ngmL−1. The microarray showed a LOD of 800fgmL−1 and a dynamic range of 800 fgmL−1 to 80ngmL−1 in serum spiked samples. PMID:24016590

  6. Discovery and validation of an INflammatory PROtein-driven GAstric cancer Signature (INPROGAS) using antibody microarray-based oncoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Costa, Manuel; Codina-Cazador, Antonio; Cortés-Pastoret, Elisabet; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cufí, Sílvia; Flaquer, Sílvia; Llopis-Puigmarti, Francesca; Pujol-Amado, Eulalia; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Ortiz, Rosa; Lopez-Bonet, Eugeni; Queralt, Bernardo; Guardeño, Raquel; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Roig, Josep; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to improve gastric cancer (GC) diagnosis by identifying and validating an INflammatory PROtein-driven GAstric cancer Signature (hereafter INPROGAS) using low-cost affinity proteomics. The detection of 120 cytokines, 43 angiogenic factors, 41 growth factors, 40 inflammatory factors and 10 metalloproteinases was performed using commercially available human antibody microarray-based arrays. We identified 21 inflammation-related proteins (INPROGAS) with significant differences in expression between GC tissues and normal gastric mucosa in a discovery cohort of matched pairs (n=10) of tumor/normal gastric tissues. Ingenuity pathway analysis confirmed the “inflammatory response”, “cellular movement” and “immune cell trafficking” as the most overrepresented biofunctions within INPROGAS. Using an expanded independent validation cohort (n = 22), INPROGAS classified gastric samples as “GC” or “non-GC” with a sensitivity of 82% (95% CI 59-94) and a specificity of 73% (95% CI 49-89). The positive predictive value and negative predictive value in this validation cohort were 75% (95% CI 53-90) and 80% (95% CI 56-94), respectively. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value in this validation cohort were 75% (95% CI 53-90) and 80% (95% CI 56-94), respectively. Antibody microarray analyses of the GC-associated inflammatory proteome identified a 21-protein INPROGAS that accurately discriminated GC from noncancerous gastric mucosa. PMID:24722433

  7. Using antibodies against ATPase and microarray immunoassays for the search for potential extraterrestrial life in saline environments on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigl, Andreas; Gruber, Claudia; Blanco-López, Yolanda; Rivas, Luis A.; Parro, Victor; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2010-05-01

    membrane fraction and whole cell preparation of Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, Escherichia coli LE392 as well as the whole cell fraction of Halorubrum saccharovorum and Bacillus megaterium. Further experiments with antibodies against ATPase are proposed to be done with procedures that are more adjusted to the search for extraterrestrial life. Therefore tests with a microarray system (Rivas et al., 2008) were done at the Centro de Astrobiología in Madrid. Cellular extracts of environmental samples from a sea salt from Piranske (Slovenia) and a rock salt from Himalaya (Pakistan) were tested with a "supermix" of 300 antibodies, additionally including an antibody against the subunit A of the A-ATPase from Halorubrum sacharovorum. Positive immuno reactions with antibodies against halophile cells as well as antibodies against exopolysaccharides could be shown. (1)Gruber C, Stan-Lotter H (1997) Western blot of stained proteins from dried polyacrylamide gels. Anal Biochem 253, 125-127. (2)Rivas LA, Garcia-Villadangos M, Moreno-Paz M, Cruz-Gil P, Gómez-Elvira J, Parro V (2008) A 200-antibody microarray biochip for environmental monitoring: searching for universal microbial biomarkers through immunoprofiling. Anal Chem 80, 7970-7979

  8. Anti-CD antibody microarray for human leukocyte morphology examination allows analyzing rare cell populations and suggesting preliminary diagnosis in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khvastunova, Alina N; Kuznetsova, Sofya A; Al-Radi, Liubov S; Vylegzhanina, Alexandra V; Zakirova, Anna O; Fedyanina, Olga S; Filatov, Alexander V; Vorobjev, Ivan A; Ataullakhanov, Fazly

    2015-07-27

    We describe a method for leukocyte sorting by a microarray of anti-cluster-of-differentiation (anti-CD) antibodies and for preparation of the bound cells for morphological or cytochemical examination. The procedure results in a "sorted" smear with cells positive for certain surface antigens localised in predefined areas. The morphology and cytochemistry of the microarray-captured normal and neoplastic peripheral blood mononuclear cells are identical to the same characteristics in a smear. The microarray permits to determine the proportions of cells positive for the CD antigens on the microarray panel with high correlation with flow cytometry. Using the anti-CD microarray we show that normal granular lymphocytes and lymphocytes with radial segmentation of the nuclei are positive for CD3, CD8, CD16 or CD56 but not for CD4 or CD19. We also show that the described technique permits to obtain a pure leukemic cell population or to separate two leukemic cell populations on different antibody spots and to study their morphology or cytochemistry directly on the microarray. In cases of leukemias/lymphomas when circulating neoplastic cells are morphologically distinct, preliminary diagnosis can be suggested from full analysis of cell morphology, cytochemistry and their binding pattern on the microarray.

  9. Label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using carbon nanotube antibody micro-arrays

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Farhad; Trainor, Patrick; Rai, Shesh N; Kloecker, Goetz; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using nanotube-antibody micro-arrays. Single wall carbon nanotube arrays were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies were functionalized to the surface of the nanotube devices using 1-pyrene-butanoic acid succinimidyl ester functionalization method. Following functionalization, plain buffy coat and MCF7 cell spiked buffy coats were adsorbed on to the nanotube device and electrical signatures were recorded for differences in interaction between samples. A statistical classifier for the ‘liquid biopsy’ was developed to create a predictive model based on dynamic time warping to classify device electrical signals that corresponded to plain (control) or spiked buffy coats (case). In training test, the device electrical signals originating from buffy versus spiked buffy samples were classified with ~100% sensitivity, ~91% specificity and ~96% accuracy. In the blinded test, the signals were classified with ~91% sensitivity, ~82% specificity and ~86% accuracy. A heatmap was generated to visually capture the relationship between electrical signatures and the sample condition. Confocal microscopic analysis of devices that were classified as spiked buffy coats based on their electrical signatures confirmed the presence of cancer cells, their attachment to the device and overexpression of EpCAM receptors. The cell numbers were counted to be ~1—17 cells per 5 µl per device suggesting single cell sensitivity in spiked buffy coats that is scalable to higher volumes using the micro-arrays. PMID:26901310

  10. Label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using carbon nanotube antibody micro-arrays.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Farhad; Trainor, Patrick; Rai, Shesh N; Kloecker, Goetz; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using nanotube-antibody micro-arrays. Single wall carbon nanotube arrays were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies were functionalized to the surface of the nanotube devices using 1-pyrene-butanoic acid succinimidyl ester functionalization method. Following functionalization, plain buffy coat and MCF7 cell spiked buffy coats were adsorbed on to the nanotube device and electrical signatures were recorded for differences in interaction between samples. A statistical classifier for the 'liquid biopsy' was developed to create a predictive model based on dynamic time warping to classify device electrical signals that corresponded to plain (control) or spiked buffy coats (case). In training test, the device electrical signals originating from buffy versus spiked buffy samples were classified with ∼100% sensitivity, ∼91% specificity and ∼96% accuracy. In the blinded test, the signals were classified with ∼91% sensitivity, ∼82% specificity and ∼86% accuracy. A heatmap was generated to visually capture the relationship between electrical signatures and the sample condition. Confocal microscopic analysis of devices that were classified as spiked buffy coats based on their electrical signatures confirmed the presence of cancer cells, their attachment to the device and overexpression of EpCAM receptors. The cell numbers were counted to be ∼1-17 cells per 5 μl per device suggesting single cell sensitivity in spiked buffy coats that is scalable to higher volumes using the micro-arrays.

  11. Label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using carbon nanotube antibody micro-arrays.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Farhad; Trainor, Patrick; Rai, Shesh N; Kloecker, Goetz; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using nanotube-antibody micro-arrays. Single wall carbon nanotube arrays were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies were functionalized to the surface of the nanotube devices using 1-pyrene-butanoic acid succinimidyl ester functionalization method. Following functionalization, plain buffy coat and MCF7 cell spiked buffy coats were adsorbed on to the nanotube device and electrical signatures were recorded for differences in interaction between samples. A statistical classifier for the 'liquid biopsy' was developed to create a predictive model based on dynamic time warping to classify device electrical signals that corresponded to plain (control) or spiked buffy coats (case). In training test, the device electrical signals originating from buffy versus spiked buffy samples were classified with ∼100% sensitivity, ∼91% specificity and ∼96% accuracy. In the blinded test, the signals were classified with ∼91% sensitivity, ∼82% specificity and ∼86% accuracy. A heatmap was generated to visually capture the relationship between electrical signatures and the sample condition. Confocal microscopic analysis of devices that were classified as spiked buffy coats based on their electrical signatures confirmed the presence of cancer cells, their attachment to the device and overexpression of EpCAM receptors. The cell numbers were counted to be ∼1-17 cells per 5 μl per device suggesting single cell sensitivity in spiked buffy coats that is scalable to higher volumes using the micro-arrays. PMID:26901310

  12. Label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using carbon nanotube antibody micro-arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi, Farhad; Trainor, Patrick; Rai, Shesh N.; Kloecker, Goetz; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the rapid and label-free capture of breast cancer cells spiked in buffy coats using nanotube-antibody micro-arrays. Single wall carbon nanotube arrays were manufactured using photo-lithography, metal deposition, and etching techniques. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibodies were functionalized to the surface of the nanotube devices using 1-pyrene-butanoic acid succinimidyl ester functionalization method. Following functionalization, plain buffy coat and MCF7 cell spiked buffy coats were adsorbed on to the nanotube device and electrical signatures were recorded for differences in interaction between samples. A statistical classifier for the ‘liquid biopsy’ was developed to create a predictive model based on dynamic time warping to classify device electrical signals that corresponded to plain (control) or spiked buffy coats (case). In training test, the device electrical signals originating from buffy versus spiked buffy samples were classified with ˜100% sensitivity, ˜91% specificity and ˜96% accuracy. In the blinded test, the signals were classified with ˜91% sensitivity, ˜82% specificity and ˜86% accuracy. A heatmap was generated to visually capture the relationship between electrical signatures and the sample condition. Confocal microscopic analysis of devices that were classified as spiked buffy coats based on their electrical signatures confirmed the presence of cancer cells, their attachment to the device and overexpression of EpCAM receptors. The cell numbers were counted to be ˜1-17 cells per 5 μl per device suggesting single cell sensitivity in spiked buffy coats that is scalable to higher volumes using the micro-arrays.

  13. Rapid and Sensitive Multiplex Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei-Specific Antibodies in Melioidosis Patients Based on a Protein Microarray Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Christian; Dunachie, Susanna J.; Müller, Elke; Kohler, Anne; Jenjaroen, Kemajittra; Teparrukkul, Prapit; Baier, Vico; Ehricht, Ralf; Steinmetz, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Background The environmental bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes the infectious disease melioidosis with a high case-fatality rate in tropical and subtropical regions. Direct pathogen detection can be difficult, and therefore an indirect serological test which might aid early diagnosis is desirable. However, current tests for antibodies against B. pseudomallei, including the reference indirect haemagglutination assay (IHA), lack sensitivity, specificity and standardization. Consequently, serological tests currently do not play a role in the diagnosis of melioidosis in endemic areas. Recently, a number of promising diagnostic antigens have been identified, but a standardized, easy-to-perform clinical laboratory test for sensitive multiplex detection of antibodies against B. pseudomallei is still lacking. Methods and Principal Findings In this study, we developed and validated a protein microarray which can be used in a standard 96-well format. Our array contains 20 recombinant and purified B. pseudomallei proteins, previously identified as serodiagnostic candidates in melioidosis. In total, we analyzed 196 sera and plasmas from melioidosis patients from northeast Thailand and 210 negative controls from melioidosis-endemic and non-endemic regions. Our protein array clearly discriminated between sera from melioidosis patients and controls with a specificity of 97%. Importantly, the array showed a higher sensitivity than did the IHA in melioidosis patients upon admission (cut-off IHA titer ≥1:160: IHA 57.3%, protein array: 86.7%; p = 0.0001). Testing of sera from single patients at 0, 12 and 52 weeks post-admission revealed that protein antigens induce either a short- or long-term antibody response. Conclusions Our protein array provides a standardized, rapid, easy-to-perform test for the detection of B. pseudomallei-specific antibody patterns. Thus, this system has the potential to improve the serodiagnosis of melioidosis in clinical settings. Moreover, our

  14. Fabrication of Homogeneous High-Density Antibody Microarrays for Cytokine Detection

    PubMed Central

    Hospach, Ingeborg; Joseph, Yvonne; Mai, Michaela Kathrin; Krasteva, Nadejda; Nelles, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Cytokine proteins are known as biomarker molecules, characteristic of a disease or specific body condition. Monitoring of the cytokine pattern in body fluids can contribute to the diagnosis of diseases. Here we report on the development of an array comprised of different anti-cytokine antibodies on an activated solid support coupled with a fluorescence readout mechanism. Optimization of the array preparation was done in regard of spot homogeneity and spot size. The proinflammatory cytokines Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) and Interleukin 6 (IL-6) were chosen as the first targets of interest. First, the solid support for covalent antibody immobilization and an adequate fluorescent label were selected. Three differently functionalized glass substrates for spotting were compared: amine and epoxy, both having a two-dimensional structure, and the NHS functionalized hydrogel (NHS-3D). The NHS-hydrogel functionalization of the substrate was best suited to antibody immobilization. Then, the optimization of plotting parameters and geometry as well as buffer media were investigated, considering the ambient analyte theory of Roger Ekins. As a first step towards real sample studies, a proof of principle of cytokine detection has been established. PMID:27600349

  15. SOLID3: A Multiplex Antibody Microarray-Based Optical Sensor Instrument for In Situ Life Detection in Planetary Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parro, Víctor; de Diego-Castilla, Graciela; Rodríguez-Manfredi, José A.; Rivas, Luis A.; Blanco-López, Yolanda; Sebastián, Eduardo; Romeral, Julio; Compostizo, Carlos; Herrero, Pedro L.; García-Marín, Adolfo; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; García-Villadangos, Miriam; Cruz-Gil, Patricia; Peinado, Verónica; Martín-Soler, Javier; Pérez-Mercader, Juan; Gómez-Elvira, Javier

    2011-01-01

    The search for unequivocal signs of life on other planetary bodies is one of the major challenges for astrobiology. The failure to detect organic molecules on the surface of Mars by measuring volatile compounds after sample heating, together with the new knowledge of martian soil chemistry, has prompted the astrobiological community to develop new methods and technologies. Based on protein microarray technology, we have designed and built a series of instruments called SOLID (for ``Signs Of LIfe Detector'') for automatic in situ detection and identification of substances or analytes from liquid and solid samples (soil, sediments, or powder). Here, we present the SOLID3 instrument, which is able to perform both sandwich and competitive immunoassays and consists of two separate functional units: a Sample Preparation Unit (SPU) for 10 different extractions by ultrasonication and a Sample Analysis Unit (SAU) for fluorescent immunoassays. The SAU consists of five different flow cells, with an antibody microarray in each one (2000 spots). It is also equipped with an exclusive optical package and a charge-coupled device (CCD) for fluorescent detection. We demonstrated the performance of SOLID3 in the detection of a broad range of molecular-sized compounds, which range from peptides and proteins to whole cells and spores, with sensitivities at 1-2ppb (ngmL-1) for biomolecules and 104 to 103 spores per milliliter. We report its application in the detection of acidophilic microorganisms in the Río Tinto Mars analogue and report the absence of substantial negative effects on the immunoassay in the presence of 50mM perchlorate (20 times higher than that found at the Phoenix landing site). Our SOLID instrument concept is an excellent option with which to detect biomolecules because it avoids the high-temperature treatments that may destroy organic matter in the presence of martian oxidants.

  16. SOLID3: a multiplex antibody microarray-based optical sensor instrument for in situ life detection in planetary exploration.

    PubMed

    Parro, Víctor; de Diego-Castilla, Graciela; Rodríguez-Manfredi, José A; Rivas, Luis A; Blanco-López, Yolanda; Sebastián, Eduardo; Romeral, Julio; Compostizo, Carlos; Herrero, Pedro L; García-Marín, Adolfo; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; García-Villadangos, Miriam; Cruz-Gil, Patricia; Peinado, Verónica; Martín-Soler, Javier; Pérez-Mercader, Juan; Gómez-Elvira, Javier

    2011-01-01

    The search for unequivocal signs of life on other planetary bodies is one of the major challenges for astrobiology. The failure to detect organic molecules on the surface of Mars by measuring volatile compounds after sample heating, together with the new knowledge of martian soil chemistry, has prompted the astrobiological community to develop new methods and technologies. Based on protein microarray technology, we have designed and built a series of instruments called SOLID (for "Signs Of LIfe Detector") for automatic in situ detection and identification of substances or analytes from liquid and solid samples (soil, sediments, or powder). Here, we present the SOLID3 instrument, which is able to perform both sandwich and competitive immunoassays and consists of two separate functional units: a Sample Preparation Unit (SPU) for 10 different extractions by ultrasonication and a Sample Analysis Unit (SAU) for fluorescent immunoassays. The SAU consists of five different flow cells, with an antibody microarray in each one (2000 spots). It is also equipped with an exclusive optical package and a charge-coupled device (CCD) for fluorescent detection. We demonstrated the performance of SOLID3 in the detection of a broad range of molecular-sized compounds, which range from peptides and proteins to whole cells and spores, with sensitivities at 1-2 ppb (ng mL⁻¹) for biomolecules and 10⁴ to 10³ spores per milliliter. We report its application in the detection of acidophilic microorganisms in the Río Tinto Mars analogue and report the absence of substantial negative effects on the immunoassay in the presence of 50 mM perchlorate (20 times higher than that found at the Phoenix landing site). Our SOLID instrument concept is an excellent option with which to detect biomolecules because it avoids the high-temperature treatments that may destroy organic matter in the presence of martian oxidants.

  17. SOLID3: a multiplex antibody microarray-based optical sensor instrument for in situ life detection in planetary exploration.

    PubMed

    Parro, Víctor; de Diego-Castilla, Graciela; Rodríguez-Manfredi, José A; Rivas, Luis A; Blanco-López, Yolanda; Sebastián, Eduardo; Romeral, Julio; Compostizo, Carlos; Herrero, Pedro L; García-Marín, Adolfo; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; García-Villadangos, Miriam; Cruz-Gil, Patricia; Peinado, Verónica; Martín-Soler, Javier; Pérez-Mercader, Juan; Gómez-Elvira, Javier

    2011-01-01

    The search for unequivocal signs of life on other planetary bodies is one of the major challenges for astrobiology. The failure to detect organic molecules on the surface of Mars by measuring volatile compounds after sample heating, together with the new knowledge of martian soil chemistry, has prompted the astrobiological community to develop new methods and technologies. Based on protein microarray technology, we have designed and built a series of instruments called SOLID (for "Signs Of LIfe Detector") for automatic in situ detection and identification of substances or analytes from liquid and solid samples (soil, sediments, or powder). Here, we present the SOLID3 instrument, which is able to perform both sandwich and competitive immunoassays and consists of two separate functional units: a Sample Preparation Unit (SPU) for 10 different extractions by ultrasonication and a Sample Analysis Unit (SAU) for fluorescent immunoassays. The SAU consists of five different flow cells, with an antibody microarray in each one (2000 spots). It is also equipped with an exclusive optical package and a charge-coupled device (CCD) for fluorescent detection. We demonstrated the performance of SOLID3 in the detection of a broad range of molecular-sized compounds, which range from peptides and proteins to whole cells and spores, with sensitivities at 1-2 ppb (ng mL⁻¹) for biomolecules and 10⁴ to 10³ spores per milliliter. We report its application in the detection of acidophilic microorganisms in the Río Tinto Mars analogue and report the absence of substantial negative effects on the immunoassay in the presence of 50 mM perchlorate (20 times higher than that found at the Phoenix landing site). Our SOLID instrument concept is an excellent option with which to detect biomolecules because it avoids the high-temperature treatments that may destroy organic matter in the presence of martian oxidants. PMID:21294639

  18. A multi-parametric microarray for protein profiling: simultaneous analysis of 8 different cytochromes via differentially element tagged antibodies and laser ablation ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Waentig, Larissa; Techritz, Sandra; Jakubowski, Norbert; Roos, Peter H

    2013-11-01

    The paper presents a new multi-parametric protein microarray embracing the multi-analyte capabilities of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The combination of high throughput reverse phase protein microarrays with element tagged antibodies and LA-ICP-MS makes it possible to detect and quantify many proteins or biomarkers in multiple samples simultaneously. A proof of concept experiment is performed for the analysis of cytochromes particularly of cytochrome P450 enzymes, which play an important role in the metabolism of xenobiotics such as toxicants and drugs. With the aid of the LA-ICP-MS based multi-parametric reverse phase protein microarray it was possible to analyse 8 cytochromes in 14 different proteomes in one run. The methodology shows excellent detection limits in the lower amol range and a very good linearity of R(2) ≥ 0.9996 which is a prerequisite for the development of further quantification strategies.

  19. Deciphering the Prokaryotic Community and Metabolisms in South African Deep-Mine Biofilms through Antibody Microarrays and Graph Theory

    PubMed Central

    García-Moyano, Antonio; Aguirre, Jacobo; Cruz-Gil, Patricia; Palacín, Arantxa; van Heerden, Esta; Parro, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    In the South African deep mines, a variety of biofilms growing in mine corridor walls as water seeps from intersections or from fractures represents excellent proxies for deep-subsurface environments. However, they may be greatly affected by the oxygen inputs through the galleries of mining activities. As a consequence, the interaction between the anaerobic water coming out from the walls with the oxygen inputs creates new conditions that support rich microbial communities. The inherent difficulties for sampling these delicate habitats, together with transport and storage conditions may alter the community features and composition. Therefore, the development of in situ monitoring methods would be desirable for quick evaluation of the microbial community. In this work, we report the usefulness of an antibody-microarray (EMChip66) immunoassay for a quick check of the microbial diversity of biofilms located at 1.3 km below surface within the Beatrix deep gold mine (South Africa). In addition, a deconvolution method, previously described and used for environmental monitoring, based on graph theory and applied on antibody cross-reactivity was used to interpret the immunoassay results. The results were corroborated and further expanded by 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Both culture-independent techniques coincided in detecting features related to aerobic sulfur-oxidizers, aerobic chemoorganotrophic Alphaproteobacteria and metanotrophic Gammaproteobacteria. 16S rRNA gene sequencing detected phylotypes related to nitrate-reducers and anaerobic sulfur-oxidizers, whereas the EMChip66 detected immunological features from methanogens and sulfate-reducers. The results reveal a diverse microbial community with syntrophic metabolisms both anaerobic (fermentation, methanogenesis, sulphate and nitrate reduction) and aerobic (methanotrophy, sulphur oxidation). The presence of oxygen-scavenging microbes might indicate that the system is modified by the artificial oxygen inputs

  20. Comparison of HIV antibody detection by conventional method and dried tube specimen: stability and validation study for HIV serology.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Shashi; Arora, Usha

    2011-06-01

    This study was carried out to compare HIV antibody detection by conventional method and serum dried in test tube and to check the stability of dried tube specimen (DTS) at ambient temperature. A total of 50 serum samples were tested for HIV antibodies, which were sent for testing in the state reference laboratory, by conventional method according to NACO guidelines. The same serum samples were dried in test tubes and then after elution with PBS again tested for HIV antibodies by same method and kits at 0 day and after 30 days. DTS eluted by PBS showed linear correlation to the serum samples. The antibodies in DTS were found to be stable at 37 degrees c up to 30 days. This method is simple, sensitive and specific and can be used in resource limited settings embarking on scaling up of HIV testing.

  1. Serial Analysis of 38 Proteins during the Progression of Human Breast Tumor in Mice Using an Antibody Colocalization Microarray*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiyan; Bergeron, Sébastien; Annis, Matthew G.; Siegel, Peter M.; Juncker, David

    2015-01-01

    Proteins in serum or plasma hold great potential for use in disease diagnosis and monitoring. However, the correlation between tumor burden and protein biomarker concentration has not been established. Here, using an antibody colocalization microarray, the protein concentration in serum was measured and compared with the size of mammary xenograft tumors in 11 individual mice from the time of injection; seven blood samples were collected from each tumor-bearing mouse as well as control mice on a weekly basis. The profiles of 38 proteins detected in sera from these animals were analyzed by clustering, and we identified 10 proteins with the greatest relative increase in serum concentration that correlated with growth of the primary mammary tumor. To evaluate the diagnosis of cancer based on these proteins using either an absolute threshold (i.e. a concentration cutoff) or self-referenced differential threshold based on the increase in concentration before cell injection, receiver operating characteristic curves were produced for 10 proteins with increased concentration, and the area under curve was calculated for each time point based on a single protein or on a panel of proteins, in each case showing a rapid increase of the area under curve. Next, the sensitivity and specificity of individual and optimal protein panels were calculated, showing high accuracy as early as week 2. These results provide a foundation for studies of tumor growth through measuring serial changes of protein concentration in animal models. PMID:25680959

  2. High-throughput screening of monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall glycans by hierarchical clustering of their carbohydrate microarray binding profiles

    PubMed Central

    Moller, Isabel; Marcus, Susan E.; Haeger, Ash; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Verhoef, Rene; Schols, Henk; Ulvskov, Peter; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Knox, J. Paul

    2007-01-01

    Antibody-producing hybridoma cell lines were created following immunisation with a crude extract of cell wall polymers from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to rapidly screen the specificities of individual monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), their binding to microarrays containing 50 cell wall glycans immobilized on nitrocellulose was assessed. Hierarchical clustering of microarray binding profiles from newly produced mAbs, together with the profiles for mAbs with previously defined specificities allowed the rapid assignments of mAb binding to antigen classes. mAb specificities were further investigated using subsequent immunochemical and biochemical analyses and two novel mAbs are described in detail. mAb LM13 binds to an arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitope and mAb LM14, binds to an epitope occurring on arabinogalactan-proteins. Both mAbs display novel patterns of recognition of cell walls in plant materials. PMID:17629746

  3. [Preparation of recombinant serpins B3 and B4 and investigation of their specific interactions with antibodies using hydrogel-based microarrays].

    PubMed

    Butvilovskaya, V I; Tsybulskaya, M V; Tikhonov, A A; Talibov, V O; Belousov, P V; Sazykin, A Yu; Schwartz, A M; Putlyaeva, L V; Surzhikov, S A; Stomakhin, A A; Solopova, O N; Rubina, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain preparations of recombinant squamous-cell carcinoma antigens (serpins B3 and B4) and to investigate their interactions with different monoclonal antibodies using hydrogel-based microarrays (biochips). Two genetic constructs encoding full-length serpin B3 and serpin B4 molecules were created to produce recombinant SPB3 and SPB4 proteins carrying a N-terminal His6-tag. Monoclonal antibodies against serpin B3 (H3, C5, H5, H81, and G9) were also obtained. An experimental gel-based biological microchip was designed to contain gel elements that carry immobilized antibodies against SPB3, immobilized commercial monoclonal SCC107 and SCC140 antibodies against squamous-cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA), and gel elements with immobilized SPB3 or SPB4. Judging by the specificity of recombinant SPB3 and SPB4, which bind to monoclonal antibodies against SCCA and, according to the manufacturer's data, can recognize conformational epitopes of both SPB3 and SPB4, it was concluded that the obtained recombinant serpins had the correct tertiary structure. A biochip-based direct immunoassay showed that SPB4 could bind effectively only to SCC107 and SCC140 antibodies, while SPB3 interacted specifically not only with these antibodies, but also with H3 and C5 monoclonal antibodies. Using biochip-based sandwich immunoassay, a pair of monoclonal antibodies SCC107/C5 that interacted specifically with serpin B3 but did not interact with serpin B4 was identified. Thus, it has been demonstrated that serpin B3 can be selectively determined in the presence of highly homologous serpin B4 using a biochip-based assay. PMID:26510597

  4. Simultaneous and sensitive detection of six serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based protein antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Lou, Jianlong; Jenko, Kathryn L.; Marks, James D.; Varnum, Susan M.

    2012-11-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by Clostridium botulinum, are a group of seven (A-G) immunologically distinct proteins and cause the paralytic disease botulism. These toxins are the most poisonous substances known to humans and are potential bioweapon agents. Therefore, it is necessary to develop highly sensitive assays for the detection of BoNTs in both clinical and environmental samples. In the present study, we have developed an ELISA-based protein antibody microarray for the sensitive and simultaneous detection of BoNT serotype A, B, C, D, E and F. With engineered high-affinity antibodies, the assays have sensitivities in buffer of 8 fM (1.2 pg/mL) for serotypes A and B, and 32 fM (4.9 pg/mL) for serotypes C, D, E, and F. Using clinical and environmental samples (serum and milk), the microarray is capable of detecting BoNT/A-F to the same levels as in standard buffer. Cross reactivity between assays for individual serotype was also analyzed. These simultaneous, rapid, and sensitive assays have the potential to measure botulinum toxins in a high-throughput manner in complex clinical or environmental samples.

  5. Peptides and Anti-peptide Antibodies for Small and Medium Scale Peptide and Anti-peptide Affinity Microarrays: Antigenic Peptide Selection, Immobilization, and Processing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Briones, Andrea; Soloviev, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of selection of antigenic peptides for the development of anti-peptide antibodies for use in microarray-based multiplex affinity assays and also with mass-spectrometry detection. The methods described here are mostly applicable to small to medium scale arrays. Although the same principles of peptide selection would be suitable for larger scale arrays (with 100+ features) the actual informatics software and printing methods may well be different. Because of the sheer number of proteins/peptides to be processed and analyzed dedicated software capable of processing all the proteins and an enterprise level array robotics may be necessary for larger scale efforts. This report aims to provide practical advice to those who develop or use arrays with up to ~100 different peptide or protein features.

  6. Inferring epitopes of a polymorphic antigen amidst broadly cross-reactive antibodies using protein microarrays: a study of OspC proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Baum, Elisabeth; Randall, Arlo Z; Zeller, Michael; Barbour, Alan G

    2013-01-01

    Epitope mapping studies aim to identify the binding sites of antibody-antigen interactions to enhance the development of vaccines, diagnostics and immunotherapeutic compounds. However, mapping is a laborious process employing time- and resource-consuming 'wet bench' techniques or epitope prediction software that are still in their infancy. For polymorphic antigens, another challenge is characterizing cross-reactivity between epitopes, teasing out distinctions between broadly cross-reactive responses, limited cross-reactions among variants and the truly type-specific responses. A refined understanding of cross-reactive antibody binding could guide the selection of the most informative subsets of variants for diagnostics and multivalent subunit vaccines. We explored the antibody binding reactivity of sera from human patients and Peromyscus leucopus rodents infected with Borrelia burgdorferi to the polymorphic outer surface protein C (OspC), an attractive candidate antigen for vaccine and improved diagnostics for Lyme disease. We constructed a protein microarray displaying 23 natural variants of OspC and quantified the degree of cross-reactive antibody binding between all pairs of variants, using Pearson correlation calculated on the reactivity values using three independent transforms of the raw data: (1) logarithmic, (2) rank, and (3) binary indicators. We observed that the global amino acid sequence identity between OspC pairs was a poor predictor of cross-reactive antibody binding. Then we asked if specific regions of the protein would better explain the observed cross-reactive binding and performed in silico screening of the linear sequence and 3-dimensional structure of OspC. This analysis pointed to residues 179 through 188 the fifth C-terminal helix of the structure as a major determinant of type-specific cross-reactive antibody binding. We developed bioinformatics methods to systematically analyze the relationship between local sequence/structure variation

  7. Biofunctionalization of surfaces by energetic ion implantation: Review of progress on applications in implantable biomedical devices and antibody microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, Marcela M. M.

    2014-08-01

    Despite major research efforts in the field of biomaterials, rejection, severe immune responses, scar tissue and poor integration continue to seriously limit the performance of today's implantable biomedical devices. Implantable biomaterials that interact with their host via an interfacial layer of active biomolecules to direct a desired cellular response to the implant would represent a major and much sought after improvement. Another, perhaps equally revolutionary, development that is on the biomedical horizon is the introduction of cost-effective microarrays for fast, highly multiplexed screening for biomarkers on cell membranes and in a variety of analyte solutions. Both of these advances will rely on effective methods of functionalizing surfaces with bioactive molecules. After a brief introduction to other methods currently available, this review will describe recently developed approaches that use energetic ions extracted from plasma to facilitate simple, one-step covalent surface immobilization of bioactive molecules. A kinetic theory model of the immobilization process by reactions with long-lived, mobile, surface-embedded radicals will be presented. The roles of surface chemistry and microstructure of the ion treated layer will be discussed. Early progress on applications of this technology to create diagnostic microarrays and to engineer bioactive surfaces for implantable biomedical devices will be reviewed.

  8. The SOLID (Signs Of LIfe Detector) instruments, antibody microarray based biosensors for in situ analysis: environmental immuno-profiles as biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parro, Víctor

    Up to now most of the techniques used for organics or life detection in space missions are based on the detection of volatiles compounds by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This was the case for the Viking's and Cassini/Huygens missions, or for the proposed SAM instrument for MSL. Even the Urey instrument, proposed for ESA's ExoMars mission, which focus on the analysis of the fluorescent-tagged volatiles by capillary electrophoresis. Sandwich antibody microarray immnunoassay is an excellent technique for the detection of complex and non volatile biological polymers (Parro et al., Space Sci. Rev, 2007. DOI 10.1007/s11214- 007-9276-1). A positive result in a sandwich immunoassay indicates that the sample contains a relatively complex molecular structure with at least two antigenic determinants, otherwise sandwich could not be detected. We have reported (Rivas et al., submitted) a shotgun approach for antibody production for biomarker detection in astrobiology and environmental monitoring, the production and testing of 155 new polyclonal antibodies against different bacteria and natural samples (water, sediments, soil, biofilms, etc) from Mars analog environments, as well as the construction and validation of a Life Detector Chip (LDCHIP200) with more than 200 antibodies for monitoring the presence of such bacteria or some of their remains. Some of the antibodies produced against iron-sulfur rich Rio Tinto environment (SW Spain) reacted against biological polymers from samples taken around the world (Antarctica, Yellowstone, 4 km depth mine in South Africa or Iceland). A redundancy in the number of antibodies against different target biomarkers apart of revealing the presence of certain biomolecules, it renders a sample-specific immuno-profile, an immnuno-fingerprint, which may constitute by itself an indirect biosignature. We will present a case study of immunoprofiling different iron-sulfur as well as phylosilicates rich samples along the Rio Tinto

  9. Detection of total and A1c-glycosylated hemoglobin in human whole blood using sandwich immunoassays on polydimethylsiloxane-based antibody microarrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huang-Han; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Tsai, Mei-Ling; Huang, Yi-Jing; Chen, Shu-Hui

    2012-10-16

    The percentage of glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (%GHbA1c) in human whole blood indicates the average plasma glucose concentration over a prolonged period of time and is used to diagnose diabetes. However, detecting GHbA1c in the whole blood using immunoassays has limited detection sensitivity due to its low percentage in total hemoglobin (tHb) and interference from various glycan moieties in the sample. We have developed a sandwich immunoassay using an antibody microarray on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate modified with fluorinated compounds to detect tHb and glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (GHbA1c) in human whole blood without sample pretreatment. A polyclonal antibody against hemoglobin (Hb) immobilized on PDMS is used as a common capture probe to enrich all forms of Hb followed by detection via monoclonal anti-Hb and specific monoclonal anti-GHbA1c antibodies for tHb and GHbA1c detection, respectively. This method prevents the use of glycan binding molecules and dramatically reduces the background interference, yielding a detection limit of 3.58 ng/mL for tHb and 0.20 ng/mL for GHbA1c. The fluorinated modification on PDMS is superior to the glass substrate and eliminates the need for the blocking step which is required in commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Moreover, the detection sensitivity for GHbA1c is 4-5 orders of magnitude higher, but the required sample amount is 25 times less than the commercial method. On the basis of patient sample data, a good linear correlation between %GHbA1c values determined by our method and the certified high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) standard method is shown with R(2) > 0.98, indicating the great promise of the developed method for clinical applications.

  10. Microarrays in Glycoproteomics Research

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Tingting; Haab, Brian B.

    2009-01-01

    Microarrays have been extremely useful for investigating binding interactions among diverse types of molecular species, with the main advantage being the ability to examine many interactions using small amount of samples and reagents. Microarrays are increasingly being used to advance research in the field of glycobiology, which is the study of the nature and function and carbohydrates in health and disease. Several types of microarrays are being used in the study of glycans and proteins in glycobiology, including glycan arrays to study the recognition of carbohydrates, lectin arrays to determine carbohydrate expression on purified proteins or on cells, and antibody arrays to examine the variation in particular glycan structures on specific proteins. This review will cover the technology and applications of these types of microarrays, as well as their use for obtaining complementary information on various aspects of glycobiology. PMID:19389548

  11. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  12. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  13. Microarray platform for omics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecklenburg, Michael; Xie, Bin

    2001-09-01

    Microarray technology has revolutionized genetic analysis. However, limitations in genome analysis has lead to renewed interest in establishing 'omic' strategies. As we enter the post-genomic era, new microarray technologies are needed to address these new classes of 'omic' targets, such as proteins, as well as lipids and carbohydrates. We have developed a microarray platform that combines self- assembling monolayers with the biotin-streptavidin system to provide a robust, versatile immobilization scheme. A hydrophobic film is patterned on the surface creating an array of tension wells that eliminates evaporation effects thereby reducing the shear stress to which biomolecules are exposed to during immobilization. The streptavidin linker layer makes it possible to adapt and/or develop microarray based assays using virtually any class of biomolecules including: carbohydrates, peptides, antibodies, receptors, as well as them ore traditional DNA based arrays. Our microarray technology is designed to furnish seamless compatibility across the various 'omic' platforms by providing a common blueprint for fabricating and analyzing arrays. The prototype microarray uses a microscope slide footprint patterned with 2 by 96 flat wells. Data on the microarray platform will be presented.

  14. Tissue Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Dancau, Ana-Maria; Simon, Ronald; Mirlacher, Martina; Sauter, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Modern next-generation sequencing and microarray technologies allow for the simultaneous analysis of all human genes on the DNA, RNA, miRNA, and methylation RNA level. Studies using such techniques have lead to the identification of hundreds of genes with a potential role in cancer or other diseases. The validation of all of these candidate genes requires in situ analysis of high numbers of clinical tissues samples. The tissue microarray technology greatly facilitates such analysis. In this method minute tissue samples (typically 0.6 mm in diameter) from up to 1000 different tissues can be analyzed on one microscope glass slide. All in situ methods suitable for histological studies can be applied to TMAs without major changes of protocols, including immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, or RNA in situ hybridization. Because all tissues are analyzed simultaneously with the same batch of reagents, TMA studies provide an unprecedented degree of standardization, speed, and cost efficiency.

  15. Chromosome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  16. Confirmation of positive antibody screens by solid-phase red cell adherence assay using a tube technique method with polyethylene glycol enhancement.

    PubMed

    Gammon, R R; Lake, M; Velasquez, N; Prichard, A

    2001-01-01

    Our blood bank routinely screens donors for antibodies using a solid-phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) assay. Positive results are then confirmed using a tube technique with polyethylene glycol (PEG) enhancement due to reported higher specificity than with SPRCA. Over a 5-month period, 49,084 donor serum or plasma samples were tested using the SPRCA assay. Further identification of positive samples was performed using a PEG enhancement method. Testing was performed with strict adherence to the manufacturers' inserts. Of 49,084 samples, 313 (0.64%) were positive by the SPRCA assay. Of these, 99 (31.6%) samples remained positive when tested with PEG enhancement. The remaining 214 (68.4%) were negative, giving specificity for the SPRCA assay of 99.6 percent (48,985/ 49,199). We report a high specificity for antibody screening using the SPRCA assay. However, it is cost effective to perform a confirmatory tube test with PEG enhancement because 214 SPRCA assay samples were interpreted as having a negative antibody screen, thus allowing the release of valuable blood components for transfusion.

  17. Evaluation of Novel Multiplex Antibody Kit for Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1/2 and Hepatitis C Virus Using Sol-Gel Based Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seung Gyu; Jang, Jin Woo; Lee, Jong Han; Lim, Chae Seung; Kim, Jinhong; Ki, Yeona; Jo, Minjoung; Kim, Soyoun

    2015-01-01

    Background. Microarrays enable high-throughput screening (HTS) of disease-related molecules, including important signaling proteins/peptides and small molecules that are in low abundance. In this study, we developed a multiplex blood bank screening platform, referred to as the Hi3-1 assay, for simultaneous detection of human immunodeficiency virus 1/2 (HIV 1/2) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Methods. The Hi3-1 assay was tested using four panels (Panel 1, n = 4,581 patient samples; Panel 2, n = 15 seroconversion samples; Panel 3, n = 4 performance samples; and Panel 4, n = 251 purchased positive control samples), and the results were collected by the Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea University Medical College, Republic of Korea. The present study compares the sensitivity of the multiplex detection platform for both HIV and HCV using a sol-gel based microarray, which was based on a reference test (Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo and Architect anti-HCV assays), in Korean patients. Results. The sensitivity of the multiplex detection platform for both HIV and HCV was 100%, and the specificity was 99.96% for HIV and 99.76% for HCV, which is equivalent to that of the reference test. Conclusion. We have successfully applied a novel screening technology to multiplex HIV and HCV diagnoses in a blood bank screening test. PMID:26457305

  18. Protein microarrays for parasite antigen discovery.

    PubMed

    Driguez, Patrick; Doolan, Denise L; Molina, Douglas M; Loukas, Alex; Trieu, Angela; Felgner, Phil L; McManus, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    The host serological profile to a parasitic infection, such as schistosomiasis, can be used to define potential vaccine and diagnostic targets. Determining the host antibody response using traditional approaches is hindered by the large number of putative antigens in any parasite proteome. Parasite protein microarrays offer the potential for a high-throughput host antibody screen to simplify this task. In order to construct the array, parasite proteins are selected from available genomic sequence and protein databases using bioinformatic tools. Selected open reading frames are PCR amplified, incorporated into a vector for cell-free protein expression, and printed robotically onto glass slides. The protein microarrays can be probed with antisera from infected/immune animals or humans and the antibody reactivity measured with fluorophore labeled antibodies on a confocal laser microarray scanner to identify potential targets for diagnosis or therapeutic or prophylactic intervention. PMID:25388117

  19. Flow cytometry immunophenotyping in integrated diagnostics of patients with newly diagnosed cytopenia: one tube 10-color 14-antibody screening panel and 3-tube extensive panel for detection of MDS-related features.

    PubMed

    Porwit, A; Rajab, A

    2015-05-01

    Acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), myeloproliferative neoplasms and lymphomas are the most prevalent diagnoses in adults presenting with new onset cytopenia. Here, we describe two 10-color panels of surface markers (screening and comprehensive panel) applied at the Flow Cytometry Laboratory, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada. A 10-color flow cytometry is applied using the stain-lyse-wash sample preparation method. In patients with <10% blasts and no clear involvement by hematological malignancy based on cytomorphological evaluation of bone marrow (BM) smear, the recently published one-tube 10-color 14-antibody screening panel is applied. This panel allows detection of major B- and T-cell abnormalities, enumeration of cells in blast region (CD45 dim), and gives insight into myeloid BM compartment, including calculation of four-parameter score for MDS-related abnormalities. In patients who present with ≥10 - <20% blasts in blood or BM smears, a comprehensive three-tube panel of surface markers is used up front. The analysis is focused on the detection of abnormal antigen expression patterns not seen in normal/reactive BM, according to the guidelines developed by International/European LeukemiaNet Working Group for Flow Cytometry in MDS. In patients with ≥20% blasts, an additional tube is added to allow the detection of cytoplasmic markers necessary to diagnose mixed phenotype acute leukemia.

  20. DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  1. Multiple Antibody Targets on Herpes B Glycoproteins B and D Identified by Screening Sera of Infected Rhesus Macaques with Peptide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Beutling, Ulrike; Jentsch, Dieter; Motzkus, Dirk; Frank, Ronald; Hunsmann, Gerhard; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Fritz, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Herpes B virus (or Herpesvirus simiae or Macacine herpesvirus 1) is endemic in many populations of macaques, both in the wild and in captivity. The virus elicits only mild clinical symptoms (if any) in monkeys, but can be transmitted by various routes, most commonly via bites, to humans where it causes viral encephalitis with a high mortality rate. Hence, herpes B constitutes a considerable occupational hazard for animal caretakers, veterinarians and laboratory personnel. Efforts are therefore being made to reduce the risk of zoonotic infection and to improve prognosis after accidental exposure. Among the measures envisaged are serological surveillance of monkey colonies and specific diagnosis of herpes B zoonosis against a background of antibodies recognizing the closely related human herpes simplex virus (HSV). 422 pentadecapeptides covering, in an overlapping fashion, the entire amino acid sequences of herpes B proteins gB and gD were synthesized and immobilized on glass slides. Antibodies present in monkey sera that bind to subsets of the peptide collection were detected by microserological techniques. With 42 different rhesus macaque sera, 114 individual responses to 18 different antibody target regions (ATRs) were recorded, 17 of which had not been described earlier. This finding may pave the way for a peptide-based, herpes B specific serological diagnostic test. PMID:24497986

  2. Aptamer Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Angel-Syrett, Heather; Collett, Jim; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2009-01-02

    In vitro selection can yield specific, high-affinity aptamers. We and others have devised methods for the automated selection of aptamers, and have begun to use these reagents for the construction of arrays. Arrayed aptamers have proven to be almost as sensitive as their solution phase counterparts, and when ganged together can provide both specific and general diagnostic signals for proteins and other analytes. We describe here technical details regarding the production and processing of aptamer microarrays, including blocking, washing, drying, and scanning. We will also discuss the challenges involved in developing standardized and reproducible methods for binding and quantitating protein targets. While signals from fluorescent analytes or sandwiches are typically captured, it has proven possible for immobilized aptamers to be uniquely coupled to amplification methods not available to protein reagents, thus allowing for protein-binding signals to be greatly amplified. Into the future, many of the biosensor methods described in this book can potentially be adapted to array formats, thus further expanding the utility of and applications for aptamer arrays.

  3. Automated analytical microarrays: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Michael; Niessner, Reinhard

    2008-07-01

    Microarrays provide a powerful analytical tool for the simultaneous detection of multiple analytes in a single experiment. The specific affinity reaction of nucleic acids (hybridization) and antibodies towards antigens is the most common bioanalytical method for generating multiplexed quantitative results. Nucleic acid-based analysis is restricted to the detection of cells and viruses. Antibodies are more universal biomolecular receptors that selectively bind small molecules such as pesticides, small toxins, and pharmaceuticals and to biopolymers (e.g. toxins, allergens) and complex biological structures like bacterial cells and viruses. By producing an appropriate antibody, the corresponding antigenic analyte can be detected on a multiplexed immunoanalytical microarray. Food and water analysis along with clinical diagnostics constitute potential application fields for multiplexed analysis. Diverse fluorescence, chemiluminescence, electrochemical, and label-free microarray readout systems have been developed in the last decade. Some of them are constructed as flow-through microarrays by combination with a fluidic system. Microarrays have the potential to become widely accepted as a system for analytical applications, provided that robust and validated results on fully automated platforms are successfully generated. This review gives an overview of the current research on microarrays with the focus on automated systems and quantitative multiplexed applications.

  4. Highly sensitive and reproducible immunoradiometric assay for total human renin using monoclonal antibodies, iodogen labelling and polystyrene star tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, M.D.; Rasumussen, P.H.; Giese, J.

    1987-01-01

    A two-site immunoradiometric assay for total renin concentration in human plasma is described. A new type of polystyrene tubes with a special bottom geometry, so-called Star Tubes were used. The lower limit of detection was 2 microIU per ml and the working range from 2 to 2000 microIU per ml. The variation for duplicate determinations on standards and plasma samples was 2.7% and the day to day variation was 4.8%. No significant interferences or cross reactivities were identified. EDTA-plasma was analyzed after dilution with a phosphate buffer. Plasma samples from different patient categories were analyzed. The results were compared with those obtained by our substrate enrichment method after acid activation of the samples had taken place. A linear correlation (r = 0.990) between the results obtained with the two methods was found.

  5. Antibody validation

    PubMed Central

    Bordeaux, Jennifer; Welsh, Allison W.; Agarwal, Seema; Killiam, Elizabeth; Baquero, Maria T.; Hanna, Jason A.; Anagnostou, Valsamo K.; Rimm, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are among the most frequently used tools in basic science research and in clinical assays, but there are no universally accepted guidelines or standardized methods for determining the validity of these reagents. Furthermore, for commercially available antibodies, it is clear that what is on the label does not necessarily correspond to what is in the tube. To validate an antibody, it must be shown to be specific, selective, and reproducible in the context for which it is to be used. In this review, we highlight the common pitfalls when working with antibodies, common practices for validating antibodies, and levels of commercial antibody validation for seven vendors. Finally, we share our algorithm for antibody validation for immunohistochemistry and quantitative immunofluorescence. PMID:20359301

  6. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  7. Microarrays, Integrated Analytical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combinatorial chemistry is used to find materials that form sensor microarrays. This book discusses the fundamentals, and then proceeds to the many applications of microarrays, from measuring gene expression (DNA microarrays) to protein-protein interactions, peptide chemistry, carbodhydrate chemistry, electrochemical detection, and microfluidics.

  8. Manufacturing of microarrays.

    PubMed

    Petersen, David W; Kawasaki, Ernest S

    2007-01-01

    DNA microarray technology has become a powerful tool in the arsenal of the molecular biologist. Capitalizing on high precision robotics and the wealth of DNA sequences annotated from the genomes of a large number of organisms, the manufacture of microarrays is now possible for the average academic laboratory with the funds and motivation. Microarray production requires attention to both biological and physical resources, including DNA libraries, robotics, and qualified personnel. While the fabrication of microarrays is a very labor-intensive process, production of quality microarrays individually tailored on a project-by-project basis will help researchers shed light on future scientific questions.

  9. The Impact of Photobleaching on Microarray Analysis.

    PubMed

    von der Haar, Marcel; Preuß, John-Alexander; von der Haar, Kathrin; Lindner, Patrick; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    DNA-Microarrays have become a potent technology for high-throughput analysis of genetic regulation. However, the wide dynamic range of signal intensities of fluorophore-based microarrays exceeds the dynamic range of a single array scan by far, thus limiting the key benefit of microarray technology: parallelization. The implementation of multi-scan techniques represents a promising approach to overcome these limitations. These techniques are, in turn, limited by the fluorophores' susceptibility to photobleaching when exposed to the scanner's laser light. In this paper the photobleaching characteristics of cyanine-3 and cyanine-5 as part of solid state DNA microarrays are studied. The effects of initial fluorophore intensity as well as laser scanner dependent variables such as the photomultiplier tube's voltage on bleaching and imaging are investigated. The resulting data is used to develop a model capable of simulating the expected degree of signal intensity reduction caused by photobleaching for each fluorophore individually, allowing for the removal of photobleaching-induced, systematic bias in multi-scan procedures. Single-scan applications also benefit as they rely on pre-scans to determine the optimal scanner settings. These findings constitute a step towards standardization of microarray experiments and analysis and may help to increase the lab-to-lab comparability of microarray experiment results. PMID:26378589

  10. 3-D microarray and its microfabrication-free fluidic immunoassay device.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingshuai; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Zhisong; Li, Chang Ming

    2015-08-19

    Conventional 2-D microarray is known to have high-throughput detection capability; however, the sensing spots density is significantly hindered by the spot-to-spot distance (gap) requirement for eliminating cross-talks between adjacent spots. Herein a new conceptual 3-D microarray device is proposed to significantly improve the spots density. To demonstrate advantages of the 3-D array, a microfabrication-free fluidic immunoassay device is further made by simply coupling an antibodies-arrayed glass cuboid into a circular glass tube. Rapid, sensitive and high-throughput flow-through immunoassays were accomplished with the 3-D array-based device for detection limits of 10-100 pg mL(-1) and wide dynamic range over 4-5 orders of magnitude in human serum with cancer biomarkers α-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as model targets, holding great promise for practical clinical applications. The 3-D microarray device not only significantly increases the density of sensing spots, but also greatly enhances the mass transport for rapid immunoassay when using in a flow-through device. PMID:26343442

  11. Microarrays in hematology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Josef; Flower, Darren; Rigley, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Microarrays are fast becoming routine tools for the high-throughput analysis of gene expression in a wide range of biologic systems, including hematology. Although a number of approaches can be taken when implementing microarray-based studies, all are capable of providing important insights into biologic function. Although some technical issues have not been resolved, microarrays will continue to make a significant impact on hematologically important research. PMID:11753074

  12. A Protein Microarray ELISA for Screening Biological Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Woodbury, Ronald L.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2004-02-01

    Protein microarrays permit the simultaneous measurement of many proteins in a small sample volume and therefore provide an attractive approach for the quantitative measurement of proteins in biological fluids, including serum. This chapter describes a microarray ELISA assay. Capture antibodies are immobilized onto a glass surface, the covalently attached antibodies bind a specific antigen from a sample overlaying the array. A second, biotinylated antibody that recognizes the same antigen as the first antibody but at a different epitope is then used for detection. Detection is based upon an enzymatic signal enhancement method known as tyramide signal amplification (TSA). By coupling a microarray-ELISA format with the signal amplification of tyramide deposition, the assay sensitivity is as low as sub-pg/ml.

  13. Chemiluminescence microarrays in analytical chemistry: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Michael; Niessner, Reinhard

    2014-09-01

    Multi-analyte immunoassays on microarrays and on multiplex DNA microarrays have been described for quantitative analysis of small organic molecules (e.g., antibiotics, drugs of abuse, small molecule toxins), proteins (e.g., antibodies or protein toxins), and microorganisms, viruses, and eukaryotic cells. In analytical chemistry, multi-analyte detection by use of analytical microarrays has become an innovative research topic because of the possibility of generating several sets of quantitative data for different analyte classes in a short time. Chemiluminescence (CL) microarrays are powerful tools for rapid multiplex analysis of complex matrices. A wide range of applications for CL microarrays is described in the literature dealing with analytical microarrays. The motivation for this review is to summarize the current state of CL-based analytical microarrays. Combining analysis of different compound classes on CL microarrays reduces analysis time, cost of reagents, and use of laboratory space. Applications are discussed, with examples from food safety, water safety, environmental monitoring, diagnostics, forensics, toxicology, and biosecurity. The potential and limitations of research on multiplex analysis by use of CL microarrays are discussed in this review.

  14. Severe acute respiratory syndrome diagnostics using a coronavirus protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Heng; Hu, Shaohui; Jona, Ghil; Zhu, Xiaowei; Kreiswirth, Nate; Willey, Barbara M; Mazzulli, Tony; Liu, Guozhen; Song, Qifeng; Chen, Peng; Cameron, Mark; Tyler, Andrea; Wang, Jian; Wen, Jie; Chen, Weijun; Compton, Susan; Snyder, Michael

    2006-03-14

    To monitor severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) infection, a coronavirus protein microarray that harbors proteins from SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and five additional coronaviruses was constructed. These microarrays were used to screen approximately 400 Canadian sera from the SARS outbreak, including samples from confirmed SARS-CoV cases, respiratory illness patients, and healthcare professionals. A computer algorithm that uses multiple classifiers to predict samples from SARS patients was developed and used to predict 206 sera from Chinese fever patients. The test assigned patients into two distinct groups: those with antibodies to SARS-CoV and those without. The microarray also identified patients with sera reactive against other coronavirus proteins. Our results correlated well with an indirect immunofluorescence test and demonstrated that viral infection can be monitored for many months after infection. We show that protein microarrays can serve as a rapid, sensitive, and simple tool for large-scale identification of viral-specific antibodies in sera.

  15. A comparison of titers of anti-Brucella antibodies of naturally infected and healthy vaccinated cattle by standard tube agglutination test, microtiter plate agglutination test, indirect hemagglutination assay, and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Anju; Saxena, Hari Mohan; Malhotra, Puneet

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We determined the antibody response in cattle naturally infected with brucellosis and normal healthy adult cattle vaccinated during calf hood with strain 19. Materials and Methods: The antibody titers were measured by standard tube agglutination test (STAT), microtiter plate agglutination test (MAT), indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA), and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) as per standard protocols. Results: The mean STAT titers were 1.963±0.345 in infected cattle and 1.200±0.155 in healthy vaccinated cattle. The difference was extremely significant (p<0.0001). The mean MAT titers were 2.244±0.727 in infected cattle and 1.200±0.155 in healthy vaccinated cattle. The difference was very significant (p<0.005). The mean IHA titers in infected cattle were 2.284±0.574, and those in healthy vaccinated cattle were 1.200±0.155. The difference was extremely significant (p=0.0002). However, the difference in mean iELISA titers of infected cattle (1.3678±0.014) and healthy vaccinated cattle (1.367±0.014) was non-significant. The infected animals showed very high titers of agglutinating antibodies compared to the vaccinated animals. However, it cannot be ascertained whether these antibodies are due to vaccine or response to infection. Since the infected animals had been vaccinated earlier, the current infection may suggest that vaccination was unable to induce protective levels of antibody. The heightened antibody response after infection may also indicate a secondary immune response to the antigens common to the vaccine strain and wild Brucella organisms. Conclusion: The brucellosis infected animals showed very high titers of agglutinating antibodies compared to the vaccinated animals. PMID:27536032

  16. Microarray Analysis in Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Bhawe, Kaumudi M.; Aghi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Microarray analysis in glioblastomas is done using either cell lines or patient samples as starting material. A survey of the current literature points to transcript-based microarrays and immunohistochemistry (IHC)-based tissue microarrays as being the preferred methods of choice in cancers of neurological origin. Microarray analysis may be carried out for various purposes including the following: To correlate gene expression signatures of glioblastoma cell lines or tumors with response to chemotherapy (DeLay et al., Clin Cancer Res 18(10):2930–2942, 2012)To correlate gene expression patterns with biological features like proliferation or invasiveness of the glioblastoma cells (Jiang et al., PLoS One 8(6):e66008, 2013)To discover new tumor classificatory systems based on gene expression signature, and to correlate therapeutic response and prognosis with these signatures (Huse et al., Annu Rev Med 64(1):59–70, 2013; Verhaak et al., Cancer Cell 17(1):98–110, 2010) While investigators can sometimes use archived tumor gene expression data available from repositories such as the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus to answer their questions, new arrays must often be run to adequately answer specific questions. Here, we provide a detailed description of microarray methodologies, how to select the appropriate methodology for a given question, and analytical strategies that can be used. Experimental methodology for protein microarrays is outside the scope of this chapter, but basic sample preparation techniques for transcript-based microarrays are included here. PMID:26113463

  17. Microarray Analysis in Glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Bhawe, Kaumudi M; Aghi, Manish K

    2016-01-01

    Microarray analysis in glioblastomas is done using either cell lines or patient samples as starting material. A survey of the current literature points to transcript-based microarrays and immunohistochemistry (IHC)-based tissue microarrays as being the preferred methods of choice in cancers of neurological origin. Microarray analysis may be carried out for various purposes including the following: i. To correlate gene expression signatures of glioblastoma cell lines or tumors with response to chemotherapy (DeLay et al., Clin Cancer Res 18(10):2930-2942, 2012). ii. To correlate gene expression patterns with biological features like proliferation or invasiveness of the glioblastoma cells (Jiang et al., PLoS One 8(6):e66008, 2013). iii. To discover new tumor classificatory systems based on gene expression signature, and to correlate therapeutic response and prognosis with these signatures (Huse et al., Annu Rev Med 64(1):59-70, 2013; Verhaak et al., Cancer Cell 17(1):98-110, 2010). While investigators can sometimes use archived tumor gene expression data available from repositories such as the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus to answer their questions, new arrays must often be run to adequately answer specific questions. Here, we provide a detailed description of microarray methodologies, how to select the appropriate methodology for a given question, and analytical strategies that can be used. Experimental methodology for protein microarrays is outside the scope of this chapter, but basic sample preparation techniques for transcript-based microarrays are included here. PMID:26113463

  18. Tube support

    DOEpatents

    Mullinax, Jerry L.

    1988-01-01

    A tube support for supporting horizontal tubes from an inclined vertical support tube passing between the horizontal tubes. A support button is welded to the vertical support tube. Two clamping bars or plates, the lower edges of one bearing on the support button, are removably bolted to the inclined vertical tube. The clamping bars provide upper and lower surface support for the horizontal tubes.

  19. A microarray immunoassay for simultaneous detection of proteins and bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delehanty, James B.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2002-01-01

    We report the development and characterization of an antibody microarray biosensor for the rapid detection of both protein and bacterial analytes under flow conditions. Using a noncontact microarray printer, biotinylated capture antibodies were immobilized at discrete locations on the surface of an avidin-coated glass microscope slide. Preservation of capture antibody function during the deposition process was accomplished with the use of a low-salt buffer containing sucrose and bovine serum albumin. The slide was fitted with a six-channel flow module that conducted analyte-containing solutions over the array of capture antibody microspots. Detection of bound analyte was subsequently achieved using fluorescent tracer antibodies. The pattern of fluorescent complexes was interrogated using a scanning confocal microscope equipped with a 635-nm laser. This microarray system was employed to detect protein and bacterial analytes both individually and in samples containing mixtures of analytes. Assays were completed in 15 min, and detection of cholera toxin, staphylococcal enterotoxin B, ricin, and Bacillus globigii was demonstrated at levels as low as 8 ng/mL, 4 ng/mL, 10 ng/mL, and 6.2 x 10(4) cfu/mL, respectively. The assays presented here are very fast, as compared to previously published methods for measuring antibody-antigen interactions using microarrays (minutes versus hours).

  20. Functional Protein Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaohui; Xie, Zhi; Qian, Jiang; Blackshaw, Seth; Zhu, Heng

    2010-01-01

    Functional protein microarrays are emerging as a promising new tool for large-scale and high-throughput studies. In this article, we will review their applications in basic proteomics research, where various types of assays have been developed to probe binding activities to other biomolecules, such as proteins, DNA, RNA, small molecules, and glycans. We will also report recent progress of using functional protein microarrays in profiling protein posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, acetylation, and nitrosylation. Finally, we will discuss potential of functional protein microarrays in biomarker identification and clinical diagnostics. We strongly believe that functional protein microarrays will soon become an indispensible and invaluable tool in proteomics research and systems biology. PMID:20872749

  1. DNA Microarray Technology

    SciTech Connect

    WERNER-WASHBURNE, MARGARET; DAVIDSON, GEORGE S.

    2002-01-01

    Collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico Biology Department resulted in the capability to train students in microarray techniques and the interpretation of data from microarray experiments. These studies provide for a better understanding of the role of stationary phase and the gene regulation involved in exit from stationary phase, which may eventually have important clinical implications. Importantly, this research trained numerous students and is the basis for three new Ph.D. projects.

  2. DNA microarrays in neuropsychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Marcotte, E R; Srivastava, L K; Quirion, R

    2001-08-01

    Recent advances in experimental genomics, coupled with the wealth of sequence information available for a variety of organisms, have the potential to transform the way pharmacological research is performed. At present, high-density DNA microarrays allow researchers to quickly and accurately quantify gene-expression changes in a massively parallel manner. Although now well established in other biomedical fields, such as cancer and genetics research, DNA microarrays have only recently begun to make significant inroads into pharmacology. To date, the major focus in this field has been on the general application of DNA microarrays to toxicology and drug discovery and design. This review summarizes the major microarray findings of relevance to neuropsychopharmacology, as a prelude to the design and analysis of future basic and clinical microarray experiments. The ability of DNA microarrays to monitor gene expression simultaneously in a large-scale format is helping to usher in a post-genomic age, where simple constructs about the role of nature versus nurture are being replaced by a functional understanding of gene expression in living organisms. PMID:11479006

  3. Feeding Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... administer the TPN. Tubes Used for Enteral Feeds NG (Nasogastric Tube) A flexible tube is placed via ... down through the esophagus into the stomach. The NG tube can be used to empty the stomach ...

  4. Ear Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Tubes Ear Tubes Patient Health Information News media ... and throat specialist) may be considered. What are ear tubes? Ear tubes are tiny cylinders placed through ...

  5. Communication: Antibody stability and behavior on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bush, Derek B; Knotts, Thomas A

    2015-08-14

    Antibody microarrays have the potential to revolutionize molecular detection in scientific, medical, and other biosensor applications, but their current use is limited because of poor reliability. It is hypothesized that one reason for their poor performance results from strong antibody-surface interactions that destabilize the antibody structure and create steric interference for antigen recognition. Using a recently developed coarse-grain protein-surface model that has been parameterized against experimental data, antibody-surface interactions for two antibody orientations on two types of surfaces have been investigated. The results show that regardless of attachment geometry, antibodies tend to collapse onto hydrophobic surfaces and exhibit lower overall stability compared to antibodies on hydrophilic surfaces or in bulk solution. The results provide an unprecedented view into the dynamics of antibodies on surfaces and offer new insights into the poor performance exhibited by current antibody microarrays. PMID:26277119

  6. Sandwich ELISA Microarrays: Generating Reliable and Reproducible Assays for High-Throughput Screens

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Rachel M.; Varnum, Susan M.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2009-05-11

    The sandwich ELISA microarray is a powerful screening tool in biomarker discovery and validation due to its ability to simultaneously probe for multiple proteins in a miniaturized assay. The technical challenges of generating and processing the arrays are numerous. However, careful attention to possible pitfalls in the development of your antibody microarray assay can overcome these challenges. In this chapter, we describe in detail the steps that are involved in generating a reliable and reproducible sandwich ELISA microarray assay.

  7. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures. PMID:26039143

  8. Plasmonically amplified fluorescence bioassay with microarray format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogalic, S.; Hageneder, S.; Ctortecka, C.; Bauch, M.; Khan, I.; Preininger, Claudia; Sauer, U.; Dostalek, J.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal in bioassays with microarray detection format is reported. A crossed relief diffraction grating was designed to couple an excitation laser beam to surface plasmons at the wavelength overlapping with the absorption and emission bands of fluorophore Dy647 that was used as a label. The surface of periodically corrugated sensor chip was coated with surface plasmon-supporting gold layer and a thin SU8 polymer film carrying epoxy groups. These groups were employed for the covalent immobilization of capture antibodies at arrays of spots. The plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal on the developed microarray chip was tested by using interleukin 8 sandwich immunoassay. The readout was performed ex situ after drying the chip by using a commercial scanner with high numerical aperture collecting lens. Obtained results reveal the enhancement of fluorescence signal by a factor of 5 when compared to a regular glass chip.

  9. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-10-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) - about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences.

  10. Applications in high-content functional protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Moore, Cedric D; Ajala, Olutobi Z; Zhu, Heng

    2016-02-01

    Protein microarray technology provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds to thousands of proteins in a parallel and high-throughput manner. Over the last decade, applications of functional protein microarrays in particular have flourished in studying protein function at a systems level and have led to the construction of networks and pathways describing these functions. Relevant areas of research include the detection of various binding properties of proteins, the study of enzyme-substrate relationships, the analysis of host-microbe interactions, and profiling antibody specificity. In addition, discovery of novel biomarkers in autoimmune diseases and cancers is emerging as a major clinical application of functional protein microarrays. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances of functional protein microarrays in both basic and clinical applications. PMID:26599287

  11. Microarrays for Undergraduate Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Dale; Nguyen, Lisa L.; Denyer, Gareth S.; Johnston, Jill M.

    2006-01-01

    A microarray experiment is presented that, in six laboratory sessions, takes undergraduate students from the tissue sample right through to data analysis. The model chosen, the murine erythroleukemia cell line, can be easily cultured in sufficient quantities for class use. Large changes in gene expression can be induced in these cells by…

  12. TUBE TESTER

    DOEpatents

    Gittings, H.T. Jr.; Kalbach, J.F.

    1958-01-14

    This patent relates to tube testing, and in particular describes a tube tester for automatic testing of a number of vacuum tubes while in service and as frequently as may be desired. In it broadest aspects the tube tester compares a particular tube with a standard tube tarough a difference amplifier. An unbalanced condition in the circuit of the latter produced by excessive deviation of the tube in its characteristics from standard actuates a switch mechanism stopping the testing cycle and indicating the defective tube.

  13. Microarrays under the microscope

    PubMed Central

    Wildsmith, S E; Elcock, F J

    2001-01-01

    Microarray technology is a rapidly advancing area, which is gaining popularity in many biological disciplines from drug target identification to predictive toxicology. Over the past few years, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of methods and techniques available for carrying out this form of gene expression analysis. The techniques and associated peripherals, such as slide types, deposition methods, robotics, and scanning equipment, are undergoing constant improvement, helping to drive the technology forward in terms of robustness and ease of use. These rapid developments, combined with the number of options available and the associated hyperbole, can prove daunting for the new user. This review aims to guide the researcher through the various steps of conducting microarray experiments, from initial strategy to analysing the data, with critical examination of the benefits and disadvantages along the way. PMID:11212888

  14. Navigating public microarray databases.

    PubMed

    Penkett, Christopher J; Bähler, Jürg

    2004-01-01

    With the ever-escalating amount of data being produced by genome-wide microarray studies, it is of increasing importance that these data are captured in public databases so that researchers can use this information to complement and enhance their own studies. Many groups have set up databases of expression data, ranging from large repositories, which are designed to comprehensively capture all published data, through to more specialized databases. The public repositories, such as ArrayExpress at the European Bioinformatics Institute contain complete datasets in raw format in addition to processed data, whilst the specialist databases tend to provide downstream analysis of normalized data from more focused studies and data sources. Here we provide a guide to the use of these public microarray resources.

  15. Reducing heterophilic antibody interference in immunoassays using single chain antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Tan, Ruimin; Fischer, Christopher J.; Victry, Kristin D.; Zangar, Richard C.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2011-12-15

    Sandwich ELISA microarrays have the potential to simultaneously quantify the levels of multiple diagnostic targets in a biological sample. However, as seen with traditional ELISA diagnostics, heterophilic antibodies (HA) in patient sera have the potential to cause interference in these assays. We demonstrate here that reducing the diagnostic capture antibody to its minimal functional unit, the variable heavy and light domains artificially connected with a short polypeptide linker (scFv), is an effective strategy for reducing the HA assay interference.

  16. Design and development of a microarray processing station (MPS) for automated miniaturized immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Pla-Roca, Mateu; Altay, Gizem; Giralt, Xavier; Casals, Alícia; Samitier, Josep

    2016-08-01

    Here we describe the design and evaluation of a fluidic device for the automatic processing of microarrays, called microarray processing station or MPS. The microarray processing station once installed on a commercial microarrayer allows automating the washing, and drying steps, which are often performed manually. The substrate where the assay occurs remains on place during the microarray printing, incubation and processing steps, therefore the addressing of nL volumes of the distinct immunoassay reagents such as capture and detection antibodies and samples can be performed on the same coordinate of the substrate with a perfect alignment without requiring any additional mechanical or optical re-alignment methods. This allows the performance of independent immunoassays in a single microarray spot. PMID:27405464

  17. Development of a protein microarray using sequence-specific DNA binding domain on DNA chip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Pack, Seung Pil; Yoo, Young Je . E-mail: yjyoo@snu.ac.kr

    2005-04-22

    A protein microarray based on DNA microarray platform was developed to identify protein-protein interactions in vitro. The conventional DNA chip surface by 156-bp PCR product was prepared for a substrate of protein microarray. High-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding domain, GAL4 DNA binding domain, was introduced to the protein microarray as fusion partner of a target model protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein. The target protein was oriented immobilized directly on the DNA chip surface. Finally, monoclonal antibody of the target protein was used to identify the immobilized protein on the surface. This study shows that the conventional DNA chip can be used to make a protein microarray directly, and this novel protein microarray can be applicable as a tool for identifying protein-protein interactions.

  18. Assessing Bacterial Interactions Using Carbohydrate-Based Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Andrea; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a crucial role in host-microorganism interactions and many host glycoconjugates are receptors or co-receptors for microbial binding. Host glycosylation varies with species and location in the body, and this contributes to species specificity and tropism of commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, bacterial glycosylation is often the first bacterial molecular species encountered and responded to by the host system. Accordingly, characterising and identifying the exact structures involved in these critical interactions is an important priority in deciphering microbial pathogenesis. Carbohydrate-based microarray platforms have been an underused tool for screening bacterial interactions with specific carbohydrate structures, but they are growing in popularity in recent years. In this review, we discuss carbohydrate-based microarrays that have been profiled with whole bacteria, recombinantly expressed adhesins or serum antibodies. Three main types of carbohydrate-based microarray platform are considered; (i) conventional carbohydrate or glycan microarrays; (ii) whole mucin microarrays; and (iii) microarrays constructed from bacterial polysaccharides or their components. Determining the nature of the interactions between bacteria and host can help clarify the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate-mediated interactions in microbial pathogenesis, infectious disease and host immune response and may lead to new strategies to boost therapeutic treatments. PMID:27600247

  19. Novel 3-Dimensional Dendrimer Platform for Glycolipid Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Xichun

    2011-01-01

    Glycolipids are important biological molecules that modulate cellular recognitions and pathogen adhesions. In this paper, we report a sensitive glycolipid microarray for non-covalently immobilizing glycolipids on a microarray substrate and we perform a set of immunoassays to explore glycolipid-protein interactions. This substrate utilizes a three-dimensional hydrazide-functionalized dendrimer monolayer attached onto a microscopic glass surface, which possesses the characteristics to adsorb glycoliplids non-covalently and facilitates multivalent attributes on the substrate surface. In the proof-of-concept experiments, gangliosides such as GM1, FucGM1, GM3, GD1b, GT1b, and GQ1b, and a lipoarabinomannan were tested on the substrate and interrogated with toxins and antibodies. The resulting glycolipid microarrays exhibited hypersensitivity and specificity for detection of glycolipid-protein interactions. In particular, a robust and specific binding of a pentameric cholera toxin B subunit to the GM1 glycolipid spotted on the array has demonstrated its superiority in sensitivity and specificity. In addition, this glycolipid microarray substrate was used to detect lipoarabinomannan in buffer within a limit-of-detection of 125 ng/mL. Furthermore, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) Lipoarabinomannan was tested in human urine specimens on this platform, which can effectively identify urine samples either infected or not infected with Mtb. The results of this work suggest the possibility of using this glycolipid microarray platform to fabricate glycoconjugate microarrays, which includes free glycans and glycolipids and potential application in detection of pathogen and toxin. PMID:21820887

  20. Assessing Bacterial Interactions Using Carbohydrate-Based Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Andrea; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a crucial role in host-microorganism interactions and many host glycoconjugates are receptors or co-receptors for microbial binding. Host glycosylation varies with species and location in the body, and this contributes to species specificity and tropism of commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, bacterial glycosylation is often the first bacterial molecular species encountered and responded to by the host system. Accordingly, characterising and identifying the exact structures involved in these critical interactions is an important priority in deciphering microbial pathogenesis. Carbohydrate-based microarray platforms have been an underused tool for screening bacterial interactions with specific carbohydrate structures, but they are growing in popularity in recent years. In this review, we discuss carbohydrate-based microarrays that have been profiled with whole bacteria, recombinantly expressed adhesins or serum antibodies. Three main types of carbohydrate-based microarray platform are considered; (i) conventional carbohydrate or glycan microarrays; (ii) whole mucin microarrays; and (iii) microarrays constructed from bacterial polysaccharides or their components. Determining the nature of the interactions between bacteria and host can help clarify the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate-mediated interactions in microbial pathogenesis, infectious disease and host immune response and may lead to new strategies to boost therapeutic treatments.

  1. A high-throughput, precipitating colorimetric sandwich ELISA microarray for shiga toxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxins 1 and 2 (Stx1 and Stx2) from Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) bacteria were simultaneously detected with a newly developed, high-throughput antibody microarray platform. The proteinaceous toxins were immobilized and sandwiched between biorecognition elements (monoclonal antibodies)...

  2. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, Davis Austin

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons), 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)

  3. Ecotoxicogenomics: Microarray interlaboratory comparability.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dorsch, Doris E; Bay, Steven M; Moore, Shelly; Layton, Blythe; Mehinto, Alvine C; Vulpe, Chris D; Brown-Augustine, Marianna; Loguinov, Alex; Poynton, Helen; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Perkins, Edward J; Escalon, Lynn; Denslow, Nancy D; Cristina, Colli-Dula R; Doan, Tri; Shukradas, Shweta; Bruno, Joy; Brown, Lorraine; Van Agglen, Graham; Jackman, Paula; Bauer, Megan

    2016-02-01

    Transcriptomic analysis can complement traditional ecotoxicology data by providing mechanistic insight, and by identifying sub-lethal organismal responses and contaminant classes underlying observed toxicity. Before transcriptomic information can be used in monitoring and risk assessment, it is necessary to determine its reproducibility and detect key steps impacting the reliable identification of differentially expressed genes. A custom 15K-probe microarray was used to conduct transcriptomics analyses across six laboratories with estuarine amphipods exposed to cyfluthrin-spiked or control sediments (10 days). Two sample types were generated, one consisted of total RNA extracts (Ex) from exposed and control samples (extracted by one laboratory) and the other consisted of exposed and control whole body amphipods (WB) from which each laboratory extracted RNA. Our findings indicate that gene expression microarray results are repeatable. Differentially expressed data had a higher degree of repeatability across all laboratories in samples with similar RNA quality (Ex) when compared to WB samples with more variable RNA quality. Despite such variability a subset of genes were consistently identified as differentially expressed across all laboratories and sample types. We found that the differences among the individual laboratory results can be attributed to several factors including RNA quality and technical expertise, but the overall results can be improved by following consistent protocols and with appropriate training.

  4. The Genopolis Microarray Database

    PubMed Central

    Splendiani, Andrea; Brandizi, Marco; Even, Gael; Beretta, Ottavio; Pavelka, Norman; Pelizzola, Mattia; Mayhaus, Manuel; Foti, Maria; Mauri, Giancarlo; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene expression databases are key resources for microarray data management and analysis and the importance of a proper annotation of their content is well understood. Public repositories as well as microarray database systems that can be implemented by single laboratories exist. However, there is not yet a tool that can easily support a collaborative environment where different users with different rights of access to data can interact to define a common highly coherent content. The scope of the Genopolis database is to provide a resource that allows different groups performing microarray experiments related to a common subject to create a common coherent knowledge base and to analyse it. The Genopolis database has been implemented as a dedicated system for the scientific community studying dendritic and macrophage cells functions and host-parasite interactions. Results The Genopolis Database system allows the community to build an object based MIAME compliant annotation of their experiments and to store images, raw and processed data from the Affymetrix GeneChip® platform. It supports dynamical definition of controlled vocabularies and provides automated and supervised steps to control the coherence of data and annotations. It allows a precise control of the visibility of the database content to different sub groups in the community and facilitates exports of its content to public repositories. It provides an interactive users interface for data analysis: this allows users to visualize data matrices based on functional lists and sample characterization, and to navigate to other data matrices defined by similarity of expression values as well as functional characterizations of genes involved. A collaborative environment is also provided for the definition and sharing of functional annotation by users. Conclusion The Genopolis Database supports a community in building a common coherent knowledge base and analyse it. This fills a gap between a local

  5. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications.

  6. Living-Cell Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Yarmush, Martin L.; King, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Living cells are remarkably complex. To unravel this complexity, living-cell assays have been developed that allow delivery of experimental stimuli and measurement of the resulting cellular responses. High-throughput adaptations of these assays, known as living-cell microarrays, which are based on microtiter plates, high-density spotting, microfabrication, and microfluidics technologies, are being developed for two general applications: (a) to screen large-scale chemical and genomic libraries and (b) to systematically investigate the local cellular microenvironment. These emerging experimental platforms offer exciting opportunities to rapidly identify genetic determinants of disease, to discover modulators of cellular function, and to probe the complex and dynamic relationships between cells and their local environment. PMID:19413510

  7. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons),more » 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)« less

  8. Exploiting fluorescence for multiplex immunoassays on protein microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbáth, Melinda; Papp, Krisztián; Balogh, Andrea; Matkó, János; Prechl, József

    2014-09-01

    Protein microarray technology is becoming the method of choice for identifying protein interaction partners, detecting specific proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, or for characterizing protein interactions and serum antibodies in a massively parallel manner. Availability of the well-established instrumentation of DNA arrays and development of new fluorescent detection instruments promoted the spread of this technique. Fluorescent detection has the advantage of high sensitivity, specificity, simplicity and wide dynamic range required by most measurements. Fluorescence through specifically designed probes and an increasing variety of detection modes offers an excellent tool for such microarray platforms. Measuring for example the level of antibodies, their isotypes and/or antigen specificity simultaneously can offer more complex and comprehensive information about the investigated biological phenomenon, especially if we take into consideration that hundreds of samples can be measured in a single assay. Not only body fluids, but also cell lysates, extracted cellular components, and intact living cells can be analyzed on protein arrays for monitoring functional responses to printed samples on the surface. As a rapidly evolving area, protein microarray technology offers a great bulk of information and new depth of knowledge. These are the features that endow protein arrays with wide applicability and robust sample analyzing capability. On the whole, protein arrays are emerging new tools not just in proteomics, but glycomics, lipidomics, and are also important for immunological research. In this review we attempt to summarize the technical aspects of planar fluorescent microarray technology along with the description of its main immunological applications.

  9. A protein multiplex microarray substrate with high sensitivity and specificity

    PubMed Central

    Fici, Dolores A.; McCormick, William; Brown, David W.; Herrmann, John E.; Kumar, Vikram; Awdeh, Zuheir L.

    2010-01-01

    The problems that have been associated with protein multiplex microarray immunoassay substrates and existing technology platforms include: binding, sensitivity, a low signal to noise ratio, target immobilization and the optimal simultaneous detection of diverse protein targets. Current commercial substrates for planar multiplex microarrays rely on protein attachment chemistries that range from covalent attachment to affinity ligand capture, to simple adsorption. In this pilot study, experimental performance parameters for direct monoclonal mouse IgG detection were compared for available two and three dimensional slide surface coatings with a new colloidal nitrocellulose substrate. New technology multiplex microarrays were also developed and evaluated for the detection of pathogen specific antibodies in human serum and the direct detection of enteric viral antigens. Data supports the nitrocellulose colloid as an effective reagent with the capacity to immobilize sufficient diverse protein target quantities for increased specificory signal without compromising authentic protein structure. The nitrocellulose colloid reagent is compatible with the array spotters and scanners routinely used for microarray preparation and processing. More importantly, as an alternate to fluorescence, colorimetric chemistries may be used for specific and sensitive protein target detection. The advantages of the nitrocellulose colloid platform indicate that this technology may be a valuable tool for the further development and expansion of multiplex microarray immunoassays in both the clinical and research laborat environment. PMID:20974147

  10. Rapid microarray-based DNA genoserotyping of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Geue, Lutz; Monecke, Stefan; Engelmann, Ines; Braun, Sascha; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-02-01

    In this study, an improvement in the oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray for the genoserotyping of Escherichia coli is presented. Primer and probes for additional 70 O antigen groups were developed. The microarray was transferred to a new platform, the ArrayStrip format, which allows high through-put tests in 96-well formats and fully automated microarray analysis. Thus, starting from a single colony, it is possible to determine within a few hours and a single experiment, 94 of the over 180 known O antigen groups as well as 47 of the 53 different H antigens. The microarray was initially validated with a set of defined reference strains that had previously been serotyped by conventional agglutination in various reference centers. For further validation of the microarray, 180 clinical E. coli isolates of human origin (from urine samples, blood cultures, bronchial secretions, and wound swabs) and 53 E. coli isolates from cattle, pigs, and poultry were used. A high degree of concordance between the results of classical antibody-based serotyping and DNA-based genoserotyping was demonstrated during validation of the new 70 O antigen groups as well as for the field strains of human and animal origin. Therefore, this oligonucleotide array is a diagnostic tool that is user-friendly and more efficient than classical serotyping by agglutination. Furthermore, the tests can be performed in almost every routine lab and are easily expanded and standardized.

  11. A Liposome-Based Approach to the Integrated Multi-Component Antigen Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Denong

    2015-01-01

    This report describes an experimental procedure for constructing integrated lipid, carbohydrate, and protein microarrays. In essence, it prints liposomes on nitrocellulose-coated micro-glass slides, a biochip substrate for spotting protein and carbohydrate microarrays, and the substances that can form liposomes (homo-liposomes) or can be incorporated into liposomes (hetero-liposomes) are suitable for microarray construction using existing microarray spotting devices. Importantly, this technology allows simultaneous detection of serum antibody activities among the three major classes of antigens, i.e., lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins. The potential of this technology is illustrated by its use in revealing a broad-spectrum of pre-existing anti-lipid antibodies in blood circulation and monitoring the epitope spreading of autoantibody reactivities among protein, carbohydrate, and lipid antigens in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

  12. A Protein Microarray ELISA for the Detection of Botulinum neurotoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.

    2007-06-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray was developed for the specific and sensitive detection of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A), using high-affinity recombinant monoclonal antibodies against the receptor binding domain of the heavy chain of BoNT/A. The ELISA microarray assay, because of its sensitivity, offers a screening test with detection limits comparable to the mouse bioassay, with results available in hours instead of days.

  13. Microarray Analysis of Microbial Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson-Francis, K.; van Houdt, R.; Leys, N.; Mergeay, M.; Cockell, C. S.

    2010-04-01

    Microarray analysis of the heavy metal resistant bacterium, Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 was used to investigate the genes involved in the weathering. The results demonstrated that large porin and membrane transporter genes were unregulated.

  14. Nasogastric feeding tube

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - nasogastric tube; NG tube; Bolus feeding; Continuous pump feeding; Gavage tube ... A nasogastric tube (NG tube) is a special tube that carries food and medicine to the stomach through the nose. It can be ...

  15. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube insertion; G-tube insertion; PEG tube insertion; Stomach tube insertion; Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion ... and down the esophagus, which leads to the stomach. After the endoscopy tube is inserted, the skin ...

  16. [Protein microarrays and personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiabo; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Joos, Thomas O

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, DNA microarrays have achieved a robust analytical performance, enabling their use for analyzing the whole transcriptome or for screening thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a single experiment. DNA microarrays allow scientists to correlate gene expression signatures with disease progression, to screen for disease-specific mutations, and to treat patients according to their individual genetic profiles; however, the real key is proteins and their manifold functions. It is necessary to achieve a greater understanding of not only protein function and abundance but also their role in the development of diseases. Protein concentrations have been shown to reflect the physiological and pathologic state of an organ, tissue, or cells far more directly than DNA, and proteins can be profiled effectively with protein microarrays, which require only a small amount of sample material. Protein microarrays have become wellestablished tools in basic and applied research, and the first products have already entered the in vitro diagnostics market. This review focuses on protein microarray applications for biomarker discovery and validation, disease diagnosis, and use within the area of personalized medicine. Protein microarrays have proved to be reliable research tools in screening for a multitude of parameters with only a minimal quantity of sample and have enormous potential in applications for diagnostic and personalized medicine.

  17. Versatile High Resolution Oligosaccharide Microarrays for Plant Glycobiology and Cell Wall Research*

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Henriette L.; Fangel, Jonatan U.; McCleary, Barry; Ruzanski, Christian; Rydahl, Maja G.; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Farkas, Vladimir; von Schantz, Laura; Marcus, Susan E.; Andersen, Mathias C. F.; Field, Rob; Ohlin, Mats; Knox, J. Paul; Clausen, Mads H.; Willats, William G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays are powerful tools for high throughput analysis, and hundreds or thousands of molecular interactions can be assessed simultaneously using very small amounts of analytes. Nucleotide microarrays are well established in plant research, but carbohydrate microarrays are much less established, and one reason for this is a lack of suitable glycans with which to populate arrays. Polysaccharide microarrays are relatively easy to produce because of the ease of immobilizing large polymers noncovalently onto a variety of microarray surfaces, but they lack analytical resolution because polysaccharides often contain multiple distinct carbohydrate substructures. Microarrays of defined oligosaccharides potentially overcome this problem but are harder to produce because oligosaccharides usually require coupling prior to immobilization. We have assembled a library of well characterized plant oligosaccharides produced either by partial hydrolysis from polysaccharides or by de novo chemical synthesis. Once coupled to protein, these neoglycoconjugates are versatile reagents that can be printed as microarrays onto a variety of slide types and membranes. We show that these microarrays are suitable for the high throughput characterization of the recognition capabilities of monoclonal antibodies, carbohydrate-binding modules, and other oligosaccharide-binding proteins of biological significance and also that they have potential for the characterization of carbohydrate-active enzymes. PMID:22988248

  18. Comparing Bacterial DNA Microarray Fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Willse, Alan R.; Chandler, Darrell P.; White, Amanda M.; Protic, Miroslava; Daly, Don S.; Wunschel, Sharon C.

    2005-08-15

    Detecting subtle genetic differences between microorganisms is an important problem in molecular epidemiology and microbial forensics. In a typical investigation, gel electrophoresis is used to compare randomly amplified DNA fragments between microbial strains, where the patterns of DNA fragment sizes are proxies for a microbe's genotype. The limited genomic sample captured on a gel is often insufficient to discriminate nearly identical strains. This paper examines the application of microarray technology to DNA fingerprinting as a high-resolution alternative to gel-based methods. The so-called universal microarray, which uses short oligonucleotide probes that do not target specific genes or species, is intended to be applicable to all microorganisms because it does not require prior knowledge of genomic sequence. In principle, closely related strains can be distinguished if the number of probes on the microarray is sufficiently large, i.e., if the genome is sufficiently sampled. In practice, we confront noisy data, imperfectly matched hybridizations, and a high-dimensional inference problem. We describe the statistical problems of microarray fingerprinting, outline similarities with and differences from more conventional microarray applications, and illustrate the statistical fingerprinting problem for 10 closely related strains from three Bacillus species, and 3 strains from non-Bacillus species.

  19. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) – about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences. PMID:26493176

  20. Multiplexed protein profiling on microarrays by rolling-circle amplification

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, Barry; Roberts, Scott; Grimwade, Brian; Shao, Weiping; Wang, Minjuan; Fu, Qin; Shu, Quiping; Laroche, Isabelle; Zhou, Zhimin; Tchernev, Velizar T.; Christiansen, Jason; Velleca, Mark; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescent-sandwich immunoassays on microarrays hold appeal for proteomics studies, because equipment and antibodies are readily available, and assays are simple, scalable, and reproducible. The achievement of adequate sensitivity and specificity, however, requires a general method of immunoassay amplification. We describe coupling of isothermal rolling-circle amplification (RCA) to universal antibodies for this purpose. A total of 75 cytokines were measured simultaneously on glass arrays with signal amplification by RCA with high specificity, femtomolar sensitivity, 3 log quantitative range, and economy of sample consumption. A 51-feature RCA cytokine glass array was used to measure secretion from human dendritic cells (DCs) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). As expected, LPS induced rapid secretion of inflammatory cytokines such as macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β, interleukin (IL)-8, and interferon-inducible protein (IP)-10. We found that eotaxin-2 and I-309 were induced by LPS; in addition, macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), soluble interleukin 6 receptor (sIL-6R), and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor I (sTNF-RI) were induced by TNF-α treatment. Because microarrays can accommodat ~1,000 sandwich immunoassays of this type, a relatively small number of RCA microarrays seem to offer a tractable approach for proteomic surveys. PMID:11923841

  1. Protein Microarrays-Based Strategies for Life Detection in Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parro, Víctor; Rivas, Luis A.; Gómez-Elvira, Javier

    2008-03-01

    The detection of organic molecules of unambiguous biological origin is fundamental for the confirmation of present or past life. Planetary exploration requires the development of miniaturized apparatus for in situ life detection. Analytical techniques based on mass spectrometry have been traditionally used in space science. Following the Viking landers, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for organic detection has gained general acceptance and has been used successfully in the Cassini-Huygens mission to Titan. Microfluidics allows the development of miniaturized capillary electrophoresis devices for the detection of important molecules for life, like amino acids or nucleobases. Recently, a new approach is gaining acceptance in the space science community: the application of the well-known, highly specific, antibody-antigen affinity interaction for the detection and identification of organics and biochemical compounds. Antibodies can specifically bind a plethora of structurally different compounds of a broad range of molecular sizes, from amino acids level to whole cells. Antibody microarray technology allows us to look for the presence of thousands of different compounds in a single assay and in just one square centimeter. Herein, we discuss several important issues—most of which are common with other instruments dealing with life signature detection in the solar system—that must be addressed in order to use antibody microarrays for life detection and planetary exploration. These issues include (1) preservation of biomarkers, (2) the extraction techniques for biomarkers, (3) terrestrial analogues, (4) the antibody stability under space environments, (5) the selection of unequivocal biomarkers for the antibody production, or (6) the instrument design and implementation.

  2. Protein Microarrays-Based Strategies for Life Detection in Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parro, Víctor; Rivas, Luis A.; Gómez-Elvira, Javier

    The detection of organic molecules of unambiguous biological origin is fundamental for the confirmation of present or past life. Planetary exploration requires the development of miniaturized apparatus for in situ life detection. Analytical techniques based on mass spectrometry have been traditionally used in space science. Following the Viking landers, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for organic detection has gained general acceptance and has been used successfully in the Cassini-Huygens mission to Titan. Microfluidics allows the development of miniaturized capillary electrophoresis devices for the detection of important molecules for life, like amino acids or nucleobases. Recently, a new approach is gaining acceptance in the space science community: the application of the well-known, highly specific, antibody-antigen affinity interaction for the detection and identification of organics and biochemical compounds. Antibodies can specifically bind a plethora of structurally different compounds of a broad range of molecular sizes, from amino acids level to whole cells. Antibody microarray technology allows us to look for the presence of thousands of different compounds in a single assay and in just one square centimeter. Herein, we discuss several important issues—most of which are common with other instruments dealing with life signature detection in the solar system—that must be addressed in order to use antibody microarrays for life detection and planetary exploration. These issues include (1) preservation of biomarkers, (2) the extraction techniques for biomarkers, (3) terrestrial analogues, (4) the antibody stability under space environments, (5) the selection of unequivocal biomarkers for the antibody production, or (6) the instrument design and implementation.

  3. Protective tubes for sodium heated water tubes

    DOEpatents

    Essebaggers, Jan

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which water tubes are heated by liquid sodium which minimizes the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes. A cylindrical protective tube envelopes each water tube and the sodium flows axially in the annular spaces between the protective tubes and the water tubes.

  4. Protein microarrays: prospects and problems.

    PubMed

    Kodadek, T

    2001-02-01

    Protein microarrays are potentially powerful tools in biochemistry and molecular biology. Two types of protein microarrays are defined. One, termed a protein function array, will consist of thousands of native proteins immobilized in a defined pattern. Such arrays can be utilized for massively parallel testing of protein function, hence the name. The other type is termed a protein-detecting array. This will consist of large numbers of arrayed protein-binding agents. These arrays will allow for expression profiling to be done at the protein level. In this article, some of the major technological challenges to the development of protein arrays are discussed, along with potential solutions.

  5. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Naidu, Balachandar; Ziminksy, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2013-08-13

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  6. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2012-12-11

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  7. Ear tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Myringotomy; Tympanostomy; Ear tube surgery; Pressure equalization tubes; Ventilating tubes; Ear infection - tubes; Otitis - tubes ... trapped fluid can flow out of the middle ear. This prevents hearing loss and reduces the risk ...

  8. A high-throughput antibody-based microarray typing platform

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many rapid methods have been developed for screening foods for the presence of pathogenic microorganisms. Rapid methods that have the ability to identify microorganisms via multiplexed immunological recognition have the potential for classification or typing microbial contaminants thus facilitating...

  9. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-06-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice.

  10. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-01-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice. PMID:27279139

  11. Microarray Developed on Plastic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Bañuls, María-José; Morais, Sergi B; Tortajada-Genaro, Luis A; Maquieira, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    There is a huge potential interest to use synthetic polymers as versatile solid supports for analytical microarraying. Chemical modification of polycarbonate (PC) for covalent immobilization of probes, micro-printing of protein or nucleic acid probes, development of indirect immunoassay, and development of hybridization protocols are described and discussed. PMID:26614067

  12. Microfluidic microarray systems and methods thereof

    SciTech Connect

    West, Jay A. A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Hux, Gary A.

    2009-04-28

    Disclosed are systems that include a manifold in fluid communication with a microfluidic chip having a microarray, an illuminator, and a detector in optical communication with the microarray. Methods for using these systems for biological detection are also disclosed.

  13. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen

  14. Combinatorial antibody libraries: new advances, new immunological insights.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Immunochemists have become quite proficient in engineering existing antibody molecules to control their pharmacological properties. However, in terms of generating new antibodies, the combinatorial antibody library has become a central feature of modern immunochemistry. These libraries are essentially an immune system in a test tube and enable the selection of antibodies without the constraints of whole animal or cell-based systems. This Review provides an overview of how antibody libraries are constructed and discusses what can be learnt from these synthetic systems. In particular, the Review focuses on new biological insights from antibody libraries - such as the concept of 'SOS antibodies' - and the growing use of intracellular antibodies to perturb cellular functions.

  15. The Microarray Revolution: Perspectives from Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Jay L.; Beason, K. Beth; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Evans, Irene M.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, microarray analysis has become a key experimental tool, enabling the analysis of genome-wide patterns of gene expression. This review approaches the microarray revolution with a focus upon four topics: 1) the early development of this technology and its application to cancer diagnostics; 2) a primer of microarray research,…

  16. Tube Feedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy

    This module on tube feedings is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who work in long-term care. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then provided. A brief discussion follows…

  17. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  19. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. The mitochondria are an important part of cells. They are ... often, in people with other kinds of liver disease and some autoimmune diseases. Risks Risks for having ...

  20. Angular glass tubing drawn from round tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Round glass tubing softened in a furnace is drawn over a shaped plug or mandel to form shapes with other than a circular cross section. Irregularly shaped tubing is formed without limitations on tube length or wall thickness.

  1. Microarray technology for use in molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Suzanne D; Whistler, Toni

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful laboratory tool for the simultaneous assessment of the activity of thousands genes. Remarkable advances in biological sample collection, preparation and automation of hybridization have enabled the application of microarray technology to large, population-based studies. Now, microarrays have the potential to serve as screening tools for the detection of altered gene expression activity that might contribute to diseases in human populations. Reproducible and reliable microarray results depend on multiple factors. In this chapter, biological sample parameters are introduced that should be considered for any microarray experiment. Then, the microarray technology that we have successfully applied to limited biological sample from all our molecular epidemiology studies is detailed. This reproducible and reliable approach for using microarrays should be applicable to any biological questions asked.

  2. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna

    2016-07-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  3. Phenotypic MicroRNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Jun; Heo, Jin Yeong; Kim, Hi Chul; Kim, Jin Yeop; Liuzzi, Michel; Soloveva, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology has become a very popular approach in cases where multiple experiments need to be conducted repeatedly or done with a variety of samples. In our lab, we are applying our high density spots microarray approach to microscopy visualization of the effects of transiently introduced siRNA or cDNA on cellular morphology or phenotype. In this publication, we are discussing the possibility of using this micro-scale high throughput process to study the role of microRNAs in the biology of selected cellular models. After reverse-transfection of microRNAs and siRNA, the cellular phenotype generated by microRNAs regulated NF-κB expression comparably to the siRNA. The ability to print microRNA molecules for reverse transfection into cells is opening up the wide horizon for the phenotypic high content screening of microRNA libraries using cellular disease models.

  4. Self-Assembling Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Eisenstein, Samuel; Rosen, Benjamin; Lau, Albert Y.; C. Walter, Johannes; LaBaer, Joshua

    2004-07-01

    Protein microarrays provide a powerful tool for the study of protein function. However, they are not widely used, in part because of the challenges in producing proteins to spot on the arrays. We generated protein microarrays by printing complementary DNAs onto glass slides and then translating target proteins with mammalian reticulocyte lysate. Epitope tags fused to the proteins allowed them to be immobilized in situ. This obviated the need to purify proteins, avoided protein stability problems during storage, and captured sufficient protein for functional studies. We used the technology to map pairwise interactions among 29 human DNA replication initiation proteins, recapitulate the regulation of Cdt1 binding to select replication proteins, and map its geminin-binding domain.

  5. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  6. Label-Free and High-Throughput Detection of Protein Microarrays by Oblique-Incidence Reflectivity Difference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Lu, Heng; Wen, Juan; Yuan, Kun; LÜ, Hui-Bin; Jin, Kui-Juan; Zhou, Yue-Liang; Yang, Guo-Zhen

    2010-10-01

    We label-free detected the biological process of preparing a microarray that includes 400 spots of mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG) as well as the specific hybridization between mouse IgG and goat anti-mouse IgG by an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) method. The detection results after each process including printing, washing, blocking, and hybridization, demonstrate that the OI-RD method can trace the preparation process of a microarray and detect the specific hybridization between antigens and antibodies. OI-RD is a promising method for label-free and high-throughput detection of biological microarrays.

  7. Tissue microarray profiling in human heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lal, Sean; Nguyen, Lisa; Tezone, Rhenan; Ponten, Fredrik; Odeberg, Jacob; Li, Amy; Dos Remedios, Cristobal

    2016-09-01

    Tissue MicroArrays (TMAs) are a versatile tool for high-throughput protein screening, allowing qualitative analysis of a large number of samples on a single slide. We have developed a customizable TMA system that uniquely utilizes cryopreserved human cardiac samples from both heart failure and donor patients to produce formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. Confirmatory upstream or downstream molecular studies can then be performed on the same (biobanked) cryopreserved tissue. In a pilot study, we applied our TMAs to screen for the expression of four-and-a-half LIM-domain 2 (FHL2), a member of the four-and-a-half LIM family. This protein has been implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure in a variety of animal models. While FHL2 is abundant in the heart, not much is known about its expression in human heart failure. For this purpose, we generated an affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal anti-human FHL2 antibody. Our TMAs allowed high-throughput profiling of FHL2 protein using qualitative and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry that proved complementary to Western blot analysis. We demonstrated a significant relative reduction in FHL2 protein expression across different forms of human heart failure.

  8. Microarrays, antiobesity and the liver

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Chávez, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    In this review, the microarray technology and especially oligonucleotide arrays are exemplified with a practical example taken from the perilipin−/− mice and using the dChip software, available for non-lucrative purposes. It was found that the liver of perilipin−/− mice was healthy and normal, even under high-fat diet when compared with the results published for the scd1−/− mice, which under high-fat diets had a darker liver, suggestive of hepatic steatosis. Scd1 is required for the biosynthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids and plays a key role in the hepatic synthesis of triglycerides and of very-low-density lipoproteins. Both models of obesity resistance share many similar phenotypic antiobesity features, however, the perilipin−/− mice had a significant downregulation of stearoyl CoA desaturases scd1 and scd2 in its white adipose tissue, but a normal level of both genes inside the liver, even under high-fat diet. Here, different microarray methodologies are discussed, and also some of the most recent discoveries and perspectives regarding the use of microarrays, with an emphasis on obesity gene expression, and a personal remark on my findings of increased expression for hemoglobin transcripts and other hemo related genes (hemo-like), and for leukocyte like (leuko-like) genes inside the white adipose tissue of the perilipin−/− mice. In conclusion, microarrays have much to offer in comparative studies such as those in antiobesity, and also they are methodologies adequate for new astounding molecular discoveries [free full text of this article PMID:15657555

  9. Lectin microarrays for glycomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Surolia, Avadhesha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan

    2010-08-01

    Glycomics is the study of comprehensive structural elucidation and characterization of all glycoforms found in nature and their dynamic spatiotemporal changes that are associated with biological processes. Glycocalyx of mammalian cells actively participate in cell-cell, cell-matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions, which impact embryogenesis, growth and development, homeostasis, infection and immunity, signaling, malignancy, and metabolic disorders. Relative to genomics and proteomics, glycomics is just growing out of infancy with great potential in biomedicine for biomarker discovery, diagnosis, and treatment. However, the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and their multiple modes of interactions with proteins pose great challenges for development of analytical tools for delineating structure function relationships and understanding glyco-code. Several tools are being developed for glycan profiling based on chromatography, mass spectrometry, glycan microarrays, and glyco-informatics. Lectins, which have long been used in glyco-immunology, printed on a microarray provide a versatile platform for rapid high throughput analysis of glycoforms of biological samples. Herein, we summarize technological advances in lectin microarrays and critically review their impact on glycomics analysis. Challenges remain in terms of expansion to include nonplant derived lectins, standardization for routine clinical use, development of recombinant lectins, and exploration of plant kingdom for discovery of novel lectins. PMID:20726799

  10. Lectin microarrays for glycomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Surolia, Avadhesha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan

    2010-08-01

    Glycomics is the study of comprehensive structural elucidation and characterization of all glycoforms found in nature and their dynamic spatiotemporal changes that are associated with biological processes. Glycocalyx of mammalian cells actively participate in cell-cell, cell-matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions, which impact embryogenesis, growth and development, homeostasis, infection and immunity, signaling, malignancy, and metabolic disorders. Relative to genomics and proteomics, glycomics is just growing out of infancy with great potential in biomedicine for biomarker discovery, diagnosis, and treatment. However, the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and their multiple modes of interactions with proteins pose great challenges for development of analytical tools for delineating structure function relationships and understanding glyco-code. Several tools are being developed for glycan profiling based on chromatography, mass spectrometry, glycan microarrays, and glyco-informatics. Lectins, which have long been used in glyco-immunology, printed on a microarray provide a versatile platform for rapid high throughput analysis of glycoforms of biological samples. Herein, we summarize technological advances in lectin microarrays and critically review their impact on glycomics analysis. Challenges remain in terms of expansion to include nonplant derived lectins, standardization for routine clinical use, development of recombinant lectins, and exploration of plant kingdom for discovery of novel lectins.

  11. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  12. QUANTIZING TUBE

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, A.S.; Gray, G.W.

    1958-07-01

    Beam deflection tubes are described for use in switching or pulse amplitude analysis. The salient features of the invention reside in the target arrangement whereby outputs are obtained from a plurality of collector electrodes each correspondlng with a non-overlapping range of amplitudes of the input sigmal. The tube is provded with mcans for deflecting the electron beam a1ong a line in accordance with the amplitude of an input signal. The target structure consists of a first dymode positioned in the path of the beam wlth slots spaced a1ong thc deflection line, and a second dymode posltioned behind the first dainode. When the beam strikes the solid portions along the length of the first dymode the excited electrons are multiplied and collected in separate collector electrodes spaced along the beam line. Similarly, the electrons excited when the beam strikes the second dynode are multiplied and collected in separate electrodes spaced along the length of the second dyode.

  13. Electron tube

    DOEpatents

    Suyama, Motohiro; Fukasawa, Atsuhito; Arisaka, Katsushi; Wang, Hanguo

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  14. Straightforward protein immobilization on Sylgard 184 PDMS microarray surface.

    PubMed

    Heyries, Kevin A; Marquette, Christophe A; Blum, Loïc J

    2007-04-10

    In this work, a straightforward technique for protein immobilization on Sylgard 184 is described. The method consists of a direct transfer of dried protein/salt solutions to the PDMS interface during the polymer curing. Such non-conventional treatment of proteins was found to have no major negative consequence on their integrity. The mechanisms of this direct immobilization were investigated using a lysine modified dextran molecule as a model. Clear experimental results suggested that both chemical bounding and molding effect were implicated. As a proof of concept study, three different proteins were immobilized on a single microarray (Arachis hypogaea lectin, rabbit IgG, and human IgG) and used as antigens for capture of chemiluminescent immunoassays. The proteins were shown to be easily recognized by their specific antibodies, giving antibody detection limits in the fmol range.

  15. Tube Feeding Troubleshooting Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... profile tube also has a stem length). Note: NG and NJ tubes (that go through a person’s ... Immediate Action: • Discontinue feeding. • If you have an NG or NJ tube, and the tube is curled ...

  16. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your head. Sometimes, ...

  17. Lithographic techniques and surface chemistries for the fabrication of PEG-passivated protein microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Balaji; Castelino, Kenneth; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a new technique to fabricate patterns of functional molecules surrounded by a coating of the inert poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) on glass slides for applications in protein microarray technology. The chief advantages of this technique are that it is based entirely on standard lithography processes, makes use of glass slides employing surface chemistries that are standard in the microarray community, and has the potential to massively scale up the density of microarray spots. It is shown that proteins and antibodies can be made to self-assemble on the functional patterns in a microarray format, with the PEG coating acting as an effective passivating agent to prevent non-specific protein adsorption. Various standard surface chemistries such as aldehyde, epoxy and amine are explored for the functional layer, and it is conclusively demonstrated that only an amine-terminated surface satisfies all the process constraints imposed by the lithography process sequence. The effectiveness of this microarray technology is demonstrated by patterning fluorescent streptavidin and a fluorescent secondary antibody using the well-known and highly specific interaction between biotin and streptavidin. PMID:16457998

  18. DNA and protein microarray printing on silicon nitride waveguide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Hogrebe, Paul; Grainger, David W

    2006-01-15

    Sputtered silicon nitride optical waveguide surfaces were silanized and modified with a hetero-bifunctional crosslinker to facilitate thiol-reactive immobilization of contact-printed DNA probe oligonucleotides, streptavidin and murine anti-human interleukin-1 beta capture agents in microarray formats. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize each reaction sequence on the native silicon oxynitride surface. Thiol-terminated DNA probe oligonucleotides exhibited substantially higher surface printing immobilization and target hybridization efficiencies than non-thiolated DNA probe oligonucleotides: strong fluorescence signals from target DNA hybridization supported successful DNA oligonucleotide probe microarray fabrication and specific capture bioactivity. Analogously printed arrays of thiolated streptavidin and non-thiolated streptavidin did not exhibit noticeable differences in either surface immobilization or analyte capture assay signals. Non-thiolated anti-human interleukin-1 beta printed on modified silicon nitride surfaces reactive to thiol chemistry exhibited comparable performance for capturing human interleukin-1 beta analyte to commercial amine-reactive microarraying polymer surfaces in sandwich immunoassays, indicating substantial non-specific antibody-surface capture responsible for analyte capture signal.

  19. Polypyrrole-peptide microarray for biomolecular interaction analysis by SPR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Villiers, Marie-Bernadette; Cortès, Sandra; Brakha, Carine; Marche, Patrice; Roget, André; Livache, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, high-throughput analysis of biological events is a great challenge which could take benefit of the recent development of microarray devices. The great potential of such technology is related to the availability of a chip bearing a large set of probes, stable and easy to obtain, and suitable for ligand binding detection. Here, we described a new method based on polypyrrole chemistry and allowing the covalent immobilization of peptides in a microarray format and on a gold surface compatible with the use of Surface Plasmon Resonance. This technique is then illustrated by the detection and characterization of antibodies induced by hepatitis C virus and present in patients’serums. PMID:19649603

  20. Tube furnace

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Kenneth G.; Frohwein, Eugene J.; Taylor, Robert W.; Bowen, David W.

    1991-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  1. Integrated Amplification Microarrays for Infectious Disease Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Bryant, Lexi; Griesemer, Sara B.; Gu, Rui; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Kukhtin, Alexander; Parker, Jennifer; Zimmerman, Cynthia; George, Kirsten St.; Cooney, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    This overview describes microarray-based tests that combine solution-phase amplification chemistry and microarray hybridization within a single microfluidic chamber. The integrated biochemical approach improves microarray workflow for diagnostic applications by reducing the number of steps and minimizing the potential for sample or amplicon cross-contamination. Examples described herein illustrate a basic, integrated approach for DNA and RNA genomes, and a simple consumable architecture for incorporating wash steps while retaining an entirely closed system. It is anticipated that integrated microarray biochemistry will provide an opportunity to significantly reduce the complexity and cost of microarray consumables, equipment, and workflow, which in turn will enable a broader spectrum of users to exploit the intrinsic multiplexing power of microarrays for infectious disease diagnostics.

  2. Microarray data analysis and mining approaches.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Francesca; Botta, Marco; Calogero, Raffaele A

    2007-12-01

    Microarray based transcription profiling is now a consolidated methodology and has widespread use in areas such as pharmacogenomics, diagnostics and drug target identification. Large-scale microarray studies are also becoming crucial to a new way of conceiving experimental biology. A main issue in microarray transcription profiling is data analysis and mining. When microarrays became a methodology of general use, considerable effort was made to produce algorithms and methods for the identification of differentially expressed genes. More recently, the focus has switched to algorithms and database development for microarray data mining. Furthermore, the evolution of microarray technology is allowing researchers to grasp the regulative nature of transcription, integrating basic expression analysis with mRNA characteristics, i.e. exon-based arrays, and with DNA characteristics, i.e. comparative genomic hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism, tiling and promoter structure. In this article, we will review approaches used to detect differentially expressed genes and to link differential expression to specific biological functions.

  3. Automated Microarray Image Analysis Toolbox for MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Willse, Alan R.; Protic, Miroslava; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2005-09-01

    The Automated Microarray Image Analysis (AMIA) Toolbox for MATLAB is a flexible, open-source microarray image analysis tool that allows the user to customize analysis of sets of microarray images. This tool provides several methods of identifying and quantify spot statistics, as well as extensive diagnostic statistics and images to identify poor data quality or processing. The open nature of this software allows researchers to understand the algorithms used to provide intensity estimates and to modify them easily if desired.

  4. Surface free energy and microarray deposition technology.

    PubMed

    McHale, Glen

    2007-03-01

    Microarray techniques use a combinatorial approach to assess complex biochemical interactions. The fundamental goal is simultaneous, large-scale experimentation analogous to the automation achieved in the semiconductor industry. However, microarray deposition inherently involves liquids contacting solid substrates. Liquid droplet shapes are determined by surface and interfacial tension forces, and flows during drying. This article looks at how surface free energy and wetting considerations may influence the accuracy and reliability of spotted microarray experiments.

  5. Tapered pulse tube for pulse tube refrigerators

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Olson, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube refrigerator is maintained by optimally varying the radius of the pulse tube to suppress convective heat loss from mass flux streaming in the pulse tube. A simple cone with an optimum taper angle will often provide sufficient improvement. Alternatively, the pulse tube radius r as a function of axial position x can be shaped with r(x) such that streaming is optimally suppressed at each x.

  6. Collapse Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02154 Collapse Tubes

    The discontinuous channels in this image are collapsed lava tubes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -19.7N, Longitude 317.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. THE ABRF MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2005: TAKING THE PULSE ON THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years microarray technology has evolved into a critical component of any discovery based program. Since 1999, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Microarray Research Group (MARG) has conducted biennial surveys designed to generate a pr...

  8. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts.

    PubMed

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays. PMID:27600077

  9. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays. PMID:27600077

  10. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays.

  11. Highly parallel microbial diagnostics using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Loy, Alexander; Bodrossy, Levente

    2006-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are highly parallel hybridization platforms, allowing rapid and simultaneous identification of many different microorganisms and viruses in a single assay. In the past few years, researchers have been confronted with a dramatic increase in the number of studies reporting development and/or improvement of oligonucleotide microarrays for microbial diagnostics, but use of the technology in routine diagnostics is still constrained by a variety of factors. Careful development of microarray essentials (such as oligonucleotide probes, protocols for target preparation and hybridization, etc.) combined with extensive performance testing are thus mandatory requirements for the maturation of diagnostic microarrays from fancy technological gimmicks to robust and routinely applicable tools.

  12. Estimating Gene Signals From Noisy Microarray Images

    PubMed Central

    Sarder, Pinaki; Davis, Paul H.; Stanley, Samuel L.

    2016-01-01

    In oligonucleotide microarray experiments, noise is a challenging problem, as biologists now are studying their organisms not in isolation but in the context of a natural environment. In low photomultiplier tube (PMT) voltage images, weak gene signals and their interactions with the background fluorescence noise are most problematic. In addition, nonspecific sequences bind to array spots intermittently causing inaccurate measurements. Conventional techniques cannot precisely separate the foreground and the background signals. In this paper, we propose analytically based estimation technique. We assume a priori spot-shape information using a circular outer periphery with an elliptical center hole. We assume Gaussian statistics for modeling both the foreground and background signals. The mean of the foreground signal quantifies the weak gene signal corresponding to the spot, and the variance gives the measure of the undesired binding that causes fluctuation in the measurement. We propose a foreground-signal and shape-estimation algorithm using the Gibbs sampling method. We compare our developed algorithm with the existing Mann–Whitney (MW)- and expectation maximization (EM)/iterated conditional modes (ICM)-based methods. Our method outperforms the existing methods with considerably smaller mean-square error (MSE) for all signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in computer-generated images and gives better qualitative results in low-SNR real-data images. Our method is computationally relatively slow because of its inherent sampling operation and hence only applicable to very noisy-spot images. In a realistic example using our method, we show that the gene-signal fluctuations on the estimated foreground are better observed for the input noisy images with relatively higher undesired bindings. PMID:18556262

  13. Taguchi design-based optimization of sandwich immunoassay microarrays for detecting breast cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen; Pla-Roca, Mateu; Juncker, David

    2011-07-15

    Taguchi design, a statistics-based design of experiment method, is widely used for optimization of products and complex production processes in many different industries. However, its use for antibody microarray optimization has remained underappreciated. Here, we provide a brief explanation of Taguchi design and present its use for the optimization of antibody sandwich immunoassay microarray with five breast cancer biomarkers: CA15-3, CEA, HER2, MMP9, and uPA. Two successive optimization rounds with each 16 experimental trials were performed. We tested three factors (capture antibody, detection antibody, and analyte) at four different levels (concentrations) in the first round and seven factors (including buffer solution, streptavidin-Cy5 dye conjugate concentration, and incubation times for five assay steps) with two levels each in the second round; five two-factor interactions between selected pairs of factors were also tested. The optimal levels for each factor as measured by net assay signal increase were determined graphically, and the significance of each factor was analyzed statistically. The concentration of capture antibody, streptavidin-Cy5, and buffer composition were identified as the most significant factors for all assays; analyte incubation time and detection antibody concentration were significant only for MMP9 and CA15-3, respectively. Interactions between pairs of factors were identified, but were less influential compared with single factor effects. After Taguchi optimization, the assay sensitivity was improved between 7 and 68 times, depending on the analyte, reaching 640 fg/mL for uPA, and the maximal signal intensity increased between 1.8 and 3 times. These results suggest that Taguchi design is an efficient and useful approach for the rapid optimization of antibody microarrays.

  14. 2008 Microarray Research Group (MARG Survey): Sensing the State of Microarray Technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution and transformation, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. Th...

  15. THE ABRF-MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2004: TAKING THE PULSE OF THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. The goal of the surve...

  16. A tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    SciTech Connect

    Ashcroft, J.; Campbell, B.; Depoy, D.

    1996-12-31

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell.

  17. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    DOEpatents

    Ashcroft, John; Campbell, Brian; DePoy, David

    1998-01-01

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell.

  18. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    DOEpatents

    Ashcroft, J.; Campbell, B.; DePoy, D.

    1998-06-30

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell. 8 figs.

  19. The use of lectin microarray for assessing glycosylation of therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycans or carbohydrates attached to therapeutic glycoproteins can directly affect product quality, safety and efficacy, and therefore must be adequately analyzed and controlled throughout product life cycles. However, the complexity of protein glycosylation poses a daunting analytical challenge. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a lectin microarray for assessing protein glycans. Using commercial lectin chips, which contain 45 lectins toward distinct glycan structures, we were able to determine the lectin binding patterns of a panel of 15 therapeutic proteins, including 8 monoclonal antibodies. Lectin binding signals were analyzed to generate glycan profiles that were generally consistent with the known glycan patterns for these glycoproteins. In particular, the lectin-based microarray was found to be highly sensitive to variations in the terminal carbohydrate structures such as galactose versus sialic acid epitopes. These data suggest that lectin microarray could be used for screening glycan patterns of therapeutic glycoproteins. PMID:26918373

  20. Detection of the specific binding on protein microarrays by oblique-incidence reflectivity difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Heng; Wen, Juan; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Kun; Li, Wei; Lu, Huibin; Zhou, Yueliang; Jin, Kuijuan; Ruan, Kangcheng; Yang, Guozhen

    2010-09-01

    The specific binding between Cy5-labeled goat anti-mouse Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mouse IgG with a concentration range from 625 to 104 µg ml - 1 has been detected successfully by the oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) method in each procedure of microarray fabrication. The experimental data prove that the OI-RD method can be employed not only to distinguish the different concentrations in label-free fashion but also to detect the antibody-antigen capture. In addition, the differential treatment of the OI-RD signals can decrease the negative influences of glass slide as the microarray upholder. Therefore the OI-RD technique has promising applications for the label-free and high-throughput detection of protein microarrays.

  1. Gastrostomy feeding tube - bolus

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - gastrostomy tube - bolus; G-tube - bolus; Gastrostomy button - bolus; Bard Button - bolus; MIC-KEY - bolus ... Your child's gastrostomy tube (G-tube) is a special tube in your child's stomach that will help deliver food and medicines until your ...

  2. Studying bovine early embryo transcriptome by microarray.

    PubMed

    Dufort, Isabelle; Robert, Claude; Sirard, Marc-André

    2015-01-01

    Microarrays represent a significant advantage when studying gene expression in early embryo because they allow for a speedy study of a large number of genes even if the sample of interest contains small quantities of genetic material. Here we describe the protocols developed by the EmbryoGENE Network to study the bovine transcriptome in early embryo using a microarray experimental design.

  3. Microarrays Made Simple: "DNA Chips" Paper Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarray technology is revolutionizing biological science. DNA microarrays (also called DNA chips) allow simultaneous screening of many genes for changes in expression between different cells. Now researchers can obtain information about genes in days or weeks that used to take months or years. The paper activity described in this article…

  4. Application of microarray technology in pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tzouvelekis, Argyris; Patlakas, George; Bouros, Demosthenes

    2004-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful tool that have multiple applications both in clinical and cell biology arenas of common lung diseases. To exemplify how this tool can be useful, in this review, we will provide an overview of the application of microarray technology in research relevant to common lung diseases and present some of the future perspectives. PMID:15585067

  5. Sensing immune responses with customized peptide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Schirwitz, Christopher; Loeffler, Felix F; Felgenhauer, Thomas; Stadler, Volker; Breitling, Frank; Bischoff, F Ralf

    2012-12-01

    The intent to solve biological and biomedical questions in high-throughput led to an immense interest in microarray technologies. Nowadays, DNA microarrays are routinely used to screen for oligonucleotide interactions within a large variety of potential interaction partners. To study interactions on the protein level with the same efficiency, protein and peptide microarrays offer similar advantages, but their production is more demanding. A new technology to produce peptide microarrays with a laser printer provides access to affordable and highly complex peptide microarrays. Such a peptide microarray can contain up to 775 peptide spots per cm², whereby the position of each peptide spot and, thus, the amino acid sequence of the corresponding peptide, is exactly known. Compared to other techniques, such as the SPOT synthesis, more features per cm² at lower costs can be synthesized which paves the way for laser printed peptide microarrays to take on roles as efficient and affordable biomedical sensors. Here, we describe the laser printer-based synthesis of peptide microarrays and focus on an application involving the blood sera of tetanus immunized individuals, indicating the potential of peptide arrays to sense immune responses.

  6. Microarray Applications in Microbial Ecology Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, T.; Schadt, C.; Zhou, J.

    2006-04-06

    Microarray technology has the unparalleled potential tosimultaneously determine the dynamics and/or activities of most, if notall, of the microbial populations in complex environments such as soilsand sediments. Researchers have developed several types of arrays thatcharacterize the microbial populations in these samples based on theirphylogenetic relatedness or functional genomic content. Several recentstudies have used these microarrays to investigate ecological issues;however, most have only analyzed a limited number of samples withrelatively few experiments utilizing the full high-throughput potentialof microarray analysis. This is due in part to the unique analyticalchallenges that these samples present with regard to sensitivity,specificity, quantitation, and data analysis. This review discussesspecific applications of microarrays to microbial ecology research alongwith some of the latest studies addressing the difficulties encounteredduring analysis of complex microbial communities within environmentalsamples. With continued development, microarray technology may ultimatelyachieve its potential for comprehensive, high-throughput characterizationof microbial populations in near real-time.

  7. Real-time DNA microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hassibi, Arjang; Vikalo, Haris; Riechmann, José Luis; Hassibi, Babak

    2009-01-01

    We present a quantification method for affinity-based DNA microarrays which is based on the real-time measurements of hybridization kinetics. This method, i.e. real-time DNA microarrays, enhances the detection dynamic range of conventional systems by being impervious to probe saturation in the capturing spots, washing artifacts, microarray spot-to-spot variations, and other signal amplitude-affecting non-idealities. We demonstrate in both theory and practice that the time-constant of target capturing in microarrays, similar to all affinity-based biosensors, is inversely proportional to the concentration of the target analyte, which we subsequently use as the fundamental parameter to estimate the concentration of the analytes. Furthermore, to empirically validate the capabilities of this method in practical applications, we present a FRET-based assay which enables the real-time detection in gene expression DNA microarrays. PMID:19723688

  8. Real-time DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Hassibi, Arjang; Vikalo, Haris; Riechmann, José Luis; Hassibi, Babak

    2009-11-01

    We present a quantification method for affinity-based DNA microarrays which is based on the real-time measurements of hybridization kinetics. This method, i.e. real-time DNA microarrays, enhances the detection dynamic range of conventional systems by being impervious to probe saturation in the capturing spots, washing artifacts, microarray spot-to-spot variations, and other signal amplitude-affecting non-idealities. We demonstrate in both theory and practice that the time-constant of target capturing in microarrays, similar to all affinity-based biosensors, is inversely proportional to the concentration of the target analyte, which we subsequently use as the fundamental parameter to estimate the concentration of the analytes. Furthermore, to empirically validate the capabilities of this method in practical applications, we present a FRET-based assay which enables the real-time detection in gene expression DNA microarrays. PMID:19723688

  9. Tissue Microarrays in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, David; Kenney, Challayne; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2008-01-01

    The tissue microarray is a recently-implemented, high-throughput technology for the analysis of molecular markers in oncology. This research tool permits the rapid assessment of a biomarker in thousands of tumor samples, using commonly available laboratory assays such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Although introduced less than a decade ago, the TMA has proven to be invaluable in the study of tumor biology, the development of diagnostic tests, and the investigation of oncological biomarkers. This review describes the impact of TMA-based research in clinical oncology and its potential future applications. Technical aspects of TMA construction, and the advantages and disadvantages inherent to this technology are also discussed. PMID:18314063

  10. Innovative instrumentation for microarray scanning and analysis: application for characterization of oligonucleotide duplexes behavior.

    PubMed

    Khomyakova, E B; Dreval, E V; Tran-Dang, M; Potier, M C; Soussaline, F P

    2004-05-01

    Accuracy in microarray technology requires new approaches to microarray reader development. A microarray reader system (optical scanning array or OSA reader) based on automated microscopy with large field of view, high speed 3 axis scanning at multiple narrow-band spectra of excitation light has been developed. It allows fast capture of high-resolution, multi-fluorescence images and is characterized by a linear dynamic range and sensitivity comparable to commonly used photo-multiplier tube (PMT)-based laser scanner. Controlled by high performance software, the instrument can be used for scanning and quantitative analysis of any type of dry microarray. Studies implying temperature-controlled hybridization chamber containing a microarray can also be performed. This enables the registration of kinetics and melting curves. This feature is required in a wide range of on-chip chemical and enzymatic reactions including on-chip PCR amplification. We used the OSA reader for the characterization of hybridization and melting behaviour of oligonucleotide:oligonucleotide duplexes on three-dimensional Code Link slides. PMID:15209342

  11. DNA Microarrays for Identifying Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Nölte, M.; Weber, H.; Silkenbeumer, N.; Hjörleifsdottir, S.; Hreggvidsson, G. O.; Marteinsson, V.; Kappel, K.; Planes, S.; Tinti, F.; Magoulas, A.; Garcia Vazquez, E.; Turan, C.; Hervet, C.; Campo Falgueras, D.; Antoniou, A.; Landi, M.; Blohm, D.

    2008-01-01

    In many cases marine organisms and especially their diverse developmental stages are difficult to identify by morphological characters. DNA-based identification methods offer an analytically powerful addition or even an alternative. In this study, a DNA microarray has been developed to be able to investigate its potential as a tool for the identification of fish species from European seas based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequences. Eleven commercially important fish species were selected for a first prototype. Oligonucleotide probes were designed based on the 16S rDNA sequences obtained from 230 individuals of 27 fish species. In addition, more than 1200 sequences of 380 species served as sequence background against which the specificity of the probes was tested in silico. Single target hybridisations with Cy5-labelled, PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments from each of the 11 species on microarrays containing the complete set of probes confirmed their suitability. True-positive, fluorescence signals obtained were at least one order of magnitude stronger than false-positive cross-hybridisations. Single nontarget hybridisations resulted in cross-hybridisation signals at approximately 27% of the cases tested, but all of them were at least one order of magnitude lower than true-positive signals. This study demonstrates that the 16S rDNA gene is suitable for designing oligonucleotide probes, which can be used to differentiate 11 fish species. These data are a solid basis for the second step to create a “Fish Chip” for approximately 50 fish species relevant in marine environmental and fisheries research, as well as control of fisheries products. PMID:18270778

  12. SNP microarray-based 24 chromosome aneuploidy screening is significantly more consistent than FISH

    PubMed Central

    Treff, Nathan R.; Levy, Brynn; Su, Jing; Northrop, Lesley E.; Tao, Xin; Scott, Richard T.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies estimate that chromosomal mosaicism within the cleavage-stage human embryo is high. However, comparison of two unique methods of aneuploidy screening of blastomeres within the same embryo has not been conducted and may indicate whether mosaicism has been overestimated due to technical inconsistency rather than the biological phenomena. The present study investigates the prevalence of chromosomal abnormality and mosaicism found with two different single cell aneuploidy screening techniques. Thirteen arrested cleavage-stage embryos were studied. Each was biopsied into individual cells (n = 160). The cells from each embryo were randomized into two groups. Those destined for FISH-based aneuploidy screening (n = 75) were fixed, one cell per slide. Cells for SNP microarray-based aneuploidy screening (n = 85) were put into individual tubes. Microarray was significantly more reliable (96%) than FISH (83%) for providing an interpretable result (P = 0.004). Markedly different results were obtained when comparing microarray and FISH results from individual embryos. Mosaicism was significantly less commonly observed by microarray (31%) than by FISH (100%) (P = 0.0005). Although FISH evaluated fewer chromosomes per cell and fewer cells per embryo, FISH still displayed significantly more unique genetic diagnoses per embryo (3.2 ± 0.2) than microarray (1.3 ± 0.2) (P < 0.0001). This is the first prospective, randomized, blinded and paired comparison between microarray and FISH-based aneuploidy screening. SNP microarray-based 24 chromosome aneuploidy screening provides more complete and consistent results than FISH. These results also suggest that FISH technology may overestimate the contribution of mitotic error to the origin of aneuploidy at the cleavage stage of human embryogenesis. PMID:20484246

  13. Cell-Cell Interactions during pollen tube guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Daphne Preuss

    2009-03-31

    The long-term goal of this research is to identify the signaling molecules that mediate plant cell-cell interactions during pollination. The immediate goals of this project are to perform genetic and molecular analysis of pollen tube guidance. Specifically, we proposed to: 1. Characterize the pistil components that direct pollen tube navigation using the Arabidopsis thaliana in vitro pollen tube guidance system 2. Identify pistil signals that direct pollen tube guidance by a) using microarrays to profile gene expression in developing pistils, and b) employing proteomics and metabolomics to isolate pollen tube guidance signals. 3. Explore the genetic basis of natural variation in guidance signals, comparing the in vitro interactions between pollen and pistils from A. thaliana and its close relatives.

  14. Sensitive immunoassay detection of multiple environmental chemicals on protein microarrays using DNA/dye conjugate as a fluorescent label

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Indirect competitive immunoassays were developed on protein microarrays for the sensitive and simultaneous detection of multiple environmental chemicals in one sample. In this assay, a DNA/SYTOX Orange conjugate was employed as antibody labels to increase the fluorescence signal and sensitivity. Ep...

  15. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  16. Use of principal components analysis and protein microarray to explore the association of HIV-1-specific IgG responses with disease progression.

    PubMed

    Gerns Storey, Helen L; Richardson, Barbra A; Singa, Benson; Naulikha, Jackie; Prindle, Vivian C; Diaz-Ochoa, Vladimir E; Felgner, Phil L; Camerini, David; Horton, Helen; John-Stewart, Grace; Walson, Judd L

    2014-01-01

    The role of HIV-1-specific antibody responses in HIV disease progression is complex and would benefit from analysis techniques that examine clusterings of responses. Protein microarray platforms facilitate the simultaneous evaluation of numerous protein-specific antibody responses, though excessive data are cumbersome in analyses. Principal components analysis (PCA) reduces data dimensionality by generating fewer composite variables that maximally account for variance in a dataset. To identify clusters of antibody responses involved in disease control, we investigated the association of HIV-1-specific antibody responses by protein microarray, and assessed their association with disease progression using PCA in a nested cohort design. Associations observed among collections of antibody responses paralleled protein-specific responses. At baseline, greater antibody responses to the transmembrane glycoprotein (TM) and reverse transcriptase (RT) were associated with higher viral loads, while responses to the surface glycoprotein (SU), capsid (CA), matrix (MA), and integrase (IN) proteins were associated with lower viral loads. Over 12 months greater antibody responses were associated with smaller decreases in CD4 count (CA, MA, IN), and reduced likelihood of disease progression (CA, IN). PCA and protein microarray analyses highlighted a collection of HIV-specific antibody responses that together were associated with reduced disease progression, and may not have been identified by examining individual antibody responses. This technique may be useful to explore multifaceted host-disease interactions, such as HIV coinfections.

  17. Protein microarrays for the diagnosis of allergic diseases: state-of-the-art and future development.

    PubMed

    Harwanegg, Christian; Hiller, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    In the emerging field of Functional Proteomics, protein microarrays are considered to be one of the most promising tools for the simultaneous analysis of the a) abundance, b) function, and c) interaction of proteins on a system-wide scale. Resting on the technological grounds of widely used DNA biochips, the great power of microarray-based miniature solid-phase immunoassays lies in their potential to investigate in parallel large numbers of analyte pairs in a variety of biological samples. Consequently, this has fueled aspirations that protein microarrays may serve as tools for the high-throughput functional investigation of complete proteomes and, moreover, that they will develop into promising candidates for innovative in-vitro diagnostic (IVD) applications. To date, published examples of protein microarrays for IVD purposes have included tests for allergy, autoimmune and infectious diseases. Here, we discuss recent advancements in the development of protein microarrays for the profiling of IgE antibodies in the diagnosis of Type 1-related allergic diseases.

  18. PTM Microarray: Request for Year 3 Set-Aside Funds — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    We hypothesize that PTMs on proteins that are secreted by the breast will provide a more sensitive method for detecting breast cancer than analysis of the parent protein. We will antibody microarrays to have examine 9 circulating proteins, each of which is known to be actively secreted by the breast, for several structurally and functionally distinct PTMs. We will determine if these modified proteins have the potential to used in the early detection of breast cancer.

  19. Microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic immunoassay system.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongsik; Park, Je-Kyun

    2016-05-01

    A microarray-based analytical platform has been utilized as a powerful tool in biological assay fields. However, an analyte depletion problem due to the slow mass transport based on molecular diffusion causes low reaction efficiency, resulting in a limitation for practical applications. This paper presents a novel method to improve the efficiency of microarray-based immunoassay via an optically induced electrokinetic phenomenon by integrating an optoelectrofluidic device with a conventional glass slide-based microarray format. A sample droplet was loaded between the microarray slide and the optoelectrofluidic device on which a photoconductive layer was deposited. Under the application of an AC voltage, optically induced AC electroosmotic flows caused by a microarray-patterned light actively enhanced the mass transport of target molecules at the multiple assay spots of the microarray simultaneously, which reduced tedious reaction time from more than 30 min to 10 min. Based on this enhancing effect, a heterogeneous immunoassay with a tiny volume of sample (5 μl) was successfully performed in the microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic system using immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-IgG, resulting in improved efficiency compared to the static environment. Furthermore, the application of multiplex assays was also demonstrated by multiple protein detection.

  20. Epitope Identification from Fixed-complexity Random-sequence Peptide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Josh; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Stafford, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies play an important role in modern science and medicine. They are essential in many biological assays and have emerged as an important class of therapeutics. Unfortunately, current methods for mapping antibody epitopes require costly synthesis or enrichment steps, and no low-cost universal platform exists. In order to address this, we tested a random-sequence peptide microarray consisting of over 330,000 unique peptide sequences sampling 83% of all possible tetramers and 27% of pentamers. It is a single, unbiased platform that can be used in many different types of tests, it does not rely on informatic selection of peptides for a particular proteome, and it does not require iterative rounds of selection. In order to optimize the platform, we developed an algorithm that considers the significance of k-length peptide subsequences (k-mers) within selected peptides that come from the microarray. We tested eight monoclonal antibodies and seven infectious disease cohorts. The method correctly identified five of the eight monoclonal epitopes and identified both reported and unreported epitope candidates in the infectious disease cohorts. This algorithm could greatly enhance the utility of random-sequence peptide microarrays by enabling rapid epitope mapping and antigen identification. PMID:25368412

  1. Microarrays: molecular allergology and nanotechnology for personalised medicine (I).

    PubMed

    Lucas, J M

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis of antibody-mediated allergic disorders is based on the clinical findings and the detection of allergen-specific IgE based on in vitro and in vivo techniques, together with allergen provocation tests. In vitro diagnostic techniques have progressed enormously following the introduction of the advances made in proteomics and nanotechnology--offering tools for the diagnosis and investigation of allergy at molecular level. The most advanced developments are the microarray techniques, which in genomics allowed rapid description of the human genetic code, and which now have been applied to proteomics, broadening the field for research and clinical use. Together with these technological advances, the characterisation of most of the different proteins generating specific IgE and which conform each natural allergen, as well as their purification or genetic engineering-based synthesis, have been crucial elements--offering the possibility of identifying disease-causing allergens at molecular level, establishing a component-resolved diagnosis (CRD), using them to study the natural course of the disease, and applying them to improvements in specific immunotherapy. Microarrays of allergic components offer results relating to hundreds of these allergenic components in a single test, and use a small amount of serum that can be obtained from capillary blood. The availability of new molecules will allow the development of panels including new allergenic components and sources, which will require evaluation for clinical use. The present study reviews these new developments, component-resolved diagnosis, and the development of microarray techniques as a critical element for furthering our knowledge of allergic disease.

  2. Determination of optimal method for antibody identification in a reference laboratory.

    PubMed

    Haywood, J R; Moulds, M K G; Bryant, B J

    2011-01-01

    Methods commonly used for antibody identification are hemagglutination (tube), column agglutination (gel), and solid-phase red cell adherence. Our AABB immunohematology reference laboratory (IRL) conducted a study to determine which antibody identification testing method was optimal for detecting all clinically significant antibodies. Patient specimens were sent to our IRL from August 2008 to September 2009. Routine testing was performed by tube method and then by manual gel and manual solid-phase methods. Of the 254 samples tested, 115 showed agreement in antibody identification with all three methods. The tube method identified all but six clinically significant antibodies. The gel method did not identify 59 clinically significant antibodies. Fifty-six clinically significant antibodies were not identified by solid-phase testing. Tube testing identified 27 clinically insignificant antibodies, primarily cold autoantibodies. Gel and solid-phase methodologies identified two and three cold autoantibodies, respectively. Solid-phase testing failed to detect 12 examples of anti-K. No identifiable pattern of reactivity was found in 13 samples using gel testing compared with 6 for solid-phase and none for tube methodologies. Hemagglutination tube method was the best choice for our IRL because it missed the fewest number of clinically significant alloantibodies. Benefits also included the ability to use various potentiating factors, incubation times, and temperature phases to enhance antibody identification. The tube method provided critical data for determining antibody clinical significance.

  3. Progress in the application of DNA microarrays.

    PubMed Central

    Lobenhofer, E K; Bushel, P R; Afshari, C A; Hamadeh, H K

    2001-01-01

    Microarray technology has been applied to a variety of different fields to address fundamental research questions. The use of microarrays, or DNA chips, to study the gene expression profiles of biologic samples began in 1995. Since that time, the fundamental concepts behind the chip, the technology required for making and using these chips, and the multitude of statistical tools for analyzing the data have been extensively reviewed. For this reason, the focus of this review will be not on the technology itself but on the application of microarrays as a research tool and the future challenges of the field. PMID:11673116

  4. DNA Microarrays in Herbal Drug Research

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Preeti; Joshi, Kalpana; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2006-01-01

    Natural products are gaining increased applications in drug discovery and development. Being chemically diverse they are able to modulate several targets simultaneously in a complex system. Analysis of gene expression becomes necessary for better understanding of molecular mechanisms. Conventional strategies for expression profiling are optimized for single gene analysis. DNA microarrays serve as suitable high throughput tool for simultaneous analysis of multiple genes. Major practical applicability of DNA microarrays remains in DNA mutation and polymorphism analysis. This review highlights applications of DNA microarrays in pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, toxicogenomics and quality control of herbal drugs and extracts. PMID:17173108

  5. Comparison of microarray preprocessing methods.

    PubMed

    Shakya, K; Ruskin, H J; Kerr, G; Crane, M; Becker, J

    2010-01-01

    Data preprocessing in microarray technology is a crucial initial step before data analysis is performed. Many preprocessing methods have been proposed but none has proved to be ideal to date. Frequently, datasets are limited by laboratory constraints so that the need is for guidelines on quality and robustness, to inform further experimentation while data are yet restricted. In this paper, we compared the performance of four popular methods, namely MAS5, Li & Wong pmonly (LWPM), Li & Wong subtractMM (LWMM), and Robust Multichip Average (RMA). The comparison is based on the analysis carried out on sets of laboratory-generated data from the Bioinformatics Lab, National Institute of Cellular Biotechnology (NICB), Dublin City University, Ireland. These experiments were designed to examine the effect of Bromodeoxyuridine (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine, BrdU) treatment in deep lamellar keratoplasty (DLKP) cells. The methodology employed is to assess dispersion across the replicates and analyze the false discovery rate. From the dispersion analysis, we found that variability is reduced more effectively by LWPM and RMA methods. From the false positive analysis, and for both parametric and nonparametric approaches, LWMM is found to perform best. Based on a complementary q-value analysis, LWMM approach again is the strongest candidate. The indications are that, while LWMM is marginally less effective than LWPM and RMA in terms of variance reduction, it has considerably improved discrimination overall.

  6. AMIC@: All MIcroarray Clusterings @ once.

    PubMed

    Geraci, Filippo; Pellegrini, Marco; Renda, M Elena

    2008-07-01

    The AMIC@ Web Server offers a light-weight multi-method clustering engine for microarray gene-expression data. AMIC@ is a highly interactive tool that stresses user-friendliness and robustness by adopting AJAX technology, thus allowing an effective interleaved execution of different clustering algorithms and inspection of results. Among the salient features AMIC@ offers, there are: (i) automatic file format detection, (ii) suggestions on the number of clusters using a variant of the stability-based method of Tibshirani et al. (iii) intuitive visual inspection of the data via heatmaps and (iv) measurements of the clustering quality using cluster homogeneity. Large data sets can be processed efficiently by selecting algorithms (such as FPF-SB and k-Boost), specifically designed for this purpose. In case of very large data sets, the user can opt for a batch-mode use of the system by means of the Clustering wizard that runs all algorithms at once and delivers the results via email. AMIC@ is freely available and open to all users with no login requirement at the following URL http://bioalgo.iit.cnr.it/amica.

  7. Protein Microarrays: Novel Developments and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Berrade, Luis; Garcia, Angie E.

    2011-01-01

    Protein microarray technology possesses some of the greatest potential for providing direct information on protein function and potential drug targets. For example, functional protein microarrays are ideal tools suited for the mapping of biological pathways. They can be used to study most major types of interactions and enzymatic activities that take place in biochemical pathways and have been used for the analysis of simultaneous multiple biomolecular interactions involving protein-protein, protein-lipid, protein-DNA and protein-small molecule interactions. Because of this unique ability to analyze many kinds of molecular interactions en masse, the requirement of very small sample amount and the potential to be miniaturized and automated, protein microarrays are extremely well suited for protein profiling, drug discovery, drug target identification and clinical prognosis and diagnosis. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent developments in the production, applications and analysis of protein microarrays. PMID:21116694

  8. Quality Visualization of Microarray Datasets Using Circos

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Martin; Wiese, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Quality control and normalization is considered the most important step in the analysis of microarray data. At present there are various methods available for quality assessments of microarray datasets. However there seems to be no standard visualization routine, which also depicts individual microarray quality. Here we present a convenient method for visualizing the results of standard quality control tests using Circos plots. In these plots various quality measurements are drawn in a circular fashion, thus allowing for visualization of the quality and all outliers of each distinct array within a microarray dataset. The proposed method is intended for use with the Affymetrix Human Genome platform (i.e., GPL 96, GPL570 and GPL571). Circos quality measurement plots are a convenient way for the initial quality estimate of Affymetrix datasets that are stored in publicly available databases.

  9. Contributions to Statistical Problems Related to Microarray Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Microarray is a high throughput technology to measure the gene expression. Analysis of microarray data brings many interesting and challenging problems. This thesis consists three studies related to microarray data. First, we propose a Bayesian model for microarray data and use Bayes Factors to identify differentially expressed genes. Second, we…

  10. High quality epoxysilane substrate for clinical multiplex serodiagnostic proteomic microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewart, Tom; Carmichael, Stuart; Lea, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Polylysine and aminopropylsilane treated glass comprised the majority of substrates employed in first generation genetic microarray substrates. Second generation single stranded long oligo libraries with amino termini provided for controlled terminal specific attachment, and rationally designed unique sequence libraries with normalized melting temperatures. These libraries benefit from active covalent coupling surfaces such as Epoxysilane. The latter's oxime ring shows versatile reactivity with amino-, thiol- and hydroxyl- groups thus encompassing small molecule, oligo and proteomic microarray applications. Batch-to-batch production uniformity supports entry of the Epoxysilane process into clinical diagnostics. We carried out multiple print runs of 21 clinically relevant bacterial and viral antigens at optimized concentrations, plus human IgG and IgM standards in triplicate on multiple batches of Epoxysilane substrates. A set of 45 patient sera were assayed in a 35 minute protocol using 10 microliters per array in a capillary-fill format (15 minute serum incubation, wash, 15 minute incubation with Cy3-labeled anti-hIgG plus Dy647-labeled anti-hIgM, final wash). The LOD (3 SD above background) was better than 1 microgram/ml for IgG, and standard curves were regular and monotonically increasing over the range 0 to 1000 micrograms/ml. Ninety-five percent of the CVs for the standards were under 10%, and 90% percent of CVs for antigen responses were under 10% across all batches of Epoxysilane and print runs. In addition, where SDs are larger than expected, microarray images may be readily reviewed for quality control purposes and pin misprints quickly identified. In order to determine the influence of stirring on sensitivity and speed of the microarray assay, we printed 10 common ToRCH antigens (H. pylori, T. gondii, Rubella, Rubeola, C. trachomatis, Herpes 1 and 2, CMV, C. jejuni, and EBV) in Epoxysilane-activated slide-wells. Anti-IgG-Cy3 direct binding to printed Ig

  11. Identification of non-random sequence properties in groups of signature peptides obtained in random sequence peptide microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Igor B

    2016-05-01

    Immunosignaturing is an emerging experimental technique that uses random sequence peptide microarrays to detect antibodies produced by the immune system in response to a particular disease. Two important questions regarding immunosignaturing are "Do microarray peptides that exhibit a strong affinity to a given type of antibodies share common sequence properties?" and "If so, what are those properties?" In this work, three statistical tests designed to detect non-random patterns in the amino acid makeup of a group of microarray peptides are presented. One test detects patterns of significantly biased amino acid usage, whereas the other two detect patterns of significant bias in the biochemical properties. These tests do not require a large number of peptides per group. The tests were applied to analyze 19 groups of peptides identified in immunosignaturing experiments as being specific for antibodies produced in response to various types of cancer and other diseases. The positional distribution of the biochemical properties of the amino acids in these 19 peptide groups was also studied. Remarkably, despite the random nature of the sequence libraries used to design the microarrays, a unique group-specific non-random pattern was identified in the majority of the peptide groups studied. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 318-329, 2016. PMID:27037995

  12. Generation of Two-color Antigen Microarrays for the Simultaneous Detection of IgG and IgM Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Chruscinski, Andrzej; Huang, Flora Y Y; Ulndreaj, Antigona; Chua, Conan; Fehlings, Michael; Rao, Vivek; Ross, Heather J; Levy, Gary A

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies, which are antibodies against self-antigens, are present in many disease states and can serve as markers for disease activity. The levels of autoantibodies to specific antigens are typically detected with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. However, screening for multiple autoantibodies with ELISA can be time-consuming and requires a large quantity of patient sample. The antigen microarray technique is an alternative method that can be used to screen for autoantibodies in a multiplex fashion. In this technique, antigens are arrayed onto specially coated microscope slides with a robotic microarrayer. The slides are probed with patient serum samples and subsequently fluorescent-labeled secondary antibodies are added to detect binding of serum autoantibodies to the antigens. The autoantibody reactivities are revealed and quantified by scanning the slides with a scanner that can detect fluorescent signals. Here we describe methods to generate custom antigen microarrays. Our current arrays are printed with 9 solid pins and can include up to 162 antigens spotted in duplicate. The arrays can be easily customized by changing the antigens in the source plate that is used by the microarrayer. We have developed a two-color secondary antibody detection scheme that can distinguish IgG and IgM reactivities on the same slide surface. The detection system has been optimized to study binding of human and murine autoantibodies. PMID:27685156

  13. Torsion Tests of Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stang, Ambrose H; Ramberg, Walter; Back, Goldie

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests of 63 chromium-molybdenum steel tubes and 102 17st aluminum-alloy tubes of various sizes and lengths made to study the dependence of the torsional strength on both the dimensions of the tube and the physical properties of the tube material. Three types of failure are found to be important for sizes of tubes frequently used in aircraft construction: (1) failure by plastic shear, in which the tube material reached its yield strength before the critical torque was reached; (2) failure by elastic two-lobe buckling, which depended only on the elastic properties of the tube material and the dimensions of the tube; and (3) failure by a combination of (1) and (2) that is, by buckling taking place after some yielding of the tube material.

  14. Development of a Novel Peptide Microarray for Large Scale Epitope Mapping of Food Allergens

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing; Bardina, Ludmilla; Shreffler, Wayne G.; Andreae, Doerthe A.; Ge, Yongchao; Wang, Julie; Bruni, Francesca M.; Fu, Zhiyan; Han, Youngshin; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The peptide microarray is a novel assay which facilitates high-throughput screening of peptides with a small quantity of sample. Objective We sought to use overlapping peptides of milk allergenic proteins as a model system to establish a reliable and sensitive peptide microarray-based immunoassay for large scale epitope mapping of food allergens. Methods A milk peptide microarray was developed using commercially synthesized peptides (20-mers, 3 offset) covering the primary sequences of αs1-, αs2-, β-, and κ-caseins, and β-lactoglobulin. Conditions for printing and immunolabeling were optimized using a serum pool of five milk-allergic patients. Reproducibility of the milk peptide microarray was evaluated using replicate arrays immunolabeled with the serum pool, whereas specificity and sensitivity were assessed using serial dilution of the serum pool and a peptide inhibition assay. Results Our results show that epitopes identified by the peptide microarray were mostly consistent with those identified previously by SPOT membrane technology, but with specific binding to a few newly identified epitopes of milk allergens. Data from replicate arrays were reproducible (R≥0.92) regardless of printing lots, immunolabeling and serum pool batches. Using the serially diluted serum pool, we confirmed that IgE antibody binding detected in the array was specific. Peptide inhibition of IgE binding to the same peptide and overlapping peptides further confirmed the specificity of the array. Conclusions A reliable peptide microarray was established for large scale IgE epitope mapping of milk allergens and this robust technology could be applied for epitope mapping of other food allergens. PMID:19577281

  15. Chromosomal Microarray versus Karyotyping for Prenatal Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wapner, Ronald J.; Martin, Christa Lese; Levy, Brynn; Ballif, Blake C.; Eng, Christine M.; Zachary, Julia M.; Savage, Melissa; Platt, Lawrence D.; Saltzman, Daniel; Grobman, William A.; Klugman, Susan; Scholl, Thomas; Simpson, Joe Leigh; McCall, Kimberly; Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Bunke, Brian; Nahum, Odelia; Patel, Ankita; Lamb, Allen N.; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Ledbetter, David H.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Jackson, Laird

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromosomal microarray analysis has emerged as a primary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of developmental delay and structural malformations in children. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy, efficacy, and incremental yield of chromosomal microarray analysis as compared with karyotyping for routine prenatal diagnosis. Methods Samples from women undergoing prenatal diagnosis at 29 centers were sent to a central karyotyping laboratory. Each sample was split in two; standard karyotyping was performed on one portion and the other was sent to one of four laboratories for chromosomal microarray. Results We enrolled a total of 4406 women. Indications for prenatal diagnosis were advanced maternal age (46.6%), abnormal result on Down’s syndrome screening (18.8%), structural anomalies on ultrasonography (25.2%), and other indications (9.4%). In 4340 (98.8%) of the fetal samples, microarray analysis was successful; 87.9% of samples could be used without tissue culture. Microarray analysis of the 4282 nonmosaic samples identified all the aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements identified on karyotyping but did not identify balanced translocations and fetal triploidy. In samples with a normal karyotype, microarray analysis revealed clinically relevant deletions or duplications in 6.0% with a structural anomaly and in 1.7% of those whose indications were advanced maternal age or positive screening results. Conclusions In the context of prenatal diagnostic testing, chromosomal microarray analysis identified additional, clinically significant cytogenetic information as compared with karyotyping and was equally efficacious in identifying aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements but did not identify balanced translocations and triploidies. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01279733.) PMID:23215555

  16. [Evaluation of the analytic performance of blood collection tubes (BD Vacutainer SST) for the screening of anti-HIV, anti-HTLV, anti-HCV, anti-HBc, anti-CMV antibodies, and of HBs, P24 HIV antigens, and of alanine aminotransferase].

    PubMed

    Gobin, E; Desruelle, J M; Vigier, J P

    2001-02-01

    The Laboratory of Viral Diseases Immunology (Laboratoire d'Immunologie des Maladies Virales) of the Northern Region Blood Bank (Etablissement Français du Sang Nord de France) performs between 180.000 and 200.000 viral blood qualifications per year. The use of a serum gel separator evacuated tube should contribute to improve the quality of the pre-analytical phase. However, it must not impact negatively the analytical performances. We evaluated such tube within our specific environment and with the various reagents used in routine. The open study compared the BD Vacutainer plain tube (7 mL, non siliconised) with the BD Vacutainer SST tube (6 mL siliconised with serum gel separator) against the anti-HIV, anti-HTLV, anti-HCV, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, anti-CMV antibodies, the HBs, HIV P24 antigen and the alanine aminotransferase. The study objectives were to find potential gel interference; to verify the diagnostic sensitivity, reagents specificity, and reproducibility. The results analysis show: equivalent performances with the anti-HIV Ab (Anti HIV 1/2 recombinant--Biotest et Genscreen HIV 1/2--Sanofi), anti HIV WB Ab (New Lav Blot 1--Sanofi), anti-HBs Ab (Enzygnost anti-HBs micro--Behring), anti-HBc Ab (HBc Elisa Test System--Ortho), anti-CMV Ab (Enzygnost anti-CMV IgG + M--Behring) kits; lower performances with: The Vironostika HIV Uni Form II plus 0--Organon kit with a -3.5% signal decrease around the ratio R = 2.7 for positive anti-HIV Ab. The Elisa test System 3 Ag HBs-Ortho kit with an increase of the mean ratio of the negative Ag HBs samples; better performances with: the Vironostika HIV 1 Antigen--Organon kit with a +10% signal increase around the threshold ratio R = 1 for positive Ag HIV samples. This deserves further study to verify that the specificity is maintained. The HTLV Type 1 et 2 EIA--Ortho kit with +8% signal increase around the ratio R = 2 for positive anti-HTLV Ab samples without change of the specificity. The Ortho HCV 3.0 Elisa Test System and

  17. DNA microarray analyses in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, David W

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarrays were originally devised and described as a convenient technology for the global analysis of plant gene expression. Over the past decade, their use has expanded enormously to cover all kingdoms of living organisms. At the same time, the scope of applications of microarrays has increased beyond expression analyses, with plant genomics playing a leadership role in the on-going development of this technology. As the field has matured, the rate-limiting step has moved from that of the technical process of data generation to that of data analysis. We currently face major problems in dealing with the accumulating datasets, not simply with respect to how to archive, access, and process the huge amounts of data that have been and are being produced, but also in determining the relative quality of the different datasets. A major recognized concern is the appropriate use of statistical design in microarray experiments, without which the datasets are rendered useless. A vigorous area of current research involves the development of novel statistical tools specifically for microarray experiments. This article describes, in a necessarily selective manner, the types of platforms currently employed in microarray research and provides an overview of recent activities using these platforms in plant biology.

  18. Oligonucleotide microarrays in constitutional genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Keren, Boris; Le Caignec, Cedric

    2011-06-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays such as comparative genomic hybridization arrays and SNP microarrays enable the identification of genomic imbalances - also termed copy-number variants - with increasing resolution. This article will focus on the most significant applications of high-throughput oligonucleotide microarrays, both in genetic diagnosis and research. In genetic diagnosis, the method is becoming a standard tool for investigating patients with unexplained developmental delay/intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders and/or with multiple congenital anomalies. Oligonucleotide microarray have also been recently applied to the detection of genomic imbalances in prenatal diagnosis either to characterize a chromosomal rearrangement that has previously been identified by standard prenatal karyotyping or to detect a cryptic genomic imbalance in a fetus with ultrasound abnormalities and a normal standard prenatal karyotype. In research, oligonucleotide microarrays have been used for a wide range of applications, such as the identification of new genes responsible for monogenic disorders and the association of a copy-number variant as a predisposing factor to a common disease. Despite its widespread use, the interpretation of results is not always straightforward. We will discuss several unexpected results and ethical issues raised by these new methods.

  19. Advancing Microarray Assembly with Acoustic Dispensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wong, E. Y.; Diamond, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    In the assembly of microarrays and microarray-based chemical assays and enzymatic bioassays, most approaches use pins for contact spotting. Acoustic dispensing is a technology capable of nanoliter transfers by using acoustic energy to eject liquid sample from an open source well. Although typically used for well plate transfers, when applied to microarraying it avoids drawbacks of undesired physical contact with sample, difficulty in assembling multicomponent reactions on a chip by readdressing, a rigid mode of printing that lacks patterning capabilities, and time-consuming wash steps. We demonstrated the utility of acoustic dispensing by delivering human cathepsin L in a drop-on-drop fashion into individual 50-nanoliter, pre-spotted reaction volumes to activate enzyme reactions at targeted positions on a microarray. We generated variable-sized spots ranging from 200 to 750 μm (and higher), and handled the transfer of fluorescent bead suspensions with increasing source well concentrations of 0.1 to 10 ×108 beads/mL in a linear fashion. There are no tips that can clog and liquid dispensing CVs are generally below 5%. This platform expands the toolbox for generating analytical arrays and meets needs associated with spatially-addressed assembly of multicomponent microarrays on the nanoliter scale. PMID:19035650

  20. A Synthetic Kinome Microarray Data Generator

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Farhad; Kusalik, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Cellular pathways involve the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of proteins. Peptide microarrays called kinome arrays facilitate the measurement of the phosphorylation activity of hundreds of proteins in a single experiment. Analyzing the data from kinome microarrays is a multi-step process. Typically, various techniques are possible for a particular step, and it is necessary to compare and evaluate them. Such evaluations require data for which correct analysis results are known. Unfortunately, such kinome data is not readily available in the community. Further, there are no established techniques for creating artificial kinome datasets with known results and with the same characteristics as real kinome datasets. In this paper, a methodology for generating synthetic kinome array data is proposed. The methodology relies on actual intensity measurements from kinome microarray experiments and preserves their subtle characteristics. The utility of the methodology is demonstrated by evaluating methods for eliminating heterogeneous variance in kinome microarray data. Phosphorylation intensities from kinome microarrays often exhibit such heterogeneous variance and its presence can negatively impact downstream statistical techniques that rely on homogeneity of variance. It is shown that using the output from the proposed synthetic data generator, it is possible to critically compare two variance stabilization methods. PMID:27600233

  1. Improved continuous-flow print head for micro-array deposition.

    PubMed

    Eddings, Mark A; Miles, Adam R; Eckman, Josh W; Kim, Jungkyu; Rich, Rebecca L; Gale, Bruce K; Myszka, David G

    2008-11-01

    Limitations in depositing ligands using conventional micro-array pin spotting have hindered the application of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) technology. To address these challenges we introduce a modification to our continuous-flow micro-spotting technology that improves ligand deposition. Using Flexchip protein A/G and neutravidin capturing surfaces, we demonstrate that our new microfluidic spotter requires 1000 times less concentrated antibodies and biotinylated ligands than is required for pin spotting. By varying the deposition flow rate, we show that the design of our tip overlay flow cell is efficient at delivering sample to the substrate surface. Finally, contact time studies show that it is possible to capture antibodies and biotinylated ligands at concentrations of less than 0.1 ug/ml and 100 pM, respectively. These improvements in spotting technology will help to expand the applications of SPRi systems in areas such as antibody screening, carbohydrate arrays, and biomarker detection.

  2. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ...

  3. Microarray immunoassay for phenoxybenzoic acid using polymer-functionalized lanthanide oxide nanoparticles as fluorescent labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichkova, Mikaela; Dosev, Dosi; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2005-11-01

    Fluorescent properties and low production cost makes lanthanide oxide nanoparticles attractive labels in biochemistry. Nanoparticles with different fluorescent spectra were produced by doping of oxides such as Y IIO 3 and Gd IIO 3 with different lanthanide ions (Eu, Tb, Sm) giving the possibility for multicolor labeling. Protein microarrays have the potential to play a fundamental role in the miniaturization of biosensors, clinical immunological assays, and protein-protein interaction studies. Here we present the application of fluorescent lanthanide oxide nanoparticles as labels in microarray-based immunoassay for phenoxybenzoic acid (PBA), a generic biomarker of human exposure to the highly potent insecticides pyrethroids. A novel polymer-based protocol was developed for biochemical functionalization of the nanoparticles. Microarrays of antibodies were fabricated by microcontact printing in line patterns onto glass substrates and immunoassays were successfully performed using the corresponding functionalized nanoparticles. The applicability of the fluorophore nanoparticles as reporters for detection of antibody-antigen interactions has been demonstrated for phenoxybenzoic acid (PBA)/anti-PBA IgG. The sensitivity of the competitive fluorescent immunoassay for PBA was similar to that of the corresponding ELISA.

  4. Evaluating Common Humoral Responses against Fungal Infections with Yeast Protein Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paulo S R; Im, Hogune; Clemons, Karl V; Snyder, Michael P; Stevens, David A

    2015-09-01

    We profiled the global immunoglobulin response against fungal infection by using yeast protein microarrays. Groups of CD-1 mice were infected systemically with human fungal pathogens (Coccidioides posadasii, Candida albicans, or Paracoccidioides brasiliensis) or inoculated with PBS as a control. Another group was inoculated with heat-killed yeast (HKY) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. After 30 days, serum from mice in the groups were collected and used to probe S. cerevisiae protein microarrays containing 4800 full-length glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fusion proteins. Antimouse IgG conjugated with Alexafluor 555 and anti-GST antibody conjugated with Alexafluor 647 were used to detect antibody-antigen interactions and the presence of GST-fusion proteins, respectively. Serum after infection with C. albicans reacted with 121 proteins: C. posadasii, 81; P. brasiliensis, 67; and after HKY, 63 proteins on the yeast protein microarray, respectively. We identified a set of 16 antigenic proteins that were shared across the three fungal pathogens. These include retrotransposon capsid proteins, heat shock proteins, and mitochondrial proteins. Five of these proteins were identified in our previous study of fungal cell wall by mass spectrometry (Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 2012, 1273, 44-51). The results obtained give a comprehensive view of the immunological responses to fungal infections at the proteomic level. They also offer insight into immunoreactive protein commonality among several fungal pathogens and provide a basis for a panfungal vaccine. PMID:26258609

  5. Evaluating Common Humoral Responses against Fungal Infections with Yeast Protein Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paulo S R; Im, Hogune; Clemons, Karl V; Snyder, Michael P; Stevens, David A

    2015-09-01

    We profiled the global immunoglobulin response against fungal infection by using yeast protein microarrays. Groups of CD-1 mice were infected systemically with human fungal pathogens (Coccidioides posadasii, Candida albicans, or Paracoccidioides brasiliensis) or inoculated with PBS as a control. Another group was inoculated with heat-killed yeast (HKY) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. After 30 days, serum from mice in the groups were collected and used to probe S. cerevisiae protein microarrays containing 4800 full-length glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fusion proteins. Antimouse IgG conjugated with Alexafluor 555 and anti-GST antibody conjugated with Alexafluor 647 were used to detect antibody-antigen interactions and the presence of GST-fusion proteins, respectively. Serum after infection with C. albicans reacted with 121 proteins: C. posadasii, 81; P. brasiliensis, 67; and after HKY, 63 proteins on the yeast protein microarray, respectively. We identified a set of 16 antigenic proteins that were shared across the three fungal pathogens. These include retrotransposon capsid proteins, heat shock proteins, and mitochondrial proteins. Five of these proteins were identified in our previous study of fungal cell wall by mass spectrometry (Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 2012, 1273, 44-51). The results obtained give a comprehensive view of the immunological responses to fungal infections at the proteomic level. They also offer insight into immunoreactive protein commonality among several fungal pathogens and provide a basis for a panfungal vaccine.

  6. Automated microfluidic assay system for autoantibodies found in autoimmune diseases using a photoimmobilized autoantigen microarray.

    PubMed

    Matsudaira, Takahiro; Tsuzuki, Saki; Wada, Akira; Suwa, Akira; Kohsaka, Hitoshi; Tomida, Maiko; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and autoimmune diabetes are characterized by the production of autoantibodies that serve as useful diagnostic markers, surrogate markers, and prognostic factors. We devised an in vitro system to detect these clinically pivotal autoantibodies using a photoimmobilized autoantigen microarray. Photoimmobilization was useful for preparing the autoantigen microarray, where autoantigens are covalently immobilized on a plate, because it does not require specific functional groups of the autoantigens and any organic material can be immobilized by a radical reaction induced by photoirradiation. Here, we prepared the microarray using a very convenient method. Aqueous solutions of each autoantigen were mixed with a polymer of poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate and a photoreactive crosslinker, and the mixtures were microspotted on a plate and dried in air. Finally, the plate was irradiated with an ultraviolet lamp to obtain immobilization. In the assay, patient serum was added to the microarray plate. Antigen-specific IgG adsorbed on the microspotted autoantigen was detected by peroxidase-conjugated anti-IgG antibody. The chemical luminescence intensities of the substrate decomposed by the peroxidase were detected with a sensitive CCD camera. All autoantigens were immobilized stably by this method and used to screen antigen-specific IgG. In addition, the plate was covered with a polydimethylsiloxane sheet containing microchannels and automated measurement was carried out. PMID:19194953

  7. Microinjection of sigma-D-glucose standards and Amplex Red reagent on micro-arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerman, R.; van den Doel, L. Richard; Picioreanu, S.; Frank, J.; Marijnissen, Johannes P. A.; van Dedem, G. W. K.; Hjelt, Kari H.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Sarro, Pasqualina M.; Young, Ian T.

    1999-06-01

    Intelligent Molecular Diagnostic Systems (IMDS)- The objective of this multidisciplinary research program is to design and develop an analytical system that is able to measure and interpret concentrations of various analytes which are dispensed on a micro-array. The analytes are detected by means of fluorescence or (chemi)luminescence measurement. Furthermore, the collected data are combined and interpreted using modern reasoning techniques. Micro-injection- Dispensing picoliters (pl) of reagents (enzymes, antibodies, etc.) and liquid samples on a micro-array requires special techniques. At the moment we are working on a technique which will allow for accurately dispensing liquid volumes less than 100 pl on a micro-array. Detection of (beta) -D-glucose- (beta) -D-glucose standards are dispensed on a micro-array, after which a solution of Amplex Red reagent, horse radish peroxidase (HARP), and glucose oxidase in a mixture of ethylene glycol and water is added. Ethylene glycol is added to prevent evaporation. The (beta) -D-glucose reacts with glucose oxidase to D-gluconolactone and H2O2. The H2O2 reacts with 10-acetyl-3,7-dihydroxyphenoxazine (Amplex Red) with a 1:1 stoichiometry to produce highly fluorescent resorufin. The formation of resorufin with time is followed with a Zeiss Axioskop microscope equipped with a KAF Photometrics CCD camera, in order to determine the sensitivity, concentrations, and volumes associated with the dispensed fluids.

  8. Automated microfluidic assay system for autoantibodies found in autoimmune diseases using a photoimmobilized autoantigen microarray.

    PubMed

    Matsudaira, Takahiro; Tsuzuki, Saki; Wada, Akira; Suwa, Akira; Kohsaka, Hitoshi; Tomida, Maiko; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and autoimmune diabetes are characterized by the production of autoantibodies that serve as useful diagnostic markers, surrogate markers, and prognostic factors. We devised an in vitro system to detect these clinically pivotal autoantibodies using a photoimmobilized autoantigen microarray. Photoimmobilization was useful for preparing the autoantigen microarray, where autoantigens are covalently immobilized on a plate, because it does not require specific functional groups of the autoantigens and any organic material can be immobilized by a radical reaction induced by photoirradiation. Here, we prepared the microarray using a very convenient method. Aqueous solutions of each autoantigen were mixed with a polymer of poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate and a photoreactive crosslinker, and the mixtures were microspotted on a plate and dried in air. Finally, the plate was irradiated with an ultraviolet lamp to obtain immobilization. In the assay, patient serum was added to the microarray plate. Antigen-specific IgG adsorbed on the microspotted autoantigen was detected by peroxidase-conjugated anti-IgG antibody. The chemical luminescence intensities of the substrate decomposed by the peroxidase were detected with a sensitive CCD camera. All autoantigens were immobilized stably by this method and used to screen antigen-specific IgG. In addition, the plate was covered with a polydimethylsiloxane sheet containing microchannels and automated measurement was carried out.

  9. Profiling Humoral Immune Responses to Clostridium difficile-Specific Antigens by Protein Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Negm, Ola H.; Hamed, Mohamed R.; Dilnot, Elizabeth M.; Shone, Clifford C.; Marszalowska, Izabela; Lynch, Mark; Loscher, Christine E.; Edwards, Laura J.; Tighe, Patrick J.; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive, and spore-forming bacterium that is the leading worldwide infective cause of hospital-acquired and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Several studies have reported associations between humoral immunity and the clinical course of C. difficile infection (CDI). Host humoral immune responses are determined using conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques. Herein, we report the first use of a novel protein microarray assay to determine systemic IgG antibody responses against a panel of highly purified C. difficile-specific antigens, including native toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB, respectively), recombinant fragments of toxins A and B (TxA4 and TxB4, respectively), ribotype-specific surface layer proteins (SLPs; 001, 002, 027), and control proteins (tetanus toxoid and Candida albicans). Microarrays were probed with sera from a total of 327 individuals with CDI, cystic fibrosis without diarrhea, and healthy controls. For all antigens, precision profiles demonstrated <10% coefficient of variation (CV). Significant correlation was observed between microarray and ELISA in the quantification of antitoxin A and antitoxin B IgG. These results indicate that microarray is a suitable assay for defining humoral immune responses to C. difficile protein antigens and may have potential advantages in throughput, convenience, and cost. PMID:26178385

  10. Probing High-density Functional Protein Microarrays to Detect Protein-protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Fasolo, Joseph; Im, Hogune; Snyder, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    High-density functional protein microarrays containing ~4,200 recombinant yeast proteins are examined for kinase protein-protein interactions using an affinity purified yeast kinase fusion protein containing a V5-epitope tag for read-out. Purified kinase is obtained through culture of a yeast strain optimized for high copy protein production harboring a plasmid containing a Kinase-V5 fusion construct under a GAL inducible promoter. The yeast is grown in restrictive media with a neutral carbon source for 6 hr followed by induction with 2% galactose. Next, the culture is harvested and kinase is purified using standard affinity chromatographic techniques to obtain a highly purified protein kinase for use in the assay. The purified kinase is diluted with kinase buffer to an appropriate range for the assay and the protein microarrays are blocked prior to hybridization with the protein microarray. After the hybridization, the arrays are probed with monoclonal V5 antibody to identify proteins bound by the kinase-V5 protein. Finally, the arrays are scanned using a standard microarray scanner, and data is extracted for downstream informatics analysis to determine a high confidence set of protein interactions for downstream validation in vivo. PMID:26274875

  11. Tracheostomy tube - speaking

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000465.htm Tracheostomy tube - speaking To use the sharing features on ... are even speaking devices that can help you. Tracheostomy Tubes and Speaking Air passing through vocal cords ( ...

  12. Glass tube splitting tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, J. A.; Murray, C. D.; Stein, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Tool accurately splits glass tubing so cuts are aligned 180 deg apart and reassembled tube forms low pressure, gastight enclosure. Device should interest industries using cylindrical closed glass containers.

  13. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the first month ... she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina ...

  14. Eustachian tube (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are more common in children because their eustachian tubes are shorter, narrower, and more horizontal than in ... become trapped when the tissue of the eustachian tube becomes swollen from colds or allergies. Bacteria trapped ...

  15. Feeding tube - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube is misplaced and not in the proper position, the baby may have problems with: An abnormally slow heart rate (bradycardia) Breathing Spitting up Rarely, the feeding tube can puncture the stomach.

  16. Microhole Tubing Bending Report

    DOE Data Explorer

    Oglesby, Ken

    2012-01-01

    A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

  17. Platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pulkrabek, S M

    1996-12-01

    The proper diagnosis of patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenias can be accomplished by using the advances made in the field of platelet serology. These techniques range from solid phase red cell adherence to sequencing platelet antigen amino acids by polymerase chain reaction. This article describes platelet antigens, the clinical tests available to detect platelet antigens and antibodies, and the value of these tests in supporting clinical diagnoses.

  18. Hybridization and Selective Release of DNA Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Baker, B; Piggott, T; Maberry, S; Hara, C M; DeOtte, J; Benett, W; Mukerjee, E; Dzenitis, J; Wheeler, E K

    2011-11-29

    DNA microarrays contain sequence specific probes arrayed in distinct spots numbering from 10,000 to over 1,000,000, depending on the platform. This tremendous degree of multiplexing gives microarrays great potential for environmental background sampling, broad-spectrum clinical monitoring, and continuous biological threat detection. In practice, their use in these applications is not common due to limited information content, long processing times, and high cost. The work focused on characterizing the phenomena of microarray hybridization and selective release that will allow these limitations to be addressed. This will revolutionize the ways that microarrays can be used for LLNL's Global Security missions. The goals of this project were two-fold: automated faster hybridizations and selective release of hybridized features. The first study area involves hybridization kinetics and mass-transfer effects. the standard hybridization protocol uses an overnight incubation to achieve the best possible signal for any sample type, as well as for convenience in manual processing. There is potential to significantly shorten this time based on better understanding and control of the rate-limiting processes and knowledge of the progress of the hybridization. In the hybridization work, a custom microarray flow cell was used to manipulate the chemical and thermal environment of the array and autonomously image the changes over time during hybridization. The second study area is selective release. Microarrays easily generate hybridization patterns and signatures, but there is still an unmet need for methodologies enabling rapid and selective analysis of these patterns and signatures. Detailed analysis of individual spots by subsequent sequencing could potentially yield significant information for rapidly mutating and emerging (or deliberately engineered) pathogens. In the selective release work, optical energy deposition with coherent light quickly provides the thermal energy to

  19. Analysis of High-Throughput ELISA Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-02-23

    Our research group develops analytical methods and software for the high-throughput analysis of quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays. ELISA microarrays differ from DNA microarrays in several fundamental aspects and most algorithms for analysis of DNA microarray data are not applicable to ELISA microarrays. In this review, we provide an overview of the steps involved in ELISA microarray data analysis and how the statistically sound algorithms we have developed provide an integrated software suite to address the needs of each data-processing step. The algorithms discussed are available in a set of open-source software tools (http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT).

  20. Photo-Generation of Carbohydrate Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Gregory T.; Wang, Denong; Turro, Nicholas J.; Koberstein, Jeffrey T.

    The unparalleled structural diversity of carbohydrates among biological molecules has been recognized for decades. Recent studies have highlighted carbohydrate signaling roles in many important biological processes, such as fertilization, embryonic development, cell differentiation and cellȁ4cell communication, blood coagulation, inflammation, chemotaxis, as well as host recognition and immune responses to microbial pathogens. In this chapter, we summarize recent progress in the establishment of carbohydrate-based microarrays and the application of these technologies in exploring the biological information content in carbohydrates. A newly established photochemical platform of carbohydrate microarrays serves as a model for a focused discussion.

  1. Protein Microarrays for the Detection of Biothreats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Amy E.

    Although protein microarrays have proven to be an important tool in proteomics research, the technology is emerging as useful for public health and defense applications. Recent progress in the measurement and characterization of biothreat agents is reviewed in this chapter. Details concerning validation of various protein microarray formats, from contact-printed sandwich assays to supported lipid bilayers, are presented. The reviewed technologies have important implications for in vitro characterization of toxin-ligand interactions, serotyping of bacteria, screening of potential biothreat inhibitors, and as core components of biosensors, among others, research and engineering applications.

  2. Pineal Function: Impact of Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Klein, David C.; Bailey, Michael J.; Carter, David A.; Kim, Jong-so; Shi, Qiong; Ho, Anthony; Chik, Constance; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Morin, Fabrice; Ganguly, Surajit; Rath, Martin F.; Møller, Morten; Sugden, David; Rangel, Zoila G.; Munson, Peter J.; Weller, Joan L.; Coon, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Microarray analysis has provided a new understanding of pineal function by identifying genes that are highly expressed in this tissue relative to other tissues and also by identifying over 600 genes that are expressed on a 24-hour schedule. This effort has highlighted surprising similarity to the retina and has provided reason to explore new avenues of study including intracellular signaling, signal transduction, transcriptional cascades, thyroid/retinoic acid hormone signaling, metal biology, RNA splicing, and the role the pineal gland plays in the immune/inflammation response. The new foundation that microarray analysis has provided will broadly support future research on pineal function. PMID:19622385

  3. The use of microarrays in microbial ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, G.L.; He, Z.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Zhou, J.

    2009-09-15

    Microarrays have proven to be a useful and high-throughput method to provide targeted DNA sequence information for up to many thousands of specific genetic regions in a single test. A microarray consists of multiple DNA oligonucleotide probes that, under high stringency conditions, hybridize only to specific complementary nucleic acid sequences (targets). A fluorescent signal indicates the presence and, in many cases, the abundance of genetic regions of interest. In this chapter we will look at how microarrays are used in microbial ecology, especially with the recent increase in microbial community DNA sequence data. Of particular interest to microbial ecologists, phylogenetic microarrays are used for the analysis of phylotypes in a community and functional gene arrays are used for the analysis of functional genes, and, by inference, phylotypes in environmental samples. A phylogenetic microarray that has been developed by the Andersen laboratory, the PhyloChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that targets the known diversity within the 16S rRNA gene to determine microbial community composition. Using multiple, confirmatory probes to increase the confidence of detection and a mismatch probe for every perfect match probe to minimize the effect of cross-hybridization by non-target regions, the PhyloChip is able to simultaneously identify any of thousands of taxa present in an environmental sample. The PhyloChip is shown to reveal greater diversity within a community than rRNA gene sequencing due to the placement of the entire gene product on the microarray compared with the analysis of up to thousands of individual molecules by traditional sequencing methods. A functional gene array that has been developed by the Zhou laboratory, the GeoChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that dynamically identifies functional activities of multiple members within a community. The recent version of GeoChip contains more than 24,000 50mer

  4. MicroRNA expression profiling using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Love, Cassandra; Dave, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs which are able to regulate gene expression at both the transcriptional and translational levels. There is a growing recognition of the role of microRNAs in nearly every tissue type and cellular process. Thus there is an increasing need for accurate quantitation of microRNA expression in a variety of tissues. Microarrays provide a robust method for the examination of microRNA expression. In this chapter, we describe detailed methods for the use of microarrays to measure microRNA expression and discuss methods for the analysis of microRNA expression data. PMID:23666707

  5. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  10. REACTOR COOLANT TUBE SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Morris, W.J.

    1958-12-01

    A plle-flattenlng control element and a fluid seal therefore to permit movement of the element into a liquld contnining region of a neutronlc reactor are described. The device consists of flattened, thin-walled aluminum tubing contalnlng a uniform mixture of thermal neutron absorbing material, and a number of soft rubber closures for the process tubes, having silts capable of passing the flattened elements therethrough, but effectively sealing the process tubes against fluld leaknge by compression of the rubber. The flattened tubing is sufficiently flexible to enable it to conform to the configuratlon of the annular spacing surrounding the fuel elements ln the process tubes.

  11. [The cell-free protein synthesis-based protein microarray technology].

    PubMed

    Lu, Linli; Lin, Bicheng

    2010-12-01

    The major bottle-neck in the way of constructing high density protein microarray is the availability and stability of proteins. The traditional methods of generating protein arrays require the in-vivo expression, purification and immobilization of hundreds or thousands of proteins. The cell-free protein array technology employs cell-free expression systems to produce proteins directly onto surface from co-distributed or pre-arrayed DNA or RNA, thus avoiding the laborious and often costly processes of protein preparation in the traditional approach. Here we provide an overview of recently developed novel technology in cell free based protein microarray and their applications in protein interaction analysis, in antibody specificity and vaccine screening, and in biomarker assay. PMID:21375003

  12. Anti-heat shock protein autoantibody profiling in breast cancer using customized protein microarray.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liu; Gehin, Thomas; Chevolot, Yann; Souteyrand, Eliane; Mangé, Alain; Solassol, Jérôme; Laurenceau, Emmanuelle

    2016-02-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are over-expressed in a wide range of human cancers. It results in the stimulation of the immune system and consequently in elevated concentration of anti-HSP autoantibodies. Elevated anti-HSP autoantibodies were found in breast cancer patients, and they are associated with tumor metastasis. Therefore, screening these autoantibodies could be of diagnostic and prognostic values. Protein microarrays have already demonstrated their great potential as a diagnostic tool. However, protein diversity requires optimization of the microarray fabrication to achieve high sensitivity and specificity. In this study, seven HSPs were immobilized on six different surface chemistries. After evaluation and optimization with purified antibodies of the six surface chemistries, two surfaces were selected to detect anti-HSP autoantibodies in breast cancer sera. Multiplex detection of anti-HSP autoantibodies allowed discrimination of breast cancer patients (50) from healthy controls (26) with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 100%. PMID:26715250

  13. Intercostal drainage tube or intracardiac drainage tube?

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, N.; Kamath, S. Ganesh; Khymdeit, Edison; Prabhu, Manjunath

    2016-01-01

    Although insertion of chest drain tubes is a common medical practice, there are risks associated with this procedure, especially when inexperienced physicians perform it. Wrong insertion of the tube has been known to cause morbidity and occasional mortality. We report a case where the left ventricle was accidentally punctured leading to near-exsanguination. This report is to highlight the need for experienced physicians to supervise the procedure and train the younger physician in the safe performance of the procedure. PMID:27397467

  14. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    MedlinePlus

    ... YouTube Videos > NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration Amblyopia ... of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI on Twitter NEI on YouTube NEI ...

  15. Calling Biomarkers in Milk Using a Protein Microarray on Your Smartphone.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Susann K J; Tokarski, Christian; Lang, Stefan N; van Ginkel, Leendert A; Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan; Nielen, Michel W F

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the concept of a protein microarray-based fluorescence immunoassay for multiple biomarker detection in milk extracts by an ordinary smartphone. A multiplex immunoassay was designed on a microarray chip, having built-in positive and negative quality controls. After the immunoassay procedure, the 48 microspots were labelled with Quantum Dots (QD) depending on the protein biomarker levels in the sample. QD-fluorescence was subsequently detected by the smartphone camera under UV light excitation from LEDs embedded in a simple 3D-printed opto-mechanical smartphone attachment. The somewhat aberrant images obtained under such conditions, were corrected by newly developed Android-based software on the same smartphone, and protein biomarker profiles were calculated. The indirect detection of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) in milk extracts based on altered biomarker profile of anti-rbST antibodies was selected as a real-life challenge. RbST-treated and untreated cows clearly showed reproducible treatment-dependent biomarker profiles in milk, in excellent agreement with results from a flow cytometer reference method. In a pilot experiment, anti-rbST antibody detection was multiplexed with the detection of another rbST-dependent biomarker, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Milk extract IGF-1 levels were found to be increased after rbST treatment and correlated with the results obtained from the reference method. These data clearly demonstrate the potential of the portable protein microarray concept towards simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers. We envisage broad application of this 'protein microarray on a smartphone'-concept for on-site testing, e.g., in food safety, environment and health monitoring.

  16. Calling Biomarkers in Milk Using a Protein Microarray on Your Smartphone.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Susann K J; Tokarski, Christian; Lang, Stefan N; van Ginkel, Leendert A; Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan; Nielen, Michel W F

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the concept of a protein microarray-based fluorescence immunoassay for multiple biomarker detection in milk extracts by an ordinary smartphone. A multiplex immunoassay was designed on a microarray chip, having built-in positive and negative quality controls. After the immunoassay procedure, the 48 microspots were labelled with Quantum Dots (QD) depending on the protein biomarker levels in the sample. QD-fluorescence was subsequently detected by the smartphone camera under UV light excitation from LEDs embedded in a simple 3D-printed opto-mechanical smartphone attachment. The somewhat aberrant images obtained under such conditions, were corrected by newly developed Android-based software on the same smartphone, and protein biomarker profiles were calculated. The indirect detection of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) in milk extracts based on altered biomarker profile of anti-rbST antibodies was selected as a real-life challenge. RbST-treated and untreated cows clearly showed reproducible treatment-dependent biomarker profiles in milk, in excellent agreement with results from a flow cytometer reference method. In a pilot experiment, anti-rbST antibody detection was multiplexed with the detection of another rbST-dependent biomarker, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Milk extract IGF-1 levels were found to be increased after rbST treatment and correlated with the results obtained from the reference method. These data clearly demonstrate the potential of the portable protein microarray concept towards simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers. We envisage broad application of this 'protein microarray on a smartphone'-concept for on-site testing, e.g., in food safety, environment and health monitoring. PMID:26308444

  17. Calling Biomarkers in Milk Using a Protein Microarray on Your Smartphone

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Susann K. J.; Tokarski, Christian; Lang, Stefan N.; van Ginkel, Leendert A.; Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan; Nielen, Michel W. F.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the concept of a protein microarray-based fluorescence immunoassay for multiple biomarker detection in milk extracts by an ordinary smartphone. A multiplex immunoassay was designed on a microarray chip, having built-in positive and negative quality controls. After the immunoassay procedure, the 48 microspots were labelled with Quantum Dots (QD) depending on the protein biomarker levels in the sample. QD-fluorescence was subsequently detected by the smartphone camera under UV light excitation from LEDs embedded in a simple 3D-printed opto-mechanical smartphone attachment. The somewhat aberrant images obtained under such conditions, were corrected by newly developed Android-based software on the same smartphone, and protein biomarker profiles were calculated. The indirect detection of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) in milk extracts based on altered biomarker profile of anti-rbST antibodies was selected as a real-life challenge. RbST-treated and untreated cows clearly showed reproducible treatment-dependent biomarker profiles in milk, in excellent agreement with results from a flow cytometer reference method. In a pilot experiment, anti-rbST antibody detection was multiplexed with the detection of another rbST-dependent biomarker, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Milk extract IGF-1 levels were found to be increased after rbST treatment and correlated with the results obtained from the reference method. These data clearly demonstrate the potential of the portable protein microarray concept towards simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers. We envisage broad application of this ‘protein microarray on a smartphone’-concept for on-site testing, e.g., in food safety, environment and health monitoring. PMID:26308444

  18. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  19. A new method for gridding DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, Christoforos C; Matsopoulos, George K

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, a new methodological scheme for the gridding of DNA microarrays is proposed. The scheme composes of a series of processes applied sequentially. Each DNA microarray image is pre-processed to remove any noise and the center of each spot is detected using a template matching algorithm. Then, an initial gridding is automatically placed on the DNA microarray image by 'building' rectangular pyramids around the detected spots' centers. The gridlines "move" between the pyramids, horizontally and vertically, forming this initial grid. Furthermore, a refinement process is applied composing of a five-step approach in order to correct gridding imperfections caused by its initial placement, both in non-spot cases and in more than one spot enclosure cases. The proposed gridding scheme is applied on DNA microarray images under known transformations and on real-world DNA data. Its performance is compared against the projection pursuit method, which is often used due to its speed and simplicity, as well as against a state-of-the-art method, the Optimal Multi-level Thresholding Gridding (OMTG). According to the obtained results, the proposed gridding scheme outperforms both methods, qualitatively and quantitatively.

  20. Diagnostic Oligonucleotide Microarray Fingerprinting of Bacillus Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Alferov, Oleg; Chernov, Boris; Daly, Don S.; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander N.; Protic, Miroslava; Robison, Richard; Shipma, Matthew; White, Amanda M.; Willse, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    A diagnostic, genome-independent microbial fingerprinting method using DNA oligonucleotide microarrays was used for high-resolution differentiation between closely related Bacillus strains, including two strains of Bacillus anthracis that are monomorphic (indistinguishable) via amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting techniques. Replicated hybridizations on 391-probe nonamer arrays were used to construct a prototype fingerprint library for quantitative comparisons. Descriptive analysis of the fingerprints, including phylogenetic reconstruction, is consistent with previous taxonomic organization of the genus. Newly developed statistical analysis methods were used to quantitatively compare and objectively confirm apparent differences in microarray fingerprints with the statistical rigor required for microbial forensics and clinical diagnostics. These data suggest that a relatively simple fingerprinting microarray and statistical analysis method can differentiate between species in the Bacillus cereus complex, and between strains of B. anthracis. A synthetic DNA standard was used to understand underlying microarray and process-level variability, leading to specific recommendations for the development of a standard operating procedure and/or continued technology enhancements for microbial forensics and diagnostics.

  1. Data Analysis Strategies for Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Paula; Dasilva, Noelia; González-González, María; Matarraz, Sergio; Casado-Vela, Juan; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays constitute a new platform which allows the discovery and characterization of proteins. According to different features, such as content, surface or detection system, there are many types of protein microarrays which can be applied for the identification of disease biomarkers and the characterization of protein expression patterns. However, the analysis and interpretation of the amount of information generated by microarrays remain a challenge. Further data analysis strategies are essential to obtain representative and reproducible results. Therefore, the experimental design is key, since the number of samples and dyes, among others aspects, would define the appropriate analysis method to be used. In this sense, several algorithms have been proposed so far to overcome analytical difficulties derived from fluorescence overlapping and/or background noise. Each kind of microarray is developed to fulfill a specific purpose. Therefore, the selection of appropriate analytical and data analysis strategies is crucial to achieve successful biological conclusions. In the present review, we focus on current algorithms and main strategies for data interpretation.

  2. Shrinkage covariance matrix approach for microarray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-04-01

    Microarray technology was developed for the purpose of monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes. A microarray data set typically consists of tens of thousands of genes (variables) from just dozens of samples due to various constraints including the high cost of producing microarray chips. As a result, the widely used standard covariance estimator is not appropriate for this purpose. One such technique is the Hotelling's T2 statistic which is a multivariate test statistic for comparing means between two groups. It requires that the number of observations (n) exceeds the number of genes (p) in the set but in microarray studies it is common that n < p. This leads to a biased estimate of the covariance matrix. In this study, the Hotelling's T2 statistic with the shrinkage approach is proposed to estimate the covariance matrix for testing differential gene expression. The performance of this approach is then compared with other commonly used multivariate tests using a widely analysed diabetes data set as illustrations. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  3. Microarrays (DNA Chips) for the Classroom Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy; Sussman, Michael; BonDurant, Sandra Splinter; Nienhuis, James; Krysan, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and optimized the necessary laboratory materials to make DNA microarray technology accessible to all high school students at a fraction of both cost and data size. The primary component is a DNA chip/array that students "print" by hand and then analyze using research tools that have been adapted for classroom use. The primary…

  4. Data Analysis Strategies for Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Paula; Dasilva, Noelia; González-González, María; Matarraz, Sergio; Casado-Vela, Juan; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays constitute a new platform which allows the discovery and characterization of proteins. According to different features, such as content, surface or detection system, there are many types of protein microarrays which can be applied for the identification of disease biomarkers and the characterization of protein expression patterns. However, the analysis and interpretation of the amount of information generated by microarrays remain a challenge. Further data analysis strategies are essential to obtain representative and reproducible results. Therefore, the experimental design is key, since the number of samples and dyes, among others aspects, would define the appropriate analysis method to be used. In this sense, several algorithms have been proposed so far to overcome analytical difficulties derived from fluorescence overlapping and/or background noise. Each kind of microarray is developed to fulfill a specific purpose. Therefore, the selection of appropriate analytical and data analysis strategies is crucial to achieve successful biological conclusions. In the present review, we focus on current algorithms and main strategies for data interpretation. PMID:27605336

  5. DISC-BASED IMMUNOASSAY MICROARRAYS. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology as applied to areas that include genomics, diagnostics, environmental, and drug discovery, is an interesting research topic for which different chip-based devices have been developed. As an alternative, we have explored the principle of compact disc-based...

  6. MICROARRAY DATA ANALYSIS USING MULTIPLE STATISTICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray Data Analysis Using Multiple Statistical Models

    Wenjun Bao1, Judith E. Schmid1, Amber K. Goetz1, Ming Ouyang2, William J. Welsh2,Andrew I. Brooks3,4, ChiYi Chu3,Mitsunori Ogihara3,4, Yinhe Cheng5, David J. Dix1. 1National Health and Environmental Effects Researc...

  7. Raman-based microarray readout: a review.

    PubMed

    Haisch, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    For a quarter of a century, microarrays have been part of the routine analytical toolbox. Label-based fluorescence detection is still the commonest optical readout strategy. Since the 1990s, a continuously increasing number of label-based as well as label-free experiments on Raman-based microarray readout concepts have been reported. This review summarizes the possible concepts and methods and their advantages and challenges. A common label-based strategy is based on the binding of selective receptors as well as Raman reporter molecules to plasmonic nanoparticles in a sandwich immunoassay, which results in surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals of the reporter molecule. Alternatively, capture of the analytes can be performed by receptors on a microarray surface. Addition of plasmonic nanoparticles again leads to a surface-enhanced Raman scattering signal, not of a label but directly of the analyte. This approach is mostly proposed for bacteria and cell detection. However, although many promising readout strategies have been discussed in numerous publications, rarely have any of them made the step from proof of concept to a practical application, let alone routine use. Graphical Abstract Possible realization of a SERS (Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering) system for microarray readout. PMID:26973235

  8. PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR PROCESSING AND ANALYZING SPOTTED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thoughtful data analysis is as important as experimental design, biological sample quality, and appropriate experimental procedures for making microarrays a useful supplement to traditional toxicology. In the present study, spotted oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile...

  9. Identification of Antigenic Glycans from Schistosoma mansoni by Using a Shotgun Egg Glycan Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Mickum, Megan L.; Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Song, Xuezheng; Dorabawila, Nelum; Mandalasi, Msano; Lasanajak, Yi; Luyai, Anthony; Secor, W. Evan; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Van Die, Irma; Smith, David F.; Nyame, A. Kwame

    2016-01-01

    Infection of mammals by the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni induces antibodies to glycan antigens in worms and eggs, but the differential nature of the immune response among infected mammals is poorly understood. To better define these responses, we used a shotgun glycomics approach in which N-glycans from schistosome egg glycoproteins were prepared, derivatized, separated, and used to generate an egg shotgun glycan microarray. This array was interrogated with sera from infected mice, rhesus monkeys, and humans and with glycan-binding proteins and antibodies to gather information about the structures of antigenic glycans, which also were analyzed by mass spectrometry. A major glycan antigen targeted by IgG from different infected species is the FLDNF epitope [Fucα3GalNAcβ4(Fucα3)GlcNAc-R], which is also recognized by the IgG monoclonal antibody F2D2. The FLDNF antigen is expressed by all life stages of the parasite in mammalian hosts, and F2D2 can kill schistosomula in vitro in a complement-dependent manner. Different antisera also recognized other glycan determinants, including core β-xylose and highly fucosylated glycans. Thus, the natural shotgun glycan microarray of schistosome eggs is useful in identifying antigenic glycans and in developing new anti-glycan reagents that may have diagnostic applications and contribute to developing new vaccines against schistosomiasis. PMID:26883596

  10. A high-throughput, precipitating colorimetric sandwich ELISA microarray for Shiga toxins.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Andrew; He, Xiaohua; Fratamico, Pina; Lee, Joseph; Bagi, Lori; Brewster, Jeffrey; Paoli, George; He, Yiping; Xie, Yanping; Skinner, Craig; Barnett, Charlie; Harris, Douglas

    2014-06-11

    Shiga toxins 1 and 2 (Stx1 and Stx2) from Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) bacteria were simultaneously detected with a newly developed, high-throughput antibody microarray platform. The proteinaceous toxins were immobilized and sandwiched between biorecognition elements (monoclonal antibodies) and pooled horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated monoclonal antibodies. Following the reaction of HRP with the precipitating chromogenic substrate (metal enhanced 3,3-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride or DAB), the formation of a colored product was quantitatively measured with an inexpensive flatbed page scanner. The colorimetric ELISA microarray was demonstrated to detect Stx1 and Stx2 at levels as low as ~4.5 ng/mL within ~2 h of total assay time with a narrow linear dynamic range of ~1-2 orders of magnitude and saturation levels well above background. Stx1 and/or Stx2 produced by various strains of STEC were also detected following the treatment of cultured cells with mitomycin C (a toxin-inducing antibiotic) and/or B-PER (a cell-disrupting, protein extraction reagent). Semi-quantitative detection of Shiga toxins was demonstrated to be sporadic among various STEC strains following incubation with mitomycin C; however, further reaction with B-PER generally resulted in the detection of or increased detection of Stx1, relative to Stx2, produced by STECs inoculated into either axenic broth culture or culture broth containing ground beef.

  11. A High-Throughput, Precipitating Colorimetric Sandwich ELISA Microarray for Shiga Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Andrew; He, Xiaohua; Fratamico, Pina; Lee, Joseph; Bagi, Lori; Brewster, Jeffrey; Paoli, George; He, Yiping; Xie, Yanping; Skinner, Craig; Barnett, Charlie; Harris, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxins 1 and 2 (Stx1 and Stx2) from Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) bacteria were simultaneously detected with a newly developed, high-throughput antibody microarray platform. The proteinaceous toxins were immobilized and sandwiched between biorecognition elements (monoclonal antibodies) and pooled horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated monoclonal antibodies. Following the reaction of HRP with the precipitating chromogenic substrate (metal enhanced 3,3-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride or DAB), the formation of a colored product was quantitatively measured with an inexpensive flatbed page scanner. The colorimetric ELISA microarray was demonstrated to detect Stx1 and Stx2 at levels as low as ~4.5 ng/mL within ~2 h of total assay time with a narrow linear dynamic range of ~1–2 orders of magnitude and saturation levels well above background. Stx1 and/or Stx2 produced by various strains of STEC were also detected following the treatment of cultured cells with mitomycin C (a toxin-inducing antibiotic) and/or B-PER (a cell-disrupting, protein extraction reagent). Semi-quantitative detection of Shiga toxins was demonstrated to be sporadic among various STEC strains following incubation with mitomycin C; however, further reaction with B-PER generally resulted in the detection of or increased detection of Stx1, relative to Stx2, produced by STECs inoculated into either axenic broth culture or culture broth containing ground beef. PMID:24921195

  12. Examining microarray slide quality for the EPA using SNL's hyperspectral microarray scanner.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Rachel M.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes research performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assess microarray quality on arrays from two platforms of interest to the EPA. Custom microarrays from two novel, commercially produced array platforms were imaged with SNL's unique hyperspectral imaging technology and multivariate data analysis was performed to investigate sources of emission on the arrays. No extraneous sources of emission were evident in any of the array areas scanned. This led to the conclusions that either of these array platforms could produce high quality, reliable microarray data for the EPA toxicology programs. Hyperspectral imaging results are presented and recommendations for microarray analyses using these platforms are detailed within the report.

  13. A Chemiluminescent Protein Microarray Method for Determining the Seroglycoid Fucosylation Index.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aiying; Skog, Sven; Wang, Shengqi; Ke, Yang; Zhang, Yonghong; Li, Kang; He, Ellen; Li, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of AFP (AFP-L3) is widely used to screen for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Japan and China. We developed a chemiluminescent protein microarray for determining the AFP-L3/AFP index (the ratio of AFP-L3 to total AFP, AFP-L3%) by fixing AFP-specific antibodies and Lens culinaris lectin on aldehyde-coated glass slides. Serum samples were tested for AFP using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to validate the microarray. AFP-L3 was detected using Hotgen Biotech glycosyl capture spin column pretreatment technology and ELISA. When the AFP cut-off value was set to 20 ng/ml, the protein microarray displayed 89.74% sensitivity and 100% specificity for HCC diagnosis, and the ELISA displayed 87.17% sensitivity and 100% specificity. When the AFP-L3% cut-off value was set to 0.1, the protein microarray displayed 56.41% sensitivity and 100% specificity for HCC diagnosis, and the ELISA displayed 53.84% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The ROC curve for the HCC diagnosis showed that the AFP area under the ROC curve (AUC = 0.996; 95% CI: 0.986-1.005) was much higher than that of AFP-L3 (AUC = 0.857; 95% CI: 0.769-0.94) and AFP-L3% (AUC = 0.827; CI: 0.730-0.924). The microarray assay used in this study is a highly sensitive, accurate, and efficient assay for the determination of the AFP-L3%. PMID:27528397

  14. A Chemiluminescent Protein Microarray Method for Determining the Seroglycoid Fucosylation Index

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aiying; Skog, Sven; Wang, Shengqi; Ke, Yang; Zhang, Yonghong; Li, Kang; He, Ellen; Li, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of AFP (AFP-L3) is widely used to screen for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Japan and China. We developed a chemiluminescent protein microarray for determining the AFP-L3/AFP index (the ratio of AFP-L3 to total AFP, AFP-L3%) by fixing AFP-specific antibodies and Lens culinaris lectin on aldehyde-coated glass slides. Serum samples were tested for AFP using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to validate the microarray. AFP-L3 was detected using Hotgen Biotech glycosyl capture spin column pretreatment technology and ELISA. When the AFP cut-off value was set to 20 ng/ml, the protein microarray displayed 89.74% sensitivity and 100% specificity for HCC diagnosis, and the ELISA displayed 87.17% sensitivity and 100% specificity. When the AFP-L3% cut-off value was set to 0.1, the protein microarray displayed 56.41% sensitivity and 100% specificity for HCC diagnosis, and the ELISA displayed 53.84% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The ROC curve for the HCC diagnosis showed that the AFP area under the ROC curve (AUC = 0.996; 95% CI: 0.986–1.005) was much higher than that of AFP-L3 (AUC = 0.857; 95% CI: 0.769–0.94) and AFP-L3% (AUC = 0.827; CI: 0.730–0.924). The microarray assay used in this study is a highly sensitive, accurate, and efficient assay for the determination of the AFP-L3%. PMID:27528397

  15. Identifying Fishes through DNA Barcodes and Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kochzius, Marc; Seidel, Christian; Antoniou, Aglaia; Botla, Sandeep Kumar; Campo, Daniel; Cariani, Alessia; Vazquez, Eva Garcia; Hauschild, Janet; Hervet, Caroline; Hjörleifsdottir, Sigridur; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur; Kappel, Kristina; Landi, Monica; Magoulas, Antonios; Marteinsson, Viggo; Nölte, Manfred; Planes, Serge; Tinti, Fausto; Turan, Cemal; Venugopal, Moleyur N.; Weber, Hannes; Blohm, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Background International fish trade reached an import value of 62.8 billion Euro in 2006, of which 44.6% are covered by the European Union. Species identification is a key problem throughout the life cycle of fishes: from eggs and larvae to adults in fisheries research and control, as well as processed fish products in consumer protection. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aims to evaluate the applicability of the three mitochondrial genes 16S rRNA (16S), cytochrome b (cyt b), and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) for the identification of 50 European marine fish species by combining techniques of “DNA barcoding” and microarrays. In a DNA barcoding approach, neighbour Joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees of 369 16S, 212 cyt b, and 447 COI sequences indicated that cyt b and COI are suitable for unambiguous identification, whereas 16S failed to discriminate closely related flatfish and gurnard species. In course of probe design for DNA microarray development, each of the markers yielded a high number of potentially species-specific probes in silico, although many of them were rejected based on microarray hybridisation experiments. None of the markers provided probes to discriminate the sibling flatfish and gurnard species. However, since 16S-probes were less negatively influenced by the “position of label” effect and showed the lowest rejection rate and the highest mean signal intensity, 16S is more suitable for DNA microarray probe design than cty b and COI. The large portion of rejected COI-probes after hybridisation experiments (>90%) renders the DNA barcoding marker as rather unsuitable for this high-throughput technology. Conclusions/Significance Based on these data, a DNA microarray containing 64 functional oligonucleotide probes for the identification of 30 out of the 50 fish species investigated was developed. It represents the next step towards an automated and easy-to-handle method to identify fish, ichthyoplankton, and fish products. PMID

  16. Facilitating functional annotation of chicken microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Modeling results from chicken microarray studies is challenging for researchers due to little functional annotation associated with these arrays. The Affymetrix GenChip chicken genome array, one of the biggest arrays that serve as a key research tool for the study of chicken functional genomics, is among the few arrays that link gene products to Gene Ontology (GO). However the GO annotation data presented by Affymetrix is incomplete, for example, they do not show references linked to manually annotated functions. In addition, there is no tool that facilitates microarray researchers to directly retrieve functional annotations for their datasets from the annotated arrays. This costs researchers amount of time in searching multiple GO databases for functional information. Results We have improved the breadth of functional annotations of the gene products associated with probesets on the Affymetrix chicken genome array by 45% and the quality of annotation by 14%. We have also identified the most significant diseases and disorders, different types of genes, and known drug targets represented on Affymetrix chicken genome array. To facilitate functional annotation of other arrays and microarray experimental datasets we developed an Array GO Mapper (AGOM) tool to help researchers to quickly retrieve corresponding functional information for their dataset. Conclusion Results from this study will directly facilitate annotation of other chicken arrays and microarray experimental datasets. Researchers will be able to quickly model their microarray dataset into more reliable biological functional information by using AGOM tool. The disease, disorders, gene types and drug targets revealed in the study will allow researchers to learn more about how genes function in complex biological systems and may lead to new drug discovery and development of therapies. The GO annotation data generated will be available for public use via AgBase website and will be updated on regular

  17. Microarray analysis at single molecule resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mureşan, Leila; Jacak, Jarosław; Klement, Erich Peter; Hesse, Jan; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2010-01-01

    Bioanalytical chip-based assays have been enormously improved in sensitivity in the recent years; detection of trace amounts of substances down to the level of individual fluorescent molecules has become state of the art technology. The impact of such detection methods, however, has yet not fully been exploited, mainly due to a lack in appropriate mathematical tools for robust data analysis. One particular example relates to the analysis of microarray data. While classical microarray analysis works at resolutions of two to 20 micrometers and quantifies the abundance of target molecules by determining average pixel intensities, a novel high resolution approach [1] directly visualizes individual bound molecules as diffraction limited peaks. The now possible quantification via counting is less susceptible to labeling artifacts and background noise. We have developed an approach for the analysis of high-resolution microarray images. It consists first of a single molecule detection step, based on undecimated wavelet transforms, and second, of a spot identification step via spatial statistics approach (corresponding to the segmentation step in the classical microarray analysis). The detection method was tested on simulated images with a concentration range of 0.001 to 0.5 molecules per square micron and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between 0.9 and 31.6. For SNR above 15 the false negatives relative error was below 15%. Separation of foreground/background proved reliable, in case foreground density exceeds background by a factor of 2. The method has also been applied to real data from high-resolution microarray measurements. PMID:20123580

  18. Generation of Antigen Microarrays to Screen for Autoantibodies in Heart Failure and Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chruscinski, Andrzej; Huang, Flora Y. Y.; Nguyen, Albert; Lioe, Jocelyn; Tumiati, Laura C.; Kozuszko, Stella; Tinckam, Kathryn J.; Rao, Vivek; Dunn, Shannon E.; Persinger, Michael A.; Levy, Gary A.; Ross, Heather J.

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies directed against endogenous proteins including contractile proteins and endothelial antigens are frequently detected in patients with heart failure and after heart transplantation. There is evidence that these autoantibodies contribute to cardiac dysfunction and correlate with clinical outcomes. Currently, autoantibodies are detected in patient sera using individual ELISA assays (one for each antigen). Thus, screening for many individual autoantibodies is laborious and consumes a large amount of patient sample. To better capture the broad-scale antibody reactivities that occur in heart failure and post-transplant, we developed a custom antigen microarray technique that can simultaneously measure IgM and IgG reactivities against 64 unique antigens using just five microliters of patient serum. We first demonstrated that our antigen microarray technique displayed enhanced sensitivity to detect autoantibodies compared to the traditional ELISA method. We then piloted this technique using two sets of samples that were obtained at our institution. In the first retrospective study, we profiled pre-transplant sera from 24 heart failure patients who subsequently received heart transplants. We identified 8 antibody reactivities that were higher in patients who developed cellular rejection (2 or more episodes of grade 2R rejection in first year after transplant as defined by revised criteria from the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation) compared with those who did have not have rejection episodes. In a second retrospective study with 31 patients, we identified 7 IgM reactivities that were higher in heart transplant recipients who developed antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) compared with control recipients, and in time course studies, these reactivities appeared prior to overt graft dysfunction. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the autoantibody microarray technique outperforms traditional ELISAs as it uses less patient sample, has

  19. Time-Frequency Analysis of Peptide Microarray Data: Application to Brain Cancer Immunosignatures

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Brian; Maurer, Alexander; Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia; Stafford, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    One of the gravest dangers facing cancer patients is an extended symptom-free lull between tumor initiation and the first diagnosis. Detection of tumors is critical for effective intervention. Using the body’s immune system to detect and amplify tumor-specific signals may enable detection of cancer using an inexpensive immunoassay. Immunosignatures are one such assay: they provide a map of antibody interactions with random-sequence peptides. They enable detection of disease-specific patterns using classic train/test methods. However, to date, very little effort has gone into extracting information from the sequence of peptides that interact with disease-specific antibodies. Because it is difficult to represent all possible antigen peptides in a microarray format, we chose to synthesize only 330,000 peptides on a single immunosignature microarray. The 330,000 random-sequence peptides on the microarray represent 83% of all tetramers and 27% of all pentamers, creating an unbiased but substantial gap in the coverage of total sequence space. We therefore chose to examine many relatively short motifs from these random-sequence peptides. Time-variant analysis of recurrent subsequences provided a means to dissect amino acid sequences from the peptides while simultaneously retaining the antibody–peptide binding intensities. We first used a simple experiment in which monoclonal antibodies with known linear epitopes were exposed to these random-sequence peptides, and their binding intensities were used to create our algorithm. We then demonstrated the performance of the proposed algorithm by examining immunosignatures from patients with Glioblastoma multiformae (GBM), an aggressive form of brain cancer. Eight different frameshift targets were identified from the random-sequence peptides using this technique. If immune-reactive antigens can be identified using a relatively simple immune assay, it might enable a diagnostic test with sufficient sensitivity to detect tumors

  20. Lunar Lava Tube Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Cheryl Lynn; Walden, Bryce; Billings, Thomas L.; Reeder, P. Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Large (greater than 300 m diameter) lava tube caverns appear to exist on the Moon and could provide substantial safety and cost benefits for lunar bases. Over 40 m of basalt and regolith constitute the lava tube roof and would protect both construction and operations. Constant temperatures of -20 C reduce thermal stress on structures and machines. Base designs need not incorporate heavy shielding, so lightweight materials can be used and construction can be expedited. Identification and characterization of lava tube caverns can be incorporated into current precursor lunar mission plans. Some searches can even be done from Earth. Specific recommendations for lunar lava tube search and exploration are (1) an Earth-based radar interferometer, (2) an Earth-penetrating radar (EPR) orbiter, (3) kinetic penetrators for lunar lava tube confirmation, (4) a 'Moon Bat' hovering rocket vehicle, and (5) the use of other proposed landers and orbiters to help find lunar lava tubes.

  1. Ruggedized electronographic tube development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevin, S.

    1981-01-01

    Because of their glass components and lack of far ultraviolet sensitivity, currently available Spectracons are not suited for rocket launch. Technology developed for second generation image tubes and for magnetically focused image tubes can be applied to improve the optical and mechanical properties of these magnetically focused electronographic tubes whose 40 kilovolt signal electrons exit a 4-micrometer thick mica window and penetrate a photographic recording emulsion.

  2. Conduction cooled tube supports

    DOEpatents

    Worley, Arthur C.; Becht, IV, Charles

    1984-01-01

    In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

  3. TUBE SPLITTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Frantz, C.E.; Cawley, W.E.

    1961-05-01

    A tool is described for cutting a coolant tube adapted to contain fuel elements to enable the tube to be removed from a graphite moderator mass. The tool splits the tube longitudinally into halves and curls the longitudinal edges of the halves inwardly so that they occupy less space and can be moved radially inwardly away from the walls of the hole in the graphite for easy removal from the graphite.

  4. COAXIAL TUBE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Niemoth, H.R.

    1963-02-26

    BS>This patent shows a device for quickly coupling coaxial tubes in metal-to-metal fashion, so as to be suitable for use in a nuclear reactor. A threaded coliar urges a tapered metal extension on the outer coaxial tube into a tapered seat in the device and simultaneously exerts pressure through a coaxial helical spring so that a similar extension on the inner tube seats in a similar seat near the other end. (AEC)

  5. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  6. Flared tube attachment fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkire, I. D.; King, J. P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Tubes can be flared first, then attached to valves and other flow line components, with new fitting that can be disassembled and reused. Installed fitting can be disassembled so parts can be inspected. It can be salvaged and reused without damaging flared tube; tube can be coated, tempered, or otherwise treated after it has been flared, rather than before, as was previously required. Fitting consists of threaded male portion with conical seating surface, hexagonal nut with hole larger than other diameter of flared end of tube, and split ferrule.

  7. Composite Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jerry L.; Cloyd, Jason H.

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the design of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube cryocooler reduces axial thermal conductance while preserving radial thermal conductance. It is desirable to minimize axial thermal conductance in the pulse-tube wall to minimize leakage of heat between the warm and cold ends of the pulse tube. At the same time, it is desirable to maximize radial thermal conductance at the cold end of the pulse tube to ensure adequate thermal contact between (1) a heat exchanger in the form of a stack of copper screens inside the pulse tube at the cold end and (2) the remainder of the cold tip, which is the object to which the heat load is applied and from which heat must be removed. The modified design yields a low-heat-leak pulse tube that can be easily integrated with a cold tip. A typical pulse tube of prior design is either a thin-walled metal tube or a metal tube with a nonmetallic lining. It is desirable that the outer surface of a pulse tube be cylindrical (in contradistinction to tapered) to simplify the design of a regenerator that is also part of the cryocooler. Under some conditions, it is desirable to taper the inner surface of the pulse tube to reduce acoustic streaming. The combination of a cylindrical outer surface and a tapered inner surface can lead to unacceptably large axial conduction if the pulse tube is made entirely of metal. Making the pulse-tube wall of a nonmetallic, lowthermal- conductivity material would not solve the problem because the wall would not afford the needed thermal contact for the stack of screens in the cold end. The modified design calls for fabricating the pulse tube in two parts: a longer, nonmetallic part that is tapered on the inside and cylindrical on the outside and a shorter, metallic part that is cylindrical on both the inside and the outside. The nonmetallic part can be made from G-10 fiberglass-reinforced epoxy or other low-thermal-conductivity, cryogenically compatible material. The metallic part must have high

  8. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    DOEpatents

    Outwater, John O.

    2000-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  9. Strong and oriented immobilization of single domain antibodies from crude bacterial lysates for high-throughput compatible cost-effective antibody array generation

    PubMed Central

    Even-Desrumeaux, Klervi; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Antibodies microarrays are among the novel class of rapidly emerging proteomic technologies that will allow us to efficiently perform specific diagnosis and proteome analysis. Recombinant antibody fragments are especially suited for this approach but their stability is often a limiting factor. Camelids produce functional antibodies devoid of light chains (HCAbs) of which the single N-terminal domain is fully capable of antigen binding. When produced as an independent domain, these so-called single domain antibody fragments (sdAbs) have several advantages for biotechnological applications thanks to their unique properties of size (15 kDa), stability, solubility, and expression yield. These features should allow sdAbs to outperform other antibody formats in a number of applications, notably as capture molecule for antibody arrays. In this study, we have produced antibody microarrays using direct and oriented immobilization of sdAbs produced in crude bacterial lysates to generate proof-of-principle of a high-throughput compatible array design. Several sdAb immobilization strategies have been explored. Immobilization of in vivo biotinylated sdAbs by direct spotting of bacterial lysate on streptavidin and sandwich detection was developed to achieve high sensitivity and specificity, whereas immobilization of “multi-tagged” sdAbs via anti-tag antibodies and direct labeled sample detection strategy was optimized for the design of high-density antibody arrays for high-throughput proteomics and identification of potential biomarkers. PMID:20859568

  10. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  11. Antibody Phage Display Libraries: Contributions to Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Dantas-Barbosa, Carmela; de Macedo Brigido, Marcelo; Maranhao, Andrea Queiroz

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of phage display technology, dating back to 1985, antibody libraries displayed on filamentous phage surfaces have been used to identify specific binders for many different purposes, including the recognition of tumors. Phage display represents a high-throughput technique for screening billions of random fusion antibodies against virtually any target on the surface or inside cancer cells, or even soluble markers found in patient serum. Many phage display derived binders targeting important tumor markers have been identified. Selection directed to tumoral cells’ surfaces lead to the identification of unknown tumoral markers. Also the improvement of methods that require smaller amounts of cells has opened the possibility to use this approach on patient samples. Robust techniques combining an antibody library displayed on the phage surface and protein microarray allowed the identification of auto antibodies recognized by patient sera. Many Ab molecules directly or indirectly targeting angiogenesis have been identified, and one of them, ramucirumab, has been tested in 27 phase I–III clinical trials in a broad array of cancers. Examples of such antibodies will be discussed here with emphasis on those used as probes for molecular imaging and other clinical trials. PMID:22754305

  12. Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Ratta, Barkha; Kumar, Ajay; Saxena, Meeta; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips is gaining momentum in recent years. Hence, it is possible to design customized microarray chip for viruses infecting livestock in India. Customized microarray chips identified Bovine herpes virus-1 (BHV-1), Canine Adeno Virus-1 (CAV-1), and Canine Parvo Virus-2 (CPV-2) in clinical samples. Microarray identified specific probes were further confirmed using RT-PCR in all clinical and known samples. Therefore, the application of microarray chips during viral disease outbreaks in Indian livestock is possible where conventional methods are unsuitable. It should be noted that customized application requires a detailed cost efficiency calculation.

  13. Advancing translational research with next-generation protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; Petritis, Brianne; LaBaer, Joshua

    2016-04-01

    Protein microarrays are a high-throughput technology used increasingly in translational research, seeking to apply basic science findings to enhance human health. In addition to assessing protein levels, posttranslational modifications, and signaling pathways in patient samples, protein microarrays have aided in the identification of potential protein biomarkers of disease and infection. In this perspective, the different types of full-length protein microarrays that are used in translational research are reviewed. Specific studies employing these microarrays are presented to highlight their potential in finding solutions to real clinical problems. Finally, the criteria that should be considered when developing next-generation protein microarrays are provided. PMID:26749402

  14. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  15. PMD: A Resource for Archiving and Analyzing Protein Microarray data.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaowei; Huang, Likun; Zhang, Hainan; Li, Yang; Guo, Shujuan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Shi-Hua; Chen, Ziqing; Wang, Jingfang; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2016-01-27

    Protein microarray is a powerful technology for both basic research and clinical study. However, because there is no database specifically tailored for protein microarray, the majority of the valuable original protein microarray data is still not publically accessible. To address this issue, we constructed Protein Microarray Database (PMD), which is specifically designed for archiving and analyzing protein microarray data. In PMD, users can easily browse and search the entire database by experimental name, protein microarray type, and sample information. Additionally, PMD integrates several data analysis tools and provides an automated data analysis pipeline for users. With just one click, users can obtain a comprehensive analysis report for their protein microarray data. The report includes preliminary data analysis, such as data normalization, candidate identification, and an in-depth bioinformatics analysis of the candidates, which include functional annotation, pathway analysis, and protein-protein interaction network analysis. PMD is now freely available at www.proteinmicroarray.cn.

  16. PMD: A Resource for Archiving and Analyzing Protein Microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhaowei; Huang, Likun; Zhang, Hainan; Li, Yang; Guo, Shujuan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Shi-hua; Chen, Ziqing; Wang, Jingfang; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2016-01-01

    Protein microarray is a powerful technology for both basic research and clinical study. However, because there is no database specifically tailored for protein microarray, the majority of the valuable original protein microarray data is still not publically accessible. To address this issue, we constructed Protein Microarray Database (PMD), which is specifically designed for archiving and analyzing protein microarray data. In PMD, users can easily browse and search the entire database by experimental name, protein microarray type, and sample information. Additionally, PMD integrates several data analysis tools and provides an automated data analysis pipeline for users. With just one click, users can obtain a comprehensive analysis report for their protein microarray data. The report includes preliminary data analysis, such as data normalization, candidate identification, and an in-depth bioinformatics analysis of the candidates, which include functional annotation, pathway analysis, and protein-protein interaction network analysis. PMD is now freely available at www.proteinmicroarray.cn. PMID:26813635

  17. Statistical Considerations for Analysis of Microarray Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Owzar, Kouros; Barry, William T.; Jung, Sin-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Microarray technologies enable the simultaneous interrogation of expressions from thousands of genes from a biospecimen sample taken from a patient. This large set of expressions generate a genetic profile of the patient that may be used to identify potential prognostic or predictive genes or genetic models for clinical outcomes. The aim of this article is to provide a broad overview of some of the major statistical considerations for the design and analysis of microarrays experiments conducted as correlative science studies to clinical trials. An emphasis will be placed on how the lack of understanding and improper use of statistical concepts and methods will lead to noise discovery and misinterpretation of experimental results. PMID:22212230

  18. Microarrays: how many do you need?

    PubMed

    Zien, Alexander; Fluck, Juliane; Zimmer, Ralf; Lengauer, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    We estimate the number of microarrays that is required in order to gain reliable results from a common type of study: the pairwise comparison of different classes of samples. We show that current knowledge allows for the construction of models that look realistic with respect to searches for individual differentially expressed genes and derive prototypical parameters from real data sets. Such models allow investigation of the dependence of the required number of samples on the relevant parameters: the biological variability of the samples within each class, the fold changes in expression that are desired to be detected, the detection sensitivity of the microarrays, and the acceptable error rates of the results. We supply experimentalists with general conclusions as well as a freely accessible Java applet at www.scai.fhg.de/special/bio/howmanyarrays/ for fine tuning simulations to their particular settings. PMID:12935350

  19. A Flexible Microarray Data Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Dembélé, Doulaye

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology allows monitoring of gene expression profiling at the genome level. This is useful in order to search for genes involved in a disease. The performances of the methods used to select interesting genes are most often judged after other analyzes (qPCR validation, search in databases...), which are also subject to error. A good evaluation of gene selection methods is possible with data whose characteristics are known, that is to say, synthetic data. We propose a model to simulate microarray data with similar characteristics to the data commonly produced by current platforms. The parameters used in this model are described to allow the user to generate data with varying characteristics. In order to show the flexibility of the proposed model, a commented example is given and illustrated. An R package is available for immediate use.

  20. Profiling protein function with small molecule microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Winssinger, Nicolas; Ficarro, Scott; Schultz, Peter G.; Harris, Jennifer L.

    2002-01-01

    The regulation of protein function through posttranslational modification, local environment, and protein–protein interaction is critical to cellular function. The ability to analyze on a genome-wide scale protein functional activity rather than changes in protein abundance or structure would provide important new insights into complex biological processes. Herein, we report the application of a spatially addressable small molecule microarray to an activity-based profile of proteases in crude cell lysates. The potential of this small molecule-based profiling technology is demonstrated by the detection of caspase activation upon induction of apoptosis, characterization of the activated caspase, and inhibition of the caspase-executed apoptotic phenotype using the small molecule inhibitor identified in the microarray-based profile. PMID:12167675

  1. Application of DNA Microarray to Clinical Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W

    2016-01-01

    Microarray-based technology to conduct array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has made a significant impact on the diagnosis of human genetic diseases. Such diagnoses, previously undetectable by traditional G-banding chromosome analysis, are now achieved by identifying genomic copy number variants (CNVs) using the microarray. Not only can hundreds of well-characterized genetic syndromes be detected in a single assay, but new genomic disorders and disease-causing genes can also be discovered through the utilization of aCGH technology. Although other platforms such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays can be used for detecting CNVs, in this chapter we focus on describing the methods for performing aCGH using Agilent oligonucleotide arrays for both prenatal (e.g., amniotic fluid and chorionic villus sample) and postnatal samples (e.g., blood).

  2. Screening and characterization of plant cell walls using carbohydrate microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Willats, William G T

    2011-01-01

    Plant cells are surrounded by cell walls built largely from complex carbohydrates. The primary walls of growing plant cells consist of interdependent networks of three polysaccharide classes: cellulose, cross-linking glycans (also known as hemicelluloses), and pectins. Cellulose microfibrils are tethered together by cross-linking glycans, and this assembly forms the major load-bearing component of primary walls, which is infiltrated with pectic polymers. In the secondary walls of woody tissues, pectins are much reduced and walls are reinforced with the phenolic polymer lignin. Plant cell walls are essential for plant life and also have numerous industrial applications, ranging from wood to nutraceuticals. Enhancing our knowledge of cell wall biology and the effective use of cell wall materials is dependent to a large extent on being able to analyse their fine structures. We have developed a suite of techniques based on microarrays probed with monoclonal antibodies with specificity for cell wall components, and here we present practical protocols for this type of analysis.

  3. Protein microarrays imaging using oblique-incidence reflectivity difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Heng; Zhang, Hongyan; Li, Wei; Zhou, Yueliang; Lu, Huibin; Jin, Kuijuan; Yang, Guozhen; Ruan, Kangcheng

    2007-11-01

    In this study Oblique-Incidence Reflectivity Difference (OIRD) technique, a recent developed label-free detection, is applied to image biomolecular microarrays. Compared to the currently widely used fluorescence-dependent optical microscopy, OIRD technique not only images the morphology of protein bio-arrays in the absence of extrinsic labeling molecules but also monitors the changes in the optical properties of biochips in high-throughput fashion. Additionally, such a technique complements other label-free detections including Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and Mass Spectrometry (MS) by offering the opportunity to detect biochemical activities without the special requirements on the substrate or the specific matrix medium. It is shown in this article that the surface topography can be reflected by OIRD method. Besides, the differences among printing concentrations and various proteins are able to be identified as well. Incidentally, the OIRD images appear to be useful aids to distinguish the variations resulting from antibody-antigen capture. Both the imaginary and real parts of OIRD images we presented provide more information than the single imaginary one especially. On the basis of the scattering mechanism, the absorptive properties of protein molecules are analyzed through the real part of OIRD signal. Accordingly, OIRD technique shows its unique potential in detection of biochemical processes.

  4. Weighted analysis of general microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sjögren, Anders; Kristiansson, Erik; Rudemo, Mats; Nerman, Olle

    2007-01-01

    Background In DNA microarray experiments, measurements from different biological samples are often assumed to be independent and to have identical variance. For many datasets these assumptions have been shown to be invalid and typically lead to too optimistic p-values. A method called WAME has been proposed where a variance is estimated for each sample and a covariance is estimated for each pair of samples. The current version of WAME is, however, limited to experiments with paired design, e.g. two-channel microarrays. Results The WAME procedure is extended to general microarray experiments, making it capable of handling both one- and two-channel datasets. Two public one-channel datasets are analysed and WAME detects both unequal variances and correlations. WAME is compared to other common methods: fold-change ranking, ordinary linear model with t-tests, LIMMA and weighted LIMMA. The p-value distributions are shown to differ greatly between the examined methods. In a resampling-based simulation study, the p-values generated by WAME are found to be substantially more correct than the alternatives when a relatively small proportion of the genes is regulated. WAME is also shown to have higher power than the other methods. WAME is available as an R-package. Conclusion The WAME procedure is generalized and the limitation to paired-design microarray datasets is removed. The examined other methods produce invalid p-values in many cases, while WAME is shown to produce essentially valid p-values when a relatively small proportion of genes is regulated. WAME is also shown to have higher power than the examined alternative methods. PMID:17937807

  5. Undetected sex chromosome aneuploidy by chromosomal microarray.

    PubMed

    Markus-Bustani, Keren; Yaron, Yuval; Goldstein, Myriam; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay

    2012-11-01

    We report on a case of a female fetus found to be mosaic for Turner syndrome (45,X) and trisomy X (47,XXX). Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) failed to detect the aneuploidy because of a normal average dosage of the X chromosome. This case represents an unusual instance in which CMA may not detect chromosomal aberrations. Such a possibility should be taken into consideration in similar cases where CMA is used in a clinical setting.

  6. Method for shaping polyethylene tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Method forms polyethylene plastic tubing into configurations previously only possible with metal tubing. By using polyethylene in place of copper or stain less steel tubing inlow pressure systems, fabrication costs are significantly reduced. Polyethylene tubing can be used whenever low pressure tubing is needed in oil operations, aircraft and space applications, powerplants, and testing laboratories.

  7. Gastrostomy feeding tube - pump - child

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - gastrostomy tube - pump; G-tube - pump; Gastrostomy button - pump; Bard Button - pump; MIC-KEY - pump ... Your child has a gastrostomy tube (G-tube). This is a soft, plastic tube placed into your child's stomach. It delivers nutrition (food) and medicines until your ...

  8. Hologram recording tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajchman, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    Optical memories allow extremely large numbers of bits to be stored and recalled in a matter of microseconds. Two recording tubes, similar to conventional image-converting tubes, but having a soft-glass surface on which hologram is recorded, do not degrade under repeated hologram read/write cycles.

  9. Microarray analysis in gastric cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Giovanna; Di Rienzo, Teresa; Ojetti, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors worldwide. Although several treatment options have been developed, the mortality rate is increasing. Lymph node involvement is considered the most reliable prognostic indicator in gastric cancer. Early diagnosis improves the survival rate of patients and increases the likelihood of successful treatment. The most reliable diagnostic method is endoscopic examination, however, it is expensive and not feasible in poorer countries. Therefore, many innovative techniques have been studied to develop a new non-invasive screening test and to identify specific serum biomarkers. DNA microarray analysis is one of the new technologies able to measure the expression levels of a large number of genes simultaneously. It is possible to define the gene expression profile of the tumor and to correlate it with the prognosis and metastasis formation. Several studies in the literature have been published on the role of microarray analysis in gastric cancer and the mechanisms of proliferation and metastasis formation. The aim of this review is to analyze the importance of microarray analysis and its clinical applications to better define the genetic characteristics of gastric cancer and its possible implications in a more decisive treatment. PMID:25232233

  10. Repeatability of published microarray gene expression analyses.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, John P A; Allison, David B; Ball, Catherine A; Coulibaly, Issa; Cui, Xiangqin; Culhane, Aedín C; Falchi, Mario; Furlanello, Cesare; Game, Laurence; Jurman, Giuseppe; Mangion, Jon; Mehta, Tapan; Nitzberg, Michael; Page, Grier P; Petretto, Enrico; van Noort, Vera

    2009-02-01

    Given the complexity of microarray-based gene expression studies, guidelines encourage transparent design and public data availability. Several journals require public data deposition and several public databases exist. However, not all data are publicly available, and even when available, it is unknown whether the published results are reproducible by independent scientists. Here we evaluated the replication of data analyses in 18 articles on microarray-based gene expression profiling published in Nature Genetics in 2005-2006. One table or figure from each article was independently evaluated by two teams of analysts. We reproduced two analyses in principle and six partially or with some discrepancies; ten could not be reproduced. The main reason for failure to reproduce was data unavailability, and discrepancies were mostly due to incomplete data annotation or specification of data processing and analysis. Repeatability of published microarray studies is apparently limited. More strict publication rules enforcing public data availability and explicit description of data processing and analysis should be considered.

  11. An imputation approach for oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Lu, Qing; Fu, Wenjiang J

    2013-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are commonly adopted for detecting and qualifying the abundance of molecules in biological samples. Analysis of microarray data starts with recording and interpreting hybridization signals from CEL images. However, many CEL images may be blemished by noises from various sources, observed as "bright spots", "dark clouds", and "shadowy circles", etc. It is crucial that these image defects are correctly identified and properly processed. Existing approaches mainly focus on detecting defect areas and removing affected intensities. In this article, we propose to use a mixed effect model for imputing the affected intensities. The proposed imputation procedure is a single-array-based approach which does not require any biological replicate or between-array normalization. We further examine its performance by using Affymetrix high-density SNP arrays. The results show that this imputation procedure significantly reduces genotyping error rates. We also discuss the necessary adjustments for its potential extension to other oligonucleotide microarrays, such as gene expression profiling. The R source code for the implementation of approach is freely available upon request.

  12. High-Throughput Enzyme Kinetics Using Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-11-01

    We report a microanalytical method to study enzyme kinetics. The technique involves immobilizing horseradish peroxidase on a poly-L-lysine (PLL)- coated glass slide in a microarray format, followed by applying substrate solution onto the enzyme microarray. Enzyme molecules are immobilized on the PLL-coated glass slide through electrostatic interactions, and no further modification of the enzyme or glass slide is needed. In situ detection of the products generated on the enzyme spots is made possible by monitoring the light intensity of each spot using a scientific-grade charged-coupled device (CCD). Reactions of substrate solutions of various types and concentrations can be carried out sequentially on one enzyme microarray. To account for the loss of enzyme from washing in between runs, a standard substrate solution is used for calibration. Substantially reduced amounts of substrate solution are consumed for each reaction on each enzyme spot. The Michaelis constant K{sub m} obtained by using this method is comparable to the result for homogeneous solutions. Absorbance detection allows universal monitoring, and no chemical modification of the substrate is needed. High-throughput studies of native enzyme kinetics for multiple enzymes are therefore possible in a simple, rapid, and low-cost manner.

  13. Integrating data from heterogeneous DNA microarray platforms.

    PubMed

    Valente, Eduardo; Rocha, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays are one of the most used technologies for gene expression measurement. However, there are several distinct microarray platforms, from different manufacturers, each with its own measurement protocol, resulting in data that can hardly be compared or directly integrated. Data integration from multiple sources aims to improve the assertiveness of statistical tests, reducing the data dimensionality problem. The integration of heterogeneous DNA microarray platforms comprehends a set of tasks that range from the re-annotation of the features used on gene expression, to data normalization and batch effect elimination. In this work, a complete methodology for gene expression data integration and application is proposed, which comprehends a transcript-based re-annotation process and several methods for batch effect attenuation. The integrated data will be used to select the best feature set and learning algorithm for a brain tumor classification case study. The integration will consider data from heterogeneous Agilent and Affymetrix platforms, collected from public gene expression databases, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas and Gene Expression Omnibus. PMID:26673932

  14. Development and Applications of the Lectin Microarray.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Kuno, Atsushi; Tateno, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The lectin microarray is an emerging technology for glycomics. It has already found maximum use in diverse fields of glycobiology by providing simple procedures for differential glycan profiling in a rapid and high-throughput manner. Since its first appearance in the literature in 2005, many application methods have been developed essentially on the same platform, comprising a series of glycan-binding proteins immobilized on an appropriate substrate such as a glass slide. Because the lectin microarray strategy does not require prior liberation of glycans from the core protein in glycoprotein analysis, it should encourage researchers not familiar with glycotechnology to use glycan analysis in future work. This feasibility should provide a broader range of experimental scientists with good opportunities to investigate novel aspects of glycoscience. Applications of the technology include not only basic sciences but also the growing fields of bio-industry. This chapter describes first the essence of glycan profiling and the basic fabrication of the lectin microarray for this purpose. In the latter part the focus is on diverse applications to both structural and functional glycomics, with emphasis on the wide applicability now available with this new technology. Finally, the importance of developing advanced lectin engineering is discussed.

  15. Metadata management and semantics in microarray repositories.

    PubMed

    Kocabaş, F; Can, T; Baykal, N

    2011-12-01

    The number of microarray and other high-throughput experiments on primary repositories keeps increasing as do the size and complexity of the results in response to biomedical investigations. Initiatives have been started on standardization of content, object model, exchange format and ontology. However, there are backlogs and inability to exchange data between microarray repositories, which indicate that there is a great need for a standard format and data management. We have introduced a metadata framework that includes a metadata card and semantic nets that make experimental results visible, understandable and usable. These are encoded in syntax encoding schemes and represented in RDF (Resource Description Frame-word), can be integrated with other metadata cards and semantic nets, and can be exchanged, shared and queried. We demonstrated the performance and potential benefits through a case study on a selected microarray repository. We concluded that the backlogs can be reduced and that exchange of information and asking of knowledge discovery questions can become possible with the use of this metadata framework. PMID:24052712

  16. Chicken sperm transcriptome profiling by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Shafeeque, C M; Sharma, S K; Singh, R; Mohan, J; Sastry, K V H; Saxena, V K; Azeez, P A

    2016-03-01

    It has been confirmed that mammalian sperm contain thousands of functional RNAs, and some of them have vital roles in fertilization and early embryonic development. Therefore, we attempted to characterize transcriptome of the sperm of fertile chickens using microarray analysis. Spermatozoal RNA was pooled from 10 fertile males and used for RNA preparation. Prior to performing the microarray, RNA quality was assessed using a bioanalyzer, and gDNA and somatic cell RNA contamination was assessed by CD4 and PTPRC gene amplification. The chicken sperm transcriptome was cross-examined by analysing sperm and testes RNA on a 4 × 44K chicken array, and results were verified by RT-PCR. Microarray analysis identified 21,639 predominantly nuclear-encoded transcripts in chicken sperm. The majority (66.55%) of the sperm transcripts were shared with the testes, while surprisingly, 33.45% transcripts were detected (raw signal intensity greater than 50) only in the sperm and not in the testes. The greatest proportion of up-regulated transcripts were responsible for signal transduction (63.20%) followed by embryonic development (56.76%) and cell structure (56.25%). Of the 20 most abundant transcripts, 18 remain uncharacterized, whereas the least abundant genes were mostly associated with the ribosome. These findings lay a foundation for more detailed investigations on sperm RNAs in chickens to identify sperm-based biomarkers for fertility.

  17. [Genomic medicine. Polymorphisms and microarray applications].

    PubMed

    Spalvieri, Mónica P; Rotenberg, Rosa G

    2004-01-01

    This update shows new concepts related to the significance of DNA variations among individuals, as well as to their detection by using a new technology. The sequencing of the human genome is only the beginning of what will enable us to understand genetic diversity. The unit of DNA variability is the polymorphism of a single nucleotide (SNP). At present, studies on SNPs are restricted to basic research but the large number of papers on this subject makes feasible their entrance into clinical practice. We illustrate here the use of SNPs as molecular markers in ethnical genotyping, gene expression in some diseases and as potential targets in pharmacological response, and also introduce the technology of arrays. Microarrays experiments allow the quantification and comparison of gene expression on a large scale, at the same time, by using special chips and array designs. Conventional methods provide data from up to 20 genes, while a single microarray may provide information about thousands of them simultaneously, leading to a more rapid and accurate genotyping. Biotechnology improvements will facilitate our knowledge of each gene sequence, the frequency and exact location of SNPs and their influence on cellular behavior. Although experimental efficiency and validity of results from microarrays are still controversial, the knowledge and characterization of a patient's genetic profile will lead, undoubtedly, to advances in prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of human diseases. PMID:15637833

  18. Multiplex pathogen detection based on spatially addressable microarrays of barcoded resins.

    PubMed

    Blais, David R; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A; Bravo-Vasquez, Juan P; Fenniri, Hicham; Pezacki, John Paul

    2008-07-01

    Suspension microsphere immunoassays are rapidly gaining recognition in antigen identification and infectious disease biodetection due to their simplicity, versatility and high-throughput multiplex screening. We demonstrate a multiplex assay based on antibody-functionalized barcoded resins (BCRs) to identify pathogen antigens in complex biological fluids. The binding event of a particular antibody on given bead (fluorescence) and the identification of the specific pathogen agent (vibrational fingerprint of the bead) can be achieved in a dispersive Raman system by exciting the sample with two different laser lines. Anthrax protective antigen, Franciscella tularensis lipopolysaccharide and CD14 antigens were accurately identified and quantified in tetraplex assays with a detection limit of 1 ng/mL. The rapid, versatile and simple analysis enabled by the BCRs demonstrates their potential for multiplex antigen detection and identification in a reconfigurable microarray format. PMID:18566958

  19. Fallopian Tube Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Thurmond, Amy Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Fallopian tube catheterization is used for treatment of infertility caused by proximal tubal occlusion, and has replaced surgical treatment for this condition. More recently, fallopian tube catheterization has been used for tubal sterilization. Interventional radiologists tested numerous methods for tubal occlusion using the rabbit as an animal model. As a result, a tubal device has recently been Food and Drug Administration approved for permanent sterilization using hysteroscopic guidance; it can also be placed fluoroscopically by fallopian tube catheterization as an “off-label” procedure. This is a 5-year continuation and update on a procedure that has been done by interventional radiologists for 25 years; history of the development of fallopian tube catheterization in women has been published in detail in this journal. Highlighted in this article will be description of the basic components needed for fallopian tube catheterization. PMID:24436565

  20. Poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) Brushes as Peptide/Protein Microarray Substrate for Improving Protein Binding and Functionality.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhen; Gao, Jiaxue; Liu, Xia; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-04-27

    We developed a three-dimensional (3D) polymer-brush substrate for protein and peptide microarray fabrication, and this substrate was facilely prepared by copolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) monomers via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) on a glass slide. The performance of obtained poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (P(GMA-HEMA)) brush substrate was assessed by binding of human IgG with rabbit antihuman IgG antibodies on a protein microarray and by the determination of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities on a peptide microarray. The P(GMA-HEMA) brush substrate exhibited higher immobilization capacities for proteins and peptides than those of a two-dimensional (2D) planar epoxy slide. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the P(GMA-HEMA) brush-based microarray on rabbit antihuman IgG antibody detection was much higher than that of its 2D counterpart. The enzyme activities of MMPs were determined specifically with a low detection limit of 6.0 pg mL(-1) for MMP-2 and 5.7 pg mL(-1) for MMP-9. By taking advantage of the biocompatibility of PHEMA, the P(GMA-HEMA) brush-based peptide microarray was also employed to evaluate the secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by cells cultured off the chip or directly on the chip, and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:27049528

  1. Poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) Brushes as Peptide/Protein Microarray Substrate for Improving Protein Binding and Functionality.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhen; Gao, Jiaxue; Liu, Xia; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-04-27

    We developed a three-dimensional (3D) polymer-brush substrate for protein and peptide microarray fabrication, and this substrate was facilely prepared by copolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) monomers via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) on a glass slide. The performance of obtained poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (P(GMA-HEMA)) brush substrate was assessed by binding of human IgG with rabbit antihuman IgG antibodies on a protein microarray and by the determination of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities on a peptide microarray. The P(GMA-HEMA) brush substrate exhibited higher immobilization capacities for proteins and peptides than those of a two-dimensional (2D) planar epoxy slide. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the P(GMA-HEMA) brush-based microarray on rabbit antihuman IgG antibody detection was much higher than that of its 2D counterpart. The enzyme activities of MMPs were determined specifically with a low detection limit of 6.0 pg mL(-1) for MMP-2 and 5.7 pg mL(-1) for MMP-9. By taking advantage of the biocompatibility of PHEMA, the P(GMA-HEMA) brush-based peptide microarray was also employed to evaluate the secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by cells cultured off the chip or directly on the chip, and satisfactory results were obtained.

  2. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  3. Development and Validation of Sandwich ELISA Microarrays with Minimal Assay Interference

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Rachel M.; Servoss, Shannon; Crowley, Sheila A.; Brown, Marty; Omenn, Gilbert; Hayes, Daniel; Zangar, Richard C.

    2008-06-01

    Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays are emerging as a strong candidate platform for multiplex biomarker analysis because of the ELISA’s ability to quantitatively measure rare proteins in complex biological fluids. Advantages of this platform are high-throughput potential, assay sensitivity and stringency, and the similarity to the standard ELISA test, which facilitates assay transfer from a research setting to a clinical laboratory. However, a major concern with the multiplexing of ELISAs is maintaining high assay specificity. In this study, we systematically determine the amount of assay interference and noise contributed by individual components of the multiplexed 24-assay system. We find that non-specific reagent cross-reactivity problems are relatively rare. We did identify the presence of contaminant antigens in a “purified antigen”. We tested the validated ELISA microarray chip using paired serum samples that had been collected from four women at a 6-month interval. This analysis demonstrated that protein levels typically vary much more between individuals then within an individual over time, a result which suggests that longitudinal studies may be useful in controlling for biomarker variability across a population. Overall, this research demonstrates the importance of a stringent screening protocol and the value of optimizing the antibody and antigen concentrations when designing chips for ELISA microarrays.

  4. Tape transfer sectioning of tissue microarrays introduces nonspecific immunohistochemical staining artifacts.

    PubMed

    Catchpoole, D; Mackie, N; McIver, S; Chetcuti, A; Henwood, A; Graf, N; Arbuckle, S

    2011-12-01

    Tissue microarrays place tens to hundreds of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue cores into a paraffin block in a systematic grid pattern that permits their simultaneous evaluation in a single section. The fragmented nature of the tissue cores often makes sectioning of tissue microarrays difficult so that the resulting disks of tissue lose their shape, fracture or fall out of the paraffin section altogether. We have evaluated an alternative sectioning protocol for stabilizing the tissue microarray surface by placing an adhesive tape "window" over the face of the paraffin block prior to sectioning. Once sectioned, the tape/sections are transferred directly onto coated microscope slides, thereby avoiding routine floating of sections on a water bath. After sectioning with either the tape transfer or standard protocols, slides were stained either using hematoxylin and eosin or immunohistochemistry using antibodies to S-100 protein and the tissue specific antigens, keratin (AE1/3) and the leukocyte common antigen CD45. We found that the tape method produced thicker sections that were darker and more densely packed with loss of tissue definition compared to sections prepared using water bath flotation. Quantitative image analysis of immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that the tape method produced a higher incidence of nonspecific staining, which raised the potential for false positive staining.

  5. Differentially expressed genes identified by cross-species microarray in the blind cavefish Astyanax.

    PubMed

    Strickler, Allen G; Jeffery, William R

    2009-03-01

    Changes in gene expression were examined by microarray analysis during development of the eyed surface dwelling (surface fish) and blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms of the teleost Astyanax mexicanus De Filippi, 1853. The cross-species microarray used surface and cavefish RNA hybridized to a DNA chip prepared from a closely related species, the zebrafish Danio rerio Hamilton, 1822. We identified a total of 67 differentially expressed probe sets at three days post-fertilization: six upregulated and 61 downregulated in cavefish relative to surface fish. Many of these genes function either in eye development and/or maintenance, or in programmed cell death. The upregulated probe set showing the highest mean fold change was similar to the human ubiquitin specific protease 53 gene. The downregulated probe sets showing some of the highest fold changes corresponded to genes with roles in eye development, including those encoding gamma crystallins, the guanine nucleotide binding proteins Gnat1 and Gant2, a BarH-like homeodomain transcription factor, and rhodopsin. Downregulation of gamma-crystallin and rhodopsin was confirmed by in situ hybridization and immunostaining with specific antibodies. Additional downregulated genes encode molecules that inhibit or activate programmed cell death. The results suggest that cross-species microarray can be used for identifying differentially expressed genes in cavefish, that many of these genes might be involved in eye degeneration via apoptotic processes, and that more genes are downregulated than upregulated in cavefish, consistent with the predominance of morphological losses over gains during regressive evolution.

  6. Determination of B-Cell Epitopes in Patients with Celiac Disease: Peptide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Choung, Rok Seon; Marietta, Eric V.; Van Dyke, Carol T.; Brantner, Tricia L.; Rajasekaran, John; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Wang, Tianhao; Bei, Kang; Krishna, Karthik; Krishnamurthy, Hari K.; Snyder, Melissa R.; Jayaraman, Vasanth; Murray, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Most antibodies recognize conformational or discontinuous epitopes that have a specific 3-dimensional shape; however, determination of discontinuous B-cell epitopes is a major challenge in bioscience. Moreover, the current methods for identifying peptide epitopes often involve laborious, high-cost peptide screening programs. Here, we present a novel microarray method for identifying discontinuous B-cell epitopes in celiac disease (CD) by using a silicon-based peptide array and computational methods. Methods Using a novel silicon-based microarray platform with a multi-pillar chip, overlapping 12-mer peptide sequences of all native and deamidated gliadins, which are known to trigger CD, were synthesized in situ and used to identify peptide epitopes. Results Using a computational algorithm that considered disease specificity of peptide sequences, 2 distinct epitope sets were identified. Further, by combining the most discriminative 3-mer gliadin sequences with randomly interpolated3- or 6-mer peptide sequences, novel discontinuous epitopes were identified and further optimized to maximize disease discrimination. The final discontinuous epitope sets were tested in a confirmatory cohort of CD patients and controls, yielding 99% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Conclusions These novel sets of epitopes derived from gliadin have a high degree of accuracy in differentiating CD from controls, compared with standard serologic tests. The method of ultra-high-density peptide microarray described here would be broadly useful to develop high-fidelity diagnostic tests and explore pathogenesis. PMID:26824466

  7. DNA Microarray for Detection of Gastrointestinal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Miguel A.; Soto-del Río, María de los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 103 virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  8. DNA microarray for detection of gastrointestinal viruses.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Miguel A; Soto-Del Río, María de Los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y; Greninger, Alexander L; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F; Isa, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 10(3) virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  9. A universal multiplex PCR strategy for 100-plex amplification using a hydrophobically patterned microarray.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Guo, Shu-Juan; Shao, Ning; Tu, Shun; Xu, Miao; Ren, Zhao-Rui; Ling, Xing; Wang, Guo-Qing; Lin, Zhi-Xin; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2011-11-01

    Both basic research and clinical medicine have urgent demands for highly efficient strategies to simultaneously identify many different DNA sequences within a single tube. Effective and simultaneous amplification of multiple target sequences is a prerequisite for any successful multiple nucleic acid detection method. Multiplex PCR is one of the best choices for this purpose. However, due to the intrinsic interference and competition among primer pairs in the same tube, multiple rounds of highly empirical optimization procedures are usually required to establish a successful multiplex PCR reaction. To address this challenge, we report here a universal multiplex PCR strategy that is capable of over 100-plex amplification using a specially designed microarray in which hydrophilic microwells are patterned on a hydrophobic chip. On such an array, primer pairs tagged with a universal sequence are physically separated in individual hydrophilic microwells on an otherwise hydrophobic chip, enabling many unique PCR reactions to be proceeded simultaneously during the first step of the procedure. The PCR products are then isolated and further amplified from the universal sequences, producing a sufficient amount of material for analysis by conventional gel electrophoresis or DNA microarray technology. This strategy is abbreviated as "MPH&HPM" for "Multiplex PCR on a Hydrophobically and Hydrophilically Patterned Microarray". The feasibility of this method is first demonstrated by a multiplex PCR reaction for the simultaneous detection of eleven pneumonia-causing pathogens. Further, we demonstrate the power of this strategy with a highly successful 116-plex PCR reaction that required only little prior optimization. The effectiveness of the MPH&HPM strategy with clinical samples is then illustrated with the detection of deleted exons of the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) gene, the results are in excellent agreement with the clinical records. Because of its generality

  10. Engineered Antibodies for Monitoring of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander E. Karu Ph.D; Victoria A. Roberts Ph.D.; Qing X. Li, Ph.D.

    2002-01-17

    This project was undertaken to fill needs in ODE's human and ecosystem health effects research, site remediation, rapid emergency response, and regulatory compliance monitoring programs. Doe has greatly stimulated development and validation of antibody-based, rapid, field-portable detection systems for small hazardous compounds. These range from simple dipsticks, microplate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), and hand-held colorimeters, to ultrasensitive microfluidic reactors, fiber-optic sensors and microarrays that can identify multiple analytes from patterns of cross-reactivity. Unfortunately, the technology to produce antibodies with the most desirable properties did not keep pace. Lack of antibodies remains a limiting factor in production and practical use of such devices. The goals of our project were to determine the chemical and structural bases for the antibody-analyte binding interactions using advanced computational chemistry, and to use this information to create useful new binding properties through in vitro genetic engineering and combinatorial library methods.

  11. Robotic Tube-Gap Inspector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Gutow, David A.; Maslakowski, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Robotic vision system measures small gaps between nearly parallel tubes. Robot-held video camera examines closely spaced tubes while computer determines gaps between tubes. Video monitor simultaneously displays data on gaps.

  12. What Are Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Neural Tube Defects (NTDs): Condition Information Skip sharing on ... media links Share this: Page Content What are neural tube defects? Neural (pronounced NOOR-uhl ) tube defects ...

  13. Statistically designing microarrays and microarray experiments to enhance sensitivity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jason C; Chang, Jane; Wang, Tao; Steingrímsson, Eiríkur; Magnússon, Magnús Karl; Bergsteinsdottir, Kristin

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression signatures from microarray experiments promise to provide important prognostic tools for predicting disease outcome or response to treatment. A number of microarray studies in various cancers have reported such gene signatures. However, the overlap of gene signatures in the same disease has been limited so far, and some reported signatures have not been reproduced in other populations. Clearly, the methods used for verifying novel gene signatures need improvement. In this article, we describe an experiment in which microarrays and sample hybridization are designed according to the statistical principles of randomization, replication and blocking. Our results show that such designs provide unbiased estimation of differential expression levels as well as powerful tests for them.

  14. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science.

  15. Comments on selected fundamental aspects of microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Riva, Alessandra; Carpentier, Anne-Sophie; Torrésani, Bruno; Hénaut, Alain

    2005-10-01

    Microarrays are becoming a ubiquitous tool of research in life sciences. However, the working principles of microarray-based methodologies are often misunderstood or apparently ignored by the researchers who actually perform and interpret experiments. This in turn seems to lead to a common over-expectation regarding the explanatory and/or knowledge-generating power of microarray analyses. In this note we intend to explain basic principles of five (5) major groups of analytical techniques used in studies of microarray data and their interpretation: the principal component analysis (PCA), the independent component analysis (ICA), the t-test, the analysis of variance (ANOVA), and self organizing maps (SOM). We discuss answers to selected practical questions related to the analysis of microarray data. We also take a closer look at the experimental setup and the rules, which have to be observed in order to exploit microarrays efficiently. Finally, we discuss in detail the scope and limitations of microarray-based methods. We emphasize the fact that no amount of statistical analysis can compensate for (or replace) a well thought through experimental setup. We conclude that microarrays are indeed useful tools in life sciences but by no means should they be expected to generate complete answers to complex biological questions. We argue that even well posed questions, formulated within a microarray-specific terminology, cannot be completely answered with the use of microarray analyses alone.

  16. [Enteral tube feeding].

    PubMed

    Haller, Alois

    2014-03-01

    Tube feeding is an integral part of medical therapies, and can be easily managed also in the outpatient setting. Tube feeding by the stomach or small intestine with nasogastral or nasojejunal tubes is common in clinical practice. Long-term nutrition is usually provided through a permanent tube, i. e. a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Modern portable nutrition pumps are used to cover the patient's nutritional needs. Enteral nutrition is always indicated if patients can not or should not eat or if nutritional requirements cannot be covered within 3 days after an intervention, e. g. after abdominal surgery. Industrially produced tube feedings with defined substrate concentrations are being used; different compositions of nutrients, such as glutamine fish oil etc., are used dependent on the the condition of the patient. Enteral nutrition may be associated with complications of the tube, e. g. dislocation, malposition or obstruction, as well as the feeding itself, e. g.hyperglycaemia, electrolyte disturbances, refeeding syndrome diarrhea or aspiration). However, the benefit of tube feeding usually exceeds the potential harm substantially.

  17. Development of an ELISA microarray assay for the sensitive and simultaneous detection of ten biodefense toxins.

    PubMed

    Jenko, Kathryn L; Zhang, Yanfeng; Kostenko, Yulia; Fan, Yongfeng; Garcia-Rodriguez, Consuelo; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D; Varnum, Susan M

    2014-10-21

    Plant and microbial toxins are considered bioterrorism threat agents because of their extreme toxicity and/or ease of availability. Additionally, some of these toxins are increasingly responsible for accidental food poisonings. The current study utilized an ELISA-based protein antibody microarray for the multiplexed detection of ten biothreat toxins, botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) A, B, C, D, E, F, ricin, shiga toxins 1 and 2 (Stx), and staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB), in buffer and complex biological matrices. The multiplexed assay displayed a sensitivity of 1.3 pg mL(-1) (BoNT/A, BoNT/B, SEB, Stx-1 and Stx-2), 3.3 pg mL(-1) (BoNT/C, BoNT/E, BoNT/F) and 8.2 pg mL(-1) (BoNT/D, ricin). All assays demonstrated high accuracy (75-120 percent recovery) and reproducibility (most coefficients of variation <20%). Quantification curves for the ten toxins were also evaluated in clinical samples (serum, plasma, nasal fluid, saliva, stool, and urine) and environmental samples (apple juice, milk and baby food) with overall minimal matrix effects. The multiplex assays were highly specific, with little cross-reactivity observed between the selected toxin antibodies. The results demonstrate a multiplex microarray that improves current immunoassay sensitivity for biological warfare agents in buffer, clinical, and environmental samples.

  18. Development of an ELISA microarray assay for the sensitive and simultaneous detection of ten biodefense toxins.

    SciTech Connect

    Jenko, Kathryn; Zhang, Yanfeng; Kostenko, Yulia; Fan, Yongfeng; Garcia-Rodriguez, Consuelo; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Varnum, Susan M.

    2014-10-21

    Plant and microbial toxins are considered bioterrorism threat agents because of their extreme toxicity and/or ease of availability. Additionally, some of these toxins are increasingly responsible for accidental food poisonings. The current study utilized an ELISA-based protein antibody microarray for the multiplexed detection of ten biothreat toxins, botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) A, B, C, D, E, F, ricin, shiga toxins 1 and 2 (Stx), and staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB), in buffer and complex biological matrices. The multiplexed assay displayed a sensitivity of 1.3 pg/mL (BoNT/A, BoNT/B, SEB, Stx-1 and Stx-2), 3.3 pg/mL (BoNT/C, BoNT/E, BoNT/F) and 8.2 pg/mL (BoNT/D, ricin). All assays demonstrated high accuracy (75-120 percent recovery) and reproducibility (most coefficients of variation < 20%). Quantification curves for the ten toxins were also evaluated in clinical samples (serum, plasma, nasal fluid, saliva, stool, and urine) and environmental samples (apple juice, milk and baby food) with overall minimal matrix effects. The multiplex assays were highly specific, with little crossreactivity observed between the selected toxin antibodies. The results demonstrate a multiplex microarray that improves current immunoassay sensitivity for biological warfare agents in buffer, clinical, and environmental samples.

  19. Eustachian Tube Function.

    PubMed

    Ars, Bernard; Dirckx, Joris

    2016-10-01

    The fibrocartilaginous eustachian tube is part of a system of contiguous organs including the nose, palate, rhinopharynx, and middle ear cleft. The middle ear cleft consists of the tympanic cavity, which includes the bony eustachian tube (protympanum) and the mastoid gas cells system. The tympanic cavity and mastoid gas cells are interconnected and allow gaseous exchange and pressure regulation. The fibrocartilaginous eustachian tube is a complex organ consisting of a dynamic conduit with its mucosa, cartilage, surrounding soft tissue, peritubal muscles (ie, tensor and levator veli palatine, salpingopharyngeus and tensor tympani), and superior bony support (the sphenoid sulcus). PMID:27468632

  20. Tube flare inspection tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meunier, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    Flare angle and symmetry of tube ends can be checked by simple tool that consists of two stainless steel pins bonded to rubber plug. Primary function of tool is to inspect tubes before they are installed, thereby eliminating expense and inconvenience of repairing leaks caused by imperfect flares. Measuring hole tapers, countersink angles, and bearing race angles are other possible uses. Tool is used with optical comparator. Axis of tool is alined with centerline of tube. Shadow of seated pins on comparator screen allows operator to verify flare angle is within tolerance.

  1. Serology in the Digital Age: Using Long Synthetic Peptides Created from Nucleic Acid Sequences as Antigens in Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Rönnberg, Bengt; Cistjakovs, Maksims; Lundkvist, Åke; Pipkorn, Rudiger; Blomberg, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antibodies to microbes, or to autoantigens, are important markers of disease. Antibody detection (serology) can reveal both past and recent infections. There is a great need for development of rational ways of detecting and quantifying antibodies, both for humans and animals. Traditionally, serology using synthetic antigens covers linear epitopes using up to 30 amino acid peptides. Methods: We here report that peptides of 100 amino acids or longer (“megapeptides”), designed and synthesized for optimal serological performance, can successfully be used as detection antigens in a suspension multiplex immunoassay (SMIA). Megapeptides can quickly be created just from pathogen sequences. A combination of rational sequencing and bioinformatic routines for definition of diagnostically-relevant antigens can, thus, rapidly yield efficient serological diagnostic tools for an emerging infectious pathogen. Results: We designed megapeptides using bioinformatics and viral genome sequences. These long peptides were tested as antigens for the presence of antibodies in human serum to the filo-, herpes-, and polyoma virus families in a multiplex microarray system. All of these virus families contain recently discovered or emerging infectious viruses. Conclusion: Long synthetic peptides can be useful as serological diagnostic antigens, serving as biomarkers, in suspension microarrays. PMID:27600087

  2. Unravelling Glucan Recognition Systems by Glycome Microarrays Using the Designer Approach and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Angelina S.; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhang, Yibing; McCleary, Barry V.; Yu, Guangli; Huang, Qilin; Guidolin, Leticia S.; Ciocchini, Andres E.; Torosantucci, Antonella; Wang, Denong; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Mulloy, Barbara; Childs, Robert A.; Feizi, Ten; Chai, Wengang

    2015-01-01

    Glucans are polymers of d-glucose with differing linkages in linear or branched sequences. They are constituents of microbial and plant cell-walls and involved in important bio-recognition processes, including immunomodulation, anticancer activities, pathogen virulence, and plant cell-wall biodegradation. Translational possibilities for these activities in medicine and biotechnology are considerable. High-throughput micro-methods are needed to screen proteins for recognition of specific glucan sequences as a lead to structure–function studies and their exploitation. We describe construction of a “glucome” microarray, the first sequence-defined glycome-scale microarray, using a “designer” approach from targeted ligand-bearing glucans in conjunction with a novel high-sensitivity mass spectrometric sequencing method, as a screening tool to assign glucan recognition motifs. The glucome microarray comprises 153 oligosaccharide probes with high purity, representing major sequences in glucans. Negative-ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation was used for complete linkage analysis of gluco-oligosaccharides in linear “homo” and “hetero” and branched sequences. The system is validated using antibodies and carbohydrate-binding modules known to target α- or β-glucans in different biological contexts, extending knowledge on their specificities, and applied to reveal new information on glucan recognition by two signaling molecules of the immune system against pathogens: Dectin-1 and DC-SIGN. The sequencing of the glucan oligosaccharides by the MS method and their interrogation on the microarrays provides detailed information on linkage, sequence and chain length requirements of glucan-recognizing proteins, and are a sensitive means of revealing unsuspected sequences in the polysaccharides. PMID:25670804

  3. Formation and characterization of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride substrates.

    PubMed

    Manning, Mary; Redmond, Gareth

    2005-01-01

    A versatile method for direct, covalent attachment of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride layers, previously deposited by chemical vapor deposition at silicon wafer substrates, is reported. Each microarray fabrication process step, from silicon nitride substrate deposition, surface cleaning, amino-silanation, and attachment of a homobifunctional cross-linking molecule to covalent immobilization of probe oligonucleotides, is defined, characterized, and optimized to yield consistent probe microarray quality, homogeneity, and probe-target hybridization performance. The developed microarray fabrication methodology provides excellent (high signal-to-background ratio) and reproducible responsivity to target oligonucleotide hybridization with a rugged chemical stability that permits exposure of arrays to stringent pre- and posthybridization wash conditions through many sustained cycles of reuse. Overall, the achieved performance features compare very favorably with those of more mature glass based microarrays. It is proposed that this DNA microarray fabrication strategy has the potential to provide a viable route toward the successful realization of future integrated DNA biochips.

  4. Tube Alinement for Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.

    1984-01-01

    Tool with stepped shoulders alines tubes for machining in preparation for welding. Alinement with machine tool axis accurate to within 5 mils (0.13mm) and completed much faster than visual setup by machinist.

  5. Kinking of medical tubes.

    PubMed

    Ingles, David

    2004-05-01

    The phenomenon of kinking in medical tubing remains a problem for some applications, particularly critical ones such as transporting gasses or fluids. Design features are described to prevent its occurrence.

  6. Ear tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100045.htm Ear tube insertion - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 4 Overview The eardrum (tympanic membrane) separates the ear canal from the middle ear. Update Date 8/ ...

  7. Tracheostomy tube - eating

    MedlinePlus

    Trach - eating ... take your first bites. Certain factors may make eating or swallowing harder, such as: Changes in the ... easier to swallow. Suction the tracheostomy tube before eating. This will keep you from coughing while eating, ...

  8. Tube-Forming Assays.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  9. Building with Tubes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Eugenio, Terrance, Ed.

    Text and illustrations show how to assemble furniture and toys out of cardboard tubes and sheets. Basic directions are provided, and the tools and materials necessary to the assembly of specific items are described. (MLF)

  10. ProMAT: protein microarray analysis tool

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Varnum, Susan M.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bollinger, Nikki; Zangar, Richard C.

    2006-04-04

    Summary: ProMAT is a software tool for statistically analyzing data from ELISA microarray experiments. The software estimates standard curves, sample protein concentrations and their uncertainties for multiple assays. ProMAT generates a set of comprehensive figures for assessing results and diagnosing process quality. The tool is available for Windows or Mac, and is distributed as open-source Java and R code. Availability: ProMAT is available at http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT. ProMAT requires Java version 1.5.0 and R version 1.9.1 (or more recent versions) which are distributed with the tool.

  11. Protein Microarrays--Without a Trace

    SciTech Connect

    Camarero, J A

    2007-04-05

    Many experimental approaches in biology and biophysics, as well as applications in diagnosis and drug discovery, require proteins to be immobilized on solid supports. Protein microarrays, for example, provide a high-throughput format to study biomolecular interactions. The technique employed for protein immobilization is a key to the success of these applications. Recent biochemical developments are allowing, for the first time, the selective and traceless immobilization of proteins generated by cell-free systems without the need for purification and/or reconcentration prior to the immobilization step.

  12. Using a nasogastric tube.

    PubMed

    Candy, C

    1986-09-01

    This discussion of the use of a nasogastric tube covers the equipment needed, the method, rehydration and feeding, prolonged nasogastric feeding, and stopping nasogastric feeding. A nasogastric tube is useful when children are unable to drink safely and in sufficient amounts for any of the following reasons: severe dehydration; if intravenous (IV) therapy is unavailable; low birth weight infants; or the child is drowsy or vomiting. Severely malnourished children may be fed initially in this way if they are too weak or anorexic to eat or drink normally. The following equipment is needed: nasogastric tube; lubricating fluid; a syringe; blue litmus paper, if available; adhesive tape; stethoscope if available; and fluid to be given. Explain to the child's parents and the child, if old enough to understand, what will be done; lie infants flat; measure the approximate length from the child's nostril to the ear lobe and then to the top of the abdomen with the tube and mark the position; clean the nostrils to remove the mucus, and lubricate the tip of the tube and gently insert into the nostril; give the child a drink of water if he or she is conscious; continue to pass the tube down until the position marked reaches the nostril; use the syringe to suck up some fluid and test with blue litmus paper to check that the tube is in the stomach; and inject 5-10 ml of fluid (saline or oral rehydration solution, not milk formula) by syringe if satisfied the tube is in the correct position. Where possible, give a continuous drip of fluid. If this is not possible, give frequent small amounts using the syringe as a funnel. If feeding continues for more than 24 hours, clean the nostrils daily with warm water and change the tube to the other nostril every few days. Also keep the mouth very clean with a dilute solution of 8% sodium bicarbonate, if available, or citrus fruit juice. To remove the tube, remove the adhesive tape, take the tube out gently and smoothly, and offer the child a

  13. Tubing crimping pliers

    DOEpatents

    Lindholm, G.T.

    1981-02-27

    The disclosure relates to pliers and more particularly to pliers for crimping two or more pieces of copper tubing together prior to their being permanently joined by brazing, soldering or the like. A die containing spring-loaded pins rotates within a cammed ring in the head of the pliers. As the die rotates, the pins force a crimp on tubing held within the pliers.

  14. Aeronautical tubes and pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauclair, N.

    1984-12-01

    The main and subcomponent French suppliers of aircraft tubes and pipes are discussed, and the state of the industry is analyzed. Quality control is essential for tubes with regard to their i.d. and metallurgical compositions. French regulations do not allow welded seam tubes in hydraulic circuits unless no other form is available, and then rustproofed steel must be installed. The actual low level of orders for any run of tubes dictates that the product is only one of several among the manufacturers' line. Automation, both in NDT and quality control, assures that the tubes meet specifications. A total of 10 French companies participate in the industry, serving both civil and military needs, with some companies specializing only in titanium, steel, or aluminum materials. Concerns wishing to enter the market must upgrade their equipment to meet the higher aeronautical specifications and be prepared to furnish tubes and pipes that serve both functional and structural purposes simultaneously. Additionally, pipe-bending machines must also perform to tight specifications. Pipes can range from 0.2 mm exterior diameter to 40 mm, with wall thicknesses from 0.02 mm to 3 mm. A chart containing a list of manufacturers and their respective specifications and characteristics is presented, and a downtrend in production with reduction of personnel is noted.

  15. Clearing obstructed feeding tubes.

    PubMed

    Marcuard, S P; Stegall, K L; Trogdon, S

    1989-01-01

    This is a report of an in vitro study evaluating the ability of six solutions to dissolve clotted enteral feeding, which can cause feeding tube occlusion. The following clotted enteral feeding products were tested: Ensure Plus, Ensure Plus with added protein (Promod 20 g/liter), Osmolite, Enrich, and Pulmocare. Clot dissolution was then tested by adding Adolf's Meat Tenderizer, Viokase, Sprite, Pepsi, Coke, or Mountain Dew. Distilled water served as control. Dissolution score for each mixture was assessed blindly. Best dissolution was observed with Viokase in pH 7.9 solution (p less than 0.01). Similar results were obtained when feeding tube patency was restored in eight in vitro occluded feeding tubes (Dobbhoff, French size 8) by using first Pepsi (two/eight successful) and then Viokase in pH 7.9 (six/six successful). We also report our experience in the first 10 patients with occluded feeding tubes using this Viokase solution injected through a Drum catheter into the feeding tube. In seven patients, this method proved to be successful, and the reasons for failure in three patients include a knotted tube, impacted tablet powder, and a formula clot fo 24 hr duration and 45 cm in length. PMID:2494372

  16. Clearing obstructed feeding tubes.

    PubMed

    Marcuard, S P; Stegall, K L; Trogdon, S

    1989-01-01

    This is a report of an in vitro study evaluating the ability of six solutions to dissolve clotted enteral feeding, which can cause feeding tube occlusion. The following clotted enteral feeding products were tested: Ensure Plus, Ensure Plus with added protein (Promod 20 g/liter), Osmolite, Enrich, and Pulmocare. Clot dissolution was then tested by adding Adolf's Meat Tenderizer, Viokase, Sprite, Pepsi, Coke, or Mountain Dew. Distilled water served as control. Dissolution score for each mixture was assessed blindly. Best dissolution was observed with Viokase in pH 7.9 solution (p less than 0.01). Similar results were obtained when feeding tube patency was restored in eight in vitro occluded feeding tubes (Dobbhoff, French size 8) by using first Pepsi (two/eight successful) and then Viokase in pH 7.9 (six/six successful). We also report our experience in the first 10 patients with occluded feeding tubes using this Viokase solution injected through a Drum catheter into the feeding tube. In seven patients, this method proved to be successful, and the reasons for failure in three patients include a knotted tube, impacted tablet powder, and a formula clot fo 24 hr duration and 45 cm in length.

  17. Applications of Functional Protein Microarrays in Basic and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Heng; Qian, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The protein microarray technology provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds of thousands of proteins in a highly parallel and high-throughput manner. It is viewed as a new tool that overcomes the limitation of DNA microarrays. On the basis of its application, protein microarrays fall into two major classes: analytical and functional protein microarrays. In addition, tissue or cell lysates can also be directly spotted on a slide to form the so-called “reverse-phase” protein microarray. In the last decade, applications of functional protein microarrays in particular have flourished in studying protein function and construction of networks and pathways. In this chapter, we will review the recent advancements in the protein microarray technology, followed by presenting a series of examples to illustrate the power and versatility of protein microarrays in both basic and clinical research. As a powerful technology platform, it would not be surprising if protein microarrays will become one of the leading technologies in proteomic and diagnostic fields in the next decade. PMID:22989767

  18. Refractive index change detection based on porous silicon microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weirong; Jia, Zhenhong; Li, Peng; Lv, Guodong; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2016-05-01

    By combining photolithography with the electrochemical anodization method, a microarray device of porous silicon (PS) photonic crystal was fabricated on the crystalline silicon substrate. The optical properties of the microarray were analyzed with the transfer matrix method. The relationship between refractive index and reflectivity of each array element of the microarray at 633 nm was also studied, and the array surface reflectivity changes were observed through digital imaging. By means of the reflectivity measurement method, reflectivity changes below 10-3 can be observed based on PS microarray. The results of this study can be applied to the detection of biosensor arrays.

  19. Re-Annotator: Annotation Pipeline for Microarray Probe Sequences.

    PubMed

    Arloth, Janine; Bader, Daniel M; Röh, Simone; Altmann, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Microarray technologies are established approaches for high throughput gene expression, methylation and genotyping analysis. An accurate mapping of the array probes is essential to generate reliable biological findings. However, manufacturers of the microarray platforms typically provide incomplete and outdated annotation tables, which often rely on older genome and transcriptome versions that differ substantially from up-to-date sequence databases. Here, we present the Re-Annotator, a re-annotation pipeline for microarray probe sequences. It is primarily designed for gene expression microarrays but can also be adapted to other types of microarrays. The Re-Annotator uses a custom-built mRNA reference database to identify the positions of gene expression array probe sequences. We applied Re-Annotator to the Illumina Human-HT12 v4 microarray platform and found that about one quarter (25%) of the probes differed from the manufacturer's annotation. In further computational experiments on experimental gene expression data, we compared Re-Annotator to another probe re-annotation tool, ReMOAT, and found that Re-Annotator provided an improved re-annotation of microarray probes. A thorough re-annotation of probe information is crucial to any microarray analysis. The Re-Annotator pipeline is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/reannotator along with re-annotated files for Illumina microarrays HumanHT-12 v3/v4 and MouseRef-8 v2.

  20. Studying cellular processes and detecting disease with protein microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.; Bollinger, Nikki

    2005-10-31

    Protein microarrays are a rapidly developing analytic tool with diverse applications in biomedical research. These applications include profiling of disease markers or autoimmune responses, understanding molecular pathways, protein modifications and protein activities. One factor that is driving this expanding usage is the wide variety of experimental formats that protein microarrays can take. In this review, we provide a short, conceptual overview of the different approaches for protein microarray. We then examine some of the most significant applications of these microarrays to date, with an emphasis on how global protein analyses can be used to facilitate biomedical research.

  1. Isolation of Microarray-Quality RNA from Primary Human Cells after Intracellular Immunostaining and Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Ussel, Maria; Marchionni, Luigi; Romerio, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have made it possible to perform high-throughput, genome-wide analyses of RNA expression from an extremely wide range of sources. This technology relies on the ability to obtain RNA of sufficient quantity and quality for this type of application. While there are means to circumvent limitations in the former, recovery of RNA suitable for microarray analysis still represents a major issue when working with some biological samples, particularly those treated with and preserved in nucleic acid-modifying organic reagents. In the present report we describe a procedure for the isolation of RNA suitable for microarray analysis from cells purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting after fixation, permeabilization and intracellular staining with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies. We show that – although the RNA isolated from these samples presented some degradation – it performed remarkably well in microarray analysis. The method we describe here makes it available to genome-wide expression profiling a variety of biological samples that so far were confined to single-gene analysis. PMID:23434645

  2. Advances in allergen-microarray technology for diagnosis and monitoring of allergy: the MeDALL allergen-chip.

    PubMed

    Lupinek, Christian; Wollmann, Eva; Baar, Alexandra; Banerjee, Srinita; Breiteneder, Heimo; Broecker, Barbara M; Bublin, Merima; Curin, Mirela; Flicker, Sabine; Garmatiuk, Tetiana; Hochwallner, Heidrun; Mittermann, Irene; Pahr, Sandra; Resch, Yvonne; Roux, Kenneth H; Srinivasan, Bharani; Stentzel, Sebastian; Vrtala, Susanne; Willison, Leanna N; Wickman, Magnus; Lødrup-Carlsen, Karin C; Antó, Josep Maria; Bousquet, Jean; Bachert, Claus; Ebner, Daniel; Schlederer, Thomas; Harwanegg, Christian; Valenta, Rudolf

    2014-03-01

    Allergy diagnosis based on purified allergen molecules provides detailed information regarding the individual sensitization profile of allergic patients, allows monitoring of the development of allergic disease and of the effect of therapies on the immune response to individual allergen molecules. Allergen microarrays contain a large variety of allergen molecules and thus allow the simultaneous detection of allergic patients' antibody reactivity profiles towards each of the allergen molecules with only minute amounts of serum. In this article we summarize recent progress in the field of allergen microarray technology and introduce the MeDALL allergen-chip which has been developed for the specific and sensitive monitoring of IgE and IgG reactivity profiles towards more than 170 allergen molecules in sera collected in European birth cohorts. MeDALL is a European research program in which allergen microarray technology is used for the monitoring of the development of allergic disease in childhood, to draw a geographic map of the recognition of clinically relevant allergens in different populations and to establish reactivity profiles which are associated with and predict certain disease manifestations. We describe technical advances of the MeDALL allergen-chip regarding specificity, sensitivity and its ability to deliver test results which are close to in vivo reactivity. In addition, the usefulness and numerous advantages of allergen microarrays for allergy research, refined allergy diagnosis, monitoring of disease, of the effects of therapies, for improving the prescription of specific immunotherapy and for prevention are discussed.

  3. Azide-Reactive Liposome for Chemoselective and Biocompatible Liposomal Surface Functionalization and Glyco-Liposomal Microarray Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yong; Zhang, Hailong; Gruzdys, Valentinas; Sun, Xue-Long

    2011-01-01

    A chemically selective liposomal surface functionalization and liposomal microarray fabrication using azide-reactive liposome are described. First, liposome carrying PEG-triphenylphosphine was prepared for Staudinger ligation with azide-containing biotin, which was conducted in PBS buffer (pH 7.4) at room temperature without catalyst. Then, immobilization and microarray fabrication of the biotinylated liposome onto streptavidin-modified glass slide via specific streptavidin/biotin interaction were investigated by comparing with direct-formed biotin-liposome, which was prepared by conventional liposome formulation of lipid-biotin with all other lipid components. Next, covalent microarray fabrication of liposome carrying triphenylphosphine onto an azide-modified glass slide and its further glyco-modification with azide-containing carbohydrate were demonstrated for glyco-liposomal microarray fabrication via Staudinger ligation. Fluorescence imaging confirmed the successful immobilization and protein binding of the intact immobilized liposomes and arrayed glyco-liposomes. The azide-reactive liposome provides a facile strategy for a membrane-mimetic glycoarray fabrication, which may find important biological and biomedical applications such as studying carbohydrate-protein interaction and toxin and antibody screening. PMID:21928859

  4. Design and Fabrication of Low-Cost 1536-Chamber Microfluidic Microarrays for Mood-Disorders-Related Serological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyan; Dong, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Mood disorders are common mental diseases, but physiological diagnostic methods are still lacking. Since much evidence has implied a relationship between mood disorders and the protein composition of blood sera, it is conceivable to develop a serological criterion for assisting diagnosis of mood disorders, based on a correlative database with enough capacity and high quality. In this pilot study, a low-cost microfluidic microarray device for quantifying at most 384 serological biomarkers at the same time was designed for the data acquisition of the serological study. The 1,536-chamber microfluidic device was modeled on a 1,536-well microtiter plate in order to employ a common microplate reader as the detection module for measuring the chemiluminescent immunoassay tests on the chips. The microfluidic microarrays were rapidly fabricated on polymethylmethacrylate slides using carbon dioxide laser ablation, followed by effective surface treatment processing. Sixteen types of different capture antibodies were immobilized on the chips to test the corresponding hormones and cytokines. The preliminary tests indicated that the signal-to-noise ratio and the limit of detection of microfluidic microarrays have reached the level of standard ELISA tests, whereas the operation time of microfluidic microarrays was sharply reduced. PMID:24169541

  5. Segmentation of prostate cancer tissue microarray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, Harvey E.; Can, Ali; Padfield, Dirk

    2006-02-01

    Prostate cancer is diagnosed by histopathology interpretation of hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)-stained tissue sections. Gland and nuclei distributions vary with the disease grade. The morphological features vary with the advance of cancer where the epithelial regions grow into the stroma. An efficient pathology slide image analysis method involved using a tissue microarray with known disease stages. Digital 24-bit RGB images were acquired for each tissue element on the slide with both 10X and 40X objectives. Initial segmentation at low magnification was accomplished using prior spectral characteristics from a training tissue set composed of four tissue clusters; namely, glands, epithelia, stroma and nuclei. The segmentation method was automated by using the training RGB values as an initial guess and iterating the averaging process 10 times to find the four cluster centers. Labels were assigned to the nearest cluster center in red-blue spectral feature space. An automatic threshold algorithm separated the glands from the tissue. A visual pseudo color representation of 60 segmented tissue microarray image was generated where white, pink, red, blue colors represent glands, epithelia, stroma and nuclei, respectively. The higher magnification images provided refined nuclei morphology. The nuclei were detected with a RGB color space principle component analysis that resulted in a grey scale image. The shape metrics such as compactness, elongation, minimum and maximum diameters were calculated based on the eigenvalues of the best-fitting ellipses to the nuclei.

  6. Inferring genetic networks from microarray data.

    SciTech Connect

    May, Elebeoba Eni; Davidson, George S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Werner-Washburne, Margaret C.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2004-06-01

    In theory, it should be possible to infer realistic genetic networks from time series microarray data. In practice, however, network discovery has proved problematic. The three major challenges are: (1) inferring the network; (2) estimating the stability of the inferred network; and (3) making the network visually accessible to the user. Here we describe a method, tested on publicly available time series microarray data, which addresses these concerns. The inference of genetic networks from genome-wide experimental data is an important biological problem which has received much attention. Approaches to this problem have typically included application of clustering algorithms [6]; the use of Boolean networks [12, 1, 10]; the use of Bayesian networks [8, 11]; and the use of continuous models [21, 14, 19]. Overviews of the problem and general approaches to network inference can be found in [4, 3]. Our approach to network inference is similar to earlier methods in that we use both clustering and Boolean network inference. However, we have attempted to extend the process to better serve the end-user, the biologist. In particular, we have incorporated a system to assess the reliability of our network, and we have developed tools which allow interactive visualization of the proposed network.

  7. Intensity-based segmentation of microarray images.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan

    2003-07-01

    The underlying principle in microarray image analysis is that the spot intensity is a measure of the gene expression. This implicitly assumes the gene expression of a spot to be governed entirely by the distribution of the pixel intensities. Thus, a segmentation technique based on the distribution of the pixel intensities is appropriate for the current problem. In this paper, clustering-based segmentation is described to extract the target intensity of the spots. The approximate boundaries of the spots in the microarray are determined by manual adjustment of rectilinear grids. The distribution of the pixel intensity in a grid containing a spot is assumed to be the superposition of the foreground and the local background. The k-means clustering technique and the partitioning around medoids (PAM) were used to generate a binary partition of the pixel intensity distribution. The median (k-means) and the medoid (PAM) of the cluster members are chosen as the cluster representatives. The effectiveness of the clustering-based segmentation techniques was tested on publicly available arrays generated in a lipid metabolism experiment (Callow et al., 2000). The results are compared against those obtained using the region-growing approach (SPOT) (Yang et al., 2001). The effect of additive white Gaussian noise is also investigated. PMID:12906242

  8. Microarray analysis of the developing cortex.

    PubMed

    Semeralul, Mawahib O; Boutros, Paul C; Likhodi, Olga; Okey, Allan B; Van Tol, Hubert H M; Wong, Albert H C

    2006-12-01

    Abnormal development of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is associated with a number of neuropsychiatric disorders that have an onset in childhood or adolescence. Although the basic laminar structure of the PFC is established in utero, extensive remodeling continues into adolescence. To map the overall pattern of changes in cortical gene transcripts during postnatal development, we made serial measurements of mRNA levels in mouse PFC using oligonucleotide microarrays. We observed changes in mRNA transcripts consistent with known postnatal morphological and biochemical events. Overall, most transcripts that changed significantly showed a progressive decrease in abundance after birth, with the majority of change between postnatal weeks 2 and 4. Genes with cell proliferative, cytoskeletal, extracellular matrix, plasma membrane lipid/transport, protein folding, and regulatory functions had decreases in mRNA levels. Quantitative PCR verified the microarray results for six selected genes: DNA methyltransferase 3A (Dnmt3a), procollagen, type III, alpha 1 (Col3a1), solute carrier family 16 (monocarboxylic acid transporters), member 1 (Slc16a1), MARCKS-like 1 (Marcksl1), nidogen 1 (Nid1) and 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (heart, mitochondrial) (Bdh).

  9. Enzyme Microarrays Assembled by Acoustic Dispensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wong, E. Y.; Diamond, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Miniaturizing bioassays to the nanoliter scale for high-throughput screening reduces the consumption of reagents that are expensive or difficult to handle. Utilizing acoustic dispensing technology, nanodroplets containing 10 µM ATP (3 µCi/µL 32P) and reaction buffer in 10% glycerol were positionally dispensed to the surface of glass slides to form 40 nL compartments (100 droplets/slide) for Pim1 (Proviral integration site 1) kinase reactions. The reactions were activated by dispensing 4 nL of various levels of a pyridocarbazolo-cyclopentadienyl ruthenium-complex Pim1 inhibitor, followed by dispensing 4 nL of a Pim1 kinase and peptide substrate solution to achieve final concentrations of 150 nM enzyme and 10 µM substrate. The microarray was incubated at 30°C (97% Rh) for 1.5 hr. The spots were then blotted to phosphocellulose membranes to capture phosphorylated substrate. Using phosphor imaging to quantify the washed membranes, the assay showed that, for doses of inhibitor from 0.75 µM to 3 µM, Pim1 was increasingly inhibited. Signal-to-background ratios were as high as 165 and average coefficients of variation (CVs) for the assay were ~20%. CVs for dispensing typical working buffers were under 5%. Thus, microarrays assembled by acoustic dispensing are promising as cost-effective tools that can be used in protein assay development. PMID:18616925

  10. Laser direct writing of biomolecule microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, P.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Berthet, F. X.; Colina, M.; Elvira, J.; Morenza, J. L.

    Protein-based biosensors are highly efficient tools for protein detection and identification. The production of these devices requires the manipulation of tiny amounts of protein solutions in conditions preserving their biological properties. In this work, laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) was used for spotting an array of a purified bacterial antigen in order to check the viability of this technique for the production of protein microarrays. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam (355 nm wavelength, 10 ns pulse duration) was used to transfer droplets of a solution containing the Treponema pallidum 17 kDa protein antigen on a glass slide. Optical microscopy showed that a regular array of micrometric droplets could be precisely and uniformly spotted onto a solid substrate. Subsequently, it was proved that LIFT deposition of a T. pallidum 17 kDa antigen onto nylon-coated glass slides preserves its antigenic reactivity and diagnostic properties. These results support that LIFT is suitable for the production of protein microarrays and pave the way for future diagnostics applications.

  11. Label-free detection repeatability of protein microarrays by oblique-incidence reflectivity difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jun; Li, Lin; Wang, JingYi; He, LiPing; Lu, HuiBin; Ruan, KangCheng; Jin, KuiJuan; Yang, GuoZhen

    2012-12-01

    We examine the repeatabilities of oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OIRD) method for label-free detecting biological molecular interaction using protein microarrays. The experimental results show that the repeatabilities are the same in a given microarray or microarray-microarray and are consistent, indicating that OIRD is a promising label-free detection technique for biological microarrays.

  12. Application of phage display to high throughput antibody generation and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Darren J; Pope, Anthony R; Clementel, Veronica; Buckell, Jenny; Chapple, Susan DJ; Clarke, Kay F; Conquer, Jennie S; Crofts, Anna M; Crowther, Sandra RE; Dyson, Michael R; Flack, Gillian; Griffin, Gareth J; Hooks, Yvette; Howat, William J; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Kunze, Susan; Martin, Cecile D; Maslen, Gareth L; Mitchell, Joanne N; O'Sullivan, Maureen; Perera, Rajika L; Roake, Wendy; Shadbolt, S Paul; Vincent, Karen J; Warford, Anthony; Wilson, Wendy E; Xie, Jane; Young, Joyce L; McCafferty, John

    2007-01-01

    We have created a high quality phage display library containing over 1010 human antibodies and describe its use in the generation of antibodies on an unprecedented scale. We have selected, screened and sequenced over 38,000 recombinant antibodies to 292 antigens, yielding over 7,200 unique clones. 4,400 antibodies were characterized by specificity testing and detailed sequence analysis and the data/clones are available online. Sensitive detection was demonstrated in a bead based flow cytometry assay. Furthermore, positive staining by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays was found for 37% (143/381) of antibodies. Thus, we have demonstrated the potential of and illuminated the issues associated with genome-wide monoclonal antibody generation. PMID:18047641

  13. Tube plug inspection system

    SciTech Connect

    Pirl, W.E.; Ray, E.A.; Costlow, A.M.; Roth, C.H. Jr.; Gradich, F.X.; Chizmar, D.A.

    1992-03-31

    This patent describes a system for inspecting a tube plug defining a chamber therein and having an open end in communication with the chamber, the chamber having disposed therein an expander element having a bore therethrough. It comprises: probe means having a sensor probe connected thereto for inspecting the tube plug, the probe means capable of being connected to the tube plug for extending the sensor probe a predetermined distance into the chamber through the open end of the tube plug; means connected to the probe means for rotating and translating the sensor probe within the chamber to provide an inspection scan interiorly of the tube plug, the rotating and translating means including: a flexible hose connected to the probe means for translating and rotating the probe means, the hose having adjacent segments so that the hose is flexible; and a connector interposed between adjacent segments of the hose for maintaining the hose in a tangle-free state; and drive means engaging the rotating and translating means for driving the rotating and translating means.

  14. A novel antibody immobilization strategy for optical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifson, Mark A.; Carter, Jared A.; Miller, Benjamin L.

    2014-03-01

    Arrayed Imaging Reflectometry (AIR) is a highly sensitive label-free biosensor which can be used to detect hundreds of antigens on a single substrate. The signal monitored with AIR is the light intensity of an angled beam reflected off of a flat substrate which is composed of a protein-reactive film on a thermally grown silicon oxide layer. If the angle, wavelength, and polarization of the incident light beam is fixed, a near-zero reflectance condition can be obtained by adjusting the thickness of the thermally grown oxide. In a typical AIR biosensing experiment, antibodies are printed (using a piezoelectric microarrayer) on top of the oxide layer to create a minimum reflectance condition. If the substrate is exposed to a complex solution (such as serum), the patterned antibodies bind to their specific targets increasing the effective spot thickness, which perturbs the anti-reflective condition and causes a measurable signal increase. One of the main considerations with AIR is evaluating and controlling the bioactivity and efficiency of antibody immobilization after printing, since these factors significantly affect the dynamic range and limit of detection. Here, we present preliminary experiments towards using microgel nanoparticles as a simple and customizable construct to deposit antibodies on biosensor surfaces. This method can be generalized to work with other microarray technology formats, including those that are not label-free.

  15. Screening individual hybridomas by microengraving to discover monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ogunniyi, Adebola O; Story, Craig M; Papa, Eliseo; Guillen, Eduardo; Love, J Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The demand for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in biomedical research is significant, but the current methodologies used to discover them are both lengthy and costly. Consequently, the diversity of antibodies available for any particular antigen remains limited. Microengraving is a soft lithographic technique that provides a rapid and efficient alternative for discovering new mAbs. This protocol describes how to use microengraving to screen mouse hybridomas to establish new cell lines producing unique mAbs. Single cells from a polyclonal population are isolated into an array of microscale wells (~105 cells per screen). The array is then used to print a protein microarray, where each element contains the antibodies captured from individual wells. The antibodies on the microarray are screened with antigens of interest, and mapped to the corresponding cells, which are then recovered from their microwells by micromanipulation. Screening and retrieval require approximately 1–3 d (9–12 d including the steps for preparing arrays of microwells). PMID:19528952

  16. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  17. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah; O'Kennedy, Richard J

    2016-06-30

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  18. Experimental Approaches to Microarray Analysis of Tumor Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furge, Laura Lowe; Winter, Michael B.; Meyers, Jacob I.; Furge, Kyle A.

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive measurement of gene expression using high-density nucleic acid arrays (i.e. microarrays) has become an important tool for investigating the molecular differences in clinical and research samples. Consequently, inclusion of discussion in biochemistry, molecular biology, or other appropriate courses of microarray technologies has…

  19. Demonstrating a Multi-drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Amplification Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2014-01-01

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice. PMID:24796567

  20. The Importance of Normalization on Large and Heterogeneous Microarray Datasets

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA microarray technology is a powerful functional genomics tool increasingly used for investigating global gene expression in environmental studies. Microarrays can also be used in identifying biological networks, as they give insight on the complex gene-to-gene interactions, ne...

  1. Demonstrating a multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis amplification microarray.

    PubMed

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G; Chandler, Darrell P

    2014-04-25

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice.

  2. Neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs), including spina bifida and anencephaly, are severe birth defects of the central nervous system that originate during embryonic development when the neural tube fails to close completely. Human NTDs are multifactorial, with contributions from both genetic and environmental factors. The genetic basis is not yet well understood, but several nongenetic risk factors have been identified as have possibilities for prevention by maternal folic acid supplementation. Mechanisms underlying neural tube closure and NTDs may be informed by experimental models, which have revealed numerous genes whose abnormal function causes NTDs and have provided details of critical cellular and morphological events whose regulation is essential for closure. Such models also provide an opportunity to investigate potential risk factors and to develop novel preventive therapies. PMID:25032496

  3. Antibody Blood Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of certain antibodies ... rye and barley that are generically known as “gluten.” Antibody Testing: Only A First Step To help ...

  4. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page ... Screen Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; Blood Typing ; RBC Antibody Identification ; Type and Screen; Crossmatch All content ...

  5. Genomic-Wide Analysis with Microarrays in Human Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Inaoka, Kenichi; Inokawa, Yoshikuni; Nomoto, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarray technologies have advanced rapidly and had a profound impact on examining gene expression on a genomic scale in research. This review discusses the history and development of microarray and DNA chip devices, and specific microarrays are described along with their methods and applications. In particular, microarrays have detected many novel cancer-related genes by comparing cancer tissues and non-cancerous tissues in oncological research. Recently, new methods have been in development, such as the double-combination array and triple-combination array, which allow more effective analysis of gene expression and epigenetic changes. Analysis of gene expression alterations in precancerous regions compared with normal regions and array analysis in drug-resistance cancer tissues are also successfully performed. Compared with next-generation sequencing, a similar method of genome analysis, several important differences distinguish these techniques and their applications. Development of novel microarray technologies is expected to contribute to further cancer research.

  6. An ultralow background substrate for protein microarray technology.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui; Zhang, Qingyang; Ma, Hongwei; Zheng, Bo

    2015-08-21

    We herein report an ultralow background substrate for protein microarrays. Conventional protein microarray substrates often suffer from non-specific protein adsorption and inhomogeneous spot morphology. Consequently, surface treatment and a suitable printing solution are required to improve the microarray performance. In the current work, we improved the situation by developing a new microarray substrate based on a fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) membrane. A polydopamine microspot array was fabricated on the FEP membrane, with proteins conjugated to the FEP surface through polydopamine. Uniform microspots were obtained on FEP without the application of a special printing solution. The modified FEP membrane demonstrated ultralow background signal and was applied in protein and peptide microarray analysis. PMID:26134063

  7. cDNA microarray screening in food safety.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K

    2006-04-01

    The cDNA microarray technology and related bioinformatics tools presents a wide range of novel application opportunities. The technology may be productively applied to address food safety. In this mini-review article, we present an update highlighting the late breaking discoveries that demonstrate the vitality of cDNA microarray technology as a tool to analyze food safety with reference to microbial pathogens and genetically modified foods. In order to bring the microarray technology to mainstream food safety, it is important to develop robust user-friendly tools that may be applied in a field setting. In addition, there needs to be a standardized process for regulatory agencies to interpret and act upon microarray-based data. The cDNA microarray approach is an emergent technology in diagnostics. Its values lie in being able to provide complimentary molecular insight when employed in addition to traditional tests for food safety, as part of a more comprehensive battery of tests.

  8. Finding dominant sets in microarray data.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xuping; Teng, Li; Li, Yao; Chen, Wenbin; Mao, Yumin; Shen, I-Fan; Xie, Yi

    2005-01-01

    Clustering allows us to extract groups of genes that are tightly coexpressed from Microarray data. In this paper, a new method DSF_Clust is developed to find dominant sets (clusters). We have preformed DSF_Clust on several gene expression datasets and given the evaluation with some criteria. The results showed that this approach could cluster dominant sets of good quality compared to kmeans method. DSF_Clust deals with three issues that have bedeviled clustering, some dominant sets being statistically determined in a significance level, predefining cluster structure being not required, and the quality of a dominant set being ensured. We have also applied this approach to analyze published data of yeast cell cycle gene expression and found some biologically meaningful gene groups to be dug out. Furthermore, DSF_Clust is a potentially good tool to search for putative regulatory signals.

  9. Digital microarray analysis for digital artifact genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger; Handley, James; Williams, Deborah

    2013-06-01

    We implement a Spatial Voting (SV) based analogy of microarray analysis for digital gene marker identification in malware code sections. We examine a famous set of malware formally analyzed by Mandiant and code named Advanced Persistent Threat (APT1). APT1 is a Chinese organization formed with specific intent to infiltrate and exploit US resources. Manidant provided a detailed behavior and sting analysis report for the 288 malware samples available. We performed an independent analysis using a new alternative to the traditional dynamic analysis and static analysis we call Spatial Analysis (SA). We perform unsupervised SA on the APT1 originating malware code sections and report our findings. We also show the results of SA performed on some members of the families associated by Manidant. We conclude that SV based SA is a practical fast alternative to dynamics analysis and static analysis.

  10. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TUBING

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.

    1958-04-15

    The manufacture of thin-walled uranium tubing by the hot-piercing techique is described. Uranium billets are preheated to a temperature above 780 d C. The heated billet is fed to a station where it is engaged on its external surface by three convex-surfaced rotating rollers which are set at an angle to the axis of the billet to produce a surface friction force in one direction to force the billet over a piercing mandrel. While being formed around the mandrel and before losing the desired shape, the tube thus formed is cooled by a water spray.

  11. Integrin-like proteins in the pollen tube: detection, localization and function.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Qian, H; Xu, X D; Han, Y; Yen, L F; Sun, D Y

    2000-10-01

    The distribution of integrin-like proteins in the pollen tube was examined by immunofluorescent labeling and western blotting techniques using antibodies against human placenta integrin vitronectin receptor (VnR), and alpha(v), beta3 and beta1 integrin subunits. Pseudocolor-coded confocal images showed intense immunostaining within 10 and 5 microm of the tip of the pollen tube in Lilium davidii and Nicotiana tabacum respectively. In both segments the site near the plasma membrane was labeled. Western blotting analyses revealed cross-reaction of anti-beta3, anti-alpha(v) and anti-VnR with the proteins in the plasma membrane preparation of L. davidii and Hemerocallis citrina pollen tube. These studies provide evidence for the first time that the integrin-like protein is present in pollen tubes, and it may be mainly composed of alpha(v) and beta3 subunits in lily pollen tubes. In a functional assay, neither anti-VnR antibody nor the Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser tetrapeptide inhibited pollen tube growth of N. tabacum in vitro, but both of them depressed tube growth on the stigma and in style under quasi in vivo culture conditions. The integrin-like proteins localized in the tip and periphery of the pollen tube appeared to play roles in growth of the pollen tube tip and interaction with the extracellular matrix of the style. PMID:11148272

  12. SAMMD: Staphylococcus aureus Microarray Meta-Database

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Elasri, Mohamed O

    2007-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen, causing a wide variety of diseases ranging from superficial skin infections to severe life threatening infections. S. aureus is one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. Its ability to resist multiple antibiotics poses a growing public health problem. In order to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis of S. aureus, several global expression profiles have been developed. These transcriptional profiles included regulatory mutants of S. aureus and growth of wild type under different growth conditions. The abundance of these profiles has generated a large amount of data without a uniform annotation system to comprehensively examine them. We report the development of the Staphylococcus aureus Microarray meta-database (SAMMD) which includes data from all the published transcriptional profiles. SAMMD is a web-accessible database that helps users to perform a variety of analysis against and within the existing transcriptional profiles. Description SAMMD is a relational database that uses MySQL as the back end and PHP/JavaScript/DHTML as the front end. The database is normalized and consists of five tables, which holds information about gene annotations, regulated gene lists, experimental details, references, and other details. SAMMD data is collected from the peer-reviewed published articles. Data extraction and conversion was done using perl scripts while data entry was done through phpMyAdmin tool. The database is accessible via a web interface that contains several features such as a simple search by ORF ID, gene name, gene product name, advanced search using gene lists, comparing among datasets, browsing, downloading, statistics, and help. The database is licensed under General Public License (GPL). Conclusion SAMMD is hosted and available at . Currently there are over 9500 entries for regulated genes, from 67 microarray experiments. SAMMD will help staphylococcal scientists to analyze their

  13. Analysis of environmental transcriptomes by DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Parro, Víctor; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; González-Toril, Elena

    2007-02-01

    In this work we investigated the correlations between global gene expression patterns and environmental parameters in natural ecosystems. We studied the preferential gene expression of the iron oxidizer bacterium Leptospirillum ferrooxidans to adapt its physiology to changes in the physicochemical parameters in its natural medium. Transcriptome analysis by DNA microarrays can proportionate an instant picture about the preferential gene expression between two different environmental samples. However, this type of analysis is very difficult and complex in natural ecosystems, mainly because of the broad biodiversity and multiple environmental parameters that may affect gene expression. The necessity of high-quality RNA preparations as well as complicated data analysis are also technological limitations. The low prokaryotic diversity of the extremely acidic and iron-rich waters of the Tinto River (Spain) ecosystem, where L. ferrooxidans is abundant, allows the opportunity to achieve global gene expression studies and to associate gene function with environmental parameters. We applied a total RNA amplification protocol validated previously for the amplification of the environmental transcriptome (meta-transcriptome). The meta-transcriptome of two sites from the Tinto River mainly differing in the salt and oxygen contents were amplified and analysed by a L. ferrooxidans DNA microarray. The results showed a clear preferential induction of genes involved in certain physicochemical parameters like: high salinity (ectAB, otsAB), low oxygen concentration (cydAB), iron uptake (fecA-exbBD-tonB), oxidative stress (carotenoid synthesis, oxyR, recG), potassium (kdpBAC) or phosphate concentrations (pstSCAB), etc. We conclude that specific gene expression patterns can be useful indicators for the physiological conditions in a defined ecosystem. Also, the upregulation of certain genes and operons reveals information about the environmental conditions (nutrient limitations, stresses

  14. Lipid Microarray Biosensor for Biotoxin Detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anup K.; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Moran-Mirabal, Jose C.; Edel, Joshua B.; Meyer, Grant D.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2006-05-01

    We present the use of micron-sized lipid domains, patterned onto planar substrates and within microfluidic channels, to assay the binding of bacterial toxins via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The lipid domains were patterned using a polymer lift-off technique and consisted of ganglioside-populated DSPC:cholesterol supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). Lipid patterns were formed on the substrates by vesicle fusion followed by polymer lift-off, which revealed micron-sized SLBs containing either ganglioside GT1b or GM1. The ganglioside-populated SLB arrays were then exposed to either Cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) or Tetanus toxin fragment C (TTC). Binding was assayed on planar substrates by TIRFM down to 1 nM concentration for CTB and 100 nM for TTC. Apparent binding constants extracted from three different models applied to the binding curves suggest that binding of a protein to a lipid-based receptor is strongly affected by the lipid composition of the SLB and by the substrate on which the bilayer is formed. Patterning of SLBs inside microfluidic channels also allowed the preparation of lipid domains with different compositions on a single device. Arrays within microfluidic channels were used to achieve segregation and selective binding from a binary mixture of the toxin fragments in one device. The binding and segregation within the microfluidic channels was assayed with epifluorescence as proof of concept. We propose that the method used for patterning the lipid microarrays on planar substrates and within microfluidic channels can be easily adapted to proteins or nucleic acids and can be used for biosensor applications and cell stimulation assays under different flow conditions. KEYWORDS. Microarray, ganglioside, polymer lift-off, cholera toxin, tetanus toxin, TIRFM, binding constant.4

  15. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  16. Multiplexed autoantigen microarrays identify HLA as a key driver of anti-desmoglein and -non-desmoglein reactivities in pemphigus

    PubMed Central

    Sajda, Thomas; Hazelton, Julian; Patel, Milan; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Steinman, Lawrence; Robinson, William; Haab, Brian B.; Sinha, Animesh A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) harbor antibodies reactive against self-antigens expressed at the surface of keratinocytes, primarily desmoglein (Dsg) 3 and, to a lesser extent, Dsg1. Conventionally, only antibodies targeting these molecules have been thought to contribute to disease pathogenesis. This notion has been challenged by a growing pool of evidence that suggests that antibodies toward additional targets may play a role in disease. The aims of this study were to (i) establish high-throughput protein microarray technology as a method to investigate traditional and putative autoantibodies (autoAbs) in PV and (ii) use multiplexed protein array technology to define the scope and specificity of the autoAb response in PV. Our analysis demonstrated significant IgG reactivity in patients with PV toward the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes 3, 4, and 5 as well as thyroid peroxidase. Furthermore, we found that healthy first- and second-degree relatives of patients with PV express autoAbs toward desmoglein and non-Dsg targets. Our analysis also identified genetic elements, particularly HLA, as key drivers of autoAb expression. Finally, we show that patients with PV exhibit significantly reduced IgM reactivity toward disease-associated antigens relative to controls. The use of protein microarrays to profile the autoAb response in PV advanced the current understanding of disease and provided insight into the complex relationship between genetics and disease development. PMID:26831096

  17. Multiplexed autoantigen microarrays identify HLA as a key driver of anti-desmoglein and -non-desmoglein reactivities in pemphigus.

    PubMed

    Sajda, Thomas; Hazelton, Julian; Patel, Milan; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Steinman, Lawrence; Robinson, William; Haab, Brian B; Sinha, Animesh A

    2016-02-16

    Patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) harbor antibodies reactive against self-antigens expressed at the surface of keratinocytes, primarily desmoglein (Dsg) 3 and, to a lesser extent, Dsg1. Conventionally, only antibodies targeting these molecules have been thought to contribute to disease pathogenesis. This notion has been challenged by a growing pool of evidence that suggests that antibodies toward additional targets may play a role in disease. The aims of this study were to (i) establish high-throughput protein microarray technology as a method to investigate traditional and putative autoantibodies (autoAbs) in PV and (ii) use multiplexed protein array technology to define the scope and specificity of the autoAb response in PV. Our analysis demonstrated significant IgG reactivity in patients with PV toward the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes 3, 4, and 5 as well as thyroid peroxidase. Furthermore, we found that healthy first- and second-degree relatives of patients with PV express autoAbs toward desmoglein and non-Dsg targets. Our analysis also identified genetic elements, particularly HLA, as key drivers of autoAb expression. Finally, we show that patients with PV exhibit significantly reduced IgM reactivity toward disease-associated antigens relative to controls. The use of protein microarrays to profile the autoAb response in PV advanced the current understanding of disease and provided insight into the complex relationship between genetics and disease development. PMID:26831096

  18. Immunoassay, DNA Analysis, and Other Ligand Binding Assay Techniques: From Electropherograms to Multiplexed, Ultrasensitive Microarrays on a Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekins, Roger P.

    1999-06-01

    "Ligand" or "binding" assays have made a major impact on biomedical research and clinical diagnosis since their development in the late 1950s. Immunoassay techniques (relying on specific antibodies to bind the target analyte) represent the best-known example, but analogous DNA and RNA analysis methods (using oligonucleotides to recognize defined polynucleotide sequences) are rapidly gaining in importance and are likely to exert profound effects on human society. The evolution of these methods may be divided into three phases: (i) the initial development and widespread use of sensitive "competitive" assays relying on radioisotopically labeled analyte to monitor the binding reaction; (ii) the introduction in the 1980s of "ultrasensitive", "noncompetitive", labeled antibody methods relying on high-specific-activity nonisotopic labels, leading to the emergence of the automatic analyzers that now dominate the field, and (iii) the present development of "microarray"methods based on antibody or oligonucleotide microspots (each recognizing an individual analyte) arrayed on a solid support and relying on observation (typically by confocal microscopy) of fluorescent signals emitted from each spot. Miniaturized microarray methods permitting ultrasensitive measurement of hundreds of different analytes in a minute sample are likely to revolutionize medicine and related fields within the next decade.

  19. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  20. Heat-shrink plastic tubing seals joints in glass tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Duca, B.; Downey, A.

    1968-01-01

    Small units of standard glass apparatus held together by short lengths of transparent heat-shrinkable polyolefin tubing. The tubing is shrunk over glass O-ring type connectors having O-rings but no lubricant.

  1. Antibodies enhance CXCL10 production during RSV infection of infant and adult immune cells.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Marloes; Schreurs, Inge; Jans, Jop; Heldens, Jacco; de Groot, Ronald; de Jonge, Marien I; Ferwerda, Gerben

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis is a major burden in infants below three months of age, when the primary immune response is mainly dependent on innate immunity and maternal antibodies. We investigated the influence of antibodies on innate immunity during RSV infection. PBMCs from infants and adults were stimulated with live RSV and inactivated RSV in combination with antibody-containing and antibody-depleted serum. The immune response was determined by transcriptome analysis and chemokine levels were measured using ELISA and flow cytometry. Microarray data showed that CXCL10 gene transcription was RSV dependent, whereas CXCL11 and IFNα were upregulated in an antibody-dependent manner. Although the presence of antibodies reduces RSV infection rate, it enhances the innate immune response. In adult immune cells, antibodies enhance CXCL10, CXCL11, IFNα and IFNγ production in response to RSV infection. Contrary, in infant immune cells only CXCL10 was enhanced in an antibody-dependent manner. Monocytes are the main source of CXCL10 and they produce CXCL10 in both an antibody- and virus-dependent manner. This study shows that antibodies enhance CXCL10 production in infant immune cells. CXCL10 has been implicated in exuberating the inflammatory response during viral infections and antibodies could therefore play a role in the pathogenesis of RSV infections.

  2. Ultrasensitive carbohydrate-peptide SPR imaging microarray for diagnosing IgE mediated peanut allergy

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Amit A.; Peczuh, Mark W.; Kumar, Challa V.; Rusling, James F

    2014-01-01

    Severity of peanut allergies is linked to allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies in blood, but diagnostics from assays using glycoprotein allergen mixtures may be inaccurate. Measuring IgEs specific to individual peptide and carbohydrate epitopes of allergenic proteins is promising. We report here the first immunoarray for IgEs utilizing both peptide and carbohydrate epitopes. A surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) microarray was equipped with peptide and β-xylosyl glycoside (BXG) epitopes from major peanut allergen glycoprotein Arachis hypogaea h2 (Ara-h2). A monoclonal anti-IgE antibody was included as positive control. IgEs were precaptured onto magnetic beads loaded with polyclonal anti-IgE antibodies to enhance sensitivity and minimize non-specific binding. As little as 0.1 attomole (0.5 pg/mL) IgE was detected from dilute serum in 45 min. IgEs binding to Ara-h2 peptide and BXG were quantified in 10 μL of patient serum and correlated with standard ImmunoCAP values. PMID:25259443

  3. Tube Feeding Transition Plateaus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    2007-01-01

    The journey children make from tube feeding to oral feeding is personal for each child and family. There is a sequence of predictable plateaus that children climb as they move toward orally eating. By better understanding this sequence, parents and children can maximize the development, learning, enjoyment and confidence at each plateau. The…

  4. Downhole pulse tube refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.; Gardner, D.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes a preliminary design study to explore the plausibility of using pulse tube refrigeration to cool instruments in a hot down-hole environment. The original motivation was to maintain Dave Reagor`s high-temperature superconducting electronics at 75 K, but the study has evolved to include three target design criteria: cooling at 30 C in a 300 C environment, cooling at 75 K in a 50 C environment, cooling at both 75 K and 30 C in a 250 C environment. These specific temperatures were chosen arbitrarily, as representative of what is possible. The primary goals are low cost, reliability, and small package diameter. Pulse-tube refrigeration is a rapidly growing sub-field of cryogenic refrigeration. The pulse tube refrigerator has recently become the simplest, cheapest, most rugged and reliable low-power cryocooler. The authors expect this technology will be applicable downhole because of the ratio of hot to cold temperatures (in absolute units, such as Kelvin) of interest in deep drilling is comparable to the ratios routinely achieved with cryogenic pulse-tube refrigerators.

  5. Development of a Fibrinogen-Specific Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Microarray Assay for Distinguishing Between Blood Plasma and Serum Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, Rachel M.; Zhang, Qibin; Zangar, Richard C.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a fibrinogen-specific sandwich ELISA microarray assay for use in qualitatively distinguishing between blood plasma and serum samples. Three capture antibodies, 49D2, HPA001900, and F8512, were evaluated in conjunction with 1D6 as detection antibody, and the data show that 49D2 and, to a lesser extent, F8512 successfully identify previously unknown plasma and serum samples based upon a ~28-fold difference in signal intensity between the sample types. This assay has utility in rapidly identifying previously archived clinical samples with incomplete annotation in a high throughput manner prior to proteomics analyses.

  6. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  7. Advances in Antibody Design.

    PubMed

    Tiller, Kathryn E; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics requires optimizing several of their key attributes. These include binding affinity and specificity, folding stability, solubility, pharmacokinetics, effector functions, and compatibility with the attachment of additional antibody domains (bispecific antibodies) and cytotoxic drugs (antibody-drug conjugates). Addressing these and other challenges requires the use of systematic design methods that complement powerful immunization and in vitro screening methods. We review advances in designing the binding loops, scaffolds, domain interfaces, constant regions, post-translational and chemical modifications, and bispecific architectures of antibodies and fragments thereof to improve their bioactivity. We also highlight unmet challenges in antibody design that must be overcome to generate potent antibody therapeutics. PMID:26274600

  8. Microarrays for identifying binding sites and probing structure of RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kierzek, Ryszard; Turner, Douglas H.; Kierzek, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are widely used in various biological studies. In this review, application of oligonucleotide microarrays for identifying binding sites and probing structure of RNAs is described. Deep sequencing allows fast determination of DNA and RNA sequence. High-throughput methods for determination of secondary structures of RNAs have also been developed. Those methods, however, do not reveal binding sites for oligonucleotides. In contrast, microarrays directly determine binding sites while also providing structural insights. Microarray mapping can be used over a wide range of experimental conditions, including temperature, pH, various cations at different concentrations and the presence of other molecules. Moreover, it is possible to make universal microarrays suitable for investigations of many different RNAs, and readout of results is rapid. Thus, microarrays are used to provide insight into oligonucleotide sequences potentially able to interfere with biological function. Better understanding of structure–function relationships of RNA can be facilitated by using microarrays to find RNA regions capable to bind oligonucleotides. That information is extremely important to design optimal sequences for antisense oligonucleotides and siRNA because both bind to single-stranded regions of target RNAs. PMID:25505162

  9. The EADGENE Microarray Data Analysis Workshop (Open Access publication)

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, Dirk-Jan; Jaffrézic, Florence; Lund, Mogens Sandø; Watson, Michael; Channing, Caroline; Hulsegge, Ina; Pool, Marco H; Buitenhuis, Bart; Hedegaard, Jakob; Hornshøj, Henrik; Jiang, Li; Sørensen, Peter; Marot, Guillemette; Delmas, Céline; Cao, Kim-Anh Lê; San Cristobal, Magali; Baron, Michael D; Malinverni, Roberto; Stella, Alessandra; Brunner, Ronald M; Seyfert, Hans-Martin; Jensen, Kirsty; Mouzaki, Daphne; Waddington, David; Jiménez-Marín, Ángeles; Pérez-Alegre, Mónica; Pérez-Reinado, Eva; Closset, Rodrigue; Detilleux, Johanne C; Dovč, Peter; Lavrič, Miha; Nie, Haisheng; Janss, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Microarray analyses have become an important tool in animal genomics. While their use is becoming widespread, there is still a lot of ongoing research regarding the analysis of microarray data. In the context of a European Network of Excellence, 31 researchers representing 14 research groups from 10 countries performed and discussed the statistical analyses of real and simulated 2-colour microarray data that were distributed among participants. The real data consisted of 48 microarrays from a disease challenge experiment in dairy cattle, while the simulated data consisted of 10 microarrays from a direct comparison of two treatments (dye-balanced). While there was broader agreement with regards to methods of microarray normalisation and significance testing, there were major differences with regards to quality control. The quality control approaches varied from none, through using statistical weights, to omitting a large number of spots or omitting entire slides. Surprisingly, these very different approaches gave quite similar results when applied to the simulated data, although not all participating groups analysed both real and simulated data. The workshop was very successful in facilitating interaction between scientists with a diverse background but a common interest in microarray analyses. PMID:18053572

  10. Microintaglio Printing for Soft Lithography-Based in Situ Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Biyani, Manish; Ichiki, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Advances in lithographic approaches to fabricating bio-microarrays have been extensively explored over the last two decades. However, the need for pattern flexibility, a high density, a high resolution, affordability and on-demand fabrication is promoting the development of unconventional routes for microarray fabrication. This review highlights the development and uses of a new molecular lithography approach, called “microintaglio printing technology”, for large-scale bio-microarray fabrication using a microreactor array (µRA)-based chip consisting of uniformly-arranged, femtoliter-size µRA molds. In this method, a single-molecule-amplified DNA microarray pattern is self-assembled onto a µRA mold and subsequently converted into a messenger RNA or protein microarray pattern by simultaneously producing and transferring (immobilizing) a messenger RNA or a protein from a µRA mold to a glass surface. Microintaglio printing allows the self-assembly and patterning of in situ-synthesized biomolecules into high-density (kilo-giga-density), ordered arrays on a chip surface with µm-order precision. This holistic aim, which is difficult to achieve using conventional printing and microarray approaches, is expected to revolutionize and reshape proteomics. This review is not written comprehensively, but rather substantively, highlighting the versatility of microintaglio printing for developing a prerequisite platform for microarray technology for the postgenomic era.

  11. Spot the Difference—Development of a Syndrome Based Protein Microarray for Specific Serological Detection of Multiple Flavivirus Infections in Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Cleton, Natalie B.; Godeke, Gert-Jan; Reimerink, Johan; Beersma, Mathias F.; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Franco, Leticia; Goeijenbier, Marco; Jimenez-Clavero, Miguel A.; Johnson, Barbara W.; Niedrig, Matthias; Papa, Anna; Sambri, Vittorio; Tami, Adriana; Velasco-Salas, Zoraida I.; Koopmans, Marion P. G.; Reusken, Chantal B. E. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, holds many of the world’s most prevalent arboviral diseases that are also considered the most important travel related arboviral infections. In most cases, flavivirus diagnosis in travelers is primarily based on serology as viremia is often low and typically has already been reduced to undetectable levels when symptoms set in and patients seek medical attention. Serological differentiation between flaviviruses and the false-positive results caused by vaccination and cross-reactivity among the different species, are problematic for surveillance and diagnostics of flaviviruses. Their partially overlapping geographic distribution and symptoms, combined with increase in travel, and preexisting antibodies due to flavivirus vaccinations, expand the need for rapid and reliable multiplex diagnostic tests to supplement currently used methods. Goal We describe the development of a multiplex serological protein microarray using recombinant NS1 proteins for detection of medically important viruses within the genus Flavivirus. Sera from clinical flavivirus patients were used for primary development of the protein microarray. Results Results show a high IgG and IgM sensitivity and specificity for individual NS1 antigens, and limited cross reactivity, even within serocomplexes. In addition, the serology based on this array allows for discrimination between infection and vaccination response for JEV vaccine, and no cross-reactivity with TBEV and YFV vaccine induced antibodies when testing for antibodies to other flaviviruses. Conclusion Based on these data, multiplex NS1-based protein microarray is a promising tool for surveillance and diagnosis of flaviviruses. PMID:25767876

  12. Quarter-wave pulse tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, G. W.; Gardner, D. L.; Backhaus, S. N.

    2011-10-01

    In high-power pulse-tube refrigerators, the pulse tube itself can be very long without too much dissipation of acoustic power on its walls. The pressure amplitude, the volume-flow-rate amplitude, and the time phase between them evolve significantly along a pulse tube that is about a quarter-wavelength long. Proper choice of length and area makes the oscillations at the ambient end of the long pulse tube optimal for driving a second, smaller pulse-tube refrigerator, thereby utilizing the acoustic power that would typically have been dissipated in the first pulse-tube refrigerator's orifice. Experiments show that little heat is carried from the ambient heat exchanger to the cold heat exchanger in such a long pulse tube, even though the oscillations are turbulent and even when the tube is compactly coiled.

  13. Rubens Flame-Tube Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ficken, George W.; Stephenson, Francis C.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates and explains the phenomenon associated with Rubens flame-tube demonstration, specifically the persistance of flames at regular intervals along the tube for few minutes after the gas is turned off. (GA)

  14. Vanadium tube processing and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, D.D.; Tanaka, G.J.

    1993-08-11

    Vanadium tubing obtained from Century Tubes, a custom tubing manufacturer, was studied to determine as-received quality and fabricability. Applications for this tubing involve crimping and sealing operations at Pantex Plant requiring very high levels of leak-tightness (leak rates less than 10{sup {minus}8} atm-cc He/sec). The as-received material had poor OD and ID surface finish and cleanliness that needed to be improved before use in component fabrication. Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC) personnel developed a cleaning procedure to make this tubing acceptable for crimping and sealing operations. After suitably cleaning the tubing, we tested several tube sealing techniques and all showed some degree of success. Pantex Plant personnel are now implementing a tube sealing process very similar to one of the techniques studied, a mechanical crimp followed by seal welding.

  15. Multiple test tubes stirred mechanically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, H. J.; Strong, I. J.

    1965-01-01

    Mechanical device simultaneously stirs multiple test tubes under controlled laboratory conditions. The invention provides a variable stirring rate, minimal amount of contamination of tube contents, unattended and simple operation, and easy maintenance and cleaning.

  16. Deciphering the glycosaminoglycan code with the help of microarrays.

    PubMed

    de Paz, Jose L; Seeberger, Peter H

    2008-07-01

    Carbohydrate microarrays have become a powerful tool to elucidate the biological role of complex sugars. Microarrays are particularly useful for the study of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), a key class of carbohydrates. The high-throughput chip format enables rapid screening of large numbers of potential GAG sequences produced via a complex biosynthesis while consuming very little sample. Here, we briefly highlight the most recent advances involving GAG microarrays built with synthetic or naturally derived oligosaccharides. These chips are powerful tools for characterizing GAG-protein interactions and determining structure-activity relationships for specific sequences. Thereby, they contribute to decoding the information contained in specific GAG sequences. PMID:18563243

  17. Protein Microarrays with Novel Microfluidic Methods: Current Advances

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Chandra K.; Aguirre, Gerson R.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic-based micromosaic technology has allowed the pattering of recognition elements in restricted micrometer scale areas with high precision. This controlled patterning enabled the development of highly multiplexed arrays multiple analyte detection. This arraying technology was first introduced in the beginning of 2001 and holds tremendous potential to revolutionize microarray development and analyte detection. Later, several microfluidic methods were developed for microarray application. In this review we discuss these novel methods and approaches which leverage the property of microfluidic technologies to significantly improve various physical aspects of microarray technology, such as enhanced imprinting homogeneity, stability of the immobilized biomolecules, decreasing assay times, and reduction of the costs and of the bulky instrumentation.

  18. Deciphering the glycosaminoglycan code with the help of microarrays.

    PubMed

    de Paz, Jose L; Seeberger, Peter H

    2008-07-01

    Carbohydrate microarrays have become a powerful tool to elucidate the biological role of complex sugars. Microarrays are particularly useful for the study of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), a key class of carbohydrates. The high-throughput chip format enables rapid screening of large numbers of potential GAG sequences produced via a complex biosynthesis while consuming very little sample. Here, we briefly highlight the most recent advances involving GAG microarrays built with synthetic or naturally derived oligosaccharides. These chips are powerful tools for characterizing GAG-protein interactions and determining structure-activity relationships for specific sequences. Thereby, they contribute to decoding the information contained in specific GAG sequences.

  19. A Perspective on DNA Microarrays in Pathology Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Jonathan R.

    2007-01-01

    DNA microarray technology matured in the mid-1990s, and the past decade has witnessed a tremendous growth in its application. DNA microarrays have provided powerful tools for pathology researchers seeking to describe, classify, and understand human disease. There has also been great expectation that the technology would advance the practice of pathology. This review highlights some of the key contributions of DNA microarrays to experimental pathology, focusing in the area of cancer research. Also discussed are some of the current challenges in translating utility to clinical practice. PMID:17600117

  20. New technologies for fabricating biological microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Bradley James

    This dissertation contains the description of two technologies that we have developed to reduce the cost and improve the quality of spotted biological microarrays. The first is a device, called a fluid microplotter, that uses ultrasonics to deposit spots with diameters of less than 5 microns. It consists of a dispenser, composed of a micropipette fastened to a piece of PZT piezoelectric, attached to a precision positioning system. A gentle pumping of fluid to the surface occurs when the micropipette is driven at specific frequencies. Spots or continuous lines can be deposited in this manner. The small fluid features conserve expensive and limited-quantity biological reagents. We characterize the performance of the microplotter in depositing fluid and examine the theoretical underpinnings of its operation. We present an analytical expression for the diameter of a deposited spot as a function of droplet volume and wettability of a surface and compare it with experimental results. We also examine the resonant properties of the piezoelectric element used to drive the dispenser and relate that to the frequencies at which pumping occurs. Finally, we propose a mechanism to explain the pumping behavior within the microplotter dispenser. The second technology we present is a process that uses a cold plasma and a subsequent in vacuo vapor-phase reaction to terminate a variety of oxide surfaces with epoxide chemical groups. These epoxide groups can react with amine-containing biomolecules to form strong covalent linkages between the biomolecules and the treated surface. The use of a plasma activation step followed by an in vacuo vapor-phase reaction allows for the precise control of surface functional groups, rather than the mixture of functionalities normally produced. This process modifies a range of different oxide surfaces, is fast, consumes a minimal amount of reagents, and produces attachment densities for bound biomolecules that are comparable to or better than

  1. Quantitative assessment of Tn antigen in breast tissue micro-arrays using CdSe aqueous quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Au, Giang H T; Mejias, Linette; Swami, Vanlila K; Brooks, Ari D; Shih, Wan Y; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we examined the use of CdSe aqueous quantum dots (AQDs) each conjugated to three streptavidin as a fluorescent label to image Tn antigen expression in various breast tissues via a sandwich staining procedure where the primary monoclonal anti-Tn antibody was bound to the Tn antigen on the tissue, a biotin-labeled secondary antibody was bound to the primary anti-Tn antibody, and finally the streptavidin-conjugated AQDs were bound to the biotin on the secondary antibody. We evaluated the AQD staining of Tn antigen on tissue microarrays consisting of 395 cores from 115 cases including three tumor cores and one normal-tissue core from each breast cancer case and three tumor cores from each benign case. The results indicated AQD-Tn staining was positive in more than 90% of the cells in the cancer cores but not the cells in the normal-tissue cores and the benign tumor cores. As a result, AQD-Tn staining exhibited 95% sensitivity and 90% specificity in differentiating breast cancer against normal breast tissues and benign breast conditions. These results were better than the 90% sensitivity and 80% specificity exhibited by the corresponding horse radish peroxidase (HRP) staining using the same antibodies on the same tissues and those of previous studies that used different fluorescent labels to image Tn antigen. In addition to sensitivity and specificity, the current AQD-Tn staining with a definitive threshold was quantitative. PMID:24411673

  2. Segment and fit thresholding: a new method for image analysis applied to microarray and immunofluorescence data.

    PubMed

    Ensink, Elliot; Sinha, Jessica; Sinha, Arkadeep; Tang, Huiyuan; Calderone, Heather M; Hostetter, Galen; Winter, Jordan; Cherba, David; Brand, Randall E; Allen, Peter J; Sempere, Lorenzo F; Haab, Brian B

    2015-10-01

    Experiments involving the high-throughput quantification of image data require algorithms for automation. A challenge in the development of such algorithms is to properly interpret signals over a broad range of image characteristics, without the need for manual adjustment of parameters. Here we present a new approach for locating signals in image data, called Segment and Fit Thresholding (SFT). The method assesses statistical characteristics of small segments of the image and determines the best-fit trends between the statistics. Based on the relationships, SFT identifies segments belonging to background regions; analyzes the background to determine optimal thresholds; and analyzes all segments to identify signal pixels. We optimized the initial settings for locating background and signal in antibody microarray and immunofluorescence data and found that SFT performed well over multiple, diverse image characteristics without readjustment of settings. When used for the automated analysis of multicolor, tissue-microarray images, SFT correctly found the overlap of markers with known subcellular localization, and it performed better than a fixed threshold and Otsu's method for selected images. SFT promises to advance the goal of full automation in image analysis. PMID:26339978

  3. Genome-wide detection of high abundance N6-methyladenosine sites by microarray

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Zhaolei; Zamudio, Alicia Viridiana; Zhao, Jing Crystal

    2015-01-01

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A), the most abundant internal RNA modification, functions in diverse biological processes, including regulation of embryonic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. As yet, methods to detect m6A in the transcriptome rely on the availability and quality of an m6A antibody and are often associated with a high rate of false positives. Here, based on our observation that m6A interferes with A–T/U pairing, we report a microarray-based technology to map m6A sites in mouse embryonic stem cells. We identified 72 unbiased sites exhibiting high m6A levels from 66 PolyA RNAs. Bioinformatics analyses suggest identified sites are enriched on developmental regulators and may in some contexts modulate microRNA/mRNA interactions. Overall, we have developed microarray-based technology to capture highly enriched m6A sites in the mammalian transcriptome. This method provides an alternative means to identify m6A sites for certain applications. PMID:26092943

  4. Segment and fit thresholding: a new method for image analysis applied to microarray and immunofluorescence data.

    PubMed

    Ensink, Elliot; Sinha, Jessica; Sinha, Arkadeep; Tang, Huiyuan; Calderone, Heather M; Hostetter, Galen; Winter, Jordan; Cherba, David; Brand, Randall E; Allen, Peter J; Sempere, Lorenzo F; Haab, Brian B

    2015-10-01

    Experiments involving the high-throughput quantification of image data require algorithms for automation. A challenge in the development of such algorithms is to properly interpret signals over a broad range of image characteristics, without the need for manual adjustment of parameters. Here we present a new approach for locating signals in image data, called Segment and Fit Thresholding (SFT). The method assesses statistical characteristics of small segments of the image and determines the best-fit trends between the statistics. Based on the relationships, SFT identifies segments belonging to background regions; analyzes the background to determine optimal thresholds; and analyzes all segments to identify signal pixels. We optimized the initial settings for locating background and signal in antibody microarray and immunofluorescence data and found that SFT performed well over multiple, diverse image characteristics without readjustment of settings. When used for the automated analysis of multicolor, tissue-microarray images, SFT correctly found the overlap of markers with known subcellular localization, and it performed better than a fixed threshold and Otsu's method for selected images. SFT promises to advance the goal of full automation in image analysis.

  5. Composite Cathode-Ray Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangal, Mukund D.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed composite cathode-ray tube consists of rectangular array of cathode-ray tubes joined at edges, sharing common vacuum. Each electron gun generates independent image on portion of screen. Composite tube operates most advantageously under digital control to make available several display modes. Brightness and resolution of large images increased. Useful for classroom presentations, conferences, and the like.

  6. Enteral Tube Feeding and Pneumonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David Sheridan; Kimmel, David

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effects of enteral tube feeding on the incidence of pneumonia, we performed a retrospective review of all clients at our institution who had gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes placed over a 10-year period. Ninety-three subjects had a history of pneumonia before feeding tube insertion. Eighty had gastrostomy and 13, jejunostomy…

  7. Antibody Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Erik D; Smider, Vaughn V; Felding, Brunhilde H

    2016-01-01

    One of the newer classes of targeted cancer therapeutics is monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics are a successful and rapidly expanding drug class due to their high specificity, activity, favourable pharmacokinetics, and standardized manufacturing processes. Antibodies are capable of recruiting the immune system to attack cancer cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In an ideal scenario the initial tumor cell destruction induced by administration of a therapeutic antibody can result in uptake of tumor associated antigens by antigen-presenting cells, establishing a prolonged memory effect. Mechanisms of direct tumor cell killing by antibodies include antibody recognition of cell surface bound enzymes to neutralize enzyme activity and signaling, or induction of receptor agonist or antagonist activity. Both approaches result in cellular apoptosis. In another and very direct approach, antibodies are used to deliver drugs to target cells and cause cell death. Such antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) direct cytotoxic compounds to tumor cells, after selective binding to cell surface antigens, internalization, and intracellular drug release. Efficacy and safety of ADCs for cancer therapy has recently been greatly advanced based on innovative approaches for site-specific drug conjugation to the antibody structure. This technology enabled rational optimization of function and pharmacokinetics of the resulting conjugates, and is now beginning to yield therapeutics with defined, uniform molecular characteristics, and unprecedented promise to advance cancer treatment. PMID:27081677

  8. Tubing rotator reduces tubing wear in rod pumped wells

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, M. ); Brown, C. )

    1994-04-04

    Tubing failures are both expensive and time-consuming. The most common failure results from rod cutting, or, erosion of the tubing ID because of continuous, reciprocating contact with the rod string. Installation of tubing rotators has decreased tubing failures in West Texas waterflood sucker-rod pumped wells. Pumping unit movement powers the rotator system, turning the tubing string at about 1 revolution/day. The rotator system has both surface and subsurface components. A reduction gear box attached to the walking beam converts the pumping unit's reciprocating strokes into rotary motion. A drive line transfers this rotary motion to a gear-driven suspension mandrel in the rotating tubing hanger. Near the bottom of the tubing string, a rotating tubing anchor/catcher allows the entire tubing string, including the tail pipe, seating nipple, and gas and mud anchor to rotate. The rotator hanger suspends the weight of the tubing string on a bearing system. One model of the hanger has a load capacity of 135,000 lb. A surface swivel allows rotation below the pumping tee so that the flow lines remain stationary. Also included in the string is a safety shear coupling to prevent over torquing the tubing.

  9. Antibody-based magnetic nanoparticle immunoassay for quantification of Alzheimer's disease pathogenic factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Beom; Choi, Yu Yong; Song, Woo Keun; Song, Ki-Bong

    2014-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to a decline in cognitive and intellectual abilities and an irreversible mental deterioration. Based on multidisciplinary AD research, the most universally accepted hypotheses on AD pathogenesis are the intracerebral aggregate formation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. According to medical paradigmatic transition from medical treatment to early diagnostic prevention, scientists have considered physiological body fluid as a biomarker medium, in which the promising AD biomarkers could be verified. Recently, use of saliva has been considered as one of the diagnostic fluids over the past decade with meaningful diagnostic potential. We utilized saliva as a biomarker medium to correlate the salivary Aβ levels to AD pathological aspects, especially to the mild cognitive impairment group among AD patients, and to verify our detecting system to be sensitive enough for an early diagnostic tool. The identification of the salivary AD biomarkers using a facile microarraying method would motivate this study with the assistance of magnetically assembled antibody-conjugated nanoparticles and a photomultiplier tube as an optical detector. This simple magnetoimmunoassay system measures the photointensity generated by fluorescence, enables the quantification of the Aβ peptides from AD salivary samples, and consequently classifies the salivary Aβ levels into AD pathological aspects. This method demonstrates a facile approach enabling it to simply detect salivary Aβ peptides at a concentration as low as ˜20 pg/ml. It is expected that our simple magnetoimmunoassay system may have a potential as a detector for low-level Aβ peptides with weak-fluorescence emission.

  10. YouTube Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riendeau, Diane

    2012-09-01

    To date, this column has presented videos to show in class, Don Mathieson from Tulsa Community College suggested that YouTube could be used in another fashion. In Don's experience, his students are not always prepared for the mathematic rigor of his course. Even at the high school level, math can be a barrier for physics students. Walid Shihabi, a colleague of Don's, decided to compile a list of YouTube videos that his students could watch to relearn basic mathematics. I thought this sounded like a fantastic idea and a great service to the students. Walid graciously agreed to share his list and I have reproduced a large portion of it below.

  11. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, D.E.

    1982-07-02

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  12. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E.

    1984-01-01

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  13. Ontology-Based Analysis of Microarray Data.

    PubMed

    Giuseppe, Agapito; Milano, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    The importance of semantic-based methods and algorithms for the analysis and management of biological data is growing for two main reasons. From a biological side, knowledge contained in ontologies is more and more accurate and complete, from a computational side, recent algorithms are using in a valuable way such knowledge. Here we focus on semantic-based management and analysis of protein interaction networks referring to all the approaches of analysis of protein-protein interaction data that uses knowledge encoded into biological ontologies. Semantic approaches for studying high-throughput data have been largely used in the past to mine genomic and expression data. Recently, the emergence of network approaches for investigating molecular machineries has stimulated in a parallel way the introduction of semantic-based techniques for analysis and management of network data. The application of these computational approaches to the study of microarray data can broad the application scenario of them and simultaneously can help the understanding of disease development and progress.

  14. [Patulous eustachian tube].

    PubMed

    Kovacević, D; Radosavljević, M; Jelesijević, J

    1995-01-01

    Patulous eustachian tube is a pathological condition which exists more often than we make a diagnosis, and a patient is not often aware of his disease. This disease can be manifested with various symptoms: respiratory synchrony noises in the ear, because of the penetration of the air current through the eustachian tube and with the movement of the eardrum outwards and inside, with autophony, reduction of the hearing, the buzzing, dizziness and disturbance of the balance. Two patients are presented. The first one was sick for many years from various chronics exhausted diseases: Jackson's epilepsy, temporary vascular brain disturbances, tuberculosis of lung, stomach ulcer, heart diseases, the patient is from low class, on one side, and also suffers from some local diseases: a paralysis of soft palate and palatal arcs, a chronic catarrhal rhinitis and sinusitis, a deviation of nasal dividing wall and hindered breathing through the nose, on the other side. Many years the patient didn't know for patological condition in the ears and in the eustachian tubes. After improving the hygienic conditions, the physical condition and local therapy, the patient felt much better. The second patient, with considerable shorter evolution of the disease and mild symptomatology, showed the amplified symptoms of the disease of the Eustachian tube in the course of the acute otitis. It is attained a satisfying calming of the manifestative symptoms by remedy therapie. Man must thing about possibility of the appearance of this pathology condition in various disease or conditions, which can take to the fast lost of the weight and physical and moral exhaustion of the patient, i.e. an adult, first as the protection of the appearance of the disease (condition) and afterwards, eventually early and regulary treatment in order to prevent various possible, above mentioned complications. PMID:16296237

  15. Joined concentric tubes

    SciTech Connect

    DeJonghe, Lutgard; Jacobson, Craig; Tucker, Michael; Visco, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Tubular objects having two or more concentric layers that have different properties are joined to one another during their manufacture primarily by compressive and friction forces generated by shrinkage during sintering and possibly mechanical interlocking. It is not necessary for the concentric tubes to display adhesive-, chemical- or sinter-bonding to each other in order to achieve a strong bond. This facilitates joining of dissimilar materials, such as ceramics and metals.

  16. Method for printing functional protein microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delehanty, James B.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2003-01-01

    Piezoelectric dispensing of proteins from borosilicate glass capillaries is a popular method of protein biochip fabrication that offers the advantages of sample recovery and noncontact with the printing substrate. However, little regard has been given to the quantitative aspects of dispensing minute volumes (1 nL or less) at the low protein concentrations (20 micrograms/mL or less) typically used in microprinting. Specifically, loss of protein sample due to nonspecific adsorption to the glass surface of the dispensing capillaries can limit the amount of protein delivered to the substrate. We demonstrate the benefits of a low ionic strength buffer containing the carrier protein BSA that effectively minimizes the ionic strength-dependent phenomenon of nonspecific protein adsorption to borosilicate glass. Over the concentration range of 20-2.5 micrograms/mL, the dispensing of a reference IgG in 10 mM PBS including 0.1% BSA resulted in the deposition of 3.6- to 44-fold more IgG compared to the deposition of IgG in standard 150 mM PBS in the absence of BSA. Furthermore, when the IgG was dispensed with carrier protein, the resulting spots exhibited a more uniform morphology. In a direct immunoassay for cholera toxin, capture antibody spots dispensed in 10 mM PBS containing 0.1% BSA produced fluorescent signals that were 2.8- to 4.3-fold more intense than antibody spots that were dispensed in 150 mM PBS without BSA. Interestingly, no differences were observed in the specific activities of the capture antibodies as a result of printing in the different buffers. The implications of these results on the future development of protein biochips are discussed.

  17. Traveling-Wave Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1998-01-01

    The traveling-wave tube (TWT) is a vacuum device invented in the early 1940's used for amplification at microwave frequencies. Amplification is attained by surrendering kinetic energy from an electron beam to a radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic wave. The demand for vacuum devices has been decreased largely by the advent of solid-state devices. However, although solid state devices have replaced vacuum devices in many areas, there are still many applications such as radar, electronic countermeasures and satellite communications, that require operating characteristics such as high power (Watts to Megawatts), high frequency (below 1 GHz to over 100 GHz) and large bandwidth that only vacuum devices can provide. Vacuum devices are also deemed irreplaceable in the music industry where musicians treasure their tube-based amplifiers claiming that the solid-state and digital counterparts could never provide the same "warmth" (3). The term traveling-wave tube includes both fast-wave and slow-wave devices. This article will concentrate on slow-wave devices as the vast majority of TWTs in operation fall into this category.

  18. Concentric tube support assembly

    DOEpatents

    Rubio, Mark F.; Glessner, John C.

    2012-09-04

    An assembly (45) includes a plurality of separate pie-shaped segments (72) forming a disk (70) around a central region (48) for retaining a plurality of tubes (46) in a concentrically spaced apart configuration. Each segment includes a support member (94) radially extending along an upstream face (96) of the segment and a plurality of annularly curved support arms (98) transversely attached to the support member and radially spaced apart from one another away from the central region for receiving respective upstream end portions of the tubes in arc-shaped spaces (100) between the arms. Each segment also includes a radial passageway (102) formed in the support member for receiving a fluid segment portion (106) and a plurality of annular passageways (104) formed in the support arms for receiving respective arm portions (108) of the fluid segment portion from the radial passageway and for conducting the respective arm portions into corresponding annular spaces (47) formed between the tubes retained by the disk.

  19. TUBE SHEARING VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Wilner, L.B.

    1960-05-24

    Explosive operated valves can be used to join two or more containers in fluid flow relationship, one such container being a sealed reservoir. The valve is most simply disposed by mounting it on the reservoir so thst a tube extends from the interior of the reservoir through the valve body, terminating at the bottom of the bore in a closed end; other containers may be similarly connected or may be open connected, as desired. The piston of the valve has a cutting edge at its lower end which shears off the closed tube ends and a recess above the cutting edge to provide a flow channel. Intermixing of the fluid being transferred with the explosion gases is prevented by a copper ring at the top of the piston which is force fitted into the bore at the beginning of the stroke. Although designed to avoid backing up of the piston at pressures up to 10,000 psi in the transferred fluid, proper operation is independent of piston position, once the tube ends were sheared.

  20. Tube bundle system

    PubMed Central

    Marchewka, W.; Mohamed, K.; Addis, J.; Karnack, F.

    2015-01-01

    A tube bundle system (TBS) is a mechanical system for continuously drawing gas samples through tubes from multiple monitoring points located in an underground coal mine. The gas samples are drawn via vacuum pump to the surface and are typically analyzed for oxygen, methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. Results of the gas analyses are displayed and recorded for further analysis. Trends in the composition of the mine atmosphere, such as increasing methane or carbon monoxide concentration, can be detected early, permitting rapid intervention that prevents problems, such as a potentially explosive atmosphere behind seals, fire or spontaneous combustion. TBS is a well-developed technology and has been used in coal mines around the world for more than 50 years. Most longwall coal mines in Australia deploy a TBS, usually with 30 to 40 monitoring points as part of their atmospheric monitoring. The primary uses of a TBS are detecting spontaneous combustion and maintaining sealed areas inert. The TBS might also provide mine atmosphere gas composition data after a catastrophe occurs in an underground mine, if the sampling tubes are not damaged. TBSs are not an alternative to statutory gas and ventilation airflow monitoring by electronic sensors or people; rather, they are an option to consider in an overall mine atmosphere monitoring strategy. This paper describes the hardware, software and operation of a TBS and presents one example of typical data from a longwall coal mine PMID:26306052

  1. Apparatus Splits Glass Tubes Longitudinally

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Ernest; Manahan, Robert O'neil

    1993-01-01

    Tubes split into half cylinders by hot-wire/thermal-shock method. Tube to be cut placed on notched jig in apparatus. Nichrome wire stretched between arms of pivoted carriage and oriented parallel to notch. Wire heated by electrical current while resting on tube. After heating for about 1 minute for each millimeter of thickness of glass, tube quenched in water and split by resulting thermal shock. Apparatus used to split tubes in sizes ranging from 3/8 in. in diameter by 1 in. long to 1 1/2 in. in diameter by 4 in. long.

  2. Antibodies to prothrombin.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, M L

    2012-06-01

    Research on antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) and the thrombotic manifestations associated with these antibodies has grown since the description of anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) by Harris and colleagues in the early 1980s. Antiprothrombin (aPT) antibodies are commonly detected by ELISA, using irradiated plates (aPT) or prothrombin in complex with phosphatidylserine (aPS/PT). Although aPT and/or aPS/PT are associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) -related clinical features and these antibodies correlate with each other, aPT and aPS/PT belong to different populations of autoantibodies even though they can both be present in the same patient. Early studies suggested that these antibodies might be the antigenic target of lupus anticoagulant (LA) and their correlation and clinical significance is being investigated. PMID:22635215

  3. Engineering antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Mark L; Gilliland, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    The successful introduction of antibody-based protein therapeutics into the arsenal of treatments for patients has within a few decades fostered intense innovation in the production and engineering of antibodies. Reviewed here are the methods currently used to produce antibodies along with how our knowledge of the structural and functional characterization of immunoglobulins has resulted in the engineering of antibodies to produce protein therapeutics with unique properties, both biological and biophysical, that are leading to novel therapeutic approaches. Antibody engineering includes the introduction of the antibody combining site (variable regions) into a host of architectures including bi and multi-specific formats that further impact the therapeutic properties leading to further advantages and successes in patient treatment. PMID:27525816

  4. Antibodies in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs from one individual to another can incite the production of antibodies specific for foreign antigens, especially major histocompatibility antigens, in the graft. Antibodies specific for a graft provide an index of immunity and a potential trigger for injury and rejection. However, the index of immunity can sometimes miss antibody-mediated rejection and besides causing injury the antibodies against a graft can also protect a graft from injury by blocking immune recognition, called enhancement, regulating activation of complement, and inducing changes in the graft that resist damage. Reviewed here are potential limitations in the use of antibodies as an index of immunity and the ways antibodies cause and/or prevent injury. PMID:20807473

  5. Design, construction, characterization, and application of a hyperspectral microarray scanner.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Michael B; Timlin, Jerilyn A; Haaland, David M; Werner-Washburne, Margaret

    2004-04-01

    We describe the design, construction, and operation of a hyperspectral microarray scanner for functional genomic research. The hyperspectral instrument operates with spatial resolutions ranging from 3 to 30 microm and records the emission spectrum between 490 and 900 nm with a spectral resolution of 3 nm for each pixel of the microarray. This spectral information, when coupled with multivariate data analysis techniques, allows for identification and elimination of unwanted artifacts and greatly improves the accuracy of microarray experiments. Microarray results presented in this study clearly demonstrate the separation of fluorescent label emission from the spectrally overlapping emission due to the underlying glass substrate. We also demonstrate separation of the emission due to green fluorescent protein expressed by yeast cells from the spectrally overlapping autofluorescence of the yeast cells and the growth media.

  6. Development and Optimization of a Thrombin Sandwich Aptamer Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Meneghello, Anna; Sosic, Alice; Antognoli, Agnese; Cretaio, Erica; Gatto, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    A sandwich microarray employing two distinct aptamers for human thrombin has been optimized for the detection of subnanomolar concentrations of the protein. The aptamer microarray demonstrates high specificity for thrombin, proving that a two-site binding assay with the TBA1 aptamer as capture layer and the TBA2 aptamer as detection layer can ensure great specificity at times and conditions compatible with standard routine analysis of biological samples. Aptamer microarray sensitivity was evaluated directly by fluorescent analysis employing Cy5-labeled TBA2 and indirectly by the use of TBA2-biotin followed by detection with fluorescent streptavidin. Sub-nanomolar LODs were reached in all cases and in the presence of serum, demonstrating that the optimized aptamer microarray can identify thrombin by a low-cost, sensitive and specific method.

  7. Cell-Based Microarrays for In Vitro Toxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, Joachim

    2015-07-01

    DNA/RNA and protein microarrays have proven their outstanding bioanalytical performance throughout the past decades, given the unprecedented level of parallelization by which molecular recognition assays can be performed and analyzed. Cell microarrays (CMAs) make use of similar construction principles. They are applied to profile a given cell population with respect to the expression of specific molecular markers and also to measure functional cell responses to drugs and chemicals. This review focuses on the use of cell-based microarrays for assessing the cytotoxicity of drugs, toxins, or chemicals in general. It also summarizes CMA construction principles with respect to the cell types that are used for such microarrays, the readout parameters to assess toxicity, and the various formats that have been established and applied. The review ends with a critical comparison of CMAs and well-established microtiter plate (MTP) approaches.

  8. FRET-based real-time DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hassibi, Arjang; Vikalo, Haris; Riechmann, José Luis; Hassibi, Babak

    2012-01-01

    We present a quantification method for affinity-based DNA microarrays which is based on the real-time measurements of hybridization kinetics. This method, i.e., real-time DNA microarrays, enhances the detection dynamic range of conventional systems by being impervious to probe saturation, washing artifacts, microarray spot-to-spot variations, and other intensity-affecting impediments. We demonstrate in both theory and practice that the time-constant of target capturing is inversely proportional to the concentration of the target analyte, which we take advantage of as the fundamental parameter to estimate the concentration of the analytes. Furthermore, to experimentally validate the capabilities of this method in practical applications, we present a FRET-based assay which enables the real-time detection in gene expression DNA microarrays. PMID:22130990

  9. Cell-Based Microarrays for In Vitro Toxicology.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    DNA/RNA and protein microarrays have proven their outstanding bioanalytical performance throughout the past decades, given the unprecedented level of parallelization by which molecular recognition assays can be performed and analyzed. Cell microarrays (CMAs) make use of similar construction principles. They are applied to profile a given cell population with respect to the expression of specific molecular markers and also to measure functional cell responses to drugs and chemicals. This review focuses on the use of cell-based microarrays for assessing the cytotoxicity of drugs, toxins, or chemicals in general. It also summarizes CMA construction principles with respect to the cell types that are used for such microarrays, the readout parameters to assess toxicity, and the various formats that have been established and applied. The review ends with a critical comparison of CMAs and well-established microtiter plate (MTP) approaches. PMID:26077916

  10. Cell-Based Microarrays for In Vitro Toxicology.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    DNA/RNA and protein microarrays have proven their outstanding bioanalytical performance throughout the past decades, given the unprecedented level of parallelization by which molecular recognition assays can be performed and analyzed. Cell microarrays (CMAs) make use of similar construction principles. They are applied to profile a given cell population with respect to the expression of specific molecular markers and also to measure functional cell responses to drugs and chemicals. This review focuses on the use of cell-based microarrays for assessing the cytotoxicity of drugs, toxins, or chemicals in general. It also summarizes CMA construction principles with respect to the cell types that are used for such microarrays, the readout parameters to assess toxicity, and the various formats that have been established and applied. The review ends with a critical comparison of CMAs and well-established microtiter plate (MTP) approaches.

  11. High-Throughput Profiling of the Humoral Immune Responses Against Thirteen Human Papillomavirus Types by Proteome Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Luevano, Martha; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A.; Trevino, Victor; Garcia-Carranca, Alejandro; Villa, Luisa L.; Monk, Bradley J.; Tan, Xiaolin; Davies, D. Huw; Felgner, Phil L.; Kalantari, Mina

    2010-01-01

    We have developed microarrays with all eight proteins encoded by 13 different human papillomavirus types associated with anogenital cancer (HPV-16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 53), genital warts (HPV-6, 11), or skin lesions (HPV-1, 2, 4, 5). We analyzed the seroprevalence of antibodies in 546 patients, which had either cervical carcinomas, or precursor lesions, or which were asymptomatic. All patient groups contained sera ranging from high reactivity against multiple HPV proteins to low or no reactivity. Computational analyses showed the E7 proteins of carcinogenic HPV types as significantly more reactive in cancer patients compared to asymptomatic individuals and discriminating between cancer and HSIL or LSIL patients. Antibodies against E4 and E5 had the highest seroprevalence, but did not exhibit differential reactivity relative to pathology. Our study introduces a new approach to future evaluation of the overall antigenicity of HPV proteins and cross-reaction between homologous proteins. PMID:20554302

  12. Reliability of steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Kadokami, E.

    1997-02-01

    The author presents results on studies made of the reliability of steam generator (SG) tubing. The basis for this work is that in Japan the issue of defects in SG tubing is addressed by the approach that any detected defect should be repaired, either by plugging the tube or sleeving it. However, this leaves open the issue that there is a detection limit in practice, and what is the effect of nondetectable cracks on the performance of tubing. These studies were commissioned to look at the safety issues involved in degraded SG tubing. The program has looked at a number of different issues. First was an assessment of the penetration and opening behavior of tube flaws due to internal pressure in the tubing. They have studied: penetration behavior of the tube flaws; primary water leakage from through-wall flaws; opening behavior of through-wall flaws. In addition they have looked at the question of the reliability of tubing with flaws during normal plant operation. Also there have been studies done on the consequences of tube rupture accidents on the integrity of neighboring tubes.

  13. Validation of tissue microarray for molecular profiling of canine and feline mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Muscatello, L V; Sarli, G; Beha, G; Asproni, P; Millanta, F; Poli, A; De Tolla, L J; Benazzi, C; Brunetti, B

    2015-01-01

    Tissue microarray (TMA) is a high-throughput method adopted for simultaneous molecular profiling of tissue samples from large patient cohorts. The aim of this study was to validate the TMA method for the molecular classification of canine and feline mammary tumours. Twelve samples, five feline and five canine mammary tumours and two canine haemangiosarcomas, were collected. TMA construction was based on Kononen's method of extracting a cylindrical core of paraffin wax-embedded 'donor' tissue and inserting it into a 'recipient' wax block. Seven consecutive sections from each tissue array block were subjected to immunohistochemistry (IHC) using primary antibodies specific for oestrogen receptor (OR), progesterone receptor (PR), c-erbB-2, cytokeratin (CK) 5/6, CK14, CK19 and p63. The same panel of antibodies was applied to the full sections from all cases. Comparison between full sections and TMA scores revealed different results depending on the antibodies. Labelling for OR, PR, CK19 and p63 showed total concordance, c-erbB2 (score +2, +3) was concordant in nine out of ten cases, CK5/6 and CK14 in eight out of ten cases. The TMA platform preserves the molecular profile of canine and feline mammary tumour markers, representing a useful tool for rapid and cost-effective analysis for the first phenotypic screening using OR, PR and c-erbB2 antibodies. Basal cytokeratin, used for triple negative identification, shows a multifocal 'niche' expression pattern, for which IHC of the full section or multiple core array is recommended. PMID:25670670

  14. Hybrid endotracheal tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakezles, Christopher Thomas

    Intubation involves the placement of a tube into the tracheal lumen and is prescribed in any setting in which the airway must be stabilized or the patient anesthetized. The purpose of the endotracheal tube in these procedures is to maintain a viable airway, facilitate mechanical ventilation, allow the administration of anesthetics, and prevent the reflux of vomitus into the lungs. In order to satisfy these requirements a nearly airtight seal must be maintained between the tube and the tracheal lining. Most conventional endotracheal tubes provide this seal by employing a cuff that is inflated once the tube is in place. However, the design of this cuff and properties of the material are a source of irritation and injury to the tracheal tissues. In fact, the complication rate for endotracheal intubation is reported to be between 10 and 60%, with manifestations ranging from severe sore throat to erosion through the tracheal wall. These complications are caused by a combination of the materials employed and the forces exerted by the cuff on the tracheal tissues. In particular, the abrasive action of the cuff shears cells from the lining, epithelium adhering to the cuff is removed during extubation, and normal forces exerted on the basement tissues disrupt the blood supply and cause pressure necrosis. The complications associated with tracheal intubation may be reduced or eliminated by employing airway devices constructed from hydrogel materials. Hydrogels are a class of crosslinked polymers which swell in the presence of moisture, and may contain more than 95% water by weight. For the current study, several prototype airway devices were constructed from hydrogel materials including poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate), and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone). The raw hydrogel materials from this group were subjected to tensile, swelling, and biocompatibility testing, while the finished devices were subjected to extensive mechanical simulation and animal trials

  15. Emerging Use of Gene Expression Microarrays in Plant Physiology

    DOE PAGES

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; Difazio, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    Microarrays have become an important technology for the global analysis of gene expression in humans, animals, plants, and microbes. Implemented in the context of a well-designed experiment, cDNA and oligonucleotide arrays can provide highthroughput, simultaneous analysis of transcript abundance for hundreds, if not thousands, of genes. However, despite widespread acceptance, the use of microarrays as a tool to better understand processes of interest to the plant physiologist is still being explored. To help illustrate current uses of microarrays in the plant sciences, several case studies that we believe demonstrate the emerging application of gene expression arrays in plant physiology weremore » selected from among the many posters and presentations at the 2003 Plant and Animal Genome XI Conference. Based on this survey, microarrays are being used to assess gene expression in plants exposed to the experimental manipulation of air temperature, soil water content and aluminium concentration in the root zone. Analysis often includes characterizing transcript profiles for multiple post-treatment sampling periods and categorizing genes with common patterns of response using hierarchical clustering techniques. In addition, microarrays are also providing insights into developmental changes in gene expression associated with fibre and root elongation in cotton and maize, respectively. Technical and analytical limitations of microarrays are discussed and projects attempting to advance areas of microarray design and data analysis are highlighted. Finally, although much work remains, we conclude that microarrays are a valuable tool for the plant physiologist interested in the characterization and identification of individual genes and gene families with potential application in the fields of agriculture, horticulture and forestry.« less

  16. Microarrays meet the Voltaire challenge: Drug discovery on a chip?

    PubMed

    Jackson, David B; Stein, Martin A; Merino, Alejandro; Eils, Roland

    2006-01-01

    The co-emergence of microarray technologies with systems oriented approaches to discovery is testament to the technological and conceptual advancements of recent years. By providing a platform for massively parallelized reductionism, microarrays are enabling us to examine the functional features of diverse classes of bio-system components in a contextually meaningful manner. Yet, to provide economic impact, future development of these technologies demands intimate alignment with the goal of producing safer and more efficacious drugs.: PMID:24980402

  17. Profiling in situ microbial community structure with an amplification microarray.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Darrell P; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Bryant, Lexi; Golova, Julia; Wiles, Cory; Williams, Kenneth H; Peacock, Aaron D; Long, Philip E

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to unify amplification, labeling, and microarray hybridization chemistries within a single, closed microfluidic chamber (an amplification microarray) and verify technology performance on a series of groundwater samples from an in situ field experiment designed to compare U(VI) mobility under conditions of various alkalinities (as HCO(3)(-)) during stimulated microbial activity accompanying acetate amendment. Analytical limits of detection were between 2 and 200 cell equivalents of purified DNA. Amplification microarray signatures were well correlated with 16S rRNA-targeted quantitative PCR results and hybridization microarray signatures. The succession of the microbial community was evident with and consistent between the two microarray platforms. Amplification microarray analysis of acetate-treated groundwater showed elevated levels of iron-reducing bacteria (Flexibacter, Geobacter, Rhodoferax, and Shewanella) relative to the average background profile, as expected. Identical molecular signatures were evident in the transect treated with acetate plus NaHCO(3), but at much lower signal intensities and with a much more rapid decline (to nondetection). Azoarcus, Thaurea, and Methylobacterium were responsive in the acetate-only transect but not in the presence of bicarbonate. Observed differences in microbial community composition or response to bicarbonate amendment likely had an effect on measured rates of U reduction, with higher rates probable in the part of the field experiment that was amended with bicarbonate. The simplification in microarray-based work flow is a significant technological advance toward entirely closed-amplicon microarray-based tests and is generally extensible to any number of environmental monitoring applications.

  18. Where statistics and molecular microarray experiments biology meet.

    PubMed

    Kelmansky, Diana M

    2013-01-01

    This review chapter presents a statistical point of view to microarray experiments with the purpose of understanding the apparent contradictions that often appear in relation to their results. We give a brief introduction of molecular biology for nonspecialists. We describe microarray experiments from their construction and the biological principles the experiments rely on, to data acquisition and analysis. The role of epidemiological approaches and sample size considerations are also discussed.

  19. Emerging Use of Gene Expression Microarrays in Plant Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Difazio, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    Microarrays have become an important technology for the global analysis of gene expression in humans, animals, plants, and microbes. Implemented in the context of a well-designed experiment, cDNA and oligonucleotide arrays can provide highthroughput, simultaneous analysis of transcript abundance for hundreds, if not thousands, of genes. However, despite widespread acceptance, the use of microarrays as a tool to better understand processes of interest to the plant physiologist is still being explored. To help illustrate current uses of microarrays in the plant sciences, several case studies that we believe demonstrate the emerging application of gene expression arrays in plant physiology were selected from among the many posters and presentations at the 2003 Plant and Animal Genome XI Conference. Based on this survey, microarrays are being used to assess gene expression in plants exposed to the experimental manipulation of air temperature, soil water content and aluminium concentration in the root zone. Analysis often includes characterizing transcript profiles for multiple post-treatment sampling periods and categorizing genes with common patterns of response using hierarchical clustering techniques. In addition, microarrays are also providing insights into developmental changes in gene expression associated with fibre and root elongation in cotton and maize, respectively. Technical and analytical limitations of microarrays are discussed and projects attempting to advance areas of microarray design and data analysis are highlighted. Finally, although much work remains, we conclude that microarrays are a valuable tool for the plant physiologist interested in the characterization and identification of individual genes and gene families with potential application in the fields of agriculture, horticulture and forestry. PMID:18629133

  20. DNA Microarray Analysis of Estrogen-Responsive Genes.

    PubMed

    Eyster, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    DNA microarray is a powerful, non-biased discovery technology that allows the analysis of the expression of thousands of genes at a time. The technology can be used for the identification of differential gene expression, genetic mutations associated with diseases, DNA methylation, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and microRNA expression, to name a few. This chapter describes microarray technology for the analysis of differential gene expression in response to estrogen treatment.