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Sample records for anticancer agent podophyllotoxin

  1. [Carboxyl nanodiamond as intracellular transporters of anticancer drug--podophyllotoxin].

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao-Li; Wang, Bin; Peng, Yan; Ni, Jing-Man

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the intracellular transporters effect and the cytotoxicity of carboxyl nanodiamond (CND) - podophyllotoxin (PPT). Nanodiamond (ND) was treated with mixed carboxylic acid and finally got 64 nm CND by centrifugation, and then it was reacted with PPT to form CND-PPT. UV spectrophotometry was used to calculate the content of PPT in CND-PPT, the particle size distribution and zeta potential were measured by Dynamic laser scattering instrument. CND, PPT, CND-PPT and CND + PPT (physical mixture of CND and PPT) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, at the same time, thermal analysis and element analysis were used to estimate the content of the PPT in CND-PPT. The affect of CND, PPT, CND-PPT on HeLa cell was measured with MTT assay. The results showed that content of PPT combined with CND accounted for about 10%. MTT assay showed that CND has low cytotoxicity and CND-PPT can increase the water soluble of PPT. As a conclusion, CND as a hydrophilic pharmaceutical carrier combined with PPT is able to increase the water solubility of PPT, at low concentration, CND-PPT can enhance the antitumor activity in comparison with PPT, so CND can be used as a potential anticancer drug carrier.

  2. Podophyllotoxin-derived insecticidal agents: part XIII--evaluation of insecticidal activity of podophyllotoxin derivatives against Brontispa longissima.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Qian; Feng, Gang; Yang, Liu; Jing-Zhang; Li, Hong-Yu

    2011-09-01

    In an attempt to find the biorational insecticides for Brontispa longissima control, 12 podophyllotoxin (PPT) analogues were tested for their insecticidal activity against the fifth-instar larvae of B. longissima in vivo for the first time. Among all the tested compounds, especially compounds 6 and 8 showed more promising and pronounced insecticidal activity than toosendanin, a commercial insecticide derived from Melia azedarach. The different insecticidal activity range of compounds 1-12 indicated that the variation of chemical structures in the PPT skeleton markedly affected the activity profiles of this compound class, and some important structure-activity relationship information has been revealed. Together, these preliminary results may be useful in guiding further modification of PPTs in the development of potential new insecticides.

  3. Recent Progress on C-4-Modified Podophyllotoxin Analogs as Potent Antitumor Agents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying-Qian; Tian, Jing; Qian, Keduo; Zhao, Xiao-Bo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Yang, Liu; Nan, Xiang; Tian, Xuan; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Podophyllotoxin (PPT), as well as its congeners and derivatives, exhibits pronounced biological activities, especially antineoplastic effects. Its strong inhibitory effect on tumor cell growth led to the development of three of the most highly prescribed anticancer drugs in the world, etoposide, teniposide, and the water-soluble prodrug etoposide phosphate. Their clinical success as well as intriguing mechanism of action stimulated great interest in further modification of PPT for better antitumor activity. The C-4 position has been a major target for structural derivatization aimed at either producing more potent compounds or overcoming drug resistance. Accordingly, numerous PPT derivatives have been prepared via hemisynthesis and important structure–activity relationship (SAR) correlations have been identified. Several resulting compounds, including GL-331, TOP-53, and NK611, reached clinical trials. Some excellent reviews on the distribution, sources, applications, synthesis, and SAR of PPT have been published. This review focuses on a second generation of new etoposide-related drugs and provides detailed coverage of the current status and recent development of C-4-modified PPT analogs as anticancer clinical trial candidates. PMID:24827545

  4. Safety Pharmacology of Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Martin, Pauline L

    2015-01-01

    The safety pharmacology testing for anticancer agents has historically differed for small molecule pharmaceutical drugs versus large-molecule biopharmaceuticals. For pharmaceutical drugs, dedicated safety pharmacology studies have been conducted according to the ICH M3 (R2), ICH 7A, and ICH S7B guidance documents. For biopharmaceuticals, safety pharmacology endpoints have been incorporated into the repeated-dose toxicology studies according to ICHS6 (R1). However, the introduction of the ICH S9 guidance document for the nonclinical evaluation for anticancer pharmaceuticals has allowed for a streamlined approach for both types of molecules to facilitate access of new potential therapeutics to cancer patients and to reduce the number of animal studies. Examples of the testing strategies that have previously been employed for some representative anticancer agents are provided, and their predictivity to adverse events noted in the clinic is discussed.

  5. Bacteriocins as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sumanpreet; Kaur, Sukhraj

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide, despite advances in its treatment and detection. The conventional chemotherapeutic agents used for the treatment of cancer have non-specific toxicity toward normal body cells that cause various side effects. Secondly, cancer cells are known to develop chemotherapy resistance in due course of treatment. Thus, the demand for novel anti-cancer agents is increasing day by day. Some of the experimental studies have reported the therapeutic potential of bacteriocins against various types of cancer cell lines. Bacteriocins are ribosomally-synthesized cationic peptides secreted by almost all groups of bacteria. Some bacteriocins have shown selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells as compared to normal cells. This makes them promising candidates for further investigation and clinical trials. In this review article, we present the overview of the various cancer cell-specific cytotoxic bacteriocins, their mode of action and efficacies. PMID:26617524

  6. Novel antibodies as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zafir-Lavie, I; Michaeli, Y; Reiter, Y

    2007-05-28

    In recent years antibodies, whether generated by traditional hybridoma technology or by recombinant DNA strategies, have evolved from Paul Ehrlich's 'magic bullets' to a modern age 'guided missile'. In the recent years of immunologic research, we are witnessing development in the fields of antigen screening and protein engineering in order to create specific anticancer remedies. The developments in the field of recombinant DNA, protein engineering and cancer biology have let us gain insight into many cancer-related mechanisms. Moreover, novel techniques have facilitated tools allowing unique distinction between malignantly transformed cells, and regular ones. This understanding has paved the way for the rational design of a new age of pharmaceuticals: monoclonal antibodies and their fragments. Antibodies can select antigens on both a specific and a high-affinity account, and further implementation of these qualities is used to target cancer cells by specifically identifying exogenous antigens of cancer cell populations. The structure of the antibody provides plasticity resonating from its functional sites. This review will screen some of the many novel antibodies and antibody-based approaches that are being currently developed for clinical applications as the new generation of anticancer agents.

  7. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed.

  8. Development of anticancer agents: wizardry with osmium.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Babak, Maria V; Hartinger, Christian G

    2014-10-01

    Platinum compounds are one of the pillars of modern cancer chemotherapy. The apparent disadvantages of existing chemotherapeutics have led to the development of novel anticancer agents with alternative modes of action. Many complexes of the heavy metal osmium (Os) are potent growth inhibitors of human cancer cells and are active in vivo, often superior or comparable to cisplatin, as the benchmark metal-based anticancer agent, or clinically tested ruthenium (Ru) drug candidates. Depending on the choice of ligand system, osmium compounds exhibit diverse modes of action, including redox activation, DNA targeting or inhibition of protein kinases. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the development of osmium anticancer drug candidates and discuss their cellular mechanisms of action.

  9. Agents from amphibians with anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chuang-Xin; Nan, Ke-Jun; Lei, Yan

    2008-11-01

    Amphibians have been found to be a source of agents with anticancer properties. Bufalin, for example, is an anticancer agent that may induce apoptosis by its interaction with other genes and cellular components. Certain peptides with anticancer activities have been found in amphibian skin; they include magainins, aureins, citropin 1.1 and gaegurins. These peptides may exert a cytotoxic effect on human cancer cells through various mechanisms. Onconase, amphinase, cSBL (sialic acid-binding lectin purified from Rana catesbeiana eggs) and jSBL (sialic acid-binding lectin purified from Rana japonica eggs), which belong to the RNase A family, were purified from the oocyte cells and eggs of three amphibians, and they induce cytotoxicity by degrading cellular RNA. This paper discusses the medical and pharmaceutical significance of products derived from amphibians.

  10. Tetrazole Derivatives as Promising Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Popova, Elena A; Protas, Aleksandra V; Trifonov, Rostislav E

    2017-03-27

    Tetrazole cycle is a promising pharmacophore fragment frequently used in the development of novel drugs. This moiety is a stable, practically non-metabolized bioisosteric analog of carboxylic, cis-amide, and other functional groups. Over recent 10-15 years, various isomeric forms of tetrazole (NH-unsubstituted, 1H-1-substituted, and 2H-2-substituted tetrazoles) have been successfully used in the design of promising anticancer drugs. Coordination compounds of transition metals containing tetrazoles as ligands, semisynthetic tetrazolyl derivatives of natural compounds (biogenic acids, peptides, steroids, combretastatin, etc.), 5-oxo and 5-thiotetrazoles, and some other related compounds have been recognized as promising antineoplastic agents. This review presents a comprehensive analysis of modern approaches to synthesis of these tetrazole derivatives as well as their biological (anticancer) properties. The most promising structure types of tetrazoles to be used as anticancer agents have been picked out.

  11. Synthesis and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study of novel isoxazoline and oxime derivatives of podophyllotoxin as insecticidal agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Shao, Yonghua; Wang, Yangyang; Fan, Lingling; Yu, Xiang; Zhi, Xiaoyan; Yang, Chun; Qu, Huan; Yao, Xiaojun; Xu, Hui

    2012-08-29

    In continuation of our program aimed at the discovery and development of natural-product-based insecticidal agents, 33 isoxazoline and oxime derivatives of podophyllotoxin modified in the C and D rings were synthesized and their structures were characterized by Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), optical rotation, melting point (mp), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The stereochemical configurations of compounds 5e, 5f, and 9f were unambiguously determined by X-ray crystallography. Their insecticidal activity was evaluated against the pre-third-instar larvae of northern armyworm, Mythimna separata (Walker), in vivo. Compounds 5e, 9c, 11g, and 11h especially exhibited more promising insecticidal activity than toosendanin, a commercial botanical insecticide extracted from Melia azedarach . A genetic algorithm combined with multiple linear regression (GA-MLR) calculation is performed by the MOBY DIGS package. Five selected descriptors are as follows: one two-dimensional (2D) autocorrelation descriptor (GATS4e), one edge adjacency indice (EEig06x), one RDF descriptor (RDF080v), one three-dimensional (3D) MoRSE descriptor (Mor09v), and one atom-centered fragment (H-052) descriptor. Quantitative structure-activity relationship studies demonstrated that the insecticidal activity of these compounds was mainly influenced by many factors, such as electronic distribution, steric factors, etc. For this model, the standard deviation error in prediction (SDEP) is 0.0592, the correlation coefficient (R(2)) is 0.861, and the leave-one-out cross-validation correlation coefficient (Q(2)loo) is 0.797.

  12. Advances in cobalt complexes as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Catherine R; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan

    2015-08-21

    The evolution of resistance to traditional platinum-based anticancer drugs has compelled researchers to investigate the cytostatic properties of alternative transition metal-based compounds. The anticancer potential of cobalt complexes has been extensively studied over the last three decades, and much time has been devoted to understanding their mechanisms of action. This perspective catalogues the development of antiproliferative cobalt complexes, and provides an in depth analysis of their mode of action. Early studies on simple cobalt coordination complexes, Schiff base complexes, and cobalt-carbonyl clusters will be documented. The physiologically relevant redox properties of cobalt will be highlighted and the role this plays in the preparation of hypoxia selective prodrugs and imaging agents will be discussed. The use of cobalt-containing cobalamin as a cancer specific delivery agent for cytotoxins will also be described. The work summarised in this perspective shows that the biochemical and biophysical properties of cobalt-containing compounds can be fine-tuned to produce new generations of anticancer agents with clinically relevant efficacies.

  13. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs): multitargeted anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Ververis, Katherine; Hiong, Alison; Karagiannis, Tom C; Licciardi, Paul V

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are an emerging class of therapeutics with potential as anticancer drugs. The rationale for developing HDAC inhibitors (and other chromatin-modifying agents) as anticancer therapies arose from the understanding that in addition to genetic mutations, epigenetic changes such as dysregulation of HDAC enzymes can alter phenotype and gene expression, disturb homeostasis, and contribute to neoplastic growth. The family of HDAC inhibitors is large and diverse. It includes a range of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds that differ in terms of structure, function, and specificity. HDAC inhibitors have multiple cell type-specific effects in vitro and in vivo, such as growth arrest, cell differentiation, and apoptosis in malignant cells. HDAC inhibitors have the potential to be used as monotherapies or in combination with other anticancer therapies. Currently, there are two HDAC inhibitors that have received approval from the US FDA for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, Zolinza) and depsipeptide (romidepsin, Istodax). More recently, depsipeptide has also gained FDA approval for the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Many more clinical trials assessing the effects of various HDAC inhibitors on hematological and solid malignancies are currently being conducted. Despite the proven anticancer effects of particular HDAC inhibitors against certain cancers, many aspects of HDAC enzymes and HDAC inhibitors are still not fully understood. Increasing our understanding of the effects of HDAC inhibitors, their targets and mechanisms of action will be critical for the advancement of these drugs, especially to facilitate the rational design of HDAC inhibitors that are effective as antineoplastic agents. This review will discuss the use of HDAC inhibitors as multitargeted therapies for malignancy. Further, we outline the pharmacology and mechanisms of action of HDAC inhibitors while

  14. Taxane anticancer agents: a patent perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ojima, Iwao; Lichtenthal, Brendan; Lee, Siyeon; Wang, Changwei; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paclitaxel and docetaxel were two epoch-making anticancer drugs and have been successfully used in chemotherapy for a variety of cancer types. In 2010, a new taxane, cabazitaxel, was approved by FDA for use in combination with prednisone for the treatment of metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab™-paclitaxel; abraxane) nanodroplet formulation was another notable invention (FDA approval 2005 for refractory, metastatic, or relapsed breast cancer). Abraxane in combination with gemcitabine for the treatment of pancreatic cancer was approved by FDA in 2013. Accordingly, there have been a huge number of patent applications dealing with taxane anticancer agents in the last five years. Thus, it is a good time to review the progress in this area and find the next wave for new developments. Area covered This review article covers the patent literature from 2010 to early 2015 on various aspects of taxane-based chemotherapies and drug developments. Expert opinion Three FDA-approved taxane anticancer drugs will continue to expand their therapeutic applications, especially through drug combinations and new formulations. Inspired by the success of abraxane, new nano-formulations are emerging. Highly potent new-generation taxanes will play a key role in the development of efficacious tumor-targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:26651178

  15. Farnesyl transferase inhibitors as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Haluska, P; Dy, G K; Adjei, A A

    2002-09-01

    Protein farnesylation catalysed by the enzyme farnesyl protein transferase involves the addition of a 15-carbon farnesyl group to conserved amino acid residues at the carboxyl terminus of certain proteins. Protein substrates of farnesyl transferase include several G-proteins, which are critical intermediates of cell signalling and cytoskeletal organisation such as Ras, Rho, PxF and lamins A and B. Activated Ras proteins trigger a cascade of phosphorylation events through sequential activation of the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway, which is critical for cell survival, and the Raf/Mek/Erk kinase pathway that has been implicated in cell proliferation. Ras mutations which encode for constitutively activated proteins are found in 30% of human cancers. Because farnesylation of Ras is required for its transforming and proliferative activity, the farnesyl protein transferase inhibitors were designed as anticancer agents to abrogate Ras function. However, current evidence suggests that the anticancer activity of the farnesyl transferase inhibitors may not be simply due to Ras inhibition. This review will discuss available clinical data on three of these agents that are currently undergoing clinical trials.

  16. Designed TPR Modules as Novel Anticancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Cortajarena,A.; Yi, F.; Regan, L.

    2008-01-01

    Molecules specifically designed to modulate protein-protein interactions have tremendous potential as novel therapeutic agents. One important anticancer target is the chaperone Hsp90, whose activity is essential for the folding of many oncogenic proteins, including HER2, IGFIR, AKT, RAF-1, and FLT-3. Here we report the design and characterization of new tetratricopeptide repeat modules, which bind to the C-terminus of Hsp90 with higher affinity and with greater specificity than natural Hsp90-binding co-chaperones. Thus, when these modules are introduced into the cell, they out-compete endogenous co-chaperones for binding, thereby inhibiting Hsp90 function. The effect of Hsp90 inhibition in this fashion is dramatic; HER2 levels are substantially decreased and BT474 HER2 positive breast cancer cells are killed. Our designs thus provide new tools with which to dissect the mechanism of Hsp90-mediated protein folding and also open the door to the development of an entirely new class of anticancer agents.

  17. Discovery and Development of Topoisomerase Inhibitors as Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, Muthu K; Kale, Anuj N; Nilewar, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    As one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide, cancer is posing threat despite efforts being taken to develop effective anticancer drugs. There is an increase in number of chemotherapy treatments due to growing number of manifestations causing increasing toxicities of cytotoxic agents. Almost all the anticancer agents available till date have one or the other side effects. Topoisomerases are the attractive targets to develop effective anticancer agents. There has been development of many topoisomerase inhibitors till date and has shown good anticancer activity but their side effects outnumber their anticancer potential. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapeutic agents with fewer side effects. This review deals with design and development aspect of topoisomerase inhibitors as exciting novel anticancer agents. The emphasis has been laid in particular on the new potential heterocyles as TOP inhibitors in the field of medicinal chemistry. The review discusses about the topoisomerase poisons, TOP1 suppressors, TOP inhibitors and Dual TOP 1/2 inhibitors.

  18. Plant Antimicrobial Peptides as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Rodríguez, Jaquelina Julia; López-Gómez, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are part of the innate immune defense mechanism of many organisms and are promising candidates to treat infections caused by pathogenic bacteria to animals and humans. AMPs also display anticancer activities because of their ability to inactivate a wide range of cancer cells. Cancer remains a cause of high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Therefore, the development of methods for its control is desirable. Attractive alternatives include plant AMP thionins, defensins, and cyclotides, which have anticancer activities. Here, we provide an overview of plant AMPs anticancer activities, with an emphasis on their mode of action, their selectivity, and their efficacy. PMID:25815333

  19. Efficient synthesis of benzamide riboside, a potential anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Bonnac, Laurent F; Gao, Guang-Yao; Chen, Liqiang; Patterson, Steven E; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W

    2007-01-01

    An efficient five step synthesis of benzamide riboside (BR) amenable for a large scale synthesis has been developed. It allows for extensive pre-clinical studies of BR as a potential anticancer agent.

  20. Recent Advances in the Chemistry and Biology of Podophyllotoxins.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang; Che, Zhiping; Xu, Hui

    2017-04-03

    Podophyllotoxin and its related aryltetralin cyclolignans belong to a family of important products that exhibit various biological properties (e.g., cytotoxic, insecticidal, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, neurotoxic, immunosuppressive, antirheumatic, antioxidative, antispasmogenic, and hypolipidemic activities). This Review provides a survey of podophyllotoxin and its analogues isolated from plants. In particular, recent developments in the elegant total chemical synthesis, structural modifications, biosynthesis, and biotransformation of podophyllotoxin and its analogues are summarized. Moreover, a deoxypodophyllotoxin-based chemosensor for selective detection of mercury ion is described. In addition to the most active podophyllotoxin derivatives in each series against human cancer cell lines and insect pests listed in the tables, the structure-activity relationships of podophyllotoxin derivatives as cytotoxic and insecticidal agents are also outlined. Future prospects and further developments in this area are covered at the end of the Review. We believe that this Review will provide necessary information for synthetic, medicinal, and pesticidal chemistry researchers who are interested in the chemistry and biology of podophyllotoxins.

  1. Nanovectors for anticancer agents based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Douziech-Eyrolles, Laurence; Marchais, Hervé; Hervé, Katel; Munnier, Emilie; Soucé, Martin; Linassier, Claude; Dubois, Pierre; Chourpa, Igor

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade, the application of nanotechnologies for anticancer drug delivery has been extensively explored, hoping to improve the efficacy and to reduce side effects of chemotherapy. The present review is dedicated to a certain kind of anticancer drug nanovectors developed to target tumors with the help of an external magnetic field. More particularly, this work treats anticancer drug nanoformulations based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with biocompatible polymers. The major purpose is to focus on the specific requirements and technological difficulties related to controlled delivery of antitumoral agents. We attempt to state the problem and its possible perspectives by considering the three major constituents of the magnetic therapeutic vectors: iron oxide nanoparticles, polymeric coating and anticancer drug. PMID:18203422

  2. Coumarin: a promising scaffold for anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manjinder; Kohli, Swarandeep; Sandhu, Sonali; Bansal, Yogita; Bansal, Gulshan

    2015-01-01

    Coumarin enjoys an important place in drug discovery process due to its presence in diversity of biologically active compounds. Many compounds of plant origin are derivatives of coumarin. Taking these natural products as lead, research groups across the globe have designed and synthesized numerous coumarin analogues for treatment of varied diseases. Cancer is one of the dreadful chronic diseases, and many drugs are available for its treatment. However, due to heterogeneity of cancer, the search is still on to develop drugs for specific types of cancers. The present review is an attempt to study various coumarin derivatives of natural as well as synthetic origins, which are identified or developed for the treatment of different types of cancers. Herein, we have classified various anticancer coumarin derivatives on the basis of their origin as well as substitution around it. These are discussed under the headings of natural, semi-synthetic and synthetic coumarin derivatives. The synthetic coumarin derivatives are further classified as mono-, di- and poly-substituted and fused coumarin derivatives. Of the six positions available for substituents on coumarin nucleus, only three positions (C-3, C-4 and C-7) are exploited for the selection of functional groups appropriate for anticancer activity. The other positions (C-5, C-6 and C-8) are either unexplored or very less exploited. The present review is expected to provide the medicinal chemists a guide to choose new functional groups for substitution at different positions of coumarin nucleus for development of novel compounds for the treatment of a specific type of cancer.

  3. The quinolone family: from antibacterial to anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Sissi, Claudia; Palumbo, Manlio

    2003-11-01

    The present review focuses on the structural modifications responsible for the transformation of an antibacterial into an anticancer agent. Indeed, a distinctive feature of drugs based on the quinolone structure is their remarkable ability to target different type II topoisomerase enzymes. In particular, some congeners of this drug family display high activity not only against bacterial topoisomerases, but also against eukaryotic topoisomerases and are toxic to cultured mammalian cells and in vivo tumor models. Hence, these cytotoxic quinolones represent an exploitable source of new anticancer agents, which might also help addressing side-toxicity and resistance phenomena. Their ability to bind metal ion co-factors represents an additional means of modulating their pharmacological response(s). Moreover, quinolones link antibacterial and anticancer chemotherapy together and provide an opportunity to clarify drug mechanism across divergent species.

  4. Natural compounds as anticancer agents: Experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer prevention research has drawn much attention worldwide. It is believed that some types of cancer can be prevented by following a healthy life style. Cancer chemoprevention by either natural or synthetic agents is a promising route towards lowering cancer incidence. In recent years, the concept of cancer chemoprevention has evolved greatly. Experimental studies in animal models demonstrate that the reversal or suppression of premalignant lesions by chemopreventive agents is achievable. Natural occurring agents such as dietary phytochemicals, tea polyphenols and resveratrol show chemopreventive activity in animal models. Moreover, clinical trials for testing the safety and efficacy of a variety of natural agents in preventing or treating human malignancy have been ongoing. Here, we summarize experimental data on the chemopreventive or tumor suppressive effects of several natural compounds including curcumin, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, indole-3-carbinol, and vitamin D. PMID:24520533

  5. Insight into the reactive form of the anticancer agent iproplatin.

    PubMed

    Volckova, Erika; Weaver, Evelyne; Bose, Rathindra N

    2008-05-01

    The reaction of iproplatin with reduced glutathione at different mole ratios yielded cis-di(isopropylamine)chloro-glutathionatoplatinum(II), not the expected cis-dichloro- species, indicating a mode of action of this anticancer agent that is different from that of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II).

  6. Comparative study of microtubule inhibitors--estramustine and natural podophyllotoxin conjugated PAMAM dendrimer on glioma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sk, Ugir Hossain; Dixit, Deobrat; Sen, Ellora

    2013-10-01

    The synthetic estramustine (EM) and natural podophyllotoxin (PODO) anti-mitotic agents that inhibit tubulin polymerization are known anticancer agents. As low bioavailability limits their anticancer properties, we investigated whether conjugation with PAMAM dendrimer (D) could enhance the activity of D-EM and D-PODO by altering their release pattern. Release kinetics indicated synthesized conjugates to be stable against hydrolytic cleavage and showed sustained release characteristics. However, release of D-EM was slow compared to D-PODO conjugate. Antitumor effect of these conjugates on glioma cells revealed (i) increased cell death and cell cycle arrest (ii) decreased migration and (iii) increased tubulin depolymerization as compared to free drug. Importantly, the effects of natural PODO conjugate on glioma cell survival and migration is more pronounced than D-EM.

  7. Alkaloids Isolated from Natural Herbs as the Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Huang, Min; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Alkaloids are important chemical compounds that serve as a rich reservoir for drug discovery. Several alkaloids isolated from natural herbs exhibit antiproliferation and antimetastasis effects on various types of cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Alkaloids, such as camptothecin and vinblastine, have already been successfully developed into anticancer drugs. This paper focuses on the naturally derived alkaloids with prospective anticancer properties, such as berberine, evodiamine, matrine, piperine, sanguinarine, and tetrandrine, and summarizes the mechanisms of action of these compounds. Based on the information in the literature that is summarized in this paper, the use of alkaloids as anticancer agents is very promising, but more research and clinical trials are necessary before final recommendations on specific alkaloids can be made. PMID:22988474

  8. Selection methodology with scoring system: application to Mexican plants producing podophyllotoxin related lignans.

    PubMed

    Lautié, E; Quintero, R; Fliniaux, M-A; Villarreal, M-L

    2008-12-08

    As most anticancer drugs are derived from natural sources, the screening of local medicinal flora should be considered a primary step in the search for new sources for antineoplastic agents. In Mexico, more than 6000 medicinal plant species are used for the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. A multifactorial plant selection method, employing various criteria was designed and applied in order to select alternative sources of podophyllotoxin lignan analogues. For each criterion (chemotaxonomy, traditional medical uses and published scientific data), an arbitrary score system was ascribed to the species and the sum of these enabled us to compare potential candidates. The resulting selected plants were tested for cytotoxic activity and the compounds responsible for this activity were evaluated by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS). Around 50 species from the Mexican flora were initially considered. From these, six species were selected by referring to the results from the scoring system and these were then collected. Three extracts were evaluated as being highly cytotoxic against three different cancer cell lines. Finally, podophyllotoxin-like lignans could be identified by observing the fragmentation pattern on mass spectra, obtained from the LC-MS in two species: Linum scabrellum and Hyptis suaveolens.

  9. Recent advances in oral anticancer agents for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Raj Kumar

    2013-12-01

    To provide therapeutic alternatives to intravenous colon chemotherapy major recent research is focusing on the development of oral chemotherapeutic agents with the intention to improve the quality of life of patients. Initially 5-fluorouracil was most commonly used for the treatment of colorectal cancer but currently oxaliplatin and irinotecan are also available. The majority of these new drugs are pyrimidines and their analogs. The rationale for using oral anticancer agents is discussed and new drugs, such as farnesyl protein transferase inhibitor S-1, rubitecan, ZD9331, MMI-166, eflornithine, sulindac, and oral camptothecin analogs, among others, are presented with the results of their preclinical and clinical developments. This article focuses on the advancement of clinical development and also discusses the relative merits and demerits of these agents. The accelerated approval of these agents by regulatory authorities is supported by survival benefit, response rate and time to progression.

  10. Discovery of new anticancer agents from higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Chai, Hee-Byung; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2012-01-01

    1. ABSTRACT Small organic molecules derived from higher plants have been one of the mainstays of cancer chemotherapy for approximately the past half a century. In the present review, selected single chemical entity natural products of plant origin and their semi-synthetic derivatives currently in clinical trials are featured as examples of new cancer chemotherapeutic drug candidates. Several more recently isolated compounds obtained from plants showing promising in vivo biological activity are also discussed in terms of their potential as anticancer agents, with many of these obtained from species that grow in tropical regions. Since extracts of only a relatively small proportion of the ca. 300,000 higher plants on earth have been screened biologically to date, bioactive compounds from plants should play an important role in future anticancer drug discovery efforts. PMID:22202049

  11. Discovery of Anticancer Agents of Diverse Natural Origin

    PubMed Central

    KINGHORN, A. DOUGLAS; CARCACHE DE BLANCO, ESPERANZA J.; LUCAS, DAVID M.; RAKOTONDRAIBE, H. LIVA; ORJALA, JIMMY; SOEJARTO, D. DOEL; OBERLIES, NICHOLAS H.; PEARCE, CEDRIC J.; WANI, MANSUKH C.; STOCKWELL, BRENT R.; BURDETTE, JOANNA E.; SWANSON, STEVEN M.; FUCHS, JAMES R.; PHELPS, MITCHELL A.; XU, LIHUI; ZHANG, XIAOLI; SHEN, YOUNG YONGCHUN

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress is described in an ongoing collaborative multidisciplinary research project directed towards the purification, structural characterization, chemical modification, and biological evaluation of new potential natural product anticancer agents obtained from a diverse group of organisms, comprising tropical plants, aquatic and terrestrial cyanobacteria, and filamentous fungi. Information is provided on how these organisms are collected and processed. The types of bioassays are indicated in which initial extracts, chromatographic fractions, and purified isolated compounds of these acquisitions are tested. Several promising biologically active lead compounds from each major organism major class investigated are described, and these may be seen to be representative of very wide chemical diversity. PMID:27793884

  12. Quinolones in the Search for New Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Pedro Netto; Vieira de Souza, Maria Cecília Bastos; Peña-Cabrera, Eduardo; Cruz, David Cruz; da Costa Santos Boechat, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Quinolones have a large bio-dynamicity. Although they are well known as antibacterials, another important activity has been investigated - quinolones are able to inhibit cancer cell proliferation. In view of the great versatility associated with the synthesis of quinolones, many researchers have spent time and resources on the development of new structurally diversified quinolone derivatives with the purpose of finding new possibilities for cancer treatment. In this review some of the most recent advances in the search for new quinolone anticancer agents are highlighted, with focus on naturally occurring substances, bioactive metal complexes, molecular hybrids, photosensitizers and heterocycle condensed quinolones.

  13. Naturally occurring anti-cancer agents targeting EZH2.

    PubMed

    Shahabipour, Fahimeh; Caraglia, Michele; Majeed, Muhammed; Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-03-18

    Natural products are considered as promising tools for the prevention and treatment of cancer. The enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a histone methyltransferase unit of polycomb repressor complexes such as PRC2 complex that has oncogenic roles through interference with growth and metastatic potential. Several agents targeting EZH2 has been discovered but they often induce side effects in clinical trials. Recently, EZH2 has emerged as a potential target of natural products with documented anti-cancer effects and this discloses a new scenario for the development of EZH2 inhibitory strategies with agents with low cytotoxic detrimental effects. In fact, several natural products such as curcumin, triptolide, ursolic acid, sulforaphane, davidiin, tanshindiols, gambogic acid, berberine and Alcea rosea have been shown to serve as EZH2 modulators. Mechanisms like inhibition of histone H3K4, H3K27 and H3K36 trimethylation, down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase expression, competitive binding to the S-adenosylmethionine binding site of EZH2 and modulation of tumor-suppressive microRNAs have been demonstrated to mediate the EZH2-inhibitory activity of the mentioned natural products. This review summarizes the pathways that are regulated by various natural products resulting in the suppression of EZH2, and provides a plausible molecular mechanism for the putative anti-cancer effects of these compounds.

  14. Non-covalent carriage of anticancer agents by humanized antibody trastuzumab.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arpita; Sharma, Sweta; Yadav, Veejendra Kumar

    2016-05-01

    This article explores the internalization and non-covalent carriage of small molecule anticancer agents like vinca alkaloids by humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Such carriage is marked by significant reduction in side effects and increased therapeutic value of these anticancer agents. This study is coherent with few clinical observations of enhanced efficiency of these anticancer agents when co-administered with therapeutic antibodies. This study will also serve as the foundation for screening a database of anticancer agents for possible compounds that may be co-delivered alongwith the antibody. Based on this study vincristine conformation inside antibody and its charge environment may be used as descriptors for screening purposes.

  15. Dual extraction of essential oil and podophyllotoxin from creeping juniper (Juniperus horizontalis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Juniperus horizontalis Moench (Family Cupressaceae), commonly called creeping juniper, is a widely distributed species in the United States and much of Canada. It is potentially a source for two important chemical products, the anticancer drug synthetic precursor, podophyllotoxin and essential oils....

  16. Monofunctional and Higher-Valent Platinum Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Wilson, Justin J.

    2013-01-01

    Platinum compounds represent one of the great success stories of metals in medicine. Following the serendipitous discovery of the anticancer activity of cisplatin by Rosenberg, a large number of cisplatin variants have been prepared and tested for their ability to kill cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. These efforts continue today with increased realization that new strategies are needed to overcome issues of toxicity and resistance inherent to treatment by the approved platinum anticancer agents. One approach has been the use of so-called “non-traditional” platinum(II) and platinum(IV) compounds that violate the structure-activity relationships that governed platinum drug-development research for many years. Another is the use of specialized drug delivery strategies. Here we describe recent developments from our laboratory involving monofunctional platinum(II) complexes together with an historical account of the manner by which we came to investigate these compounds and their relationship to previously studied molecules. We also discuss work carried out using platinum(IV) prodrugs and the development of nanoconstructs designed to deliver them in vivo. PMID:23738524

  17. Comprehensive Review on Betulin as a Potent Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Kiełbus, Michał; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Numerous plant-derived substances, and their derivatives, are effective antitumour and chemopreventive agents. Yet, there are also a plethora of tumour types that do not respond, or become resistant, to these natural substances. This requires the discovery of new active compounds. Betulin (BE) is a pentacyclic triterpene and secondary metabolite of plants abundantly found in the outer bark of the birch tree Betulaceae sp. BE displays a broad spectrum of biological and pharmacological properties, among which the anticancer and chemopreventive activity attract most of the attention. In this vein, BE and its natural and synthetic derivatives act specifically on cancer cells with low cytotoxicity towards normal cells. Although the antineoplastic mechanism of action of BE is not well understood yet, several interesting aspects of BE's interactions are coming to light. This review will summarize the anticancer and chemopreventive potential of BE in vitro and in vivo by carefully dissecting and comparing the doses and tumour lines used in previous studies, as well as focusing on mechanisms underlying its activity at cellular and molecular level, and discuss future prospects. PMID:25866796

  18. Comprehensive review on betulin as a potent anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Król, Sylwia Katarzyna; Kiełbus, Michał; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Numerous plant-derived substances, and their derivatives, are effective antitumour and chemopreventive agents. Yet, there are also a plethora of tumour types that do not respond, or become resistant, to these natural substances. This requires the discovery of new active compounds. Betulin (BE) is a pentacyclic triterpene and secondary metabolite of plants abundantly found in the outer bark of the birch tree Betulaceae sp. BE displays a broad spectrum of biological and pharmacological properties, among which the anticancer and chemopreventive activity attract most of the attention. In this vein, BE and its natural and synthetic derivatives act specifically on cancer cells with low cytotoxicity towards normal cells. Although the antineoplastic mechanism of action of BE is not well understood yet, several interesting aspects of BE's interactions are coming to light. This review will summarize the anticancer and chemopreventive potential of BE in vitro and in vivo by carefully dissecting and comparing the doses and tumour lines used in previous studies, as well as focusing on mechanisms underlying its activity at cellular and molecular level, and discuss future prospects.

  19. New gold carbene complexes as candidate anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Pratesi, Alessandro; Cirri, Damiano; Đurović, Mirjana D; Pillozzi, Serena; Petroni, Giulia; Bugarčić, Živadin D; Messori, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    Three structurally related gold(I) carbene complexes with bulky hydrophobic ligands i.e. 1-3 were investigated in solution for further consideration as candidate anticancer agents. Cytotoxic assays were subsequently conducted on bone marrow-derived preosteoclast cell line of human origin (FLG 29.1) and human colon cancer cells (HCT-116). A far greater cytotoxic activity was measured for compound 1 against HCT-116 cells compared to 2 and 3; conversely, all compounds were highly and similarly active against FLG 29.1 cells. Results obtained for the reaction of complexes 1 and 2 with RNase A documented the occurrence of a weak interaction with this model protein and the formation of a tiny amount of the corresponding adduct. Moreover, a certain reactivity of the complex 2 was also detected toward GSH. The general implications of the obtained results are discussed.

  20. T-oligo as an anticancer agent in colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wojdyla, Luke; Stone, Amanda L.; Sethakorn, Nan; Uppada, Srijayaprakash B.; Devito, Joseph T.; Bissonnette, Marc; Puri, Neelu

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • T-oligo induces cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation in CRC. • Treatment with T-oligo downregulates telomere-associated proteins. • T-oligo combined with an EGFR-TKI additively inhibits cellular proliferation. • T-oligo has potential as an effective therapeutic agent for CRC. - Abstract: In the United States, there will be an estimated 96,830 new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 50,310 deaths in 2014. CRC is often detected at late stages of the disease, at which point there is no effective chemotherapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for effective novel therapies that have minimal effects on normal cells. T-oligo, an oligonucleotide homologous to the 3′-telomere overhang, induces potent DNA damage responses in multiple malignant cell types, however, its efficacy in CRC has not been studied. This is the first investigation demonstrating T-oligo-induced anticancer effects in two CRC cell lines, HT-29 and LoVo, which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies. In this investigation, we show that T-oligo may mediate its DNA damage responses through the p53/p73 pathway, thereby inhibiting cellular proliferation and inducing apoptosis or senescence. Additionally, upregulation of downstream DNA damage response proteins, including E2F1, p53 or p73, was observed. In LoVo cells, T-oligo induced senescence, decreased clonogenicity, and increased expression of senescence associated proteins p21, p27, and p53. In addition, downregulation of POT1 and TRF2, two components of the shelterin protein complex which protects telomeric ends, was observed. Moreover, we studied the antiproliferative effects of T-oligo in combination with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib, which resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. Collectively, these data provide evidence that T-oligo alone, or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapies, has potential as an anti-cancer agent in CRC.

  1. Design, synthesis and cytotoxic activity of novel sulfonylurea derivatives of podophyllotoxin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Tian, Jing; Wang, Li-Ting; Wang, Mei-Juan; Nan, Xiang; Yang, Liu; Liu, Ying-Qian; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    Three series of novel sulfonylurea podophyllotoxin derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity against four tumor cell lines (A-549, DU-145, KB and KBvin). Compounds 14c (IC₅₀: 1.41-1.76 μM) and 14e (IC₅₀: 1.72-2.01 μM) showed superior cytotoxic activity compared with etoposide (IC₅₀: 2.03 to >20 μM), a clinically available anticancer drug. Significantly, most of the compounds exhibited comparable cytotoxicity against the drug-resistant tumor cell line KBvin, while etoposide lost activity completely. Preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) correlations indicated that the 4'-O-methyl functionality in podophyllotoxin analogues may be essential to maintain cytotoxic activity, while an arylsulfonylurea side chain at podophyllotoxin's 4β position can significantly improve cytotoxic activity.

  2. Carfilzomib is an effective anticancer agent in anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Amit; Zhang, Lisa; Boufraqech, Myriem; Zhang, Yaqin; Patel, Dhaval; Shen, Min; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies. Currently, there is no standard or effective therapy for ATC. Drug repurposing for cancer treatment is an emerging approach for identifying compounds that may have antineoplastic effects. The aim of this study was to use high-throughput drug library screening to identify and subsequently validate novel therapeutic agents with anticancer effects in ATC. We performed quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) in ATC cell lines (SW-1736, 8505C, and C-643), using a compound library of 3282 drugs. qHTS identified 100 compounds that were active in all three ATC cell lines. Proteasome inhibitors were one of the most active drug categories according to enrichment analysis. Of the three proteasome inhibitors screened, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, carfilzomib, was the most active. Treatment of ATC cells with carfilzomib significantly inhibited cellular proliferation and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Mechanistically, carfilzomib increased expression of p27 (CDKN1B) and decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein ATF4. Pretreatment with carfilzomib reduced in vivo metastases (lung, bone, liver, and kidney) and disease progression, and decreased N-cadherin expression. Carfilzomib treatment of mice with established, widely metastatic disease significantly increased their survival, without significant toxicity. Our findings support the use or clinical study of carfilzomib as a therapeutic option in patients with advanced and metastatic ATC.

  3. Diaryl Urea: A Privileged Structure in Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Garuti, Laura; Roberti, Marinella; Bottegoni, Giovanni; Ferraro, Mariarosaria

    2016-01-01

    The diaryl urea is an important fragment/pharmacophore in constructing anticancer molecules due to its near-perfect binding with certain acceptors. The urea NH moiety is a favorable hydrogen bond donor, while the urea oxygen atom is regarded as an excellent acceptor. Many novel compounds have been synthesized and evaluated for their antitumor activity with the successful development of sorafenib. Moreover, this structure is used to link alkylating pharmacophores with high affinity DNA binders. In addition, the diaryl urea is present in several kinase inhibitors, such as RAF, KDR and Aurora kinases. Above all, this moiety is used in the type II inhibitors: it usually forms one or two hydrogen bonds with a conserved glutamic acid and one with the backbone amide of the aspartic acid in the DFG motif. In addition, some diaryl urea derivatives act as Hedgehog (Hh) ligands, binding and inhibiting proteins involved in the homonymous Hh signaling pathway. In this review we provide some of the methodologies adopted for the synthesis of diaryl ureas and a description of the most representative antitumor agents bearing the diaryl urea moiety, focusing on their mechanisms bound to the receptors and structure-activity relationships (SAR). An increased knowledge of these derivatives could prompt the search to find new and more potent compounds.

  4. Selective anti-cancer agents as anti-aging drugs.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-12-01

    Recent groundbreaking discoveries have revealed that IGF-1, Ras, MEK, AMPK, TSC1/2, FOXO, PI3K, mTOR, S6K, and NFκB are involved in the aging process. This is remarkable because the same signaling molecules, oncoproteins and tumor suppressors, are well-known targets for cancer therapy. Furthermore, anti-cancer drugs aimed at some of these targets have been already developed. This arsenal could be potentially employed for anti-aging interventions (given that similar signaling molecules are involved in both cancer and aging). In cancer, intrinsic and acquired resistance, tumor heterogeneity, adaptation, and genetic instability of cancer cells all hinder cancer-directed therapy. But for anti-aging applications, these hurdles are irrelevant. For example, since anti-aging interventions should be aimed at normal postmitotic cells, no selection for resistance is expected. At low doses, certain agents may decelerate aging and age-related diseases. Importantly, deceleration of aging can in turn postpone cancer, which is an age-related disease.

  5. Current developments of coumarin-based anti-cancer agents in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Emami, Saeed; Dadashpour, Sakineh

    2015-09-18

    Cancer is one of the leading health hazards and the prominent cause of death in the world. A number of anticancer agents are currently in clinical practice and used for treatment of various kinds of cancers. There is no doubt that the existing arsenal of anticancer agents is insufficient due to the high incidence of side effects and multidrug resistance. In the efforts to develop suitable anticancer drugs, medicinal chemists have focused on coumarin derivatives. Coumarin is a naturally occurring compound and a versatile synthetic scaffold possessing wide spectrum of biological effects including potential anticancer activity. This review article covers the current developments of coumarin-based anticancer agents and also discusses the structure-activity relationship of the most potent compounds.

  6. Dual Extraction of Essential Oil and Podophyllotoxin from Creeping Juniper (Juniperus horizontalis)

    PubMed Central

    Cantrell, Charles L.; Zheljazkov, Valtcho D.; Carvalho, Camila R.; Astatkie, Tess; Jeliazkova, Ekaterina A.; Rosa, Luiz H.

    2014-01-01

    Juniperus horizontalis Moench (Family Cupressaceae), commonly called creeping juniper, is a widely distributed species in the United States and much of Canada. It is potentially a source for two important chemical products, the anticancer drug synthetic precursor, podophyllotoxin and essential oils. The objectives of this study were to ascertain the likelihood of utilizing J. horizontalis needles for the simultaneous production of both (−)-podophyllotoxin and essential oil components and to determine the optimum distillation time (DT) needed for the production of essential oil containing a specific ratio of constituents. Eleven different distillation times were tested in this study: 20, 40, 80, 160, 180, 240, 480, 600, 720, 840, and 960 min. Total essential oil content increased with increasing distillation time from a minimum of 0.023% at 20 min to a maximum of 1.098% at 960 min. The major constituents present in the oil were alpha-pinene, sabinene, and limonene. The percent concentration of sabinene in the essential oil varied from a high of 46.6% at 80 min to a low of 30.2% at 960 min, that of limonene changed very little as a result of distillation time and remained near 30% for all distillation times, whereas the concentration of alpha-pinene was 9.6% at 20 min DT and decreased to 4.2% at 960 min. Post distillation analysis of needles revealed elevated amounts of (−)-podophyllotoxin remaining in the tissue varied in the amount of podophyllotoxin present, from a low of 0.281% to a high of 0.364% as compared to undistilled needles which gave 0.217% podophyllotoxin. As a result of this study, specific essential oil components can now be targeted in J. horizontalis by varying the distillation time. Furthermore, needles can be successfully utilized as a source of both essential oil and podophyllotoxin, consecutively. PMID:25203255

  7. Dual extraction of essential oil and podophyllotoxin from creeping juniper (Juniperus horizontalis).

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Charles L; Zheljazkov, Valtcho D; Carvalho, Camila R; Astatkie, Tess; Jeliazkova, Ekaterina A; Rosa, Luiz H

    2014-01-01

    Juniperus horizontalis Moench (Family Cupressaceae), commonly called creeping juniper, is a widely distributed species in the United States and much of Canada. It is potentially a source for two important chemical products, the anticancer drug synthetic precursor, podophyllotoxin and essential oils. The objectives of this study were to ascertain the likelihood of utilizing J. horizontalis needles for the simultaneous production of both (-)-podophyllotoxin and essential oil components and to determine the optimum distillation time (DT) needed for the production of essential oil containing a specific ratio of constituents. Eleven different distillation times were tested in this study: 20, 40, 80, 160, 180, 240, 480, 600, 720, 840, and 960 min. Total essential oil content increased with increasing distillation time from a minimum of 0.023% at 20 min to a maximum of 1.098% at 960 min. The major constituents present in the oil were alpha-pinene, sabinene, and limonene. The percent concentration of sabinene in the essential oil varied from a high of 46.6% at 80 min to a low of 30.2% at 960 min, that of limonene changed very little as a result of distillation time and remained near 30% for all distillation times, whereas the concentration of alpha-pinene was 9.6% at 20 min DT and decreased to 4.2% at 960 min. Post distillation analysis of needles revealed elevated amounts of (-)-podophyllotoxin remaining in the tissue varied in the amount of podophyllotoxin present, from a low of 0.281% to a high of 0.364% as compared to undistilled needles which gave 0.217% podophyllotoxin. As a result of this study, specific essential oil components can now be targeted in J. horizontalis by varying the distillation time. Furthermore, needles can be successfully utilized as a source of both essential oil and podophyllotoxin, consecutively.

  8. Rational Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Third Generation α-Noscapine Analogues as Potent Tubulin Binding Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Manchukonda, Naresh Kumar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Santoshi, Seneha; Lopus, Manu; Joseph, Silja; Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Kantevari, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Systematic screening based on structural similarity of drugs such as colchicine and podophyllotoxin led to identification of noscapine, a microtubule-targeted agent that attenuates the dynamic instability of microtubules without affecting the total polymer mass of microtubules. We report a new generation of noscapine derivatives as potential tubulin binding anti-cancer agents. Molecular modeling experiments of these derivatives 5a, 6a-j yielded better docking score (-7.252 to -5.402 kCal/mol) than the parent compound, noscapine (-5.505 kCal/mol) and its existing derivatives (-5.563 to -6.412 kCal/mol). Free energy (ΔGbind) calculations based on the linear interaction energy (LIE) empirical equation utilizing Surface Generalized Born (SGB) continuum solvent model predicted the tubulin-binding affinities for the derivatives 5a, 6a-j (ranging from -4.923 to -6.189 kCal/mol). Compound 6f showed highest binding affinity to tubulin (-6.189 kCal/mol). The experimental evaluation of these compounds corroborated with theoretical studies. N-(3-brormobenzyl) noscapine (6f) binds tubulin with highest binding affinity (KD, 38 ± 4.0 µM), which is ~ 4.0 times higher than that of the parent compound, noscapine (KD, 144 ± 1.0 µM) and is also more potent than that of the first generation clinical candidate EM011, 9-bromonoscapine (KD, 54 ± 9.1 µM). All these compounds exhibited substantial cytotoxicity toward cancer cells, with IC50 values ranging from 6.7 µM to 72.9 µM; compound 6f showed prominent anti-cancer efficacy with IC50 values ranging from 6.7 µM to 26.9 µM in cancer cells of different tissues of origin. These compounds perturbed DNA synthesis, delayed the cell cycle progression at G2/M phase, and induced apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. Collectively, the study reported here identified potent, third generation noscapinoids as new anti-cancer agents. PMID:24205049

  9. Rational design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of third generation α-noscapine analogues as potent tubulin binding anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Manchukonda, Naresh Kumar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Santoshi, Seneha; Lopus, Manu; Joseph, Silja; Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Kantevari, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Systematic screening based on structural similarity of drugs such as colchicine and podophyllotoxin led to identification of noscapine, a microtubule-targeted agent that attenuates the dynamic instability of microtubules without affecting the total polymer mass of microtubules. We report a new generation of noscapine derivatives as potential tubulin binding anti-cancer agents. Molecular modeling experiments of these derivatives 5a, 6a-j yielded better docking score (-7.252 to -5.402 kCal/mol) than the parent compound, noscapine (-5.505 kCal/mol) and its existing derivatives (-5.563 to -6.412 kCal/mol). Free energy (ΔG bind ) calculations based on the linear interaction energy (LIE) empirical equation utilizing Surface Generalized Born (SGB) continuum solvent model predicted the tubulin-binding affinities for the derivatives 5a, 6a-j (ranging from -4.923 to -6.189 kCal/mol). Compound 6f showed highest binding affinity to tubulin (-6.189 kCal/mol). The experimental evaluation of these compounds corroborated with theoretical studies. N-(3-brormobenzyl) noscapine (6f) binds tubulin with highest binding affinity (KD, 38 ± 4.0 µM), which is ~ 4.0 times higher than that of the parent compound, noscapine (KD, 144 ± 1.0 µM) and is also more potent than that of the first generation clinical candidate EM011, 9-bromonoscapine (KD, 54 ± 9.1 µM). All these compounds exhibited substantial cytotoxicity toward cancer cells, with IC50 values ranging from 6.7 µM to 72.9 µM; compound 6f showed prominent anti-cancer efficacy with IC50 values ranging from 6.7 µM to 26.9 µM in cancer cells of different tissues of origin. These compounds perturbed DNA synthesis, delayed the cell cycle progression at G2/M phase, and induced apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. Collectively, the study reported here identified potent, third generation noscapinoids as new anti-cancer agents.

  10. Natural anti-cancer agents: Implications in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Marasini, Bishal; Sahu, Ravi P

    2017-03-15

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancy accounting for the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Among several explored anti-cancer agents, Gemcitabine, a nucleoside analogue remained a front line chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, gemcitabine exerts a low response rate with limited progression free survival in cancer patients due to cellular resistance of pancreatic tumors to this therapy. Several chemotherapeutic agents have been explored in combination with gemcitabine against pancreatic cancer with overall mixed responses and survival rates. Naturally occurring dietary agents possess promising anti-cancer properties and have been shown to target various oncogenic signaling pathways in in-vitro and in-vivo pancreatic cancer models. Multiple studies using natural compounds have shown increased therapeutic efficacy of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer models. This review is focused on recent updates on preclinical and clinical studies utilizing natural anti-cancer agents with gemcitabine against pancreatic cancer.

  11. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel diphenylthiazole-based cyclooxygenase inhibitors as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Abdelazeem, Ahmed H; Gouda, Ahmed M; Omar, Hany A; Tolba, Mai F

    2014-12-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most widely used medications as analgesics and antipyretics. Currently, there is a growing interest in their antitumor activity and their ability to reduce the risk and mortality of several cancers. While several studies revealed the ability of NSAIDs to induce apoptosis and inhibit angiogenesis in cancer cells, their exact anticancer mechanism is not fully understood. However, both cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent and -independent pathways were reported to have a role. In an attempt to develop new anticancer agents, a series of diphenylthiazole substituted thiazolidinone derivatives was synthesized and evaluated for their anticancer activity against a panel of cancer cell lines. Additionally, the inhibitory activity of the synthesized derivatives against COX enzymes was investigated as a potential mechanism for the anticancer activity. Cytotoxicity assay results showed that compounds 15b and 16b were the most potent anticancer agents with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) between 8.88 and 19.25μM against five different human cancer cell lines. Interestingly, COX inhibition assay results were in agreement with that of the cytotoxicity assays where the most potent anticancer compounds showed good COX-2 inhibition comparable to that of celecoxib. Further support to our results were gained by the docking studies which suggested the ability of compound 15b to bind into COX-2 enzyme with low energy scores. Collectively, these results demonstrated the promising activity of the newly designed compounds as leads for subsequent development into potential anticancer agents.

  12. Salinomycin: a novel anti-cancer agent with known anti-coccidial activities.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuang; Wang, Fengfei; Wong, Eric T; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Hsieh, Tze-Chen; Wu, Joseph M; Wu, Erxi

    2013-01-01

    Salinomycin, traditionally used as an anti-coccidial drug, has recently been shown to possess anti-cancer and anti-cancer stem cell (CSC) effects, as well as activities to overcome multi-drug resistance based on studies using human cancer cell lines, xenograft mice, and in case reports involving cancer patients in pilot clinical trials. Therefore, salinomycin may be considered as a promising novel anti-cancer agent despite its largely unknown mechanism of action. This review summarizes the pharmacologic effects of salinomycin and presents possible mechanisms by which salinomycin exerts its anti-tumorigenic activities. Recent advances and potential complications that might limit the utilization of salinomycin as an anti-cancer and anti-CSC agent are also presented and discussed.

  13. Design and synthesis of 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives as anti-cancer agent.

    PubMed

    Viradiya, Denish; Mirza, Sheefa; Shaikh, Faraz; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Rathod, Anand; Jain, Nayan; Rawal, Rakesh; Shah, Anamik

    2016-12-06

    A series of 1,4-dihydropyridine based compounds bearing benzylpyridinium moiety have been designed and evaluated for in vitro anticancer activity against glioblastoma U87MG, lung cancer A549 and colorectal adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cell lines using the MTT assay. Among these compounds, 7b, 7d, 7e, and 7f exhibited potent anticancer activity against the cell lines tested. The cytotoxicity of the synthesized derivatives was compared to standard drugs (carboplatin, gemcitabine, and daunorubicin). Thus, synthesized 1,4-dihydropyridines can be considered as the encouraging molecules for further drug development as anticancer agents.

  14. Nanomicellar carriers for targeted delivery of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Huang, Yixian; Li, Song

    2014-01-01

    Clinical application of anticancer drugs is limited by problems such as low water solubility, lack of tissue-specificity and toxicity. Formulation development represents an important approach to these problems. Among the many delivery systems studied, polymeric micelles have gained considerable attention owing to ease in preparation, small sizes (10–100 nm), and ability to solubilize water-insoluble anticancer drugs and accumulate specifically at the tumors. This article provides a brief review of several promising micellar systems and their applications in tumor therapy. The emphasis is placed on the discussion of the authors’ recent work on several nanomicellar systems that have both a delivery function and antitumor activity, named dual-function drug carriers. PMID:24341817

  15. Compound A398, a Novel Podophyllotoxin Analogue: Cytotoxicity and Induction of Apoptosis in Human Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Alethéia L.; Faheina-Martins, Glaúcia V.; Maia, Raquel C.; Araújo, Demetrius A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in oncology research, cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Thus, there is a demand for the development of more selective and effective antitumor agents. This study showed that A398, a novel podophyllotoxin analogue, was cytotoxic to the HT-29, MCF-7, MOLT-4 and HL-60 tumor cell lines, being less active in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and normal cell lines FGH and IEC-6. Tests using the HepG2 lineage indicated that its metabolites do not contribute to its cytotoxicity. In the HL-60 cells, A398 induced apoptosis in a time and concentration-dependent manner, promoting mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of Bcl-2, phosphatidylserine exposure, activation of caspases -8, -9 and -3, and DNA fragmentation. The production of reactive oxygen species does not seem to be a crucial event for the apoptotic process. Pretreatment with specific inhibitors of kinases ERK1/2, JNK and p38 resulted in an increased percentage of death induced by A398. These results indicate that the compound induced apoptosis through activation of intrinsic and extrinsic death pathways with the mechanism involving the inhibition of the MAPKs and Bcl-2. Taken together, our findings suggest that A398 has an anticancer potential, proving itself to be a candidate for preclinical studies. PMID:25221997

  16. A Theoretical Model for the Hormetic Dose-response Curve for Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Tatsuya; Ohashi, Takuya; Oura, Shoji; Kokawa, Yozo; Kawago, Mitsumasa; Hirai, Yoshimitsu; Miyasaka, Miwako; Nishiguchi, Haruka; Kawashima, Sayoko; Yata, Yumi; Honda, Mariko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Yoshitaka

    2015-11-01

    In the present article, we quantitatively evaluated the dose-response relationship of hormetic reactions of anticancer agents in vitro. Serial dilutions of gemcitabine, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, vinorelbine, and paclitaxel were administered to the A549 non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. The bi-phasic sigmoidal curve with hormetic and cytotoxic effects is given by the formula y=(a-b/(1+exp(c(*)log(x)-d)))/(1+exp(e(*)log(x)-f)), that was used to perform a non-linear least square regression. The dose-responses of the five anticancer agents were fitted to this equation. Gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil, which had the lowest ED50 for their hormetic reaction, had the most pronounced promotive effects out of the five anticancer agents tested. The hormetic reaction progressed exponentially with culturing time. Our theoretical model will be useful in predicting how hormetic reactions affect patients with malignant tumors.

  17. (-)-Arctigenin as a lead compound for anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui-Rong; Li, Hong-Fu; Dou, De-Qiang; Xu, Yu-Bin; Jiang, Hong-Shuai; Li, Fu-Rui; Kang, Ting-Guo

    2013-01-01

    (-)-Arctigenin, an important active constituent of the traditional Chinese herb Fructus Arctii, was found to exhibit various bioactivities, so it can be used as a good lead compound for further structure modification in order to find a safer and more potent medicine. (-)-Arctigenin derivatives 1-5 of (-)-arctingen were obtained by modifying with ammonolysis at the lactone ring and sulphonylation at C (6') and C (6″) and O-demethylation at CH3O-C (3'), CH3O-C (3″) and CH3O-C (4″), and their anticancer bioactivities were examined.

  18. Targets of 3-bromopyruvate, a new, energy depleting, anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Dell'Antone, Paolo

    2009-11-01

    3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), a pyruvate analog recently proposed as a possible anticancer drug, was investigated in relation to its capacity to inhibit energy production in fractions obtained from normal cells (rat hepatocytes) and in isolated rat thymocytes . Findings were that main targets of the drug were glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and not hexokinase as suggested for hepatoma cells, and succinate -driven ATP synthesis. Consistently with the above findings, in the normal cells studied (thymocytes ) the drug elicited an important fall in ATP levels. The significance of the present findings in concern with a possible therapeutic usefulness of the drug is discussed.

  19. A novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent with high selectivity for cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Huan; Li, Dong-Wei; Yang, Li-Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Xun-Jin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have recently emerged as novel targets for cancer therapy due to its important roles in fundamental cellular function. Discovery of new chemotherapeutic agents that allow for simultaneous treatment and visualization of cancer is urgent. Herein, we demonstrate a novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent (FPB), exhibiting both imaging capability and anticancer activity. It can selectively accumulate in mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis. Notably, it results in much higher toxicity toward cancer cells owing to much higher uptake by cancer cells. These features make it highly attractive in cancer imaging and treatment. PMID:26337336

  20. Chrysin-benzothiazole conjugates as antioxidant and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Bhupendra M; Patel, Rahul V; Keum, Young-Soo; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2015-12-01

    7-(4-Bromobutoxy)-5-hydroxy-2-phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one, obtained from chrysin with 1,4-dibromobutane, was combined with a wide range of 6-substituted 2-aminobenzthiazoles, which had been prepared from the corresponding anilines with potassium thiocyanate. Free radical scavenging efficacies of newer analogues were measured using DPPH and ABTS assays, in addition to the assessment of their anticancer activity against cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa and CaSki) and ovarian cancer cell line (SK-OV-3) implementing the SRB assay. Cytotoxicity of titled compounds was checked using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) non-cancer cell line. Overall, 6a-r indicated remarkable antioxidant power as DPPH and ABTS(+) scavengers; particularly the presence of halogen(s) (6g, 6h, 6j-6l) was favourable with IC50 values comparable to the control ascorbic acid. Unsubstituted benzothiazole ring favored the activity of resultant compounds (6a and 6r) against HeLa cell line, whereas presence of chlorine (6g) or a di-fluoro group (6k) was a key to exert strong action against CaSki. Moreover, a mono-fluoro (6j) and a ketonic functionality (6o) were beneficial to display anticipated anticancer effects against ovarian cancer cell line SK-OV-3. The structural assignments of the new products were done on the basis of IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis.

  1. Biotechnological approaches for production of anti-cancerous compounds resveratrol, podophyllotoxin and zerumbone.

    PubMed

    Nandagopal, Krishnadas; Halder, Mihir; Dash, Biswabhusan; Nayak, Sanghamitra; Jha, Sumita

    2017-04-04

    Secondary metabolites from numerous plant sources have been developed as anti-cancer reagents and compounds such as resveratrol, podophyllotoxin and zerumbone are of particular importance in this regard. Since their de novo chemical synthesis is both arduous and commercially expensive, there has been an impetus to develop viable, biotechnological methods of production. Accordingly, this review focuses on recent developments in the field, highlighting the use of micropropagation, cell suspension cultures, callus cultures, hairy root cultures, recombinant microbes and genetically modified higher plants. Optimization of media and culture conditions, precursor feeding, immobilization and the use of chemical or physical elicitation in various protocols has lead to increase in resveratrol and podophyllotoxin production. Heterologous gene transformation of higher plants with stilbene synthase derived from Arachis hypogaea or Vitis vinifera lead to resveratrol production with the concomitant increase in resistance to plant pathogens. Interestingly, genetic transformation of Podophyllum hexandrum and Linum flavum with Agrobacterium rhizogenes resulted in Ri-T-DNA gene(s)-mediated enhancement of podophyllotoxin production. Zerumbone yields from tissue cultured plantlets or from suspension cultures are generally low and these methods require further optimization. In microbes lacking the native resveratrol or zerumbone biosynthesis pathway, metabolic engineering required not only the introduction of several genes of the pathway, but also precursor feeding and optimization of gene expression to increase their production. Data pertaining to safety and toxicity testing are needed prior to use of these sources of anti-cancer compounds in therapy.

  2. Hyperglycaemia Induced by Novel Anticancer Agents: An Undesirable Complication or a Potential Therapeutic Opportunity?

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi R

    2017-03-01

    Signalling pathways involving protein kinase, insulin-like growth factor 1, insulin receptors and the phosphoinositide 3 kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) system are critical in promoting oncogenesis. The use of anticancer agents that inhibit these pathways frequently results in hyperglycaemia, an on-target effect of these drugs. Hyperglycaemia induced by these agents denotes optimal inhibition of the desired pharmacological target. As hyperglycaemia can be treated successfully and effectively with metformin, managing this complication by reducing the dose of or discontinuing the anticancer drug may be counterproductive, especially if it is otherwise effective and clinically tolerated. The use of metformin to treat hyperglycaemia induced by anticancer drugs provides a valuable therapeutic opportunity of potentiating their clinical anticancer effects. Although evidence from randomised controlled trials is awaited, extensive preclinical evidence and clinical observational studies suggest that metformin has anticancer properties that improve overall survival in patients with diabetes and a variety of cancers. Metformin has also been reported to reverse resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-inhibiting tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This review summarises briefly the role of the above signalling pathways in oncogenesis, the causal association between inhibition of these pathways and hyperglycaemia, and the effect of metformin on clinical outcomes resulting from its anticancer properties. The evidence reviewed herein, albeit almost exclusively from observational studies, provides support for a greater use of metformin not only in patients with cancer and diabetes or drug-induced hyperglycaemia but also potentially as an anticancer drug. However, prospective randomised controlled studies are needed in all these settings to better assess the effect on clinical outcomes of adding metformin to ongoing anticancer therapy.

  3. New Pt-NNSO core anticancer agents: Structural optimization and investigation of their anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Chong, Shu Xian; Jin, Yinxue; Au-Yeung, Steve Chik Fun; To, Kenneth Kin Wah

    2017-02-12

    A series of new platinum Pt(II) compounds possessing a bidentate leaving ligand modified from oxaliplatin has been synthesized, with one of the oxygen ligating atom substituted for a sulphur atom (resulting in a Pt-NNSO coordination core structure). The general structures are R,R-diaminocyclohexane (DACH)-Pt-(methylthio)acetic acid (K4) and DACH-Pt-(thiophenylacetic acid) (K4 derivatives). Substitution of an electron donating or withdrawing group at the ortho or para position on the phenyl ring of K4 derivatives was found to affect the complexes' stability, reactivity with the biological molecules (5'-guanosine monophosphate (5'-GMP) and L-methionine (L-Met)) and anticancer activity. (1)H NMR experiments demonstrated that Pt-NNSO complexes formed a mixture of mono- and diadduct with 5'-GMP in various ratios, which are different from the classical Pt drugs (forming mainly diadduct). In addition, all of the K4 derivatives with improved lipophilicity are less deactivated by L-Met in comparison to cisplatin (CDDP) and oxaliplatin. Biological assessments showed that all Pt-NNSO complexes are less toxic than CDDP in normal porcine kidney cells and are minimally affected by drug resistance. Some of the new compounds also displayed comparable anticancer activity to CDDP or better than carboplatin in a few cancer cell lines. The lower reactivity of the Pt-NNSO compounds than CDDP towards thiol molecules, presumably leading to less efflux in resistant cancer cells, and the ability to inhibit autophagy were believed to allow the new compounds to be less affected by Pt resistance.

  4. Phytochemicals and Biogenic Metallic Nanoparticles as Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Pasupuleti Visweswara; Nallappan, Devi; Madhavi, Kondeti; Rahman, Shafiqur; Jun Wei, Lim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Several classes of drugs are available to treat different types of cancer. Currently, researchers are paying significant attention to the development of drugs at the nanoscale level to increase their target specificity and to reduce their concentrations. Nanotechnology is a promising and growing field with multiple subdisciplines, such as nanostructures, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles. These materials have gained prominence in science due to their size, shape, and potential efficacy. Nanomedicine is an important field involving the use of various types of nanoparticles to treat cancer and cancerous cells. Synthesis of nanoparticles targeting biological pathways has become tremendously prominent due to the higher efficacy and fewer side effects of nanodrugs compared to other commercial cancer drugs. In this review, different medicinal plants and their active compounds, as well as green-synthesized metallic nanoparticles from medicinal plants, are discussed in relation to their anticancer activities. PMID:27057273

  5. Pegylated arginine deiminase: a novel anticancer enzyme agent

    PubMed Central

    Feun, Lynn; Savaraj, Niramol

    2011-01-01

    Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) is a novel anticancer enzyme that produces depletion of arginine, which is a nonessential amino acid in humans. Certain tumours, such as malignant melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, are auxotrophic for arginine. These tumours that are sensitive to arginine depletion do not express argininosuccinate synthetase, a key enzyme in the synthesis of arginine from citrulline. ADI-PEG20 inhibits human melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas in vitro and in vivo. Phase I – II trials in patients with melanoma and hepatocellular carcinomas have shown the drug to have antitumour activity and tolerable side effects. Large Phase II trials and randomised, controlled Phase III trials are needed to determine its overall efficacy in the treatment of these malignancies and others. PMID:16787144

  6. Recent development in [1,4]benzodiazepines as potent anticancer agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Gill, Rupinder Kaur; Kaushik, Shiv Om; Chugh, Jasreen; Bansal, Sumit; Shah, Anamik; Bariwal, Jitender

    2014-01-01

    The [1,4]benzodiazepine is an important class of heterocyclic compounds and clinically used for many ailments in humans. The [1,4]benzodiazepine has unique structure that mimics the peptide linkage. This interesting observation completely shifted the interest of medicinal chemist for [1,4]benzodiazepine from CNS acting drugs to anticancer agents. During last few decades, a large number of reports have appeared in the literature highlighting the anticancer activity of [1,4]benzodiazepines. Here, in this article, we have discussed the brief synthesis, origin of [1,4]benzodiazepines as anticancer agent, their mechanism of action and latest developments in this field. We have compiled the most important literature reports from last few decades till date.

  7. Plant Anticancer Agents XXXIII. Constituents of Passerina vulgaris1.

    PubMed

    Ji-Xian, G; Handa, S S; Pezzuto, J M; Kinghorn, A D; Farnsworth, N R

    1984-06-01

    Two lignans of known structure, (+)-syringaresinol, a cytotoxic agent, and (+)-nortrachelogenin, a compound with demonstrated antileukemic activity, were isolated from a biologically active extract of the stems of PASSERINA VULGARIS.

  8. Development of anticancer agents targeting the Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Tian, Ye; Yang, Yanling; Hao, Jijun

    2017-03-17

    Hedgehog signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway which is essential in embryonic and postnatal development as well as adult organ homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of Hedgehog signaling is implicated in many diseases including cancer. Consequently, substantial efforts have made in the past to develop potential therapeutic agents that specifically target the Hedgehog signaling for cancer treatment. Here, we review the therapeutic agents for inhibition of the Hedgehog signaling and their clinical advances in cancer treatment.

  9. Synthesis and insecticidal activity of new oxime derivatives of podophyllotoxin-based phenazines against Mythimna separata Walker.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Xiaoyan; Yang, Chun; Yu, Xiang; Xu, Hui

    2014-12-15

    To discover new natural-product-based insecticidal agents, a series of novel oxime derivatives of podophyllotoxin-based phenazines modified in the C, D and E rings of podophyllotoxin were prepared and tested as insecticidal agents against the pre-third-instar larvae of oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata (Walker) in vivo at 1 mg/mL. The steric configuration of IIIc was unambiguously confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compounds IIIa-d, and IIIi exhibited an equal or higher insecticidal activity than toosendanin.

  10. Oxidative phosphorylation-dependent regulation of cancer cell apoptosis in response to anticancer agents

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, N.; Kumar, S.; Marlowe, T.; Chaudhary, A. K.; Kumar, R.; Wang, J.; O'Malley, J.; Boland, P. M.; Jayanthi, S.; Kumar, T. K. S.; Yadava, N.; Chandra, D.

    2015-11-05

    Cancer cells tend to develop resistance to various types of anticancer agents, whether they adopt similar or distinct mechanisms to evade cell death in response to a broad spectrum of cancer therapeutics is not fully defined. Current study concludes that DNA-damaging agents (etoposide and doxorubicin), ER stressor (thapsigargin), and histone deacetylase inhibitor (apicidin) target oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for apoptosis induction, whereas other anticancer agents including staurosporine, taxol, and sorafenib induce apoptosis in an OXPHOS-independent manner. DNA-damaging agents promoted mitochondrial biogenesis accompanied by increased accumulation of cellular and mitochondrial ROS, mitochondrial protein-folding machinery, and mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis occurred in a caspase activation-independent mechanism but was reduced by autophagy inhibition and p53-deficiency. Abrogation of complex-I blocked DNA-damage-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, whereas inhibition of complex-II or a combined deficiency of OXPHOS complexes I, III, IV, and V due to impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis did not modulate caspase activity. Mechanistic analysis revealed that inhibition of caspase activation in response to anticancer agents associates with decreased release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in complex-I-deficient cells compared with wild type (WT) cells. Gross OXPHOS deficiencies promoted increased release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria compared with WT or complex-I-deficient cells, suggesting that cells harboring defective OXPHOS trigger caspase-dependent as well as caspase-independent apoptosis in response to anticancer agents. Interestingly, DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin showed strong binding to mitochondria, which was disrupted by complex-I-deficiency but not by complex-II-deficiency. Thapsigargin-induced caspase activation was reduced upon abrogation of complex-I or gross OXPHOS deficiency

  11. Oxidative phosphorylation-dependent regulation of cancer cell apoptosis in response to anticancer agents

    DOE PAGES

    Yadav, N.; Kumar, S.; Marlowe, T.; ...

    2015-11-05

    Cancer cells tend to develop resistance to various types of anticancer agents, whether they adopt similar or distinct mechanisms to evade cell death in response to a broad spectrum of cancer therapeutics is not fully defined. Current study concludes that DNA-damaging agents (etoposide and doxorubicin), ER stressor (thapsigargin), and histone deacetylase inhibitor (apicidin) target oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for apoptosis induction, whereas other anticancer agents including staurosporine, taxol, and sorafenib induce apoptosis in an OXPHOS-independent manner. DNA-damaging agents promoted mitochondrial biogenesis accompanied by increased accumulation of cellular and mitochondrial ROS, mitochondrial protein-folding machinery, and mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Induction of mitochondrialmore » biogenesis occurred in a caspase activation-independent mechanism but was reduced by autophagy inhibition and p53-deficiency. Abrogation of complex-I blocked DNA-damage-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, whereas inhibition of complex-II or a combined deficiency of OXPHOS complexes I, III, IV, and V due to impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis did not modulate caspase activity. Mechanistic analysis revealed that inhibition of caspase activation in response to anticancer agents associates with decreased release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in complex-I-deficient cells compared with wild type (WT) cells. Gross OXPHOS deficiencies promoted increased release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria compared with WT or complex-I-deficient cells, suggesting that cells harboring defective OXPHOS trigger caspase-dependent as well as caspase-independent apoptosis in response to anticancer agents. Interestingly, DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin showed strong binding to mitochondria, which was disrupted by complex-I-deficiency but not by complex-II-deficiency. Thapsigargin-induced caspase activation was reduced upon abrogation of complex-I or gross OXPHOS

  12. Oxidative phosphorylation-dependent regulation of cancer cell apoptosis in response to anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, N; Kumar, S; Marlowe, T; Chaudhary, A K; Kumar, R; Wang, J; O'Malley, J; Boland, P M; Jayanthi, S; Kumar, T K S; Yadava, N; Chandra, D

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells tend to develop resistance to various types of anticancer agents, whether they adopt similar or distinct mechanisms to evade cell death in response to a broad spectrum of cancer therapeutics is not fully defined. Current study concludes that DNA-damaging agents (etoposide and doxorubicin), ER stressor (thapsigargin), and histone deacetylase inhibitor (apicidin) target oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for apoptosis induction, whereas other anticancer agents including staurosporine, taxol, and sorafenib induce apoptosis in an OXPHOS-independent manner. DNA-damaging agents promoted mitochondrial biogenesis accompanied by increased accumulation of cellular and mitochondrial ROS, mitochondrial protein-folding machinery, and mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis occurred in a caspase activation-independent mechanism but was reduced by autophagy inhibition and p53-deficiency. Abrogation of complex-I blocked DNA-damage-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, whereas inhibition of complex-II or a combined deficiency of OXPHOS complexes I, III, IV, and V due to impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis did not modulate caspase activity. Mechanistic analysis revealed that inhibition of caspase activation in response to anticancer agents associates with decreased release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in complex-I-deficient cells compared with wild type (WT) cells. Gross OXPHOS deficiencies promoted increased release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria compared with WT or complex-I-deficient cells, suggesting that cells harboring defective OXPHOS trigger caspase-dependent as well as caspase-independent apoptosis in response to anticancer agents. Interestingly, DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin showed strong binding to mitochondria, which was disrupted by complex-I-deficiency but not by complex-II-deficiency. Thapsigargin-induced caspase activation was reduced upon abrogation of complex-I or gross OXPHOS deficiency

  13. Design, synthesis, and anticancer activity of novel berberine derivatives prepared via CuAAC "click" chemistry as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Yan, Tian-Hua; Yan, Lan; Li, Qian; Wang, Rui-Lian; Hu, Zhen-Lin; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Sun, Qing-Yan; Cao, Yong-Bing

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel derivatives of phenyl-substituted berberine triazolyls has been designed and synthesized via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition click chemistry in an attempt to develop antitumor agents. All of the compounds were evaluated for anticancer activity against a panel of three human cancer cell lines, including MCF-7 (breast), SW-1990 (pancreatic), and SMMC-7721 (liver) and the noncancerous human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cell lines. The results indicated that most of the compounds displayed notable anticancer activities against the MCF-7 cells compared with berberine. Among these derivatives, compound 16 showed the most potent inhibitory activity against the SW-1990 and SMMC-7721 cell lines, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 8.54±1.97 μM and 11.87±1.83 μM, respectively. Compound 36 exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity against the MCF-7 cell line, with an IC50 value of 12.57±1.96 μM. Compound 16 and compound 36 exhibited low cytotoxicity in the HUVEC cell line, with IC50 values of 25.49±3.24 μM and 30.47±3.47 μM. Furthermore, compounds 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 32, and 36 exhibited much better selectivity than berberine toward the normal cell line HUVEC.

  14. Double layered hydroxides as potential anti-cancer drug delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Ufana; Ashraf, S M

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology has changed the scenario of the medical world by revolutionizing the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of cancer. This nanotechnology has been proved miraculous in detecting cancer cells, delivering chemotherapeutic agents and monitoring treatment from non-specific to highly targeted killing of tumor cells. In the past few decades, a number of inorganic materials have been investigated such as calcium phosphate, gold, carbon materials, silicon oxide, iron oxide, and layered double hydroxide (LDH) for examining their efficacy in targeting drug delivery. The reason behind the selection of these inorganic materials was their versatile and unique features efficient in drug delivery, such as wide availability, rich surface functionality, good biocompatibility, potential for target delivery, and controlled release of the drug from these inorganic nanomaterials. Although, the drug-LDH hybrids are found to be quite instrumental because of their application as advanced anti-cancer drug delivery systems, there has not been much research on them. This mini review is set to highlight the advancement made in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as anti-cancer drug delivery agents. Along with the advantages of LDHs as anti-cancer drug delivery agents, the process of interaction of some of the common anti-cancer drugs with LDH has also been discussed.

  15. A novel podophyllotoxin lignan from Justicia heterocarpa.

    PubMed

    Al-Juaid, Salih Salem; Abdel-Mogib, Mamdouh

    2004-05-01

    Chromatographic separation of the extract of Justicia heterocarpa T. ANDERS. afforded, in addition to known fatty acids, terpenoids and steroids, a new podophyllotoxin lignan. Structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, and the structure of the new lignan was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies, which have shown that there is a H-bonding stabilized dimer.

  16. Recent developments of C-4 substituted coumarin derivatives as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Dandriyal, Jyoti; Singla, Ramit; Kumar, Manvendra; Jaitak, Vikas

    2016-08-25

    Cancer is a prominent cause of death in global. Currently, the numbers of drugs that are in clinical practice are having a high prevalence of side effect and multidrug resistance. Researchers have made an attempt to expand a suitable anticancer drug that has no MDR and side effect. Coumarin scaffold became an attractive subject due to their broad spectrum of pharmacological activities. Coumarin derivatives extensively explored for anticancer activities as it possesses minimum side effect along with multi-drug reversal activity. Coumarin derivatives can act by various mechanisms on different tumor cell lines depending on substitution pattern of the core structure of coumarin. Substitution on coumarin nucleus leads to the search for more potent compounds. In this review, we have made an effort to give a synthetic strategy for the preparation of C-4 substituted coumarin derivatives as anticancer agents based on their mechanism of action and also discuss the SAR of the most active compound.

  17. Repurposing the Clinically Efficacious Antifungal Agent Itraconazole as an Anticancer Chemotherapeutic.

    PubMed

    Pace, Jennifer R; DeBerardinis, Albert M; Sail, Vibhavari; Tacheva-Grigorova, Silvia K; Chan, Kelly A; Tran, Raymond; Raccuia, Daniel S; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Hadden, M Kyle

    2016-04-28

    Itraconazole (ITZ) is an FDA-approved member of the triazole class of antifungal agents. Two recent drug repurposing screens identified ITZ as a promising anticancer chemotherapeutic that inhibits both the angiogenesis and hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathways. We have synthesized and evaluated first- and second-generation ITZ analogues for their anti-Hh and antiangiogenic activities to probe more fully the structural requirements for these anticancer properties. Our overall results suggest that the triazole functionality is required for ITZ-mediated inhibition of angiogenesis but that it is not essential for inhibition of Hh signaling. The synthesis and evaluation of stereochemically defined des-triazole ITZ analogues also provides key information as to the optimal configuration around the dioxolane ring of the ITZ scaffold. Finally, the results from our studies suggest that two distinct cellular mechanisms of action govern the anticancer properties of the ITZ scaffold.

  18. Investigation of Vietnamese plants for potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Lynette Bueno; Still, Patrick C.; Naman, C. Benjamin; Ren, Yulin; Pan, Li; Chai, Hee-Byung; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.; Ninh, Tran Ngoc; Van Thanh, Bui; Swanson, Steven M.; Soejarto, Djaja D.

    2014-01-01

    Higher plants continue to afford humankind with many new drugs, for a variety of disease types. In this review, recent phytochemical and biological progress is presented for part of a collaborative multi-institutional project directed towards the discovery of new antitumor agents. The specific focus is on bioactive natural products isolated and characterized structurally from tropical plants collected in Vietnam. The plant collection, identification, and processing steps are described, and the natural products isolated from these species are summarized with their biological activities. PMID:25395897

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of 3-ylideneoxindole acetamides as potent anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Chun-Tang; Lee, Wei-Chun; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Cheng, Jing-Jy; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Chen, Chih-Yu; Song, Jen-Shin; Wu, Ming-Hsien; Shia, Kak-Shan; Li, Wen-Tai

    2015-06-15

    Indirubin, an active component in the traditional Chinese medicine formula Danggui Longhui Wan, shows promising anticancer effects. Meisoindigo is an analog derived from indirubin, which is less toxic and appears to be even more potent against cancer. In considering meisoindigo as a structural template for the development of new drugs, we designed and synthesized a series of 3-ylideneoxindole acetamides as novel anticancer agents. The acetamides were then evaluated for in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities. The 3-ylideneoxindole acetamides were found to have better anticancer activity than was indirubin-3'-oxime in several cancer cell lines and also displayed a spectrum of activity similar to that of the drug candidate roscovitine, a CDK inhibitor. Among the 3-ylideneoxindole acetamides, compound 10 showed particularly good efficacy. Cell cycle analysis further revealed that compound 10 arrested cells in the G1 phase and caused an increase in the sub-G1 population, indicating that the apoptosis pathway had been induced. In addition, exposure of cells to compound 10 led to the upregulation of the cell-cycle regulator cyclin D1, which was sustained at a high level. In contrast, the same compound induced a short-term elevation in the level of cyclin E, which was followed by a rapid decrease and the attenuation of Rb phosphorylation. Furthermore, a docking model suggests that compound 10 binds to the active site of CDK4. In testing the therapeutic potency of compound 10 on CT26-xenografted BALB/c mice, a significant reduction in tumor size comparable to that of cisplatin was found when administrated via the i.p. route. The mice presented no loss of body weight, indicating that this compound possesses low toxicity. In the future, we are planning in vivo investigations of these new active anticancer agents to better elucidate active mechanisms at the cellular level and thus benefit the development of anticancer therapies.

  20. Development of anticancer agents targeting the Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Hao, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays indispensable roles in both embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of this pathway is implicated in many types of cancer. Consequently, substantial efforts have made to develop therapeutic agents as anticancer drugs by specifically targeting the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Here we systematically review the potential therapeutic agents that have been developed to date for inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin cascade as well as current status of clinical trials of some of these agents. PMID:26396911

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibitors: understanding a new wave of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Villar-Garea, Ana; Esteller, Manel

    2004-11-01

    Cancer is as much an epigenetic disease as it is a genetic and cytogenetic disease. The discovery that drastic changes in DNA methylation and histone modifications are commonly found in human tumors has inspired various laboratories and pharmaceutical companies to develop and study epigenetic drugs. One of the most promising groups of agents is the inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs), which have different biochemical and biologic properties but have a single common activity: induction of acetylation in histones, the key proteins in nucleosome and chromatin structure. One of the main mechanisms of action of HDAC inhibitors is the transcriptional reactivation of dormant tumor-suppressor genes, such as p21WAF1. However, their pleiotropic nature leaves open the possibility that their well-known differentiation, cell-cycle arrest and apoptotic properties are also involved in other functions associated with HDAC inhibition. Many phase I clinical trials indicate that HDAC inhibitors appear to be well-tolerated drugs. Thus, the field is ready for rigorous biologic and clinical scrutiny to validate the therapeutic potential of these drugs. Our current data indicate that the use of HDAC inhibitors, probably in association with classical chemotherapy drugs or in combination with DNA-demethylating agents, could be promising for cancer patients.

  2. Fenugreek: a naturally occurring edible spice as an anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Shabbeer, Shabana; Sobolewski, Michelle; Anchoori, Ravi Kumar; Kachhap, Sushant; Hidalgo, Manuel; Jimeno, Antonio; Davidson, Nancy; Carducci, Michael A; Khan, Saeed R

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, various dietary components that can potentially be used for the prevention and treatment of cancer have been identified. In this study, we demonstrate that extract (FE) from the seeds of the plant Trigonella foenum graecum, commonly called fenugreek, are cytotoxic in vitro to a panel of cancer but not normal cells. Treatment with 10-15 ug/mL of FE for 72 h was growth inhibitory to breast, pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines (PCa). When tested at higher doses (15-20 ug/mL), FE continued to be growth inhibitory to PCa cell lines but not to either primary prostate or hTert-immortalized prostate cells. At least part of the growth inhibition is due to induction of cell death, as seen by incorporation of Ethidium Bromide III into cancer cells exposed to FE. Molecular changes induced in PCa cells are: in DU-145 cells: downregulation of mutant p53, and in PC-3 cells upregulation of p21 and inhibition of TGFbeta induced phosphorylation of Akt. The surprising finding of our studies is that death of cancer cells occurs despite growth stimulatory pathways being simultaneously upregulated (phosphorylated) by FE. Thus, these studies add another biologically active agent to our armamentarium of naturally occurring agents with therapeutic potential.

  3. Mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives: a new class of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Felipe A R; Bomfim, Igor da S; Cavalcanti, Bruno C; Pessoa, Claudia; Goncalves, Raoni S B; Wardell, James L; Wardell, Solange M S V; de Souza, Marcus V N

    2014-01-01

    A series of 23 racemic mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives, 4-[3-(aryl)hexahydro[1,3]oxazolo[3,4-a]pyridin-1-yl]-2,8-bis(trifluoromethyl)quinolines, derived from (R*, S*)-(±)-mefloquine and arenealdehydes, have been evaluated for their activity against four cancer cell lines (HCT-8, OVCAR-8, HL-60, and SF-295). Good cytotoxicities have been determined with IC50 values ranging from 0.59 to 4.79 μg/mL. In general compounds with aryl groups having strong electron-releasing substituents, such as HO and MeO, or electron-rich heteroaryl groups, for example imidazol-2-y-l, are active. However, other factors such as steric effects may play a role. As both the active and non-active conformations of the mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives are similar, it is concluded that molecular conformations do not play a significant role either. This study is the first to evaluate mefloquine derivatives as antitumor agents. The mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives are considered to be useful leads for the rational design of new antitumor agents.

  4. Molecular mechanism of action of microtubule-stabilizing anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Prota, Andrea E; Bargsten, Katja; Zurwerra, Didier; Field, Jessica J; Díaz, José Fernando; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2013-02-01

    Microtubule-stabilizing agents (MSAs) are efficacious chemotherapeutic drugs widely used for the treatment of cancer. Despite the importance of MSAs for medical applications and basic research, their molecular mechanisms of action on tubulin and microtubules remain elusive. We determined high-resolution crystal structures of αβ-tubulin in complex with two unrelated MSAs, zampanolide and epothilone A. Both compounds were bound to the taxane pocket of β-tubulin and used their respective side chains to induce structuring of the M-loop into a short helix. Because the M-loop establishes lateral tubulin contacts in microtubules, these findings explain how taxane-site MSAs promote microtubule assembly and stability. Further, our results offer fundamental structural insights into the control mechanisms of microtubule dynamics.

  5. Hormetic Effect of Berberine Attenuates the Anticancer Activity of Chemotherapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiaolin; Huang, Borong; Zou, Lidi; Chen, Shenghui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jian-Bo; Su, Huanxing; Wang, Yitao; He, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of biphasic dose response characterized by exhibiting stimulatory or beneficial effects at low doses and inhibitory or toxic effects at high doses. Increasing numbers of chemicals of various types have been shown to induce apparent hormetic effect on cancer cells. However, the underlying significance and mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Berberine, one of the major active components of Rhizoma coptidis, has been manifested with notable anticancer activities. This study aims to investigate the hormetic effect of berberine and its influence on the anticancer activities of chemotherapeutic agents. Our results demonstrated that berberine at low dose range (1.25 ~ 5 μM) promoted cell proliferation to 112% ~170% of the untreated control in various cancer cells, while berberine at high dose rage (10 ~ 80 μM) inhibited cell proliferation. Further, we observed that co-treatment with low dose berberine could significantly attenuate the anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic agents, including fluorouracil (5-FU), camptothecin (CPT), and paclitaxel (TAX). The hormetic effect and thereby the attenuated anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic drugs by berberine may attributable to the activated protective stress response in cancer cells triggered by berberine, as evidenced by up-regulated MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These results provided important information to understand the potential side effects of hormesis, and suggested cautious application of natural compounds and relevant herbs in adjuvant treatment of cancer.

  6. Benzimidazole clubbed with triazolo-thiadiazoles and triazolo-thiadiazines: new anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Husain, Asif; Rashid, Mohd; Shaharyar, M; Siddiqui, Anees A; Mishra, Ravinesh

    2013-04-01

    Two series of Benzimidazole clubbed with triazolo-thiadiazoles (5a-q, 5r, 5s and 5x-a(1)) and triazolo-thiadiazines (5t-w) were synthesized with an aim to produce promising anticancer agents. In vitro anticancer activities of synthesized compounds were investigated at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) against NCI 60 cell line panel; results showed good to remarkable broad-spectrum anticancer activity. Among them, the compound 5h (NCS: 760452, 1-(1H-benzo [d] imidazol-2-yl)-3-(6-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazol-3-yl) propan-1-one) exhibited significant growth inhibition with GI50 values ranging from 0.20 to 2.58 μM and found superior selectivity for the leukemia cell lines and further screened at 10-fold dilutions of five different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μM). The 5h may possibly be used as lead compound for developing new anticancer agents.

  7. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico toxicity assessment of potential anticancer agents from African medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Simoben, Conrad Veranso; Karaman, Berin; Ngwa, Valery Fuh; Judson, Philip Neville; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva’a

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling has been employed in the search for lead compounds of chemotherapy to fight cancer. In this study, pharmacophore models have been generated and validated for use in virtual screening protocols for eight known anticancer drug targets, including tyrosine kinase, protein kinase B β, cyclin-dependent kinase, protein farnesyltransferase, human protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1. Pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic and Güner–Henry scoring methods, indicating that several of the models generated could be useful for the identification of potential anticancer agents from natural product databases. The validated pharmacophore models were used as three-dimensional search queries for virtual screening of the newly developed AfroCancer database (~400 compounds from African medicinal plants), along with the Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anticancer Compound-Activity-Target dataset (comprising ~1,500 published naturally occurring plant-based compounds from around the world). Additionally, an in silico assessment of toxicity of the two datasets was carried out by the use of 88 toxicity end points predicted by the Lhasa’s expert knowledge-based system (Derek), showing that only an insignificant proportion of the promising anticancer agents would be likely showing high toxicity profiles. A diversity study of the two datasets, carried out using the analysis of principal components from the most important physicochemical properties often used to access drug-likeness of compound datasets, showed that the two datasets do not occupy the same chemical space. PMID:27445461

  8. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico toxicity assessment of potential anticancer agents from African medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Simoben, Conrad Veranso; Karaman, Berin; Ngwa, Valery Fuh; Judson, Philip Neville; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva'a

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling has been employed in the search for lead compounds of chemotherapy to fight cancer. In this study, pharmacophore models have been generated and validated for use in virtual screening protocols for eight known anticancer drug targets, including tyrosine kinase, protein kinase B β, cyclin-dependent kinase, protein farnesyltransferase, human protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1. Pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic and Güner-Henry scoring methods, indicating that several of the models generated could be useful for the identification of potential anticancer agents from natural product databases. The validated pharmacophore models were used as three-dimensional search queries for virtual screening of the newly developed AfroCancer database (~400 compounds from African medicinal plants), along with the Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anticancer Compound-Activity-Target dataset (comprising ~1,500 published naturally occurring plant-based compounds from around the world). Additionally, an in silico assessment of toxicity of the two datasets was carried out by the use of 88 toxicity end points predicted by the Lhasa's expert knowledge-based system (Derek), showing that only an insignificant proportion of the promising anticancer agents would be likely showing high toxicity profiles. A diversity study of the two datasets, carried out using the analysis of principal components from the most important physicochemical properties often used to access drug-likeness of compound datasets, showed that the two datasets do not occupy the same chemical space.

  9. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Complex II by the Anticancer Agent Lonidamine*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lili; Shestov, Alexander A.; Worth, Andrew J.; Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Glickson, Jerry D.; Blair, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    The antitumor agent lonidamine (LND; 1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxylic acid) is known to interfere with energy-yielding processes in cancer cells. However, the effect of LND on central energy metabolism has never been fully characterized. In this study, we report that a significant amount of succinate is accumulated in LND-treated cells. LND inhibits the formation of fumarate and malate and suppresses succinate-induced respiration of isolated mitochondria. Utilizing biochemical assays, we determined that LND inhibits the succinate-ubiquinone reductase activity of respiratory complex II without fully blocking succinate dehydrogenase activity. LND also induces cellular reactive oxygen species through complex II, which reduced the viability of the DB-1 melanoma cell line. The ability of LND to promote cell death was potentiated by its suppression of the pentose phosphate pathway, which resulted in inhibition of NADPH and glutathione generation. Using stable isotope tracers in combination with isotopologue analysis, we showed that LND increased glutaminolysis but decreased reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate. Our findings on the previously uncharacterized effects of LND may provide potential combinational therapeutic approaches for targeting cancer metabolism. PMID:26521302

  10. Bacterial biosynthesis and maturation of the didemnin anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Kersten, Roland D.; Nam, Sang-Jip; Lu, Liang; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz M.; Zheng, Huajun; Fenical, William; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2012-01-01

    The antineoplastic agent didemnin B from the Caribbean tunicate Trididemnum solidum was the first marine drug to be clinically tested in humans. Because of its limited supply and its complex cyclic depsipeptide structure, considerable challenges were encountered during didemnin B's development that continue to limit aplidine (dehydrodidemnin B), which is currently being evaluated in numerous clinical trials. Herein we show that the didemnins are bacterial products produced by the marine α-proteobacteria Tistrella mobilis and Tistrella bauzanensis via a unique post-assembly line maturation process. Complete genome sequence analysis of the 6,513,401 bp T. mobilis strain KA081020-065 with its five circular replicons revealed the putative didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster (did) on the 1,126,962 bp megaplasmid pTM3. The did locus encodes a 13-module hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase enzyme complex organized in a co-linear arrangement for the synthesis of the fatty acylglutamine ester derivatives didemnins X and Y rather than didemnin B as first anticipated. Imaging mass spectrometry of T. mobilis bacterial colonies captured the time-dependent extracellular conversion of the didemnin X and Y precursors to didemnin B in support of an unusual post-synthetase activation mechanism. Significantly, the discovery of the didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster may provide a long-term solution to the supply problem that presently hinders this group of marine natural products and pave the way for the genetic engineering of new didemnin congeners. PMID:22458477

  11. Discovery and development of natural product oridonin-inspired anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ye; Ding, Chunyong; Ye, Na; Liu, Zhiqing; Wold, Eric A; Chen, Haiying; Wild, Christopher; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2016-10-21

    Natural products have historically been, and continue to be, an invaluable source for the discovery of various therapeutic agents. Oridonin, a natural diterpenoid widely applied in traditional Chinese medicines, exhibits a broad range of biological effects including anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. To further improve its potency, aqueous solubility and bioavailability, the oridonin template serves as an exciting platform for drug discovery to yield better candidates with unique targets and enhanced drug properties. A number of oridonin derivatives (e.g. HAO472) have been designed and synthesized, and have contributed to substantial progress in the identification of new agents and relevant molecular mechanistic studies toward the treatment of human cancers and other diseases. This review summarizes the recent advances in medicinal chemistry on the explorations of novel oridonin analogues as potential anticancer therapeutics, and provides a detailed discussion of future directions for the development and progression of this class of molecules into the clinic.

  12. The application of click chemistry in the synthesis of agents with anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Nan; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Bing-Xin; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between alkynes and azides (click chemistry) to form 1,2,3-triazoles is the most popular reaction due to its reliability, specificity, and biocompatibility. This reaction has the potential to shorten procedures, and render more efficient lead identification and optimization procedures in medicinal chemistry, which is a powerful modular synthetic approach toward the assembly of new molecular entities and has been applied in anticancer drugs discovery increasingly. The present review focuses mainly on the applications of this reaction in the field of synthesis of agents with anticancer activity, which are divided into four groups: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antimicrotubule agents. PMID:25792812

  13. The application of click chemistry in the synthesis of agents with anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Nan; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Bing-Xin; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between alkynes and azides (click chemistry) to form 1,2,3-triazoles is the most popular reaction due to its reliability, specificity, and biocompatibility. This reaction has the potential to shorten procedures, and render more efficient lead identification and optimization procedures in medicinal chemistry, which is a powerful modular synthetic approach toward the assembly of new molecular entities and has been applied in anticancer drugs discovery increasingly. The present review focuses mainly on the applications of this reaction in the field of synthesis of agents with anticancer activity, which are divided into four groups: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antimicrotubule agents.

  14. Evaluation of Degradation Properties of Polyglycolide and Its Potential as Delivery Vehicle for Anticancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Noorsal, K.; Ghani, S. M.; Yunos, D. M.; Mohamed, M. S. W.; Yahya, A. F.

    2010-03-11

    Biodegradable polymers offer a unique combination of properties that can be tailored to suit nearly any controlled drug delivery application. The most common biodegradable polymers used for biomedical applications are semicrystalline polyesters and polyethers which possess good mechanical properties and have been used in many controlled release applications. Drug release from these polymers may be controlled by several mechanisms and these include diffusion of drug through a matrix, dissolution of polymer matrix and degradation of the polymer. This study aims to investigate the degradation and drug release properties of polyglycolide (1.03 dL/g), in which, cis platin, an anticancer agent was used as the model drug. The degradation behaviour of the chosen polymer is thought to largely govern the release of the anticancer agent in vitro.

  15. [Phase I clinical trial design of anticancer agents--a Fibonacci and a modified Fibonacci sequence].

    PubMed

    Kusaba, H; Tamura, T

    2000-05-01

    A Phase I clinical trial of an anticancer agent is the first evaluation in humans, and it is an important step in drug development. From the ethical point of view, the goal is to escalate to the maximum tolerated dose quickly, yet safely, to minimize the likelihood of treating patients at doses that are too low or high. It is expected that the contradictions between safety and efficacy in the Phase I clinical trials will be solved by developing methods. The modified Fibonacci sequence has been generally adopted for dose escalation, although it includes some problems. It is necessary to recognize that the method used for Phase I clinical trials for anticancer agents remains unsatisfactory, and that it is also necessary to develop more ethical and scientific methods.

  16. In vitro evaluation of a combination treatment involving anticancer agents and an aurora kinase B inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Senna; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Nakayama, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Harada, Yoshikazu; Koi, Chiho; Kurata, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2016-11-01

    Aurora kinase B (AURKB) inhibitors are regarded as potential molecular-targeting drugs for cancer therapy. The present study evaluated the cytotoxic effect of a combination of AZD1152-hQPA, an AURKB inhibitor, and various anticancer agents on the HeLa human cervical cancer cell line, as well as its cisplatin-resistant equivalent HCP4 cell line. It was demonstrated that AZD1152-hQPA had an antagonistic effect on the cytotoxicity of cisplatin, etoposide and doxorubicin, but had a synergistic effect on that of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), Am80 and TAC-101, when tested on HeLa cells. Cisplatin, etoposide and doxorubicin were shown to increase the cellular expression of AURKB, while ATRA, Am80 and TAC-101 downregulated its expression. These results suggested that AURKB expression is regulated by these anticancer agents at the transcriptional level, and that the level of expression of AURKB may influence the cytotoxic effect of AZD1152-hQPA. Therefore, when using anticancer agents, decreasing the expression of AURKB using a molecular-targeting drug may be an optimal therapeutic strategy.

  17. In vitro evaluation of a combination treatment involving anticancer agents and an aurora kinase B inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Senna; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Nakayama, Yoshifumi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Harada, Yoshikazu; Koi, Chiho; Kurata, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Aurora kinase B (AURKB) inhibitors are regarded as potential molecular-targeting drugs for cancer therapy. The present study evaluated the cytotoxic effect of a combination of AZD1152-hQPA, an AURKB inhibitor, and various anticancer agents on the HeLa human cervical cancer cell line, as well as its cisplatin-resistant equivalent HCP4 cell line. It was demonstrated that AZD1152-hQPA had an antagonistic effect on the cytotoxicity of cisplatin, etoposide and doxorubicin, but had a synergistic effect on that of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), Am80 and TAC-101, when tested on HeLa cells. Cisplatin, etoposide and doxorubicin were shown to increase the cellular expression of AURKB, while ATRA, Am80 and TAC-101 downregulated its expression. These results suggested that AURKB expression is regulated by these anticancer agents at the transcriptional level, and that the level of expression of AURKB may influence the cytotoxic effect of AZD1152-hQPA. Therefore, when using anticancer agents, decreasing the expression of AURKB using a molecular-targeting drug may be an optimal therapeutic strategy. PMID:27895801

  18. Can Some Marine-Derived Fungal Metabolites Become Actual Anticancer Agents?

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Nelson G. M.; Lefranc, Florence; Kijjoa, Anake; Kiss, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Marine fungi are known to produce structurally unique secondary metabolites, and more than 1000 marine fungal-derived metabolites have already been reported. Despite the absence of marine fungal-derived metabolites in the current clinical pipeline, dozens of them have been classified as potential chemotherapy candidates because of their anticancer activity. Over the last decade, several comprehensive reviews have covered the potential anticancer activity of marine fungal-derived metabolites. However, these reviews consider the term “cytotoxicity” to be synonymous with “anticancer agent”, which is not actually true. Indeed, a cytotoxic compound is by definition a poisonous compound. To become a potential anticancer agent, a cytotoxic compound must at least display (i) selectivity between normal and cancer cells (ii) activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells; and (iii) a preferentially non-apoptotic cell death mechanism, as it is now well known that a high proportion of cancer cells that resist chemotherapy are in fact apoptosis-resistant cancer cells against which pro-apoptotic drugs have more than limited efficacy. The present review thus focuses on the cytotoxic marine fungal-derived metabolites whose ability to kill cancer cells has been reported in the literature. Particular attention is paid to the compounds that kill cancer cells through non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms. PMID:26090846

  19. Pro-oxidant activity of dietary chemopreventive agents: an under-appreciated anti-cancer property.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Asfar S; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Hadi, S M

    2013-01-01

    " Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" was quoted by Hippocrates more than two thousand years ago and since ancient times the health benefits of different natural agents have been exploited. In modern research, the disease preventive benefits of many such natural agents, particularly dietary compounds and their derivatives, has been attributed to their well recognized activity as the regulators of redox state of the cell. Nevertheless, most of these studies have focused on their antioxidant activity. A large body of evidence indicates that a major fraction of these agents can elicit pro-oxidant (radical generating) behavior which has been linked to their anti-cancer effects. This editorial provides an overview of the under-appreciated pro-oxidant activity of natural products, with a special focus on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of transition metal ions, and discusses their possible use as cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

  20. Combining immunotherapy and anticancer agents: the right path to achieve cancer cure?

    PubMed

    Apetoh, L; Ladoire, S; Coukos, G; Ghiringhelli, F

    2015-09-01

    Recent clinical trials revealed the impressive efficacy of immunological checkpoint blockade in different types of metastatic cancers. Such data underscore that immunotherapy is one of the most promising strategies for cancer treatment. In addition, preclinical studies provide evidence that some cytotoxic drugs have the ability to stimulate the immune system, resulting in anti-tumor immune responses that contribute to clinical efficacy of these agents. These observations raise the hypothesis that the next step for cancer treatment is the combination of cytotoxic agents and immunotherapies. The present review aims to summarize the immune-mediated effects of chemotherapeutic agents and their clinical relevance, the biological and clinical features of immune checkpoint blockers and finally, the preclinical and clinical rationale for novel therapeutic strategies combining anticancer agents and immune checkpoint blockers.

  1. Carnosol: A promising anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory agent

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeremy J.

    2011-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet and more specifically certain meats, fruits, vegetables, and olive oil found in certain parts of the Mediterranean region have been associated with a decreased cardiovascular and diabetes risk. More recently, several population based studies have observed with these lifestyle choices have reported an overall reduced risk for several cancers. One study in particular observed an inverse relationship between consumption of Mediterranean herbs such as rosemary, sage, parsley, and oregano with lung cancer. In light of these findings there is a need to explore and identify the anti-cancer properties of these medicincal herbs and to identify the phytochemicals therein. One agent in particular, carnosol, has been evaluated for anti-cancer property in prostate, breast, skin, leukemia, and colon cancer with promising results. These studies have provided evidence that carnosol targets multiple deregulated pathways associated with inflammation and cancer that include nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), apoptotic related proteins, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3 K)/Akt, androgen and estrogen receptors, as well as molecular targets. In addition, carnosol appears to be well tolerated in that it has a selective toxicity towards cancer cells versus non-tumorigenic cells and is well tolerated when administered to animals. This mini-review reports on the pre-clinical studies that have been performed to date with carnosol describing mechanistic, efficacy, and safety/tolerability studies as a cancer chemoprevention and anti-cancer agent. PMID:21382660

  2. Essential Oils and Their Constituents as Anticancer Agents: A Mechanistic View

    PubMed Central

    Mantha, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Exploring natural plant products as an option to find new chemical entities as anticancer agents is one of the fastest growing areas of research. Recently, in the last decade, essential oils (EOs) have been under study for their use in cancer therapy and the present review is an attempt to collect and document the available studies indicating EOs and their constituents as anticancer agents. This review enlists nearly 130 studies of EOs from various plant species and their constituents that have been studied so far for their anticancer potential and these studies have been classified as in vitro and in vivo studies for EOs and their constituents. This review also highlights in-depth various mechanisms of action of different EOs and their constituents reported in the treatment strategies for different types of cancer. The current review indicates that EOs and their constituents act by multiple pathways and mechanisms involving apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, antimetastatic and antiangiogenic, increased levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS), DNA repair modulation, and others to demonstrate their antiproliferative activity in the cancer cell. The effect of EOs and their constituents on tumour suppressor proteins (p53 and Akt), transcription factors (NF-κB and AP-1), MAPK-pathway, and detoxification enzymes like SOD, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase has also been discussed. PMID:25003106

  3. Pharmacokinetic Properties of Anticancer Agents for the Treatment of CNS Tumors: Update of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jacus, Megan O.; Daryani, Vinay M.; Harstead, K. Elaine; Patel, Yogesh T.; Throm, Stacy L.; Stewart, Clinton F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant improvement in outcomes for patients with hematological malignancies and solid tumors over the past 10 years, patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors continue to have a poor prognosis. A primary reason for this is the inability of many chemotherapeutic drugs to penetrate into the brain and brain tumors at concentrations high enough to exert an antitumor effect due to unique barriers and efflux transporters. Several studies have been published recently examining the CNS pharmacokinetics of various anticancer drugs in patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors. To summarize recent advances in the field, this review will critically present studies published within the last 9 years examining brain and cerebrospinal fluid penetration of clinically available anticancer agents for patients with CNS tumors. PMID:26293618

  4. Evolution in Medicinal Chemistry of Ursolic Acid Derivatives as Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Gao, Yu; Wang, Ailan; Zhou, Xiaobin; Zheng, Yunquan; Zhou, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is a renewed interest in common dietaries and plant-based traditional medicines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. In the search for potential anticancer agents from natural sources, ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid widely found in various medicinal herbs and fruits, exhibits powerful biological effects including its attractive anticancer activity against various types of cancer cells. However, the limited solubility, rapid metabolism and poor bioavailability of UA restricted its further clinical applications. In the past decade, with substantial progress toward the development of new chemical entities for the treatment of cancer, numerous UA derivatives have been designed and prepared to overcome its disadvantages. Despite extensive effort, discovery of effective UA derivatives has so far met with only limited success. This review summarizes the current status of the structural diversity and evolution in medicinal chemistry of UA analogues and provides a detailed discussion of future direction for further research in the chemical modifications of UA. PMID:25617694

  5. Evolution in medicinal chemistry of ursolic acid derivatives as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haijun; Gao, Yu; Wang, Ailan; Zhou, Xiaobin; Zheng, Yunquan; Zhou, Jia

    2015-03-06

    Currently, there is a renewed interest in common dietaries and plant-based traditional medicines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. In the search for potential anticancer agents from natural sources, ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid widely found in various medicinal herbs and fruits, exhibits powerful biological effects including its attractive anticancer activity against various types of cancer cells. However, the limited solubility, rapid metabolism and poor bioavailability of UA restricted its further clinical applications. In the past decade, with substantial progress toward the development of new chemical entities for the treatment of cancer, numerous UA derivatives have been designed and prepared to overcome its disadvantages. Despite extensive effort, discovery of effective UA derivatives has so far met with only limited success. This review summarizes the current status of the structural diversity and evolution in medicinal chemistry of UA analogues and provides a detailed discussion of future direction for further research in the chemical modifications of UA.

  6. Expression of sulfotransferase SULT1A1 in cancer cells predicts susceptibility to the novel anticancer agent NSC-743380.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao; Cao, Mengru; Wang, Li; Wu, Shuhong; Liu, Xiaoying; Li, Hongyu; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Rui-Yu; Sun, Xiaoping; Wei, Caimiao; Baggerly, Keith A; Roth, Jack A; Wang, Michael; Swisher, Stephen G; Fang, Bingliang

    2015-01-01

    The small molecule anticancer agent NSC-743380 modulates functions of multiple cancer-related pathways and is highly active in a subset of cancer cell lines in the NCI-60 cell line panel. It also has promising in vivo anticancer activity. However, the mechanisms underlying NSC-743380's selective anticancer activity remain uncharacterized. To determine biomarkers that may be used to identify responders to this novel anticancer agent, we performed correlation analysis on NSC-743380's anticancer activity and the gene expression levels in NCI-60 cell lines and characterized the functions of the top associated genes in NSC-743380-mediated anticancer activity. We found sulfotransferase SULT1A1 is causally associated with NSC-743380's anticancer activity. SULT1A1 was expressed in NSC-743380-sensitive cell lines but was undetectable in resistant cancer cells. Ectopic expression of SULT1A1 in NSC743380 resistant cancer cells dramatically sensitized the resistant cells to NSC-743380. Knockdown of the SULT1A1 in the NSC-743380 sensitive cancer cell line rendered it resistance to NSC-743380. The SULT1A1 protein levels in cell lysates from 18 leukemia cell lines reliably predicted the susceptibility of the cell lines to NSC-743380. Thus, expression of SULT1A1 in cancer cells is required for NSC-743380's anticancer activity and can be used as a biomarker for identification of NSC-743380 responders.

  7. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) Extract as a Potential Complementary Agent in Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    González-Vallinas, Margarita; Reglero, Guillermo; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains an important cause of mortality nowadays and, therefore, new therapeutic approaches are still needed. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) has been reported to possess antitumor activities both in vitro and in animal studies. Some of these activities were attributed to its major components, such as carnosic acid, carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid. Initially, the antitumor effects of rosemary were attributed to its antioxidant activity. However, in recent years, a lack of correlation between antioxidant and antitumor effects exerted by rosemary was reported, and different molecular mechanisms were related to its tumor inhibitory properties. Moreover, supported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Food and Safety Authority, specific compositions of rosemary extract were demonstrated to be safe for human health and used as antioxidant additive in foods, suggesting the potential easy application of this agent as a complementary approach in cancer therapy. In this review, we aim to summarize the reported anticancer effects of rosemary, the demonstrated molecular mechanisms related to these effects and the interactions between rosemary and currently used anticancer agents. The possibility of using rosemary extract as a complementary agent in cancer therapy in comparison with its isolated components is discussed.

  8. Inner conflict in patients receiving oral anticancer agents: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Hiroko; Takahashi, Tsunehiro

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the experiences of patients receiving oral anticancer agents. Design A qualitative study using semistructured interviews with a grounded theory approach. Setting A university hospital in Japan. Participants 14 patients with gastric cancer who managed their cancer with oral anticancer agents. Results Patients with cancer experienced inner conflict between rational belief and emotional resistance to taking medication due to confrontation with cancer, doubt regarding efficacy and concerns over potential harm attached to use of the agent. Although they perceived themselves as being adherent to medication, they reported partial non-adherent behaviours. The patients reassessed their lives through the experience of inner conflict and, ultimately, they recognised their role in medication therapy. Conclusions Patients with cancer experienced inner conflict, in which considerable emotional resistance to taking their medication affected their occasional non-adherent behaviours. In patient-centred care, it is imperative that healthcare providers understand patients’ inner conflict and inconsistency between their subjective view and behaviour to support patient adherence. PMID:25872938

  9. Novel, Broad Spectrum Anticancer Agents Containing the Tricyclic 5:7:5-Fused Diimidazodiazepine Ring System

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of a series of novel, broad spectrum anticancer agents containing the tricyclic 5:7:5-fused diimidazo[4,5-d:4′,5′-f][1,3]diazepine ring system is reported. Compounds 1, 2, 8, 11, and 12 in the series show promising in vitro antitumor activity with low micromolar IC50 values against prostate, lung, breast, and ovarian cancer cell lines. Some notions about structure−activity relationships and a possible mechanism of biological activity are presented. Also presented are preliminary in vivo toxicity studies of 1 using SCID mice. PMID:21572541

  10. Discovery and Evaluation of PRL Trimer Disruptors for Novel Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunpeng; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of PRL phosphatases (PRL1, PRL2, and PRL3) has been found in a variety of late-stage tumors and their distant metastatic sites. Therefore, the oncogenic PRL phosphatases represent intriguing targets for cancer therapy. There is considerable interest in identifying small molecule inhibitors targeting PRLs as novel anticancer agents. However, it has been difficult to acquire phosphatase activity-based PRL inhibitors due to the unusual wide and shallow catalytic pockets of PRLs revealed by crystal structure studies. Here, we present a novel method to identify PRL1 inhibitors by targeting the PRL1 trimer interface and the procedure to characterize their biochemical and cellular activity.

  11. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Matthias R.; Joerger, Andreas C.; Fersht, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53’s oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1MET(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells. PMID:27551077

  12. Benzimidazole bearing oxadiazole and triazolo-thiadiazoles nucleus: design and synthesis as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Husain, Asif; Rashid, Mohd; Mishra, Ravinesh; Parveen, Shama; Shin, Dong-Soo; Kumar, Deepak

    2012-09-01

    Two new series of benzimidazole bearing oxadiazole[1-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-3-(5-substituted-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)propan-1-ones (4a-l)] and triazolo-thiadiazoles[1-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-3-(6-(substituted)-[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazol-3-yl)propan-1-one (7a-e)] have been synthesized successfully from 4-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-4-oxobutanehydrazide (3) with an aim to produce promising anticancer agents. In vitro anticancer activities of synthesized compounds were screened at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), USA, according to their applied protocol against full NCI 60 human cell lines panel; results showed good to remarkable anticancer activity. Among them, compound (4j, NCS: 761980) exhibited significant growth inhibition and further screened at 10-fold dilutions of five different concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μM) with GI(50) values ranging from 0.49 to 48.0 μM and found superior for the non-small cell lung cancer cell lines like HOP-92 (GI(50) 0.49, TGI 19.9,LC(50) >100 and Log(10)GI(50) -6.30, Log(10)TGI -4.70, Log(10)LC(50) >-4.00).

  13. Structure-Activity Relationships of Orotidine-5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase Inhibitors as Anticancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, A.; Konforte, D; Poduch, E; Furlonger, C; Wei, L; Liu, Y; Lewis, M; Pai, E; Paige, C; Kotra, L

    2009-01-01

    A series of 6-substituted and 5-fluoro-6-substituted uridine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their potential as anticancer agents. The designed molecules were synthesized from either fully protected uridine or the corresponding 5-fluorouridine derivatives. The mononucleotide derivatives were used for enzyme inhibition investigations against ODCase. Anticancer activities of all the synthesized derivatives were evaluated using the nucleoside forms of the inhibitors. 5-Fluoro-UMP was a very weak inhibitor of ODCase. 6-Azido-5-fluoro and 5-fluoro-6-iodo derivatives are covalent inhibitors of ODCase, and the active site Lys145 residue covalently binds to the ligand after the elimination of the 6-substitution. Among the synthesized nucleoside derivatives, 6-azido-5-fluoro, 6-amino-5-fluoro, and 6-carbaldehyde-5-fluoro derivatives showed potent anticancer activities in cell-based assays against various leukemia cell lines. On the basis of the overall profile, 6-azido-5-fluoro and 6-amino-5-fluoro uridine derivatives exhibited potential for further investigations.

  14. Genetic and epigenetic studies for determining molecular targets of natural product anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujiong; Li, Yong; Liu, Xiaoming; Cho, William C S

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is a disease caused by a series of genetic and epigenetic alterations. Therefore, agents targeting the genetic and/or epigenetic machinery offer potential for the development of anticancer drugs. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that some common natural products [such as epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), curcumin, genistein, sulforaphane (SFN) and resveratrol] have anticancer properties through the mechanisms of altering epigenetic processes [including DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, microRNA (miRNA) regulation] and targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs). These bioactive compounds are able to revert epigenetic alterations in a variety of cancers in vitro and in vivo. They exert anticancer effects by targeting various signaling pathways related to the initiation, progression and metastasis of cancer. It appears that natural products hold great promise for cancer prevention and treatment by altering various epigenetic modifications. This review aims to discuss our current understanding of genetic and epigenetic targets of natural products and the effects of some common natural products on cancer chemoprevention and treatment.

  15. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Matthias R; Joerger, Andreas C; Fersht, Alan R

    2016-09-06

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53's oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1(MET)(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells.

  16. Synthesis and Evaluation of Aminothiazole-Paeonol Derivatives as Potential Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Ying; Kapoor, Mohit; Huang, Ying-Pei; Lin, Hui-Hsien; Liang, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Yu-Ling; Huang, Su-Chin; Liao, Wei-Neng; Chen, Jen-Kun; Huang, Jer-Shing; Hsu, Ming-Hua

    2016-01-26

    In this study, novel aminothiazole-paeonol derivatives were synthesized and characterized using ¹H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, IR, mass spectroscopy, and high performance liquid chromatography. All the new synthesized compounds were evaluated according to their anticancer effect on seven cancer cell lines. The experimental results indicated that these compounds possess high anticancer potential regarding human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS cells) and human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29 cells). Among these compounds, N-[4-(2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-4-methoxybenzenesulfonamide (13c) had the most potent inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 4.0 µM to AGS, 4.4 µM to HT-29 cells and 5.8 µM to HeLa cells. The 4-fluoro-N-[4-(2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)thiazol-2-yl]benzenesulfonamide (13d) was the second potent compound, showing IC50 values of 7.2, 11.2 and 13.8 µM to AGS , HT-29 and HeLa cells, respectively. These compounds are superior to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for relatively higher potency against AGS and HT-29 human cancer cell lines along with lower cytotoxicity to fibroblasts. Novel aminothiazole-paeonol derivatives in this work might be a series of promising lead compounds to develop anticancer agents for treating gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma.

  17. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70–90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2–3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of

  18. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of breast

  19. [Sensitivity of esophageal cancer to anticancer agents and supplementary chemotherapy combined with surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Masaki, Y; Ishigami, K; Oka, M; Matsumoto, N; Honma, K; Uchiyama, T

    1986-04-01

    The authors examined the sensitivities of esophageal cancer to Bleomycin (BLM), Peplomycin (PEP), Cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-FU by the INAS method using 3H-thymidine or 14C-formate as labeled precursors, and determined the concentrations of anticancer agents in cancer lesions by the Band Culture method. On the other hand, the authors investigated the superiority or inferiority of various methods of BLM administration by observing the prevention effect of BLM on the development of experimental esophageal cancer in rats. Forty-three cases out of 76, 57%, showed a sensitivity to BLM, 60% to PEP, 38% to CDDP and 56% to 5-FU. As to the types of roentgenological findings, the superficial and tumorous types showed a high sensitivity rate. As to the types of macroscopical findings, the protruded and superficial types showed a high sensitivity rate. As to the types of histological findings, well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma showed a high sensitivity rate. Sensitivity was higher in metastatic lymph nodes than in main cancer lesions. Tumor tissues which had undergone previous hyperthermic management (at 42 degrees C) showed a higher sensitivity than those which had not. PEP at a half dose brought about the same grade of anticancer effect as BLM. The sensitivities of esophageal cancer to various anticancer agents showed individual differences among clinical cases. Therefore, combination chemotherapy for esophageal cancer was thought to be an effective administration method. The divided administration of small doses of BLM was thought to be more superior than the one-shot administration of a large dose for esophageal cancer. The results of the INAS sensitivity test were perfectly coincident with the effects of chemotherapy in clinical cases of esophageal cancer.

  20. ER maleate is a novel anticancer agent in oral cancer: implications for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guodong; Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Jessa, Fatima; Srivastava, Gunjan; MacMillan, Christina; Witterick, Ian; Walfish, Paul G.; Ralhan, Ranju

    2016-01-01

    ER maleate [10-(3-Aminopropyl)-3, 4-dimethyl-9(10H)-acridinone maleate] identified in a kinome screen was investigated as a novel anticancer agent for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Our aim was to demonstrate its anticancer effects, identify putative molecular targets and determine their clinical relevance and investigate its chemosensitization potential for platinum drugs to aid in OSCC management. Biologic effects of ER maleate were determined using oral cancer cell lines in vitro and oral tumor xenografts in vivo. mRNA profiling, real time PCR and western blot revealed ER maleate modulated the expression of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Their clinical significance was determined in oral SCC patients by immunohistochemistry and correlated with prognosis by Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate Cox regression analyses. ER maleate induced cell apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in oral cancer cells. Imagestream analysis revealed cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and increased polyploidy, unravelling deregulation of cell division and cell death. Mechanistically, ER maleate decreased expression of PLK1 and Syk, induced cleavage of PARP, caspase9 and caspase3, and increased chemosensitivity to carboplatin; significantly suppressed tumor growth and increased antitumor activity of carboplatin in tumor xenografts. ER maleate treated tumor xenografts showed reduced PLK1 and Syk expression. Clinical investigations revealed overexpression of PLK1 and Syk in oral SCC patients that correlated with disease prognosis. Our in vitro and in vivo findings provide a strong rationale for pre-clinical efficacy of ER maleate as a novel anticancer agent and chemosensitizer of platinum drugs for OSCC. PMID:26934445

  1. Highly Adaptable Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells as a Functional Model for Testing Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Balraj; Shamsnia, Anna; Raythatha, Milan R.; Milligan, Ryan D.; Cady, Amanda M.; Madan, Simran; Lucci, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    A major obstacle in developing effective therapies against solid tumors stems from an inability to adequately model the rare subpopulation of panresistant cancer cells that may often drive the disease. We describe a strategy for optimally modeling highly abnormal and highly adaptable human triple-negative breast cancer cells, and evaluating therapies for their ability to eradicate such cells. To overcome the shortcomings often associated with cell culture models, we incorporated several features in our model including a selection of highly adaptable cancer cells based on their ability to survive a metabolic challenge. We have previously shown that metabolically adaptable cancer cells efficiently metastasize to multiple organs in nude mice. Here we show that the cancer cells modeled in our system feature an embryo-like gene expression and amplification of the fat mass and obesity associated gene FTO. We also provide evidence of upregulation of ZEB1 and downregulation of GRHL2 indicating increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition in metabolically adaptable cancer cells. Our results obtained with a variety of anticancer agents support the validity of the model of realistic panresistance and suggest that it could be used for developing anticancer agents that would overcome panresistance. PMID:25279830

  2. Novel C6-substituted 1,3,4-oxadiazinones as potential anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yujin; Yun, Hye Jeong; Min, Hye-Young; Lee, Ho Jin; Pham, Phuong Chi; Moon, Jayoung; Kwon, Dah In; Lim, Bumhee; Suh, Young-Ger; Lee, Jeeyeon; Lee, Ho-Young

    2015-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a membrane receptor tyrosine kinase over-expressed in a number of tumors. However, combating resistance is one of the main challenges in the currently available IGF-1R inhibitor-based cancer therapies. Increased Src activation has been reported to confer resistance to anti-IGF-1R therapeutics in various tumor cells. An urgent unmet need for IGF-1R inhibitors is to suppress Src rephosphorylation induced by current anti-IGF-1R regimens. In efforts to develop effective anticancer agents targeting the IGF-1R signaling pathway, we explored 2-aryl-1,3,4-oxadiazin-5-ones as a novel scaffold that is structurally unrelated to current tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The compound, LL-2003, exhibited promising antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo; it effectively suppressed IGF-1R and Src and induced apoptosis in various non-small cell lung cancer cells. Further optimizations for enhanced potency in cellular assays need to be followed, but our strategy to identify novel IGF-1R/Src inhibitors may open a new avenue to develop more efficient anticancer agents. PMID:26515601

  3. The Anticancer Agent Chaetocin Is a Competitive Substrate and Inhibitor of Thioredoxin Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Tibodeau, Jennifer D.; Benson, Linda M.; Isham, Crescent R.; Owen, Whyte G.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We recently reported that the antineoplastic thiodioxopiperazine natural product chaetocin potently induces cellular oxidative stress, thus selectively killing cancer cells. In pursuit of underlying molecular mechanisms, we now report that chaetocin is a competitive and selective substrate for the oxidative stress mitigation enzyme thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) with lower Km than the TrxR1 native substrate thioredoxin (Trx; chaetocin Km = 4.6 ± 0.6 μM, Trx Km = 104.7 ± 26 μM), thereby attenuating reduction of the critical downstream ROS remediation substrate Trx at achieved intracellular concentrations. Consistent with a role for TrxR1 targeting in the anticancer effects of chaetocin, overexpression of the TrxR1 downstream effector Trx in HeLa cells conferred resistance to chaetocin-induced, but not to doxorubicin-induced, cytotoxicity. As the TrxR/Trx pathway is of central importance in limiting cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS)—and as chaetocin exerts its selective anticancer effects via ROS imposition—the inhibition of TrxR1 by chaetocin has potential to explain its selective anticancer effects. These observations have important implications not just with regard to the mechanism of action and clinical development of chaetocin and related thiodioxopiperazines, but also with regard to the utility of molecular targets within the thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin pathway in the development of novel candidate antineoplastic agents. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 1097–1106. PMID:18999987

  4. Isatin Derived Spirocyclic Analogues with α-Methylene-γ-butyrolactone as Anticancer Agents: A Structure-Activity Relationship Study.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sandeep; Blowers, Elizabeth C; Tebbe, Calvin; Contreras, Jacob I; Radhakrishnan, Prakash; Kizhake, Smitha; Zhou, Tian; Rajule, Rajkumar N; Arnst, Jamie L; Munkarah, Adnan R; Rattan, Ramandeep; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2016-05-26

    Design, synthesis, and evaluation of α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone analogues and their evaluation as anticancer agents is described. SAR identified a spirocyclic analogue 19 that inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB activity, cancer cell growth and tumor growth in an ovarian cancer model. A second iteration of synthesis and screening identified 29 which inhibited cancer cell growth with low-μM potency. Our data suggest that an isatin-derived spirocyclic α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone is a suitable core for optimization to identify novel anticancer agents.

  5. Engineering of bacteria for the visualization of targeted delivery of a cytolytic anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Park, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Hee Jung; Zheng, Jin Hai; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Bom, Hee-Seung; Hong, Yeongjin; Szardenings, Michael; Shin, Myung Geun; Kim, Sun-Chang; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2013-11-01

    A number of recent reports have demonstrated that attenuated Salmonella typhimurium are capable of targeting both primary and metastatic tumors. The use of bacteria as a vehicle for the delivery of anticancer drugs requires a mechanism that precisely regulates and visualizes gene expression to ensure the appropriate timing and location of drug production. To integrate these functions into bacteria, we used a repressor-regulated tetracycline efflux system, in which the expression of a therapeutic gene and an imaging reporter gene were controlled by divergent promoters (tetAP and tetRP) in response to extracellular tetracycline. Attenuated S. typhimurium was transformed with the expression plasmids encoding cytolysin A, a therapeutic gene, and renilla luciferase variant 8, an imaging reporter gene, and administered intravenously to tumor-bearing mice. The engineered Salmonella successfully localized to tumor tissue and gene expression was dependent on the concentration of inducer, indicating the feasibility of peripheral control of bacterial gene expression. The bioluminescence signal permitted the localization of gene expression from the bacteria. The engineered bacteria significantly suppressed both primary and metastatic tumors and prolonged survival in mice. Therefore, engineered bacteria that carry a therapeutic and an imaging reporter gene for targeted anticancer therapy can be designed as a theranostic agent.

  6. Nrf2 activity as a potential biomarker for the pan-epigenetic anticancer agent, RRx-001

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Shoucheng; Sekar, Thillai Veerapazham; Scicinski, Jan; Oronsky, Bryan; Peehl, Donna M.; Knox, Susan J.; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a master regulatory transcription factor that plays an important role in the antioxidant response pathway against anticancer drug-induced cytotoxic effects. RRx-001 is a new anticancer agent that generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and leads to epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. Here we report the RRx-001 mediated nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and the activation of expression of its downstream enzymes HO-1 and NQO1 in tumor cells. Inhibition of intrinsic Nrf2 expression by Nrf2-specific siRNA increased cell sensitivity to RRx-001. Molecular imaging of tumor cells co-expressing pARE-Firefly luciferase and pCMV-Renilla luciferase-mRFP in vitro and in vivo in mice revealed that RRx-001 significantly increased ARE-FLUC signal in cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting that RRx-001 is an effective activator of the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway. The pre-treatment level of ARE-FLUC signal in cells, reflecting basal activity of Nrf2, negatively correlated with the tumor response to RRx-001. The results support the concept that RRx-001 activates Nrf2-ARE antioxidant signaling pathways in tumor cells. Hence measurement of Nrf2-mediated activation of downstream target genes through ARE signaling may constitute a useful molecular biomarker for the early prediction of response to RRx-001 treatment, and thereby guide therapeutic decision-making. PMID:26280276

  7. Natural Product-Derived Spirooxindole Fragments Serve as Privileged Substructures for Discovery of New Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bin; Zheng, Yi-Chao; Shi, Xiao-Jing; Qi, Ping-Ping; Liu, Hong-Min

    2016-01-01

    The utility of natural products for identifying anticancer agents has been highly pursued in the last decades and over 100 drug molecules in clinic are natural products or natural product-derived compounds. Natural products are believed to be able to cover unexplored chemical space that is normally not occupied by commercially available molecule libraries. However, the low abundance and synthetic intractability of natural products have limited their applications in drug discovery. Recently, the identification of biologically relevant fragments derived from biologically validated natural products has been recognized as a powerful strategy in searching new biological probes and drugs. The spirocyclic oxindoles, as privileged structural scaffolds, have shown their potential in designing new drugs. Several anticancer drug candidates such as SAR405838, RO8994, CFI-400945 and their bioisosteres are undergoing clinical trials or preclinical studies. To highlight the significant progress, we focus on illustrating the discovery of SAR405838, RO8994, CFI-400945 and their bioisosteres for cancer therapy using substructure-based strategies and discussing modes of action, binding models and preclinical data.

  8. Withaferin-A--A Natural Anticancer Agent with Pleitropic Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Chul; Choi, Bu Young

    2016-03-04

    Cancer, being the second leading cause of mortality, exists as a formidable health challenge. In spite of our enormous efforts, the emerging complexities in the molecular nature of disease progression limit the real success in finding an effective cancer cure. It is now conceivable that cancer is, in fact, a progressive illness, and the morbidity and mortality from cancer can be reduced by interfering with various oncogenic signaling pathways. A wide variety of structurally diverse classes of bioactive phytochemicals have been shown to exert anticancer effects in a large number of preclinical studies. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that withaferin-A can prevent the development of cancers of various histotypes. Accumulating data from different rodent models and cell culture experiments have revealed that withaferin-A suppresses experimentally induced carcinogenesis, largely by virtue of its potent anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing properties. Moreover, withaferin-A sensitizes resistant cancer cells to existing chemotherapeutic agents. The purpose of this review is to highlight the mechanistic aspects underlying anticancer effects of withaferin-A.

  9. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Erlotinib–NSAID Conjugates as More Comprehensive Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel anticancer agents were designed and synthesized based on coupling of different nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with the epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, erlotinib. Both the antiproliferative and pharmacokinetic activity of the target compounds were evaluated using HCC827 and A431 tumor cell lines. Among the derivatives made, compounds 10a, 10c, and 21g showed superb potency, comparable to that of erlotinib. Furthermore, preliminary SAR analysis showed that when the NSAIDs were conjugated via linkage to C-6 OH versus linkage to C-7 OH of the quinazoline nucleus, superior anticancer activity was achieved. Finally, the in vitro pharmacokinetic profile of several conjugates demonstrated the desired dissociation kinetics as the coupled molecules were effectively hydrolyzed, releasing both erlotinib and the specific NSAID in a time-dependent manner. The conjugation strategy represents a unique and simplified approach toward combination therapy, particularly for the treatment of cancers where both EGFR overexpression and inflammation play a direct role in disease progression. PMID:26487917

  10. Organogold(III) compounds as experimental anticancer agents: chemical and biological profiles.

    PubMed

    Massai, Lara; Cirri, Damiano; Michelucci, Elena; Bartoli, Gianluca; Guerri, Annalisa; Cinellu, Maria A; Cocco, Fabio; Gabbiani, Chiara; Messori, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    In the last few years gold(III) complexes have attracted growing attention in the medicinal chemistry community as candidate anticancer agents. In particular some organogold(III) compounds manifested quite attractive pharmacological behaviors in preclinical studies. Here we compare the chemical and biological properties of the novel organogold(III) complex [Au(bipy(dmb)-H)(NH(CO)CH3)][PF6] (Aubipy(aa)) with those of its parent compounds [Au(bipy(dmb)-H)(OH)][PF6] (Aubipy(c)) and [Au2(bipy(dmb)-H)2)(μ-O)][PF6]2 (Au2bipy(c)), previously synthesized and characterized. The three study compounds were comparatively assessed for their antiproliferative actions against HCT-116 cancer cells, revealing moderate cytotoxic effects. Proapoptotic and cell cycle effects were also monitored. Afterward, to gain additional mechanistic insight, the three gold compounds were challenged against the model proteins HEWL, RNase A and cytochrome c and reactions investigated through UV-Vis and ESI-MS analysis. A peculiar and roughly invariant protein metalation profile emerges in the three cases consisting of protein binding of {Au(bipy(dmb)-H)} moieties. The implications of these results are discussed in the frame of current knowledge on anticancer gold compounds.

  11. HB-EGF inhibition in combination with various anticancer agents enhances its antitumor effects in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanui, Ayako; Yotsumoto, Fusanori; Tsujioka, Hiroshi; Fukami, Tatsuya; Horiuchi, Shinji; Shirota, Kyoko; Yoshizato, Toshiyuki; Kawarabayashi, Tatsuhiko; Kuroki, Masahide; Miyamoto, Shingo

    2010-08-01

    Advanced gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most lethal malignancies. Although many anticancer agents exist for the treatment of GC, its prognosis remains extremely poor. Therefore, further development of targeted therapies is required for patients with GC. To assess the role of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) as a target for GC therapy, the expression of EGF receptor ligands in GC cell lines, and the antitumor effects of an HB-EGF inhibitor (CRM197) as a single agent and in combination with other anticancer agents was assessed in GC cells. HB-EGF was the predominantly expressed ligand among EGF receptor ligands in all the cells. CRM197 induced significant cell apoptosis. Anticancer agents augmented the secretion of HB-EGF into the medium and simultaneously induced cell apoptosis. Combination of CRM197 with other anticancer agents significantly enhanced cell apoptosis. Additionally, co-administration of CRM197 and paclitaxel resulted in synergistic antitumor effects. These results suggested that HB-EGF is a rational target for GC therapy.

  12. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—Propranolol as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Pantziarka, Pan; Bouche, Gauthier; Sukhatme, Vidula; Meheus, Lydie; Rooman, Ilse; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2016-01-01

    Propranolol (PRO) is a well-known and widely used non-selective beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist (beta-blocker), with a range of actions which are of interest in an oncological context. PRO displays effects on cellular proliferation and invasion, on the immune system, on the angiogenic cascade, and on tumour cell sensitivity to existing treatments. Both pre-clinical and clinical evidence of these effects, in multiple cancer types, is assessed and summarised and relevant mechanisms of action outlined. In particular there is evidence that PRO is effective at multiple points in the metastatic cascade, particularly in the context of the post-surgical wound response. Based on this evidence the case is made for further clinical investigation of the anticancer effects of PRO, particularly in combination with other agents. A number of trials are on-going, in different treatment settings for various cancers. PMID:27899953

  13. Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases associated with molecular-targeted anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Gemma, Akihiko

    2009-02-01

    Little was known about drug-induced interstitial lung disease (ILD) when acute ILD-type events developed in several Japanese patients treated with gefitinib. A better understanding of drug-induced ILD is required, including more reliable data about the incidence of events associated with different treatments and identification of the risk factors for this type of ILD. Recent advances in imaging, molecular examination, and pathology have been used in postmarketing surveillance studies designed and conducted by an independent academic team to define the risk and to increase the amount of evidence about ILD related to various molecularly targeted anticancer agents. These studies may shed light on the underlying mechanisms of drug-induced ILD and appropriate evidence-based strategies that can be used to prevent or manage these events.

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of pyrazole derivatives containing thiourea skeleton as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Lv, Peng-Cheng; Li, Huan-Qiu; Sun, Juan; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2010-07-01

    Two series of pyrazole derivatives designing for potential EGFR kinase inhibitors have been discovered. Some of them exhibited significant EGFR inhibitory activity. Compound 3-(3,4-dimethylphenyl)-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carbothioamide (C5) displayed the most potent EGFR inhibitory activity with IC₅₀ of 0.07 μM, which was comparable to the positive control erlotinib. Docking simulation was performed to position compound C5 into the EGFR active site to determine the probable binding model. Antiproliferative assay results indicating that some of the pyrazole derivatives own high antiproliferative activity against MCF-7. Compound C5 showed significant antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 with IC₅₀ of 0.08 μM. Therefore, compound C5 with potent inhibitory activity in tumor growth inhibition would be a potential anticancer agent.

  15. Novel anticancer agent, SQAP, binds to focal adhesion kinase and modulates its activity

    PubMed Central

    Izaguirre-Carbonell, Jesus; Kawakubo, Hirofumi; Murata, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Toshifumi; Kusayanagi, Tomoe; Tsukuda, Senko; Hirakawa, Takeshi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Miura, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Sahara, Hiroeki; Kamisuki, Shinji; Sugawara, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    SQAP is a novel and promising anticancer agent that was obtained by structural modifications from a natural compound. SQAP inhibits angiogenesis in vivo resulting in increased hypoxia and reduced tumor volume. In this study, the mechanism by which SQAP modifies the tumor microenvironment was revealed through the application of a T7 phage display screening. This approach identified five SQAP-binding proteins including sterol carrier protein 2, multifunctional enzyme type 2, proteasomal ubiquitin receptor, UV excision repair protein and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). All the interactions were confirmed by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Since FAK plays an important role in cell turnover and angiogenesis, the influence of SQAP on FAK was the principal goal of this study. SQAP decreased FAK phosphorylation and cell migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and A549 cancer cells. These findings suggest that inhibition of FAK phosphorylation works as the mechanism for the anti-angiogenesis activity of SQAP. PMID:26456697

  16. Structure-activity analysis of 2'-modified cinnamaldehyde analogues as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Gan, Fei Fei; Chua, Yee Shin; Scarmagnani, Silvia; Palaniappan, Puvithira; Franks, Mark; Poobalasingam, Thurka; Bradshaw, Tracey D; Westwell, Andrew D; Hagen, Thilo

    2009-10-02

    The natural product 2'-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (HCA) and its analogue, 2'-benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde (BCA), have been previously shown to have antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in vitro and inhibit tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we use structure-activity analysis to define structural features that are important for the activity of cinnamaldehyde analogues. Our results emphasize an important role for both the propenal group as well as the modification at the 2'-position. Further studies were aimed to characterize the mechanism of action of BCA. Exposure to BCA induced cell death via caspase-dependent and -independent pathways. Cell death was not due to autophagy or necrosis as a result of energy depletion or induction of reactive oxygen species. Our findings have important implications for future drug design and highlight the importance of defining molecular drug targets for this promising class of potential anticancer agents.

  17. Investigation of Degradation Properties of Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) Matrix for Anticancer Agent Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Ghani, S. M.; Mohamed, M. S. W.; Yahya, A. F.; Noorsal, K.

    2010-03-11

    Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)(PLA{sub 50}GA{sub 50}) is a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer. It offers tremendous potential as a basis for drug delivery, either as drug delivery system alone or in conjugate with a medical device. The PLA{sub 50}GA{sub 50} is the material of choice for relatively shorter-duration applications, while the homopolymer PLA (poly-L-lactide) and PGA (polyglycolide) are preferred for longer term delivery of drugs. This paper discusses the degradation properties of poly(lactide-co-glycolide)(PLA{sub 50}GA{sub 50}) at inherent viscosity of 0.89 dL/g as preliminary studies for anticancer agent delivery.

  18. Molecular Basis for the Inhibition of Human NMPRTase, a Novel Target for Anticancer Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Khan,J.; Tao, X.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NMPRTase) has a crucial role in the salvage pathway of NAD{sup +} biosynthesis, and a potent inhibitor of NMPRTase, FK866, can reduce cellular NAD+ levels and induce apoptosis in tumors. We have determined the crystal structures at up to 2.1-Angstroms resolution of human and murine NMPRTase, alone and in complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide or the inhibitor FK866. The structures suggest that Asp219 is a determinant of substrate specificity of NMPRTase, which is confirmed by our mutagenesis studies. FK866 is bound in a tunnel at the interface of the NMPRTase dimer, and mutations in this binding site can abolish the inhibition by FK866. Contrary to current knowledge, the structures show that FK866 should compete directly with the nicotinamide substrate. Our structural and biochemical studies provide a starting point for the development of new anticancer agents.

  19. Importance of influx and efflux systems and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in intratumoral disposition of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rochat, B

    2009-08-01

    In this review, intratumoral drug disposition will be integrated into the wide range of resistance mechanisms to anticancer agents with particular emphasis on targeted protein kinase inhibitors. Six rules will be established: 1. There is a high variability of extracellular/intracellular drug level ratios; 2. There are three main systems involved in intratumoral drug disposition that are composed of SLC, ABC and XME enzymes; 3. There is a synergistic interplay between these three systems; 4. In cancer subclones, there is a strong genomic instability that leads to a highly variable expression of SLC, ABC or XME enzymes; 5. Tumor-expressed metabolizing enzymes play a role in tumor-specific ADME and cell survival and 6. These three systems are involved in the appearance of resistance (transient event) or in the resistance itself. In addition, this article will investigate whether the overexpression of some ABC and XME systems in cancer cells is just a random consequence of DNA/chromosomal instability, hypo- or hypermethylation and microRNA deregulation, or a more organized modification induced by transposable elements. Experiments will also have to establish if these tumor-expressed enzymes participate in cell metabolism or in tumor-specific ADME or if they are only markers of clonal evolution and genomic deregulation. Eventually, the review will underline that the fate of anticancer agents in cancer cells should be more thoroughly investigated from drug discovery to clinical studies. Indeed, inhibition of tumor expressed metabolizing enzymes could strongly increase drug disposition, specifically in the target cells resulting in more efficient therapies.

  20. [Visualization and analysis of adverse reactions of molecularly targeted anticancer agents using the self-organizing map (SOM)].

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Tomoyuki; Serizawa, Ayaka; Ohtsuki, Kaori; Kawakami, Junko; Sato, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Molecularly targeted anticancer agents cause a variety of adverse reactions compared with conventional anticancer agents because of their unique mechanisms of action. Sources of drug information such as package inserts (PIs) provide primarily document-based and numerical information. Therefore it is not easy to obtain a complete picture of drugs with similar effects, or to understand differences among drugs. In this study we used the self-organizing map (SOM) technique to visualize the adverse reactions indicated on PIs of 23 molecularly targeted anticancer agents as of March 2013. In both the presence/absence version and the frequency version, SOM was divided into domains according to mechanism of action, antibody drug or low-molecular weight drug, and molecular target. The component planes of the 753 adverse reaction items in the frequency version enabled us to grasp all available information and differences among the drugs. In some component planes in the presence/absence version, an adverse reaction that had not been reported for a drug but had already been reported for its proximally positioned drug(s) as of March 2013, was found to be reported thereafter by the Drug Safety Update (DSU) or the Adverse Event Report Search System "CzeekV," which is based on FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). Our results suggest that visualization of the adverse reactions of molecularly targeted anticancer agents by the SOM technique is useful not only to acquire all available information and differences among drugs, but also to predict the appearance of adverse reactions.

  1. Dietary polyphenols as antioxidants and anticancer agents: more questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Miao-Lin

    2011-01-01

    High intake of fruit and vegetables is believed to be beneficial to human health. Fruit, vegetables and some beverages, such as tea and coffee, are particularly rich in dietary polyphenols. Various studies have suggested (but not proven) that dietary polyphenols may protect against cardiovasucalar diseases, neurodegenerative diseases and some forms of cancer. Dietary polyphenols may exert their anticancer effects through several possible mechanisms, such as removal of carcinogenic agents, modulation of cancer cell signaling and antioxidant enzymatic activities, and induction of apoptosis as well as cell cycle arrest. Some of these effects may be related, at least partly, to their antioxidant activities. In recent years, a new concept of the antioxidant effects of dietary polyphenols has emerged, i.e., direct scavenging activity toward reactive species and indirect antioxidant activity; the latter activity is thought to arise primarily via the activation of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 which stimulates the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase, catalase, NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1), and/or phase II enzymes. The direct antioxidant activity of dietary polyphenols in vivo is probably limited because of their low concentrations in vivo, except in the gastrointestinal tract where they are present in high concentrations. Paradoxically, the pro-oxidant effect of dietary polyphenols may contribute to the activation of antioxidant enzymes and protective proteins in cultured cells and animal models because of the adaptation of cells and tissues to mild/moderate oxidative stress. Despite a plethora of in vitro studies on dietary polyphenols, many questions remain to be answered, such as: (1) How relevant are the direct and indirect antioxidant activities of dietary polyphenols in vivo? (2) How important are these activities in the anticancer effects of dietary polyphenols? (3) Do the pro

  2. Novel glyoxalase-I inhibitors possessing a “zinc-binding feature” as potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Al-Balas, Qosay A; Hassan, Mohammad A; Al-Shar’i, Nizar A; Mhaidat, Nizar M; Almaaytah, Ammar M; Al-Mahasneh, Fatima M; Isawi, Israa H

    2016-01-01

    Background The glyoxalase system including two thiol-dependent enzymes, glyoxalase I (Glo-I) and glyoxalase II, plays an important role in a ubiquitous metabolic pathway involved in cellular detoxification of cytotoxic 2-oxoaldehydes. Tumor cells have high glycolytic activity, leading to increased cellular levels of these toxic metabolites. The increased activity of the detoxification system in cancerous cells makes this pathway a viable target for developing novel anticancer agents. In this study, we examined the potential utility of non-glutathione-based inhibitors of the Glo-I enzyme as novel anticancer drugs. Methods Computer-aided drug design techniques, such as customized pharmacophoric features, virtual screening, and flexible docking, were used to achieve the project goals. Retrieved hits were extensively filtered and subsequently docked into the active site of the enzyme. The biological activities of retrieved hits were assessed using an in vitro assay against Glo-I. Results Since Glo-I is a zinc metalloenzyme, a customized Zn-binding pharmacophoric feature was used to search for selective inhibitors via virtual screening of a small-molecule database. Seven hits were selected, purchased, and biologically evaluated. Three of the seven hits inhibited Glo-I activity, the most effective of which exerted 76.4% inhibition at a concentration of 25 µM. Conclusion We successfully identified a potential Glo-I inhibitor that can serve as a lead compound for further optimization. Moreover, our in silico and experimental results were highly correlated. Hence, the docking protocol adopted in this study may be efficiently employed in future optimization steps. PMID:27574401

  3. Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes as mitochondria-targeted two-photon photodynamic anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangping; Chen, Yu; Li, Guanying; Zhang, Pingyu; Jin, Chengzhi; Zeng, Leli; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Clinical acceptance of photodynamic therapy is currently hindered by poor depth efficacy and inefficient activation of the cell death machinery in cancer cells during treatment. To address these issues, photoactivation using two-photon absorption (TPA) is currently being examined. Mitochondria-targeted therapy represents a promising approach to target tumors selectively and may overcome the resistance in current anticancer therapies. Herein, four ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes (RuL1-RuL4) have been designed and developed to act as mitochondria-targeted two-photon photodynamic anticancer agents. These complexes exhibit very high singlet oxygen quantum yields in methanol (0.74-0.81), significant TPA cross sections (124-198 GM), remarkable mitochondrial accumulation, and deep penetration depth. Thus, RuL1-RuL4 were utilized as one-photon and two-photon absorbing photosensitizers in both monolayer cells and 3D multicellular spheroids (MCSs). These Ru(II) complexes were almost nontoxic towards cells and 3D MCSs in the dark and generate sufficient singlet oxygen under one- and two-photon irradiation to trigger cell death. Remarkably, RuL4 exhibited an IC50 value as low as 9.6 μM in one-photon PDT (λirr = 450 nm, 12 J cm(-2)) and 1.9 μM in two-photon PDT (λirr = 830 nm, 800 J cm(-2)) of 3D MCSs; moreover, RuL4 is an order of magnitude more toxic than cisplatin in the latter test system. The combination of mitochondria-targeting and two-photon activation provides a valuable paradigm to develop ruthenium(II) complexes for PDT applications.

  4. The interactions of anticancer agents with tea catechins: current evidence from preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Shang, Weihu; Lu, Weidong; Han, Mei; Qiao, Jinping

    2014-01-01

    Tea catechins exhibit a broad range of pharmacological activities that impart beneficial effects on human health. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), one of the major tea catechins, has been widely associated with cancer prevention and treatment. In addition, tea catechins in combination with anticancer drugs are being evaluated as a new cancer treatment strategy. However, the interactions of anticancer drugs with tea catechins are largely unknown. Accumulated data indicate significant interactions between anticancer drugs and tea catechins, such as synergistic tumor inhibition or antagonist activity. Therefore, it is critical to understand comprehensively the effects of tea catechins on anticancer drugs. Focusing on evidence from preclinical studies, this paper will review the interactions between anticancer drugs and tea catechins, including pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics effects. We hope that by detailing the interactions between anticancer drugs and tea catechins, more attention will be directed to this important therapeutic combination in the future.

  5. The role of human cytochrome P450 enzymes in the metabolism of anticancer agents: implications for drug interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Kivistö, K T; Kroemer, H K; Eichelbaum, M

    1995-01-01

    1. Little information is available about the pharmacokinetic interactions of anticancer drugs in man. However, clinically significant drug interactions do occur in cancer chemotherapy, and it is likely that important interactions have not been recognized. 2. Specific cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes have been recently shown to be involved in the metabolism of several essential anticancer agents. In particular, enzymes of the CYP3A subfamily play a role in the metabolism of many anticancer drugs, including epipodophyllotoxins, ifosphamide, tamoxifen, taxol and vinca alkaloids. CYP3A4 has been shown to catalyse the activation of the prodrug ifosphamide, raising the possibility that ifosphamide could be activated in tumour tissues containing this enzyme. 3. As examples of recently found, clinically significant interactions, cyclosporin considerably increases plasma doxorubicin and etoposide concentrations. Although cyclosporin and calcium channel blockers may influence the pharmacokinetics of certain anticancer agents by inhibiting their CYP3A mediated metabolism, it is more likely that these P-glycoprotein inhibitors inhibit P-glycoprotein mediated drug elimination. 4. Appropriate caution should be exercised when combining P-glycoprotein inhibitors and potential CYP3A inhibitors with cancer chemotherapy. PMID:8703657

  6. Rescuing chemotaxis of the anticancer agent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium VNP20009.

    PubMed

    Broadway, Katherine M; Denson, Elizabeth A P; Jensen, Roderick V; Scharf, Birgit E

    2015-10-10

    The role of chemotaxis and motility in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium tumor colonization remains unclear. We determined through swim plate assays that the well-established anticancer agent S. Typhimurium VNP20009 is deficient in chemotaxis, and that this phenotype is suppressible. Through genome sequencing, we revealed that VNP20009 and four selected suppressor mutants had a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in cheY causing a mutation in the conserved proline residue at position 110. CheY is the response regulator that interacts with the flagellar motor-switch complex and modulates rotational bias. The four suppressor mutants additionally carried non-synonymous SNPs in fliM encoding a flagellar switch protein. The CheY-P110S mutation in VNP20009 likely rendered the protein unable to interact with FliM, a phenotype that could be suppressed by mutations in FliM. We replaced the mutated cheY in VNP20009 with the wild-type copy and chemotaxis was partially restored. The swim ring of the rescued strain, VNP20009 cheY(+), was 46% the size of the parental strain 14028 swim ring. When tested in capillary assays, VNP20009 cheY(+) was 69% efficient in chemotaxis towards the attractant aspartate as compared to 14028. Potential reasons for the lack of complete restoration and implications for bacterial tumor colonization will be discussed.

  7. Microencapsulation of lectin anti-cancer agent and controlled release by alginate beads, biosafety approach.

    PubMed

    El-Aassar, M R; Hafez, Elsayed E; El-Deeb, Nehal M; Fouda, Moustafa M G

    2014-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is considered as one of the most aggressive cancer worldwide. In Egypt, the prevalence of HCC is increasing during last years. Recently, drug-loaded microparticles were used to improve the efficiency of various medical treatments. This study is designed to evaluate the anticancer potentialities of lectins against HCC while hinting to its safety usage. The aim is also extended to encapsulate lectins in alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery purposes. The extracted lectins showed anti-proliferative effect against HCC with a percentage of 60.76% by using its nontoxic dose with an up-regulation of P53 gene expression. Concerning the handling of lectin alginate microbeads for oral drug delivery, the prepared lectin alginate beads were ∼100μm in diameter. The efficiency of the microcapsules was checked by scanning electron microscopy, the SEM showed the change on the alginate beads surface revealing the successful lectin encapsulation. The release of lectins from the microbeads depended on a variety of factors as the microbeads forming carriers and the amount-encapsulated lectins. The Pisum sativum extracted lectins may be considered as a promising agent in controlling HCC and this solid dosage form could be suitable for oral administration complemented with/or without the standard HCC drugs.

  8. The flavonoid fisetin as an anticancer agent targeting the growth signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Rengarajan, Thamaraiselvan; Yaacob, Nik Soriani

    2016-10-15

    Epidemiological studies show that consumption of diets rich in fruits and vegetables is associated with lower risks of cancer. This evidence has kindled interest into research on bioactive food components and has till date resulted in the identification of many compounds with cancer preventive and therapeutic potential. Among such compounds is fisetin (3,7,3,4-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonol that is commonly found in many fruits and vegetables such as apples, persimmons, grapes, kiwis, strawberries, onions and cucumbers. Fisetin has been shown to inhibit or retard the growth of various cancer cells in culture and implanted tumors in vivo. Fisetin targets many components of intracellular signaling pathways including regulators of cell survival and apoptosis, tumor angiogenic and metastatic switches by modulating a distinct set of upstream kinases, transcription factors and their regulators. Current evidence supports the idea that fisetin is a promising agent for cancer treatment. This review summarizes reported anticancer effects of fisetin, and re-emphasizes its potential therapeutic role in the treatment of cancer.

  9. Treatment Strategies that Enhance the Efficacy and Selectivity of Mitochondria-Targeted Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Modica-Napolitano, Josephine S.; Weissig, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Nearly a century has passed since Otto Warburg first observed high rates of aerobic glycolysis in a variety of tumor cell types and suggested that this phenomenon might be due to an impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity in these cells. Subsequently, much has been written about the role of mitochondria in the initiation and/or progression of various forms of cancer, and the possibility of exploiting differences in mitochondrial structure and function between normal and malignant cells as targets for cancer chemotherapy. A number of mitochondria-targeted compounds have shown efficacy in selective cancer cell killing in pre-clinical and early clinical testing, including those that induce mitochondria permeability transition and apoptosis, metabolic inhibitors, and ROS regulators. To date, however, none has exhibited the standards for high selectivity and efficacy and low toxicity necessary to progress beyond phase III clinical trials and be used as a viable, single modality treatment option for human cancers. This review explores alternative treatment strategies that have been shown to enhance the efficacy and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents in vitro and in vivo, and may yet fulfill the clinical promise of exploiting the mitochondrion as a target for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26230693

  10. Fanconi anemia D2 protein confers chemoresistance in response to the anticancer agent, irofulven.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutian; Wiltshire, Timothy; Senft, Jamie; Wenger, Sharon L; Reed, Eddie; Wang, Weixin

    2006-12-01

    The Fanconi anemia-BRCA pathway of genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically repressed in human cancer. The proteins of this pathway play pivotal roles in DNA damage signaling and repair. Irofulven is one of a new class of anticancer agents that are analogues of mushroom-derived illudin toxins. Preclinical studies and clinical trials have shown that irofulven is effective against several tumor cell types. The exact nature of irofulven-induced DNA damage is not completely understood. Previously, we have shown that irofulven activates ATM and its targets, NBS1, SMC1, CHK2, and p53. In this study, we hypothesize that irofulven induces DNA double-strand breaks and FANCD2 may play an important role in modulating cellular responses and chemosensitivity in response to irofulven treatment. By using cells that are proficient or deficient for FANCD2, ATR, or ATM, we showed that irofulven induces FANCD2 monoubiquitination and nuclear foci formation. ATR is important in mediating irofulven-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination. Furthermore, we showed that FANCD2 plays a critical role in maintaining chromosome integrity and modulating chemosensitivity in response to irofulven-induced DNA damage. Therefore, this study suggests that it might be clinically significant to target irofulven therapy to cancers defective for proteins of the Fanconi anemia-BRCA pathway.

  11. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—diclofenac as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Pantziarka, Pan; Sukhatme, Vidula; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2016-01-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is a well-known and widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with a range of actions which are of interest in an oncological context. While there has long been an interest in the use of NSAIDs in chemoprevention, there is now emerging evidence that such drugs may have activity in a treatment setting. DCF, which is a potent inhibitor of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 synthesis, displays a range of effects on the immune system, the angiogenic cascade, chemo- and radio-sensitivity and tumour metabolism. Both pre-clinical and clinical evidence of these effects, in multiple cancer types, is assessed and summarised and relevant mechanisms of action outlined. Based on this evidence the case is made for further clinical investigation of the anticancer effects of DCF, particularly in combination with other agents - with a range of possible multi-drug and multi-modality combinations outlined in the supplementary materials accompanying the main paper. PMID:26823679

  12. Parthenium hysterophorus: A Probable Source of Anticancer, Antioxidant and Anti-HIV Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashank; Chashoo, Gousia; Saxena, Ajit K.; Pandey, Abhay K.

    2013-01-01

    The present work reports the anticancer, antioxidant, lipo-protective, and anti-HIV activities of phytoconstituents present in P. hysterophorus leaf. Dried leaf samples were sequentially extracted with nonpolar and polar solvents. Ethanol fraction showed noticeable cytotoxic activity (81–85%) in SRB assay against MCF-7 and THP-1 cancer cell lines at 100 μg/ml concentration, while lower activity was observed with DU-145 cell line. The same extract exhibited 17–98% growth inhibition of HL-60 cancer cell lines in MTT assay, showing concentration dependent response. Ethanol extract caused 12% reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and 10% increment in sub G1 population of HL-60 cell lines. Several leaf fractions, namely, ethyl acetate, ethanol, and aqueous fractions exhibited considerable reducing capability at higher concentrations. Most of the extracts demonstrated appreciable (>75%) metal ion chelating and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities at 200 µg/ml. All the extracts except aqueous fraction accounted for about 70–80% inhibition of lipid peroxidation in rat liver homogenate indicating protective response against membrane damage. About 40% inhibition of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity was observed in hexane fraction in anti-HIV assay at 6.0 µg/ml concentration. The study showed that phytochemicals present in P. hysterophorus leaf have considerable potential as cytotoxic and antioxidant agents with low to moderate anti-HIV activity. PMID:24350290

  13. Synergistic Anticancer Effect of Tocotrienol Combined with Chemotherapeutic Agents or Dietary Components: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Eitsuka, Takahiro; Tatewaki, Naoto; Nishida, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    Tocotrienol (T3), unsaturated vitamin E, is gaining a lot of attention owing to its potent anticancer effect, since its efficacy is much greater than that of tocopherol (Toc). Various factors are known to be involved in such antitumor action, including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction, antiangiogenesis, anti-metastasis, nuclear factor-κB suppression, and telomerase inhibition. Owing to a difference in the affinity of T3 and Toc for the α-tocopherol transfer protein, the bioavailability of orally ingested T3 is lower than that of Toc. Furthermore, cellular uptake of T3 is interrupted by coadministration of α-Toc in vitro and in vivo. Based on this, several studies are in progress to screen for molecules that can synergize with T3 in order to augment its potency. Combinations of T3 with chemotherapeutic drugs (e.g., statins, celecoxib, and gefitinib) or dietary components (e.g., polyphenols, sesamin, and ferulic acid) exhibit synergistic actions on cancer cell growth and signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize the current status of synergistic effects of T3 and an array of agents on cancer cells, and discuss their molecular mechanisms of action. These combination strategies would encourage further investigation and application in cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:27669218

  14. Recent developments in L-asparaginase discovery and its potential as anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Abhinav; Khan, Abdul Arif; Khurshid, Mohsin; Kalam, Mohd Abul; Jain, Sudhir K; Singhal, Pradeep K

    2016-04-01

    L-Asparaginase (EC3.5.1.1) is an enzyme, which is used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and other related blood cancers from a long time. This enzyme selectively hydrolyzes the extracellular amino acid L-asparagine into L-aspartate and ammonia, leading to nutritional deficiencies, protein synthesis inhibition, and ultimately death of lymphoblastic cells by apoptosis. Currently, bacterial asparaginases are used for treatment purpose but offers scepticism due to a number of toxicities, including thrombosis, pancreatitis, hyperglycemia, and hepatotoxicity. Resistance towards bacterial asparaginase is another major disadvantage during cancer management. This situation attracted attention of researchers towards alternative sources of L-asparaginase, including plants and fungi. Present article discusses about potential of L-asparaginase as an anticancer agent, its mechanism of action, and adverse effects related to current asparaginase formulations. This article also provides an outlook for recent developments in L-asparaginase discovery from alternative sources and their potential as a less toxic alternative to current formulations.

  15. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery & development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. The conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. The importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. The most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. The factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery & development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials. PMID:26779369

  16. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Genistein Analogues as Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Pahoua; Wang, Rubing; Zhang, Xiaojie; Torre, Eduardo DeLa; Leon, Francisco; Zhang, Qiang; Zheng, Shilong; Wang, Guangdi; Chen, Qiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a bioactive isoflavone derived from soybeans. The tie-in between the intake of genistein and the decreased incidence of some solid tumors (including prostate cancer) has been demonstrated by epidemiological studies. The potential of genistein in treating prostate cancer has also been displayed by in vitro cell-based and in vivo animal experiments. Genistein has entered clinical trials for both chemoprevention and potential treatment of prostate cancer. Even though the low oral bioavailability has presented the major challenges to genistein’s further clinical development, chemical modulation of genistein holds the promise to generate potential anti-prostate cancer agents with enhanced potency and/or better pharmacokinetic profiles than genistein. As part of our ongoing project to develop natural products-based anti-prostate cancer agents, the current study was undertaken to synthesize eight genistein analogues for cytotoxic evaluation in three prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3, DU-145, LNCaP; both androgen-sensitive and androgen-refractory cell lines), as well as one aggressive cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). Eight genistein analogues have been successfully synthesized with Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction as a key step. Their in vitro anti-cancer potential was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion assay and WST-1 cell proliferation assay against a panel of four human cancer cell lines. The acquired data suggest i) that the C-5 and C-7 hydroxyl groups in genistein are very important for the cytotoxicity and anti-proliferative activity; and ii) that 1-alkyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl and pyridine-3-yl might act as good bioisosteres for the 4'-hydroxyphenyl moiety in genistein. PMID:25991428

  17. Protective effects and mechanisms of curcumin on podophyllotoxin toxicity in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Juan; Dai, Cai-Xia; Sun, Hua; Jin, Lu; Guo, Chong-Yi; Cao, Wei; Wu, Jie; Tian, Hai-Yan; Luo, Cheng; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2012-12-01

    Podophyllotoxin (POD) is a naturally occurring lignan with pronounced antineoplastic and antiviral properties. POD binds to tubulin and prevents the formation of mitotic spindle. Although cases of overdose or accidental ingestion are quite often, no specific therapy is currently available to treat the POD intoxication. In the current investigation, the protective effects and mechanisms of curcumin (CUR) on podophyllotoxin toxicity were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that CUR could protect POD-induced cytotoxicity by recovering the G2/M arrest and decrease the changes of membrane potential and microtubule structure in Vero cells. A significant decrease of mortality rates was observed in Swiss mice treated by intragastrical administration of POD + CUR as compared with POD alone. The POD + CUR group also exhibited decreases in plasma transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, plasma urea, creatinine and malondialdehyde level but elevated superoxide dismutase and glutathione levels as compared to the POD group. Histological examination of the liver and kidney demonstrated less morphological changes in the treatment of POD + CUR as compared with POD alone. The mechanism of the protective effects might be due to the competitive binding of CUR with POD in the same colchicines binding site as revealed by the tubulin polymerization assay and the molecular docking analysis, and the antioxidant activity against the oxidative stress induced by POD. In summary, both in vitro and in vivo data indicated the promising role of CUR as a protective agent against the POD poisoning. Highlights: ► A potential antidote to treat the podophyllotoxin (POD) intoxication is found. ► Curcumin showed promising effects against POD poisoning in vitro and in vivo. ► The mechanisms lie in the antioxidant activity and competitive binding with tubulin.

  18. Rational design of biaryl pharmacophore inserted noscapine derivatives as potent tubulin binding anticancer agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoshi, Seneha; Manchukonda, Naresh Kumar; Suri, Charu; Sharma, Manya; Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Joseph, Silja; Lopus, Manu; Kantevari, Srinivas; Baitharu, Iswar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-03-01

    evaluation. Treatment of mice with a daily dose of 300 mg/kg and a single dose of 600 mg/kg indicates that the compound does not induce detectable pathological abnormalities in normal tissues. Also there were no significant differences in hematological parameters between the treated and untreated groups. Hence, the newly designed noscapinoid, 5e is an orally bioavailable, safe and effective anticancer agent with a potential for the treatment of cancer and might be a candidate for clinical evaluation.

  19. Immune mechanisms regulating pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of PEGylated liposomal anticancer agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gina

    integrated approaches, we were able to identify the immunological mechanisms at the molecular, tissue, and clinical levels that may contribute to inter-individual variability in PK and PD of PLD. This dissertation research has a potential to make an impact on development of future NP-based anticancer therapeutics as well as on clinical use of PLD (DoxilRTM) and other PEGylated liposomal anticancer agents.

  20. Rational design of biaryl pharmacophore inserted noscapine derivatives as potent tubulin binding anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Santoshi, Seneha; Manchukonda, Naresh Kumar; Suri, Charu; Sharma, Manya; Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Joseph, Silja; Lopus, Manu; Kantevari, Srinivas; Baitharu, Iswar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-03-01

    toxicological evaluation. Treatment of mice with a daily dose of 300 mg/kg and a single dose of 600 mg/kg indicates that the compound does not induce detectable pathological abnormalities in normal tissues. Also there were no significant differences in hematological parameters between the treated and untreated groups. Hence, the newly designed noscapinoid, 5e is an orally bioavailable, safe and effective anticancer agent with a potential for the treatment of cancer and might be a candidate for clinical evaluation.

  1. Novel linear and step-gradient counter-current chromatography for bio-guided isolation and purification of cytotoxic podophyllotoxins from Dysosma versipellis (Hance).

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Liu, Xiaoman; Wang, Kuiwu; Cao, Xiaoji; Wu, Shihua

    2013-03-01

    Dysosma versipellis (Hance) is a famous traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of snakebite, weakness, condyloma accuminata, lymphadenopathy, and tumors for thousands of years. In this work, four podophyllotoxin-like lignans including 4'-demethylpodophyllotoxin (1), α-peltatin (2), podophyllotoxin (3), β-peltatin (4) as major cytotoxic principles of D. versipellis were successfully isolated and purified by several novel linear and step gradient counter-current chromatography methods using the systems of hexane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water (4:6:3:7 and 4:6:4:6, v/v/v/v). Compared with isocratic elution, linear and step-gradient elution can provide better resolution and save more time for the separation of photophyllotoxin and its congeners. Their cytotoxicities were further evaluated and their structures were validated by high-resolution electrospray TOF MS and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. All components showed potent anticancer activity against human hepatoma cells HepG2.

  2. Synthesis and cytotoxicity evaluation of novel podophyllotoxin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chengniu, Wang; Zhonghua, Wu; Yu, Zhao; Chunyan, Ni; Xiaodong, Zhao; Li, Zhu

    2011-11-01

    Seven benzylamino derivatives of podophyllotoxin 8a-8g were synthesized and their chemical structures were confirmed by IR, ¹H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and ESI-MS spectral analyses. Their abilities to inhibit the growth of cancer cells A549, HCT-116 and HepG2, were investigated by MTT assay. Compound 8b possessed the highest cytotoxicity on cancer cell lines with average IC(50) values of 3.8 µM. All we synthetic compounds were cytotoxic against three cancer cell lines at the micromolar range, indicating podophyllotoxin derivatives with structural modification of benzylamino possess potent antitumor activity.

  3. Design, synthesis, and anticancer activity of novel berberine derivatives prepared via CuAAC “click” chemistry as potential anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Yan, Tian-Hua; Yan, Lan; Li, Qian; Wang, Rui-Lian; Hu, Zhen-Lin; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Sun, Qing-Yan; Cao, Yong-Bing

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel derivatives of phenyl-substituted berberine triazolyls has been designed and synthesized via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition click chemistry in an attempt to develop antitumor agents. All of the compounds were evaluated for anticancer activity against a panel of three human cancer cell lines, including MCF-7 (breast), SW-1990 (pancreatic), and SMMC-7721 (liver) and the noncancerous human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cell lines. The results indicated that most of the compounds displayed notable anticancer activities against the MCF-7 cells compared with berberine. Among these derivatives, compound 16 showed the most potent inhibitory activity against the SW-1990 and SMMC-7721 cell lines, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 8.54±1.97 μM and 11.87±1.83 μM, respectively. Compound 36 exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity against the MCF-7 cell line, with an IC50 value of 12.57±1.96 μM. Compound 16 and compound 36 exhibited low cytotoxicity in the HUVEC cell line, with IC50 values of 25.49±3.24 μM and 30.47±3.47 μM. Furthermore, compounds 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 32, and 36 exhibited much better selectivity than berberine toward the normal cell line HUVEC. PMID:25120353

  4. Macromolecular Drug Targets in Cancer Treatment and Thiosemicarbazides as Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Küçükgüzel, Ş Güniz; Coşkun, Göknil P

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is known as abnormal cell division and consisting of a group of diseases on various organ tissues. Many therapies are available in cancer treatment such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy etc. Without damaging normal tissue, there is a huge need for specified anticancer drugs which have effect only on abnormal cancer cells. Therefore, advances in anticancer drug discovery in treating cancer in the recent years, directed towards to the macromolecular targets. Heterocyclic molecules, such as fluconazole, acetazolamide, etc., have a significant role in health care and pharmaceutical drug design. Thiosemicarbazides (NH2-NH-CSNH2) are the simplest hydrazine derivatives of thiocarbamic acid and are not only transition compounds, but they are also very effective organic compounds. Thiosemicarbazides possess an amide and amine protons, carbonyl and thione carbons. These structures have attracted the attention of the researchers in the development of novel compounds with anticonvulsant, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antimycobacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and anticancer activities. Recently, a number of thiosemicarbazides are available commercially as anticancer drugs for novel anticancer drug discovery. Antineoplastic or anticancer drugs prevent or inhibit the maturation and proliferation of neoplasms. These observations have been guiding the researchers for the development of new thiosemicarbazides that possess anticancer activity.

  5. Plant-derived anticancer agents: a promising treatment for bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Juárez, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a very frequent complication of advanced cancer, and it remains an incurable disease. Current therapies that have been approved for the treatment of bone metastases delay the occurrence of skeletal-related events and can extend the patient's lifespan by a few years. However, they will not cure or cause the regression of established bone metastases, and new side effects are emerging after prolonged treatment. Thus, new therapies are severely needed. There are compelling evidences from in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies that support the use of compounds derived from plants to treat several forms of cancers including bone metastasis. More than 25% of the drugs used during the past 20 years were directly derived from plants, whereas another 25% are chemically altered natural products. Still, only 5–15% of the ∼250 000 higher plants have ever been investigated for bioactive compounds. There is a growing interest for the study of anticancer drugs with relatively low side effects that target specific key signaling pathways that control the establishment and progression of the cancer metastasis. Therefore, further studies are needed to identify new natural compounds with high efficiency in cancer prevention and treatment. Extensive reviews about plant-derived agents and their use in cancer have been published, but none when it comes to the treatment of bone metastases. Only a few of these compounds have been evaluated for the treatment of bone metastasis; here we describe some of the most prominent ones that are having the potential to reach the clinic soon. PMID:28243436

  6. The prince and the pauper. A tale of anticancer targeted agents

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas-González, Alfonso; García-López, Patricia; Herrera, Luis Alonso; Medina-Franco, Jose Luis; González-Fierro, Aurora; Candelaria, Myrna

    2008-01-01

    Cancer rates are set to increase at an alarming rate, from 10 million new cases globally in 2000 to 15 million in 2020. Regarding the pharmacological treatment of cancer, we currently are in the interphase of two treatment eras. The so-called pregenomic therapy which names the traditional cancer drugs, mainly cytotoxic drug types, and post-genomic era-type drugs referring to rationally-based designed. Although there are successful examples of this newer drug discovery approach, most target-specific agents only provide small gains in symptom control and/or survival, whereas others have consistently failed in the clinical testing. There is however, a characteristic shared by these agents: -their high cost-. This is expected as drug discovery and development is generally carried out within the commercial rather than the academic realm. Given the extraordinarily high therapeutic drug discovery-associated costs and risks, it is highly unlikely that any single public-sector research group will see a novel chemical "probe" become a "drug". An alternative drug development strategy is the exploitation of established drugs that have already been approved for treatment of non-cancerous diseases and whose cancer target has already been discovered. This strategy is also denominated drug repositioning, drug repurposing, or indication switch. Although traditionally development of these drugs was unlikely to be pursued by Big Pharma due to their limited commercial value, biopharmaceutical companies attempting to increase productivity at present are pursuing drug repositioning. More and more companies are scanning the existing pharmacopoeia for repositioning candidates, and the number of repositioning success stories is increasing. Here we provide noteworthy examples of known drugs whose potential anticancer activities have been highlighted, to encourage further research on these known drugs as a means to foster their translation into clinical trials utilizing the more limited

  7. Synthesis and insecticidal activity of novel hydrazone compounds derived from a naturally occurring lignan podophyllotoxin against Mythimna separata (Walker).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Yu, Xiang; Zhi, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Xiao; Yang, Chun; Xu, Hui

    2014-06-15

    In continuation of our program aimed at the discovery and development of natural-product-based insecticidal agents, a series of novel hydrazone derivatives of podophyllotoxin, which is a naturally occurring aryltetralin lignan and isolated as the main secondary metabolite from the roots and rhizomes of Podophyllum species, were synthesized and evaluated as insecticidal agents against the pre-third-instar larvae of oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata (Walker) in vivo at 1mg/mL. Especially compounds 8i, 8j, 8t, and 8u showed the more potent insecticidal activity with the final mortality rates greater than 60%.

  8. Bioprospecting for podophyllotoxin in the Big Horn Mountains, Wyoming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate variations in podophyllotoxin concentrations in Juniperus species found in the Big Horn Mountains in Wyoming. It was found that Juniperus species in the Big Horn Mountains included three species; J. communis L. (common juniper), J. horizontalis Moench. (c...

  9. Phosphorescent iridium(III)-bis-N-heterocyclic carbene complexes as mitochondria-targeted theranostic and photodynamic anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Tan, Cai-Ping; Zhang, Wei; He, Liang; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria-targeted compounds represent a promising approach to target tumors selectively and overcome resistance to current anticancer therapies. In this work, three cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes (1-3) containing bis-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands have been explored as theranostic and photodynamic agents targeting mitochondria. These complexes display rich photophysical properties, which greatly facilitates the study of their intracellular fate. All three complexes are more cytotoxic than cisplatin against the cancer cells screened. 1-3 can penetrate into human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells quickly and efficiently, and they can carry out theranostic functions by simultaneously inducing and monitoring the morphological changes in mitochondria. Mechanism studies show that these complexes exert their anticancer efficacy by initiating a cascade of events related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, they display up to 3 orders of magnitude higher cytotoxicity upon irradiation at 365 nm, which is so far the highest photocytotoxic responses reported for iridium complexes.

  10. Synthesis, crystallographic characterization and electrochemical property of a copper(II) complex of the anticancer agent elesclomol.

    PubMed

    Vo, Nha Huu; Xia, Zhiqiang; Hanko, Jason; Yun, Tong; Bloom, Steve; Shen, Jianhua; Koya, Keizo; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Shoujun

    2014-01-01

    Elesclomol is a novel anticancer agent that has been evaluated in a number of late stage clinical trials. A new and convenient synthesis of elesclomol and its copper complex is described. X-ray crystallographic characterization and the electrochemical properties of the elesclomol copper(II) complex are discussed. The copper(II) cation is coordinated in a highly distorted square-planar geometry to each of the sulphur and amide nitrogen atoms of elesclomol. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the complex undergoes a reversible one-electron reduction at biologically accessible potentials. In contrast the free elesclomol is found electrochemically inactive. This evidence is in strong support of the mechanism of action we proposed for the anticancer activity of elesclomol.

  11. Organometallic Palladium Complexes with a Water-Soluble Iminophosphorane Ligand as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Monica; Calvo-Sanjuán, Rubén; Sanaú, Mercedes; Marzo, Isabel; Contel, María

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a new water-soluble iminophosphorane ligand TPA=N-C(O)-2BrC6H4 (C,N-IM; TPA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane) 1 is reported. Oxidative addition of 1 to Pd2(dba)3 affords the orthopalladated dimer [Pd(μ-Br){C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}]2 (2) as a mixture of cis and trans isomers (1:1 molar ratio) where the iminophosphorane moeity behaves as a C,N-pincer ligand. By addition of different neutral or monoanionic ligands to 2, the bridging bromide can be cleaved and a variety of hydrophilic or water-soluble mononuclear organometallic palladium(II) complexes of the type [Pd{C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}(L-L)] (L-L = acac (3); S2CNMe2 (4); 4,7-Diphenyl-1,10-phenanthrolinedisulfonic acid disodium salt C12H6N2(C6H4SO3Na)2 (5)); [Pd{C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}(L)Br] (L = P(mC6H4SO3Na)3 (6); P(3-Pyridyl)3 (7)) and, [Pd(C6H4(C(O)N=TPA)-2}(TPA)2Br] (8) are obtained as single isomers. All new complexes were tested as potential anticancer agents and their cytotoxicity properties were evaluated in vitro against human Jurkat-T acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, normal T-lymphocytes (PBMC) and DU-145 human prostate cancer cells. Compounds [Pd(μ-Br){C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}]2 (2) and [Pd{C6H4(C(O)N=TPA-kC,N)-2}(acac)] 3 (which has been crystallographically characterized) display the higher cytotoxicity against the above mentioned cancer cell lines while being less toxic to normal T-lymphocytes (peripheral blood mononuclear cells: PBMC). In addition, 3 is very toxic to cisplatin resistant Jurkat shBak indicating a cell death pathway that may be different to that of cisplatin. The interaction of 2 and 3 with plasmid (pBR322) DNA is much weaker than that of cisplatin pointing to an alternative biomolecular target for these cytotoxic compounds. All the compounds show an interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) faster than that of cisplatin. PMID:23066172

  12. Curcumin-albumin conjugates as an effective anti-cancer agent with immunomodulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Aravind, S R; Krishnan, Lissy K

    2016-05-01

    the drug form has the potential to be used as an anticancer agent in affected human subjects.

  13. The anticancer agent 3-bromopyruvate: a simple but powerful molecule taken from the lab to the bedside.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Silva, J; Queirós, O; Baltazar, F; Ułaszewski, S; Goffeau, A; Ko, Y H; Pedersen, P L; Preto, A; Casal, M

    2016-08-01

    At the beginning of the twenty-first century, 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), a simple alkylating chemical compound was presented to the scientific community as a potent anticancer agent, able to cause rapid toxicity to cancer cells without bystander effects on normal tissues. The altered metabolism of cancers, an essential hallmark for their progression, also became their Achilles heel by facilitating 3BP's selective entry and specific targeting. Treatment with 3BP has been administered in several cancer type models both in vitro and in vivo, either alone or in combination with other anticancer therapeutic approaches. These studies clearly demonstrate 3BP's broad action against multiple cancer types. Clinical trials using 3BP are needed to further support its anticancer efficacy against multiple cancer types thus making it available to more than 30 million patients living with cancer worldwide. This review discusses current knowledge about 3BP related to cancer and discusses also the possibility of its use in future clinical applications as it relates to safety and treatment issues.

  14. Evaluation of bishexadecyltrimethyl ammonium palladium tetrachloride based dual functional colloidal carrier as an antimicrobial and anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Sandeep; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Kaur, Baljinder; Kant, Ravi; Guru, Santosh Kumar; Bhushan, Shashi; Jaglan, Sundeep

    2016-04-21

    We have developed a dual function carrier using bishexadecyltrimethyl ammonium palladium tetrachloride, which has anticancer as well as antibacterial activity, using a ligand insertion method with a simple and easy work procedure. The complex is prepared by a simple and cost effective method using hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium chloride and palladium chloride under controlled stoichiometry. Herein, we report the aggregation (self assembly) of the metallosurfactant having palladium as a counter ion, in aqueous medium along with its binding affinity with bovine serum albumin. The palladium surfactant has exhibited excellent antimicrobial efficacy against fungus and bacteria (both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria). Cytotoxicity of palladium surfactant against cancerous (Human leukemia HL-60, pancreatic MIA-Pa-Ca-2 and prostate cancer PC-3) and healthy cells (fR2 human breast epithelial cells) was also evaluated using MTT assay. The present dual functional moiety shows a low IC50 value and has potential to be used as an anticancer agent. Our dual function carrier which itself possesses antimicrobial and anticancer activity represents a simple and effective system and can also be utilized as a drug carrier in the future.

  15. Bidirectional functions of arsenic as a carcinogen and an anti-cancer agent in human squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Thang, Nguyen Dinh; Yajima, Ichiro; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Kato, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Bidirectional cancer-promoting and anti-cancer effects of arsenic for cancer cells have been revealed in previous studies. However, each of these effects (cancer-promoting or anti-cancer) was found in different cells at different treated-concentration of arsenic. In this study, we for the first time indicated that arsenic at concentration of 3 µM, equal to average concentration in drinking water in cancer-prone areas in Bangladesh, simultaneously expressed its bidirectional effects on human squamous cell carcinoma HSC5 cells with distinct pathways. Treatment with 3 µM of arsenic promoted cell invasion via upregulation of expression of MT1-MMP and downregulation of expression of p14ARF and simultaneously induced cell apoptosis through inhibition of expression of N-cadherin and increase of expression of p21(WAF1/CIP1) at both transcript and protein levels in HSC5 cells. We also showed that inhibition of MT1-MMP expression by NSC405020 resulted in decrease of arsenic-mediated invasion of HSC5 cells involving decrease in phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (pERK). Taken together, our biological and biochemical findings suggested that arsenic expressed bidirectional effects as a carcinogen and an anti-cancer agent in human squamous cell carcinoma HSC5 cells with distinct pathways. Our results might play an important scientific evident for further studies to find out a better way in treatment of arsenic-induced cancers, especially in squamous cell carcinoma.

  16. 1-Piperazinylphthalazines as potential VEGFR-2 inhibitors and anticancer agents: Synthesis and in vitro biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Abou-Seri, Sahar M; Eldehna, Wagdy M; Ali, Mamdouh M; Abou El Ella, Dalal A

    2016-01-01

    In our endeavor towards the development of effective VEGFR-2 inhibitors, three novel series of phthalazine derivatives based on 1-piperazinyl-4-arylphthalazine scaffold were synthesized. All the newly prepared phthalazines 16a-k, 18a-e and 21a-g were evaluated in vitro for their inhibitory activity against VEGFR-2. In particular, compounds 16k and 21d potently inhibited VEGFR-2 at sub-micromolar IC50 values 0.35 ± 0.03 and 0.40 ± 0.04 μM, respectively. Moreover, seventeen selected compounds 16c-e, 16g, 16h, 16j, 16k, 18c-e and 21a-g were evaluated for their in vitro anticancer activity according to US-NCI protocol, where compounds 16k and 21d proved to be the most potent anticancer agents. While, compound 16k exhibited potent broad spectrum anticancer activity with full panel GI50 (MG-MID) value of 3.62 μM, compound 21d showed high selectivity toward leukemia and prostate cancer subpanels [subpanel GI50 (MG-MID) 3.51 and 5.15 μM, respectively]. Molecular docking of compounds16k and 21d into VEGFR-2 active site was performed to explore their potential binding mode.

  17. Molecular designing and in silico evaluation of darunavir derivatives as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Mahto, Manoj kumar; Yellapu, Nanda Kumar; Kilaru, Ravendra Babu; Chamarthi, Naga Raju; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2014-01-01

    Darunavir is a synthetic nonpeptidic protease inhibitor which has been tested for anticancer properties. To deduce and enhance the anticancer activity of the Darunavir, we have modified its reactive moiety in an effective way. We designed 9 analogues in ChemBioOffice 2010 and minimized using the LigPrep tool of Schrödinger 2011. These analogues can obstruct the activity of other signalling pathways which are implicated in many tumors. Results of the QikProp showed that all the analogues lied in the specified range of all the pharmacokinetic (ADMET) properties required to become the successful drug. Docking study was performed to test its anticancer activity against the biomarkers of the five main types of cancers i.e. bone, brain, breast, colon and skin cancer. Grid was generated for each oncoproteins by specifying the active site amino acids. The binding model of best scoring analogue with each protein was assessed from their G-scores and disclosed by docking analysis using the XP visualizer tool. An analysis of the receptor-ligand interaction studies revealed that these nine Darunavir analogues are active against all cancer biomarkers and have the features to prove themselves as anticancer drugs, further to be synthesized and tested against the cell lines. PMID:24966524

  18. Methylselenocysteine - a Promising Antiangiogenic Agent for Overcoming Drug Delivery Barriers in Solid Malignancies for Therapeutic Synergy with Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Arup

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Despite progress, chemotherapeutic response in solid malignancies has remained limited. While initial results of the use of antiangiogenic agents in combination chemotherapy indicated an enhanced therapeutic response, recent data indicates that the surviving cancer is not only able to surmount therapy, but is actually able to adapt a more aggressive metastatic phenotype. Thus, selecting an antiangiogenic agent that is less likely to lead to tumor resurgence is a key to future therapeutic success of antiangiogenic agents, in a combinatorial setting. Areas covered Against the broad spectrum of currently used antiangiogenic agents in the clinic, the putative benefits of the use of organo selenium (Se) compounds, such as methylselenocysteine (MSC), are discussed in this reiew. Expert opinion MSC, being part of the mammalian physiology, is a well tolerated, versatile and economical antiangiogenic agent. It down regulates multiple key upstream tumor survival markers, and enhances tumor drug delivery, at a given systemic dose of an anticancer agent, while protecting normal tissue from cytotoxic adverse effects. Further clinical trials, especially in poorly differentiated cancers, are warranted. PMID:21473705

  19. Tuning the metabolism of the anticancer drug cisplatin with chemoprotective agents to improve its safety and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Sooriyaarachchi, Melani; George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Narendran, Aru

    2016-01-01

    Numerous in vivo studies have shown that the severe toxic side-effects of intravenously administered cisplatin can be significantly reduced by the co-administration of sulfur-containing ‘chemoprotective agents’. Using a metallomics approach, a likely biochemical basis for these potentially useful observations was only recently uncovered and appears to involve the reaction of chemoprotective agents with cisplatin-derived Pt-species in human plasma to form novel platinum–sulfur complexes (PSC's). We here reveal aspects of the structure of two PSC's and establish the identification of an optimal chemoprotective agent to ameliorate the toxic side-effects of cisplatin, while leaving its antineoplastic activity largely intact, as a feasible research strategy to transform cisplatin into a safer and more effective anticancer drug. PMID:27722429

  20. Amide Coupling Reaction for the Synthesis of Bispyridine-based Ligands and Their Complexation to Platinum as Dinuclear Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Apps, Michael G.; Johnson, Ben W.; Sutcliffe, Oliver B.; Brown, Sarah D.; Wheate, Nial J.

    2014-01-01

    Amide coupling reactions can be used to synthesize bispyridine-based ligands for use as bridging linkers in multinuclear platinum anticancer drugs. Isonicotinic acid, or its derivatives, are coupled to variable length diaminoalkane chains under an inert atmosphere in anhydrous DMF or DMSO with the use of a weak base, triethylamine, and a coupling agent, 1-propylphosphonic anhydride. The products precipitate from solution upon formation or can be precipitated by the addition of water. If desired, the ligands can be further purified by recrystallization from hot water. Dinuclear platinum complex synthesis using the bispyridine ligands is done in hot water using transplatin. The most informative of the chemical characterization techniques to determine the structure and gross purity of both the bispyridine ligands and the final platinum complexes is 1H NMR with particular analysis of the aromatic region of the spectra (7-9 ppm). The platinum complexes have potential application as anticancer agents and the synthesis method can be modified to produce trinuclear and other multinuclear complexes with different hydrogen bonding functionality in the bridging ligand. PMID:24893964

  1. Photophysical characterization of anticancer drug valrubicin in rHDL nanoparticles and its use as an imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sunil; Chib, Rahul; Raut, Sangram; Bermudez, Jaclyn; Sabnis, Nirupama; Duggal, Divya; Kimball, Joseph D; Lacko, Andras G; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles are target-specific drug delivery agents that are increasingly used in cancer therapy to enhance bioavailability and to reduce off target toxicity of anti-cancer agents. Valrubicin is an anti-cancer drug, currently approved only for vesicular bladder cancer treatment because of its poor water solubility. On the other hand, valrubicin carrying reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticles appear ideally suited for extended applications, including systemic cancer chemotherapy. We determined selected fluorescence properties of the free (unencapsulated) drug vs. valrubicin incorporated into rHDL nanoparticles. We have found that upon encapsulation into rHDL nanoparticles the quantum yield of valrubicin fluorescence increased six fold while its fluorescence lifetime increased about 2 fold. Accordingly, these and potassium iodide (KI) quenching data suggest that upon incorporation, valrubicin is localized deep in the interior of the nanoparticle, inside the lipid matrix. Fluorescence anisotropy of the rHDL valrubicin nanoparticles was also found to be high along with extended rotational correlation time. The fluorescence of valrubicin could also be utilized to assess its distribution upon delivery to prostate cancer (PC3) cells. Overall the fluorescence properties of the rHDL: valrubicin complex reveal valuable novel characteristics of this drug delivery vehicle that may be particularly applicable when used in systemic (intravenous) therapy.

  2. Phytosterols as a natural anticancer agent: Current status and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Naiyer; Khan, Wajahatullah; Md, Shadab; Ali, Asgar; Saluja, Sundeep Singh; Sharma, Sadhana; Al-Allaf, Faisal A; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Ibrahim, Ibrahim Abdel Aziz; Abdel-Wahab, Ali Fathi; Afify, Mohamed Abdelaziz; Al-Ghamdi, Saeed Saeed

    2017-04-01

    Phytosterols are naturally occurring compounds in plants, structurally similar to cholesterol. The human diet is quite abundant in sitosterol and campesterol. Phytosterols are known to have various bioactive properties including reducing intestinal cholesterol absorption which alleviates blood LDL-cholesterol and cardiovascular problems. It is indicated that phytosterol rich diets may reduce cancer risk by 20%. Phytosterols may also affect host systems, enabling antitumor responses by improving immune response recognition of cancer, affecting the hormone dependent endocrine tumor growth, and by sterol biosynthesis modulation. Moreover, phytosterols have also exhibited properties that directly inhibit tumor growth, including reduced cell cycle progression, apoptosis induction, and tumor metastasis inhibition. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on occurrences, chemistry, pharmacokinetics and potential anticancer properties of phytosterols in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, anticancer effects of phytosterols have strongly been suggested and support their dietary inclusion to prevent and treat cancers.

  3. Repurposing drugs in oncology (ReDO)—cimetidine as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Pantziarka, Pan; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vidula; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2014-01-01

    Cimetidine, the first H2 receptor antagonist in widespread clinical use, has anti-cancer properties that have been elucidated in a broad range of pre-clinical and clinical studies for a number of different cancer types. These data are summarised and discussed in relation to a number of distinct mechanisms of action. Based on the evidence presented, it is proposed that cimetidine would synergise with a range of other drugs, including existing chemotherapeutics, and that further exploration of the potential of cimetidine as an anti-cancer therapeutic is warranted. Furthermore, there is compelling evidence that cimetidine administration during the peri-operative period may provide a survival benefit in some cancers. A number of possible combinations with other drugs are discussed in the supplementary material accompanying this paper. PMID:25525463

  4. The Applications of Targeting Anti-Cancer Agents in Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guang-Chun; Yang, Xu; Yu, Yan; Zhao, Dai-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cancer targeting drugs appear to be a new and powerful "weapon" for cancer therapies. These targeting drugs are directed against specific molecules that are over-expressed or where certain unique factors are aberrantly expressed either in cancer cells or in diseased cell sites. Compared with traditional chemotherapeutic drugs, these targeting drugs have the advantages of high specificity, efficacy and less side effects. Target therapy is a breakthrough and revolutionary advance in the field of cancer therapy. Tumor angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth and metastasis and the mutation of tyrosine kinases is also strongly associated with cancer progression. Thus, in this review, we will discuss the advances in the development of targeting anti-cancer drugs by narrowing it down to small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptors belonging to the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases and angiogenic inhibitors. It will also address concerns for drug resistance and adverse events.

  5. Neem Limonoids as Anticancer Agents: Modulation of Cancer Hallmarks and Oncogenic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Nagini, Siddavaram

    2014-01-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) is one of the most versatile medicinal plants, widely distributed in the Indian subcontinent. Neem is a rich source of limonoids that are endowed with potent medicinal properties predominantly antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. Azadirachtin, gedunin, and nimbolide are more extensively investigated relative to other neem limonoids. Accumulating evidence indicates that the anticancer effects of neem limonoids are mediated through the inhibition of hallmark capabilities of cancer such as cell proliferation, apoptosis evasion, inflammation, invasion, and angiogenesis. The neem limonoids have been demonstrated to target oncogenic signaling kinases and transcription factors chiefly, NF-κB, Wnt/β-catenin, PI3K/Akt, MAPK, and JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Neem limonoids that target multiple pathways that are aberrant in cancer are ideal candidates for cancer chemoprevention and therapy.

  6. Recent development of ATP-competitive small molecule phosphatidylinostitol-3-kinase inhibitors as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Wan, Wen-zhu; Li, Yan; Zhou, Guan-lian; Liu, Xin-guang

    2017-01-01

    Phosphatidylinostitol-3-kinase (PI3K) is the potential anticancer target in the PI3K/Akt/ mTOR pathway. Here we reviewed the ATP-competitive small molecule PI3K inhibitors in the past few years, including the pan Class I PI3K inhibitors, the isoform-specific PI3K inhibitors and/or the PI3K/mTOR dual inhibitors. PMID:27769061

  7. [Quod medicina aliis, aliis est acre venenum**--venoms as a source of anticancer agents].

    PubMed

    Kucińska, Małgorzata; Ruciński, Piotr; Murias, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Natural product derived from plants and animals were used in folk medicine for centuries. The venoms produced by animals for hunting of self-defence are rich in bioactive compounds with broad spectrum of biological activity. The papers presents the most promising compounds isolated from venoms of snakes, scorpions and toads. For these compounds both: mechanism of anticancer activity as well as possibilities of clinical use are presented.

  8. Indole-fused benzooxazepines: a new structural class of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashok K; Raj, Vinit; Rai, Amit; Keshari, Amit K; Saha, Sudipta

    2017-01-01

    Aim: A new series of compounds (1a–16a) bearing indole-fused benzooxazepine was synthesized, characterized and evaluated for anticancer activity. Materials & methods: In this study, all the synthesized compounds were screened via in vitro anticancer testing on Hep-G2 cancer cell line. A computational study was carried out on cancer-related targets including IL-2, IL-6, COX-2 Caspase-3 and Caspase-8. Results: Some of the synthesized compounds effectively controlled the growth of cancerous cells. Conclusion: The most active compounds – 6a, 10a, 13a, 14a and 15a – exemplify notable anticancer profile with GI50 <10 μg/ml. Preliminary structure–activity relationship among the tested compounds can produce an assumption that the electronegative groups at phenyl ring attached with indole-fused benzooxazepine are instrumental for the activity. Molecular docking study showed crucial hydrogen bond and π–π stacking interactions, with good ADMET profiling and molecular dynamic simulation. PMID:28344831

  9. Seeking new anti-cancer agents from autophagy-regulating natural products.

    PubMed

    Hua, Fang; Shang, Shuang; Hu, Zhuo-Wei

    2017-04-01

    Natural products are an important original source of many widely used drugs, including anti-cancer drugs. Early research efforts for seeking anti-cancer therapy from the natural products are mainly focused on the compounds with cytotoxicity capability. The good examples include vinblastine, vincristine, the camptothecin derivatives; topotecan, irinotecan, epipodophyllotoxin derivatives and paclitaxel. In a recent decade, the fundamental progression has been made in the understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms regarding tumor initiation, metastasis, therapeutic resistance, immune escape, and relapse, which provide a great opportunity for the development of new mechanism-based anticancer drugs, especially drugs against new molecular and cellular targets. Autophagy, a critical cell homeostasis mechanism and promising drug target involved in a verity of human diseases including cancer, can be modulated by many compounds derived from natural products. In this review, we'll give a short introduction of autophagy and discuss the roles of autophagy in the tumorigenesis and progression. And then, we summarize the accumulated evidences to show the anti-tumor effects of several compounds derived from natural products through modulation of autophagy activity.

  10. Characterization of human adenovirus serotypes 5, 6, 11, and 35 as anticancer agents

    SciTech Connect

    Shashkova, Elena V.; May, Shannon M.; Barry, Michael A.

    2009-11-25

    Human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) has been the most popular platform for the development of oncolytic Ads. Alternative Ad serotypes with low seroprevalence might allow for improved anticancer efficacy in Ad5-immune patients. We studied the safety and efficacy of rare serotypes Ad6, Ad11 and Ad35. In vitro cytotoxicity of the Ads correlated with expression of CAR and CD46 in most but not all cell lines. Among CAR-binding viruses, Ad5 was often more active than Ad6, among CD46-binding viruses Ad35 was generally more cytotoxic than Ad11 in cell culture studies. Ad5, Ad6, and Ad11 demonstrated similar anticancer activity in vivo, whereas Ad35 was not efficacious. Hepatotoxicity developed only in Ad5-injected mice. Predosing with Ad11 and Ad35 did not increase infection of hepatocytes with Ad5-based vector demonstrating different interaction of these Ads with Kupffer cells. Data obtained in this study suggest developing Ad6 and Ad11 as alternative Ads for anticancer treatment.

  11. Physicochemical investigations of biogenic chitosan-silver nanocomposite as antimicrobial and anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Nithya; Kumari, Henry Linda Jeeva; Singaravelu, Chandra Mohan; Kandasamy, Ruckmani; Kandasamy, Jothivenkatachalam

    2016-11-01

    Chitosan (CS), a seaweed polysaccharide is a natural macromolecule which is widely being used in medical applications because of its distinctive antimicrobial and anticancer properties. Silver, a noble metal, is also receiving wide attention for its potential usage in antimicrobial and anticancer therapeutics. In this study, an effective way of reduction of silver using chitosan at varying reaction temperatures and an optimised concentration of silver were performed. The optical, structural, spectral, morphological and elemental studies of the biosynthesized chitosan-silver (CS-Ag) nanocomposites were characterized by several techniques. The synthesized CS-Ag nanocomposites exhibit particle size around 20nm and were further exploited for potent biological applications in nanomedicine due to their nanometric sizes and biocompatibility of chitosan. The antimicrobial activity of the biosynthesized CS-Ag nanocomposites exhibits zone of inhibition ranged between 09.666±0.577 and 19.000±1.000 (mm). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were from 8 to 128μgmL(-1) and 16 to 256μgmL(-1) respectively, with the highest antimicrobial activity shown against Gram-negative Salmonella sp. The synergistic effect of chitosan and silver as a composite in nanometric size revealed significant IC50 value of 29.35μgmL(-1) and a maximum of 95.56% inhibition at 100μgmL(-1) against A549 lung cancer cell line, resulting in potent anticancer effect.

  12. Ferns and lycopods--a potential treasury of anticancer agents but also a carcinogenic hazard.

    PubMed

    Tomšík, Pavel

    2014-06-01

    Many species of seedless vascular plants-ferns and lycopods-have been used as food and folk medicine since ancient times. Some of them have become the focus of intensive research concerning their anticancer properties. Studies on the anticancer effect of crude extracts are being increasingly replaced by bioactivity-guided fractionation, as well as detailed assessment of the mechanism of action. Numerous compounds-especially flavonoids such as amentoflavone and protoapigenone, and also simpler phenolic compounds, steroids, alkaloids and terpenoids-were isolated and found to be cytotoxic, particularly pro-apoptotic, or to induce cell cycle arrest in cancer cell lines in vitro. In in vivo experiments, some fern-derived compounds inhibited tumour growth with little toxicity. On the other hand, many ferns-not only the well-known Bracken (Pteridium)-may pose a significant hazard to human health due to the fact that they contain carcinogenic sesquiterpenoids and their analogues. The objective of this review is to summarise the recent state of research on the anticancer properties of ferns and lycopods, with a focus on their characteristic bioactive constituents. The carcinogenic hazard posed by ferns is also mentioned.

  13. Next Generation Sequencing in Predicting Gene Function in Podophyllotoxin Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Joaquim V.; Kim, Kye-Won; Lee, Choonseok; Costa, Michael A.; May, Gregory D.; Crow, John A.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2013-01-01

    Podophyllum species are sources of (−)-podophyllotoxin, an aryltetralin lignan used for semi-synthesis of various powerful and extensively employed cancer-treating drugs. Its biosynthetic pathway, however, remains largely unknown, with the last unequivocally demonstrated intermediate being (−)-matairesinol. Herein, massively parallel sequencing of Podophyllum hexandrum and Podophyllum peltatum transcriptomes and subsequent bioinformatics analyses of the corresponding assemblies were carried out. Validation of the assembly process was first achieved through confirmation of assembled sequences with those of various genes previously established as involved in podophyllotoxin biosynthesis as well as other candidate biosynthetic pathway genes. This contribution describes characterization of two of the latter, namely the cytochrome P450s, CYP719A23 from P. hexandrum and CYP719A24 from P. peltatum. Both enzymes were capable of converting (−)-matairesinol into (−)-pluviatolide by catalyzing methylenedioxy bridge formation and did not act on other possible substrates tested. Interestingly, the enzymes described herein were highly similar to methylenedioxy bridge-forming enzymes from alkaloid biosynthesis, whereas candidates more similar to lignan biosynthetic enzymes were catalytically inactive with the substrates employed. This overall strategy has thus enabled facile further identification of enzymes putatively involved in (−)-podophyllotoxin biosynthesis and underscores the deductive power of next generation sequencing and bioinformatics to probe and deduce medicinal plant biosynthetic pathways. PMID:23161544

  14. A translational study "case report" on the small molecule "energy blocker" 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) as a potent anticancer agent: from bench side to bedside.

    PubMed

    Ko, Y H; Verhoeven, H A; Lee, M J; Corbin, D J; Vogl, T J; Pedersen, P L

    2012-02-01

    The small alkylating molecule, 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), is a potent and specific anticancer agent. 3BP is different in its action from most currently available chemo-drugs. Thus, 3BP targets cancer cells' energy metabolism, both its high glycolysis ("Warburg Effect") and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. This inhibits/ blocks total energy production leading to a depletion of energy reserves. Moreover, 3BP as an "Energy Blocker", is very rapid in killing such cells. This is in sharp contrast to most commonly used anticancer agents that usually take longer to show a noticeable effect. In addition, 3BP at its effective concentrations that kill cancer cells has little or no effect on normal cells. Therefore, 3BP can be considered a member, perhaps one of the first, of a new class of anticancer agents. Following 3BP's discovery as a novel anticancer agent in vitro in the Year 2000 (Published in Ko et al. Can Lett 173:83-91, 2001), and also as a highly effective and rapid anticancer agent in vivo shortly thereafter (Ko et al. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 324:269-275, 2004), its efficacy as a potent anticancer agent in humans was demonstrated. Here, based on translational research, we report results of a case study in a young adult cancer patient with fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, a bench side discovery in the Department of Biological Chemistry at Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine was taken effectively to bedside treatment at Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt/Main Hospital, Germany. The results obtained hold promise for 3BP as a future cancer therapeutic without apparent cyto-toxicity when formulated properly.

  15. Claudin-4 binder C-CPE 194 enhances effects of anticancer agents on pancreatic cancer cell lines via a MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Kono, Tsuyoshi; Kondoh, Masuo; Kyuno, Daisuke; Ito, Tatsuya; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Imamura, Masafumi; Kohno, Takayuki; Konno, Takumi; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Sawada, Norimasa; Hirata, Koichi; Kojima, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    The C-terminal fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (C-CPE) modulates the tight junction protein claudin and disrupts the tight junctional barrier. It also can enhance the effectiveness of anticancer agents. However, the detailed mechanisms of the effects of C-CPE remain unclear in both normal and cancerous cells. The C-CPE mutant called C-CPE 194 binds only to claudin-4, but the C-CPE 194 mutant called C-CPE m19 binds not only to claudin-4 but also to claudin-1. In the present study, to investigate the mechanisms of the effects of C-CPE on claudin expression, the tight junctional functions and the cytotoxicity of anticancer agents, human pancreatic cancer cells, and normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDEs) were treated with C-CPE 194 and C-CPE m19. In well-differentiated cells of the pancreatic cancer cell line HPAC, C-CPE 194 and C-CPE m19 disrupted both the barrier and fence functions without changes in expression of claudin-1 and -4, together with an increase of MAPK phosphorylation. C-CPE 194, but not C-CPE m19, enhanced the cytotoxicity of the anticancer agents gemcitabine and S-1. In poorly differentiated pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1, C-CPE 194, but not C-CPE m19, decreased claudin-4 expression and enhanced MAPK activity and the cytotoxicity of the anticancer agents. In normal HPDEs, C-CPE 194 and C-CPE m19 decreased claudin-4 expression and enhanced the MAPK activity, whereas they did not affect the cytotoxicity of the anticancer agents. Our findings suggest that the claudin-4 binder C-CPE 194 enhances effects of anticancer agents on pancreatic cancer cell lines via a MAPK pathway.

  16. Ficus spp. (fig): ethnobotany and potential as anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Lansky, Ephraim Philip; Paavilainen, Helena M; Pawlus, Alison D; Newman, Robert A

    2008-09-26

    This review explores medieval, ancient and modern sources for ethnopharmacological uses of Ficus (fig) species, specifically for employment against malignant disease and inflammation. The close connection between inflammatory/infectious and cancerous diseases is apparent both from the medieval/ancient merging of these concepts and the modern pharmacological recognition of the initiating and promoting importance of inflammation for cancer growth. Also considered are chemical groups and compounds underlying the anticancer and anti-inflammatory actions, the relationship of fig wasps and fig botany, extraction and storage of fig latex, and traditional methods of preparing fig medicaments including fig lye, fig wine and medicinal poultices.

  17. Meta-analysis of inter-patient pharmacokinetic variability of liposomal and non-liposomal anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Schell, Ryan F.; Sidone, Brian J.; Caron, Whitney P.; Walsh, Mark D.; Zamboni, Beth A.; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.; Zamboni, William C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the inter-patient pharmacokinetic (PK) variability of liposomal and small molecule (SM) anticancer agents. Methods Inter-patient PK variability of 9 liposomal and SM formulations of the same drug were evaluated. PK variability was measured as coefficient of variance (CV%) of area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC) and the fold-difference between AUCmax and AUCmin (AUC range). Results CV% of AUC and AUC ranges were 2.7-fold (P<0.001) and 16.7-fold (P=0.13) greater, respectively, for liposomal compared with SM drugs. There was an inverse linear relationship between the clearance (CL) of liposomal agents and PK variability with a lower CL associated with greater PK variability (R2 = 0.39). PK variability of liposomal agents was greater when evaluated from 0–336 h compared with 0–24 h. Conclusion PK variability of liposomes is significantly greater than SM. The factors associated with the PK variability of liposomal agents needs to be evaluated. PMID:23891988

  18. Preclinical Investigations of PM01183 (Lurbinectedin) as a Single Agent or in Combination with Other Anticancer Agents for Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ryoko; Mabuchi, Seiji; Kawano, Mahiru; Sasano, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Yuri; Kuroda, Hiromasa; Kozasa, Katsumi; Hashimoto, Kae; Sawada, Kenjiro; Kimura, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effects of lurbinectedin as a single agent or in combination with existing anticancer agents for clear cell carcinoma (CCC) of the ovary, which is regarded as an aggressive, chemoresistant, histological subtype. Methods Using human ovarian CCC cell lines, the antitumor effects of lurbinectedin, SN-38, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and paclitaxel as single agents were assessed using the MTS assay. Then, the antitumor effects of combination therapies involving lurbinectedin and 1 of the other 4 agents were evaluated using isobologram analysis to examine whether these combinations displayed synergistic effects. The antitumor activity of each treatment was also examined using cisplatin-resistant and paclitaxel-resistant CCC sublines. Finally, we determined the effects of mTORC1 inhibition on the antitumor activity of lurbinectedin-based chemotherapy. Results Lurbinectedin exhibited significant antitumor activity toward chemosensitive and chemoresistant CCC cells in vitro. An examination of mouse CCC cell xenografts revealed that lurbinectedin significantly inhibits tumor growth. Among the tested combinations, lurbinectedin plus SN-38 resulted in a significant synergistic effect. This combination also had strong synergistic effects on both the cisplatin-resistant and paclitaxel-resistant CCC cell lines. Everolimus significantly enhanced the antitumor activity of lurbinectedin-based chemotherapies. Conclusions Lurbinectedin, a new agent that targets active transcription, exhibits antitumor activity in CCC when used as a single agent and has synergistic antitumor effects when combined with irinotecan. Our results indicate that lurbinectedin is a promising agent for treating ovarian CCC, both as a first-line treatment and as a salvage treatment for recurrent lesions that develop after platinum-based or paclitaxel treatment. PMID:26986199

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of tetracyclic fluoroquinolones as antibacterial and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Al-Trawneh, Salah A; Zahra, Jalal A; Kamal, Marwan R; El-Abadelah, Mustafa M; Zani, Franca; Incerti, Matteo; Cavazzoni, Andrea; Alfieri, Roberta R; Petronini, Pier G; Vicini, Paola

    2010-08-15

    A simple and efficient synthesis of 6-fluoro-4-oxopyrido[2,3-a]carbazole-3-carboxylic acids (13a-e) and a structurally related 6-fluoro-4-oxothieno[2',3':4,5]pyrrolo[3,2-h]quinoline (13f) was achieved via Stille arylation of 7-chloro-6-fluoro-8-nitro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxylate and a subsequent microwave-assisted phosphite-mediated Cadogan reaction. The new compounds were tested for their in vitro antimicrobial and antiproliferative activity. The ability of 13a-f to inhibit the activity of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV was also investigated. The thieno isostere (13f) emerged as the most active antibacterial, while the 9-fluoro derivative (13e) was the most potent against multidrug-resistant staphylococci. Compounds 13a, 13c-f displayed growth inhibition against MCF-7 breast tumor and A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells coupled with an absence of cytotoxicity toward normal human-derm fibroblasts (HuDe). Compound 13e was the most active anticancer against MCF-7 cells, with greater potency than ellipticine (IC(50) 0.8 and 1.6muM, respectively). The most active compounds in this series show promise as dual acting anticancer and antibacterial chemotherapeutics.

  20. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—nitroglycerin as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Sukhatme, Vidula; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P; Pantziarka, Pan

    2015-01-01

    Nitroglycerin (NTG), a drug that has been in clinical use for more than a century, has a range of actions which make it of particular interest in an oncological setting. It is generally accepted that the main mechanism of action of NTG is via the production of nitric oxide (NO), which improves cardiac oxygenation via multiple mechanisms including improved blood flow (vasodilation), decreased platelet aggregation, increased erythrocyte O2 release and decreased mitochondrial utilization of oxygen. Its vasoactive properties mean that it has the potential to exploit more fully the enhanced permeability and retention effect in delivering anti-cancer drugs to tumour tissues. Moreover NTG can reduce HIF-1α levels in hypoxic tumour tissues and this may have anti-angiogenic, pro-apoptotic and anti-efflux effects. Additionally NTG may enhance anti-tumour immunity. Pre-clinical and clinical data on these anti-cancer properties of NTG are summarised and discussed. While there is evidence of a positive action as a monotherapy in prostate cancer, there are mixed results in NSCLC where initially positive results have yet to be fully replicated. Based on the evidence presented, a case is made that further exploration of the clinical benefits that may accrue to cancer patients is warranted. Additionally, it is proposed that NTG may synergise with a number of other drugs, including other repurposed drugs, and these are discussed in the supplementary material appended to this paper. PMID:26435741

  1. Ester-Modified Cyclometalated Iridium(III) Complexes as Mitochondria-Targeting Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang-Xin; Chen, Mu-He; Hu, Xiao-Ying; Ye, Rui-Rong; Tan, Cai-Ping; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Organometallic iridium complexes are potent anticancer candidates which act through different mechanisms from cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimens. Here, ten phosphorescent cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes containing 2,2′-bipyridine-4,4′-dicarboxylic acid and its diester derivatives as ligands are designed and synthesized. The modification by ester group, which can be hydrolysed by esterase, facilitates the adjustment of drug-like properties. The quantum yields and emission lifetimes are influenced by variation of the ester substituents on the Ir(III) complexes. The cytotoxicity of these Ir(III) complexes is correlated with the length of their ester groups. Among them, 4a and 4b are found to be highly active against a panel of cancer cells screened, including cisplatin-resistant cancer cells. Mechanism studies in vitro indicate that they undergo hydrolysis of ester bonds, accumulate in mitochondria, and induce a series of cell-death related events mediated by mitochondria. Furthermore, 4a and 4b can induce pro-death autophagy and apoptosis simultaneously. Our study indicates that ester modification is a simple and feasible strategy to enhance the anticancer potency of Ir(III) complexes. PMID:27958338

  2. Preclinical pharmacology of BA-TPQ, a novel synthetic iminoquinone anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Ezell, Scharri J; Li, Haibo; Xu, Hongxia; Zhang, Xiangrong; Gurpinar, Evrim; Zhang, Xu; Rayburn, Elizabeth R; Sommers, Charnell I; Yang, Xinyi; Velu, Sadanandan E; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2010-07-13

    Marine natural products and their synthetic derivatives represent a major source of novel candidate anti-cancer compounds. We have recently tested the anti-cancer activity of more than forty novel compounds based on an iminoquinone makaluvamine scaffold, and have found that many of the compounds exert potent cytotoxic activity against human cancer cell lines. One of the most potent compounds, BA-TPQ [(11,12),7-(benzylamino)-1,3,4,8-tetrahydropyrrolo[4,3,2-de]quinolin-8(1H)-one], was active against a variety of human cancer cell lines, and inhibited the growth of breast and prostate xenograft tumors in mice. However, there was some toxicity noted in the mice following administration of the compound. In order to further the development of BA-TPQ, and in a search for potential sites of accumulation that might underlie the observed toxicity of the compound, we accomplished preclinical pharmacological studies of the compound. We herein report the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties of BA-TPQ, including its stability in plasma, plasma protein binding, metabolism by S9 enzymes, and plasma and tissue distribution. We believe these studies will be useful for further investigations, and may be useful for other investigators examining the use of similar compounds for cancer therapy.

  3. Adenoviral Vectors Armed with Cell Fusion-Inducing Proteins as Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Del Papa, Joshua; Parks, Robin J.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a devastating disease that affects millions of patients every year, and causes an enormous economic burden on the health care system and emotional burden on affected families. The first line of defense against solid tumors is usually extraction of the tumor, when possible, by surgical methods. In cases where solid tumors can not be safely removed, chemotherapy is often the first line of treatment. As metastatic cancers often become vigorously resistant to treatments, the development of novel, more potent and selective anti-cancer strategies is of great importance. Adenovirus (Ad) is the most commonly used virus in cancer clinical trials, however, regardless of the nature of the Ad-based therapeutic, complete responses to treatment remain rare. A number of pre-clinical studies have shown that, for all vector systems, viral spread throughout the tumor mass can be a major limiting factor for complete tumor elimination. By expressing exogenous cell-fusion proteins, many groups have shown improved spread of Ad-based vectors. This review summarizes the research done to examine the potency of Ad vectors expressing fusogenic proteins as anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:28106842

  4. The cancer preventative agent resveratrol is converted to the anticancer agent piceatannol by the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1B1

    PubMed Central

    Potter, G A; Patterson, L H; Wanogho, E; Perry, P J; Butler, P C; Ijaz, T; Ruparelia, K C; Lamb, J H; Farmer, P B; Stanley, L A; Burke, M D

    2002-01-01

    Resveratrol is a cancer preventative agent that is found in red wine. Piceatannol is a closely related stilbene that has antileukaemic activity and is also a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Piceatannol differs from resveratrol by having an additional aromatic hydroxy group. The enzyme CYP1B1 is overexpressed in a wide variety of human tumours and catalyses aromatic hydroxylation reactions. We report here that the cancer preventative agent resveratrol undergoes metabolism by the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1B1 to give a metabolite which has been identified as the known antileukaemic agent piceatannol. The metabolite was identified by high performance liquid chromatography analysis using fluorescence detection and the identity of the metabolite was further confirmed by derivatisation followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry studies using authentic piceatannol for comparison. This observation provides a novel explanation for the cancer preventative properties of resveratrol. It demonstrates that a natural dietary cancer preventative agent can be converted to a compound with known anticancer activity by an enzyme that is found in human tumours. Importantly this result gives insight into the functional role of CYP1B1 and provides evidence for the concept that CYP1B1 in tumours may be functioning as a growth suppressor enzyme. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 774–778. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600197 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11875742

  5. Recent Advancements In 1, 4-Disubstituted 1H-1,2,3-Triazoles As Potential Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Lal, Kashmiri; Yadav, Pinki

    2016-08-11

    Cancer is a class of formidable disease with a high degree of mortality. Although, there has been much progress in chemotherapy still the problem of drug resistance has led to the search for newer leads with superior efficacy. 1,2,3-Triazole are among a vast number of nitrogen containing heterocycles studied extensively as pharmacologically important scaffolds. Recently developed copper (I)-catalyzed cycloaddition reaction between organic azides and terminal alkynes yielding 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles has attracted considerable attention because it allows the construction of vast array of 1,2,3-triazoles with significant potential in pharmaceutical chemistry. In this article, an attempt to summarize the wide range of anticancer agents derived from Copper(I)-Catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition reported by the authors worldwide has been made. This review includes articles published from 2010 onwards and summarizes the recent progress on the development of 1,4-disubstituted 1H-1,2,3-triazole as novel anticancer chemotypes with high therapeutic indices.

  6. Graphene oxide as a nanocarrier for controlled release and targeted delivery of an anticancer active agent, chlorogenic acid.

    PubMed

    Barahuie, Farahnaz; Saifullah, Bullo; Dorniani, Dena; Fakurazi, Sharida; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Elfghi, Fawzi M

    2017-05-01

    We have synthesized graphene oxide using improved Hummer's method in order to explore the potential use of the resulting graphene oxide as a nanocarrier for an active anticancer agent, chlorogenic acid (CA). The synthesized graphene oxide and chlorogenic acid-graphene oxide nanocomposite (CAGO) were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry analysis, Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), UV-vis spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The successful conjugation of chlorogenic acid onto graphene oxide through hydrogen bonding and π-π interaction was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, FTIR analysis and X-ray diffraction patterns. The loading of CA in the nanohybrid was estimated to be around 13.1% by UV-vis spectroscopy. The release profiles showed favourable, sustained and pH-dependent release of CA from CAGO nanocomposite and conformed well to the pseudo-second order kinetic model. Furthermore, the designed anticancer nanohybrid was thermally more stable than its counterpart. The in vitro cytotoxicity results revealed insignificant toxicity effect towards normal cell line, with a viability of >80% even at higher concentration of 50μg/mL. Contrarily, CAGO nanocomposite revealed enhanced toxic effect towards evaluated cancer cell lines (HepG2 human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, A549 human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line, and HeLa human cervical cancer cell line) compared to its free form.

  7. 1,3,4-Oxadiazoles: An emerging scaffold to target growth factors, enzymes and kinases as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Shalini; Asati, Vivek; Singh, Jagadish; Roy, Partha Pratim

    2015-06-05

    Five member heterocyclic 1,3,4-oxadiazole nucleus find unique place in medicinal chemistry and plays significant role in producing anticancer activity. The small and simple 1,3,4-oxadiazole nucleus is present in various compounds involved in research aimed at evaluating new products that posses interesting pharmacological properties such as antitumour activity. Mono and 2,5-di-substituted-1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives have attracted considerable attention owing to their effective biological activity and extensive use. The important mechanism involved during its tumour suppression is related with the inhibition of different growth factors, enzymes and kinases including telomerase enzyme, histone deacetylase (HDAC), methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP), thymidylate synthase (TS), glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK), epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The focused criteria of this review is to highlights the targeted inhibitory activity of 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives and their structure activity relationship to generate potential anticancer agents.

  8. Molecular combo of photodynamic therapeutic agent silicon(iv) phthalocyanine and anticancer drug cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jiafei; Zhang, Yangmiao; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhang, Changli; Guo, Zijian

    2009-02-28

    The combination of a red light PDT agent and a Pt(ii)-based chemotherapeutic drug at the molecular level maintains the intrinsic functions of each unit; the conjugated complexes exhibit remarkable photocytoxicity and demonstrate potential to serve as agents for DNA-targeting PDT as well as red light photochemotherapy.

  9. New pyrrole derivatives with potent tubulin polymerization inhibiting activity as anticancer agents including hedgehog-dependent cancer.

    PubMed

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-08-14

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

  10. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  11. 1,2,3-Triazole-nimesulide hybrid: Their design, synthesis and evaluation as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Mareddy, Jyoti; Suresh, N; Kumar, C Ganesh; Kapavarapu, Ravikumar; Jayasree, A; Pal, Sarbani

    2017-02-01

    A new hybrid template has been designed by integrating the structural features of nimesulide and the 1,2,3-triazole moiety in a single molecular entity at the same time eliminating the problematic nitro group of nimesulide. The template has been used for the generation of a library of molecules as potential anticancer agents. A mild and greener CuAAC approach has been used to synthesize these compounds via the reaction of 4-azido derivative of nimesulide and terminal alkynes in water. Three of these compounds showed promising growth inhibition (IC50 ∼6-10μM) of A549, HepG2, HeLa and DU145 cancer cell lines but no significant effects on HEK293 cell line. They also inhibited PDE4B in vitro (60-70% at 10μM) that was supported by the docking studies (PLP score 87-94) in silico.

  12. Synthesis and Structure–Activity Relationship Study of 1-Phenyl-1-(quinazolin-4-yl)ethanols as Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A quinazoline derivative PVHD121 (1a) was shown to have strong antiproliferative activity against various tumor-derived cell lines, including A549 (lung), NCI-H460 (lung), HCT116 (colon), MCF7 (breast), PC3 (prostate), and HeLa (cervical) cells with IC50 values from 0.1 to 0.3 μM. A structure–activity relationship (SAR) study at the 2- and 4-position of the quinazoline core lead to the discovery of more potent anticancer agents (14, 16, 17, 19, 24, and 31). The results of an in vitro tubulin polymerization assay and fluorescent-based colchicine site competition assay with purified tubulin indicated that 1a inhibits tubulin polymerization by binding to the colchicine site. PMID:25815147

  13. Discovery of Pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine TTK Inhibitors: CFI-402257 is a Potent, Selective, Bioavailable Anticancer Agent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Laufer, Radoslaw; Patel, Narendra Kumar; Ng, Grace; Sampson, Peter B; Li, Sze-Wan; Lang, Yunhui; Feher, Miklos; Brokx, Richard; Beletskaya, Irina; Hodgson, Richard; Plotnikova, Olga; Awrey, Donald E; Qiu, Wei; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y; Mason, Jacqueline M; Wei, Xin; Lin, Dan Chi-Chia; Che, Yi; Kiarash, Reza; Fletcher, Graham C; Mak, Tak W; Bray, Mark R; Pauls, Henry W

    2016-07-14

    This work describes a scaffold hopping exercise that begins with known imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazines, briefly explores pyrazolo[1,5-a][1,3,5]triazines, and ultimately yields pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines as a novel class of potent TTK inhibitors. An X-ray structure of a representative compound is consistent with 1(1)/2 type inhibition and provides structural insight to aid subsequent optimization of in vitro activity and physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. Incorporation of polar moieties in the hydrophobic and solvent accessible regions modulates physicochemical properties while maintaining potency. Compounds with enhanced oral exposure were identified for xenograft studies. The work culminates in the identification of a potent (TTK K i = 0.1 nM), highly selective, orally bioavailable anticancer agent (CFI-402257) for IND enabling studies.

  14. Design and synthesis of novel hydroxyanthraquinone nitrogen mustard derivatives as potential anticancer agents via a bioisostere approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li-Ming; Ma, Feng-Yan; Jin, Hai-Shan; Zheng, Shilong; Zhong, Qiu; Wang, Guangdi

    2016-01-01

    A series of hydroxyanthraquinones having an alkylating N-mustard pharmacophore at 1′-position were synthesized via a bioisostere approach to evaluate their cytotoxicity against four tumor cell lines (MDA-MB-231, HeLa, MCF-7 and A549). These compounds displayed significant in vitro cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, reflecting the excellent selectivity for the human breast cancer. Among them, compound 5k was the most cytotoxic with IC50 value of 0.263 nM and is more potent than DXR (IC50 = 0.294 nM) in inhibiting the growth of MCF-7 cells. The excellent cytotoxicity and good selectivity of compound 5k suggest that it could be a promising lead for further design and development of anticancer agents, especially for breast cancer. PMID:26291039

  15. Inhibition of Pediatric Glioblastoma Tumor Growth by the Anti-Cancer Agent OKN-007 in Orthotopic Mouse Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho de Souza, Patricia; Mallory, Samantha; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; Li, Xiao-Nan; McNall-Knapp, Rene Y.; Fung, Kar-Ming; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric glioblastomas (pGBM), although rare, are one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in children, with tumors essentially refractory to existing treatments. Here, we describe the use of conventional and advanced in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to assess a novel orthotopic xenograft pGBM mouse (IC-3752GBM patient-derived culture) model, and to monitor the effects of the anti-cancer agent OKN-007 as an inhibitor of pGBM tumor growth. Immunohistochemistry support data is also presented for cell proliferation and tumor growth signaling. OKN-007 was found to significantly decrease tumor volumes (p<0.05) and increase animal survival (p<0.05) in all OKN-007-treated mice compared to untreated animals. In a responsive cohort of treated animals, OKN-007 was able to significantly decrease tumor volumes (p<0.0001), increase survival (p<0.001), and increase diffusion (p<0.01) and perfusion rates (p<0.05). OKN-007 also significantly reduced lipid tumor metabolism in responsive animals [(Lip1.3 and Lip0.9)-to-creatine ratio (p<0.05)], as well as significantly decrease tumor cell proliferation (p<0.05) and microvessel density (p<0.05). Furthermore, in relationship to the PDGFRα pathway, OKN-007 was able to significantly decrease SULF2 (p<0.05) and PDGFR-α (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α) (p<0.05) immunoexpression, and significantly increase decorin expression (p<0.05) in responsive mice. This study indicates that OKN-007 may be an effective anti-cancer agent for some patients with pGBMs by inhibiting cell proliferation and angiogenesis, possibly via the PDGFRα pathway, and could be considered as an additional therapy for pediatric brain tumor patients. PMID:26248280

  16. Effect of cyclosporin A on human bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitors with anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Y; Matsuda, H; Kida, K

    1995-10-01

    Cyclosporin A (CyA) overcomes P-glycoprotein (P-gp) associated multidrug resistance (MDR). P-gp expression is frequently observed among, not only various cancer cells, but also several normal tissues including bone marrow progenitor cells. These findings lead us to examine whether CyA enhances the myelotoxicity of anti-cancer agents. Bone marrow mononuclear cells were incubated with anti-cancer agents (vincristine, VCR; doxorubicin, ADM; etoposide, VP-16; cytarabine, Ara-C; methotrexate, MTX) and a concentration of CyA (0.5, 5.0 micrograms/mL). The methylcellulose assay for granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (CFU-GM) was conducted using the post-treated cells. There was no significant toxicity for marrow CFU-GM formation after 72 h incubation with CyA (84-108% of control). The inhibitory concentration that reduced colonies by 50% (IC50) was 12 nmol/L for VCR, 6 nmol/L for ADM, 220 nmol/L for VP-16, 15 nmol/L for Ara-C and 35 nmol/L for MTX, respectively. For VCR, ADM and VP-16, the number of CFU-GM was unchanged with the addition of CyA at 0.5 microgram/mL concentration. In contrast at 5 micrograms/mL CyA, the number of CFU-GM (% of control) was reduced significantly (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). With MTX and Ara-C, the number of CFU-GM was unchanged after addition of CyA, even at 5 micrograms/mL concentration. We conclude CyA may therefore enhance cytotoxic drug sensitivity in MDR tumor cells at a clinically achievable concentration (0.5 microgram/mL) without marrow toxicity.

  17. Insights into the importance for designing curcumin-inspired anticancer agents by a prooxidant strategy: The case of diarylpentanoids.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fang; Liu, Guo-Yun; Li, Yan; Yan, Wen-Jing; Wang, Qi; Yang, Jie; Lu, Dong-Liang; Ding, De-Jun; Lin, Dong; Zhou, Bo

    2015-08-01

    Developing anticancer agents by a prooxidant strategy has attracted increasing attention in recent years, although it is not conventional in medicinal chemistry and is completely opposite to antioxidant therapy. In this work, a panel of diarylpentanoids as the curcumin mono-carbonyl analogs were designed and synthesized, and their cytotoxic and proapoptotic mechanisms against human lung cancer A549 cells were investigated at the frontiers of chemistry and biology. It was found that compared with curcumin, the compounds (A1, B1, and C1) bearing two ortho substituents on the aromatic rings, especially A1, exhibit significantly increased cytotoxic and proapoptotic activities through a Michael acceptor unit-dependent prooxidant-mediated mechanism. The prooxidative ability is governed not only by their electrophilicity but also by their geometry, cellular uptake and metabolic stability, and TrxR-inhibitory activity. Mechanistic investigation reveals that the compound A1 could effectively and irreversibly modify the TrxR by virtue of the above optimal biochemical parameters, and convert this antioxidant enzyme into a reactive oxygen species (ROS) promoter, resulting in a burst of the intracellular ROS including H2O2 and O2(-)•. The ROS generation is associated with falling apart in the redox buffering system, and subsequently induces increases in Ca(2+) influx and oxidative stress, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, ultimately leading to cell apoptosis. This work highlights the feasibility in designing curcumin-inspired anticancer agents by a prooxidant strategy, and gives us useful information on how to design them.

  18. Methylsulfonyl benzothiazoles (MSBT) derivatives: Search for new potential antimicrobial and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Lad, Nitin P; Manohar, Yogesh; Mascarenhas, Malcolm; Pandit, Yashwant B; Kulkarni, Mahesh R; Sharma, Rajiv; Salkar, Kavita; Suthar, Ashish; Pandit, Shivaji S

    2017-03-01

    A series of novel 4 and 5-substituted methylsulfonyl benzothiazole (MSBT) compounds having amide, alkoxy, sulfonamide, nitro and amine functionality were synthesized from sequential reactions on 5-ethoxy-2-(methylsulfonyl)benzo[d]thiazole such as nitration, reduction, sulfonation, dealkylation, etc. All synthesized compounds were screened against antimicrobial and selected screened for anticancer activity. Antimicrobial activities studies reveled that among all compounds screened, out of MSBT-07, MSBT-11, MSBT-12, MSBT-14, MSBT-19, and MSBT-27 were found to have promising antimicrobial activity at MIC range of 4-50μg/ml against selected bacterial as well as fungal species. Compounds having good antimicrobial activity were screened for cervical cancer (HeLA cell lines). Of these MSBT-07 and MSBT-12 significantly reduced the cell growth. Consequently their calculated GI50 values were found to be 0.1 or <0.1μM.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of 2-substituted benzimidazoles and their evaluation as anticancer agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, Mohammad; Khan, Azmat Ali; Al-Resayes, Saud I.; Islam, Mohammad Shahidul; Saxena, Ajit Kumar; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Musarrat, Javed; Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata; Kruszynski, Rafal

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we report a series of benzimidazole derivatives synthesized from benzene-1,2-diamine and aryl-aldehydes at room temperature. The synthesized compounds have been characterized on the basis of elemental analysis and various spectroscopic studies viz., IR, 1H- and 13C-NMR, ESI-MS as well by X-ray single X-ray crystallographic study. Interaction of these compounds with CT-DNA has been examined with fluorescence experiments and showed significant binding ability. All the synthesized compounds have been screened for their antitumor activities against various human cancer cell lines viz., Human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7), Human leukemia cell line (THP-1), Human prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3) and adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial cell lines (A-549). Interestingly, all the compounds showed significant anticancer activity.

  20. Synthesis of novel anticancer agents through opening of spiroacetal ring of diosgenin.

    PubMed

    Hamid, A A; Hasanain, Mohammad; Singh, Arjun; Bhukya, Balakishan; Omprakash; Vasudev, Prema G; Sarkar, Jayanta; Chanda, Debabrata; Khan, Feroz; Aiyelaagbe, O O; Negi, Arvind S

    2014-09-01

    Diosgenin has been modified to furostane derivatives after opening the F-spiroacetal ring. The aldehyde group at C26 in derivative 8 was unexpectedly transformed to the ketone 9. The structure of ketone 9 was confirmed by spectroscopy and finally by X-ray crystallography. Five of the diosgenin derivatives showed significant anticancer activity against human cancer cell lines. The most potent molecule of this series i.e. compound 7, inhibited cellular growth by arresting the population at G0/G1 phase of cell division cycle. Cells undergo apoptosis after exposure to the derivative 7 which was evident by increase in sub G0 population in cell cycle analysis. Docking experiments showed caspase-3 and caspase-9 as possible molecular targets for these compounds. This was further validated by cleavage of PARP, a caspase target in apoptotic pathway. Compound 7 was found non-toxic up to 1000mg/kg dose in acute oral toxicity in Swiss albino mice.

  1. Library construction and biological evaluation of enmein-type diterpenoid analogues as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Dahong; Xu, Shengtao; Cai, Hao; Pei, Lingling; Wang, Lei; Wu, Xiaoming; Yao, Hequan; Jiang, Jieyun; Sun, Yijun; Xu, Jinyi

    2013-05-01

    A library of promising enmein-type 14-O-diterpenoid derivatives was constructed from a commercially available kaurene-type oridonin by practical and efficient synthetic methods. These synthetic derivatives were evaluated for their antiproliferative activities against a set of four human cancer cell lines. The IC50 values are similar to or improved over those of the parent molecule and paclitaxel, the latter of which was used as a positive control. Compound 29 was further investigated for its apoptotic properties against human hepatocarcinoma Bel-7402 cells to better understand its mode of action. Moreover, compound 29 was shown to have potent antitumor activity in vivo in studies with a murine model of gastric cancer (MGC-803 mice). These results warrant further preclinical investigations of these diterpenoid-based analogues as potential novel anticancer chemotherapeutics.

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of some novel tetrahydroquinolines as anticancer and antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Faidallah, Hassan M; Saqer, Alaa A; Alamry, Khalid A; Khan, Khalid A; Asiri, Abdullah M

    2014-06-01

    This study reports the synthesis of a series of new 2-amino-3-cyano-8-methyl-4-substituted-5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinolines along with some derived fused-ring systems. Ten compounds have shown remarkable cytotoxic activity against human colon carcinoma HT29, hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Caucasian breast adenocarcinoma MCF7 cell lines. Six compounds showed considerable broad-spectrum cytotoxic activity among which two proved to be the most active derivatives. Likewise, seven compounds from the series were found to exhibit significant antimicrobial activity and three of them proved to be the most active candidates. Two alkylthio-pyrimido quinolines are suggested as possible antimicrobial and anticancer candidates in the present series.

  3. Anticancer agent xanthohumol inhibits IL-2 induced signaling pathways involved in T cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongbo; Gao, Xiaohua; Deeb, Dorrah; Arbab, Ali S.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Gautam, Subhash C.

    2013-01-01

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylated chalcone present in hops exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer activity. In the present study we show that XN inhibits the proliferation of mouse lymphoma cells and IL-2 induced proliferation and cell cycle progression in mouse splenic T cells. The suppression of T cell proliferation by XN was due to the inhibition of IL-2 induced Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/STAT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) signaling pathways. XN also inhibited proliferation-related cellular proteins such as c-Myc, c-Fos and NF-κB and cyclin D1. Thus, understanding of IL-2 induced cell signaling pathways in normal T cells, which are constitutively turned on in T cell lymphomas may facilitate development of XN for the treatment of hematologic cancers. PMID:22946339

  4. New triarylpyrazoles as broad-spectrum anticancer agents: design, synthesis, and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    El-Gamal, Mohammed I; Park, Yi Seul; Chi, Dae Yoon; Yoo, Kyung Ho; Oh, Chang-Hyun

    2013-07-01

    A new series of diarylureas and diarylamides possessing 1,3,4-triarylpyrazole scaffold was designed and synthesized. Their in vitro antiproliferative activities against NCI-60 cell line panel were tested. Most of the compounds showed strong and broad-spectrum antiproliferative activities. Compound 18 exerted sub-micromolar IC50 values over all the subpanels of nine different cancer types. Its IC50 value over MDA-MB-435 melanoma cell line was 27 nM. Compounds 10-13, 22, and 23 possessing urea spacer exerted lethal effect over the NCI-60 panel with mean %inhibitions more than 100% in single-dose testing. Compounds 13 and 23 with urea linker and 3',5'-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl terminal ring showed the highest mean %inhibition over the NCI-60 panel in single-dose testing, and showed high potencies and broad-spectrum anticancer activities in five-dose testing.

  5. Investigating the cellular fate of a DNA-targeted platinum-based anticancer agent by orthogonal double-click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xin; Ding, Song; Liu, Fang; Kucera, Gregory L; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study a platinum-based anticancer agent in intact NCI-H460 lung cancer cells. Orthogonal copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click) reactions were used to simultaneously determine the cell-cycle-specific localization of the azide-functionalized platinum-acridine agent 1 and monitor its effects on nucleic acid metabolism. Copper-catalyzed postlabeling showed advantages over copper-free click chemistry using a dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO)-modified reporter dye, which produced high background levels in microscopic images and failed to efficiently label platinum adducts in chromatin. Compound 1 was successfully labeled with the fluorophore DIBO to yield 1* (characterized by in-line high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray mass spectrometry). 1 and 1* show a high degree of colocalization in the confocal images, but the ability of 1* to target the (compacted) chromatin was markedly reduced, most likely owing to the steric bulk introduced by the DIBO tag. Nuclear platinum levels correlated inversely with the ability of the cells to synthesize DNA and cause cell cycle arrest, as confirmed by bivariate flow cytometry analysis. In addition, a decrease in the level of cellular transcription, shrinkage of the nucleolar regions, and redistribution of RNA into the cytosol were observed. Postlabeling in conjunction with colocalization experiments is a useful tool for studying the cell killing mechanism of this type of DNA-targeted agent.

  6. Investigating the cellular fate of a DNA-targeted platinum-based anticancer agent by orthogonal double-click chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Xin; Ding, Song; Liu, Fang; Kucera, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study a platinum-based anticancer agent in intact NCI-H460 lung cancer cells. Orthogonal copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (click) reactions were used to simultaneously determine the cell-cycle-specific localization of the azide-functionalized platinum–acridine agent 1 and monitor its effects on nucleic acid metabolism. Copper-catalyzed postlabeling showed advantages over copper-free click chemistry using a dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO)-modified reporter dye, which produced high background levels in microscopic images and failed to efficiently label platinum adducts in chromatin. Compound 1 was successfully labeled with the fluorophore DIBO to yield 1* (characterized by in-line high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray mass spectrometry). 1 and 1* show a high degree of colocalization in the confocal images, but the ability of 1* to target the (compacted) chromatin was markedly reduced, most likely owing to the steric bulk introduced by the DIBO tag. Nuclear platinum levels correlated inversely with the ability of the cells to synthesize DNA and cause cell cycle arrest, as confirmed by bivariate flow cytometry analysis. In addition, a decrease in the level of cellular transcription, shrinkage of the nucleolar regions, and redistribution of RNA into the cytosol were observed. Postlabeling in conjunction with colocalization experiments is a useful tool for studying the cell killing mechanism of this type of DNA-targeted agent. PMID:24407462

  7. DRDE-07 and its analogues as promising cytoprotectants to nitrogen mustard (HN-2)--an alkylating anticancer and chemical warfare agent.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manoj; Vijayaraghavan, R; Gautam, Anshoo

    2009-08-10

    Nitrogen mustard (HN-2), also known as mechlorethamine, is an alkylating anticancer agent as well as blister inducing chemical warfare agent. We evaluated the cytoprotective efficacy of amifostine, DRDE-07 and their analogues, and other antidotes of mustard agents against HN-2. Administration of 1 LD(50) of HN-2 (20mg/kg) percutaneously, decreased WBC count from 24h onwards. Liver glutathione (GSH) level decreased prominently and the maximum depletion was observed on 7th day post-HN-2 administration. Oxidised glutathione (GSSG) level increased significantly at 24h post-administration and subsequently showed a progressive decrease. Hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) level and percent DNA damage increased progressively following HN-2 administration. The spleen weight decreased progressively and reached a minimum on 3-4 days with subsequent increase. The antidotes were administered repeatedly for 4 and 8 days after percutaneous administration of single sublethal dose (0.5 and 0.25 LD(50)) of HN-2. Treatment with DRDE-07, DRDE-30 and DRDE-35 significantly protected the changes in spleen weight, WBC count, GSH, GSSG, MDA and DNA damage following HN-2 administration (0.5 and 0.25 LD(50)). There was no alteration in the transaminases (AST and ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities, neither with HN-2 nor with antidotes. The present study shows that HN-2 is highly toxic by percutaneous route and DRDE-07, DRDE-30 and DRDE-35 can partially protect it.

  8. Lappaol F, a novel anticancer agent isolated from plant arctium Lappa L.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qing; Liu, Kanglun; Shen, Xiaoling; Jin, Weixin; Jiang, Lingyan; Sheikh, M Saeed; Hu, Yingjie; Huang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to search for new cancer-fighting therapeutics, we identified a novel anticancer constituent, Lappaol F, from plant Arctium Lappa L. Lappaol F suppressed cancer cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner in human cancer cell lines of various tissue types. We found that Lappaol F induced G(1) and G(2) cell-cycle arrest, which was associated with strong induction of p21 and p27 and reduction of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). Depletion of p21 via genetic knockout or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) approaches significantly abrogated Lappaol F-mediated G(2) arrest and CDK1 and cyclin B1 suppression. These results suggest that p21 seems to play a crucial role in Lappaol F-mediated regulation of CDK1 and cyclin B1 and G(2) arrest. Lappaol F-mediated p21 induction was found to occur at the mRNA level and involved p21 promoter activation. Lappaol F was also found to induce cell death in several cancer cell lines and to activate caspases. In contrast with its strong growth inhibitory effects on tumor cells, Lappaol F had minimal cytotoxic effects on nontumorigenic epithelial cells tested. Importantly, our data also demonstrate that Lappaol F exhibited strong growth inhibition of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Lappaol F was well tolerated in treated animals without significant toxicity. Taken together, our results, for the first time, demonstrate that Lappaol F exhibits antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo and has strong potential to be developed as an anticancer therapeutic.

  9. The effects of nanoparticle drug loading on the pharmacokinetics of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Petschauer, Jennifer S.; Madden, Andrew J.; Kirschbrown, Whitney P.; Song, Gina; Zamboni, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in carrier-mediated agents, which include nanoparticles, nanosomes and conjugates, have revolutionized drug delivery capabilities over the past decade. While providing numerous advantages, such as greater solubility, duration of exposure and delivery to the site of action over their small-molecule counterparts, there is substantial variability in systemic clearance and distribution, tumor delivery and pharmacologic effects (efficacy and toxicity) of these agents. This review provides an overview of factors that affect the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of carrier-mediated agents in preclinical models and patients. PMID:25707978

  10. Potential anticancer heterometallic Fe-Au and Fe-Pd agents: initial mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Lease, Nicholas; Vasilevski, Vadim; Carreira, Monica; de Almeida, Andreia; Sanaú, Mercedes; Hirva, Pipsa; Casini, Angela; Contel, María

    2013-07-25

    A series of gold(III) and palladium(II) heterometallic complexes with new iminophosphorane ligands derived from ferrocenylphosphanes [{Cp-P(Ph2)═N-Ph}2Fe] (1), [{Cp-P(Ph2)═N-CH2-2-NC5H4}2Fe] (2), and [{Cp-P(Ph2)═N-CH2-2-NC5H4}Fe(Cp)] (3) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Ligands 2 and 3 afford stable coordination complexes [AuCl2(3)]ClO4, [{AuCl2}2(2)](ClO4)2, [PdCl2(3)], and [{PdCl2}2(2)]. The complexes have been evaluated for their antiproliferative properties in human ovarian cancer cells sensitive and resistant to cisplatin (A2780S/R), in human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and in a nontumorigenic human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK-293T). The highly cytotoxic trimetallic derivatives M2Fe (M = Au, Pd) are more cytotoxic to cancer cells than their corresponding monometallic fragments. Moreover, these complexes were significantly more cytotoxic than cisplatin in the resistant A2780R and the MCF7 cell lines. Studies of the interactions of the trimetallic compounds with DNA and the zinc-finger protein PARP-1 indicate that they exert anticancer effects in vitro based on different mechanisms of actions with respect to cisplatin.

  11. The Use of 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 as an Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkowska, Ewa; Wallace, Graham R.; Brown, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    The notion that vitamin D can influence the incidence of cancer arose from epidemiological studies. The major source of vitamin D in the organism is skin production upon exposure to ultra violet-B. The very first observation of an inverse correlation between exposure of individuals to the sun and the likelihood of cancer was reported as early as 1941. In 1980, Garland and Garland hypothesised, from findings from epidemiological studies of patients in the US with colon cancer, that vitamin D produced in response to sun exposure is protective against cancer as opposed to sunlight per se. Later studies revealed inverse correlations between sun exposure and the occurrence of prostate and breast cancers. These observations prompted laboratory investigation of whether or not vitamin D had an effect on cancer cells. Vitamin D is not active against cancer cells, but the most active metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) has profound biological effects. Here, we review the anticancer action of 1,25D, clinical trials of 1,25D to date and the prospects of the future therapeutic use of new and low calcaemic analogues. PMID:27187375

  12. Synthesis of xanthohumol analogues and discovery of potent thioredoxin reductase inhibitor as potential anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baoxin; Duan, Dongzhu; Ge, Chunpo; Yao, Juan; Liu, Yaping; Li, Xinming; Fang, Jianguo

    2015-02-26

    The selenoprotein thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) are attractive targets for anticancer drugs development. Xanthohumol (Xn), a naturally occurring polyphenol chalcone from hops, has received increasing attention because of its multiple pharmacological activities. We synthesized Xn and its 43 analogues and discovered that compound 13n displayed the highest cytotoxicity toward HeLa cells (IC50 = 1.4 μM). Structure-activity relationship study indicates that the prenyl group is not necessary for cytotoxicity, and introducing electron-withdrawing group, especially on the meta-position, is favored. In addition, methylation of the phenoxyl groups generally improves the potency. Mechanistic study revealed that 13n selectively inhibits TrxR and induces reactive oxygen species and apoptosis in HeLa cells. Cells overexpressing TrxR are resistant to 13n insult, while knockdown of TrxR sensitizes cells to 13n treatment, highlighting the physiological significance of targeting TrxR by 13n. The clarification of the structural determinants for the potency would guide the design of novel potent molecules for future development.

  13. Natural product modulators of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as potential anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Sieglitz, Florian; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L

    2016-11-07

    Treatment of cancer is a significant challenge in clinical medicine, and its research is a top priority in chemical biology and drug discovery. Consequently, there is an urgent need for identifying innovative chemotypes capable of modulating unexploited drug targets. The transient receptor potential (TRPs) channels persist scarcely explored as targets, despite intervening in a plethora of pathophysiological events in numerous diseases, including cancer. Both agonists and antagonists have proven capable of evoking phenotype changes leading to either cell death or reduced cell migration. Among these, natural products entail biologically pre-validated and privileged architectures for TRP recognition. Furthermore, several natural products have significantly contributed to our current knowledge on TRP biology. In this Tutorial Review we focus on selected natural products, e.g. capsaicinoids, cannabinoids and terpenes, by highlighting challenges and opportunities in their use as starting points for designing natural product-inspired TRP channel modulators. Importantly, the de-orphanization of natural products as TRP channel ligands may leverage their exploration as viable strategy for developing anticancer therapies. Finally, we foresee that TRP channels may be explored for the selective pharmacodelivery of cytotoxic payloads to diseased tissues, providing an innovative platform in chemical biology and molecular medicine.

  14. Iron(III)-binding of the anticancer agents doxorubicin and vosaroxin.

    PubMed

    Mjos, Katja Dralle; Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Jamieson, Gene; Fox, Judith A; Orvig, Chris

    2015-02-07

    The Fe(iii)-binding constant of vosaroxin, an anticancer quinolone derivative, has been determined spectrophotometrically and compared with the analogous Fe(iii) complex formed with doxorubicin. The in vivo metabolic stability and iron coordination properties of the quinolones compared to the anthracylines may provide significant benefit to cardiovascular safety. The mechanism of action of both molecules target the topoisomerase II enzyme. Both doxorubicin (Hdox, log βFeL3 = 33.41, pM = 17.0) and vosaroxin (Hvox, log βFeL3 = 33.80(3), pM = 15.9) bind iron(iii) with comparable strength; at physiological pH however, [Fe(vox)3] is the predominant species in contrast to a mixture of species observed for the Fe:dox system. Iron(iii) nitrate and gallium(iii) nitrate at a 1 : 3 ratio with vosaroxin formed stable tris(vosaroxacino)-iron(iii) and tris(vosaroxino)gallium(iii) complexes that were isolated and characterized. Their redox behavior was studied by CV, and their stereochemistry was further explored in temperature dependent (1)H NMR studies. The molecular pharmacology of their interaction with iron(iii) may be one possible differentiation in the safety profile of quinolones compared to anthracyclines in relation to cardiotoxicity.

  15. Resveratrol-salicylate derivatives as selective DNMT3 inhibitors and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Aldawsari, Fahad S; Aguayo-Ortiz, Rodrigo; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Yoo, Jakyung; Luo, Minkui; Medina-Franco, José L; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A

    2016-10-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol with plethora of biological activities. Resveratrol has previously shown to decrease DNA-methyltransferase (DNMT) enzymes expression and to reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes. Currently, it seems that no resveratrol analogs have been developed as DNMT inhibitors. Recently, we reported the synthesis of resveratrol-salicylate derivatives and by examining the chemical structure of these analogs, we proposed that these compounds could exhibit DNMT inhibition especially that they resembled NSC 14778, a compound we previously identified as a DNMT inhibitor by virtual screening. Indeed, using in vitro DNMT inhibition assay, some of the resveratrol-salicylate analogs we screened in this work that showed selective inhibition against DNMT3 enzymes which were greater than resveratrol. A molecular docking study revealed key binding interactions with DNMT3A and DNMT3B enzymes. In addition, the most active analog, 10 showed considerable cytotoxicity against three human cancer cells; HT-29, HepG2 and SK-BR-3, which was greater than resveratrol. Further studies are needed to understand the anticancer mechanisms of these derivatives.

  16. Novel Anticancer Agents Based on Targeting the Trimer Interface of the PRL Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunpeng; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Sijiu; Zhang, Lujuan; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Zeng, Li-Fan; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-08-15

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) oncoproteins are phosphatases overexpressed in numerous types of human cancer. Elevated levels of PRL associate with metastasis and poor clinical outcomes. In principle, PRL phosphatases offer appealing therapeutic targets, but they remain underexplored due to the lack of specific chemical probes. In this study, we address this issue by exploiting a unique property of PRL phosphatases, namely, that they may function as homotrimers. Starting from a sequential structure-based virtual screening and medicinal chemistry strategy, we identified Cmpd-43 and several analogs that disrupt PRL1 trimerization. Biochemical and structural analyses demonstrate that Cmpd-43 and its close analogs directly bind the PRL1 trimer interface and obstruct PRL1 trimerization. Cmpd-43 also specifically blocks the PRL1-induced cell proliferation and migration through attenuation of both ERK1/2 and Akt activity. Importantly, Cmpd-43 exerted potent anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo in a murine xenograft model of melanoma. Our results validate a trimerization-dependent signaling mechanism for PRL and offer proof of concept for trimerization inhibitors as candidate therapeutics to treat PRL-driven cancers. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4805-15. ©2016 AACR.

  17. CRM1 is a direct cellular target of the natural anti-cancer agent plumbagin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejiao; Niu, Mingshan; Xu, Xiaoyu; Cai, Wei; Zeng, Lingyu; Zhou, Xiuping; Yu, Rutong; Xu, Kailin

    2014-01-01

    Plumbagin, a naphthoquinone derived from the medicinal plant Plumbago zeylanica, has been shown to exert anti-cancer and anti-proliferative activities in vitro as well as in animal tumor models. However, the mechanism underlying its anti-tumor action still remains unclear. CRM1 is a nuclear export receptor involved in the active transport of tumor suppressors whose function is altered in cancer due to increased expression and overactive transport. We showed that CRM1 is a direct cellular target of plumbagin. The nuclei of cells incubated with plumbagin accumulated tumor-suppressor proteins and inhibited the interactions between CRM1 and these proteins. Particularly, we demonstrated that plumbagin could specifically react with the conserved Cys(528) of CRM1 but not with a Cys(528) mutant peptide through Mass spectrometric analysis. More importantly, cancer cells that are transfected with mutant CRM1 (C528S) are resistant to the inhibitory effects of plumbagin, demonstrating that the inhibition is through direct interaction with Cys(528) of CRM1. The inhibition of nuclear traffic by plumbagin may account for its therapeutic properties in cancer and inflammatory diseases. Our findings could contribute to the development of a new class of CRM1 inhibitors.

  18. Progress Toward the Development of Noscapine and Derivatives as Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    DeBono, Aaron; Capuano, Ben; Scammells, Peter J

    2015-08-13

    Many nitrogen-moiety containing alkaloids derived from plant origins are bioactive and play a significant role in human health and emerging medicine. Noscapine, a phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid derived from Papaver somniferum, has been used as a cough suppressant since the mid 1950s, illustrating a good safety profile. Noscapine has since been discovered to arrest cells at mitosis, albeit with moderately weak activity. Immunofluorescence staining of microtubules after 24 h of noscapine exposure at 20 μM elucidated chromosomal abnormalities and the inability of chromosomes to complete congression to the equatorial plane for proper mitotic separation ( Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 1998 , 95 , 1601 - 1606 ). A number of noscapine analogues possessing various modifications have been described within the literature and have shown significantly improved antiprolific profiles for a large variety of cancer cell lines. Several semisynthetic antimitotic alkaloids are emerging as possible candidates as novel anticancer therapies. This perspective discusses the advancing understanding of noscapine and related analogues in the fight against malignant disease.

  19. Tumor-targeting peptides and small molecules as anti-cancer agents to overcome drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Sarafraz-Yazdi, Ehsan; Pincus, Matthew R; Michl, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of chemotherapy in cancer therapy, development of resistance to every new therapeutic has been the universal experience. The growing understanding of cancer genomics, cancer-associated signal transduction pathways, and key protein drivers of cancer has enabled cancer biologists and medicinal chemists to develop targeted molecules to interfere with these pathways to tackle drug resistant cancers. However, to the dismay of oncologists, the clinical use of many of these tools has once again brought to the forefront the inevitable challenge of drug resistance. It is now understood that cancer resistance to different therapies involves multiple challenges that encompass the cancer cell itself as well as host physiology. This review presents small molecule inhibitors and peptides as two therapeutic approaches in anti-cancer drug development. Resistance to selected samples of these novel therapies is described in the context of cell autonomous resistance, the contributions of the tumor microenvironment, and germ line factors. For each approach, advantages and disadvantages are discussed on how to better overcome the inevitable challenge of resistance in cancer treatment.

  20. Potential Anticancer Heterometallic Fe-Au and Fe-Pd Agents: Initial Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Lease, Nicholas; Vasilevski, Vadim; Carreira, Monica; de Almeida, Andreia; Sanaú, Mercedes; Hirva, Pipsa; Casini, Angela; Contel, Maria

    2013-01-01

    A series of gold(III) and palladium(II) heterometallic complexes with new iminophosphorane ligands derived from ferrocenyl-phosphanes [{Cp-P(Ph2)=N-Ph}2Fe] (1), [{Cp-P(Ph2)=N-CH2-2-NC5H4}2Fe] (2) and [{Cp-P(Ph2)=N-CH2-2-NC5H4}Fe(Cp)] (3) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Ligands 2 and 3 afford stable coordination complexes [AuCl2(3)]ClO4, [{AuCl2}2(2)](ClO4)2, [PdCl2(3)] and [{PdCl2}2(2)]. The complexes have been evaluated for their antripoliferative properties in human ovarian cancer cells sensitive and resistant to cisplatin (A2780S/R), in human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and in a non-tumorigenic human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK-293T). The highly cytotoxic trimetallic derivatives M2Fe (M = Au, Pd) are more cytotoxic to cancer cells than their corresponding monometallic fragments. Moreover, these complexes were significantly more cytotoxic than cisplatin in the resistant A2780R and the MCF7 cell lines. Studies of the interactions of the trimetallic compounds with DNA and the zinc-finger protein PARP-1 indicate that they exert anticancer effects in vitro based on different mechanisms of actions with respect to cisplatin. PMID:23786413

  1. Application of computer assisted combinatorial chemistry in antivirial, antimalarial and anticancer agents design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burello, E.; Bologa, C.; Frecer, V.; Miertus, S.

    Combinatorial chemistry and technologies have been developed to a stage where synthetic schemes are available for generation of a large variety of organic molecules. The innovative concept of combinatorial design assumes that screening of a large and diverse library of compounds will increase the probability of finding an active analogue among the compounds tested. Since the rate at which libraries are screened for activity currently constitutes a limitation to the use of combinatorial technologies, it is important to be selective about the number of compounds to be synthesized. Early experience with combinatorial chemistry indicated that chemical diversity alone did not result in a significant increase in the number of generated lead compounds. Emphasis has therefore been increasingly put on the use of computer assisted combinatorial chemical techniques. Computational methods are valuable in the design of virtual libraries of molecular models. Selection strategies based on computed physicochemical properties of the models or of a target compound are introduced to reduce the time and costs of library synthesis and screening. In addition, computational structure-based library focusing methods can be used to perform in silico screening of the activity of compounds against a target receptor by docking the ligands into the receptor model. Three case studies are discussed dealing with the design of targeted combinatorial libraries of inhibitors of HIV-1 protease, P. falciparum plasmepsin and human urokinase as potential antivirial, antimalarial and anticancer drugs. These illustrate library focusing strategies.

  2. Pre-clinical evaluation of a novel class of anti-cancer agents, the Pyrrolo-1, 5-benzoxazepines

    PubMed Central

    Greene, LM; Butini, S; Campiani, G; Williams, DC; Zisterer, DM

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are currently ranked one of the most validated targets for chemotherapy; with clinical use of microtubule targeting agents (MTAs) extending beyond half a century. Recent research has focused on the development of novel MTAs to combat drug resistance and drug associated toxicities. Of particular interest are compounds structurally different to those currently used within the clinic. The pyrrolo-1, 5-benzoxazepines (PBOXs) are a structurally distinct novel group of anti-cancer agents, some of which target tubulin. Herein, we review the chemistry, mechanism of action, preclinical development of the PBOXs and comparisons with clinically relevant chemotherapeutics. The PBOXs induce a range of cellular responses including; cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, autophagy, anti-vascular and anti-angiogenic effects. The apoptotic potential of the PBOXs extends across a wide spectrum of cancer-derived cell lines, by targeting tubulin and multiple molecular pathways frequently deregulated in human cancers. Extensive experimental data suggest that combining the PBOXs with established chemotherapeutics or radiation is therapeutically advantageous. Pre-clinical highlights of the PBOXs include; cancer specificity and improved therapeutic efficacy as compared to some current first line therapeutics. PMID:27994676

  3. Anti-cancer agents based on 6-trifluoromethoxybenzimidazole derivatives and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Gakh, Andrei A; Vovk, Mykhaylo V; Mel& #x27; nychenko, Nina V; Sukach, Volodymyr A

    2012-10-23

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds having the structural Formulas (1a,1b), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof as chemotherapy agents for treating of cancer, particularly androgen-independent prostate cancer. The disclosure also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  4. Anti-cancer agents based on 6-trifluoromethoxybenzimidazole derivatives and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Vovk, Mykhaylo V.; Mel'nychenko, Nina V.; Sukach, Volodymyr A.

    2012-08-14

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds having the structural Formulas (1a,1b), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof as chemotherapy agents for treating of cancer, particularly androgen-independent prostate cancer. The disclosure also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  5. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of organometallic gold(I) derivatives as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Elena; Tomás, Alejandro; Atrián-Blasco, Elena; Gascón, Sonia; Romanos, Eduardo; Rodriguez-Yoldi, Mary Jesus; Cerrada, Elena; Laguna, Mariano

    2016-02-14

    Alkyne gold(I) derivatives with the water soluble phosphanes PTA (1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane) and DAPTA (3,7-diacetyl-1,3,7-triaza-5-phosphabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane) were described and their anticancer potential against the colon cancer cell line Caco-2 (PD7 and TC7 clones) was studied. Strong antiproliferative effects are found, for all the new complexes, to be even more pronounced than for the reference drug cisplatin, and similar to auranofin. The interaction of these derivatives with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. The types of quenching and binding constants were determined by a fluorescence quenching method. Moderate values of the binding constants are calculated for the tested derivatives indicating that these complexes can be stored and carried easily by this protein in the body. The study of the thermodynamic parameters in the case of [Au(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CCH2Spyridine)(PTA)] points out to the presence of van der Waals interactions or hydrogen bonding between the metallic complex and the protein. In addition, the complex [Au(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CCH2Spyridine)(PTA)] has shown inhibition in colon cancer proliferation of HTC-116-luc2 cell lines via the apoptotic pathway and S-phase arrest of the cell cycle. Intraperitoneal injection of this derivative in athymic nude mice inoculated with HTC-116-luc2 cells prolonged their survival and displayed moderate inhibition of the tumour growth with no subsequent organ (kidney and liver) damage after treatment.

  6. Zampanolide and dactylolide: cytotoxic tubulin-assembly agents and promising anticancer leads

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Covering: through January 2014 Zampanolide is a marine natural macrolide and a recent addition to the family of microtubule-stabilizing cytotoxic agents. Zampanolide exhibits unique effects on tubulin assembly and is more potent than paclitaxel against several multi-drug resistant cancer cell lines. A high-resolution crystal structure of αβ-tubulin in complex with zampanolide explains how taxane-site microtubule-stabilizing agents promote microtubule assemble and stability. This review provides an overview of current developments of zampanolide and its related but less potent analogue dactylolide, covering their natural sources and isolation, structure and conformation, cytotoxic potential, structure–activity studies, mechanism of action, and syntheses. PMID:24945566

  7. Fluorine-Containing Taxoid Anticancer Agents and Their Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Joshua; Vineberg, Jacob G.; Zuniga, Edison S.; Ojima, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing problem of conventional chemotherapy is the lack of tumor-specific treatments. Traditional chemotherapy relies on the premise that rapidly proliferating cancer cells are more likely to be killed by a cytotoxic agent. In reality, however, cytotoxic agents have very little or no specificity, which leads to systemic toxicity, causing undesirable severe side effects. Consequently, various “molecularly targeted cancer therapies” have been developed for use in specific cancers, including tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. In general, such a drug delivery system consists of a tumor recognition moiety and a cytotoxic “warhead” connected through a “smart” linker to form a conjugate. When a multi-functionalized nanomaterial is used as the vehicle, a “Trojan Horse” approach can be used for mass delivery of cytotoxic “warheads” to maximize the efficacy. Exploitation of the special properties of fluorine has proven successful in the development of new and effective biochemical tools as well as therapeutic agents. Fluorinated congeners can also serve as excellent probes for the investigation of biochemical mechanisms. 19F-NMR can provide unique and powerful tools for mechanistic investigations in chemical biology. This account presents our recent progress, in perspective, on the molecular approaches to the design and development of novel tumor-targeted drug delivery systems for new generation chemotherapy by exploiting the unique nature of fluorine. PMID:23935213

  8. A novel anticancer agent SNG1153 inhibits growth of lung cancer stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zhu, Hai; Han, Yuqing; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Congya; Ma, Junfeng; Lin, Qingcong; Wang, Zhaoyi; Meng, Kun; Fu, Xueqi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in both men and women. Lung cancer contains a small population of cancer cells with stem-like features known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are often more resistant to current therapeutic treatments. Thus, it is urgent to develop a novel agent that is able to inhibit CSCs growth. In this study, we examined the ability of SNG1153, a novel chemical agent to inhibit the growth of lung CSCs. We found that SNG1153 inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in established lung cancer cells. We also found that SNG1153 inhibited the tumorsphere formation and decreased CD133-positive (lung CSC marker) cancer cells. SNG1153 was able to attenuate tumor formation in NOD/SCID (non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient) mice injected with lung tumorsphere cells. We further demonstrated that SNG1153 induced β-catenin phosphorylation and down-regulated β-catenin. Our results thus demonstrate that SNG1153 effectively inhibits the growth of lung CSCs and suggest that SNG1153 may be a novel therapeutic agent to treat human lung cancer. PMID:27281614

  9. Identification of endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing agents by antagonizing autophagy: a new potential strategy for identification of anti-cancer therapeutics in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Emilia; Maddocks, Kami; Flynn, Joseph; Jones, Jeffrey; Cole, Sara L.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Byrd, John C.; Johnson, Amy J.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a vital function in multiple cellular processes. There is a growing interest in developing therapeutic agents that can target the ER in cancer cells, inducing a stress response that leads to cell death. However, ER stress-inducing agents can also induce autophagy, a survival strategy of cancer cells. Therefore, by inhibiting autophagy we can increase the efficacy of the ER stress-inducing agents. Nelfinavir, a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor with anti-cancer properties, can induce ER stress. Nelfinavir’s effects on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are yet to be elucidated. Herein we demonstrate that nelfinavir induces ER morphological changes and stress response, along with an autophagic protective strategy. Our data reveal that chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, significantly increases nelfinavir cytotoxicity. These results identify a novel strategy potentially effective in CLL treatment, by repositioning two well-known drugs as a combinatorial therapy with anti-cancer properties. PMID:23469959

  10. Multi-platinum anti-cancer agents. Substitution-inert compounds for tumor selectivity and new targets.

    PubMed

    Farrell, N P

    2015-12-21

    -action anti-cancer agents.

  11. Anticancer and antimicrobial metallopharmaceutical agents based on palladium, gold, and silver N-heterocyclic carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sriparna; Mohan, Renu; Singh, Jay K; Samantaray, Manoja K; Shaikh, Mobin M; Panda, Dulal; Ghosh, Prasenjit

    2007-12-05

    Complete synthetic, structural, and biomedical studies of two Pd complexes as well as Au and Ag complexes of 1-benzyl-3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene are reported. Specifically, trans-[1-benzyl-3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene]Pd(pyridine)Cl2 (1a) was synthesized from the reaction of 1-benzyl-3-tert-butylimidazolium chloride (1) with PdCl2 in the presence of K2CO3 as a base. The other palladium complex, [1-benzyl-3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene]2PdCl2 (1b), and a gold complex, [1-benzyl-3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene]AuCl (1c), were synthesized by following a transmetallation route from the silver complex, [1-benzyl-3-tert-butylimidazol-2-ylidene]AgCl (1d), by treatment with (COD)PdCl2 and (SMe2)AuCl, respectively. The silver complex 1d in turn was synthesized by the reaction of 1 with Ag2O. The molecular structures of 1a-d have been determined by X-ray diffraction studies. Biomedical studies revealed that, while the palladium complexes 1a and 1b displayed potent anticancer activity, the gold (1c) and silver (1d) complexes exhibited significant antimicrobial properties. Specifically, 1b showed strong antiproliferative activity against three types of human tumor cells, namely, cervical cancer (HeLa), breast cancer (MCF-7), and colon adenocarcinoma (HCT 116), in culture. The antiproliferative activity of 1b was found to be considerably stronger than that of cisplatin. The 1b complex inhibited tumor cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle progression at the G2 phase, preventing the mitotic entry of the cell. We present evidence suggesting that the treated cells underwent programmed cell death through a p53-dependent pathway. Though both the gold (1c) and silver (1d) complexes showed antimicrobial activity toward Bacillus subtilis, 1c was found to be ca. 2 times more potent than 1d.

  12. Comparison of the effects of various anticancer agents on intestinal anastomosis after intraperitoneal administration.

    PubMed

    Arikan, A Y; Senel, F M; Akman, R Y; Can, C

    1999-01-01

    In this study, the effects of intraperitoneal 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cisplatinum (Cis), adriamycin (Adr), and methotrexate (MTX) administration on rat intestinal anastomosis were compared. Cis and MTX led to significant weight loss in the first 5 days compared with the control group. Within 14 days all rats except the MTX group nearly reached their preoperative weight. No remarkable weight loss or systemic toxicity was observed among the 5-FU and Adr groups. The anastomosis bursting pressure (ABP) at 1 week was significantly lower than that of the control group (P < 0.01 and P < 0.005, respectively). On day 14 the anastomosis bursting pressure in the Cis group was similar to that of the control group but was significantly lower in the MTX group (P < 0.002). Histopathologically, MTX avoided the development of a mucosal layer at the anastomosis site and led to ulcer formation in some of the rats. The ABPs at 7 and 14 days were similar to those in the control group. Neither of the agents had any significant mechanical or histopathologic adverse effects on anastomosis. According to the results of our study, MTX impaired the healing of the anastomosis, and we thus conclude that the intraperitoneal administration of this agent is not safe. On the other hand, Cis showed a detrimental effect on the anastomosis, particularly in the early phase, but this effect disappeared in the late phase. Cis thus should not be administered in the early postoperative phase. As a result, 5-FU and Adr were found to be the safest agents as they did not delay wound healing and did not reduce the anastomotic strength.

  13. Molecular predictors of therapeutic response to specific anti-cancer agents

    DOEpatents

    Spellman, Paul T.; Gray, Joe W.; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Heiser, Laura M.; Gibb, William J.; Kuo, Wen-lin; Wang, Nicholas J.

    2016-11-29

    Herein is described the use of a collection of 50 breast cancer cell lines to match responses to 77 conventional and experimental therapeutic agents with transcriptional, proteomic and genomic subtypes found in primary tumors. Almost all compounds produced strong differential responses across the cell lines produced responses that were associated with transcriptional and proteomic subtypes and produced responses that were associated with recurrent genome copy number abnormalities. These associations can now be incorporated into clinical trials that test subtype markers and clinical responses simultaneously.

  14. In Vitro Evaluation of Oxoplatin: An Oral Platinum(IV) Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Olszewski, Ulrike; Ach, Florian; Ulsperger, Ernst; Baumgartner, Gerhard; Zeillinger, Robert; Bednarski, Patrick; Hamilton, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Platinum(IV) compounds like oxoplatin (cis, cis, trans-diammine-dichlorido-dihydroxido-platinum(IV)) show increased stability and therefore can be applied orally. In a panel of 38 human cancer cell lines this drug induced S-phase arrest and cell death with IC50 values 2.5-fold higher than cisplatin. Oxoplatin may be converted to cisplatin by intracellular reducing agents, however, exposure to 0.1 M HCl mimicking gastric acid yielded cis-diammine-tetrachlorido-platinum(IV) exhibiting twofold increased activity. Similar results were obtained for another platinum(IV) compound, JM 149 (ammine-dichlorido-(cyclohexylamine)-dihydroxido-platinum(IV)), but not for its parent drug JM 216/satraplatin. Genome-wide expression profiling of H526 small cell lung cancer cells treated with these platinum species revealed clear differences in the expression pattern of affected genes between oxoplatin and cisplatin. In conclusion, oxoplatin constitutes a potent oral agent that is either reduced or converted to distinct active compounds, for example, by gastric acid or acidic areas prevailing in solid tumors, in dependence of the respective pharmaceutical formulation. PMID:19587824

  15. Retaspimycin hydrochloride (IPI-504): a novel heat shock protein inhibitor as an anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Britt Erika; Vesole, David H

    2009-09-01

    Heat shock proteins are vital to cell survival under conditions of stress. They bind client proteins to assist in protein stabilization, translocation of polypeptides across cell membranes and recovery of proteins from aggregates. Heat shock protein inhibitors are a diverse group of novel agents that have been demonstrated to have pro-apoptotic effects on malignant cells through inhibition of ATP binding on the ATP/ADP-binding pocket of the heat shock protein. Initial development of heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, geldanamycin and 17-AAG, were limited by hepatotoxicity and the need for solvent carrying agents. In contrast, retaspimycin, or IPI-504, a derivative of geldanamycin and 17-AAG, is highly soluble in water and generally well tolerated. In Phase I/II trials, retaspimycin has shown activity in NSCLC and gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The most promising activity was observed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Phase I/II trials are currently underway to evaluate the dosing schedules and activity of IPI-504 in breast cancer. Given the in vitro activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, melanoma, leukemia and pancreatic cancer, current and future trials are of clinical interest. This article reviews IPI-504 and its utility in a wide variety of cancer phenotypes.

  16. Novel angular benzophenazines: dual topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II inhibitors as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Vicker, Nigel; Burgess, Luke; Chuckowree, Irina S; Dodd, Rory; Folkes, Adrian J; Hardick, David J; Hancox, Timothy C; Miller, Warren; Milton, John; Sohal, Sukhjit; Wang, Shouming; Wren, Stephen P; Charlton, Peter A; Dangerfield, Wendy; Liddle, Chris; Mistry, Prakash; Stewart, Alistair J; Denny, William A

    2002-01-31

    A series of substituted angular benzophenazines were prepared using a new synthetic route via a novel regiocontrolled condensation of 1,2-naphthoquinones and 2,3-diaminobenzoic acids. The synthesis and biological activity of this new series of substituted 8,9-benzo[a]phenazine carboxamide systems are described. The analogues were evaluated against the H69 parental human small cell lung carcinoma cell line and H69/LX4 resistant cell line which overexpresses P-glycoprotein. Selected analogues were evaluated against the COR-L23 parental human non small cell lung carcinoma cell line and the COR-L23/R resistant cell line which overexpresses multidrug resistance protein. This series of novel angular benzophenazines were potent cytotoxic agents in these cell lines and may be able to circumvent multidrug resistance mechanisms which result in the lack of efficacy of many drugs in cancer chemotherapy. These compounds show dual inhibition of topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II and thus target two key enzymes responsible for the topology of DNA that are active at different points in the cell cycle. The introduction of chirality into the carboxamide side chain of these novel benzophenazine carboxamides has resulted in the discovery of a potent enantiospecific series of cytotoxic agents, exemplified by 4-methoxy-benzo[a]phenazine-11-carboxylic acid (2-(dimethylamino)-1-(R)-methyl-ethyl)-amide, XR11576 ((R)-4j' '). In vivo activity has been demonstrated for 4-methoxy-benzo[a]phenazine-11-carboxylic acid (2-(dimethylamino)-1-(R)-methyl-ethyl)-amide, XR11576, after intravenous administration to female mice, and this compound has been selected as a development candidate for further evaluation.

  17. Evaluation of SD-208, a TGF-β-RI Kinase Inhibitor, as an Anticancer Agent in Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Fadakar, Puran; Akbari, Abolfazl; Ghassemi, Fariba; Mobini, Gholam Reza; Mohebi, Masoumeh; Bolhassani, Manzar; Abed Khojasteh, Hoda; Heidari, Mansour

    2016-06-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor in children resulting from genetic alterations and transformation of mature retinal cells. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of SD-208, TGF-β-RI kinase inhibitor, on the expression of some miRNAs including a miR-17/92 cluster in retinoblastoma cells. Prior to initiate this work, the cell proliferation was studied by Methyl Thiazolyl Tetrazolium (MTT) and bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assays. Then, the expression patterns of four miRNAs (18a, 20a, 22, and 34a) were investigated in the treated SD-208 (0.0, 1, 2 and 3 µM) and untreated Y-79 cells. A remarkable inhibition of the cell proliferation was found in Y-79 cells treated with SD-208 versus untreated cells. Also, the expression changes were observed in miRNAs 18a, 20a, 22 and 34a in response to SD-208 treatment (P<0.05). The findings of the present study suggest that the anti-cancer effect of SD-208 may be exerted due to the regulation of specific miRNAs, at least in this particular retinoblastoma cell line. To the best of the researchers' knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the SD-208 could alter the expression of tumor suppressive miRNAs as well as oncomiRs in vitro. In conclusion, the present data suggest that SD-208 could be an alternative agent in retinoblastoma treatment.

  18. Identification of potential transmembrane protease serine 4 inhibitors as anti-cancer agents by integrated computational approach.

    PubMed

    Ilamathi, M; Hemanth, R; Nishanth, S; Sivaramakrishnan, V

    2016-01-21

    Transmembrane protease serine 4 is a well known cell surface protease facilitating the extracellular matrix degradation and epithelial mesenchymal transition in hepatocellular carcinoma. Henceforth targeting transmembrane protease serine 4 is strongly believed to provide therapeutic intervention against hepatocellular carcinoma. Owing to lack of crystal structure for human transmembrane protease serine 4, we predicted its three dimensional structure for the first time in this study. Experimentally proven inhibitor-Tyroserleutide (TSL) against hepatocellular carcinoma via transmembrane protease serine 4 was used as a benchmark to identify structurally similar candidates from PubChem database to create the TSL library. Virtual screening of TSL library against modeled transmembrane protease serine 4 revealed the top four potential inhibitors. Further binding free energy (ΔGbind) analysis of the potential inhibitors revealed the best potential lead compound against transmembrane protease serine 4. Drug likeliness nature of the top four potential hits were additionally analyzed in comparison to TSL to confirm on the best potential lead compound with the highest % of human oral absorption. Consequently, e-pharmacophore mapping of the best potential lead compound yielded a six point feature. It was observed to contain four hydrogen bond donor sites (D), one positively ionizable site (P) and one aromatic ring (R). Such e-pharmacophore insight obtained from structural determinants by integrated computational analysis could serve as a framework for further advancement of drug discovery process of new anti-cancer agents with less toxicity and high specificity targeting transmembrane protease serine 4 and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  19. Targeted Delivery of Anticancer Agents via a Dual Function Nanocarrier with an Interfacial Drug-Interactive Motif

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a dual-function drug carrier, polyethylene glycol (PEG)-derivatized farnesylthiosalicylate (FTS). Here we report that incorporation of a drug-interactive motif (Fmoc) into PEG5k–FTS2 led to further improvement in both drug loading capacity and formulation stability. Doxorubicin (DOX) formulated in PEG5k–Fmoc–FTS2 showed sustained release kinetics slower than those of DOX loaded in PEG5k–FTS2. The maximum tolerated dose of DOX- or paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded PEG5k–Fmoc–FTS2 was significantly higher than that of the free drug. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies showed that DOX/PEG5k–Fmoc–FTS2 mixed micelles were able to retain DOX in the bloodstream for a significant amount of time and efficiently deliver the drug to tumor sites. More importantly, drug (DOX or PTX)-loaded PEG5k–Fmoc–FTS2 led to superior antitumor activity over other treatments including drugs formulated in PEG5k–FTS2 in breast cancer and prostate cancer models. Our improved dual function carrier with a built-in drug-interactive motif represents a simple and effective system for targeted delivery of anticancer agents. PMID:25325795

  20. Design, synthesis and in vitro evaluation of novel dehydroabietic acid derivatives containing a dipeptide moiety as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Chao; Jin, Le; Wang, Meng; Liang, Dong; Chen, Zhen-Feng; Zhang, Ye; Pan, Ying-Ming; Wang, Heng-Shan

    2015-01-07

    A series of novel dehydroabietic acid (DHA) chiral dipeptide derivatives were designed and synthesized as potent antitumor agents. The inhibitory activities of these compounds against NCI-H460 (lung), HeLa (epithelial cervical) and MGC-803 (gastric) human cancer cell lines were estimated by MTT assay in vitro. The antitumor activities screening indicated that many compounds showed moderate to high levels of antitumor activities against these three cancer cell lines and most of these compounds displayed more potent inhibitory activities compared with commercial anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The induction of apoptosis and affects on the cell cycle distribution with compound 8k were investigated by acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, Hoechst 33258 staining, JC-1 mitochondrial membrane potential staining, TUNEL assay, flow cytometry and the activities of caspase-3 and -9 assay in Hela cells, which exhibited that the compound could induce cell apoptosis in Hela cells. In addition, further investigation showed that apoptosis were associated with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, enhancement of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and intracellular ROS production, elevation of Bax expression, down-regulation of Bcl-2, and the activation of caspase-9 and -3.

  1. A transesterification reaction is implicated in the covalent binding of benzo[b]acronycine anticancer agents with DNA and glutathion.

    PubMed

    David-Cordonnier, Marie Hélène; Laine, William; Kouach, Mostafa; Briand, Gilbert; Vezin, Hervé; Gaslonde, Thomas; Michel, Sylvie; Doan Thi Mai, Huong; Tillequin, Francois; Koch, Michel; Léonce, Stéphane; Pierré, Alain; Bailly, Christian

    2004-01-02

    The benzo[b]acronycine derivative S23906-1 has been recently identified as a promising antitumor agent, showing remarkable in vivo activities against a panel of solid tumors. The anticancer activity is attributed to the capacity of the drug to alkylate DNA, selectively at the exocyclic 2-amino group of guanine residues. Hydrolysis of the C-1 and C-2 acetate groups of S23906-1 provides the diol compound S28907-1 which is inactive whereas the intermediate C-2 monoacetate derivative S28687-1 is both highly reactive toward DNA and cytotoxic. The reactivity of this later compound S28687-1 toward two bionucleophiles, DNA and the tripeptide glutathion, has been investigated by mass spectrometry to identify the nature of the (type II) covalent adducts characterized by the loss of the acetate group at position 2. On the basis of NMR and molecular modeling analyses, the reaction mechanism is explained by a transesterification process where the acetate leaving group is transferred from position C-2 to C-1. Altogether, the study validates the reaction scheme of benzo[b]acronycine derivative with its target.

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of glycopolymeric decorated gold nanoparticles functionalized with gold-triphenyl phosphine as anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Adokoh, Christian K; Quan, Stephen; Hitt, Mary; Darkwa, James; Kumar, Piyush; Narain, Ravin

    2014-10-13

    In this study, statistical glyco-dithiocarbamate (DTC) copolymers were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT) and subsequently used to prepare glyconanoparticles and conjugated glyconanoparticles with the anticancer drug, gold(I) triphenylphosphine. These glyconanoparticles and the corresponding conjugates were then tested for their in vitro cytotoxicity in both normal and cancer cell lines using Neutral Red assay. The glyconanoparticles and their Au(I)PPh3 conjugates were all active against MCF7 and HepG2 cells, but galactose-functionalized glyconanoparticles {P(GMA-EDAdtc(AuPPh3)-st-LAEMA)AuNP} were found to be the most cytotoxic to HepG2 cells (IC50 ∼ 4.13 ± 0.73 μg/mL). The p(GMA-EDAdtc(AuPPh3)-st-LAEMA)AuNP was found to be a 4-fold more potent antitumor agent in HepG2 cells, and the overexpressed asialoglycoprotein (ASGPR) receptors revealed to play an important role in the cytotoxicity, presumably by the enhanced uptake. In addition, the glyconanoparticles Au(I) conjugates are found to be significantly more toxic as compared to the standard chemotherapeutic reagents such as cisplatin and cytarabine.

  3. HS-133, a novel fluorescent phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor as a potential imaging and anticancer agent for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunseung; Son, Mi Kwon; Yun, Sun-Mi; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Kyeong-Ryoon; Lee, Soyoung; Kim, Donghee; Hong, Sungwoo; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2014-01-01

    As PI3K/Akt signaling is frequently deregulated in a wide variety of human tumors, PI3K inhibitors are an emerging class of drugs for cancer treatment. The monitoring of the drug behavior and distribution in the biological system can play an important role for targeted therapy and provide information regarding the response or resistance to available therapies. In this study, therefore, we have developed a family of xanthine derivatives, serving as a dual function exhibiting fluorescence, as well as inhibiting PI3K. Among them, HS-133 showed anti-proliferative effects and was monitored for its subcellular localization by a fluorescence microscopy. HS-133 suppressed the PI3K/Akt pathway and induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase. The induction of apoptosis by HS-133 was confirmed by the increases of the cleaved PARP, caspase-3, and caspase-8. Furthermore, HS-133 decreased the protein expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, as well inhibited the tube formation and migration of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In vivo imaging also showed that tumors were visualized fluorescent with HS-133, and its oral administration significantly inhibited the growth of tumor in SkBr3 mouse xenograft models. Thus, we suggest that HS-133 may be used as a fluorescent anticancer agent against human breast cancer. PMID:25338206

  4. Hsp90 inhibitors as anti-cancer agents, from basic discoveries to clinical development.

    PubMed

    Soga, Shiro; Akinaga, Shiro; Shiotsu, Yukimasa

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 is an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which stabilizes various oncogenic kinases, including HER2, EGFR, BCR-ABL, B-Raf and EML4-ALK, which are essential for tumor growth. Several monoclonal antibodies and small molecule kinase inhibitors which target these kinases have been identified as potential new molecular target therapeutics. Previous reports have shown that many oncogenic proteins essential for cancer transformation are chaperoned by the Hsp90 complex, and some of these client proteins have been discovered by using Hsp90 inhibitors, such as geldanamycin (GA) and radicicol (RD).Thus far more than 200 client proteins have been identified. In past derivatives of these natural products have been evaluated in clinical trials, but none of the 1st generation of Hsp90 inhibitors has been approved yet because of their limitations in physico-chemical properties and/or safety profiles. However, recent reports have indicated that more than 10 new agents, 2nd generation of Hsp90 inhibitors with different chemotypes from GA and RD, have entered clinical trials and some of them showed clinical efficacy. In this review article, we describe the discoveries of major Hsp90 client proteins in the cancer field by RD derivatives, the history of KW-2478 discovery and development by Kyowa Hakko Kirin, and gave an update on the current status of new Hsp90 inhibitors in clinical trials.

  5. Psoralea glandulosa as a Potential Source of Anticancer Agents for Melanoma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Madrid, Alejandro; Cardile, Venera; González, César; Montenegro, Ivan; Villena, Joan; Caggia, Silvia; Graziano, Adriana; Russo, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of identifying novel agents with antigrowth and pro-apoptotic activity on melanoma cancer, the present study was undertaken to investigate the biological activity of the resinous exudate of aerial parts from Psoralea glandulosa, and its active components (bakuchiol (1), 3-hydroxy-bakuchiol (2) and 12-hydroxy-iso-bakuchiol (3)) against melanoma cells (A2058). In addition, the effect in cancer cells of bakuchiol acetate (4), a semi-synthetic derivative of bakuchiol, was examined. The results obtained show that the resinous exudate inhibited the growth of cancer cells with IC50 value of 10.5 μg/mL after 48 h of treatment, while, for pure compounds, the most active was the semi-synthetic compound 4. Our data also demonstrate that resin is able to induce apoptotic cell death, which could be related to an overall action of the meroterpenes present. In addition, our data seem to indicate that the apoptosis correlated to the tested products appears, at least in part, to be associated with an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In summary, our study provides the first evidence that P. glandulosa may be considered a source of useful molecules in the development of analogues with more potent efficacy against melanoma cells. PMID:25860949

  6. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel quinazolinyl-diaryl urea derivatives as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Nian; Wang, Xian-Fu; Li, Ting; Wu, De-Wen; Fu, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Guang-Ji; Shen, Xing-Can; Wang, Heng-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Through a structure-based molecular hybridization approach, a series of novel quinazolinyl-diaryl urea derivatives were designed, synthesized, and screened for their in vitro antiproliferative activities against three cancer cell lines (HepG2, MGC-803, and A549). Six compounds (7 g, 7 m, 7 o, 8 e, 8 g, and 8 m) showed stronger activity against a certain cell line compared with the positive reference drugs sorafenib and gefitinib. Among the six compounds, 8 g exhibited the strongest activity. In particular, compound 8 g induced A549 apoptosis, arrested cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase, elevated intracellular reactive oxygen species level, and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. This compound can also effectively regulate the expression of apoptosis- and cell cycle-related proteins, and influence the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Molecular docking and structure-activity relationship analyses revealed that it can bind well to the active site of the receptor c-Raf, which was consistent with the biological data. Therefore, compound 8 g may be a potent antitumor agent, representing a promising lead for further optimization.

  7. Noncovalent Binding to DNA: Still a Target in Developing Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Portugal, José; Barceló, Francisca

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding compounds are of extraordinary importance in medicine, accounting for a substantial portion of antitumor drugs in clinical usage. However, their mechanisms of action remain sometimes incompletely understood. This review critically examines two broad classes of molecules that bind noncovalently to DNA: intercalators and groove binders. Intercalators bind to DNA by inserting their chromophore moiety between two consecutive base pairs, whereas groove binders fit into the grooves of DNA. Noncovalent DNAinteractive drugs can recognize certain supramolecular DNA structures such as the Gquadruplexes found in telomeres and in numerous gene promoters, and they can act as topoisomerase I and II poisons. We discuss how DNA-binding compounds affect transcription and compete with protein factors for binding to consensus binding sites in gene promoters both in vitro and in cultured cancer cells. Moreover, we comment on the design of molecules that can tightly and specifically bind to any desired target DNA, such as various hairpin polyamides which efficacy as chemotherapeutic agents is being evaluated. At present, genome-wide studies, which provide details of events that may influence both cancer progression and therapeutic outcome, are a common way used to analyze the effects of DNA-binding compounds. A conclusive feature that emerges from reviewing the information on DNA-binding compounds is that both natural sources and chemical approaches can be productively used to obtain drugs to manipulate gene expression in cancer cells.

  8. Design, modeling, synthesis and biological activity evaluation of camptothecin-linked platinum anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Cincinelli, Raffaella; Musso, Loana; Dallavalle, Sabrina; Artali, Roberto; Tinelli, Stella; Colangelo, Donato; Zunino, Franco; De Cesare, Michelandrea; Beretta, Giovanni Luca; Zaffaroni, Nadia

    2013-05-01

    The design, modeling, synthesis and biological activity evaluation of two hybrid agents formed by 7-oxyiminomethylcamptothecin derivatives and diaminedichloro-platinum (II) complex are reported. The compounds showed growth inhibitory activity against a panel of human tumor cell lines, including sublines resistant to topotecan and platinum compounds. The derivatives were active in all the tested cell lines, and compound 1b, the most active one, was able to overcome cisplatin resistance in the osteosarcoma U2OS/Pt cell line. Platinum-containing camptothecins produced platinum-DNA adducts and topoisomerase I-mediated DNA damage with cleavage pattern and persistence similar to SN38, the active principle of irinotecan. Compound 1b exhibited an appreciable antitumor activity in vivo against human H460 tumor xenograft, comparable to that of irinotecan at lower well-tolerated dose levels and superior to cisplatin. The results support the interpretation that the diaminedichloro-platinum (II) complex conjugated via an oxyiminomethyl linker at the 7-position of the camptothecin resulted in a new class of effective antitumor compounds.

  9. Folates as adjuvants to anticancer agents: Chemical rationale and mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Danenberg, Peter V; Gustavsson, Bengt; Johnston, Patrick; Lindberg, Per; Moser, Rudolf; Odin, Elisabeth; Peters, Godefridus J; Petrelli, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Folates have been used with cytotoxic agents for decades and today they are used in hundreds of thousands of patients annually. Folate metabolism is complex. In the treatment of cancer with 5-fluorouracil, the administration of folates mechanistically leads to the formation of [6R]-5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate, and the increased concentration of this molecule leads to stabilization of the ternary complex comprising thymidylate synthase, 2'-deoxy-uridine-5'-monophosphate, and [6R]-5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. The latter is the only natural folate that can bind directly in the ternary complex, with other folates requiring metabolic activation. Modulation of thymidylate synthase activity became central in the study of folate/cytotoxic combinations and, despite wide use, research into the folate component was neglected, leaving important questions unanswered. This article revisits the mechanisms of action of folates and evaluates commercially available folate derivatives in the light of current research. Better genomic insight and availability of new analytical techniques and stable folate compounds may open new avenues of research and therapy, ultimately bringing increased clinical benefit to patients.

  10. Phosphine-gold(I) compounds as anticancer agents: general description and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Lima, João Carlos; Rodriguez, Laura

    2011-12-01

    Gold complexes have been explored as metallodrugs with great potential applications as antitumoral agents. In particular, gold-phosphine derivatives seemed quite promising since the use of the antiarthritic auranofin drug (thiolate-Au-PEt3 complex) presented also biological activity against different cancer cells. So, different auranofin analogues have been explored within this context and for this reason, the main number of phosphine-gold complexes developed with this goal contain thiolate ligands. Other complexes have been also studied such as tetrahedral bis(phosphine)gold(I) and phosphine-gold-halides. Very recently, phosphine-gold-alkynyl complexes have also shown very interesting biological activities although few reports are published related to them. Their mechanism of action seems to be clearly different that the used by platinum drugs (DNA intercalating processes) and recent studies point to be related to the inhibition of Trx reductase. Cellular uptake and biodistribution studies are well reported in the original works but the use of luminescence techniques is relatively less explored. For this, the use of these techniques is also specifically reported in this review.

  11. Preclinical evaluation of the metabolism and disposition of RRx-001, a novel investigative anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Scicinski, Jan; Oronsky, Bryan; Taylor, Michael; Luo, Gang; Musick, Timothy; Marini, Joseph; Adams, Christopher M; Fitch, William L

    2012-09-01

    RRx-001 has shown promise as a novel cancer therapeutic agent. The disposition of RRx-001 was evaluated in vitro and after intravenous administration to rats. At both 24 and 168 h after a single intravenous administration of ¹⁴C-RRx-001 (10 mg/kg), the majority of radiolabel was in the blood. The recovery of label in excreta was quite low, but the major route of radiolabel excretion was via the kidney, with approximately 26% in the urine by the first 8 h and decreasing amounts in all subsequent collections to a total of 36.3% by 168 h. The partitioning of total radioactivity in red blood cells (RBCs) and plasma was determined after in vitro addition to human, rat, dog, and monkey whole blood at 1 and 20 μM. In rat, at 30 min, approximately 75% of the radioactivity is associated with RBCs and 25% with plasma. In human, at 30 min, approximately 25% of the radioactivity is associated with RBCs and 75% with plasma. Analysis by liquid chromatography/radiodetection/mass spectrometry showed that ¹⁴C-RRx-001 reacted rapidly with whole blood to give four major soluble metabolites: the GSH and Cys adducts of RRx-001 (M1 and M2) and the corresponding mononitro GSH and Cys adducts (M3 and M4). Human Hb was incubated with cold RRx-001 in buffer, and a standard proteomics protocol was used to separate and identify the tryptic peptides. Standard peptide collision-induced fragment ions supported the structure of the peptide GTFATLSELHCDK with the alkylation on the Cys-93 locus of the Hb β chain.

  12. Compatibility and stability of the investigational polypeptide marine anticancer agent kahalalide F in infusion devices.

    PubMed

    Nuijen, B; Bouma, M; Manada, C; Jimeno, J M; Lazaro, L L; Bult, A; Beijnen, J H

    2001-01-01

    Kahalalide F is a novel marine-derived antitumor agent isolated from the marine mollusk Elysia rufescens, an organism living in the seas near Hawaii. The compound has shown highly selective in vitro activity against prostate tumors and phase I trials in patients with androgen independent prostate tumors incorporating a daily times five and weekly schedule have been initiated. Kahalalide F is pharmaceutically formulated as a lyophilized product containing 150 microg active substance per dosage unit. Prior to i.v. administration it is reconstituted with a solution composed of Cremophor EL, ethanol absolute and Water for Injection (CEW, 5/5/90% v/v/v) with further dilution in 0.9% w/v sodium chloride for infusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the compatibility and stability of kahalalide F with different infusion systems prior to the start of clinical trials with the compound. Due to the presence of Cremophor EL in the infusion solution, leaching of diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) from polyvinyl chloride infusion containers (PVC, Add-a-Flex) was found. Loss of kahalalide F as a consequence of sorption to contact surfaces was shown with an infusion container composed of low density polyethylene (LD-PE, Miniflac). We conclude that kahalalide F must be administered in a 3-h infusion in concentrations of 0.5 microg/mL to 14.7 microg/mL using an administration set consisting of a glass container and a low-extrables, DEHP-free extension set. Kahalalide F 150 microg/vial powder for infusion reconstituted with 5/5/90% v/v/v CEW is stable in the original container for at least 24 h at room temperature (+20-25 degrees C) and ambient light conditions. Infusion solutions stored in glass infusion containers at either room temperature (+20-25 degrees C, in the dark) or refrigerated conditions (+2-8 degrees C, in the dark) are stable for at least 5 days after preparation.

  13. Design, synthesis and potent cytotoxic activity of novel podophyllotoxin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Qun; Wang, Xu-Li; Qian, Keduo; Liu, Ying-Qian; Wang, Chih-Ya; Yang, Liu; Tian, Jin; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Zhou, Xing-Wen; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2013-04-15

    Twenty new acyl thiourea derivatives of podophyllotoxin and 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin were prepared and screened for their cytotoxicity against four human tumor cell lines, A-549, DU-145, KB, and KBvin. With IC50 values of 0.098-1.13 μM, compounds 13b, 13c, and 13o displayed much better cytotoxic activity than the control etoposide. Most importantly, 13b and 13o exhibited promising cytotoxicity against the drug resistant tumor cell line KBvin with IC50 values of 0.098 and 0.13 μM, respectively, while etoposide lost activity completely. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) correlations of the new derivatives have been established. Compounds 13b and 13o merit further development as a new generation of epipodophyllotoxin-derived antitumor clinical trial candidates.

  14. Polymer-drug compatibility: a guide to the development of delivery systems for the anticancer agent, ellipticine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jubo; Xiao, Yuehua; Allen, Christine

    2004-01-01

    To establish a method for predicting polymer-drug compatibility as a means to guide formulation development, we carried out physicochemical analyses of polymer-drug pairs and compared the difference in total and partial solubility parameters of polymer and drug. For these studies, we employed a range of biodegradable polymers and the anticancer agent Ellipticine as the model drug. The partial and total solubility parameters for the polymer and drug were calculated using the group contribution method. Drug-polymer pairs with different enthalpy of mixing values were analyzed by physicochemical techniques including X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared. Polymers identified to be compatible [i.e., polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly-beta-benzyl-L-aspartate (PBLA)] and incompatible [i.e., poly (d,l-lactide (PLA)], by the above mentioned methods, were used to formulate Ellipticine. Specifically, Ellipticine was loaded into PBLA, PCL, and PLA films using a solvent casting method to produce a local drug formulation; while, polyethylene oxide (PEO)-b-polycaprolactone (PCL) and PEO-b-poly (d,l-lactide) (PLA) copolymer micelles were prepared by both dialysis and dry down methods resulting in a formulation for systemic administration. The drug release profiles for all formulations and the drug loading efficiency for the micelle formulations were also measured. In this way, we compared formulation characteristics with predictions from physicochemical analyses and comparison of total and partial solubility parameters. Overall, a good correlation was obtained between drug formulation characteristics and findings from our polymer-drug compatibility studies. Further optimization of the PEO-b-PCL micelle formulation for Ellipticine was also performed.

  15. Mechanism of Degradation of an α-Keto-Epoxide, a Model for the Warhead for Various Proteasome Inhibitor Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Phizackerley, Kirsten M; Jumaa, Mouhannad; Lopalco, Antonio; Wolfe, Bradley H; Ablan, Christopher D; Stella, Valentino J

    2016-12-20

    The anticancer agent, carfilzomib, has a unique α-keto-epoxide warhead. The model α-keto-epoxide, N-((S)-1-((R)-2-methyloxiran-2-yl)-1-oxo-3-phenylpropan-2-yl)pivalamide (1), along with a few of its degradation products was synthesized and studied. The kinetics of hydrolysis and identification of some of the degradation products of 1 were performed at pH values 2, 4, 5, 7, and 8 at 25°C, 40°C, and 60°C and followed by HPLC and liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy, respectively. 1 degraded independent of pH between pH values 4-7 but showed some acid catalysis at pH 2 and base catalysis at pH 8. Energy of activation, Ea, values progressed from 16.8 ± 0.1 at pH 2 to 20.3 ± 0.1 kcal/mole at pH 8. The major initial degradation products in the pH range 4-5 were the S,R diol (hydrolysis of the epoxide), and S,R chlorohydrin (in the presence of chloride ions). At pH 7-8, the major products were the R,R diastereomer and the S,R and R,R diols. At pH 2, additional unidentified products were seen with relative retention times of 0.28, 0.30, 0.33, and 0.35 and masses equivalent to the diols. The study of 1 provides insight into the degradation of future drugs that use an α-keto-epoxide functional group.

  16. Level of Serum Enzymes and Electrocardiogram in Healthy Rabbits after Injection of ICD-85 as an Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Zare Mirakabadi, Abbas; Sarzaeem, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Our previous in vivo studies confirmed that ICD-85, as an anticancer agent, was able to prevent further growth of breast tumors and expand the life expectancy of mice with breast cancer. Methods: Blood collection was carried out before, 1, 3, and 6 hours after ICD-85 injection. Sera were used to determinate the cardio and hepatic enzymes levels, including ALT, AST, LDH, CPK, and Ck-MB. Coagulation factors such as PT and PTT were also assayed. ECGs of all rabbits were recorded during the experiment. Results: ECG results showed that the injection of 50 and 100 µg/kg ICD-85 into healthy rabbits has no significant effect on heart function while the injection of 150 to 200 µg/kg ICD-85 caused ECG wave changes and mild bradycardia without toxic effects on heart. After ICD-85 injection (concentrations below 100 µg/kg), no significant increase was observed in liver and cardiac enzymes (ALT, AST, LDH, CPK, and CK-MB). However, the concentration of 150 µg/kg and above caused a rise in the enzymes. Comparison of the PT and PTT before and after ICD-85 injection showed no significant clotting time at any concentrations below 200 µg/kg. Conclusion: Based on the results obtained in the present study as well as our previous reports, ICD-85 at concentrations below 100 µg/kg seems to have no significant effect on the serum enzymes as indicators of hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity in healthy rabbits. However, to confirm this conclusion, more detailed surveys on heart and liver is needed to be carried out. PMID:26239313

  17. Synthesis and anti-cancer screening of novel heterocyclic-(2H)-1,2,3-triazoles as potential anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Madhukuri, Leena; Thakkar, Shraddha; Madadi, Nikhil Reddy; Lamture, Gauri; Eoff, Robert L.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    trans-Cyanocombretastatin A-4 (trans-CA-4) analogues have been structurally modified to afford their more stable CA-4-(2H)-1,2,3-triazole analogues. Fifteen novel, stable 4-heteroaryl-5-aryl-(2H)-1,2,3-triazole CA-4 analogues (8a–i, 9 and 11a–e) were evaluated for anti-cancer activity against a panel of 60 human cancer cell lines. These analogues displayed potent cytotoxic activity against both hematological and solid tumor cell lines with GI50 values in the low nanomolar range. The most potent compound, 8a, was a benzothiophen-2-yl analogue that incorporated a 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl moiety connected to the (2H)-1,2,3-triazole ring system. Compound 8a exhibited GI50 values of <10 nM against 80% of the cancer cell lines in the panel. Three triazole analogues, 8a, 8b and 8g, showed particularly potent growth inhibition against the triple negative Hs578T breast cancer cell line with GI50 values of 10.3 nM, 66.5 nM and 20.3 nM, respectively. Molecular docking studies suggest that these compounds bind to the same hydrophobic pocket at the interface of α- and β-tubulin that is occupied by colchicine and cis-CA-4, and are stabilized by Van der Waals’ interactions with surrounding amino acid residues. Compound 8a was found to inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro with an IC50 value of 1.7 µM. The potent cytotoxicity of these novel compounds and their inhibition of tubulin dynamics make these triazole analogues promising candidates for development as anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27066215

  18. Pharmacokinetics and derivation of an anticancer dosing regimen for the novel anti-cancer agent isobutyl-deoxynyboquinone (IB-DNQ), a NQO1 bioactivatable molecule, in the domestic felid species.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Alycen P; Francis, Joshua M; Pajak, Malgorzata; Parkinson, Elizabeth I; Wycislo, Kathryn L; Rosol, Thomas J; Brown, Megan E; London, Cheryl A; Dirikolu, Levent; Hergenrother, Paul J; Fan, Timothy M

    2016-12-14

    Isobutyl-deoxynyboquinone (IB-DNQ) is a selective substrate for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), an enzyme overexpressed in many solid tumors. Following activation by NQO1, IB-DNQ participates in a catalytic futile reduction/reoxidation cycle with consequent toxic reactive oxygen species generation within the tumor microenvironment. To elucidate the potential of IB-DNQ to serve as a novel anticancer agent, in vitro studies coupled with in vivo pharmacokinetic and toxicologic investigations in the domestic felid species were conducted to investigate the tractability of IB-DNQ as a translationally applicable anticancer agent. First, using feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) as a comparative cancer model, expressions of NQO1 were characterized in not only human, but also feline OSCC tissue microarrays. Second, IB-DNQ mediated cytotoxicity in three immortalized feline OSCC cell lines were studied under dose-dependent and sequential exposure conditions. Third, the feasibility of administering IB-DNQ at doses predicted to achieve cytotoxic plasma concentrations and biologically relevant durations of exposure were investigated through pharmacokinetic and tolerability studies in healthy research felines. Intravenous administration of IB-DNQ at 1.0-2.0 mg/kg achieved peak plasma concentrations and durations of exposure reaching or exceeding predicted in vitro cytotoxic concentrations. Clinical adverse side effects including ptyalism and tachypnea exhibited during and post-IV infusion of IB-DNQ were transient and tolerable. Additionally, IB-DNQ administration did not produce acute or delayed-onset unacceptable hematologic, non-hematologic, or off-target oxidative toxicities. Collectively, the findings reported here within provide important safety and pharmacokinetic data to support the continued development of IB-DNQ as a novel anticancer strategy for NQO1 expressing cancers.

  19. Podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin in Juniperus bermudiana and 12 other Juniperus species: optimization of extraction, method validation, and quantification.

    PubMed

    Renouard, Sullivan; Lopez, Tatiana; Hendrawati, Oktavia; Dupre, Patricia; Doussot, Joël; Falguieres, Annie; Ferroud, Clotilde; Hagege, Daniel; Lamblin, Frédéric; Laine, Eric; Hano, Christophe

    2011-08-10

    The lignans podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin are secondary metabolites with potent pharmaceutical applications in cancer therapy. However, the supply of podophyllotoxin from its current natural source, Podophyllum hexandrum, is becoming increasingly problematic, and alternative sources are therefore urgently needed. So far, podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin have been found in some Juniperus species, although at low levels in most cases. Moreover, extraction protocols deserve optimization. This study aimed at developing and validating an efficient extraction protocol of podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin from Juniperus species and applying it to 13 Juniperus species, among which some had never been previously analyzed. Juniperus bermudiana was used for the development and validation of an extraction protocol for podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin allowing extraction yields of up to 22.6 mg/g DW of podophyllotoxin and 4.4 mg/g DW deoxypodophyllotoxin, the highest values found in leaf extract of Juniperus. The optimized extraction protocol and HPLC separation from DAD or MS detections were established and validated to investigate podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin contents in aerial parts of 12 other Juniperus species. This allowed either higher yields to be obtained in some species reported to contain these two compounds or the occurrence of these compounds in some other species to be reported for the first time. This efficient protocol allows effective extraction of podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin from aerial parts of Juniperus species, which could therefore constitute interesting alternative sources of these valuable metabolites.

  20. D-ring substituted 1,2,3-triazolyl 20-keto pregnenanes as potential anticancer agents: Synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Banday, Abid H; Shameem, Shameem A; Gupta, B D; Kumar, H M Sampath

    2010-12-01

    A facile synthesis of 21-triazolyl derivatives of pregnenolone and their potential antitumour activity is reported. The scheme involves the transformation of the starting pregnenolone acetate into pregnenolone, conversion of pregnenolone to 21-bromo pregnenolone and finally the one-pot, two-step in situ conversion of the bromo derivative to the 21-triazolyl pregnenolone using the 'click chemistry' approach. These derivatives were screened for their anticancer activity against seven human cancer cell lines. The compounds especially 5a, 5b, 5c, 5e, 5g and 5h exhibited significant anticancer activity with compound 5e as the most active in this study.

  1. Thymoquinone as an anticancer agent: evidence from inhibition of cancer cells viability and invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Attoub, Samir; Sperandio, Olivier; Raza, Haider; Arafat, Kholoud; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Sultan, Mahmood Ahmed; Al Safi, Maha; Takahashi, Takashi; Adem, Abdu

    2013-10-01

    Phytochemical compounds are emerging as a new generation of anticancer agents with limited toxicity in cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential impact of thymoquinone (TQ), the major constituent of black seed, on survival, invasion of cancer cells in vitro, and tumor growth in vivo. Exposure of cells derived from lung (LNM35), liver (HepG2), colon (HT29), melanoma (MDA-MB-435), and breast (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) tumors to increasing TQ concentrations resulted in a significant inhibition of viability through the inhibition of Akt phosphorylation leading to DNA damage and activation of the mitochondrial-signaling proapoptotic pathway. We provide evidence that TQ at non-toxic concentrations inhibited the invasive potential of LNM35, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB231-1833 cancer cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that TQ synergizes with DNA-damaging agent cisplatin to inhibit cellular viability. The anticancer activity of thymoquinone was also investigated in athymic mice inoculated with the LNM35 lung cells. Administration of TQ (10 mg/kg/i.p.) for 18 days inhibited the LNM35 tumor growth by 39% (P < 0.05). Tumor growth inhibition was associated with significant increase in the activated caspase-3. The in silico target identification suggests several potential targets of TQ mainly HDAC2 proteins and the 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase. In this context, we demonstrated that TQ treatment resulted in a significant inhibition of HDAC2 proteins. In view of the available experimental findings, we contend that thymoquinone and/or its analogues may have clinical potential as an anticancer agent alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin.

  2. Anti-cancer agents based on 4-(hetero)Ary1-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl Amino derivatives and a method of making

    DOEpatents

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Krasavin, Mikhail; Karapetian, Ruben; Rufanov, Konstantin A.; Konstantinov, Igor; Godovykh, Elena; Soldatkina, Olga; Sosnov, Andrey V.

    2013-01-29

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds that can be used as anti-cancer agents in the prostate cancer therapy. ##STR00001## In particular, the invention relates N-substituted derivatives of 4-(hetero)aryl-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl amines having the structural Formula (I) and (II), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof. Meaning of R1 and R2 in the Formula (I) and (II) are defined in claim 1. The invention also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  3. Novel quinolone substituted thiazolidin-4-ones as anti-inflammatory, anticancer agents: design, synthesis and biological screening.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Sharad Kumar; Jaiswal, Varun; Lohan, Sandeep; Bansal, Sumit; Chaudhary, Anil; Tiwari, Amit; Alex, Angel Treasa; Joesph, Alex

    2013-05-01

    Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) has been reported to regulate various genes involved in cancer and inflammation. Accordingly, drugs suppressing or inhibiting NF-κB may possess both anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. A library of quinolone substituted thiazolidin-4-ones was docked into the active site of NF-κB and the top-ranked 31 compounds were synthesized and evaluated for anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity. The best-ranked compound 6b showed highest anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan-induced paw edema model. In vitro anticancer studies revealed 1a and 16a as most active compounds against BT-549, HeLa, COLO-205 and ACHN human cancer cell lines. Compounds 1a and 16a exhibited NF-κB dependent anticancer properties and apoptosis mediated cell death. In vivo Ehrlich ascites carcinoma study further confirmed the antitumor activity of 1a and 16a.

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of multi-wall carbon nanotube–paclitaxel complex as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemvand, Fariba; Biazar, Esmaeil; Tavakolifard, Sara; Khaledian, Mohammad; Rahmanzadeh, Saeid; Momenzadeh, Daruosh; Afroosheh, Roshanak; Zarkalami, Faezeh; Shabannezhad, Marjan; Hesami Tackallou, Saeed; Massoudi, Nilofar; Heidari Keshel, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to design multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) loaded with paclitaxel (PTX) anti-cancer drug and investigate its anti-cancerous efficacy of human gastric cancer. Background: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) represent a novel nano-materials applied in various fields such as drug delivery due to their unique chemical properties and high drug loading. Patients and methods: In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) pre-functionalized covalently with a paclitaxel (PTX) as an anti-cancer drug and evaluated by different analyses including, scanning electron microscope (SEM), particle size analyzer and cellular analyses. Results: A well conjugated of anti-cancer drug on the carbon nanotube surfaces was shown. This study demonstrates that the MWCN-PTX complex is a potentially useful system for delivery of anti-cancer drugs. The flow cytometry, CFU and MTT assay results have disclosed that MWCNT/PTXs might promote apoptosis in MKN-45 gastric adenocarcinoma cell line. Conclusion: According to results, our simple method can be designed a candidate material for chemotherapy. It has presented a few bio-related applications including, their successful use as a nano-carriers for drug transport. PMID:27458512

  5. In vitro determination of the efficacy of scorpion venoms as anti-cancer agents against colorectal cancer cells: a nano-liposomal delivery approach

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman K; Ullah, Zabih; Al Balowi, Ali; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2017-01-01

    The use of liposomes in biological and medicinal sciences is a relatively new approach. The liposomal strategy greatly depends on the technological advancement in the formation of vesicles of various sizes and properties. In the current study, we encapsulated the venoms obtained from medically important scorpions such as Androctonus bicolor (AB), Androctonus crassicauda (AC), and Leiurus quinquestriatus (LQ). To begin with, our first and foremost aim was to prepare biocompatible and biodegradable nanovesicles. Additionally, we intended to enhance the anti-cancer potential of these encapsulated venoms. The liposomal venoms were prepared by rehydration and dehydration methods. Morphology, particle size, and size distribution of the liposomes were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and Zetasizer. We found that the prepared liposomes had a smooth surface and a spherical/ovoid shape and existed mainly as single unilamellar vesicles (SUVs). Furthermore, the liposomal formulation of all three venoms exhibited excellent stability and good encapsulation efficiency (EE). Additionally, the anti-cancer potential of the encapsulated venoms was also evaluated on a colorectal cancer cell line (HCT-8). The venom-loaded liposomes showed elevated anti-cancer properties such as low rate of cell survival, higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and enhancement in the number of apoptotic cells. In addition to this, cell cycle analysis revealed G0/G1 enrichment upon venom treatment. The effect of treatment was more pronounced when venom–liposome was used as compared to free venom on the HCT-8 cell line. Furthermore, we did not observe any interference of liposomal lipids used in these preparations on the progression of cancer cells. Considering these findings, we can conclude that the encapsulated scorpion venoms exhibit better efficacy and act more vigorously as an anti-cancer agent on the colorectal cancer cell line when

  6. In vitro determination of the efficacy of scorpion venoms as anti-cancer agents against colorectal cancer cells: a nano-liposomal delivery approach.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman K; Ullah, Zabih; Al Balowi, Ali; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2017-01-01

    The use of liposomes in biological and medicinal sciences is a relatively new approach. The liposomal strategy greatly depends on the technological advancement in the formation of vesicles of various sizes and properties. In the current study, we encapsulated the venoms obtained from medically important scorpions such as Androctonus bicolor (AB), Androctonus crassicauda (AC), and Leiurus quinquestriatus (LQ). To begin with, our first and foremost aim was to prepare biocompatible and biodegradable nanovesicles. Additionally, we intended to enhance the anti-cancer potential of these encapsulated venoms. The liposomal venoms were prepared by rehydration and dehydration methods. Morphology, particle size, and size distribution of the liposomes were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and Zetasizer. We found that the prepared liposomes had a smooth surface and a spherical/ovoid shape and existed mainly as single unilamellar vesicles (SUVs). Furthermore, the liposomal formulation of all three venoms exhibited excellent stability and good encapsulation efficiency (EE). Additionally, the anti-cancer potential of the encapsulated venoms was also evaluated on a colorectal cancer cell line (HCT-8). The venom-loaded liposomes showed elevated anti-cancer properties such as low rate of cell survival, higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and enhancement in the number of apoptotic cells. In addition to this, cell cycle analysis revealed G0/G1 enrichment upon venom treatment. The effect of treatment was more pronounced when venom-liposome was used as compared to free venom on the HCT-8 cell line. Furthermore, we did not observe any interference of liposomal lipids used in these preparations on the progression of cancer cells. Considering these findings, we can conclude that the encapsulated scorpion venoms exhibit better efficacy and act more vigorously as an anti-cancer agent on the colorectal cancer cell line when

  7. Discovery of Potent Anticancer Agent HJC0416, an Orally Bioavailable Small Molecule Inhibitor of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haijun; Yang, Zhengduo; Ding, Chunyong; Xiong, Ailian; Wild, Christopher; Wang, Lili; Ye, Na; Cai, Guoshuai; Flores, Rudolfo M.; Ding, Ye; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop orally bioavailable small-molecule STAT3 inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for human cancer, a series of novel diversified analogues based on our identified lead compound HJC0149 (1) (5-chloro-N-(1,1-dioxo-1H-1λ6-benzo[b]thiophen-6-yl)-2-hydroxybenzamide, Eur. J. Med. Chem. 2013, 62, 498–507) have been rationally designed, synthesized, and pharmacologically evaluated. Molecular docking studies and biological characterization supported our earlier findings that the O-alkylamino-tethered side chain on the hydroxyl group is an effective and essential structural determinant for improving biological activities and druglike properties of these molecules. Compounds with such modifications exhibited potent antiproliferative effects against breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines with IC50 values from low micromolar to nanomolar range. Among them, the newly discovered STAT3 inhibitor 12 (HJC0416) displayed an intriguing anticancer profile both in vitro and in vivo (i.p. & p.o.). More importantly, HJC0416 is an orally bioavailable anticancer agent as a promising candidate for further development. PMID:24904966

  8. Discovery of potent and selective inhibitors of ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3 related (ATR) protein kinase as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Jean-Damien; Durrant, Steven J; Golec, Julian M C; Kay, David P; Knegtel, Ronald M A; MacCormick, Somhairle; Mortimore, Michael; O'Donnell, Michael E; Pinder, Joanne L; Reaper, Philip M; Rutherford, Alistair P; Wang, Paul S H; Young, Stephen C; Pollard, John R

    2011-04-14

    DNA-damaging agents are among the most frequently used anticancer drugs. However, they provide only modest benefit in most cancers. This may be attributed to a genome maintenance network, the DNA damage response (DDR), that recognizes and repairs damaged DNA. ATR is a major regulator of the DDR and an attractive anticancer target. Herein, we describe the discovery of a series of aminopyrazines with potent and selective ATR inhibition. Compound 45 inhibits ATR with a K(i) of 6 nM, shows >600-fold selectivity over related kinases ATM or DNA-PK, and blocks ATR signaling in cells with an IC(50) of 0.42 μM. Using this compound, we show that ATR inhibition markedly enhances death induced by DNA-damaging agents in certain cancers but not normal cells. This differential response between cancer and normal cells highlights the great potential for ATR inhibition as a novel mechanism to dramatically increase the efficacy of many established drugs and ionizing radiation.

  9. [Response of Pharmaceutical Companies to the Crisis of Post-Marketing Clinical Trials of Anti-Cancer Agents -- Results of Questionnaires to Pharmaceutical Companies].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Toshifusa

    2016-04-01

    Investigator-oriented post-marketing clinical trials of anti-cancer agents are faced to financial crisis due to drastic decrease in research-funds from pharmaceutical companies caused by a scandal in 2013. In order to assess the balance of research funds between 2012 and 2014, we made queries to 26 companies manufacturing anti-cancer agents, and only 10 of 26 responded to our queries. Decrease in the fund was observed in 5 of 10, no change in 1, increase in 3 and no answer in 1. Companies showed passive attitude to carry out doctor-oriented clinical trials of off-patent drugs or unapproved drugs according to advanced medical care B program, though some companies answered to proceed approved routines of these drugs if clinical trials showed good results. Most companies declined to make comments on the activity of Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED), but some insisted to produce good corroboration between AMED and pharmaceutical companies in order to improve the quality of trials. Further corroboration must be necessary for this purpose among researchers, governmental administrative organs, pharmaceutical companies, patients' groups, and mass-media.

  10. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Rapamycin Benzothiazole Hybrids as mTOR Targeted Anti-cancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijun; Huang, Jie; Chen, Xiaoming; Yu, Hui; Li, Kualiang; Yang, Dan; Chen, Xiaqin; Ying, Jiayin; Pan, Fusheng; Lv, Youbing; Cheng, Yuanrong

    2016-01-01

    The immunosuppressant drug rapamycin, was firstly identified as a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) allosteric inhibitor, and its derivatives have been successfully developed as anti-cancer drugs. Therefore, finding rapamycin derivatives with better anti-cancer activity has been proved to be an effective way to discover new targeted anti-cancer drugs. In this paper, structure modification was performed at the C-43 position of rapamycin using bioisosterism and a hybrid approach: a series of novel rapamycin-benzothiazole hybrids 4a-e, 5a-c, and 9a, b have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their anti-cancer activity against Caski, CNE-2, SGC-7901, PC-3, SK-NEP-1 and A-375 human cancer cell lines. Some of these compounds (4a-e, 9a, b) displayed good to excellent potency against the Caski and SK-NEP-1 cell line as compared with rapamycin. Compound 9b as the most active compound showed IC50 values of 8.3 (Caski) and 9.6 μM (SK-NEP-1), respectively. In addition, research on the mechanism showed that 9b was able to cause G1 phase arrest and induce apoptosis in the Caski cell line. Most importantly, it significantly decreased the phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein, p70S6K1 and 4EBP1, which indicated that 9b inhibited the cancer cell growth by blocking the mTOR pathway and may have the potential to become a new mTOR inhibitor.

  11. Synthesis of Rapamycin Derivatives Containing the Triazole Moiety Used as Potential mTOR-Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijun; Huang, Jie; Chen, Xiaoming; Yu, Hui; Li, Kualiang; Yang, Dan; Chen, Xiaqin; Ying, Jiayin; Pan, Fusheng; Lv, Youbing; Cheng, Yuanrong

    2016-06-01

    Rapamycin, a potent antifungal antibiotic, was approved as immunosuppressant, and lately its derivatives have been developed into mTOR targeting anticancer drugs. Structure modification was performed at the C-42 position of rapamycin, and a novel series of rapamycin triazole hybrids (4a-d, 5a-e, 8a-e, and 9a-e) was facilely synthesized via Huisgen's reaction. The anticancer activity of these compounds was evaluated against the Caski, H1299, MGC-803, and H460 human cancer cell lines. Some of the derivatives (8a-e, 9a-e) appeared to have stronger activity than that of rapamycin; however, 4a-d and 5a-e failed to show potential anticancer activity. Compound 9e with a (2,4-dichlorophenylamino)methyl moiety on the triazole ring was the most active anticancer compound, which showed IC50 values of 6.05 (Caski), 7.89 (H1299), 25.88 (MGC-803), and 8.60 μM (H460). In addition, research on the mechanism showed that 9e was able to cause cell morphological changes and to induce apoptosis in the Caski cell line. Most importantly, 9e can decrease the phosphorylation of mTOR and of its downstream key proteins, S6 and P70S6K1, indicating that 9e can effectively inhibit the mTOR signaling pathway. Thus, it may have the potential to become a new mTOR inhibitor against various cancers.

  12. Potentiation of anti-cancer agent cytotoxicity by the potent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors NU1025 and NU1064.

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, K. J.; White, A.; Golding, B. T.; Griffin, R. J.; Curtin, N. J.

    1998-01-01

    The ability of the potent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, NU1025 (8-hydroxy-2-methyl-quinazolin-4-[3H]one) to potentiate the cytotoxicity of a panel of mechanistically diverse anti-cancer agents was evaluated in L1210 cells. NU1025 enhanced the cytotoxicity of the DNA-methylating agent MTIC, gamma-irradiation and bleomycin 3.5-, 1.4- and 2-fold respectively. The cytotoxicities of the thymidylate synthase inhibitor, nolatrexed, and the cytotoxic nucleoside, gemcitabine, were not increased. Potentiation of MTIC cytotoxicity by a delayed exposure to NU1025 was equally effective as by a simultaneous exposure to NU1025, indicating that the effects of NU1025 were mediated by an inhibition of the cellular recovery. The recovery from potentially lethal gamma-irradiation damage cytotoxicity in plateau-phase cells was also inhibited by NU1025. Investigation of DNA strand breakage and repair in gamma-irradiated cells by alkaline elution demonstrated that NU1025 caused a marked retardation of DNA repair. A structurally different PARP inhibitor, NU1064 (2-methylbenzimidazole-4-carboxamide), also potentiated the cytotoxicity of MTIC, to a similar extent to NU1025. NU1064 potentiated a sublethal concentration of a DNA methylating agent in a concentration-dependent manner. Collectively, these data suggest that the most suitable cytotoxic agents for use in combination with PARP inhibitors are methylating agents, bleomycin and ionizing radiation, but not anti-metabolites. PMID:9823965

  13. Alleviation of Podophyllotoxin Toxicity Using Coexisting Flavonoids from Dysosma versipellis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Sun, Hua; Jin, Lu; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Jin; Guo, Chong-Yi; Ding, Ke; Luo, Cheng; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2013-01-01

    Podophyllotoxin (POD) is a lignan-type toxin existing in many herbs used in folk medicine. Until now, no effective strategy is available for the management of POD intoxication. This study aims to determine the protective effects of flavonoids (quercetin and kaempferol) on POD-induced toxicity. In Vero cells, both flavonoids protected POD-induced cytotoxicity by recovering alleviating G2/M arrest, decreasing ROS generation and changes of membrane potential, and recovering microtubule structure. In Swiss mice, the group given both POD and flavonoids group had significantly lower mortality rate and showed less damages in the liver and kidney than the group given POD alone. As compared to the POD group, the POD plus flavonoids group exhibited decreases in plasma transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, plasma urea, creatinine and malondialdehyde levels, and increases in superoxide dismutase and glutathione levels. Histological examination of the liver and kidney showed less pathological changes in the treatment of POD plus flavonoids group. The protective mechanisms were due to the antioxidant activity of flavonoids against the oxidative stress induced by POD and the competitive binding of flavonoids against POD for the same colchicines-binding sites. The latter binding was confirmed by the tubulin assembly assay in combination with molecular docking analyses. In conclusion, this study for the first time demonstrated that the coexisting flavonoids have great protective effects against the POD toxicity, and results of this study highlighted the great potential of searching for effective antidotes against toxins based on the pharmacological clues. PMID:23991049

  14. Cheminformatics models based on machine learning approaches for design of USP1/UAF1 abrogators as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Wahi, Divya; Jamal, Salma; Goyal, Sukriti; Singh, Aditi; Jain, Ritu; Rana, Preeti; Grover, Abhinav

    2015-06-01

    Cancer cells have upregulated DNA repair mechanisms, enabling them survive DNA damage induced during repeated rapid cell divisions and targeted chemotherapeutic treatments. Cancer cell proliferation and survival targeting via inhibition of DNA repair pathways is currently a very promiscuous anti-tumor approach. The deubiquitinating enzyme, USP1 is known to promote DNA repair via complexing with UAF1. The USP1/UAF1 complex is responsible for regulating DNA break repair pathways such as trans-lesion synthesis pathway, Fanconi anemia pathway and homologous recombination. Thus, USP1/UAF1 inhibition poses as an efficient anti-cancer strategy. The recently made available high throughput screen data for anti USP1/UAF1 activity prompted us to compute bioactivity predictive models that could help in screening for potential USP1/UAF1 inhibitors having anti-cancer properties. The current study utilizes publicly available high throughput screen data set of chemical compounds evaluated for their potential USP1/UAF1 inhibitory effect. A machine learning approach was devised for generation of computational models that could predict for potential anti USP1/UAF1 biological activity of novel anticancer compounds. Additional efficacy of active compounds was screened by applying SMARTS filter to eliminate molecules with non-drug like features. The structural fragment analysis was further performed to explore structural properties of the molecules. We demonstrated that modern machine learning approaches could be efficiently employed in building predictive computational models and their predictive performance is statistically accurate. The structure fragment analysis revealed the structures that could play an important role in identification of USP1/UAF1 inhibitors.

  15. Folate-targeted pH-responsive calcium zoledronate nanoscale metal-organic frameworks: Turning a bone antiresorptive agent into an anticancer therapeutic.

    PubMed

    Au, Kin Man; Satterlee, Andrew; Min, Yuanzeng; Tian, Xi; Kim, Young Seok; Caster, Joseph M; Zhang, Longzhen; Zhang, Tian; Huang, Leaf; Wang, Andrew Z

    2016-03-01

    Zoledronate (Zol) is a third-generation bisphosphonate that is widely used as an anti-resorptive agent for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis. While there is preclinical data indicating that bisphosphonates such as Zol have direct cytotoxic effects on cancer cells, such effect has not been firmly established in the clinical setting. This is likely due to the rapid absorption of bisphosphonates by the skeleton after intravenous (i.v.) administration. Herein, we report the reformulation of Zol using nanotechnology and evaluation of this novel nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (nMOFs) formulation of Zol as an anticancer agent. The nMOF formulation is comprised of a calcium zoledronate (CaZol) core and a polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface. To preferentially deliver CaZol nMOFs to tumors as well as facilitate cellular uptake of Zol, we incorporated folate (Fol)-targeted ligands on the nMOFs. The folate receptor (FR) is known to be overexpressed in several tumor types, including head-and-neck, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers. We demonstrated that these targeted CaZol nMOFs possess excellent chemical and colloidal stability in physiological conditions. The release of encapsulated Zol from the nMOFs occurs in the mid-endosomes during nMOF endocytosis. In vitro toxicity studies demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are more efficient than small molecule Zol in inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in FR-overexpressing H460 non-small cell lung and PC3 prostate cancer cells. Our findings were further validated in vivo using mouse xenograft models of H460 and PC3. We demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are effective anticancer agents and increase the direct antitumor activity of Zol by 80-85% in vivo through inhibition of tumor neovasculature, and inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

  16. Design and synthesis of novel 1,2,3-triazole-pyrimidine-urea hybrids as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Ying; Wang, Bo; Pang, Lu-Ping; Zhang, Miao; Wang, Sai-Qi; Zheng, Yi-Chao; Shao, Kun-Peng; Xue, Deng-Qi; Liu, Hong-Min

    2015-03-01

    A series of novel 1,2,3-triazole-pyrimidine-urea hybrids were designed, synthesized and evaluated for anticancer activity against four selected cancer cell lines (MGC-803, EC-109, MCF-7 and B16-F10). Majority of the synthesized compounds exhibited moderate to potent activity against all the cancer cell lines assayed. Particularly, compounds 26, 30 and 38 exhibited excellent growth inhibition against B16-F10 with IC50 values of 32nM, 35nM and 42nM, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that compound 26 induced the cellular apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner.

  17. Effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 on Cancer Cells and Potential Applications in Combination with Established and Putative Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Abu el Maaty, Mohamed A.; Wölfl, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The diverse effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), the bio-active form of vitamin D, on cancer cell metabolism and proliferation has made it an interesting candidate as a supporting therapeutic option in cancer treatment. An important strategy in cancer therapy is the use of combination chemotherapy to overcome drug resistance associated with numerous anti-cancer agents and to provide better means of avoiding undesirable side effects. This complex strategy is widely adopted by oncologists and several established “cocktails” of chemotherapeutics are routinely administered to cancer patients. Among the principles followed in designing such treatment regimens is the use of drugs with different mechanisms of action to overcome the issue of tumor heterogeneity and to evade resistance. In light of the profound and diverse effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 reported by in vitro and in vivo studies, we discuss how these effects could support the use of this molecule in combination with “classical” cytotoxic drugs, such as platins and anti-metabolites, for the treatment of solid and hematological tumors. We also examine recent evidence supporting synergistic activities with other promising anti-cancer drug candidates, and postulate mechanisms through which 1,25(OH)2D3 may help evade chemoresistance. PMID:28124999

  18. Scaffold-hopping of bioactive flavonoids: Discovery of aryl-pyridopyrimidinones as potent anticancer agents that inhibit catalytic role of topoisomerase IIα.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshani, Garima; Amrutkar, Suyog; Nayak, Anmada; Banerjee, Uttam C; Kundu, Chanakya N; Guchhait, Sankar K

    2016-10-21

    A strategy of scaffold-hopping of bioactive natural products, flavones and isoflavones, leading to target-based discovery of potent anticancer agents has been reported for the first time. Scaffold-hopped flavones, 2-aryl-4H-pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-4-ones and the scaffold-hopped isoflavones, 3-aryl-pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-4-ones were synthesized via Pd-catalyzed activation-arylation methods. Most of the compounds were found to exhibit pronounced human topoisomerase IIα (hTopoIIα) inhibitory activities and several compounds were found to be more potent than etoposide (a hTopoIIα-inhibiting anticancer drug). These classes of compounds were found to be hTopoIIα-selective catalytic inhibitors while not interfering with topoisomerase I and interacted with DNA plausibly in groove domain. Cytotoxicities against various cancer cells, low toxicity in normal cells, and apoptotic effects were observed. Interestingly, compared to parent flavones/isoflavones, their scaffold-hopped analogs bearing alike functionalities showed significant/enhanced hTopoIIα-inhibitory and cytotoxic properties, indicating the importance of a natural product-based scaffold-hopping strategy in the drug discovery.

  19. Anti-cancer agents based on N-acyl-2, 3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b] quinoline derivatives and a method of making

    DOEpatents

    Gakh, Andrei; Krasavin, Mikhail; Karapetian, Ruben; Rufanov, Konstantin A; Konstantinov, Igor; Godovykh, Elena; Soldatkina, Olga; Sosnov, Andrey V

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds that can be used as anti-cancer agents in the prostate cancer therapy. In particular, the invention relates to N-acyl derivatives of 2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]quinolines having the structural Formula (I), ##STR00001## stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof. The meaning of R1 is independently selected from H; C1-C6 Alkyl, cyclo-Alkyl or iso-Alkyl substituents; R2 is selected from C1-C6 Alkyl, cyclo-Alkyl or iso-Alkyl; substituted or non-substituted, fused or non-fused to substituted or non-substituted aromatic ring, aryl or heteroaryl groups. The invention also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  20. Transcription of the protein kinase C-δ gene is activated by JNK through c-Jun and ATF2 in response to the anticancer agent doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byong Wook; Kim, Chang Gun; Ko, Jesang; Lim, Yoongho

    2008-01-01

    Expression of protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) is up-regulated by apoptosis-inducing stimuli. However, very little is known about the signaling pathways that control PKCδ gene transcription. In the present study, we demonstrate that JNK stimulates PKCδ gene expression via c-Jun and ATF2 in response to the anticancer agent doxorubicin (DXR) in mouse lymphocytic leukemia L1210 cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that DXR-induced activation of the PKCδ promoter was enhanced by ectopic expression of JNK1, c-Jun, or ATF2, whereas it was strongly reduced by expression of dominant negative JNK1 or by treatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Furthermore, point mutations in the core sequence of the c-Jun/ATF2 binding site suppressed DXR-induced activation of the PKCδ promoter. Our results suggest an additional role for a JNK signaling cascade in DXR-induced PKCδ gene expression. PMID:19116455

  1. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of New Carbohydrate-Substituted Indenoisoquinoline Topoisomerase I Inhibitors and Improved Syntheses of the Experimental Anticancer Agents Indotecan (LMP400) and Indimitecan (LMP776)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate moieties were strategically transported from the indolocarbazole topoisomerase I (Top1) inhibitor class to the indenoisoquinoline system in search of structurally novel and potent Top1 inhibitors. The syntheses and biological evaluation of 20 new indenoisoquinolines glycosylated with linear and cyclic sugar moieties are reported. Aromatic ring substitution with 2,3-dimethoxy-8,9-methylenedioxy or 3-nitro groups exerted strong effects on antiproliferative and Top1 inhibitory activities. While the length of the carbohydrate side chain clearly correlated with antiproliferative activity, the relationship between stereochemistry and biological activity was less clearly defined. Twelve of the new indenoisoquinolines exhibit Top1 inhibitory activity equal to or better than that of camptothecin. An advanced synthetic intermediate from this study was also used to efficiently prepare indotecan (LMP400) and indimitecan (LMP776), two anticancer agents currently under investigation in a Phase I clinical trial at the National Institutes of Health. PMID:24517248

  2. Eldecalcitol (ED-71), an analog of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 as a potential anti-cancer agent for oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Shintani, T; Rosli, S N Z; Takatsu, F; Choon, Y F; Hayashido, Y; Toratani, S; Usui, E; Okamoto, T

    2016-11-01

    We have previously reported that 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibits NF-κB activity and thus inhibits growth of OSCC cells in serum-free culture and down-regulates HBp17/FGFBP-1 expression, which is important for cancer cell growth and angiogenesis. Here, we have investigated the effects of ED-71, an analog of vitamin D3 (VD) on OSCC cell lines in serum-free culture. It is known that ED-71 has a stronger inhibitory effect on bone resorption compared to VD and other VD analogs. To the best of our knowledge, there was no report examining the potential of ED-71 as an anti-cancer agent for OSCC. We found that ED-71 is able to inhibit the growth of cancer cell lines at a concentration of hundred times lower than calcitriol. As Cyp24A1 was reportedly induced in cancer cells, we measured the expression of CYP24A1 in OSCC cell lines (NA and UE), A431 epidermoid carcinoma and normal fibroblast cell (gfi) in serum-free culture. As a result, CYP24A1 mRNA and the protein expression in the OSCC cells treated with ED-71 increased in a dose-dependent manner. However, in vivo experiment, in which the A431 cells were implanted in mice, tumor formation was reduced by the ED-71 treatment with no significant difference between Cyp24A1 expression in the tumors of ED-71-treated and control group, as analyzed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that ED-71 is a potential anti-cancer agent for OSCC.

  3. Azide derivatized anticancer agents of Vitamin K 3: X-ray structural, DSC, resonance spectral and API studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badave, Kirti; Patil, Yogesh; Gonnade, Rajesh; Srinivas, Darbha; Dasgupta, Rajan; Khan, Ayesha; Rane, Sandhya

    2011-12-01

    Compound 1 [1-imino (acetyl hydrazino)-Vitamin K 3], displays valence tautomerically related electronic isomers as Form I and Form II. Form I exhibits 2D packing fragment with 1D ribbon chains of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and shows EPR silent features. While Form II is EPR active and exhibits biradical nature with double quantum transitions at g = 2.0040. 1H NMR of compound 2, [1-imino (hydrazino carboxylate)-Vitamin K 3] and Form II exhibit π delocalization via resonance assisted H-bonding [RAHB] effect compared to Form I. Molecular interactions in Form I and II are visualized by DSC. The electronic structures of compounds 1 and 2 have been correlated to their API values by measuring anticancer activities, mitochondrial potentials and DNA shearing patterns. Form II and compound 2 indicate mitochondria mediated apoptosis (˜75% cell death) while Form I causes 35% cell death.

  4. Potential therapeutic applications of multifunctional host-defense peptides from frog skin as anti-cancer, anti-viral, immunomodulatory, and anti-diabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Lukic, Miodrag L; Flatt, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Frog skin constitutes a rich source of peptides with a wide range of biological properties. These include host-defense peptides with cytotoxic activities against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and mammalian cells. Several hundred such peptides from diverse species have been described. Although attention has been focused mainly on antimicrobial activity, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents remains to be realized and no compound based upon their structures has yet been adopted in clinical practice. Consequently, alternative applications are being explored. Certain naturally occurring frog skin peptides, and analogs with improved therapeutic properties, show selective cytotoxicity against tumor cells and viruses and so have potential for development into anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. Some peptides display complex cytokine-mediated immunomodulatory properties. Effects on the production of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been observed so that clinical applications as anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and immunostimulatory agents are possible. Several frog skin peptides, first identified on the basis of antimicrobial activity, have been shown to stimulate insulin release both in vitro and in vivo and so show potential as incretin-based therapies for treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review assesses the therapeutic possibilities of peptides from frogs belonging to the Ascaphidae, Alytidae, Pipidae, Dicroglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Hylidae, and Ranidae families that complement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms.

  5. Synthesis, anticancer activity and molecular docking studies on a series of heterocyclic trans-cyanocombretastatin analogues as antitubulin agents

    PubMed Central

    Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Zong, Hongliang; Ketkar, Amit; Madadi, Nikhil Reddy; Janganati, Venumadav; Eoff, Robert L.; Guzman, Monica L.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    A series of heterocyclic combretastatin analogues have been synthesized and evaluated for their anticancer activity against a panel of 60 human cancer cell lines. The most potent compounds were two 3,4,5-trimethoxy phenyl analogues containing either an (Z)-indol-2-yl (8) or (Z)-benzo[b]furan-2-yl (12) moiety; these compounds exhibited GI50 values of <10 nM against 74% and 70%, respectively, of the human cancer cell lines in the 60-cell panel. Compounds 8, and 12 and two previously reported compounds in the same structural class, i.e. 29 and 31, also showed potent anti-leukemic activity against leukemia MV4-11 cell lines with LD50 values = 44 nM, 47 nM, 18 nM, and 180 nM, respectively. From the NCI anti-cancer screening results and the data from the in vitro toxicity screening on cultured AML cells, seven compounds: 8, 12, 21, 23, 25, 29 and 31 were screened for their in vitro inhibitory activity on tubulin polymerization in MV4-11 AML cells; at 50 nM, 8 and 29 inhibited polymerization of tubulin by >50%. The binding modes of the three most active compounds (8, 12 and 29) to tubulin were also investigated utilizing molecular docking studies. All three molecules were observed to bind in the same hydrophobic pocket at the interface of α- and β-tubulin that is occupied by colchicine, and were stablized by van der Waals’ interactions with surrounding tubulin residues. The results from the tubulin polymerization and molecular docking studies indicate that compounds 8 and 29 are the most potent anti-leukemic compounds in this structural class, and are considered lead compounds for further development as anti-leukemic drugs. PMID:25557492

  6. The anti-cancer agent guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane: Ensuing energetic and oxidative stress implications

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L.; Tudella, Valeria G.

    2011-06-15

    Guttiferone-A (GA) is a natural occurring polyisoprenylated benzophenone with cytotoxic action in vitro and anti-tumor action in rodent models. We addressed a potential involvement of mitochondria in GA toxicity (1-25 {mu}M) toward cancer cells by employing both hepatic carcinoma (HepG2) cells and succinate-energized mitochondria, isolated from rat liver. In HepG2 cells GA decreased viability, dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential, depleted ATP and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In isolated rat-liver mitochondria GA promoted membrane fluidity increase, cyclosporine A/EGTA-insensitive membrane permeabilization, uncoupling (membrane potential dissipation/state 4 respiration rate increase), Ca{sup 2+} efflux, ATP depletion, NAD(P)H depletion/oxidation and ROS levels increase. All effects in cells, except mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, as well as NADPH depletion/oxidation and permeabilization in isolated mitochondria, were partly prevented by the a NAD(P)H regenerating substrate isocitrate. The results suggest the following sequence of events: 1) GA interaction with mitochondrial membrane promoting its permeabilization; 2) mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation; 3) NAD(P)H oxidation/depletion due to inability of membrane potential-sensitive NADP{sup +} transhydrogenase of sustaining its reduced state; 4) ROS accumulation inside mitochondria and cells; 5) additional mitochondrial membrane permeabilization due to ROS; and 6) ATP depletion. These GA actions are potentially implicated in the well-documented anti-cancer property of GA/structure related compounds. - Graphical abstract: Guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane and induces cancer cell death Display Omitted Highlights: > We addressed the involvement of mitochondria in guttiferone (GA) toxicity toward cancer cells. > GA promoted membrane permeabilization, membrane potential dissipation, NAD(P)H depletion, ROS accumulation and ATP depletion. > These actions

  7. Synthesis and anticancer effects evaluation of 1-alkyl-3-(6-(2-methoxy-3-sulfonylaminopyridin-5-yl)benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)urea as anticancer agents with low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-Xiao; Li, Huan; Wang, Juan; Mao, Shuai; Xin, Min-Hang; Lu, She-Min; Mei, Qi-Bing; Zhang, San-Qi

    2015-10-01

    As a PI3K and mTOR dual inhibitor, N-(2-chloro-5-(2-acetylaminobenzo[d]thiazol-6-yl)pyridin-3-yl)-4-fluorophenylsulfonamide displays toxicity when orally administrated. In the present study, alkylurea moiety replaced the acetamide group in the compound and a series of 1-alkyl-3-(6-(2,3-disubstituted pyridin-5-yl)benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)urea derivatives were synthesized. The antiproliferative activities of the synthesized compounds in vitro were evaluated against HCT116, MCF-7, U87 MG and A549 cell lines. The compounds with potent antiproliferative activity were tested for their acute oral toxicity and inhibitory activity against PI3Ks and mTORC1. The results indicate that the compound attached a 2-(dialkylamino)ethylurea moiety at the 2-positeion of benzothiazole can retain the antiproliferative activity and inhibitory activity against PI3K and mTOR. In addition, their acute oral toxicity reduced dramatically. Moreover, compound 2f can effectively inhibit tumor growth in a mice S180 homograft model. These findings suggest that 1-(2-dialkylaminoethyl)-3-(6-(2-methoxy-3-sulfonylaminopyridin-5-yl)benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)urea derivatives can serve as potent PI3K inhibitors and anticancer agents with low toxicity.

  8. Heritable and cancer risks of exposures to anticancer drugs: inter-species comparisons of covalent deoxyribonucleic acid-binding agents.

    PubMed

    Vogel, E W; Barbin, A; Nivard, M J; Stack, H F; Waters, M D; Lohman, P H

    1998-05-25

    In the past years, several methodologies were developed for potency ranking of genotoxic carcinogens and germ cell mutagens. In this paper, we analyzed six sub-classes of covalent deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) binding antineoplastic drugs comprising a total of 37 chemicals and, in addition, four alkyl-epoxides, using four approaches for the ranking of genotoxic agents on a potency scale: the EPA/IARC genetic activity profile (GAP) database, the ICPEMC agent score system, and the analysis of qualitative and quantitative structure-activity and activity-activity relationships (SARs, AARs) between types of DNA modifications and genotoxic endpoints. Considerations of SARs and AARs focused entirely on in vivo data for mutagenicity in male germ cells (mouse, Drosophila), carcinogenicity (TD50s) and acute toxicity (LD50s) in rodents, whereas the former two approaches combined the entire database on in vivo and in vitro mutagenicity tests. The analysis shows that the understanding and prediction of rank positions of individual genotoxic agents requires information on their mechanism of action. Based on SARs and AARs, the covalent DNA binding antineoplastic drugs can be divided into three categories. Category 1 comprises mono-functional alkylating agents that primarily react with N7 and N3 moieties of purines in DNA. Efficient DNA repair is the major protective mechanism for their low and often not measurable genotoxic effects in repair-competent germ cells, and the need of high exposure doses for tumor induction in rodents. Due to cell type related differences in the efficiency of DNA repair, a strong target cell specificity in various species regarding the potency of these agents for adverse effects is found. Three of the four evaluation systems rank category 1 agents lower than those of the other two categories. Category 2 type mutagens produce O-alkyl adducts in DNA in addition to N-alkyl adducts. In general, certain O-alkyl DNA adducts appear to be slowly repaired, or

  9. Marine-Sourced Anti-Cancer and Cancer Pain Control Agents in Clinical and Late Preclinical Development †

    PubMed Central

    Newman, David J.; Cragg, Gordon M.

    2014-01-01

    The marine habitat has produced a significant number of very potent marine-derived agents that have the potential to inhibit the growth of human tumor cells in vitro and, in a number of cases, in both in vivo murine models and in humans. Although many agents have entered clinical trials in cancer, to date, only Cytarabine, Yondelis® (ET743), Eribulin (a synthetic derivative based on the structure of halichondrin B), and the dolastatin 10 derivative, monomethylauristatin E (MMAE or vedotin) as a warhead, have been approved for use in humans (Adcetris®). In this review, we show the compounds derived from marine sources that are currently in clinical trials against cancer. We have included brief discussions of the approved agents, where they are in trials to extend their initial approved activity (a common practice once an agent is approved), and have also included an extensive discussion of the use of auristatin derivatives as warheads, plus an area that has rarely been covered, the use of marine-derived agents to ameliorate the pain from cancers in humans, and to act as an adjuvant in immunological therapies. PMID:24424355

  10. Redesigning the DNA-Targeted Chromophore in Platinum–Acridine Anticancer Agents: A Structure–Activity Relationship Study

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Amanda J.; Liu, Fang; Bartenstein, Thomas F.; Haines, Laura G.; Levine, Keith E.; Kucera, Gregory L.; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Platinum–acridine hybrid agents show low-nanomolar potency in chemoresistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but high systemic toxicity in vivo. To reduce the promiscuous genotoxicity of these agents and improve their pharmacological properties, a modular build–click–screen approach was used to evaluate a small library of twenty hybrid agents containing truncated and extended chromophores of varying basicities. Selected derivatives were resynthesized and tested in five NSCLC cell lines representing large cell, squamous cell, and adenocarcinomas. 7-Aminobenz[c]acridine was identified as a promising scaffold in a hybrid agent (P1–B1) that maintained submicromolar activity in several of the DNA-repair proficient and p53-mutant cancer models, while showing improved tolerability in mice by 32-fold compared to the parent platinum–acridine (P1–A1). The distribution and DNA/RNA adduct levels produced by the acridine- and benz[c]acridine-based analogues in NCI-H460 cells (confocal microscopy, ICP-MS), and their ability to bind G-quadruplex forming DNA sequences (CD spectroscopy, HR-ESMS) were studied. P1–B1 emerges as a less genotoxic, more tolerable, and potentially more target-selective hybrid agent than P1–A1. PMID:25302716

  11. Gallic acid as a selective anticancer agent that induces apoptosis in SMMC-7721 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guojun; Zhang, Shuqin; Xie, Yanru; Zhang, Ziyu; Zhao, Wenjing

    2016-01-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid; GA) is a naturally occurring plant polyphenol, isolated from water caltrop, which has been reported to exert anticancer effects. The present study investigated the antiproliferative effects of GA on the HepG2 and SMMC-7721 human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines using MTT and colony formation assays. In particular, the underlying mechanism of GA-induced apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells was studied in vitro by flow cytometry and western blotting. The results of the present study indicated that GA was capable of inhibiting the proliferation of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, as well as inducing the apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cells. GA induced caspase-3, caspase-9 and reactive oxygen species activity, elevated the expression of apoptosis regulator Bcl-2-like protein 4 and reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential in SMMC-7721 cells. When compared with HL-7702 normal human hepatocytes, GA demonstrated selective toxicity for HCC cells. In conclusion, GA is able to induce apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells in vitro via mitochondrial-mediated pathways, and may possess the potential to be a novel therapeutic compound for use in the treatment of HCC.

  12. Utilizing hydrogen sulfide as a novel anti-cancer agent by targeting cancer glycolysis and pH imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Z-W; Teo, X-Y; Tay, E Y-W; Tan, C-H; Hagen, T; Moore, P K; Deng, L-W

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many disparate studies have reported the ambiguous role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in cell survival. The present study investigated the effect of H2S on the viability of cancer and non-cancer cells. Experimental Approach Cancer and non-cancer cells were exposed to H2S [using sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and GYY4137] and cell viability was examined by crystal violet assay. We then examined cancer cellular glycolysis by in vitro enzymatic assays and pH regulator activity. Lastly, intracellular pH (pHi) was determined by ratiometric pHi measurement using BCECF staining. Key Results Continuous, but not a single, exposure to H2S decreased cell survival more effectively in cancer cells, as compared to non-cancer cells. Slow H2S-releasing donor, GYY4137, significantly increased glycolysis, leading to overproduction of lactate. H2S also decreased anion exchanger and sodium/proton exchanger activity. The combination of increased metabolic acid production and defective pH regulation resulted in an uncontrolled intracellular acidification, leading to cancer cell death. In contrast, no significant intracellular acidification or cell death was observed in non-cancer cells. Conclusions and Implications Low and continuous exposure to H2S targets metabolic processes and pH homeostasis in cancer cells, potentially serving as a novel and selective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:24827113

  13. Biological evaluation of some new N-(2,6-dimethoxypyrimidinyl) thioureido benzenesulfonamide derivatives as potential antimicrobial and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ghorab, Mostafa M; Alsaid, Mansour S; El-Gaby, Mohamed S A; Safwat, Nesreen A; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Soliman, Aiten M

    2016-11-29

    A series of novel heterocyclic thioureas 3a-u containing sulfonamide moiety have been synthesized by the condensation of isothiocyanatobenzenesulfonamide 2 with a variety of heterocyclic amines. The newly synthesized heterocyclic thioureas were investigated for their antimicrobial and anticancer activity. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity were done using well diffusion method. Interestingly, compounds 3j and 3m, showed similar or better activity compared with the reference drug against the tested microorganisms. Although, 3j was less active among its analogues to inhibit the breast carcinoma cells, it exhibit strong broad spectrum antimicrobial activities. However, The results of the cytotoxic activity revealed that compound 3p was the most active against the breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) giving promising IC50 value of 1.72 μg/mL, compared with reference drug (5-flourouracil) with IC50 value of 4.8 μg/mL. The most potent compounds in cytotoxic activity 3b and 3p were further docked inside the active site of CAIX and were found to exhibit a proper binding with the active site amino acids according to their bond lengths, angles and conformational energy.

  14. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of asymmetric EF24 analogues as potential anti-cancer agents for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianzhang; Wu, Shoubiao; Shi, Lingyi; Zhang, Shanshan; Ren, Jiye; Yao, Song; Yun, Di; Huang, Lili; Wang, Jiabing; Li, Wulan; Wu, Xiaoping; Qiu, Peihong; Liang, Guang

    2017-01-05

    The nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway has been targeted for the therapy of various cancers, including lung cancer. EF24 was considered as a potent inhibitor of NF-κB signaling pathway. In this study, a series of asymmetric EF24 analogues were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-cancer activity against three lung cancer cell lines (A549, LLC, H1650). Most of the compounds exhibited good anti-tumor activity. Among them, compound 81 showed greater cytotoxicity than EF24. Compound 81 also possessed a potent anti-migration and anti-proliferative ability against A549 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, compound 81 induced lung cancer cells death by inhibiting NF-κB signaling pathway, and activated the JNK-mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation resulting in apoptosis. In summary, compound 81 is a valuable candidate for anti-lung cancer therapy.

  15. Diarylureas and diarylamides with pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine scaffold as broad-spectrum anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    El-Gamal, Mohammed Ibrahim; Oh, Chang-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    A series of diarylureas and diarylamides possessing pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine scaffold was designed and synthesized. The in vitro antiproliferative activities of a selected group of the target compounds against NCI-60 cell line panel were tested and compared with Sorafenib and Imatinib as reference compounds. Most of the compounds showed strong and broad-spectrum antiproliferative activities. Compounds IVa, IVb, and IVd with benzamido moiety at position 4 of the pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine nucleus, para-disubstituted phenyl ring at N1-position of pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine scaffold, and urea linker showed strong and broad-spectrum anticancer results with high potencies and efficacies. In addition, the amide derivatives Vb and Vc demonstrated one-digit nanomolar IC50 values over two and one cell line(s), respectively. Amid all the target compounds, compound IVa demonstrated the best results in both one-dose and five-dose testing modes. It showed 109.18% mean % inhibition over the NCI-60 cancer cell line panel at 10 µM concentration, submicromolar 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values over eight cell lines of eight different cancer types, and high efficacy with total growth inhibition (TGI) and 50% lethal concentration (LC50) values less than 4.22 µM over three colon, ovarian, and prostate cancer cell lines. It showed superior potency and efficacy to Sorafenib and Imatinib over most of the tested cell lines.

  16. Synthesis of some new 1,3,5-trisubstituted pyrazolines bearing benzene sulfonamide as anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Rafia; Ovais, Syed; Yaseen, Shafiya; Hamid, Hinna; Alam, M S; Samim, Mohammad; Singh, Surender; Javed, Kalim

    2011-07-15

    Thirteen new 2-pyrazoline derivatives bearing benzenesulfonamide moiety (2a-m) were synthesized by condensing appropriate chalcones with 4-hydrazinonbenzenesulfonamide hydrochloride and tested for anticancer and anti-inflammatory actions. According to the protocol of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in vitro disease-oriented human cells screening panel assay compounds 2b, 2c, 2e, 2f and 2g exhibited considerable antitumor activities against the entire tested tumor cell lines and showed effective growth inhibition GI(50) (MG-MID) values of 2.63, 2.57, 6.61, 3.31 and 2.57μM, respectively, beside a cyclostatic activity TGI (MG-MID) 9.54, 8.51, 24.0, 19.9 and 8.71μM, respectively. Two compounds 2g and 2k showed more potent anti-inflammatory activity than celecoxib at 5h in carrageenan-induced rat paw edema bioassay. These compounds (2g and 2k) proved to have superior gastrointestinal safety profiles as compared to celecoxib, when tested for their ulcerogenic effects. Compounds 2g and 2k showed no inhibition against the enzymatic activity of bovine COX-2 (in vitro).

  17. Structure-Based Design and Synthesis of Potent, Ethylenediamine-Based, Mammalian Farnesyltransferase Inhibitors as Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Steven; Keaney, Erin Pusateri; Cummings, Christopher G.; Blaskovich, Michelle A.; Hast, Michael A.; Glenn, Matthew P.; Chang, Sung-Youn; Bucher, Cynthia J.; Floyd, Ryan J.; Katt, William P.; Gelb, Michael H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Beese, Lorena S.; Sebti, Said M.; Hamilton, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    A potent class of anticancer, human farnesyltransferase (hFTase) inhibitors has been identified by “piggy-backing” on potent, antimalarial inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum farnesyltransferase (PfFTase). On the basis of a 4-fold substituted ethylenediamine scaffold, the inhibitors are structurally simple and readily derivatized, facilitating the extensive structure–activity relationship (SAR) study reported herein. Our most potent inhibitor is compound 1f, which exhibited an in vitro hFTase IC50 value of 25 nM and a whole cell H-Ras processing IC50 value of 90 nM. Moreover, it is noteworthy that several of our inhibitors proved highly selective for hFTase (up to 333-fold) over the related prenyltransferase enzyme geranylgeranyltransferase-I (GGTase-I). A crystal structure of inhibitor 1a co-crystallized with farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) in the active site of rat FTase illustrates that the para-benzonitrile moiety of 1a is stabilized by a π–π stacking interaction with the Y361β residue, suggesting a structural explanation for the observed importance of this component of our inhibitors. PMID:20822181

  18. Discovery and development of anticancer agents from marine sponges: perspectives based on a chemistry-experimental therapeutics collaborative program.

    PubMed

    Valeriote, Frederick A; Tenney, Karen; Media, Joseph; Pietraszkiewicz, Halina; Edelstein, Matthew; Johnson, Tyler A; Amagata, Taro; Crews, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative program was initiated in 1990 between the natural product chemistry laboratory of Dr. Phillip Crews at the University of California Santa Cruz and the experimental therapeutics laboratory of Dr. Fred Valeriote at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The program focused on the discovery and development of anticancer drugs from sponge extracts. A novel in vitro disk diffusion, solid tumor selective assay was used to examine 2,036 extracts from 683 individual sponges. The bioassay-directed fractionation discovery component led to the identification of active pure compounds from many of these sponges. In most cases, pure compound was prepared in sufficient quantities to both chemically identify the active compound(s) as well as pursue one or more of the biological development components. The latter included IC50, clonogenic survival-concentration exposure, maximum tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics and therapeutic assessment studies. Solid tumor selective compounds included fascaplysin and 10-bromofascaplysin (Fascaplysinopsis), neoamphimedine, 5-methoxyneoamphimedine and alpkinidine (Xestospongia), makaluvamine C and makaluvamine H (Zyzzya), psymberin (Psammocinia and Ircinia), and ethylplakortide Z and ethyldidehydroplakortide Z (Plakortis). These compounds or analogs thereof continue to have therapeutic potential.

  19. Stimuli-responsive protamine-based biodegradable nanocapsules for enhanced bioavailability and intracellular delivery of anticancer agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishna; Thomas, Midhun B.; Pulakkat, Sreeranjini; Gnanadhas, Divya P.; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Raichur, Ashok M.

    2015-08-01

    Enzyme- and pH-responsive polyelectrolyte nanocapsules having diameters in the range of 200 ± 20 nm were fabricated by means of Layer-by-Layer assembly of biopolymers, protamine, and heparin, and then loaded with anticancer drug doxorubicin. The incorporation of the FDA-approved peptide drug protamine as a wall component rendered the capsules responsive to enzyme stimuli. The stimuli-responsive drug release from these nanocapsules was evaluated, and further modulation of capsule permeability to avoid premature release was demonstrated by crosslinking the wall components. The interaction of the nanocapsules with cancer cells was studied using MCF-7 breast cancer cells. These capsules were readily internalized and disintegrated inside the cells, culminating in the release of the loaded doxorubicin and subsequent cell death as observed by confocal microscopy and MTT Assay. The bioavailability studies performed using BALB/c mice revealed that the encapsulated doxorubicin exhibited enhanced bioavailability compared to free doxorubicin. Our results indicate that this stimuli-responsive system fabricated from clinically used FDA-approved molecules and exhibiting minimal premature release has great potential for drug-delivery applications.

  20. Atypical fluoroquinolone gold(III) chelates as potential anticancer agents: relevance of DNA and protein interactions for their mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Gouvea, Ligiane R; Garcia, Luciene S; Lachter, Daniela R; Nunes, Paula Roberta; de Castro Pereira, Flávia; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela P; Louro, Sônia R W; Barbeira, Paulo Jorge S; Teixeira, Letícia R

    2012-09-01

    Quinolones are known for their antimicrobial and antitumor activities. Gold(III) compounds constitute an emerging class of biologically active substances, of special interest as potential anticancer agents. In this work three gold(III) complexes of the fluoroquinolones antimicrobial agents norfloxacin (NOR), levofloxacin (LEVO) and sparfloxacin (SPAR) were prepared and characterized with physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. In these complexes, NOR, LEVO and SPAR act as bidentate neutral ligands bound to gold(III) through the nitrogen atoms of the piperazine ring, which is an unusual mode of coordination for this class of compounds. Two chloride ions occupy the remaining coordination sites. The cytotoxic activity of the fluoroquinolones and their gold(III) complexes was tested against the A20 (murine lymphoma), B16-F10 (murine melanoma) and K562 (human myeloid leukemia) tumor cell lines as well as the L919 (murine lung fibroblasts) and MCR-5 (human lung fibroblasts) normal cells lines. All complexes were more active than their corresponding free ligands. Complex [AuCl(2)(LEVO)]Cl was selected for DNA fragmentation and cell cycle analysis. Spectroscopic titration with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) showed that the complexes can bind weakly to CT DNA, probably by an external contact (electrostatic or groove binding). The complexes exhibit good binding propensity to bovine serum albumin (BSA) having relatively high binding constant values.

  1. Utilization of microbial iron assimilation processes for the development of new antibiotics and inspiration for the design of new anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marvin J; Zhu, Helen; Xu, Yanping; Wu, Chunrui; Walz, Andrew J; Vergne, Anne; Roosenberg, John M; Moraski, Garrett; Minnick, Albert A; McKee-Dolence, Julia; Hu, Jingdan; Fennell, Kelley; Kurt Dolence, E; Dong, Li; Franzblau, Scott; Malouin, Francois; Möllmann, Ute

    2009-02-01

    Pathogenic microbes rapidly develop resistance to antibiotics. To keep ahead in the "microbial war", extensive interdisciplinary research is needed. A primary cause of drug resistance is the overuse of antibiotics that can result in alteration of microbial permeability, alteration of drug target binding sites, induction of enzymes that destroy antibiotics (ie., beta-lactamase) and even induction of efflux mechanisms. A combination of chemical syntheses, microbiological and biochemical studies demonstrate that the known critical dependence of iron assimilation by microbes for growth and virulence can be exploited for the development of new approaches to antibiotic therapy. Iron recognition and active transport relies on the biosyntheses and use of microbe-selective iron-chelating compounds called siderophores. Our studies, and those of others, demonstrate that siderophores and analogs can be used for iron transport-mediated drug delivery ("Trojan Horse" antibiotics) and induction of iron limitation/starvation (Development of new agents to block iron assimilation). Recent extensions of the use of siderophores for the development of novel potent and selective anticancer agents are also described.

  2. Destabilization of the MutSα’s protein-protein interface due to binding to the DNA adduct induced by anticancer agent Carboplatin via molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Negureanu, Lacramioara; Salsbury, Freddie R

    2013-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins maintain genetic integrity in all organisms by recognizing and repairing DNA errors. Such alteration of hereditary information can lead to various diseases, including cancer. Besides their role in DNA repair, MMR proteins detect and initiate cellular responses to certain type of DNA damage. Its response to the damaged DNA has made the human MMR pathway a useful target for anticancer agents such as carboplatin. This study indicates that strong, specific interactions at the interface of MutSα in response to the mismatched DNA recognition are replaced by weak, non-specific interactions in response to the damaged DNA recognition. Data suggest a severe impairment of the dimerization of MutSα in response to the damaged DNA recognition. While the core of MutSα is preserved in response to the damaged DNA recognition, the loss of contact surface and the rearrangement of contacts at the protein interface suggest a different packing in response to the damaged DNA recognition. Coupled in response to the mismatched DNA recognition, interaction energies, hydrogen bonds, salt bridges, and solvent accessible surface areas at the interface of MutSα and within the subunits are uncoupled or asynchronously coupled in response to the damaged DNA recognition. These pieces of evidence suggest that the loss of a synchronous mode of response in the MutSα’s surveillance for DNA errors would possible be one of the mechanism(s) of signaling the MMR-dependent programed cell death much wanted in anticancer therapies. The analysis was drawn from dynamics simulations. PMID:24061854

  3. Mode of action and resistance studies unveil new roles for tropodithietic acid as an anticancer agent and the γ-glutamyl cycle as a proton sink.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Maxwell Z; Wang, Rurun; Gitai, Zemer; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R

    2016-02-09

    While we have come to appreciate the architectural complexity of microbially synthesized secondary metabolites, far less attention has been paid to linking their structural features with possible modes of action. This is certainly the case with tropodithietic acid (TDA), a broad-spectrum antibiotic generated by marine bacteria that engage in dynamic symbioses with microscopic algae. TDA promotes algal health by killing unwanted marine pathogens; however, its mode of action (MoA) and significance for the survival of an algal-bacterial miniecosystem remains unknown. Using cytological profiling, we herein determine the MoA of TDA and surprisingly find that it acts by a mechanism similar to polyether antibiotics, which are structurally highly divergent. We show that like polyether drugs, TDA collapses the proton motive force by a proton antiport mechanism, in which extracellular protons are exchanged for cytoplasmic cations. The α-carboxy-tropone substructure is ideal for this purpose as the proton can be carried on the carboxyl group, whereas the basicity of the tropylium ion facilitates cation export. Based on similarities to polyether anticancer agents we have further examined TDA's cytotoxicity and find it to exhibit potent, broad-spectrum anticancer activities. These results highlight the power of MoA-profiling technologies in repurposing old drugs for new targets. In addition, we identify an operon that confers TDA resistance to the producing marine bacteria. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses of these genes lead to a previously unknown metabolic link between TDA/acid resistance and the γ-glutamyl cycle. The implications of this resistance mechanism in the context of the algal-bacterial symbiosis are discussed.

  4. Mode of action and resistance studies unveil new roles for tropodithietic acid as an anticancer agent and the γ-glutamyl cycle as a proton sink

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Maxwell Z.; Wang, Rurun; Gitai, Zemer; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R.

    2016-01-01

    While we have come to appreciate the architectural complexity of microbially synthesized secondary metabolites, far less attention has been paid to linking their structural features with possible modes of action. This is certainly the case with tropodithietic acid (TDA), a broad-spectrum antibiotic generated by marine bacteria that engage in dynamic symbioses with microscopic algae. TDA promotes algal health by killing unwanted marine pathogens; however, its mode of action (MoA) and significance for the survival of an algal–bacterial miniecosystem remains unknown. Using cytological profiling, we herein determine the MoA of TDA and surprisingly find that it acts by a mechanism similar to polyether antibiotics, which are structurally highly divergent. We show that like polyether drugs, TDA collapses the proton motive force by a proton antiport mechanism, in which extracellular protons are exchanged for cytoplasmic cations. The α-carboxy-tropone substructure is ideal for this purpose as the proton can be carried on the carboxyl group, whereas the basicity of the tropylium ion facilitates cation export. Based on similarities to polyether anticancer agents we have further examined TDA’s cytotoxicity and find it to exhibit potent, broad-spectrum anticancer activities. These results highlight the power of MoA-profiling technologies in repurposing old drugs for new targets. In addition, we identify an operon that confers TDA resistance to the producing marine bacteria. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses of these genes lead to a previously unknown metabolic link between TDA/acid resistance and the γ-glutamyl cycle. The implications of this resistance mechanism in the context of the algal-bacterial symbiosis are discussed. PMID:26802120

  5. Development and validation of a rapid HPLC method for quantitation of SP-141, a novel pyrido[b]indole anticancer agent, and an initial pharmacokinetic study in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Subhasree; Qin, Jiang-Jiang; Voruganti, Sukesh; Wang, Ming-Hai; Sharma, Horrick; Patil, Shivaputra; Buolamwini, John K.; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in targeting the MDM2 oncogene for cancer therapy. SP-141, a novel designed small molecule MDM2 inhibitor, exerts excellent in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity. To facilitate the preclinical development of this candidate anticancer agent, we have developed an HPLC method for the quantitative analysis of SP-141. The method was validated to be precise, accurate, and specific, with a linear range of 16.2–32,400 ng/mL in plasma, 16.2–6480 ng/mL in homogenates of brain, heart, liver, kidneys, lungs, muscle and tumor, and 32.4–6480 ng/mL in spleen homogenates. The lower limit of quantification was 16.2 ng/mL in plasma and all the tissue homogenates, except for spleen homogenates, where it was 32.4 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-assay precisions (coefficient of variation) were between 0.86 and 13.39%, and accuracies (relative errors) ranged from −8.50 to 13.92%. The relative recoveries were 85.6–113.38%. SP-141 was stable in mouse plasma, modestly plasma bound and metabolized by S9 microsomal enzymes. We performed an initial pharmacokinetic study in tumor-bearing nude mice, demonstrating that SP-141 has a short half-life in plasma and wide tissue distribution. In summary, this HPLC method can be used in future preclinical and clinical investigations of SP-141. PMID:25294254

  6. The Antioxidant Transcription Factor Nrf2 Negatively Regulates Autophagy and Growth Arrest Induced by the Anticancer Redox Agent Mitoquinone*

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. Ashutosh; Klein, Sarah R.; Bonar, Spencer J.; Zielonka, Jacek; Mizuno, Naoko; Dickey, Jennifer S.; Keller, Paul W.; Joseph, Joy; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Shacter, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Mitoquinone (MitoQ) is a synthetically modified, redox-active ubiquinone compound that accumulates predominantly in mitochondria. We found that MitoQ is 30-fold more cytotoxic to breast cancer cells than to healthy mammary cells. MitoQ treatment led to irreversible inhibition of clonogenic growth of breast cancer cells through a combination of autophagy and apoptotic cell death mechanisms. Relatively limited cytotoxicity was seen with the parent ubiquinone coenzyme Q10. Inhibition of cancer cell growth by MitoQ was associated with G1/S cell cycle arrest and phosphorylation of the checkpoint kinases Chk1 and Chk2. The possible role of oxidative stress in MitoQ activity was investigated by measuring the products of hydroethidine oxidation. Increases in ethidium and dihydroethidium levels, markers of one-electron oxidation of hydroethidine, were observed at cytotoxic concentrations of MitoQ. Keap1, an oxidative stress sensor protein that regulates the antioxidant transcription factor Nrf2, underwent oxidation, degradation, and dissociation from Nrf2 in MitoQ-treated cells. Nrf2 protein levels, nuclear localization, and transcriptional activity also increased following MitoQ treatment. Knockdown of Nrf2 caused a 2-fold increase in autophagy and an increase in G1 cell cycle arrest in response to MitoQ but had no apparent effect on apoptosis. The Nrf2-regulated enzyme NQO1 is partly responsible for controlling the level of autophagy. Keap1 and Nrf2 act as redox sensors for oxidative perturbations that lead to autophagy. MitoQ and similar compounds should be further evaluated for novel anticancer activity. PMID:20805228

  7. Sustained release of anticancer agent phytic acid from its chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles for drug-delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Barahuie, Farahnaz; Dorniani, Dena; Saifullah, Bullo; Gothai, Sivapragasam; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Pandurangan, Ashok Kumar; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Norhaizan, Mohd Esa

    2017-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were coated with phytic acid (PTA) to form phytic acid-chitosan-iron oxide nanocomposite (PTA-CS-MNP). The obtained nanocomposite and nanocarrier were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, transmission electron microscopy, and thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric analyses. Fourier transform infrared spectra and thermal analysis of MNPs and PTA-CS-MNP nanocomposite confirmed the binding of CS on the surface of MNPs and the loading of PTA in the PTA-CS-MNP nanocomposite. The coating process enhanced the thermal stability of the anticancer nanocomposite obtained. X-ray diffraction results showed that the MNPs and PTA-CS-MNP nanocomposite are pure magnetite. Drug loading was estimated using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and showing a 12.9% in the designed nanocomposite. Magnetization curves demonstrated that the synthesized MNPs and nanocomposite were superparamagnetic with saturation magnetizations of 53.25 emu/g and 42.15 emu/g, respectively. The release study showed that around 86% and 93% of PTA from PTA-CS-MNP nanocomposite could be released within 127 and 56 hours by a phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.4 and 4.8, respectively, in a sustained manner and governed by pseudo-second order kinetic model. The cytotoxicity of the compounds on HT-29 colon cancer cells was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The HT-29 cell line was more sensitive against PTA-CS-MNP nanocomposite than PTA alone. No cytotoxic effect was observed on normal cells (3T3 fibroblast cells). This result indicates that PTA-CS-MNP nanocomposite can inhibit the proliferation of colon cancer cells without causing any harm to normal cell. PMID:28392693

  8. Discovery of a Series of Acridinones as Mechanism-Based Tubulin Assembly Inhibitors with Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Magalhaes, Luma G.; Marques, Fernando B.; da Fonseca, Marina B.; Rogério, Kamilla R.; Graebin, Cedric S.; Andricopulo, Adriano D.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules play critical roles in vital cell processes, including cell growth, division, and migration. Microtubule-targeting small molecules are chemotherapeutic agents that are widely used in the treatment of cancer. Many of these compounds are structurally complex natural products (e.g., paclitaxel, vinblastine, and vincristine) with multiple stereogenic centers. Because of the scarcity of their natural sources and the difficulty of their partial or total synthesis, as well as problems related to their bioavailability, toxicity, and resistance, there is an urgent need for novel microtubule binding agents that are effective for treating cancer but do not have these disadvantages. In the present work, our lead discovery effort toward less structurally complex synthetic compounds led to the discovery of a series of acridinones inspired by the structure of podophyllotoxin, a natural product with important microtubule assembly inhibitory activity, as novel mechanism-based tubulin assembly inhibitors with potent anticancer properties and low toxicity. The compounds were evaluated in vitro by wound healing assays employing the metastatic and triple negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Four compounds with IC50 values between 0.294 and 1.7 μM were identified. These compounds showed selective cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 and DU-145 cancer cell lines and promoted cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and apoptosis. Consistent with molecular modeling results, the acridinones inhibited tubulin assembly in in vitro polymerization assays with IC50 values between 0.9 and 13 μM. Their binding to the colchicine-binding site of tubulin was confirmed through competitive assays. PMID:27508497

  9. CoMFA and CoMSIA Studies of 1,2-dihydropyridine Derivatives as Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Ismail; Abdel-Fattah, Mohamed A. O.; Hany, Marwa S.; El-Sharif, Shaimaa A.; El-Naggar, Mahmoud A. M.; Rashied, Rasha M. H.; Piazza, Gary A.; Abadi, Ashraf H.

    2016-01-01

    Taking advantage of our in-house experimental data on 3-cyano-2-imino-1, 2-dihydropyridine and 3-cyano-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine derivatives as inhibitors of the growth of the human HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma tumor cell line, we have established a highly significant CoMFA and CoMSIA models (q2cv =0.70/0.639). The models were investigated to assure their stability and predictivity (r2pred= 0.65/0.61) and successfully applied to design a new potential cell growth inhibitory agent with IC50s in the submicromolar range. PMID:22530888

  10. 3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) a fast acting, promising, powerful, specific, and effective "small molecule" anti-cancer agent taken from labside to bedside: introduction to a special issue.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Peter L

    2012-02-01

    Although the "Warburg effect", i.e., elevated glucose metabolism to lactic acid (glycolysis) even in the presence of oxygen, has been recognized as the most common biochemical phenotype of cancer for over 80 years, its biochemical and genetic basis remained unknown for over 50 years. Work focused on elucidating the underlying mechanism(s) of the "Warburg effect" commenced in the author's laboratory in 1969. By 1985 among the novel findings made two related most directly to the basis of the "Warburg effect", the first that the mitochondrial content of tumors exhibiting this phenotype is markedly decreased relative to the tissue of origin, and the second that such mitochondria have markedly elevated amounts of the enzyme hexokinase-2 (HK2) bound to their outer membrane. HK2 is the first of a number of enzymes in cancer cells involved in metabolizing the sugar glucose to lactic acid. At its mitochondrial location HK2 binds at/near the protein VDAC (voltage dependent anion channel), escapes inhibition by its product glucose-6-phosphate, and gains access to mitochondrial produced ATP. As shown by others, it also helps immortalize cancer cells, i.e., prevents cell death. Based on these studies, the author's laboratory commenced experiments to elucidate the gene basis for the overexpression of HK2 in cancer. These studies led to both the discovery of a unique HK2 promoter region markedly activated by both hypoxic conditions and moderately activated by several metabolites (e.g., glucose), Also discovered was the promoter's regulation by epigenetic events (i.e., methylation, demethylation). Finally, the author's laboratory turned to the most important objective. Could they selectively and completely destroy cancerous tumors in animals? This led to the discovery in an experiment conceived, designed, and conducted by Young Ko that the small molecule 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), the subject of this mini-review series, is an incredibly powerful and swift acting anticancer agent

  11. PT-ACRAMTU, a platinum–acridine anticancer agent, lengthens and aggregates, but does not stiffen or soften DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Samrat; Snyder, Matthew J.; Rosile, David; Binz, Kristen L.; Roll, Eric H.; Suryadi, Jimmy; Bierbach, Ulrich; Guthold, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the dose-dependent change in conformational and mechanical properties of DNA treated with PT-ACRAMTU ([PtCl(en)(ACRAMTU-S)](NO3)2, (en = ethane-1,2-diamine, ACRAMTU = 1-[2-(acridin-9-ylamino)ethyl]-1,3-dimethylthiourea. PT-ACRAMTU is the parent drug of a family of nonclassical platinum-based agents that show potent activity in non-small cell lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Its acridine moiety intercalates between DNA bases, while the platinum group forms monoadducts with DNA bases. AFM images show that PT-ACRAMTU causes some DNA looping and aggregation at drug-to-base pair ratio (rb) of 0.1 and higher. Very significant lengthening of the DNA was observed with increasing doses of PT-ACRAMTU, and reached saturation at an rb of 0.15. At rb of 0.1, lengthening was 0.6 nm per drug molecule, which is more than one fully stretched base pair stack can accommodate, indicating that ACRAMTU also disturbs the stacking of neighboring base pair stacks. Analysis of the AFM images based on the worm-like chain (WLC) model showed that PT-ACRAMTU did not change the flexibility of (non-aggregated) DNA, despite the extreme lengthening. The persistence length of untreated DNA and DNA treated with PT-ACRAMTU was in the range of 49 to 65 nm. Potential consequences of the perturbations caused by this agent for the recognition and processing of the DNA adducts it forms are discussed. PMID:23636685

  12. Systematic Analysis of the Anticancer Agent Taxol-Producing Capacity in Colletotrichum Species and Use of the Species for Taxol Production

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinhee; Park, Jae Gyu; Ali, Md. Sarafat

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel (taxol) has long been used as a potent anticancer agent for the treatment of many cancers. Ever since the fungal species Taxomyces andreanae was first shown to produce taxol in 1993, many endophytic fungal species have been recognized as taxol accumulators. In this study, we analyzed the taxol-producing capacity of different Colletotrichum spp. to determine the distribution of a taxol biosynthetic gene within this genus. Distribution of the taxadiene synthase (TS) gene, which cyclizes geranylgeranyl diphosphate to produce taxadiene, was analyzed in 12 Colletotrichum spp., of which 8 were found to contain the unique skeletal core structure of paclitaxel. However, distribution of the gene was not limited to closely related species. The production of taxol by Colletotrichum dematium, which causes pepper anthracnose, depended on the method in which the fungus was stored, with the highest production being in samples stored under mineral oil. Based on its distribution among Colletotrichum spp., the TS gene was either integrated into or deleted from the bacterial genome in a species-specific manner. In addition to their taxol-producing capacity, the simple genome structure and easy gene manipulation of these endophytic fungal species make them valuable resources for identifying genes in the taxol biosynthetic pathway. PMID:27433121

  13. Rationally Developed Organic Salts of Tolfenamic Acid and Its β-Alanine Derivatives for Dual Purposes as an Anti-Inflammatory Topical Gel and Anticancer Agent.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Rumana; Sravanthi, Bommagani; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2017-04-04

    A new series of primary ammonium monocarboxylate (PAM) salts of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), namely, tolfenamic acid (TA), and its β-alanine derivatives were generated. Nearly 67 % of the salts in the series showed gelling abilities with various solvents, including water (biogenic solvent) and methyl salicylate (typically used for topical gel formulations). Gels were characterized by rheology, electron microscopy, and so forth. Structure-property correlations based on single-crystal and powder XRD data of several gelator and nongelator salts revealed intriguing insights. Studies (in vitro) on an aggressive human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231) with the l-tyrosine methyl ester salt of TA (S7) revealed that the hydrogelator salt was more effective at killing cancer cells than the mother drug TA (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay); displayed better anti-inflammatory activity compared with that of TA (prostaglandin E2 assay); could be internalized within the cancer cells, as revealed by fluorescence microscopy; and inhibited effectively migration of the cancer cells. Thus, the easily accessible ambidextrous gelator salt S7 can be used for two purposes: as an anti-inflammatory topical gel and as an anticancer agent.

  14. A comparison of patient adherence and preference of packaging method for oral anticancer agents using conventional pill bottles versus daily pill boxes.

    PubMed

    Macintosh, P W; Pond, G R; Pond, B J; Leung, V; Siu, L L

    2007-07-01

    Adherence to medications is an important issue in oncology due to the increasing number of anticancer agents, such as targeted therapies, formulated for oral dosing. A prospective, crossover design was utilized in which patients on capecitabine were randomly assigned to one of two packaging methods for one cycle, and then switched over to the alternate packaging method in the subsequent cycle. Twenty-five patients were accrued to this study. Adherence rates were similar when using the daily pill boxes (17/21 = 81%) and when using the conventional pill bottles (18/21 = 86%). However, more patients were satisfied with the daily pill boxes (61% versus 11%, P = 0.027), preferred the daily pill boxes (61% versus 17%, P = 0.061), and thought the daily pill boxes were more helpful in reminding them to take their medications (50% versus 11%, P = 0.070). In conclusion, this small pilot study did not demonstrate that the use of daily pill boxes improved patient adherence with capecitabine, but patient satisfaction and preference for this packaging method were greater than for the conventional pill bottles. Further exploration of this intervention in a larger study is warranted.

  15. Elucidating the in vivo fate of nanocrystals using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model: a case study with the anticancer agent SNX-2112

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Dong; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Huailing; Zhang, Xingwang; Wang, Yifei; Wu, Baojian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction SNX-2112 is a promising anticancer agent but has poor solubility in both water and oil. In the study reported here, we aimed to develop a nanocrystal formulation for SNX-2112 and to determine the pharmacokinetic behaviors of the prepared nanocrystals. Methods Nanocrystals of SNX-2112 were prepared using the wet-media milling technique and characterized by particle size, differential scanning calorimetry, drug release, etc. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was undertaken to evaluate the drug’s disposition in rats following administration of drug cosolvent or nanocrystals. Results The optimized SNX-2112 nanocrystals (with poloxamer 188 as the stabilizer) were 203 nm in size with a zeta potential of −11.6 mV. In addition, the nanocrystals showed a comparable release profile to the control (drug cosolvent). Further, the rat PBPK model incorporating the parameters of particulate uptake (into the liver and spleen) and of in vivo drug release was well fitted to the experimental data following administration of the drug nanocrystals. The results reveal that the nanocrystals rapidly released drug molecules in vivo, accounting for their cosolvent-like pharmacokinetic behaviors. Due to particulate uptake, drug accumulation in the liver and spleen was significant at the initial time points (within 1 hour). Conclusion The nanocrystals should be a good choice for the systemic delivery of the poorly soluble drug SNX-2112. Also, our study contributes to an improved understanding of the in vivo fate of nanocrystals. PMID:25848269

  16. Development and validation of an HPLC method for quantitation of BA-TPQ, a novel iminoquinone anticancer agent, and an initial pharmacokinetic study in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Haibo; Ezell, Scharri J; Zhang, Xiangrong; Wang, Wei; Xu, Hongxia; Rayburn, Elizabeth R; Zhang, Xu; Gurpinar, Evrim; Yang, Xinyi; Sommers, Charnell I; Velu, Sadanandan E; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2011-05-01

    We herein describe the development and validation of an HPLC method for the quantitation of 7-(benzylamino)-1,3,4,8-tetrahydropyrrolo [4,3,2-de]quinolin-8(1H)-one (BA-TPQ), a newly synthesized iminoquinone anticancer agent. BA-TPQ was extracted from plasma and tissue samples by first precipitating proteins with acetonitrile followed by a liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. Chromatographic separation was carried out using a gradient flow rate on a Zorbax SB C(18) column, and the effluent was monitored by UV detection at 346 nm. The method was found to be precise, accurate, and specific, with a linear range of 3.91-1955.0  ng/mL in plasma, 19.55-1955.0  ng/mL in spleen, brain, and liver homogenates and 19.55-3910.0  ng/mL in heart, lung and kidney homogenates. The method was stable under all relevant conditions. Using this method, we also carried out an initial study determining plasma pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of BA-TPQ in mice following intravenous administration. In summary, this simple and sensitive HPLC method can be used in future preclinical and clinical studies of BA-TPQ.

  17. Screening the yeast genome for energetic metabolism pathways involved in a phenotypic response to the anti-cancer agent 3-bromopyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Paweł; Jurkiewicz, Paweł; Cal-Bąkowska, Magdalena; Ko, Young H.; Pedersen, Peter L.; Goffeau, Andre; Ułaszewski, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    In this study the detailed characteristic of the anti-cancer agent 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model is described, with the emphasis on its influence on energetic metabolism of the cell. It shows that 3-BP toxicity in yeast is strain-dependent and influenced by the glucose-repression system. Its toxic effect is mainly due to the rapid depletion of intracellular ATP. Moreover, lack of the Whi2p phosphatase results in strongly increased sensitivity of yeast cells to 3-BP, possibly due to the non-functional system of mitophagy of damaged mitochondria through the Ras-cAMP-PKA pathway. Single deletions of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes, the TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondrial carriers result in multiple effects after 3-BP treatment. However, it can be concluded that activity of the pentose phosphate pathway is necessary to prevent the toxicity of 3-BP, probably due to the fact that large amounts of NADPH are produced by this pathway, ensuring the reducing force needed for glutathione reduction, crucial to cope with the oxidative stress. Moreover, single deletions of genes encoding the TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondrial carriers generally cause sensitivity to 3-BP, while totally inactive mitochondrial respiration in the rho0 mutant resulted in increased resistance to 3-BP. PMID:26862728

  18. The water soluble peripherally tetra-substituted zinc(ii), manganese(iii) and copper(ii) phthalocyanines as new potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Barut, Burak; Sofuoğlu, Ayşenur; Biyiklioglu, Zekeriya; Özel, Arzu

    2016-09-28

    In this study, [2-(2-morpholin-4-ylethoxy)ethoxy] group substituted zinc(ii), manganese(iii) and copper(ii) phthalocyanines 2-4 and their water soluble derivatives 2a, 3a and 4a were synthesized and the interactions of compounds 2a, 3a and 4a with CT-DNA and supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA were investigated. The results of binding experiments showed that these compounds were able to interact with CT-DNA via intercalative mode with a strong binding affinity in the order 3a > 2a > 4a. DNA-photocleavage activities of compounds 2a, 3a and 4a were determined. These compounds cleaved supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA efficiently under irradiation at 650 nm for 2a and 4a, and at 750 nm for 3a. These compounds displayed remarkable inhibitory activities against topoisomerase I enzyme in a dose-dependent manner. All of these results suggest that these phthalocyanines might be suitable anticancer agents due to their strong binding affinities, significant cleavage activities and effective topoisomerase I inhibition.

  19. Synthesis of ent-BE-43547A1 reveals a potent hypoxia-selective anticancer agent and uncovers the biosynthetic origin of the APD-CLD natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villadsen, Nikolaj L.; Jacobsen, Kristian M.; Keiding, Ulrik B.; Weibel, Esben T.; Christiansen, Bjørn; Vosegaard, Thomas; Bjerring, Morten; Jensen, Frank; Johannsen, Mogens; Tørring, Thomas; Poulsen, Thomas B.

    2016-11-01

    Tumour hypoxia is speculated to be a key driver of therapeutic resistance and metastatic dissemination. Consequently, the discovery of new potent agents that selectively target the hypoxic cell population may reveal new and untapped antitumour mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that the BE-43547 subclass of the APD-CLD (amidopentadienoate-containing cyclolipodepsipeptides) natural products possesses highly hypoxia-selective growth-inhibitory activity against pancreatic cancer cells. To enable this discovery, we have developed the first synthesis of the BE-43547-macrocyclic scaffold in 16 steps (longest linear sequence), which also allowed access to the full panel of relative stereoisomers and ultimately to the assignment of stereochemical configuration. Discrepancies between the spectroscopic signatures of the synthetic compounds with that originally reported for the BE-43547 members stimulated us to re-isolate the natural product from a BE-43547-producing microorganism during which we elucidated the biosynthetic gene clusters for the BE-43547 family as well as for all other known APD-CLDs. Our studies underline the exciting possibilities for the further development of the anticancer activities of these natural products.

  20. Screening the yeast genome for energetic metabolism pathways involved in a phenotypic response to the anti-cancer agent 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    Lis, Paweł; Jurkiewicz, Paweł; Cal-Bąkowska, Magdalena; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Goffeau, Andre; Ułaszewski, Stanisław

    2016-03-01

    In this study the detailed characteristic of the anti-cancer agent 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model is described, with the emphasis on its influence on energetic metabolism of the cell. It shows that 3-BP toxicity in yeast is strain-dependent and influenced by the glucose-repression system. Its toxic effect is mainly due to the rapid depletion of intracellular ATP. Moreover, lack of the Whi2p phosphatase results in strongly increased sensitivity of yeast cells to 3-BP, possibly due to the non-functional system of mitophagy of damaged mitochondria through the Ras-cAMP-PKA pathway. Single deletions of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes, the TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondrial carriers result in multiple effects after 3-BP treatment. However, it can be concluded that activity of the pentose phosphate pathway is necessary to prevent the toxicity of 3-BP, probably due to the fact that large amounts of NADPH are produced by this pathway, ensuring the reducing force needed for glutathione reduction, crucial to cope with the oxidative stress. Moreover, single deletions of genes encoding the TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondrial carriers generally cause sensitivity to 3-BP, while totally inactive mitochondrial respiration in the rho0 mutant resulted in increased resistance to 3-BP.

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 6-hydroxy-benzo[d][1,3]oxathiol-2-one Schiff bases as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Chazin, Eliza de Lucas; Sanches, Paola de Souza; Lindgren, Eric Brazil; Vellasco Júnior, Walcimar Trindade; Pinto, Laine Celestino; Burbano, Rommel Mario Rodríguez; Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Gomes, Claudia Regina Brandão; Wardell, James Lewis; Wardell, Solange Maria Silva Veloso; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Vasconcelos, Thatyana Rocha Alves

    2015-01-27

    With the aim of discovering new anticancer agents, we have designed and synthesized novel 6-hydroxy-benzo[d][1,3]oxathiol-2-one Schiff bases. The synthesis started with the selective nitration at 5-position of 6-hydroxybenzo[d][1,3]oxathiol-2-one (1) leading to the nitro derivative 2. The nitro group of 2 was reduced to give the amino intermediate 3. Schiff bases 4a-r were obtained from coupling reactions between 3 and various benzaldehydes and heteroaromatic aldehydes. All the new compounds were fully identified and characterized by NMR (1H and 13C) and specifically for 4q by X-ray crystallography. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the compounds was evaluated against cancer cell lines (ACP-03, SKMEL-19 and HCT-116) by using MTT assay. Schiff bases 4b and 4o exhibited promising cytotoxicity against ACP-03 and SKMEL-19, respectively, with IC50 values lower than 5 μM. This class of compounds can be considered as a good starting point for the development of new lead molecules in the fight against cancer.

  2. One-Pot Three-Component Synthesis of Novel Diethyl((2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinolin-3-yl)(arylamino)methyl)phosphonate as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yi-Lin; Wu, Zhi-Lin; Xiao, Meng-Wu; Tang, Yu-Ting; Li, Kang-Ming; Ye, Jiao; Xiang, Jian-Nan; Hu, Ai-Xi

    2016-01-01

    With the aim of discovering new anticancer agents, we have designed and synthesized novel α-aminophosphonate derivatives containing a 2-oxoquinoline structure using a convenient one-pot three-component method. The newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for antitumor activities against the A549 (human lung adenocarcinoma cell), HeLa (human cervical carcinoma cell), MCF-7 (human breast cancer cell), and U2OS (human osteosarcoma cell) cancer cell lines in vitro, employing a standard 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results of pharmacological screening indicated that many compounds exhibited moderate to high levels of antitumor activities against the tested cancer cell lines and that most compounds showed more potent inhibitory activities comparable to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) which was used as a positive control. The mechanism of representative compound 4u (diethyl((2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinolin-3-yl)(phenyl-amino)methyl)phosphonate) indicated that the compound mainly arrested HeLa cells in S and G2 stages and was accompanied by apoptosis in HeLa cells. This action was confirmed by acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, Hoechst 33342 staining, and flow cytometry. PMID:27136538

  3. Investigation on pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of a novel platinum anticancer agent in rats by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Wen, Yanli; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Di; Fan, Ali; Zhang, Yongjie; Deng, Shuhua; Wang, Xin; Liu, Qingwang; Lu, Yang; Wang, Zhimei; Gou, Shaohua; Chen, Xijing

    2014-08-01

    1. DN604 is a new platinum agent with encouraging anticancer activity. The present study was to explore the pharmacokinetic profiles, distribution and excretion of platinum in Sprague-Dawley rats after intravenous administration of DN604. A sensitive and selective inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method was established for determination of platinum in biological specimens. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by a non-compartmental method. 2. The area under concentration-time curve AUC0-t and AUC0-∞ for platinum originating from DN604 at 10 mg/kg were 25.15 ± 1.29 and 28.72 ± 1.04 μg/hml, respectively. The mean residence time MRT was 36.59 ± 6.65 h. The volume of distribution Vz was 11.42 ± 2.49 l/kg and clearance CL was 0.18 ± 0.01 l/h/kg. In addition, the elimination half-life T1/2z was 44.83 ± 9.75 h. After intravenous administration of DN604, platinum was extensively distributed in most of tested tissues except brain. The majority of platinum excreted via urine, and its accumulative excretion ratio during the period of 120 h was 63.5% ± 7.7% for urine, but only 6.94% ± 0.11% for feces. 3. The satisfactory half-life, wide distribution and high excretion made this novel platinum agent worthy of further research and development.

  4. Biological evaluation of new potential anticancer agent for tumour imaging and radiotherapy by two methods: 99mTc-radiolabelling and EPR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Karamalakova, Yanka; Chuttani, Krishna; Sharma, Rakesh; Zheleva, Antoaneta; Gadjeva, Veselina; Mishra, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a new class of in vitro and ex vivo radiotracers/radioprotectors, the nitroxyl-labelled agent 1-ethyl-1-nitroso–3-[4-(2,2,6,6–tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl)]-urea (SLENU), has been discovered. Our previous investigations demonstrated that SLENU is a low-molecular-weight stable free radical which is freely membrane permeable, easily crosses the blood brain barrier and exhibited in/ex vivo the lowest general toxicity and higher anticancer activity against some experimental tumour models. Further investigation was aimed to develop a 99mTc-labelled SLENU (97%) as a chelator and evaluate its labelling efficiency and potential use as a tumour seeking agent and for early diagnosis. Tissue biodistribution of 99mTc-SLENU was determined in normal mice at 1, 2 and 24 h (n = 4/time interval, route of administration i.v.). The distribution data were compared using male albino non-inbred mice and electron paramagnetic resonance investigation. The imaging characteristics of 99mTc-SLENU conjugate examined in BALB/c mice grafted with Ehrlich Ascitis tumour in the thigh of hind leg demonstrated major accumulation of the radiotracer in the organs and tumour. Planar images and auto-radiograms confirmed that the tumours could be visualized clearly with 99mTc-SLENU. Blood kinetic study of radio-conjugate showed a bi-exponential pattern, as well as quick reduced duration in the blood circulation. This study establishes nitroxyls as a general class of new spin-labelled diagnostic markers that reduce the negative lateral effects of radiotherapy and drug damages, and are appropriate for tumour-localization. PMID:26019604

  5. New Oxidovanadium Complexes Incorporating Thiosemicarbazones and 1, 10-Phenanthroline Derivatives as DNA Cleavage, Potential Anticancer Agents, and Hydroxyl Radical Scavenger.

    PubMed

    Ying, Peng; Zeng, Pengfei; Lu, Jiazheng; Chen, Hongyuan; Liao, Xiangwen; Yang, Ning

    2015-10-01

    Four novel oxidovanadium(IV) complexes, [VO(hntdtsc)(PHIP)] (1) (hntdtsc = 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde thiosemicarbazone, PHIP= 2-phenyl-imidazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline), [VO(hntdtsc)(DPPZ)](2)(DPPZ= dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine), [VO(satsc)(PHIP)](3) (satsc=salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone), and [VO(satsc)(DPPZ)](4), have been prepared and characterized. The chemical nuclease activities and photocleavage reactions of the complexes were tested. All four complexes can efficiently cleave pBR322 DNA, and complex 1 has the best cleaving ability. The antitumor properties of these complexes were examined with three different tumor cell lines using MTT assay. Their antitumor mechanism has been analyzed using cell cycle analysis, fluorescence microscopy of apoptosis, and Annexin V-FITC/PI assay. The results showed that the growth of human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y, SK-N-SH) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells were inhibited significantly with very low IC50 values. Complex 1 was found to be the most potent antitumor agent among the four complexes. It can cause G0/G1 phase arrest of the cell cycle and exhibited significant induced apoptosis in SK-N-SH cells and displayed typical morphological apoptotic characteristics. In addition, they all displayed reasonable abilities to scavenge hydroxyl radical, and complex 1 was the best inhibitor.

  6. Using immunoadjuvant agent glycated chitosan to enhance anti-cancer stem like cell immunity induced by HIFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-L.; Chen, W.-R.; Liu, R.-S.; Yang, F.-Y.; Wang, C.-Y.; Lee, Y.-J.

    2013-02-01

    Thermal therapy is based on the observation that tumor cells are sensitive to increased temperature, which is important for tumor control. In this study, the high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) system was used to simulate thermal therapy on breast cancer control in the small animal model. Additionally, the immunoadjuvant agent, so called glycated chitosan (GC), was used to enhance the immunological effects on tumor control. The bioluminescent imaging showed that tumor metastasis was apparently suppressed by a combined treatment using HIFU and GC, but not in HIFU or GC alone. Using immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, lung metastasis of 4T1-3R tumor cells further agree the observations obtained from non-invasive in vivo imaging. We also found that plasma collected from mice treated with combined HIFU and GC could significantly suppress the viability of cultured 4T1 cells compared to untreated or single treated group. In summary, these results suggest that the HIFU therapy combined with GC can enhance the tumor immunogenicity and tumor control.

  7. Synthesis and biological evaluation of non-glucose glycoconjugated N-hydroyxindole class LDH inhibitors as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Di Bussolo, Valeria; Calvaresi, Emilia C.; Granchi, Carlotta; Del Bino, Linda; Frau, Ileana; Lang, Maria Chiara Dasso; Tuccinardi, Tiziano; Macchia, Marco; Martinelli, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of human lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A) are promising therapeutic agents against cancer. The development of LDH-A inhibitors that possess cellular activities has so far proved to be particularly challenging, since the enzyme’s active site is narrow and highly polar. In the recent past, we were able to develop a glucose-conjugated N-hydroxyindole-based LDH-A inhibitor designed to exploit the sugar avidity expressed by cancer cells (the Warburg effect). Herein we describe a structural modulation of the sugar moiety of this class of inhibitors, with the insertion of α-D-mannose, β-D-gulose, or β-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine portions in their structures. Their stereospecific chemical synthesis, which involves a substrate-dependent stereospecific glycosylation step, and their biological activity in reducing lactate production and proliferation in cancer cells are reported. Interestingly, the α-D-mannose conjugate displayed the best properties in the cellular assays, demonstrating an efficient antiglycolytic and antiproliferative activity in cancer cells. PMID:26167277

  8. Synthesis, Aqueous Reactivity, and Biological Evaluation of Carboxylic Acid Ester-Functionalized Platinum–Acridine Hybrid Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Leigh A.; Suryadi, Jimmy; West, Tiffany K.; Kucera, Gregory L.; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of platinum–acridine hybrid agents containing carboxylic acid ester groups is described. The most active derivatives and the unmodified parent compounds showed up to 6-fold higher activity in ovarian cancer (OVCAR-3) and breast cancer (MCF-7, MDA-MB-23) cell lines than cisplatin. Inhibition of cell proliferation at nanomolar concentrations was observed in pancreatic (PANC-1) and non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLC, NCI-H460) of 80- and 150-fold, respectively. Introduction of the ester groups did not affect the cytotoxic properties of the hybrids, which form the same monofunctional–intercalative DNA adducts as the parent compounds, as demonstrated in a plasmid unwinding assay. In-line high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-ESMS) shows that the ester moieties undergo platinum-mediated hydrolysis in a chloride concentration-dependent manner to form carboxylate chelates. Potential applications of the chloride-sensitive ester hydrolysis as a self-immolative release mechanism for tumor-selective delivery of platinum–acridines are discussed. PMID:22871158

  9. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jason Z.; Ke, Yuebin; Misra, Hara P.; Trush, Michael A.; Li, Y. Robert; Zhu, Hong; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-12-15

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  10. Design, synthesis and structural studies of meta-xylyl linked bis-benzimidazolium salts: potential anticancer agents against ‘human colon cancer’

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Benzimidazole derivatives are structurally bioisosteres of naturally occurring nucleotides, which makes them compatible with biopolymers of living systems. This property gives benzimidazole a biological and clinical importance. In the last decade, this class of compounds has been reported to possess anti-allergic, anti-diabatic, anti-HIV, anti-hypertensive, anti-inflammatory, anti-mycobacterial, anti-oxidant, anti-protozoal, and anti-viral properties. The researchers are now interested to explore their potential as anti-cancer agents. In the present study, an effort was made to further explore this area of research. Furthermore, in order to increase the solubility and efficacy of these heterocycles, the interest is now shifted to the salts of these compounds. With this background, we planned to synthesize a series of meta-xylyl linked bis-benzimidazolium salts to assess their anti-proliferation efficacy on human colon cancer cell line (HCT 116). Results A number of N-alkylbenzimidazoles were synthesized by reactions of benzimidazole with alkyl halides (i-PrBr, PrBr, EthBr, Pent-2-ylBr, BuBr, BenzCl, HeptBr). The subsequent treatment of the resulting N-alkylbenzimidazoles with 1,3-(bromomethylene)benzene afforded corresponding bis-benzimidazolium salts. All synthesized compounds were characterized by spectroscopic techniques (Additional file 1: NMR & FT-IR) and microanalysis. Molecular structures of selected compounds were established through single crystal x-ray diffraction studies. All the compounds were assessed for their anti-proliferation test on human colorectal cancer cell line (HCT 116). Results showed that the compounds exhibited dose dependent cytotoxicity towards the colon cancer cells with IC50 ranges between 0.1 to 17.6 μM. The anti-proliferation activity of all compounds was more pronounced than that of standard reference drug 5-flourouracil (IC50 =19.2 μM). Conclusions All the synthesized bis-benzimidazolium salts showed potential

  11. Chemical genetics analysis of an aniline mustard anticancer agent reveals complex I of the electron transport chain as a target.

    PubMed

    Fedeles, Bogdan I; Zhu, Angela Y; Young, Kellie S; Hillier, Shawn M; Proffitt, Kyle D; Essigmann, John M; Croy, Robert G

    2011-09-30

    The antitumor agent 11β (CAS 865070-37-7), consisting of a DNA-damaging aniline mustard linked to an androgen receptor (AR) ligand, is known to form covalent DNA adducts and to induce apoptosis potently in AR-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro; it also strongly prevents growth of LNCaP xenografts in mice. The present study describes the unexpectedly strong activity of 11β against the AR-negative HeLa cells, both in cell culture and tumor xenografts, and uncovers a new mechanism of action that likely explains this activity. Cellular fractionation experiments indicated that mitochondria are the major intracellular sink for 11β; flow cytometry studies showed that 11β exposure rapidly induced oxidative stress, mitochondria being an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, 11β inhibited oxygen consumption both in intact HeLa cells and in isolated mitochondria. Specifically, 11β blocked uncoupled oxygen consumption when mitochondria were incubated with complex I substrates, but it had no effect on oxygen consumption driven by substrates acting downstream of complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Moreover, 11β enhanced ROS generation in isolated mitochondria, suggesting that complex I inhibition is responsible for ROS production. At the cellular level, the presence of antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine or vitamin E) significantly reduced the toxicity of 11β, implicating ROS production as an important contributor to cytotoxicity. Collectively, our findings establish complex I inhibition and ROS generation as a new mechanism of action for 11β, which supplements conventional DNA adduct formation to promote cancer cell death.

  12. Copper(II)-based metal affinity chromatography for the isolation of the anticancer agent bleomycin from Streptomyces verticillus culture.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiesi; Codd, Rachel

    2012-10-01

    The glycopeptide-based bleomycins are structurally complex natural products produced by Streptomyces verticillus used in combination therapy against testicular and other cancers. Bleomycin has a high affinity towards a range of transition metal ions with the 1:1 Fe(II) complex relevant to its mechanism of action in vivo and the 1:1 Cu(II) complex relevant to its production from culture. The affinity between Cu(II) and bleomycin was the underlying principle for using Cu(II)-based metal affinity chromatography in this work to selectively capture bleomycin from crude S. verticillus culture. A solution of standard bleomycin was retained at a binding capacity of 300 nmol mL(-1) on a 1-mL bed volume of Cu(II)-loaded iminodiacetate (IDA) resin at pH 9 via the formation of the heteroleptic immobilized complex [Cu(IDA)(bleomycin)]. Bleomycin was eluted from the resin at pH 5 as the metal-free ligand under conditions where pK(a) (IDA)agent.

  13. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of di-substituted noscapine analogs as potent and microtubule-targeted anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ram C; Gundala, Sushma R; Karna, Prasanthi; Lopus, Manu; Gupta, Kamlesh K; Nagaraju, Mulpuri; Hamelberg, Donald; Tandon, Vibha; Panda, Dulal; Reid, Michelle D; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Noscapine is an opium-derived kinder-gentler microtubule-modulating drug, currently in Phase I/II clinical trials for cancer chemotherapy. Here, we report the synthesis of four more potent di-substituted brominated derivatives of noscapine, 9-Br-7-OH-NOS (2), 9-Br-7-OCONHEt-NOS (3), 9-Br-7-OCONHBn-NOS (4), and 9-Br-7-OAc-NOS (5) and their chemotherapeutic efficacy on PC-3 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The four derivatives were observed to have higher tubulin binding activity than noscapine and significantly affect tubulin polymerization. The equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) for the interaction between tubulin and 2, 3, 4, 5 was found to be, 55±6μM, 44±6μM, 26±3μM, and 21±1μM respectively, which is comparable to parent analog. The effects of these di-substituted noscapine analogs on cell cycle parameters indicate that the cells enter a quiescent phase without undergoing further cell division. The varying biological activity of these analogs and bulk of substituent at position-7 of the benzofuranone ring system of the parent molecule was rationalized utilizing predictive in silico molecular modeling. Furthermore, the immunoblot analysis of protein lysates from cells treated with 4 and 5, revealed the induction of apoptosis and down-regulation of survivin levels. This result was further supported by the enhanced activity of caspase-3/7 enzymes in treated samples compared to the controls. Hence, these compounds showed a great potential for studying microtubule-mediated processes and as chemotherapeutic agents for the management of human cancers.

  14. NF-κB-dependent and -independent epigenetic modulation using the novel anti-cancer agent DMAPT

    PubMed Central

    Nakshatri, H; Appaiah, H N; Anjanappa, M; Gilley, D; Tanaka, H; Badve, S; Crooks, P A; Mathews, W; Sweeney, C; Bhat-Nakshatri, P

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) is constitutively active in several cancers and is a target of therapeutic development. We recently developed dimethylaminoparthenolide (DMAPT), a clinical grade water-soluble analog of parthenolide, as a potent inhibitor of NF-κB and demonstrated in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activities in multiple cancers. In this study, we show DMAPT is an epigenetic modulator functioning in an NF-κB-dependent and -independent manner. DMAPT-mediated NF-κB inhibition resulted in elevated histone H3K36 trimethylation (H3K36me3), which could be recapitulated through genetic ablation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB or inhibitor-of-kappaB alpha super-repressor overexpression. DMAPT treatment and p65 ablation increased the levels of H3K36 trimethylases NSD1 (KMT3B) and SETD2 (KMT3A), suggesting that NF-κB directly represses their expression and that lower H3K36me3 is an epigenetic marker of constitutive NF-κB activity. Overexpression of a constitutively active p65 subunit of NF-κB reduced NSD1 and H3K36me3 levels. NSD1 is essential for DMAPT-induced expression of pro-apoptotic BIM, indicating a functional link between epigenetic modification and gene expression. Interestingly, we observed enhanced H4K20 trimethylation and induction of H4K20 trimethylase KMT5C in DMAPT-treated cells independent of NF-κB inhibition. These results add KMT5C to the list NF-κB-independent epigenetic targets of parthenolide, which include previously described histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC-1) and DNA methyltransferase 1. As NSD1 and SETD2 are known tumor suppressors and loss of H4K20 trimethylation is an early event in cancer progression, which contributes to genomic instability, we propose DMAPT as a potent pharmacologic agent that can reverse NF-κB-dependent and -independent cancer-specific epigenetic abnormalities. PMID:25611383

  15. [A primary clinical trial of genital warts treated with domestic highly purified podophyllotoxin].

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Wang, B; Shao, Y

    1994-04-01

    Genital warts (condyloma accunimata) are a kind of sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). In this article, we report 75 cases of genital warts treated with highly purified podophyllotoxin. All volunteers were selected in our clinic and diagnosed according to typical skin lesions and positive 0.5% acetic acid test. Of the 74 cases 48 were male and 26 were female, with a mean age of 28.4 years (21-54). The average duration of disease was 4.4 months (2 weeks-3 years). All lesions were treated with 0.5% podophyllotoxin-ethanal solution topically 2 times per day for 3 successive days. The treatment was repeated if any warts persisted, but not more than 3 therapies in total were applied. The results showed that 41/48 (85.4%) of male and 23/26 (88.5%) of female patients were cured, the overall cure rate was 86.5% and the effectiveness rate (more than 50% lesions disappeared) was 96.15%. During another 3 months of follow-up, 9 male and 4 female patients (17.6% in total) experienced relapsed warts; these were cured with another treatment. Side effects including slight local irritation and erythema or superficial erosions were common, but 3 male and 2 female patients complained of sever pain and local swelling. All side effects were tolerable. It is concluded that our domestically produced highly purified podophyllotoxin is an effective, comparatively safe drug for the treatment of genital warts. It is also very simple to apply, and can be used for self-treatment.

  16. Evaluation of the bioequivalence of tablets and capsules containing the novel anticancer agent R115777 (Zarnestra) in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Crul, M; de Klerk, G J; Swart, M; Weiner, L; Palmer, P A; Bol, C J; Beijnen, J H; Schellens, J H M

    2002-01-01

    R115777 (Zamestra) is a novel anticancer agent, currently undergoing phase III clinical testing. An open, cross-over trial was performed in 24 patients with solid tumors to compare the bioavailability of a new tablet formulation with the standard capsule formulation. Both dosage forms were administered once daily in doses of 300 or 400 mg. Patients received R115777 as a capsule on day I and as a tablet on day 2, or vice versa. Blood samples were drawn up to 24 hours after drug intake and R115777 levels were measured using a validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The following pharmacokinetic parameters were determined and compared for the two formulations: time to maximal plasma concentration (Tmax), half-life (t 1/2), maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve at twenty-four hours (AUC24h). For the latter two parameters, 90% classical confidence intervals of the ratio tablet/capsule were calculated after a log-transformation, using an Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). For t 1/2 and Tmax, no statistically significant differences were found between tablet and capsule. The point estimates of the ratio's of the log-normalized Cmax and AUC24h were 0.94 and 0.92, respectively, and the 90% confidence intervals were 0.81-1.09 and 0.83-1.03, which is within the critical range for bioequivalence of 0.80-1.25. In conclusion, the established pharmacokinetic parameters demonstrate that the capsule and tablet formulations of R115777 are interchangeable.

  17. Genome-wide functional genetic screen with the anticancer agent AMPI-109 identifies PRL-3 as an oncogenic driver in triple-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Gari, Hamid H; Gearheart, Christy M; Fosmire, Susan; DeGala, Gregory D; Fan, Zeying; Torkko, Kathleen C; Edgerton, Susan M; Lucia, M Scott; Ray, Rahul; Thor, Ann D; Porter, Christopher C; Lambert, James R

    2016-03-29

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are among the most aggressive and heterogeneous cancers with a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. Here, we demonstrate that the anticancer compound, AMPI-109, is selectively efficacious in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of multiple TNBC subtype cell lines as assessed by activation of pro-apoptotic caspases-3 and 7, PARP cleavage and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. AMPI-109 had little to no effect on growth in the majority of non-TNBC cell lines examined. We therefore utilized AMPI-109 in a genome-wide shRNA screen in the TNBC cell line, BT-20, to investigate the utility of AMPI-109 as a tool in helping to identify molecular alterations unique to TNBC. Our screen identified the oncogenic phosphatase, PRL-3, as a potentially important driver of TNBC growth, migration and invasion. Through stable lentiviral knock downs and transfection with catalytically impaired PRL-3 in TNBC cells, loss of PRL-3 expression, or functionality, led to substantial growth inhibition. Moreover, AMPI-109 treatment, downregulation of PRL-3 expression or impairment of PRL-3 activity reduced TNBC cell migration and invasion. Histological evaluation of human breast cancers revealed PRL-3 was significantly, though not exclusively, associated with the TNBC subtype and correlated positively with regional and distant metastases, as well as 1 and 3 year relapse free survival. Collectively, our study is proof-of-concept that AMPI-109, a selectively active agent against TNBC cell lines, can be used as a molecular tool to uncover unique drivers of disease progression, such as PRL-3, which we show promotes oncogenic phenotypes in TNBC cells.

  18. Genome-wide functional genetic screen with the anticancer agent AMPI-109 identifies PRL-3 as an oncogenic driver in triple-negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Gari, Hamid H.; Gearheart, Christy M.; Fosmire, Susan; DeGala, Gregory D.; Fan, Zeying; Torkko, Kathleen C.; Edgerton, Susan M.; Lucia, M. Scott; Ray, Rahul; Thor, Ann D.; Porter, Christopher C.; Lambert, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are among the most aggressive and heterogeneous cancers with a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. Here, we demonstrate that the anticancer compound, AMPI-109, is selectively efficacious in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of multiple TNBC subtype cell lines as assessed by activation of pro-apoptotic caspases-3 and 7, PARP cleavage and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. AMPI-109 had little to no effect on growth in the majority of non-TNBC cell lines examined. We therefore utilized AMPI-109 in a genome-wide shRNA screen in the TNBC cell line, BT-20, to investigate the utility of AMPI-109 as a tool in helping to identify molecular alterations unique to TNBC. Our screen identified the oncogenic phosphatase, PRL-3, as a potentially important driver of TNBC growth, migration and invasion. Through stable lentiviral knock downs and transfection with catalytically impaired PRL-3 in TNBC cells, loss of PRL-3 expression, or functionality, led to substantial growth inhibition. Moreover, AMPI-109 treatment, downregulation of PRL-3 expression or impairment of PRL-3 activity reduced TNBC cell migration and invasion. Histological evaluation of human breast cancers revealed PRL-3 was significantly, though not exclusively, associated with the TNBC subtype and correlated positively with regional and distant metastases, as well as 1 and 3 year relapse free survival. Collectively, our study is proof-of-concept that AMPI-109, a selectively active agent against TNBC cell lines, can be used as a molecular tool to uncover unique drivers of disease progression, such as PRL-3, which we show promotes oncogenic phenotypes in TNBC cells. PMID:26909599

  19. A combined DNA-affinic molecule and N-mustard alkylating agent has an anti-cancer effect and induces autophagy in oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wen-Liang; Chu, Pen-Yuan; Lee, Tsung-Heng; Su, Tsann-Long; Chien, Yueh; Chen, Yi-Wei; Huang, Pin-I; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Tu, Pang-Hsien; Kao, Shou-Yen; Lo, Jeng-Fan

    2012-01-01

    Although surgery or the combination of chemotherapy and radiation are reported to improve the quality of life and reduce symptoms in patients with oral cancer, the prognosis of oral cancer remains generally poor. DNA alkylating agents, such as N-mustard, play an important role in cancer drug development. BO-1051 is a new 9-anilinoacridine N-mustard-derivative anti-cancer drug that can effectively target a variety of cancer cell lines and inhibit tumorigenesis in vivo. However, the underlying mechanism of BO-1051-mediated tumor suppression remains undetermined. In the present study, BO-1051 suppressed cell viability with a low IC(50) in oral cancer cells, but not in normal gingival fibroblasts. Cell cycle analysis revealed that the tumor suppression by BO-1051 was accompanied by cell cycle arrest and downregulation of stemness genes. The enhanced conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and the formation of acidic vesicular organelles indicated that BO-1501 induced autophagy. The expression of checkpoint kinases was upregulated as demonstrated with Western blot analysis, showing that BO-1051 could induce DNA damage and participate in DNA repair mechanisms. Furthermore, BO-1051 treatment alone exhibited a moderate tumor suppressive effect against xenograft tumor growth in immunocompromised mice. Importantly, the combination of BO-1051 and radiation led to a potent inhibition on xenograft tumorigenesis. Collectively, our findings demonstrated that BO-1051 exhibited a cytotoxic effect via cell cycle arrest and the induction of autophagy. Thus, the combination of BO-1051 and radiotherapy may be a feasible therapeutic strategy against oral cancer in the future.

  20. Oxalone and lactone moieties of podophyllotoxin exhibit properties of both the B and C rings of colchicine in its binding with tubulin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Suvroma; Das, Lalita; Datta, Ajit B; Poddar, Asim; Janik, Mark E; Bhattacharyya, Bhabatarak

    2006-05-23

    Thermodynamics of podophyllotoxin binding to tubulin and its multiple points of attachment with tubulin has been studied in detail using isothermal titration calorimetry. The calorimetric enthalpy of the association of podophyllotoxin with tubulin is negative and occurs with a negative heat capacity change (DeltaC(p) = -2.47 kJ mol(-)(1) K(-)(1)). The binding is unique with a simultaneous participation of both hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding forces with unfavorable negative entropic contribution at higher temperature, favored with an enthalpy-entropy compensation. Interestingly, the binding of 2-methoxy-5-(2',3',4'-trimethoxyphenyl)tropone (AC, a colchicine analogue without the B ring) with tubulin is enthalpy-favored. However, the podophyllotoxin-tubulin association depending upon the temperature of the reaction has a favorable entropic and enthalpic component, which resembles both B- and C-ring properties of colchicine. On the basis of the crystal structure of the podophyllotoxin-tubulin complex, distance calculations have indicated a possible interaction between threonine 179 of alpha-tubulin and the hydroxy group on the D ring of podophyllotoxin. To confirm the involvement of the oxalone moiety as well as the lactone ring of podophyllotoxin in tubulin binding, analogues of podophyllotoxin are synthesized with methoxy substitution at the 4' position of ring D along with its isomer and another analogue epimerized at ring E. From these results, involvement of oxalone as well as the lactone ring of the drug in a specific orientation inclusive of ring A is indicated for podophyllotoxin-tubulin binding. Therefore, podophyllotoxin, like colchicine, behaves as a bifunctional ligand having properties of both the B and C rings of colchicine by making more than one point of attachment with the protein tubulin.

  1. Heterocyclic Scaffolds: Centrality in Anticancer Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Lone, Mohammad Nadeem; Al-Othman, Zeid A; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has been cursed for human beings for long time. Millions people lost their lives due to cancer. Despite of the several anticancer drugs available, cancer cannot be cured; especially at the late stages without showing any side effect. Heterocyclic compounds exhibit exciting medicinal properties including anticancer. Some market selling heterocyclic anticancer drugs include 5-flourouracil, methortrexate, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, etc. Besides, some natural products such as vinblastine and vincristine are also used as anticancer drugs. Overall, heterocyclic moeities have always been core parts in the expansion of anticancer drugs. This article describes the importance of heterocyclic nuclei in the development of anticancer drugs. Besides, the attempts have been made to discuss both naturally occurring and synthetic heterocyclic compounds as anticancer agents. In addition, some market selling anticancer heterocyclic compounds have been described. Moreover, the efforts have been made to discuss the mechanisms of actions and recent advances in heterocyclic compounds as anticancer agents. The current challenges and future prospectives of heterocyclic compounds have also been discussed. Finally, the suggestions for syntheses of effective, selective, fast and human friendly anticancer agents are discussed into the different sections.

  2. Crude drugs as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Xiaoyang; Kesari, Santosh; Wen, Patrick Y; Huang, Xudong

    2011-01-01

    Although tremendous progress has been made in basic cancer biology and in the development of novel cancer treatments, cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world. The etiopathogenesis of cancer is complex. Besides genetic predisposition, known environmental factors associated with cancer are: diet, lifestyle, and environmental toxins. Toxicity of drugs and eventual relapse of cancers contribute to high cancer death rates. Current therapeutic interventions for cancer- surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, thermotherapy, etc. are far from being curative for many forms of cancer. Chemotherapy, in particular, though the most commonly used cancer treatment, is usually associated with side effects with varying degrees of severity. The purpose of this brief review is to assemble current literature on some crude drugs and to focus on their beneficial roles and drug targets in cancer therapy and chemo-prevention. Although their pharmacological mechanisms and biochemical roles in cancer biology and tumor chemo-prevention are not fully understood, crude drugs are believed to have nutriceutical effects upon cancer patients. PMID:21394282

  3. Anticancer agents: towards the future.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Manlio

    2004-09-01

    A major need in cancer chemotherapy is the availability of cancer cell-specific drugs. This paper discusses recent advances and perspectives in the field of selective drug recognition considering the key targets tyrosine kinases, DNA-topoisomerases and telomerase.

  4. Preparation, characterization, and anti-tumor property of podophyllotoxin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R. R.; Qin, L. L.; Wang, M.; Wu, S. M.; Wang, S. L.; Zhang, R.; Liu, Z. X.; Sun, X. Y.; Yao, S. D.

    2009-02-01

    In an effort to develop an alternative formulation of podophyllotoxin suitable for drug release and delivery, podophyllotoxin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (PPT-SLNs) were constructed, characterized and examined for in vitro cytotoxicity and tumor inhibition. The SLNs were prepared by using a solvent emulsification-evaporation method, and their size was around 50 nm. TEM detection showed that the SLNs were homogeneous and spherical in shape, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurement revealed a new conformation of PPT-SLNs. An in vitro drug release study showed that PPT was released from the SLNs in a slow but time-dependent manner. Furthermore, the treatment of 293T and HeLa cells with PPT-SLNs demonstrated that PPT-SLNs were less toxic to normal cells and more effective in anti-tumor potency compared with unconjugated PPT. A colony forming efficiency assay showed an effective long-term cancer growth suppression of PPT-SLNs; in addition, they can also enhance the apoptotic and cellular uptake processes on tumor cells compared with PPT. These results collectively demonstrated that this SLN formulation has a potential application as an alternative delivery system for anti-tumor drugs.

  5. Sesterterpenoids with Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Evidente, Antonio; Kornienko, Alexander; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Dasari, Ramesh; Evidente, Marco; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Terpenes have received a great deal of attention in the scientific literature due to complex, synthetically challenging structures and diverse biological activities associated with this class of natural products. Based on the number of C5 isoprene units they are generated from, terpenes are classified as hemi- (C5), mono- (C10), sesqui- (C15), di- (C20), sester- (C25), tri (C30), and tetraterpenes (C40). Among these, sesterterpenes and their derivatives known as sesterterpenoids, are ubiquitous secondary metabolites in fungi, marine organisms, and plants. Their structural diversity encompasses carbotricyclic ophiobolanes, polycyclic anthracenones, polycyclic furan-2-ones, polycyclic hydroquinones, among many other carbon skeletons. Furthermore, many of them possess promising biological activities including cytotoxicity and the associated potential as anticancer agents. This review discusses the natural sources that produce sesterterpenoids, provides sesterterpenoid names and their chemical structures, biological properties with the focus on anticancer activities and literature references associated with these metabolites. A critical summary of the potential of various sesterterpenoids as anticancer agents concludes the review. PMID:26295461

  6. Design and Evaluation of Novel Antimicrobial and Anticancer Agents Among Tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline-5-thione S-Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Antypenko, Lyudmyla M.; Kovalenko, Sergey I.; Antypenko, Olexii M.; Katsev, Andrey M.; Achkasova, Olena M.

    2013-01-01

    The novel heterocyclization of 5-(2-aminophenyl)-1H-tetrazole with potassium ethylxanthogenate or carbon disulfide was proposed. The potassium salt of the tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline-5-thione was subsequently modified by alkylation with proper halogen derivatives to (tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthio)alkyls, N,N-dialkylethylamines, 1-aryl-2-ethanones, 1-(alkyl)aryl-2-ethanols, carboxylic acids, and esters. The structures of all newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by FT-IR, UV-vis, LC-MS, 1H, 13C NMR, and elemental analysis data. The substances were screened for antibacterial and antifungal activities (100 μg) against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes, Entrococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Candida albicans. Preliminary bioluminescence inhibition tests against Photobacterium leiognathi Sh1 showed that substances 5.2–5.4, 6.1, 7.1 with ethanone or carboxylic acid substituents showed toxicity against bacteria cells. The substances chosen by the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) were screened for their ability to inhibit 60 different human tumor cell lines, where 2-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthio)-1-(4-tolyl)ethanone (5.2), 3-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthio)propanoic and related 3-metyl-butanoic acids (6.2, 6.3), and ethyl tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthio)acetate (7.2) showed lethal antitumor activity (1.0 μM) against the acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line (CCRF-CEM), and substances 5.2 and 6.3 exhibited moderate anticancer properties inhibiting growth of the leukemia MOLT-4 and HL06-(TB) cell lines. The moderate antitumor activity was demonstrated in 1-(2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthio)ethanone (5.4) against the CNS cancer cell line SNB-75. Comparing the docking mode of the Gefitinib and synthesised substances on the ATP binding site of EGFR, it could be assumed that these compounds might act in the same way. The results of the investigation could

  7. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Phase II Drug Metabolizing/Antioxidant Enzymes Gene Response by Anti-cancer Agent Sulforaphane in Rat Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hu; Khor, Tin Oo; Yang, Qian; Huang, Ying; Wu, Tien-yuan; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Lin, Wen; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE This study assesses the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of Nrf2-mediated increased expression of Phase II drug metabolizing enzyme (DME) and antioxidant enzymes which represents an important component of cancer chemoprevention in rat lymphocytes following intravenous (i.v.) administration of an anti-cancer phytochemical sulforaphane (SFN) METHODS SFN was administered intravenously to four groups of male Sprague-Dawley JVC rats each group comprising four animals. Blood samples were drawn at selected time points. Plasma were obtained from half of the blood samples and analyzed using a validated LC-MS/MS method. Lymphocytes were collected from the remaining blood samples using Ficoll-Paque™ Plus centrifuge medium. Lymphocyte RNAs were extracted, converted to cDNA, and quantitative real-time PCR analyses were performed and fold changes were calculated against those at time zero for the relative expression of Nrf2-target genes of phase II DME/antioxidant enzymes. PK-PD modeling was conducted based on Jusko’s indirect response model (IDR) using GastroPlus™ and Bootstrap Method. RESULTS SFN plasma concentration declined biexponentially and the pharmacokinetic parameters were generated. Rat lymphocyte mRNA expression levels showed no change for GSTM1, SOD, NF-κB, UGT1A1, or UGT1A6. Moderate increases (2-5 folds) over the time zero were seen for HO-1, Nrf2, and NQO1, and significant increase (> 5 folds) for GSTT1, GPx1, and Maf. PK-PD analyses using GastroPlus™ and Bootstrap method provided reasonable fitting for the PK and PD profiles and parameter estimates. CONCLUSION Our present study shows that SFN could induce Nrf2-mediated phase II DME/antioxidant mRNA expression for NQO1, GSTT1, Nrf2, GPx, Maf, and HO-1 in rat lymphocytes after i.v. administration, suggesting that Nrf2-mediated mRNA expression in lymphocytes may serve as surrogate biomarkers. The PK-PD IDR model simultaneously linking the plasma concentrations of SFN and the PD

  8. Genetic and pharmacological screens converge in identifying FLIP, BCL2 and IAP proteins as key regulators of sensitivity to the TRAIL-inducing anti-cancer agent ONC201/TIC10

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Joshua E.; Prabhu, Varun V.; Talekar, Mala; van den Heuvel, AP; Lim, Bora; Dicker, David T.; Fritz, Jennifer L.; Beck, Adam; El-Deiry, Wafik S.

    2015-01-01

    ONC201/TIC10 is a small molecule inducer of the TRAIL gene under current investigation as a novel anticancer agent. In this study, we identify critical molecular determinants of ONC201 sensitivity offering potential utility as pharmacodynamic or predictive response markers. By screening a library of kinase siRNAs in combination with a subcytotoxic dose of ONC201, we identified several kinases that ablated tumor cell sensitivity, including the MAPK pathway inducer KSR1. Unexpectedly, KSR1 silencing did not affect MAPK signaling in the presence or absence of ONC201, but instead reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins FLIP, Mcl-1, Bcl-2, cIAP1, cIAP2, and survivin. In parallel to this work, we also conducted a synergy screen in which ONC201 was combined with approved small molecule anticancer drugs. In multiple cancer cell populations, ONC201 synergized with diverse drug classes including the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib. Notably, combining ONC201 and sorafenib led to synergistic induction of TRAIL and its receptor DR5 along with a potent induction of cell death. In a mouse xenograft model of hepatocellular carcinoma, we demonstrated that ONC201 and sorafenib cooperatively and safely triggered tumor regressions. Overall, our results established a set of determinants for ONC201 sensitivity that may predict therapeutic response, particularly in settings of sorafenib co-treatment to enhance anticancer responses. PMID:25681273

  9. Novel gold(I) complexes with 5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thione and phosphine as potential anticancer and antileishmanial agents.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Joana Darc S; Tunes, Luiza Guimarães; de J Franco, Chris Hebert; Francisco, Thiago Martins; Corrêa, Charlane Cimini; Murta, Silvane M F; Monte-Neto, Rubens Lima; Silva, Heveline; Fontes, Ana Paula S; de Almeida, Mauro V

    2017-02-15

    The current anticancer and antileishmanial drug arsenal presents several limitations concerning their specificity, efficacy, costs and the emergence of drug-resistant cells lines, which encourages the urgent need to search for new alternatives. Inspired by the fact that gold(I)-based compounds are promising antitumoral and antileishmanial drug candidates, we synthesized novel gold(I) complexes containing phosphine and 5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thione and evaluated their anticancer and antileishmanial activities. Synthesis was performed by reacting 5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thione derivatives with chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) and chloro(triethylphosphine)gold(I). The novel compounds were characterized by infrared, Raman, (1)H, (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance, high-resolution mass spectra, and x-ray crystallography. The coordination of the ligands to gold(I) occurred through the exocyclic sulfur atom. All gold(I) complexes were active at low micromolar or nanomolar range with IC50 values ranging from <0.10 to 1.66 μM against cancer cell lines and from 0.9 to 4.2 μM for Leishmania infantum intracellular amastigotes. Compound (6-A) was very selective against murine melanoma B16F10, colon cancer CT26.WT cell lines and L. infantum intracellular amastigotes. Compound (7-B) presented the highest anticancer activity against both cancer cell lines while the promising antileishmanial lead was compound (6-A). Tiethylphosphine gold(I) complexes were more active than the conterparts triphenylphosphine derivatives for both anticancer and antileishmanial activities. Triethylphosphine gold(I) derivatives presented antimony cross-resistance in L. guyanensis demonstrating their potential to be used as chemical tools to better understand mechanisms of drug resistance and action. These findings revealed the anticancer and antileishmanial potential of gold(I) oxadiazole phosphine derivatives.

  10. Anticancer Studies of Aqueous Extract of Roots and Leaves of Pandanus Odoratissimus f. ferreus (Y. Kimura) Hatus: An In Vitro Approach

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Gunti Gowtham; Varghese, Hyma Sara; Kotagiri, Sarita; Vrushabendra Swamy, B. M.; Swamy, Archana; Pathan, Rafi Khan

    2014-01-01

    A number of medicinal plant extracts are being used against various diseases in different systems of medicine such as Ayurveda, Unani, and Siddha, but only a few of them have been scientifically explored. The objective of the present study was to explore the dose-dependent in vitro anticancer effects of the extracts of Pandanus odoratissimus whose scientific documentation as an anticancer agent is lacking despite being used traditionally. The dried parts of roots and leaves were extracted with methanol (MEPO) and water (AEPO). The extracts were then subjected to in vitro cytotoxic and antimitotic screening by brine shrimp lethality assay and onion root tip method, respectively. Further, the behavior of the extracts on calu-6 (non-small cell lung cancer cell lines), PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) and WI (lung fibroblast cell lines) was studied using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) assay followed by flow cytometric analysis on calu-6 cell lines. AEPO showed significant cytotoxic and antimitotic activities. It showed 100% lethality of brine shrimps at 80 μg/ml and an LC50 of 33.33 μg/ml, which was eightfold higher than that of synthetic standard podophyllotoxin (4.16 μg/ml). AEPO at 10 mg/ml concentration showed significant antimitotic activity by showing 3% mitotic index. which was more than that of standard cyclophosphamide with 4% mitotic index in comparison to control. There was a significant reduction in cell proliferation of calu-6 cells, ranging from 56 to 35%, after 24-48 h of treatment with 200 μg/ml (P < 0.001) of AEPO, while AEPO remained unaffected on PBMC and WI-38 cel lines. Cell cycle analysis revealed that AEPO at 50 μg/ml and 100 μg/ml significantly increased the number of cells in sub G0–G1 phase, indicating the cells entering in to apoptotic phase. These results suggest that aqueous extract of P. odoratissimus possesses better anticancer activity. The plant has the potential to be used in anticancer

  11. HSP32 (HO-1) inhibitor, copoly(styrene-maleic acid)-zinc protoporphyrin IX, a water-soluble micelle as anticancer agent: In vitro and in vivo anticancer effect.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jun; Greish, Khaled; Qin, Haibo; Liao, Long; Nakamura, Hideaki; Takeya, Motohiro; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    We reported previously the antitumor effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibition by zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP). ZnPP per se is poorly water soluble and thus cannot be used as anticancer chemotherapeutic. Subsequently, we developed water-soluble micelles of ZnPP using styrene-maleic acid copolymer (SMA), which encapsulated ZnPP (SMA-ZnPP). In this report, the in vitro and in vivo therapeutic effects of SMA-ZnPP are described. In vitro experiments using 11 cultured tumor cell lines and six normal cell lines revealed a remarkable cytotoxicity of SMA-ZnPP against various tumor cells; average IC(50) is about 11.1 μM, whereas the IC(50) to various normal cells is significantly higher, that is, more than 50 μM. In the pharmacokinetic study, we found that SMA-ZnPP predominantly accumulated in the liver tissue after i.v. injection, suggesting its applicability for liver cancer. As expected, a remarkable antitumor effect was achieved in the VX-2 tumor model in the liver of rabbit that is known as one the most difficult tumor models to cure. Antitumor effect was also observed in murine tumor xenograft, that is, B16 melanoma and Meth A fibrosarcoma. Meanwhile, no apparent side effects were found even at the dose of ∼7 times higher concentration of therapeutics dose. These findings suggest a potential of SMA-ZnPP as a tool for anticancer therapy toward clinical development, whereas further investigations are warranted.

  12. New class of squalene-based releasable nanoassemblies of paclitaxel, podophyllotoxin, camptothecin and epothilone A.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Stella; Christodoulou, Michael S; Ficarra, Ilaria; Silvani, Alessandra; Cappelletti, Graziella; Cartelli, Daniele; Damia, Giovanna; Ricci, Francesca; Zucchetti, Massimo; Dosio, Franco; Passarella, Daniele

    2014-10-06

    The present study reports the preparation of a novel class of squalene conjugates with paclitaxel, podophyllotoxin, camptothecin and epothilone A. The obtained compounds are characterized by a squalene tail that makes them able to self-assemble in water, and by a drug unit connected via a disulfide-containing linker to secure the release inside the cell. All the obtained compounds were effectively able to self-assemble and to release the parent drug in vitro. Disulfide-containing paclitaxel-squalene derivative showed a similar biological activity when compared to the free drug. Immunofluorescence assay shows that this squalene conjugate enters A549 cells and stain microtubule bundles. The results described herein pave the way for different classes of squalene-based releasable nanoassemblies.

  13. Production of podophyllotoxin from roots and plantlets of Hyptis suaveolens cultivated in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Velóz, Rafael A.; Cardoso-Taketa, Alexandre; Villarreal, María Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hyptis suaveolens was an important source of food and medicines in pre-hispanic Mιxico and is actually used popularly to treat respiratory and skin diseases, fever, pain, and cramps, between other ailments. In 2008 the presence of podophyllotoxin (PTOX) was reported in this plant. Objective: To establish in vitro cultures of H. suaveolens able to produce PTOX. Materials and Methods: Explants of H. suaveolens were cultivated in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with different concentrations of the phytohormones 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BAP), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and kinetin (Kin), in order to induce the production of podophyllotoxin. Root cultures without hormones were also established and the quantification of PTOX was performed by HPLC analysis. Results: The presence of growth regulators during in vitro cultivation of H. suaveolens, provoked morphological variations in explants, and induced the accumulation of different levels of PTOX. Roots grown without phytohormones accumulated PTOX at 0.013% dry weight (DW), while in three of the callus cultures cell lines growing together with roots, PTOX accumulated at concentrations of 0.003, 0.005 and 0.006% DW when NAA was combined with either Kin or BAP. In wild plant material PTOX was present in trace amounts in the aerial parts, while in the roots it was found at 0.005% DW. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that although it is possible to obtain PTOX in a variety of in vitro cultures of H. suaveolens, in vitro roots grown without the addition of growth regulators were better producers of PTOX. PMID:23798883

  14. A novel class of ethacrynic acid derivatives as promising drug-like potent generation of anticancer agents with established mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Mignani, Serge; El Brahmi, Nabil; El Kazzouli, Saïd; Eloy, Laure; Courilleau, Delphine; Caron, Joachim; Bousmina, Mosto M; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Cresteil, Thierry; Majoral, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-21

    The well-known diuretic Ethacrynic acid (EA, Edecrin), showing low anti-proliferative activities, was chemically modified at different positions. The new EA derivatives have been tested in vitro in anti-proliferative assays on both tumor KB (epidermal carcinoma) and leukemia HL60 (promyelocytic) cells suitable targets for anticancer activity. Reduction of the α-β double bond of EA completely abolished anti-cancer activities, whereas introduction of either 2-(4-substituted phenyl)ethanamine (series A) or 4-(4-substituted phenyl)piperazine (series B) moieties generated compounds showing moderate to strong anti-proliferative activities against human cancer cell lines. Several substitutions on the phenyl of these two moieties are tolerated. The mechanism of action of the EA derivatives prepared in this study is more complex than the inhibition of glutathione S-transferase π ascribed as unique effect to EA and might help to overcome tumor resistances.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of cytotoxic activity of Some Pyrroles and Fused Pyrroles Running Title: Fused pyrroles as Novel Anti-Cancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Fatahala, Samar S; Mohamed, Mosaad S; Youns, Mahmoud; Abd-El Hameed, Rania H

    2017-01-02

    Pyrrole derivatives represent a very interesting class as biologically active compounds. The objective of our study was to investigate the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects and antioxidant activity of the newly synthesized pyrrole derivatives. A series of novel pyrroles and fused pyrroles (tetrahydroindoles, pyrrolopyrimidines, pyrrolopyridines and pyrrolotriazines) were synthesized and characterized using IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, MS and elemental analysis techniques. The antiproliferative activity of our synthesized compounds and their modulatory effect apoptotic pathway were investigated. The effect on cellular proliferation and viability was monitored by resazurin assay. Apoptotic effect was evaluated by caspase glo 3/7 assay. Synthesized compounds are then tested for their anticancer activities against three different cell lines representing three different tumor types, namely; the HepG-2 (Human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line), the human MCF-7 cell line (breast cancer) and the pancreatic resistant Panc-1 cells .Compounds Ia-e, IIe, and IXc,d showed a promising anti-cancer activity on all tested cell lines. Antioxidant and wound healing invasion assays were examined for promising anticancer candidate compounds.

  16. Anticancer chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    This document examines chemotherapeutic agents for use in veterinary oncology. It lists some of the most common categories of chemotherapeutic drugs, such as alkylating agents and corticosteroids. For each category, the paper lists some example drugs, gives their mode of action, tumors usually susceptible to the drug, and common side effects. A brief discussion of mechanisms of drug resistance is also provided. (MHB)

  17. Liposomal encapsulated anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Gnad-Vogt, Senta Ulrike; Beyer, Ulrich; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2005-08-01

    Among several drug delivery systems, liposomal encapsulated anti-cancer agents represent an advanced and versatile technology. Several formulations of liposomal anthracyclines are approved, e.g. for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (pegylated and non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin) or AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma (pegylated liposomal doxorubicin and liposomal daunorubicin). Meanwhile, virtually all anti-cancer drugs have been encapsulated in liposomes using different technologies. This review will summarize preclinical and clinical data of approved and exemplary emerging liposomal anti-cancer agents.

  18. Could the FDA-approved anti-HIV PR inhibitors be promising anticancer agents? An answer from enhanced docking approach and molecular dynamics analyses.

    PubMed

    Arodola, Olayide A; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2015-01-01

    Based on experimental data, the anticancer activity of nelfinavir (NFV), a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI), was reported. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of NFV is yet to be verified. It was hypothesized that the anticancer activity of NFV is due to its inhibitory effect on heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a promising target for anticancer therapy. Such findings prompted us to investigate the potential anticancer activity of all other FDA-approved HIV-1 PIs against human Hsp90. To accomplish this, "loop docking" - an enhanced in-house developed molecular docking approach - followed by molecular dynamic simulations and postdynamic analyses were performed to elaborate on the binding mechanism and relative binding affinities of nine FDA-approved HIV-1 PIs against human Hsp90. Due to the lack of the X-ray crystal structure of human Hsp90, homology modeling was performed to create its 3D structure for subsequent simulations. Results showed that NFV has better binding affinity (ΔG =-9.2 kcal/mol) when compared with other PIs: this is in a reasonable accordance with the experimental data (IC50 3.1 μM). Indinavir, saquinavir, and ritonavir have close binding affinity to NFV (ΔG =-9.0, -8.6, and -8.5 kcal/mol, respectively). Per-residue interaction energy decomposition analysis showed that hydrophobic interaction (most importantly with Val534 and Met602) played the most predominant role in drug binding. To further validate the docking outcome, 5 ns molecular dynamic simulations were performed in order to assess the stability of the docked complexes. To our knowledge, this is the first account of detailed computational investigations aimed to investigate the potential anticancer activity and the binding mechanism of the FDA-approved HIV PIs binding to human Hsp90. Information gained from this study should also provide a route map toward the design, optimization, and further experimental investigation of potential

  19. Could the FDA-approved anti-HIV PR inhibitors be promising anticancer agents? An answer from enhanced docking approach and molecular dynamics analyses

    PubMed Central

    Arodola, Olayide A; Soliman, Mahmoud ES

    2015-01-01

    Based on experimental data, the anticancer activity of nelfinavir (NFV), a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI), was reported. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of NFV is yet to be verified. It was hypothesized that the anticancer activity of NFV is due to its inhibitory effect on heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a promising target for anticancer therapy. Such findings prompted us to investigate the potential anticancer activity of all other FDA-approved HIV-1 PIs against human Hsp90. To accomplish this, “loop docking” – an enhanced in-house developed molecular docking approach – followed by molecular dynamic simulations and postdynamic analyses were performed to elaborate on the binding mechanism and relative binding affinities of nine FDA-approved HIV-1 PIs against human Hsp90. Due to the lack of the X-ray crystal structure of human Hsp90, homology modeling was performed to create its 3D structure for subsequent simulations. Results showed that NFV has better binding affinity (ΔG =−9.2 kcal/mol) when compared with other PIs: this is in a reasonable accordance with the experimental data (IC50 3.1 μM). Indinavir, saquinavir, and ritonavir have close binding affinity to NFV (ΔG =−9.0, −8.6, and −8.5 kcal/mol, respectively). Per-residue interaction energy decomposition analysis showed that hydrophobic interaction (most importantly with Val534 and Met602) played the most predominant role in drug binding. To further validate the docking outcome, 5 ns molecular dynamic simulations were performed in order to assess the stability of the docked complexes. To our knowledge, this is the first account of detailed computational investigations aimed to investigate the potential anticancer activity and the binding mechanism of the FDA-approved HIV PIs binding to human Hsp90. Information gained from this study should also provide a route map toward the design, optimization, and further experimental investigation of

  20. Vacuum-powered bubble-assisted solvent extraction followed by macroporous resin enrichment for isolation of podophyllotoxin from Sinopodophyllum emodi.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Yang, Lei; Sui, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jie; Li, Li; Fu, Shuang; Li, Wenjing; Liang, Xin

    2015-10-01

    A vacuum-powered bubble-assisted solvent extraction (VBE) technique was used to extract podophyllotoxin from the root of Sinopodophyllum emodi. We optimized the VBE procedure and showed it had the highest efficiency of extraction compared to other conventional extraction techniques. Based upon the results of single-factor experiments, a three-factor, three-level experiment design was developed by application of a Box-Behnken design. The method was validated by stability, repeatability and recovery experiments. The optimal conditions were: solvent, 60% (v/v) ethanol; particle size of the sample, 60-80 mesh; soak time, 2h; liquid/solid ratio, 21L/kg; air flow, 32mL/min; vacuum-powered bubble extraction time, 65min. The VBE method we developed achieved efficient extraction of podophyllotoxin from S. emodi. The podophyllotoxin extracted can be enriched and separated by an HPD300 macroporous resin adsorption and desorption process. The results indicated that VBE is a convenient, rapid and efficient sample preparation technique.

  1. Anticancer mechanisms of cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, G.; Sánchez, C.; Guzmán, M.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the well-known palliative effects of cannabinoids on some cancer-associated symptoms, a large body of evidence shows that these molecules can decrease tumour growth in animal models of cancer. They do so by modulating key cell signalling pathways involved in the control of cancer cell proliferation and survival. In addition, cannabinoids inhibit angiogenesis and decrease metastasis in various tumour types in laboratory animals. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of cannabinoids as antitumour agents, focusing on recent discoveries about their molecular mechanisms of action, including resistance mechanisms and opportunities for their use in combination therapy. Those observations have already contributed to the foundation for the development of the first clinical studies that will analyze the safety and potential clinical benefit of cannabinoids as anticancer agents. PMID:27022311

  2. Exploiting developments in nanotechnology for the preferential delivery of platinum-based anti-cancer agents to tumours: targeting some of the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Parker, James P; Ude, Ziga; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-01-01

    Platinum drugs as anti-cancer therapeutics are held in extremely high regard. Despite their success, there are drawbacks associated with their use; their dose-limiting toxicity, their limited activity against an array of common cancers and patient resistance to Pt-based therapeutic regimes. Current investigations in medicinal inorganic chemistry strive to offset these shortcomings through selective targeting of Pt drugs and/or the development of Pt drugs with new or multiple modes of action. A comprehensive overview showcasing how liposomes, nanocapsules, polymers, dendrimers, nanoparticles and nanotubes may be employed as vehicles to selectively deliver cytotoxic Pt payloads to tumour cells is provided.

  3. Synthesis of some novel quinolines and pyrimido [4,5-b] quinolines bearing A sulfonamide moiety as potential anticancer and radioprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Ghorab, Mostafa M; Ragab, Fatma A; Noaman, Eman; Heiba, Helmy I; El-Hossary, Ebaa M

    2007-01-01

    Some novel 4-(quinolin-1-yl)-benzenesulfonamide and 4-(pyrimido[4,5-b]quinolin-10-yl)-benzenesulfonamide derivatives have been synthesized. All the newly synthesized target compounds were subjected to in vitro cytotoxic screening to be evaluated for their anticancer activity against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells. Among these new compounds, compounds 9a, 11, 12b, 18 and, in particular, 19 showed promising in vitro cytotoxic activity compared with doxorubicin (CAS 23214-92-8) as a reference drug. Moreover, compound 8 exhibited in vivo radioprotective activity against gamma-irradiation in mice.

  4. Anticancer therapy

    DOEpatents

    Norenberg, Jeffrey P.

    2017-04-04

    A subject afflicted with a cancer or precancerous condition is treated by administering an agent that increases expression of somatostatin receptors, and a cytotoxic recognition ligand. In an alternative embodiment, somatostatin analogs, which are radiolabeled are used to treat cancer or precancerous conditions.

  5. Regioselective reductive cleavage of bis-benzylidene acetal: stereoselective synthesis of anticancer agent OGT2378 and glycosidase inhibitor 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-l-xylitol.

    PubMed

    Aravind, Appu; Sankar, Muthukumar Gomathi; Varghese, Babu; Baskaran, Sundarababu

    2009-04-03

    A highly regioselective reductive cleavage of the bis-benzylidene acetal of D-mannitol was performed using a BF(3) x Et(2)O/Et(3)SiH reagent system. A chiral intermediate 6 thus obtained was efficiently utilized in the stereoselective synthesis of the anticancer agent OGT2378 (3) and glycosidase inhibitor derivative N-tosyl 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-L-xylitol (22). Chemoselective reduction of azido epoxide 10 followed by regioselective intramolecular cyclization of amino epoxide 11 resulted in the exclusive formation of deoxyidonojirimycin derivative 12. By changing the order of deprotection, the chiral intermediate 6 was readily transformed to glycosidase inhibitor derivative 22.

  6. A Combination of Podophyllotoxin and Rutin Attenuates Radiation Induced Gastrointestinal Injury by Negatively Regulating NF-κB/p53 Signaling in Lethally Irradiated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kalita, Bhargab; Ranjan, Rajiv; Singh, Abhinav; Yashavarddhan, M. H.; Bajaj, Sania; Gupta, Manju Lata

    2016-01-01

    Development of an effective radio protector to minimise radiation-inflicted damages have largely failed owing to inherent toxicity of most of the agents examined so far. This study is centred towards delivering protection to lethally irradiated mice by pre-administration of a safe formulation G-003M (combination of podophyllotoxin and rutin) majorly through regulation of inflammatory and cell death pathways in mice. Single intramuscular dose of G-003M injected 60 min prior to 9 Gy exposure rescued 89% of whole body lethally irradiated C57BL/6J mice. Studies have revealed reduction in radiation induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) generation, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels and intestinal apoptosis in G-003M pre-treated mice intestine. Restricted nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and subsequent downregulation of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS; EC 1.14.13.39) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) levels demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effect that G-003M exerts. Support to early hematopoietic recovery was exhibited through G-003M mediated induction of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin (IL-6) levels in lethally irradiated mice. Considerable attenuation in radiation induced morphological damage to the intestinal villi, crypts and mucosal layers was observed in G-003M pre-treated mice. Additionally, our formulation did not reduce the sensitivity of tumor tissue to radiation. Altogether, these results suggest that G-003M ameliorates the deleterious effects of radiation exposure by minimising ROS and NO generation and effectively regulating inflammatory and cell death pathways. Mechanism of protection elucidated in the current study demonstrates that G-003M can be used as a safe and effective radio protective agent in radiotherapy for human application. PMID:28036347

  7. Synthesis, quantitative structure-activity relationship and biological evaluation of 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives possessing diphenylamine moiety as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Abdel Rahman, Doaa Ezzat

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of 2,5-disubstituted-1,3,4-oxadiazole (2a-c), 3-substituted aminomethyl-5-substituted-1,3,4-oxadiazole-2(3H)-thione (4a-m) and 2-substituted thio-5-substituted-1,3,4-oxadiazole (5a, b) had been described. All the synthesized derivatives were screened for anticancer activity against HT29 and MCF7 cancer cell lines using Sulfo-Rodamine B (SRB) standard method. Most of the tested compounds exploited potent antiproliferative activity against HT29 cancer cell line rather than MCF7 cancer cell line. Compounds 2a-c, 4f and 5a exhibited potent cytotoxicity (IC(50) 1.3-2.0 µM) and selectivity against HT29 cancer cell line. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study was applied to find a correlation between the experimental antiproliferative activities of the newly synthesized oxadiazole derivatives with their physicochemical parameter and topological index.

  8. Distribution of withaferin A, an anticancer potential agent, in different parts of two varieties of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal. grown in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Siriwardane, A S; Dharmadasa, R M; Samarasinghe, Kosala

    2013-02-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal. (Family: Solanaceae) is a therapeutically important medicinal plant in traditional and Ayurveda systems of medicine in Sri Lanka. Witheferin A, is a potential anticancer compound found in W. somnifera. In the present study, attempts have been made to compare witheferin A content, in different parts of (root, stem, bark, leaf) two varieties of (LC1 and FR1) W. somnifera grown in same soil and climatic conditions. Ground sample (1g) of leaves, bark, stem and roots of two W. somnifera varieties were extracted with CHCl3 three times. Thin Layer Chromatographic analysis (TLC) of withaferin A in both plant extracts were performed on pre-coated Silica gel 60 GF254 plates in hexane: ethyl acetate: methanol (2: 14: 1) mobile phase. Densitometer scanning was performed at lambda(max) = 215 nm. HPLC of W. somnifera extracts was performed using Kromasil C18 reverse phase column. Both varieties of W. somnifera differed in withaferin A. After visualizing TLC plates with vanillin-sulphuric acid leaf and bark extracts of both varieties showed high intensity purple colour spots (R(f) 0.14) than in stem and roots. The highest amount of withaferin A (3812 ppm) was observed in leaves of variety LC1 while the lowest amount was observed in roots of variety FR1 (5 ppm). According to the results it could be concluded that content of Witheferin A was vary leaf > bark > stem > roots in both varieties. Therefore, there is a high potential of incorporation of leaves and bark of W. somnifera for the preparation of Ayurveda drug leading to anticancer activity instead of roots.

  9. Development of synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bingliang

    2014-10-09

    The concept of synthetic lethality (the creation of a lethal phenotype from the combined effects of mutations in two or more genes) has recently been exploited in various efforts to develop new genotype-selective anticancer therapeutics. These efforts include screening for novel anticancer agents, identifying novel therapeutic targets, characterizing mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy, and improving efficacies through the rational design of combination therapy. This review discusses recent developments in synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics, including poly ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitors for BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutant cancers, checkpoint inhibitors for p53 mutant cancers, and small molecule agents targeting RAS gene mutant cancers. Because cancers are caused by mutations in multiple genes and abnormalities in multiple signaling pathways, synthetic lethality for a specific tumor suppressor gene or oncogene is likely cell context-dependent. Delineation of the mechanisms underlying synthetic lethality and identification of treatment response biomarkers will be critical for the success of synthetic lethality anticancer therapy.

  10. Advances in chalcones with anticancer activities.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Moorthy, Narayana S H Narayana; Ramasamy, Sakthivel; Vanam, Uma; Manivannan, Elangovan; Karunagaran, Devarajan; Trivedi, Piyush

    2015-01-01

    Chalcones are naturally occurring compounds exhibiting broad spectrum biological activities including anticancer activity through multiple mechanisms. Literature on anticancer chalcones highlights the employment of three pronged strategies, namely; structural manipulation of both aryl rings, replacement of aryl rings with heteroaryl scaffolds, molecular hybridization through conjugation with other pharmacologically interesting scaffolds for enhancement of anticancer properties. Methoxy substitutions on both the aryl rings (A and B) of the chalcones, depending upon their positions in the aryl rings appear to influence anticancer and other activities. Similarly, heterocyclic rings either as ring A or B in chalcones, also influence the anticancer activity shown by this class of compounds. Hybrid chalcones formulated by chemically linking chalcones to other prominent anticancer scaffolds such as pyrrol[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepines, benzothiazoles, imidazolones have demonstrated synergistic or additive pharmacological activities. The successful application of these three pronged strategies for discovering novel anticancer agents based on chalcone scaffold has resulted in many novel and chemically diverse chalcones with potential therapeutic application for many types of cancer. This review summarizes the concerted efforts expended on the design and development of anticancer chalcones recorded in recent literature and also provides an overview of the patents published in this area between 2007 and 2014 (WO2013022951, WO201201745 & US2012029489).

  11. Agents.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2002-01-01

    Although health care is inherently an economic activity, it is inadequately described as a market process. An alternative, grounded in organizational economic theory, is to view professionals and many others as agents, contracted to advance the best interests of their principals (patients). This view untangles some of the ethical conflicts in dentistry. It also helps identify major controllable costs in dentistry and suggests that dentists can act as a group to increase or decrease agency costs, primarily by controlling the bad actors who damage the value of all dentists.

  12. Novel Podophyllotoxin Derivatives as Partial PPARγ Agonists and their Effects on Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangming; Liu, Huijuan; Sun, Bo; Sun, Yan; Zhong, Weilong; Liu, Yanrong; Chen, Shuang; Ling, Honglei; Zhou, Lei; Jing, Xiangyan; Qin, Yuan; Xiao, Ting; Sun, Tao; Zhou, Honggang; Yang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is recognized as a key regulator of insulin resistance. In this study, we searched for novel PPARγ agonists in a library of structurally diverse organic compounds and determined that podophyllotoxin exhibits partial agonist activity toward PPARγ. Eight novel podophyllotoxin-like derivatives were synthesized and assayed for toxicity and functional activity toward PPARγ to reduce the possible systemic toxic effects of podophyllotoxin and to maintain partial agonist activity toward PPARγ. Cell-based transactivation assays showed that compounds (E)-3-(hydroxy(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methyl)-4-(4(trifluoromethyl)styryl)dihydrofuran-2(3H)-one (3a) and (E)-4-(3-acetylstyryl)-3-(hydroxyl (3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methyl)dihydrofuran-2(3H)-one (3f) exhibited partial agonist activity. An experiment using human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2) that were induced to become an insulin-resistant model showed that compounds 3a and 3f improved insulin sensitivity and glucose consumption. In addition, compounds 3a and 3f significantly improved hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in high-fat diet-fed streptozotocin (HFD-STZ)-induced type 2 diabetic rats at a dose of 15 mg/kg/day administered orally for 45 days, without significant weight gain. Cell toxicity testing also showed that compounds 3a and 3f exhibited weaker toxicity than pioglitazone. These findings suggested that compounds 3a and 3f improved insulin resistance in vivo and in vitro and that the compounds exhibited potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27853282

  13. Synthesis and characterization of mixed-ligand diimine-piperonal thiosemicarbazone complexes of ruthenium(II): Biophysical investigations and biological evaluation as anticancer and antibacterial agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckford, Floyd A.; Thessing, Jeffrey; Shaloski, Michael, Jr.; Canisius Mbarushimana, P.; Brock, Alyssa; Didion, Jacob; Woods, Jason; Gonzalez-Sarrías, Antonio; Seeram, Navindra P.

    2011-04-01

    We have used a novel microwave-assisted method developed in our laboratories to synthesize a series of ruthenium-thiosemicarbazone complexes. The new thiosemicarbazone ligands are derived from benzo[ d][1,3]dioxole-5-carbaldehyde (piperonal) and the complexes are formulated as [(diimine) 2Ru(TSC)](PF 6) 2 (where the TSC is the bidentate thiosemicarbazone ligand). The diimine in the complexes is either 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline. The complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic means (NMR, IR and UV-Vis) as well as by elemental analysis. We have studied the biophysical characteristics of the complexes by investigating their anti-oxidant ability as well as their ability to disrupt the function of the human topoisomerase II enzyme. The complexes are moderately strong binders of DNA with binding constants of 10 4 M -1. They are also strong binders of human serum albumin having binding constants on the order of 10 4 M -1. The complexes show good in vitro anticancer activity against human colon cancer cells, Caco-2 and HCT-116 and indeed show some cytotoxic selectivity for cancer cells. The IC 50 values range from 7 to 159 μM (after 72 h drug incubation). They also have antibacterial activity against Gram-positive strains of pathogenic bacteria with IC 50 values as low as 10 μM; little activity was seen against Gram-negative strains. It has been established that all the compounds are catalytic inhibitors of human topoisomerase II.

  14. Preparation of thermo and pH-responsive polymer@Au/Fe3O4 core/shell nanoparticles as a carrier for delivery of anticancer agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani, Marjan; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Arsalani, Naser; Entezami, Ali Akbar

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a thermo and pH-responsive poly- N-isopropylacrylamide-co-itaconic acid containing thiol side groups were successfully synthesized to prepare Doxorubicin-loaded polymer@Au/Fe3O4 core/shell nanoparticles (DOX-NPs). Copolymer and NPs were fully characterized by FT-IR, HNMR, photo-correlation spectroscopy, SEM, X-ray diffraction, vibrating-sample magnetometer, thermal gravimetric analysis, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The stimuli-responsive characteristics of NPs were evaluated by in vitro release study in simulated cancerous environment. The biocompatibility and cytotoxic properties of NPs and DOX-NPs are explored by MTT method. The prepared NPs with the size of 50 nm showed paramagnetic characteristics with suitable and stable dispersion at physiological medium and high loading capacity (up to 55 %) of DOX. DOX-NPs yielded a pH- and temperature-triggered release of entrapped drugs at tumor tissue environment (59 % of DOX release) compared to physiological condition (20 % of DOX release) during 48 h. In vitro cytotoxicity studies indicated that the NPs showed no cytotoxicity on A549 cells at different amounts after incubation for 72 h confirming its suitability as a drug carrier. DOX-NPs, on the other hand, caused an efficient anticancer performance as verified by MTT assay test. It was concluded that developed NPs by us in this study may open the possibilities for targeted delivery of DOX to the cancerous tissues.

  15. In search of AKT kinase inhibitors as anticancer agents: structure-based design, docking and molecular dynamics studies of 2,4,6-trisubstituted pyridines.

    PubMed

    Trejo-Soto, Pedro Josué; Hernández-Campos, Alicia; Romo-Mancillas, Antonio; Medina-Franco, José L; Castillo, Rafael

    2017-02-02

    The AKT isoforms are a group of key kinases that play a critical role in tumorigenesis. These enzymes are overexpressed in different types of cancers, such as breast, colon, prostate, ovarian and lung. Because of its relevance the AKT isoforms are attractive targets for the design of anticancer molecules. However, it has been found that AKT1 and AKT3 isoforms have a main role in tumor progression and metastasis; thus, the identification of AKT isoforms specific inhibitors seems to be a challenge. Previously, we identified an ATP binding pocket pan-AKT inhibitor, this compound is a 2,4,6-trisubstituted pyridine (compound 11), which represents a new interesting scaffold for the developing of AKT inhibitors. Starting from the 2,4,6-trisubstituted pyridine scaffold, and guided by structure-based design technique, 42 new inhibitors were designed and further evaluated in the three AKT isoforms by multiple docking approach and molecular dynamics. Results showed that seven compounds presented binding selectivity for AKT1 and AKT3, better than for AKT2. The binding affinities of these seven compounds on AKT1 and AKT3 isoforms were mainly determined by hydrophobic contributions between the aromatic portion at position 4 of the pyridine ring with residues Phe236/234, Phe237/235, Phe438/435 and Phe442/439 in the ATP binding pocket. Results presented in this work provide an addition knowledge leading to promising selective AKT inhibitors.

  16. Semi-synthesis of acylated triterpenes from olive-oil industry wastes for the development of anticancer and anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Parra, Andres; Martin-Fonseca, Samuel; Rivas, Francisco; Reyes-Zurita, Fernando J; Medina-O'Donnell, Marta; Martinez, Antonio; Garcia-Granados, Andres; Lupiañez, Jose A; Albericio, Fernando

    2014-03-03

    A broad set of potential bioactive conjugate compounds has been semi-synthesized through solution- and solid-phase organic procedures, coupling two natural pentacyclic triterpene acids, oleanolic (OA) and maslinic acids (MA), at the hydroxyl groups of the A-ring of the triterpene skeleton, with 10 different acyl groups. These acyl OA and MA derivatives have been tested for their anti-proliferative (against the b16f10 murine melanoma cancer cells) and antiviral (as inhibitors of the HIV-1-protease) effects. Several derivatives have shown high levels of early and total apoptosis (up to 90%). Most of the compounds that exhibited anti-proliferative effects also generated ROS, probably involving the activation of an intrinsic apoptotic route. The only four compounds that did not cause the release of ROS could be related to the participation of a probable extrinsic activation of the apoptosis mechanism. A great number of these acyl OA and MA derivatives have proved to be potent inhibitors of the HIV-1-protease, the most active inhibitors having IC50 values between 0.31 and 15.6 μM, these values being between 4 and 186 times lower than their non-acylated precursors. The potent activities exhibited in the apoptosis-activation processes and in the inhibition of the HIV-1-protease by some OA and MA acylated derivatives imply that these compounds could be used as new, safe, and effective anticancer and/or antiviral drugs.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of novel platinum containing anticancer agent BP-C1 studied in rabbits using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Navolotskii, Denis V; Ivanenko, Natalya B; Solovyev, Nikolay D; Fedoros, Elena I; Panchenko, Andrey V

    2015-09-01

    A method of platinum quantification in whole blood samples after microwave digestion using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been developed. The following analytical figures of merit have been established: limit of detection 1.1 µg/L for blood samples, dynamic range 3.6-200 µg/L, intra-day precision (relative standard deviation, n = 9) did not exceed 5%. Spiked samples were analyzed for method validation. The method was used for pharmacokinetics studies of a novel anti-cancer drug BP-С1, a complex of cis-configured platinum and benzene-poly-carboxylic acids. Main pharmacokinetic parameters (area under curve, maximum concentration, clearance, half-life times for α- and β-phase) were estimated for two dosage forms of BP-C1 0.05 and 0.125 mass %. Pharmacokinetic curves were assessed for single and course administration. Studies were performed using rabbits (n = 6) as a model. BP-C1 was injected intramuscularly. The study established dose proportionality of the tested dosage forms and suggested clinical dosing schedule: 5 days of injections followed by 2 days' break. Platinum tissue distribution was studied in tissue samples collected 20 days after the last injection. Predominant platinum accumulation was observed in kidneys, liver, and muscles near injection site. 'Slow' phase of platinum excretion kinetics may be related to the muscles at the injection site.

  18. Identification of anti-cancer chemical compounds using Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Kuriyama, Sei; Itoh, Go; Kohyama, Aki; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Yashiro, Masakazu; Aiba, Namiko

    2016-06-01

    Cancer tissues have biological characteristics similar to those observed in embryos during development. Many types of cancer cells acquire pro-invasive ability through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Similar processes (gastrulation and migration of cranial neural crest cells [CNCC]) are observed in the early stages of embryonic development in Xenopus during which cells that originate from epithelial sheets through EMT migrate to their final destinations. The present study examined Xenopus embryonic tissues to identify anti-cancer compounds that prevent cancer invasion. From the initial test of known anti-cancer drugs, AMD3100 (an inhibitor of CXCR4) and paclitaxel (a cytoskeletal drug targeting microtubules) effectively prevented migration during gastrulation or CNCC development. Blind-screening of 100 synthesized chemical compounds was performed, and nine candidates that inhibited migration of these embryonic tissues without embryonic lethality were selected. Of these, C-157 (an analog of podophyllotoxin) and D-572 (which is an indole alkaroid) prevented cancer cell invasion through disruption of interphase microtubules. In addition, these compounds affected progression of mitotic phase and induced apoptosis of SAS oral cancer cells. SAS tumors were reduced in size after intratumoral injection of C-157, and peritoneal dissemination of melanoma cells and intracranial invasion of glioma cells were inhibited by C-157 and D-572. When the other analogues of these chemicals were compared, those with subtle effect on embryos were not tumor suppressive. These results suggest that a novel chemical-screening approach based on Xenopus embryos is an effective method for isolating anti-cancer drugs and, in particular, targeting cancer cell invasion and proliferation.

  19. Discovery of a novel anticancer agent with both anti-topoisomerase I and II activities in hepatocellular carcinoma SK-Hep-1 cells in vitro and in vivo: Cinnamomum verum component 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Perng, Daw-Shyong; Tsai, Yu-Hsin; Cherng, Jonathan; Wang, Jeng-Shing; Chou, Kuo-Shen; Shih, Chia-Wen; Cherng, Jaw-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamomum verum is used to make the spice cinnamon and has been used as a traditional Chinese herbal medicine for various applications. We evaluated the anticancer effect of 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde (2-MCA), a constituent of the bark of the plant, and its underlying molecular biomarkers associated with carcinogenesis in human hepatocellular carcinoma SK-Hep-1 cell line. The results show that 2-MCA suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis as indicated by mitochondrial membrane potential loss, activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, increase in the DNA content in sub-G1, and morphological characteristics of apoptosis, including blebbing of plasma membrane, nuclear condensation, fragmentation, apoptotic body formation, and long comet tail. In addition, 2-MCA also induced lysosomal vacuolation with increased volume of acidic compartments, suppressions of nuclear transcription factors NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and both topoisomerase I and II activities in a dose-dependent manner. Further study reveals the growth-inhibitory effect of 2-MCA was also evident in a nude mice model. Taken together, the data suggest that the growth-inhibitory effect of 2-MCA against SK-Hep-1 cells is accompanied by downregulations of NF-κB-binding activity, inflammatory responses involving cyclooxygenase-2 and PGE2, and proliferative control involving apoptosis, both topoisomerase I and II activities, together with an upregulation of lysosomal vacuolation and volume of acidic compartments. Similar effects (including all of the above-mentioned effects) were found in other tested cell lines, including human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep 3B, lung adenocarcinoma A549, squamous cell carcinoma NCI-H520, colorectal adenocarcinoma COLO 205, and T-lymphoblastic MOLT-3 (results not shown). Our data suggest that 2-MCA could be a potential agent for anticancer therapy. PMID:26792981

  20. Synthesis and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study of novel 4-acyloxypodophyllotoxin derivatives modified in the A and C rings as insecticidal agents.

    PubMed

    He, Shuzhen; Shao, Yonghua; Fan, Lingling; Che, Zhiping; Xu, Hui; Zhi, Xiaoyan; Wang, Juanjuan; Yao, Xiaojun; Qu, Huan

    2013-01-23

    In continuation of our program aimed at the discovery and development of natural-product-based insecticidal agents, we have synthesized three series of novel 4-acyloxy compounds derived from podophyllotoxin modified in the A and C rings, which is isolated as the main secondary metabolite from the roots and rhizomes of Podophyllum hexandrum . Their insecticidal activity was preliminarily evaluated against the pre-third-instar larvae of Mythimna separata in vivo. Compound 9g displayed the best promising insecticidal activity. It revealed that cleavage of the 6,7-methylenedioxy group of podophyllotoxin will lead to a less active compound and that the C-4 position of podophyllotoxin was the important modification location. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was developed by genetic algorithm combined with multiple linear regression (GA-MLR). For this model, the squared correlation coefficient (R(2)) is 0.914, the leave-one-out cross-validation correlation coefficient (Q(2)(LOO)) is 0.881, and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) is 0.024. Five descriptors, BEHm2, Mor14v, Wap, G1v, and RDF020e, are likely to influence the biological activity of these compounds. Among them, two important ones are BEHm2 and Mor14v. This study will pave the way for further design, structural modification, and development of podophyllotoxin derivatives as insecticidal agents.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of mixed-ligand diimine-piperonal thiosemicarbazone complexes of ruthenium(II): Biophysical investigations and biological evaluation as anticancer and antibacterial agents

    PubMed Central

    Beckford, Floyd A.; Thessing, Jeffrey; Shaloski, Michael; Mbarushimana, P. Canisius; Brock, Alyssa; Didion, Jacob; Woods, Jason; Gonzalez-Sarrías, Antonio; Seeram, Navindra P.

    2011-01-01

    We have used a novel microwave-assisted method developed in our laboratories to synthesize a series of ruthenium-thiosemicarbazone complexes. The new thiosemicarbazone ligands are derived from benzo[d][1,3]dioxole-5-carbaldehyde (piperonal) and the complexes are formulated as [(diimine)2Ru(TSC)](PF6)2 (where the TSC is the bidentate thiosemicarbazone ligand). The diimine in the complexes is either 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline. The complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic means (NMR, IR and UV-Vis) as well as by elemental analysis. We have studied the biophysical characteristics of the complexes by investigating their anti-oxidant ability as well as their ability to disrupt the function of the human topoisomerase II enzyme. The complexes are moderately strong binders of DNA with binding constants of 104 M−1. They are also strong binders of human serum albumin having binding constants on the order of 104 M−1. The complexes show good in vitro anticancer activity against human colon cancer cells, Caco-2 and HCT-116 and indeed show some cytotoxic selectivity for cancer cells. The IC50 values range from 7 – 159 μM (after 72 h drug incubation). They also have antibacterial activity against Gram-positive strains of pathogenic bacteria with IC50 values as low as 10 μM; little activity was seen against Gram-negative strains. It has been established that all the compounds are catalytic inhibitors of human topoisomerase II. PMID:21552381

  2. Synthesis of novel quinoline-based 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazoles as potential anticancer, antifungal, antibacterial and antiprotozoal agents.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Prada, Jonathan; Robledo, Sara M; Vélez, Iván D; Crespo, María Del Pilar; Quiroga, Jairo; Abonia, Rodrigo; Montoya, Alba; Svetaz, Laura; Zacchino, Susana; Insuasty, Braulio

    2017-05-05

    A new series of N-substituted 2-pyrazolines 9a-f, 10a-f, 11a-f, 12a-f and 13a-f were obtained from the cyclocondensation reaction of [(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)amino]chalcones 8a-f with hydrazine hydrate and its derivatives. Fourteen of the synthesized compounds including the starting chalcones were selected by US National Cancer Institute (NCI) for testing their anticancer activity against 60 different human cancer cell lines, with the most important GI50 values ranging from 0.28 to 11.7 μM (0.13-6.05 μg/mL) and LC50 values ranging from 2.6 to > 100 μM (1.2 to > 51.7 μg/mL), for chalcones 8a,d and pyrazolines 10c,d. All compounds were assessed for antibacterial activity against wild type and multidrug resistant gram negative and gram positive bacteria, with MIC values ranging from 31.25 to 500 μg/mL. Additionally, the novel compounds were tested for antifungal and antiparasitic properties. Although these compounds showed mild activity against Candida albicans, chalcones 8a and 8e showed high activity against Cryptococcus neoformans with MIC50 = 7.8 μg/mL. For anti-Plasmodium falciparum activity the 2-pyrazoline 11b was the most active with EC50 = 5.54 μg/mL. Regarding the activity against Trypanosoma cruzi, compound 10a was highly active with EC50 = 0.70 μg/mL. Chalcone 8a had good activity against Leishmania panamensis amastigotes with EC50 = 0.79 μg/mL.

  3. Drug delivery system for an anticancer agent, chlorogenate-Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide nanohybrid synthesised using direct co-precipitation and ion exchange methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barahuie, Farahnaz; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2014-09-01

    A nano-structured drug-inorganic clay hybrid involving an active anticancer compound, which is chlorogenic acid (CA) intercalated into Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide, has been assembled via ion-exchange and co-precipitation methods to form a nanohybrid CZAE (a chlorogenic acid-Zn/Al nanohybrid synthesised using an ion-exchange method) and CZAC (a chlorogenic acid-Zn/Al nanohybrid synthesised using a direct method), respectively. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirmed that the CA-LDH had a hybrid structure in which the anionic chlorogenate is arranged between the interlayers as a horizontal monolayer at 90 and 20° angles from the x axis for CZAE and CZAC, respectively. Both nanohybrids have the properties of mesoporous materials. The high loading percentage of chlorogenic acid (approximately 43.2% for CZAE and 45.3% for CZAC) with basal spacings of 11.7 and 12.6 Å for CZAE and CZAC, respectively, corroborates the successful intercalation of chlorogenic acid into the interlayer gallery of layered double hydroxides. Free chlorogenic acid and the synthesised nanocomposites (CZAE, CZAC) were assessed for their cytotoxicity against various cancer cells. The Fourier transform infrared data supported the formation of both nanohybrids, and a thermal analysis showed that the nanohybrids are more thermally stable than their counterparts. The chlorogenate shows a sustained release, and the release rate of chlorogenate from CZAE and CZAC nanohybrids at pH 7.4 is remarkably lower than that at pH 4.8 due to their different release mechanisms. The release rate of chlorogenate from both nanohybrids can be described as pseudo-second order. The present investigation revealed the potential of the nanohybrids to enhance the in vitro anti-tumour effect of chlorogenic acid in liver and lung cancer cells in vitro.

  4. Icariside II, a Broad-Spectrum Anti-cancer Agent, Reverses Beta-Amyloid-Induced Cognitive Impairment through Reducing Inflammation and Apoptosis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yuanyuan; Long, Long; Wang, Keke; Zhou, Jiayin; Zeng, Lingrong; He, Lianzi; Gong, Qihai

    2017-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition, associated neuronal apoptosis and neuroinflammation are considered as the important factors which lead to cognitive deficits in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Icariside II (ICS II), an active flavonoid compound derived from Epimedium brevicornum Maxim, has been extensively used to treat erectile dysfunction, osteoporosis and dementia in traditional Chinese medicine. Recently, ICS II attracts great interest due to its broad-spectrum anti-cancer property. ICS II shows an anti-inflammatory potential both in cancer treatment and cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. It is not yet clear whether the anti-inflammatory effect of ICS II could delay progression of AD. Therefore, the current study aimed to investigate the effects of ICS II on the behavioral deficits, Aβ levels, neuroinflammatory responses and apoptosis in Aβ25-35-treated rats. We found that bilateral hippocampal injection of Aβ25-35 induced cognitive impairment, neuronal damage, along with increase of Aβ, inflammation and apoptosis in hippocampus of rats. However, treatment with ICS II 20 mg/kg could improve the cognitive deficits, ameliorate neuronal death, and reduce the levels of Aβ in the hippocampus. Furthermore, ICS II could suppress microglial and astrocytic activation, inhibit expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, COX-2, and iNOS mRNA and protein, and attenuate the Aβ induced Bax/Bcl-2 ratio elevation and caspase-3 activation. In conclusion, these results showed that ICS II could reverse Aβ-induced cognitive deficits, possibly via the inhibition of neuroinflammation and apoptosis, which suggested a potential protective effect of ICS II on AD. PMID:28210222

  5. Developing FGFR4 inhibitors as potential anti-cancer agents via in silico design, supported by in vitro and cell-based testing.

    PubMed

    Ho, H K; Németh, G; Ng, Y R; Pang, E; Szántai-Kis, C; Zsákai, L; Breza, N; Greff, Z; Horváth, Z; Pató, J; Szabadkai, I; Szokol, B; Baska, F; Őrfî, L; Ullrich, A; Kéri, G; Chua, B T

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor-4 (FGFR4) is a tyrosine kinase with a range of important physiological functions. However, it is also frequently mutated in various cancers and is now generating significant interest as a potential therapeutic target. Unfortunately, biochemical characterization of its role in disease, and further evaluation as a drug target is hampered by lack of a specific inhibitor. We aimed to discover new inhibitors for FGFR4 ab initio using a strategy combining in silico, in vitro and cell-based assays. We used the homologous FGFR1 to calculate docking scores of a chemically-diverse library of approximately 2000 potential kinase inhibitors. Nineteen potential inhibitors and ten randomly- selected negative controls were taken forward for in vitro FGFR4 kinase assays. All compounds with good docking scores significantly inhibited FGFR4 kinase activity, some with sub-micromolar (most potent being V4-015 with an IC(50) of 0.04 μM). Four of these compounds also demonstrated substantial activity in cellular assays using the FGFR4- overexpressing breast carcinoma cell line, MDA-MB453. Through immunoblot assays, these compounds were shown to block the phosphorylation of the FGFR4 adaptor protein, FGFR substrate protein-2α (FRS2α). The most potent compound to date, V4-015, suppressed proliferation of MDA-MB453 cells at sub-micromolar concentrations, activated the pro-apoptotic caspases 3/7 and inhibited cellular migration. While achieving complete selectivity of this compound for FGFR4 will require further lead optimization, this study has successfully identified new chemical scaffolds with unprecedented FGFR4 inhibition capacities that will support mechanism of action studies and future anti-cancer drug design.

  6. Proteins differentially expressed in elicited cell suspension culture of Podophyllum hexandrum with enhanced podophyllotoxin content

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Podophyllotoxin (PTOX), the precursor for semi-synthesis of cancer therapeutics like etoposide, teniposide and etophos, is primarily obtained from an endangered medicinal herb, Podophyllum hexandrum Royle. PTOX, a lignan is biosynthetically derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. The aim of this study is to investigate changes in the P. hexandrum cell proteome potentially related to PTOX accumulation in response to methyl jasmonate (MeJA) elicitation. High-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by colloidal Coomassie staining and mass spectrometric analysis was used to detect statistically significant changes in cell’s proteome. Result The HPLC analysis showed approximately 7–8 fold change in accumulation of PTOX, in the 12day old cell suspension culture (i.e. after 9days of elicitation) elicited with 100 μM MeJA as compared to the control. Using 2-DE a total of 233 spots was detected, out of which 105 spots were identified by MALDI TOF-TOF MS/MS. Data were subjected to functional annotation from a biological point of view through KEGG. The phenylpropanoid and monolignol pathway enzymes were identified, amongst these, chalcone synthase, polyphenol oxidase, caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase, S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferases, caffeic acid-O-methyl transferase etc. are noted as important. The relation of other differentially accumulated proteins with varied effects caused by elicitors on P. hexandrum cells namely stress and defense related protein, transcription and DNA replication and signaling are also discussed. Conclusions Elicitor-induced PTOX accumulation in P. hexandrum cell cultures provides a responsive model system to profile modulations in proteins related to phenylpropanoid/monolignol biosynthesis and other defense responses. Present findings form a baseline for future investigation on a non-sequenced medicinal herb P. hexandrum at molecular level. PMID:22621772

  7. Self-assembled 4-(1,2-diphenylbut-1-en-1-yl)aniline based nanoparticles: podophyllotoxin and aloin as building blocks.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Gaia; Christodoulou, Michael S; Riva, Benedetta; Revuelta, Inigo; Marucci, Cristina; Collico, Veronica; Prosperi, Davide; Riva, Sergio; Perdicchia, Dario; Bassanini, Ivan; García-Argáez, Aida; Via, Lisa Dalla; Passarella, Daniele

    2017-02-01

    The ability of 4-(1,2-diphenylbut-1-en-1-yl)aniline as a self-assembly inducer is reported. The conjugation of this moiety with aloin or podophyllotoxin resulted in spherical nanoparticles that were characterized by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and NanoSight technology. A preliminary biological evaluation on two cancer cell lines is reported.

  8. Drug delivery system for an anticancer agent, chlorogenate-Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide nanohybrid synthesised using direct co-precipitation and ion exchange methods

    SciTech Connect

    Barahuie, Farahnaz; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2014-09-15

    A nano-structured drug-inorganic clay hybrid involving an active anticancer compound, which is chlorogenic acid (CA) intercalated into Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide, has been assembled via ion-exchange and co-precipitation methods to form a nanohybrid CZAE (a chlorogenic acid-Zn/Al nanohybrid synthesised using an ion-exchange method) and CZAC (a chlorogenic acid-Zn/Al nanohybrid synthesised using a direct method), respectively. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirmed that the CA-LDH had a hybrid structure in which the anionic chlorogenate is arranged between the interlayers as a horizontal monolayer at 90 and 20° angles from the x axis for CZAE and CZAC, respectively. Both nanohybrids have the properties of mesoporous materials. The high loading percentage of chlorogenic acid (approximately 43.2% for CZAE and 45.3% for CZAC) with basal spacings of 11.7 and 12.6 Å for CZAE and CZAC, respectively, corroborates the successful intercalation of chlorogenic acid into the interlayer gallery of layered double hydroxides. Free chlorogenic acid and the synthesised nanocomposites (CZAE, CZAC) were assessed for their cytotoxicity against various cancer cells. The Fourier transform infrared data supported the formation of both nanohybrids, and a thermal analysis showed that the nanohybrids are more thermally stable than their counterparts. The chlorogenate shows a sustained release, and the release rate of chlorogenate from CZAE and CZAC nanohybrids at pH 7.4 is remarkably lower than that at pH 4.8 due to their different release mechanisms. The release rate of chlorogenate from both nanohybrids can be described as pseudo-second order. The present investigation revealed the potential of the nanohybrids to enhance the in vitro anti-tumour effect of chlorogenic acid in liver and lung cancer cells in vitro. - Highlights: • We intercalated chlorogenic into Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide by ion-exchange and coprecipitation methods. • The two methods gave nanocomposites

  9. 'Smartening' anticancer therapeutic nanosystems using biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Lozano, Rebeca; Cano, Manuel; Pimentel, Belén; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    To be effective, anticancer agents must induce cell killing in a selective manner, something that is proving difficult to achieve. Drug delivery systems could help to solve problems associated with the lack of selectivity of classical chemotherapeutic agents. However, to realize this, such systems must overcome multiple physiological barriers. For instance, they must evade surveillance by the immune system, attach selectively to target cells, and gain access to their interior. Furthermore, there they must escape endosomal entrapment, and release their cargoes in a controlled manner, without affecting their functionality. Here we review recent efforts aiming at using biomolecules to confer these abilities to bare nanoparticles, to transform them into smart anticancer therapeutic nanosystems.

  10. Anticancer Molecular Mechanisms of Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Varoni, Elena M.; Lo Faro, Alfredo Fabrizio; Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Iriti, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a pleiotropic phytochemical belonging to the stilbene family. Though it is only significantly present in grape products, a huge amount of preclinical studies investigated its anticancer properties in a plethora of cellular and animal models. Molecular mechanisms of resveratrol involved signaling pathways related to extracellular growth factors and receptor tyrosine kinases; formation of multiprotein complexes and cell metabolism; cell proliferation and genome instability; cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase signaling (cytokine, integrin, and developmental pathways); signal transduction by the transforming growth factor-β super-family; apoptosis and inflammation; and immune surveillance and hormone signaling. Resveratrol also showed a promising role to counteract multidrug resistance: in adjuvant therapy, associated with 5-fluoruracyl and cisplatin, resveratrol had additive and/or synergistic effects increasing the chemosensitization of cancer cells. Resveratrol, by acting on diverse mechanisms simultaneously, has been emphasized as a promising, multi-target, anticancer agent, relevant in both cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:27148534

  11. Fungal metabolites with anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Evidente, Antonio; Kornienko, Alexander; Cimmino, Alessio; Andolfi, Anna; Lefranc, Florence; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Covering: 1964 to 2013. Natural products from bacteria and plants have played a leading role in cancer drug discovery resulting in a large number of clinically useful agents. In contrast, the investigations of fungal metabolites and their derivatives have not led to a clinical cancer drug in spite of significant research efforts revealing a large number of fungi-derived natural products with promising anticancer activity. Many of these natural products have displayed notable in vitro growth-inhibitory properties in human cancer cell lines and select compounds have been demonstrated to provide therapeutic benefits in mouse models of human cancer. Many of these compounds are expected to enter human clinical trials in the near future. The present review discusses the reported sources, structures and biochemical studies aimed at the elucidation of the anticancer potential of these promising fungal metabolites.

  12. Pre-clinical toxicology and pathology of 9-(2'-hydroxyethylamino)-4-methyl-1-nitroacridine (C-1748), a novel anti-cancer agent in male Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Ashok, B T; Tadi, K; Banerjee, D; Konopa, J; Iatropoulos, M; Tiwari, R K

    2006-08-29

    We have developed a group of 4-substituted-1-nitroacridines with potent anti-tumor activity against prostate cancer and less toxic than parent 1-nitroacridines. The most active 9-(2'-hydroxyethylamino)-4-methyl-1-nitroacridine (C-1748) was selected for pre-clinical studies. The current study was undertaken to evaluate clinical and/or morphological adverse effects of C-1748 as a single intravenous dose at concentrations ranging from 0.16 to 4.6 mg/kg administered to male Beagle dogs. The maximum tolerated dose was 1.5 mg/kg. Emesis was observed in all groups lasting an average of 30 min to 12 h post-dosing. At high dose, extreme aggression was observed in one dog followed by disorientation and depression lasting for 48 h a frequent observation with chemotherapy. Reductions in platelets and white blood cells were observed which was similar to that seen with other chemotherapeutic agents. A compensatory hyperplasia of lymph nodes and a transient and limited extravasation in the intestinal mucosa were also observed. Increases in aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and creatine phosphokinase were transient with normal levels restored by day 9. These enzyme increases were accompanied by epithelial hypertrophy of larger bile ductules in the periportal triads of the liver. The low toxicity profile and high tumor target activity make this novel class of drug a promising chemotherapeutic agent.

  13. Targeted deletion of the ara operon of Salmonella typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and drives PBAD-promoted expression of anti-cancer toxins and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyun; Lim, Daejin; Kim, Geun-Joong; Park, Seung-Hwan; Sik Kim, Hyeon; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-specific expression of antitumor drugs can be achieved using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium harboring the PBAD promoter, which is induced by L-arabinose. However, L-arabinose does not accumulate because it is metabolized to D-xylulose-5-P by enzymes encoded by the ara operon in Salmonellae. To address this problem, we developed an engineered strain of S. typhimurium in which the ara operon is deleted. Linear DNA transformation was performed using λ red recombinase to exchange the ara operon with linear DNA carrying an antibiotic-resistance gene with homology to regions adjacent to the ara operon. The ara operon-deleted strain and its parental strain were transformed with a plasmid encoding Renilla luciferase variant 8 (RLuc8) or cytolysin A (clyA) under the control of the PBAD promoter. Luciferase assays demonstrated that RLuc8 expression was 49-fold higher in the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium than in the parental strain after the addition of L-arabinose. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed that the tumor tissue targeted by the ara operon-deleted Salmonella had a stronger imaging signal (~30-fold) than that targeted by the parental strain. Mice with murine colon cancer (CT26) that had been injected with the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium expressing clyA showed significant tumor suppression. The present report demonstrates that deletion of the ara operon of S. typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and thereby drives PBAD-promoted expression of cytotoxic agents and imaging agents. This is a promising approach for tumor therapy and imaging.

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 2-substituted-4-(3′,4′,5′-trimethoxyphenyl)-5-aryl thiazoles as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, Romeo; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Salvador, Maria Kimatrai; Camacho, M. Encarnacion; Preti, Delia; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Bassetto, Marcella; Brancale, Andrea; Hamel, Ernest; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro

    2012-01-01

    Antitumor agents that bind to tubulin and disrupt microtubule dynamics have attracted considerable attention in the last few years. To extend our knowledge of the thiazole ring as a suitable mimic for the cis-olefin present in combretastatin A-4, we fixed the 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl at the C4-position of the thiazole core. We found that the substituents at the C2- and C5-positions had a profound effect on antiproliferative activity. Comparing compounds with the same substituents at the C5-position of the thiazole ring, the moiety at the C2-position influenced antiproliferative activities, with the order of potency being NHCH3> Me ≫ N(CH3)2. The N-methylamino substituent significantly improved antiproliferative activity on MCF-7 cells with respect to C2-amino counterparts. Increasing steric bulk at the C2-position from N-methylamino to N,N-dimethylamino caused a 1–2 log decrease in activity. The 2-N-methylamino thiazole derivatives 3b, 3d and 3e were the most active compounds as antiproliferative agents, with IC50 values from low micromolar to single digit nanomolar, and, in addition, they are also active on multidrug-resistant cell lines over-expressing P-glycoprotein. Antiproliferative activity was probably caused by the compounds binding to the colchicines site of tubulin polymerization and disrupting microtubule dynamics. Moreover, the most active compound 3e induced apoptosis through the activation of caspase-2, -3 and -8, but 3e did not cause mitochondrial depolarization. PMID:23117171

  15. A potential anti-cancer agent: 5-chloro-7-iodo-8-hy-droxy-quinolinium dichlorido(5-chloro-7-iodo-quinolin-8-olato-κN,O)palladium(II) dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Vranec, Peter; Potočňák, Ivan

    2011-11-01

    The title Pd(II) coordination compound, (C(9)H(6)ClINO)[PdCl(2)(C(9)H(4)ClINO)]·2H(2)O, was prepared as a potential anti-cancer agent. Its structure is ionic and consists of a square-planar [PdCl(2)(CQ)](-) complex anion (CQ is 5-chloro-7-iodo-quinolin-8-olate), with the Pd(II) atom surrounded by two chloride ligands in a cis configuration and one N,O-bidentate CQ mol-ecule, a protonated anion of CQ as counter-cation and two non-coordinated water mol-ecules. The water mol-ecules are involved in O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which inter-connect the HCQ(+) cations into a chain parallel to [010]. Apart from these inter-actions, the structure is also stabilized by face-to-face π-π inter-actions [centroid-centroid = 3.546 (3) Å], which occur between the phenolic parts of the complex anions and cations.

  16. Intracellular uptake and behavior of two types zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) micelles, SMA-ZnPP and PEG-ZnPP as anticancer agents; unique intracellular disintegration of SMA micelles.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hideaki; Fang, Jun; Gahininath, Bharate; Tsukigawa, Kenji; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2011-11-07

    SMA-ZnPP and PEG-ZnPP are micellar drugs, encapsulating zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) with styrene maleic acid copolymer (SMA) and covalent conjugate of ZnPP with polyethylene glycol (PEG) respectively. Their intracellular uptake rate and subcellular localization were investigated. We found SMA-ZnPP showed higher and more efficient (about 2.5 times) intracellular uptake rate than PEG-ZnPP, although both SMA-ZnPP and PEG-ZnPP micelles were localized at endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and inhibited the target enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) similarly. Both micellar ZnPP were taken up into the tumor cells by endocytosis. Furthermore SMA-ZnPP and PEG-ZnPP were examined for their drug releasing mechanisms. Liberation of ZnPP from the SMA micelle appears to depend on cellular amphiphilic components such as lecithin, while that for PEG-ZnPP depends on hydrolytic cleavage. These results indicate that these micelle formulations make water insoluble ZnPP to water soluble practical anticancer agents.

  17. Expression of microRNA-30c via lentivirus vector inhibits the proliferation and enhances the sensitivity of highly aggressive ccRCC Caki-1 cells to anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Honglin; Song, Erlin; Shen, Guorong; Zhu, Tonghua; Jiang, Tingwang; Shen, Hao; Niu, Liping; Wang, Biao; Lu, Zhaoyang; Qian, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    The clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is one of the most fatal urologic tumors, and the prognosis remains very poor for advanced or metastatic ccRCC. This study reveals the roles of microRNA (miR)-30c in regulating a highly aggressive ccRCC cell line proliferation by targeting MTA-1, which is a key mediator for human cancer metastasis. Results from quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the expression of MTA-1, the target of miR-30c, was significantly higher in metastatic ccRCC specimens than in nonmetastatic ccRCC or nontumor specimens. Accordingly, endogenous miR-30c is at a much lower level in highly aggressive ccRCC Caki-1 cells than nontumor or ccRCC cell lines. Expression of miR-30c via lentivirus vector inhibits the proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, in vitro invasion or migration, or in vivo growth of Caki-1 cells by repressing MTA-1 protein expression. miR-30c also enhances the sensitivity of Caki-1 cells to anticancer agents, including sorafenib and paclitaxel. These data reveal the potential application of miR-30c and that its targeting gene, MTA-1, would be a potential target in metastatic ccRCC treatment. PMID:28203091

  18. Expression of microRNA-30c via lentivirus vector inhibits the proliferation and enhances the sensitivity of highly aggressive ccRCC Caki-1 cells to anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Honglin; Song, Erlin; Shen, Guorong; Zhu, Tonghua; Jiang, Tingwang; Shen, Hao; Niu, Liping; Wang, Biao; Lu, Zhaoyang; Qian, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    The clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is one of the most fatal urologic tumors, and the prognosis remains very poor for advanced or metastatic ccRCC. This study reveals the roles of microRNA (miR)-30c in regulating a highly aggressive ccRCC cell line proliferation by targeting MTA-1, which is a key mediator for human cancer metastasis. Results from quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the expression of MTA-1, the target of miR-30c, was significantly higher in metastatic ccRCC specimens than in nonmetastatic ccRCC or nontumor specimens. Accordingly, endogenous miR-30c is at a much lower level in highly aggressive ccRCC Caki-1 cells than nontumor or ccRCC cell lines. Expression of miR-30c via lentivirus vector inhibits the proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, in vitro invasion or migration, or in vivo growth of Caki-1 cells by repressing MTA-1 protein expression. miR-30c also enhances the sensitivity of Caki-1 cells to anticancer agents, including sorafenib and paclitaxel. These data reveal the potential application of miR-30c and that its targeting gene, MTA-1, would be a potential target in metastatic ccRCC treatment.

  19. A New Cross-Link for an Old Cross-Linking Drug: The Nitrogen Mustard Anticancer Agent Mechlorethamine Generates Cross-Links Derived from Abasic Sites in Addition to the Expected Drug-Bridged Cross-Links.

    PubMed

    Nejad, Maryam Imani; Johnson, Kevin M; Price, Nathan E; Gates, Kent S

    2016-12-20

    Nitrogen mustard anticancer drugs generate highly reactive aziridinium ions that alkylate DNA. Monoadducts arising from reaction with position N7 of guanine residues are the major DNA adducts generated by these agents. Interstrand cross-links in which the drug bridges position N7 of two guanine residues are formed in low yields relative to those of the monoadducts but are generally thought to be central to medicinal activity. The N7-alkylguanine residues generated by nitrogen mustards are depurinated to yield abasic (Ap) sites in duplex DNA. Here, we show that Ap sites generated by the nitrogen mustard mechlorethamine lead to interstrand cross-links of a type not previously associated with this drug. Gel electrophoretic data were consistent with early evolution of the expected drug-bridged cross-links, followed by the appearance of Ap-derived cross-links. The evidence is further consistent with a reaction pathway involving alkylation of a guanine residue in a 5'-GT sequence, followed by depurination to generate the Ap site, and cross-link formation via reaction of the Ap aldehyde residue with the opposing adenine residue at this site [Price, N. E., Johnson, K. M., Wang, J., Fekry, M. I., Wang, Y., and Gates, K. S. (2014) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 3483-3490]. The monofunctional DNA-alkylating agents 2-chloro-N,N-diethylethanamine 5, (2-chloroethyl)ethylsulfide 6, and natural product leinamycin similarly were found to induce the formation of Ap-derived cross-links in duplex DNA. This work provides the first characterization of Ap-derived cross-links at sequences in which a cytosine residue is located directly opposing the Ap site. Cross-linking processes of this type could be relevant in medicine and biology because Ap sites with directly opposing cytosine residues occur frequently in genomic DNA via spontaneous or enzymatic depurination of guanine and N7-alkylguanine residues.

  20. Dendrimer-encapsulated naphthalocyanine as a single agent-based theranostic nanoplatform for near-infrared fluorescence imaging and combinatorial anticancer phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taratula, Olena; Schumann, Canan; Duong, Tony; Taylor, Karmin L.; Taratula, Oleh

    2015-02-01

    Multifunctional theranostic platforms capable of concurrent near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging and phototherapies are strongly desired for cancer diagnosis and treatment. However, the integration of separate imaging and therapeutic components into nanocarriers results in complex theranostic systems with limited translational potential. A single agent-based theranostic nanoplatform, therefore, was developed for concurrent NIR fluorescence imaging and combinatorial phototherapy with dual photodynamic (PDT) and photothermal (PTT) therapeutic mechanisms. The transformation of a substituted silicon naphthalocyanine (SiNc) into a biocompatible nanoplatform (SiNc-NP) was achieved by SiNc encapsulation into the hydrophobic interior of a generation 5 polypropylenimine dendrimer following surface modification with polyethylene glycol. Encapsulation provides aqueous solubility to SiNc and preserves its NIR fluorescence, PDT and PTT properties. Moreover, an impressive photostability in the dendrimer-encapsulated SiNc has been detected. Under NIR irradiation (785 nm, 1.3 W cm-2), SiNc-NP manifested robust heat generation capability (ΔT = 40 °C) and efficiently produced reactive oxygen species essential for PTT and PDT, respectively, without releasing SiNc from the nanopaltform. By varying the laser power density from 0.3 W cm-2 to 1.3 W cm-2 the therapeutic mechanism of SiNc-NP could be switched from PDT to combinatorial PDT-PTT treatment. In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that phototherapy mediated by SiNc can efficiently destroy chemotherapy resistant ovarian cancer cells. Remarkably, solid tumors treated with a single dose of SiNc-NP combined with NIR irradiation were completely eradicated without cancer recurrence. Finally, the efficiency of SiNc-NP as an NIR imaging agent was confirmed by recording the strong fluorescence signal in the tumor, which was not photobleached during the phototherapeutic procedure.Multifunctional theranostic platforms capable of

  1. An Improved High Yield Total Synthesis and Cytotoxicity Study of the Marine Alkaloid Neoamphimedine: An ATP-Competitive Inhibitor of Topoisomerase IIα and Potent Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linfeng; Abraham, Adedoyin D.; Zhou, Qiong; Ali, Hadi; O’Brien, Jeremy V.; Hamill, Brayden D.; Arcaroli, John J.; Messersmith, Wells A.; LaBarbera, Daniel V.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we characterized neoamphimedine (neo) as an ATP-competitive inhibitor of the ATPase domain of human Topoisomerase IIα. Thus far, neo is the only pyridoacridine with this mechanism of action. One limiting factor in the development of neo as a therapeutic agent has been access to sufficient amounts of material for biological testing. Although there are two reported syntheses of neo, both require 12 steps with low overall yields (≤6%). In this article, we report an improved total synthesis of neo achieved in 10 steps with a 25% overall yield. In addition, we report an expanded cytotoxicity study using a panel of human cancer cell lines, including: breast, colorectal, lung, and leukemia. Neo displays potent cytotoxicity (nM IC50 values) in all, with significant potency against colorectal cancer (lowest IC50 = 6 nM). We show that neo is cytotoxic not cytostatic, and that neo exerts cytotoxicity by inducing G2-M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. PMID:25244109

  2. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of hybrids of β-carboline and salicylic acid as potential anticancer and apoptosis inducing agents

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi-Bing; Chen, Xiang-Fan; Feng, Jiao; Miao, Jie-Fei; Liu, Ji; Liu, Feng-Tao; Niu, Bi-Xi; Cai, Jin-Yang; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Yanan; Ling, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A novel series of hybrids (7a-l, 8a-l) from β-carboline and salicylic acid (SA) were designed and synthesized, and their in vitro biological activities were evaluated. Most of the hybrids displayed potent antiproliferative activity against five cancer cell lines in vitro, showing potencies superior to 5-FU and harmine. In particular, compound 8h selectively inhibited proliferation of liver cancer SMMC-7721 cells but not normal liver LO2 cells, and displayed greater inhibitory selectivity than intermediate 5h and SA. 8h also induced cancer cell apoptosis in an Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide flow cytometry assay, and triggered the mitochondrial/caspase apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential which was associated with up-regulation of Bax, down-regulation of Bcl-2 and activation levels of the caspase cascade in a concentration-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that the β-carboline/SA hybrids may hold greater promise as therapeutic agents for the intervention of human cancers. PMID:27824091

  3. Binding and molecular dynamic studies of sesquiterpenes (2R-acetoxymethyl-1,3,3-trimethyl-4t-(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)-1t-cyclohexanol) derived from marine Streptomyces sp. VITJS8 as potential anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Naine, S Jemimah; Devi, C Subathra; Mohanasrinivasan, V; Doss, C George Priya; Kumar, D Thirumal

    2016-03-01

    ) analysis showed that protein-ligand complex reaches equilibration state around 10 ns that illustrates the docked complex is stable. We propose the possible mechanism of sesquiterpenes to play a significant role in antitumor cascade. Hence, our studies open up a new facet for a potent drug as an anticancer agent.

  4. Preclinical discovery of candidate genes to guide pharmacogenetics during phase I development: the example of the novel anticancer agent ABT-751

    PubMed Central

    Innocenti, Federico; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Obel, Jennifer; Xiong, Julia; Mirkov, Snezana; Chiu, Yi-Lin; Katz, David A.; Carr, Robert A.; Zhang, Wei; Das, Soma; Adjei, Araba; Moyer, Ann M.; Chen, Pei Xian; Krivoshik, Andrew; Medina, Diane; Gordon, Gary B.; Ratain, Mark J.; Sahelijo, Leonardo; Weinshilboum, Richard M.; Fleming, Gini F.; Bhathena, Anahita

    2013-01-01

    Objective ABT-751, a novel orally available antitubulin agent, is mainly eliminated as inactive glucuronide (ABT-751G) and sulfate (ABT-751S) conjugates. We performed a pharmacogenetic investigation of ABT-751 pharmacokinetics using in-vitro data to guide the selection of genes for genotyping in a phase I trial of ABT-751. Methods UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and sulfotransferase (SULT) enzymes were screened for ABT-751 metabolite formation in vitro. Forty-seven cancer patients treated with ABT-751 were genotyped for 21 variants in these genes. Results UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A8, UGT2B7, and SULT1A1 were found to be involved in the formation of inactive ABT-751 glucuronide (ABT-751G) and sulfate (ABT-751S). SULT1A1 copy number (> 2) was associated with an average 34% increase in ABT-751 clearance (P= 0.044), an 18% reduction in ABT-751 AUC (P = 0.045), and a 50% increase in sulfation metabolic ratios (P=0.025). UGT1A8 rs6431558 was associated with a 28% increase in glucuronidation metabolic ratios (P =0.022), and UGT1A4*2 was associated with a 65% decrease in ABT-751 Ctrough (P = 0.009). Conclusion These results might represent the first example of a clinical pharmacokinetic effect of the SULT1A1 copy number variant on the clearance of a SULT1A1 substrate. A-priori selection of candidate genes guided by in-vitro metabolic screening enhanced our ability to identify genetic determinants of interpatient pharmacokinetic variability. PMID:23670235

  5. MetAP1 and MetAP2 drive cell selectivity for a potent anti-cancer agent in synergy, by controlling glutathione redox state

    PubMed Central

    Frottin, Frédéric; Bienvenut, Willy V.; Bignon, Jérôme; Jacquet, Eric; Jacome, Alvaro Sebastian Vaca; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Cianferani, Sarah; Carapito, Christine; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2016-01-01

    Fumagillin and its derivatives are therapeutically useful because they can decrease cancer progression. The specific molecular target of fumagillin is methionine aminopeptidase 2 (MetAP2), one of the two MetAPs present in the cytosol. MetAPs catalyze N-terminal methionine excision (NME), an essential pathway of cotranslational protein maturation. To date, it remains unclear the respective contribution of MetAP1 and MetAP2 to the NME process in vivo and why MetAP2 inhibition causes cell cycle arrest only in a subset of cells. Here, we performed a global characterization of the N-terminal methionine excision pathway and the inhibition of MetAP2 by fumagillin in a number of lines, including cancer cell lines. Large-scale N-terminus profiling in cells responsive and unresponsive to fumagillin treatment revealed that both MetAPs were required in vivo for M[VT]X-targets and, possibly, for lower-level M[G]X-targets. Interestingly, we found that the responsiveness of the cell lines to fumagillin was correlated with the ability of the cells to modulate their glutathione homeostasis. Indeed, alterations to glutathione status were observed in fumagillin-sensitive cells but not in cells unresponsive to this agent. Proteo-transcriptomic analyses revealed that both MetAP1 and MetAP2 accumulated in a cell-specific manner and that cell sensitivity to fumagillin was related to the levels of these MetAPs, particularly MetAP1. We suggest that MetAP1 levels could be routinely checked in several types of tumor and used as a prognostic marker for predicting the response to treatments inhibiting MetAP2. PMID:27542228

  6. Identification of novel inhibitors of human Chk1 using pharmacophore-based virtual screening and their evaluation as potential anti-cancer agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vikash; Khan, Saman; Gupta, Priyanka; Rastogi, Namrata; Mishra, Durga Prasad; Ahmed, Shakil; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran

    2014-12-01

    Kinases are one of the major players in cancer development and progression. Serine threonine kinases such as human checkpoint kinase-1 (Chk1), Mek1 and cyclin-dependent kinases have been identified as promising targets for cancer treatment. Chk1 is an important kinase with vital role in cell cycle arrest and many potent inhibitors targeted to Chk1 have been reported and few are currently in clinical trials. Considering the emerging importance of Chk1 inhibitors in cancer treatment there is a need to widen the chemical space of Chk1 inhibitors. In this study, we are reporting an integrated in silico approach to identify novel competitive Chk1 inhibitors. A 4-features pharmacophore model was derived from a co-crystallized structure of known potent Chk1 inhibitor and subjected to screen Maybridge compound library. Hits obtained from the screening were docked into the Chk1 active site and filtered on the basis of docking score and the number of pharmacophoric features showing conserved interaction within the active site of Chk1. Further, five compounds from the top ranking hits were subjected to in vitro evaluation as Chk1 inhibitor. After the kinase assay, four compounds were found to be active against human Chk1 (IC50 range from 4.2 to 12.5 µM). Subsequent study using the cdc25-22 mutant yeast cells revealed that one of compound (SPB07479; IC50 = 4.24 µM) promoted the formation of multinucleated cells, therefore overriding the cell cycle checkpoint. Validation studies using normal and human cancer cell lines, indicated that SPB07479 significantly inhibited proliferation of cervical cancer cells as a single agent and chemosensitized glioma and pancreatic cancer cell lines to standard chemotherapy while sparing normal cells. Additionally SPB07479 did not show significant cytotoxicity in normal cells. In conclusion we report that SPB07479 appear promising for further development of Chk1 inhibitors. This study also highlights the role of conserved water molecules in

  7. The anti-cancer activity of noscapine: a review.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Massoud; Rahimi-Moghaddam, Parvaneh

    2009-01-01

    Noscapine is an isoqiunoline alkaloid found in opium latex. Unlike most other alkaloids obtained from opium latex, noscapine is not sedative and has been used as antitussive drug in various countries. Recently, it has been introduced as an anti-mitotic agent. This drug can be used orally. When the resistance to other anti-cancer drugs such as paclitaxel manifests, noscapine might be effective. Therefore, noscapine and its analogs have great potential as novel anti-cancer agents.

  8. Raman and infrared spectroscopy, DFT calculations, and vibrational assignment of the anticancer agent picoplatin: performance of long-range corrected/hybrid functionals for a platinum(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Malik, Magdalena; Wysokiński, Rafał; Zierkiewicz, Wiktor; Helios, Katarzyna; Michalska, Danuta

    2014-08-28

    Picoplatin, cis-[PtCl2(NH3)(2-picoline)], is a new promising anticancer agent undergoing clinical trials, which reveals high efficacy against many tumors and greatly reduced toxicity, in comparison to cisplatin. In this work, we present for the first time the Fourier-transform Raman and infrared spectra of picoplatin, in the region of 3500-50 cm(-1). The comprehensive theoretical studies on the molecular structure, the nature of Pt-ligand bonding, vibrational frequencies, and intensities were performed by employing different DFT methods, including hybrid (PBE0, mPW1PW, and B3LYP) and long-range-corrected hybrid density functionals (LC-ωPBE, CAM-B3LYP). Various effective core potentials (ECP) and basis sets have been used. In the prediction of the molecular structure of picoplatin, the best results have been obtained by LC-ωPBE, followed by PBE0, mPW1PW, and CAM-B3LYP density functionals, while the least accurate is B3LYP. The use of the LanL2TZ(f) ECP/basis set for Pt, in conjunction with all tested DFT methods, improves the calculated geometry of the title complex. The PBE0, mPW1PW, and CAM-B3LYP methods have shown the best performance in the calculations of the frequencies of Pt-ligand vibrations. A clear-cut assignment of all the bands in the IR and Raman spectra have been made on the basis of the calculated potential energy distribution (PED). The nature of the "vibrational signatures" of picoplatin have been determined. These results are indispensable for further investigation on drug-target interactions using vibrational spectroscopy.

  9. Aplidine, a new anticancer agent of marine origin, inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion and blocks VEGF-VEGFR-1 (flt-1) autocrine loop in human leukemia cells MOLT-4.

    PubMed

    Broggini, M; Marchini, S V; Galliera, E; Borsotti, P; Taraboletti, G; Erba, E; Sironi, M; Jimeno, J; Faircloth, G T; Giavazzi, R; D'Incalci, M

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism by which aplidine, a marine natural product in early clinical development as an anticancer agent, induces cell growth inhibition and apoptosis has been investigated in the human leukemia cell line MOLT-4. This cell line is characterized not only by the ability to secrete VEGF, but also for the presence on its surface of the VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1). Previous studies from our laboratory concerned with evaluating early changes in gene expression induced by aplidine in MOLT-4 cells have shown that the drug decreases the expression of VEGFR-1 (Marchini et al. Proc Am Assoc Cancer Res 2000; 41: 833). Here, we report the ability of aplidine to block the VEGF/VEGFR-1 loop. We found that aplidine blocked VEGF secretion that was temporally followed by a decrease in both VEGF and VEGFR-1 production. Aplidine did not directly affect either VEGF transcription or stabilization of its mRNA. Transfection of MOLT-4 cells with an antisense VEGF cDNA construct, resulted in inhibition of colony formations. One clone, transfected with sense VEGF cDNA, secreting 8-10 times more VEGF than parental cells, was less sensitive to aplidine-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis than control cells. Moreover, addition of VEGF in the medium decreased the activity of aplidine in MOLT-4 cells. These data demonstrate that aplidine inhibits the growth and induces apoptosis in MOLT-4 cells through the inhibition of VEGF secretion which blocks the VEGF/VEGFR-1 autocrine loop necessary for the growth of these cells.

  10. Replacement of the lactone moiety on podophyllotoxin and steganacin analogues with a 1,5-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazole via ruthenium-catalyzed click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Imperio, Daniela; Pirali, Tracey; Galli, Ubaldina; Pagliai, Francesca; Cafici, Laura; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Sorba, Giovanni; Genazzani, Armando A; Tron, Gian Cesare

    2007-11-01

    Steganacin and podophyllotoxin are two naturally occurring lignans first isolated from plant sources, which share the capability to disrupt tubulin assembly. Although not strictly essential for its activity, the lactone ring on both structures represents Achilles' heel, as it is a potential site of metabolic degradation and epimerization on its C2 carbon brings about a significant loss in potency. In the present manuscript, we have used the ruthenium-catalyzed [3+2] azide-alkyne cycloaddition, a click-chemistry reaction, to replace the lactone ring with a 1,5-disubstituted triazole in few synthetic steps. The compounds were cytotoxic, although to a lesser degree compared to podophyllotoxin, while retaining antitubulin activity. The present structures might therefore represent a good platform for the fast generation of metabolically stable compounds with few stereogenic centers that might be of value from a medicinal chemistry point of view.

  11. Podophyllotoxin content, above- and belowground biomass in relation to altitude in Podophyllum hexandrum populations from Kumaun region of the Indian Central Himalaya.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, M; Palni, L M S; Kumar, A; Nandi, S K

    2007-04-01

    The morphological features of Podophyllum hexandrum Royle, a 'critically endangered' medicinal herb and a source of podophyllotoxin, were studied in populations growing in different parts of the Kumaun region of the Indian Central Himalaya. Plant growth performance in terms of biomass accumulation and podopyllotoxin levels in the rhizomes collected from eleven natural populations (P1 to P11, altitude ranging from 2740 to 3350 m) were analyzed. Morphological features, e. g., plant height, stem diameter and leaf area were, in general, negatively correlated with an increase in the altitude. Maximum aboveground (8.46 g/individual) and belowground (48.18 g/individual) biomass values were recorded from a population (P9) at the lowest altitude (2740 m) and, in general, the species was found to perform better at the lower altitudes. The podophyllotoxin content of rhizomes ranged between 0.36-1.08% (on dry wt. basis) in different populations, and a positive correlation was observed between podophyllotoxin content and an increase in the altitude.

  12. Ligands for cannabinoid receptors, promising anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Nikan, Marjan; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Manayi, Azadeh

    2016-02-01

    Cannabinoid compounds are unique to cannabis and provide some interesting biological properties. These compounds along with endocannabinoids, a group of neuromodulator compounds in the body especially in brain, express their effects by activation of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. There are several physiological properties attributed to the endocannabinoids including pain relief, enhancement of appetite, blood pressure lowering during shock, embryonic development, and blocking of working memory. On the other hand, activation of endocannabinoid system may be suppresses evolution and progression of several types of cancer. According to the results of recent studies, CB receptors are over-expressed in cancer cell lines and application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds reduce tumor size through decrease of cell proliferation or induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis along with desirable effect on decrease of tumor-evoked pain. Therefore, modulation of endocannabinoid system by inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme, which metabolized endocannabinoids, or application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds, may be appropriate for the treatment of several cancer subtypes. This review focuses on how cannabinoid affect different types of cancers.

  13. Ferrocene Functionalized Endocrine Modulators as Anticancer Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillard, Elizabeth A.; Vessières, Anne; Jaouen, Gerard

    We present here some of our studies on the synthesis and behaviour of ferrocenyl selective endocrine receptor modulators against cancer cells, particularly breast and prostate cancers. The proliferative/anti-proliferative effects of compounds based on steroidal and non-steroidal endocrine modulators have been extensively explored in vitro. Structure-activity relationship studies of such molecules, particularly the hydroxyferrocifens and ferrocene phenols, have shown the effect of (1) the presence and the length of the N,N-dimethylamino side chain, (2) the presence and position of the phenol group, (3) the role of the ferrocenyl moiety, (4) that of conjugation, (5) phenyl functionalisation and (6) the placement of the phenyl group. Compounds possessing a ferrocene moiety linked to a p-phenol by a conjugated π-system are among the most potent of the series, with IC50 values ranging from 0.090 to 0.6µM on hormone independent breast cancer cells. Based on the SAR data and electrochemical studies, we have proposed an original mechanism to explain the unusual behaviour of these bioorganometallic species and coin the term "kronatropic" to qualify this effect, involving ROS production and bio-oxidation. In addition, the importance of formulation is underlined. We also discuss the behaviour of ferrocenyl androgens and anti-androgens for possible use against prostate cancers. In sum, ferrocene has proven to be a fascinating substituent due to its vast potential for oncology.

  14. Anticancer agents: Unleash the forces within

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2012-12-01

    Liposomes are a leading drug-delivery platform in cancer chemotherapy. Now they can be used to destroy cancer cells through a method that converts chemical energy to mechanical force. These localized disruptions can cause cell death while minimizing the collateral damage to neighbouring cells.

  15. CancerHSP: anticancer herbs database of systems pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Weiyang; Li, Bohui; Gao, Shuo; Bai, Yaofei; Shar, Piar Ali; Zhang, Wenjuan; Guo, Zihu; Sun, Ke; Fu, Yingxue; Huang, Chao; Zheng, Chunli; Mu, Jiexin; Pei, Tianli; Wang, Yuan; Li, Yan; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-06-01

    The numerous natural products and their bioactivity potentially afford an extraordinary resource for new drug discovery and have been employed in cancer treatment. However, the underlying pharmacological mechanisms of most natural anticancer compounds remain elusive, which has become one of the major obstacles in developing novel effective anticancer agents. Here, to address these unmet needs, we developed an anticancer herbs database of systems pharmacology (CancerHSP), which records anticancer herbs related information through manual curation. Currently, CancerHSP contains 2439 anticancer herbal medicines with 3575 anticancer ingredients. For each ingredient, the molecular structure and nine key ADME parameters are provided. Moreover, we also provide the anticancer activities of these compounds based on 492 different cancer cell lines. Further, the protein targets of the compounds are predicted by state-of-art methods or collected from literatures. CancerHSP will help reveal the molecular mechanisms of natural anticancer products and accelerate anticancer drug development, especially facilitate future investigations on drug repositioning and drug discovery. CancerHSP is freely available on the web at http://lsp.nwsuaf.edu.cn/CancerHSP.php.

  16. CancerHSP: anticancer herbs database of systems pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weiyang; Li, Bohui; Gao, Shuo; Bai, Yaofei; Shar, Piar Ali; Zhang, Wenjuan; Guo, Zihu; Sun, Ke; Fu, Yingxue; Huang, Chao; Zheng, Chunli; Mu, Jiexin; Pei, Tianli; Wang, Yuan; Li, Yan; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-06-15

    The numerous natural products and their bioactivity potentially afford an extraordinary resource for new drug discovery and have been employed in cancer treatment. However, the underlying pharmacological mechanisms of most natural anticancer compounds remain elusive, which has become one of the major obstacles in developing novel effective anticancer agents. Here, to address these unmet needs, we developed an anticancer herbs database of systems pharmacology (CancerHSP), which records anticancer herbs related information through manual curation. Currently, CancerHSP contains 2439 anticancer herbal medicines with 3575 anticancer ingredients. For each ingredient, the molecular structure and nine key ADME parameters are provided. Moreover, we also provide the anticancer activities of these compounds based on 492 different cancer cell lines. Further, the protein targets of the compounds are predicted by state-of-art methods or collected from literatures. CancerHSP will help reveal the molecular mechanisms of natural anticancer products and accelerate anticancer drug development, especially facilitate future investigations on drug repositioning and drug discovery. CancerHSP is freely available on the web at http://lsp.nwsuaf.edu.cn/CancerHSP.php.

  17. Anticancer drugs during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Yamada, Manabu; Kasai, Yasuyo; Miyauchi, Akito; Andoh, Kazumichi

    2016-09-01

    Although cancer diagnoses during pregnancy are rare, they have been increasing with the rise in maternal age and are now a topic of international concern. In some cases, the administration of chemotherapy is unavoidable, though there is a relative paucity of evidence regarding the administration of anticancer drugs during pregnancy. As more cases have gradually accumulated and further research has been conducted, we are beginning to elucidate the appropriate timing for the administration of chemotherapy, the regimens that can be administered with relative safety, various drug options and the effects of these drugs on both the mother and fetus. However, new challenges have arisen, such as the effects of novel anticancer drugs and the desire to bear children during chemotherapy. In this review, we outline the effects of administering cytotoxic anticancer drugs and molecular targeted drugs to pregnant women on both the mother and fetus, as well as the issues regarding patients who desire to bear children while being treated with anticancer drugs.

  18. In silico identification of anti-cancer compounds and plants from traditional Chinese medicine database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing; Han, Fei-Fei; Guo, Yi-Cheng; Zheng, Jun-Juan; Liu, Jia-Qian; Wang, Qian; Gao, Yue-Dong; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2016-05-01

    There is a constant demand to develop new, effective, and affordable anti-cancer drugs. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a valuable and alternative resource for identifying novel anti-cancer agents. In this study, we aim to identify the anti-cancer compounds and plants from the TCM database by using cheminformatics. We first predicted 5278 anti-cancer compounds from TCM database. The top 346 compounds were highly potent active in the 60 cell lines test. Similarity analysis revealed that 75% of the 5278 compounds are highly similar to the approved anti-cancer drugs. Based on the predicted anti-cancer compounds, we identified 57 anti-cancer plants by activity enrichment. The identified plants are widely distributed in 46 genera and 28 families, which broadens the scope of the anti-cancer drug screening. Finally, we constructed a network of predicted anti-cancer plants and approved drugs based on the above results. The network highlighted the supportive role of the predicted plant in the development of anti-cancer drug and suggested different molecular anti-cancer mechanisms of the plants. Our study suggests that the predicted compounds and plants from TCM database offer an attractive starting point and a broader scope to mine for potential anti-cancer agents.

  19. In silico identification of anti-cancer compounds and plants from traditional Chinese medicine database

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing; Han, Fei-Fei; Guo, Yi-Cheng; Zheng, Jun-Juan; Liu, Jia-Qian; Wang, Qian; Gao, Yue-Dong; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2016-01-01

    There is a constant demand to develop new, effective, and affordable anti-cancer drugs. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a valuable and alternative resource for identifying novel anti-cancer agents. In this study, we aim to identify the anti-cancer compounds and plants from the TCM database by using cheminformatics. We first predicted 5278 anti-cancer compounds from TCM database. The top 346 compounds were highly potent active in the 60 cell lines test. Similarity analysis revealed that 75% of the 5278 compounds are highly similar to the approved anti-cancer drugs. Based on the predicted anti-cancer compounds, we identified 57 anti-cancer plants by activity enrichment. The identified plants are widely distributed in 46 genera and 28 families, which broadens the scope of the anti-cancer drug screening. Finally, we constructed a network of predicted anti-cancer plants and approved drugs based on the above results. The network highlighted the supportive role of the predicted plant in the development of anti-cancer drug and suggested different molecular anti-cancer mechanisms of the plants. Our study suggests that the predicted compounds and plants from TCM database offer an attractive starting point and a broader scope to mine for potential anti-cancer agents. PMID:27145869

  20. In silico identification of anti-cancer compounds and plants from traditional Chinese medicine database.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing; Han, Fei-Fei; Guo, Yi-Cheng; Zheng, Jun-Juan; Liu, Jia-Qian; Wang, Qian; Gao, Yue-Dong; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2016-05-05

    There is a constant demand to develop new, effective, and affordable anti-cancer drugs. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a valuable and alternative resource for identifying novel anti-cancer agents. In this study, we aim to identify the anti-cancer compounds and plants from the TCM database by using cheminformatics. We first predicted 5278 anti-cancer compounds from TCM database. The top 346 compounds were highly potent active in the 60 cell lines test. Similarity analysis revealed that 75% of the 5278 compounds are highly similar to the approved anti-cancer drugs. Based on the predicted anti-cancer compounds, we identified 57 anti-cancer plants by activity enrichment. The identified plants are widely distributed in 46 genera and 28 families, which broadens the scope of the anti-cancer drug screening. Finally, we constructed a network of predicted anti-cancer plants and approved drugs based on the above results. The network highlighted the supportive role of the predicted plant in the development of anti-cancer drug and suggested different molecular anti-cancer mechanisms of the plants. Our study suggests that the predicted compounds and plants from TCM database offer an attractive starting point and a broader scope to mine for potential anti-cancer agents.

  1. Anti-Cancer Potential of a Novel SERM Ormeloxifene

    PubMed Central

    Gara, Rishi Kumar; Sundram, Vasudha; Chauhan, Subhash C.; Jaggi, Meena

    2014-01-01

    Ormeloxifene is a non-steroidal Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator (SERM) that is used as an oral contraceptive. Recent studies have shown its potent anti-cancer activities in breast, head and neck, and chronic myeloid leukemia cells. Several in vivo and clinical studies have reported that ormeloxifene possesses an excellent therapeutic index and has been well-tolerated, without any haematological, biochemical or histopathological toxicity, even with chronic administration. A reasonably long period of time and an enormous financial commitment are required to develop a lead compound into a clinically approved anti-cancer drug. For these reasons and to circumvent these obstacles, ormeloxifene is a promising candidate on a fast track for the development or repurposing established drugs as anti-cancer agents for cancer treatment. The current review summarizes recent findings on ormeloxifene as an anti-cancer agent and future prospects of this clinically safe pharmacophore. PMID:23895678

  2. Hyaluronic acid for anticancer drug and nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    Dosio, Franco; Arpicco, Silvia; Stella, Barbara; Fattal, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is widely used in anticancer drug delivery, since it is biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic, and non-immunogenic; moreover, HA receptors are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Exploiting this ligand-receptor interaction, the use of HA is now a rapidly-growing platform for targeting CD44-overexpressing cells, to improve anticancer therapies. The rationale underlying approaches, chemical strategies, and recent advances in the use of HA to design drug carriers for delivering anticancer agents, are reviewed. Comprehensive descriptions are given of HA-based drug conjugates, particulate carriers (micelles, liposomes, nanoparticles, microparticles), inorganic nanostructures, and hydrogels, with particular emphasis on reports of preclinical/clinical results.

  3. Cimetidine: an anticancer drug?

    PubMed

    Kubecova, Martina; Kolostova, Katarina; Pinterova, Daniela; Kacprzak, Grzegorz; Bobek, Vladimir

    2011-04-18

    Cimetidine, H(2) receptor antagonists, is commonly prescribed for gastric and duodenal ulcer disease. Additionally, cimetidine has been shown to have anticancer effects. This review describes the mechanism of antitumor action of cimetidine including its ability to interfere with tumor cell adhesion, angiogenesis and proliferation; its effect on the immune system; as well as inhibition of postoperative immunosuppression. Its anticancer effect is also compared to that of the other H(2) receptor antagonists as well as outcomes of cimetidine in clinical studies in cancer patients.

  4. Methyl Jasmonate Regulates Podophyllotoxin Accumulation in Podophyllum hexandrum by Altering the ROS-Responsive Podophyllotoxin Pathway Gene Expression Additionally through the Down Regulation of Few Interfering miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Saptarshi; Bhattacharyya, Dipto; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2017-01-01

    Podophylloxin (ptox), primarily obtained from Podophyllum hexandrum, is the precursor for semi-synthetic anticancer drugs viz. etoposide, etopophos, and teniposide. Previous studies established that methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treated cell culture of P. hexandrum accumulate ptox significantly. However, the molecular mechanism of MeJA induced ptox accumulation is yet to be explored. Here, we demonstrate that MeJA induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which stimulates ptox accumulation significantly and up regulates three ROS-responsive ptox biosynthetic genes, namely, PhCAD3, PhCAD4 (cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase), and NAC3 by increasing their mRNA stability. Classic uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, as well as H2O2 treatment induced the ROS generation and consequently, enhanced the ptox production. However, when the ROS was inhibited with NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium and Superoxide dismutase inhibitor diethyldithio-carbamic acid, the ROS inhibiting agent, the ptox production was decreased significantly. We also noted that, MeJA up regulated other ptox biosynthetic pathway genes which are not affected by the MeJA induced ROS. Further, these ROS non-responsive genes were controlled by MeJA through the down regulation of five secondary metabolites biosynthesis specific miRNAs viz. miR172i, miR035, miR1438, miR2275, and miR8291. Finally, this study suggested two possible mechanisms through which MeJA modulates the ptox biosynthesis: primarily by increasing the mRNA stability of ROS-responsive genes and secondly, by the up regulation of ROS non-responsive genes through the down regulation of some ROS non-responsive miRNAs.

  5. Methyl Jasmonate Regulates Podophyllotoxin Accumulation in Podophyllum hexandrum by Altering the ROS-Responsive Podophyllotoxin Pathway Gene Expression Additionally through the Down Regulation of Few Interfering miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Saptarshi; Bhattacharyya, Dipto; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2017-01-01

    Podophylloxin (ptox), primarily obtained from Podophyllum hexandrum, is the precursor for semi-synthetic anticancer drugs viz. etoposide, etopophos, and teniposide. Previous studies established that methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treated cell culture of P. hexandrum accumulate ptox significantly. However, the molecular mechanism of MeJA induced ptox accumulation is yet to be explored. Here, we demonstrate that MeJA induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which stimulates ptox accumulation significantly and up regulates three ROS-responsive ptox biosynthetic genes, namely, PhCAD3, PhCAD4 (cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase), and NAC3 by increasing their mRNA stability. Classic uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, as well as H2O2 treatment induced the ROS generation and consequently, enhanced the ptox production. However, when the ROS was inhibited with NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium and Superoxide dismutase inhibitor diethyldithio-carbamic acid, the ROS inhibiting agent, the ptox production was decreased significantly. We also noted that, MeJA up regulated other ptox biosynthetic pathway genes which are not affected by the MeJA induced ROS. Further, these ROS non-responsive genes were controlled by MeJA through the down regulation of five secondary metabolites biosynthesis specific miRNAs viz. miR172i, miR035, miR1438, miR2275, and miR8291. Finally, this study suggested two possible mechanisms through which MeJA modulates the ptox biosynthesis: primarily by increasing the mRNA stability of ROS-responsive genes and secondly, by the up regulation of ROS non-responsive genes through the down regulation of some ROS non-responsive miRNAs. PMID:28261233

  6. Cell Death Signaling and Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Vacchelli, Erika; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-01-01

    For a long time, it was commonly believed that efficient anticancer regimens would either trigger the apoptotic demise of tumor cells or induce a permanent arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, i.e., senescence. The recent discovery that necrosis can occur in a regulated fashion and the increasingly more precise characterization of the underlying molecular mechanisms have raised great interest, as non-apoptotic pathways might be instrumental to circumvent the resistance of cancer cells to conventional, pro-apoptotic therapeutic regimens. Moreover, it has been shown that some anticancer regimens engage lethal signaling cascades that can ignite multiple oncosuppressive mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, and senescence. Among these signaling pathways is mitotic catastrophe, whose role as a bona fide cell death mechanism has recently been reconsidered. Thus, anticancer regimens get ever more sophisticated, and often distinct strategies are combined to maximize efficacy and minimize side effects. In this review, we will discuss the importance of apoptosis, necrosis, and mitotic catastrophe in the response of tumor cells to the most common clinically employed and experimental anticancer agents. PMID:22655227

  7. Cell death signaling and anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Vacchelli, Erika; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-01-01

    For a long time, it was commonly believed that efficient anticancer regimens would either trigger the apoptotic demise of tumor cells or induce a permanent arrest in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, i.e., senescence. The recent discovery that necrosis can occur in a regulated fashion and the increasingly more precise characterization of the underlying molecular mechanisms have raised great interest, as non-apoptotic pathways might be instrumental to circumvent the resistance of cancer cells to conventional, pro-apoptotic therapeutic regimens. Moreover, it has been shown that some anticancer regimens engage lethal signaling cascades that can ignite multiple oncosuppressive mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis, and senescence. Among these signaling pathways is mitotic catastrophe, whose role as a bona fide cell death mechanism has recently been reconsidered. Thus, anticancer regimens get ever more sophisticated, and often distinct strategies are combined to maximize efficacy and minimize side effects. In this review, we will discuss the importance of apoptosis, necrosis, and mitotic catastrophe in the response of tumor cells to the most common clinically employed and experimental anticancer agents.

  8. Anticancer Activity of Stilbene-based Derivatives.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Barbara; Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; Fantacuzzi, Marialuigia; Giampietro, Letizia; Maccallini, Cristina; Amoroso, Rosa

    2017-03-07

    Anticancer Activity of Stilbene-based Derivatives Barbara De Filippis,* Alessandra Ammazzalorso, Marialuigia Fantacuzzi, Letizia Giampietro, Cristina Maccallini, Rosa Amoroso Dipartimento di Farmacia, Università "G. d'Annunzio", via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti, Italy; * E-mail: barbara.defilippis@unich.it Stilbene is a very present structural scaffold in nature and stilbene-based compounds are largely described for their biological activity such as cardioprotective, potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer agents. Starting from their potent chemotherapeutic activity against a wide variety of cancers, stilbene scaffold of resveratrol has been subjected to synthetic manipulations with the aim to obtaining new resveratrol analogues with improved anticancer activity and better bioavailability. In the last decade, majority of new synthetic stilbenoids demonstrated significant anticancer activity against a large number of cancer cell lines employed, depending on the type and position of substituents on stilbene skeleton. Given the importance of this topic and the vast therapeutic potential, especially in the field of cancer research, in the last years, some reviews have been published focusing on general pharmacological activity or, more recently, on the usefulness of hybrid molecule containing stilbene scaffold. The present review article focuses on the pharmacological profile of the key compounds containing stilbene scaffold and classify them on the type of structural modifications in stilbene skeleton.

  9. The molecular shape and the field similarities as criteria to interpret SAR studies for fragment-based design of platinum(IV) anticancer agents. Correlation of physicochemical properties with cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Julia; Montaña, Ángel M

    2016-09-01

    Molecular shape similarity and field similarity have been used to interpret, in a qualitative way, the structure-activity relationships in a selected series of platinum(IV) complexes with anticancer activity. MM and QM calculations have been used to estimate the electron density, electrostatic potential maps, partial charges, dipolar moments and other parameters to correlate the stereo-electronic properties with the differential biological activity of complexes. Extended Electron Distribution (XED) field similarity has been also evaluated for the free 1,4-diamino carrier ligands, in a fragment-based drug design approach, comparing Connolly solvent excluded surface, hydrophobicity field surface, Van der Waals field surface, nucleophilicity field surface, electrophilicity field surface and the extended electron-distribution maxima field points. A consistency has been found when comparing the stereo-electronic properties of the studied series of platinum(IV) complexes and/or the free ligands evaluated and their in vitro anticancer activity.

  10. Design and synthesis of 6,7-methylenedioxy-4-substituted phenylquinolin-2(1H)-one derivatives as novel anticancer agents that induce apoptosis with cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Fong; Lin, Yi-Chien; Huang, Po-Kai; Chan, Hsu-Chin; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Huang, Li-Jiau

    2013-09-01

    Novel 6,7-methylenedioxy-4-substituted phenylquinolin-2(1H)-one derivatives 12a-n were designed and prepared through an intramolecular cyclization reaction and evaluated for in vitro anticancer activity. Among the synthesized compounds, 6,7-methylenedioxy-4-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)quinolin-2(1H)-one (12e) displayed potent cytotoxicity against several different tumor cell lines at a sub-micromolar level. Furthermore, results of fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis suggested that 12e induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase accompanied by apoptosis in HL-60 and H460 cells. This action was confirmed by Hoechst staining and caspase-3 activation. Due to their easy synthesis and remarkable biological activities, 4-phenylquinolin-2(1H)-one analogs (4-PQs) are promising new anticancer leads based on the quinoline scaffold. Accordingly, compound 12e was identified as a new lead compound that merits further optimization and development as an anticancer candidate.

  11. Anticancer properties of Monascus metabolites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Liu, Junwen; Luo, Feijun; Lin, Qinlu; Rosol, Thomas J; Deng, Xiyun

    2014-08-01

    This review provides up-to-date information on the anticancer properties of Monascus-fermented products. Topics covered include clinical evidence for the anticancer potential of Monascus metabolites, bioactive Monascus components with anticancer potential, mechanisms of the anticancer effects of Monascus metabolites, and existing problems as well as future perspectives. With the advancement of related fields, the development of novel anticancer Monascus food products and/or pharmaceuticals will be possible with the ultimate goal of decreasing the incidence and mortality of malignancies in humans.

  12. Podophyllotoxin and Rutin Modulates Ionizing Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptotic Cell Death in Mice Bone Marrow and Spleen.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhinav; Yashavarddhan, M H; Kalita, Bhargab; Ranjan, Rajiv; Bajaj, Sania; Prakash, Hridayesh; Gupta, Manju Lata

    2017-01-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the radioprotective efficacy of G-003M (combination of podophyllotoxin and rutin) against gamma radiation-induced oxidative stress and subsequent cell death in mice bone marrow and spleen. Prophylactic administration of G-003M (-1 h) rendered more than 85% survival in mice exposed to 9 Gy (lethal dose) with dose reduction factor of 1.26. G-003M pretreated mice demonstrated significantly reduced level of reactive oxygen species, membrane lipid peroxidation, and retained glutathione level. In the same group, we obtained increased expression of master redox regulator, nuclear factor erythroid-derived like-2 factor (Nrf-2), and its downstream targets (heme oxygenase-1, Nqo-1, glutathione S-transferase, and thioredoxin reductase-1). In addition, G-003M preadministration has also shown a significant reduction in Keap-1 level (Nrf-2 inhibitor). Radiation-induced lethality was significantly amended in combination-treated (G-003M) mice as demonstrated by reduced 8-OHdG, annexin V FITC(+) cells, and restored mitochondrial membrane potential. Expression of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL was restored in G-003M pretreated group. However, proapoptotic proteins (Puma, Bax, Bak, Caspase-3, and Caspase-7) were significantly declined in this group. Further analysis of immune cells revealed G-003M-mediated restoration of CD3 and CD19 receptor, which was found decreased to significant level following irradiation. Similarly, Gr-1, a marker of granulocytes, was also retained by G-003M administration prior to radiation. Modulatory potential of this formulation (G-003M) can be exploited as a safe and effective countermeasure against radiation-induced lymphohemopoietic injury.

  13. Podophyllotoxin and Rutin Modulates Ionizing Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptotic Cell Death in Mice Bone Marrow and Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhinav; Yashavarddhan, M. H.; Kalita, Bhargab; Ranjan, Rajiv; Bajaj, Sania; Prakash, Hridayesh; Gupta, Manju Lata

    2017-01-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the radioprotective efficacy of G-003M (combination of podophyllotoxin and rutin) against gamma radiation-induced oxidative stress and subsequent cell death in mice bone marrow and spleen. Prophylactic administration of G-003M (−1 h) rendered more than 85% survival in mice exposed to 9 Gy (lethal dose) with dose reduction factor of 1.26. G-003M pretreated mice demonstrated significantly reduced level of reactive oxygen species, membrane lipid peroxidation, and retained glutathione level. In the same group, we obtained increased expression of master redox regulator, nuclear factor erythroid-derived like-2 factor (Nrf-2), and its downstream targets (heme oxygenase-1, Nqo-1, glutathione S-transferase, and thioredoxin reductase-1). In addition, G-003M preadministration has also shown a significant reduction in Keap-1 level (Nrf-2 inhibitor). Radiation-induced lethality was significantly amended in combination-treated (G-003M) mice as demonstrated by reduced 8-OHdG, annexin V FITC+ cells, and restored mitochondrial membrane potential. Expression of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL was restored in G-003M pretreated group. However, proapoptotic proteins (Puma, Bax, Bak, Caspase-3, and Caspase-7) were significantly declined in this group. Further analysis of immune cells revealed G-003M-mediated restoration of CD3 and CD19 receptor, which was found decreased to significant level following irradiation. Similarly, Gr-1, a marker of granulocytes, was also retained by G-003M administration prior to radiation. Modulatory potential of this formulation (G-003M) can be exploited as a safe and effective countermeasure against radiation-induced lymphohemopoietic injury. PMID:28289414

  14. Total synthesis of bryostatin 16 using a Pd-catalyzed diyne coupling as macrocyclization method and synthesis of C20-epi-bryostatin 7 as a potent anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Trost, Barry M; Dong, Guangbin

    2010-11-24

    Asymmetric total synthesis of bryostatin 16 was achieved in 26 steps in the longest linear sequence and in 39 total steps from aldehyde 10. A Pd-catalyzed alkyne-alkyne coupling was employed for the first time as a macrocyclization method in a natural product synthesis. A route to convert bryostatin 16 to a new family of bryostatin analogues was developed. Toward this end, 20-epi-bryostatin 7 was synthesized from a bryostatin 16-like intermediate; the key step involves a Re-catalyzed epoxidation/ring-opening reaction. Preliminary biological studies indicated that this new analogue exhibits nanomolar anti-cancer activity against several cancer cell lines.

  15. Liposomal anticancer therapy: pharmacokinetic and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, A

    2004-11-01

    Liposomes, which are vesicles composed of a phospholipid bilayer surrounding an aqueous milieu, represent a new strategy for anticancer drug delivery. Extravasation and accumulation of liposomal drugs within neoplastic tissues are possible because of the leaky vasculature and scarce lymphatic vessels of tumours (the enhanced permeability and retention effect). Furthermore, liposomal chemotherapeutic agents display distinctive pharmacokinetic characteristics, because they possess longer elimination half-lives, reduced clearance and smaller volume of distribution with respect to corresponding free drugs. Taken together, these features lead to highest levels of cytotoxic agents in tumours, as demonstrated in preclinical models and clinical trials, whereas healthy tissues are spared from toxicity. In fact, liposomal drugs (i.e., doxorubicin), alone or in combination with other cytotoxic agents, lead to improved clinical effectiveness and ameliorated toxicity profile with respect to corresponding free drugs when they are used for the treatment of metastatic breast and ovarian cancers, and Kaposi's sarcoma.

  16. Melatonin Anticancer Effects: Review

    PubMed Central

    Di Bella, Giuseppe; Mascia, Fabrizio; Gualano, Luciano; Di Bella, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, MLT), the main hormone produced by the pineal gland, not only regulates circadian rhythm, but also has antioxidant, anti-ageing and immunomodulatory properties. MLT plays an important role in blood composition, medullary dynamics, platelet genesis, vessel endothelia, and in platelet aggregation, leukocyte formula regulation and hemoglobin synthesis. Its significant atoxic, apoptotic, oncostatic, angiogenetic, differentiating and antiproliferative properties against all solid and liquid tumors have also been documented. Thanks, in fact, to its considerable functional versatility, MLT can exert both direct and indirect anticancer effects in factorial synergy with other differentiating, antiproliferative, immunomodulating and trophic molecules that form part of the anticancer treatment formulated by Luigi Di Bella (Di Bella Method, DBM: somatostatin, retinoids, ascorbic acid, vitamin D3, prolactin inhibitors, chondroitin-sulfate). The interaction between MLT and the DBM molecules counters the multiple processes that characterize the neoplastic phenotype (induction, promotion, progression and/or dissemination, tumoral mutation). All these particular characteristics suggest the use of MLT in oncological diseases. PMID:23348932

  17. Anticancer substances of mushroom origin.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, T S; Krupodorova, T A; Barshteyn, V Y; Artamonova, A B; Shlyakhovenko, V A

    2014-06-01

    The present status of investigations about the anticancer activity which is inherent to medicinal mushrooms, as well as their biomedical potential and future prospects are discussed. Mushroom products and extracts possess promising immunomodulating and anticancer effects, so the main biologically active substances of mushrooms responsible for immunomodulation and direct cytoto-xicity toward cancer cell lines (including rarely mentioned groups of anticancer mushroom proteins), and the mechanisms of their antitumor action were analyzed. The existing to date clinical trials of mushroom substances are mentioned. Mushroom anticancer extracts, obtained by the different solvents, are outlined. Modern approaches of cancer treatment with implication of mushroom products, including DNA vaccinotherapy with mushroom immunomodulatory adjuvants, creation of prodrugs with mushroom lectins that can recognize glycoconjugates on the cancer cell surface, development of nanovectors etc. are discussed. The future prospects of mushroom anticancer substances application, including chemical modification of polysaccharides and terpenoids, gene engineering of proteins, and implementation of vaccines are reviewed.

  18. Classification of mitocans, anti-cancer drugs acting on mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Neuzil, Jiri; Dong, Lan-Feng; Rohlena, Jakub; Truksa, Jaroslav; Ralph, Stephen J

    2013-05-01

    Mitochondria have emerged as an intriguing target for anti-cancer drugs, inherent to vast majority if not all types of tumours. Drugs that target mitochondria and exert anti-cancer activity have become a focus of recent research due to their great clinical potential (which has not been harnessed thus far). The exceptional potential of mitochondria as a target for anti-cancer agents has been reinforced by the discouraging finding that even tumours of the same type from individual patients differ in a number of mutations. This is consistent with the idea of personalised therapy, an elusive goal at this stage, in line with the notion that tumours are unlikely to be treated by agents that target only a single gene or a single pathway. This endows mitochondria, an invariant target present in all tumours, with an exceptional momentum. This train of thoughts inspired us to define a class of anti-cancer drugs acting by way of mitochondrial 'destabilisation', termed 'mitocans'. In this communication, we define mitocans (many of which have been known for a long time) and classify them into several classes based on their molecular mode of action. We chose the targets that are of major importance from the point of view of their role in mitochondrial destabilisation by small compounds, some of which are now trialled as anti-cancer agents. The classification starts with targets at the surface of mitochondria and ending up with those in the mitochondrial matrix. The purpose of this review is to present in a concise manner the classification of compounds that hold a considerable promise as potential anti-cancer drugs.

  19. The Extraction, Anticancer Effect, Bioavailability, and Nanotechnology of Baicalin

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Ondrea A.; Gao, Ying; Chen, Allen Y.; Brittain, Ross; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2016-01-01

    The dried root of Baikal skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensis) has been historically and widely used in traditional Eastern medicine. Modern science proved that baicalin is the major bioactive responsible for the physiological activity of Baikal skullcap. Baicalin, a flavonoid found in several species in the genus Scutellaria, has been regarded as a potent anticancer agent. In this review, we present the main extraction methods, anticancer activity and bioavailability of baicalin. Besides, the utilization of nanotechnology to improve the bioavailability of baicalin is also mentioned. PMID:27790646

  20. DNA topoisomerases and their poisoning by anticancer and antibacterial drugs.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Yves; Leo, Elisabetta; Zhang, HongLiang; Marchand, Christophe

    2010-05-28

    DNA topoisomerases are the targets of important anticancer and antibacterial drugs. Camptothecins and novel noncamptothecins in clinical development (indenoisoquinolines and ARC-111) target eukaryotic type IB topoisomerases (Top1), whereas human type IIA topoisomerases (Top2alpha and Top2beta) are the targets of the widely used anticancer agents etoposide, anthracyclines (doxorubicin, daunorubicin), and mitoxantrone. Bacterial type II topoisomerases (gyrase and Topo IV) are the targets of quinolones and aminocoumarin antibiotics. This review focuses on the molecular and biochemical characteristics of topoisomerases and their inhibitors. We also discuss the common mechanism of action of topoisomerase poisons by interfacial inhibition and trapping of topoisomerase cleavage complexes.

  1. Small-molecule delivery by nanoparticles for anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuo (Georgia)

    2013-01-01

    Using nanoparticles for the delivery of small molecules in anticancer therapy is a rapidly growing area of research. The advantages of using nanoparticles for drug delivery include enhanced water solubility, tumor-specific accumulation and improved antitumor efficacy, while reducing nonspecific toxicity. Current research in this field focuses on understanding precisely how small molecules are released from nanoparticles and delivered to the targeted tumor tissues or cells, and how the unique biodistribution of the drug-carrying nanoparticles limits toxicity in major organs. Here, we discuss existing nanoparticles for the delivery of small-molecule anticancer agents and recent advances in this field. PMID:20846905

  2. Novel pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine with 4-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-phenylamine as broad spectrum anticancer agents: Synthesis, cell based assay, topoisomerase inhibition, DNA intercalation and bovine serum albumin studies.

    PubMed

    Singla, Prinka; Luxami, Vijay; Singh, Raja; Tandon, Vibha; Paul, Kamaldeep

    2017-01-27

    A series of new pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine possessing 4-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-phenylamine moiety at C4 position and primary as well as secondary amines at C6 position has been designed and synthesized. Their antitumor activities were evaluated against a panel of 60 human cancer cell lines at National Cancer Institute (NCI). Six compounds displayed potent and broad spectrum anticancer activities at 10 μM. Compounds 8, 12, 14 and 17 proved to be the most active and efficacious candidate in this series, with mean GI50 values of 1.30 μM, 1.43 μM, 2.38 μM and 2.18 μM, respectively against several cancer cell lines. Further biological evaluation of these compounds suggested that these compounds induce apoptosis and inhibit human topoisomerase (Topo) IIα as a possible intracellular target. UV-visible and fluorescence studies of these compounds revealed strong interaction with ct-DNA and bovine serum albumin (BSA).

  3. Design and Synthesis of Potent in Vitro and in Vivo Anticancer Agents Based on 1-(3′,4′,5′-Trimethoxyphenyl)-2-Aryl-1H-Imidazole

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, Romeo; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Prencipe, Filippo; Oliva, Paola; Baraldi, Stefania; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Lopez-Cara, Luisa Carlota; Ferla, Salvatore; Brancale, Andrea; Hamel, Ernest; Ronca, Roberto; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Mariotto, Elena; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    A novel series of tubulin polymerization inhibitors, based on the 1-(3′,4′,5′-trimethoxyphenyl)-2-aryl-1H-imidazole scaffold and designed as cis-restricted combretastatin A-4 analogues, was synthesized with the goal of evaluating the effects of various patterns of substitution on the phenyl at the 2-position of the imidazole ring on biological activity. A chloro and ethoxy group at the meta- and para-positions, respectively, produced the most active compound in the series (4o), with IC50 values of 0.4-3.8 nM against a panel of seven cancer cell lines. Except in HL-60 cells, 4o had greater antiproliferative than CA-4, indicating that the 3′-chloro-4′-ethoxyphenyl moiety was a good surrogate for the CA-4 B-ring. Experiments carried out in a mouse syngenic model demonstrated high antitumor activity of 4o, which significantly reduced the tumor mass at a dose thirty times lower than that required for CA-4P, which was used as a reference compound. Altogether, our findings suggest that 4o is a promising anticancer drug candidate that warrants further preclinical evaluation. PMID:27216165

  4. Proteomic profiling predicts drug response to novel targeted anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Li, Zilin; Hua, Yunfen; Lim, Yoon Pin

    2016-01-01

    Most recently approved anti-cancer drugs by the US FDA are targeted therapeutic agents and this represents an important trend for future anticancer therapy. Unlike conventional chemotherapy that rarely considers individual differences, it is crucial for targeted therapies to identify the beneficial subgroup of patients for the treatment. Currently, genomics and transcriptomics are the major 'omic' analytics used in studies of drug response prediction. However, proteomic profiling excels both in its advantages of directly detecting an instantaneous dynamic of the whole proteome, which contains most current diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets. Moreover, proteomic profiling improves understanding of the mechanism for drug resistance and helps finding optimal combination therapy. This article reviews the recent success of applications of proteomic analytics in predicting the response to targeted anticancer therapeutics, and discusses the potential avenues and pitfalls of proteomic platforms and techniques used most in the field.

  5. [Degrading anticancer drugs in the medical environment using a visible light-driven photocatalyst].

    PubMed

    Sato, Junya; Kikuchi, Satomi; Kudo, Kenzo

    2014-01-01

      Occupational exposure to anticancer drugs is recognized as a risk for healthcare workers. Reducing anticancer drugs in the environment is important to prevent the exposure of individuals to anticancer drugs. However, there are currently no effective degrading agents for all anticancer drugs used in clinical settings. We previously reported the resolution of an anticancer drug with the use of a photocatalyst (TiO2), which acts by absorbing ultraviolet light to degrade organic compounds. In this study, we evaluated anticancer drug degradation using a visible light-driven photocatalyst (Cu/WO3). Anticancer drugs [cyclophosphamide (CPA), paclitaxel (PTX), methotrexate (MTX), irinotecan (CPT-11), cytarabine (Ara-C), and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)], were experimentally deposited on a stainless steel plate. The visible light-driven photocatalytic agent (0.075% Cu/WO3 solution) was sprayed onto the plate, and the plate was then left under a fluorescent lamp for 12 h. The anticancer drugs remaining on the plate were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). CPA, PTX, MTX, CPT-11, Ara-C, and 5-FU were found to be degraded by up to 37.7%, >99.0%, 57.1%, 54.6%, 69.5%, and 36.3%, respectively. The visible light-driven photocatalyst was therefore confirmed to degrade anticancer drugs under a fluorescent lamp. The ability of the visible light-driven photocatalyst to degrade multiple chemotherapeutic agents without the need for altering the light source could make it a useful tool for reducing anticancer drug pollution in clinical settings.

  6. Anticancer activity assessment of two novel binuclear platinum (II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Shahsavani, Mohammad Bagher; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Aseman, Marzieh Dadkhah; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Rashidi, Mehdi; Asadi, Zahra; Erfani, Nasrollah; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Niazi, Ali; Bahaoddini, Aminollah; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, two binuclear Pt (II) complexes, containing cis, cis-[Me2Pt (μ-NN) (μ-dppm) PtMe2] (1), and cis,cis-[Me2Pt(μ-NN)(μ dppm) Pt((CH2)4)] (2) in which NN=phthalazine and dppm=bis (diphenylphosphino) methane were evaluated for their anticancer activities and DNA/purine nucleotide binding properties. These Pt (II) complexes, with the non-classical structures, demonstrated a significant anticancer activity against Jurkat and MCF-7 cancer cell lines. The results of ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and Caspase-III activity suggest that these complexes were capable to stimulate an apoptotic mechanism of cell death in the cancer cells. Using different biophysical techniques and docking simulation analysis, we indicated that these complexes were also capable to interact efficiently with DNA via a non-intercalative mechanism. According to our results, substitution of cyclopentane (in complex 2) with two methyl groups (in complex 1) results in significant improvement of the complex ability to interact with DNA and subsequently to induce the anticancer activity. Overall, these binuclear Pt (II) complexes are promising group of the non-classical potential anticancer agents which can be considered as molecular templates in designing of highly efficient platinum anticancer drugs.

  7. Acupuncture as anticancer treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Kilian-Kita, Aneta; Püsküllüoglu, Mirosława; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    The mystery of Traditional Chinese Medicine has been attracting people for years. Acupuncture, ranked among the most common services of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, has recently gained a lot of interest in the scientific world. Contemporary researchers have been continuously trying to shed light on its possible mechanism of action in human organism. Numerous studies pertaining to acupuncture’s application in cancer symptoms or treatment-related side effects management have already been published. Moreover, since the modern idea of acupuncture’s immunomodulating effect seems to be promising, scientists have propounded a concept of its potential application as part of direct anti-tumor therapy. In our previous study we summarized possible use of acupuncture in management of cancer symptoms and treatment-related ailments, such as chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, xerostomia, vasomotor symptoms, neutropenia, fatigue, anxiety, insomnia, lymphoedema after mastectomy and peripheral neuropathy. This article reviews the studies concerning acupuncture as a possible tool in modern anticancer treatment. PMID:28239282

  8. In vitro evaluation of anticancer effect and neurotoxicity of Styrylpyrone derivative (SPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Chee-Wai; Nagaoka, Yasuo; Nor, Norefrina Shafinaz Md.; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2016-11-01

    The increasing number of death due to cancer emphasizes the need of novel anticancer agents. Styrylpyrone derivative (SPD) was previously found to have potential anticancer action towards many types of cancer. Some of the SPD-anticancer mechanisms were elucidated as induction of cancer cell apoptosis. However, more understanding on cancer cell type specific action of SPD-anticancer effects needs to be evaluated. HCT-116 cell line, a type of human colon carcinoma, was used to study SPD-anticancer effect. It was found that SPD concentration as low as 0.25 µM was able to inhibit 80% growth of cancer cells. IC50 value of SPD for HCT-116 was found to be 0.038 µM. Neurotoxicity test, carried out to determine the adverse effect of SPD towards nerve cells, gives CC50 value as 4.88 µM, thus concluded it to be a neurotoxic compound.

  9. Trial Watch: Peptide-based anticancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Jonathan; Bloy, Norma; Buqué, Aitziber; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Galon, Jérôme; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Malignant cells express antigens that can be harnessed to elicit anticancer immune responses. One approach to achieve such goal consists in the administration of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) or peptides thereof as recombinant proteins in the presence of adequate adjuvants. Throughout the past decade, peptide vaccines have been shown to mediate antineoplastic effects in various murine tumor models, especially when administered in the context of potent immunostimulatory regimens. In spite of multiple limitations, first of all the fact that anticancer vaccines are often employed as therapeutic (rather than prophylactic) agents, this immunotherapeutic paradigm has been intensively investigated in clinical scenarios, with promising results. Currently, both experimentalists and clinicians are focusing their efforts on the identification of so-called tumor rejection antigens, i.e., TAAs that can elicit an immune response leading to disease eradication, as well as to combinatorial immunostimulatory interventions with superior adjuvant activity in patients. Here, we summarize the latest advances in the development of peptide vaccines for cancer therapy. PMID:26137405

  10. Recent development of anticancer therapeutics targeting Akt.

    PubMed

    Morrow, John K; Du-Cuny, Lei; Chen, Lu; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J; Mash, Eugene A; Powis, Garth; Zhang, Shuxing

    2011-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt has proven to be a significant signaling target, involved in various biological functions. Because of its cardinal role in numerous cellular responses, Akt has been implicated in many human diseases, particularly cancer. It has been established that Akt is a viable and feasible target for anticancer therapeutics. Analysis of all Akt kinases reveals conserved homology for an N-terminal regulatory domain, which contains a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain for cellular translocation, a kinase domain with serine/threonine specificity, and a C-terminal extension domain. These well defined regions have been targeted, and various approaches, including in silico methods, have been implemented to develop Akt inhibitors. In spite of unique techniques and a prolific body of knowledge surrounding Akt, no targeted Akt therapeutics have reached the market yet. Here we will highlight successes and challenges to date on the development of anticancer agents modulating the Akt pathway in recent patents as well as discuss the methods employed for this task. Special attention will be given to patents with focus on those discoveries using computer-aided drug design approaches.

  11. Tribenzyltin carboxylates as anticancer drug candidates: Effect on the cytotoxicity, motility and invasiveness of breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Anasamy, Theebaa; Thy, Chun Keng; Lo, Kong Mun; Chee, Chin Fei; Yeap, Swee Keong; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Chung, Lip Yong

    2017-01-05

    This study seeks to investigate the relationship between the structural modification and bioactivity of a series of tribenzyltin complexes with different ligands and substitutions. Complexation with the N,N-diisopropylcarbamothioylsulfanylacetate or isonicotinate ligands enhanced the anticancer properties of tribenzyltin compounds via delayed cancer cell-cycle progression, caspase-dependent apoptosis induction, and significant reduction in cell motility, migration and invasion. Halogenation of the benzyl ring improved the anticancer effects of the tribenzyltin compounds with the N,N-diisopropylcarbamothioylsulfanylacetate ligand. These compounds also demonstrated far greater anticancer effects and selectivity than cisplatin and doxorubicin, which provides a rationale for their further development as anticancer agents.

  12. CEST theranostics: label-free MR imaging of anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiadi; Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Chan, Kannie W. Y.; Luo, Liangping; McMahon, Michael T.; Vogelstein, Bert; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Zhou, Shibin; Liu, Guanshu

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery is of great clinical interest. Here, we explored a direct way, namely CEST theranostics, to detect diamagnetic anticancer drugs simply through their inherent Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) MRI signal, and demonstrated its application in image-guided drug delivery of nanoparticulate chemotherapeutics. We first screened 22 chemotherapeutic agents and characterized the CEST properties of representative agents and natural analogs in three major categories, i.e., pyrimidine analogs, purine analogs, and antifolates, with respect to chemical structures. Utilizing the inherent CEST MRI signal of gemcitabine, a widely used anticancer drug, the tumor uptake of the i.v.-injected, drug-loaded liposomes was successfully detected in CT26 mouse tumors. Such label-free CEST MRI theranostics provides a new imaging means, potentially with an immediate clinical impact, to monitor the drug delivery in cancer. PMID:26837220

  13. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vacchelli, Erika; Bravo-San Pedro, José-Manuel; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V; Eggermont, Alexander M; Fearon, Douglas T; Fridman, Wolf H; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J; Speiser, Daniel E; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K; Talmadge, James E; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S; Whiteside, Theresa L; Wolchok, Jedd D; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-12-30

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into "passive" and "active" based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches.

  14. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Pedro, José-Manuel Bravo-San; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N.; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P.; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Eggermont, Alexander M.; Fearon, Douglas T.; Fridman, Wolf H.; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M.; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E.; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Talmadge, James E.; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J.; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into “passive” and “active” based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  15. In silico inspired design and synthesis of a novel tubulin-binding anti-cancer drug: folate conjugated noscapine (Targetin).

    PubMed

    Naik, Pradeep K; Lopus, Manu; Aneja, Ritu; Vangapandu, Surya N; Joshi, Harish C

    2012-02-01

    Our screen for tubulin-binding small molecules that do not depolymerize bulk cellular microtubules, but based upon structural features of well known microtubule-depolymerizing colchicine and podophyllotoxin, revealed tubulin binding anti-cancer property of noscapine (Ye et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 95:2280-2286, 1998). Guided by molecular modelling calculations and structure-activity relationships we conjugated at C9 of noscapine, a folate group-a ligand for cellular folate receptor alpha (FRα). FRα is over-expressed on some solid tumours such as ovarian epithelial cancers. Molecular docking experiments predicted that a folate conjugated noscapine (Targetin) accommodated well inside the binding cavity (docking score -11.295 kcal/mol) at the interface between α- and β-tubulin. The bulky folate moiety of Targetin is extended toward lumen of microtubules. The binding free energy (ΔG (bind)) computed based on molecular mechanics energy minimization was -221.01 kcal/mol that revealed favourable interaction of Targetin with the receptor. Chemical synthesis, tubulin-binding experiments, and anti-cancer activity in vitro corroborate fully well with the molecular modelling experiments. Targetin binds tubulin with a dissociation constant (K (d) value) of 149 ± 3.0 μM and decreases the transition frequencies between growth and shortening phases of microtubule assembly dynamics at concentrations that do not alter the total polymer mass. Cancer cells in general were more sensitive to Targetin compared with the founding compound noscapine (IC(50) in the range of 15-40 μM). Quite strikingly, ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3 and A2780), known to overexpress FRα, were much more sensitive to targetin (IC(50) in the range of 0.3-1.5 μM).

  16. In silico inspired design and synthesis of a novel tubulin-binding anti-cancer drug: folate conjugated noscapine (Targetin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Pradeep K.; Lopus, Manu; Aneja, Ritu; Vangapandu, Surya N.; Joshi, Harish C.

    2012-02-01

    Our screen for tubulin-binding small molecules that do not depolymerize bulk cellular microtubules, but based upon structural features of well known microtubule-depolymerizing colchicine and podophyllotoxin, revealed tubulin binding anti-cancer property of noscapine (Ye et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 95:2280-2286, 1998). Guided by molecular modelling calculations and structure-activity relationships we conjugated at C9 of noscapine, a folate group—a ligand for cellular folate receptor alpha (FRα). FRα is over-expressed on some solid tumours such as ovarian epithelial cancers. Molecular docking experiments predicted that a folate conjugated noscapine (Targetin) accommodated well inside the binding cavity (docking score -11.295 kcal/mol) at the interface between α- and β-tubulin. The bulky folate moiety of Targetin is extended toward lumen of microtubules. The binding free energy (Δ G bind) computed based on molecular mechanics energy minimization was -221.01 kcal/mol that revealed favourable interaction of Targetin with the receptor. Chemical synthesis, tubulin-binding experiments, and anti-cancer activity in vitro corroborate fully well with the molecular modelling experiments. Targetin binds tubulin with a dissociation constant ( K d value) of 149 ± 3.0 μM and decreases the transition frequencies between growth and shortening phases of microtubule assembly dynamics at concentrations that do not alter the total polymer mass. Cancer cells in general were more sensitive to Targetin compared with the founding compound noscapine (IC50 in the range of 15-40 μM). Quite strikingly, ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3 and A2780), known to overexpress FRα, were much more sensitive to targetin (IC50 in the range of 0.3-1.5 μM).

  17. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27610018

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Agents for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rayburn, Elizabeth R.; Ezell, Scharri J.; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation is closely linked to cancer, and many anti-cancer agents are also used to treat inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, chronic inflammation increases the risk for various cancers, indicating that eliminating inflammation may represent a valid strategy for cancer prevention and therapy. This article explores the relationship between inflammation and cancer with an emphasis on epidemiological evidence, summarizes the current use of anti-inflammatory agents for cancer prevention and therapy, and describes the mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer effects of anti-inflammatory agents. Since monotherapy is generally insufficient for treating cancer, the combined use of anti-inflammatory agents and conventional cancer therapy is also a focal point in discussion. In addition, we also briefly describe future directions that should be explored for anti-cancer anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:20333321

  19. Zirconium Phosphate Nanoplatelet Potential for Anticancer Drug Delivery Applications.

    PubMed

    González, Millie L; Ortiz, Mayra; Hernández, Carmen; Cabán, Jennifer; Rodríguez, Axel; Colón, Jorge L; Báez, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Zirconium phosphate (ZrP) nanoplatelets can intercalate anticancer agents via an ion exchange reaction creating an inorganic delivery system with potential for cancer treatment. ZrP delivery of anticancer agents inside tumor cells was explored in vitro. Internalization and cytotoxicity of ZrP nanoplatelets were studied in MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. DOX-loaded ZrP nanoplatelets (DOX@ZrP) uptake was assessed by confocal (CLSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cytotoxicity to MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells was determined by the MTT assay. Reactive Oxy- gen Species (ROS) production was analyzed by fluorometric assay, and cell cycle alterations and induction of apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. ZrP nanoplatelets were localized in the endosomes of MCF-7 cells. DOX and ZrP nanoplatelets were co-internalized into MCF-7 cells as detected by CLSM. While ZrP showed limited toxicity to MCF-7 cells, DOX@ZrP was cytotoxic at an IC₅₀ similar to that of free DOX. Meanwhile, DOX lC₅₀ was significantly lower than the equivalent concentration of DOX@ZrP in MCF-10A cells. ZrP did not induce apoptosis in both cell lines. DOX and DOX@ZrP induced significant oxidative stress in both cell models. Results suggest that ZrP nanoplatelets are promising as carriers of anticancer agents into cancer cells.

  20. hBfl-1/hNOXA Interaction Studies Provide New Insights on the Role of Bfl-1 in Cancer Cell Resistance and for the Design of Novel Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Barile, Elisa; Marconi, Guya D; De, Surya K; Baggio, Carlo; Gambini, Luca; Salem, Ahmed F; Kashyap, Manoj K; Castro, Januario E; Kipps, Thomas J; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2017-02-17

    Upregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins in certain tumors confers cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy or radiations. Members of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, including Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-xL, Bcl-w, and Bfl-1, inhibit apoptosis by selectively binding to conserved α-helical regions, named BH3 domains, of pro-apoptotic proteins such as Bim, tBid, Bad, or NOXA. Five antiapoptotic proteins have been identified that interact with various selectivity with BH3 containing pro-apoptotic counterparts. Cancer cells present various and variable levels of these proteins, making the design of effective apoptosis based therapeutics challenging. Recently, BH3 profiling was introduced as a method to classify cancer cells based on their ability to resist apoptosis following exposure to selected BH3 peptides. However, these studies were based on binding affinities measured with model BH3 peptides and Bcl-2-proteins taken from mouse sequences. While the majority of these interactions are conserved between mice and humans, we found surprisingly that human NOXA binds to human Bfl-1 potently and covalently via conserved Cys residues, with over 2 orders of magnitude increased affinity over hMcl-1. Our data suggest that some assumptions of the original BH3 profiling need to be revisited and that perhaps further targeting efforts should be redirected toward Bfl-1, for which no suitable specific inhibitors or pharmacological tools have been reported. In this regard, we also describe the initial design and characterizations of novel covalent BH3-based agents that potently target Bfl-1. These molecules could provide a novel platform on which to design effective Bfl-1 targeting therapeutics.

  1. hBfl-1/hNOXA Interaction Studies Provide New Insights on the Role of Bfl-1 in Cancer Cell Resistance and for the Design of Novel Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Upregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins in certain tumors confers cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy or radiations. Members of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, including Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-xL, Bcl-w, and Bfl-1, inhibit apoptosis by selectively binding to conserved α-helical regions, named BH3 domains, of pro-apoptotic proteins such as Bim, tBid, Bad, or NOXA. Five antiapoptotic proteins have been identified that interact with various selectivity with BH3 containing pro-apoptotic counterparts. Cancer cells present various and variable levels of these proteins, making the design of effective apoptosis based therapeutics challenging. Recently, BH3 profiling was introduced as a method to classify cancer cells based on their ability to resist apoptosis following exposure to selected BH3 peptides. However, these studies were based on binding affinities measured with model BH3 peptides and Bcl-2-proteins taken from mouse sequences. While the majority of these interactions are conserved between mice and humans, we found surprisingly that human NOXA binds to human Bfl-1 potently and covalently via conserved Cys residues, with over 2 orders of magnitude increased affinity over hMcl-1. Our data suggest that some assumptions of the original BH3 profiling need to be revisited and that perhaps further targeting efforts should be redirected toward Bfl-1, for which no suitable specific inhibitors or pharmacological tools have been reported. In this regard, we also describe the initial design and characterizations of novel covalent BH3-based agents that potently target Bfl-1. These molecules could provide a novel platform on which to design effective Bfl-1 targeting therapeutics. PMID:28026162

  2. Antidiabetic and anticancer activities of Mangifera indica cv. Okrong leaves

    PubMed Central

    Ganogpichayagrai, Aunyachulee; Palanuvej, Chanida; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes and cancer are a major global public health problem. Plant-derived agents with undesirable side-effects were required. This study aimed to evaluate antidiabetic and anticancer activities of the ethanolic leaf extract of Mangifera indica cv. Okrong and its active phytochemical compound, mangiferin. Antidiabetic activities against yeast α-glucosidase and rat intestinal α-glucosidase were determined using 1 mM of p-nitro phenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside as substrate. Inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic α-amylase was performed using 1 mM of 2-chloro-4 nitrophenol-α-D-maltotroside-3 as substrate. Nitrophenol product was spectrophotometrically measured at 405 nm. Anticancer activity was evaluated against five human cancer cell lines compared to two human normal cell lines using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Mango leaf extract and mangiferin exhibited dose-dependent inhibition against yeast α-glucosidase with the IC50 of 0.0503 and 0.5813 mg/ml, respectively, against rat α-glucosidase with the IC50 of 1.4528 and 0.4333 mg/ml, respectively, compared to acarbose with the IC50 of 11.9285 and 0.4493 mg/ml, respectively. For anticancer activity, mango leaf extract, at ≥200 μg/ml showed cytotoxic potential against all tested cancer cell lines. In conclusion, mango leaf possessed antidiabetic and anticancer potential in vitro. PMID:28217550

  3. Antidiabetic and anticancer activities of Mangifera indica cv. Okrong leaves.

    PubMed

    Ganogpichayagrai, Aunyachulee; Palanuvej, Chanida; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes and cancer are a major global public health problem. Plant-derived agents with undesirable side-effects were required. This study aimed to evaluate antidiabetic and