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Sample records for antibody potently inhibits

  1. Fully Human Antagonistic Antibodies against CCR4 Potently Inhibit Cell Signaling and Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Géraudie, Solène; Scheffler, Ulrike; Griep, Remko A.; Reiersen, Herald; Duncan, Alexander R.; Kiprijanov, Sergej M.

    2014-01-01

    Background CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) represents a potentially important target for cancer immunotherapy due to its expression on tumor infiltrating immune cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and on tumor cells in several cancer types and its role in metastasis. Methodology Using phage display, human antibody library, affinity maturation and a cell-based antibody selection strategy, the antibody variants against human CCR4 were generated. These antibodies effectively competed with ligand binding, were able to block ligand-induced signaling and cell migration, and demonstrated efficient killing of CCR4-positive tumor cells via ADCC and phagocytosis. In a mouse model of human T-cell lymphoma, significant survival benefit was demonstrated for animals treated with the newly selected anti-CCR4 antibodies. Significance For the first time, successful generation of anti- G-protein coupled chemokine receptor (GPCR) antibodies using human non-immune library and phage display on GPCR-expressing cells was demonstrated. The generated anti-CCR4 antibodies possess a dual mode of action (inhibition of ligand-induced signaling and antibody-directed tumor cell killing). The data demonstrate that the anti-tumor activity in vivo is mediated, at least in part, through Fc-receptor dependent effector mechanisms, such as ADCC and phagocytosis. Anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 antibodies inhibiting receptor signaling have potential as immunomodulatory antibodies for cancer. PMID:25080123

  2. Cell-cell transmission enables HIV-1 to evade inhibition by potent CD4bs directed antibodies.

    PubMed

    Abela, Irene A; Berlinger, Livia; Schanz, Merle; Reynell, Lucy; Günthard, Huldrych F; Rusert, Peter; Trkola, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    HIV is known to spread efficiently both in a cell-free state and from cell to cell, however the relative importance of the cell-cell transmission mode in natural infection has not yet been resolved. Likewise to what extent cell-cell transmission is vulnerable to inhibition by neutralizing antibodies and entry inhibitors remains to be determined. Here we report on neutralizing antibody activity during cell-cell transmission using specifically tailored experimental strategies which enable unambiguous discrimination between the two transmission routes. We demonstrate that the activity of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and entry inhibitors during cell-cell transmission varies depending on their mode of action. While gp41 directed agents remain active, CD4 binding site (CD4bs) directed inhibitors, including the potent neutralizing mAb VRC01, dramatically lose potency during cell-cell transmission. This implies that CD4bs mAbs act preferentially through blocking free virus transmission, while still allowing HIV to spread through cell-cell contacts. Thus providing a plausible explanation for how HIV maintains infectivity and rapidly escapes potent and broadly active CD4bs directed antibody responses in vivo.

  3. Cell-Cell Transmission Enables HIV-1 to Evade Inhibition by Potent CD4bs Directed Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Schanz, Merle; Reynell, Lucy; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Rusert, Peter; Trkola, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    HIV is known to spread efficiently both in a cell-free state and from cell to cell, however the relative importance of the cell-cell transmission mode in natural infection has not yet been resolved. Likewise to what extent cell-cell transmission is vulnerable to inhibition by neutralizing antibodies and entry inhibitors remains to be determined. Here we report on neutralizing antibody activity during cell-cell transmission using specifically tailored experimental strategies which enable unambiguous discrimination between the two transmission routes. We demonstrate that the activity of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and entry inhibitors during cell-cell transmission varies depending on their mode of action. While gp41 directed agents remain active, CD4 binding site (CD4bs) directed inhibitors, including the potent neutralizing mAb VRC01, dramatically lose potency during cell-cell transmission. This implies that CD4bs mAbs act preferentially through blocking free virus transmission, while still allowing HIV to spread through cell-cell contacts. Thus providing a plausible explanation for how HIV maintains infectivity and rapidly escapes potent and broadly active CD4bs directed antibody responses in vivo. PMID:22496655

  4. Potent inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication by an intracellular anti-Rev single-chain antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Duan, L; Bagasra, O; Laughlin, M A; Oakes, J W; Pomerantz, R J

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has a complex life cycle, which has made it a difficult target for conventional therapeutic modalities. A single-chain antibody moiety, directed against the HIV-1 regulatory protein Rev, which rescues unspliced viral RNA from the nucleus of infected cells, has now been developed. This anti-Rev single-chain construct (SFv) consists of both light and heavy chain variable regions of anti-Rev monoclonal antibody, which, when expressed intracellularly within human cells, potently inhibits HIV-1 replication. This intracellular SFv molecule is demonstrated to specifically antagonize Rev function. Thus, intracellular SFv expression, against a retroviral regulatory protein, may be useful as a gene therapeutic approach to combat HIV-1 infections. Images PMID:8197188

  5. Potent Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication by an Intracellular Anti-Rev Single-Chain Antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lingxun; Bagasra, Omar; Laughlin, Mark A.; Oakes, Joseph W.; Pomerantz, Roger J.

    1994-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has a complex life cycle, which has made it a difficult target for conventional therapeutic modalities. A single-chain antibody moiety, directed against the HIV-1 regulatory protein Rev, which rescues unspliced viral RNA from the nucleus of infected cells, has now been developed. This anti-Rev single-chain construct (SFv) consists of both light and heavy chain variable regions of an anti-Rev monoclonal antibody, which, when expressed intracellularly within human cells, potently inhibits HIV-1 replication. This intracellular SFv molecule is demonstrated to specifically antagonize Rev function. Thus, intracellular SFv expression, against a retroviral regulatory protein, may be useful as a gene therapeutic approach to combat HIV-1 infections.

  6. Identifying Monoclonal Antibodies that Potently Inhibit MERS-CoV | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), first isolated in September 2012, infects cells lining the human airway, causing severe flu-like symptoms that, in some cases, lead to death. As of July 2, 2014, 824 confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection, including at least 286 related deaths, have been reported to the World Health Organization. While there are currently no effective therapies against the virus, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) may be a promising candidate. Having previously developed MAbs against other viruses, including the related severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus or SARS-CoV, Dimiter Dimitrov, Ph.D., of CCR’s Laboratory of Experimental Immunology (LEI), and his colleagues decided to pan a library of antigen binding fragments (Fab) for activity against MERS-CoV.

  7. A Single-Domain Llama Antibody Potently Inhibits the Enzymatic Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin by Binding to the Non-Catalytic [alpha]-Exosite Binding Region

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jianbo; Thompson, Aaron A.; Fan, Yongfeng; Lou, Jianlong; Conrad, Fraser; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Marks, James D.

    2010-08-13

    Ingestion or inhalation of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) results in botulism, a severe and frequently fatal disease. Current treatments rely on antitoxins, which, while effective, cannot reverse symptoms once BoNT has entered the neuron. For treatments that can reverse intoxication, interest has focused on developing inhibitors of the enzymatic BoNT light chain (BoNT Lc). Such inhibitors typically mimic substrate and bind in or around the substrate cleavage pocket. To explore the full range of binding sites for serotype A light chain (BoNT/A Lc) inhibitors, we created a library of non-immune llama single-domain VHH (camelid heavy-chain variable region derived from heavy-chain-only antibody) antibodies displayed on the surface of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Library selection on BoNT/A Lc yielded 15 yeast-displayed VHH with equilibrium dissociation constants (K{sub d}) from 230 to 0.03 nM measured by flow cytometry. Eight of 15 VHH inhibited the cleavage of substrate SNAP25 (synaptosome-associated protein of 25,000 Da) by BoNT/A Lc. The most potent VHH (Aa1) had a solution K{sub d} for BoNT/A Lc of 1.47 x 10{sup -10} M and an IC{sub 50} (50% inhibitory concentration) of 4.7 x 10{sup -10} M and was resistant to heat denaturation and reducing conditions. To understand the mechanism by which Aa1 inhibited catalysis, we solved the X-ray crystal structure of the BoNT/A Lc-Aa1 VHH complex at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals that the Aa1 VHH binds in the {alpha}-exosite of the BoNT/A Lc, far from the active site for catalysis. The study validates the utility of non-immune llama VHH libraries as a source of enzyme inhibitors and identifies the BoNT/A Lc {alpha}-exosite as a target for inhibitor development.

  8. Combination therapy with anti-ErbB3 monoclonal antibodies and EGFR TKIs potently inhibits Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Noto, Alessia; De Vitis, Claudia; Roscilli, Giuseppe; Fattore, Luigi; Malpicci, Debora; Marra, Emanuele; Luberto, Laura; D'Andrilli, Antonio; Coluccia, Pierpaolo; Giovagnoli, Maria Rosaria; Normanno, Nicola; Ruco, Luigi; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Mancini, Rita; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2013-01-01

    Personalized therapy of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been improved by the introduction of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), gefitinib and erlotinib. EGFR TKIs induce dramatic objective responses and increase survival in patients bearing sensitizing mutations in the EGFR intracytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain. However, virtually all patients develop resistance, and this is responsible for disease relapse. Hence several efforts are being undertaken to understand the mechanisms of resistance in order to develop combination treatments capable to sensitize resistant cells to EGFR TKIs. Recent studies have suggested that upregulation of another member of the EGFR receptor family, namely ErbB3 is involved in drug resistance, through increased phosphorylation of its intracytoplasmic domain and activation of PI3K/AKT signaling. In this paper we first show, by using a set of malignant pleural effusion derived cell cultures (MPEDCC) from patients with lung adenocarcinoma, that surface ErbB3 expression correlates with increased AKT phosphorylation. Antibodies against ErbB3, namely A3, which we previously demonstrated to induce receptor internalization and degradation, inhibit growth and induce apoptosis only in cells overexpressing surface ErbB3. Furthermore, combination of anti-ErbB3 antibodies with EGFR TKIs synergistically affect cell proliferation in vitro, cause cell cycle arrest, up-regulate p21 expression and inhibit tumor growth in mouse xenografts. Importantly, potentiation of gefitinib by anti-ErbB3 antibodies occurs both in de novo and in ab initio resistant cells. Anti-ErbB3 mAbs strongly synergize also with the dual EGFR and HER2 inhibitor lapatinib. Our results suggest that combination treatment with EGFR TKI and antibodies against ErbB3 should be a promising approach to pursue in the clinic. PMID:23896512

  9. Highly potent anti-human GPVI monoclonal antibodies derived from GPVI knockout mouse immunization.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yutaka; Takizawa, Hisao; Gong, Xiaoqi; Le, Sang; Lockyer, Simon; Okuyama, Keiji; Tanaka, Michinori; Yoshitake, Masuhiro; Tandon, Narendra N; Kambayashi, Junichi

    2007-01-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of thrombus formation has suggested an important role for glycoprotein (GP) VI in this process. To clarify the exact role in detail, it is necessary to use specific, high affinity inhibitory antibodies. However, possibly due to the conserved structure of GPVI among species, it has been difficult to obtain potent antibodies. In this study, we developed highly potent anti-human GPVI monoclonal antibodies using GPVI knockout mice for immunization. Fab fragments of these antibodies, named OM1 and OM2, potently inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation. The IC(50) values for OM1 and OM2 are 0.6+/-0.05 and 1.7+/-0.5 microg/mL, respectively, showing potency greater than, or equal to that of abciximab (1.7+/-0.3 microg/mL), an anti-GPIIb/IIIa antibody. Fab fragments of OM1 and OM2 also potently inhibit collagen-induced ATP release, thromboxane A(2) formation, and platelet adhesion to immobilized collagen under static and flow conditions. Interestingly, platelet aggregation induced with collagen-related peptide was potently inhibited by OM2 but not OM1, indicating that OM1 recognizes an epitope that is different from collagen-related peptide-binding site on GPVI. These results suggest that OM1 and OM2 may be useful tools to understand the role of GPVI in thrombus formation. Furthermore, these antibodies have the potential to be developed as a new class of therapeutic tool.

  10. Diversity Against Adversity: How Adaptive Immune System Evolves Potent Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Muyoung; Zeldovich, Konstantin B.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2011-07-01

    Adaptive immunity is an amazing mechanism, whereby new protein functions—affinity of antibodies (Immunoglobulins) to new antigens—evolve through mutation and selection in a matter of a few days. Despite numerous experimental studies, the fundamental physical principles underlying immune response are still poorly understood. In considerable departure from past approaches, here, we propose a microscopic multiscale model of adaptive immune response, which consists of three essential players: The host cells, viruses, and B-cells in Germinal Centers (GC). Each moiety carries a genome, which encodes proteins whose stability and interactions are determined from their sequences using laws of Statistical Mechanics, providing an exact relationship between genomic sequences and strength of interactions between pathogens and antibodies and antibodies and host proteins (autoimmunity). We find that evolution of potent antibodies (the process known as Affinity Maturation (AM)) is a delicate balancing act, which has to reconcile the conflicting requirements of protein stability, lack of autoimmunity, and high affinity of antibodies to incoming antigens. This becomes possible only when antibody producing B cells elevate their mutation rates (process known as Somatic Hypermutation (SHM)) to fall into a certain range—not too low to find potency increasing mutations but not too high to destroy stable Immunoglobulins and/or already achieved affinity. Potent antibodies develop through clonal expansion of initial B cells expressing marginally potent antibodies followed by their subsequent affinity maturation through mutation and selection. As a result, in each GC the population of mature potent Immunoglobulins is monoclonal being ancestors of a single cell from initial (germline) pool. We developed a simple analytical theory, which provides further rationale to our findings. The model and theory reveal the molecular factors that determine the efficiency of affinity maturation

  11. Potent CD4+ T cell-associated antitumor memory responses induced by trifunctional bispecific antibodies in combination with immune checkpoint inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Deppisch, Nina; Ruf, Peter; Eißler, Nina; Lindhofer, Horst; Mocikat, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Combinatorial approaches of immunotherapy hold great promise for the treatment of malignant disease. Here, we examined the potential of combining an immune checkpoint inhibitor and trifunctional bispecific antibodies (trAbs) in a preclinical melanoma mouse model using surrogate antibodies of Ipilimumab and Catumaxomab, both of which have already been approved for clinical use. The specific binding arms of trAbs redirect T cells to tumor cells and trigger direct cytotoxicity, while the Fc region activates accessory cells eventually giving rise to a long-lasting immunologic memory. We show here that T cells redirected to tumor cells by trAbs strongly upregulate CTLA-4 expression in vitro and in vivo. This suggested that blocking of CTLA-4 in combination with trAb treatment enhances T-cell activation in a tumor-selective manner. However, when mice were challenged with melanoma cells and subsequently treated with antibodies, there was only a moderate beneficial effect of the combinatorial approach in vivo with regard to direct tumor destruction in comparison to trAb therapy alone. By contrast, a significantly improved vaccination effect was obtained by CTLA-4 blocking during trAb-dependent immunization. This resulted in enhanced rejection of melanoma cells given after pre-immunization. The improved immunologic memory induced by the combinatorial approach correlated with an increased humoral antitumor response as measured in the sera and an expansion of CD4+ memory T cells found in the spleens. PMID:27966460

  12. Combination of antibody that inhibits ligand-independent HER3 dimerization and a p110α inhibitor potently blocks PI3K signaling and growth of HER2+ breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Joan T; Sutton, Cammie R; Kurupi, Richard; Bialucha, Carl Uli; Ettenberg, Seth A; Collins, Scott D; Sheng, Qing; Wallweber, Jerry; Defazio-Eli, Lisa; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-10-01

    We examined the effects of LJM716, an HER3 (ERBB3) neutralizing antibody that inhibits ligand-induced and ligand-independent HER3 dimerization, as a single agent and in combination with BYL719, an ATP competitive p110α-specific inhibitor, against HER2-overexpressing breast and gastric cancers. Treatment with LJM716 reduced HER2-HER3 and HER3-p85 dimers, P-HER3 and P-AKT, both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with LJM716 alone markedly reduced growth of BT474 xenografts. The combination of LJM716/lapatinib/trastuzumab significantly improved survival of mice with BT474 xenografts compared with lapatinib/trastuzumab (P = 0.0012). LJM716 and BYL719 synergistically inhibited growth in a panel of HER2+ and PIK3CA mutant cell lines. The combination also inhibited P-AKT in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and growth of HER2+ NCI-N87 gastric cancer xenografts more potently than LJM716 or BYL719 alone. Trastuzumab-resistant HER2+/PIK3CA mutant MDA453 xenografts regressed completely after 3 weeks of therapy with LJM716 and BYL719, whereas either single agent inhibited growth only partially. Finally, mice with BT474 xenografts treated with trastuzumab/LJM716, trastuzumab/BYL719, LJM716/BYL719, or trastuzumab/LJM716/BYL719 exhibited similar rates of tumor regression after 3 weeks of treatment. Thirty weeks after treatment discontinuation, 14% of mice were treated with trastuzumab/LJM716/BYL719, whereas >80% in all other treatment groups were sacrificed due to a recurrent large tumor burden (P = 0.0066). These data suggest that dual blockade of the HER2 signaling network with an HER3 antibody that inhibits HER2-HER3 dimers in combination with a p110α-specific inhibitor in the absence of a direct HER2 antagonist is an effective treatment approach against HER2-overexpressing cancers.

  13. A truncated receptor-binding domain of MERS-CoV spike protein potently inhibits MERS-CoV infection and induces strong neutralizing antibody responses: implication for developing therapeutics and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Du, Lanying; Kou, Zhihua; Ma, Cuiqing; Tao, Xinrong; Wang, Lili; Zhao, Guangyu; Chen, Yaoqing; Yu, Fei; Tseng, Chien-Te K; Zhou, Yusen; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-01-01

    An emerging respiratory infectious disease with high mortality, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), is caused by a novel coronavirus (MERS-CoV). It was first reported in 2012 in Saudi Arabia and has now spread to eight countries. Development of effective therapeutics and vaccines is crucial to save lives and halt the spread of MERS-CoV. Here, we show that a recombinant protein containing a 212-amino acid fragment (residues 377-588) in the truncated receptor-binding domain (RBD: residues 367-606) of MERS-CoV spike (S) protein fused with human IgG Fc fragment (S377-588-Fc) is highly expressed in the culture supernatant of transfected 293T cells. The purified S377-588-Fc protein efficiently binds to dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), the receptor of MERS-CoV, and potently inhibited MERS-CoV infection, suggesting its potential to be further developed as a therapeutic modality for treating MERS-CoV infection and saving the patients' lives. The recombinant S377-588-Fc is able to induce in the vaccinated mice strong MERS-CoV S-specific antibodies, which blocks the binding of RBD to DPP4 receptor and effectively neutralizes MERS-CoV infection. These findings indicate that this truncated RBD protein shows promise for further development as an effective and safe vaccine for the prevention of MERS-CoV infection.

  14. Neutralization mechanism of a highly potent antibody against Zika virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuijun; Kostyuchenko, Victor A.; Ng, Thiam-Seng; Lim, Xin-Ni; Ooi, Justin S. G.; Lambert, Sebastian; Tan, Ter Yong; Widman, Douglas G.; Shi, Jian; Baric, Ralph S.; Lok, Shee-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of Zika virus (ZIKV), which causes microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome, signals an urgency to identify therapeutics. Recent efforts to rescreen dengue virus human antibodies for ZIKV cross-neutralization activity showed antibody C10 as one of the most potent. To investigate the ability of the antibody to block fusion, we determined the cryoEM structures of the C10-ZIKV complex at pH levels mimicking the extracellular (pH8.0), early (pH6.5) and late endosomal (pH5.0) environments. The 4.0 Å resolution pH8.0 complex structure shows that the antibody binds to E proteins residues at the intra-dimer interface, and the virus quaternary structure-dependent inter-dimer and inter-raft interfaces. At pH6.5, antibody C10 locks all virus surface E proteins, and at pH5.0, it locks the E protein raft structure, suggesting that it prevents the structural rearrangement of the E proteins during the fusion event—a vital step for infection. This suggests antibody C10 could be a good therapeutic candidate. PMID:27882950

  15. Generation of potent mouse monoclonal antibodies to self-proteins using T-cell epitope "tags".

    PubMed

    Percival-Alwyn, Jennifer L; England, Elizabeth; Kemp, Benjamin; Rapley, Laura; Davis, Nicola H E; McCarthy, Grant R; Majithiya, Jayesh B; Corkill, Dominic J; Welsted, Sarah; Minton, Kevin; Cohen, E Suzanne; Robinson, Matthew J; Dobson, Claire; Wilkinson, Trevor C I; Vaughan, Tristan J; Groves, Maria A T; Tigue, Natalie J

    2015-01-01

    Immunization of mice or rats with a "non-self" protein is a commonly used method to obtain monoclonal antibodies, and relies on the immune system's ability to recognize the immunogen as foreign. Immunization of an antigen with 100% identity to the endogenous protein, however, will not elicit a robust immune response. To develop antibodies to mouse proteins, we focused on the potential for breaking such immune tolerance by genetically fusing two independent T-cell epitope-containing sequences (from tetanus toxin (TT) and diphtheria toxin fragment A (DTA)) to a mouse protein, mouse ST2 (mST2). Wild-type CD1 mice were immunized with three mST2 tagged proteins (Fc, TT and DTA) and the specific serum response was determined. Only in mice immunized with the T-cell epitope-containing antigens were specific mST2 serum responses detected; hybridomas generated from these mice secreted highly sequence-diverse IgGs that were capable of binding mST2 and inhibiting the interaction of mST2 with its ligand, mouse interleukin (IL)-33 (mIL-33). Of the hundreds of antibodies profiled, we identified five potent antibodies that were able to inhibit IL-33 induced IL-6 release in a mast cell assay; notably one such antibody was sufficiently potent to suppress IL-5 release and eosinophilia infiltration in an Alternaria alternata challenge mouse model of asthma. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that T-cell epitope-containing tags have the ability to break tolerance in wild-type mice to 100% conserved proteins, and it provides a compelling argument for the broader use of this approach to generate antibodies against any mouse protein or conserved ortholog.

  16. A novel highly potent therapeutic antibody neutralizes multiple human chemokines and mimics viral immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Scalley-Kim, Michelle L; Hess, Bruce W; Kelly, Ryan L; Krostag, Anne-Rachel F; Lustig, Kurt H; Marken, John S; Ovendale, Pamela J; Posey, Aaron R; Smolak, Pamela J; Taylor, Janelle D L; Wood, C L; Bienvenue, David L; Probst, Peter; Salmon, Ruth A; Allison, Daniel S; Foy, Teresa M; Raport, Carol J

    2012-01-01

    Chemokines play a key role in leukocyte recruitment during inflammation and are implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of autoimmune diseases. As such, inhibiting chemokine signaling has been of keen interest for the development of therapeutic agents. This endeavor, however, has been hampered due to complexities in the chemokine system. Many chemokines have been shown to signal through multiple receptors and, conversely, most chemokine receptors bind to more than one chemokine. One approach to overcoming this complexity is to develop a single therapeutic agent that binds and inactivates multiple chemokines, similar to an immune evasion strategy utilized by a number of viruses. Here, we describe the development and characterization of a novel therapeutic antibody that targets a subset of human CC chemokines, specifically CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5, involved in chronic inflammatory diseases. Using a sequential immunization approach, followed by humanization and phage display affinity maturation, a therapeutic antibody was developed that displays high binding affinity towards the three targeted chemokines. In vitro, this antibody potently inhibits chemotaxis and chemokine-mediated signaling through CCR1 and CCR5, primary chemokine receptors for the targeted chemokines. Furthermore, we have demonstrated in vivo efficacy of the antibody in a SCID-hu mouse model of skin leukocyte migration, thus confirming its potential as a novel therapeutic chemokine antagonist. We anticipate that this antibody will have broad therapeutic utility in the treatment of a number of autoimmune diseases due to its ability to simultaneously neutralize multiple chemokines implicated in disease pathogenesis.

  17. Biochemical characterization and structure determination of a potent, selective antibody inhibitor of human MMP9.

    PubMed

    Appleby, Todd C; Greenstein, Andrew E; Hung, Magdeleine; Liclican, Albert; Velasquez, Maile; Villaseñor, Armando G; Wang, Ruth; Wong, Melanie H; Liu, Xiaohong; Papalia, Giuseppe A; Schultz, Brian E; Sakowicz, Roman; Smith, Victoria; Kwon, Hyock Joo

    2017-02-24

    Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) is a key regulator of the extracellular matrix (ECM), involved in the degradation of various ECM proteins. MMP9 is a member of a large family of proteases that are secreted as inactive zymogens. MMP9 plays a pathological role in a variety of inflammatory and oncology disorders and has long been considered an attractive therapeutic target. GS-5745 is a potent, highly selective humanized monoclonal antibody inhibitor of MMP9 that has shown promise in treating ulcerative colitis and gastric cancer. Here we describe the crystal structure of GS-5745:MMP9 complex and biochemical studies to elucidate the mechanism of GS-5745 inhibition of MMP9. GS-5745 binds MMP9 distal to the active site, near the junction between the prodomain and catalytic domain. GS-5745 inhibits MMP9 by two mechanisms: binding to active MMP9 allosterically inhibits MMP9 activity and binding to pro-MMP9 prevents MMP9 activation.

  18. The heptide repeat 2 and upstream region of TGEV induces potent cross-neutralizing antibodies against group I coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huiling; Wu, Nannan; Wang, Xiaoming; Wang, Tianhou

    2012-10-01

    The coronavirus heptide repeat (HR) region in the spike protein induces neutralizing antibodies that block the postfusion core formation and inhibit virus entry into target cells. The HR2 regions for coronaviruses of the same serogroup share high homology. We found that polyclonal antibodies derived from transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus HR2 and upstream region were cross-reactive with the S proteins of the same serogroup in western blotting. The polyclonal antibodies also potently cross-neutralized viruses from the same serogroup. This study provides new insight for designing vaccine and therapeutic reagents against coronavirus infections.

  19. Potent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Miao; Niu, Xuefeng; He, Shihua; Wang, Ruoke; Feng, Yupeng; Kroeker, Andrea; Zuo, Yanan; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ying; Li, Jiade; Li, Chufang; Shi, Yi; Shi, Xuanling; Gao, George F.; Xiang, Ye; Qiu, Xiangguo; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Linqi

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus infections cause a deadly hemorrhagic disease for which no vaccines or therapeutics has received regulatory approval. Here we show isolation of three (Q206, Q314 and Q411) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus identified in West Africa in 2014 through sequential immunization of Chinese rhesus macaques and antigen-specific single B cell sorting. These mAbs demonstrated potent neutralizing activities against both pseudo and live Ebola virus independent of complement. Biochemical, single particle EM, and mutagenesis analysis suggested Q206 and Q411 recognized novel epitopes in the head while Q314 targeted the glycan cap in the GP1 subunit. Q206 and Q411 appeared to influence GP binding to its receptor NPC1. Treatment with these mAbs provided partial but significant protection against disease in a mouse model of Ebola virus infection. These novel mAbs could serve as promising candidates for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against Ebola virus infection. PMID:27181584

  20. Liposomes Containing Monophosphoryl Lipid A: A Potent Adjuvant System For Inducing Antibodies To Heroin Hapten Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Matyas, Gary R.; Mayorov, Alexander V.; Rice, Kenner C.; Jacobson, Arthur E.; Cheng, Kejun; Iyer, Malliga R.; Li, Fuying; Beck, Zoltan; Janda, Kim D.; Alving, Carl R.

    2014-01-01

    In order to create an effective immunization approach for a potential vaccine to heroin, liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A [L(MPLA)] were tested as an adjuvant system to induce antibodies to heroin hapten analogs. Four synthetic haptens and two immunization strategies were employed. In the first strategy, a hydrophobic 23 amino acid immunogenic peptide derived from the membrane proximal external region of gp41 from HIV-1 envelope protein was embedded as a carrier in the outer surface of L(MPLA), to which was conjugated a 15 amino acid universal T cell epitope and a terminal heroin hapten analog. In the second strategy, tetanus toxoid (TT) carrier protein was decorated with haptens by conjugation, and the hapten-conjugated protein was mixed with L(MPLA). After immunization of mice, each of the immunization strategies was effective for induction of IgG anti-hapten antibodies. The first immunization strategy induced a mean end-point IgG titer against one of two haptens tested of approximately 12,800; however, no detectable antibodies were induced against the liposome-associated HIV-1 carrier peptide. In the second immunization strategy, depending on the hapten used for decorating the TT, end-point IgG titers ranged from 100,000 to 6,500,000. In this strategy, in which hapten was conjugated to the TT, end-point IgG titers of 400,000 to the TT carrier were observed with each conjugate. However, upon mixing unconjugated TT with L(MPLA), anti-TT titers of 6,500,000 were observed. We conclude that L(MPLA) serves as a potent adjuvant for inducing antibodies to candidate heroin haptens. However, antibodies to the carrier peptide or protein were partly or completed inhibited by the presence of conjugated hapten. PMID:23624097

  1. Liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A: a potent adjuvant system for inducing antibodies to heroin hapten analogs.

    PubMed

    Matyas, Gary R; Mayorov, Alexander V; Rice, Kenner C; Jacobson, Arthur E; Cheng, Kejun; Iyer, Malliga R; Li, Fuying; Beck, Zoltan; Janda, Kim D; Alving, Carl R

    2013-06-10

    In order to create an effective immunization approach for a potential vaccine to heroin, liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A [L(MPLA)] were tested as an adjuvant system to induce antibodies to heroin hapten analogs. Four synthetic haptens and two immunization strategies were employed. In the first strategy, a hydrophobic 23 amino acid immunogenic peptide derived from the membrane proximal external region of gp41 from HIV-1 envelope protein was embedded as a carrier in the outer surface of L(MPLA), to which was conjugated a 15 amino acid universal T cell epitope and a terminal heroin hapten analog. In the second strategy, tetanus toxoid (TT) carrier protein was decorated with haptens by conjugation, and the hapten-conjugated protein was mixed with L(MPLA). After immunization of mice, each of the immunization strategies was effective for induction of IgG anti-hapten antibodies. The first immunization strategy induced a mean end-point IgG titer against one of two haptens tested of approximately 12,800; however, no detectable antibodies were induced against the liposome-associated HIV-1 carrier peptide. In the second immunization strategy, depending on the hapten used for decorating the TT, end-point IgG titers ranged from 100,000 to 6,500,000. In this strategy, in which hapten was conjugated to the TT, end-point IgG titers of 400,000 to the TT carrier were observed with each conjugate. However, upon mixing unconjugated TT with L(MPLA), anti-TT titers of 6,500,000 were observed. We conclude that L(MPLA) serves as a potent adjuvant for inducing antibodies to candidate heroin haptens. However, antibodies to the carrier peptide or protein were partly or completed inhibited by the presence of conjugated hapten. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Monochloramine potently inhibits arachidonic acid metabolism in rat platelets.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yohko; Ikeda, Mai; Sakuma, Satoru

    2006-05-26

    In the present study, the effects of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), monochloramine (NH(2)Cl), glutamine-chloramine (Glu-Cl) and taurine-chloramine (Tau-Cl) on the formation of 12-lipoxygenase (LOX) metabolite, 12-HETE, and cyclooxygenase (COX) metabolites, TXB(2), and 12-HHT, from exogenous arachidonic acid (AA) in rat platelets were examined. Rat platelets (4x10(8)/ml) were preincubated with drugs for 5min at 37 degrees C prior to the incubation with AA (40microM) for 2min at 37 degrees C. HOCl (50-250microM) showed an inhibition on the formation of LOX metabolite (12-HETE, 5-67% inhibition) and COX metabolites (TXB(2), 33-73% inhibition; 12-HHT, 27-74% inhibition). Although Tau-Cl and Glu-Cl up to 100microM were without effect on the formation of 12-HETE, TXB(2) and 12-HTT, NH(2)Cl showed a strong inhibition on the formation of all three metabolites (10-100microM NH(2)Cl, 12-HETE, 21-92% inhibition; TXB(2), 58-94% inhibition; 12-HHT, 36-92% inhibition). Methionine reversed a reduction of formation of LOX and COX metabolites induced by NH(2)Cl, and taurine restoring that induced by both NH(2)Cl and HOCl. These results suggest that NH(2)Cl is a more potent inhibitor of COX and LOX pathways in platelets than HOCl, and taurine and methionine can be modulators of NH(2)Cl-induced alterations in the COX and LOX pathways in vivo.

  3. Production of Potent Fully Human Polyclonal Antibodies Against Zaire Ebola Virus in Transchromosomal Cattle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    1 Production of potent fully human polyclonal antibodies against Zaire Ebola virus in transchromosomal cattle John M. Dye1, Hua Wu2, Jay...mail: jjiao@sabbiotherapeutics.com Keywords: Ebola virus, virus neutralization assay, human polyclonal antibodies, transchromosomal bovine...recombinant glycoprotein (GP) vaccine consisting of the 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV)-Makona isolate. Serum collected from these hyperimmunized Tc

  4. Potent inhibition of tau fibrillization with a multivalent ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Honson, Nicolette S.; Jensen, Jordan R.; Darby, Michael V.; Kuret, Jeff

    2007-11-09

    Small-molecule inhibitors of tau fibrillization are under investigation as tools for interrogating the tau aggregation pathway and as potential therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease. Established inhibitors include thiacarbocyanine dyes, which can inhibit recombinant tau fibrillization in the presence of anionic surfactant aggregation inducers. In an effort to increase inhibitory potency, a cyclic bis-thiacarbocyanine molecule containing two thiacarbocyanine moieties was synthesized and characterized with respect to tau fibrillization inhibitory activity by electron microscopy and ligand aggregation state by absorbance spectroscopy. Results showed that the inhibitory activity of the bis-thiacarbocyanine was qualitatively similar to a monomeric cyanine dye, but was more potent with 50% inhibition achieved at {approx}80 nM concentration. At all concentrations tested in aqueous solution, the bis-thiacarbocyanine collapsed to form a closed clamshell structure. However, the presence of tau protein selectively stabilized the open conformation. These results suggest that the inhibitory activity of bis-thiacarbocyanine results from multivalency, and reveal a route to more potent tau aggregation inhibitors.

  5. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical.

  6. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical. PMID:25751125

  7. Ricin-Holotoxin-Based Vaccines: Induction of Potent Ricin-Neutralizing Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Tamar; Kronman, Chanoch; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known to which there is no available antidote. Currently, the most promising therapy is based on neutralizing antibodies elicited by active vaccination or given passively. Here, detailed protocols are provided for the production of two ricin holotoxin-based vaccines: monomerized subunit-based vaccine, and a formaldehyde-based ricin toxoid vaccine. Both vaccines were found to be stable with no toxic activity reversion even after long-term storage while eliciting high anti-ricin antibody titers possessing a potent neutralizing activity. The use of these vaccines is highly suitable for both the production of sera that can be used in passive protection experiments and immunization aimed to isolate potent anti-ricin monoclonal antibodies.

  8. Potent neutralization of botulinum neurotoxin by recombinant oligoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowski, A.; Wang, C.; Powers, D. B.; Amersdorfer, P.; Smith, T. J.; Montgomery, V. A.; Sheridan, R.; Blake, R.; Smith, L. A.; Marks, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the paralytic human disease botulism and are one of the highest-risk threat agents for bioterrorism. To generate a pharmaceutical to prevent or treat botulism, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated by phage display and evaluated for neutralization of BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) in vivo. Although no single mAb significantly neutralized toxin, a combination of three mAbs (oligoclonal Ab) neutralized 450,000 50% lethal doses of BoNT/A, a potency 90 times greater than human hyperimmune globulin. The potency of oligoclonal Ab was primarily due to a large increase in functional Ab binding affinity. The results indicate that the potency of the polyclonal humoral immune response can be deconvoluted to a few mAbs binding nonoverlapping epitopes, providing a route to drugs for preventing and treating botulism and diseases caused by other pathogens and biologic threat agents. PMID:12177434

  9. Acylthiourea, acylurea, and acylguanidine derivatives with potent hedgehog inhibiting activity.

    PubMed

    Solinas, Antonio; Faure, Hélène; Roudaut, Hermine; Traiffort, Elisabeth; Schoenfelder, Angèle; Mann, André; Manetti, Fabrizio; Taddei, Maurizio; Ruat, Martial

    2012-02-23

    The Smoothened (Smo) receptor is the major transducer of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. On the basis of the structure of the acylthiourea Smo antagonist (MRT-10), a number of different series of analogous compounds were prepared by ligand-based structural optimization. The acylthioureas, originally identified as actives, were converted into the corresponding acylureas or acylguanidines. In each series, similar structural trends delivered potent compounds with IC(50) values in the nanomolar range with respect to the inhibition of the Hh signaling pathway in various cell-based assays and of BODIPY-cyclopamine binding to human Smo. The similarity of their biological activities, in spite of discrete structural differences, may reveal the existence of hydrogen-bonding interactions between the ligands and the receptor pocket. Biological potency of compounds 61, 72, and 86 (MRT-83) were comparable to those of the clinical candidate GDC-0449. These findings suggest that these original molecules will help delineate Smo and Hh functions and can be developed as potential anticancer agents.

  10. HIV-specific CD4-induced Antibodies Mediate Broad and Potent Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Activity and are Commonly Detected in Plasma from HIV-infected Humans

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Katherine L.; Cortez, Valerie; Dingens, Adam S.; Gach, Johannes S.; Rainwater, Stephanie; Weis, Julie F.; Chen, Xuemin; Spearman, Paul; Forthal, Donald N.; Overbaugh, Julie

    2015-01-01

    HIV-specific antibodies (Abs) can reduce viral burden by blocking new rounds of infection or by destroying infected cells via activation of effector cells through Fc–FcR interaction. This latter process, referred to as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), has been associated with viral control and improved clinical outcome following both HIV and SIV infections. Here we describe an HIV viral-like particle (VLP)-based sorting strategy that led to identification of HIV-specific memory B cells encoding Abs that mediate ADCC from a subtype A-infected Kenyan woman at 914 days post-infection. Using this strategy, 12 HIV-envelope-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were isolated and three mediated potent ADCC activity when compared to well-characterized ADCC mAbs. The ADCC-mediating Abs also mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), which provides a net measure of Fc receptor-triggered effects against replicating virus. Two of the three ADCC-mediating Abs targeted a CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope also bound by the mAb C11; the third antibody targeted the N-terminus of V3. Both CD4i Abs identified here demonstrated strong cross-clade breadth with activity against 10 of 11 envelopes tested, including those from clades A, B, C, A/D and C/D, whereas the V3-specific antibody showed more limited breadth. Variants of these CD4i, C11-like mAbs engineered to interrupt binding to FcγRs inhibited a measurable percentage of the donor's ADCC activity starting as early as 189 days post-infection. C11-like antibodies also accounted for between 18–78% of ADCC activity in 9 chronically infected individuals from the same cohort study. Further, the two CD4i Abs originated from unique B cells, suggesting that antibodies targeting this epitope can be commonly produced. Taken together, these data provide strong evidence that CD4i, C11-like antibodies develop within the first 6 months of infection and they can arise from unique B-cell lineages in the

  11. Crystal structure of HIV-1 primary receptor CD4 in complex with a potent antiviral antibody.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael M; Seaman, Michael S; Rits-Volloch, Sophia; Hong, Xinguo; Kao, Chia-Ying; Ho, David D; Chen, Bing

    2010-12-08

    Ibalizumab is a humanized, anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. It potently blocks HIV-1 infection and targets an epitope in the second domain of CD4 without interfering with immune functions mediated by interaction of CD4 with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. We report here the crystal structure of ibalizumab Fab fragment in complex with the first two domains (D1-D2) of CD4 at 2.2 Å resolution. Ibalizumab grips CD4 primarily by the BC-loop (residues 121-125) of D2, sitting on the opposite side of gp120 and MHC-II binding sites. No major conformational change in CD4 accompanies binding to ibalizumab. Both monovalent and bivalent forms of ibalizumab effectively block viral infection, suggesting that it does not need to crosslink CD4 to exert antiviral activity. While gp120-induced structural rearrangements in CD4 are probably minimal, CD4 structural rigidity is dispensable for ibalizumab inhibition. These results could guide CD4-based immunogen design and lead to a better understanding of HIV-1 entry.

  12. Crystal structure of HIV-1 primary receptor CD4 in complex with a potent antiviral antibody

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Michael M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Rits-Volloch, Sophia; Hong, Xinguo; Kao, Chia-Ying; Ho, David D.; Chen, Bing

    2010-01-01

    Summary Ibalizumab is a humanized, anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. It potently blocks HIV-1 infection and targets an epitope in the second domain of CD4 without interfering with immune functions mediated by interaction of CD4 with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. We report here the crystal structure of ibalizumab Fab fragment in complex with the first two domains (D1-D2) of CD4 at 2.2 Å resolution. Ibalizumab grips CD4 primarily by the BC-loop (residues 121-125) of D2, sitting on the opposite side of gp120 and MHC-II binding sites. No major conformational change in CD4 accompanies binding to ibalizumab. Both monovalent and bivalent forms of ibalizumab effectively block viral infection, suggesting that it does not need to crosslink CD4 to exert antiviral activity. While gp120-induced structural rearrangements in CD4 are probably minimal, CD4 structural rigidity is dispensable for ibalizumab inhibition. These results could guide CD4-based immunogen design and lead to a better understanding of HIV-1 entry. PMID:21134642

  13. Crystal Structure of HIV-1 Primary Receptor CD4 i Complex with a Potent Antiviral Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.M.; Hong, X.; Seaman, M.S.; Rits-Vollock, S.p Kao, C.Y.; Ho, D.D.; Chen, B.

    2010-06-18

    Ibalizumab is a humanized, anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. It potently blocks HIV-1 infection and targets an epitope in the second domain of CD4 without interfering with immune functions mediated by interaction of CD4 with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. We report here the crystal structure of ibalizumab Fab fragment in complex with the first two domains (D1-D2) of CD4 at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. Ibalizumab grips CD4 primarily by the BC-loop (residues 121125) of D2, sitting on the opposite side of gp120 and MHC-II binding sites. No major conformational change in CD4 accompanies binding to ibalizumab. Both monovalent and bivalent forms of ibalizumab effectively block viral infection, suggesting that it does not need to crosslink CD4 to exert antiviral activity. While gp120-induced structural rearrangements in CD4 are probably minimal, CD4 structural rigidity is dispensable for ibalizumab inhibition. These results could guide CD4-based immunogen design and lead to a better understanding of HIV-1 entry.

  14. Affinity-purified respiratory syncytial virus antibodies from intravenous immunoglobulin exert potent antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nimesh; LeGoff, Jerome; Chamat, Soulaima; Mercier-Delarue, Severine; Touzelet, Olivier; Power, Ultan F; Kazatchkine, Michel D; Simon, Francois; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sebastien; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas V

    2013-01-01

    Mixed infections are one of the major therapeutic challenges, as the current strategies have had limited success. One of the most common and widespread conditions of mixed infection is respiratory syncytial virus-mediated pathology of the respiratory tract in children. There is a dire need for the development of novel therapeutic approaches during mixed infections. Therapeutic intravenous immunoglobulin preparations, obtained from plasma pools of healthy donors have been used in immune deficiencies. This study was thus designed to characterize the functional efficacy of RSV-specific antibodies in IVIg. To explore the functional ability of these affinity-purified RSV-specific antibodies, the antibody-dependent and complement dependent cytotoxicity was determined using peripheral cells of healthy donors. This study demonstrates the existence of highly potent RSV-specific antibodies in IVIg preparations and provides the basis for the use of IVIg as broad-spectrum protective shield to RSV-infected children during mixed infections.

  15. Affinity-Purified Respiratory Syncytial Virus Antibodies from Intravenous Immunoglobulin Exert Potent Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nimesh; LeGoff, Jerome; Chamat, Soulaima; Mercier-Delarue, Severine; Touzelet, Olivier; Power, Ultan F.; Kazatchkine, Michel D.; Simon, Francois; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sebastien; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas V.

    2013-01-01

    Mixed infections are one of the major therapeutic challenges, as the current strategies have had limited success. One of the most common and widespread conditions of mixed infection is respiratory syncytial virus-mediated pathology of the respiratory tract in children. There is a dire need for the development of novel therapeutic approaches during mixed infections. Therapeutic intravenous immunoglobulin preparations, obtained from plasma pools of healthy donors have been used in immune deficiencies. This study was thus designed to characterize the functional efficacy of RSV-specific antibodies in IVIg. To explore the functional ability of these affinity-purified RSV-specific antibodies, the antibody-dependent and complement dependent cytotoxicity was determined using peripheral cells of healthy donors. This study demonstrates the existence of highly potent RSV-specific antibodies in IVIg preparations and provides the basis for the use of IVIg as broad-spectrum protective shield to RSV-infected children during mixed infections. PMID:23894466

  16. Structural basis of potent Zika-dengue virus antibody cross-neutralization.

    PubMed

    Barba-Spaeth, Giovanna; Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Rouvinski, Alexander; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Medits, Iris; Sharma, Arvind; Simon-Lorière, Etienne; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Haouz, Ahmed; England, Patrick; Stiasny, Karin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Heinz, Franz X; Screaton, Gavin R; Rey, Félix A

    2016-08-04

    Zika virus is a member of the Flavivirus genus that had not been associated with severe disease in humans until the recent outbreaks, when it was linked to microcephaly in newborns in Brazil and to Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults in French Polynesia. Zika virus is related to dengue virus, and here we report that a subset of antibodies targeting a conformational epitope isolated from patients with dengue virus also potently neutralize Zika virus. The crystal structure of two of these antibodies in complex with the envelope protein of Zika virus reveals the details of a conserved epitope, which is also the site of interaction of the envelope protein dimer with the precursor membrane (prM) protein during virus maturation. Comparison of the Zika and dengue virus immunocomplexes provides a lead for rational, epitope-focused design of a universal vaccine capable of eliciting potent cross-neutralizing antibodies to protect simultaneously against both Zika and dengue virus infections.

  17. Bacterially Expressed Full-Length Recombinant Plasmodium falciparum RH5 Protein Binds Erythrocytes and Elicits Potent Strain-Transcending Parasite-Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, K. Sony; Pandey, Alok K.; Singh, Hina; Sahar, Tajali; Emmanuel, Amlabu; Chitnis, Chetan E.; Chauhan, Virander S.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte binding-like homologous protein 5 (PfRH5) is an essential merozoite ligand that binds with its erythrocyte receptor, basigin. PfRH5 is an attractive malaria vaccine candidate, as it is expressed by a wide number of P. falciparum strains, cannot be genetically disrupted, and exhibits limited sequence polymorphisms. Viral vector-induced PfRH5 antibodies potently inhibited erythrocyte invasion. However, it has been a challenge to generate full-length recombinant PfRH5 in a bacterial-cell-based expression system. In this study, we have produced full-length recombinant PfRH5 in Escherichia coli that exhibits specific erythrocyte binding similar to that of the native PfRH5 parasite protein and also, importantly, elicits potent invasion-inhibitory antibodies against a number of P. falciparum strains. Antibasigin antibodies blocked the erythrocyte binding of both native and recombinant PfRH5, further confirming that they bind with basigin. We have thus successfully produced full-length PfRH5 as a functionally active erythrocyte binding recombinant protein with a conformational integrity that mimics that of the native parasite protein and elicits potent strain-transcending parasite-neutralizing antibodies. P. falciparum has the capability to develop immune escape mechanisms, and thus, blood-stage malaria vaccines that target multiple antigens or pathways may prove to be highly efficacious. In this regard, antibody combinations targeting PfRH5 and other key merozoite antigens produced potent additive inhibition against multiple worldwide P. falciparum strains. PfRH5 was immunogenic when immunized with other antigens, eliciting potent invasion-inhibitory antibody responses with no immune interference. Our results strongly support the development of PfRH5 as a component of a combination blood-stage malaria vaccine. PMID:24126527

  18. Bispecific Antibodies Targeting Different Epitopes on the HIV-1 Envelope Exhibit Broad and Potent Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Asokan, M.; Rudicell, R. S.; Louder, M.; McKee, K.; O'Dell, S.; Stewart-Jones, G.; Wang, K.; Xu, L.; Chen, X.; Choe, M.; Chuang, G.; Georgiev, I. S.; Joyce, M. G.; Kirys, T.; Ko, S.; Pegu, A.; Shi, W.; Todd, J. P.; Yang, Z.; Bailer, R. T.; Rao, S.; Kwong, P. D.; Nabel, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The potency and breadth of the recently isolated neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies to HIV-1 have stimulated interest in their use to prevent or to treat HIV-1 infection. Due to the antigenically diverse nature of the HIV-1 envelope (Env), no single antibody is highly active against all viral strains. While the physical combination of two broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) can improve coverage against the majority of viruses, the clinical-grade manufacturing and testing of two independent antibody products are time and resource intensive. In this study, we constructed bispecific immunoglobulins (IgGs) composed of independent antigen-binding fragments with a common Fc region. We developed four different bispecific IgG variants that included antibodies targeting four major sites of HIV-1 neutralization. We show that these bispecific IgGs display features of both antibody specificities and, in some cases, display improved coverage over the individual parental antibodies. All four bispecific IgGs neutralized 94% to 97% of antigenically diverse viruses in a panel of 206 HIV-1 strains. Among the bispecific IgGs tested, VRC07 × PG9-16 displayed the most favorable neutralization profile. It was superior in breadth to either of the individual antibodies, neutralizing 97% of viruses with a median 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.055 μg/ml. This bispecific IgG also demonstrated in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters comparable to those of the parental bNAbs when administered to rhesus macaques. These results suggest that IgG-based bispecific antibodies are promising candidates for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection in humans. IMPORTANCE To prevent or treat HIV-1 infection, antibodies must potently neutralize nearly all strains of HIV-1. Thus, the physical combination of two or more antibodies may be needed to broaden neutralization coverage and diminish the possibility of viral resistance. A bispecific antibody that has two different

  19. Antibody inhibition of protein activity in starfish oocytes.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Eiichi; Hara, Masatoshi; Kishimoto, Takeo

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are widely utilized in cell and molecule biology for immunoblots, immunostaining, immunoprecipitation, immunoaffinity purification, and immunoassay. Some antibodies can be used for in vivo inhibition experiments. These antibodies bind to their target molecules and neutralize their functions, providing functional information in the study of their biological role. Here, we describe our methods for obtaining inhibitory antibodies against desired proteins. We then describe in the starfish oocyte system how to inhibit a target protein, even in the nucleus, by injection of antibody into the cytoplasm, and how to evaluate antibody inhibition of cell cycle regulators in small numbers of oocytes.

  20. Isolation of potent neutralizing antibodies from a survivor of the 2014 Ebola virus outbreak.

    PubMed

    Bornholdt, Zachary A; Turner, Hannah L; Murin, Charles D; Li, Wen; Sok, Devin; Souders, Colby A; Piper, Ashley E; Goff, Arthur; Shamblin, Joshua D; Wollen, Suzanne E; Sprague, Thomas R; Fusco, Marnie L; Pommert, Kathleen B J; Cavacini, Lisa A; Smith, Heidi L; Klempner, Mark; Reimann, Keith A; Krauland, Eric; Gerngross, Tillman U; Wittrup, Karl D; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Burton, Dennis R; Glass, Pamela J; Ward, Andrew B; Walker, Laura M

    2016-03-04

    Antibodies targeting the Ebola virus surface glycoprotein (EBOV GP) are implicated in protection against lethal disease, but the characteristics of the human antibody response to EBOV GP remain poorly understood. We isolated and characterized 349 GP-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from the peripheral B cells of a convalescent donor who survived the 2014 EBOV Zaire outbreak. Remarkably, 77% of the mAbs neutralize live EBOV, and several mAbs exhibit unprecedented potency. Structures of selected mAbs in complex with GP reveal a site of vulnerability located in the GP stalk region proximal to the viral membrane. Neutralizing antibodies targeting this site show potent therapeutic efficacy against lethal EBOV challenge in mice. The results provide a framework for the design of new EBOV vaccine candidates and immunotherapies.

  1. Isolation of potent neutralizing antibodies from a survivor of the 2014 Ebola virus outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Turner, Hannah L.; Murin, Charles D.; Li, Wen; Sok, Devin; Souders, Colby A.; Piper, Ashley E.; Goff, Arthur; Shamblin, Joshua D.; Wollen, Suzanne E.; Sprague, Thomas R.; Fusco, Marnie L.; Pommert, Kathleen B.J.; Cavacini, Lisa A.; Smith, Heidi L.; Klempner, Mark; Reimann, Keith A.; Krauland, Eric; Gerngross, Tillman U.; Wittrup, Dane K.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Burton, Dennis R.; Glass, Pamela J.; Ward, Andrew B.; Walker, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies targeting the Ebola virus surface glycoprotein (EBOV GP) are implicated in protection against lethal disease, but the characteristics of the human antibody response to EBOV GP remain poorly understood. Here we isolated and characterized 349 GP-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from the peripheral B cells of a convalescent donor who survived the 2014 EBOV Zaire outbreak. Remarkably, 77% of the mAbs neutralize live EBOV and several mAbs exhibit unprecedented potency. Structures of selected mAbs in complex with GP reveal a site of vulnerability located in the GP stalk region proximal to the viral membrane. Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) targeting this site show potent therapeutic efficacy against lethal EBOV challenge in mice. The results provide a framework for the design of new EBOV vaccine candidates and immunotherapies. PMID:26912366

  2. A novel bispecific antibody, S-Fab, induces potent cancer cell killing.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; He, Ping; Zhou, Changhua; Jing, Li; Dong, Bin; Chen, Siqi; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yawei; Miao, Ji; Wang, Zhong; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies that engage immune cells to kill cancer cells have been actively studied in cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we present a novel bispecific format, S-Fab, fabricated by linking a single-domain anti-carcinoembryonic antigen VHH to a conventional anti-CD3 Fab. In contrast to most bispecific antibodies, the S-Fab bispecific antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from bacteria. The purified S-Fab is stable in serum and is able to recruit T cells to drive potent cancer cell killing. In xenograft models, the S-Fab antibody suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our study suggested that the bispecific S-Fab format can be applied to a wide range of immunotherapies.

  3. Potent human monoclonal antibodies against SARS CoV, Nipah and Hendra viruses.

    PubMed

    Prabakaran, Ponraj; Zhu, Zhongyu; Xiao, Xiaodong; Biragyn, Arya; Dimitrov, Antony S; Broder, Christopher C; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2009-03-01

    Recently, several potently neutralizing fully human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs) targeting the severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS CoV) S glycoprotein, and the G glycoprotein of the paramyxoviruses Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) have been discovered [corrected]. To examine, compare and contrast the functional characteristics of hmAbs with the potential for prophylaxis and treatment of diseases caused by SARS CoV, HeV and NiV. A review of relevant literature. Structural, functional and biochemical analyses [corrected] have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms of receptor recognition and antibody neutralization, and suggested that these antibodies alone or in combination could fight the viruses' heterogeneity and mutability, which is a major problem in the development of effective therapeutic agents against viruses, including therapeutic antibodies.

  4. Structural and Pharmacological Characterization of Novel Potent and Selective Monoclonal Antibody Antagonists of Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ravn, Peter; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Kunze, Susan; Matthews, Evelyn; Priest, Claire; O'Brien, Siobhan; Collinson, Andie; Papworth, Monika; Fritsch-Fredin, Maria; Jermutus, Lutz; Benthem, Lambertus; Gruetter, Markus; Jackson, Ronald H.

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an endogenous hormonal factor (incretin) that, upon binding to its receptor (GIPr; a class B G-protein-coupled receptor), stimulates insulin secretion by beta cells in the pancreas. There has been a lack of potent inhibitors of the GIPr with prolonged in vivo exposure to support studies on GIP biology. Here we describe the generation of an antagonizing antibody to the GIPr, using phage and ribosome display libraries. Gipg013 is a specific competitive antagonist with equally high potencies to mouse, rat, dog, and human GIP receptors with a Ki of 7 nm for the human GIPr. Gipg013 antagonizes the GIP receptor and inhibits GIP-induced insulin secretion in vitro and in vivo. A crystal structure of Gipg013 Fab in complex with the human GIPr extracellular domain (ECD) shows that the antibody binds through a series of hydrogen bonds from the complementarity-determining regions of Gipg013 Fab to the N-terminal α-helix of GIPr ECD as well as to residues around its highly conserved glucagon receptor subfamily recognition fold. The antibody epitope overlaps with the GIP binding site on the GIPr ECD, ensuring competitive antagonism of the receptor. This well characterized antagonizing antibody to the GIPr will be useful as a tool to further understand the biological roles of GIP. PMID:23689510

  5. Structural and pharmacological characterization of novel potent and selective monoclonal antibody antagonists of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Ravn, Peter; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Kunze, Susan; Matthews, Evelyn; Priest, Claire; O'Brien, Siobhan; Collinson, Andie; Papworth, Monika; Fritsch-Fredin, Maria; Jermutus, Lutz; Benthem, Lambertus; Gruetter, Markus; Jackson, Ronald H

    2013-07-05

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an endogenous hormonal factor (incretin) that, upon binding to its receptor (GIPr; a class B G-protein-coupled receptor), stimulates insulin secretion by beta cells in the pancreas. There has been a lack of potent inhibitors of the GIPr with prolonged in vivo exposure to support studies on GIP biology. Here we describe the generation of an antagonizing antibody to the GIPr, using phage and ribosome display libraries. Gipg013 is a specific competitive antagonist with equally high potencies to mouse, rat, dog, and human GIP receptors with a Ki of 7 nm for the human GIPr. Gipg013 antagonizes the GIP receptor and inhibits GIP-induced insulin secretion in vitro and in vivo. A crystal structure of Gipg013 Fab in complex with the human GIPr extracellular domain (ECD) shows that the antibody binds through a series of hydrogen bonds from the complementarity-determining regions of Gipg013 Fab to the N-terminal α-helix of GIPr ECD as well as to residues around its highly conserved glucagon receptor subfamily recognition fold. The antibody epitope overlaps with the GIP binding site on the GIPr ECD, ensuring competitive antagonism of the receptor. This well characterized antagonizing antibody to the GIPr will be useful as a tool to further understand the biological roles of GIP.

  6. ARGX-110, a highly potent antibody targeting CD70, eliminates tumors via both enhanced ADCC and immune checkpoint blockade

    PubMed Central

    Silence, Karen; Dreier, Torsten; Moshir, Mahan; Ulrichts, Peter; Gabriels, Sofie ME; Saunders, Michael; Wajant, Harald; Brouckaert, Peter; Huyghe, Leander; Van Hauwermeiren, Tim; Thibault, Alain; De Haard, Hans J

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of CD70 has been documented in a variety of solid and hematological tumors, where it is thought to play a role in tumor proliferation and evasion of immune surveillance. Here, we describe ARGX-110, a defucosylated IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) that selectively targets and neutralizes CD70, the ligand of CD27.   ARGX-110 was generated by immunization of outbred llamas. The antibody was germlined to 95% human identity, and its anti-tumor efficacy was tested in several in vitro assays. ARGX-110 binds CD70 with picomolar affinity. In depletion studies, ARGX-110 lyses tumor cells with greater efficacy than its fucosylated version. In addition, ARGX-110 demonstrates strong complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis activity. ARGX-110 inhibits signaling of CD27, which results in blocking of the activation and proliferation of Tregs. In a Raji xenograft model, administration of the fucosylated version of ARGX-110 resulted in a prolonged survival at doses of 0.1 mg/kg and above. The pharmacokinetics of ARGX-110 was tested in cynomolgus monkeys; the calculated half-life is 12 days. In conclusion, ARGX-110 is a potent blocking mAb with a dual mode of action against both CD70-bearing tumor cells and CD70-dependent Tregs. This antibody is now in a Phase 1 study in patients with advanced malignancies expressing CD70 (NCT01813539). PMID:24492296

  7. A potent broad-spectrum protective human monoclonal antibody crosslinking two haemagglutinin monomers of influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying; Cho, MyungSam; Shore, David; Song, Manki; Choi, JungAh; Jiang, Tao; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Bourgeois, Melissa; Almli, Lynn; Yang, Hua; Chen, Li-Mei; Shi, Yi; Qi, Jianxu; Li, An; Yi, Kye Sook; Chang, MinSeok; Bae, Jin Soo; Lee, HyunJoo; Shin, JiYoung; Stevens, James; Hong, SeoungSuh; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Gao, George F.; Chang, Shin Jae; Donis, Ruben O.

    2015-01-01

    Effective annual influenza vaccination requires frequent changes in vaccine composition due to both antigenic shift for different subtype hemagglutinins (HAs) and antigenic drift in a particular HA. Here we present a broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody with an unusual binding modality. The antibody, designated CT149, was isolated from convalescent patients infected with pandemic H1N1 in 2009. CT149 is found to neutralize all tested group 2 and some group 1 influenza A viruses by inhibiting low pH-induced, HA-mediated membrane fusion. It promotes killing of infected cells by Fc-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. X-ray crystallographic data reveal that CT149 binds primarily to the fusion domain in HA2, and the light chain is also largely involved in binding. The epitope recognized by this antibody comprises amino-acid residues from two adjacent protomers of HA. This binding characteristic of CT149 will provide more information to support the design of more potent influenza vaccines. PMID:26196962

  8. Crystal structure of human antibody 2909 reveals conserved features of quaternary structure-specific antibodies that potently neutralize HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Changela, Anita; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhu, Jiang; Nardone, Glenn A; O'Dell, Sijy; Pancera, Marie; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Phogat, Sanjay; Robinson, James E; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D

    2011-03-01

    Monoclonal antibody 2909 belongs to a class of potently neutralizing antibodies that recognize quaternary epitopes on HIV-1. Some members of this class, such as 2909, are strain specific, while others, such as antibody PG16, are broadly neutralizing; all, however, recognize a region on the gp120 envelope glycoprotein that includes two loops (V2 and V3) and forms appropriately only in the oligomeric HIV-1 spike (gp120(3)/gp41(3)). Here we present the crystal structure of 2909 and report structure-function analysis with antibody chimeras composed of 2909 and other members of this antibody class. The 2909 structure was dominated by a heavy-chain third-complementarity-determining region (CDR H3) of 21 residues, which comprised 36% of the combining surface and formed a β-hairpin club extending ∼20 Å beyond the rest of the antibody. Sequence analysis and mass spectrometry identified sites of tyrosine sulfation at the middle and top of CDR H3; substitutions with phenylalanine either ablated (middle substitution) or substantially diminished (top substitution) neutralization. Chimeric antibodies composed of heavy and light chains, exchanged between 2909 and other members of the class, indicated a substantial lack of complementation. Comparison of 2909 to PG16 (which is tyrosine sulfated and the only other member of the class for which a structure has previously been reported) showed that both utilize protruding, anionic CDR H3s for recognition. Thus, despite some diversity, members of this class share structural and functional similarities, with conserved features of the CDR H3 subdomain likely reflecting prevalent solutions by the human immune system for recognition of a quaternary site of HIV-1 vulnerability.

  9. Conformation-Dependent High-Affinity Potent Ricin-Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Hu, Charles Chen; Lillico, Dustin; Yu, Justin; Negrych, Laurel M.; Cherwonogrodzky, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potential biothreat agent with no approved antidote available for ricin poisoning. The aim of this study was to develop potent antibody-based antiricin antidotes. Four strong ricin resistant hybridoma clones secreting antiricin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. All four mAbs are bound to conformational epitopes of ricin toxin B (RTB) with high affinity (KD values from 2.55 to 36.27 nM). RTB not only triggers cellular uptake of ricin, but also facilitates transport of the ricin toxin A (RTA) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, where RTA exerts its toxic activity. The four mAbs were found to have potent ricin-neutralizing capacities and synergistic effects among them as determined by an in vitro neutralization assay. In vivo protection assay demonstrated that all four mAbs had strong efficacy against ricin challenges. D9 was found to be exceptionally effective. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of D9, at a dose of 5 μg, 6 weeks before or 6 hours after an i.p. challenge with 5 × LD50 of ricin was able to protect or rescue 100% of the mice, indicating that mAb D9 is an excellent candidate to be developed as a potent antidote against ricin poisoning for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:23484120

  10. Conformation-dependent high-affinity potent ricin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Hu, Charles Chen; Lillico, Dustin; Yu, Justin; Negrych, Laurel M; Cherwonogrodzky, John W

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potential biothreat agent with no approved antidote available for ricin poisoning. The aim of this study was to develop potent antibody-based antiricin antidotes. Four strong ricin resistant hybridoma clones secreting antiricin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. All four mAbs are bound to conformational epitopes of ricin toxin B (RTB) with high affinity (KD values from 2.55 to 36.27 nM). RTB not only triggers cellular uptake of ricin, but also facilitates transport of the ricin toxin A (RTA) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, where RTA exerts its toxic activity. The four mAbs were found to have potent ricin-neutralizing capacities and synergistic effects among them as determined by an in vitro neutralization assay. In vivo protection assay demonstrated that all four mAbs had strong efficacy against ricin challenges. D9 was found to be exceptionally effective. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of D9, at a dose of 5 μ g, 6 weeks before or 6 hours after an i.p. challenge with 5 × LD50 of ricin was able to protect or rescue 100% of the mice, indicating that mAb D9 is an excellent candidate to be developed as a potent antidote against ricin poisoning for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes.

  11. Potent neutralization of VEGF biological activities with a fully human antibody Fab fragment directed against VEGF receptor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, H.-Q. . E-mail: hua-quan.miao@imclone.com; Hu, Kun; Jimenez, Xenia; Navarro, Elizabeth; Zhang, Haifan; Lu Dan; Ludwig, Dale L.; Balderes, Paul; Zhu Zhenping . E-mail: zhenping.zhu@imclone.com

    2006-06-23

    Compelling evidence suggest that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors, especially receptor 2 (VEGFR2, or kinase insert domain-containing receptor, KDR), play a critical role in angiogenesis under both physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer and angiogenic retinopathies such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To this end, inhibition of angiogenesis with antagonists to either VEGF or KDR has yielded significant therapeutic efficacy both in preclinical studies in animal models and in clinical trials in patients with cancer and AMD. We previously reported the identification of a high affinity, fully human anti-KDR antibody fragment, 1121B Fab, through a highly stringent affinity maturation process with a Fab originally isolated from a naive human antibody phage display library. In this study, we demonstrate that 1121B Fab is able to strongly block KDR/VEGF interaction, resulting in potent inhibition of an array of biological activities of VEGF, including activation of the receptor and its signaling pathway, intracellular calcium mobilization, and migration and proliferation of endothelial cells. Taken together, our data lend strong support to the further development of 1121B Fab fragment as an anti-angiogenesis agent in both cancer and angiogenic retinopathies.

  12. Human monomeric antibody fragments to TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 that display potent in vitro agonism

    PubMed Central

    Main, Sarah; Newton, Philip; Chodorge, Matthieu; Cadwallader, Karen; Humphreys, Robin; Albert, Vivian; Vaughan, Tristan J; Minter, Ralph R; Edwards, Bryan M

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis through the TRAIL receptor pathway can be induced via agonistic IgG to either TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2. Here we describe the use of phage display to isolate a substantive panel of fully human anti-TRAIL receptor single chain Fv fragments (scFvs); 234 and 269 different scFvs specific for TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 respectively. In addition, 134 different scFvs that were cross-reactive for both receptors were isolated. To facilitate screening of all 637 scFvs for potential agonistic activity in vitro, a novel high-throughput surrogate apoptosis assay was developed. Ten TRAIL-R1 specific scFv and 6 TRAIL-R2 specific scFv were shown to inhibit growth of tumor cells in vitro in the absence of any cross-linking agents. These scFv were all highly specific for either TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2, potently inhibited tumor cell proliferation, and were antagonists of TRAIL binding. Moreover, further characterization of TRAIL-R1 agonistic scFv demonstrated significant anti-tumor activity when expressed and purified as a monomeric Fab fragment. Thus, scFv and Fab fragments, in addition to whole IgG, can be agonistic and induce tumor cell death through specific binding to either TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2. These potent agonistic scFv were all isolated directly from the starting phage antibody library and demonstrated significant tumor cell killing properties without any requirement for affinity maturation. Some of these selected scFv have been converted to IgG format and are being studied extensively in clinical trials to investigate their potential utility as human monoclonal antibody therapeutics for the treatment of human cancer. PMID:20068388

  13. Potent inhibition of microRNA in vivo without degradation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Scott; Propp, Stephanie; Freier, Susan M; Jones, Laura E; Serra, Martin J; Kinberger, Garth; Bhat, Balkrishen; Swayze, Eric E; Bennett, C Frank; Esau, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are widely used as a tool to functionalize microRNAs (miRNAs). Reduction of miRNA level after ASO inhibition is commonly reported to show efficacy. Whether this is the most relevant endpoint for measuring miRNA inhibition has not been adequately addressed in the field although it has important implications for evaluating miRNA targeting studies. Using a novel approach to quantitate miRNA levels in the presence of excess ASO, we have discovered that the outcome of miRNA inhibition can vary depending on the chemical modification of the ASO. Although some miRNA inhibitors cause a decrease in mature miRNA levels, we have identified a novel 2'-fluoro/2'-methoxyethyl modified ASO motif with dramatically improved in vivo potency which does not. These studies show there are multiple mechanisms of miRNA inhibition by ASOs and that evaluation of secondary endpoints is crucial for interpreting miRNA inhibition studies.

  14. On the role of phosphatidylethanolamine in the inhibition of activated protein C activity by antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, M D; Triplett, D T; Comp, P C; Esmon, N L; Esmon, C T

    1995-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is an important membrane component for supporting activated protein C anticoagulant activity but has little influence on prothrombin activation. This difference constitutes a potential mechanism for selective inhibition of the protein C anticoagulant pathway by lupus anticoagulants and/or antiphospholipid antibodies. In this study, we demonstrate that the presence of PE augments lupus anticoagulant activity. In the plasma of some patients with lupus anticoagulants, activated protein C anticoagulant activity is more potently inhibited than prothrombin activation. As a result, in the presence of activated protein C and PE, these patient plasmas clot faster than normal plasma. Patients with minimal lupus anticoagulant activity are identified whose plasma potently inhibits activated protein C anticoagulant activity. This process is also PE dependent. In three patient plasmas, these phenomena are shown to be due to immunoglobulins. The PE requirement in the expression of activated protein C anticoagulant activity and the PE dependence of some antiphospholipid antibodies provide a mechanistic basis for the selective inhibition of the protein C pathway. Inhibition of activated protein C function may be a common mechanism contributing to increased thrombotic risk in certain patients with antiphospholipid antibodies. PMID:7814631

  15. CROSS-REACTIVE AND POTENT NEUTRALIZING ANTIBODY RESPONSES IN HUMAN SURVIVORS OF NATURAL EBOLAVIRUS INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Flyak, Andrew I.; Shen, Xiaoli; Murin, Charles D.; Turner, Hannah L.; David, Joshua A.; Fusco, Marnie L.; Lampley, Rebecca; Kose, Nurgun; Ilinykh, Philipp A.; Kuzmina, Natalia; Branchizio, Andre; King, Hannah; Brown, Leland; Bryan, Christopher; Davidson, Edgar; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Slaughter, James C.; Sapparapu, Gopal; Klages, Curtis; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Ward, Andrew B.; Bukreyev, Alexander; Crowe, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies have suggested that antibody-mediated protection against the Ebolaviruses may be achievable, but little is known about whether or not antibodies can confer cross-reactive protection against viruses belonging to diverse Ebolavirus species, such as Ebola virus (EBOV), Sudan virus (SUDV) and Bundibugyo virus (BDBV). We isolated a large panel of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against BDBV glycoprotein (GP) using peripheral blood B cells from survivors of the 2007 BDBV outbreak in Uganda. We determined that a large proportion of mAbs with potent neutralizing activity against BDBV bind to the glycan cap and recognize diverse epitopes within this major antigenic site. We identified several glycan cap-specific mAbs that neutralized multiple ebolaviruses including SUDV, and a cross-reactive mAb that completely protected guinea pigs from the lethal challenge with heterologous EBOV. Our results provide a roadmap to develop a single antibody-based treatment effective against multiple Ebolavirus infections. PMID:26806128

  16. Neutralizing antibodies are unable to inhibit direct viral cell-to-cell spread of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Christian L; Lamorte, Louie; Sepulveda, Eliud; Lorenz, Ivo C; Gauthier, Annick; Franti, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Infection with human cytomegalovirus (CMV) during pregnancy is the most common cause of congenital disorders, and can lead to severe life-long disabilities with associated high cost of care. Since there is no vaccine or effective treatment, current efforts are focused on identifying potent neutralizing antibodies. A panel of CMV monoclonal antibodies identified from patent applications, was synthesized and expressed in order to reproduce data from the literature showing that anti-glycoprotein B antibodies neutralized virus entry into all cell types and that anti-pentameric complex antibodies are highly potent in preventing virus entry into epithelial cells. It had not been established whether antibodies could prevent subsequent rounds of infection that are mediated primarily by direct cell-to-cell transmission. A thorough validation of a plaque reduction assay to monitor cell-to-cell spread led to the conclusion that neutralizing antibodies do not significantly inhibit plaque formation or reduce plaque size when they are added post-infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Generation of a novel Antibody-Drug Conjugate targeting endosialin: potent and durable antitumor response in sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Capone, Emily; Piccolo, Enza; Fichera, Imma; Ciufici, Paolo; Barcaroli, Daniela; Sala, Arturo; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo; Iacobelli, Valentina; Iacobelli, Stefano; Sala, Gianluca

    2017-09-01

    The endosialin/CD248/TEM1 receptor is expressed on the cell surface of tumor-associated stroma cells as well as in sarcoma and neuroblastoma cells. This receptor is emerging as an attractive molecule in diagnostics and therapeutics because of its expression across the stroma of many human tumors, the low to absent expression in normal tissues and accessibility from the vascular circulation. In this study, we present evidence of the preclinical efficacy of a novel Antibody-Drug Conjugate (ENDOS/ADC). It consists of a humanized endosialin monoclonal antibody, named hMP-E-8.3, conjugated to a potent duocarmycin derivative. In endosialin expressing cancer cell lines, this ENDOS/ADC showed a powerful, specific and target-dependent killing activity. High expression levels of endosialin in cells correlated with efficient internalization and cytotoxic effects in vitro. Efficacy studies demonstrated that ENDOS/ADC treatment led to a long-lasting tumor growth inhibition of a cell line-based model of human osteosarcoma. Taken together, our results demonstrate that endosialin is an attractive target in sarcoma and suggest that ENDOS/ADC has the potential to be developed into a bio-therapeutic agent for these malignancies.

  18. Production of Potent Fully Human Polyclonal Antibodies against Ebola Zaire Virus in Transchromosomal Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Dye, John M.; Wu, Hua; Hooper, Jay W.; Khurana, Surender; Kuehne, Ana I.; Coyle, Elizabeth M.; Ortiz, Ramon A.; Fuentes, Sandra; Herbert, Andrew S.; Golding, Hana; Bakken, Russell A.; Brannan, Jennifer M.; Kwilas, Steve A.; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Luke, Thomas C.; Smith, Gale; Glenn, Gregory; Li, Wenfang; Ye, Ling; Yang, Chinglai; Compans, Richard W.; Tripp, Ralph A.; Jiao, Jin-an

    2016-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies, derived from humans or hyperimmunized animals, have been used prophylactically or therapeutically as countermeasures for a variety of infectious diseases. SAB Biotherapeutics has successfully developed a transchromosomic (Tc) bovine platform technology that can produce fully human immunoglobulins rapidly, and in substantial quantities, against a variety of disease targets. In this study, two Tc bovines expressing high levels of fully human IgG were hyperimmunized with a recombinant glycoprotein (GP) vaccine consisting of the 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) Makona isolate. Serum collected from these hyperimmunized Tc bovines contained high titers of human IgG against EBOV GP as determined by GP specific ELISA, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and virus neutralization assays. Fully human polyclonal antibodies against EBOV were purified and evaluated in a mouse challenge model using mouse adapted Ebola virus (maEBOV). Intraperitoneal administration of the purified anti-EBOV IgG (100 mg/kg) to BALB/c mice one day after lethal challenge with maEBOV resulted in 90% protection; whereas 100% of the control animals succumbed. The results show that hyperimmunization of Tc bovines with EBOV GP can elicit protective and potent neutralizing fully human IgG antibodies rapidly and in commercially viable quantities. PMID:27109916

  19. Production of Potent Fully Human Polyclonal Antibodies against Ebola Zaire Virus in Transchromosomal Cattle.

    PubMed

    Dye, John M; Wu, Hua; Hooper, Jay W; Khurana, Surender; Kuehne, Ana I; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Ortiz, Ramon A; Fuentes, Sandra; Herbert, Andrew S; Golding, Hana; Bakken, Russell A; Brannan, Jennifer M; Kwilas, Steve A; Sullivan, Eddie J; Luke, Thomas C; Smith, Gale; Glenn, Gregory; Li, Wenfang; Ye, Ling; Yang, Chinglai; Compans, Richard W; Tripp, Ralph A; Jiao, Jin-An

    2016-04-25

    Polyclonal antibodies, derived from humans or hyperimmunized animals, have been used prophylactically or therapeutically as countermeasures for a variety of infectious diseases. SAB Biotherapeutics has successfully developed a transchromosomic (Tc) bovine platform technology that can produce fully human immunoglobulins rapidly, and in substantial quantities, against a variety of disease targets. In this study, two Tc bovines expressing high levels of fully human IgG were hyperimmunized with a recombinant glycoprotein (GP) vaccine consisting of the 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) Makona isolate. Serum collected from these hyperimmunized Tc bovines contained high titers of human IgG against EBOV GP as determined by GP specific ELISA, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and virus neutralization assays. Fully human polyclonal antibodies against EBOV were purified and evaluated in a mouse challenge model using mouse adapted Ebola virus (maEBOV). Intraperitoneal administration of the purified anti-EBOV IgG (100 mg/kg) to BALB/c mice one day after lethal challenge with maEBOV resulted in 90% protection; whereas 100% of the control animals succumbed. The results show that hyperimmunization of Tc bovines with EBOV GP can elicit protective and potent neutralizing fully human IgG antibodies rapidly and in commercially viable quantities.

  20. Vaccine-Derived Neutralizing Antibodies to the Human Cytomegalovirus gH/gL Pentamer Potently Block Primary Cytotrophoblast Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chiuppesi, Flavia; Wussow, Felix; Johnson, Erica; Bian, Chao; Zhuo, Meng; Rajakumar, Augustine; Barry, Peter A.; Britt, William J.; Chakraborty, Rana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) elicits neutralizing antibodies (NAb) of various potencies and cell type specificities to prevent HCMV entry into fibroblasts (FB) and epithelial/endothelial cells (EpC/EnC). NAb targeting the major essential envelope glycoprotein complexes gB and gH/gL inhibit both FB and EpC/EnC entry. In contrast to FB infection, HCMV entry into EpC/EnC is additionally blocked by extremely potent NAb to conformational epitopes of the gH/gL/UL128/130/131A pentamer complex (PC). We recently developed a vaccine concept based on coexpression of all five PC subunits by a single modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vector, termed MVA-PC. Vaccination of mice and rhesus macaques with MVA-PC resulted in a high titer and sustained NAb that blocked EpC/EnC infection and lower-titer NAb that inhibited FB entry. However, antibody function responsible for the neutralizing activity induced by the MVA-PC vaccine is uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that MVA-PC elicits NAb with cell type-specific neutralization potency and antigen recognition pattern similar to human NAb targeting conformational and linear epitopes of the UL128/130/131A subunits or gH. In addition, we show that the vaccine-derived PC-specific NAb are significantly more potent than the anti-gH NAb to prevent HCMV spread in EpC and infection of human placental cytotrophoblasts, cell types thought to be of critical importance for HCMV transmission to the fetus. These findings further validate MVA-PC as a clinical vaccine candidate to elicit NAb that resembles those induced during HCMV infection and provide valuable insights into the potency of PC-specific NAb to interfere with HCMV cell-associated spread and infection of key placental cells. IMPORTANCE As a consequence of the leading role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in causing permanent birth defects, developing a vaccine against HCMV has been assigned a major public health priority. We have recently introduced a vaccine strategy based

  1. Vaccine-Derived Neutralizing Antibodies to the Human Cytomegalovirus gH/gL Pentamer Potently Block Primary Cytotrophoblast Infection.

    PubMed

    Chiuppesi, Flavia; Wussow, Felix; Johnson, Erica; Bian, Chao; Zhuo, Meng; Rajakumar, Augustine; Barry, Peter A; Britt, William J; Chakraborty, Rana; Diamond, Don J

    2015-12-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) elicits neutralizing antibodies (NAb) of various potencies and cell type specificities to prevent HCMV entry into fibroblasts (FB) and epithelial/endothelial cells (EpC/EnC). NAb targeting the major essential envelope glycoprotein complexes gB and gH/gL inhibit both FB and EpC/EnC entry. In contrast to FB infection, HCMV entry into EpC/EnC is additionally blocked by extremely potent NAb to conformational epitopes of the gH/gL/UL128/130/131A pentamer complex (PC). We recently developed a vaccine concept based on coexpression of all five PC subunits by a single modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vector, termed MVA-PC. Vaccination of mice and rhesus macaques with MVA-PC resulted in a high titer and sustained NAb that blocked EpC/EnC infection and lower-titer NAb that inhibited FB entry. However, antibody function responsible for the neutralizing activity induced by the MVA-PC vaccine is uncharacterized. Here, we demonstrate that MVA-PC elicits NAb with cell type-specific neutralization potency and antigen recognition pattern similar to human NAb targeting conformational and linear epitopes of the UL128/130/131A subunits or gH. In addition, we show that the vaccine-derived PC-specific NAb are significantly more potent than the anti-gH NAb to prevent HCMV spread in EpC and infection of human placental cytotrophoblasts, cell types thought to be of critical importance for HCMV transmission to the fetus. These findings further validate MVA-PC as a clinical vaccine candidate to elicit NAb that resembles those induced during HCMV infection and provide valuable insights into the potency of PC-specific NAb to interfere with HCMV cell-associated spread and infection of key placental cells. As a consequence of the leading role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in causing permanent birth defects, developing a vaccine against HCMV has been assigned a major public health priority. We have recently introduced a vaccine strategy based on a widely used

  2. Transient antibody targeting of CD45RC induces transplant tolerance and potent antigen-specific regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Picarda, Elodie; Bézie, Séverine; Boucault, Laetitia; Autrusseau, Elodie; Kilens, Stéphanie; Martinet, Bernard; Daguin, Véronique; Donnart, Audrey; Charpentier, Eric; Anegon, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Rat and human CD4+ and CD8+ Tregs expressing low levels of CD45RC have strong immunoregulatory properties. We describe here that human CD45 isoforms are nonredundant and identify distinct subsets of cells. We show that CD45RC is not expressed by CD4+ and CD8+ Foxp3+ Tregs, while CD45RA/RB/RO are. Transient administration of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting CD45RC in a rat cardiac allotransplantation model induced transplant tolerance associated with inhibition of allogeneic humoral responses but maintained primary and memory responses against cognate antigens. Anti-CD45RC mAb induced rapid death of CD45RChigh T cells through intrinsic cell signaling but preserved and potentiated CD4+ and CD8+ CD45RClow/– Tregs, which are able to adoptively transfer donor-specific tolerance to grafted recipients. Anti-CD45RC treatment results in distinct transcriptional signature of CD4+ and CD8+ CD45RClow/– Tregs. Finally, we demonstrate that anti-human CD45RC treatment inhibited graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in immune-humanized NSG mice. Thus, short-term anti-CD45RC is a potent therapeutic candidate to induce transplantation tolerance in human. PMID:28194440

  3. Potent single-domain antibodies that arrest respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein in its prefusion state

    PubMed Central

    Rossey, Iebe; Gilman, Morgan S. A.; Kabeche, Stephanie C.; Sedeyn, Koen; Wrapp, Daniel; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Chen, Man; Mas, Vicente; Spitaels, Jan; Melero, José A.; Graham, Barney S.; Schepens, Bert; McLellan, Jason S.; Saelens, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the main cause of lower respiratory tract infections in young children. The RSV fusion protein (F) is highly conserved and is the only viral membrane protein that is essential for infection. The prefusion conformation of RSV F is considered the most relevant target for antiviral strategies because it is the fusion-competent form of the protein and the primary target of neutralizing activity present in human serum. Here, we describe two llama-derived single-domain antibodies (VHHs) that have potent RSV-neutralizing activity and bind selectively to prefusion RSV F with picomolar affinity. Crystal structures of these VHHs in complex with prefusion F show that they recognize a conserved cavity formed by two F protomers. In addition, the VHHs prevent RSV replication and lung infiltration of inflammatory monocytes and T cells in RSV-challenged mice. These prefusion F-specific VHHs represent promising antiviral agents against RSV. PMID:28194013

  4. Structure of IL-17A in complex with a potent, fully human neutralizing antibody.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Stefan; Abbott, W Mark; Hargreaves, David; Pauptit, Richard A; Davies, Rick A; Needham, Maurice R C; Langham, Caroline; Barker, Wendy; Aziz, Azad; Snow, Melanie J; Dawson, Sarah; Welsh, Fraser; Wilkinson, Trevor; Vaugan, Tris; Beste, Gerald; Bishop, Sarah; Popovic, Bojana; Rees, Gareth; Sleeman, Matthew; Tuske, Steven J; Coales, Stephen J; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Russell, Caroline

    2009-12-18

    IL-17A is a pro-inflammatory cytokine produced by the newly identified Th17 subset of T-cells. We have isolated a human monoclonal antibody to IL-17A (CAT-2200) that can potently neutralize the effects of recombinant and native human IL-17A. We determined the crystal structure of IL-17A in complex with the CAT-2200 Fab at 2.6 A resolution in order to provide a definitive characterization of the epitope and paratope regions. Approximately a third of the IL-17A dimer is disordered in this crystal structure. The disorder occurs in both independent copies of the complex in the asymmetric unit and does not appear to be influenced by crystal packing. The complex contains one IL-17A dimer sandwiched between two CAT-2200 Fab fragments. The IL-17A is a disulfide-linked homodimer that is similar in structure to IL-17F, adopting a cystine-knot fold. The structure is not inconsistent with the previous prediction of a receptor binding cavity on IL-17 family members. The epitope recognized by CAT-2200 is shown to involve 12 amino acid residues from the quaternary structure of IL-17A, with each Fab contacting both monomers in the dimer. All complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) in the Fab contribute to a total of 16 amino acid residues in the antibody paratope. In vitro affinity optimization was used to generate CAT-2200 from a parental lead antibody using random mutagenesis of CDR3 loops. This resulted in seven amino acid changes (three in VL-CDR3 and four in VH-CDR3) and gave an approximate 30-fold increase in potency in a cell-based neutralization assay. Two of the seven amino acids form part of the CAT-2200 paratope. The observed interaction site between CAT-2200 and IL-17A is consistent with data from hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and mutagenesis approaches.

  5. Aspartate aminotransferase is potently inhibited by copper complexes: Exploring copper complex-binding proteome.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuqi; Lu, Liping; Yuan, Caixia; Feng, Sisi; Zhu, Miaoli

    2017-05-01

    Recent researches indicated that a copper complex-binding proteome that potently interacted with copper complexes and then influenced cellular metabolism might exist in organism. In order to explore the copper complex-binding proteome, a copper chelating ion-immobilized affinity chromatography (Cu-IMAC) column and mass spectrometry were used to separate and identify putative Cu-binding proteins in primary rat hepatocytes. A total of 97 putative Cu-binding proteins were isolated and identified. Five higher abundance proteins, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), catalase (CAT), calreticulin (CRT) and albumin (Alb) were further purified using a SP-, and (or) Q-Sepharose Fast Flow column. The interaction between the purified proteins and selected 11 copper complexes and CuCl2 was investigated. The enzymes inhibition tests demonstrated that AST was potently inhibited by copper complexes while MDH and CAT were weakly inhibited. Schiff-based copper complexes 6 and 7 potently inhibited AST with the IC50 value of 3.6 and 7.2μM, respectively and exhibited better selectivity over MDH and CAT. Fluorescence titration results showed the two complexes tightly bound to AST with binding constant of 3.89×10(6) and 3.73×10(6)M(-1), respectively and a stoichiometry ratio of 1:1. Copper complex 6 was able to enter into HepG2 cells and further inhibit intracellular AST activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Potent nonimmunosuppressive cyclophilin inhibitors with improved pharmaceutical properties and decreased transporter inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jiping; Tjandra, Meiliana; Becker, Christopher; Bednarczyk, Dallas; Capparelli, Michael; Elling, Robert; Hanna, Imad; Fujimoto, Roger; Furegati, Markus; Karur, Subramanian; Kasprzyk, Theresa; Knapp, Mark; Leung, Kwan; Li, Xiaolin; Lu, Peichao; Mergo, Wosenu; Miault, Charlotte; Ng, Simon; Parker, David; Peng, Yunshan; Roggo, Silvio; Rivkin, Alexey; Simmons, Robert L; Wang, Michael; Wiedmann, Brigitte; Weiss, Andrew H; Xiao, Linda; Xie, Lili; Xu, Wenjian; Yifru, Aregahegn; Yang, Shengtian; Zhou, Bo; Sweeney, Zachary K

    2014-10-23

    Nonimmunosuppressive cyclophilin inhibitors have demonstrated efficacy for the treatment of hepatitis C infection (HCV). However, alisporivir, cyclosporin A, and most other cyclosporins are potent inhibitors of OATP1B1, MRP2, MDR1, and other important drug transporters. Reduction of the side chain hydrophobicity of the P4 residue preserves cyclophilin binding and antiviral potency while decreasing transporter inhibition. Representative inhibitor 33 (NIM258) is a less potent transporter inhibitor relative to previously described cyclosporins, retains anti-HCV activity in cell culture, and has an acceptable pharmacokinetic profile in rats and dogs. An X-ray structure of 33 bound to rat cyclophilin D is reported.

  7. Selective and potent Akt inhibition triggers anti-myeloma activities and enhances fatal endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Naoya; Hideshima, Teru; Shimomura, Toshiyasu; Suzuki, Rikio; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Rizq, Ola; Kikuchi, Shohei; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Cottini, Francesca; Jakubikova, Jana; Cirstea, Diana; Gorgun, Gullu; Minami, Jiro; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Richardson, Paul G; Utsugi, Teruhiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2014-08-15

    The PI3K/Akt pathway plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma (MM) in the bone marrow (BM) milieu. However, efficacy of selective and potent Akt inhibition has not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we, therefore, examined the biologic impact of selective and potent Akt inhibition by a novel allosteric inhibitor TAS-117. TAS-117 induced significant growth inhibition, associated with downregulation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), selectively in MM cell lines with high baseline p-Akt. Cytotoxicity of TAS-117 was also observed in patient MM cells, but not in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Importantly, TAS-117 induced significant cytotoxicity in MM cells even in the presence of BM stromal cells, associated with inhibition of IL6 secretion. Oral administration of TAS-117 significantly inhibited human MM cell growth in murine xenograft models. TAS-117 triggered apoptosis and autophagy, as well as induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response with minimal expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), a fatal ER stress marker. Importantly, TAS-117 enhanced bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity, associated with increased CHOP and PARP cleavage and blockade of bortezomib-induced p-Akt, suggesting that TAS-117 augments bortezomib-induced ER stress and apoptotic signaling. Carfilzomib-induced cytotoxicity was similarly enhanced by TAS-117. Importantly, TAS-117 enhanced bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity in vivo, associated with prolonged host survival. Our results show that selective and potent Akt inhibition by TAS-117 triggers anti-MM activities in vitro and in vivo, as well as enhances cytotoxicity of proteasome inhibition, providing the preclinical framework for clinical evaluation of selective Akt inhibitors, alone and in combination with proteasome inhibitors in MM. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Vacuolin-1 potently and reversibly inhibits autophagosome-lysosome fusion by activating RAB5A

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yingying; Dong, Shichen; Hao, Baixia; Li, Chang; Zhu, Kaiyuan; Guo, Wenjing; Wang, Qian; Cheung, King-Ho; Wong, Connie WM; Wu, Wu-Tian; Markus, Huss; Yue, Jianbo

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic lysosomal degradation process essential for cellular homeostasis and cell survival. Dysfunctional autophagy has been associated with a wide range of human diseases, e.g., cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. A large number of small molecules that modulate autophagy have been widely used to dissect this process and some of them, e.g., chloroquine (CQ), might be ultimately applied to treat a variety of autophagy-associated human diseases. Here we found that vacuolin-1 potently and reversibly inhibited the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes in mammalian cells, thereby inducing the accumulation of autophagosomes. Interestingly, vacuolin-1 was less toxic but at least 10-fold more potent in inhibiting autophagy compared with CQ. Vacuolin-1 treatment also blocked the fusion between endosomes and lysosomes, resulting in a defect in general endosomal-lysosomal degradation. Treatment of cells with vacuolin-1 alkalinized lysosomal pH and decreased lysosomal Ca2+ content. Besides marginally inhibiting vacuolar ATPase activity, vacuolin-1 treatment markedly activated RAB5A GTPase activity. Expression of a dominant negative mutant of RAB5A or RAB5A knockdown significantly inhibited vacuolin-1-induced autophagosome-lysosome fusion blockage, whereas expression of a constitutive active form of RAB5A suppressed autophagosome-lysosome fusion. These data suggest that vacuolin-1 activates RAB5A to block autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Vacuolin-1 and its analogs present a novel class of drug that can potently and reversibly modulate autophagy. PMID:25483964

  9. Anti-amyloid precursor protein antibodies inhibit amyloid-β production by steric hindrance

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Rhian S.; Liddell, J. Eryl; Kidd, Emma J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases results in the production of amyloid-β (Aβ) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We raised two monoclonal antibodies, 2B3 and 2B12, that recognise the β-secretase cleavage site on APP but not Aβ. We hypothesised that these antibodies would reduce Aβ levels via steric hindrance of β-secretase. Both antibodies decreased extracellular Aβ levels from astrocytoma cells, but 2B3 was more potent than 2B12. Levels of soluble sAPPα from the non-amyloidogenic α-secretase pathway and intracellular APP were not affected by either antibody nor were there any effects on cell viability. 2B3 exhibited a higher affinity for APP than 2B12 and its epitope appeared to span the cleavage site while 2B12 bound slightly upstream. Both of these factors probably contribute to its greater effect on Aβ levels. After 60 minutes incubation at pH 4.0, most 2B3 and 2B12 remained bound to their antigen, suggesting that the antibodies will remain bound to APP in the acidic endosomes where β-secretase cleavage probably occurs. Only 2B3 and 2B12, but not control antibodies, inhibited the cleavage of sAPPα by β-secretase in a cell-free assay where effects of antibody internalisation and intracellular degradation were excluded. 2B3 virtually abolished this cleavage. In addition, levels of C-terminal APP fragments, βCTF, generated following β-secretase cleavage, were significantly reduced in cells after incubation with 2B3. These results strongly suggest that anti-cleavage site antibodies can generically reduce Aβ levels via inhibition of β-secretase by steric hindrance and may provide a novel alternative therapy for AD. PMID:21122073

  10. A three monoclonal antibody combination potently neutralizes multiple botulinum neurotoxin serotype F subtypes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yongfeng; Garcia-Rodriguez, Consuelo; Lou, Jianlong; Wen, Weihua; Conrad, Fraser; Zhai, Wenwu; Smith, Theresa J; Smith, Leonard A; Marks, James D

    2017-01-01

    Human botulism is primarily caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A, B and E, with around 1% caused by serotype F (BoNT/F). BoNT/F comprises at least seven different subtypes with the amino acid sequence difference between subtypes as high as 36%. The sequence differences present a significant challenge for generating monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that can bind, detect and neutralize all BoNT/F subtypes. We used repertoire cloning of immune mouse antibody variable (V) regions and yeast display to generate a panel of 33 lead single chain Fv (scFv) mAbs that bound one or more BoNT/F subtypes with a median equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 4.06 × 10-9 M. By diversifying the V-regions of the lead mAbs and selecting for cross reactivity we generated five mAbs that bound each of the seven subtypes. Three scFv binding non-overlapping epitopes were converted to IgG that had KD for the different BoNT/F subtypes ranging from 2.2×10-8 M to 1.47×10-12 pM. An equimolar combination of the mAbs was able to potently neutralize BoNT/F1, F2, F4 and F7 in the mouse neutralization assay. The mAbs have potential utility as diagnostics capable of recognizing the known BoNT/F subtypes and could be developed as antitoxins to prevent and treat type F botulism.

  11. A three monoclonal antibody combination potently neutralizes multiple botulinum neurotoxin serotype F subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongfeng; Garcia-Rodriguez, Consuelo; Lou, Jianlong; Wen, Weihua; Conrad, Fraser; Zhai, Wenwu; Smith, Theresa J.; Smith, Leonard A.

    2017-01-01

    Human botulism is primarily caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A, B and E, with around 1% caused by serotype F (BoNT/F). BoNT/F comprises at least seven different subtypes with the amino acid sequence difference between subtypes as high as 36%. The sequence differences present a significant challenge for generating monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that can bind, detect and neutralize all BoNT/F subtypes. We used repertoire cloning of immune mouse antibody variable (V) regions and yeast display to generate a panel of 33 lead single chain Fv (scFv) mAbs that bound one or more BoNT/F subtypes with a median equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 4.06 × 10−9 M. By diversifying the V-regions of the lead mAbs and selecting for cross reactivity we generated five mAbs that bound each of the seven subtypes. Three scFv binding non-overlapping epitopes were converted to IgG that had KD for the different BoNT/F subtypes ranging from 2.2×10−8 M to 1.47×10−12 pM. An equimolar combination of the mAbs was able to potently neutralize BoNT/F1, F2, F4 and F7 in the mouse neutralization assay. The mAbs have potential utility as diagnostics capable of recognizing the known BoNT/F subtypes and could be developed as antitoxins to prevent and treat type F botulism. PMID:28323873

  12. Antibodies to PhnD Inhibit Staphylococcal Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Hubert; Kesselly, Augustus; Stegalkina, Svetlana; Kleanthous, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation on central lines or peripheral catheters is a serious threat to patient well-being. Contaminated vascular devices can act as a nidus for bloodstream infection and systemic pathogen dissemination. Staphylococcal biofilms are the most common cause of central-line-associated bloodstream infections, and antibiotic resistance makes them difficult to treat. As an alternative to antibiotic intervention, we sought to identify anti-staphylococcal biofilm targets for the development of a vaccine or antibody prophylactic. A screening strategy was devised using a microfluidic system to test antibody-mediated biofilm inhibition under biologically relevant conditions of shear flow. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies to target antigen PhnD inhibited both Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. aureus biofilms. PhnD-specific antibodies blocked biofilm development at the initial attachment and aggregation stages, and deletion of phnD inhibited normal biofilm formation. We further adapted our microfluidic biofilm system to monitor the interaction of human neutrophils with staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrated that PhnD-specific antibodies also serve as opsonins to enhance neutrophil binding, motility, and biofilm engulfment. These data support the identification of PhnD as a lead target for biofilm intervention strategies performed either by vaccination or through passive administration of antibodies. PMID:24958708

  13. Tremorgenic indole alkaloids potently inhibit smooth muscle high-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Knaus, H G; McManus, O B; Lee, S H; Schmalhofer, W A; Garcia-Calvo, M; Helms, L M; Sanchez, M; Giangiacomo, K; Reuben, J P; Smith, A B

    1994-05-17

    Tremorgenic indole alkaloids produce neurological disorders (e.g., staggers syndromes) in ruminants. The mode of action of these fungal mycotoxins is not understood but may be related to their known effects on neurotransmitter release. To determine whether these effects could be due to inhibition of K+ channels, the interaction of various indole diterpenes with high-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ (maxi-K) channels was examined. Paspalitrem A, paspalitrem C, aflatrem, penitrem A, and paspalinine inhibit binding of [125I]charybdotoxin (ChTX) to maxi-K channels in bovine aortic smooth muscle sarcolemmal membranes. In contrast, three structurally related compounds, paxilline, verruculogen, and paspalicine, enhanced toxin binding. As predicted from the binding studies, covalent incorporation of [125I]ChTX into the 31-kDa subunit of the maxi-K channel was blocked by compounds that inhibit [125I]ChTX binding and enhanced by compounds that stimulate [125I]ChTX binding. Modulation of [125I]ChTX binding was due to allosteric mechanisms. Despite their different effects on binding of [125I]ChTX to maxi-K channels, all compounds potently inhibited maxi-K channels in electrophysiological experiments. Other types of voltage-dependent or Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels examined were not affected. Chemical modifications of paxilline indicate a defined structure-activity relationship for channel inhibition. Paspalicine, a deshydroxy analog of paspalinine lacking tremorgenic activity, also potently blocked maxi-K channels. Taken together, these data suggest that indole diterpenes are the most potent nonpeptidyl inhibitors of maxi-K channels identified to date. Some of their pharmacological properties could be explained by inhibition of maxi-K channels, although tremorgenicity may be unrelated to channel block.

  14. Potent Selective Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase A by Alternariol Monomethyl Ether Isolated from Alternaria brassicae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Woo; Kim, Yeon Ji; Nam, Sang-Jip; Kim, Hoon

    2017-02-28

    Alternariol monomethyl ether (AME), a dibenzopyrone derivative, was isolated from Alternaria brassicae along with altertoxin II (ATX-II). The compounds were tested for the inhibitory activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO), which catalyzes neurotransmitting monoamines. AME was found to be a highly potent and selective inhibitor of human MAO-A with an IC50 value of 1.71 µM; however, it was found to be ineffective for MAO-B inhibition. ATX-II was not effective for the inhibition of either MAO-A or MAO-B. The inhibition of MAO-A using AME was apparently instantaneous. MAO-A activity was almost completely recovered after the dilution of the inhibited enzyme with an excess amount of AME, suggesting AME is a reversible inhibitor. AME showed mixed inhibition for MAO-A in Lineweaver-Burk plots with a Ki value of 0.34 µM. The findings of this study suggest that microbial metabolites and dibenzopyrone could be potent MAO inhibitors. In addition, AME could be a useful lead compound for developing reversible MAO-A inhibitors to treat depression, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Rational Design and Characterization of the Novel, Broad and Potent Bispecific HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody iMabm36

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ming; Pace, Craig S.; Yao, Xin; Yu, Faye; Padte, Neal N.; Huang, Yaoxing; Seaman, Michael S.; Li, Qihan; Ho, David D.

    2014-01-01

    While broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) have always been considered potential therapeutic options for the prophylactic and treatment of HIV infection, their lack of breadth against all HIV variants has been one of the limiting factors. To provide sufficient neutralization breadth and potency against diverse viruses, including neutralization escape variants, strategies to combine different bNAbs have been explored recently. We rationally designed and engineered a novel bispecific HIV-1 neutralizing antibody (bibNAb), iMabm36, for high potency and breadth against HIV. iMabm36 is composed of the anti-CD4 Ab ibalizumab (iMab) linked to two copies of the single-domain Ab m36 which targets a highly conserved CD4-induced epitope. iMabm36 neutralizes a majority of a large, multi-clade panel of pseudoviruses (96%, n=118) at an IC50 concentration of less than 10 μg/mL, with 83% neutralized at an IC50 concentration of less than 0.1μg/ml. In addition, iMabm36 neutralizes six replication-competent transmitted-founder viruses to 100% inhibition at a concentration of less than 0.1μg/ml in a PBMC-based neutralizing assay. Mechanistically, improved antiviral activity of iMabm36 is dependent on both CD4 binding activity of iMab component and CD4i binding activity of the m36 component. After characterizing viral resistance to iMabm36 neutralization was due to mutations residing in the bridging sheet of gp120, an optimized m36 variant was engineered that, when fused to iMab, improved antiviral activity significantly. Together inter-dependency of this dual mechanism of action enables iMabm36 to potently inhibit HIV-1 entry. These results demonstrate that mechanistic-based design of bibNAbs could generate potential preventive and therapeutic candidates for HIV/AIDS. PMID:24853313

  16. Gossypol enantiomers potently inhibit human placental 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 and aromatase activities.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yaoyao; Mao, Baiping; Li, Linxi; Guan, Hongguo; Su, Ying; Li, Xiaoheng; Lian, Qingquan; Huang, Ping; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-03-01

    Gossypol is a chemical isolated from cotton seeds. It exists as (+) or (-) enantiomer and has been tested for anticancer, abortion-inducing, and male contraception. Progesterone formed from pregnenolone by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD3B1) and estradiol from androgen by aromatase (CYP19A1) are critical for the maintenance of pregnancy or associated with some cancers. In this study we compared the potencies of (+)- and (-)-gossypol enantiomers in the inhibition of HSD3B1 and aromatase activities as well as progesterone and estradiol production in human placental JEG-3 cells. (+) Gossypol showed potent inhibition on human placental HSD3B1 with IC50 value of 2.3 μM, while (-) gossypol weakly inhibited it with IC50 over 100 μM. In contrast, (-) gossypol moderately inhibited CYP19A1 activity with IC50 of 23 μM, while (+) gossypol had no inhibition when the highest concentration (100 μM) was tested. (+) Gossypol enantiomer competitively inhibited HSD3B1 against substrate pregnenolone and showed mixed mode against NAD(+). (-) Gossypol competitively inhibited CYP19A1 against substrate testosterone. Gossypol enantiomers showed different potency related to their inhibition on human HSD3B1 and CYP19A1. Whether gossypol enantiomer is used alone or in combination relies on its application and beneficial effects.

  17. Potent inhibition of cytochrome P450 2B6 by sibutramine in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Hyeon; Kwon, Min Jo; Choi, Eu Jin; Zheng, Yu Fen; Yoon, Kee Dong; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Bae, Soo Kyung

    2013-09-05

    The present study was performed to evaluate the potency and specificity of sibutramine as an inhibitor of the activities of nine human CYP isoforms in liver microsomes. Using a cocktail assay, the effects of sibutramine on specific marker reactions of the nine CYP isoforms were measured in human liver microsomes. Sibutramine showed potent inhibition of CYP2B6-mediated bupropion 6-hydroxylation with an IC50 value of 1.61μM and Ki value of 0.466μM in a competitive manner at microsomal protein concentrations of 0.25mg/ml; this was 3.49-fold more potent than the typical CYP2B6 inhibitor thio-TEPA (Ki=1.59μM). In addition, sibutramine slightly inhibited CYP2C19 activity (Ki=16.6μM, noncompetitive inhibition) and CYP2D6 activity (Ki=15.7μM, noncompetitive inhibition). These observations indicated 35.6- and 33.7-fold decreases in inhibition potency, respectively, compared with that of CYP2B6 by sibutramine. However, no inhibition of CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, or CYP2E1 activities was observed. In addition, the CYP2B6 inhibitory potential of sibutramine was enhanced at a lower microsomal protein concentration of 0.05mg/ml. After 30min preincubation of human liver microsomes with sibutramine in the presence of NADPH, no shift in IC50 was observed in terms of inhibition of the activities of the nine CYPs, suggesting that sibutramine is not a time-dependent inactivator. These observations suggest that sibutramine is a selective and potent inhibitor of CYP2B6 in vitro, whereas inhibition of other CYPs is substantially lower. These in vitro data support the use of sibutramine as a well-known inhibitor of CYP2B6 for routine screening of P450 reversible inhibition when human liver microsomes are used as the enzyme source.

  18. Potent Plasmablast-Derived Antibodies Elicited by the NIH Dengue Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Diogo M; Silveira, Cassia G T; Ricciardi, Michael J; Gonzalez-Nieto, Lucas; Pedreño-Lopez, Núria; Bailey, Varian K; Gutman, Martin J; Maxwell, Helen S; Domingues, Aline; Costa, Priscilla R; Ferrari, Lilian; Goulart, Raphaella; Martins, Mauricio A; Martinez-Navio, José M; Fuchs, Sebastian P; Kalil, Jorge; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo; Wrammert, Jens; Whitehead, Stephen S; Burton, Dennis R; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Kallas, Esper G; Waktins, David I

    2017-09-06

    live attenuated tetravalent vaccines (LATVs) will be introduced worldwide is higher than ever. While it is widely accepted that dengue virus (DENV)-neutralizing antibody (nAb) titers are associated with protection, the Ab repertoire induced by LATVs remain uncharacterized. Here, we describe the isolation of potent (Neut50 < 0.1 μg/ml) nAbs from a DENV-seropositive volunteer immunized with the tetravalent vaccine Butantan-DV, which is currently in Phase III trials. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. NCI Researchers Discover Exceptionally Potent Antibodies with Potential for Prophylaxis and Therapy of MERS-Coronavirus Infections | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer In a recent article published in the Journal of Virology, Tianlei Ying, Ph.D., Dimiter Dimitrov, Ph.D., and their colleagues in the Laboratory of Experimental Immunology (LEI), Cancer and Inflammation Program, NCI Center for Cancer Research, reported the identification of three human monoclonal antibodies (m336, m337, and m338) that target the part of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) that is responsible for binding to its receptor. These antibodies are exceptionally potent inhibitors of MERS-CoV infection and also provide a basis for creating a future MERS-CoV vaccine.

  20. The Interglomerular Circuit Potently Inhibits Olfactory Bulb Output Neurons by Both Direct and Indirect Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Puche, Adam C.; Shipley, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Sensory processing shapes our perception. In mammals, odor information is encoded by combinatorial activity patterns of olfactory bulb (OB) glomeruli. Glomeruli are richly interconnected by short axon cells (SACs), which form the interglomerular circuit (IGC). It is unclear how the IGC impacts OB output to downstream neural circuits. We combined in vitro and in vivo electrophysiology with optogenetics in mice and found the following: (1) the IGC potently and monosynaptically inhibits the OB output neurons mitral/tufted cells (MTCs) by GABA release from SACs: (2) gap junction-mediated electrical coupling is strong for the SAC→MTC synapse, but negligible for the SAC→ETC synapse; (3) brief IGC-mediated inhibition is temporally prolonged by the intrinsic properties of MTCs; and (4) sniff frequency IGC activation in vivo generates persistent MTC inhibition. These findings suggest that the temporal sequence of glomerular activation by sensory input determines which stimulus features are transmitted to downstream olfactory networks and those filtered by lateral inhibition. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Odor identity is encoded by combinatorial patterns of activated glomeruli, the initial signal transformation site of the olfactory system. Lateral circuit processing among activated glomeruli modulates olfactory signal transformation before transmission to higher brain centers. Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo optogenetics, this work demonstrates that interglomerular circuitry produces potent inhibition of olfactory bulb output neurons via direct chemical and electrical synapses as well as by indirect pathways. The direct inhibitory synaptic input engages mitral cell intrinsic membrane properties to generate inhibition that outlasts the initial synaptic action. PMID:27629712

  1. Single-domain antibody-based and linker-free bispecific antibodies targeting FcγRIII induce potent antitumor activity without recruiting regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Rozan, Caroline; Cornillon, Amélie; Pétiard, Corinne; Chartier, Martine; Behar, Ghislaine; Boix, Charlotte; Kerfelec, Brigitte; Robert, Bruno; Pèlegrin, André; Chames, Patrick; Teillaud, Jean-Luc; Baty, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, one of the most prominent modes of action of antitumor antibodies, suffers from important limitations due to the need for optimal interactions with Fcγ receptors. In this work, we report the design of a new bispecific antibody format, compact and linker-free, based on the use of llama single-domain antibodies that are capable of circumventing most of these limitations. This bispecific antibody format was created by fusing single-domain antibodies directed against the carcinoembryonic antigen and the activating FcγRIIIa receptor to human Cκ and CH1 immunoglobulin G1 domains, acting as a natural dimerization motif. In vitro and in vivo characterization of these Fab-like bispecific molecules revealed favorable features for further development as a therapeutic molecule. They are easy to produce in Escherichia coli, very stable, and elicit potent lysis of tumor cells by human natural killer cells at picomolar concentrations. Unlike conventional antibodies, they do not engage inhibitory FcγRIIb receptor, do not compete with serum immunoglobulins G for receptor binding, and their cytotoxic activity is independent of Fc glycosylation and FcγRIIIa polymorphism. As opposed to anti-CD3 bispecific antitumor antibodies, they do not engage regulatory T cells as these latter cells do not express FcγRIII. Studies in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient gamma mice xenografted with carcinoembryonic antigen-positive tumor cells showed that Fab-like bispecific molecules in the presence of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells significantly slow down tumor growth. This new compact, linker-free bispecific antibody format offers a promising approach for optimizing antibody-based therapies.

  2. JMV641: a potent bombesin receptor antagonist that inhibits Swiss 3T3 cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Azay, J; Gagne, D; Devin, C; Llinares, M; Fehrentz, J A; Martinez, J

    1996-08-27

    The peptides of the bombesin family are involved in stimulation of mitogenesis in various cell lines, including cancerous cell lines. Bombesin receptor antagonists are of great interest to inhibit this proliferation. We have synthesized a potent bombesin receptor antagonist, e.g., compound JMV641 [H-DPhe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-NH-*CH[CH2-CH(CH3)2]-**CHOH- (CH2)3-CH3 [*(S); **92% of (S) isomer], in which a pseudopeptide bond mimicking the transition state analogue replaced the peptide bond between the two C-terminal residues. This compound was highly potent to dose-dependently inhibit binding of 125I-GRP to Swiss 3T3 cells (IC50 = 0.85 +/- 0.15 nM) and bombesin-stimulated Swiss 3T3 proliferation (pA2 = 8.78). However, compound JMV641 can inhibit bombesin-induced AP-1 regulated genes that are nuclear messengers mediating the actions of signal transduction pathways stimulated by growth factors.

  3. Potent inhibition by star fruit of human cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) activity.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Muneaki; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Ogikubo, Tetsuya; Yamasaki, Keishi; Iwakiri, Tomomi; Okumura, Manabu; Kodama, Hirofumi; Arimori, Kazuhiko

    2004-06-01

    There has been very limited information on the capacities of tropical fruits to inhibit human cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) activity. Thus, the inhibitory effects of tropical fruits on midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activity of CYP3A in human liver microsomes were evaluated. Eight tropical fruits such as common papaw, dragon fruit, kiwi fruit, mango, passion fruit, pomegranate, rambutan, and star fruit were tested. We also examined the inhibition of CYP3A activity by grapefruit (white) and Valencia orange as controls. The juice of star fruit showed the most potent inhibition of CYP3A. The addition of a star fruit juice (5.0%, v/v) resulted in the almost complete inhibition of midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activity (residual activity of 0.1%). In the case of grape-fruit, the residual activity was 14.7%. The inhibition depended on the amount of fruit juice added to the incubation mixture (0.2-6.0%, v/v). The elongation of the preincubation period of a juice from star fruit (1.25 or 2.5%, v/v) with the microsomal fraction did not alter the CYP3A inhibition, suggesting that the star fruit did not contain a mechanism-based inhibitor. Thus, we discovered filtered extracts of star fruit juice to be inhibitors of human CYP3A activity in vitro.

  4. A single-domain antibody-linked Fab bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab has potent cytotoxicity against Her2-expressing tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Aifen; Xing, Jieyu; Li, Li; Zhou, Changhua; Dong, Bin; He, Ping; Li, Qing; Wang, Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Her2, which is frequently overexpressed in breast cancer, is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer therapy. Anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, has achieved significant clinical benefits in metastatic breast cancer. In this study, we describe a novel bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab targeting Her2 by linking a single domain anti-CD16 VHH to the trastuzumab Fab. The Her2-S-Fab antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, and drive potent cancer cell killing in HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. In xenograft model, the Her2-S-Fab suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our results suggest that the bispecific Her2-S-Fab may provide a valid alternative to Her2 positive cancer therapy.

  5. Generation of Potent Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Neutralizing Antibodies from Mouse Phage Display Library for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yan-Da; Wu, Yen-Yu; Tsai, Yi-Jiue; Tsai, Yi-San; Lin, Yu-Ying; Lai, Szu-Liang; Huang, Chao-Yang; Lok, Ying-Yung; Hu, Chih-Yung; Lai, Jiann-Shiun

    2016-02-05

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important stimulator for angiogenesis in solid tumors. Blocking VEGF activity is an effective therapeutic strategy to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. Avastin, a humanized monoclonal antibody recognizes VEGF, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. To generate potential VEGF-recognizing antibodies with better tumor regression ability than that of Avastin, we have designed a systematic antibody selection plan. From mice immunized with recombinant human VEGF, we generated three phage display libraries, scFv-M13KO7, Fab-M13KO7, and scFv-Hyperphage, in single-chain Fv (scFv) or Fab format, displayed using either M13KO7 helper phage or Hyperphage. Solid-phase and solution-phase selection strategies were then applied to each library, generating six panning combinations. A total of sixty-four antibodies recognizing VEGF were obtained. Based on the results of epitope mapping, binding affinity, and biological functions in tumor inhibition, eight antibodies were chosen to examine their abilities in tumor regression in a mouse xenograft model using human COLO 205 cancer cells. Three of them showed improvement in the inhibition of tumor growth (328%-347% tumor growth ratio (% of Day 0 tumor volume) on Day 21 vs. 435% with Avastin). This finding suggests a potential use of these three antibodies for VEGF-targeted therapy.

  6. Sansanmycin natural product analogues as potent and selective anti-mycobacterials that inhibit lipid I biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Anh T.; Watson, Emma E.; Pujari, Venugopal; Conroy, Trent; Dowman, Luke J.; Giltrap, Andrew M.; Pang, Angel; Wong, Weng Ruh; Linington, Roger G.; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Saunders, Jessica; Charman, Susan A.; West, Nicholas P.; Bugg, Timothy D. H.; Tod, Julie; Dowson, Christopher G.; Roper, David I.; Crick, Dean C.; Britton, Warwick J.; Payne, Richard J.

    2017-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is responsible for enormous global morbidity and mortality, and current treatment regimens rely on the use of drugs that have been in use for more than 40 years. Owing to widespread resistance to these therapies, new drugs are desperately needed to control the TB disease burden. Herein, we describe the rapid synthesis of analogues of the sansanmycin uridylpeptide natural products that represent promising new TB drug leads. The compounds exhibit potent and selective inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of TB, both in vitro and intracellularly. The natural product analogues are nanomolar inhibitors of Mtb phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase, the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of lipid I in mycobacteria. This work lays the foundation for the development of uridylpeptide natural product analogues as new TB drug candidates that operate through the inhibition of peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

  7. Sansanmycin natural product analogues as potent and selective anti-mycobacterials that inhibit lipid I biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Anh T.; Watson, Emma E.; Pujari, Venugopal; Conroy, Trent; Dowman, Luke J.; Giltrap, Andrew M.; Pang, Angel; Wong, Weng Ruh; Linington, Roger G.; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Saunders, Jessica; Charman, Susan A.; West, Nicholas P.; Bugg, Timothy D. H.; Tod, Julie; Dowson, Christopher G.; Roper, David I.; Crick, Dean C.; Britton, Warwick J.; Payne, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is responsible for enormous global morbidity and mortality, and current treatment regimens rely on the use of drugs that have been in use for more than 40 years. Owing to widespread resistance to these therapies, new drugs are desperately needed to control the TB disease burden. Herein, we describe the rapid synthesis of analogues of the sansanmycin uridylpeptide natural products that represent promising new TB drug leads. The compounds exhibit potent and selective inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of TB, both in vitro and intracellularly. The natural product analogues are nanomolar inhibitors of Mtb phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase, the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of lipid I in mycobacteria. This work lays the foundation for the development of uridylpeptide natural product analogues as new TB drug candidates that operate through the inhibition of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. PMID:28248311

  8. Sansanmycin natural product analogues as potent and selective anti-mycobacterials that inhibit lipid I biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tran, Anh T; Watson, Emma E; Pujari, Venugopal; Conroy, Trent; Dowman, Luke J; Giltrap, Andrew M; Pang, Angel; Wong, Weng Ruh; Linington, Roger G; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Saunders, Jessica; Charman, Susan A; West, Nicholas P; Bugg, Timothy D H; Tod, Julie; Dowson, Christopher G; Roper, David I; Crick, Dean C; Britton, Warwick J; Payne, Richard J

    2017-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is responsible for enormous global morbidity and mortality, and current treatment regimens rely on the use of drugs that have been in use for more than 40 years. Owing to widespread resistance to these therapies, new drugs are desperately needed to control the TB disease burden. Herein, we describe the rapid synthesis of analogues of the sansanmycin uridylpeptide natural products that represent promising new TB drug leads. The compounds exhibit potent and selective inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of TB, both in vitro and intracellularly. The natural product analogues are nanomolar inhibitors of Mtb phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide translocase, the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of lipid I in mycobacteria. This work lays the foundation for the development of uridylpeptide natural product analogues as new TB drug candidates that operate through the inhibition of peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

  9. Human Antibodies Fix Complement to Inhibit Plasmodium falciparum Invasion of Erythrocytes and Are Associated with Protection against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Michelle J.; Reiling, Linda; Feng, Gaoqian; Langer, Christine; Osier, Faith H.; Aspeling-Jones, Harvey; Cheng, Yik Sheng; Stubbs, Janine; Tetteh, Kevin K.A.; Conway, David J.; McCarthy, James S.; Muller, Ivo; Marsh, Kevin; Anders, Robin F.; Beeson, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Antibodies play major roles in immunity to malaria; however, a limited understanding of mechanisms mediating protection is a major barrier to vaccine development. We have demonstrated that acquired human anti-malarial antibodies promote complement deposition on the merozoite to mediate inhibition of erythrocyte invasion through C1q fixation and activation of the classical complement pathway. Antibody-mediated complement-dependent (Ab-C′) inhibition was the predominant invasion-inhibitory activity of human antibodies; most antibodies were non-inhibitory without complement. Inhibitory activity was mediated predominately via C1q fixation, and merozoite surface proteins 1 and 2 were identified as major targets. Complement fixation by antibodies was very strongly associated with protection from both clinical malaria and high-density parasitemia in a prospective longitudinal study of children. Ab-C′ inhibitory activity could be induced by human immunization with a candidate merozoite surface-protein vaccine. Our findings demonstrate that human anti-malarial antibodies have evolved to function by fixing complement for potent invasion-inhibitory activity and protective immunity. PMID:25786180

  10. Potent and long-lasting inhibition of human P2X2 receptors by copper

    PubMed Central

    Punthambaker, Sukanya; Hume, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    P2X receptors are ion channels gated by ATP. In rodents these channels are modulated by zinc and copper. Zinc is co-released with neurotransmitter at some synapses and can modulate neuronal activity, but the role of copper in the brain is unclear. Rat P2X2 receptors show potentiation by 2–100 µM zinc or copper in the presence of a submaximal concentration of ATP but are inhibited by zinc or copper at concentrations above 100 µM. In contrast, human P2X2 (hP2X2) receptors show no potentiation and are strongly inhibited by zinc over the range of 2–100 µM. The effect of copper on hP2X2 is of interest because there are human brain disorders in which copper concentration is altered. We found that hP2X2 receptors are potently inhibited by copper (IC50 = 40 nM). ATP responsiveness recovered extremely slowly after copper washout, with full recovery requiring over 1 h. ATP binding facilitated copper binding but not unbinding from this inhibitory site. A mutant receptor in which the first six extracellular cysteines were deleted, C(1–6)S, showed normal copper inhibition, however reducing agents dramatically accelerated recovery from copper inhibition in wild type hP2X2 and the C(1–6)S mutant, indicating that the final two disulfide bonds are required to maintain the high affinity copper binding site. Three histidine residues required for normal zinc inhibition were also required for normal copper inhibition. Humans with untreated Wilson’s disease have excess amounts of copper in the brain. The high copper sensitivity of hP2X2 receptors suggests that they are non-functional in these patients. PMID:24067922

  11. Selective inhibition of the cytochrome P450 isoform by hyperoside and its potent inhibition of CYP2D6.

    PubMed

    Song, Min; Hong, Miri; Lee, Min Young; Jee, Jun-Goo; Lee, You Mie; Bae, Jong-Sup; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Sangkyu

    2013-09-01

    Hyperoside, quercetin-3-O-galactoside, is a flavonoid isolated from Oenanthe javanica. In the present study, we investigated potential herb-drug inhibitory effects of hyperoside on nine cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms in pooled human liver microsomes (HLMs) and human recombinant cDNA expressed CYP using a cocktail probe assay. Hyperoside strongly inhibited CYP2D6-catalyzed dextromethorphan O-demethylation, with IC₅₀ values of 1.2 and 0.81 μM after 0 and 15 min of preincubation, and a Ki value of 2.01 μM in HLMs, respectively. Hyperoside strongly decreased CYP2D6 activity dose-, but not time-, dependently in HLMs. In addition, the Lineweaver-Burk and Secondary plots for the inhibition of CYP2D6 in HLMs fitted a competitive inhibition mode. Furthermore, hyperoside decreased CYP2D6-catalyzed dextromethorphan O-demethylation activity of human recombinant cDNA-expressed CYP2D6, with an IC₅₀ value of 3.87 μM. However, other CYPs were not inhibited significantly by hyperoside. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that hyperoside is a potent selective CYP2D6 inhibitor in HLMs, and suggest that hyperoside might cause herb-drug interactions when co-administrated with CYP2D substrates.

  12. Ley specific antibody with potent anti-tumor activity is internalized and degraded in lysosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Garrigues, J.; Garrigues, U.; Hellström, I.; Hellström, K. E.

    1993-01-01

    BR96 is a monoclonal antibody (MAb) that recognizes many human carcinomas and can kill antigen-positive tumor cells in vitro. Using both gold and radiolabeled MAb, the distribution and cellular processing of BR96 during cytolysis has been determined. After a brief (< 3 minutes) MAb treatment, cells in suspension are stained by the nuclear viability dye propidium iodide. Whole MAb and F(ab')2 fragments are equally cytotoxic; monovalent F(ab) fragments, however, have no effect on dye uptake unless cross-linked with goat anti-mouse IgG. The level of toxicity is dependent on both MAb dose and on cell surface receptor density. Cell contact may regulate receptor expression. BR96 receptors are more abundant on cells migrating into the open areas of a scratch wounded confluent culture than on the adjacent contact-inhibited cells. BR96 can also inhibit the anchorage-independent growth of tumor cells in soft agar showing that its effects on propidium iodide staining are not due to transient changes in membrane permeability. Immunogold electron microscopy reveals that, after a 1-minute treatment, BR96 induces significant infolding of the plasma membrane and that internalized MAb is localized to these structures. Immediately thereafter, large cell surface and intracellular vesicles form, mitochondria are swollen, and membrane integrity is lost. Therefore, BR96 seems to cause morphological changes characteristic of necrosis rather than apoptosis. When bound to adherent carcinoma cells, BR96 is distributed uniformly on the apical surface of cells labeled at 4 C and is enriched at points of cell substratum contact. Upon warming of the cells to 37 C, BR96 localizes in small perinuclear clusters and the cell margin is now devoid of label. Immunogold electron microscopy reveals that BR96 undergoes receptor mediated internalization and is localized within the same coated pits, endosomes, and lysosomes as the transferrin receptor. Quantitative studies using iodinated BR96 show that

  13. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-gp120 interface

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H.; Pancera, Marie; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Tong, Tommy; Feng, Yu; Imamichi, Hiromi; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Laub, Leo; Sliepen, Kwinten; van Gils, Marit J.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Derking, Ronald; Klasse, Per-Johan; Migueles, Stephen A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Alam, Munir; Pugach, Pavel; Haynes, Barton F.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Binley, James M.; Ward, Andrew B.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Connors, Mark

    2015-10-15

    The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies is providing important insights into the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in ref. 1). Here we report a broad and extremely potent HIV-specific monoclonal antibody, termed 35O22, which binds a novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. 35O22 neutralized 62% of 181 pseudoviruses with a half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) <50 μg ml-1. The median IC50 of neutralized viruses was 0.033 μg ml-1, among the most potent thus far described. 35O22 did not bind monomeric forms of Env tested, but did bind the trimeric BG505 SOSIP.664. Mutagenesis and a reconstruction by negative-stain electron microscopy of the Fab in complex with trimer revealed that it bound to a conserved epitope, which stretched across gp120 and gp41. The specificity of 35O22 represents a novel site of vulnerability on HIV Env, which serum analysis indicates to be commonly elicited by natural infection. Binding to this new site of vulnerability may thus be an important complement to current monoclonal-antibody-based approaches to immunotherapies, prophylaxis and vaccine design.

  14. A Humanized Anti-CD22-Onconase Antibody-Drug Conjugate Mediates Highly Potent Destruction of Targeted Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Tobias; Mavratzas, Athanasios; Kiesgen, Stefan; Haase, Stephanie; Bötticher, Benedikt; Exner, Evelyn; Mier, Walter; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jäger, Dirk; Arndt, Michaela A. E.; Krauss, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have evolved as a new class of potent cancer therapeutics. We here report on the development of ADCs with specificity for the B-cell lineage specific (surface) antigen CD22 being expressed in the majority of hematological malignancies. As targeting moiety a previously generated humanized anti-CD22 single-chain variable fragment (scFv) derivative from the monoclonal antibody RFB4 was reengineered into a humanized IgG1 antibody format (huRFB4). Onconase (ranpirnase), a clinically active pancreatic-type ribonuclease, was employed as cytotoxic payload moiety. Chemical conjugation via thiol-cleavable disulfide linkage retained full enzymatic activity and full binding affinity of the ADC. Development of sophisticated purification procedures using size exclusion and ion exchange chromatography allowed the separation of immunoconjugate species with stoichiometrically defined number of Onconase cargos. A minimum of two Onconase molecules per IgG was required for achieving significant in vitro cytotoxicity towards lymphoma and leukemia cell lines. Antibody-drug conjugates with an Onconase to antibody ratio of 3 : 1 exhibited an IC50 of 0.08 nM, corresponding to more than 18,400-fold increased cytotoxicity of the ADC when compared with unconjugated Onconase. These results justify further development of this ADC as a promising first-in-class compound for the treatment of CD22-positive malignancies. PMID:26605343

  15. Resveratrol analogue 4,4′-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene potently inhibits cancer invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Savio, Monica; Ferraro, Daniela; Maccario, Cristina; Vaccarone, Rita; Jensen, Lasse D.; Corana, Federica; Mannucci, Barbara; Bianchi, Livia; Cao, Yihai; Stivala, Lucia Anna

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the preventive effects of resveratrol analogue 4,4′-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene (DHS) on cancer invasion and metastasis. Two different in vivo approaches of mouse and zebrafish lung cancer invasion models were employed in our study. The in vitro results showed that DHS displays potent inhibition on anchorage-dependent or -independent cell growth of LLC cells, leading to impairment of the cell cycle progression with reduction of cell numbers arresting at the G1 phase, an evident accumulation of pre-G1 events correlated with apoptotic behaviour. In addition, DHS induces a marked inhibition of LLC cell migration and matrigel invasion. In a murine lung cancer model, tumour volume, cell proliferation, and tumour angiogenesis were significantly inhibited by DHS. Importantly, liver metastatic lesions were significantly reduced in DHS-treated mice. Similarly, DHS significantly inhibits lung cancer cell dissemination, invasion and metastasis in a zebrafish tumour model. These findings demonstrate that DHS could potentially be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of cancer and metastasis. PMID:26829331

  16. Resveratrol analogue 4,4'-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene potently inhibits cancer invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Savio, Monica; Ferraro, Daniela; Maccario, Cristina; Vaccarone, Rita; Jensen, Lasse D; Corana, Federica; Mannucci, Barbara; Bianchi, Livia; Cao, Yihai; Stivala, Lucia Anna

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the preventive effects of resveratrol analogue 4,4'-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene (DHS) on cancer invasion and metastasis. Two different in vivo approaches of mouse and zebrafish lung cancer invasion models were employed in our study. The in vitro results showed that DHS displays potent inhibition on anchorage-dependent or -independent cell growth of LLC cells, leading to impairment of the cell cycle progression with reduction of cell numbers arresting at the G1 phase, an evident accumulation of pre-G1 events correlated with apoptotic behaviour. In addition, DHS induces a marked inhibition of LLC cell migration and matrigel invasion. In a murine lung cancer model, tumour volume, cell proliferation, and tumour angiogenesis were significantly inhibited by DHS. Importantly, liver metastatic lesions were significantly reduced in DHS-treated mice. Similarly, DHS significantly inhibits lung cancer cell dissemination, invasion and metastasis in a zebrafish tumour model. These findings demonstrate that DHS could potentially be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of cancer and metastasis.

  17. Potent inhibition of human neutrophil activations by bractelactone, a novel chalcone from Fissistigma bracteolatum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yang-Chang; Sureshbabu, Munisamy; Fang, Yao-Ching; Wu, Yi-Hsiu; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Chang, Ya-Wen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-02-01

    Fissistigma bracteolatum is widely used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. However, its active components and mechanisms of action remain unclear. In this study, (3Z)-6,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-3-(phenylmethylidene)-5-(3-phenylpropanoyl) -1-benzofuran-2(3H) (bractelactone), a novel chalcone from F. bracteolatum, showed potent inhibitory effects against superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) production, elastase release, and CD11b expression in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced human neutrophils. However, bractelactone showed only weak inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate-caused O{sub 2}{sup ·−} production. The peak cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) was unaltered by bractelactone in FMLP-induced neutrophils, but the decay time of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was significantly shortened. In a calcium-free solution, changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} caused by the addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} were inhibited by bractelactone in FMLP-activated cells. In addition, bractelactone did not alter the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, or AKT or the concentration of cAMP. These results suggest that bractelactone selectively inhibits store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). In agreement with this concept, bractelactone suppressed sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} changes in thapsigargin-activated neutrophils. Furthermore, bractelactone did not alter FMLP-induced formation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of bractelactone, an active ingredient of F. bracteolatum, in human neutrophils are through the selective inhibition of SOCE. Highlights: ► Bractelactone isolated from Fissistigma bracteolatum. ► Bractelactone inhibited FMLP-induced human neutrophil activations. ► Bractelactone had no effect on IP3 formation. ► Bractelactone did not alter MAPKs, AKT, and cAMP pathways. ► Bractelactone inhibited store-operated calcium entry.

  18. Passive transfer of modest titers of potent and broadly neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibodies block SHIV infection in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Shingai, Masashi; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald J.; Buckler-White, Alicia; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Nason, Martha C.; Montefiori, David; Moldt, Brian; Poignard, Pascal; Diskin, Ron; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Eckhaus, Michael A.; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Cetrulo Lorenzi, Julio Cesar; Gazumyan, Anna; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    It is widely appreciated that effective human vaccines directed against viral pathogens elicit neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The passive transfer of anti–HIV-1 NAbs conferring sterilizing immunity to macaques has been used to determine the plasma neutralization titers, which must be present at the time of exposure, to prevent acquisition of SIV/HIV chimeric virus (SHIV) infections. We administered five recently isolated potent and broadly acting anti-HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to rhesus macaques and challenged them intrarectally 24 h later with either of two different R5-tropic SHIVs. By combining the results obtained from 60 challenged animals, we determined that the protective neutralization titer in plasma preventing virus infection in 50% of the exposed monkeys was relatively modest (∼1:100) and potentially achievable by vaccination. PMID:25155019

  19. Antibodies elicited by yeast glycoproteins recognize HIV-1 virions and potently neutralize virions with high mannose N-glycans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Fu, Hu; Luallen, Robert J.; Liu, Bingfen; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W.; Geng, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The glycan shield on the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein has drawn attention as a target for HIV-1 vaccine design given that an increasing number of potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) recognize epitopes entirely or partially comprised of high mannose type N-linked glycans. In an attempt to generate immunogens that target the glycan shield of HIV-1, we previously engineered a triple mutant (TM) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that results in exclusive presentation of high mannose type N-glycans, and identified five TM yeast glycoproteins that support strong binding of 2G12, a bNAb that targets a cluster of high mannose glycans on the gp120 subunit of Env. Here, we further analyzed the antigenicity and immunogenicity of these proteins in inducing anti-HIV responses. Our study demonstrated that the 2G12-reactive TM yeast glycoproteins efficiently bound to recently identified bNAbs including PGT125–130 and PGT135 that recognize high mannose glycan-dependent epitopes. Immunization of rabbits with a single TM yeast glycoprotein (Gp38 or Pst1), when conjugated to a promiscuous T-cell epitope peptide and coadministered with a Toll-like receptor 2 agonist, induced glycan-specific HIV-1 Env cross-reactive antibodies. The immune sera bound to both synthetic mannose oligosaccharides and gp120 proteins from a broad range of HIV-1 strains. The purified antibodies recognized and captured virions that contain both complex- and high mannose-type of N-glycans, and potently neutralized virions from different HIV-1 clades but only when the virions were enforced to retain high mannose N-glycans. This study provides insights into the elicitation of anti-carbohydrate, HIV-1 Env-cross reactive antibodies with a heterologous glycoprotein and may have applications in the design and administration of immunogens that target the viral glycan shield for development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:26277072

  20. Dual inhibiting OCT4 and AKT potently suppresses the propagation of human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenxin; Zhou, Yanwen; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Yang, Ying; Dan, Songsong; Su, Tong; She, Shiqi; Dong, Weilai; Zhao, Qingwei; Jia, Jia; Yao, Hangping; Zheng, Min; Kang, Bo; Wang, Ying-Jie

    2017-01-01

    AKT serves as an epigenetic modulator that links epigenetic regulation to cell survival and proliferation while the epigenetic mediator OCT4 critically controls stem cell pluripotency and self-renewal. Emerging evidence indicated their complicated interplays in cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSCs), and inhibiting either one may activate the other. Thus, in this study, we propose a strategy to targeting both factors simultaneously. Firstly, a combination of an OCT4-specific shRNA and the specific AKT inhibitor Akti-1/2 potently suppressed the propagation of human embryonal carcinoma cells, adherent cancer cells and stem-like cancer cells, establishing the proof-of-concept that dual inhibiting OCT4 and AKT can effectively target various cancer cells. Next, we combined Akti-1/2 with metformin, a widely-prescribed drug for treating type 2 diabetes, which was reported to down-regulate OCT4 expression. The metformin + Akti-1/2 combo significantly altered multiple signaling and epigenetic pathways, induced growth arrest and cell death of adherent and stem-like glioblastoma U87 cells, and attenuated their tumorigenicity in vivo. Taken together, we demonstrate here that simultaneously targeting an epigenetic mediator and an epigenetic modulator, by dual inhibiting OCT4 and AKT, can have significantly improved efficacies over single treatment in suppressing the propagation of CSCs as well as the entire bulk of differentiated cancer cells. PMID:28383051

  1. Neurologically Potent Molecules from Crataegus oxyacantha; Isolation, Anticholinesterase Inhibition, and Molecular Docking

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mumtaz; Muhammad, Sultan; Shah, Muhammad R.; Khan, Ajmal; Rashid, Umer; Farooq, Umar; Ullah, Farhat; Sadiq, Abdul; Ayaz, Muhammad; Ali, Majid; Ahmad, Manzoor; Latif, Abdul

    2017-01-01

    Crataegus oxyacantha is an important herbal supplement and famous for its antioxidant potential. The antioxidant in combination with anticholinesterase activity can be considered as an important target in the management of Alzheimer’s disease. The compounds isolated from C. oxyacantha were evaluated for cholinesterases inhibitory activity using Ellman’s assay with Galantamine as standard drug. Total of nine (1–9) compounds were isolated. Compounds 1 and 2 were isolated for the first time from natural source. Important natural products like β-Sitosterol-3-O-β-D-Glucopyranoside (3), lupeol (4), β-sitosterol (5), betulin (6), betulinic acid (7), oleanolic acid (8), and chrysin (9) have also been isolated from C. oxyacantha. Overall, all the compounds exhibited an overwhelming acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition potential in the range 5.22–44.47 μM. The compound 3 was prominent AChE inhibitor with IC50 value of 5.22 μM. Likewise, all the compounds were also potent in butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitions with IC50s of up to 0.55–15.36 μM. All the compounds, except 3, were selective toward BChE. Mechanism of the inhibition of both the enzymes were further studied by docking procedures using Genetic Optimization for Ligand Docking suit v5.4.1. Furthermore, computational blood brain barrier prediction of the isolated compounds suggest that these are BBB+. PMID:28638340

  2. Neurologically Potent Molecules from Crataegus oxyacantha; Isolation, Anticholinesterase Inhibition, and Molecular Docking.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mumtaz; Muhammad, Sultan; Shah, Muhammad R; Khan, Ajmal; Rashid, Umer; Farooq, Umar; Ullah, Farhat; Sadiq, Abdul; Ayaz, Muhammad; Ali, Majid; Ahmad, Manzoor; Latif, Abdul

    2017-01-01

    Crataegus oxyacantha is an important herbal supplement and famous for its antioxidant potential. The antioxidant in combination with anticholinesterase activity can be considered as an important target in the management of Alzheimer's disease. The compounds isolated from C. oxyacantha were evaluated for cholinesterases inhibitory activity using Ellman's assay with Galantamine as standard drug. Total of nine (1-9) compounds were isolated. Compounds 1 and 2 were isolated for the first time from natural source. Important natural products like β-Sitosterol-3-O-β-D-Glucopyranoside (3), lupeol (4), β-sitosterol (5), betulin (6), betulinic acid (7), oleanolic acid (8), and chrysin (9) have also been isolated from C. oxyacantha. Overall, all the compounds exhibited an overwhelming acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition potential in the range 5.22-44.47 μM. The compound 3 was prominent AChE inhibitor with IC50 value of 5.22 μM. Likewise, all the compounds were also potent in butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitions with IC50s of up to 0.55-15.36 μM. All the compounds, except 3, were selective toward BChE. Mechanism of the inhibition of both the enzymes were further studied by docking procedures using Genetic Optimization for Ligand Docking suit v5.4.1. Furthermore, computational blood brain barrier prediction of the isolated compounds suggest that these are BBB+.

  3. Potent inhibition of yeast-expressed CYP2D6 by dihydroquinidine, quinidine, and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ching, M S; Blake, C L; Ghabrial, H; Ellis, S W; Lennard, M S; Tucker, G T; Smallwood, R A

    1995-09-07

    The inhibitory effects of dihydroquinidine, quinidine and several quinidine metabolites on cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) activity were examined. CYP2D6 heterologously expressed in yeast cells O-demethylated dextromethorphan with a mean Km of 5.4 microM and a Vmax of 0.47 nmol/min/nmol. Quinidine and dihydroquinidine both potently inhibited CYP2D6 metabolic activity (mean Ki = 0.027 and 0.013 microM, respectively) in yeast microsomes and in human liver microsomes. The metabolites, 3-hydroxyquinidine, O-desmethylquinidine and quinidine N-oxide also inhibited CYP2D6, but their Ki values (0.43 to 2.3 microM) were one to two orders of magnitude weaker than the values for quinidine and dihydroquinidine. There was a trend towards an inverse relationship between Ki and lipophilicity (r = -0.90, N = 5, P = 0.07), as determined by the retention-time parameter k' using reverse-phase HPLC. Thus, although the metabolites of quinidine have the capacity to inhibit CYP2D6 activity, quinidine and the impurity dihydroquinidine are the important inhibitors of CYP2D6.

  4. Potent inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases by copper complexes with multi-benzimidazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Lu, Liping; Zhu, Miaoli; Wang, Qingming; Yuan, Caixia; Xing, Shu; Fu, Xueqi; Mei, Yuhua

    2011-12-01

    A series of copper complexes with multi-benzimidazole derivatives, including mono- and di-nuclear, were synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, elemental analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The speciation of Cu/NTB in aqueous solution was investigated by potentiometric pH titrations. Their inhibitory effects against human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), megakaryocyte protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (PTP-MEG2), srchomology phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) and srchomology phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) were evaluated in vitro. The five copper complexes exhibit potent inhibition against PTP1B, TCPTP and PTP-MEG2 with almost same inhibitory effects with IC(50) at submicro molar level and about tenfold weaker inhibition versus SHP-1, but almost no inhibition against SHP-2. Kinetic analysis indicates that they are reversible competitive inhibitors of PTP1B. Fluorescence study on the interaction between PTP1B and complex 2 or 4 suggests that the complexes bind to PTP1B with the formation of a 1:1 complex. The binding constant are about 1.14 × 10(6) and 1.87 × 10(6) M(-1) at 310 K for 2 and 4, respectively.

  5. Potent inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus by MDL 101028, a novel sulphonic acid polymer.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D L; Brennan, T M; Bridges, C G; Mullins, M J; Tyms, A S; Jackson, R; Cardin, A D

    1995-10-01

    MDL 101028, a novel biphenyl disulphonic acid urea co-polymer was designed and synthesised as a heparin mimetic. This low molecular weight polymer showed potent inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in a number of host-cell/virus systems, including primary clinical isolates of the virus cultured in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). When compared with the heterogeneous polysulphated molecules, heparin and dextran sulphate, this chemically defined compound showed equivalent antiviral activity with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) in the range 0.27-3.0 micrograms/ml in the host-cell/virus systems tested. MDL 101028 also inhibited the replication of HIV type 2 and the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), as well as HIV-1 variants resistant to reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Virus growth was blocked when exposure of T-lymphocytes to MDL 101028 was restricted to the virus absorption stage, or even in whole blood conditions. MDL 101028 did not irreversibly inactivate virions, and in contrast to heparin, did not inhibit the attachment of radiolabelled HIV-1 to CD4+ T-cells. MDL 101028 blocked HIV-induced cell-to-cell fusion and this activity appears to explain the mechanism of its antiviral action. The antiviral evaluation of discrete oligomer molecules of MDL 101028 showed that a polymer chain length of six repeating units had optimal potency. The lack of anticoagulant properties and significant antiviral activity in whole blood may allow the development of MDL 101028 as a treatment of HIV infections.

  6. Poliovirus RNA synthesis in vitro: structural elements and antibody inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Semler, B.L.; Hanecak, R.; Dorner, L.F.; Anderson, C.W.; Wimmer, E.

    1983-01-01

    The poliovirus RNA polymerase complex has been analyzed by immunoautoradiography using antibody probes derived from purified replicase (P3) region viral polypeptides. Antibody preparations made against the polio RNA polymerase, P3-4b, detected a previously unreported cellular protein that copurifies with the RNA polymerase. An IgG fraction purified from rabbit antiserum to polypeptide P3-2, a precursor fo the RNA polymerase, specifically inhibits poliovirus RNA synthesis in vitro. The authors have also immunoprecipitated a 60,000-dalton protein (P3-4a) with antiserum to protein P3-4b and have determined the precise genomic map position of this protein by automated Edman degradation. Protein P3-4a originates by cleavage of the RNA polymerase precursor at a glutamine-glucine amino acid pair not previously reported to be a viral cleavage site.

  7. Structural Basis for Broad and Potent Neutralization of HIV-1 by Antibody VRC01

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tongqing; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Dai, Kaifan; Finzi, Andrés; Kwon, Young Do; Scheid, Johannes F.; Shi, Wei; Xu, Ling; Yang, Yongping; Zhu, Jiang; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Sodroski, Joseph; Shapiro, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-08-26

    During HIV-1 infection, antibodies are generated against the region of the viral gp120 envelope glycoprotein that binds CD4, the primary receptor for HIV-1. Among these antibodies, VRC01 achieves broad neutralization of diverse viral strains. We determined the crystal structure of VRC01 in complex with a human immunodeficiency virus HIV-1 gp120 core. VRC01 partially mimics CD4 interaction with gp120. A shift from the CD4-defined orientation, however, focuses VRC01 onto the vulnerable site of initial CD4 attachment, allowing it to overcome the glycan and conformational masking that diminishes the neutralization potency of most CD4-binding-site antibodies. To achieve this recognition, VRC01 contacts gp120 mainly through immunoglobulin V-gene regions substantially altered from their genomic precursors. Partial receptor mimicry and extensive affinity maturation thus facilitate neutralization of HIV-1 by natural human antibodies.

  8. Inhibition of alpha-glucosidase by aqueous extracts of some potent antidiabetic medicinal herbs.

    PubMed

    Onal, Seçil; Timur, Suna; Okutucu, Burcu; Zihnioğlu, Figen

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most prevalant diseases of adults. Agents with alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity have been useful as oral hypoglycemic drugs for the control of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2; noninsulin-dependent, diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Investigation of some medicinal herbs: Urtica dioica, Taraxacum officinale, Viscum album, and Myrtus communis with alpha-glucosidase inhibitor activity was conducted to identify a prophylactic effect for diabetes in vitro. All plants showed differing potent alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activity. However, Myrtus communis strongly inhibited the enzyme (IC50 = 38 microg/mL). The inhibitory effect of these plants and some common antidiabetic drugs against the enzyme source (baker's yeast, rabbit liver, and small intestine) were also searched. Approximately all inhibitors used in this study showed quite different inhibitory activities, according to alpha-glucosidase origins. Furthermore, subsequent separation of the active material from Myrtus communis by HPLC showed that only one fraction acted as an a-glucosidase inhibitor.

  9. Alkamides from the fruits of Piper longum and Piper nigrum displaying potent cell adhesion inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Woong; Kim, Young Kook; Kim, Koanhoi; Lee, Hyun Sun; Choi, Jung Ho; Lee, Woo Song; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Jee Hun; Lee, Jeong Min; Rho, Mun-Chual

    2008-08-15

    Eight alkamides 1-8 were isolated by bioassay-guided isolation of EtOH extracts of the fruits of Piper longum and Piper nigum (Piperaceae). Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis ((1)H, (13)C NMR, and ESI-MS) as follows: guineensine (1), retrofracamide C (2), (2E,4Z,8E)-N-[9-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-2,4,8-nonatrienoyl]piperidine (3), pipernonaline (4), piperrolein B (5), piperchabamide D (6), pellitorin (7), and dehydropipernonaline (8). Their compounds 3-5, 7, and 8 inhibited potently the direct binding between sICAM-1 and LFA-1 of THP-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner, with IC(50) values of 10.7, 8.8, 13.4, 13.5, and 6.0 microg/mL, respectively.

  10. Glycosynthase Mutants of Endoglycosidase S2 Show Potent Transglycosylation Activity and Remarkably Relaxed Substrate Specificity for Antibody Glycosylation Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiezheng; Tong, Xin; Yang, Qiang; Giddens, John P; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2016-08-05

    Glycosylation can exert a profound impact on the structures and biological functions of antibodies. Glycosylation remodeling using the endoglycosidase-catalyzed deglycosylation and transglycosylation approach is emerging as a promising platform to produce homogeneous glycoforms of antibodies, but the broad application of this method will require the availability of highly efficient glycosynthase mutants. We describe in this paper a systematic site-directed mutagenesis of an endoglycosidase from Streptococcus pyogenes of serotype M49 (Endo-S2) and the evaluation of the resulting mutants for their hydrolysis and transglycosylation activities. We found that mutations at the Asp-184 residue gave mutants that demonstrated significantly different properties, some possessed potent transglycosylation activity with diminished hydrolysis activity but others did not, which would be otherwise difficult to predict without the comparative study. In contrast to the previously reported Endo-S mutants that are limited to action on complex type N-glycans, the Endo-S2 glycosynthases described here, including D184M and D184Q, were found to have remarkably relaxed substrate specificity and were capable of transferring three major types (complex, high-mannose, and hybrid type) of N-glycans for antibody glycosylation remodeling. In addition, the Endo-S2 glycosynthase mutants were found to be much more active in general than the Endo-S mutants for transglycosylation. The usefulness of these Endo-S2 glycosynthase mutants was exemplified by an efficient glycosylation remodeling of two therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, rituximab and trastuzumab (Herceptin).

  11. LYATK1 potently inhibits LPS-mediated pro-inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Feng; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Xiujuan; Kong, Wei; Zhao, Feng

    2016-01-29

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-primed monocytes/macrophages produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, which could lead to endotoxin shock. TGF-β-activated kinase1 (TAK1) activation is involved in the process. In the current study, we studied the potential effect of a selective TAK1 inhibitor, LYTAK1, on LPS-stimulated response both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that LYTAK1 inhibited LPS-induced mRNA expression and production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin 1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)] in RAW 264.7 macrophages. LYTAK1's activity was almost nullified with TAK1 shRNA-knockdown. Meanwhile, in both primary mouse bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production was again attenuated with LYTAK1 co-treatment. Molecularly, LYTAK1 dramatically inhibited LPS-induced TAK1-nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (Erk, Jnk and p38) activation in RAW 264.7 cells, mouse BMDMs and human PBMCs. In vivo, oral administration of LYTAK1 inhibited LPS-induced activation of TAK1-NFκB-p38 in ex-vivo cultured PBMCs, and cytokine production and endotoxin shock in mice. Together, these results demonstrate that LYTAK1 inhibits LPS-induced production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and endotoxin shock probably through blocking TAK1-regulated signalings. - Highlights: • LYTAK1 inhibits LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in RAW 264.7 cells. • The effect by LYTAK1 is more potent than other known TAK1 inhibitors. • LYTAK1 inhibits LPS-induced cytokine production in primary macrophages/monocytes. • LYTAK1 inhibits LPS-induced TAK1-NFκB and MAPK activation in macrophages/monocytes. • LYTAK1 gavage inhibits LPS-induced endotoxin shock and cytokine production in mice.

  12. Developmental pathway for potent V1V2-directed HIV-neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Schramm, Chaim A.; Gorman, Jason; Moore, Penny L.; Bhiman, Jinal N.; DeKosky, Brandon J.; Ernandes, Michael J.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Kim, Helen J.; Pancera, Marie; Staupe, Ryan P.; Altae-Tran, Han R.; Bailer, Robert T.; Crooks, Ema T.; Cupo, Albert; Druz, Aliaksandr; Garrett, Nigel J.; Hoi, Kam H.; Kong, Rui; Louder, Mark K.; Longo, Nancy S.; McKee, Krisha; Nonyane, Molati; O’Dell, Sijy; Roark, Ryan S.; Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Sheward, Daniel J.; Soto, Cinque; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Zhenhai; Mullikin, James C.; Binley, James M.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Wilson, Ian A.; Moore, John P.; Ward, Andrew B.; Georgiou, George; Williamson, Carolyn; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Morris, Lynn; Kwong, Peter D.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Antibodies capable of neutralizing HIV-1 often target variable regions 1 and 2 (V1V2) of the HIV-1 envelope, but the mechanism of their elicitation has been unclear. Here we define the developmental pathway by which such antibodies are generated and acquire the requisite molecular characteristics for neutralization. Twelve somatically related neutralizing antibodies (CAP256-VRC26.01-12) were isolated from CAPRISA-donor CAP256; each antibody contained the protruding tyrosine-sulfated, anionic antigen-binding loop (CDR H3) characteristic of this category of antibodies. Their unmutated ancestor emerged between weeks 30–38 post-infection with a 35-residue CDR H3, and neutralized the virus that superinfected this individual 15 weeks after initial infection. Improved neutralization breadth occurred by week 59 with modest affinity maturation, and was preceded by extensive diversification of the virus population. HIV-1 V1V2-directed neutralizing antibodies can thus develop relatively rapidly through initial selection of B cells with a long CDR H3, and limited subsequent somatic hypermutation, an important vaccine insight. PMID:24590074

  13. Developmental pathway for potent V1V2-directed HIV-neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Schramm, Chaim A; Gorman, Jason; Moore, Penny L; Bhiman, Jinal N; DeKosky, Brandon J; Ernandes, Michael J; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kim, Helen J; Pancera, Marie; Staupe, Ryan P; Altae-Tran, Han R; Bailer, Robert T; Crooks, Ema T; Cupo, Albert; Druz, Aliaksandr; Garrett, Nigel J; Hoi, Kam H; Kong, Rui; Louder, Mark K; Longo, Nancy S; McKee, Krisha; Nonyane, Molati; O'Dell, Sijy; Roark, Ryan S; Rudicell, Rebecca S; Schmidt, Stephen D; Sheward, Daniel J; Soto, Cinque; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Zhenhai; Mullikin, James C; Binley, James M; Sanders, Rogier W; Wilson, Ian A; Moore, John P; Ward, Andrew B; Georgiou, George; Williamson, Carolyn; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Morris, Lynn; Kwong, Peter D; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R

    2014-05-01

    Antibodies capable of neutralizing HIV-1 often target variable regions 1 and 2 (V1V2) of the HIV-1 envelope, but the mechanism of their elicitation has been unclear. Here we define the developmental pathway by which such antibodies are generated and acquire the requisite molecular characteristics for neutralization. Twelve somatically related neutralizing antibodies (CAP256-VRC26.01-12) were isolated from donor CAP256 (from the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA)); each antibody contained the protruding tyrosine-sulphated, anionic antigen-binding loop (complementarity-determining region (CDR) H3) characteristic of this category of antibodies. Their unmutated ancestor emerged between weeks 30-38 post-infection with a 35-residue CDR H3, and neutralized the virus that superinfected this individual 15 weeks after initial infection. Improved neutralization breadth and potency occurred by week 59 with modest affinity maturation, and was preceded by extensive diversification of the virus population. HIV-1 V1V2-directed neutralizing antibodies can thus develop relatively rapidly through initial selection of B cells with a long CDR H3, and limited subsequent somatic hypermutation. These data provide important insights relevant to HIV-1 vaccine development.

  14. Building a better dynasore: the dyngo compounds potently inhibit dynamin and endocytosis.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Adam; Daniel, James A; Hadzic, Gordana; Chau, Ngoc; Clayton, Emma L; Mariana, Anna; Whiting, Ainslie; Gorgani, Nick N; Lloyd, Jonathan; Quan, Annie; Moshkanbaryans, Lia; Krishnan, Sai; Perera, Swetha; Chircop, Megan; von Kleist, Lisa; McGeachie, Andrew B; Howes, Mark T; Parton, Robert G; Campbell, Michael; Sakoff, Jennette A; Wang, Xuefeng; Sun, Jian-Yuan; Robertson, Mark J; Deane, Fiona M; Nguyen, Tam H; Meunier, Frederic A; Cousin, Michael A; Robinson, Phillip J

    2013-12-01

    Dynamin GTPase activity increases when it oligomerizes either into helices in the presence of lipid templates or into rings in the presence of SH3 domain proteins. Dynasore is a dynamin inhibitor of moderate potency (IC₅₀ ~ 15 μM in vitro). We show that dynasore binds stoichiometrically to detergents used for in vitro drug screening, drastically reducing its potency (IC₅₀ = 479 μM) and research tool utility. We synthesized a focused set of dihydroxyl and trihydroxyl dynasore analogs called the Dyngo™ compounds, five of which had improved potency, reduced detergent binding and reduced cytotoxicity, conferred by changes in the position and/or number of hydroxyl substituents. The Dyngo compound 4a was the most potent compound, exhibiting a 37-fold improvement in potency over dynasore for liposome-stimulated helical dynamin activity. In contrast, while dynasore about equally inhibited dynamin assembled in its helical or ring states, 4a and 6a exhibited >36-fold reduced activity against rings, suggesting that they can discriminate between helical or ring oligomerization states. 4a and 6a inhibited dynamin-dependent endocytosis of transferrin in multiple cell types (IC₅₀ of 5.7 and 5.8 μM, respectively), at least sixfold more potently than dynasore, but had no effect on dynamin-independent endocytosis of cholera toxin. 4a also reduced synaptic vesicle endocytosis and activity-dependent bulk endocytosis in cultured neurons and synaptosomes. Overall, 4a and 6a are improved and versatile helical dynamin and endocytosis inhibitors in terms of potency, non-specific binding and cytotoxicity. The data further suggest that the ring oligomerization state of dynamin is not required for clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  15. Generation of a human antibody that inhibits TSPAN8-mediated invasion of metastatic colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taek-Keun; Park, Chang Sik; Jeoung, Mee Hyun; Lee, Woo Ran; Go, Nam Kyung; Choi, Jong Rip; Lee, Tae Sup; Shim, Hyunbo; Lee, Sukmook

    2015-12-25

    Tetraspanin 8 (TSPAN8) is a tumor-associated antigen implicated in tumor progression and metastasis. However, the validation of TSPAN8 as a potential therapeutic target in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has not yet been studied. In this study, through several in vitro methodologies, we identified a large extracellular loop of TSPAN8 (TSPAN8-LEL) as a key domain for regulating mCRC invasion. Using phage display technology, we developed a novel anti-TSPAN8-LEL human antibody with subnanomolar affinity that specifically recognizes amino acids 140-205 of TSPAN8-LEL in a conformation-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrated that the antibody specifically reduces invasion in the HCT116 and LoVo mCRC cell lines more potently than in the HCT-8 and SW480 non-mCRC cell lines. Our data suggest that TSPAN8-LEL may play an important role in mCRC cell invasion, and that the antibody we have developed could be a useful tool for inhibiting the invasion of TSPAN8-expressing mCRCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Potent in vitro and in vivo activity of an Fc-engineered humanized anti-HM1.24 antibody against multiple myeloma via augmented effector function.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yu-Tzu; Horton, Holly M; Kong, Sun-Young; Pong, Erik; Chen, Hsing; Cemerski, Saso; Bernett, Matthew J; Nguyen, Duc-Hanh T; Karki, Sher; Chu, Seung Y; Lazar, Greg A; Munshi, Nikhil C; Desjarlais, John R; Anderson, Kenneth C; Muchhal, Umesh S

    2012-03-01

    HM1.24, an immunologic target for multiple myeloma (MM) cells, has not been effectively targeted with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-MM activities of XmAb5592, a humanized anti-HM1.24 mAb with Fc-domain engineered to significantly enhance FcγR binding and associated immune effector functions. XmAb5592 increased antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) several fold relative to the anti-HM1.24 IgG1 analog against both MM cell lines and primary patient myeloma cells. XmAb5592 also augmented antibody dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) by macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells became more activated by XmAb5592 than the IgG1 analog, evidenced by increased cell surface expression of granzyme B-dependent CD107a and MM cell lysis, even in the presence of bone marrow stromal cells. XmAb5592 potently inhibited tumor growth in mice bearing human MM xenografts via FcγR-dependent mechanisms, and was significantly more effective than the IgG1 analog. Lenalidomide synergistically enhanced in vitro ADCC against MM cells and in vivo tumor inhibition induced by XmAb5592. A single dose of 20 mg/kg XmAb5592 effectively depleted both blood and bone marrow plasma cells in cynomolgus monkeys. These results support clinical development of XmAb5592, both as a monotherapy and in combination with lenalidomide, to improve patient outcome of MM.

  17. A potent anti-dengue human antibody preferentially recognizes the conformation of E protein monomers assembled on the virus surface

    PubMed Central

    Fibriansah, Guntur; Tan, Joanne L; Smith, Scott A; Alwis, Adamberage R; Ng, Thiam-Seng; Kostyuchenko, Victor A; Ibarra, Kristie D; Wang, Jiaqi; Harris, Eva; Silva, Aravinda; Crowe, James E; Lok, Shee-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), which consists of four serotypes (DENV1-4), infects over 400 million people annually. Previous studies have indicated most human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) from dengue patients are cross-reactive and poorly neutralizing. Rare neutralizing HMAbs are usually serotype-specific and bind to quaternary structure-dependent epitopes. We determined the structure of DENV1 complexed with Fab fragments of a highly potent HMAb 1F4 to 6 Å resolution by cryo-EM. Although HMAb 1F4 appeared to bind to virus and not E proteins in ELISAs in the previous study, our structure showed that the epitope is located within an envelope (E) protein monomer, and not across neighboring E proteins. The Fab molecules bind to domain I (DI), and DI-DII hinge of the E protein. We also showed that HMAb 1F4 can neutralize DENV at different stages of viral entry in a cell type and receptor dependent manner. The structure reveals the mechanism by which this potent and specific antibody blocks viral infection. Subject Categories Microbiology, Virology & Host Pathogen Interaction; Immunology PMID:24421336

  18. Vaccination of rabbits with an alkylated toxoid rapidly elicits potent neutralizing antibodies against botulinum neurotoxin serotype B.

    PubMed

    Held, Daniel M; Shurtleff, Amy C; Fields, Scott; Green, Christopher; Fong, Julie; Jones, Russell G A; Sesardic, Dorothea; Buelow, Roland; Burke, Rae Lyn

    2010-06-01

    New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were immunized with several different nontoxic botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BoNT/B) preparations in an effort to optimize the production of a rapid and highly potent, effective neutralizing antibody response. The immunogens included a recombinant heavy chain (rHc) protein produced in Escherichia coli, a commercially available formaldehyde-inactivated toxoid, and an alkylated toxoid produced by urea-iodoacetamide inactivation of the purified active toxin. All three immunogens elicited an antibody response to BoNT/B, detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by toxin neutralization assay, by the use of two distinct mouse toxin challenge models. The induction period and the ultimate potency of the observed immune response varied for each immunogen, and the ELISA titer was not reliably predictive of the potency of toxin neutralization. The kinetics of the BoNT/B-specific binding immune response were nearly identical for the formaldehyde toxoid and alkylated toxoid immunogens, but immunization with the alkylated toxoid generated an approximately 10-fold higher neutralization potency that endured throughout the study, and after just 49 days, each milliliter of serum was capable of neutralizing 10(7) 50% lethal doses of the toxin. Overall, the immunization of rabbits with alkylated BoNT/B toxoid appears to have induced a neutralizing immune response more rapid and more potent than the responses generated by vaccination with formaldehyde toxoid or rHc preparations.

  19. Arctigenin, a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, inhibits MAP kinases and AP-1 activation via potent MKK inhibition: the role in TNF-alpha inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Kyung; Jang, Young Pyo; Kim, Young Choong; Kim, Sang Geon

    2004-10-01

    Arctigenin, naturally occurring in Bardanae fructus, Saussurea medusa, Arctium lappa L., Torreya nucifera and Ipomea cairica, is a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Previously, we showed that arctigenin potently inhibited the induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which involved suppression of NF-kappaB activation. In the present study, we examined the effects of arctigenin on mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in Raw264.7 cells and MAP kinase kinase (MKK) activity. The effect of arctigenin on activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation was also studied in association with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression. Immunoblot analysis showed that arctigenin inhibited phosphorylation of MAP kinases ERK1/2, p38 kinase and JNK and their activities in Raw264.7 cells treated with LPS. Arctigenin potently inhibited the activity of MKK1 in vitro with the IC(50) value of 1 nM. Gel shift and reporter gene analyses revealed that arctigenin inhibited LPS-inducible AP-1 binding to the AP-1 consensus oligonucleotide and AP-1-mediated reporter gene expression. In view of the potential role of AP-1 in the induction of TNF-alpha, we next examined the inhibitory effects of arctigenin on the expression of TNF-alpha. Arctigenin blocked TNF-alpha production and decreased the level of TNF-alpha mRNA in the cells exposed to LPS. These results showed that arctigenin inhibited activation of MAP kinases including ERK1/2, p38 kinase and JNK through the inhibition of MKK activities, leading to AP-1 inactivation, which might, at least in part, contribute to the inhibition of TNF-alpha production.

  20. Potent Inhibition of Late Stages of Hepadnavirus Replication by a Modified Cell Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Abdul, Fabien; Ndeboko, Bénédicte; Buronfosse, Thierry; Zoulim, Fabien; Kann, Michael; Nielsen, Peter E.; Cova, Lucyna

    2012-01-01

    Cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and their lipid domain-conjugates (CatLip) are agents for the delivery of (uncharged) biologically active molecules into the cell. Using infection and transfection assays we surprisingly discovered that CatLip peptides were able to inhibit replication of Duck Hepatitis B Virus (DHBV), a reference model for human HBV. Amongst twelve CatLip peptides we identified Deca-(Arg)8 having a particularly potent antiviral activity, leading to a drastic inhibition of viral particle secretion without detectable toxicity. Inhibition of virion secretion was correlated with a dose-dependent increase in intracellular viral DNA. Deca-(Arg)8 peptide did neither interfere with DHBV entry, nor with formation of mature nucleocapsids nor with their travelling to the nucleus. Instead, Deca-(Arg)8 caused envelope protein accumulation in large clusters as revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy indicating severe structural changes of preS/S. Sucrose gradient analysis of supernatants from Deca-(Arg)8-treated cells showed unaffected naked viral nucleocapsids release, which was concomitant with a complete arrest of virion and surface protein-containing subviral particle secretion. This is the first report showing that a CPP is able to drastically block hepadnaviral release from infected cells by altering late stages of viral morphogenesis via interference with enveloped particle formation, without affecting naked nucleocapsid egress, thus giving a view inside the mode of inhibition. Deca-(Arg)8 may be a useful tool for elucidating the hepadnaviral secretory pathway, which is not yet fully understood. Moreover we provide the first evidence that a modified CPP displays a novel antiviral mechanism targeting another step of viral life cycle compared to what has been so far described for other enveloped viruses. PMID:23173037

  1. Potent inhibition of late stages of hepadnavirus replication by a modified cell penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Abdul, Fabien; Ndeboko, Bénédicte; Buronfosse, Thierry; Zoulim, Fabien; Kann, Michael; Nielsen, Peter E; Cova, Lucyna

    2012-01-01

    Cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and their lipid domain-conjugates (CatLip) are agents for the delivery of (uncharged) biologically active molecules into the cell. Using infection and transfection assays we surprisingly discovered that CatLip peptides were able to inhibit replication of Duck Hepatitis B Virus (DHBV), a reference model for human HBV. Amongst twelve CatLip peptides we identified Deca-(Arg)₈ having a particularly potent antiviral activity, leading to a drastic inhibition of viral particle secretion without detectable toxicity. Inhibition of virion secretion was correlated with a dose-dependent increase in intracellular viral DNA. Deca-(Arg)₈ peptide did neither interfere with DHBV entry, nor with formation of mature nucleocapsids nor with their travelling to the nucleus. Instead, Deca-(Arg)₈ caused envelope protein accumulation in large clusters as revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy indicating severe structural changes of preS/S. Sucrose gradient analysis of supernatants from Deca-(Arg)₈-treated cells showed unaffected naked viral nucleocapsids release, which was concomitant with a complete arrest of virion and surface protein-containing subviral particle secretion. This is the first report showing that a CPP is able to drastically block hepadnaviral release from infected cells by altering late stages of viral morphogenesis via interference with enveloped particle formation, without affecting naked nucleocapsid egress, thus giving a view inside the mode of inhibition. Deca-(Arg)₈ may be a useful tool for elucidating the hepadnaviral secretory pathway, which is not yet fully understood. Moreover we provide the first evidence that a modified CPP displays a novel antiviral mechanism targeting another step of viral life cycle compared to what has been so far described for other enveloped viruses.

  2. Potent inhibition of anoxic depolarization by the sodium channel blocker dibucaine

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Heather A.; Callaway, Jennifer K.; Sword, Jeremy; Kirov, Sergei A.

    2011-01-01

    Recurring waves of peri-infarct depolarizations (PIDs) propagate across gray matter in the hours and days following stroke, expanding the primary site of injury. Ischemic depolarization (termed anoxic depolarization or AD in live brain slices) is PID-like but immediately arises in the more metabolically compromised ischemic core. This causes dramatic neuronal and astrocyte swelling and dendritic beading with spine loss within minutes, resulting in acute cell death. AD is evoked in rodent neocortical slices by suppressing the Na+/K+-ATPase pump with either oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) or exposure to ouabain. The process driving AD and PIDs remains poorly understood. Here we show that dibucaine is a potent drug inhibiting AD because of its high binding affinity to the Na+ channel. Field recording reveals that, when superfused with ouabain (5 min), neocortical slices pretreated with 1 μM dibucaine for 45 min display either no AD or delayed AD onset compared with untreated controls. If ouabain exposure is extended to 10 min, 1 μM dibucaine is still able to delay AD onset by ∼60%. Likewise, it delays OGD-evoked AD onset by ∼54% but does not depress action potentials (APs) or evoked orthodromic field potentials. Increasing dibucaine to 10 μM inhibits AP firing, gradually putting the slice into a stasis that inhibits AD onset but also renders the slice functionally quiescent. Two-photon microscopy reveals that 10 μM dibucaine pretreatment prevents or helps reverse ouabain-induced structural neuronal damage. Although the therapeutic range of dibucaine is quite narrow, dibucaine-like drugs could prove therapeutically useful in inhibiting PIDs and their resultant neuronal damage. PMID:21273307

  3. Structural basis for germ-line gene usage of a potent class of antibodies targeting the CD4-binding site of HIV-1 gp120.

    PubMed

    West, Anthony P; Diskin, Ron; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2012-07-24

    A large number of anti-HIV-1 antibodies targeting the CD4-binding site (CD4bs) on the envelope glycoprotein gp120 have recently been reported. These antibodies, typified by VRC01, are remarkable for both their breadth and their potency. Crystal structures have revealed a common mode of binding for several of these antibodies; however, the precise relationship among CD4bs antibodies remains to be defined. Here we analyze existing structural and sequence data, propose a set of signature features for potent VRC01-like (PVL) antibodies, and verify the importance of these features by mutagenesis. The signature features explain why PVL antibodies derive from a single germ-line human V(H) gene segment and why certain gp120 sequences are associated with antibody resistance. Our results bear on vaccine development and structure-based design to improve the potency and breadth of anti-CD4bs antibodies.

  4. Protective monotherapy against lethal Ebola virus infection by a potently neutralizing antibody.

    PubMed

    Corti, Davide; Misasi, John; Mulangu, Sabue; Stanley, Daphne A; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Wollen, Suzanne; Ploquin, Aurélie; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Staupe, Ryan P; Bailey, Michael; Shi, Wei; Choe, Misook; Marcus, Hadar; Thompson, Emily A; Cagigi, Alberto; Silacci, Chiara; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Perez, Laurent; Sallusto, Federica; Vanzetta, Fabrizia; Agatic, Gloria; Cameroni, Elisabetta; Kisalu, Neville; Gordon, Ingelise; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Muyembe-Tamfun, Jean-Jacques; Trefry, John C; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Sullivan, Nancy J

    2016-03-18

    Ebola virus disease in humans is highly lethal, with case fatality rates ranging from 25 to 90%. There is no licensed treatment or vaccine against the virus, underscoring the need for efficacious countermeasures. We ascertained that a human survivor of the 1995 Kikwit Ebola virus disease outbreak maintained circulating antibodies against the Ebola virus surface glycoprotein for more than a decade after infection. From this survivor we isolated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize recent and previous outbreak variants of Ebola virus and mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. Strikingly, monotherapy with mAb114 protected macaques when given as late as 5 days after challenge. Treatment with a single human mAb suggests that a simplified therapeutic strategy for human Ebola infection may be possible.

  5. A Potent and Broad Neutralizing Antibody Recognizes and Penetrates the HIV Glycan Shield

    SciTech Connect

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J.; Walker, Laura M.; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C.; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P.; Olson, William C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-10-15

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 and 128 with Man{sub 9} at 1.65 and 1.29 angstrom resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose-binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 angstroms reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short {beta}-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificify. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 immunoglobulin Gs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface.

  6. A potent and broad neutralizing antibody recognizes and penetrates the HIV glycan shield.

    PubMed

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J; Walker, Laura M; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P; Olson, William C; Ward, Andrew B; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R; Burton, Dennis R; Wilson, Ian A

    2011-11-25

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 and 128 with Man(9) at 1.65 and 1.29 angstrom resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose-binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 angstroms reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short β-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificity. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 immunoglobulin Gs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface.

  7. A potent and broad neutralizing antibody recognizes and penetrates the HIV glycan shield

    PubMed Central

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J.; Walker, Laura M.; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C.; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P.; Olson, William C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of Fabs PGT 127 and 128 with Man9 at 1.65 and 1.29 Å resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully-glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 Å reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short β-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificify. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 IgGs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface. PMID:21998254

  8. Potent monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile toxin A elicited by DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Jin, Ke; Xiao, Yanling; Cheng, Ying; Huang, Zuhu; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that DNA immunization is effective in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses against a wide range of infectious disease targets. The polyclonal antibodies elicited by DNA vaccination exhibit high sensitivity to conformational epitopes and high avidity. However, there have been limited reports in literature on the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) by DNA immunization. Here, by using Clostridium difficile (C. diff) toxin A as a model antigen, we demonstrated that DNA immunization was effective in producing a panel of mAb that are protective against toxin A challenge and can also be used as sensitive reagents to detect toxin A from various testing samples. The immunoglobulin (Ig) gene usage for such mAb was also investigated. Further studies should be conducted to fully establish DNA immunization as a unique platform to produce mAb in various hosts.

  9. Potent inhibition of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) by myeloperoxidase-dependent oxidation of epicatechins.

    PubMed

    Dickerhof, Nina; Magon, Nicholas J; Tyndall, Joel D A; Kettle, Anthony J; Hampton, Mark B

    2014-09-01

    MIF (macrophage migration inhibitory factor) plays a central role in the promotion and maintenance of the inflammatory response. It is implicated in a number of inflammatory diseases including sepsis, arthritis and colitis, and in diseases with an inflammatory component, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes and cancer. MIF has an unusual N-terminal proline with catalytic activity, and targeting of this residue by small-molecule inhibitors has been shown to interfere with the biological activity of MIF. The objective of the present study was to determine if MIF was susceptible to modification by epicatechins, a group of dietary flavonoids with known anti-inflammatory properties. Epicatechins are substrates for peroxidases including neutrophil-derived MPO (myeloperoxidase). In the present study we show that oxidation of the catechol moiety of epicatechins to an ο-quinone by MPO generates potent MIF inhibitors. Near complete inhibition of MIF by the MPO/H2O2/epicatechin system was achieved at equimolar concentrations of epicatechin and MIF, even in the presence of other MPO substrates. We have characterized the modification introduced by oxidized (-)-epicatechin on MIF by LC-MS (liquid chromatography MS) and found it to occur at the N-terminal proline. We propose that MIF inhibition by oxidized epicatechins contributes to the anti-inflammatory activity of these compounds.

  10. Structurally novel steroidal spirooxindole by241 potently inhibits tumor growth mainly through ROS-mediated mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao-Jing; Yu, Bin; Wang, Jun-Wei; Qi, Ping-Ping; Tang, Kai; Huang, Xin; Liu, Hong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells always have increased ROS levels, thus making them more vulnerable to persistent endogenous oxidative stress. The biochemical difference between cancer and normal cells could be exploited to achieve selective cancer cell killing by exogenous ROS-producing agents. Herein we described a structurally novel steroidal spirooxindole by241 and its anticancer efficacy. By241 exhibited potent inhibition against human cancer cells and less toxic to normal cells. By241 concentration-dependently induced apoptosis of MGC-803 and EC9706 cells, accompanied with the mitochondrial dysfunction and increased ROS levels. NAC can completely restore the decreased cell viability of MGC-803 cells caused by by241, suggesting ROS-mediated mechanisms. The expression levels of proteins involved in the mitochondrion-related pathways were detected, showing increased expression of proapoptotic proteins and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, and activation of caspases-9/-3, but without activating caspase-8 expression. Pretreatment with Z-VAD-FMK partially rescued by241-induced apoptosis of MGC-803 cells. Additionally, by241 inhibited mTOR, activated p53 and its downstream proteins, cleaved MDM2 and PI3K/AKT as well as NF-κB signaling pathway. In vivo experiments showed that by241 did not have significant acute oral toxicity and exerted good anticancer efficacy against MGC-803 bearing mice models. Therefore, by241 may serve as a lead for further development for cancer therapy. PMID:27527552

  11. Rhodanine hydrolysis leads to potent thioenolate mediated metallo-β-lactamase inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brem, Jürgen; van Berkel, Sander S.; Aik, Weishen; Rydzik, Anna M.; Avison, Matthew B.; Pettinati, Ilaria; Umland, Klaus-Daniel; Kawamura, Akane; Spencer, James; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; McDonough, Michael A.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2014-12-01

    The use of β-lactam antibiotics is compromised by resistance, which is provided by β-lactamases belonging to both metallo (MBL)- and serine (SBL)-β-lactamase subfamilies. The rhodanines are one of very few compound classes that inhibit penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), SBLs and, as recently reported, MBLs. Here, we describe crystallographic analyses of the mechanism of inhibition of the clinically relevant VIM-2 MBL by a rhodanine, which reveal that the rhodanine ring undergoes hydrolysis to give a thioenolate. The thioenolate is found to bind via di-zinc chelation, mimicking the binding of intermediates in β-lactam hydrolysis. Crystallization of VIM-2 in the presence of the intact rhodanine led to observation of a ternary complex of MBL, a thioenolate fragment and rhodanine. The crystallographic observations are supported by kinetic and biophysical studies, including 19F NMR analyses, which reveal the rhodanine-derived thioenolate to be a potent broad-spectrum MBL inhibitor and a lead structure for the development of new types of clinically useful MBL inhibitors.

  12. Novel, potent, and selective GABAC antagonists inhibit myopia development and facilitate learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Chebib, Mary; Hinton, Tina; Schmid, Katrina L; Brinkworth, Darren; Qian, Haohua; Matos, Susana; Kim, Hye-Lim; Abdel-Halim, Heba; Kumar, Rohan J; Johnston, Graham A R; Hanrahan, Jane R

    2009-02-01

    This study reports pharmacological and physiological effects of cis- and trans-(3-aminocyclopentanyl)butylphosphinic acid (cis- and trans-3-ACPBPA). These compounds are conformationally restricted analogs of the orally active GABA(B/C) receptor antagonist (3-aminopropyl)-n-butylphosphinic acid (CGP36742 or SGS742). cis-[IC(50)(rho1) = 5.06 microM and IC(50)(rho2) = 11.08 microM; n = 4] and trans-3-ACPMPA [IC(50)(rho1) = 72.58 microM and IC(50)(rho2) = 189.7 microM; n = 4] seem competitive at GABA(C) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, having no effect as agonists (1 mM) but exerting weak antagonist (1 mM) effects on human GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors. cis-3-ACPBPA was more potent and selective than the trans-compound, being more than 100 times more potent at GABA(C) than GABA(A) or GABA(B) receptors. cis-3-ACPBPA was further evaluated on dissociated rat retinal bipolar cells and dose-dependently inhibited the native GABA(C) receptor (IC(50) = 47 +/- 4.5 microM; n = 6). When applied to the eye as intravitreal injections, cis- and trans-3-ACPBPA prevented experimental myopia development and inhibited the associated vitreous chamber elongation, in a dose-dependent manner in the chick model. Doses only 10 times greater than required to inhibit recombinant GABA(C) receptors caused the antimyopia effects. Using intraperitoneal administration, cis- (30 mg/kg) and trans-3-ACPBPA (100 mg/kg) enhanced learning and memory in male Wistar rats; compared with vehicle there was a significant reduction in time for rats to find the platform in the Morris water maze task (p < 0.05; n = 10). As the physiological effects of cis- and trans-3-ACPBPA are similar to those reported for CGP36742, the memory and refractive effects of CGP36742 may be due in part to its GABA(C) activity.

  13. Proteasome Inhibition Suppresses Dengue Virus Egress in Antibody Dependent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Vivian V.; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Horrevorts, Sophie; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV) is a cause of significant global health burden, with an estimated 390 million infections occurring annually. However, no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatment for dengue is available. DENV interacts with host cell factors to complete its life cycle although this virus-host interplay remains to be fully elucidated. Many studies have identified the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) to be important for successful DENV production, but how the UPP contributes to DENV life cycle as host factors remains ill defined. We show here that proteasome inhibition decouples infectious virus production from viral RNA replication in antibody-dependent infection of THP-1 cells. Molecular and imaging analyses in β-lactone treated THP-1 cells suggest that proteasome function does not prevent virus assembly but rather DENV egress. Intriguingly, the licensed proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, is able to inhibit DENV titers at low nanomolar drug concentrations for different strains of all four serotypes of DENV in primary monocytes. Furthermore, bortezomib treatment of DENV-infected mice inhibited the spread of DENV in the spleen as well as the overall pathological changes. Our findings suggest that preventing DENV egress through proteasome inhibition could be a suitable therapeutic strategy against dengue. PMID:26565697

  14. SL-01, an oral gemcitabine derivative, inhibited human cancer growth more potently than gemcitabine

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Cuirong; Yue, Bin; Liu, Huiping; Sun, Cuicui; Li, Wenbao; Qu, Xianjun

    2012-08-01

    SL-01, an oral gemcitabine derivative, was synthesized by introducing the moiety of 3-(dodecyloxycarbonyl)pyrazine-2-carbonyl at the N4-position on the cytidine ring of gemcitabine. Our goal in this study was to evaluate the efficacy of SL-01 on the growth of human cancers with gemcitabine as control. Experiments were performed on human non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 and colon cancer HCT-116 both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro assays, SL-01 significantly inhibited the growth of cancer cells as determined by the 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Further studies indicated that SL-01 induced the cancer cells to apoptosis showing chromatin condensation and externalization of phosphatidylserine. In in vivo studies, we evaluated the efficacy of SL-01 in nude mice bearing human cancer xenografts. SL-01 effectively delayed the growth of NCI-H460 and HCT-116 without significant loss of body weight. Molecular analysis indicated that the high efficacy of SL-01 was associated with its ability to induce apoptosis as evidenced by increase of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining cells, activation of caspase-9, caspase-3 and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) in tumor tissues. SL-01 also increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in cancer cells. These biological activities of SL-01 were more potential than that of gemcitabine. Based on these in vitro and in vivo results, SL-01 is proposed as a potent oral anticancer agent that may supplant the use of gemcitabine in the clinic. -- Highlights: ► An oral gemcitabine derivative SL-01 was synthesized. ► The effects of SL-01 were evaluated and its efficacy was compared with gemcitabine. ► The biological activities of SL-01 were more potent than that of gemcitabine. ► SL-01 could replace gemcitabine for clinical use.

  15. Potent and Selective Inhibition of Plasma Membrane Monoamine Transporter by HIV Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Haichuan; Hu, Tao; Foti, Robert S.; Pan, Yongmei; Swaan, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) is a major uptake-2 monoamine transporter that shares extensive substrate and inhibitor overlap with organic cation transporters 1–3 (OCT1–3). Currently, there are no PMAT-specific inhibitors available that can be used in in vitro and in vivo studies to differentiate between PMAT and OCT activities. In this study, we showed that IDT307 (4-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium iodide), a fluorescent analog of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), is a transportable substrate for PMAT and that IDT307-based fluorescence assay can be used to rapidly identify and characterize PMAT inhibitors. Using the fluorescent substrate-based assays, we analyzed the interactions of eight human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) with human PMAT and OCT1–3 in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells stably transfected with individual transporters. Our data revealed that PMAT and OCTs exhibit distinct sensitivity and inhibition patterns toward HIV PIs. PMAT is most sensitive to PI inhibition whereas OCT2 and OCT3 are resistant. OCT1 showed an intermediate sensitivity and a distinct inhibition profile from PMAT. Importantly, lopinavir is a potent PMAT inhibitor and exhibited >120 fold selectivity toward PMAT (IC50 = 1.4 ± 0.2 µM) over OCT1 (IC50 = 174 ± 40 µM). Lopinavir has no inhibitory effect on OCT2 or OCT3 at maximal tested concentrations. Lopinavir also exhibited no or much weaker interactions with uptake-1 monoamine transporters. Together, our results reveal that PMAT and OCTs have distinct specificity exemplified by their differential interaction with HIV PIs. Further, we demonstrate that lopinavir can be used as a selective PMAT inhibitor to differentiate PMAT-mediated monoamine and organic cation transport from those mediated by OCT1–3. PMID:26285765

  16. New pyrrole derivatives with potent tubulin polymerization inhibiting activity as anticancer agents including hedgehog-dependent cancer.

    PubMed

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-08-14

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

  17. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  18. Monoclonal antibody-induced ErbB3 receptor internalization and degradation inhibits growth and migration of human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Belleudi, Francesca; Marra, Emanuele; Mazzetta, Francesca; Fattore, Luigi; Giovagnoli, Maria Rosaria; Mancini, Rita; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2012-04-01

    Members of the ErbB receptor family are targets of a growing numbers of small molecules and monoclonal antibodies inhibitors currently under development for the treatment of cancer. Although historical efforts have been directed against ErbB1 (EGFR) and ErbB2 (HER2/neu), emerging evidences have pointed to ErbB3 as a key node in the activation of proliferation/survival pathways from the ErbB receptor family and have fueled enthusiasm toward the clinical development of anti-ErbB3 agents. In this study, we have evaluated the potential therapeutic efficacy of a set of three recently generated anti-human ErbB3 monoclonals, A2, A3 and A4, in human primary melanoma cells. We show that in melanoma cells expressing ErbB1, ErbB3 and ErbB4 but not ErbB2 receptor ligands activate the PI3K/AKT pathway, and this leads to increased cell proliferation and migration. While antibodies A3 and A4 are able to potently inhibit ligand-induced signaling, proliferation and migration, antibody A2 is unable to exert this effect. In attempt to understand the mechanism of action and the basis of this different behavior, we demonstrate, through a series of combined approaches, that antibody efficacy strongly correlates with antibody-induced receptor internalization, degradation and inhibition of receptor recycling to the cell surface. Finally, fine epitope mapping studies through a peptide array show that inhibiting vs. non-inhibiting antibodies have a dramatically different mode of binding to the to the receptor extracellular domain. Our study confirms the key role of ErbB3 and points to exploitation of novel combination therapies for treatment of malignant melanoma.

  19. Delta- and gamma-tocotrienol isomers are potent in inhibiting inflammation and endothelial activation in stimulated human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Muid, Suhaila; Froemming, Gabriele R. Anisah; Rahman, Thuhairah; Ali, A. Manaf; Nawawi, Hapizah M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tocotrienols (TCTs) are more potent antioxidants than α-tocopherol (TOC). However, the effectiveness and mechanism of the action of TCT isomers as anti-atherosclerotic agents in stimulated human endothelial cells under inflammatory conditions are not well established. Aims 1) To compare the effects of different TCT isomers on inflammation, endothelial activation, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). 2) To identify the two most potent TCT isomers in stimulated human endothelial cells. 3) To investigate the effects of TCT isomers on NFκB activation, and protein and gene expression levels in stimulated human endothelial cells. Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with various concentrations of TCT isomers or α-TOC (0.3–10 µM), together with lipopolysaccharides for 16 h. Supernatant cells were collected and measured for protein and gene expression of cytokines (interleukin-6, or IL-6; tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or TNF-α), adhesion molecules (intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, or ICAM-1; vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, or VCAM-1; and e-selectin), eNOS, and NFκB. Results δ-TCT is the most potent TCT isomer in the inhibition of IL-6, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and NFκB, and it is the second potent in inhibiting e-selectin and eNOS. γ-TCT isomer is the most potent isomer in inhibiting e-selectin and eNOS, and it is the second most potent in inhibiting is IL-6, VCAM-1, and NFκB. For ICAM-1 protein expression, the most potent is δ-TCT followed by α-TCT. α- and β-TCT inhibit IL-6 at the highest concentration (10 µM) but enhance IL-6 at lower concentrations. γ-TCT markedly increases eNOS expression by 8–11-fold at higher concentrations (5–10 µM) but exhibits neutral effects at lower concentrations. Conclusion δ- and γ-TCT are the two most potent TCT isomers in terms of the inhibition of inflammation and endothelial activation whilst enhancing eNOS, possibly mediated via the NFκB pathway. Hence, there is a

  20. A Potent Virus-Specific Antibody-Secreting Cell Response to Acute Enterovirus 71 Infection in Children.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Ying Arthur; Lin, Jainn-Jim; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Yang, Shuan; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2015-09-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) remains a leading pathogen for acute infectious diseases in children, especially in Asia. The cellular basis for establishing a virus-specific antibody response to acute EV71 infections is unclear in children. We studied the magnitude of virus-specific antibody-secreting B cells (ASCs) and its relationship with serological response, clinical parameters, and virological parameters among children with laboratory-confirmed EV71 infection. A potent EV71 genogroup B- and virus-specific ASC response was detected in the first week of illness among genotype B5 EV71-infected children. The cross-reactive EV71-specific ASC response to genogroup C viral antigens composed about 10% of the response. The EV71-specific ASC response in children aged ≥3 years produced immunoglobulin G predominantly, but immunoglobulin M was predominant in younger children. Proliferation marker was expressed by the majority of circulating ASCs in the acute phase of EV71 infection. Virus-specific ASC responses significantly correlated with throat viral load, fever duration, and serological genogroup-specific neutralization titer. The presence of a virus-specific ASC response serves an early cellular marker of an EV71-specific antibody response. Further detailed study of EV71-specific ASCs at the monoclonal level is crucial to delineate the specificity and function of antibody immunity in children. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Structural and Functional Characterization of Anti-A33 Antibodies Reveal a Potent Cross-Species Orthopoxviruses Neutralizer

    PubMed Central

    Matho, Michael H.; Schlossman, Andrew; Meng, Xiangzhi; Benhnia, Mohammed Rafii-El-Idrissi; Kaever, Thomas; Buller, Mark; Doronin, Konstantin; Parker, Scott; Peters, Bjoern; Crotty, Shane; Xiang, Yan; Zajonc, Dirk M.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus A33 is an extracellular enveloped virus (EEV)-specific type II membrane glycoprotein that is essential for efficient EEV formation and long-range viral spread within the host. A33 is a target for neutralizing antibody responses against EEV. In this study, we produced seven murine anti-A33 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) by immunizing mice with live VACV, followed by boosting with the soluble A33 homodimeric ectodomain. Five A33 specific MAbs were capable of neutralizing EEV in the presence of complement. All MAbs bind to conformational epitopes on A33 but not to linear peptides. To identify the epitopes, we have adetermined the crystal structures of three representative neutralizing MAbs in complex with A33. We have further determined the binding kinetics for each of the three antibodies to wild-type A33, as well as to engineered A33 that contained single alanine substitutions within the epitopes of the three crystallized antibodies. While the Fab of both MAbs A2C7 and A20G2 binds to a single A33 subunit, the Fab from MAb A27D7 binds to both A33 subunits simultaneously. A27D7 binding is resistant to single alanine substitutions within the A33 epitope. A27D7 also demonstrated high-affinity binding with recombinant A33 protein that mimics other orthopoxvirus strains in the A27D7 epitope, such as ectromelia, monkeypox, and cowpox virus, suggesting that A27D7 is a potent cross-neutralizer. Finally, we confirmed that A27D7 protects mice against a lethal challenge with ectromelia virus. PMID:26325270

  2. Glycycoumarin from Glycyrrhizae Radix acts as a potent antispasmodic through inhibition of phosphodiesterase 3.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuji; Akao, Teruaki; He, Ju-Xiu; Nojima, Hiroshi; Kuraishi, Yasushi; Morota, Takashi; Asano, Takayuki; Tani, Tadato

    2006-05-24

    Glycyrrhizae Radix is used to treat abdominal pain as a component of Shakuyaku-kanzo-to, a traditional Chinese medicine formulation. We aim at clarifying the antispasmodic principles of Glycyrrhizae Radix, and consequently isolated glycycoumarin as a potent relaxant on the carbamylcholine (CCh)-induced contraction of mouse jejunum. In this paper we investigated the effects and the action mechanism of glycycoumarin on the contraction of mouse jejunum. Glycycoumarin inhibited the contraction induced by various types of stimulants, such as CCh, KCl, BaCl(2), and A23187 (calcium ionophore III) with IC(50) values of 2.93+/-0.94 micromol/l (1.08+/-0.35 microg/ml), 2.59+/-0.58 micromol/l (0.95+/-0.29 microg/ml), 4.09+/-1.82 micromol/l (1.51+/-0.67 microg/ml) and 7.39+/-5.19 micromol/l (2.72+/-1.91 microg/ml), respectively, with a potency similar to that of papaverine (a representative antispasmodic for smooth muscle). Furthermore, pretreatment with glycycoumarin enhanced the relaxation induced by forskolin on CCh-evoked contraction, similar to that by pretreatment with IBMX, a non-specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Pretreatment with glycycoumarin also enhanced the relaxation effect of rolipram, a specific inhibitor of PDE isozyme 4, as pretreatment with milrinone, a specific inhibitor of isozyme 3, did. Moreover, the effect of glycycoumarin was associated with dose-dependent accumulation of cAMP, but not cGMP, in mouse jejunum. These results indicate that glycycoumarin has an inhibitory effect on smooth muscle contraction induced by various types of stimulants through the inhibition of PDEs, especially isozyme 3, followed by the accumulation of intracellular cAMP.

  3. Potent inhibition of scrapie prion replication in cultured cells by bis-acridines

    PubMed Central

    May, Barnaby C. H.; Fafarman, Aaron T.; Hong, Septima B.; Rogers, Michael; Deady, Leslie W.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Cohen, Fred E.

    2003-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by an accumulation of PrPSc, a misfolded isoform of the normal cellular prion protein, PrPC. We previously reported the bioactivity of acridine-based compounds against PrPSc replication in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells and now report the improved potency of bis-acridine compounds. Bis-acridines are characterized by a dimeric motif, comprising two acridine heterocycles tethered by a linker. A library of bis-(6-chloro-2-methoxy-acridin-9-yl) and bis-(7-chloro-2-methoxy-benzo[b][1,5]naphthyridin-10-yl) analogs was synthesized to explore the effect of structurally diverse linkers on PrPSc replication in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells. Structure–activity analysis revealed that linker length and structure are important determinants for inhibition of prion replication in cultured scrapied cells. Three bis-acridine analogs, (6-chloro-2-methoxy-acridin-9-yl)-(3-{4-[3-(6-chloro-2-methoxy-acridin-9-ylamino)-propyl]-piperazin-1-yl}-propyl)-amine, N,N′-bis-(6-chloro-2-methoxy-acridin-9-yl)-1,8-diamino-3,6-dioxaoctane, and (1-{[4-(6-chloro-2-methoxy-acridin-9-ylamino)-butyl]-[3-(6-chloro-2-methoxy-acridin-9-ylamino)-propyl]-carbamoyl}-ethyl)-carbamic acid tert-butyl ester, showed half-maximal inhibition of PrPSc formation at 40, 25, and 30 nM, respectively, and were not cytotoxic to uninfected neuroblastoma cells at concentrations of 500 nM. Our data suggest that bis-acridine analogs may provide a potent alternative to the acridine-based compound quinacrine, which is currently under clinical evaluation for the treatment of prion disease. PMID:12626750

  4. Potent inhibition of HIV-1 entry by (s4dU)35.

    PubMed

    Horváth, András; Tokés, Szilvia; Hartman, Tracy; Watson, Karen; Turpin, Jim A; Buckheit, Robert W; Sebestyén, Zsolt; Szöllosi, János; Benko, Ilona; Bardos, Thomas J; Dunn, Joseph A; Fésüs, László; Tóth, Ferenc D; Aradi, Janos

    2005-04-10

    We have previously reported the potent in vitro HIV-1 anti-reverse transcriptase activity of a 35-mer of 4-thio-deoxyuridylate [(s(4)dU)(35)]. In efforts to define its activity in a more physiological system, studies were carried out to determine the stage of viral infection that this compound mediates its anti-viral effect. Results of the studies reported herein show that (s(4)dU)(35) is nontoxic and is capable of inhibiting both single and multi-drug resistant HIV strains (IC(50): 0.8-25.4 microg/ml) in vitro. Besides its previously reported anti-RT activity, (s(4)dU)(35) mediated its antiviral action by preventing virus attachment (IC(50): 0.002-0.003 microg/ml), and was stable in vitro and slowly degraded by DNAses. Competition studies and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments indicated that (s(4)dU)(35) preferentially binds to CD4 receptors, but not to CD48. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies showed that (s(4)dU)(35) did not penetrate into the cells and colocalized with cell surface thioredoxin. Our studies identify (s(4)dU)(35) as a potential novel HIV entry inhibitor that may have utility as either a systemic antiretroviral or as a preventing agent for HIV transmission.

  5. Potent Inhibition of Feline Coronaviruses with Peptidyl Compounds Targeting Coronavirus 3C-like Protease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yunjeong; Mandadapu, Sivakoteswara Rao; Groutas, William C.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2012-01-01

    Feline coronavirus infection is common among domestic and exotic felid species and usually associated with mild or asymptomatic enteritis; however, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal disease of cats that is caused by systemic infection with a feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), a variant of feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). Currently, there is no specific treatment approved for FIP despite the importance of FIP as the leading infectious cause of death in young cats. During the replication process, coronavirus produces viral polyproteins that are processed into mature proteins by viral proteases, the main protease (3C-like [3CL] protease) and the papain-like protease. Since the cleavages of viral polyproteins are an essential step for virus replication, blockage of viral protease is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Previously, we reported the generation of broad-spectrum peptidyl inhibitors against viruses that possess a 3C or 3CL protease. In this study, we further evaluated the antiviral effects of the peptidyl inhibitors against feline coronaviruses, and investigated the interaction between our protease inhibitor and a cathepsin B inhibitor, an entry blocker, against feline coronaviruses in cell culture. Herein we report that our compounds behave as reversible, competitive inhibitors of 3CL protease, potently inhibited the replication of feline coronaviruses (EC50 in a nanomolar range) and, furthermore, the combination of cathepsin B and 3CL protease inhibitors led to a strong synergistic interaction against feline coronaviruses in cell culture systems. PMID:23219425

  6. Extracts from Annona Muricata L. and Annona Reticulata L. (Annonaceae) Potently and Selectively Inhibit Plasmodium Falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Yamthe, Lauve Rachel Tchokouaha; Fokou, Patrick Valere Tsouh; Mbouna, Cedric Derick Jiatsa; Keumoe, Rodrigue; Ndjakou, Bruno Lenta; Djouonzo, Paul Toukam; Mfopa, Alvine Ngoutane; Legac, Jennifer; Tsabang, Nole; Gut, Jiri; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Boyom, Fabrice Fekam

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to screen extracts from Annona muricata and Annona reticulata in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum. Crude ethanolic extracts, methylene chloride fractions, aqueous fractions, subfractions and isolated compounds (stigmasterol-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside, lichexanthone, gallic acid and β-sitosterol-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside) were tested for cytotoxicity on erythrocytes and Human Foreskin Fibroblasts cells and against the W2 strain of P. falciparum in culture. Results indicated that none of the extracts was cytotoxic at concentrations up to 10 µg/mL. Most of the extracts, fractions and subfractions inhibited the growth of P. falciparum with IC50 values ranging from 0.07 to 3.46 µg/mL. The most potent was the subfraction 30 from A. muricata stem bark (IC50 = 0.07 µg/mL) with a selectivity index of ˃ 142. Subfraction 3 from A. muricata root also exhibited very good activity (IC50 = 0.09 µg/mL) with a high selectivity index (SI ˃ 111). Amongst the isolated compounds, only gallic acid showed activity with IC50 of 3.32 µg/mL and SI > 10. These results support traditional claims for A. muricata and A. reticulata in the treatment of malaria. Given their limited cytotoxicity profile, their extracts qualify as promising starting points for antimalarial drug discovery. PMID:28930201

  7. Extracts from Annona Muricata L. and Annona Reticulata L. (Annonaceae) Potently and Selectively Inhibit Plasmodium Falciparum.

    PubMed

    Yamthe, Lauve Rachel Tchokouaha; Fokou, Patrick Valere Tsouh; Mbouna, Cedric Derick Jiatsa; Keumoe, Rodrigue; Ndjakou, Bruno Lenta; Djouonzo, Paul Toukam; Mfopa, Alvine Ngoutane; Legac, Jennifer; Tsabang, Nole; Gut, Jiri; Rosenthal, Philip J; Boyom, Fabrice Fekam

    2015-04-30

    The aim of this work was to screen extracts from Annona muricata and Annona reticulata in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum. Crude ethanolic extracts, methylene chloride fractions, aqueous fractions, subfractions and isolated compounds (stigmasterol-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside, lichexanthone, gallic acid and β-sitosterol-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside) were tested for cytotoxicity on erythrocytes and Human Foreskin Fibroblasts cells and against the W2 strain of P. falciparum in culture. Results indicated that none of the extracts was cytotoxic at concentrations up to 10 µg/mL. Most of the extracts, fractions and subfractions inhibited the growth of P. falciparum with IC50 values ranging from 0.07 to 3.46 µg/mL. The most potent was the subfraction 30 from A. muricata stem bark (IC50 = 0.07 µg/mL) with a selectivity index of ˃ 142. Subfraction 3 from A. muricata root also exhibited very good activity (IC50 = 0.09 µg/mL) with a high selectivity index (SI ˃ 111). Amongst the isolated compounds, only gallic acid showed activity with IC50 of 3.32 µg/mL and SI > 10. These results support traditional claims for A. muricata and A. reticulata in the treatment of malaria. Given their limited cytotoxicity profile, their extracts qualify as promising starting points for antimalarial drug discovery.

  8. Potent inhibition of feline coronaviruses with peptidyl compounds targeting coronavirus 3C-like protease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunjeong; Mandadapu, Sivakoteswara Rao; Groutas, William C; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2013-02-01

    Feline coronavirus infection is common among domestic and exotic felid species and usually associated with mild or asymptomatic enteritis; however, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal disease of cats that is caused by systemic infection with a feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), a variant of feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). Currently, there is no specific treatment approved for FIP despite the importance of FIP as the leading infectious cause of death in young cats. During the replication process, coronavirus produces viral polyproteins that are processed into mature proteins by viral proteases, the main protease (3C-like [3CL] protease) and the papain-like protease. Since the cleavages of viral polyproteins are an essential step for virus replication, blockage of viral protease is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Previously, we reported the generation of broad-spectrum peptidyl inhibitors against viruses that possess a 3C or 3CL protease. In this study, we further evaluated the antiviral effects of the peptidyl inhibitors against feline coronaviruses, and investigated the interaction between our protease inhibitor and a cathepsin B inhibitor, an entry blocker, against a feline coronavirus in cell culture. Herein we report that our compounds behave as reversible, competitive inhibitors of 3CL protease, potently inhibited the replication of feline coronaviruses (EC(50) in a nanomolar range) and, furthermore, combination of cathepsin B and 3CL protease inhibitors led to a strong synergistic interaction against feline coronaviruses in a cell culture system.

  9. Inhibition of ectopic glioma tumor growth by a potent ferrocenyl drug loaded into stealth lipid nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Lainé, Anne-Laure; Clavreul, Anne; Rousseau, Audrey; Tétaud, Clément; Vessieres, Anne; Garcion, Emmanuel; Jaouen, Gerard; Aubert, Léo; Guilbert, Matthieu; Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Toillon, Robert-Alain; Passirani, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    In this work, a novel ferrocenyl complex (ansa-FcdiOH) was assessed for brain tumor therapy through stealth lipid nanocapsules (LNCs). Stealth LNCs, prepared according to a one-step process, showed rapid uptake by cancer cells and extended blood circulation time. The ferrocenyl complex was successfully encapsulated into these LNCs measuring 40 nm with a high loading capacity (6.4%). In vitro studies showed a potent anticancer effect of ansa-FcdiOH on 9L cells with a low IC50 value (0.1 μM) associated with an oxidative stress and a dose-dependent alteration of the cell cycle. Repeated intravenous injections of stealth ansa-FcdiOH LNCs in ectopic glioma bearing rats induced a significant tumor growth inhibition, supported by a reduced number of proliferative cells in tumors compared to control group. Additionally, no liver damage was observed in treated animals. These results indicated that stealth ansa-FcdiOH LNCs might be considered as a potential new approach for cancer chemotherapy. In this study, a novel ferrocenyl complex was assessed for brain tumor therapy through stealth lipid nanocapsules, demonstrating no liver damage, and superior tumor volume reduction compared to saline and stealth lipid nanocapsules alone in an ectopic glioma model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-120 interface

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H.; Pancera, Marie; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Tong, Tommy; Feng, Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Laub, Leo; Sliepen, Kwinten; van Gils, Marit J.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Derking, Ronald; Klasse, Per-Johan; Migueles, Stephen A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Alam, Munir; Pugach, Pavel; Haynes, Barton F.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Binley, James M.; Ward, Andrew B.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Connors, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is providing important insights regarding the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in1). Here we report a broad and extremely potent HIV-specific mAb, termed 35O22, which binds novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. 35O22 neutralized 62% of 181 pseudoviruses with an IC50<50 μg/ml. The median IC50 of neutralized viruses was 0.033 μg/ml, among the most potent thus far described. 35O22 did not bind monomeric forms of Env tested, but did bind the trimeric BG505 SOSIP.664. Mutagenesis and a reconstruction by negative-stain electron microscopy of the Fab in complex with trimer revealed it to bind a conserved epitope, which stretched across gp120 and gp41. The specificity of 35O22 represents a novel site of vulnerability on HIV Env, which serum analysis indicates to be commonly elicited by natural infection. Binding to this new site of vulnerability may thus be an important complement to current mAb-based approaches to immunotherapies, prophylaxis, and vaccine design. PMID:25186731

  11. The Antibody Targeting the E314 Peptide of Human Kv1.3 Pore Region Serves as a Novel, Potent and Specific Channel Blocker

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Cheng, Long-Xian; Liu, Jin-Ping; Wang, Yan-Fu; Gao, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Hua; Wang, Min; Zeng, Qiu-Tang; Liu, Kun

    2012-01-01

    Selective blockade of Kv1.3 channels in effector memory T (TEM) cells was validated to ameliorate autoimmune or autoimmune-associated diseases. We generated the antibody directed against one peptide of human Kv1.3 (hKv1.3) extracellular loop as a novel and possible Kv1.3 blocker. One peptide of hKv1.3 extracellular loop E3 containing 14 amino acids (E314) was chosen as an antigenic determinant to generate the E314 antibody. The E314 antibody specifically recognized 63.8KD protein stably expressed in hKv1.3-HEK 293 cell lines, whereas it did not recognize or cross-react to human Kv1.1(hKv1.1), Kv1.2(hKv1.2), Kv1.4(hKv1.4), Kv1.5(hKv1.5), KCa3.1(hKCa3.1), HERG, hKCNQ1/hKCNE1, Nav1.5 and Cav1.2 proteins stably expressed in HEK 293 cell lines or in human atrial or ventricular myocytes by Western blotting analysis and immunostaining detection. By the technique of whole-cell patch clamp, the E314 antibody was shown to have a directly inhibitory effect on hKv1.3 currents expressed in HEK 293 or Jurkat T cells and the inhibition showed a concentration-dependence. However, it exerted no significant difference on hKv1.1, hKv1.2, hKv1.4, hKv1.5, hKCa3.1, HERG, hKCNQ1/hKCNE1, L-type Ca2+ or voltage-gated Na+ currents. The present study demonstrates that the antibody targeting the E314 peptide of hKv1.3 pore region could be a novel, potent and specific hKv1.3 blocker without affecting a variety of closely related Kv1 channels, KCa3.1 channels and functional cardiac ion channels underlying central nervous systerm (CNS) disorders or drug-acquired arrhythmias, which is required as a safe clinic-promising channel blocker. PMID:22558454

  12. Epitope Mapping of M36, a Human Antibody Domain with Potent and Broad HIV-1 Inhibitory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weizao; Yuan, Xiaohui; Chong, Huihui; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; He, Yuxian

    2013-01-01

    M36 is the first member of a novel class of potent HIV-1 entry inhibitors based on human engineered antibody domains (eAds). It exhibits broad inhibitory activity suggesting that its CD4-induced epitope is highly conserved. Here, we describe fine mapping of its epitope by using several approaches. First, a panel of mimotopes was affinity-selected from a random peptide library and potential m36-binding residues were computationally predicted. Second, homology modeling of m36 and molecular docking of m36 onto gp120 revealed potentially important residues in gp120-m36 interactions. Third, the predicted contact residues were verified by site-directed mutagenesis. Taken together, m36 epitope comprising three discontinuous sites including six key gp120 residues (Site C1: Thr123 and Pro124; Site C3: Glu370 and Ile371; Site C4: Met426 and Trp427) were identified. In the 3D structure of gp120, the sites C1 and C4 are located in the bridging sheet and the site C3 is within the β15-α3 excursion, which play essential roles for the receptor- and coreceptor-binding and are major targets of neutralizing antibodies. Based on these results we propose a precise localization of the m36 epitope and suggest a mechanism of its broad inhibitory activity which could help in the development of novel HIV-1 therapeutics based on eAds. PMID:23776690

  13. Synergistic anti-tumor therapy by a comb-like multifunctional antibody nanoarray with exceptionally potent activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huafei; Sun, Yun; Chen, Di; Zhao, He; Zhao, Mengxin; Zhu, Xiandi; Ke, Changhong; Zhang, Ge; Jiang, Cheng; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Fulei; Wei, Huafeng; Li, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Simultaneously blocking multiple mediators offers new hope for the treatment of complex diseases. However, the curative potential of current combination therapy by chronological administration of separate monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or multi-specific mAbs is still moderate due to inconvenient manipulation, low cooperative effectors, poor pharmacokinetics and insufficient tumor accumulation. Here, we describe a facile strategy that arms distinct mAbs with cooperative effectors onto a long chain to form a multicomponent comb-like nano mAb. Unlike dissociative parental mAbs, the multifunctional mAb nanoarray (PL-RB) constructed from type I/II anti-CD20 mAbs shows good pharmacokinetics. This PL-RB simultaneously targets distinct epitopes on a single antigen (Ag) and neighboring Ags on different lymphocytes. This unique intra- and intercellular Ag cross-linking endows the multifunctional mAb nanoarray with potent apoptosis activity. The exceptional apoptosis, complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) that are synchronously evoked by the nano PL-RB are further synergistically promoted via enhanced permeability and retention (EPR), which resulted in high intratumor accumulation and excellent anti-lymphoma efficiency.

  14. Generation of potent neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies against cytomegalovirus infection from immune B cells

    PubMed Central

    Funaro, Ada; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Luganini, Anna; Ortolan, Erika; Lo Buono, Nicola; Vicenzi, Elisa; Cassetta, Luca; Landolfo, Santo; Buick, Richard; Falciola, Luca; Murphy, Marianne; Garotta, Gianni; Malavasi, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    Background Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) generated as a result of the immune response are likely to be the most effective therapeutic antibodies, particularly in the case of infectious diseases against which the immune response is protective. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an ubiquitous opportunistic virus that is the most serious pathogenic agent in transplant patients. The available therapeutic armamentarium (e.g. HCMV hyperimmune globulins or antivirals) is associated with severe side effects and the emergence of drug-resistant strains; therefore, neutralizing human mAb may be a decisive alternative in the prevention of primary and re-activated HCMV infections in these patients. Results The purpose of this study was to generate neutralizing mAb against HCMV from the immunological repertoire of immune donors. To this aim, we designed an efficient technology relying on two discrete and sequential steps: first, human B-lymphocytes are stimulated with TLR9-agonists and IL-2; second, after both additives are removed, the cells are infected with EBV. Using this strategy we obtained 29 clones secreting IgG neutralizing the HCMV infectivity; four among these were further characterized. All of the mAbs neutralize the infection in different combinations of HCMV strains and target cells, with a potency ~20 fold higher than that of the HCMV hyperimmune globulins, currently used in transplant recipients. Recombinant human monoclonal IgG1 suitable as a prophylactic or therapeutic tool in clinical applications has been generated. Conclusion The technology described has proven to be more reproducible, efficient and rapid than previously reported techniques, and can be adopted at low overall costs by any cell biology laboratory for the development of fully human mAbs for immunotherapeutic uses. PMID:19014469

  15. Simultaneous inhibition of multiple oncogenic miRNAs by a multi-potent microRNA sponge.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaeyun; Yeom, Chanjoo; Choi, Yeon-Sook; Kim, Sinae; Lee, EunJi; Park, Min Ji; Kang, Sang Wook; Kim, Sung Bae; Chang, Suhwan

    2015-08-21

    The roles of oncogenic miRNAs are widely recognized in many cancers. Inhibition of single miRNA using antagomiR can efficiently knock-down a specific miRNA. However, the effect is transient and often results in subtle phenotype, as there are other miRNAs contribute to tumorigenesis. Here we report a multi-potent miRNA sponge inhibiting multiple miRNAs simultaneously. As a model system, we targeted miR-21, miR-155 and miR-221/222, known as oncogenic miRNAs in multiple tumors including breast and pancreatic cancers. To achieve efficient knockdown, we generated perfect and bulged-matched miRNA binding sites (MBS) and introduced multiple copies of MBS, ranging from one to five, in the multi-potent miRNA sponge. Luciferase reporter assay showed the multi-potent miRNA sponge efficiently inhibited 4 miRNAs in breast and pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, a stable and inducible version of the multi-potent miRNA sponge cell line showed the miRNA sponge efficiently reduces the level of 4 target miRNAs and increase target protein level of these oncogenic miRNAs. Finally, we showed the miRNA sponge sensitize cells to cancer drug and attenuate cell migratory activity. Altogether, our study demonstrates the multi-potent miRNA sponge is a useful tool to examine the functional impact of simultaneous inhibition of multiple miRNAs and proposes a therapeutic potential.

  16. XGFR*, a novel affinity-matured bispecific antibody targeting IGF-1R and EGFR with combined signaling inhibition and enhanced immune activation for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schanzer, Juergen M.; Wartha, Katharina; Moessner, Ekkehard; Hosse, Ralf J.; Moser, Samuel; Croasdale, Rebecca; Trochanowska, Halina; Shao, Cuiying; Wang, Peng; Shi, Lei; Weinzierl, Tina; Rieder, Natascha; Bacac, Marina; Ries, Carola H.; Kettenberger, Hubert; Schlothauer, Tilman; Friess, Thomas; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) play critical roles in tumor growth, providing a strong rationale for the combined inhibition of IGF-1R and EGFR signaling in cancer therapy. We describe the design, affinity maturation, in vitro and in vivo characterization of the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR*. XGFR* is based on the bispecific IgG antibody XGFR, which enabled heterodimerization of an IGF-1R binding scFab heavy chain with an EGFR-binding light and heavy chain by the “knobs-into-holes” technology. XGFR* is optimized for monovalent binding of human EGFR and IGF-1R with increased binding affinity for IGF-1R due to affinity maturation and highly improved protein stability to oxidative and thermal stress. It bears an afucosylated Fc-portion for optimal induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Stable Chinese hamster ovary cell clones with production yields of 2–3 g/L were generated, allowing for large scale production of the bispecific antibody. XGFR* potently inhibits EGFR- and IGF-1R-dependent receptor phosphorylation, reduces tumor cell proliferation in cells with heterogeneous levels of IGF-1R and EGFR receptor expression and induces strong ADCC in vitro. A comparison of pancreatic and colorectal cancer lines demonstrated superior responsiveness to XGFR*-mediated signaling and tumor growth inhibition in pancreatic cancers that frequently show a high degree of IGF-1R/EGFR co-expression. XGFR* showed potent anti-tumoral efficacy in the orthotopic MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic xenograft model, resulting in nearly complete tumor growth inhibition with significant number of tumor remissions. In summary, the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR* combines potent signaling and tumor growth inhibition with enhanced ADCC induction and represents a clinical development candidate for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26984378

  17. A chalcone with potent inhibiting activity against biofilm formation by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Kunthalert, Duangkamol; Baothong, Sudarat; Khetkam, Pichit; Chokchaisiri, Suwadee; Suksamrarn, Apichart

    2014-10-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), an important human respiratory pathogen, frequently causes biofilm infections. Currently, resistance of bacteria within the biofilm to conventional antimicrobials poses a major obstacle to effective medical treatment on a global scale. Novel agents that are effective against NTHi biofilm are therefore urgently required. In this study, a series of natural and synthetic chalcones with various chemical substituents were evaluated in vitro for their antibiofilm activities against strong biofilm-forming strains of NTHi. Of the test chalcones, 3-hydroxychalcone (chalcone 8) exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity, its mean minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC50 ) being 16 μg/mL (71.35 μM), or approximately sixfold more active than the reference drug, azithromycin (MBIC50 419.68 μM). The inhibitory activity of chalcone 8, which is a chemically modified chalcone, appeared to be superior to those of the natural chalcones tested. Significantly, chalcone 8 inhibited biofilm formation by all studied NTHi strains, indicating that the antibiofilm activities of this compound occur across multiple strong-biofilm forming NTHi isolates of different clinical origins. According to antimicrobial and growth curve assays, chalcone 8 at concentrations that decreased biofilm formation did not affect growth of NTHi, suggesting the biofilm inhibitory effect of chalcone 8 is non-antimicrobial. In terms of structure-activity relationship, the possible substituent on the chalcone backbone required for antibiofilm activity is discussed. These findings indicate that 3-hydroxychalcone (chalcone 8) has powerful antibiofilm activity and suggest the potential application of chalcone 8 as a new therapeutic agent for control of NTHi biofilm-associated infections.

  18. Soy extract is more potent than genistein on tumor growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-A; Jeong, Kyu-Shik; Kim, Yoo Kyeong

    2008-01-01

    Soybean and soy products have received much attention for their potential heath benefits. Recently it has been reported that the bioactivity of soy products is influenced by the degree of soy processing. This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the influence of diets containing genistein and soy extract on the growth of the estrogen-independent human breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231, implanted into female Balb/c mice. Four-week-old female athymic nude mice (Balb/c) were acclimatized to an AIN-93G control diet for one week prior to initiating the experimental diets. The animals were placed into three treatment groups, each of which was provided with containing DMSO, genistein (750 microg/g AIN-93G diet) or 0.6% soy extract (containing genistein at 750 microg/g AIN-93G diet) for three weeks from one week prior to the injection of MDA-MB-231 cells (1 x 10(6)/site) and subsequently fed on the AIN-93G control diet until sacrifice. The tumor volumes increased steeply in the control group and the genistein-treated group. However, tumor growth was significantly reduced in the soy extract-treated group compared to the control and genistein-treated groups. Immunohistochemistry of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) also revealed that the soy extract treatment effectively reduced cell proliferation of the implanted tumors. In conclusion, soy extract is more potent than genistein in the inhibition of tumor growth, presumably resulting from the synergistic effect of the various bioactive components in the soy extract.

  19. Suxiao Jiuxin Pill Induces Potent Relaxation and Inhibition on Contraction in Human Artery and the Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Ping; Yang, Qin; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; Wang, Jun; Tong, Yong-Ling; Xiong, Song-Jin; Liu, Li-Hua; Wang, Lei; He, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Suxiao Jiuxin Pill, a compound Chinese traditional medicine with main components of tetramethylpyrazine and borneol, is widely used for antiangina treatment in China but its pharmacological effect on human blood vessels is unknown. We investigated the effect and possible mechanism of SJP in the human internal mammary artery (IMA, n = 78) taken from patients undergoing coronary surgery. SJP caused full relaxation in KCl- (99.4 ± 10.5%, n = 6) and U46619- (99.9 ± 5.6%, n = 6) contracted IMA. Pretreatment of IMA with plasma concentrations of SJP (1 mg/mL), calculated from the plasma concentration of its major component borneol, significantly depressed the maximal contraction to KCl (from 35.8 ± 6.0 mN to 12.6 ± 5.6 mN, P = 0.03) and U46619 (from 19.4 ± 2.9 mN to 5.7 ± 2.4 mN, P = 0.007) while SJP at 10 mg/mL abolished the subsequent contraction. Endothelium denudation and inhibition of eNOS significantly altered the SJP-induced relaxation without changes of eNOS expression. We conclude that SJP has a potent inhibitory effect on the vasoconstriction mediated by a variety of vasoconstrictors in human arteries. The vasorelaxation involves both endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Thus, the effect of SJP on human arteries demonstrated in this study may prove to be particularly important in vasorelaxing therapy in cardiovascular disease. PMID:24808920

  20. Novel neutralizing hedgehog antibody MEDI-5304 exhibits antitumor activity by inhibiting paracrine hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Neil R; Wang, Youzhen; McEachern, Kristen A; Jordan, Jerold J; Mazzola, Anne Marie; Hernandez, Axel; Jalla, Sanjoo; Chesebrough, Jon W; Hynes, Mark J; Belmonte, Matthew A; Wang, Lidong; Kang, Jaspal S; Jovanovic, Jelena; Laing, Naomi; Jenkins, David W; Hurt, Elaine; Liang, Meina; Frantz, Christopher; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Simeone, Diane M; Blakey, David C; Bedian, Vahe

    2014-02-01

    The hedgehog pathway has been implicated in the tumorigenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis of numerous human cancers. We generated the first fully human hedgehog antibody MEDI-5304 and characterized its antitumor activity and preclinical toxicology. MEDI-5304 bound sonic hedgehog (SHH) and Indian hedgehog (IHH) with low picomolar affinity and neutralized SHH and IHH activity in cellular mGLI1 reporter assays. The antibody inhibited transcription of hedgehog target genes and osteoblast differentiation of C3H10T1/2 cells. We evaluated the activity of MEDI-5304 in vivo in model systems that allowed us to evaluate two primary hypotheses of hedgehog function in human cancer, paracrine signaling between tumor and stromal cells and cancer stem cell (CSC) self-renewal. MEDI-5304 displayed robust pharmacodynamic effects in stromal cells that translated to antitumor efficacy as a single agent in an HT-29/MEF coimplantation model of paracrine hedgehog signaling. MEDI-5304 also improved responses to carboplatin in the HT-29/MEF model. The antibody, however, had no effect as a single agent or in combination with gemcitabine on the CSC frequency or growth of several primary pancreatic cancer explant models. These findings support the conclusion that hedgehog contributes to tumor biology via paracrine tumor-stromal signaling but not via CSC maintenance or propagation. Finally, the only safety study finding associated with MEDI-5304 was ondontodysplasia in rats. Thus, MEDI-5304 represents a potent dual hedgehog inhibitor suitable for continued development to evaluate efficacy and safety in human patients with tumors harboring elevated levels of SHH or IHH.

  1. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies that strongly inhibit Electrophorus electricus acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Remy, M H; Frobert, Y; Grassi, J

    1995-08-01

    In this study, we describe three different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs Elec-403, Elec-408, and Elec-410) directed against Electrophorus electricus acetylcholinesterase (AChE) which were selected as inhibitors for this enzyme. Two of these antibodies (Elec-403 and Elec-410), recognized overlapping but different epitopes, competed with snake venom toxin fasciculin for binding to the enzyme, and thus apparently recognized the peripheral site of AChE. In addition, the binding of Elec-403 was antagonized by 1,5-bis(4-allyldimethylammoniumphenyl)pentan-3-one dibromide (BW284C51) and propidium, indicating that the corresponding epitope encompassed the anionic site involved in the binding of these low-molecular-mass inhibitors. The third mAb (Elec-408), was clearly bound to another site on the AChE molecule, and its inhibitory effect was cumulative with those of Elec-403, Elec-410, and fasciculin. All mAbs bound AChE with high affinity and were as strong inhibitors with an apparent Ki values less than 0.1 nM. Elec-403 was particularly efficient with an inhibitory activity similar to that of fasciculin. Inhibition was observed with both charged (acetylthiocholine) and neutral substrates (o-nitrophenyl acetate) and had the characteristics of a non-competitive process. Elec-403 and Elec-410 probably exert their effect by triggering allosteric transitions from the peripheral site to the active site. The epitope recognized by mAb Elec-408 has not been localized, but it may correspond to a new regulatory site on AChE.

  2. Inhibition of IGF receptor signaling and hepatoma cell growth by an antibody to ligand oligopeptide of receptor.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Diao, Zhenyu; Deng, Xiaozhao

    2008-02-01

    Research on insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system have shown it to be potent mitogen for hepatoma cells and made it an attractive therapeutic target. But little strategy has been reported to date on targeting and sequestrating IGF against hepatoma. This study is based on the capability of ligand oligopeptide (LOP) to recognize IGF receptor with high efficiency, which is over-expressed on some hepatoma cells. We have been hypothesizing that antibody to LOP would mimic the extracellular ligand-binding domain of IGF receptor and inhibit receptor signaling and cell proliferation. Gene encoding for LOP [E5 (EPFRSPDLALETYG)] of IGF receptor was inserted into HBc carrier for expression in Escherichia coli. The monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific LOP potently inhibited signal transduction mediated by the IGF-IR interaction with IGF-I. Furthermore, it exhibited 47% inhibitory rate of soft agar colony formation and also induced apoptosis. These results indicate an anti-hepatoma potential of the mAb to an LOP of IGF receptor could block the activation of receptor and downstream signaling pathways, and suppress the biological effects mediated by receptor.

  3. Nanomolecular HLA-DR10 antibody mimics: A potent system for molecular targeted therapy and imaging.

    PubMed

    DeNardo, Gerald L; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Hok, Saphon; Mirick, Gary; DeNardo, Sally J; Corzett, Michele; Sysko, Vladimir; Lehmann, Joerg; Beckett, Laurel; Balhorn, Rod

    2008-12-01

    To mimic the molecular specificity and cell selectivity of monoclonal antibody (mAb) binding while decreasing size, nanomolecules (selective high-affinity ligands; SHALs), based on in silico modeling, have been created to bind to human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR10), a signaling receptor protein upregulated on the malignant B-lymphocytes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. SHALs were synthesized with a biotin or DOTA chelate (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid), using a solid-phase lysine-polyethyleneglycol backbone to link sets of ligands shown previously to bind to HLA-DR10. Using cell-binding and death assays and confocal microscopy, SHAL uptake, residualization, and cytocidal activity were evaluated in HLA-DR10 expressing and nonexpressing live, human lymphoma cell lines. All of the SHALs tested were selective for, and accumulated in, expressing cells. Reflecting binding to HLA-DR10 inside the cells, SHALs having the Ct ligand (3-(2-([3-chloro-5-trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl]oxy)-anilino)-3-oxopropanionic acid) residualized in expressing cells greater than 179 times more than accountable by cell-surface membrane HLA-DR10. Confocal microscopy confirmed the intracellular residualization of these SHALs. Importantly, SHALs with a Ct ligand had direct cytocidal activity, similar in potency to that of Lym-1 mAb and rituximab, selectively for HLA-DR10 expressing lymphoma cells and xenografts. The results show that SHALs containing the Ct ligand residualize intracellularly and have cytocidal effects mediated by HLA-DR10. These SHALs have extraordinary potential as novel molecules for the selective targeting of lymphoma and leukemia for molecular therapy and imaging. Further, these SHALs can be used to transport and residualize cytotoxic agents near critical sites inside these malignant cells.

  4. Halogenated pyrrolopyrimidine analogues of adenosine from marine organisms: pharmacological activities and potent inhibition of adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Davies, L P; Jamieson, D D; Baird-Lambert, J A; Kazlauskas, R

    1984-02-01

    Two novel halogenated pyrrolopyrimidine analogues of adenosine, isolated from marine sources, have been examined for pharmacological and biochemical activities. 4-Amino-5-bromo-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine, from a sponge of the genus Echinodictyum, had bronchodilator activity at least as potent as theophylline but with a different biochemical profile; unlike theophylline it had no antagonist activity at CNS adenosine receptors and it was quite a potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake and adenosine kinase in brain tissue. 5'-Deoxy-5-iodotubercidin, isolated from the red alga Hypnea valentiae, caused potent muscle relaxation and hypothermia when injected into mice. This compound was a very potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake into rat and guinea-pig brain slices and an extremely potent inhibitor of adenosine kinase from guinea-pig brain and rat brain and liver. Neither of these two pyrrolopyrimidine analogues was a substrate for, or an inhibitor of, adenosine deaminase. Neither compound appeared to have any direct agonist activity on guinea-pig brain adenosine-stimulated adenylate cyclase (A2 adenosine receptors). 5'-Deoxy-5-iodotubercidin is unique in two respects: it appears to be the first naturally-occurring example of a 5'-deoxyribosyl nucleoside and is the first example of a specifically iodinated nucleoside from natural sources. It may be the most potent adenosine kinase inhibitor yet described and, by virtue of its structure, may prove to be the most specific.

  5. Viral Epitopes and Monoclonal Antibodies: Isolation of Blocking Antibodies that Inhibit Virus Neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard J.; Schochetman, Gerald

    1981-07-01

    The inability of pathogenic animal viruses to be completely neutralized by antibodies can lead to chronic viral infections in which infectious virus persists even in the presence of excess neutralizing antibody. A mechanism that results in this nonneutralized fraction of virus was defined by the topographical relationships of viral epitopes identified with monoclonal antibodies wherein monoclonal antibodies bind to virus and sterically block the binding of neutralizing antibodies.

  6. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, James C.; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F.; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F.; Damschroder, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT CD73 (ecto-5′-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states. PMID:26854859

  7. Inhibition of CD73 AMP hydrolysis by a therapeutic antibody with a dual, non-competitive mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, James C; Diedrich, Gundo; Lu, Xiaojun; Rosenthal, Kim; Sachsenmeier, Kris F; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Damschroder, Melissa M

    2016-01-01

    CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase) has recently been established as a promising immuno-oncology target. Given its role in activating purinergic signaling pathways to elicit immune suppression, antagonizing CD73 (i.e., releasing the brake) offers a complimentary pathway to inducing anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we describe the mechanistic activity of a new clinical therapeutic, MEDI9447, a human monoclonal antibody that non-competitively inhibits CD73 activity. Epitope mapping, structural, and mechanistic studies revealed that MEDI9447 antagonizes CD73 through dual mechanisms of inter-CD73 dimer crosslinking and/or steric blocking that prevent CD73 from adopting a catalytically active conformation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an antibody that inhibits an enzyme's function through 2 distinct modes of action. These results provide a finely mapped epitope that can be targeted for selective, potent, and non-competitive inhibition of CD73, as well as establish a strategy for inhibiting enzymes that function in both membrane-bound and soluble states.

  8. Comparison of growth inhibition of a human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line by free monoclonal antibodies and their corresponding antibody-recombinant ricin A chain immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Ettenson, D; Sheldon, K; Marks, A; Houston, L L; Baumal, R

    1988-01-01

    Four mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) (8C, IgG2a; M2A, IgG2a; M2D, IgG2b; 10B, IgG1) directed against the human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line HEY were compared for their ability in the free form and as immunotoxins made with recombinant ricin A chain (rRA) to inhibit the growth of HEY cells. For in vitro studies cultured HEY cells were assayed for protein synthesis and plated in agarose to form colonies, and for in vivo studies they were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into BALB/c nu/nu (nude) mice at a challenge dose (3 X 10(5) cells) which produced carcinomatosis with ascites, leading to death 30 days following injection. In the free form, mAB 8C was the most potent in inhibiting colony formation in the complement (C)-mediated and ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytoxicity) assays in vitro. This mAb was also the only one capable of prolonging survival of mice, both in tumor cell neutralization, and tumor growth inhibition experiments. The four mAb-rRA immunotoxins were effective in inhibiting protein synthesis in vitro in the presence of 10(-7) M monensin. However, in vivo, only 8C-rRA and M2A-rRA were capable of prolonging survival of mice in tumor growth inhibition experiments. Our results suggest that mAb 8C might be useful in the free form and as an 8C-rRA immunotoxin for i.p. immunotherapy of ovarian cancer.

  9. Potent inhibition of monoamine oxidase A by decursin from Angelica gigas Nakai and by wogonin from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Woo; Ryu, Hyung Won; Kang, Myung-Gyun; Park, Daeui; Lee, Hanna; Shin, Heung Mook; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Kim, Hoon

    2017-04-01

    During the ongoing search for new monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, five coumarin derivatives and eight flavonoids were isolated from the roots of Angelica gigas Nakai and Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, respectively. Of the phytochemicals, decursin (4) was found to potently and selectively inhibit human MAO-A (IC50=1.89μM). The IC50 value of 4 for MAO-A belonged to the lowest group in herbal sources and was similar to that of toloxatone (1.78μM), a marketed drug. Wogonin (11) effectively inhibited MAO-A and MAO-B (IC50=6.35 and 20.8μM, respectively). Furthermore, compounds 5 (decursinol angelate) and 10 (baicalein) were observed to selectively and moderately inhibit MAO-A. In addition, compound 4 reversibly and competitively inhibited MAO-A with a Ki of 0.17μM. Compound 11 also competitively inhibited MAO-A and MAO-B (Ki=0.56 and 1.96μM, respectively). Molecular docking simulation revealed that 4 interacts with Asn181 residue of MAO-A or Asn116 residue of MAO-B by formation of hydrogen bond. The findings suggest compounds 4 and 11 be considered as new potent and reversible MAO-A inhibitors or useful lead compounds for the developments of MAO inhibitors for the treatment of disorders like depression, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Potent inhibition of telomerase by small-molecule pentacyclic acridines capable of interacting with G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Gowan, S M; Heald, R; Stevens, M F; Kelland, L R

    2001-11-01

    A novel pentacyclic acridine, 3,11-difluoro-6,8,13-trimethyl-8H-quino[4,3,2-kl]acridinium methosulfate (RHPS4), has been identified as a potent inhibitor of telomerase in the cell-free telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP). Modeling and biophysical studies suggest that RHPS4 inhibits telomerase through stabilization of four-stranded G-quadruplex structures formed by single-stranded telomeric DNA. In contrast to G-quadruplex interactive telomerase inhibitors described previously, RHPS4 inhibited telomerase at submicromolar levels (50% inhibition in the TRAP assay at 0.33 +/- 0.13 microM). Moreover, RHPS4 exhibited a wide differential between this potent inhibition of telomerase and acute cellular cytotoxicity (mean IC(50) value of 7.02 microM in 4-day growth inhibition assay). RHPS4, when added to 21NT breast cancer cells at nonacute cytotoxic concentrations (200 nM) every 3 to 4 days, induced a marked cessation in cell growth after 15 days. Similar effects were observed using another cell line possessing relatively short telomeres, A431 human vulval carcinoma cells, but not in a human ovarian carcinoma cell line (SKOV-3) possessing relatively long telomeres. In 21NT cells, growth cessation was accompanied by an increase in cells in the G(2)/M phase of the cell cycle, a reduction in cellular telomerase activity, and a lower expression of the hTERT gene. These effects occurred in the absence of a detectable reduction in telomere length as measured by slot blotting. RHPS4 also induced a cessation of growth of GM847 cells that maintain telomeres by a nontelomerase alternative mechanism for lengthening telomeres (ALT) after 15 days. RHPS4 represents a promising G-quadruplex interactive small molecule that is a potent cell-free inhibitor of human telomerase and induces growth inhibitory effects in human tumor cell lines after prolonged (2-week) exposure to nonacute cytotoxic drug concentrations.

  11. Chemical or genetic Pin1 inhibition exerts potent anticancer activity against hepatocellular carcinoma by blocking multiple cancer-driving pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Arina Li; Zheng, Min; Li, Mei-Qing; Chen, Champ Peng; Xu, Huijuan; Chu, Qing-Song; Yang, Dayun; Lu, Wenxian; Tsai, Ting-Fen; Liu, Hekun; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Lu, Kun Ping

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most prevalent and malignant cancers with high inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity. A central common signaling mechanism in cancer is proline-directed phosphorylation, which is further regulated by the unique proline isomerase Pin1. Pin1 is prevalently overexpressed in human cancers including ~70% of HCC, and promotes tumorigenesis by activating multiple cancer-driving pathways. However, it was challenging to evaluate the significance of targeting Pin1 in cancer treatment until the recent identification of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) as a Pin1 inhibitor. Here we systematically investigate functions of Pin1 and its inhibitor ATRA in the development and treatment of HCC. Pin1 knockdown potently inhibited HCC cell proliferation and tumor growth in mice. ATRA-induced Pin1 degradation inhibited the growth of HCC cells, although at a higher IC50 as compared with breast cancer cells, likely due to more active ATRA metabolism in liver cells. Indeed, inhibition of ATRA metabolism enhanced the sensitivity of HCC cells to ATRA. Moreover, slow-releasing ATRA potently and dose-dependently inhibited HCC growth in mice. Finally, chemical or genetic Pin1 ablation blocked multiple cancer-driving pathways simultaneously in HCC cells. Thus, targeting Pin1 offers a promising therapeutic approach to simultaneously stop multiple cancer-driving pathways in HCC. PMID:28262728

  12. Artemisinin-derived dimer ART-838 potently inhibited human acute leukemias, persisted in vivo, and synergized with antileukemic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer M.; Moynihan, James R.; Mott, Bryan T.; Mazzone, Jennifer R.; Anders, Nicole M.; Brown, Patrick A.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Liu, Jun O.; Arav-Boger, Ravit; Posner, Gary H.

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinins, endoperoxide-containing molecules, best known as antimalarials, have potent antineoplastic activity. The established antimalarial, artesunate (AS), and the novel artemisinin-derived trioxane diphenylphosphate dimer 838 (ART-838) inhibited growth of all 23 tested acute leukemia cell lines, reduced cell proliferation and clonogenicity, induced apoptosis, and increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ART-838 was 88-fold more potent that AS in vitro, inhibiting all leukemia cell lines at submicromolar concentrations. Both ART-838 and AS cooperated with several established antileukemic drugs and newer kinase inhibitors to inhibit leukemia cell growth. ART-838 had a longer plasma half-life than AS in immunodeficient NOD-SCID-IL2Rgnull (NSG) mice, remaining at effective antileukemic concentrations for >8h. Intermittent cycles of ART-838 inhibited growth of acute leukemia xenografts and primagrafts in NSG mice, at higher potency than AS. Based on these preclinical data, we propose that AS, with its established low toxicity and low cost, and ART-838, with its higher potency and longer persistence in vivo, should be further developed toward integration into antileukemic regimens. PMID:26771236

  13. Artemisinin-derived dimer ART-838 potently inhibited human acute leukemias, persisted in vivo, and synergized with antileukemic drugs.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jennifer M; Moynihan, James R; Mott, Bryan T; Mazzone, Jennifer R; Anders, Nicole M; Brown, Patrick A; Rudek, Michelle A; Liu, Jun O; Arav-Boger, Ravit; Posner, Gary H; Civin, Curt I; Chen, Xiaochun

    2016-02-09

    Artemisinins, endoperoxide-containing molecules, best known as antimalarials, have potent antineoplastic activity. The established antimalarial, artesunate (AS), and the novel artemisinin-derived trioxane diphenylphosphate dimer 838 (ART-838) inhibited growth of all 23 tested acute leukemia cell lines, reduced cell proliferation and clonogenicity, induced apoptosis, and increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ART-838 was 88-fold more potent that AS in vitro, inhibiting all leukemia cell lines at submicromolar concentrations. Both ART-838 and AS cooperated with several established antileukemic drugs and newer kinase inhibitors to inhibit leukemia cell growth. ART-838 had a longer plasma half-life than AS in immunodeficient NOD-SCID-IL2Rgnull (NSG) mice, remaining at effective antileukemic concentrations for >8h. Intermittent cycles of ART-838 inhibited growth of acute leukemia xenografts and primagrafts in NSG mice, at higher potency than AS. Based on these preclinical data, we propose that AS, with its established low toxicity and low cost, and ART-838, with its higher potency and longer persistence in vivo, should be further developed toward integration into antileukemic regimens.

  14. The potent inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor ONO-1714 inhibits neuronal NOS and exerts antinociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Mita, Yoko; Kamanaka, Yoshihisa; Kawao, Naoyuki; Matsuya, Hidekazu; Taga, Chiyomi; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2004-07-22

    We evaluated if ONO-1714, known as an inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, could inhibit neuronal NOS (nNOS) and exert antinociception. ONO-1714 potently inhibited both crude rat cerebellar NOS and recombinant human nNOS in vitro. Systemic ONO-1714 at 1-10 mg/kg suppressed carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia in rats, an effect being equivalent to the antinociception caused by L-NAME or 7-nitroindazole at 25 mg/kg. The same doses of ONO-1714 also caused hypertension. Intrathecal (i.t.) ONO-1714 potently reduced the hyperalgesia, the effective dose range (0.2-0.6 microg/rat) being much lower than the antinociceptive dose (150 microg/rat) of i.t. L-NAME. Thus, ONO-1714 is considered a potent inhibitor of nNOS in addition to iNOS. The distinct relative antinociceptive activities of systemic and i.t. ONO-1714 are attributable to its possible poor blood-brain barrier permeability.

  15. Neutralizing Antibodies Induced by Recombinant Virus-Like Particles of Enterovirus 71 Genotype C4 Inhibit Infection at Pre- and Post-attachment Steps

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Zhiqiang; Ye, Xiaohua; Huang, Xulin; Cai, Yicun; Liu, Qingwei; Li, Yan; Su, Zhiguo; Huang, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease, which has been prevalent in Asia–Pacific regions, causing significant morbidity and mortality in young children. Antibodies elicited by experimental EV71 vaccines could neutralize infection in vitro and passively protect animal models from lethal challenge, indicating that neutralizing antibodies play an essential role in protection. However, how neutralizing antibodies inhibit infection in vitro remains unclear. Methods/Findings In the present study, we explored the mechanisms of neutralization by antibodies against EV71 virus-like particles (VLPs). Recombinant VLPs of EV71 genotype C4 were produced in insect cells using baculovirus vectors. Immunization with the VLPs elicited a high-titer, EV71-specific antibody response in mice. Anti-VLP mouse sera potently neutralized EV71 infection in vitro. The neutralizing antibodies in the anti-VLP mouse sera were found to target mainly an extremely conserved epitope (FGEHKQEKDLEYGAC) located at the GH loop of the VP1 protein. The neutralizing anti-VLP antisera were able to inhibit virus binding to target cells efficiently. In addition, post-attachment treatment of virus-bound cells with the anti-VLP antisera also neutralized virus infection, although the antibody concentration required was higher than that of the pre-attachment treatment. Conclusions Collectively, our findings represent a valuable addition to the understanding of mechanisms of EV71 neutralization and have strong implications for EV71 vaccine development. PMID:23451250

  16. Inhibition and Reversal of Microbial Attachment by an Antibody with Parasteric Activity against the FimH Adhesin of Uropathogenic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Della; Jalan, Aachal; Gupta, Shivani; Interlandi, Gianluca; Liu, Yan; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Rodriguez, Victoria B.; Sumida, John P.; Strong, Roland K.; Wu, Xue-Ru; Thomas, Wendy E.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2015-01-01

    Attachment proteins from the surface of eukaryotic cells, bacteria and viruses are critical receptors in cell adhesion or signaling and are primary targets for the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. It is proposed that the ligand-binding pocket in receptor proteins can shift between inactive and active conformations with weak and strong ligand-binding capability, respectively. Here, using monoclonal antibodies against a vaccine target protein - fimbrial adhesin FimH of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, we demonstrate that unusually strong receptor inhibition can be achieved by antibody that binds within the binding pocket and displaces the ligand in a non-competitive way. The non-competitive antibody binds to a loop that interacts with the ligand in the active conformation of the pocket but is shifted away from ligand in the inactive conformation. We refer to this as a parasteric inhibition, where the inhibitor binds adjacent to the ligand in the binding pocket. We showed that the receptor-blocking mechanism of parasteric antibody differs from that of orthosteric inhibition, where the inhibitor replaces the ligand or allosteric inhibition where the inhibitor binds at a site distant from the ligand, and is very potent in blocking bacterial adhesion, dissolving surface-adherent biofilms and protecting mice from urinary bladder infection. PMID:25974133

  17. Inhibition of breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) in human myeloid dendritic cells induces potent tolerogenic functions during LPS stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jun-O; Zhang, Wei; Wong, Ka-Wing; Kwak, Minseok; van Driel, Ian R; Yu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2), a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporters has been identified as a major determinant of multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells, but ABC transporter inhibition has limited therapeutic value in vivo. In this research, we demonstrated that inhibition of efflux transporters ABCG2 induced the generation of tolerogenic DCs from human peripheral blood myeloid DCs (mDCs). ABCG2 expression was present in mDCs and was further increased by LPS stimulation. Treatment of CD1c+ mDCs with an ABCG2 inhibitor, Ko143, during LPS stimulation caused increased production of IL-10 and decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased expression of CD83 and CD86. Moreover, inhibition of ABCG2 in monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) abrogated the up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells in response to LPS. Furthermore, CD1c+ mDCs stimulated with LPS plus Ko143 inhibited the proliferation of allogeneic and superantigen-specific syngenic CD4+ T cells and promoted expansion of CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells in an IL-10-dependent fashion. These tolerogenic effects of ABCG2 inhibition could be abolished by ERK inhibition. Thus, we demonstrated that inhibition of ABCG2 in LPS-stimulated mDCs can potently induce tolerogenic potentials in these cells, providing crucial new information that could lead to development of better strategies to combat MDR cancer.

  18. Inhibition of bactericidal activity of anticapsular antibody by nonspecific antibodies reactive with surface-exposed antigenic determinants on Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Udeze, F A; Kadis, S

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the mechanism of serum resistance in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, in the present study we examined various interactions among the bacterial surface constituents, serum antibodies, and complement. Analysis of swine sera revealed the presence of anticapsular antibodies in convalescent-phase sera but not in preimmune sera. Both types of sera contained antibodies which reacted with each of 14 polypeptides present in saline extracts of the bacteria. Absorption of the preimmune sera with intact bacteria depleted antibodies to two of the polypeptides (27 and 32 kDa) and high-molecular-weight (greater than 97.4,000) components which did not stain with Coomassie blue. Data derived from complement consumption and C3-binding experiments indicated that the organism was capable of initiating complement activation and binding C3 during incubation in preimmune and immune sera. Experiments designed to evaluate the bactericidal effectiveness of anticapsular antibody revealed that the purified antibody was bactericidal only when preimmune sera absorbed with intact bacteria were used as a source of complement. The bactericidal effects of anticapsular antibody and absorbed preimmune sera were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by heat-inactivated preimmune sera and immunoglobulin G derived from the sera. The inhibitory activity of the preimmune sera was neutralized by preincubating the sera with column fractions of the saline extract which contained either the 27- or the 32-kDa polypeptide. These results indicate that serum resistance in A. pleuropneumoniae 4074 could be related to inhibition of the bactericidal action of anticapsular antibody by nonspecific antibodies which recognize surface-exposed epitopes on the polypeptides. Images PMID:1379990

  19. Novel and potent inhibitors of fatty acid synthase derived from catechins and their inhibition on MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Yan; Ma, Xiao-Feng; Zheng, Chao-Gu; Wang, Yan; Cao, Xue-Li; Tian, Wei-Xi

    2009-06-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a potential target for cancer, but potent inhibitors against FAS are scarce. In this study, we found that activities of catechins on inhibiting FAS increased greatly by heating them in acid. The enhancement was positively correlated to H(+) concentration. The inhibitory activities of the final products from different catechins were similar, all of which were less than 1 microg/mL. The product from (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) was stable at room temperature, and its inhibitory kinetics and reacting sites on FAS were obviously different from the known FAS inhibitors. It also affected the viability of MCF-7 cells more obviously than EGCG. A putative route of the reaction progress was proposed and the effective inhibitors were deduced to be oligomers of 2-hydroxy-3-(3', 4', 5'-trihydroxyphenyl) propenoic acid by analysis of their spectra. The work affords new and potent FAS inhibitors that would be promising candidates for the treatment of cancer.

  20. Potent inhibition of HIV type 1 infection of mononuclear phagocytes by synthetic peptide analogs of HIV type 1 protease substrates.

    PubMed

    Dukes, C S; Matthews, T J; Lambert, D M; Dreyer, G B; Petteway, S R; Weinberg, J B

    1996-06-10

    The HIV-1 genome encodes a protease that is required for viral processing of the precursor polyproteins Pr55gag and Pr160gag-pol. Interference with this process in human lymphocytes inhibits production of infectious virus. We tested the ability of several protease inhibitors to decrease replication of HIV-1BaL in human monocytes and peritoneal macrophages. The compounds tested are oligopeptide analogs of HIV-1 protease substrates in which the scissile dipeptide has been replaced by a hydroxyethylene isostere. The protease inhibitors were added only once, 1 hr prior to inoculation with virus. Every 3-5 days, half the medium was replaced with fresh medium. Inhibition of virus production was assessed by measuring reverse transcriptase (RT) activity in supernatant medium 14 days after infection. The concentration of drug required to inhibit infection by 50% (IC50) in monocytes ranged from 0.17 to 2.99 microM; IC50 values for peritoneal macrophages ranged from 0.21 to 1.9 microM. The IC50 values for these compounds were 1.1- to 10-fold higher when tested in monocytes compared to their inhibitory effect in lymphocytes, although still potently effective in the dosage range that appeared nontoxic to cells. Cell toxicity was seen only at concentrations greater than 10 microM, and varied among the drugs tested. Immunoblot analysis of two of the drugs (SB205700 and SB108922) confirmed inhibition of polyprotein processing. In control cells, 22% of viral protein pr55 was processed to p24 by 24 hr, and 51% was processed by 48 hr. In cells treated with the protease inhibitors (2 microM), Pr55 processing was inhibited 77% at 24 hr and 89% at 48 hr. Thus, these synthetic peptide analogs potently inhibit productive infection of mononuclear phagocytes by HIV-1. Drugs of this class may be useful for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in humans.

  1. Targeted In Vivo Inhibition of Specific Protein–Protein Interactions Using Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zábrady, Matej; Hrdinová, Vendula; Müller, Bruno; Conrad, Udo; Hejátko, Jan; Janda, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    With the growing availability of genomic sequence information, there is an increasing need for gene function analysis. Antibody-mediated “silencing” represents an intriguing alternative for the precise inhibition of a particular function of biomolecules. Here, we describe a method for selecting recombinant antibodies with a specific purpose in mind, which is to inhibit intrinsic protein–protein interactions in the cytosol of plant cells. Experimental procedures were designed for conveniently evaluating desired properties of recombinant antibodies in consecutive steps. Our selection method was successfully used to develop a recombinant antibody inhibiting the interaction of ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE PHOSPHOTRANSFER PROTEIN 3 with such of its upstream interaction partners as the receiver domain of CYTOKININ INDEPENDENT HISTIDINE KINASE 1. The specific down-regulation of the cytokinin signaling pathway in vivo demonstrates the validity of our approach. This selection method can serve as a prototype for developing unique recombinant antibodies able to interfere with virtually any biomolecule in the living cell. PMID:25299686

  2. Newcastle disease viruses in birds in the Atlantic flyway: isolations, haemagglutination-inhibition and elution-inhibition antibody profiles.

    PubMed

    Graves, I L

    1996-01-01

    The study involved 15 avian species with 5,012 attempts to isolate Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) from their faeces over a three-year period (1977-1979). NDV were isolated from asymptomatic adult Canada geese, nestling Royal terms, a juvenile European Mute swan, and adult Tundra swans on the Eastern flyway. Ring-billed gulls were negative for haemagglutination-inhibition (HI), elution-inhibition (EI) (anti-neuraminidase) antibodies, and NDV despite 3,403 isolation attempts. The EI antibody assay used a strain isolated from a Mute swan. The prevalence of EI antibodies in the swan and geese ranged from 3-41%, while the geometric mean titre (GMT) varied from 20-36. The prevalence of HI antibodies in the swans and geese ranged from 4-62%, while the GMT varied from 16-42. In each of three years (1977-1979), the adult Mute swans had a higher HI antibody prevalence than the juveniles (P < 0.01). Among the Mute swans the HI and EI assays detected serologic conversions and persistent antibodies over the three-year period. The HI and EI assays were effective in showing differences in antibody prevalences in populations of feral birds of different species and age. The EI assay is applicable for population studies of the anti-neuraminidase antibody.

  3. An Anti-Human Lutheran Glycoprotein Phage Antibody Inhibits Cell Migration on Laminin-511: Epitope Mapping of the Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto-Okawa, Yurie; Maeda, Yuka; Harashima, Nozomi; Sugawara, Yumika; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Hozumi, Kentaro; Hui, Kam Man; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Ito, Yuji; Kikkawa, Yamato

    2017-01-01

    The Lutheran glycoprotein (Lu), also known as basal cell adhesion molecule (B-CAM), is an Ig superfamily (IgSF) transmembrane receptor for laminin α5. Although Lu is not present in normal hepatocytes, its expression is significantly increased in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we isolated thirteen phage antibodies to Lu from a phage library of peripheral blood from HCC patients, suggesting that these patients produced autoantibodies against endogenous Lu. To characterize the phage antibodies, we determined the Lu domains they recognize. The extracellular domain of Lu contains five IgSF domains, D1-D2-D3-D4-D5. The epitope of one phage antibody (A7) was localized to the D5 domain. The other phage antibodies recognized the D2 domain, which is also recognized by a function blocking mouse monoclonal antibody. One of the antibodies to D2 (C7) inhibited the binding of Lu to ligand, and it also prevented tumor cell migration on laminin-511 (LM-511). However, the C7 scFv purified from the periplasm fraction of bacteria did not exhibit the inhibitory effects, indicating that the scFv form could not sterically inhibit the binding of Lu to LM-511. We also identified the amino acid residues that form the epitope recognized by the C7 phage antibody. Mutagenesis studies showed that Arg247 is necessary for forming the epitope. The C7 phage antibody and its epitope may be useful for developing drugs to prevent HCC progression and/or metastasis. PMID:28060819

  4. Frequent Use of the IgA Isotype in Human B Cells Encoding Potent Norovirus-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies That Block HBGA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Shanker, Sreejesh; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) are the most common cause of non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis and cause local outbreaks of illness, especially in confined situations. Despite being identified four decades ago, the correlates of protection against norovirus gastroenteritis are still being elucidated. Recent studies have shown an association of protection with NoV-specific serum histo-blood group antigen-blocking antibody and with serum IgA in patients vaccinated with NoV VLPs. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of human monoclonal IgG and IgA antibodies against a GI.I NoV, Norwalk virus (NV). A higher proportion of the IgA antibodies blocked NV VLP binding to glycans than did IgG antibodies. We generated isotype-switched variants of IgG and IgA antibodies to study the effects of the constant domain on blocking and binding activities. The IgA form of antibodies appears to be more potent than the IgG form in blocking norovirus binding to histo-blood group antigens. These studies suggest a unique role for IgA antibodies in protection from NoV infections by blocking attachment to cell receptors. PMID:27355511

  5. Core-Scaffold-Inspired Asymmetric Synthesis of Polysubstituted Chiral Hexahydropyridazines that Potently Inhibit Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation by Inducing Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Leng, Hai-Jun; Peng, Fu; Zingales, Sarah; Huang, Wei; Wang, Biao; Zhao, Qian; Zhou, Rui; He, Gu; Peng, Cheng; Han, Bo

    2015-12-07

    The highly enantioselective preparation of pharmacologically interesting hexahydropyridazine derivatives based on a multicomponent cascade reaction is described. This one-pot approach utilizes an organocatalytic Michael reaction followed by intermolecular α-amination and intramolecular hemiaminalization to yield a chiral pyridazine backbone with contiguous stereogenic centers and multiple functional groups in good yield and with high stereoselectivity. Compounds synthesized by this method potently inhibited proliferation of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Mechanistic studies suggest that compound 5 c exerts these anticancer effects by inducing apoptosis through extracellular signal related kinase (ERK)- and poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase (PARP)-regulated pathways, as well as mitochondrial pathways.

  6. The anti-erbB3 antibody MM-121/SAR256212 in combination with trastuzumab exerts potent antitumor activity against trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Elevated expression of erbB3 receptor has been reported to induce resistance to therapeutic agents, including trastuzumab in erbB2-overexpressing breast cancer. Our recent studies indicate that erbB3 interacts with both erbB2 and IGF-1 receptor to form a heterotrimeric complex in trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer cells. Herein, we investigate the antitumor activity of MM-121/SAR256212, a fully human anti-erbB3 antibody (Ab), against two erbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cell lines resistant to trastuzumab. Methods MTS-based proliferation assays were used to determine cell viability upon treatment of trastuzumab and/or MM-121/SAR256212. Cell cycle progression was examined by flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analyses were performed to determine the expression and activation of proteins. Tumor xenografts were established by inoculation of the trastuzumab-resistant BT474-HR20 cells into nude mice. The tumor-bearing mice were treated with trastuzumab and/or MM-121/SAR256212 via i.p injection to determine the Abs’ antitumor activity. Immunohistochemical analyses were carried out to study the Abs’ inhibitory effects on tumor cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in vivo. Results MM-121 significantly enhanced trastuzumab-induced growth inhibition in two sensitive and two resistant breast cancer cell lines. MM-121 in combination with trastuzumab resulted in a dramatic reduction of phosphorylated erbB3 (P-erbB3) and Akt (P-Akt) in the in vitro studies. MM-121 combined with trastuzumab did not induce apoptosis in the trastuzumab-resistant cell lines under our cell culture condition, rather induced cell cycle G1 arrest mainly associated with the upregulation of p27kip1. Interestingly, in the tumor xenograft model established from the trastuzumab-resistant cells, MM-121 in combination with trastuzumab as compared to either agent alone dramatically inhibited tumor growth correlated with a significant reduction of Ki67 staining and increase of

  7. CCR7 expressing mesenchymal stem cells potently inhibit graft-versus-host disease by spoiling the fourth supplemental Billingham's tenet.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Jiang, Yan-Ming; Sun, Yan-Feng; Li, Ping; Dang, Rui-Jie; Ning, Hong-Mei; Li, Yu-Hang; Zhang, Ying-Jie; Jiang, Xiao-Xia; Guo, Xi-Min; Wen, Ning; Han, Yan; Mao, Ning; Chen, Hu; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The clinical acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD)-therapy of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is not as satisfactory as expected. Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are the major niches serve to initiate immune responses or induce tolerance. Our previous study showed that CCR7 guide murine MSC line C3H10T1/2 migrating to SLOs. In this study, CCR7 gene was engineered into murine MSCs by lentivirus transfection system (MSCs/CCR7). The immunomodulatory mechanism of MSCs/CCR7 was further investigated. Provoked by inflammatory cytokines, MSCs/CCR7 increased the secretion of nitric oxide and calmed down the T cell immune response in vitro. Immunofluorescent staining results showed that transfused MSCs/CCR7 can migrate to and relocate at the appropriate T cell-rich zones within SLOs in vivo. MSCs/CCR7 displayed enhanced effect in prolonging the survival and alleviating the clinical scores of the GvHD mice than normal MSCs. Owing to the critical relocation sites, MSCs/CCR7 co-infusion potently made the T cells in SLOs more naïve like, thus control T cells trafficking from SLOs to the target organs. Through spoiling the fourth supplemental Billingham's tenet, MSCs/CCR7 potently inhibited the development of GvHD. The study here provides a novel therapeutic strategy of MSCs/CCR7 infusion at a low dosage to give potent immunomodulatory effect for clinical immune disease therapy.

  8. Antibody-mediated inhibition of ricin toxin retrograde transport.

    PubMed

    Yermakova, Anastasiya; Klokk, Tove Irene; Cole, Richard; Sandvig, Kirsten; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-04-08

    Ricin is a member of the ubiquitous family of plant and bacterial AB toxins that gain entry into the cytosol of host cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and retrograde traffic through the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). While a few ricin toxin-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been identified, the mechanisms by which these antibodies prevent toxin-induced cell death are largely unknown. Using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and a TGN-specific sulfation assay, we demonstrate that 24B11, a MAb against ricin's binding subunit (RTB), associates with ricin in solution or when prebound to cell surfaces and then markedly enhances toxin uptake into host cells. Following endocytosis, however, toxin-antibody complexes failed to reach the TGN; instead, they were shunted to Rab7-positive late endosomes and LAMP-1-positive lysosomes. Monovalent 24B11 Fab fragments also interfered with toxin retrograde transport, indicating that neither cross-linking of membrane glycoproteins/glycolipids nor the recently identified intracellular Fc receptor is required to derail ricin en route to the TGN. Identification of the mechanism(s) by which antibodies like 24B11 neutralize ricin will advance our fundamental understanding of protein trafficking in mammalian cells and may lead to the discovery of new classes of toxin inhibitors and therapeutics for biodefense and emerging infectious diseases. IMPORTANCE Ricin is the prototypic member of the AB family of medically important plant and bacterial toxins that includes cholera and Shiga toxins. Ricin is also a category B biothreat agent. Despite ongoing efforts to develop vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics against ricin, very little is known about the mechanisms by which antibodies neutralize this toxin. In general, it is thought that antibodies simply prevent toxins from attaching to cell surface receptors or promote their clearance through Fc receptor (FcR)-mediated uptake

  9. Inhibition of CXCR4 by LY2624587, a Fully Humanized Anti-CXCR4 Antibody Induces Apoptosis of Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Sheng-Bin; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Paul, Donald; Kays, Lisa M.; Ye, Ming; Vaillancourt, Peter; Dowless, Michele; Stancato, Louis F.; Stewart, Julie; Uhlik, Mark T.; Long, Haiyan; Chu, Shaoyou; Obungu, Victor H.

    2016-01-01

    SDF-1 and CXCR4 are a chemokine and chemokine receptor pair playing critical roles in tumorigenesis. Overexpression of CXCR4 is a hallmark of many hematological malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and generally correlates with a poor prognosis. In this study, we developed a humanized anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody, LY2624587 as a potent CXCR4 antagonist that was advanced into clinical study for cancer. LY2624587 blocked SDF-1 binding to CXCR4 with an IC50 of 0.26 nM, and inhibited SDF-1-induced GTP binding with a Kb of 0.66 nM. In human lymphoma U937 and leukemia CCRF-CEM cells expressing endogenous CXCR4, LY2624587 inhibited SDF-1-induced cell migration with IC50 values of 3.7 and 0.26 nM, respectively. This antibody also inhibited CXCR4 and SDF-1 mediated cell signaling including activation of MAPK and AKT in tumor cells expressing CXCR4. Bifocal microscopic and flow cytometry analyses revealed that LY2624587 mediated receptor internalization and caused CXCR4 down-regulation on the cell surface. In human hematologic cancer cells, LY2624587 caused dose dependent apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. In mouse xenograft models developed with human leukemia and lymphoma cells expressing high levels of CXCR4, LY2624587 exhibited dose-dependent tumor growth inhibition and provided significant survival benefit in a disseminated lymphoma model. Collectively, we have demonstrated that CXCR4 inhibition by LY2624587 has the potential for the treatment of human hematological malignancies. PMID:26954567

  10. Potent and Selective Inhibition of the Open-Channel Conformation of AMPA Receptors by an RNA Aptamer†

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhen; Han, Yan; Wang, Congzhou; Niu, Li

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitors of AMPA receptors are useful as biochemical probes for structure-function studies and as drug candidates for a number of neurological disorders and diseases. Here we report the identification of an RNA inhibitor or aptamer by an in vitro evolution approach. Using a laser-pulse photolysis technique, we further characterized the mechanism of inhibition of this aptamer on the AMPA receptor channel-opening rate process in the microsecond-to-millisecond time domain. Our results show that the aptamer we isolated is a noncompetitive inhibitor that selectively inhibits the open-channel conformation of AMPA receptors with nanomolar affinity. The potency and the selectivity of this noncompetitive aptamer rival those of small molecule inhibitors. Our results therefore demonstrate the utility of this approach to develop water-soluble, highly potent and conformation-selective noncompetitive inhibitors of AMPA receptors. PMID:20518485

  11. Insulin Action is Blocked by a Monoclonal Antibody That Inhibits the Insulin Receptor Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, David O.; Ho, Lisa; Korn, Laurence J.; Roth, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor were produced. Thirty-four bound the intracellular domain of the receptor β subunit, the domain containing the tyrosine-specific kinase activity. Of these 34 antibodies, 33 recognized the rat receptor and 1 was shown to precipitate the receptors from mice, chickens, and frogs with high affinity. Another of the antibodies inhibited the kinase activities of the human and frog receptors with equal potencies. This antibody inhibited the kinase activities of these receptors by more than 90%, whereas others had no effect on either kinase activity. Microinjection of the inhibiting antibody into Xenopus oocytes blocked the ability of insulin to stimulate oocyte maturation. In contrast, this inhibiting antibody did not block the ability of progesterone to stimulate the same response. Furthermore, control immunoglobulin and a noninhibiting antibody to the receptor β subunit did not block this response to insulin. These results strongly support a role for the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor in mediating this biological effect of insulin.

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies to the Apical Chloride Channel in Necturus Gallbladder Inhibit the Chloride Conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Arthur L.; Tsai, Lih-Min; Falk, Ronald J.

    1989-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies raised by injecting Necturus gallbladder cells into mice were tested for their ability to inhibit the apical chloride conductance induced by elevation of cellular cAMP. Five of these monoclonal antibodies bound to the apical cells, as shown by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and inhibited the chloride conductance; one antibody that bound only to subepithelial smooth muscle, by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, showed no inhibition of chloride transport. The channel or a closely related molecule is present in the membrane whether or not the pathway is open, since, in addition to inhibiting the conductance of the open channel, the antibody also bound to the membrane in the resting state and prevented subsequent opening of the channel. The antibody was shown to recognize, by ELISA, epitopes from the Necturus gallbladder and small intestine. Finally, by Western blot analysis of Necturus gallbladder homogenates, the antibody was shown to recognize two protein bands of Mr 219,000 and Mr 69,000. This antibody should permit isolation and characterization of this important ion channel.

  13. Insulin action is blocked by a monoclonal antibody that inhibits insulin receptor kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.O.; Ho, L.; Korn, L.J.; Roth, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six monoclonal antibodies to the human insulin receptor were produced. Thirty-four bound the intracellular domain of the receptor ..beta.. subunit, the domain containing the tyrosine-specific kinase activity. Of these 34 antibodies, 33 recognized the rat receptor and 1 was shown to precipitate the receptors from mice, chickens and frogs with high affinity. Another of the antibodies inhibited the kinase activities of the human and frog receptors with equal potencies. This antibody inhibited the kinase activities of these receptors by more than 90%, whereas others had no effect on either kinase activity. Microinjection of the inhibiting antibody into Xenopus oocytes blocked the ability of insulin to stimulate oocyte maturation. In contrast, this inhibiting antibody did not block the ability of progesterone to stimulate the same response. Furthermore, control immunoglobulin and a noninhibiting antibody to the receptor ..beta.. subunit did not block this response to insulin. These results strongly support a role for the tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor in mediating this biological effect of insulin.

  14. Antibodies against dengue virus E protein peptide bind to human plasminogen and inhibit plasmin activity

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, Y H; CHANG, B I; LEI, H Y; LIU, H S; LIU†, C C; WU, H L; YEH, T M

    1997-01-01

    Both mice and rabbits immunized with dengue virus E protein peptide spanning amino acids 100–119 (D4E) produced antibodies that reacted not only with the D4E peptide itself but also with human plasminogen, as shown by ELISA and Western blot. Sera from dengue virus-hyperimmunized mice and dengue patients also contained antibodies against D4E and plasminogen. Furthermore, such sera all contained plasmin inhibitory activity. Using affinity-purified anti-D4E antibodies and free D4E peptide for competitive inhibition, we demonstrated that the inhibition of plasmin activity was due to anti-D4E antibodies rather than other substances in the sera. Taken together, these results suggest dengue virus E protein amino acids 100–119 are a cross-reactive immunogenic region, and antibodies against this region may interfere with human fibrinolysis. PMID:9353146

  15. Potent inhibition of alcohol self-administration in alcohol-preferring rats by a κ-opioid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Cashman, John R; Azar, Marc R

    2014-07-01

    A substituted aryl amide derivative of 6-naltrexamine--17-cyclopropylmethyl-3,14β-dihydroxy-4,5α-epoxy-6β-[(4'-trimethylfluoro)benzamido]morphinan-hydrochloride--(compound 5), previously shown to be a potent κ-opioid receptor antagonist, was used to characterize the physicochemical properties and efficacy to decrease alcohol self-administration in alcohol-preferring rats (P-rats) and binge-like P-rats. Previous studies showed that compounds closely related to compound 5 possessed favorable properties regarding penetration of the blood-brain barrier. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that compound 5 had acceptable bioavailability. In contrast to other κ-receptor antagonists, in particular norbinaltorphimine, compound 5 showed favorable drug-like properties. Based on these findings, further studies were done. Safety studies showed that compound 5 was not hepatotoxic at doses 200-fold greater than an efficacious dose. The effects of compound 5 or naltrexone on the hepatotoxicity of thiobenzamide were investigated. In contrast to naltrexone, which exacerbated thiobenzamide-mediated hepatotoxicity, compound 5 was observed to be hepatoprotective. Based on the physicochemical properties of compound 5, the compound was examined in rat animal models of alcohol self-administration. The inhibition of ethanol self-administration by compound 5 in alcohol-dependent and alcohol-nondependent P-rats trained to self-administer a 10% (w/v) ethanol solution, using operant techniques, showed very potent efficacy (i.e., estimated ED50 values of 4-5 μg/kg). In a binge-like P-rat animal model, inhibition of alcohol self-administration by compound 5 had an estimated ED50 value of 8 μg/kg. The results suggest that compound 5 is a potent drug-like κ-opioid receptor antagonist of utility in alcohol cessation medications development.

  16. Potent Functional Antibody Responses Elicited by HIV-I DNA Priming and Boosting with Heterologous HIV-1 Recombinant MVA in Healthy Tanzanian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Joachim, Agricola; Nilsson, Charlotta; Aboud, Said; Bakari, Muhammad; Lyamuya, Eligius F.; Robb, Merlin L.; Marovich, Mary A.; Earl, Patricia; Moss, Bernard; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Wahren, Britta; Mhalu, Fred; Sandström, Eric; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Ferrari, Guido; Polonis, Victoria R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine-induced HIV antibodies were evaluated in serum samples collected from healthy Tanzanian volunteers participating in a phase I/II placebo-controlled double blind trial using multi-clade, multigene HIV-DNA priming and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (HIV-MVA) virus boosting (HIVIS03). The HIV-DNA vaccine contained plasmids expressing HIV-1 gp160 subtypes A, B, C, Rev B, Gag A, B and RTmut B, and the recombinant HIV-MVA boost expressed CRF01_AE HIV-1 Env subtype E and Gag-Pol subtype A. While no neutralizing antibodies were detected using pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl cell assay, this prime-boost vaccination induced neutralizing antibodies in 83% of HIVIS03 vaccinees when a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) assay using luciferase reporter-infectious molecular clones (LucR-IMC) was employed. The serum neutralizing activity was significantly (but not completely) reduced upon depletion of natural killer (NK) cells from PBMC (p=0.006), indicating a role for antibody-mediated Fcγ-receptor function. High levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC)-mediating antibodies against CRF01_AE and/or subtype B were subsequently demonstrated in 97% of the sera of vaccinees. The magnitude of ADCC-mediating antibodies against CM235 CRF01_AE IMC-infected cells correlated with neutralizing antibodies against CM235 in the IMC/PBMC assay. In conclusion, HIV-DNA priming, followed by two HIV-MVA boosts elicited potent ADCC responses in a high proportion of Tanzanian vaccinees. Our findings highlight the potential of HIV-DNA prime HIV-MVA boost vaccines for induction of functional antibody responses and suggest this vaccine regimen and ADCC studies as potentially important new avenues in HIV vaccine development. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials ISRCTN90053831 The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry ATMR2009040001075080 (currently PACTR2009040001075080) PMID:25874723

  17. Monoclonal antibodies against the native urease of Helicobacter pylori: synergistic inhibition of urease activity by monoclonal antibody combinations.

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, K; Mizuta, T; Tonokatu, Y; Fukuda, Y; Okamura, H; Hayashi, T; Shimoyama, T; Tamura, T

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the native urease of Helicobacter pylori NCTC 11637 were found to clearly inhibit the urease activity. Interestingly, synergistic inhibition by two MAbs recognizing different subunits was also observed. Ten MAbs were produced and classified as two isotypes of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass, IgG1, and IgG2a. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that five MAbs recognized the large subunit and the other five recognized the small subunit of the urease. Among the MAbs, L2 and S2, which recognized the large and the small subunits, respectively, were also able to inhibit the urease activity of clinical isolates from H. pylori-infected patients. The combination of L2 and S2 led to augmented synergistic inhibition. L2, but not S2, could also inhibit the urease activity from Helicobacter mustelae; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot analysis showed that L2 cross-reacted with this urease. These results suggested that the epitope recognized by L2 had a structure common to both Helicobacter species and may be involved in the active site of the urease. In contrast to the MAbs, a polyclonal antibody in sera from mice immunized with H. pylori urease did not have the ability to inhibit H. pylori urease activity. However, the polyclonal antibody retained the ability to abolish the inhibitory action of these MAbs. Moreover, other MAbs which could not inhibit H. pylori urease activity also abolished the inhibitory action. Images PMID:1383158

  18. Antigenic Characterization of the HCMV gH/gL/gO and Pentamer Cell Entry Complexes Reveals Binding Sites for Potently Neutralizing Human Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ciferri, Claudio; Chandramouli, Sumana; Leitner, Alexander; Donnarumma, Danilo; Cianfrocco, Michael A.; Gerrein, Rachel; Friedrich, Kristian; Aggarwal, Yukti; Palladino, Giuseppe; Aebersold, Ruedi; Norais, Nathalie; Settembre, Ethan C.; Carfi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in transplant patients and in fetuses following congenital infection. The glycoprotein complexes gH/gL/gO and gH/gL/UL128/UL130/UL131A (Pentamer) are required for HCMV entry in fibroblasts and endothelial/epithelial cells, respectively, and are targeted by potently neutralizing antibodies in the infected host. Using purified soluble forms of gH/gL/gO and Pentamer as well as a panel of naturally elicited human monoclonal antibodies, we determined the location of key neutralizing epitopes on the gH/gL/gO and Pentamer surfaces. Mass Spectrometry (MS) coupled to Chemical Crosslinking or to Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange was used to define residues that are either in proximity or part of neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein complexes. We also determined the molecular architecture of the gH/gL/gO- and Pentamer-antibody complexes by Electron Microscopy (EM) and 3D reconstructions. The EM analysis revealed that the Pentamer specific neutralizing antibodies bind to two opposite surfaces of the complex, suggesting that they may neutralize infection by different mechanisms. Together, our data identify the location of neutralizing antibodies binding sites on the gH/gL/gO and Pentamer complexes and provide a framework for the development of antibodies and vaccines against HCMV. PMID:26485028

  19. Changes in plasma membrane phospholipids inhibit antibody-mediated lysis.

    PubMed

    Harris, David T

    2012-01-06

    A variety of mechanisms have been proposed to explain how tumors evade immune destruction. This work has identified one such mechanism that determines susceptibility to immune lysis; membrane phospholipid composition altered susceptibility to antibody plus complement (Ab+C)-mediated lysis. Effects on antibody plus complement-mediated lysis were correlated with levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules but not inherent resistance to complement damage. This cellular mechanism could be a means by which tumor cells escape immune detection and destruction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A new and potent calmodulin antagonist, HF-2035, which inhibits vascular relaxation induced by nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Win, N H; Ishikawa, T; Saito, N; Kato, M; Yokokura, H; Watanabe, Y; Iida, Y; Hidaka, H

    1996-03-28

    HF-2035, 2-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2,4,5-trichlorobenzenesulfonyl)] amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine, was synthesized and its effects on calmodulin-dependent enzymes were investigated. HF-2035 inhibited calmodulin kinase I, calmodulin kinase II and myosin light-chain kinase with IC50 values of 1.3 microM, 1.6 microM and 68 microM, respectively. HF-2035 also inhibited the activity of recombinant rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase, one of the calmodulin-dependent enzymes, with a Ki of 0.78 microM. Partially purified nitric oxide synthase of rat brain was also inhibited by HF-2035 with an IC50 of 3.2 microM. Kinetic analysis indicated that this inhibitory effect of HF-2035 was competitive with respect to calmodulin. We examined the effects of HF-2035 on constitutive nitric oxide synthase in a bioassay using vascular strips of rabbit carotid artery with and without endothelium. HF-2035 inhibited acetylcholine- and calcium ionophore, A23187 (6S-[6 alpha (2S*,3S*),8 beta (R*),9 beta, 11 alpha]-5- (methylamino)-2-[[3,9,11-trimethyl-8-[1-methyl-2-oxo-2-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)- ethyl]-1,7-dioxaspiro[5.5]undec-2-yl]methyl]-4-benzoxazol ecarboxylic acid)-induced relaxation of endothelium-intact strips with an ED50 of 1.5 +/- 0.5 microM and 2.8 +/- 1 microM, respectively. This compound, however, did not inhibit N-nitroso-N-morpholinoaminoacetonitrile (SIN-1A), an exogenous nitric oxide donor, -induced relaxation of endothelium-denuded strips. W-7 (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1- naphthalenesulfonamide) inhibited acetylcholine-induced relaxation with an ED50 of 46 +/- 7 microM, which was 30-fold less potent than HF-2035. HF-2035 was unable to inhibit the activity of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase in isolated thoracic aorta of rat treated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. These findings suggest that HF-2035 is a new and potent calmodulin antagonist, and may be used as a mother compound to develop more selective inhibitors of constitutive nitric oxide

  1. Enfuvirtide (T20)-Based Lipopeptide Is a Potent HIV-1 Cell Fusion Inhibitor: Implications for Viral Entry and Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiujuan; Chong, Huihui; Zhu, Yuanmei; Wei, Huamian; Wu, Xiyuan; He, Jinsheng; Wang, Xinquan; He, Yuxian

    2017-09-15

    The peptide drug enfuvirtide (T20) is the only viral fusion inhibitor used in combination therapy for HIV-1 infection, but it has relatively low antiviral activity and easily induces drug resistance. Emerging studies demonstrate that lipopeptide-based fusion inhibitors, such as LP-11 and LP-19, which mainly target the gp41 pocket site, have greatly improved antiviral potency and in vivo stability. In this study, we focused on developing a T20-based lipopeptide inhibitor that lacks pocket-binding sequence and targets a different site. First, the C-terminal tryptophan-rich motif (TRM) of T20 was verified to be essential for its target binding and inhibition; then, a novel lipopeptide, termed LP-40, was created by replacing the TRM with a fatty acid group. LP-40 showed markedly enhanced binding affinity for the target site and dramatically increased inhibitory activity on HIV-1 membrane fusion, entry, and infection. Unlike LP-11 and LP-19, which required a flexible linker between the peptide sequence and the lipid moiety, addition of a linker to LP-40 sharply reduced its potency, implying different binding modes with the extended N-terminal helices of gp41. Also, interestingly, LP-40 showed more potent activity than LP-11 in inhibiting HIV-1 Env-mediated cell-cell fusion while it was less active than LP-11 in inhibiting pseudovirus entry, and the two inhibitors displayed synergistic antiviral effects. The crystal structure of LP-40 in complex with a target peptide revealed their key binding residues and motifs. Combined, our studies have not only provided a potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitor, but also revealed new insights into the mechanisms of viral inhibition.IMPORTANCE T20 is the only membrane fusion inhibitor available for treatment of viral infection; however, T20 requires high doses and has a low genetic barrier for resistance, and its inhibitory mechanism and structural basis remain unclear. Here, we report the design of LP-40, a T20-based lipopeptide inhibitor

  2. Comparison of an Established Antibody Sandwich Method with an Inhibition Method of Histoplasma capsulatum Antigen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Garringer, Todd O.; Wheat, L. Joseph; Brizendine, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    The Histoplasma antigen immunoassay utilizes an antibody sandwich method that provides a rapid and reliable means of diagnosing the more severe forms of histoplasmosis. Inhibition assays have been developed for antigen detection and offer at least one potential advantage, namely, reduced antibody requirements. We have developed an inhibition assay using the polyclonal antibody employed in our standard sandwich assay. Urine and serum specimens from patients with culture-proven histoplasmosis and controls were tested using both methods. The two methods had similar sensitivities for detection of antigen in urine (antibody sandwich = 92.5% versus inhibition = 87.5%, P = 0.500) and serum (82.5% versus 80.0%, P = 1.000). With serum, the specificities of both methods were similar (antibody sandwich assay = 95.0% versus inhibition assay = 92.5%, P = 1.000), and with urine, the specificity of the antibody sandwich method was superior (97.5% versus 80.0%, P = 0.039). While the overall reproducibility of both methods was excellent (with urine, antibody sandwich assay intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.9975 and with serum = 0.9949; correlation coefficient of the inhibition assay with urine = 0.9736 and with serum = 0.9850), that of the inhibition method was only fair to poor for the controls: urine = −0.0152, serum = 0.5595. Reproducibility was good for the controls using the sandwich method: urine = 0.7717, serum = 0.9470. Cross-reactivity was observed in specimens from patients infected with Blastomyces dermatitidis, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and Penicillium marneffei. In conclusion, the decreased specificity and inferior reproducibility with control specimens suggest that the inhibition assay has poorer precision toward the lower end of the detection range. PMID:10921949

  3. Substituted benzene sulfonamides incorporating 1,3,5-triazinyl moieties potently inhibit human carbonic anhydrases II, IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Saluja, Amrita K; Tiwari, Meena; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-03-01

    A series of benzene sulfonamides incorporating 1,3,5-triazinyl moieties were synthesized using cyanuric chloride as starting material. Inhibition studies against human carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms I, II (cytosolic) and IX, XII (transmembrane, tumor-associated) isoforms were performed with the new compounds. hCA I was modestly inhibited (KIs in the range of 87 nM-4.35 μM), hCA II was moderately inhibited by most of the new compounds (KIs in the range of 12.5-130 nM), whereas the tumor associated isoforms were potently inhibited, with KIs in the range of 1.2-34.1 nM against hCA IX and of 2.1-33.9 against hCA XII, respectively. Docking studies of some of the new compounds showed an effective binding mode within the enzyme active site, as demonstrated earlier by X-ray crystallography for structurally-related sulfonamides incorporating 1,3,5-triazinyl functionalities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Potent human α-amylase inhibition by the β-defensin-like protein helianthamide

    DOE PAGES

    Tysoe, Christina; Williams, Leslie K.; Keyzers, Robert; ...

    2016-02-26

    Here, selective inhibitors of human pancreatic α-amylase (HPA) are an effective means of controlling blood sugar levels in the management of diabetes. A high-throughput screen of marine natural product extracts led to the identification of a potent (Ki = 10 pM) peptidic HPA inhibitor, helianthamide, from the Caribbean sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. Active helianthamide was produced in Escherichia coli via secretion as a barnase fusion protein. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the complex of helianthamide with porcine pancreatic α-amylase revealed that helianthamide adopts a β-defensin fold and binds into and across the amylase active site, utilizing a contiguous YIYH inhibitory motif.more » Helianthamide represents the first of a novel class of glycosidase inhibitors and provides an unusual example of functional malleability of the β-defensin fold, which is rarely seen outside of its traditional role in antimicrobial peptides.« less

  5. Potent Human α-Amylase Inhibition by the β-Defensin-like Protein Helianthamide.

    PubMed

    Tysoe, Christina; Williams, Leslie K; Keyzers, Robert; Nguyen, Nham T; Tarling, Chris; Wicki, Jacqueline; Goddard-Borger, Ethan D; Aguda, Adeleke H; Perry, Suzanne; Foster, Leonard J; Andersen, Raymond J; Brayer, Gary D; Withers, Stephen G

    2016-03-23

    Selective inhibitors of human pancreatic α-amylase (HPA) are an effective means of controlling blood sugar levels in the management of diabetes. A high-throughput screen of marine natural product extracts led to the identification of a potent (Ki = 10 pM) peptidic HPA inhibitor, helianthamide, from the Caribbean sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. Active helianthamide was produced in Escherichia coli via secretion as a barnase fusion protein. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the complex of helianthamide with porcine pancreatic α-amylase revealed that helianthamide adopts a β-defensin fold and binds into and across the amylase active site, utilizing a contiguous YIYH inhibitory motif. Helianthamide represents the first of a novel class of glycosidase inhibitors and provides an unusual example of functional malleability of the β-defensin fold, which is rarely seen outside of its traditional role in antimicrobial peptides.

  6. Potent Human α-Amylase Inhibition by the β-Defensin-like Protein Helianthamide

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of human pancreatic α-amylase (HPA) are an effective means of controlling blood sugar levels in the management of diabetes. A high-throughput screen of marine natural product extracts led to the identification of a potent (Ki = 10 pM) peptidic HPA inhibitor, helianthamide, from the Caribbean sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. Active helianthamide was produced in Escherichia coli via secretion as a barnase fusion protein. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the complex of helianthamide with porcine pancreatic α-amylase revealed that helianthamide adopts a β-defensin fold and binds into and across the amylase active site, utilizing a contiguous YIYH inhibitory motif. Helianthamide represents the first of a novel class of glycosidase inhibitors and provides an unusual example of functional malleability of the β-defensin fold, which is rarely seen outside of its traditional role in antimicrobial peptides. PMID:27066537

  7. Targeting Membrane-Bound Viral RNA Synthesis Reveals Potent Inhibition of Diverse Coronaviruses Including the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Tomas; Kann, Nina; Adamiak, Beata; Hannoun, Charles; Kindler, Eveline; Jónsdóttir, Hulda R.; Muth, Doreen; Kint, Joeri; Forlenza, Maria; Müller, Marcel A.; Drosten, Christian; Thiel, Volker; Trybala, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses raise serious concerns as emerging zoonotic viruses without specific antiviral drugs available. Here we screened a collection of 16671 diverse compounds for anti-human coronavirus 229E activity and identified an inhibitor, designated K22, that specifically targets membrane-bound coronaviral RNA synthesis. K22 exerts most potent antiviral activity after virus entry during an early step of the viral life cycle. Specifically, the formation of double membrane vesicles (DMVs), a hallmark of coronavirus replication, was greatly impaired upon K22 treatment accompanied by near-complete inhibition of viral RNA synthesis. K22-resistant viruses contained substitutions in non-structural protein 6 (nsp6), a membrane-spanning integral component of the viral replication complex implicated in DMV formation, corroborating that K22 targets membrane bound viral RNA synthesis. Besides K22 resistance, the nsp6 mutants induced a reduced number of DMVs, displayed decreased specific infectivity, while RNA synthesis was not affected. Importantly, K22 inhibits a broad range of coronaviruses, including Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS–CoV), and efficient inhibition was achieved in primary human epithelia cultures representing the entry port of human coronavirus infection. Collectively, this study proposes an evolutionary conserved step in the life cycle of positive-stranded RNA viruses, the recruitment of cellular membranes for viral replication, as vulnerable and, most importantly, druggable target for antiviral intervention. We expect this mode of action to serve as a paradigm for the development of potent antiviral drugs to combat many animal and human virus infections. PMID:24874215

  8. Targeting membrane-bound viral RNA synthesis reveals potent inhibition of diverse coronaviruses including the middle East respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Anna; Dijkman, Ronald; Bergström, Tomas; Kann, Nina; Adamiak, Beata; Hannoun, Charles; Kindler, Eveline; Jónsdóttir, Hulda R; Muth, Doreen; Kint, Joeri; Forlenza, Maria; Müller, Marcel A; Drosten, Christian; Thiel, Volker; Trybala, Edward

    2014-05-01

    Coronaviruses raise serious concerns as emerging zoonotic viruses without specific antiviral drugs available. Here we screened a collection of 16671 diverse compounds for anti-human coronavirus 229E activity and identified an inhibitor, designated K22, that specifically targets membrane-bound coronaviral RNA synthesis. K22 exerts most potent antiviral activity after virus entry during an early step of the viral life cycle. Specifically, the formation of double membrane vesicles (DMVs), a hallmark of coronavirus replication, was greatly impaired upon K22 treatment accompanied by near-complete inhibition of viral RNA synthesis. K22-resistant viruses contained substitutions in non-structural protein 6 (nsp6), a membrane-spanning integral component of the viral replication complex implicated in DMV formation, corroborating that K22 targets membrane bound viral RNA synthesis. Besides K22 resistance, the nsp6 mutants induced a reduced number of DMVs, displayed decreased specific infectivity, while RNA synthesis was not affected. Importantly, K22 inhibits a broad range of coronaviruses, including Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and efficient inhibition was achieved in primary human epithelia cultures representing the entry port of human coronavirus infection. Collectively, this study proposes an evolutionary conserved step in the life cycle of positive-stranded RNA viruses, the recruitment of cellular membranes for viral replication, as vulnerable and, most importantly, druggable target for antiviral intervention. We expect this mode of action to serve as a paradigm for the development of potent antiviral drugs to combat many animal and human virus infections.

  9. Inhibition of erythroid progenitor cells by anti-Kell antibodies in fetal alloimmune anemia.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, J I; Manning, M; Warwick, R M; Letsky, E A; Murray, N A; Roberts, I A

    1998-03-19

    In alloimmune anemia of the newborn, the level of hemolysis caused by the presence of antibodies to antigens of the Kell blood-group system is less than that caused by antibodies to the D antigen of the Rh blood-group system, and the numbers of reticulocytes and normoblasts in the baby's circulation are inappropriately low for the degree of anemia. These findings suggest that sensitization to Kell antigens results in suppression of fetal erythropoiesis as well as hemolysis. We compared the growth in vitro of Kell-positive and Kell-negative hematopoietic progenitor cells from cord blood in the presence of human monoclonal anti-Kell antibodies and anti-D antibodies and serum from women with anti-Kell antibodies. The growth of Kell-positive erythroid progenitor cells (erythroid burst-forming units and colony-forming units) from cord blood was markedly inhibited by monoclonal IgG and IgM anti-Kell antibodies in a dose-dependent fashion (range of concentrations, 0.2 to 20 percent), but monoclonal anti-D antibodies had no effect. The growth of these types of cells from Kell-negative cord blood was not affected by either type of antibody. Neither monoclonal anti-Kell antibodies nor monoclonal anti-D antibodies inhibited the growth of granulocyte or megakaryocyte progenitor cells from cord blood. Serum from 22 women with anti-Kell antibodies inhibited the growth of Kell-positive erythroid burst-forming units and colony-forming units but not of Kell-negative erythroid burst-forming units and colony-forming units (P<0.001 for the difference between groups). The maternal anti-Kell antibodies had no inhibitory effects on granulocyte-macrophage or mega-karyocyte progenitor cells from cord blood. Anti-Kell antibodies specifically inhibit the growth of Kell-positive erythroid burst-forming units and colony-forming units, a finding that supports the hypothesis that these antibodies cause fetal anemia by suppressing erythropoiesis at the progenitor-cell level.

  10. Akt inhibition enhances expansion of potent tumor-specific lymphocytes with memory cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Crompton, Joseph G.; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Clever, David; Gros, Alena; Eil, Robert; Tran, Eric; Hanada, Ken-ichi; Yu, Zhiya; Palmer, Douglas C.; Kerkar, Sid P.; Michalek, Ryan D.; Upham, Trevor; Leonardi, Anthony; Aquavella, Nicholas; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Gattinoni, Luca; Muranski, Pawel; Sundrud, Mark S.; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Fearon, Douglas T.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) can result in complete regression of advanced cancer in some patients, but the efficacy of this potentially curative therapy might be limited by poor persistence of TIL after adoptive-transfer. Pharmacologic inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase Akt has recently been shown to promote immunologic memory in viral-specific murine models, but whether this approach may enhance features of memory (e.g. long-term persistence) in TIL which are characteristically exhausted and senescent is not established. Here we show that pharmacologic inhibition of Akt enables expansion of TIL with the transcriptional, metabolic and functional properties characteristic of memory T cells. Consequently, Akt inhibition results in enhanced persistence of TIL after adoptive transfer into an immunodeficient animal model and augments anti-tumor immunity of CD8 T cells in a mouse model of cell-based immunotherapy. Pharmacologic inhibition of Akt represents a novel immunometabolomic approach to enhance the persistence of anti-tumor T cells and improve the efficacy of cell-based immunotherapy for metastatic cancer. PMID:25432172

  11. Potent Inhibition of HIV-1 Replication in Resting CD4 T Cells by Resveratrol and Pterostilbene.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chi N; Trinité, Benjamin; Levy, David N

    2017-09-01

    HIV-1 infection of resting CD4 T cells plays a crucial and numerically dominant role during virus transmission at mucosal sites and during subsequent acute replication and T cell depletion. Resveratrol and pterostilbene are plant stilbenoids associated with several health-promoting benefits. Resveratrol has been shown to inhibit the replication of several viruses, including herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2, papillomaviruses, severe acute respiratory syndrome virus, and influenza virus. Alone, resveratrol does not inhibit HIV-1 infection of activated T cells, but it does synergize with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in these cells to inhibit reverse transcription. Here, we demonstrate that resveratrol and pterostilbene completely block HIV-1 infection at a low micromolar dose in resting CD4 T cells, primarily at the reverse transcription step. The anti-HIV effect was fully reversed by exogenous deoxynucleosides and Vpx, an HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus protein that increases deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) levels. These findings are consistent with the reported ability of resveratrol to inhibit ribonucleotide reductase and to lower dNTP levels in cells. This study supports the potential use of resveratrol, pterostilbene, or related compounds as adjuvants in anti-HIV preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) formulations. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Inhibition of immune opsonin-independent phagocytosis by antibody to a pulmonary macrophage cell surface antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Parod, R.J.; Godleski, J.J.; Brain J.D.

    1986-03-15

    Unlike other hamster phagoycytes, hamster pulmonary macrophages (PM) avidly ingest albumin-coated latex particles in the absence of serum. They also possess a highly specific cell surface antigen. To evaluate the relationship between these two characteristics, PM were incubated with mouse monoclonal antibody directed against the PM antigen. After unbound antibody was removed, the amount of bound antibody and the phagocytic capability of PM were measured by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Maximum antibody binding produced a 25% inhibition of ingestion. Particle attachment was not affected. This effect was antigen specific, since neither a nonspecific mouse myeloma protein of the same subclass nor a mouse antibody that bound to another hamster surface antigen had any effect on binding or ingestion. If antigen-specific F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments were introduced both before and during the period of phagocytosis, the inhibition of particle ingestion approached 100%. Particle binding increased at low F(ab')/sub 2/ concentrations but declined at higher concentrations. Because calcium may play a role in the ingestion process, the effect of antibody on /sup 45/Ca uptake was evaluated. It was observed that antigen-specific F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments stimulated /sup 45/Ca uptake, whereas control antibodies did not. These results suggest that the antigen reacting with the anti-hamster PM monoclonal antibody is involved in immune opsonin-independent phagocytosis and that calcium participates in this phagocytic process.

  13. Antibody inhibition of polymorphonuclear phagocytosis. Dissociation of bacterial attachment and bacterial killing.

    PubMed

    Crowley, J P; Valeri, C R

    1980-06-01

    The inhibition of killing of Staphylococcus aureus 502A by PMNs treated with the IgG fraction of serum from a group of patients with demonstrable leukocyte antibodies was investigated. The uptake of opsonized thymidine-labeled S. aureus 502A by PMNs treated with allogeneic antibody was essentially unimpaired, despite significantly decreased killing. The findings were similar to bacteria opsonized by serum complement or bacteria opsonized with specific lapine antibody. An increased proportion of PMN-bound bacteria susceptible to lysis by lysostaphin indicated a reduced rate of translocation of bacteria from the surface of allogeneic antibody-treated PMNs. Antibody did not stimulate the basal oxidative metabolism, but the oxidative metabolism of antibody-treated PMNs during phagocytosis was increased. Although the precise mechanism of inhibition of PMN killing by antibody is uncertain, the data suggest that the impairment of bacterial killing by PMNs treated with allogeneic leukocyte antibody is associated with inefficient translocation of bacteria into phagolysosomes rather than by interference with the binding of bacteria to specific PMN opsonic receptors.

  14. Anti-MUC1 antibody inhibits EGF receptor signaling in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hisatsune, Akinori; Nakayama, Hideki; Kawasaki, Mitsuru; Horie, Ichiro; Miyata, Takeshi; Isohama, Yoichiro; Kim, Kwang Chul; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} We identified changes in the expression and function of EGFR by anti-MUC1 antibody. {yields} An anti-MUC1 antibody GP1.4 decreased EGFR from cell surface by internalization. {yields} GP1.4 specifically inhibited ERK signaling triggered EGF-EGFR signaling pathway. {yields} Internalization of EGFR was dependent on the presence of MUC1 on cell surface. {yields} GP1.4 significantly inhibited EGF-dependent cancer cell proliferation and migration. -- Abstract: MUC1 is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein aberrantly overexpressed in various cancer cells. High expression of MUC1 is closely associated with cancer progression and metastasis, leading to poor prognosis. We previously reported that MUC1 is internalized by the binding of the anti-MUC1 antibody, from the cell surface to the intracellular region via the macropinocytotic pathway. Since MUC1 is closely associated with ErbBs, such as EGF receptor (EGFR) in cancer cells, we examined the effect of the anti-MUC1 antibody on EGFR trafficking. Our results show that: (1) anti-MUC1 antibody GP1.4, but not another anti-MUC1 antibody C595, triggered the internalization of EGFR in pancreatic cancer cells; (2) internalization of EGFR by GP1.4 resulted in the inhibition of ERK phosphorylation by EGF stimulation, in a MUC1 dependent manner; (3) inhibition of ERK phosphorylation by GP1.4 resulted in the suppression of proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells. We conclude that the internalization of EGFR by anti-MUC1 antibody GP1.4 inhibits the progression of cancer cells via the inhibition of EGFR signaling.

  15. Differential Inhibition of Human Atherosclerotic Plaque–Induced Platelet Activation by Dimeric GPVI-Fc and Anti-GPVI Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Jamasbi, Janina; Megens, Remco T.A.; Bianchini, Mariaelvy; Münch, Götz; Ungerer, Martin; Faussner, Alexander; Sherman, Shachar; Walker, Adam; Goyal, Pankaj; Jung, Stephanie; Brandl, Richard; Weber, Christian; Lorenz, Reinhard; Farndale, Richard; Elia, Natalie; Siess, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Background Glycoprotein VI (GPVI) is the essential platelet collagen receptor in atherothrombosis, but its inhibition causes only a mild bleeding tendency. Thus, targeting this receptor has selective antithrombotic potential. Objectives This study sought to compare compounds interfering with platelet GPVI–atherosclerotic plaque interaction to improve current antiatherothrombotic therapy. Methods Human atherosclerotic plaque–induced platelet aggregation was measured in anticoagulated blood under static and arterial flow conditions (550/s, 1,100/s, and 1,500/s). Inhibition by dimeric GPVI fragment crystallizable region of IgG (Fc) masking GPVI binding sites on collagen was compared with that of 3 anti-GPVI antibodies: BLO8-1, a human domain antibody; 5C4, a fragment antigen-binding (Fab fragment) of monoclonal rat immunoglobulin G; and m-Fab-F, a human recombinant sFab against GPVI dimers. Results GPVI-Fc reduced plaque-triggered platelet aggregation in static blood by 51%, BLO8-1 by 88%, and 5C4 by 93%. Under arterial flow conditions, BLO8-1 and 5C4 almost completely inhibited platelet aggregation while preserving platelet adhesion on plaque. Inhibition by GPVI-Fc, even at high concentrations, was less marked but increased with shear rate. Advanced optical imaging revealed rapid persistent GPVI-Fc binding to collagen under low and high shear flow, upstream and downstream of plaque fragments. At low shear particularly, platelets adhered in plaque flow niches to GPVI-Fc–free segments of collagen fibers and recruited other platelets onto aggregates via ADP and TxA2 release. Conclusions Anti-GPVI antibodies inhibit atherosclerotic plaque-induced platelet aggregation under static and flow conditions more effectively than GPVI-Fc. However, potent platelet inhibition by GPVI-Fc at a higher shear rate (1,500/s) suggests localized antithrombotic efficacy at denuded or fissured stenotic high-risk lesions without systemic bleeding. The compound-specific differences

  16. Structure and function of broadly reactive antibody PG16 reveal an H3 subdomain that mediates potent neutralization of HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Pejchal, Robert; Walker, Laura M.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Phogat, Sanjay K.; Koff, Wayne C.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-11-15

    Development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 will likely require elicitation of broad and potent neutralizing antibodies against the trimeric surface envelope glycoprotein (Env). Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) PG9 and PG16 neutralize {approx}80% of HIV-1 isolates across all clades with extraordinary potency and target novel epitopes preferentially expressed on Env trimers. As these neutralization properties are ideal for a vaccine-elicited antibody response to HIV-1, their structural basis was investigated. The crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of PG16 at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution revealed its unusually long, 28-residue, complementarity determining region (CDR) H3 forms a unique, stable subdomain that towers above the antibody surface. A 7-residue 'specificity loop' on the 'hammerhead' subdomain was identified that, when transplanted from PG16 to PG9 and vice versa, accounted for differences in the fine specificity and neutralization of these two mAbs. The PG16 electron density maps also revealed that a CDR H3 tyrosine was sulfated, which was confirmed for both PG9 (doubly) and PG16 (singly) by mass spectral analysis. We further showed that tyrosine sulfation plays a role in binding and neutralization. An N-linked glycan modification is observed in the variable light chain, but not required for antigen recognition. Further, the crystal structure of the PG9 light chain at 3.0 {angstrom} facilitated homology modeling to support the presence of these unusual features in PG9. Thus, PG9 and PG16 use unique structural features to mediate potent neutralization of HIV-1 that may be of utility in antibody engineering and for high-affinity recognition of a variety of therapeutic targets.

  17. IMGN853, a Folate Receptor-α (FRα)-Targeting Antibody-Drug Conjugate, Exhibits Potent Targeted Antitumor Activity against FRα-Expressing Tumors.

    PubMed

    Ab, Olga; Whiteman, Kathleen R; Bartle, Laura M; Sun, Xiuxia; Singh, Rajeeva; Tavares, Daniel; LaBelle, Alyssa; Payne, Gillian; Lutz, Robert J; Pinkas, Jan; Goldmacher, Victor S; Chittenden, Thomas; Lambert, John M

    2015-07-01

    A majority of ovarian and non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma cancers overexpress folate receptor α (FRα). Here, we report the development of an anti-FRα antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), consisting of a FRα-binding antibody attached to a highly potent maytansinoid that induces cell-cycle arrest and cell death by targeting microtubules. From screening a large panel of anti-FRα monoclonal antibodies, we selected the humanized antibody M9346A as the best antibody for targeted delivery of a maytansinoid payload into FRα-positive cells. We compared M9346A conjugates with various linker/maytansinoid combinations, and found that a conjugate, now denoted as IMGN853, with the N-succinimidyl 4-(2-pyridyldithio)-2-sulfobutanoate (sulfo-SPDB) linker and N(2')-deacetyl-N(2')-(4-mercapto-4-methyl-1-oxopentyl)-maytansine (DM4) exhibited the most potent antitumor activity in several FRα-expressing xenograft tumor models. The level of expression of FRα on the surface of cells was a major determinant in the sensitivity of tumor cells to the cytotoxic effect of the conjugate. Efficacy studies of IMGN853 in xenografts of ovarian cancer and non-small cell lung cancer cell lines and of a patient tumor-derived xenograft model demonstrated that the ADC was highly active against tumors that expressed FRα at levels similar to those found on a large fraction of ovarian and non-small cell lung cancer patient tumors, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. IMGN853 displayed cytotoxic activity against FRα-negative cells situated near FRα-positive cells (bystander cytotoxic activity), indicating its ability to eradicate tumors with heterogeneous expression of FRα. Together, these findings support the clinical development of IMGN853 as a novel targeted therapy for patients with FRα-expressing tumors.

  18. Potent Inhibition of Junín Virus Infection by Interferon in Murine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng; Walker, Aida G.; Grant, Ashley M.; Kolokoltsova, Olga A.; Yun, Nadezhda E.; Seregin, Alexey V.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    The new world arenavirus Junín virus (JUNV) is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, a lethal human infectious disease. Adult laboratory mice are generally resistant to peripheral infection by JUNV. The mechanism underlying the mouse resistance to JUNV infection is largely unknown. We have reported that interferon receptor knockout mice succumb to JUNV infection, indicating the critical role of interferon in restricting JUNV infection in mice. Here we report that the pathogenic and vaccine strains of JUNV were highly sensitive to interferon in murine primary cells. Treatment with low concentrations of interferon abrogated viral NP protein expression in murine cells. The replication of both JUNVs was enhanced in IRF3/IRF7 deficient cells. In addition, the vaccine strain of JUNV displayed impaired growth in primary murine cells. Our data suggested a direct and potent role of host interferon response in restricting JUNV replication in mice. The defect in viral growth for vaccine JUNV might also partially explain its attenuation in mice. PMID:24901990

  19. Potent Inhibition of Enterovirus D68 and Human Rhinoviruses by Dipeptidyl Aldehydes and α-Ketoamides

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yunjeong; Galasiti Kankanamalage, Anushka C.; Damalanka, Vishnu C.; Weerawarna, Pathum M.; Groutas, William C.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an emerging pathogen responsible for mild to severe respiratory infections that occur mostly in infants, children and teenagers. EV-D68, one of more than 100 non-polio enteroviruses, is acid-labile and biologically similar to human rhinoviruses (HRV) (originally classified as HRV87). However, there is no approved preventive or therapeutic measure against EV-D68, HRV, or other enteroviruses. In this study, we evaluated the antiviral activity of series of dipeptidyl compounds against EV-D68 and HRV strains, and demonstrated that several peptidyl aldehyde and α-ketoamide peptidyl compounds are potent inhibitors of EV-D68 and HRV strains with high in-vitro therapeutic indices (>1000). One of the α-ketoamide compounds is shown to have favorable pharmacokinetics profiles, including a favorable oral bioavailability in rats. Recent successful development of α-ketoamide protease inhibitors against hepatitis C virus suggests these compounds may have a high potential for further optimization and development against emerging EV-D68, as well as HRV. PMID:26658373

  20. Potent inhibition of Junín virus infection by interferon in murine cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Walker, Aida G; Grant, Ashley M; Kolokoltsova, Olga A; Yun, Nadezhda E; Seregin, Alexey V; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-06-01

    The new world arenavirus Junín virus (JUNV) is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, a lethal human infectious disease. Adult laboratory mice are generally resistant to peripheral infection by JUNV. The mechanism underlying the mouse resistance to JUNV infection is largely unknown. We have reported that interferon receptor knockout mice succumb to JUNV infection, indicating the critical role of interferon in restricting JUNV infection in mice. Here we report that the pathogenic and vaccine strains of JUNV were highly sensitive to interferon in murine primary cells. Treatment with low concentrations of interferon abrogated viral NP protein expression in murine cells. The replication of both JUNVs was enhanced in IRF3/IRF7 deficient cells. In addition, the vaccine strain of JUNV displayed impaired growth in primary murine cells. Our data suggested a direct and potent role of host interferon response in restricting JUNV replication in mice. The defect in viral growth for vaccine JUNV might also partially explain its attenuation in mice.

  1. Production of mouse monoclonal antibodies which inhibit in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed Central

    Ravdin, J I; Petri, W A; Murphy, C F; Smith, R D

    1986-01-01

    Adherence by axenic Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to mammalian cells is mediated by an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-inhibitable adhesin on the surface of the parasite. We isolated 35 hybridoma cell lines producing antibodies to E. histolytica as indicated by ELISA with sonicated amebic protein or by immunofluorescence assay with fixed whole trophozoites. Tissue culture supernatants were further screened for subcloning by the ability to bind to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells which were first exposed to a partially purified soluble preparation of the amebic GalNAc-inhibitable lectin. Eight tissue culture supernatants were positive in this assay. Antibodies from four subcloned cell lines (D3-14, H8-5, I12-2, and I1-21) inhibited amebic adherence to CHO cells (P less than 0.01). Of the original 35 tissue culture supernatants, 3 also inhibited amebic adherence (P less than 0.01; F1, F14, and J10); monoclonal antibodies in these supernatants did not bind to lectin-exposed CHO cells. Three purified monoclonal antibodies (H8-5, I12-2, and I1-21) inhibited amebic adherence at greater than or equal to 2 micrograms/10(4) amebae (P less than 0.05). None of these inhibitory monoclonal antibodies immunoprecipitated with a soluble amebic protein preparation following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. Monoclonal antibodies which inhibit in vitro adherence by E. histolytica will be useful in purification of the GalNAc-inhibitable lectin. PMID:2873102

  2. Potent competitive inhibition of human ribonucleotide reductase by a nonnucleoside small molecule.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Md Faiz; Alam, Intekhab; Huff, Sarah E; Pink, John; Flanagan, Sheryl A; Shewach, Donna; Misko, Tessianna A; Oleinick, Nancy L; Harte, William E; Viswanathan, Rajesh; Harris, Michael E; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey

    2017-08-01

    Human ribonucleotide reductase (hRR) is crucial for DNA replication and maintenance of a balanced dNTP pool, and is an established cancer target. Nucleoside analogs such as gemcitabine diphosphate and clofarabine nucleotides target the large subunit (hRRM1) of hRR. These drugs have a poor therapeutic index due to toxicity caused by additional effects, including DNA chain termination. The discovery of nonnucleoside, reversible, small-molecule inhibitors with greater specificity against hRRM1 is a key step in the development of more effective treatments for cancer. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a unique nonnucleoside small-molecule hRR inhibitor, naphthyl salicylic acyl hydrazone (NSAH), using virtual screening, binding affinity, inhibition, and cell toxicity assays. NSAH binds to hRRM1 with an apparent dissociation constant of 37 µM, and steady-state kinetics reveal a competitive mode of inhibition. A 2.66-Å resolution crystal structure of NSAH in complex with hRRM1 demonstrates that NSAH functions by binding at the catalytic site (C-site) where it makes both common and unique contacts with the enzyme compared with NDP substrates. Importantly, the IC50 for NSAH is within twofold of gemcitabine for growth inhibition of multiple cancer cell lines, while demonstrating little cytotoxicity against normal mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells. NSAH depresses dGTP and dATP levels in the dNTP pool causing S-phase arrest, providing evidence for RR inhibition in cells. This report of a nonnucleoside reversible inhibitor binding at the catalytic site of hRRM1 provides a starting point for the design of a unique class of hRR inhibitors.

  3. Trans-3,4,5,4′-tetramethoxystilbene, a resveratrol analog, potently inhibits angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang-ke; Qiang, Peng-fei; Xu, Qi-ping; Zhao, Yi-hua; Dai, Fang; Zhang, Lu

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Trans-3,4,5,4′-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-212) has shown strong antiproliferative activities against a variety of cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-angiogenic effects of DMU-212 in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used in this study. Cell viability was studied with MTT assay, and cell apoptosis was evaluated using TUNEL assay and morphological observation. The expression of the related genes and proteins was analyzed with qRT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Angiogenesis of HUVECs were studied using cell migration and capillary-like tube formation assays in vitro, and mouse Matrigel plug assay and chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay in vivo. The tyrosine kinase activities of VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 were measured using commercial kits. Results: DMU-212 (5–80 μmol/L) significantly inhibited VEGF-stimulated proliferation of HUVECs (IC50 value was approximately 20 μmol/L), and induced apoptosis. Furthermore, DMU-212 concentration-dependently inhibited VEGF-induced migration of HUVECs and capillary-like structure formation in vitro. DMU-212 also inhibited VEGF-induced generation of new vasculature in Matrigel plugs in vivo with significantly decreased area of infiltrating CD31-positive endothelial cells, and inhibited newly formed microvessels in chick CAMs. Moreover, DMU-212 concentration-dependently suppressed VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2, and inhibited phosphorylation of multiple downstream signaling components in the VEGFR2 pathway, including c-Src, FAK, Erk1/2, Akt, mTOR, and p70S6K in HUVECs. DMU-212 had no effect on VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR1. Conclusion: DMU-212 is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis that exerts anti-angiogenic activity at least in part through the VEGFR2 signaling pathway. PMID:23770989

  4. Non-proteinogenic amino acids in lacticin 481 analogues result in more potent inhibition of peptidoglycan transglycosylation.

    PubMed

    Knerr, Patrick J; Oman, Trent J; Garcia De Gonzalo, Chantal V; Lupoli, Tania J; Walker, Suzanne; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2012-11-16

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide natural products that contain the thioether structures lanthionine and methyllanthionine and exert potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. At present, detailed modes-of-action are only known for a small subset of family members. Lacticin 481, a tricyclic lantibiotic, contains a lipid II binding motif present in related compounds such as mersacidin and nukacin ISK-1. Here, we show that lacticin 481 inhibits PBP1b-catalyzed peptidoglycan formation. Furthermore, we show that changes in potency of analogues of lacticin 481 containing non-proteinogenic amino acids correlate positively with the potency of inhibition of the transglycosylase activity of PBP1b. Thus, lipid II is the likely target of lacticin 481, and use of non-proteinogenic amino acids resulted in stronger inhibition of the target. Additionally, we demonstrate that lacticin 481 does not form pores in the membranes of susceptible bacteria, a common mode-of-action of other lantibiotics.

  5. Positional Isomers of Aspirin Are Equally Potent in Inhibiting Colon Cancer Cell Growth: Differences in Mode of Cyclooxygenase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kodela, Ravinder; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Goswami, Satindra; Gan, Zong Yuan; Rao, Praveen P. N.; Nia, Kamran V.; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the differential effects of positional isomers of acetylsalicylic acid (o-ASA, m-ASA, and p-ASA) on cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition, gastric prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cell growth inhibition, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell-cycle progression. We also evaluated the gastric toxicity exerted by ASA isomers. All ASA isomers inhibit COX enzymes, but only the o-ASA exerted an irreversible inhibitory profile. We did not observe a significant difference between ASA isomers in their ability to decrease the in vivo synthesis of PGE2 and SOD activity. Furthermore, all isomers increased the levels of gastric and TNF-α when administered orally at equimolar doses. We observed a dose-dependent cell growth inhibitory effect; the order of potency was p-ASA > m-ASA ≈ o-ASA. There was a dose-dependent decrease in cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis, with a concomitant Go/G1 arrest. The ulcerogenic profile of the three ASA isomers showed a significant difference between o-ASA (aspirin) and its two positional isomers when administered orally at equimolar doses (1 mmol/kg); the ulcer index (UI) for o-ASA indicated extensive mucosal injury (UI = 38), whereas m-ASA and p-ASA produced a significantly decreased toxic response (UI = 12 and 8, respectively) under the same experimental conditions. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of ASA exert practically the same biologic profile in vitro and in vivo but showed different safety profiles. The mechanism of gastric ulcer formation exerted by aspirin and its two isomers warrants a more detailed and thorough investigation. PMID:23349335

  6. Positional isomers of aspirin are equally potent in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth: differences in mode of cyclooxygenase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kodela, Ravinder; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Goswami, Satindra; Gan, Zong Yuan; Rao, Praveen P N; Nia, Kamran V; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2013-04-01

    We compared the differential effects of positional isomers of acetylsalicylic acid (o-ASA, m-ASA, and p-ASA) on cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition, gastric prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cell growth inhibition, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell-cycle progression. We also evaluated the gastric toxicity exerted by ASA isomers. All ASA isomers inhibit COX enzymes, but only the o-ASA exerted an irreversible inhibitory profile. We did not observe a significant difference between ASA isomers in their ability to decrease the in vivo synthesis of PGE2 and SOD activity. Furthermore, all isomers increased the levels of gastric and TNF-α when administered orally at equimolar doses. We observed a dose-dependent cell growth inhibitory effect; the order of potency was p-ASA > m-ASA ≈ o-ASA. There was a dose-dependent decrease in cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis, with a concomitant Go/G1 arrest. The ulcerogenic profile of the three ASA isomers showed a significant difference between o-ASA (aspirin) and its two positional isomers when administered orally at equimolar doses (1 mmol/kg); the ulcer index (UI) for o-ASA indicated extensive mucosal injury (UI = 38), whereas m-ASA and p-ASA produced a significantly decreased toxic response (UI = 12 and 8, respectively) under the same experimental conditions. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of ASA exert practically the same biologic profile in vitro and in vivo but showed different safety profiles. The mechanism of gastric ulcer formation exerted by aspirin and its two isomers warrants a more detailed and thorough investigation.

  7. Characterization of the variable regions of a chimpanzee monoclonal antibody with potent neutralizing activity against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Vijh-Warrier, S; Murphy, E; Yokoyama, I; Tilley, S A

    1995-10-01

    The variable (V) regions of C108G, a potent neutralizing chimpanzee mAb against a glycan-dependent epitope in the V2 region of HIV-1 gp120, have been characterized for reactivity with human VH and VK family-specific antisera, and their nucleotide sequences have been determined and analysed. To our knowledge, this is the first study characterizing expressed chimpanzee VH and VK genes. Results show that C108G expresses members of the VH3 and VK1 families, the largest VH and VK families in humans, respectively. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence analyses reveal that C108G VH is most homologous to the human VH3 germline gene, hsigdp33 or V3-43, and the human JH4 minigene. The human germline VK1 gene that is most homologous to C108G VK, hsigk1012, was previously observed in unmutated form in a human autoantibody with anti-i red blood cell antigen specificity and in seven human Fabs and a mAb directed against epitopes overlapping the CD4-binding site of HIV-1 gp120. This germline gene was unmutated in three of the human Fabs and was somatically mutated in the other four Fabs and the mAb. In addition, the JK minigene was used in C108G VK, JK2, is apparently over-represented in anti-HIV-1 mAbs/Fabs; this minigene was used in 61% of the anti-gp120 human Fabs recently described and in three other anti-CD4-binding site human mAbs derived by EBV transformation. While the significance of these findings is unclear, they may suggest a bias in VK/JK gene usage and/or network regulation involving an hsigk1012/JK2 idiotope(s) in the antibody response to HIV-1. Both the C108G VH and VK genes showed evidence of somatic mutation and antigen selection that apparently occurred in vivo during chronic exposure to HIV-1 and its antigens. Surprisingly, this somatic mutation was most profound in the CDR3 region of C108G VK; this region shared only 48% nucleotide homology with hsigk1012 contrasted with a homology of 94% over the remainder of these two V gene sequences. Perhaps the most

  8. Comparison of hemagglutination inhibition test and ELISA in quantification of antibodies to egg drop syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Raj, G Dhinakar; Ratnapraba, S; Matheswaran, K; Nachimuthu, K

    2004-01-01

    A single-serum dilution ELISA for egg drop syndrome (EDS) virus-specific antibodies was developed. In testing 425 chicken sera it was found to have a 93.6% sensitivity and 98.7% specificity relative to a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. The correlation coefficient for ELISA and HI titers was 0.793. The ELISA was efficacious in quantification of both vaccinal and infection antibodies and could routinely be used for screening large numbers of field sera.

  9. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase: selective inhibition by potent n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates.

    PubMed

    Quistad, Gary B; Fisher, Karl J; Owen, Sarah C; Klintenberg, Rebecka; Casida, John E

    2005-06-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent endogenous phospholipid modulator of diverse biological activities, including inflammation and shock. PAF levels are primarily regulated by PAF acetylhydrolases (PAF-AHs). These enzymes are candidate secondary targets of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and related toxicants. Previously known OP inhibitors of other serine hydrolases were tested with PAF-AH from mouse brain and testes of established functional importance compared with the structurally different human plasma enzyme. Several key OP pesticides and their oxon metabolites were very poor inhibitors of mouse brain and human plasma PAF-AH in vitro but moderately active for mouse brain and blood PAF-AH in vivo (e.g., tribufos defoliant and profenofos insecticide, presumably following oxidative bioactivation). OP compounds were then designed for maximum in vitro potency and selectivity for mouse brain PAF-AH vs. acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Lead compounds were found in a series of benzodioxaphosphorin 2-oxides. Ultrahigh potency and selectivity were achieved with n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates (long-chain sarin analogs): mouse brain and testes IC50 < or = 5 nM for C(8)-C(18) analogs and 0.1-0.6 nM for C(13) and C(14) compounds; human plasma IC50 < or = 2 nM for C(13)-C(18) analogs. AChE inhibitory potency decreased as chain length increased with maximum brain PAF-AH/AChE selectivity (>3000-fold) for C(13)-C(18) compounds. The toxicity of i.p.-administered PAF (LD50 ca. 0.5 mg/kg) was increased less than 2-fold by pretreatment with tribufos or the C(13)n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridate. These studies with a mouse model indicate that PAF-AH is not a major secondary target of OP pesticide poisoning. The optimized PAF-AH inhibitors may facilitate investigations on other aspects of PAF metabolism and action.

  10. Potent and Selective Peptide-based Inhibition of the G Protein Gαq.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Thomas H; Waldo, Gary L; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D; Kash, Thomas L; Harden, T Kendall; Sondek, John

    2016-12-02

    In contrast to G protein-coupled receptors, for which chemical and peptidic inhibitors have been extensively explored, few compounds are available that directly modulate heterotrimeric G proteins. Active Gαq binds its two major classes of effectors, the phospholipase C (PLC)-β isozymes and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs) related to Trio, in a strikingly similar fashion: a continuous helix-turn-helix of the effectors engages Gαq within its canonical binding site consisting of a groove formed between switch II and helix α3. This information was exploited to synthesize peptides that bound active Gαq in vitro with affinities similar to full-length effectors and directly competed with effectors for engagement of Gαq A representative peptide was specific for active Gαq because it did not bind inactive Gαq or other classes of active Gα subunits and did not inhibit the activation of PLC-β3 by Gβ1γ2 In contrast, the peptide robustly prevented activation of PLC-β3 or p63RhoGEF by Gαq; it also prevented G protein-coupled receptor-promoted neuronal depolarization downstream of Gαq in the mouse prefrontal cortex. Moreover, a genetically encoded form of this peptide flanked by fluorescent proteins inhibited Gαq-dependent activation of PLC-β3 at least as effectively as a dominant-negative form of full-length PLC-β3. These attributes suggest that related, cell-penetrating peptides should effectively inhibit active Gαq in cells and that these and genetically encoded sequences may find application as molecular probes, drug leads, and biosensors to monitor the spatiotemporal activation of Gαq in cells.

  11. Adamantyl Analogues of Paracetamol as Potent Analgesic Drugs via Inhibition of TRPA1

    PubMed Central

    Fresno, Nieves; Pérez-Fernández, Ruth; Goicoechea, Carlos; Alkorta, Ibon; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; de la Torre-Martínez, Roberto; Quirce, Susana; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Martín, M. Isabel; Goya, Pilar; Elguero, José

    2014-01-01

    Paracetamol also known as acetaminophen, is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent. We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of adamantyl analogues of paracetamol with important analgesic properties. The mechanism of nociception of compound 6a/b, an analog of paracetamol, is not exerted through direct interaction with cannabinoid receptors, nor by inhibiting COX. It behaves as an interesting selective TRPA1 channel antagonist, which may be responsible for its analgesic properties, whereas it has no effect on the TRPM8 nor TRPV1 channels. The possibility of replacing a phenyl ring by an adamantyl ring opens new avenues in other fields of medicinal chemistry. PMID:25438056

  12. Adamantyl analogues of paracetamol as potent analgesic drugs via inhibition of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Fresno, Nieves; Pérez-Fernández, Ruth; Goicoechea, Carlos; Alkorta, Ibon; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; de la Torre-Martínez, Roberto; Quirce, Susana; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Martín, M Isabel; Goya, Pilar; Elguero, José

    2014-01-01

    Paracetamol also known as acetaminophen, is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic agent. We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of adamantyl analogues of paracetamol with important analgesic properties. The mechanism of nociception of compound 6a/b, an analog of paracetamol, is not exerted through direct interaction with cannabinoid receptors, nor by inhibiting COX. It behaves as an interesting selective TRPA1 channel antagonist, which may be responsible for its analgesic properties, whereas it has no effect on the TRPM8 nor TRPV1 channels. The possibility of replacing a phenyl ring by an adamantyl ring opens new avenues in other fields of medicinal chemistry.

  13. Phenoxy herbicides and fibrates potently inhibit the human chemosensory receptor subunit T1R3

    PubMed Central

    Maillet, Emeline L.; Margolskee, Robert F.; Mosinger, Bedrich

    2009-01-01

    We show that phenoxy-auxin herbicides and lipid-lowering fibrates inhibit human but not rodent T1R3. T1R3 as a co-receptor in taste cells responds to sweet compounds and amino-acids; in endocrine cells of gut and pancreas T1R3 contributes to glucose sensing. Thus, certain effects of fibrates in treating hyperlipidemia and type II diabetes may be via actions on T1R3. Likewise, phenoxy-herbicides may have adverse metabolic effects in humans that would have gone undetected in studies on rodents. PMID:19817384

  14. Overcoming the Constraints of Anti-HIV/CD89 Bispecific Antibodies That Limit Viral Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Mark; Posner, Marshall R.

    2016-01-01

    Innovative strategies are necessary to maximize the clinical application of HIV neutralizing antibodies. To this end, bispecific constructs of human antibody F240, reactive with well-conserved gp41 epitope and antibody 14A8, reactive with the IgA receptor (CD89) on effector cells, were constructed. A F240 × 14A8 bispecific single chain variable region (scFv) molecule was constructed by linking two scFvs using a conventional GGGGS linker. Despite immunoreactivity with HIV gp41 and neutrophils, this bispecific scFv failed to inhibit HIV infection. This is in sharp contrast to viral inhibition using a chemical conjugate of the Fab of these two antibodies. Therefore, we constructed two novel Fab-like bispecific antibody molecules centered on fusion of the IgG1 CH1 domain or CH1-hinge domain to the C-terminus of F240scFv and fusion of the kappa chain CL domain to the C-terminus of 14A8scFv. Both Bi-Fab antibodies showed significant ADCVI activity for multiple clade B and clade C isolates by arming the neutrophils to inhibit HIV infection. The approach presented in this study is unique for HIV immunotherapy in that the impetus of neutralization is to arm and mobilize PMN to destroy HIV and HIV infected cells. PMID:27419146

  15. Method for Extracting Viral Hemagglutination-Inhibiting Antibodies from the Nonspecific Inhibitors of Serum

    PubMed Central

    Altemeier, William A.; Mundon, Francis K.; Top, Franklin H.; Russell, Philip K.

    1970-01-01

    Various methods are used to remove nonspecific inhibitors from sera before titering viral hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies. These methods have several undesirable features; some are tedious and time-consuming, some remove antibody along with nonspecific inhibitors, and different techniques are usually required to remove the nonspecific inhibitors for different viruses. This communication describes a single method that uses diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex to extract the immunoglobulin G antibodies for several viruses from nonspecific inhibitors. The procedure is fast, simple to perform, and removed the nonspecific inhibitors for influenza, Western equine encephalitis, dengue-2, and rubella viruses. Images PMID:5463576

  16. A-62176, a potent topoisomerase inhibitor, inhibits the expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Lin; Jeon, Kyung-Hwa; Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Choi, Yongmun; Kim, Dae-Kee; Na, Younghwa; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2012-12-01

    HER2 overexpression is observed in ∼6-35% of all gastric cancers, while co-amplification of topoisomerase IIα occurs in ∼32-90% of all cancers with HER2 amplification. The present study reports that HER2 expression is down-regulated by A-62176, a fluoroquinophenoxazine derivative that we previously demonstrated to inhibit topoisomerase I and IIα. The results suggest that A-62176 inhibits the interaction between the ESX, an ets transcription factor, and its co-activator Sur2, leading to the attenuation of HER2-mediated phosphorylation of MAPK/Akt. A-62176 arrests the cell cycle in the G1 phase via the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and the up-regulation of p27(Kip1) in NCI-N87 gastric cancer cells. The combination of A-62176 with doxorubicin provides a strong synergistic activity. We propose that A-62176 is a dual inhibitor that impairs the expression of HER2 and restrains the activity of topoisomerase IIα. Our results may lead to the rational design of anticancer molecules targeting a subgroup of gastric cancer cells overexpressing both HER2 and topoisomerase IIα.

  17. Isatin-pyrazole benzenesulfonamide hybrids potently inhibit tumor-associated carbonic anhydrase isoforms IX and XII.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Abou-Seri, Sahar M; Tanc, Muhammet; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-10-20

    New series of benzenesulfonamide derivatives incorporating pyrazole and isatin moieties were prepared using celecoxib as lead molecule. Biological evaluation of the target compounds was performed against the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) and more precisely against the human isoforms hCA I, II (cytosolic), IX and XII (transmembrane, tumor-associated enzymes). Most of the tested compounds efficiently inhibited hCA I, II and IX, with KIs of 2.5-102 nM, being more effective than the reference drug acetazolamide. Compounds 11e, 11f, 16e and 16f were found to inhibit hCA XII with Ki of 3.7, 6.5, 5.4 and 7.2 nM, respectively. Compounds 11e and 16e, with 5-NO2 substitution on the isatin ring, were found to be selective inhibitors of hCA IX and hCA XII. Docking studies revealed that the NO2 group of both compounds participate in interactions with Asp132 within the hCA IX active site, and with residues Lys67 and Asp130 in hCA XII, respectively.

  18. In vitro inhibition of Cryptosporidium parvum infection by human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, B C; Wisnewski, A V; Johnson, J; Fenwick-Smith, D; Wiest, P; Hamer, D; Kresina, T; Flanigan, T P

    1997-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum infection of the small epithelial intestine causes unremitting diarrhea and malabsorption that can lead to chronic and sometimes fatal illness in patients with AIDS. The illness may be ameliorated by passive oral immunoglobulin therapy. The objective of this study was to produce anti-Cryptosporidium human monoclonal antibodies for evaluation as potential therapy. All human monoclonal cell lines that produced C. parvum antibodies were originally generated from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative woman. She had recovered from C. parvum infection and had a high specific antibody titer. Hybridization of these lymphocytes with a tumor cell line was accomplished by hypo-osmolar electrofusion. Twelve clones were identified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as secreting anti-Cryptosporidium antibodies after the initial hybridization. From the 12 positive clones, two high antibody-secreting clones, 17A and 17B, were maintained in long-term culture. A second hybridization produced two other human monoclonal cell lines, EC5 and BB2. Human monoclonal antibody from the first two cell lines bound to C. parvum sporozoites and oocysts by immunofluorescence. The ability of human monoclonal antibodies to inhibit C. parvum infection in vitro was assessed by using a human enterocyte cell line, HT29.74. The antibodies of the four different human hybridomas inhibited infection by 35 to 68% (P < 0.05) compared to a control irrelevant human monoclonal antibody derived in a similar fashion. Human monoclonal antibodies are candidate molecules for immunotherapy of C. parvum infection. PMID:9284173

  19. A monoclonal antibody targeting ErbB2 domain III inhibits ErbB2 signaling and suppresses the growth of ErbB2-overexpressing breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Y; Zheng, L; Yang, Y; Wang, H; Dong, J; Wang, C; Zhang, Y; Yu, X; Wang, L; Xia, T; Zhang, D; Guo, Y; Li, B

    2016-01-01

    The anti-ErbB2 antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab in combination have recently been approved for the treatment of patients with ErbB2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Pertuzumab, which binds to ErbB2 near the center of domain II, and trastuzumab, which binds to the juxtamembrane region of ErbB2 domain IV, directly interfere with domain II- and domain IV-mediated heterodimerization contacts, respectively. In this study, we report a novel anti-ErbB2 antibody, 3E10, which binds to an epitope in domain III that appears to be located opposite to the dimerization interfaces in domain II and domain IV of ErbB2. Our data show that the 3E10 antibody inhibits ErbB2 heterodimerization via a mechanism that strikingly differs from trastuzumab and pertuzumab. It could be speculated that the 3E10 antibody may affect ErbB2 heterodimerization by causing major conformational changes of ErbB2. Furthermore, 3E10 provides synergistic inhibition of ErbB2 heterodimerization and signaling in combination with either trastuzumab or pertuzumab. The combination of these three anti-ErbB2 antibodies that have complementary mechanisms of action appears to be an extremely potent ErbB2 heterodimerization blocker. Compared with trastuzumab plus pertuzumab, the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab and 3E10 provides a more potent blockade of ErbB2 signaling. Consistent with this, trastuzumab plus pertuzumab plus 3E10 results in greater in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity in ErbB2-overexpressing breast tumor models, suggesting its potential use for treating ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer. PMID:26999718

  20. A monoclonal antibody targeting ErbB2 domain III inhibits ErbB2 signaling and suppresses the growth of ErbB2-overexpressing breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Meng, Y; Zheng, L; Yang, Y; Wang, H; Dong, J; Wang, C; Zhang, Y; Yu, X; Wang, L; Xia, T; Zhang, D; Guo, Y; Li, B

    2016-03-21

    The anti-ErbB2 antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab in combination have recently been approved for the treatment of patients with ErbB2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Pertuzumab, which binds to ErbB2 near the center of domain II, and trastuzumab, which binds to the juxtamembrane region of ErbB2 domain IV, directly interfere with domain II- and domain IV-mediated heterodimerization contacts, respectively. In this study, we report a novel anti-ErbB2 antibody, 3E10, which binds to an epitope in domain III that appears to be located opposite to the dimerization interfaces in domain II and domain IV of ErbB2. Our data show that the 3E10 antibody inhibits ErbB2 heterodimerization via a mechanism that strikingly differs from trastuzumab and pertuzumab. It could be speculated that the 3E10 antibody may affect ErbB2 heterodimerization by causing major conformational changes of ErbB2. Furthermore, 3E10 provides synergistic inhibition of ErbB2 heterodimerization and signaling in combination with either trastuzumab or pertuzumab. The combination of these three anti-ErbB2 antibodies that have complementary mechanisms of action appears to be an extremely potent ErbB2 heterodimerization blocker. Compared with trastuzumab plus pertuzumab, the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab and 3E10 provides a more potent blockade of ErbB2 signaling. Consistent with this, trastuzumab plus pertuzumab plus 3E10 results in greater in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity in ErbB2-overexpressing breast tumor models, suggesting its potential use for treating ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer.

  1. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile; Hoglund, Anna-Stina; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) inhibition emerges as an effective means for probing gene function in plant cells. Employing this method we have established the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor for regulation of starch synthesis in barley endosperm, and arrived at a model for the role of the SUSIBAs in sugar signaling and source-sink commutation during cereal endosperm development. In this addendum we provide additional data demonstrating the suitability of the antisense ODN technology in studies on starch branching enzyme activities in barley leaves. We also comment on the mechanism for ODN uptake in plant cells. Antisense ODNs are short (12-25 nt-long) stretches of single-stranded ODNs that hybridize to the cognate mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby inhibiting gene expression. They are naturally occurring in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes where they partake in gene regulation and defense against viral infection. The mechanisms for antisense ODN inhibition are not fully understood but it is generally considered that the ODN either sterically interferes with translation or promotes transcript degradation by RNase H activation. The earliest indication of the usefulness of antisense ODN technology for the purposes of molecular biology and medical therapy was the demonstration in 1978 that synthetic ODNs complementary to Raos sarcoma virus could inhibit virus replication in tissue cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts. Since then the antisense ODN technology has been widely used in animal sciences and as an important emerging therapeutic approach in clinical medicine. However, antisense ODN inhibition has been an under-exploited strategy for plant tissues, although the prospects for plant cells in suspension cultures to take up single-stranded ODNs was reported over a decade ago. In 2001, two reports from Malho and coworker demonstrated the use of cationic-complexed antisense ODNs to suppress expression of genes encoding pollen

  2. A human antibody to the CD4 binding site of gp120 capable of highly potent but sporadic cross clade neutralization of primary HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Gach, Johannes S; Quendler, Heribert; Tong, Tommy; Narayan, Kristin M; Du, Sean X; Whalen, Robert G; Binley, James M; Forthal, Donald N; Poignard, Pascal; Zwick, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Primary isolates of HIV-1 resist neutralization by most antibodies to the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) on gp120 due to occlusion of this site on the trimeric spike. We describe 1F7, a human CD4bs monoclonal antibody that was found to be exceptionally potent against the HIV-1 primary isolate JR-FL. However, 1F7 failed to neutralize a patient-matched primary isolate, JR-CSF even though the two isolates differ by <10% in gp120 at the protein level. In an HIV-1 cross clade panel (n = 157), 1F7 exhibited moderate breadth, but occasionally achieved considerable potency. In binding experiments using monomeric gp120s of select resistant isolates and domain-swap chimeras between JR-FL and JR-CSF, recognition by 1F7 was limited by sequence polymorphisms involving at least the C2 region of Env. Putative N-linked glycosylation site (PNGS) mutations, notably at position 197, allowed 1F7 to neutralize JR-CSF potently without improving binding to the cognate, monomeric gp120. In contrast, flow cytometry experiments using the same PNGS mutants revealed that 1F7 binding is enhanced on cognate trimeric Env. BN-PAGE mobility shift experiments revealed that 1F7 is sensitive to the diagnostic mutation D368R in the CD4 binding loop of gp120. Our data on 1F7 reinforce how exquisitely targeted CD4bs antibodies must be to achieve cross neutralization of two closely related primary isolates. High-resolution analyses of trimeric Env that show the orientation of glycans and polymorphic elements of the CD4bs that affect binding to antibodies like 1F7 are desirable to understand how to promote immunogenicity of more conserved elements of the CD4bs.

  3. Actions of adenosine A1 and A2 receptor antagonists on CFTR antibody-inhibited β-adrenergic mucin secretion response

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, M M C; Lloyd Mills, C; Dormer, R L; McPherson, M A

    1998-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis gene protein, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) acts as a chloride channel and is a key regulator of mucin secretion. The mechanism by which 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) corrects the defect in CFTR mediated β-adrenergic stimulation of mucin secretion has not been determined. The present study has investigated the actions of adenosine A1 and A2 receptor antagonists to determine whether ability to stimulate mucin secretion correlates with correction of CFTR antibody inhibited β-adrenergic response and whether excessive cyclic AMP rise is required.CFTR antibodies were introduced into living rat submandibular acini by hypotonic swelling. Following recovery, mucin secretion in response to isoproterenol was measured.The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, 8 cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT) was a less potent stimulator of mucin secretion than was the A2 receptor antagonist dimethylpropargylxanthine (DMPX). A concentration of CPT close to the Ki for A1 receptor antagonism (10 nM) did not stimulate mucin secretion.DMPX, although a potent stimulator of mucin secretion, did not correct CFTR antibody inhibited mucin secretion.CPT corrected defective CFTR antibody inhibited mucin secretion at a high (1 mM) concentration, suggesting a mechanism other than adenosine receptor antagonism.DMPX potentiated the isoproterenol induced cyclic AMP rise, whereas CPT did not.Correction of the defective CFTR mucin secretion response did not correlate with ability to stimulate mucin secretion and did not require potentiation of β-adrenergic induced increases in cyclic AMP. This affords real promise for the development of a selective drug treatment for cystic fibrosis. PMID:9831904

  4. Potent and Specific Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Glen A.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2002-01-01

    Synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been shown to induce the degradation of specific mRNA targets in human cells by inducing RNA interference (RNAi). Here, we demonstrate that siRNA duplexes targeted against the essential Tat and Rev regulatory proteins encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can specifically block Tat and Rev expression and function. More importantly, we show that these same siRNAs can effectively inhibit HIV-1 gene expression and replication in cell cultures, including those of human T-cell lines and primary lymphocytes. These observations demonstrate that RNAi can effectively block virus replication in human cells and raise the possibility that RNAi could provide an important innate protective response, particularly against viruses that express double-stranded RNAs as part of their replication cycle. PMID:12186906

  5. PCSK9 Inhibition With Monoclonal Antibodies: Modern Management of Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Raul D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Current guidelines for hypercholesterolemia treatment emphasize lifestyle modification and lipid‐modifying therapy to reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease. Statins are the primary class of agents used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Although statins are effective for many patients, they fail to achieve optimal reduction in lipids for some patients, including those who have or are at high risk for cardiovascular disease. The PCSK9 gene was identified in the past decade as a potential therapeutic target for the management of patients with hypercholesterolemia. Pharmacologic interventions to decrease PCSK9 levels are in development, with the most promising approach using monoclonal antibodies that bind to PCSK9 in the plasma. Two monoclonal antibodies, alirocumab and evolocumab, have recently been approved for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, and a third one, bococizumab, is in phase 3 clinical development. All 3 agents achieve significant reductions in levels of low‐density lipoprotein cholesterol, as well as reductions in non‐high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, and lipoprotein(a). Long‐term outcome trials are under way to determine the sustained efficacy, safety, and tolerability of PCSK9 inhibitors and whether this novel class of agents decreases the risk for major cardiovascular events in patients on lipid‐modifying therapy. Available data suggest that PCSK9 inhibitors provide a robust reduction in atherogenic cholesterol levels with a good safety profile, especially for patients who fail to obtain an optimal clinical response to statin therapy, those who are statin intolerant or have contraindications to statin therapy, and those with familial hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27195910

  6. PCSK9 Inhibition With Monoclonal Antibodies: Modern Management of Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Ito, Matthew K; Santos, Raul D

    2017-01-01

    Current guidelines for hypercholesterolemia treatment emphasize lifestyle modification and lipid-modifying therapy to reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease. Statins are the primary class of agents used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Although statins are effective for many patients, they fail to achieve optimal reduction in lipids for some patients, including those who have or are at high risk for cardiovascular disease. The PCSK9 gene was identified in the past decade as a potential therapeutic target for the management of patients with hypercholesterolemia. Pharmacologic interventions to decrease PCSK9 levels are in development, with the most promising approach using monoclonal antibodies that bind to PCSK9 in the plasma. Two monoclonal antibodies, alirocumab and evolocumab, have recently been approved for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, and a third one, bococizumab, is in phase 3 clinical development. All 3 agents achieve significant reductions in levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, as well as reductions in non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, and lipoprotein(a). Long-term outcome trials are under way to determine the sustained efficacy, safety, and tolerability of PCSK9 inhibitors and whether this novel class of agents decreases the risk for major cardiovascular events in patients on lipid-modifying therapy. Available data suggest that PCSK9 inhibitors provide a robust reduction in atherogenic cholesterol levels with a good safety profile, especially for patients who fail to obtain an optimal clinical response to statin therapy, those who are statin intolerant or have contraindications to statin therapy, and those with familial hypercholesterolemia. © 2016, The Authors. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  7. A Novel Sulindac Derivative That Does Not Inhibit Cyclooxygenases but Potently Inhibits Colon Tumor Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis with Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gary A.; Keeton, Adam B.; Tinsley, Heather N.; Gary, Bernard D.; Whitt, Jason D.; Mathew, Bini; Thaiparambil, Jose; Coward, Lori; Gorman, Gregory; Li, Yonghe; Sani, Brahma; Hobrath, Judith V.; Maxuitenko, Yulia Y.; Reynolds, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as sulindac have shown promising antineoplastic activity, although toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis limits their use for chemoprevention. Previous studies have concluded that the mechanism responsible for their antineoplastic activity may be COX independent. To selectively design out the COX inhibitory activity of sulindac sulfide (SS), in silico modeling studies were done that revealed the crucial role of the carboxylate moiety for COX-1 and COX-2 binding. These studies prompted the synthesis of a series of SS derivatives with carboxylate modifications that were screened for tumor cell growth and COX inhibitory activity. A SS amide (SSA) with a N,N-dimethylethyl amine substitution was found to lack COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity, yet potently inhibit the growth of human colon tumor cell lines, HT-29, SW480, and HCT116 with IC50 values of 2 to 5 µmol/L compared with 73 to 85 µmol/L for SS. The mechanism of growth inhibition involved the suppression of DNA synthesis and apoptosis induction. Oral administration of SSA was well-tolerated in mice and generated plasma levels that exceeded its in vitro IC50 for tumor growth inhibition. In the human HT-29 colon tumor xenograft mouse model, SSA significantly inhibited tumor growth at a dosage of 250 mg/kg. Combined treatment of SSA with the chemotherapeutic drug, Camptosar, caused a more sustained suppression of tumor growth compared with Camptosar treatment alone. These results indicate that SSA has potential safety and efficacy advantages for colon cancer chemoprevention as well as utility for treating malignant disease if combined with chemotherapy. PMID:19470791

  8. A novel sulindac derivative that does not inhibit cyclooxygenases but potently inhibits colon tumor cell growth and induces apoptosis with antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Gary A; Keeton, Adam B; Tinsley, Heather N; Gary, Bernard D; Whitt, Jason D; Mathew, Bini; Thaiparambil, Jose; Coward, Lori; Gorman, Gregory; Li, Yonghe; Sani, Brahma; Hobrath, Judith V; Maxuitenko, Yulia Y; Reynolds, Robert C

    2009-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as sulindac have shown promising antineoplastic activity, although toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis limits their use for chemoprevention. Previous studies have concluded that the mechanism responsible for their antineoplastic activity may be COX independent. To selectively design out the COX inhibitory activity of sulindac sulfide (SS), in silico modeling studies were done that revealed the crucial role of the carboxylate moiety for COX-1 and COX-2 binding. These studies prompted the synthesis of a series of SS derivatives with carboxylate modifications that were screened for tumor cell growth and COX inhibitory activity. A SS amide (SSA) with a N,N-dimethylethyl amine substitution was found to lack COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity, yet potently inhibit the growth of human colon tumor cell lines, HT-29, SW480, and HCT116 with IC(50) values of 2 to 5 micromol/L compared with 73 to 85 micromol/L for SS. The mechanism of growth inhibition involved the suppression of DNA synthesis and apoptosis induction. Oral administration of SSA was well-tolerated in mice and generated plasma levels that exceeded its in vitro IC(50) for tumor growth inhibition. In the human HT-29 colon tumor xenograft mouse model, SSA significantly inhibited tumor growth at a dosage of 250 mg/kg. Combined treatment of SSA with the chemotherapeutic drug, Camptosar, caused a more sustained suppression of tumor growth compared with Camptosar treatment alone. These results indicate that SSA has potential safety and efficacy advantages for colon cancer chemoprevention as well as utility for treating malignant disease if combined with chemotherapy.

  9. Miniaturized Growth Inhibition Assay to Assess the Anti-blood Stage Activity of Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Elizabeth H; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S

    2015-01-01

    While no immune correlate for blood-stage specific immunity against Plasmodium falciparum malaria has been identified, there is strong evidence that antibodies directed to various malarial antigens play a crucial role. In an effort to evaluate the role of antibodies in inhibiting growth and/or invasion of erythrocytic stages of the malaria parasite it will be necessary to test large sample sets from Phase 2a/b trials as well as epidemiological studies. The major constraints for such analyses are (1) availability of sufficient sample quantities (especially from infants and small children) and (2) the throughput of standard growth inhibition assays. The method described here assesses growth- and invasion inhibition by measuring the metabolic activity and viability of the parasite (by using a parasite lactate dehydrogenase-specific substrate) in a 384-microtiter plate format. This culture method can be extended beyond the described detection system to accommodate other techniques commonly used for growth/invasion-inhibition.

  10. A novel small molecule agent displays potent anti-myeloma activity by inhibiting the JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jingyu; Xu, Yujia; Wang, Siyu; Xu, Xin; Ji, Peng; Yu, Yang; Cao, Biyin; Han, Kunkun; Hou, Tingjun; Xu, Zhuan; Kong, Yan; Jiang, Gaofeng; Tang, Xiaowen; Qiao, Chunhua; Mao, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic STAT3 signaling pathway is emerging as a promising target for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). In the present study, we identified a novel STAT3 inhibitor SC99 in a target-based high throughput screen. SC99 inhibited JAK2-STAT3 activation but had no effects on other transcription factors such as NF-κB, and kinases such as AKT, ERK, and c-Src that are in association with STAT3 signaling pathway. Furthermore, SC99 downregulated the expression of STAT3-modulated genes, including Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, VEGF, cyclin D2, and E2F-1. By inhibiting the STAT3 signaling, SC99 induced MM cell apoptosis which could be partly abolished by the ectopic expression of STAT3. Furthermore, SC99 displayed potent anti-MM activity in two independent MM xenograft models in nude mice. Oral administration of SC99 led to marked decrease of tumor growth within 10 days at a daily dosage of 30 mg/kg, but did not raise toxic effects. Taken together, this study identified a novel oral JAK2/STAT3 inhibitor that could be developed as an anti-myeloma agent. PMID:26814430

  11. Structural basis for the potent inhibition of the HIV integrase-LEDGF/p75 protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Ribone, Sergio R; Quevedo, Mario A

    2017-08-01

    Integrase (IN) constitutes one of the key enzymes involved in the lifecycle of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), the etiological agent of AIDS. The biological role of IN strongly depends on the recognition and binding of cellular cofactors belonging to the infected host cell. Thus, the inhibition of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) between IN and cellular cofactors has been envisioned as a promising therapeutic target. In the present work we explore a structure-activity relationship for a set of 14 compounds reported as inhibitors of the PPI between IN and the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). Our results demonstrate that the possibility to adopt the bioactive conformation capable of interacting with the hotspots IN-LEDGF/p75 hotspots residues constitutes a critical feature to obtain a potent inhibition. A ligand efficiency (|Lig-Eff|) quantitative descriptor combining both interaction energetics and conformational requirements was developed and correlated with the reported biological activity. Our results contribute to the rational development of IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction inhibitors providing a solid quantitative structure-activity relationship aimed for the screening of new IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development and Characterization of a Humanized Anti-HER2 Antibody HuA21 with Potent Anti-Tumor Properties in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruilin; Hu, Siyi; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Zhihui; Zha, Zhao; Huang, Hui; Shen, Guodong; Liu, Jing; Song, Lihua; Wei, Wei

    2016-04-15

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer immunotherapy. An engineered anti-HER-2 chimeric A21 antibody (chA21) is a chimeric antibody targeted to subdomain I of the HER2 extracellular domain. Here, we report the anti-tumor activity of the novel engineered monoclonal antibody humanized chA21 (HuA21) that targets HER2 on the basis of chA21, and we describe the underlying mechanisms. Our results reveal that HuA21 markedly inhibits the proliferation and migration of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and causes enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity potency against HER2-overexpressing tumor cells. In particular, HuA21, but not trastuzumab (Tra), markedly suppresses growth and enhances the internalization of the antibody in Tra-resistant BT-474 breast cancer cells. These characteristics are highly associated with the intrinsic ability of HuA21 to down-regulate HER2 activation and inhibit the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathways. Furthermore, the combination of HuA21 with Tra synergistically enhances the anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo and inhibits HER2 activation and the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways. Altogether, our results suggest that HuA21 may represent a unique anti-HER2 antibody with potential as a therapeutic candidate alone or in combination with other anti-HER2 reagents in cancer therapy.

  13. Development and Characterization of a Humanized Anti-HER2 Antibody HuA21 with Potent Anti-Tumor Properties in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruilin; Hu, Siyi; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Zhihui; Zha, Zhao; Huang, Hui; Shen, Guodong; Liu, Jing; Song, Lihua; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer immunotherapy. An engineered anti-HER-2 chimeric A21 antibody (chA21) is a chimeric antibody targeted to subdomain I of the HER2 extracellular domain. Here, we report the anti-tumor activity of the novel engineered monoclonal antibody humanized chA21 (HuA21) that targets HER2 on the basis of chA21, and we describe the underlying mechanisms. Our results reveal that HuA21 markedly inhibits the proliferation and migration of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and causes enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity potency against HER2-overexpressing tumor cells. In particular, HuA21, but not trastuzumab (Tra), markedly suppresses growth and enhances the internalization of the antibody in Tra-resistant BT-474 breast cancer cells. These characteristics are highly associated with the intrinsic ability of HuA21 to down-regulate HER2 activation and inhibit the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathways. Furthermore, the combination of HuA21 with Tra synergistically enhances the anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo and inhibits HER2 activation and the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways. Altogether, our results suggest that HuA21 may represent a unique anti-HER2 antibody with potential as a therapeutic candidate alone or in combination with other anti-HER2 reagents in cancer therapy. PMID:27092488

  14. Phyto-power dietary supplement potently inhibits dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Fen; Tsai, Mei-Ling; Sun, Pei-Pei; Chien, Ling-Lung; Cheng, An-Chin; Ma, Nianhan Jia-Lin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2013-02-26

    Curcumin has been extensively studied for its therapeutic effects in a variety of disorders. Fermented soy consumption is associated with a low incidence rate of chronic diseases in many Asian countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential underlying mechanisms of the effect of a phyto-power dietary supplement on liver fibrosis. Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with dimethylnitrosamine (DMN; 10 mg kg(-1)) three times a week for four consecutive weeks. A phyto-power dietary supplement (50 or 100 mg kg(-1)) was administered by oral gavage daily for four weeks. Liver morphology, function, and fibrotic status were examined in DMN induced hepatic fibrogenesis. However, a phyto-power dietary supplement alleviated liver damage as indicated by histopathological examination of the α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen I, accompanied by the concomitant reduction of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). These data indicate that the phyto-power dietary supplement may inhibit the TGF-β1/Smad signaling and relieve liver damage in experimental fibrosis.

  15. Tafamidis, a potent and selective transthyretin kinetic stabilizer that inhibits the amyloid cascade

    PubMed Central

    Bulawa, Christine E.; Connelly, Stephen; DeVit, Michael; Wang, Lan; Weigel, Charlotte; Fleming, James A.; Packman, Jeff; Powers, Evan T.; Wiseman, R. Luke; Foss, Theodore R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Labaudinière, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The transthyretin amyloidoses (ATTR) are invariably fatal diseases characterized by progressive neuropathy and/or cardiomyopathy. ATTR are caused by aggregation of transthyretin (TTR), a natively tetrameric protein involved in the transport of thyroxine and the vitamin A–retinol-binding protein complex. Mutations within TTR that cause autosomal dominant forms of disease facilitate tetramer dissociation, monomer misfolding, and aggregation, although wild-type TTR can also form amyloid fibrils in elderly patients. Because tetramer dissociation is the rate-limiting step in TTR amyloidogenesis, targeted therapies have focused on small molecules that kinetically stabilize the tetramer, inhibiting TTR amyloid fibril formation. One such compound, tafamidis meglumine (Fx-1006A), has recently completed Phase II/III trials for the treatment of Transthyretin Type Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) and demonstrated a slowing of disease progression in patients heterozygous for the V30M TTR mutation. Herein we describe the molecular and structural basis of TTR tetramer stabilization by tafamidis. Tafamidis binds selectively and with negative cooperativity (Kds ∼2 nM and ∼200 nM) to the two normally unoccupied thyroxine-binding sites of the tetramer, and kinetically stabilizes TTR. Patient-derived amyloidogenic variants of TTR, including kinetically and thermodynamically less stable mutants, are also stabilized by tafamidis binding. The crystal structure of tafamidis-bound TTR suggests that binding stabilizes the weaker dimer-dimer interface against dissociation, the rate-limiting step of amyloidogenesis. PMID:22645360

  16. Tafamidis, a potent and selective transthyretin kinetic stabilizer that inhibits the amyloid cascade.

    PubMed

    Bulawa, Christine E; Connelly, Stephen; Devit, Michael; Wang, Lan; Weigel, Charlotte; Fleming, James A; Packman, Jeff; Powers, Evan T; Wiseman, R Luke; Foss, Theodore R; Wilson, Ian A; Kelly, Jeffery W; Labaudinière, Richard

    2012-06-12

    The transthyretin amyloidoses (ATTR) are invariably fatal diseases characterized by progressive neuropathy and/or cardiomyopathy. ATTR are caused by aggregation of transthyretin (TTR), a natively tetrameric protein involved in the transport of thyroxine and the vitamin A-retinol-binding protein complex. Mutations within TTR that cause autosomal dominant forms of disease facilitate tetramer dissociation, monomer misfolding, and aggregation, although wild-type TTR can also form amyloid fibrils in elderly patients. Because tetramer dissociation is the rate-limiting step in TTR amyloidogenesis, targeted therapies have focused on small molecules that kinetically stabilize the tetramer, inhibiting TTR amyloid fibril formation. One such compound, tafamidis meglumine (Fx-1006A), has recently completed Phase II/III trials for the treatment of Transthyretin Type Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) and demonstrated a slowing of disease progression in patients heterozygous for the V30M TTR mutation. Herein we describe the molecular and structural basis of TTR tetramer stabilization by tafamidis. Tafamidis binds selectively and with negative cooperativity (K(d)s ~2 nM and ~200 nM) to the two normally unoccupied thyroxine-binding sites of the tetramer, and kinetically stabilizes TTR. Patient-derived amyloidogenic variants of TTR, including kinetically and thermodynamically less stable mutants, are also stabilized by tafamidis binding. The crystal structure of tafamidis-bound TTR suggests that binding stabilizes the weaker dimer-dimer interface against dissociation, the rate-limiting step of amyloidogenesis.

  17. Diethylstilbestrol can effectively accelerate estradiol-17-O-glucuronidation, while potently inhibiting estradiol-3-O-glucuronidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Liangliang; Xiao, Ling; Xia, Yangliu; Zhou, Kun; Wang, Huili; Huang, Minyi; Ge, Guangbo; Wu, Yan; Wu, Ganlin; Yang, Ling

    2015-03-01

    This in vitro study investigates the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES), a widely used toxic synthetic estrogen, on estradiol-3- and 17-O- (E2-3/17-O) glucuronidation, via culturing human liver microsomes (HLMs) or recombinant UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) with DES and E2. DES can potently inhibit E2-3-O-glucuronidation in HLM, a probe reaction for UGT1A1. Kinetic assays indicate that the inhibition follows a competitive inhibition mechanism, with the Ki value of 2.1 ± 0.3 μM, which is less than the possible in vivo level. In contrast to the inhibition on E2-3-O-glucuronidation, the acceleration is observed on E2-17-O-glucuronidation in HLM, in which cholestatic E2-17-O-glucuronide is generated. In the presence of DES (0–6.25 μM), K{sub m} values for E2-17-O-glucuronidation are located in the range of 7.2–7.4 μM, while V{sub max} values range from 0.38 to 1.54 nmol/min/mg. The mechanism behind the activation in HLM is further demonstrated by the fact that DES can efficiently elevate the activity of UGT1A4 in catalyzing E2-17-O-glucuronidation. The presence of DES (2 μM) can elevate V{sub max} from 0.016 to 0.81 nmol/min/mg, while lifting K{sub m} in a much lesser extent from 4.4 to 11 μM. Activation of E2-17-O-glucuronidation is well described by a two binding site model, with K{sub A}, α, and β values of 0.077 ± 0.18 μM, 3.3 ± 1.1 and 104 ± 56, respectively. However, diverse effects of DES towards E2-3/17-O-glucuronidation are not observed in liver microsomes from several common experimental animals. In summary, this study issues new potential toxic mechanisms for DES: potently inhibiting the activity of UGT1A1 and powerfully accelerating the formation of cholestatic E2-17-O-glucuronide by UGT1A4. - Highlights: • E2-3-O-glucuronidation in HLM is inhibited when co-incubated with DES. • E2-17-O-glucuronidation in HLM is stimulated when co-incubated with DES. • Acceleration of E2-17-O-glucuronidationin in HLM by DES is via activating the

  18. Potent and Specific Inhibition of Glycosidases by Small Artificial Binding Proteins (Affitins)

    PubMed Central

    Mechaly, Ariel E.; Obal, Gonzalo; Béhar, Ghislaine; Mouratou, Barbara; Oppezzo, Pablo; Alzari, Pedro M.; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Glycosidases are associated with various human diseases. The development of efficient and specific inhibitors may provide powerful tools to modulate their activity. However, achieving high selectivity is a major challenge given that glycosidases with different functions can have similar enzymatic mechanisms and active-site architectures. As an alternative approach to small-chemical compounds, proteinaceous inhibitors might provide a better specificity by involving a larger surface area of interaction. We report here the design and characterization of proteinaceous inhibitors that specifically target endoglycosidases representative of the two major mechanistic classes; retaining and inverting glycosidases. These inhibitors consist of artificial affinity proteins, Affitins, selected against the thermophilic CelD from Clostridium thermocellum and lysozyme from hen egg. They were obtained from libraries of Sac7d variants, which involve either the randomization of a surface or the randomization of a surface and an artificially-extended loop. Glycosidase binders exhibited affinities in the nanomolar range with no cross-recognition, with efficient inhibition of lysozyme (Ki = 45 nM) and CelD (Ki = 95 and 111 nM), high expression yields in Escherichia coli, solubility, and thermal stabilities up to 81.1°C. The crystal structures of glycosidase-Affitin complexes validate our library designs. We observed that Affitins prevented substrate access by two modes of binding; covering or penetrating the catalytic site via the extended loop. In addition, Affitins formed salt-bridges with residues essential for enzymatic activity. These results lead us to propose the use of Affitins as versatile selective glycosidase inhibitors and, potentially, as enzymatic inhibitors in general. PMID:24823716

  19. Fasudil hydrochloride, a potent ROCK inhibitor, inhibits corneal neovascularization after alkali burns in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Peng; Pi, Rong-biao; Li, Peng; Chen, Rong-xin; Lin, Li-mian; He, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects and mechanisms of fasudil hydrochloride (fasudil) on and in alkali burn-induced corneal neovascularization (CNV) in mice. Methods To observe the effect of fasudil, mice with alkali-burned corneas were treated with either fasudil eye drops or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) four times per day for 14 consecutive days. After injury, CNV and corneal epithelial defects were measured. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) was measured. The infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and the mRNA expressions of CNV-related genes were analyzed on day 14. Results The incidence of CNV was significantly lower after treatment with 100 μM and 300 μM fasudil than with PBS, especially with 100 μM fasudil. Meanwhile, the incidences of corneal epithelial defects was lower (n=15, all p<0.01). After treatment with 100 μM fasudil, the intensity of DHE fluorescence was reduced in the corneal epithelium and stroma than with PBS treatment (n=5, all p<0.01), and the number of filtrated PMNs decreased. There were significant differences between the expressions of VEGF, TNF-a, MMP-8, and MMP-9 in the 100 μM fasudil group and the PBS group (n=8, all p<0.05). The production of HO-1 protein in the 100 μM fasudil group was 1.52±0.34 times more than in the PBS group (n=5 sample, p<0.05). Conclusions 100 μM fasudil eye drops administered four times daily can significantly inhibit alkali burn-induced CNV and promote the healing of corneal epithelial defects in mice. These effects are attributed to a decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration, reduction of ROS, and upregulation of HO-1 protein after fasudil treatment. PMID:26120273

  20. LFA-1 integrin antibodies inhibit leukocyte α4β1-mediated adhesion by intracellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Grönholm, Mikaela; Jahan, Farhana; Bryushkova, Ekaterina A; Madhavan, Sudarrshan; Aglialoro, Francesca; Soto Hinojosa, Laura; Uotila, Liisa M; Gahmberg, Carl G

    2016-09-01

    Binding of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 to the β2-integrin leukocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) is known to induce cross-talk to the α4β1 integrin. Using different LFA-1 monoclonal antibodies, we have been able to study the requirement and mechanism of action for the cross-talk in considerable detail. LFA-1-activating antibodies and those inhibitory antibodies that signal to α4β1 induce phosphorylation of Thr-758 on the β2-chain, which is followed by binding of 14-3-3 proteins and signaling through the G protein exchange factor Tiam1. This results in dephosphorylation of Thr-788/789 on the β1-chain of α4β1 and loss of binding to its ligand vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. The results show that with LFA-1 antibodies, we can activate LFA-1 and inhibit α4β1, inhibit both LFA-1 and α4β1, inhibit LFA-1 but not α4β1, or not affect LFA-1 or α4β1 These findings are important for the understanding of integrin regulation and for the interpretation of the effect of integrin antibodies and their use in clinical applications. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Inhibition of triple-negative breast cancer models by combinations of antibodies to EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Daniela A.; Gaborit, Nadège; Maron, Ruth; Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Porat, Ziv; Pareja, Fresia; Lavi, Sara; Lindzen, Moshit; Ben-Chetrit, Nir; Sela, Michael; Yarden, Yosef

    2013-01-01

    Breast tumors lacking expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and the estrogen and the progesterone receptors (triple negative; TNBC) are more aggressive than other disease subtypes, and no molecular targeted agents are currently available for their treatment. Because TNBC commonly displays EGF receptor (EGFR) expression, and combinations of monoclonal antibodies to EGFR effectively inhibit other tumor models, we addressed the relevance of this strategy to treatment of TNBC. Unlike a combination of the clinically approved monoclonal antibodies, cetuximab and panitumumab, which displaced each other and displayed no cooperative effects, several other combinations resulted in enhanced inhibition of TNBC’s cell growth both in vitro and in animals. The ability of certain antibody mixtures to remove EGFR from the cell surface and to promote its intracellular degradation correlated with the inhibitory potential. However, unlike EGF-induced sorting of EGFR to lysosomal degradation, the antibody-induced pathway displayed independence from the intrinsic kinase activity and dimer formation ability of EGFR, and it largely avoided the recycling route. In conclusion, although TNBC clinical trials testing EGFR inhibitors reported lack of benefit, our results offer an alternative strategy that combines noncompetitive antibodies to achieve robust degradation of EGFR and tumor inhibition. PMID:23319610

  2. Antibodies inhibit the protease-mediated processing of a malaria merozoite surface protein

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    When merozoites of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are released from infected erythrocytes and invade new red cells, a component of a protein complex derived from the merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) precursor undergoes a single proteolytic cleavage known as secondary processing. This releases the complex from the parasite surface, except for a small membrane-bound fragment consisting of two epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains, which is the only part of MSP-1 to be carried into invaded erythrocytes. We report that, a group of monoclonal antibodies specific for epitopes within the EGF- like domains, some interfere with secondary processing whereas others do not. Those that most effectively inhibit processing have previously been shown to prevent invasion. Other antibodies, some of which can block this inhibition, not only do not prevent invasion but are carried into the host cell bound to the merozoite surface. These observations unequivocally demonstrate that the binding of antibody to the COOH- terminal region of MSP-1 on the merozoite surface may not be sufficient to prevent erythrocyte invasion, and show that the interaction of different antibodies with adjacent epitopes within the EGF-like domains of MSP-1 can have distinct biochemical effects on the molecule. Inhibition of MSP-1 processing on merozoites may be a mechanism by which protective antibodies interrupt the asexual cycle of the malaria parasite. PMID:7516416

  3. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody inhibits apoptotic cell clearance by macrophages in pregnant NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Sóñora, Cecilia; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Calo, Guillermina; Hauk, Vanesa; Ramhorst, Rosanna; Hernández, Ana; Leirós, Claudia Pérez

    2014-06-01

    Autoimmunity is a feature of celiac disease (CD) with tissue transglutaminase (tTG) as a major autoantigen. A correlation between gynecological-obstetric disorders in CD patients and the presence of circulating antibodies anti-tTG that inhibited tTG activity was reported. Serum anti-tTG antibodies were detected in a non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type I insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and Sjögren's syndrome, two comorbid states with CD. Since pregnancy complications have been described in NOD mice, we evaluated the ability of anti-tTG antibodies to affect the functions of tTG relevant to the normal course of an early pregnancy like extracellular matrix assembling and apoptotic cell phagocytosis by macrophages. Circulating IgG antibodies against tTG were detected in NOD mice with titers that decreased at early pregnancy; interestingly, the in vitro transamidating activity of tTG was reduced by NOD serum samples. Particularly, anti-tTG antibody inhibited apoptotic cell phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages from pregnant NOD mice that express the enzyme on surface. Evidence provided support for a role for anti-tTG antibodies through reduced transamidating activity and reduced apoptotic cell clearance by the macrophages of pregnant NOD mice.

  4. Compounds from Terminalia mantaly L. (Combretaceae) Stem Bark Exhibit Potent Inhibition against Some Pathogenic Yeasts and Enzymes of Metabolic Significance

    PubMed Central

    Tchuente Tchuenmogne, Marthe Aimée; Kammalac, Thierry Ngouana; Gohlke, Sebastian; Kouipou, Rufin Marie Toghueo; Aslan, Abdulselam; Kuzu, Muslum; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Ngouela, Silvère Augustin; Tsamo, Etienne; Sewald, Norbert; Lenta, Bruno Ndjakou; Boyom, Fabrice Fekam

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pathogenic yeasts resistance to current drugs emphasizes the need for new, safe, and cost-effective drugs. Also, new inhibitors are needed to control the effects of enzymes that are implicated in metabolic dysfunctions such as cancer, obesity, and epilepsy. Methods: The anti-yeast extract from Terminalia mantaly (Combretaceae) was fractionated and the structures of the isolated compounds established by means of spectroscopic analysis and comparison with literature data. Activity was assessed against Candida albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. krusei using the microdilution method, and against four enzymes of metabolic significance: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, human erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase I and II, and glutathione S-transferase. Results: Seven compounds, 3,3′-di-O-methylellagic acid 4′-O-α-rhamnopyranoside; 3-O-methylellagic acid; arjungenin or 2,3,19,23-tetrahydroxyolean-12-en-28-oïc acid; arjunglucoside or 2,3,19,23-tetrahydroxyolean-12-en-28-oïc acid glucopyranoside; 2α,3α,24-trihydroxyolean-11,13(18)-dien-28-oïc acid; stigmasterol; and stigmasterol 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside were isolated from the extract. Among those, 3,3′-di-O-methylellagic acid 4′-O-α-rhamnopyranoside, 3-O-methylellagic acid, and arjunglucoside showed anti-yeast activity comparable to that of reference fluconazole with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) below 32 µg/mL. Besides, Arjunglucoside potently inhibited the tested enzymes with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) below 4 µM and inhibitory constant (Ki) <3 µM. Conclusions: The results achieved indicate that further SAR studies will likely identify potent hit derivatives that should subsequently enter the drug development pipeline. PMID:28930221

  5. Potent inhibition of VEGFR-2 activation by tight binding of green tea epigallocatechin gallate and apple procyanidins to VEGF: relevance to angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moyle, Christina W A; Cerezo, Ana B; Winterbone, Mark S; Hollands, Wendy J; Alexeev, Yuri; Needs, Paul W; Kroon, Paul A

    2015-03-01

    Excessive concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drive angiogenesis and cause complications such as increased growth of tumours and atherosclerotic plaques. The aim of this study was to determine the molecular mechanism underlying the potent inhibition of VEGF signalling by polyphenols. We show that the polyphenols epigallocatechin gallate from green tea and procyanidin oligomers from apples potently inhibit VEGF-induced VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) signalling in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by directly interacting with VEGF. The polyphenol-induced inhibition of VEGF-induced VEGFR-2 activation occurred at nanomolar polyphenol concentrations and followed bi-phasic inhibition kinetics. VEGF activity could not be recovered by dialysing VEGF-polyphenol complexes. Exposure of VEGF to epigallocatechin gallate or procyanidin oligomers strongly inhibited subsequent binding of VEGF to human umbilical vein endothelial cells expressing VEGFR-2. Remarkably, even though VEGFR-2 signalling was completely inhibited at 1 μM concentrations of polyphenols, endothelial nitric oxide synthase was shown to still be activated via the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway which is downstream of VEGFR-2. These data demonstrate for the first time that VEGF is a key molecular target for specific polyphenols found in tea, apples and cocoa which potently inhibit VEGF signalling and angiogenesis at physiological concentrations. These data provide a plausible mechanism which links bioactive compounds in food with their beneficial effects. © 2014 The Authors. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. LOCALIZATION, FERTILITY INHIBITION, AND EPITOPE MAPS USING ANTIBODIES TO THE SPERM PROTEIN SP22

    EPA Science Inventory

    LOCALIZATION, FERTILITY INHIBITION, AND EPITOPE MAPS USING ANTIBODIES TO THE SPERM PROTEIN SP22. GR Klinefelter1, JE Welch*1, HDM Moore*2, K Bobseine*1, J Suarez*1 ,N Roberts*1 ,R Zucker *1 1U.S. EPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC and 2University of Sheffield...

  7. LOCALIZATION, FERTILITY INHIBITION, AND EPITOPE MAPS USING ANTIBODIES TO THE SPERM PROTEIN SP22

    EPA Science Inventory

    LOCALIZATION, FERTILITY INHIBITION, AND EPITOPE MAPS USING ANTIBODIES TO THE SPERM PROTEIN SP22. GR Klinefelter1, JE Welch*1, HDM Moore*2, K Bobseine*1, J Suarez*1 ,N Roberts*1 ,R Zucker *1 1U.S. EPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC and 2University of Sheffield...

  8. The derivation of a minimum immune titre of rubella haemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibody*

    PubMed Central

    Bradstreet, C. M. Patricia; Kirkwood, B.; Pattison, J. R.; Tobin, J. O'H.

    1978-01-01

    Ten laboratories collaborated in a study of minimum immune titre (MIT) of rubella haemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) antibody with one laboratory acting as a reference laboratory to provide a uniform basis for comparison of the HI results. The international unitage equivalent to the MIT used by the ten laboratories was found to vary from 24 to 98 units. Testing of the sera by immunofluorescence and by HI after flotation centrifugation indicated that residual non-specific inhibitors may interfere with HI antibody testing to an extent equivalent to 12-15 units. An acceptable MIT would therefore be equivalent to 24-48 units of rubella HI antibody. The single radial haemolysis (SRH) results on the sera indicate that this is a sensitive and specific test for rubella antibody. PMID:366017

  9. Antibody-mediated rejection despite inhibition of terminal complement.

    PubMed

    Bentall, Andrew; Tyan, Dolly B; Sequeira, Flavia; Everly, Matthew J; Gandhi, Manish J; Cornell, Lynn D; Li, Han; Henderson, Nicole A; Raghavaiah, Suresh; Winters, Jeffrey L; Dean, Patrick G; Stegall, Mark D

    2014-12-01

    Terminal complement blockade has been shown to decrease the incidence of early acute antibody-mediated rejection (eAMR) in the first month after positive cross-match kidney transplant recipients, yet some patients still develop eAMR. The current study investigated possible mechanisms of eAMR despite eculizumab treatment. Of the 26 patients treated with eculizumab, two developed clinical eAMR and another patient developed histologic signs of eAMR without graft dysfunction ('subclinical eAMR'). Twenty-three did not have histologic injury on early surveillance biopsies. All 26 patients had therapeutic levels of eculizumab and showed complete blockade of complement in hemolytic assays. High levels of donor-specific alloantibody (DSA) including total IgG, IgG3, and C1q+ DSA were present in patients with and without eAMR, and none correlated well with eAMR. In contrast, IgM DSA was present in only four patients after transplantation: the two patients with clinical eAMR, one patient with subclinical AMR, and one patient without eAMR (P = 0.006 correlation with eAMR). Both clinical eAMR episodes were easily treated with plasma exchange which removed IgM more completely and rapidly than IgG, resulting in normalization of function and histology. These data suggest a possible role of antidonor IgM DSA in the pathogenesis of eAMR in patients treated with terminal complement blockade (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00670774). © 2014 Steunstichting ESOT.

  10. Specific inhibition of AGC protein kinases by antibodies against C-terminal epitopes.

    PubMed

    Traincard, François; Giacomoni, Véronique; Veron, Michel

    2004-08-13

    The sequences contributing to the catalytic site of protein kinases are not all comprised within the highly conserved catalytic core. Thus, in mammalian cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), the C-terminal sequence participates in substrate binding. Using synthetic peptides mimicking the FxxF motif present at most C-termini of AGC kinases, we have raised highly specific antibodies which are potent and specific inhibitors of the catalytic activity of the cognate protein kinase. Taking into account the structure of PKA, these results point to the potential of the C-terminal region of protein kinases as a target for designing specific protein kinase inhibitors.

  11. Inhibition of nitric oxide and inflammatory cytokines in LPS-stimulated murine macrophages by resveratrol, a potent proteasome inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Altered immune function during ageing results in increased production of nitric oxide (NO) and other inflammatory mediators. Recently, we have reported that NO production was inhibited by naturally-occurring proteasome inhibitors (quercetin, δ-tocotrienol, and riboflavin) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, and thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages from C57BL/6 mice. In a continuous effort to find more potent, non-toxic, commercially available, naturally-occurring proteasome inhibitors that suppress inflammation, the present study was carried out to describe the inhibition of NF-κB activation and NO, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and iNOS expression by trans-resveratrol, trans-pterostilbene, morin hydrate, and nicotinic acid in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells and thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages from C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. Results The present results indicate that resveratrol, pterostilbene, and morin hydrate caused significant inhibition (>70% to 90%; P < 0.02) in the activities of chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and post-acidic (post-glutamase) proteasome sites in RAW 264.7 cells at a dose of only 20 μM. These compounds also inhibited the production of NO by RAW-264.7 cells stimulated with LPS alone (>40%; P < 0.05), or LPS + interferon-γ (IFN-γ; >60%; P < 0.02). Furthermore, resveratrol, pterostilbene, morin hydrate, and quercetin suppressed secretion of TNF-α (>40%; P < 0.05) in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, and suppressed NF-κB activation (22% to 45%; P < 0.05) in LPS-stimulated HEK293T cells. These compounds also significantly suppressed LPS-induced expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and iNOS genes in RAW 264.7 cells, and also in thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages from C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. Conclusions The present results clearly demonstrate that resveratrol and pterostilbene are particularly potent proteasome inhibitors that suppress expression of genes, and production

  12. A Novel Antibody against Human Properdin Inhibits the Alternative Complement System and Specifically Detects Properdin from Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, Diana; Nagel, Benedikt M.; Reinders, Jörg; Killian, Tobias; Wulf, Matthias; Ackermann, Susanne; Ehrenstein, Boris; Zipfel, Peter F.; Skerka, Christine; Weber, Bernhard H. F.

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is an essential part of the innate immune system by acting as a first line of defense which is stabilized by properdin, the sole known positive regulator of the alternative complement pathway. Dysregulation of complement can promote a diversity of human inflammatory diseases which are treated by complement inhibitors. Here, we generated a novel blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) against properdin and devised a new diagnostic assay for this important complement regulator. Mouse mAb 1340 specifically detected native properdin from human samples with high avidity. MAb 1340 inhibited specifically the alternative complement mediated cell lysis within a concentration range of 1–10 µg/mL. Thus, in vitro anti-properdin mAb 1340 was up to fifteen times more efficient in blocking the complement system as compared to anti-C5 or anti-Ba antibodies. Computer-assisted modelling suggested a three-dimensional binding epitope in a properdin-C3(H2O)-clusterin complex to be responsible for the inhibition. Recovery of properdin in a newly established sandwich ELISA using mAb 1340 was determined at 80–125% for blood sample dilutions above 1∶50. Reproducibility assays showed a variation below 25% at dilutions less than 1∶1,000. Systemic properdin concentrations of healthy controls and patients with age-related macular degeneration or rheumatic diseases were all in the range of 13–30 µg/mL and did not reveal significant differences. These initial results encourage further investigation into the functional role of properdin in the development, progression and treatment of diseases related to the alternative complement pathway. Thus, mAb 1340 represents a potent properdin inhibitor suitable for further research to understand the exact mechanisms how properdin activates the complement C3-convertase and to determine quantitative levels of properdin in biological samples. PMID:24797388

  13. A novel antibody against human properdin inhibits the alternative complement system and specifically detects properdin from blood samples.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Diana; Nagel, Benedikt M; Reinders, Jörg; Killian, Tobias; Wulf, Matthias; Ackermann, Susanne; Ehrenstein, Boris; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is an essential part of the innate immune system by acting as a first line of defense which is stabilized by properdin, the sole known positive regulator of the alternative complement pathway. Dysregulation of complement can promote a diversity of human inflammatory diseases which are treated by complement inhibitors. Here, we generated a novel blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) against properdin and devised a new diagnostic assay for this important complement regulator. Mouse mAb 1340 specifically detected native properdin from human samples with high avidity. MAb 1340 inhibited specifically the alternative complement mediated cell lysis within a concentration range of 1-10 µg/mL. Thus, in vitro anti-properdin mAb 1340 was up to fifteen times more efficient in blocking the complement system as compared to anti-C5 or anti-Ba antibodies. Computer-assisted modelling suggested a three-dimensional binding epitope in a properdin-C3(H2O)-clusterin complex to be responsible for the inhibition. Recovery of properdin in a newly established sandwich ELISA using mAb 1340 was determined at 80-125% for blood sample dilutions above 1∶50. Reproducibility assays showed a variation below 25% at dilutions less than 1∶1,000. Systemic properdin concentrations of healthy controls and patients with age-related macular degeneration or rheumatic diseases were all in the range of 13-30 µg/mL and did not reveal significant differences. These initial results encourage further investigation into the functional role of properdin in the development, progression and treatment of diseases related to the alternative complement pathway. Thus, mAb 1340 represents a potent properdin inhibitor suitable for further research to understand the exact mechanisms how properdin activates the complement C3-convertase and to determine quantitative levels of properdin in biological samples.

  14. Structures of complexes formed by H5 influenza hemagglutinin with a potent broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Corti, Davide; Liu, Junfeng; Pinna, Debora; Foglierini, Mathilde; Calder, Lesley J; Martin, Stephen R; Lin, Yi Pu; Walker, Philip A; Collins, Patrick J; Monne, Isabella; Suguitan, Amorsolo L; Santos, Celia; Temperton, Nigel J; Subbarao, Kanta; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Gamblin, Steven J; Skehel, John J

    2015-07-28

    H5N1 avian influenza viruses remain a threat to public health mainly because they can cause severe infections in humans. These viruses are widespread in birds, and they vary in antigenicity forming three major clades and numerous antigenic variants. The most important features of the human monoclonal antibody FLD194 studied here are its broad specificity for all major clades of H5 influenza HAs, its high affinity, and its ability to block virus infection, in vitro and in vivo. As a consequence, this antibody may be suitable for anti-H5 therapy and as a component of stockpiles, together with other antiviral agents, for health authorities to use if an appropriate vaccine was not available. Our mutation and structural analyses indicate that the antibody recognizes a relatively conserved site near the membrane distal tip of HA, near to, but distinct from, the receptor-binding site. Our analyses also suggest that the mechanism of infectivity neutralization involves prevention of receptor recognition as a result of steric hindrance by the Fc part of the antibody. Structural analyses by EM indicate that three Fab fragments are bound to each HA trimer. The structure revealed by X-ray crystallography is of an HA monomer bound by one Fab. The monomer has some similarities to HA in the fusion pH conformation, and the monomer's formation, which results from the presence of isopropanol in the crystallization solvent, contributes to considerations of the process of change in conformation required for membrane fusion.

  15. Gold(I) complex of N,N'-disubstituted cyclic thiourea with in vitro and in vivo anticancer properties-potent tight-binding inhibition of thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kun; Lok, Chun-Nam; Bierla, Katarzyna; Che, Chi-Ming

    2010-11-07

    Coinage metal complexes of an N,N'-disubstituted cyclic thiourea exert significant cytotoxicities to cancer cells and, in particular, the gold(i) thiourea complex exhibits a potent tight-binding inhibition of the anticancer drug target thioredoxin reductase with an inhibitory constant at nanomolar level.

  16. Junctional and allele-specific residues are critical for MERS-CoV neutralization by an exceptionally potent germline-like antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, Tianlei; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Du, Lanying; Shi, Wei; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Lingshu; Li, Wei; Jiang, Shibo; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Zhou, Tongqing

    2015-09-15

    The MERS-CoV is an emerging virus, which already infected more than 1,300 humans with high (~36%) mortality. Here, we show that m336, an exceptionally potent human anti-MERS-CoV antibody, is almost germline with only one somatic mutation in the heavy chain. The structure of Fab m336 in complex with the MERS-CoV receptor-binding domain reveals that its IGHV1-69-derived heavy chain provides more than 85% binding surface and that its epitope almost completely overlaps with the receptor-binding site. Analysis of antibodies from 69 healthy humans suggests an important role of the V(D)J recombination-generated junctional and allele-specific residues for achieving high affinity of binding at such low levels of somatic hypermutation. Our results also have important implications for development of vaccine immunogens based on the newly identified m336 epitope as well as for elucidation of mechanisms of neutralization by m336-like antibodies and their elicitation in vivo.

  17. Junctional and allele-specific residues are critical for MERS-CoV neutralization by an exceptionally potent germline-like antibody

    DOE PAGES

    Ying, Tianlei; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Du, Lanying; ...

    2015-09-15

    The MERS-CoV is an emerging virus, which already infected more than 1,300 humans with high (~36%) mortality. Here, we show that m336, an exceptionally potent human anti-MERS-CoV antibody, is almost germline with only one somatic mutation in the heavy chain. The structure of Fab m336 in complex with the MERS-CoV receptor-binding domain reveals that its IGHV1-69-derived heavy chain provides more than 85% binding surface and that its epitope almost completely overlaps with the receptor-binding site. Analysis of antibodies from 69 healthy humans suggests an important role of the V(D)J recombination-generated junctional and allele-specific residues for achieving high affinity of bindingmore » at such low levels of somatic hypermutation. Our results also have important implications for development of vaccine immunogens based on the newly identified m336 epitope as well as for elucidation of mechanisms of neutralization by m336-like antibodies and their elicitation in vivo.« less

  18. Antibody-engineered nanoparticles selectively inhibit mesenchymal cells isolated from patients with chronic lung allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cova, Emanuela; Colombo, Miriam; Inghilleri, Simona; Morosini, Monica; Miserere, Simona; Peñaranda-Avila, Jesus; Santini, Benedetta; Piloni, Davide; Magni, Sara; Gramatica, Furio; Prosperi, Davide; Meloni, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lung allograft dysfunction represents the main cause of death after lung transplantation, and so far there is no effective therapy. Mesenchymal cells (MCs) are primarily responsible for fibrous obliteration of small airways typical of chronic lung allograft dysfunction. Here, we engineered gold nanoparticles containing a drug in the hydrophobic section to inhibit MCs, and exposing on the outer hydrophilic surface a monoclonal antibody targeting a MC-specific marker (half-chain gold nanoparticles with everolimus). Half-chain gold nanoparticles with everolimus have been synthesized and incubated with MCs to evaluate the effect on proliferation and apoptosis. Drug-loaded gold nanoparticles coated with the specific antibody were able to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis without stimulating an inflammatory response, as assessed by in vitro experiments. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of our nanoparticles in inhibiting MCs and open new perspectives for a local treatment of chronic lung allograft dysfunction.

  19. Ex vivo Akt inhibition promotes the generation of potent CD19CAR T cells for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Urak, Ryan; Walter, Miriam; Lim, Laura; Wong, ChingLam W; Budde, Lihua E; Thomas, Sandra; Forman, Stephen J; Wang, Xiuli

    2017-01-01

    Insufficient persistence and effector function of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells have been challenging issues for adoptive T cell therapy. Generating potent CAR T cells is of increasing importance in the field. Studies have demonstrated the importance of the Akt pathway in the regulation of T cell differentiation and memory formation. We now investigate whether inhibition of Akt signaling during ex vivo expansion of CAR T cells can promote the generation of CAR T cells with enhanced antitumor activity following adoptive therapy in a murine leukemia xenograft model. Various T cell subsets including CD8+ T cells, bulk T cells, central memory T cells and naïve/memory T cells were isolated from PBMC of healthy donors, activated with CD3/CD28 beads, and transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding a second-generation CD19CAR containing a CD28 co-stimulatory domain. The transduced CD19CAR T cells were expanded in the presence of IL-2 (50U/mL) and Akt inhibitor (Akti) (1 μM) that were supplemented every other day. Proliferative/expansion potential, phenotypical characteristics and functionality of the propagated CD19CAR T cells were analyzed in vitro and in vivo after 17-21 day ex vivo expansion. Anti-tumor activity was evaluated after adoptive transfer of the CD19CAR T cells into CD19+ tumor-bearing immunodeficient mice. Tumor signals were monitored with biophotonic imaging, and survival rates were analyzed by the end of the experiments. We found that Akt inhibition did not compromise CD19CAR T cell proliferation and expansion in vitro, independent of the T cell subsets, as comparable CD19CAR T cell expansion was observed after culturing in the presence or absence of Akt inhibitor. Functionally, Akt inhibition did not dampen cell-mediated effector function, while Th1 cytokine production increased. With respect to phenotype, Akti-treated CD19CAR T cells expressed higher levels of CD62L and CD28 as compared to untreated CD19CAR T cells. Once

  20. Inhibition of HIV replication by pokeweed antiviral protein targeted to CD4+ cells by monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarling, Joyce M.; Moran, Patricia A.; Haffar, Omar; Sias, Joan; Richman, Douglas D.; Spina, Celsa A.; Myers, Dorothea E.; Kuebelbeck, Virginia; Ledbetter, Jeffrey A.; Uckun, Fatih M.

    1990-09-01

    FUNCTIONAL impairment and selective depletion of CD4+ T cells, the hallmark of AIDS, are at least partly caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) type 1 binding to the CD4 molecule and infecting CD4+ cells1,2. It may, therefore, be of therapeutic value to target an antiviral agent to CD4+ cells to prevent infection and to inhibit HIV-1 production in patients' CD4+ cells which contain proviral DNA3,4. We report here that HIV-1 replication in normal primary CD4+ T cells can be inhibited by pokeweed antiviral protein, a plant protein of relative molecular mass 30,000 (ref. 5), which inhibits replication of certain plant RNA viruses6-8, and of herpes simplex virus, poliovirus and influenza virus9-11. Targeting pokeweed antiviral protein to CD4+ T cells by conjugating it to monoclonal antibodies reactive with CDS, CD7 or CD4 expressed on CD4+ cells, increased its anti-HIV potency up to 1,000-fold. HIV-1 replication is inhibited at picomolar concentrations of conjugates of pokeweed antiviral protein and monoclonal antibodies, which do not inhibit proliferation of normal CD4+ T cells or CD4-dependent responses. These conjugates inhibit HIV-1 protein synthesis and also strongly inhibit HIV-1 production in activated CD4+ T cells from infected patients.

  1. Discovery of a small molecule Tat-trans-activation-responsive RNA antagonist that potently inhibits human immunodeficiency virus-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seongwoo; Tamilarasu, Natarajan; Kibler, Karen; Cao, Hong; Ali, Akbar; Ping, Yueh-Hsin; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Rana, Tariq M

    2003-10-03

    Antiretroviral therapy to treat AIDS uses molecules that target the reverse transcriptase and protease enzymes of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1). A major problem associated with these treatments, however, is the emergence of drug-resistant strains. Thus, there is a compelling need to find drugs against other viral targets. One such target is the interaction between Tat, an HIV-1 regulatory protein essential for viral replication, and trans-activation-responsive (TAR) RNA. Here we describe the design and synthesis of an encoded combinatorial library containing 39,304 unnatural small molecules. Using a rapid high through-put screening technology, we identified 59 compounds. Structure-activity relationship studies led to the synthesis of 19 compounds that bind TAR RNA with high affinities. In the presence of a representative Tat-TAR inhibitor (5 microM TR87), we observed potent and sustained suppression of HIV replication in cultured cells over 24 days. The same concentration of this inhibitor did not exhibit any toxicity in cell cultures or in mice. TR87 was also shown to specifically disrupt Tat-TAR binding in vitro and inhibit Tat-mediated transcriptional activation in vitro and in vivo, providing a strong correlation between its activities and inhibition of HIV-1 replication. These results provide a structural scaffold for further development of new drugs, alone or in combination with other drugs, for treatment of HIV-1-infected individuals. Our results also suggest a general strategy for discovering pharmacophores targeting RNA structures that are essential in progression of other infectious, inflammatory, and genetic diseases.

  2. Human Memory B Cells Producing Potent Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies against Human Parechovirus: Implications for Prevalence, Treatment, and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Benschop, K. S. M.; Koen, G.; Claassen, Y. B.; Wagner, K.; Bakker, A. Q.; Wolthers, K. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The family Picornaviridae is a large and diverse group of positive-sense RNA viruses, including human enteroviruses (EVs) and human parechoviruses (HPeVs). The human immune response against EVs and HPeVs is thought to be mainly humoral, and an insufficient neutralizing antibody (Ab) response during infection is a risk factor and can ultimately be life threatening. The accessibility of different antigenic sites and observed cross-reactivity make HPeVs a good target for development of therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). In this study, we generated two different human MAbs specific for HPeV by screening culture supernatants of Ab-producing human B cell cultures for direct neutralization of HPeV1. Both MAbs showed HPeV1-specific neutralization as well as neutralization of HPeV2. One antibody, AM18, cross-neutralized HPeV4, -5, and -6 and coxsackievirus A9 (CV-A9). VP1 capsid protein-specific assays confirmed that AM18 bound VP1 of HPeV1, -2, and -4 with high affinity (11.5 pM). In contrast, the HPeV1-specific MAb AM28, which neutralized HPeV1 even more efficiently than did AM18, showed no cross-reactivity with HPeV3 to -6 or other EVs and did not bind any of the capsid proteins, suggesting that AM28 is specific for a conformation-dependent, nonlinear epitope on the virus. The discovery of MAbs that are cross-reactive between HPeVs may help development of HPeV treatment options with antibodies and vaccine design based on epitopes recognized by these antibodies. IMPORTANCE HPeV infections are widespread among young children and adults, causing a broad range of disease. Infections can be severe and life threatening, while no antiviral treatment is available. Given that the absence of neutralizing Abs is a risk factor for severe disease in infants, treatment of picornavirus infections with MAbs would be a therapeutic option. To study antibody neutralization of HPeV in more detail, we generated two different HPeV1-specific human MAbs. Both MAbs show HPe

  3. Antibodies toward high-density lipoprotein components inhibit paraoxonase activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Batuca, J R; Ames, P R J; Isenberg, D A; Alves, J Delgado

    2007-06-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have an increased incidence of vascular disease, and oxidative stress is recognized as an important feature in this condition, despite the underlying mechanisms not being fully understood. In these patients, an interaction between lipoproteins and the immune system has been suggested, but most studies have only looked at antibodies against oxidized low-density lipoproteins. This study was undertaken to determine the presence of antibodies directed against high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and to identify a possible association between these antibodies and paraoxonase (PON), an antioxidant enzyme present in HDL. Plasma from 55 patients with SLE was collected and IgG aHDL and antiapolipoprotein A-I (aApo A-I) antibodies were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Standardization of the method was performed in a control population of 150 healthy subjects. Plasma levels above 5 standard deviations of the mean of the control population were considered positive. PON activity was assessed by quantification of p-nitrophenol formation (micromol/mL/min). Patients with SLE had higher titers of aHDL (P < 0.0001) and aApo A-I (P < 0.0001) antibodies, and lower PON activity (P < 0.0001) than healthy controls. There was also a direct correlation between the titers of aHDL and aApo A-I antibodies (r = 0.61; P < 0.0001). PON activity was inversely correlated with aApo A-I (P = 0.0129) antibody levels. Anti-HDL and aApo A-I antibodies from patients with high titers were isolated and subsequently incubated with human HDL. These antibodies reduced PON activity up to a maximum of 70.2% and 78.4%, respectively. This study showed the presence of aHDL and aApo A-I antibodies in patients with SLE. These antibodies were associated with reduced PON activity in plasma, and the in vitro inhibition assay confirmed a direct inhibition of the enzyme activity.

  4. A novel monoclonal antibody targeting coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor inhibits tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Manabu; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Kajikawa, Masunori; Sugiura, Masahito; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Urano, Sakiko; Karasawa, Chigusa; Usami, Ihomi; Futakuchi, Mitsuru; Masuda, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    To create a new anti-tumor antibody, we conducted signal sequence trap by retrovirus-meditated expression method and identified coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CXADR) as an appropriate target. We developed monoclonal antibodies against human CXADR and found that one antibody (6G10A) significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneous as well as orthotopic xenografts of human prostate cancer cells in vivo. Furthermore, 6G10A also inhibited other cancer xenografts expressing CXADR, such as pancreatic and colorectal cancer cells. Knockdown and overexpression of CXADR confirmed the dependence of its anti-tumor activity on CXADR expression. Our studies of its action demonstrated that 6G10A exerted its anti-tumor activity primarily through both antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Moreover, 6G10A reacted with human tumor tissues, such as prostate, lung, and brain, each of which express CXADR. Although we need further evaluation of its reactivity and safety in human tissues, our results show that a novel anti-CXADR antibody may be a feasible candidate for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:28074864

  5. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody that specifically inhibits triosephosphate isomerase activity of Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Víctor, Sanabria-Ayala; Yolanda, Medina-Flores; Araceli, Zavala-Carballo; Lucía, Jiménez; Abraham, Landa

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, we obtained and characterized partially a monoclonal antibody (4H11D10B11 mAb) against triosephosphate isomerase from Taenia solium (TTPI). This antibody recognized the enzyme by both ELISA and western blot and was able to inhibit its enzymatic activity in 74%. Moreover, the antigen-binding fragments (Fabs), products of digestion of the monoclonal antibody with papain, retained almost the same inhibitory effect. We determined the binding site by ELISA; synthetic peptides containing sequences from different non-conserved regions of the TTPI were confronted to the 4H11D10B11 mAb. The epitope recognized by the monoclonal antibody was located on peptide TTPI-56 (ATPAQAQEVHKVVRDWIRKHVDAGIADKARI), and an analysis of mimotopes, obtained with the 4H11D10B11 mAb, suggests that the epitope spans the sequence WIRKHVDAGIAD, residues 193-204 of the enzyme. This epitope is located within helix 6, next to loop 6, an essential active loop during catalysis. The antibody did not recognize triosephosphate isomerase from man and pig, definitive and intermediary hosts of T. solium, respectively. Furthermore, it did not bind to the catalytic site, since kinetic analysis demonstrated that inhibition had a non-competitive profile.

  6. Simultaneous knockdown of BRAF and expression of INK4A in melanoma cells leads to potent growth inhibition and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yanhua; Zhang Yan; Yang Zhen; Li, Albert; Dong Jianli

    2008-06-06

    Abnormal BRAF and p16INK4A co-exist in 60% of melanomas. BRAF mutation also occurs in 80% of benign nevi where it turns-on p16INK4A resulting in proliferative senescence; loss of p16INK4A removes the inhibitory block leading to melanoma development. Since only melanomas with wild-type BRAF have amplified CDK4 and cyclin D1 genes, p16INK4A-CDK4/6-cyclin D pathway is viewed as linearly downstream of BRAF. Thus, co-occurrence of aberrant BRAF and INK4A may be remnant of changes during melanoma formation without functional significance. To explore this notion, we simultaneously knocked down BRAF (via siRNA) and expressed INK4A cDNA in melanoma cells and observed enhanced growth inhibition. Notably, although each alone had no statistically significant effect on apoptosis, co-expression of BRAF siRNA and INK4A cDNA caused potent apoptosis, which was associated with up-regulation of BIM and down-regulation of BCL2. Our results suggest that aberrant BRAF and INK4A cooperate to promote proliferation and survival of melanoma cells.

  7. Chemically modified, non-anticoagulant heparin derivatives are potent galectin-3 binding inhibitors and inhibit circulating galectin-3-promoted metastasis.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Carrie A; Guimond, Scott E; Sindrewicz, Paulina; Hughes, Ashley J; French, Neil S; Lian, Lu-Yun; Yates, Edwin A; Pritchard, D Mark; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Turnbull, Jeremy E; Yu, Lu-Gang

    2015-09-15

    Concentrations of circulating galectin-3, a metastasis promoter, are greatly increased in cancer patients. Here we show that 2- or 6-de-O-sulfated, N-acetylated heparin derivatives are galectin-3 binding inhibitors. These chemically modified heparin derivatives inhibited galectin-3-ligand binding and abolished galectin-3-mediated cancer cell-endothelial adhesion and angiogenesis. Unlike standard heparin, these modified heparin derivatives and their ultra-low molecular weight sub-fractions had neither anticoagulant activity nor effects on E-, L- or P-selectin binding to their ligands nor detectable cytotoxicity. Intravenous injection of such heparin derivatives (with cancer cells pre-treated with galectin-3 followed by 3 subcutaneous injections of the derivatives) abolished the circulating galectin-3-mediated increase in lung metastasis of human melanoma and colon cancer cells in nude mice. Structural analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopies showed that the modified heparin derivatives bind to the galectin-3 carbohydrate-recognition domain. Thus, these chemically modified, non-anticoagulant, low-sulfated heparin derivatives are potent galectin-3 binding inhibitors with substantial potential as anti-metastasis/cancer drugs.

  8. Linker-extended native cyanovirin-N facilitates PEGylation and potently inhibits HIV-1 by targeting the glycan ligand.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Huang, Dane; Chen, Wei; Guo, Chaowan; Wei, Bo; Wu, Chongchao; Peng, Zhou; Fan, Jun; Hou, Zhibo; Fang, Yongsheng; Wang, Yifei; Kitazato, Kaio; Yu, Guoying; Zou, Chunbin; Qian, Chuiwen; Xiong, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Cyanovirin-N (CVN) potently inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, but both cytotoxicity and immunogenicity have hindered the translation of this protein into a viable therapeutic. A molecular docking analysis suggested that up to 12 residues were involved in the interaction of the reverse parallel CVN dimer with the oligosaccharide targets, among which Leu-1 was the most prominent hot spot residue. This finding provided a possible explanation for the lack of anti-HIV-1 activity observed with N-terminal PEGylated CVN. Therefore, linker-CVN (LCVN) was designed as a CVN derivative with a flexible and hydrophilic linker (Gly4Ser)3 at the N-terminus. The N-terminal α-amine of LCVN was PEGylated to create 10 K PEG-aldehyde (ALD)-LCVN. LCVN and 10 K PEG-ALD-LCVN retained the specificity and affinity of CVN for high mannose N-glycans. Moreover, LCVN exhibited significant anti-HIV-1 activity with attenuated cytotoxicity in the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line and MT-4 T lymphocyte cell lines. 10 K PEG-ALD-LCVN also efficiently inactivated HIV-1 with remarkably decreased cytotoxicity and pronounced cell-to-cell fusion inhibitory activity in vitro. The linker-extended CVN and the mono-PEGylated derivative were determined to be promising candidates for the development of an anti-HIV-1 agent. This derivatization approach provided a model for the PEGylation of biologic candidates without introducing point mutations.

  9. Chemically modified, non-anticoagulant heparin derivatives are potent galectin-3 binding inhibitors and inhibit circulating galectin-3-promoted metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sindrewicz, Paulina; Hughes, Ashley J.; French, Neil S.; Lian, Lu-Yun; Yates, Edwin A.; Pritchard, D. Mark; Rhodes, Jonathan M.; Turnbull, Jeremy E.; Yu, Lu-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of circulating galectin-3, a metastasis promoter, are greatly increased in cancer patients. Here we show that 2- or 6-de-O-sulfated, N-acetylated heparin derivatives are galectin-3 binding inhibitors. These chemically modified heparin derivatives inhibited galectin-3-ligand binding and abolished galectin-3-mediated cancer cell-endothelial adhesion and angiogenesis. Unlike standard heparin, these modified heparin derivatives and their ultra-low molecular weight sub-fractions had neither anticoagulant activity nor effects on E-, L- or P-selectin binding to their ligands nor detectable cytotoxicity. Intravenous injection of such heparin derivatives (with cancer cells pre-treated with galectin-3 followed by 3 subcutaneous injections of the derivatives) abolished the circulating galectin-3-mediated increase in lung metastasis of human melanoma and colon cancer cells in nude mice. Structural analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopies showed that the modified heparin derivatives bind to the galectin-3 carbohydrate-recognition domain. Thus, these chemically modified, non-anticoagulant, low-sulfated heparin derivatives are potent galectin-3 binding inhibitors with substantial potential as anti-metastasis/cancer drugs. PMID:26160844

  10. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate potently inhibits the in vitro activity of hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase[S

    PubMed Central

    Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Spina, Michele; Tran, Chi Nhan; Falconi, Maurizio; Eleuteri, Anna Maria; Angeletti, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) is the rate-controlling enzyme of cholesterol synthesis, and owing to its biological and pharmacological relevance, researchers have investigated several compounds capable of modulating its activity with the hope of developing new hypocholesterolemic drugs. In particular, polyphenol-rich extracts were extensively tested for their cholesterol-lowering effect as alternatives, or adjuvants, to the conventional statin therapies, but a full understanding of the mechanism of their action has yet to be reached. Our work reports on a detailed kinetic and equilibrium study on the modulation of HMGR by the most-abundant catechin in green tea, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Using a concerted approach involving spectrophotometric, optical biosensor, and chromatographic analyses, molecular docking, and site-directed mutagenesis on the cofactor site of HMGR, we have demonstrated that EGCG potently inhibits the in vitro activity of HMGR (Ki in the nanomolar range) by competitively binding to the cofactor site of the reductase. Finally, we evaluated the effect of combined EGCG-statin administration. PMID:21357570

  11. The G-quadruplex-forming aptamer AS1411 potently inhibits HIV-1 attachment to the host cell

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Rosalba; Butovskaya, Elena; Lago, Sara; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Pannecouque, Christophe; Palù, Giorgio; Richter, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    AS1411 is a G-rich aptamer that forms a stable G-quadruplex structure and displays antineoplastic properties both in vitro and in vivo. This oligonucleotide has undergone phase 2 clinical trials. The major molecular target of AS1411 is nucleolin (NCL), a multifunctional nucleolar protein also present in the cell membrane where it selectively mediates the binding and uptake of AS1411. Cell-surface NCL has been recognised as a low-affinity co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) anchorage on target cells. Here we assessed the anti-HIV-1 properties and underlying mechanism of action of AS1411. The antiviral activity of AS1411 was determined towards different HIV-1 strains, host cells and at various times post-infection. Acutely, persistently and latently infected cells were tested, including HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a healthy donor. Mechanistic studies to exclude modes of action other than virus binding via NCL were performed. AS1411 efficiently inhibited HIV-1 attachment/entry into the host cell. The aptamer displayed antiviral activity in the absence of cytotoxicity at the tested doses, therefore displaying a wide therapeutic window and favourable selectivity indexes. These findings, besides validating cell-surface-expressed NCL as an antiviral target, open the way for the possible use of AS1411 as a new potent and promisingly safe anti-HIV-1 agent. PMID:27032748

  12. Immunisation with Recombinant PfEMP1 Domains Elicits Functional Rosette-Inhibiting and Phagocytosis-Inducing Antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Ghumra, Ashfaq; Khunrae, Pongsak; Ataide, Ricardo; Raza, Ahmed; Rogerson, Stephen J.; Higgins, Matthew K.; Rowe, J. Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Background Rosetting is a Plasmodium falciparum virulence factor implicated in the pathogenesis of life-threatening malaria. Rosetting occurs when parasite–derived P. falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein One (PfEMP1) on the surface of infected erythrocytes binds to human receptors on uninfected erythrocytes. PfEMP1 is a possible target for a vaccine to induce antibodies to inhibit rosetting and prevent severe malaria. Methodology/Findings We examined the vaccine potential of the six extracellular domains of a rosette-mediating PfEMP1 variant (ITvar9/R29var1 from the R29 parasite strain) by immunizing rabbits with recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli. Antibodies raised to each domain were tested for surface fluorescence with live infected erythrocytes, rosette inhibition and phagocytosis-induction. Antibodies to all PfEMP1 domains recognized the surface of live infected erythrocytes down to low concentrations (0.02–1.56 µg/ml of total IgG). Antibodies to all PfEMP1 domains except for the second Duffy-Binding-Like region inhibited rosetting (50% inhibitory concentration 0.04–4 µg/ml) and were able to opsonize and induce phagocytosis of infected erythrocytes at low concentrations (1.56–6.25 µg/ml). Antibodies to the N-terminal region (NTS-DBL1α) were the most effective in all assays. All antibodies were specific for the R29 parasite strain, and showed no functional activity against five other rosetting strains. Conclusions/Significance These results are encouraging for vaccine development as they show that potent antibodies can be generated to recombinant PfEMP1 domains that will inhibit rosetting and induce phagocytosis of infected erythrocytes. However, further work is needed on rosetting mechanisms and cross-reactivity in field isolates to define a set of PfEMP1 variants that could induce functional antibodies against a broad range of P. falciparum rosetting parasites. PMID:21305024

  13. Use of Candida-specific chicken egg yolk antibodies to inhibit the adhering of Candida to denture base materials: prevention of denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Yoshiaki; Fujisaki, Junichi; Nagayama, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Kiyotsugu; Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Hamada, Tomofumi; Sakamoto, Ryoich; Mukai, Hiroshi; Sugihara, Kazumasa

    2016-09-01

    Polyclonal anti-Candida chicken egg yolk antibodies (anti-IgY) were used to investigate the prevention of adherence of Candida species to denture base material in vitro. Candida is a potential virulence factor that can cause systemic infection and even death in immunocompromised individuals. Because long-term antifungal treatment may lead to the emergence of drug-resistant strains, it is necessary to develop novel preventive measures and treatments for candidiasis. Three types of chicken egg yolk antibodies were used in this study: non-specific antibody (control IgY), Candida albicans-specific antibody (anti-C.a.IgY) and Candida glabrata-specific antibody (anti-C.g.IgY). A mixture of different dilutions of each antibody with a suspension of Candida species and denture base material was incubated for 3 h, and then the colony-forming units of Candida on the denture base material were counted. Compared with control IgY, anti-C.a.IgY and anti-C.g.IgY significantly inhibited the adherence of C. albicans, but anti-C.a.IgY tended to be more potent than anti-C.g.IgY. The adherence of C. glabrata was also inhibited significantly by anti-C.a.IgY and anti-C.g.IgY with almost equivalent potency, indicating that their actions against C. glabrata were comparable. This study revealed the inhibitory effects of anti-C.a.IgY and anti-C.g.IgY against the adherence of C. albicans and C. glabrata to denture base material. This finding indicates the possibility of a beneficial effect of IgYs for the prevention of denture stomatitis and candidiasis in clinical settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A platelet monoclonal antibody inhibition assay for detection of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa-related platelet alloantibodies.

    PubMed

    Reiner, A P; Teramura, G; Nelson, K A; Slichter, S J

    1995-08-18

    Post-transfusion purpura (PTP) and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAT) result from formation of alloantibodies to platelet membrane glycoprotein-associated antigens. The detection and identification of platelet-specific alloantibodies in patient sera is often complicated by the presence of co-existing HLA antibodies and/or more than one platelet specificity in the same serum. We describe a solid phase assay that specifically detects antibodies to platelet membrane associated alloantigens by measuring the ability of patient antisera to inhibit the binding of glycoprotein GPIIb or GPIIIa monoclonal antibodies to intact platelets. When tested in the GPIIIa assay against a panel of random platelet donors, the reactivities of two known PLAI antisera that also contained different HLA antibodies were highly correlated (r = 0.99) and allowed PLA phenotyping of the population. A standard direct binding platelet ELISA, on the other hand, was unable to accurately PLA phenotype the same population. The reactivities of two known Baka antisera (one containing additional anti-PLA2 and the other anti-Brb specificities) were highly correlated (r = 0.95) in the GPIIb assay, and Bak phenotype determination was similarly accomplished for a random platelet panel. Furthermore, a comparison of platelet phenotype results (using the monoclonal inhibition assay) and genotype results (using DNA analysis) for the PLA and Bak systems showed a concordance of 98% for 146 alleles tested. In conclusion, the platelet monoclonal antibody inhibition assay: (1) allows determination of platelet-specific alloantibodies in the presence of contaminating HLA antibodies and/or in sera containing multiple platelet alloantibodies; (2) allows accurate platelet phenotyping for the GPIIIa-associated PLA and GPIIb-associated Bak antigen systems; and (3) may be applicable to the detection of other known or even novel platelet glycoprotein-associated antigens.

  15. Invasion-inhibitory antibodies inhibit proteolytic processing of apical membrane antigen 1 of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sheetij; Haynes, J. David; Moch, J. Kathleen; Barbosa, Arnoldo; Lanar, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) is a promising vaccine candidate for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Antibodies against AMA-1 of P. falciparum (PfAMA-1) interrupt merozoite invasion into RBCs. Initially localized within the apical complex, PfAMA-1 is proteolytically processed and redistributed circumferentially on merozoites at about the time of their release and invasion into RBCs. An 83-kDa precursor form of PfAMA-1 is processed to 66-kDa and then to 48- and 44-kDa products. We show that, even at low concentrations, IgG antibodies against correctly folded recombinant PfAMA-1 cross-linked and trapped the 52-, 48-, and 44-kDa proteolytic products on merozoites. These products are normally shed into the culture medium. At higher concentrations antibodies inhibited invasion into RBCs and caused a reduction in the amount of 44- and 48-kDa products, both on merozoites and in the culture medium. A corresponding increase also occurred in the amount of the 66- and 52-kDa forms detected on the merozoites. These antibodies also prevented circumferential redistribution of AMA-1. In contrast, monovalent invasion-inhibitory Fab fragments caused accumulation of 66- and 52-kDa forms, with no cross-linking, trapping, or prevention of redistribution. Antibodies at low concentrations can be used as trapping agents for intermediate and soluble forms of AMA-1 and are useful for studying proteolytic processing of AMA-1. With this technique, it was confirmed that protease inhibitor chymostatin and Ca2+ chelators can inhibit the breakdown of the 66-kDa form. We propose that antibodies to AMA-1 capable of inhibiting erythrocyte invasion act by disrupting proteolytic processing of AMA-1. PMID:14526103

  16. Ebolavirus Nucleoprotein C-Termini Potently Attract Single Domain Antibodies Enabling Monoclonal Affinity Reagent Sandwich Assay (MARSA) Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Laura J.; Hayhurst, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Background Antigen detection assays can play an important part in environmental surveillance and diagnostics for emerging threats. We are interested in accelerating assay formulation; targeting the agents themselves to bypass requirements for a priori genome information or surrogates. Previously, using in vitro affinity reagent selection on Marburg virus we rapidly established monoclonal affinity reagent sandwich assay (MARSA) where one recombinant antibody clone was both captor and tracer for polyvalent nucleoprotein (NP). Hypothesizing that the closely related Ebolavirus genus may share the same Achilles' heel, we redirected the scheme to see whether similar assays could be delivered and began to explore their mechanism. Methods and Findings In parallel we selected panels of llama single domain antibodies (sdAb) from a semi-synthetic library against Zaire, Sudan, Ivory Coast, and Reston Ebola viruses. Each could perform as both captor and tracer in the same antigen sandwich capture assay thereby forming MARSAs. All sdAb were specific for NP and those tested required the C-terminal domain for recognition. Several clones were cross-reactive, indicating epitope conservation across the Ebolavirus genus. Analysis of two immune shark sdAb revealed they also targeted the C-terminal domain, and could be similarly employed, yet were less sensitive than a comparable llama sdAb despite stemming from immune selections. Conclusions The C-terminal domain of Ebolavirus NP is a strong attractant for antibodies and enables sensitive sandwich immunoassays to be rapidly generated using a single antibody clone. The polyvalent nature of nucleocapsid borne NP and display of the C-terminal region likely serves as a bountiful affinity sink during selections, and a highly avid target for subsequent immunoassay capture. Combined with the high degree of amino acid conservation through 37 years and across wide geographies, this domain makes an ideal handle for monoclonal affinity reagent

  17. Plasmodium vivax Invasion of Human Erythrocytes Inhibited by Antibodies Directed against the Duffy Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Grimberg, Brian T; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Xainli, Jia; McHenry, Amy; Panichakul, Tasanee; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cui, Liwang; Bockarie, Moses; Chitnis, Chetan; Adams, John; Zimmerman, Peter A; King, Christopher L

    2007-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax invasion requires interaction between the human Duffy antigen on the surface of erythrocytes and the P. vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) expressed by the parasite. Given that Duffy-negative individuals are resistant and that Duffy-negative heterozygotes show reduced susceptibility to blood-stage infection, we hypothesized that antibodies directed against region two of P. vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBPII) would inhibit P. vivax invasion of human erythrocytes. Methods and Findings Using a recombinant region two of the P. vivax Duffy binding protein (rPvDBPII), polyclonal antibodies were generated from immunized rabbits and affinity purified from the pooled sera of 14 P. vivax–exposed Papua New Guineans. It was determined by ELISA and by flow cytometry, respectively, that both rabbit and human antibodies inhibited binding of rPvDBPII to the Duffy antigen N-terminal region and to Duffy-positive human erythrocytes. Additionally, using immunofluorescent microscopy, the antibodies were shown to attach to native PvDBP on the apical end of the P. vivax merozoite. In vitro invasion assays, using blood isolates from individuals in the Mae Sot district of Thailand, showed that addition of rabbit anti-PvDBPII Ab or serum (antibodies against, or serum containing antibodies against, region two of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein) (1:100) reduced the number of parasite invasions by up to 64%, while pooled PvDBPII antisera from P. vivax–exposed people reduced P. vivax invasion by up to 54%. Conclusions These results show, for what we believe to be the first time, that both rabbit and human antibodies directed against PvDBPII reduce invasion efficiency of wild P. vivax isolated from infected patients, and suggest that a PvDBP-based vaccine may reduce human blood-stage P. vivax infection. PMID:18092885

  18. Human Antibodies to a Mr 155,000 Plasmodium falciparum Antigen Efficiently Inhibit Merozoite Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlin, Birgitta; Wahlgren, Mats; Perlmann, Hedvig; Berzins, Klavs; Bjorkman, Anders; Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Perlmann, Peter

    1984-12-01

    IgG from a donor clinically immune to Plasmodium falciparum malaria strongly inhibited reinvasion in vitro of human erythrocytes by the parasite. When added to monolayers of glutaraldehyde-fixed and air-dried erythrocytes infected with the parasite, this IgG also displayed a characteristic immunofluorescence restricted to the surface of infected erythrocytes. Elution of the IgG adsorbed to such monolayers gave an antibody fraction that was 40 times more efficient in the reinvasion inhibition assay (50% inhibition titer, <1 μ g/ml) than the original IgG preparation. The major antibody in this eluate was directed against a parasite-derived antigen of Mr 155,000 (Pf 155) deposited by the parasite in the erythrocyte membrane in the course of invasion. A detailed study of IgG fractions from 11 donors with acute P. falciparum malaria or clinical immunity revealed the existence of an excellent correlation between their capacities to stain the surface of infected erythrocytes, their titers in reinvasion inhibition, and the presence of antibodies to Pf 155 as detected by immunoblotting. No such correlations were seen when the IgG fractions were analyzed for immunofluorescence of intracellular parasites or for the presence of antibodies to other parasite antigens as detected by immunoprecipitation of [35S]methionine-labeled and NaDodSO4/PAGE-separated parasite extracts. The results suggest that Pf 155 has an important role in the process of erythrocyte infection and that host antibodies to this antigen may efficiently interfere with this process.

  19. Mining the human autoantibody repertoire: isolation of potent IL17A-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies from a patient with thymoma.

    PubMed

    Beerli, Roger R; Bauer, Monika; Fritzer, Andrea; Rosen, Lindsey B; Buser, Regula B; Hanner, Markus; Maudrich, Melanie; Nebenfuehr, Mario; Toepfer, Jorge Alejandro Sepulveda; Mangold, Susanne; Bauer, Anton; Holland, Steven M; Browne, Sarah K; Meinke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Anti-cytokine autoantibodies have been widely reported to be present in human plasma, both in healthy subjects and in patients with underlying autoimmune conditions, such as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) or thymic epithelial neoplasms. While often asymptomatic, they can cause or facilitate a wide range of diseases including opportunistic infections. The potential therapeutic value of specific neutralizing anti-cytokine autoantibodies has not been thoroughly investigated. Here we used mammalian cell display to isolate IL17A-specific antibodies from a thymoma patient with proven high-titer autoantibodies against the same. We identified 3 distinct clonotypes that efficiently neutralized IL17A in a cell-based in vitro assay. Their potencies were comparable to those of known neutralizing antibodies, including 2, AIN457 (secukinumab) and ixekizumab that are currently in clinical development for the treatment of various inflammatory disorders. These data clearly demonstrate that the human autoantibody repertoire can be mined for antibodies with high therapeutic potential for clinical development.

  20. Mining the human autoantibody repertoire: Isolation of potent IL17A-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies from a patient with thymoma

    PubMed Central

    Beerli, Roger R; Bauer, Monika; Fritzer, Andrea; Rosen, Lindsey B; Buser, Regula B; Hanner, Markus; Maudrich, Melanie; Nebenfuehr, Mario; Toepfer, Jorge Alejandro Sepulveda; Mangold, Susanne; Bauer, Anton; Holland, Steven M; Browne, Sarah K; Meinke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Anti-cytokine autoantibodies have been widely reported to be present in human plasma, both in healthy subjects and in patients with underlying autoimmune conditions, such as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) or thymic epithelial neoplasms. While often asymptomatic, they can cause or facilitate a wide range of diseases including opportunistic infections. The potential therapeutic value of specific neutralizing anti-cytokine autoantibodies has not been thoroughly investigated. Here we used mammalian cell display to isolate IL17A-specific antibodies from a thymoma patient with proven high-titer autoantibodies against the same. We identified 3 distinct clonotypes that efficiently neutralized IL17A in a cell-based in vitro assay. Their potencies were comparable to those of known neutralizing antibodies, including 2, AIN457 (secukinumab) and ixekizumab that are currently in clinical development for the treatment of various inflammatory disorders. These data clearly demonstrate that the human autoantibody repertoire can be mined for antibodies with high therapeutic potential for clinical development. PMID:25484038

  1. Anti-syntaxin antibodies inhibit calcium-dependent catecholamine secretion from permeabilized chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, L M; Quintanar, J L; Viniegra, S; Salinas, E; Moya, F; Reig, J A

    1995-01-05

    Adrenomedullary chromaffin cells release catecholamines in response to the intracellular calcium rise upon stimulation by different secretagogues. The presence of syntaxin 1, a protein presumably involved in docking of synaptic vesicles to presynaptic membranes, has been investigated in chromaffin cells. The study using two different monoclonal antibodies shows that syntaxin 1 is present in the chromaffin cell membrane fraction. Functional experiments demonstrate that anti-syntaxin antibodies inhibit calcium-dependent secretion in permeabilized cells. These results suggest that syntaxin 1 is an important component of the secretory machinery in chromaffin cells.

  2. Characterization of the structural determinants required for potent mechanism-based inhibition of human cytochrome P450 1A1 by cannabidiol.

    PubMed

    Yamaori, Satoshi; Okushima, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Ikuo; Watanabe, Kazuhito

    2014-05-25

    We previously demonstrated that cannabidiol (CBD) was a potent mechanism-based inhibitor of human cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). However, the moiety of CBD that contributes to the potent mechanism-based inhibition of human CYP1A1 remains unknown. Thus, the effects of compounds structurally related to CBD on CYP1A1 activity were examined with recombinant human CYP1A1 in order to characterize the structural requirements for potent inactivation by CBD. When preincubated in the presence of NADPH for 20min, olivetol, which corresponds to the pentylresorcinol moiety of CBD, enhanced the inhibition of the 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity of CYP1A1. In contrast, d-limonene, which corresponds to the terpene moiety of CBD, failed to inhibit CYP1A1 activity in a metabolism-dependent manner. Pentylbenzene, which lacks two free phenolic hydroxyl groups, also did not enhance CYP1A1 inhibition. On the other hand, preincubation of the CBD-2'-monomethyl ether (CBDM) and CBD-2',6'-dimethyl ether (CBDD) enhanced the inhibition of CYP1A1 activity. Inhibition by cannabidivarin (CBDV), which possessed a propyl side chain, was strongly potentiated by its preincubation. Orcinol, which has a methyl group, augmented CYP1A1 inhibition, whereas its derivative without an alkyl side chain, resorcinol, did not exhibit any metabolism-dependent inhibition. The preincubation of CBD-hydroxyquinone did not markedly enhance CYP1A1 inhibition. We further confirmed that olivetol, CBDM, CBDD, CBDV, and orcinol, as well as CBD (kinact=0.215min(-1)), inactivated CYP1A1 activity; their kinact values were 0.154, 0.0638, 0.0643, 0.226, and 0.0353min(-1), respectively. These results suggest that the methylresorcinol structure in CBD may have structurally important roles in the inactivation of CYP1A1.

  3. Inhibition of HIV-1 entry by antibodies: potential viral and cellular targets

    PubMed Central

    Phogat, S.; Wyatt, R. T.; Hedestam, G. B. Karlsson

    2008-01-01

    Phogat S, Wyatt RT, Karlsson Hedestam GB (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; Department of Microbiology Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; and the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Solna, Sweden). Inhibition of HIV-1 entry by antibodies: potential viral and cellular targets (Review). Vaccine-induced antibodies that interfere with viral entry are the protective correlate of most existing prophylactic vaccines. However, for highly variable viruses such as HIV-1, the ability to elicit broadly neutralizing antibody responses through vaccination has proven to be extremely difficult. The major targets for HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies are the viral envelope glycoprotein trimers on the surface of the virus that mediate receptor binding and entry. HIV-1 has evolved many mechanisms on the surface of envelope glyco-proteins to evade antibody-mediated neutralization, including the masking of conserved regions by glycan, quaternary protein interactions and the presence of immunodominant variable elements. The primary challenge in the development of an HIV-1 vaccine that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies therefore lies in the design of suitable envelope glycoprotein immunogens that circumvent these barriers. Here, we describe neutralizing determinants on the viral envelope glyco-proteins that are defined by their function in receptor binding or by rare neutralizing antibodies isolated from HIV-infected individuals. We also describe the nonvariable cellular receptors involved in the HIV-1 entry process, or other cellular proteins, and ongoing studies to determine if antibodies against these proteins have efficacy as therapeutic reagents or, in some cases, as vaccine targets to interfere with HIV-1 entry. PMID:17598813

  4. Human Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody Inhibition of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Replication in the Common Marmoset.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Bao, Linlin; Chen, Cong; Zou, Tingting; Xue, Ying; Li, Fengdi; Lv, Qi; Gu, Songzhi; Gao, Xiaopan; Cui, Sheng; Wang, Jianmin; Qin, Chuan; Jin, Qi

    2017-06-15

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in humans is highly lethal, with a fatality rate of 35%. New prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to combat human infections are urgently needed. We isolated a fully human neutralizing antibody, MCA1, from a human survivor. The antibody recognizes the receptor-binding domain of MERS-CoV S glycoprotein and interferes with the interaction between viral S and the human cellular receptor human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). To our knowledge, this study is the first to report a human neutralizing monoclonal antibody that completely inhibits MERS-CoV replication in common marmosets. Monotherapy with MCA1 represents a potential alternative treatment for human infections with MERS-CoV worthy of evaluation in clinical settings. © Crown copyright 2017.

  5. Inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine delivered to rat skin via high density microprojection array elicits potent neutralising antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    Muller, David A.; Pearson, Frances E.; Fernando, Germain J.P.; Agyei-Yeboah, Christiana; Owens, Nick S.; Corrie, Simon R.; Crichton, Michael L.; Wei, Jonathan C.J.; Weldon, William C.; Oberste, M. Steven; Young, Paul R.; Kendall, Mark A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Polio eradication is progressing rapidly, and the live attenuated Sabin strains in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) are being removed sequentially, starting with type 2 in April 2016. For risk mitigation, countries are introducing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into routine vaccination programs. After April 2016, monovalent type 2 OPV will be available for type 2 outbreak control. Because the current IPV is not suitable for house-to-house vaccination campaigns (the intramuscular injections require health professionals), we developed a high-density microprojection array, the Nanopatch, delivered monovalent type 2 IPV (IPV2) vaccine to the skin. To assess the immunogenicity of the Nanopatch, we performed a dose-matched study in rats, comparing the immunogenicity of IPV2 delivered by intramuscular injection or Nanopatch immunisation. A single dose of 0.2 D-antigen units of IPV2 elicited protective levels of poliovirus antibodies in 100% of animals. However, animals receiving IPV2 by IM required at least 3 immunisations to reach the same neutralising antibody titres. This level of dose reduction (1/40th of a full dose) is unprecedented for poliovirus vaccine delivery. The ease of administration coupled with the dose reduction observed in this study points to the Nanopatch as a potential tool for facilitating inexpensive IPV for mass vaccination campaigns. PMID:26911254

  6. Inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine delivered to rat skin via high density microprojection array elicits potent neutralising antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Muller, David A; Pearson, Frances E; Fernando, Germain J P; Agyei-Yeboah, Christiana; Owens, Nick S; Corrie, Simon R; Crichton, Michael L; Wei, Jonathan C J; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Young, Paul R; Kendall, Mark A F

    2016-02-25

    Polio eradication is progressing rapidly, and the live attenuated Sabin strains in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) are being removed sequentially, starting with type 2 in April 2016. For risk mitigation, countries are introducing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into routine vaccination programs. After April 2016, monovalent type 2 OPV will be available for type 2 outbreak control. Because the current IPV is not suitable for house-to-house vaccination campaigns (the intramuscular injections require health professionals), we developed a high-density microprojection array, the Nanopatch, delivered monovalent type 2 IPV (IPV2) vaccine to the skin. To assess the immunogenicity of the Nanopatch, we performed a dose-matched study in rats, comparing the immunogenicity of IPV2 delivered by intramuscular injection or Nanopatch immunisation. A single dose of 0.2 D-antigen units of IPV2 elicited protective levels of poliovirus antibodies in 100% of animals. However, animals receiving IPV2 by IM required at least 3 immunisations to reach the same neutralising antibody titres. This level of dose reduction (1/40th of a full dose) is unprecedented for poliovirus vaccine delivery. The ease of administration coupled with the dose reduction observed in this study points to the Nanopatch as a potential tool for facilitating inexpensive IPV for mass vaccination campaigns.

  7. Crystal Structure of the Hendra Virus Attachment G Glycoprotein Bound to a Potent Cross-Reactive Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kai; Rockx, Barry; Xie, Yihu; DeBuysscher, Blair L.; Fusco, Deborah L.; Zhu, Zhongyu; Chan, Yee-Peng; Xu, Yan; Luu, Truong; Cer, Regina Z.; Feldmann, Heinz; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Broder, Christopher C.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.

    2013-01-01

    The henipaviruses, represented by Hendra (HeV) and Nipah (NiV) viruses are highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxoviruses with uniquely broad host tropisms responsible for repeated outbreaks in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. The high morbidity and mortality rates associated with infection and lack of licensed antiviral therapies make the henipaviruses a potential biological threat to humans and livestock. Henipavirus entry is initiated by the attachment of the G envelope glycoprotein to host cell membrane receptors. Previously, henipavirus-neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies (hmAb) have been isolated using the HeV-G glycoprotein and a human naïve antibody library. One cross-reactive and receptor-blocking hmAb (m102.4) was recently demonstrated to be an effective post-exposure therapy in two animal models of NiV and HeV infection, has been used in several people on a compassionate use basis, and is currently in development for use in humans. Here, we report the crystal structure of the complex of HeV-G with m102.3, an m102.4 derivative, and describe NiV and HeV escape mutants. This structure provides detailed insight into the mechanism of HeV and NiV neutralization by m102.4, and serves as a blueprint for further optimization of m102.4 as a therapeutic agent and for the development of entry inhibitors and vaccines. PMID:24130486

  8. A Potent Germline-like Human Monoclonal Antibody Targets a pH-Sensitive Epitope on H7N9 Influenza Hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Song, He; Wu, Yanling; Chang, So Young; Wang, Lili; Li, Wei; Hong, Binbin; Xia, Shuai; Wang, Chunyu; Khurana, Surender; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Sun, Zhiwu; He, Biao; Hou, Dongni; Manischewitz, Jody; King, Lisa R; Song, Yuanlin; Min, Ji-Young; Golding, Hana; Ji, Xinhua; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Ying, Tianlei

    2017-10-11

    The H7N9 influenza virus causes high-mortality disease in humans but no effective therapeutics are available. Here we report a human monoclonal antibody, m826, that binds to H7 hemagglutinin (HA) and protects against H7N9 infection. m826 binds to H7N9 HA with subnanomolar affinity at acidic pH and 10-fold lower affinity at neutral pH. The high-resolution (1.9 Å) crystal structure of m826 complexed with H7N9 HA indicates that m826 binds an epitope that may be fully exposed upon pH-induced conformational changes in HA. m826 fully protects mice against lethal challenge with H7N9 virus through mechanisms likely involving antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Interestingly, immunogenetic analysis indicates that m826 is a germline antibody, and m826-like sequences can be identified in H7N9-infected patients, healthy adults, and newborn babies. These m826 properties offer a template for H7N9 vaccine immunogens, a promising candidate therapeutic, and a tool for exploring mechanisms of virus infection inhibition by antibodies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhibition of parietal cell function by human gammaglobulin containing gastric parietal cell antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Loveridge, N; Bitensky, L; Chayen, J; Hausamen, T U; Fisher, J M; Taylor, K B; Gardner, J D; Bottazzo, G F; Doniach, D

    1980-01-01

    Parietal cell antibodies (PCA) are found in up to 90% of sera from pernicious anaemia patients but it is often stated that they could represent an epiphenomenon without being directly responsible for the achlorhydria. In the present studies a direct effect of these antibodies on the secretory function of gastric acid-secreting cells has been demonstrated in two different experimental systems. In one set of experiments IgGs containing PCA activity were shown to inhibit acid secretion specifically in the living gastric mucosa of the bull frog suspended as a diaphragm between two chambers. The other system demonstrated their inhibition of carbonic anhydrase activity in a cytochemical bioassay for human G17-gastrin, suggesting a blocking effect on the gastrin receptors in the canalicular microvilli or the cell membrane. These experiments suggest a direct pathogenic role for PCA in autoimmune fundal gastritis and in pernicious anaemia. PMID:6777102

  10. A humanized anti-DLL4 antibody promotes dysfunctional angiogenesis and inhibits breast tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xuelian; Wang, Wenyi; Xu, Zhuobin; Wang, Shijing; Wang, Tong; Wang, Min; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Blockage of Delta-like 4 (DLL4)-directed Notch signaling induces excessive tip cell formation and endothelial proliferation resulting in dysfunctional angiogenesis in tumors. MMGZ01, as a murine anti-human DLL4 monoclonal antibody, specifically binds to human DLL4 and blocks Notch pathway. Here, the structure of MMGZ01 variable fragment (Fv) was established and framework region (FR) residues which supported complementarily determining region (CDR) loop conformation were identified. Important residues interactions were also identified through docking MMGZ01 Fv with antigen epitope in DLL4. To humanize the murine antibody, we modified MMGZ01 Fv through CDR grafting and the reconstructed antibody (H3L2) maintained similar structure and binding affinity to parental MMGZ01 after back mutation of 12 canonical murine residues in the FRs. Meanwhile, H3L2 promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation through inhibiting DLL4-directed Notch pathway. Moreover, in MDA-MB-231-bearing nude mice, H3L2 induced dysfunctional angiogenesis and tumor cell apoptosis and showed superior anti-tumor activity. In conclusion, H3L2 is an ideal humanized antibody that inhibits tumor growth through targeting DLL4-Notch pathway and has attracting potentials for clinical applications. PMID:27301650

  11. Inhibition of the activity of cytotoxic murine T lymphocytes by antibodies to idiotypic determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, R; Schlesinger, M

    1980-01-01

    The nature of the receptors on the surface of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), which enable these cells to recognize antigens on allogeneic targets, is still a matter of controversy. In the present study various mouse alloantisera were tested for their capacity to inhibit, in the absence of complement, the cytotoxic activity of sensitized peritoneal T lymphocytes. The only antiserum which, even after heat inactivation, consistently inhibited cytotoxic T lymphocytes was an antiserum elicited in (C3H X C57B1/6)F1 mice by immunization with AKR/Cum thymus cells. The serum inhibited the cytotoxic reaction of either AKR/J or AKR/Cum CTL on EL-4 target cells but had no inhibitory activity on the cytotoxic reaction of AKR/J cells against P-815 target cells. Thus the inhibitory activity of the serum could not be attributed to antibodies against Ly-3 determinants present in the serum. This conclusion was strengthened by the finding that the inhibitory activity of the serum could be removed by absorption, not only with AKR/J thymus cells but also with AKR/J bone-marrow cells, a procedure which did not affect the titre of Ly-3 antibodies. The serum failed to exert any inhibition on cytotoxic T lymphocytes of BALB/c and C3H mice reacting against EL-4 target cells, indicating that the inhibitory activity of the antiserum did not result from contamination by antibodies against C57B1 antigenic determinants. It was concluded that the inhibitory activity of the antiserum resulted from the presence of antibodies against idiotypic determinants expressed on AKR/Cum thymus cells reacting against the hybrid hosts. It seems, therefore, that idiotypic determinants expressed on the surface of cytotoxic T lymphocytes may be directly involved in their cytotoxic activity. PMID:6155324

  12. Inhibition of human factor VIIIa by anti-A2 subunit antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Lollar, P; Parker, E T; Curtis, J E; Helgerson, S L; Hoyer, L W; Scott, M E; Scandella, D

    1994-01-01

    Human inhibitory alloantibodies and autoantibodies to Factor VIII (FVIII) are usually directed toward the A2 and/or C2 domains of the FVIII molecule. Anti-C2 antibodies block the binding of FVIII to phospholipid, but the mechanism of action of anti-A2 antibodies is not known. We investigated the properties of a patient autoantibody, RC, and a monoclonal antibody, 413, that bind to the region which contains the epitopes of all anti-A2 alloantibodies or autoantibodies studied to date. mAb 413 and RC were noncompetitive inhibitors of a model intrinsic Factor X activation complex (intrinsic FXase) consisting of Factor IXa, activated FVIII (FVIIIa), and synthetic phospholipid vesicles, since they decreased the Vmax of intrinsic FXase by > 95% at saturating concentrations without altering the Km. This indicates that RC and mAb 413 either block the binding of FVIIIa to FIXa or phospholipid or interfere with the catalytic function of fully assembled intrinsic FXase, but they do not inhibit the binding of the substrate Factor X. mAb 413 did not inhibit the increase in fluorescence anisotropy that results from the binding of Factor VIIIa to fluorescein-5-maleimidyl-D-phenylalanyl-prolyl-arginyl-FIXa (Fl-M-FPR-FIXa) on phospholipid vesicles in the absence of Factor X, indicating it does not inhibit assembly of intrinsic FXase. Addition of Factor X to Fl-M-FPR-FIXa, FVIIIa, and phospholipid vesicles produced a further increase in fluorescence anisotropy and a decrease in fluorescence intensity. This effect was blocked completely by mAb 413. We conclude that anti-A2 antibodies inhibit FVIIIa function by blocking the conversion of intrinsic FXase/FX complex to the transition state, rather than by interfering with formation of the ground state Michaelis complex. PMID:8200986

  13. Inhibition of Giardia lamblia excystation by antibodies against cyst walls and by wheat germ agglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    Meng, T C; Hetsko, M L; Gillin, F D

    1996-01-01

    Although excystation is crucial to the initiation of infection by Giardia lamblia, little is known about the regulation of this important process. We have been able to reliably induce excystation in vitro by mimicking cyst passage through the stomach and upper small intestine by the exposure of in vitro-derived cysts to an acidic, reducing environment (stage I) followed by protease treatment at a slightly alkaline pH (stage II). Preexposure of cysts to polyclonal rabbit antiserum against purified cyst walls (PCWs) or to wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) inhibited excystation by > 90%. Adsorption of either ligand with PCWs eliminated inhibition, demonstrating specificity for cyst wall epitopes. Inhibition by WGA was reversed by either chitotriose or sialic acid, while inhibition by polyclonal antibodies against PCWs (anti-PCW) was reversed only by sialic acid, which also inhibited binding of both ligands to intact cysts and to cyst wall antigens in immunoblots. Binding of anti-PCW did not affect acidification of cyst cytoplasm during stage I. Exposure of cysts to anti-PCW and WGA prior to, but not after, stage II was sufficient to inhibit excystation, and inhibition could be partially reversed by increasing the protease concentration during stage II. A 7- to 10-fold higher proportion of WGA- and anti-PCW-treated cysts than control cysts remained intact after stage II. Our results suggest that these ligands, which bind cyst wall epitopes, inhibit excystation, most likely by interfering with proteolysis of cyst wall glycoproteins during stage II. PMID:8675320

  14. Recombinant receptor-binding domain of SARS-CoV spike protein expressed in mammalian, insect and E. coli cells elicits potent neutralizing antibody and protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Du, Lanying; Zhao, Guangyu; Chan, Chris C S; Sun, Shihui; Chen, Min; Liu, Zhonghua; Guo, Hongxiang; He, Yuxian; Zhou, Yusen; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Jiang, Shibo

    2009-10-10

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly emerging infectious disease. The potential recurrence of the disease from animal reservoirs highlights the significance of development of safe and efficient vaccines to prevent a future SARS epidemic. In this study, we expressed the recombinant receptor-binding domain (rRBD) in mammalian (293T) cells, insect (Sf9) cells, and E. coli, respectively, and compared their immunogenicity and protection against SARS-CoV infection in an established mouse model. Our results show that all rRBD proteins expressed in the above systems maintained intact conformation, being able to induce highly potent neutralizing antibody responses and complete protective immunity against SARS-CoV challenge in mice, albeit the rRBD expressed in 293T cells elicited stronger humoral immune responses with significantly higher neutralizing activity (P<0.05) than those expressed in Sf9 and E. coli cells. These results suggest that all three rRBDs are effective in eliciting immune responses and protection against SARS-CoV and any of the above expression systems can be used for production of rRBD-based SARS subunit vaccines. Preference will be given to rRBD expressed in mammalian cells for future evaluation of the vaccine efficacy in a non-human primate model of SARS because of its ability to refold into a native conformation more readily and to induce higher level of neutralizing antibody responses than those expressed in E. coli and insect cells.

  15. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  16. Inhibition of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Lescar, J.; Brynda, J.; Rezacova, P.; Stouracova, R.; Riottot, M. M.; Chitarra, V.; Fabry, M.; Horejsi, M.; Sedlacek, J.; Bentley, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody 1696, directed against the HIV-1 protease, displays strong inhibitory effects toward the catalytic activity of the enzyme of both the HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates. This antibody cross-reacts with peptides that include the N-terminus of the enzyme, a region that is well conserved in sequence among different viral strains and which, furthermore, is crucial for homodimerization to the active enzymatic form. This observation, as well as antigen-binding studies in the presence of an active site inhibitor, suggest that 1696 inhibits the HIV protease by destabilizing its active homodimeric form. To characterize further how the antibody 1696 inhibits the HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases, we have solved the crystal structure of its Fab fragment by molecular replacement and refined it at 3.0 A resolution. The antigen binding site has a deep cavity at its center, which is lined mainly by acidic and hydrophobic residues, and is large enough to accommodate several antigen residues. The structure of the Fab 1696 could form a starting basis for the design of alternative HIV protease-inhibiting molecules of broad specificity. PMID:10631984

  17. Diagnosis of typhoid fever: detection of Salmonella typhi porins-specific antibodies by inhibition ELISA.

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, K S; Palanivel, V; Muthukkaruppan, V

    1993-01-01

    Porins are highly immunogenic outer membrane proteins of Salmonella. Sera from typhoid patients contained a high level of IgG antibodies directed to porins of Salm. typhi. Since porins are highly conserved proteins, anti-porins antibodies both from typhoid patients and healthy normals reacted with porins from several Gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, in order to improve the specificity of detecting Salm. typhi porins-specific antibodies, an inhibition ELISA was developed using enzyme-conjugated MoAbs (MP1 and MPN4) specific to Salm. typhi porins. Sera from typhoid patients with positive haemoculture (16 out of 17) inhibited the binding of MP1 to porins, thus showing a positive test for typhoid, whereas sera from patients with other Gram-negative bacterial infections (n = 7) and from healthy volunteers (66 out of 67) were found to be negative. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of this assay were 94.1, 98.7, 97.8, 94.1 and 98.7% respectively. The validity of our inhibition ELISA for typhoid was higher than that of the Widal test. The diagnosis of typhoid fever as early as 3 days after the onset of fever, using a single specimen is possible. PMID:8222322

  18. Complement inhibition as potential new therapy for antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Eskandary, Farsad; Wahrmann, Markus; Mühlbacher, Jakob; Böhmig, Georg A

    2016-04-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is a leading cause of kidney allograft failure. While the exact mechanisms contributing to donor-specific antibody (DSA)-triggered tissue injury are still incompletely understood, complement activation via the classical pathway is believed to be one of the key players. There is now growing interest in complement blockade as an antirejection treatment. One attractive strategy may be inhibition of terminal complex formation using anti-C5 antibody eculizumab. Anecdotal reports, case series, and a unique cohort of flow crossmatch-positive live donor kidney transplant recipients subjected to eculizumab-based desensitization have demonstrated successful prevention and reversal of acute clinical ABMR. Nevertheless, maybe due to complement activation steps proximal of C5 or even complement-independent mechanisms, subclinical rejection processes that might culminate in chronic injury were found to escape inhibition. Larger studies designed to clarify the actual clinical value of terminal complement inhibition as an antirejection treatment are currently underway. In addition, alternative concepts, such as therapies that target key component C1, are currently under development, and we will see in the near future whether new strategies in the pipeline will have the potential to beneficially impact clinical practice.

  19. Prevalence of hemagglutination-inhibition and neutralizing antibodies to arboviruses in horses of java.

    PubMed

    Widjaja, S; Soekotjo, W; Hartati, S; Jennings, G B; Corwin, A L

    1995-03-01

    A study was conducted to measure the prevalence of hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) and neutralizing antibodies against two arboviruses (Chikungunya and Japanese encephalitis virus) in horses of Java, Indonesia. Blood specimens were collected from a sample of 112 horses at two stables: Pulo Mas, a racing track-horse complex, located in a residential area in North Jakarta, and Pamulang, a riding school, located in a rural environment of West Jaya. Sera were tested by the HI assay and plaque reduction neutralization test. JEV antibodies were detected by HI in 58 (52%) of the horses, while only 11 (10%) had Chikungunya antibodies by HI. The proportion of Pamulang horses infected with JEV (66%) was significantly higher than found among Pulo Mas horses (40%) screened (p < 0.01). Of the 58 horses with JEV antibodies by HI, 52 (90%) were found to have specific neutralization antibodies to JEV. HI and neutralization tests on horse sera indicated that the risk to alpha virus infections was minimal in horses surveyed from Java. However, there was a high risk of JEV infection among the same population.

  20. VNAR single-domain antibodies specific for BAFF inhibit B cell development by molecular mimicry.

    PubMed

    Häsler, Julien; Flajnik, Martin F; Williams, Gareth; Walsh, Frank S; Rutkowski, J Lynn

    2016-07-01

    B cell-activating factor (BAFF) plays a dominant role in the B cell homeostasis. However, excessive BAFF promotes the development of autoreactive B-cells and several antibodies have been developed to block its activity. Bispecific antibodies with added functionality represent the next wave of biologics that may be more effective in the treatment of complex autoimmune disease. The single variable domain from the immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (VNAR) is one of the smallest antibody recognition units that could be combined with monospecific antibodies to develop bispecific agents. We isolated a panel of BAFF-binding VNARs with low nM potency from a semi-synthetic phage display library and examined their functional activity. The anti-BAFF VNARs blocked the binding of BAFF to all three of its receptors (BR3, TACI and BCMA) and the presence of the conserved DXL receptor motif found in the CDR3 regions suggests molecular mimicry as the mechanism of antagonism. One clone was formatted as an Fc fusion for functional testing and it was found to inhibit both mouse and human BAFF with equal potency ex vivo in a splenocyte proliferation assay. In mice, subchronic administration reduced the number of immature and transitional intermediates B cells and mature B cell subsets. These results indicate that VNAR single domain antibodies function as selective B-cell inhibitors and offer an alternative molecular format for targeting B-cell disorders.

  1. Comparisons of Venezuelan encephalitis virus strains by hemagglutination-inhibition tests with chicken antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, W F; Pancake, B A

    1977-01-01

    Twenty strains of Venezuelan encephalitis (VE) virus inoculated intravenously in large doses into roosters produced hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibodies detectable in plasmas within 7 to 10 days. No signs of illness occurred, and there was no evidence of viral growth in tissues since blood concentrations of infectious virus steadily decreased after inoculation. HI antibodies in early plasmas were specific for VE virus and did not cross-react significantly with two other North American alphaviruses, eastern and western encephalitis viruses. VE virus strains could be distinquished by virus-dilution, short-incubation HI, but not by plasma-dilution neutralization tests, by using early rooster antibodies. The distinctions by HI test were similar with some strains to, but different with other strains from, those described by Young and Johnson with the spiny rat antisera used to establish their subtype classifications of VE virus (14, 28). Nevertheless, results of HI tests with rooster antibodies correlated with equine virulence, as did results with spiny rat antibodies, and distinguished the new strains of virus that appeared in Middle America during the VE outbreak of 1969 from preexisting strains. PMID:591629

  2. Extraction and Inhibition of Enzymatic Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxins/A1, /A2, and /A3 by a Panel of Monoclonal Anti-BoNT/A Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Suzanne R.; Lou, Jianlong; Garcia-Rodriguez, Consuelo; Geren, Isin N.; Smith, Theresa J.; Moura, Hercules; Marks, James D.; Smith, Leonard A.; Pirkle, James L.; Barr, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely potent toxins that are capable of causing death or respiratory failure leading to long-term intensive care. Treatment includes serotype-specific antitoxins, which must be administered early in the course of the intoxication. Rapidly determining human exposure to BoNT is an important public health goal. In previous work, our laboratory focused on developing Endopep-MS, a mass spectrometry-based endopeptidase method for detecting and differentiating BoNT/A–G serotypes in buffer and BoNT/A, /B, /E, and /F in clinical samples. We have previously reported the effectiveness of antibody-capture to purify and concentrate BoNTs from complex matrices, such as clinical samples. Because some antibodies inhibit or neutralize the activity of BoNT, the choice of antibody with which to extract the toxin is critical. In this work, we evaluated a panel of 16 anti-BoNT/A monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for their ability to inhibit the in vitro activity of BoNT/A1, /A2, and /A3 complex as well as the recombinant LC of A1. We also evaluated the same antibody panel for the ability to extract BoNT/A1, /A2, and /A3. Among the mAbs, there were significant differences in extraction efficiency, ability to extract BoNT/A subtypes, and inhibitory effect on BoNT catalytic activity. The mAbs binding the C-terminal portion of the BoNT/A heavy chain had optimal properties for use in the Endopep-MS assay. PMID:19399171

  3. Monoclonal antibodies that inhibit ADP-ribosyltransferase but not NAD-glycohydrolase activity of pertussis toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Kaslow, H R; Schlotterbeck, J D; Kenimer, J G

    1990-01-01

    Kenimer et al. (J. G. Kenimer, J. Kim, P. G. Probst, C. R. Manclark, D. G. Burstyn, and J. L. Lowell, Hybridoma 8:37-51, 1989) identified three classes of monoclonal antibodies, termed A, B, and C, that recognize the S1 subunit of pertussis toxin. This report presents data demonstrating that class A monoclonal antibodies (3CX4, 6D11C, and 3C4D), which block the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and recognize the predominant neutralizing epitope on the S1 subunit of the toxin, do not inhibit the NAD-glycohydrolase activity of the toxin. In addition, alkylation of cysteine 41 of the S1 subunit, which may interact with NAD, inactivates the toxin but does not prevent binding by class A antibodies. Taken together, these results support the conclusion that proper alterations of amino acids that interact with NAD should allow for inactivation of the toxin without destruction of the predominant neutralizing epitope. The class A antibodies recognized control but not heat-treated pertussis toxin spotted onto nitrocellulose, indicating that class A antibodies do not recognize denatured S1 subunit. In contrast, a nonneutralizing class C antibody (X2X5) failed to bind to control toxin or S1 subunit in solution and recognized heat-treated pertussis toxin better than control toxin when spotted onto nitrocellulose. Thus, this type of analysis presents a heterogeneous mixture of fully or partially denatured and native S1 proteins and fails to distinguish between neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies. Images PMID:2155182

  4. Peptide derived from anti-idiotypic single-chain antibody is a potent antifungal agent compared to its parent fungicide HM-1 killer toxin peptide.

    PubMed

    Kabir, M Enamul; Karim, Nurul; Krishnaswamy, Senthilkumar; Selvakumar, Dakshnamurthy; Miyamoto, Masahiko; Furuichi, Yasuhiro; Komiyama, Tadazumi

    2011-12-01

    Based on anti-idiotypic network theory in light of the need for new antifungal drugs, we attempted to identify biologically active fragments from HM-1 yeast killer toxin and its anti-idiotypic antibody and to compare their potency as an antifungal agent. Thirteen overlapping peptides from HM-1 killer toxin and six peptides from its anti-idiotypic single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies representing the complementarity determining regions were synthesized. The binding affinities of these peptides were investigated and measured by Dot blot and surface plasmon resonance analysis and finally their antifungal activities were investigated by inhibition of growth, colony forming unit assay. Peptide P6, containing the potential active site of HM-1 was highly capable of inhibiting the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae but was less effective on pathogenic fungi. However, peptide fragments derived from scFv antibody exerted remarkable inhibitory effect on the growth of pathogenic strains of Candida and Cryptococcus species in vitro. One scFv-derived decapeptide (SP6) was selected as the strongest killer peptide for its high binding affinity and antifungal abilities on both Candida and Cryptococcus species with IC(50) values from 2.33 × 10(-7) M to 36.0 × 10(-7) M. SP6 peptide activity was neutralized by laminarin, a β-1,3-glucan molecule, indicating this peptide derived from scFv anti-idiotypic antibody retains antifungal activity through interaction with cell wall β-glucan of their target fungal cells. Experimental evidence strongly suggested the possibility of development of anti-idiotypic scFv peptide-based antifungal agents which may lead to improve therapeutics for the management of varieties of fungal infections.

  5. Anti-LcrV antibody inhibits delivery of Yops by Yersinia pestis KIM5 by directly promoting phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Clarissa; Philipovskiy, Alexander V; Wulff-Strobel, Christine R; Ye, Zhan; Straley, Susan C

    2005-09-01

    LcrV of Yersinia pestis is a major protective antigen proposed for inclusion in subunit plague vaccines. One way that anti-LcrV antibody is thought to protect is by inhibiting the delivery of toxins called Yops to host cells. The present study characterizes the relation between this inhibition and the phagocytosis of the bacteria. J774A.1 cells were infected with Y. pestis KIM5 in the presence of a protective polyclonal anti-LcrV antibody or a nonprotective polyclonal anti-YopM antibody, and delivery of YopH and YopE into the cytoplasm was assayed by immunoblotting. The ability to inhibit the delivery of these Yops depended upon having antibody bound to the cell surface; blocking conditions that prevented the binding of antibody to Fc receptors prevented the inhibition of Yop delivery. Anti-LcrV antibody also promoted phagocytosis of the yersiniae, whereas F(ab')(2) fragments did not. Further, anti-LcrV antibody could not inhibit the delivery of Yops into cells that were unable to phagocytose due to the presence of cytochalasin D. However, Yops were produced only by extracellular yersiniae. We hypothesize that anti-LcrV antibody does not directly inhibit Yop delivery but instead causes phagocytosis, with consequent inhibition of Yop protein production in the intracellular yersiniae. The prophagocytic effect of anti-LcrV antibody extended to mouse polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in vitro, and PMNs were shown to be critical for protection: when PMNs in mice were ablated, the mice lost all ability to be protected by anti-LcrV antibody.

  6. Anti-LcrV Antibody Inhibits Delivery of Yops by Yersinia pestis KIM5 by Directly Promoting Phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Clarissa; Philipovskiy, Alexander V.; Wulff-Strobel, Christine R.; Ye, Zhan; Straley, Susan C.

    2005-01-01

    LcrV of Yersinia pestis is a major protective antigen proposed for inclusion in subunit plague vaccines. One way that anti-LcrV antibody is thought to protect is by inhibiting the delivery of toxins called Yops to host cells. The present study characterizes the relation between this inhibition and the phagocytosis of the bacteria. J774A.1 cells were infected with Y. pestis KIM5 in the presence of a protective polyclonal anti-LcrV antibody or a nonprotective polyclonal anti-YopM antibody, and delivery of YopH and YopE into the cytoplasm was assayed by immunoblotting. The ability to inhibit the delivery of these Yops depended upon having antibody bound to the cell surface; blocking conditions that prevented the binding of antibody to Fc receptors prevented the inhibition of Yop delivery. Anti-LcrV antibody also promoted phagocytosis of the yersiniae, whereas F(ab′)2 fragments did not. Further, anti-LcrV antibody could not inhibit the delivery of Yops into cells that were unable to phagocytose due to the presence of cytochalasin D. However, Yops were produced only by extracellular yersiniae. We hypothesize that anti-LcrV antibody does not directly inhibit Yop delivery but instead causes phagocytosis, with consequent inhibition of Yop protein production in the intracellular yersiniae. The prophagocytic effect of anti-LcrV antibody extended to mouse polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in vitro, and PMNs were shown to be critical for protection: when PMNs in mice were ablated, the mice lost all ability to be protected by anti-LcrV antibody. PMID:16113334

  7. IL-18 receptors, their role in ligand binding and function: anti-IL-1RAcPL antibody, a potent antagonist of IL-18.

    PubMed

    Debets, R; Timans, J C; Churakowa, T; Zurawski, S; de Waal Malefyt, R; Moore, K W; Abrams, J S; O'Garra, A; Bazan, J F; Kastelein, R A

    2000-11-01

    IL-18 is critical in eliciting IFN-gamma production from Th1 cells both in vitro and in vivo. Th1 cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders, making antagonists of IL-18 promising therapeutics. However, specificity and binding characteristics of IL-18R components have only been superficially explored. In this study, we show that IL-1R related protein 1 (IL-1Rrp1) and IL-1R accessory protein-like (IL-1RAcPL) confer responsiveness to IL-18 in a highly specific (no response to other IL-1 ligands) and unique manner (no functional pairing with other IL-1Rs and IL-1R-like molecules). Cotransfection with both receptor components resulted in expression of both low and high affinity binding sites for IL-18 (K:(d) of 11 and 0.4 nM, respectively). We prepared anti-IL-1RAcPL mAb TC30-28E3, which, in contrast to soluble R proteins, effectively inhibited the IL-18-induced activation of NF-kappaB. Quantitative PCR showed that Th1 but not Th2 cells are unique in that they coexpress IL-1Rrp1 and IL-1RAcPL. mAb TC30-28E3 inhibited IL-18-induced production of IFN-gamma by Th1 cells, being at least 10-fold more potent than anti-IL-18 ligand mAb. This study shows that IL-1RAcPL is highly specific to IL-18, is required for high affinity binding of IL-18, and that the anti-IL-1RAcPL mAb TC30-28E3 potently antagonizes IL-18 responses in vitro, providing a rationale for the use of anti-IL-1RAcPL Abs to inhibit Th1-mediated inflammatory pathologies.

  8. Inhibiting angiogenesis with human single-chain variable fragment antibody targeting VEGF.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Hossien; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Ebrahimizadeh, Walead; Dehbidi, Gholamreza Rafiei

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific angiogenesis factor which has crucial roles in the angiogenesis of tumors. Anti-angiogenesis agents can inhibit growth and metastasis of tumor cells. Single-chain variable fragments (scFv) have the same affinity as whole antibodies and smaller size, thus result in more tissue permeability and higher production yield. In this research we aim to isolate a human scFv antibody against VEGF that inhibits angiogenesis. For that, we have used human scFv phage library to isolate a specific scFv antibody against binding site of VEGF. The human scFv phage library was amplified according to the manufacture protocol and panned against recombinant VEGF. ScFv antibody was isolated after five rounds of panning. Phage ELISA was used for detection of the highest affinity binder (HR6). Soluble HR6 scFv was expressed in non-suppressor strain of Escherichia coli HB2151 and purified using Ni-NTA chromatography. In vivo and in vitro function of the HR6 scFv was analyzed by chorioallantoic membrane assay and endothelial cell proliferation assay on VEGF stimulated HUVECs. Result of the cross reactivity showed that HR6 scFv specifically bounds to VEGF. The affinity was calculated to be 1.8×10(-7)M. HR6 could stop HUVEC proliferation in a dose dependent manner and anti-angiogenesis activity was observed using 10μg of HR6 in chorioallantoic membrane assay. In this work, we demonstrate that a HR6 scFv selected from human library phage display specifically blocks VEGF signaling, furthermore, this scFv has an anti-angiogenesis effect and because of its small size has more tissue diffusion. The HR6 antibody was isolated form a human library thus, it is not immunogenic for humans and could serve as a potential therapeutic agent in cancer.

  9. Neuraminidase inhibiting antibody responses in pigs differ between influenza A virus N2 lineages and by vaccine type

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The neuraminidase (NA) protein of influenza A viruses (IAV) has important functional roles in the viral replication cycle. Antibodies specific to NA can reduce viral replication and limit disease severity, but are not routinely measured. We analyzed NA inhibiting (NI) antibody titers in serum and re...

  10. Invasion of erythrocytes in vitro by Plasmodium falciparum can be inhibited by monoclonal antibody directed against an S antigen.

    PubMed

    Saul, A; Cooper, J; Ingram, L; Anders, R F; Brown, G V

    1985-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody has been produced which binds to the heat stable S antigen present in the FCQ-27/PNG isolate of Plasmodium falciparum. This monoclonal antibody also inhibits the invasion in vitro of erythrocytes by malarial merozoites thus demonstrating that the S antigens of Plasmodium falciparum may be a target of protective immune responses.

  11. Human Antibodies against a Purified Glucosylceramide from Cryptococcus neoformans Inhibit Cell Budding and Fungal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Miranda, Kildare R.; Franzen, Anderson J.; Rozental, Sonia; de Souza, Wanderley; Alviano, Celuta S.; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana

    2000-01-01

    A major ceramide monohexoside (CMH) was purified from lipidic extracts of Cryptococcus neoformans. This molecule was analyzed by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, and fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry. The cryptococcal CMH is a β-glucosylceramide, with the carbohydrate residue attached to 9-methyl-4,8-sphingadienine in amidic linkage to 2-hydroxyoctadecanoic acid. Sera from patients with cryptococcosis and a few other mycoses reacted with the cryptococcal CMH. Specific antibodies were purified from patients' sera by immunoadsorption on the purified glycolipid followed by protein G affinity chromatography. The purified antibodies to CMH (mainly immunoglobulin G1) bound to different strains and serological types of C. neoformans, as shown by flow cytofluorimetry and immunofluorescence labeling. Transmission electron microscopy of yeasts labeled with immunogold-antibodies to CMH and immunostaining of isolated cell wall lipid extracts separated by HPTLC showed that the cryptococcal CMH predominantly localizes to the fungal cell wall. Confocal microscopy revealed that the β-glucosylceramide accumulates mostly at the budding sites of dividing cells with a more disperse distribution at the cell surface of nondividing cells. The increased density of sphingolipid molecules seems to correlate with thickening of the cell wall, hence with its biosynthesis. The addition of human antibodies to CMH to cryptococcal cultures of both acapsular and encapsulated strains of C. neoformans inhibited cell budding and cell growth. This process was complement-independent and reversible upon removal of the antibodies. The present data suggest that the cryptococcal β-glucosylceramide is a fungal antigen that plays a role on the cell wall synthesis and yeast budding and that antibodies raised against this component are inhibitory in vitro. PMID:11083830

  12. Ouabain-specific antibodies: immunochemical properties and reversal of Na+, K+-activated adenosine triphosphatase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Thomas W.

    1972-01-01

    Antibodies with high affinity and specificity for the cardiac glycoside ouabain were raised in rabbits. The antigen used was a conjugate of ouabain linked through its rhamnose moiety to terminal α-amino groups of poly D,L alanyl-human serum albumin. Ouabain-specific antibodies were present as early as 3 wk, and rose steadily in titer over the initial 20-33 wk of immunization. Levels as high as 6.5 mg specific immunoglobulin per ml antiserum were reached in one rabbit at the end of 45 wk. The average intrinsic association constants for ouabain were 1.3 × 109 M-1 and 1.6 × 109 M-1 in antisera studied in detail, and there was evidence of restricted heterogeneity of binding site affinities. A high degree of specificity was demonstrated. Significant cross-reactivity occurred only with other cardioactive steroid compounds such as acetyl strophanthidin, digoxin, and digitoxin, while endogenous steroids did not cross-react even when present in 1000-fold excess. A rapid and convenient radioimmunoassay procedure for plasma or urine ouabain concentrations was developed using these antibodies. Competition between ouabain-3H tracer and unlabeled ouabain for specific antibody binding sites allowed the measurement of ouabain concentrations as low as 0.1 ng/ml or less without need for extraction procedures. The high association constants observed in these studies permit antibody reversal of established myocardial effects of ouabain. Both blockade and reversal of ouabain inhibition of canine myocardial microsomal Na+, K+-activated ATPase by antibody were documented, suggesting a possible mechanism for reversal of cellular effects. PMID:4260123

  13. Inhibition of kinesin-driven microtubule motility by monoclonal antibodies to kinesin heavy chains

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have prepared and characterized seven mouse monoclonal antibodies (SUK 1-7) to the 130-kD heavy chain of sea urchin egg kinesin. On immunoblots, SUK 3 and SUK 4 cross-reacted with Drosophila embryo 116- kD heavy chains, and SUK 4, SUK 5, SUK 6, and SUK 7 bound to the 120-kD heavy chains of bovine brain kinesin. Three out of seven monoclonal antikinesins (SUK 4, SUK 6, and SUK 7) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of sea urchin egg kinesin-induced microtubule translocation, whereas the other four monoclonal antibodies had no detectable effect on this motility. The inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (SUK 4, SUK 6, and SUK 7) appear to bind to spatially related sites on an ATP- sensitive microtubule binding 45-kD chymotryptic fragment of the 130-kD heavy chain, whereas SUK 2 binds to a spatially distinct site. None of the monoclonal antikinesins inhibited the microtubule activated MgATPase activity of kinesin, suggesting that SUK 4, SUK 6, and SUK 7 uncouple this MgATPase activity from motility. PMID:2974459

  14. Inhibition of chronic rejection by antibody induced vascular accommodation in fully allogeneic heart allografts.

    PubMed

    Semiletova, Natalya V; Shen, Xiu-Da; Baibakov, Boris; Feldman, Daniel M; Mukherjee, Kaushik; Frank, Jonathan M; Stepkowski, Stainslaw M; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Ghobrial, Rafik M

    2005-12-15

    The potential role of altered antibody responses as an effector protective mechanism to induce graft accommodation has been widely investigated in xenogeneic responses. Here we investigate the protective effects of antibody binding to vascular endothelium in a fully mismatched allogeneic model of heart transplantation. ACI recipients of WF cardiac grafts were treated either with allochimeric [alpha1h ]-RT1.A class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) extracts (1 mg/rat, p.v. day 0) or high dose of CsA (10 mg/kg/day, p.o., day 0-6). Cardiac allografts were evaluated at 100 days posttransplant by immunohistology for evidence of chronic rejection and/or vascular accommodation. Activation of apoptotic or antiapoptotic mechanisms was verified by DNA fragmentation (TUNEL) analysis. Allochimeric therapy resulted in inhibition of chronic rejection, absence of neointimal formation and induction of vascular accommodation of fully allogeneic WF hearts in ACI hosts. Such accommodation was evident by IgG and IgM vascular endothelial binding and marked reduction of DNA fragmentation. In contrast, CsA therapy resulted in marked neointimal proliferation, without evidence of vascular accommodation. Immunohistochemical analysis failed to demonstrate vascular endothelial antibody binding. Further, severe chronic rejection following CsA treatment was accompanied by marked DNA fragmentation. Alteration of humoral immunity induces vascular accommodation in allogeneic transplantation. Vascular accommodation is the underlying mechanism for inhibition allograft vasculopathy following allochimeric MHC class I therapy.

  15. Human single-chain variable fragment antibody inhibits macrophage migration inhibitory factor tautomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Tarasuk, Mayuri; Poungpair, Ornnuthchar; Ungsupravate, Duangporn; Bangphoomi, Kunan; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai

    2014-03-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine, secreted from a variety of immune cells, that regulates innate and adaptive immune responses. Elevation of MIF levels in plasma correlates with the severity of inflammatory diseases in humans. Inhibition of MIF or its tautomerase activity ameliorates disease severity by reducing inflammatory responses. In this study, the human single-chain variable fragment (HuScFv) antibody specific to MIF was selected from the human antibody phage display library by using purified recombinant full-length human MIF (rMIF) as the target antigen. Monoclonal HuScFv was produced from phage-transformed bacteria and tested for their binding activities to rMIF by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as well as to native MIF by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assay. The HuScFv with highest binding signal to rMIF also inhibited the tautomerase activities of both rMIF and native MIF in human monoblastic leukemia (U937) cells in a dose-dependent manner. Mimotope searching and molecular docking concordantly demonstrated that the HuScFv interacted with Lys32 and Ile64 in the MIF tautomerase active site. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to focus on MIF-specific fully-human antibody fragment with a tautomerase-inhibitory effect that has potential to be developed as anti-inflammatory biomolecules for human use.

  16. Galantamine Attenuates Type 1 Diabetes and Inhibits Anti-Insulin Antibodies in Nonobese Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hanes, William M; Olofsson, Peder S; Kwan, Kevin; Hudson, LaQueta K; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Pavlov, Valentin A; Tracey, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes in mice is characterized by autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. Disease pathogenesis involves invasion of pancreatic islets by immune cells, including macrophages and T cells, and production of antibodies to self-antigens, including insulin. Activation of the inflammatory reflex, the neural circuit that inhibits inflammation, culminates on cholinergic receptor signals on immune cells to attenuate cytokine release and inhibit B-cell antibody production. Here, we show that galantamine, a centrally acting acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and an activator of the inflammatory reflex, attenuates murine experimental type 1 diabetes. Administration of galantamine to animals immunized with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) significantly suppressed splenocyte release of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-6 during KLH challenge ex vivo. Administration of galantamine beginning at 1 month of age in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice significantly delayed the onset of hyperglycemia, attenuated immune cell infiltration in pancreatic islets and decreased anti-insulin antibodies in serum. These observations indicate that galantamine attenuates experimental type 1 diabetes in mice and suggest that activation of the inflammatory reflex should be further studied as a potential therapeutic approach. PMID:26322849

  17. Synthetic nanoparticle vaccines produced by layer-by-layer assembly of artificial biofilms induce potent protective T-cell and antibody responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Powell, Thomas J; Palath, Naveen; DeRome, Mary E; Tang, Jie; Jacobs, Andrea; Boyd, James G

    2011-01-10

    Nanoparticle vaccines induce potent immune responses in the absence of conventional adjuvant due to the recognition by immune cells of the particle structures, which mimic natural pathogens such as viruses and bacteria. Nanoparticle vaccines were fabricated by constructing artificial biofilms using layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of oppositely charged polypeptides and target designed peptides on CaCO(3) cores. LbL nanoparticles were efficiently internalized by dendritic cells in vitro by a mechanism that was at least partially phagocytic, and induced DC maturation without triggering secretion of inflammatory cytokines. LbL nanoparticle delivery of designed peptides to DC resulted in potent cross-presentation to CD8+ T-cells and more efficient presentation to CD4+ T-cells compared to presentation of soluble peptide. A single immunization of mice with LbL nanoparticles containing designed peptide induced vigorous T-cell responses characterized by a balanced effector (IFNγ) and Th2 (IL-4) ELISPOT profile and in vivo CTL activity. Mice immunized with LbL nanoparticles bearing ovalbumin-derived designed peptides were protected from challenge with Listeria monocytogenes ectopically expressing ovalbumin, confirming the relevance of the CTL/effector T-cell responses. LbL nanoparticles also elicited antibody responses to the target epitope but not to the matrix components of the nanoparticle, avoiding the vector or carrier affect that hampers utility of other vaccine platforms. The potency and efficacy of LbL nanoparticles administered in aqueous suspension without adjuvant or other formulation additive, and the absence of immune responses to the matrix components, suggest that this strategy may be useful in producing novel vaccines against multiple diseases.

  18. Potent and Broad Inhibition of HIV-1 by a Peptide from the gp41 Heptad Repeat-2 Domain Conjugated to the CXCR4 Amino Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Haggarty, Beth S.; Duong, Jennifer; Jordon, Andrea P. O.; Romano, Josephine; DeClercq, Joshua J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Riley, James L.; Holmes, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 entry can be inhibited by soluble peptides from the gp41 heptad repeat-2 (HR2) domain that interfere with formation of the 6-helix bundle during fusion. Inhibition has also been seen when these peptides are conjugated to anchoring molecules and over-expressed on the cell surface. We hypothesized that potent anti-HIV activity could be achieved if a 34 amino acid peptide from HR2 (C34) were brought to the site of virus-cell interactions by conjugation to the amino termini of HIV-1 coreceptors CCR5 or CXCR4. C34-conjugated coreceptors were expressed on the surface of T cell lines and primary CD4 T cells, retained the ability to mediate chemotaxis in response to cognate chemokines, and were highly resistant to HIV-1 utilization for entry. Notably, C34-conjugated CCR5 and CXCR4 each exhibited potent and broad inhibition of HIV-1 isolates from diverse clades irrespective of tropism (i.e., each could inhibit R5, X4 and dual-tropic isolates). This inhibition was highly specific and dependent on positioning of the peptide, as HIV-1 infection was poorly inhibited when C34 was conjugated to the amino terminus of CD4. C34-conjugated coreceptors could also inhibit HIV-1 isolates that were resistant to the soluble HR2 peptide inhibitor, enfuvirtide. When introduced into primary cells, CD4 T cells expressing C34-conjugated coreceptors exhibited physiologic responses to T cell activation while inhibiting diverse HIV-1 isolates, and cells containing C34-conjugated CXCR4 expanded during HIV-1 infection in vitro and in a humanized mouse model. Notably, the C34-conjugated peptide exerted greater HIV-1 inhibition when conjugated to CXCR4 than to CCR5. Thus, antiviral effects of HR2 peptides can be specifically directed to the site of viral entry where they provide potent and broad inhibition of HIV-1. This approach to engineer HIV-1 resistance in functional CD4 T cells may provide a novel cell-based therapeutic for controlling HIV infection in humans. PMID:27855210

  19. Antibody-Mediated Inhibition of Tspan12 Ameliorates Vasoproliferative Retinopathy Through Suppression of β-Catenin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Felicitas; Zhang, Ding; Aguilar, Edith; Sakimoto, Susumu; Diaz-Aguilar, Sophia; Rosenfeld, Mauricio; Zha, Zhao; Zhang, Hongkai; Friedlander, Martin; Yea, Kyungmoo

    2017-07-11

    Anti-angiogenic biologicals represent an important concept for the treatment of vasoproliferative diseases. However, the need for continued treatment, the presence of nonresponders, and the risk of long-term side effects limit the success of existing therapeutic agents. Although Tspan12 has been shown to regulate retinal vascular development, nothing is known about its involvement in neovascular disease and its potential as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of vasoproliferative diseases. Rodent models of retinal neovascular disease, including the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy and the very low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mouse model were analyzed for Tspan/β-catenin regulation. Screening of a phage display of a human combinatorial antibody (Ab) library was used for the development of a high-affinity Ab against Tspan12. Therapeutic effects of the newly developed Ab on vascular endothelial cells were tested in vitro and in vivo in the oxygen-induced retinopathy and very low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mouse model. The newly developed anti-Tspan12 Ab exhibited potent inhibitory effects on endothelial cell migration and tube formation. Mechanistic studies confirmed that the Ab inhibited the interaction between Tspan12 and Frizzled-4 and effectively modulates β-catenin levels and target genes in vascular endothelial cells. Tspan12/β-catenin signaling was activated in response to acute and chronic stress in the oxygen-induced retinopathy and very low density lipoprotein receptor mouse model of proliferative retinopathy. Intravitreal application of the Ab showed significant therapeutic effects in both models without inducing negative side effects on retina function. Moreover, combined intravitreal injection of the Ab with a known vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor, Aflibercept, resulted in significant enhancement of the therapeutic efficacy of each monotherapy. Combination therapy with the Tspan12 blocking antibody

  20. Antibody-Mediated Inhibition of TNFR1 Attenuates Disease in a Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sarah K.; Maier, Olaf; Fischer, Roman; Fairless, Richard; Hochmeister, Sonja; Stojic, Aleksandar; Pick, Lara; Haar, Doreen; Musiol, Sylvia; Storch, Maria K.; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Diem, Ricarda

    2014-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is known to regulate inflammation in a number of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Although targeting of TNF in models of MS has been successful, the pathological role of TNF in MS remains unclear due to clinical trials where the non-selective inhibition of TNF resulted in exacerbated disease. Subsequent experiments have indicated that this may have resulted from the divergent effects of the two TNF receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2. Here we show that the selective targeting of TNFR1 with an antagonistic antibody ameliorates symptoms of the most common animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), when given following both a prophylactic and therapeutic treatment regime. Our results demonstrate that antagonistic TNFR1-specific antibodies may represent a therapeutic approach for the treatment of MS in the future. PMID:24587232

  1. Induction of Potent and Long-Lived Antibody and Cellular Immune Responses in the Genitorectal Mucosa Could be the Critical Determinant of HIV Vaccine Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Chanzu, Nadia; Ondondo, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    The field of HIV prevention has indeed progressed in leaps and bounds, but with major limitations of the current prevention and treatment options, the world remains desperate for an HIV vaccine. Sadly, this continues to be elusive, because more than 30 years since its discovery there is no licensed HIV vaccine. Research aiming to define immunological biomarkers to accurately predict vaccine efficacy have focused mainly on systemic immune responses, and as such, studies defining correlates of protection in the genitorectal mucosa, the primary target site for HIV entry and seeding are sparse. Clearly, difficulties in sampling and analysis of mucosal specimens, as well as their limited size have been a major deterrent in characterizing the type (mucosal antibodies, cytokines, chemokines, or CTL), threshold (magnitude, depth, and breadth) and viral inhibitory capacity of HIV-1-specific immune responses in the genitorectal mucosa, where they are needed to immediately block HIV acquisition and arrest subsequent virus dissemination. Nevertheless, a few studies document the existence of HIV-specific immune responses in the genitorectal mucosa of HIV-infected aviremic and viremic controllers, as well as in highly exposed persistently seronegative (HEPS) individuals with natural resistance to HIV-1. Some of these responses strongly correlate with protection from HIV acquisition and/or disease progression, thus providing significant clues of the ideal components of an efficacious HIV vaccine. In this study, we provide an overview of the key features of protective immune responses found in HEPS, elite and viremic controllers, and discuss how these can be achieved through mucosal immunization. Inevitably, HIV vaccine development research will have to consider strategies that elicit potent antibody and cellular immune responses within the genitorectal mucosa or induction of systemic immune cells with an inherent potential to home and persist at mucosal sites of HIV entry. PMID

  2. Breakthrough of SIV strain smE660 challenge in SIV strain mac239-vaccinated rhesus macaques despite potent autologous neutralizing antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Burton, Samantha L; Kilgore, Katie M; Smith, S Abigail; Reddy, Sharmila; Hunter, Eric; Robinson, Harriet L; Silvestri, Guido; Amara, Rama R; Derdeyn, Cynthia A

    2015-08-25

    Although the correlates of immunological protection from human immunodeficiency virus or simian immunodeficiency virus infection remain incompletely understood, it is generally believed that medium to high titers of serum neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against the challenge virus will prevent infection. This paradigm is based on a series of studies in which passive transfer of HIV-specific nAbs protected rhesus macaques (RMs) from subsequent mucosal challenge with a chimeric human/simian immunodeficiency virus. However, it is unknown whether nAb titers define protection in the setting of active immunization. Here we determined serum nAb titers against breakthrough transmitted/founder (T/F) SIVsmE660-derived envelope glycoprotein (Env) variants from 14 RMs immunized with SIVmac239-based DNA-prime/modified vaccinia virus Ankara-boost vaccine regimens that included GM-CSF or CD40L adjuvants and conferred significant but incomplete protection against repeated low-dose intrarectal challenge. A single Env variant established infection in all RMs except one, with no identifiable genetic signature associated with vaccination breakthrough compared with T/F Envs from four unvaccinated monkeys. Breakthrough T/F Env pseudoviruses were potently neutralized in vitro by heterologous pooled serum from chronically SIVsmE660-infected monkeys at IC50 titers exceeding 1:1,000,000. Remarkably, the T/F Env pseudoviruses from 13 of 14 monkeys were also susceptible to neutralization by autologous prechallenge serum at in vitro IC50 titers ranging from 1:742-1:10,832. These titers were similar to those observed in vaccinated RMs that remained uninfected. These data suggest that the relationship between serum nAb titers and protection from mucosal SIV challenge in the setting of active immunization is more complex than previously recognized, warranting further studies into the balance between immune activation, target cell availability, and protective antibody responses.

  3. Inhibition of antibody formation during continual stimulation with a strong immunogen

    PubMed Central

    Gras, J.; Roca, Mercedes; Ayats, Rosa; Castro, Rosa; Duran, F.

    1974-01-01

    Long persisting antigenic stimulation at immunogenic levels leads to a profound inhibition of antibody formation. With Brucellus abortus, there is first a brief and high IgM response. IgG antibody titres remain at a low level for some days, and then begin a slow and progressive increase, leading to a rather persistent maximum, and finally after about 300 days, to the state of inhibition. When the same total dose is given with monthly intervals, the effect is quite different, with similar IgM and IgG peaks being observed after each dose. The inhibited animals respond moderately to a ten-fold higher antigen dose, and only with IgG. Six months after interruption of the persistent antigenic stimulus, a strong response can be obtained after a new antigenic stimulation, with a substantial proportion of IgM. It is concluded that persistent antigenic stimulation plays a major role in the change from IgM to IgG synthesis. PMID:4212089

  4. LY2875358, a neutralizing and internalizing anti-MET bivalent antibody, inhibits HGF-dependent and HGF-independent MET activation and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Zeng, Wei; Wortinger, Mark A; Yan, S Betty; Cornwell, Paul; Peek, Victoria L; Stephens, Jennifer R; Tetreault, Jonathan W; Xia, Jinqi; Manro, Jason R; Credille, Kelly M; Ballard, Darryl W; Brown-Augsburger, Patricia; Wacheck, Volker; Chow, Chi-Kin; Huang, Lihua; Wang, Yong; Denning, Irene; Davies, Julian; Tang, Ying; Vaillancourt, Peter; Lu, Jirong

    2014-12-01

    MET, the receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), has been implicated in driving tumor proliferation and metastasis. High MET expression is correlated with poor prognosis in multiple cancers. Activation of MET can be induced either by HGF-independent mechanisms such as gene amplification, specific genetic mutations, and transcriptional upregulation or by HGF-dependent autocrine or paracrine mechanisms. Here, we report on LY2875358, a novel humanized bivalent anti-MET antibody that has high neutralization and internalization activities, resulting in inhibition of both HGF-dependent and HGF-independent MET pathway activation and tumor growth. In contrast to other bivalent MET antibodies, LY2875358 exhibits no functional agonist activity and does not stimulate biologic activities such as cell proliferation, scattering, invasion, tubulogenesis, or apoptosis protection in various HGF-responsive cells and no evidence of inducing proliferation in vivo in a monkey toxicity study. LY2875358 blocks HGF binding to MET and HGF-induced MET phosphorylation and cell proliferation. In contrast to the humanized one-armed 5D5 anti-MET antibody, LY2875358 induces internalization and degradation of MET that inhibits cell proliferation and tumor growth in models where MET is constitutively activated. Moreover, LY2875358 has potent antitumor activity in both HGF-dependent and HGF-independent (MET-amplified) xenograft tumor models. Together, these findings indicate that the mechanism of action of LY2875358 is different from that of the one-armed MET antibody. LY2875358 may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for patients whose tumors are driven by both HGF-dependent and HGF-independent MET activation. LY2875358 is currently being investigated in multiple clinical studies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Antibodies against thrombospondin-related anonymous protein do not inhibit Plasmodium sporozoite infectivity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gantt, S; Persson, C; Rose, K; Birkett, A J; Abagyan, R; Nussenzweig, V

    2000-06-01

    Thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP), a candidate malaria vaccine antigen, is required for Plasmodium sporozoite gliding motility and cell invasion. For the first time, the ability of antibodies against TRAP to inhibit sporozoite infectivity in vivo is evaluated in detail. TRAP contains an A-domain, a well-characterized adhesive motif found in integrins. We modeled here a three-dimensional structure of the TRAP A-domain of Plasmodium yoelii and located regions surrounding the MIDAS (metal ion-dependent adhesion site), the presumed business end of the domain. Mice were immunized with constructs containing these A-domain regions but were not protected from sporozoite challenge. Furthermore, monoclonal and rabbit polyclonal antibodies against the A-domain, the conserved N terminus, and the repeat region of TRAP had no effect on the gliding motility or sporozoite infectivity to mice. TRAP is located in micronemes, secretory organelles of apicomplexan parasites. Accordingly, the antibodies tested here stained cytoplasmic TRAP brightly by immunofluorescence. However, very little TRAP could be detected on the surface of sporozoites. In contrast, a dramatic relocalization of TRAP onto the parasite surface occurred when sporozoites were treated with calcium ionophore. This likely mimics the release of TRAP from micronemes when a sporozoite contacts its target cell in vivo. Contact with hepatoma cells in culture also appeared to induce the release of TRAP onto the surface of sporozoites. If large amounts of TRAP are released in close proximity to its cellular receptor(s), effective competitive inhibition by antibodies may be difficult to achieve.

  6. Muscle palmitate uptake and binding are saturable and inhibited by antibodies to FABP(PM).

    PubMed

    Turcotte, L P; Swenberger, J R; Tucker, M Z; Yee, A J; Trump, G; Luiken, J J; Bonen, A

    2000-07-01

    Studies show that uptake of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) across the plasma membranes (PM) may occur partly via a carrier-mediated process and that the plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein (FABP(PM)) may be a component of this system. To test the hypothesis that FABP(PM) is involved in transsarcolemmal transport of LCFA in muscle, we measured palmitate uptake in giant sarcolemmal vesicles and palmitate binding to PM proteins in rat muscles, (1) in the presence of increasing amounts of unbound palmitate and (2) in the absence or presence of antibody to FABP(PM). Both palmitate uptake and binding were found to be saturable functions of the unbound palmitate concentration with calculated Vmax values of 10.5 +/- 1.2 pmol/mg protein/15 sec and 45.6 +/- 2.9 nmol/mg protein/15 min and Km values of 12.8 +/- 3.8 and 18.4 +/- 1.8 nmol/L, respectively. The Vmax values for both palmitate uptake and binding were significantly decreased by 75-79% in the presence of a polyclonal antibody to the rat hepatic FABP(PM). Antibody inhibition was found to be dose-dependent and specific to LCFA. Glucose uptake was not affected by the presence of the antibody to FABP(PM). Palmitate uptake and binding were also inhibited in the presence of trypsin and phloretin. These results support the hypothesis that transsarcolemmal LCFA transport occurs in part by a carrier-mediated process and that FABP(PM) is a component of this process in muscle.

  7. Antibodies against Thrombospondin-Related Anonymous Protein Do Not Inhibit Plasmodium Sporozoite Infectivity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Soren; Persson, Cathrine; Rose, Keith; Birkett, Ashley J.; Abagyan, Ruben; Nussenzweig, Victor

    2000-01-01

    Thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP), a candidate malaria vaccine antigen, is required for Plasmodium sporozoite gliding motility and cell invasion. For the first time, the ability of antibodies against TRAP to inhibit sporozoite infectivity in vivo is evaluated in detail. TRAP contains an A-domain, a well-characterized adhesive motif found in integrins. We modeled here a three-dimensional structure of the TRAP A-domain of Plasmodium yoelii and located regions surrounding the MIDAS (metal ion-dependent adhesion site), the presumed business end of the domain. Mice were immunized with constructs containing these A-domain regions but were not protected from sporozoite challenge. Furthermore, monoclonal and rabbit polyclonal antibodies against the A-domain, the conserved N terminus, and the repeat region of TRAP had no effect on the gliding motility or sporozoite infectivity to mice. TRAP is located in micronemes, secretory organelles of apicomplexan parasites. Accordingly, the antibodies tested here stained cytoplasmic TRAP brightly by immunofluorescence. However, very little TRAP could be detected on the surface of sporozoites. In contrast, a dramatic relocalization of TRAP onto the parasite surface occurred when sporozoites were treated with calcium ionophore. This likely mimics the release of TRAP from micronemes when a sporozoite contacts its target cell in vivo. Contact with hepatoma cells in culture also appeared to induce the release of TRAP onto the surface of sporozoites. If large amounts of TRAP are released in close proximity to its cellular receptor(s), effective competitive inhibition by antibodies may be difficult to achieve. PMID:10816526

  8. Characterization of electrogenic bromosulfophthalein transport in carnation petal microsomes and its inhibition by antibodies against bilitranslocase.

    PubMed

    Passamonti, Sabina; Cocolo, Alessandra; Braidot, Enrico; Petrussa, Elisa; Peresson, Carlo; Medic, Nevenka; Macri, Francesco; Vianello, Angelo

    2005-07-01

    Bilitranslocase is a rat liver plasma membrane carrier, displaying a high-affinity binding site for bilirubin. It is competitively inhibited by grape anthocyanins, including aglycones and their mono- and di-glycosylated derivatives. In plant cells, anthocyanins are synthesized in the cytoplasm and then translocated into the central vacuole, by mechanisms yet to be fully characterized. The aim of this work was to determine whether a homologue of rat liver bilitranslocase is expressed in carnation petals, where it might play a role in the membrane transport of anthocyanins. The bromosulfophthalein-based assay of rat liver bilitranslocase transport activity was implemented in subcellular membrane fractions, leading to the identification of a bromosulfophthalein carrier (K(M) = 5.3 microm), which is competitively inhibited by cyanidine 3-glucoside (Ki = 51.6 microm) and mainly noncompetitively by cyanidin (Ki = 88.3 microm). Two antisequence antibodies against bilitranslocase inhibited this carrier. In analogy to liver bilitranslocase, one antibody identified a bilirubin-binding site (Kd = 1.7 nm) in the carnation carrier. The other antibody identified a high-affinity binding site for cyanidine 3-glucoside (Kd = 1.7 microm) on the carnation carrier only, and a high-affinity bilirubin-binding site (Kd = 0.33 nm) on the liver carrier only. Immunoblots showed a putative homologue of rat liver bilitranslocase in both plasma membrane and tonoplast fractions, isolated from carnation petals. Furthermore, only epidermal cells were immunolabeled in petal sections examined by microscopy. In conclusion, carnation petals express a homologue of rat liver bilitranslocase, with a putative function in the membrane transport of secondary metabolites.

  9. Human platelet antigen (HPA)-specific immunoglobulin M antibodies in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia can inhibit the binding of HPA-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Matthew; Lucas, Geoff; Calvert, Anthony; Bendukidze, Nina; Green, Frances; Kotecha, Krishna; Poles, Anthony

    2017-05-01

    A term baby with unexplained thrombocytopenia and a platelet (PLT) count of 14 × 10(9) /L (maternal PLT count was 200 × 10(9) /L) was investigated for neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. Serologic investigations were performed using the PLT immunofluorescence test (PIFT), monoclonal antibody immobilization of PLT antigens (MAIPA), and a bead-based assay (BBA) with maternal sera taken up to 56 days postdelivery. One serum sample was also separated into "immunoglobulin (Ig)M-rich" and "IgM-depleted" fractions and tested for PLT-specific antibodies. The family was genotyped for HPA. HPA-3a-specific IgM antibodies were detected in the PIFT and confirmed in the BBA. PLT-specific IgG HPA-3a antibodies were not detected in the MAIPA assay and BBA in the initial sample but were detected in both techniques in subsequent serum samples. Testing of IgM-rich and IgM-depleted fractions in the MAIPA assay revealed that IgG antibody binding of the IgM-depleted fraction was inhibited by approximately 50% when it was reconstituted with the IgM-rich fraction suggesting that the IgM antibodies blocked the binding of the IgG antibodies. This effect was not observed when the IgM-depleted fraction or untreated serum was diluted with elution buffer. Incompatibility for HPA-3 was identified between the mother and the infant. The infant received one HPA-1a, -5b negative neonatal PLT transfusion, and one random PLT transfusion, with satisfactory outcomes. Both units were later found to be HPA-3b3b. HPA-3a IgM antibodies can inhibit PLT-specific HPA-3a IgG antibodies in the MAIPA assay. © 2017 AABB.

  10. Catechins and procyanidins of Ginkgo biloba show potent activities towards the inhibition of β-amyloid peptide aggregation and destabilization of preformed fibrils.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haiyan; Wang, Jing-Rong; Yau, Lee-Fong; Liu, Yong; Liu, Liang; Han, Quan-Bin; Zhao, Zhongzhen; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2014-04-22

    Catechins and procyanidins, together with flavonoid glycosides and terpene trilactones, are three important categories of components in the standard extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb761). In this research, catechins and proanthocyanidins were found to exist in both the extract of Ginkgo leaves and Ginkgo products. By comparing with reference compounds, six of them were identified as (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, (-)-gallocatechin, (-)-epigallocatechin and procyanidins B1 and B3. The activities of these polyphenols in the inhibition of Aβ42 aggregation and the destabilization of preformed fibrils were evaluated using biochemical assays, which showed that all six of the polyphenols, as well as a fraction of the extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb) containing catechins and procyanidins, exerted potent inhibitory activities towards Aβ42 aggregation and could also destabilize the performed fibrils. Catechins and procyanidins can therefore be regarded as the potent active constituents of EGb761 in terms of their inhibition of Aβ42 aggregation and destabilization of the fibrils. Although quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis revealed that the catechins and procyanidins are only present in low concentrations in EGb761, these components should be studied in greater detail because of their potent inhibitory effects towards Aβ42 aggregation and their ability to destabilize preformed fibrils, especially during the quality control of Ginkgo leaves and the manufacture of Ginkgo products.

  11. Structural definition of a potent macrophage activating factor derived from vitamin D3-binding protein with adjuvant activity for antibody production.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N

    1996-10-01

    Incubation of human vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein), with a mixture of immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase, efficiently generated a potent macrophage activating factor, a protein with N-acetylgalactosamine as the remaining sugar. Stepwise incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase, and isolation of the intermediates with immobilized lectins, revealed that either sequence of hydrolysis of Gc glycoprotein by these glycosidases yields the macrophage-activating factor, implying that Gc protein carries a trisaccharide composed of N-acetylgalactosamine and dibranched galactose and sialic acid termini. A 3 hr incubation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with picomolar amounts of the enzymatically generated macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) resulted in a greatly enhanced phagocytic activity. Administration of a minute amount (10-50 pg/mouse) of GcMAF resulted in a seven- to nine-fold enhanced phagocytic activity of macrophages. Injection of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) along with GcMAF into mice produced a large number of anti-SRBC antibody secreting splenic cells in 2-4 days.

  12. Targeting Attenuated Interferon-α to Myeloma Cells with a CD38 Antibody Induces Potent Tumor Regression with Reduced Off-Target Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pogue, Sarah L.; Taura, Tetsuya; Bi, Mingying; Yun, Yong; Sho, Angela; Mikesell, Glen; Behrens, Collette; Sokolovsky, Maya; Hallak, Hussein; Rosenstock, Moti; Sanchez, Eric; Chen, Haiming; Berenson, James; Doyle, Anthony; Nock, Steffen; Wilson, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-α (IFNα) has been prescribed to effectively treat multiple myeloma (MM) and other malignancies for decades. Its use has waned in recent years, however, due to significant toxicity and a narrow therapeutic index (TI). We sought to improve IFNα’s TI by, first, attaching it to an anti-CD38 antibody, thereby directly targeting it to MM cells, and, second, by introducing an attenuating mutation into the IFNα portion of the fusion protein rendering it relatively inactive on normal, CD38 negative cells. This anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) immunocytokine, or CD38-Attenukine™, exhibits 10,000-fold increased specificity for CD38 positive cells in vitro compared to native IFNα and, significantly, is ~6,000-fold less toxic to normal bone marrow cells in vitro than native IFNα. Moreover, the attenuating mutation significantly decreases IFNα biomarker activity in cynomolgus macaques indicating that this approach may yield a better safety profile in humans than native IFNα or a non-attenuated IFNα immunocytokine. In human xenograft MM tumor models, anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) exerts potent anti-tumor activity in mice, inducing complete tumor regression in most cases. Furthermore, anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) is more efficacious than standard MM treatments (lenalidomide, bortezomib, dexamethasone) and exhibits strong synergy with lenalidomide and with bortezomib in xenograft models. Our findings suggest that tumor-targeted attenuated cytokines such as IFNα can promote robust tumor killing while minimizing systemic toxicity. PMID:27611189

  13. Inhibition of autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction by monoclonal antibodies specific for the beta chain of HLA-DR antigens.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, M; Ikeda, H; Ogasawara, K; Ishikawa, N; Okuyama, T; Fukasawa, Y; Kojima, H; Kunikane, H; Hawkin, S; Ohhashi, T

    1984-09-01

    Recent studies using rabbit antisera to the separated HLA-DR alpha and beta subunits have suggested that alpha chain-specific, but not beta chain-specific, antisera inhibit T cell proliferative responses in primary and secondary human autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR). In the present study, with the aid of sequential co-precipitation assays and Western blotting methods, a monoclonal rat alloantibody 1E4, specific for the beta chain of rat class II molecules carrying an Ia determinant Ba-2.7, was characterized to recognize a monomorphic determinant located on the beta chain of DR antigens. This antibody and a murine monoclonal antibody HU-4, also specific for the beta chain of DR antigens, strongly inhibited both primary and secondary AMLR through a mechanism distinct from an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity reaction. These results indicate that the inhibition of AMLR is not a unique feature of DR alpha-specific antibodies.

  14. Humanized Affinity-matured Monoclonal Antibody 8H9 Has Potent Antitumor Activity and Binds to FG Loop of Tumor Antigen B7-H3.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Cheng, Ming; Zhao, Qi; Goldgur, Yehuda; Cheal, Sarah M; Guo, Hong-fen; Larson, Steven M; Cheung, Nai-kong V

    2015-12-11

    B7-H3 (CD276) is both an inhibitory ligand for natural killer cells and T cells and a tumor antigen that is widely expressed among human solid tumors. Anti-B7-H3 mouse monoclonal antibody 8H9 has been successfully used for radioimmunotherapy for patients with B7-H3(+) tumors. We present the humanization, affinity maturation, and epitope mapping of 8H9 based on structure determination, modeling, and yeast display methods. The crystal structure of ch8H9 Fab fragment was solved to 2.5-Å resolution and used as a template for humanization. By displaying the humanized 8H9 single chain Fv (scFv) on the surface of yeast, the affinity was matured by sequential random mutagenesis and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Six mutations (three in the complementarity-determining region and three in the framework regions) were identified and incorporated into an affinity-matured humanized 8H9 construct (hu8H9-6m) and an affinity-matured chimeric 8H9 construct (ch8H9-6m). The hu8H9-6m scFv had a 160-fold improvement in affinity (0.9 nm KD) compared with parental hu8H9 scFv (144 nm KD). The IgG formats of ch8H9-6m and hu8H9-6m (nanomolar to subnanomolar KD) had 2-9-fold enhancements in affinity compared with their parental forms, potent in vitro antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (0.1-0.3 μg/ml EC50), and high tumor uptake in mouse xenografts. Based on in silico docking studies and experimental validation, the molecular epitope of 8H9 was determined to be dependent on the FG loop of B7-H3, a region critical to its function in immunologic blockade and unique among anti-B7-H3 antibodies published to date. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. The mechanism of potent GTP cyclohydrolase I inhibition by 2,4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine: requirement of the GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Kolinsky, Monica A; Gross, Steven S

    2004-09-24

    Inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) has been used as a selective tool to assess the role of de novo synthesis of (6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH4) in a biological system. Toward this end, 2,4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine (DAHP) has been used as the prototypical GTPCH inhibitor. Using a novel real-time kinetic microplate assay for GTPCH activity and purified prokaryote-expressed recombinant proteins, we show that potent inhibition by DAHP is not the result of a direct interaction with GTPCH. Rather, inhibition by DAHP in phosphate buffer occurs via an indirect mechanism that requires the presence of GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). Notably, GFRP was previously discovered as the essential factor that reconstitutes inhibition of pure recombinant GTPCH by the pathway end product BH4. Thus, DAHP inhibits GTPCH by engaging the endogenous feedback inhibitory system. We further demonstrate that L-Phe fully reverses the inhibition of GTPCH by DAHP/GFRP, which is also a feature in common with inhibition by BH4/GFRP. These findings suggest that DAHP is not an indiscriminate inhibitor of GTPCH in biological systems; instead, it is predicted to preferentially attenuate GTPCH activity in cells that most abundantly express GFRP and/or contain the lowest levels of L-Phe.

  16. Inhibition of viral reverse transcriptase and human sperm DNA polymerase by anti-sperm antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Witkin, S S; Higgins, P J; Bendich, A

    1978-01-01

    The IgG fraction of serum from a rabbit immunized with detergent-prepared human sperm nuclei inhibited the DNA polymerase activities in human sperm and seminal fluid as well as the partially purified reverse transcriptase of the baboon endogenous type-C retrovirus (BEV). The analogous enzymes from lysates of oncogenic type-C viruses was unaffected. IgG from the serum of individual partners from infertile marriages similarly inhibited both purified BEV reverse transcriptase and human sperm DNA polymerase, but not a DNA polymerase isolated from human prostatic fluid. The data suggest that BEV reverse transcriptase and the human sperm DNA polymerase are antigenically related. Furthermore, the sperm appears to be auto-antigenic and the antibodies thus formed may be capable of interfering with reproductive success. PMID:82498

  17. Xanthatin, a novel potent inhibitor of VEGFR2 signaling, inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao; Yu, Jing; Pei, Chong Gang; Li, Yun Yan; Tu, Ping; Gao, Gui Ping; Shao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenesis targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) has emerged as an important tool for cancer treatment. In this study, we described a novel VEGFR2 inhibitor, xanthatin, which inhibits tumor angiogenesis and growth. The biochemical profiles of xanthatin were investigated using kinase assay, migration assay, tube formation, Matrigel plug assay, western blot, immunofluorescence and human tumor xenograft model. Xanthatin significantly inhibited growth, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cell as well as inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated angiogenesis. In addition, it inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream signaling regulator. Moreover, xanthatin directly inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. Oral administration of xanthatin could markedly inhibit human tumor xenograft growth and decreased microvessel densities (MVD) in tumor sections. Taken together, these preclinical evaluations suggest that xanthatin inhibits angiogenesis and may be a promising anticancer drug candidate.

  18. Testing human sera for antibodies against avian influenza viruses: horse RBC hemagglutination inhibition vs. microneutralization assays.

    PubMed

    Kayali, Ghazi; Setterquist, Sharon F; Capuano, Ana W; Myers, Kendall P; Gill, James S; Gray, Gregory C

    2008-09-01

    The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is a frequently used method to screen human sera for antibodies against influenza A viruses. Because HI has relatively poor sensitivity in detecting antibodies against avian influenza A strains, a more complicated microneutralization (MN) assay is often preferred. Recent research suggests that the sensitivity of the HI assay can be improved by switching from the traditionally used turkey, guinea pig, human, or chicken RBCs to horse RBCs. To evaluate the performance of the horse RBC HI when screening for human antibodies against avian influenza types H3, H4, H5, H6, H7, H9, H11, and H12. We evaluated the reproducibility of horse RBC HI and its agreement with MN results using sera from people exposed or not exposed to wild and domestic birds. The horse RBC HI assay had high reliability (90%-100%) and good agreement with MN assay results (52%-100%). The horse RBC HI assay is reliable, less expensive, less complex, and faster than the MN assay. While MN will likely remain the gold standard serologic assay for avian viruses, the horse RBC HI assay may be very useful as a screening assay in large-scale epidemiologic studies.

  19. Use of bacteriophage particles displaying influenza virus hemagglutinin for the detection of hemagglutination-inhibition antibodies.

    PubMed

    Domm, William; Brewer, Matthew; Baker, Steven F; Feng, Changyong; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Treanor, John; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Bacteriophage lambda capsids provide a flexible molecular scaffold that can be engineered to display a wide range of exogenous proteins, including full-length viral glycoproteins produced in eukaryotic cells. One application for such particles lies in the detection of virus-specific antibodies, since they may obviate the need to work with infectious stocks of highly pathogenic or emerging viruses that can pose significant biosafety and biocontainment challenges. Bacteriophage lambda capsids were produced that displayed an insect-cell derived, recombinant H5 influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) on their surface. The particles agglutinated red blood cells efficiently, in a manner that could be blocked using H5 HA-specific monoclonal antibodies. The particles were then used to develop a modified hemagglutinination-inhibition (HAI) assay, which successfully identified human sera with H5 HA-specific HAI activity. These results demonstrate the utility of HA-displaying bacteriophage capsids for the detection of influenza virus-specific HAI antibodies. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. THE SELECTIVE INHIBITION OF MACROPHAGE PHAGOCYTIC RECEPTORS BY ANTI-MEMBRANE ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Phillip; Holland, Nancy H; Cohn, Zanvil A.

    1972-01-01

    Rabbit antibodies were prepared against purified mouse macrophages, erythrocytes, and liver lysosomes. In the presence of complement each of these reagents was capable of lysing mouse erythrocytes and macrophages. In the absence of complement, all antisera agglutinated mouse erythrocytes and at high concentration produced a cytotoxic effect on macrophages. At IgG concentrations of 100 µg/ml, no morphological evidence of cytotoxicity was evident. These data suggest the presence of common antigens on the erythrocyte and macrophage plasma membrane. Anti-macrophage, anti-erythrocyte, and anti-lysosomal γ-globulins and IgG, employed at subtoxic concentrations, all inhibited the attachment and ingestion of opsonized erythrocytes and mycoplasma. This occurred without significant reduction in the phagocytosis of polystyrene particles, formalinized erythrocytes, and yeast cell walls. Each of the anti-membrane IgG antibodies was capable of blocking the Fc receptor on the macrophage plasma membrane. Attachment to the macrophage membrane occurred by means of the Fab region. However, a role for the Fc portion of the molecule was suggested since pepsin-digested IgG was unable to block the receptor. Each of the IgG antibodies produced a partial blockade of the complement receptor and reduced the ingestion of EAC1,4,2,3 by approximately 50%. PMID:4550767

  1. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3-dependent lung adenocarcinoma with a human monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yongjun; Ren, Xiaodi; Smith, Craig; Guo, Qianxu; Malabunga, Maria; Guernah, Ilhem; Zhang, Yiwei; Shen, Juqun; Sun, Haijun; Chehab, Nabil; Loizos, Nick; Ludwig, Dale L.; Ornitz, David M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Activating mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) have been identified in multiple types of human cancer and in congenital birth defects. In human lung cancer, fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9), a high-affinity ligand for FGFR3, is overexpressed in 10% of primary resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens. Furthermore, in a mouse model where FGF9 can be induced in lung epithelial cells, epithelial proliferation and ensuing tumorigenesis is dependent on FGFR3. To develop new customized therapies for cancers that are dependent on FGFR3 activation, we have used this mouse model to evaluate a human monoclonal antibody (D11) with specificity for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of FGFR3, that recognizes both human and mouse forms of the receptor. Here, we show that D11 effectively inhibits signaling through FGFR3 in vitro, inhibits the growth of FGFR3-dependent FGF9-induced lung adenocarcinoma in mice, and reduces tumor-associated morbidity. Given the potency of FGF9 in this mouse model and the absolute requirement for signaling through FGFR3, this study validates the D11 antibody as a potentially useful and effective reagent for treating human cancers or other pathologies that are dependent on activation of FGFR3. PMID:27056048

  2. Function-blocking ERBB3 antibody inhibits the adaptive response to RAF inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Kugel, Curtis H.; Hartsough, Edward J.; Davies, Michael A.; Setiady, Yulius Y.; Aplin, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    ERBB3/HER3 expression and signaling is upregulated in mutant BRAF melanoma as an adaptive, pro-survival response to FDA-approved RAF inhibitors. Since compensatory ERBB3 signaling counteracts the effects of RAF inhibitors, co-targeting ERBB3 may increase the efficacy of RAF inhibitors in mutant BRAF models of melanoma. Here we corroborate this concept by showing that the ERBB3 function-blocking monoclonal antibody huHER3-8 can inhibit neuregulin-1 (NRG1) activation of ERBB3 and downstream signaling in RAF-inhibited melanoma cells. Targeting mutant BRAF in combination with huHER3-8 decreased cell proliferation and increased cell death in vitro, and decreased tumor burden in vivo, compared to targeting either mutant BRAF or ERBB3 alone. Further, the likelihood of a durable tumor response in vivo was increased when huHER3-8 was combined with RAF inhibitor PLX4720. Together, these results offer a preclinical proof of concept for the application of ERBB3 neutralizing antibodies to enhance the efficacy of RAF inhibitors in melanoma to delay or prevent tumor re-growth. Insofar as ERBB3 is often upregulated in response to other kinase-targeted therapeutics, findings may have implications for other cancers as well. PMID:25035390

  3. Laurenditerpenol, a New Diterpene from the Tropical Marine Alga Laurencia intricata Potently Inhibits HIF-1 Mediated Hypoxic Signaling in Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Kaleem A.; Hossain, Chowdhury Faiz; Zhang, Lei; Bruick, Richard K.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2010-01-01

    The degree of tumor hypoxia correlates with advanced disease stages and treatment resistance. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) promotes tumor cell adaptation and survival under hypoxic conditions. Therefore, specific HIF-1 inhibitors represent an important new class of potential tumor-selective therapeutic agents. A T47D human breast tumor cell-based reporter assay was used to examine extracts of plants and marine organisms for inhibitors of HIF-1 activation. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the lipid extract of the red alga Laurencia intricata yielded a structurally novel diterpene laurenditerpenol (1). The structure of 1 was determined spectroscopically. The relative configurations of the substituents of each ring system were assigned based on NOESY correlations. The absolute configurations of positions C-1 was determined by the modified Mosher ester procedure (directly in NMR tubes). Compound 1 potently inhibited hypoxia-activated HIF-1 (IC50: 0.4 μM) and hypoxia-induced VEGF (a potent angiogenic factor) in T47D cells. Compound 1 selectively inhibits HIF-1 activation by hypoxia but not iron chelator induced activation. Further, 1 suppresses tumor cell survival under hypoxic conditions without affecting normoxic cell growth. Compound 1 inhibits HIF-1 by blocking the induction of the oxygen-regulated HIF-1α protein. Mitochondrial respiration studies revealed that 1 suppresses oxygen consumption. PMID:15620241

  4. Inhibition of tumorigenesis driven by different Wnt proteins requires blockade of distinct ligand-binding regions by LRP6 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ettenberg, Seth A.; Charlat, Olga; Daley, Michael P.; Liu, Shanming; Vincent, Karen J.; Stuart, Darrin D.; Schuller, Alwin G.; Yuan, Jing; Ospina, Beatriz; Green, John; Yu, Qunyan; Walsh, Renee; Schmitz, Rita; Heine, Holger; Bilic, Sanela; Ostrom, Lance; Mosher, Rebecca; Hartlepp, K. Felix; Zhu, Zhenping; Fawell, Stephen; Yao, Yung-Mae; Stover, David; Finan, Peter M.; Porter, Jeffery A.; Sellers, William R.; Klagge, Ingo M.; Cong, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Disregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been linked to various human diseases, including cancers. Inhibitors of oncogenic Wnt signaling are likely to have a therapeutic effect in cancers. LRP5 and LRP6 are closely related membrane coreceptors for Wnt proteins. Using a phage-display library, we identified anti-LRP6 antibodies that either inhibit or enhance Wnt signaling. Two classes of LRP6 antagonistic antibodies were discovered: one class specifically inhibits Wnt proteins represented by Wnt1, whereas the second class specifically inhibits Wnt proteins represented by Wnt3a. Epitope-mapping experiments indicated that Wnt1 class-specific antibodies bind to the first propeller and Wnt3a class-specific antibodies bind to the third propeller of LRP6, suggesting that Wnt1- and Wnt3a-class proteins interact with distinct LRP6 propeller domains. This conclusion is further supported by the structural functional analysis of LRP5/6 and the finding that the Wnt antagonist Sclerostin interacts with the first propeller of LRP5/6 and preferentially inhibits the Wnt1-class proteins. We also show that Wnt1 or Wnt3a class-specific anti-LRP6 antibodies specifically block growth of MMTV-Wnt1 or MMTV-Wnt3 xenografts in vivo. Therapeutic application of these antibodies could be limited without knowing the type of Wnt proteins expressed in cancers. This is further complicated by our finding that bivalent LRP6 antibodies sensitize cells to the nonblocked class of Wnt proteins. The generation of a biparatopic LRP6 antibody blocks both Wnt1- and Wnt3a-mediated signaling without showing agonistic activity. Our studies provide insights into Wnt-induced LRP5/6 activation and show the potential utility of LRP6 antibodies in Wnt-driven cancer. PMID:20713706

  5. The structure of a furin-antibody complex explains non-competitive inhibition by steric exclusion of substrate conformers.

    PubMed

    Dahms, Sven O; Creemers, John W M; Schaub, Yvonne; Bourenkov, Gleb P; Zögg, Thomas; Brandstetter, Hans; Than, Manuel E

    2016-09-27

    Proprotein Convertases (PCs) represent highly selective serine proteases that activate their substrates upon proteolytic cleavage. Their inhibition is a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. Inhibitory camelid antibodies were developed, targeting the prototypical PC furin. Kinetic analyses of them revealed an enigmatic non-competitive mechanism, affecting the inhibition of large proprotein-like but not small peptidic substrates. Here we present the crystal structures of furin in complex with the antibody Nb14 and of free Nb14 at resolutions of 2.0 Å and 2.3 Å, respectively. Nb14 binds at a site distant to the substrate binding pocket to the P-domain of furin. Interestingly, no major conformational changes were observed upon complex formation, neither for the protease nor for the antibody. Inhibition of furin by Nb14 is instead explained by steric exclusion of specific substrate conformers, explaining why Nb14 inhibits the processing of bulky protein substrates but not of small peptide substrates. This mode of action was further supported by modelling studies with the ternary factor X-furin-antibody complex and a mutation that disrupted the interaction interface between furin and the antibody. The observed binding mode of Nb14 suggests a novel approach for the development of highly specific antibody-based proprotein convertase inhibitors.

  6. The structure of a furin-antibody complex explains non-competitive inhibition by steric exclusion of substrate conformers

    PubMed Central

    Dahms, Sven O.; Creemers, John W. M.; Schaub, Yvonne; Bourenkov, Gleb P.; Zögg, Thomas; Brandstetter, Hans; Than, Manuel E.

    2016-01-01

    Proprotein Convertases (PCs) represent highly selective serine proteases that activate their substrates upon proteolytic cleavage. Their inhibition is a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. Inhibitory camelid antibodies were developed, targeting the prototypical PC furin. Kinetic analyses of them revealed an enigmatic non-competitive mechanism, affecting the inhibition of large proprotein-like but not small peptidic substrates. Here we present the crystal structures of furin in complex with the antibody Nb14 and of free Nb14 at resolutions of 2.0 Å and 2.3 Å, respectively. Nb14 binds at a site distant to the substrate binding pocket to the P-domain of furin. Interestingly, no major conformational changes were observed upon complex formation, neither for the protease nor for the antibody. Inhibition of furin by Nb14 is instead explained by steric exclusion of specific substrate conformers, explaining why Nb14 inhibits the processing of bulky protein substrates but not of small peptide substrates. This mode of action was further supported by modelling studies with the ternary factor X-furin-antibody complex and a mutation that disrupted the interaction interface between furin and the antibody. The observed binding mode of Nb14 suggests a novel approach for the development of highly specific antibody-based proprotein convertase inhibitors. PMID:27670069

  7. A small molecule antagonist of chemokine receptors CCR1 and CCR3. Potent inhibition of eosinophil function and CCR3-mediated HIV-1 entry.

    PubMed

    Sabroe, I; Peck, M J; Van Keulen, B J; Jorritsma, A; Simmons, G; Clapham, P R; Williams, T J; Pease, J E

    2000-08-25

    We describe a small molecule chemokine receptor antagonist, UCB35625 (the trans-isomer J113863 published by Banyu Pharmaceutical Co., patent WO98/04554), which is a potent, selective inhibitor of CCR1 and CCR3. Nanomolar concentrations of UCB35625 were sufficient to inhibit eosinophil shape change responses to MIP-1alpha, MCP-4, and eotaxin, while greater concentrations could inhibit the chemokine-induced internalization of both CCR1 and CCR3. UCB35625 also inhibited the CCR3-mediated entry of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 primary isolate 89.6 into the glial cell line, NP-2 (IC(50) = 57 nm). Chemotaxis of transfected cells expressing either CCR1 or CCR3 was inhibited by nanomolar concentrations of the compound (IC(50) values of CCR1-MIP-1alpha = 9.6 nm, CCR3-eotaxin = 93.7 nm). However, competitive ligand binding assays on the same transfectants revealed that considerably larger concentrations of UCB35625 were needed for effective ligand displacement than were needed for the inhibition of receptor function. Thus, it appears that the compound may interact with a region present in both receptors that inhibits the conformational change necessary to initiate intracellular signaling. By virtue of its potency at the two major eosinophil chemokine receptors, UCB35625 is a prototypic therapy for the treatment of eosinophil-mediated inflammatory disorders, such as asthma and as an inhibitor of CCR3-mediated human immunodeficiency virus-1 entry.

  8. Azelastine is more potent than olopatadine n inhibiting interleukin-6 and tryptase release from human umbilical cord blood-derived cultured mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Huang, Man; Kandere, Kristiana; Boucher, William; Letourneau, Richard; Jeudy, Sheila; Fitzgerald, Kim; Spear, Kathleen; Athanasiou, Achilles; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2002-05-01

    Mast cells are involved in early- and late-phase reactions by releasing vasoactive molecules, proteases, and cytokines. Certain histamine-1 receptor antagonists and other antiallergic drugs seem to inhibit the release of mediators from rat and human mast cells. Azelastine and olopatadine are antiallergic agents present in the ophthalmic solutions azelastine hydrochloride (Optivar, Asta Medica/Muro Pharmaceuticals, Tewksbury, MA), and olopatadine hydrochloride (Patanol, Alcon Laboratories, Fort Worth, TX), respectively. We investigated the effect of these drugs on interleukin-6 (IL-6), tryptase, and histamine release from cultured human mast cells (CHMCs). CHMCs were grown from human umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells in the presence of stem cell factor and IL-6 for 14 to 16 weeks. Sensitized CHMCs were pretreated with various concentrations of azelastine or olopatadine for 5 minutes. CHMCs were then challenged with anti-immunoglobulin E, and the released mediators were quantitated. The greatest inhibition of mediator release was seen with 24 microM azelastine; this level of inhibition was matched with the use of 133 microM olopatadine. At this concentration, these drugs inhibited IL-6 release by 83% and 74%, tryptase release by 55% and 79%, and histamine release by 41% and 45%, respectively. Activated CHMCs were characterized by numerous filopodia that were inhibited by both drugs as shown by electron microscopy. These results indicate that azelastine and olopatadine can inhibit CHMCs activation and release of IL-6, tryptase, and histamine. On an equimolar basis, azelastine was a more potent inhibitor than olopatadine.

  9. Antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen PfMSPDBL1 inhibit merozoite invasion into human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hirokazu; Takeo, Satoru; Maier, Alexander G; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cowman, Alan F; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2012-03-02

    One approach to develop a malaria blood-stage vaccine is to target proteins that play critical roles in the erythrocyte invasion of merozoites. The merozoite surface proteins (MSPs) and the erythrocyte-binding antigens (EBAs) are considered promising vaccine candidates, for they are known to play important roles in erythrocyte invasion and are exposed to host immune system. Here we focused on a Plasmodium falciparum antigen, PfMSPDBL1 (encoded by PF10_0348 gene) that is a member of the MSP3 family and has both Duffy binding-like (DBL) domain and secreted polymorphic antigen associated with merozoites (SPAM) domain. Therefore, we aimed to characterize PfMSPDBL1 as a vaccine candidate. Recombinant full-length protein (rFL) of PfMSPDBL1 was synthesized by a wheat germ cell-free system, and rabbit antiserum was raised against rFL. We show that rabbit anti-PfMSPDBL1 antibodies inhibited erythrocyte invasion of wild type parasites in vitro in a dose dependent manner, and the specificity of inhibitory activity was confirmed using PfMSPDBL1 knockout parasites. Pre-incubation of the anti-PfMSPDBL1 antibodies with the recombinant SPAM domain had no effect on the inhibitory activity suggesting that antibodies to this region were not involved. In addition, antibodies to rFL were elicited by P. falciparum infection in malaria endemic area, suggesting the PfMSLDBL1 is immunogenic to humans. Our results suggest that PfMSPDBL1 is a novel blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate.

  10. Dual control mechanism for heme oxygenase: tin(IV)-protoporphyrin potently inhibits enzyme activity while markedly increasing content of enzyme protein in liver.

    PubMed Central

    Sardana, M K; Kappas, A

    1987-01-01

    Tin(IV)-protoporphyrin (Sn-protoporphyrin) potently inhibits heme degradation to bile pigments in vitro and in vivo, a property that confers upon this synthetic compound the ability to suppress a variety of experimentally induced and naturally occurring forms of jaundice in animals and humans. Utilizing rat liver heme oxygenase purified to homogeneity together with appropriate immunoquantitation techniques, we have demonstrated that Sn-protoporphyrin possesses the additional property of potently inducing the synthesis of heme oxygenase protein in liver cells while, concurrently, completely inhibiting the activity of the newly formed enzyme. Substitution of tin for the central iron atom of heme thus leads to the formation of a synthetic heme analogue that regulates heme oxygenase by a dual mechanism, which involves competitive inhibition of the enzyme for the natural substrate heme and simultaneous enhancement of new enzyme synthesis. Cobaltic(III)-protoporphyrin (Co-protoporphyrin) also inhibits heme oxygenase activity in vitro, but unlike Sn-protoporphyrin it greatly enhances the activity of the enzyme in the whole animal. Co-protoporphyrin also acts as an in vivo inhibitor of heme oxygenase; however, its inducing effect on heme oxygenase synthesis is so pronounced as to prevail in vivo over its inhibitory effect on the enzyme. These studies show that certain synthetic heme analogues possess the ability to simultaneously inhibit as well as induce the enzyme heme oxygenase in liver. The net balance between these two actions, as reflected in the rate of heme oxidation activity in the whole animal, appears to be influenced by the nature of the central metal atom of the synthetic metalloporphyrin. Images PMID:3470805

  11. TGF-β3 Inhibits Antibody Production by Human B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchida, Yumi; Sumitomo, Shuji; Ishigaki, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Akari; Kochi, Yuta; Tsuchiya, Haruka; Ota, Mineto; Komai, Toshihiko; Inoue, Mariko; Morita, Kaoru; Okamura, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Fujio, Keishi

    2017-01-01

    TGF-β is a pleotropic cytokine involved in various biological processes. Of the three isoforms of TGF-β, TGF-β1 has long been recognized as an important inhibitory cytokine in the immune system and has been reported to inhibit B cell function in both mice and humans. Recently, it has been suggested that TGF-β3 may play an important role in the regulation of immune system in mice. Murine CD4+CD25-LAG3+ regulatory T cells suppress B cell function through the production of TGF-β3, and it has been reported that TGF-β3 is therapeutic in a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus. The effect of TGF-β3 on human B cells has not been reported, and we herein examined the effect of TGF-β3 on human B cells. TGF-β3 suppressed B cell survival, proliferation, differentiation into plasmablasts, and antibody secretion. Although the suppression of human B cells by TGF-β1 has long been recognized, the precise mechanism for the suppression of B cell function by TGF-β1 remains elusive; therefore, we examined the effect of TGF-β1 and β3 on pathways important in B cell activation and differentiation. TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 inhibited some of the key molecules of the cell cycle, as well as transcription factors important in B cell differentiation into antibody secreting cells such as IRF4, Blimp-1, and XBP1. TGF-β1 and β3 also inhibited B cell receptor signaling. Our results suggest that TGF-β3 modifying therapy might be therapeutic in autoimmune diseases with B cell dysregulation in humans. PMID:28052118

  12. Complement Inhibition for Prevention and Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Renal Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Jordan, S C; Choi, J; Kahwaji, J; Vo, A

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic interventions aimed at the human complement system are recognized as potentially important strategies for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases because there is often evidence of complement-mediated injury according to pathologic assessments. In addition, there are a large number of potential targets, both soluble and cell bound, that might offer potential for new drug development, but progress in this area has met with significant challenges. Currently, 2 drugs are approved aimed at inhibition of complement activation. The first option is eculizumab (anti-C5), which is approved for the treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Eculizumab has also been studied in human transplantation for the treatment and prevention of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Initial data from uncontrolled studies suggested a significant benefit of eculizumab for the prevention of ABMR in highly HLA-sensitized patients, but a subsequent randomized, placebo-controlled trial failed to meet its primary endpoint. Anecdotal data, primarily from case studies, showed benefits in treating complement-mediated ABMR. A second approved complement-inhibiting therapy is C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), which is approved for use in patients with hereditary angioedema, a condition caused by mutations in the gene that codes for C1-INH. A recent placebo-controlled trial of C1-INH for prevention of ABMR in HLA-sensitized patients found that the drug was safe, with evidence for inhibition of systemic complement activation and complement-activating donor-specific antibodies. Other drugs are now under development.

  13. Significant decrease of ADP release rate underlies the potent activity of dimethylenastron to inhibit mitotic kinesin Eg5 and cancer cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Linlin; Sun, Xiaodong; Xie, Songbo; Yu, Haiyang; Zhong, Diansheng

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • DIMEN displays higher anti-proliferative activity than enastron. • DIMEN induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis more significantly than enastron. • DIMEN blocked the conformational change of ADP-binding pocket more effectively. • DIMEN hindered ADP release more potently than enastron. - Abstract: Eg5 is a mitotic kinesin that plays a crucial role in the formation of bipolar mitotic spindles, by hydrolyzing ATP to push apart anti-parallel microtubules. Dimethylenastron is potent specific small molecule inhibitor of Eg5. The mechanism by which dimethylenastron inhibits Eg5 function remains unclear. By comparing with enastron, here we report that dimethylenastron prevents the growth of pancreatic and lung cancer cells more effectively, by halting mitotic progression and triggering apoptosis. We analyze their interactions with ADP-bound Eg5 crystal structure, and find that dimethylenastron binds Eg5 motor domain with higher affinity. In addition, dimethylenastron allosterically blocks the conformational change of the “sandwich”-like ADP-binding pocket more effectively. We subsequently use biochemical approach to reveal that dimethylenastron slows ADP release more significantly than enastron. These data thus provide biological, structural and mechanistic insights into the potent inhibitory activity of dimethylenastron.

  14. Inhibition of Enzyme Activity of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus Triosephosphate Isomerase and BME26 Cell Growth by Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Saramago, Luiz; Franceschi, Mariana; Logullo, Carlos; Masuda, Aoi; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Farias, Sandra Estrazulas; Moraes, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we produced two monoclonal antibodies (BrBm37 and BrBm38) and tested their action against the triosephosphate isomerase of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (RmTIM). These antibodies recognize epitopes on both the native and recombinant forms of the protein. rRmTIM inhibition by BrBm37 was up to 85% whereas that of BrBrm38 was 98%, depending on the antibody-enzyme ratio. RmTIM activity was lower in ovarian, gut, and fat body tissue extracts treated with BrBm37 or BrBm38 mAbs. The proliferation of the embryonic tick cell line (BME26) was inhibited by BrBm37 and BrBm38 mAbs. In summary, the results reveal that it is possible to interfere with the RmTIM function using antibodies, even in intact cells. PMID:23202941

  15. Anti-phospholipid human monoclonal antibodies inhibit CCR5-tropic HIV-1 and induce β-chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S. Munir; Scearce, Richard M.; Plonk, M. Kelly; Kozink, Daniel M.; Drinker, Mark S.; Zhang, Ruijun; Xia, Shi-Mao; Sutherland, Laura L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Giles, Ian P.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Edmonds, Tara G.; Soares, Melina; Barbero, Gustavo; Forthal, Donald N.; Landucci, Gary; Chang, Connie; King, Steven W.; Kavlie, Anita; Denny, Thomas N.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Pojen P.; Thorpe, Philip E.; Montefiori, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional antibody-mediated neutralization of HIV-1 infection is thought to result from the binding of antibodies to virions, thus preventing virus entry. However, antibodies that broadly neutralize HIV-1 are rare and are not induced by current vaccines. We report that four human anti-phospholipid monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (PGN632, P1, IS4, and CL1) inhibit HIV-1 CCR5-tropic (R5) primary isolate infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with 80% inhibitory concentrations of <0.02 to ∼10 µg/ml. Anti-phospholipid mAbs inhibited PBMC HIV-1 infection in vitro by mechanisms involving binding to monocytes and triggering the release of MIP-1α and MIP-1β. The release of these β-chemokines explains both the specificity for R5 HIV-1 and the activity of these mAbs in PBMC cultures containing both primary lymphocytes and monocytes. PMID:20368576

  16. Inhibition of enzyme activity of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus triosephosphate isomerase and BME26 cell growth by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Saramago, Luiz; Franceschi, Mariana; Logullo, Carlos; Masuda, Aoi; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Farias, Sandra Estrazulas; Moraes, Jorge

    2012-10-12

    In the present work, we produced two monoclonal antibodies (BrBm37 and BrBm38) and tested their action against the triosephosphate isomerase of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (RmTIM). These antibodies recognize epitopes on both the native and recombinant forms of the protein. rRmTIM inhibition  by BrBm37 was up to 85% whereas that of BrBrm38 was 98%, depending on the antibody-enzyme ratio. RmTIM activity was lower in ovarian, gut, and fat body tissue extracts treated with BrBm37 or BrBm38 mAbs. The proliferation of the embryonic tick cell line (BME26) was inhibited by BrBm37 and BrBm38 mAbs. In summary, the results reveal that it is possible to interfere with the RmTIM function using antibodies, even in intact cells.

  17. Potent and Selective Inhibition of Human Cytomegalovirus Replication by 1263W94, a Benzimidazole l-Riboside with a Unique Mode of Action†

    PubMed Central

    Biron, Karen K.; Harvey, Robert J.; Chamberlain, Stanley C.; Good, Steven S.; Smith III, Albert A.; Davis, Michelle G.; Talarico, Christine L.; Miller, Wayne H.; Ferris, Robert; Dornsife, Ronna E.; Stanat, Sylvia C.; Drach, John C.; Townsend, Leroy B.; Koszalka, George W.

    2002-01-01

    Benzimidazole nucleosides have been shown to be potent inhibitors of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication in vitro. As part of the exploration of structure-activity relationships within this series, we synthesized the 2-isopropylamino derivative (3322W93) of 1H-β-d-ribofuranoside-2-bromo-5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole (BDCRB) and the biologically unnatural l-sugars corresponding to both compounds. One of the l derivatives, 1H-β-l-ribofuranoside-2-isopropylamino-5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole (1263W94), showed significant antiviral potency in vitro against both laboratory HCMV strains and clinical HCMV isolates, including those resistant to ganciclovir (GCV), foscarnet, and BDCRB. 1263W94 inhibited viral replication in a dose-dependent manner, with a mean 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.12 ± 0.01 μM compared to a mean IC50 for GCV of 0.53 ± 0.04 μM, as measured by a multicycle DNA hybridization assay. In a single replication cycle, 1263W94 treatment reduced viral DNA synthesis, as well as overall virus yield. HCMV mutants resistant to 1263W94 were isolated, establishing that the target of 1263W94 was a viral gene product. The resistance mutation was mapped to the UL97 open reading frame. The pUL97 protein kinase was strongly inhibited by 1263W94, with 50% inhibition occurring at 3 nM. Although HCMV DNA synthesis was inhibited by 1263W94, the inhibition was not mediated by the inhibition of viral DNA polymerase. The parent benzimidazole d-riboside BDCRB inhibits viral DNA maturation and processing, whereas 1263W94 does not. The mechanism of the antiviral effect of l-riboside 1263W94 is thus distinct from those of GCV and of BDCRB. In summary, 1263W94 inhibits viral replication by a novel mechanism that is not yet completely understood. PMID:12121906

  18. Inhibition of insulin degradation by hepatoma cells after microinjection of monoclonal antibodies to a specific cytosolic protease.

    PubMed Central

    Shii, K; Roth, R A

    1986-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies were identified by their ability to bind to 125I-labeled insulin covalently linked to a cytosolic insulin-degrading enzyme from human erythrocytes. All four antibodies were also found to remove more than 90% of the insulin-degrading activity from erythrocyte extracts. These antibodies were shown to be directed to different sites on the enzyme by mapping studies and by their various properties. Two antibodies recognized the insulin-degrading enzyme from rat liver; one inhibited the erythrocyte enzyme directly; and two recognized the enzyme after gel electrophoresis and transfer to nitrocellulose filters. By this latter procedure and immunoprecipitation from metabolically labeled cells, the enzyme from a variety of tissues was shown to be composed of a single polypeptide chain of apparent Mr 110,000. Finally, these monoclonal antibodies were microinjected into the cytoplasm of a human hepatoma cell line to assess the contribution of this enzyme to insulin degradation in the intact cell. In five separate experiments, preloading of cells with these monoclonal antibodies resulted in an inhibition of insulin degradation of 18-54% (average 39%) and increased the amount of 125I-labeled insulin associated with the cells. In contrast, microinjection of control antibody or an extraneous monoclonal antibody had no effect on insulin degradation or on the amount of insulin associated with the cells. Moreover, the monoclonal antibodies to the insulin-degrading enzyme caused no significant inhibition of degradation of another molecule, low density lipoprotein. Thus, these results support a role for this enzyme in insulin degradation in the intact cell. Images PMID:2424018

  19. Inhibition of HIV-1 Env-Mediated Cell-Cell Fusion by Lectins, Peptide T-20, and Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Michael; Konopka, Krystyna; Balzarini, Jan; Düzgüneş, Nejat

    2011-01-01

    Background: Broadly cross-reactive, neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies, including 2F5, 2G12, 4E10 and IgG1 b12, can inhibit HIV-1 infection in vitro at very low concentrations. We examined the ability of these antibodies to inhibit cell-cell fusion between Clone69TRevEnv cells induced to express the viral envelope proteins, gp120/gp41 (Env), and highly CD4-positive SupT1 cells. The cells were loaded with green and red-orange cytoplasmic fluorophores, and fusion was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Results: Cell-cell fusion was inhibited completely by the carbohydrate binding proteins (CBPs), Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) agglutinin (HHA), and Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop) agglutinin (GNA), and by the peptide, T-20, at relatively low concentrations. Anti-gp120 and anti-gp41 antibodies, at concentrations much higher than those required for neutralization, were not particularly effective in inhibiting fusion. Monoclonal antibodies b12, m14 IgG and 2G12 had moderate inhibitory activity; the IC50 of 2G12 was about 80 µg/ml. Antibodies 4E10 and 2F5 had no inhibitory activity at the concentrations tested. Conclusions: These observations raise concerns about the ability of neutralizing antibodies to inhibit the spread of viral genetic material from infected cells to uninfected cells via cell-cell fusion. The interaction of gp120/gp41 with cell membrane CD4 may be different in cell-cell and virus-cell membrane fusion reactions, and may explain the differential effects of antibodies in these two systems. The fluorescence assay described here may be useful in high throughput screening of potential HIV fusion inhibitors. PMID:21660189

  20. Inhibition of HIV-1 Env-Mediated Cell-Cell Fusion by Lectins, Peptide T-20, and Neutralizing Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yee, Michael; Konopka, Krystyna; Balzarini, Jan; Düzgüneş, Nejat

    2011-01-01

    Broadly cross-reactive, neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies, including 2F5, 2G12, 4E10 and IgG1 b12, can inhibit HIV-1 infection in vitro at very low concentrations. We examined the ability of these antibodies to inhibit cell-cell fusion between Clone69TRevEnv cells induced to express the viral envelope proteins, gp120/gp41 (Env), and highly CD4-positive SupT1 cells. The cells were loaded with green and red-orange cytoplasmic fluorophores, and fusion was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Cell-cell fusion was inhibited completely by the carbohydrate binding proteins (CBPs), Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) agglutinin (HHA), and Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop) agglutinin (GNA), and by the peptide, T-20, at relatively low concentrations. Anti-gp120 and anti-gp41 antibodies, at concentrations much higher than those required for neutralization, were not particularly effective in inhibiting fusion. Monoclonal antibodies b12, m14 IgG and 2G12 had moderate inhibitory activity; the IC(50) of 2G12 was about 80 µg/ml. Antibodies 4E10 and 2F5 had no inhibitory activity at the concentrations tested. These observations raise concerns about the ability of neutralizing antibodies to inhibit the spread of viral genetic material from infected cells to uninfected cells via cell-cell fusion. The interaction of gp120/gp41 with cell membrane CD4 may be different in cell-cell and virus-cell membrane fusion reactions, and may explain the differential effects of antibodies in these two systems. The fluorescence assay described here may be useful in high throughput screening of potential HIV fusion inhibitors.

  1. AP24534, a Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Potently Inhibits the T315I Mutant and Overcomes Mutation-Based Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    O’Hare, Thomas; Shakespeare, William C.; Zhu, Xiaotian; Eide, Christopher A.; Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Frank; Adrian, Lauren T.; Zhou, Tianjun; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Qihong; Metcalf, III, Chester A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Keats, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Thomas, Mathew; Zhou, Dong; Snodgrass, Joseph; Commodore, Lois; Sawyer, Tomi K.; Dalgarno, David C.; Deininger, Michael W.N.; Druker, Brian J.; Clackson, Tim

    2010-09-07

    Inhibition of BCR-ABL by imatinib induces durable responses in many patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but resistance attributable to kinase domain mutations can lead to relapse and a switch to second-line therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib. Despite three approved therapeutic options, the cross-resistant BCR-ABL{sup T315I} mutation and compound mutants selected on sequential inhibitor therapy remain major clinical challenges. We report design and preclinical evaluation of AP24534, a potent, orally available multitargeted kinase inhibitor active against T315I and other BCR-ABL mutants. AP24534 inhibited all tested BCR-ABL mutants in cellular and biochemical assays, suppressed BCR-ABL{sup T315I}-driven tumor growth in mice, and completely abrogated resistance in cell-based mutagenesis screens. Our work supports clinical evaluation of AP24534 as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor for treatment of CML.

  2. AP24534, a Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Potently Inhibits the T315I Mutant and Overcomes Mutation-Based Resistance

    PubMed Central

    O’Hare, Thomas; Shakespeare, William C.; Zhu, Xiaotian; Eide, Christopher A.; Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Frank; Adrian, Lauren T.; Zhou, Tianjun; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Qihong; Metcalf, Chester A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Keats, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Thomas, Mathew; Zhou, Dong; Snodgrass, Joseph; Commodore, Lois; Sawyer, Tomi K.; Dalgarno, David C.; Deininger, Michael W.N.; Druker, Brian J.; Clackson, Tim

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Inhibition of BCR-ABL by imatinib induces durable responses in many patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but resistance attributable to kinase domain mutations can lead to relapse and a switch to second-line therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib. Despite three approved therapeutic options, the cross-resistant BCR-ABLT315I mutation and compound mutants selected on sequential inhibitor therapy remain major clinical challenges. We report design and pre-clinical evaluation of AP24534, a potent, orally available multi-targeted kinase inhibitor active against T315I and other BCR-ABL mutants. AP24534 inhibited all tested BCR-ABL mutants in cellular and biochemical assays, suppressed BCR-ABLT315I-driven tumor growth in mice, and completely abrogated resistance in cell-based mutagenesis screens. Our work supports clinical evaluation of AP24534 as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor for treatment of CML. PMID:19878872

  3. Oblongifolin M, an active compound isolated from a Chinese medical herb Garcinia oblongifolia, potently inhibits enterovirus 71 reproduction through downregulation of ERp57

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; He, Yaqing; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Rong; Chen, Xinchun; Zhou, Boping; He, Jason; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan; Huang, Jian-dong; Xu, Hongxi; He, Ming-Liang

    2016-01-01

    There is no effective drug to treat EV71 infection yet. Traditional Chinese herbs are great resources for novel antiviral compounds. Here we showed that Oblongifolin M (OM), an active compound isolated from Garcinia oblongifolia, potently inhibited EV71 infection in a dose dependent manner. To identify its potential effectors in the host cells, we successfully identified 18 proteins from 52 differentially expressed spots by comparative proteomics studies. Further studies showed that knockdown of ERp57 inhibited viral replication through downregulating viral IRES (internal ribosome entry site) activities, whereas ectopic expression of ERp57 increased IRES activity and partly rescued the inhibitory effects of OM on viral replication. We demonstrated that OM is an effective antiviral agent; and that ERp57 is one of its cellular effectors against EV71 infection. PMID:26848777

  4. Oblongifolin M, an active compound isolated from a Chinese medical herb Garcinia oblongifolia, potently inhibits enterovirus 71 reproduction through downregulation of ERp57.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengjie; Dong, Qi; Wang, Hua; He, Yaqing; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Rong; Chen, Xinchun; Zhou, Boping; He, Jason; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan; Huang, Jian-dong; Xu, Hongxi; He, Ming-Liang

    2016-02-23

    There is no effective drug to treat EV71 infection yet. Traditional Chinese herbs are great resources for novel antiviral compounds. Here we showed that Oblongifolin M (OM), an active compound isolated from Garcinia oblongifolia, potently inhibited EV71 infection in a dose dependent manner. To identify its potential effectors in the host cells, we successfully identified 18 proteins from 52 differentially expressed spots by comparative proteomics studies. Further studies showed that knockdown of ERp57 inhibited viral replication through downregulating viral IRES (internal ribosome entry site) activities, whereas ectopic expression of ERp57 increased IRES activity and partly rescued the inhibitory effects of OM on viral replication. We demonstrated that OM is an effective antiviral agent; and that ERp57 is one of its cellular effectors against EV71 infection.

  5. Association between Haemagglutination inhibiting antibodies and protection against clade 6B viruses in 2013 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sophia; Saborio, Saira; Kuan, Guillermina; Gresh, Lionel; Sanchez, Nery; Ojeda, Sergio; Harris, Eva; Balmaseda, Angel; Gordon, Aubree

    2017-10-03

    The epidemiology of the pandemic A(H1N1) virus has been changing as population immunity continues to co-evolve with the virus. The impact of genetic changes in the virus on human's susceptibility is an outstanding important question in vaccine design. In a community-based study, we aim to (1) determine the genetic characteristics of 2009-2015 pandemic H1N1 viruses, (2) assess antibody response following natural infections and (3) assess the correlation of A/California/07/09 antibody titers to protection in the 2013 and 2015 epidemics. In a household transmission study, serum specimens from 253 individuals in Managua, Nicaragua were analyzed. Combined nose and throat swabs were collected to detect RT-PCR confirmed influenza infection and virus sequencing. Hemagglutination inhibition assays were performed and the protective titer for circulating H1N1pdm was determined. Clade 6B pandemic H1N1 viruses predominated in Nicaragua during the 2013 and 2015 seasons. Our household transmission study detected a household secondary attack rate of 17% in 2013 and 33% in 2015. Infected individuals, including vaccinees, showed an apparent antibody response to A/California/07/09. Baseline titers of A/California/07/09 antibodies were found to associate with protection in both seasons. A titer of ≥1:40 correlated to a 44% protection in children, a 29% protection in adults 15-49years old and a 51% protection in adults 50-85years old. In 2013 and 2015, antibody titers to A/California/07/09 associated with an infection risk reduction amongst exposed household contacts. This is consistent with a detectable vaccine effectiveness reported in a number of studies. Genetic changes in clade 6B viruses might have led to a reduced immunity in some whereas others might have been less affected. The use of human serologic data is important in virus characterization and if performed in a timely manner, could assist in vaccine strain selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Triptonide acts as a novel potent anti-lymphoma agent with low toxicity mainly through inhibition of proto-oncogene Lyn transcription and suppression of Lyn signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Dong, Fulu; Zhou, Quansheng

    2017-08-15

    Lyn is a proto-oncogene overexpressed and constitutively activated in lymphoma, and plays an important role in lymphoma initiation and malignant progression. Hence, the oncogenic Lyn has recently been targeted for novel anti-lymphoma drug discovery; however, the effective Lyn-targeted drug for lymphoma treatment with low toxicity is absent in the clinical setting. The goal of this study is to explore powerful and low toxic Lyn-targeted anti-lymphoma agent. Here we show that triptonide, a small molecule purified from the herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, potently inhibits the proliferation of human B-lymphoma Raji and T-lymphoma Jurkat cells with IC50 of 5.7nM and 4.8nM, respectively. Strikingly, triptonide at a dose of 5mg/kg/day almost completely inhibited the lymphoma growth in human lymphoma cells-xenografted mice without obvious side effects, particularly; the tumors in 6 mice among the 8 xenografted mice were completely eradicated in vivo. Cell biological studies showed that triptonide at the doses of 2.5-10nM notably suppressed B-lymphoma cell colony-forming capability, and that triptonide at the dose of 20nM promoted apoptosis through activation of PARP and caspase 3, but reduction of BCL2 protein levels in the lymphoma cells. Molecular studies revealed that triptonide markedly inhibited oncogenic Lyn transcription through suppressing the promoter activity of the gene, and that it remarkably reduced both total and phosphorylated Lyn proteins, and diminished Lyn downstream ERK and ATK signal pathways. Additionally, triptonide significantly enhanced p38 phosphorylation. Together, triptonide exerts potent anti-lymphoma effect with low toxicity mainly through inhibition of proto-oncogene Lyn transcription and suppression of Lyn downstream ERK and ATK signal pathways, providing an attractive drug candidate for development of novel anti-lymphoma therapeutics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI): phage display and antibodies as tools for finding target regions to inhibit catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Ayala, Víctor; Belmont, Iaraset; Abraham, Landa

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that antibodies against triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI) can alter its enzymatic catalysis. In the present study, we used antibodies produced against the NH2-terminal region of TTPI (1/3NH2TTPI) and the phage display technology to find target regions to inhibit TTPI activity. As a first step, we obtained polyclonal antibodies against non-conserved regions from the 1/3NH2TTPI, which had an inhibitory effect of about 74 % on catalytic activity. Afterward, they were used to screen a library of phage-displayed dodecapeptides; as a result, 41 phage mimotope clones were isolated and grouped according to their amino acid sequence, finding the consensus A1 (VPTXPI), A2 (VPTXXI), B (LTPGQ), and D (DPLPR). Antibodies against selected phage mimotope clones were obtained by rabbit's immunization; these ones clearly recognized TTPI by both Western blot and ELISA. However, only the mimotope PDTS16 (DSVTPTSVMAVA) clone, which belongs to the VPTXXI consensus, raised antibodies capable of inhibiting the TTPI catalytic activity in 45 %. Anti-PDTS16 antibodies were confronted to several synthetic peptides that encompass the 1/3NH2TTPI, and they only recognized three, which share the motif FDTLQK belonging to the helix-α1 in TTPI. This suggests that this motif is the main part of the epitope recognized by anti-PDTS16 antibodies and revealed its importance for TTPI catalysis.

  8. Targeted inhibition of the immunoproteasome is a potent strategy against models of multiple myeloma that overcomes resistance to conventional drugs and nonspecific proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Deborah J.; Hunsucker, Sally A.; Chen, Qing; Voorhees, Peter M.; Orlowski, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Proteasome inhibition is a validated strategy for therapy of multiple myeloma, but this disease remains challenging as relapses are common, and often associated with increasing chemoresistance. Moreover, nonspecific proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib can induce peripheral neuropathy and other toxicities that may compromise the ability to deliver therapy at full doses, thereby decreasing efficacy. One novel approach may be to target the immunoproteasome, a proteasomal variant found predominantly in cells of hematopoietic origin that differs from the constitutive proteasome found in most other cell types. Using purified preparations of constitutive and immunoproteasomes, we screened a rationally designed series of peptidyl-aldehydes and identified several with relative specificity for the immunoproteasome. The most potent immunoproteasome-specific inhibitor, IPSI-001, preferentially targeted the β1i subunit of the immunoproteasome in vitro and in cellulo in a dose-dependent manner. This agent induced accumulation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, proapoptotic proteins, and activated caspase-mediated apoptosis. IPSI-001 potently inhibited proliferation in myeloma patient samples and other hematologic malignancies. Importantly, IPSI-001 was able to overcome conventional and novel drug resistance, including resistance to bortezomib. These findings provide a rationale for the translation of IPSIs to the clinic, where they may provide antimyeloma activity with greater specificity and less toxicity than current inhibitors. PMID:19050304

  9. More potent inhibition of human CYP2A6 than mouse CYP2A5 enzyme activities by derivatives of phenylethylamine and benzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Rahnasto, M; Raunio, H; Poso, A; Juvonen, R O

    2003-05-01

    1. A rapid 96-well plate assay method was developed and validated to measure liver microsomal coumarin 7-hydroxylation in vitro. 2. The method was used to test inhibition of human and mouse CYP2A enzymes by three phenylethylamine derivatives 2-(p-tolyl)-ethylamine, amphetamine, 2-phenylethylamine and benzaldehyde, and two of its derivatives, 4-methylbenzaldehyde and 4-methoxybenzaldehyde. 3. The benzaldehyde derivatives were more potent inhibitors of CYP2A5 than the phenylethylamines. The K(ic) value of 4-methylbenzaldehyde was 3.4 micro M and for 4-methoxybenzaldehyde it was 0.86 micro M for CYP2A5. 4. Amphetamine is a weak inhibitor of CYP2A6, whereas benzaldehyde is a suicide inhibitor with K(inact) = 0.16 min(-1) and K(I) = 18 micro M. The K(ic) values of 2-phenylethylamine, 2-(p-tolyl)-ethylamine, 4-methylbenzaldehyde and 4-methoxybenzaldehyde were 1.13, 0.23, 0.36 and 0.73 micro M for CYP2A6, respectively. 5. Novel potent inhibitors were found for CYP2A6 and, except for 4-methoxybenzaldehyde, all the compounds inhibited CYP2A5 and CYP2A6 enzymes differentially. These data add to the refinement of CYP2A enzyme active sites and provide chemical leads for developing novel chemical inhibitors of the CYP2A6 enzyme.

  10. Potent inhibition of endopeptidase 24.16 and endopeptidase 24.15 by the phosphonamide peptide N-(phenylethylphosphonyl)-Gly-L-Pro-L-aminohexanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Barelli, H; Dive, V; Yiotakis, A; Vincent, J P; Checler, F

    1992-10-15

    A phosphonamide peptide, N-(phenylethylphosphonyl)-Gly-L-Pro-L-aminohexanoic acid, previously shown to block Clostridium histolyticum collagenases, was examined as a putative inhibitor of endopeptidase 24.16 and endopeptidase 24.15. Hydrolysis of two endopeptidase 24.16 substrates, i.e. 3-carboxy-7-methoxycoumarin (Mcc)-Pro-Leu-Gly-Pro-D-Lys-dinitrophenyl (Dnp) and neurotensin, were completely and dose-dependently inhibited by the phosphonamide inhibitor with KI values of 0.3 and 0.9 nM respectively. In addition, the phosphonamide peptide inhibited the hydrolysis of benzoyl (Bz)-Gly-Ala-Ala-Phe-(pAB) p-aminobenzoate and neurotensin by endopeptidase 24.15 with about a 10-fold lower potency (KI values of 5 and 7.5 nM respectively). The selectivity of this inhibitor towards several exo- and endo-peptidases belonging to the zinc-containing metallopeptidase family established that a 1 microM concentration of this inhibitor was unable to affect leucine aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase A, angiotensin-converting enzyme and endopeptidase 24.11. The present paper therefore reports on the first hydrophilic highly potent endopeptidase 24.16 inhibitor and describes the most potent inhibitory agent directed towards endopeptidase 24.15 developed to date. These tools should allow one to assess the contribution of endopeptidase 24.16 and endopeptidase 24.15 to the physiological inactivation of neurotensin as well as other neuropeptides.

  11. Water extracts of cinnamon and clove exhibits potent inhibition of protein glycation and anti-atherosclerotic activity in vitro and in vivo hypolipidemic activity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seori; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2011-07-01

    Advanced glycation end products contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic complications and atherosclerosis. Aqueous extracts of ground pepper, cinnamon, rosemary, ginger, and clove were analyzed and tested for anti-atherosclerotic activity in vitro and in vivo using hypercholesterolemic zebrafish. Cinnamon and clove extracts (at final 10 μg/mL) had the strongest anti-glycation and antioxidant activity in this study. Cinnamon and clove had the strongest inhibition of activity against copper-mediated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and LDL phagocytosis by macrophages. Cinnamon or clove extracts had potent cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitory activity in a concentration-dependent manner. They exhibited hypolipidemic activity in a hypercholesterolemic zebrafish model; the clove extract-treated group had a 68% and 80% decrease in serum cholesterol and TG levels, respectively. The clove extract-fed group had the smallest increase in body weight and height and the strongest antioxidant activity following a 5-week high cholesterol diet. Hydrophilic ingredients of cinnamon and clove showed potent activities to suppress the incidence of atherosclerosis and diabetes via strong antioxidant potential, prevention of apoA-I glycation and LDL-phagocytosis, inhibition of CETP, and hypolipidemic activity. These results suggest the potential to develop a new functional dietary agent to treat chronic metabolic diseases, such as hyperlipidemia and diabetes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Extranodal dissemination of non-Hodgkin lymphoma requires CD47 and is inhibited by anti-CD47 antibody therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chad; Pachynski, Russell K.; Chin, Robert; Majeti, Ravindra; Weissman, Irving L.

    2011-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) presents as both localized and disseminated disease with spread to secondary sites carrying a worse prognosis. Although pathways driving NHL dissemination have been identified, there are few therapies capable of inhibiting them. Here, we report a novel role for the immunomodulatory protein CD47 in NHL dissemination, and we demonstrate that therapeutic targeting of CD47 can prevent such spread. We developed 2 in vivo lymphoma metastasis models using Raji cells, a human NHL cell line, and primary cells from a lymphoma patient. CD47 expression was required for Raji cell dissemination to the liver in mouse xenotransplants. Targeting of CD47 with a blocking antibody inhibited Raji cell dissemination to major organs, including the central nervous system, and inhibited hematogenous dissemination of primary lymphoma cells. We hypothesized that anti-CD47 antibody-mediated elimination of circulating tumor cells occurred through phagocytosis, a previously described mechanism for blocking anti-CD47 antibodies. As predicted, inhibition of dissemination by anti-CD47 antibodies was dependent on blockade of phagocyte SIRPα and required macrophage effector cells. These results demonstrate that CD47 is required for NHL dissemination, which can be therapeutically targeted with a blocking anti-CD47 antibody. Ultimately, these findings are potentially applicable to the dissemination and metastasis of other solid tumors. PMID:21828138

  13. Capacity of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies to Inhibit HIV-1 Cell-Cell Transmission Is Strain- and Epitope-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Reh, Lucia; Magnus, Carsten; Schanz, Merle; Weber, Jacqueline; Uhr, Therese; Rusert, Peter; Trkola, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are considered leads for HIV-1 vaccine development and novel therapeutics. Here, we systematically explored the capacity of bnAbs to neutralize HIV-1 prior to and post-CD4 engagement and to block HIV-1 cell-cell transmission. Cell-cell spread is known to promote a highly efficient infection with HIV-1 which can inflict dramatic losses in neutralization potency compared to free virus infection. Selection of bnAbs that are capable of suppressing HIV irrespective of the transmission mode therefore needs to be considered to ascertain their in vivo activity in therapeutic use and vaccines. Employing assay systems that allow for unambiguous discrimination between free virus and cell-cell transmission to T cells, we probed a panel of 16 bnAbs for their activity against 11 viruses from subtypes A, B and C during both transmission modes. Over a wide range of bnAb-virus combinations tested, inhibitory activity against HIV-1 cell-cell transmission was strongly decreased compared to free virus transmission. Activity loss varied considerably between virus strains and was inversely associated with neutralization of free virus spread for V1V2- and V3-directed bnAbs. In rare bnAb-virus combinations, inhibition for both transmission modes was comparable but no bnAb potently blocked cell-cell transmission across all probed virus strains. Mathematical analysis indicated an increased probability of bnAb resistance mutations to arise in cell-cell rather than free virus spread, further highlighting the need to block this pathway. Importantly, the capacity to efficiently neutralize prior to CD4 engagement correlated with the inhibition efficacy against free virus but not cell-cell transmitted virus. Pre-CD4 attachment activity proved strongest amongst CD4bs bnAbs and varied substantially for V3 and V1V2 loop bnAbs in a strain-dependent manner. In summary, bnAb activity against divergent viruses varied depending on the

  14. Potent and selective inhibition of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) by nucleoside analogues with an unusual bicyclic base.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, C; Yarnold, C J; Jones, G; Velázquez, S; Barucki, H; Brancale, A; Andrei, G; Snoeck, R; De Clercq, E; Balzarini, J

    1999-11-04

    We herein report the discovery of an entirely new category of potent antiviral agents based on novel deoxynucleoside analogues with unusual bicyclic base moieties. Target structures, previously known as byproducts in Pd-catalyzed coupling of terminal alkynes with 5-iodo-nucleosides, are recognized herein for the first time to be potent and selective inhibitors of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in vitro. As an unusual structure-activity relationship we noted the absolute requirement of a long alkyl side chain, with an optimum length of C(8)-C(10), for antiviral activity. We thus report the synthesis and characterization of a series of chain-modified analogues and their extensive in vitro evaluation. The lead compounds have a ca. 300-fold enhancement in anti-VZV activity over the reference compound acyclovir, with no detectable in vitro cytotoxicity. The novel structure of these compounds, coupled with their ease of synthesis, excellent antiviral profile, and promising physical properties, makes them of great interest for possible antiviral drug development.

  15. CSL311, a novel, potent, therapeutic monoclonal antibody for the treatment of diseases mediated by the common β chain of the IL-3, GM-CSF and IL-5 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Panousis, Con; Dhagat, Urmi; Edwards, Kirsten M.; Rayzman, Veronika; Hardy, Matthew P.; Braley, Hal; Gauvreau, Gail M.; Hercus, Timothy R.; Smith, Steven; Sehmi, Roma; McMillan, Laura; Dottore, Mara; McClure, Barbara J.; Fabri, Louis J.; Vairo, Gino; Lopez, Angel F; Parker, Michael W.; Nash, Andrew D.; Wilson, Nicholas J.; Wilson, Michael J.; Owczarek, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The β common-signaling cytokines interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-5 stimulate pro-inflammatory activities of haematopoietic cells via a receptor complex incorporating cytokine-specific α and shared β common (βc, CD131) receptor. Evidence from animal models and recent clinical trials demonstrate that these cytokines are critical mediators of the pathogenesis of inflammatory airway disease such as asthma. However, no therapeutic agents, other than steroids, that specifically and effectively target inflammation mediated by all 3 of these cytokines exist. We employed phage display technology to identify and optimize a novel, human monoclonal antibody (CSL311) that binds to a unique epitope that is specific to the cytokine-binding site of the human βc receptor. The binding epitope of CSL311 on the βc receptor was defined by X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis. CSL311 has picomolar binding affinity for the human βc receptor, and at therapeutic concentrations is a highly potent antagonist of the combined activities of IL-3, GM-CSF and IL-5 on primary eosinophil survival in vitro. Importantly, CSL311 inhibited the survival of inflammatory cells present in induced sputum from human allergic asthmatic subjects undergoing allergen bronchoprovocation. Due to its high potency and ability to simultaneously suppress the activity of all 3 β common cytokines, CSL311 may provide a new strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases where the human βc receptor is central to pathogenesis. The coordinates for the βc/CSL311 Fab complex structure have been deposited with the RCSB Protein Data Bank (PDB 5DWU). PMID:26651396

  16. CSL311, a novel, potent, therapeutic monoclonal antibody for the treatment of diseases mediated by the common β chain of the IL-3, GM-CSF and IL-5 receptors.

    PubMed

    Panousis, Con; Dhagat, Urmi; Edwards, Kirsten M; Rayzman, Veronika; Hardy, Matthew P; Braley, Hal; Gauvreau, Gail M; Hercus, Timothy R; Smith, Steven; Sehmi, Roma; McMillan, Laura; Dottore, Mara; McClure, Barbara J; Fabri, Louis J; Vairo, Gino; Lopez, Angel F; Parker, Michael W; Nash, Andrew D; Wilson, Nicholas J; Wilson, Michael J; Owczarek, Catherine M

    2016-01-01

    The β common-signaling cytokines interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-5 stimulate pro-inflammatory activities of haematopoietic cells via a receptor complex incorporating cytokine-specific α and shared β common (βc, CD131) receptor. Evidence from animal models and recent clinical trials demonstrate that these cytokines are critical mediators of the pathogenesis of inflammatory airway disease such as asthma. However, no therapeutic agents, other than steroids, that specifically and effectively target inflammation mediated by all 3 of these cytokines exist. We employed phage display technology to identify and optimize a novel, human monoclonal antibody (CSL311) that binds to a unique epitope that is specific to the cytokine-binding site of the human βc receptor. The binding epitope of CSL311 on the βc receptor was defined by X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis. CSL311 has picomolar binding affinity for the human βc receptor, and at therapeutic concentrations is a highly potent antagonist of the combined activities of IL-3, GM-CSF and IL-5 on primary eosinophil survival in vitro. Importantly, CSL311 inhibited the survival of inflammatory cells present in induced sputum from human allergic asthmatic subjects undergoing allergen bronchoprovocation. Due to its high potency and ability to simultaneously suppress the activity of all 3 β common cytokines, CSL311 may provide a new strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases where the human βc receptor is central to pathogenesis. The coordinates for the βc/CSL311 Fab complex structure have been deposited with the RCSB Protein Data Bank (PDB 5DWU).

  17. Env-2dCD4 S60C complexes act as super immunogens and elicit potent, broadly neutralizing antibodies against clinically relevant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    Killick, Mark A; Grant, Michelle L; Cerutti, Nichole M; Capovilla, Alexio; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A

    2015-11-17

    The ability to induce a broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) response following vaccination is regarded as a crucial aspect in developing an effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The bNAbs target the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) which is exposed on the virus surface, thereby preventing cell entry. To date, conventional vaccine approaches such as the use of Env-based immunogens have been unsuccessful. We expressed, purified, characterized and evaluated the immunogenicity of several unique HIV-1 subtype C Env immunogens in small animals. Here we report that vaccine immunogens based on Env liganded to a two domain CD4 variant, 2dCD4(S60C) are capable of consistently eliciting potent, broadly neutralizing antibody responses in New Zealand white rabbits against a panel of clinically relevant HIV-1 pseudoviruses. This was irrespective of the Env protein subtype and context. Importantly, depletion of the anti-CD4 antibodies appeared to abrogate the neutralization activity in the rabbit sera. Taken together, this data suggests that the Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes described here are "super" immunogens, and potentially immunofocus antibody responses to a unique epitope spanning the 2dCD4(60C). Recent data from the two available anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies, Ibalizumab and CD4-Ig (and bispecific variants thereof) have highlighted that the use of these broad and potent entry inhibitors could circumvent the need for a conventional vaccine targeting HIV-1. Overall, the ability of the unique Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes to elicit potent bNAb responses has not been described previously, reinforcing that further investigation for their utility in preventing and controlling HIV-1/SIV infection is warranted.

  18. Age-associated B cells (ABC) inhibit B lymphopoiesis and alter antibody repertoires in old age.

    PubMed

    Riley, Richard L; Khomtchouk, Kelly; Blomberg, Bonnie B

    2017-04-26

    With old age (∼2y old), mice show substantial differences in B cell composition within the lymphoid tissues. In particular, a novel subset of IgM(+) CD21/35(lo/-) CD23(-) mature B cells, the age-associated B cells or ABC, increases numerically and proportionately. This occurs at the expense of other B cell subsets, including B2 follicular B cells in spleen and recirculating primary B cells in bone marrow. Our studies suggest that ABC have a distinctive antibody repertoire, as evidenced by relatively high reactivity to the self-antigens phosphorylcholine (PC) and malondialdehyde (MDA). While PC and MDA are found on apoptotic cells and oxidized lipoproteins, antibodies to these antigens are also cross-reactive with epitopes on bacterial species. In old mice, ABC express TNFα and are pro-inflammatory. ABC can inhibit growth and/or survival in pro-B cells as well as common lymphoid progenitors (CLP). In particular, ABC cause apoptosis in pro-B cells with relatively high levels of the surrogate light chain (SLC) and, consequently, promote an "SLC low" pathway of B cell differentiation in old mice. SLC together with μ heavy chain comprises the pre-B cell receptor (preBCR) critical for pre-B cell expansion and selection of the μ heavy chain Vh repertoire. The low level of SLC likely impairs normal preBCR driven proliferation and alters μ heavy chain Vh selection thereby affecting the antibody specificities of new B cells. In this manner, ABC may contribute to both qualitative and quantitative disruptions of normal B lymphopoiesis in old age. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Epitope mapping for the monoclonal antibody that inhibits intramolecular electron transfer in flavocytochrome b2.

    PubMed Central

    Lê, K H Diêp; Mayer, Martine; Lederer, Florence

    2003-01-01

    Flavocytochrome b(2) (yeast L-lactate dehydrogenase) carries one FMN and one protohaem IX on each of its four subunits. The prosthetic groups are bound to separate domains, the haem domain (residues 1-99) and the flavin domain (residues 100-485), which interact for electron transfer between lactate-reduced FMN and haem b(2); in vivo, the latter reduces cytochrome c. In the crystal structure, one haem domain out of two is mobile. Previously we have described a monoclonal antibody, raised against the tetramer, that only recognizes the native haem domain and prevents electron transfer between flavin and haem, while having no effect on flavin reduction by the substrate [Miles, Lederer and Lê (1998) Biochemistry 37, 3440-3448]. In order to understand the structural basis of the uncoupling between the domains, we proceeded to site-directed mutagenesis, so as to map the epitope on the surface of the haem domain. We analysed the effects of 14 mutations at 12 different positions, located mostly in the domain interface or at its edge; we also analysed the effect of replacing protohaem IX with its dimethyl ester. We used as criteria the antibody-mediated inhibition of cytochrome c reduction by flavocytochrome b(2), competitive ELISA tests and surface plasmon resonance. We have thus defined a minimal epitope surface on the haem domain; it encompasses positions 63, 64, 65, 67, 69 and 70 and one or both haem propionates. When the haem and flavin domains are docked for electron transfer, the 65, 67 and 70 side chains, as well as the haem propionates, are excluded from solvent. The present results thus indicate that, when bound, the antibody acts as a wedge between the domains and constitutes a physical barrier to electron transfer. PMID:12646042

  20. Therapeutic antibody targeting of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO2) inhibits autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Lauren M F; Grabler, Samantha; DuHadaway, James B; Pigott, Elizabeth; Manley, Kaylend; Prendergast, George C; Laury-Kleintop, Lisa D; Mandik-Nayak, Laura

    2017-02-20

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a debilitating inflammatory autoimmune disease with no known cure. Recently, we identified the immunomodulatory enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase 2 (IDO2) as an essential mediator of autoreactive B and T cell responses driving RA. However, therapeutically targeting IDO2 has been challenging given the lack of small molecules that specifically inhibit IDO2 without also affecting the closely related IDO1. In this study, we develop a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based approach to therapeutically target IDO2. Treatment with IDO2-specific mAb alleviated arthritis in two independent preclinical arthritis models, reducing autoreactive T and B cell activation and recapitulating the strong anti-arthritic effect of genetic IDO2 deficiency. Mechanistic investigations identified FcγRIIb as necessary for mAb internalization, allowing targeting of an intracellular antigen traditionally considered inaccessible to mAb therapy. Taken together, our results offer preclinical proof of concept for antibody-mediated targeting of IDO2 as a new therapeutic strategy to treat RA and other autoantibody-mediated diseases.

  1. Antibody-Based Detection and Inhibition of Vaginolysin, the Gardnerella vaginalis Cytolysin

    PubMed Central

    Randis, Tara M.; Kulkarni, Ritwij; Aguilar, Jorge L.; Ratner, Adam J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal infection worldwide and is associated with significant adverse sequelae. We have recently characterized vaginolysin (VLY), the human-specific cytotoxin produced by Gardnerella vaginalis and believed to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of BV and its associated morbidities. We hypothesize that novel antibody-based strategies may be useful for detection of VLY and for inhibition of its toxic effects on human cells. Using purified toxin as an immunogen, we generated polyclonal rabbit immune serum (IS) against VLY. A western blot of G. vaginalis lysate was probed with IS and a single band (57 kD) identified. Immunofluorescence techniques using IS detected VLY production by G. vaginalis. In addition, we have developed a sandwich ELISA assay capable of VLY quantification at ng/ml concentrations in the supernatant of growing G. vaginalis. To investigate the potential inhibitory role of IS on VLY-mediated cell lysis, we exposed human erythrocytes to VLY or VLY pretreated with IS and determined the percent hemolysis. Pretreatment with IS resulted in a significant reduction in VLY-mediated lysis. Similarly, both human cervical carcinoma cells and vaginal epithelial cells exhibited reduced cytolysis following exposure to VLY with IS compared to VLY alone. These results confirm that antibody-based techniques are an effective means of VLY detection. Furthermore, VLY antiserum functions as an inhibitor of VLY–CD59 interaction, mitigating cell lysis. These strategies may have a potential role in the diagnosis and treatment of BV. PMID:19370149

  2. Structural basis for inhibition of erythrocyte invasion by antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum protein CyRPA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Xu, Yibin; Wong, Wilson; Thompson, Jennifer K; Healer, Julie; Goddard-Borger, Ethan D; Lawrence, Michael C; Cowman, Alan F

    2017-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum causes malaria in humans with over 450,000 deaths annually. The asexual blood stage involves invasion of erythrocytes by merozoites, in which they grow and divide to release daughter merozoites, which in turn invade new erythrocytes perpetuating the cycle responsible for malaria. A key step in merozoite invasion is the essential binding of PfRh5/CyRPA/PfRipr complex to basigin, a step linked to the formation of a pore between merozoites and erythrocytes. We show CyRPA interacts directly with PfRh5. An invasion inhibitory monoclonal antibody to CyRPA blocks binding of CyRPA to PfRh5 and complex formation thus illuminating the molecular mechanism for inhibition of parasite growth. We determined the crystal structures of CyRPA alone and in complex with an antibody Fab fragment. CyRPA has a six-bladed β-propeller fold, and we identify the region that interacts with PfRh5. This functionally conserved epitope is a potential target for vaccines against P. falciparum. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21347.001 PMID:28195530

  3. Inhibition of human tumor xenograft growth in nude mice by a conjugate of monoclonal antibody LA22 to epidermal growth factor receptor with anti-tumor antibiotics mitomycin C

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Wei; Zhao Shan; Liu Zhaofei; Zhang Jianzhong; Ma Shujun; Sato, J. Denry; Zhang Peng; Tong Mei; Han Jiping; Wang Yan; Bai Dongmei; Wang Fan . E-mail: wangfan@bjmu.edu.cn; Sun Le . E-mail: lsun@welsonpharma.com

    2006-10-20

    Anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies LA22 and Erbitux bind to different epitopes of EGFR. The chemimmunoconjugates of MMC with LA22 or Erbitux were prepared, and in vitro cytotoxicity assays with A549 cells showed that LA22-MMC was much more potent than Erbitux or Erbitux-MMC. Viabilities of A549 cells treated with LA22-MMC, Erbitux or Erbitux-MMC were 35%, 94%, and 81%, respectively. Immunoscintigraphy of xenografts of human A431 and A549 cells in nude mice both showed that {sup 125}I-labeled-LA22-MMC enriched in tumor sites prominently. Most importantly, in vivo assays showed LA22-MMC was significantly more effective than free drug MMC in the treatment of subcutaneous xenografts of human A431 cells in nude mice (83% inhibition for LA22-MMC and 30% for MMC). We concluded that LA22-MMC could be a very potent drug for treatment of solid tumors.

  4. Monoclonal antibody that inhibits infection of HeLa and rhabdomyosarcoma cells by selected enteroviruses through receptor blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, R.L.; Field, A.K.; Schleif, W.A.; Long, W.L.; Colonno, R.J.; Mapoles, J.E.; Emini, E. A.

    1986-02-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with HeLa cells, and their spleen cells were fused with myeloma cells to produce hybridomas. Initial screening of culture fluids from 800 fusion products in a cell protection assay against coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) and the CB3-RD virus variant yielded five presumptive monoclonal antibodies with three specificities: (i) protection against CB3 on HeLa, (ii) protection against CB3-RD on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, and (iii) protection against both viruses on the respective cells. Only one of the monoclonal antibodies (with dual specificity) survived two subclonings and was studied in detail. The antibody was determined to have an immunoglobulin G2a isotype and protected cells by blockade of cellular receptors, since attachment of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled CB3 was inhibited by greater than 90%. The monoclonal antibody protected HeLa cells against infection by CB1, CB3, CB5, echovirus 6, and coxsackievirus A21 and RD cells against CB1-RD, CB3-RD, and CB5-Rd virus variants. The monoclonal antibody did not protect either cell type against 16 other immunotypes of picornaviruses. The monoclonal antibody produced only positive fluorescence on those cells which were protected against infection, and /sup 125/I-labeled antibody confirmed the specific binding to HeLa and RD cells. The results suggest that this monoclonal antibody possesses some of the receptor specificity of the group B coxsackieviruses.

  5. Potent and Selective Inhibition of a Single α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Subunit by an RNA Aptamer*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Seon; Wang, Congzhou; Han, Yan; Huang, Zhen; Niu, Li

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitors of AMPA-type glutamate ion channels are useful as biochemical probes for structure-function studies and as drug candidates for a number of neurological disorders and diseases. Here, we describe the identification of an RNA inhibitor or aptamer by an in vitro evolution approach and a characterization of its mechanism of inhibition on the sites of interaction by equilibrium binding and on the receptor channel opening rate by a laser-pulse photolysis technique. Our results show that the aptamer is a noncompetitive inhibitor that selectively inhibits the GluA2Qflip AMPA receptor subunit without any effect on other AMPA receptor subunits or kainate or NMDA receptors. On the GluA2 subunit, this aptamer preferentially inhibits the flip variant. Furthermore, the aptamer preferentially inhibits the closed-channel state of GluA2Qflip with a KI = 1.5 μm or by ∼15-fold over the open-channel state. The potency and selectivity of this aptamer rival those of small molecule inhibitors. Together, these properties make this aptamer a promising candidate for the development of water-soluble, highly potent, and GluA2 subunit-selective drugs. PMID:21402710

  6. Small molecule kinase inhibitor LRRK2-IN-1 demonstrates potent activity against colorectal and pancreatic cancer through inhibition of doublecortin-like kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) is emerging as a tumor specific stem cell marker in colorectal and pancreatic cancer. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the therapeutic effects of inhibiting DCLK1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) as well as genetically targeting the DCLK1+ cell for deletion. However, the effects of inhibiting DCLK1 kinase activity have not been studied directly. Therefore, we assessed the effects of inhibiting DCLK1 kinase activity using the novel small molecule kinase inhibitor, LRRK2-IN-1, which demonstrates significant affinity for DCLK1. Results Here we report that LRRK2-IN-1 demonstrates potent anti-cancer activity including inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion as well as induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Additionally we found that it regulates stemness, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and oncogenic targets on the molecular level. Moreover, we show that LRRK2-IN-1 suppresses DCLK1 kinase activity and downstream DCLK1 effector c-MYC, and demonstrate that DCLK1 kinase activity is a significant factor in resistance to LRRK2-IN-1. Conclusions Given DCLK1’s tumor stem cell marker status, a strong understanding of its biological role and interactions in gastrointestinal tumors may lead to discoveries that improve patient outcomes. The results of this study suggest that small molecule inhibitors of DCLK1 kinase should be further investigated as they may hold promise as anti-tumor stem cell drugs. PMID:24885928

  7. Selective inhibition of EZH2 by ZLD1039 blocks H3K27methylation and leads to potent anti-tumor activity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuejiao; Gao, Tiantao; Wang, Ningyu; Feng, Qiang; You, Xinyu; Ye, Tinghong; Lei, Qian; Zhu, Yongxia; Xiong, Menghua; Xia, Yong; Yang, Fangfang; Shi, Yaojie; Wei, Yuquan; Zhang, Lidan; Yu, Luoting

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a candidate oncogenic driver due to its prevalent overexpression and aberrant repression of tumor suppressor genes in diverse cancers. Therefore, blocking EZH2 enzyme activity may present a valid therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers with EZH2 overexpression including breast cancers. Here, we described ZLD1039 a potent, highly selective, and orally bioavailable small molecule inhibitor of EZH2, which inhibited breast tumor growth and metastasis. ZLD1039 considerably inhibited EZH2 methyltransferase activity with nanomolar potency, decreased global histone-3 lysine-27 (H3K27) methylation, and reactivated silenced tumor suppressors connected to increased survival of patients with breast cancer. Comparable to conditional silencing of EZH2, its inhibition by ZLD1039 decreased cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, and induced apoptosis. Comparably, treatment of xenograft-bearing mice with ZLD1039 led to tumor growth regression and metastasis inhibition. These data confirmed the dependency of breast cancer progression on EZH2 activity and the usefulness of ZLD1039 as a promising treatment for breast cancer. PMID:26868841

  8. Structure-Based Design and Synthesis of Potent Cyclic Peptides Inhibiting the YAP–TEAD Protein–Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The YAP–TEAD protein–protein interaction (PPI) mediates the oncogenic function of YAP, and inhibitors of this PPI have potential usage in treatment of YAP-involved cancers. Here we report the design and synthesis of potent cyclic peptide inhibitors of the YAP–TEAD interaction. A truncation study of YAP interface 3 peptide identified YAP84–100 as a weak peptide inhibitor (IC50 = 37 μM), and an alanine scan revealed a beneficial mutation, D94A. Subsequent replacement of a native cation−π interaction with an optimized disulfide bridge for conformational constraint and synergistic effect between macrocyclization and modification at positions 91 and 93 greatly boosted inhibitory activity. Peptide 17 was identified with an IC50 of 25 nM, and the binding affinity (Kd = 15 nM) of this 17mer peptide to TEAD1 proved to be stronger than YAP50–171 (Kd = 40 nM). PMID:25221655

  9. Structure-Based Design and Synthesis of Potent Cyclic Peptides Inhibiting the YAP-TEAD Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhisen; Lin, Zhaohu; Zhou, Zheng; Shen, Hong C; Yan, S Frank; Mayweg, Alexander V; Xu, Zhiheng; Qin, Ning; Wong, Jason C; Zhang, Zhenshan; Rong, Yiping; Fry, David C; Hu, Taishan

    2014-09-11

    The YAP-TEAD protein-protein interaction (PPI) mediates the oncogenic function of YAP, and inhibitors of this PPI have potential usage in treatment of YAP-involved cancers. Here we report the design and synthesis of potent cyclic peptide inhibitors of the YAP-TEAD interaction. A truncation study of YAP interface 3 peptide identified YAP(84-100) as a weak peptide inhibitor (IC50 = 37 μM), and an alanine scan revealed a beneficial mutation, D94A. Subsequent replacement of a native cation-π interaction with an optimized disulfide bridge for conformational constraint and synergistic effect between macrocyclization and modification at positions 91 and 93 greatly boosted inhibitory activity. Peptide 17 was identified with an IC50 of 25 nM, and the binding affinity (K d = 15 nM) of this 17mer peptide to TEAD1 proved to be stronger than YAP(50-171) (K d = 40 nM).

  10. A unique anti-CD115 monoclonal antibody which inhibits osteolysis and skews human monocyte differentiation from M2-polarized macrophages toward dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Haegel, Hélène; Thioudellet, Christine; Hallet, Rémy; Geist, Michel; Menguy, Thierry; Le Pogam, Fabrice; Marchand, Jean-Baptiste; Toh, Myew-Ling; Duong, Vanessa; Calcei, Alexandre; Settelen, Nathalie; Preville, Xavier; Hennequi, Marie; Grellier, Benoit; Ancian, Philippe; Rissanen, Jukka; Clayette, Pascal; Guillen, Christine; Rooke, Ronald; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Cancer progression has been associated with the presence of tumor-associated M2-macrophages (M2-TAMs) able to inhibit anti-tumor immune responses. It is also often associated with metastasis-induced bone destruction mediated by osteoclasts. Both cell types are controlled by the CD115 (CSF-1R)/colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1, M-CSF) pathway, making CD115 a promising target for cancer therapy. Anti-human CD115 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that inhibit the receptor function have been generated in a number of laboratories. These mAbs compete with CSF-1 binding to CD115, dramatically affecting monocyte survival and preventing osteoclast and macrophage differentiation, but they also block CD115/CSF-1 internalization and degradation, which could lead to potent rebound CSF-1 effects in patients after mAb treatment has ended. We thus generated and selected a non-ligand competitive anti-CD115 mAb that exerts only partial inhibitory effects on CD115 signaling without blocking the internalization or the degradation of the CD115/CSF-1 complex. This mAb, H27K15, affects monocyte survival only minimally, but downregulates osteoclast differentiation and activity. Importantly, it inhibits monocyte differentiation to CD163(+)CD64(+) M2-polarized suppressor macrophages, skewing their differentiation toward CD14(-)CD1a(+) dendritic cells (DCs). In line with this observation, H27K15 also drastically inhibits monocyte chemotactic protein-1 secretion and reduces interleukin-6 production; these two molecules are known to be involved in M2-macrophage recruitment. Thus, the non-depleting mAb H27K15 is a promising anti-tumor candidate, able to inhibit osteoclast differentiation, likely decreasing metastasis-induced osteolysis, and able to prevent M2 polarization of TAMs while inducing DCs, hence contributing to the creation of more efficient anti-tumor immune responses.

  11. Potent and synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin combined with monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 2G12.

    PubMed Central

    Mascola, J R; Louder, M K; VanCott, T C; Sapan, C V; Lambert, J S; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B; Birx, D L; Robb, M L

    1997-01-01

    Three antibody reagents that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for magnitude and breadth of neutralization when used alone or in double or triple combinations. Hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is derived from the plasma of HIV-1-infected donors, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 bind to distinct regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The antibodies were initially tested against a panel of 15 clade B HIV-1 isolates, using a single concentration that is achievable in vivo (HIVIG, 2,500 microg/ml; MAbs, 25 microg/ml). Individual antibody reagents neutralized many of the viruses tested, but antibody potency varied substantially among the viruses. The virus neutralization produced by double combinations of HIVIG plus 2F5 or 2G12, the two MAbs together, or the triple combination of HIVIG, 2F5, and 2G12 was generally equal to or greater than that predicted by the effect of individual antibodies. Overall, the triple combination displayed the greatest magnitude and breadth of neutralization. Synergistic neutralization was evaluated by analyzing data from dose-response curves of each individual antibody reagent compared to the triple combination and was demonstrated against each of four viruses tested. Therefore, combinations of polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HIV antibodies can produce additive or synergistic neutralization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Passive immunotherapy for treatment or prophylaxis of HIV-1 should consider mixtures of potent neutralizing antibody reagents to expand the magnitude and breadth of virus neutralization. PMID:9311792

  12. Potent and synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin combined with monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 2G12.

    PubMed

    Mascola, J R; Louder, M K; VanCott, T C; Sapan, C V; Lambert, J S; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B; Birx, D L; Robb, M L

    1997-10-01

    Three antibody reagents that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for magnitude and breadth of neutralization when used alone or in double or triple combinations. Hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is derived from the plasma of HIV-1-infected donors, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 bind to distinct regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The antibodies were initially tested against a panel of 15 clade B HIV-1 isolates, using a single concentration that is achievable in vivo (HIVIG, 2,500 microg/ml; MAbs, 25 microg/ml). Individual antibody reagents neutralized many of the viruses tested, but antibody potency varied substantially among the viruses. The virus neutralization produced by double combinations of HIVIG plus 2F5 or 2G12, the two MAbs together, or the triple combination of HIVIG, 2F5, and 2G12 was generally equal to or greater than that predicted by the effect of individual antibodies. Overall, the triple combination displayed the greatest magnitude and breadth of neutralization. Synergistic neutralization was evaluated by analyzing data from dose-response curves of each individual antibody reagent compared to the triple combination and was demonstrated against each of four viruses tested. Therefore, combinations of polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HIV antibodies can produce additive or synergistic neutralization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Passive immunotherapy for treatment or prophylaxis of HIV-1 should consider mixtures of potent neutralizing antibody reagents to expand the magnitude and breadth of virus neutralization.

  13. Anti-myeloma activity of a multi targeted kinase inhibitor, AT9283, via potent Aurora Kinase and STAT3 inhibition either alone or in combination with lenalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Loredana; Hideshima, Teru; Cirstea, Diana; Bandi, Madhavi; Nelson, Erik A.; Gorgun, Gullu; Rodig, Scott; Vallet, Sonia; Pozzi, Samantha; Patel, Kishan; Unitt, Christine; Squires, Matt; Hu, Yiguo; Chauhan, Dharminder; Mahindra, Anuj; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Raje, Noopur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Aurora Kinases, whose expression is linked to genetic instability and cellular proliferation, are under investigation as novel therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma (MM). Here, we investigated the preclinical activity of a small molecule–multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, AT9283, with potent activity against Aurora kinase A (AURKA), Aurora kinase B (AURKB) and Janus Kinase 2/3. Experimental design We evaluated the in vitro anti myeloma activity of AT9283 alone and in combination with lenalidomide and the in vivo efficacy by using a Xenograft mouse model of human MM. Results Our data demonstrated AT9283 induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in MM. Studying the apoptosis mechanism of AT9283 in MM, we observed features consistent with both AURKA and AURKB inhibition, e.g increase of cells with polyploid DNA content, decrease in phospho-Histone H3, and decrease of phospho-Aurora A. Importantly, AT9283 also inhibited STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation in MM cells. Genetic depletion of STAT3, AURKA or AURKB showed growth inhibition of MM cells, suggesting a role of AT9283-induced inhibition of these molecules in the underlying mechanism of MM cell death. In vivo studies demonstrated decreased MM cell growth and prolonged survival in AT9283-treated mice compared to controls. Importantly, combination studies of AT9283 with lenalidomide showed significant synergistic cytotoxicity in MM cells, even in the presence of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Enhanced cytotoxicity was associated with increased inhibition of pSTAT3 and pERK. Conclusions Demonstration of in vitro and in vivo anti-MM activity of AT9283 provides the rationale for the clinical evaluation of AT9283 as monotherapy and in combination in patients with MM. PMID:21430070

  14. A novel sulindac derivative that potently suppresses colon tumor cell growth by inhibiting cGMP phosphodiesterase and β-catenin transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Jason D; Li, Nan; Tinsley, Heather N; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yonghe; Gary, Bernard D; Keeton, Adam B; Xi, Yaguang; Abadi, Ashraf H; Grizzle, William E; Piazza, Gary A

    2012-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been widely reported to inhibit tumor growth by a COX-independent mechanism, although alternative targets have not been well defined or used to develop improved drugs for cancer chemoprevention. Here, we characterize a novel sulindac derivative referred to as sulindac benzylamine (SBA) that does not inhibit COX-1 or COX-2, yet potently inhibits the growth and induces the apoptosis of human colon tumor cells. The basis for this activity appears to involve cyclic guanosine 3',5',-monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) inhibition as evident by its ability to inhibit cGMP hydrolysis in colon tumor cell lysates and purified cGMP-specific PDE5, increase intracellular cGMP levels, and activate cGMP-dependent protein kinase G at concentrations that suppress tumor cell growth. PDE5 was found to be essential for colon tumor cell growth as determined by siRNA knockdown studies, elevated in colon tumor cells as compared with normal colonocytes, and associated with the tumor selectivity of SBA. SBA activation of PKG may suppress the oncogenic activity of β-catenin as evident by its ability to reduce β-catenin nuclear levels, Tcf (T-cell factor) transcriptional activity, and survivin levels. These events preceded apoptosis induction and appear to result from a rapid elevation of intracellular cGMP levels following cGMP PDE inhibition. We conclude that PDE5 and possibly other cGMP degrading isozymes can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious NSAID derivatives for colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

  15. A Novel Sulindac Derivative that Potently Suppresses Colon Tumor Cell Growth by Inhibiting cGMP Phosphodiesterase and β-Catenin Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Whitt, Jason D.; Li, Nan; Tinsley, Heather N.; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yonghe; Gary, Bernard D.; Keeton, Adam B.; Xi, Yaguang; Abadi, Ashraf H.; Grizzle, William E.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been widely reported to inhibit tumor growth by a COX-independent mechanism, although alternative targets have not been well defined or used to develop improved drugs for cancer chemoprevention. Here, we characterize a novel sulindac derivative referred to as sulindac benzylamine (SBA) that does not inhibit COX-1 or COX-2, yet potently inhibits the growth and induces the apoptosis of human colon tumor cells. The basis for this activity appears to involve cyclic guanosine 3′,5′,-monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) inhibition as evident by its ability to inhibit cGMP hydrolysis in colon tumor cell lysates and purified cGMP-specific PDE5, increase intracellular cGMP levels, and activate cGMP-dependent protein kinase G at concentrations that suppress tumor cell growth. PDE5 was found to be essential for colon tumor cell growth as determined by siRNA knockdown studies, elevated in colon tumor cells as compared with normal colonocytes, and associated with the tumor selectivity of SBA. SBA activation of PKG may suppress the oncogenic activity of β-catenin as evident by its ability to reduce β-catenin nuclear levels, Tcf (T-cell factor) transcriptional activity, and survivin levels. These events preceded apoptosis induction and appear to result from a rapid elevation of intracellular cGMP levels following cGMP PDE inhibition. We conclude that PDE5 and possibly other cGMP degrading isozymes can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious NSAID derivatives for colorectal cancer chemoprevention. PMID:22556201

  16. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Receptor 5 Inhibits B Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling and Antibody Response1

    PubMed Central

    Shotts, Kristin; Donovan, Erin E.; Strauch, Pamela; Pujanauski, Lindsey M.; Victorino, Francisco; Al-Shami, Amin; Fujiwara, Yuko; Tigyi, Gabor; Oravecz, Tamas; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids have emerged as biologically important chemoattractants capable of directing lymphocyte development, trafficking and localization. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a major lysophospholipid found systemically and whose levels are elevated in certain pathological settings such as cancer and infections. Here, we demonstrate that BCR signal transduction by mature murine B cells is inhibited upon LPA engagement of the LPA5 (GPR92) receptor via a Gα12/13 – Arhgef1 pathway. The inhibition of BCR signaling by LPA5 manifests by impaired intracellular calcium store release and most likely by interfering with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity. We further show that LPA5 also limits antigen-specific induction of CD69 and CD86 expression and that LPA5-deficient B cells display enhanced antibody responses. Thus, these data show that LPA5 negatively regulates BCR signaling, B cell activation and immune response. Our findings extend the influence of lysophospholipids on immune function and suggest that alterations in LPA levels likely influence adaptive humoral immunity. PMID:24890721

  17. Aggregation of macrophages and fibroblasts is inhibited by a monoclonal antibody to the hyaluronate receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Green, S.J.; Underhill, C.B. ); Tarone, G. )

    1988-10-01

    To examine the role of the hyaluronate receptor in cell to cell adhesion, the authors have employed the K-3 monoclonal antibody (MAb) which specifically binds to the hyaluronate receptor and blocks its ability to interact with hyaluronate. In the first set of experiments, they investigated the spontaneous aggregation of SV-3T3 cells, which involves two distinct mechanisms, one of which is dependent upon the presence of divalent cation and the other is independent. The divalent cation-independent aggregation was found to be completely inhibited by both intact and Fab fragments of the K-3 MAb. In contrast, the K-3 MAb had no effect on the divalent cation-dependent aggregation of cells. In a second set of experiments, we examined alveolar macrophages. The presence of hyaluronate receptors on alveolar macrophages was demonstrated by the fact that detergent extracts of these cells could bind ({sup 3})hyaluronate, and this binding was blocked by the K-3 MAb. Immunoblot analysis of alveolar macrophages showed that the hyaluronate receptor had a M{sub r} of 99,500, which is considerably larger than the 85,000 M{sub r} for that on BHK cells. When hyaluronate was added to suspensions of alveolar macrophages, the cells were induced to aggregate. This effect was inhibited by the K-3 MAb, suggesting that the hyaluronate-induced aggregation was mediated by the receptor.

  18. An Anti-C1s Monoclonal, TNT003, Inhibits Complement Activation Induced by Antibodies Against HLA

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, K A; Valenzuela, N M; Gjertson, D; Mulder, A; Fishbein, M C; Parry, G C; Panicker, S; Reed, E F

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organ transplants (SOT) is characterized by damage triggered by donor-specific antibodies (DSA) binding donor Class I and II HLA (HLA-I and HLA-II) expressed on endothelial cells. While F(ab′)2 portions of DSA cause cellular activation and proliferation, Fc regions activate the classical complement cascade, resulting in complement deposition and leukocyte recruitment, both hallmark features of AMR. We characterized the ability of an anti-C1s monoclonal antibody, TNT003, to inhibit HLA antibody (HLA-Ab)-induced complement activation. Complement deposition induced by HLA-Ab was evaluated using novel cell- and bead-based assays. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were cultured with HLA-Ab and human complement; production of activated complement proteins was measured by flow cytometry. Additionally, C3d deposition was measured on single antigen beads (SAB) mixed with HLA-Ab and human complement. TNT003 inhibited HLA-Ab mediated complement deposition on HAEC in a concentration-dependent manner; C3a, C4a and C5a anaphylatoxin production was also diminished by TNT003. Finally, TNT003 blocked C3d deposition induced by Class I (HLAI-Ab)- and Class II (HLAII-Ab)-specific antibodies on SAB. These data suggest TNT003 may be useful for modulating the effects of DSA, as TNT003 inhibits complement deposition and split product formation generated by HLA-I/II-Ab in vitro. PMID:25904443

  19. Broadly Reactive Anti-Respiratory Syncytial Virus G Antibodies from Exposed Individuals Effectively Inhibit Infection of Primary Airway Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Cortjens, B; Yasuda, E; Yu, X; Wagner, K; Claassen, Y B; Bakker, A Q; van Woensel, J B M; Beaumont, T

    2017-05-15

    has a high mortality. Without an effective vaccine, only passive immunization with palivizumab is approved for prophylactic treatment. However, highly potent RSV-specific monoclonal antibodies could potentially serve as a therapeutic treatment and contribute to disease control and mortality reduction. In addition, these antibodies could guide further vaccine development. In this study, we isolated and characterized several novel antibodies directed at the RSV G protein. This information can add to our understanding and treatment of RSV disease. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Inhibiting CD146 by its Monoclonal Antibody AA98 Improves Radiosensitivity of Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huawen

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death of females worldwide. Radiotherapy is considered effective for cervical cancer treatment, but the low radiosensitivity found in some cases severely affects therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to reveal the role of CD146, an important adhesion molecule facilitating tumor angiogenesis, in regulating radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells. Material/Methods CD146 protein expression was compared in normal cells, cervical cancer cells with lower radiosensitivity, and cervical cancer cells with higher sensitivity from cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients. Anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody AA98 was used to inhibit CD146 in human cervical cancer SiHa cells with relatively low radiosensitivity, and then the cell survival and apoptosis changes after radiation were detected by colony formation assay and flow cytometry. Results CD146 protein was significantly up-regulated in cervical cancer cells (P<0.001), especially in cancer cells with lower radiosensitivity. The SiHa cells treated with AA98 showed more obvious inhibition in cell survival (P<0.05) and promotion in cell apoptosis (P<0.01) after radiation, compared to the untreated cells. More dramatic changes in apoptotic factors Caspase 3 and Bcl-XL were also detected in AA98-treated cells. Conclusions These results indicate that inhibiting CD146 improves the effect of radiation in suppressing SiHa cells. This study shows the potential of CD146 as a target for increasing radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells, which might allow improvement in treatment outcome in cervical cancer. Further studies are necessary for understanding the detailed mechanism of CD146 in regulating radiosensitivity. PMID:27647179

  1. Mechanism of surface plasmon resonance sensing by indirect competitive inhibition immunoassay using Au nanoparticle labeled antibody.

    PubMed

    Kabiraz, Dulal C; Morita, Kinichi; Sakamoto, Kazuhira; Kawaguchi, Toshikazu

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the use of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor using an antibody (Ab) labeled with Au-nanoparticle (Ab-AuNP conjugate). As clenbuterol is a small molecule, an indirect competitive inhibition immunoassay was used. The SPR immunoassay using Ab-AuNP conjugate had an extremely low limit of the detection (LOD) with a magnitude of 0.05 ppt (0.05pgmL(-1)), which was 40 times lower than that of unlabeled Ab. To identify the key factor in determining the LOD of the indirect competitive inhibition immunoassay, affinity constants of the surface immunoreaction (K1) and of the premixed solution (αK2) were evaluated. We found that the dielectric constant change due to AuNP labeling of Ab did not affect on the affinity constants, because all the amplification magnitude terms canceled out in the equations. Thus, the K1 and αK2 values were determined to 3.0×10(11)M(-1) and 2.9×10(12)M(-1), respectively, which were three and four orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than those of unlabeled Ab. The simulation plot of LOD with respect to K1 and αK2 showed that a K1 one order of magnitude lower than αK2 produced a ppt level LOD. Because the affinity constants are determined by the molar concentrations of reactant and product, the molar mass of the Ab or Ab-AuNP conjugate in the sample solution containing 1ppm (1μgmL(-1)) highly affects the constants. Consequently, molar mass adjustment can be used to adjust the LOD in an indirect competitive inhibition immunoassay as needed for a practical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. INHIBITION OF IN VITRO FERTILIZATION IN THE HAMSTER BY ANTIBODIES RAISED AGAINST THE RAT SPERM PROTEIN SP22

    EPA Science Inventory

    INHIBITION OF IN VITRO FERTILIZATION IN THE HAMSTER BY ANTIBODIES RAISED AGAINST THE RAT SPERM PROTEIN SP22. SC Jeffay*, SD Perreault, KL Bobseine*, JE Welch*, GR Klinefelter, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.
    SP22, a rat sperm membrane protein that is highly-correlated w...

  3. INHIBITION OF IN VITRO FERTILIZATION IN THE HAMSTER BY ANTIBODIES RAISED AGAINST THE RAT SPERM PROTEIN SP22

    EPA Science Inventory

    INHIBITION OF IN VITRO FERTILIZATION IN THE HAMSTER BY ANTIBODIES RAISED AGAINST THE RAT SPERM PROTEIN SP22. SC Jeffay*, SD Perreault, KL Bobseine*, JE Welch*, GR Klinefelter, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.
    SP22, a rat sperm membrane protein that is highly-correlated w...

  4. Immune inhibition of virus release from human and nonhuman cells by antibody to viral and host cell determinants.

    PubMed

    Shariff, D M; Davies, J; Desperbasques, M; Billstrom, M; Geerligs, H J; Welling, G W; Welling-Wester, S; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R

    1991-01-01

    Immune inhibition of release of the DNA viruses, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and pseudorabies virus by anti-viral and anti-host cell sera occurred while two RNA viruses, influenza and encephalomyocarditis, were inhibited only by anti-viral sera (not anti-host cell sera). Simian virus 40 and surprisingly two herpes viruses, bovine mamillitis and equine abortion, were not inhibited by either anti-viral or anti-host sera. Using the herpes simplex virus model, inhibition of virus release was detected in different cells of human and nonhuman origin with cross-inhibition between cell lines of different origin; thus, this form of immunotherapy may not require antibody to be tissue or organ specific. Evidence of inhibition of virus release from neoplastic and leukemic cell lines suggests possible application of this approach to control of virus-mediated leukoproliferative pathology (e.g. Burkitt's lymphoma or adult T cell leukemia).

  5. Peptide-rich venom from the spider Heteropoda venatoria potently inhibits insect voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yazhou; Wu, Xinzhou; Zhang, Peng; Duan, Zhigui; Zhou, Xi; Chen, Minzhi; Farooq, Athar; Liang, Songping; Liu, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    Heteropoda venatoria is a venomous spider species distributed worldwide and has a characteristic habit of feeding on insects. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analyses revealed that H. venatoria venom contains hundreds of peptides with a predominant molecular weights of 3000-5000 Da. Intra-abdominal injection of the venom had severe toxic effects on cockroaches and caused death at higher concentrations. The LD50 was 28.18 μg/g of body weight in the cockroach. It was found that the venom had potent inhibitory effect on voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) in Periplaneta americana cockroach dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons with an IC50 values of 6.25 ± 0.02 μg/mL. However, 100 μg/mL venom only partially blocked VGSC currents in rat dorsal root ganglion cells, a much lower inhibitory effect than that on DUM VGSCs. Our results indicate that the venom of H. venatoria contains diverse neurotoxins that might become new leads for bioinsecticides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Potent and selective chemical probe of hypoxic signalling downstream of HIF-α hydroxylation via VHL inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Julianty; Galdeano, Carles; Soares, Pedro; Gadd, Morgan S.; Grzes, Katarzyna M.; Ellis, Lucy; Epemolu, Ola; Shimamura, Satoko; Bantscheff, Marcus; Grandi, Paola; Read, Kevin D.; Cantrell, Doreen A.; Rocha, Sonia; Ciulli, Alessio

    2016-11-01

    Chemical strategies to using small molecules to stimulate hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) activity and trigger a hypoxic response under normoxic conditions, such as iron chelators and inhibitors of prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) enzymes, have broad-spectrum activities and off-target effects. Here we disclose VH298, a potent VHL inhibitor that stabilizes HIF-α and elicits a hypoxic response via a different mechanism, that is the blockade of the VHL:HIF-α protein-protein interaction downstream of HIF-α hydroxylation by PHD enzymes. We show that VH298 engages with high affinity and specificity with VHL as its only major cellular target, leading to selective on-target accumulation of hydroxylated HIF-α in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion in different cell lines, with subsequent upregulation of HIF-target genes at both mRNA and protein levels. VH298 represents a high-quality chemical probe of the HIF signalling cascade and an attractive starting point to the development of potential new therapeutics targeting hypoxia signalling.

  7. Potent and selective chemical probe of hypoxic signal